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Sample records for zk60 magnesium alloy

  1. Effect of thermal treatment on the bio-corrosion and mechanical properties of ultrafine-grained ZK60 magnesium alloy.

    PubMed

    Choi, H Y; Kim, W J

    2015-11-01

    The combination of solid solution heat treatments and severe plastic deformation by high-ratio differential speed rolling (HRDSR) resulted in the formation of an ultrafine-grained microstructure with high thermal stability in a Mg-5Zn-0.5Zr (ZK60) alloy. When the precipitate particle distribution was uniform in the matrix, the internal stresses and dislocation density could be effectively removed without significant grain growth during the annealing treatment (after HRDSR), leading to enhancement of corrosion resistance. When the particle distribution was non-uniform, rapid grain growth occurred in local areas where the particle density was low during annealing, leading to development of a bimodal grain size distribution. The bimodal grain size distribution accelerated corrosion by forming a galvanic corrosion couple between the fine-grained and coarse-grained regions. The HRDSR-processed ZK60 alloy with high thermal stability exhibited high corrosion resistance, high strength and high ductility, and excellent superplasticity, which allow the fabrication of biodegradable magnesium devices with complicated designs that have a high mechanical integrity throughout the service life in the human body. PMID:26275491

  2. The in vitro degradation process and biocompatibility of a ZK60 magnesium alloy with a forsterite-containing micro-arc oxidation coating.

    PubMed

    Lin, Xiao; Tan, Lili; Zhang, Qiang; Yang, Ke; Hu, Zhuangqi; Qiu, Jianhong; Cai, Yong

    2013-11-01

    Magnesium has attracted much attention as a class of biodegradable metallic biomaterials. In this study, a silicate electrolyte-based micro-arc oxidation (MAO) treatment was adopted to prepare forsterite-containing MAO coatings on a ZK60 magnesium alloy in order to decrease the degradation rate and increase the biological property of the alloy. Four anodization voltages were chosen to prepare the MAO coatings. The cell experiment showed a cytotoxicity of grade 0 for the MAO-coated alloy to L929 cells and the hemolytic ratio was dramatically decreased for the MAO-coated alloy compared with the bare one. The corrosion resistance and the degradation behavior of the MAO-coated ZK60 alloy were studied using drop tests, electrochemical measurements and immersion tests. The results indicate that the MAO coating could effectively decrease the initial degradation rate of the alloy. The corrosion resistance of MAO coating was increased with the elevation of the preparation voltage. A degradation model for ZK60 alloy with a forsterite-containing MAO coating was proposed. Based on the model, the MAO-coated alloy experiences destruction and restoration simultaneously, and the coating fails in a peeling-off mode. PMID:23261923

  3. Microstructure, texture evolution, mechanical properties and corrosion behavior of ECAP processed ZK60 magnesium alloy for biodegradable applications.

    PubMed

    Mostaed, Ehsan; Hashempour, Mazdak; Fabrizi, Alberto; Dellasega, David; Bestetti, Massimiliano; Bonollo, Franco; Vedani, Maurizio

    2014-09-01

    Ultra-fine grained ZK60 Mg alloy was obtained by multi-pass equal-channel angular pressing at different temperatures of 250°C, 200°C and 150°C. Microstructural observations showed a significant grain refinement after ECAP, leading to an equiaxed and ultrafine grain (UFG) structure with average size of 600nm. The original extrusion fiber texture with planes oriented parallel to extrusion direction was gradually undermined during ECAP process and eventually it was substituted by a newly stronger texture component with considerably higher intensity, coinciding with ECAP shear plane. A combination of texture modification and grain refinement in UFG samples led to a marked reduction in mechanical asymmetric behavior compared to the as-received alloy, as well as adequate mechanical properties with about 100% improvement in elongation to failure while keeping relatively high tensile strength. Open circuit potential, potentiodynamic and weight loss measurements in a phosphate buffer solution electrolyte revealed an improved corrosion resistance of UFG alloy compared to the extruded one, stemming from a shift of corrosion regime from localized pitting in the as-received sample to a more uniform corrosion mode with reduced localized attack in ECAP processed alloy. Compression tests on immersed samples showed that the rate of loss of mechanical integrity in the UFG sample was lower than that in the as-received sample. PMID:24971801

  4. Analysis of flow stress and deformation mechanism under hot working of ZK60 magnesium alloy by a new strain-dependent constitutive equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ciccarelli, D.; El Mehtedi, M.; Jäger, A.; Spigarelli, S.

    2015-12-01

    The present study investigates the variation of flow stress and microstructural evolution with strain for ZK60 magnesium alloy. A new constitutive equation was used to model the flow stress with excellent results. This constitutive analysis and the microstructural studies carried out on strained samples revealed the existence of two different regimes. At temperatures above 300 °C, moderate grain growth and intragranular dislocation activity. Yet, the calculated value of the activation energy and the marked increase in the equivalent strain to fracture indicated grain boundary sliding as a dominant mechanism in this regime of strain rate and temperature, with dislocation motion playing an ancillary role. At lower temperatures, deformation was exclusively governed by dislocation motion, with the extensive occurrence of dynamic recrystallization, which started at low strains, and absence of grain growth.

  5. In vitro degradation and biocompatibility of a strontium-containing micro-arc oxidation coating on the biodegradable ZK60 magnesium alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Xiao; Yang, Xiaoming; Tan, Lili; Li, Mei; Wang, Xin; Zhang, Yu; Yang, Ke; Hu, Zhuangqi; Qiu, Jianhong

    2014-01-01

    Magnesium alloys are promising biodegradable implant candidates for orthopedic application. In the present study, a phosphate-based micro-arc oxidation (MAO) coating was applied on the ZK60 alloy to decrease its initial degradation rate. Strontium (Sr) was incorporated into the coating in order to improve the bioactivity of the coating. The in vitro degradation studies showed that the MAO coating containing Sr owned a better initial corrosion resistance, which was mainly attributed to the superior inner barrier layer, and a better long-term protective ability, probably owning to its larger thickness, superior inner barrier layer and the superior apatite formation ability. The degradation of MAO coating was accompanied by the formation of degradation layer and Ca-P deposition layer. The in vitro cell tests demonstrated that the incorporation of Sr into the MAO coating enhanced both the proliferation of preosteoblast cells and the alkaline phosphatase activity of the murine bone marrow stromal cells. In conclusion, the MAO coating with Sr is a promising surface treatment for the biodegradable magnesium alloys.

  6. The n-MAO/EPD bio-ceramic composite coating fabricated on ZK60 magnesium alloy using combined micro-arc oxidation with electrophoretic deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiong, Ying; Lu, Chao; Wang, Chao; Song, Renguo

    2014-12-01

    A bio-ceramic composite coating was fabricated on ZK60 magnesium (Mg) alloy using combined micro-arc oxidation (MAO) with electrophoretic deposition (EPD) technique. The MAO coating as the basal layer was produced in alkaline electrolyte with (n-MAO coating) and without (MAO coating) the addition of CeO2 and ZrO2 nano-particles, respectively. A hydroxyapatite (HA) coating as the covering layer was deposited on the n-MAO coating to improve the biological properties of the coating (n-MAO/EPD composite coating). The morphology and phase composition of three treated coatings were investigated by scanning electron microscope (SEM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD). The corrosion resistance of these coatings was evaluated with potentiodynamic polarization tests and immersion tests in simulated body fluid (SBF) at 36.5 ± 0.5 °C. The XRD spectra showed that the CeO2 and ZrO2 peaks can be collected in the n-MAO coating, and HA particles exists in the n-MAO/EPD composite coating. The results of corrosion tests indicated that the n-MAO/EPD composite coating owned increased bioactivity and long-term protective ability compared with the MAO coating and the n-MAO coating. Thus Mg alloy coated with the n-MAO/EPD composite coating should be more suited as biodegradable bone implants.

  7. Influence of ECAP process on mechanical and corrosion properties of pure Mg and ZK60 magnesium alloy for biodegradable stent applications

    PubMed Central

    Mostaed, Ehsan; Vedani, Maurizio; Hashempour, Mazdak; Bestetti, Massimiliano

    2014-01-01

    Equal channel angular pressing (ECAP) was performed on ZK60 alloy and pure Mg in the temperature range 150–250 °C. A significant grain refinement was detected after ECAP, leading to an ultrafine grain size (UFG) and enhanced formability during extrusion process. Comparing to conventional coarse grained samples, fracture elongation of pure Mg and ZK60 alloy were significantly improved by 130% and 100%, respectively, while the tensile strength remained at high level. Extrusion was performed on ECAP processed billets to produce small tubes (with outer/inner diameter of 4/2.5 mm) as precursors for biodegradable stents. Studies on extruded tubes revealed that even after extrusion the microstructure and microhardness of the UFG ZK60 alloy were almost stable. Furthermore, pure Mg tubes showed an additional improvement in terms of grain refining and mechanical properties after extrusion. Electrochemical analyses and microstructural assessments after corrosion tests demonstrated two major influential factors in corrosion behavior of the investigated materials. The presence of Zn and Zr as alloying elements simultaneously increases the nobility by formation of a protective film and increase the local corrosion damage by amplifying the pitting development. ECAP treatment decreases the size of the second phase particles thus improving microstructure homogeneity, thereby decreasing the localized corrosion effects. PMID:25482411

  8. Grain refinement of magnesium alloy sheets by ARB using high-speed rolling mill

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Utsunomiya, Hiroshi; Izumi, Ken-ichi; Sakai, Tetsuo; Mukai, Toshiji

    2009-05-01

    Applications of ARB to magnesium alloys were limited due to low deformability. The authors recently found that the rollability of the alloys is significantly improved in highspeed rolling. It is supposed that the severe plastic deformation of magnesium alloy sheets is feasible if rolling in ARB processes is conducted at high speed. In this study, AZ31B and ZK60A sheets are processed by ARB up to five cycles at 423K with a speed of 1000m/min. Vickers hardness increases with increasing number of ARB cycles, while the tensile strength shows the maximum after the second cycle. The grain size is reduced significantly at the first cycle and decreases gradually from the second cycle. The mean grain sizes after five cycles are 1.6?m for AZ31B and 1.8?m for ZK60A. It is concluded that ARB using high-speed rolling is effective for grain refinement of magnesium alloys.

  9. Magnesium and magnesium alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Avedesian, M.; Baker, H.

    1998-12-31

    This new handbook is the most comprehensive publication of engineering information on commercial magnesium alloys under one cover in the last sixty years. Prepared with the cooperation of the International Magnesium Association, it presents the industrial practices currently used throughout the world, as well as the properties of the products critical to their proper application. Contents include: general characteristics; physical metallurgy; melting, refining, alloying, recycling, and powder production; casting; heat treatment; forging, rolling, and extrusion; semisolid processing; forming; joining; cleaning and finishing; selection, application, and properties of grades and alloys; design considerations; mechanical behavior and wear resistance; fatigue and fracture-mechanics; high-temperature strength and creep; corrosion and stress-corrosion cracking; specification.

  10. Microstructure-modified biodegradable magnesium alloy for promoting cytocompatibility and wound healing in vitro.

    PubMed

    Lin, Da-Jun; Hung, Fei-Yi; Yeh, Ming-Long; Lui, Truan-Sheng

    2015-10-01

    The microstructure of biomedical magnesium alloys has great influence on anti-corrosion performance and biocompatibility. In practical application and for the purpose of microstructure modification, heat treatments were chosen to provide widely varying microstructures. The aim of the present work was to investigate the influence of the microstructural parameters of an Al-free Mg-Zn-Zr alloy (ZK60), and the corresponding heat-treatment-modified microstructures on the resultant corrosion resistance and biological performance. Significant enhancement in corrosion resistance was obtained in Al-free Mg-Zn-Zr alloy (ZK60) through 400 °C solid-solution heat treatment. It was found that the optimal condition of solid-solution treatment homogenized the matrix and eliminated internal defects; after which, the problem of unfavorable corrosion behavior was improved. Further, it was also found that the Mg ion-release concentration from the modified ZK60 significantly induced the cellular activity of fibroblast cells, revealing in high viability value and migration ability. The experimental evidence suggests that this system can further accelerate wound healing. From the perspective of specific biomedical applications, this research result suggests that the heat treatment should be applied in order to improve the biological performance. PMID:26411444

  11. Electrodeposition of magnesium and magnesium/aluminum alloys

    DOEpatents

    Mayer, A.

    1988-01-21

    Electrolytes and plating solutions for use in processes for electroplating and electroforming pure magnesium and alloys of aluminum and magnesium and also electrodeposition processes. An electrolyte of this invention is comprised of an alkali metal fluoride or a quaternary ammonium halide, dimethyl magnesium and/or diethyl magnesium, and triethyl aluminum and/or triisobutyl aluminum. An electrolyte may be dissolved in an aromatic hydrocarbon solvent to form a plating solution. The proportions of the component compounds in the electrolyte are varied to produce essentially pure magnesium or magnesium/aluminum alloys having varying selected compositions.

  12. Electrodeposition of magnesium and magnesium/aluminum alloys

    DOEpatents

    Mayer, Anton (Los Alamos, NM)

    1988-01-01

    Electrolytes and plating solutions for use in processes for electroplating and electroforming pure magnesium and alloys of aluminum and magnesium and also electrodeposition processes. An electrolyte of this invention is comprised of an alkali metal fluoride or a quaternary ammonium halide, dimethyl magnesium and/or diethyl magnesium, and triethyl aluminum and/or triisobutyl aluminum. An electrolyte may be dissolved in an aromatic hydrocarbon solvent to form a plating solution. The proportions of the component compounds in the electrolyte are varied to produce essentially pure magnesium or magnesium/aluminum alloys having varying selected compositions.

  13. Nondestructive spot test method for magnesium and magnesium alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, M. L. (inventor)

    1973-01-01

    A method for spot test identification of magnesium and various magnesium alloys commonly used in aerospace applications is described. The spot test identification involves color codes obtained when several drops of 3 M hydrochloric acid are placed on the surface to be tested. After approximately thirty seconds, two drops of this reacted acid is transferred to each of two depressions in a spot plate for additions of other chemicals with subsequent color changes indicating magnesium or its alloy.

  14. Effects of Titanium Nitride Surface Coating on High Speed Impact Induced Damage of Magnesium Alloys at Cryogenic Temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takayama, K.; Numata, D.; Kubota, R.; Shimamoto, A.

    2009-06-01

    This reports a summary of our recent high speed impact tests aiming to clarify the impact characteristic of magnesium alloy with titanium nitride coating. We placed 100 mm x 100 mm and 3 mm thick magnesium alloy plates, ZK60A-T5 at 298 K, 223 K and 153 K, which were coated with 1 micron thick titanium nitride layer based on a hollow cathode discharge method. We also tested with uncoated magnesium plates. The plates were impinged by 8 mm diameter aluminum alloy (Al2017-T4) spheres at impact speeds of 0.5 to 1.7 km/s in a two-stage light gas gun in the SWRC, IFS, Tohoku Univ. Two specimens were installed at 100 mm interval vertically to the spheres in a cryogenic test chamber [1]. Impact phenomena were visualized with shadowgraph arrangements and recorded with ImaCon 200. As a result, the effect of surface coating on surface fracture was examined. We found the increase of hole areas in proportional to the impact speed and a clear difference of penetration hole and fracture patterns between impact speed of 0.5 km/s and higher impact speeds. The titanium nitride coating was effective to favorably control the damage process. [1] Numata,D. et al., Shock Waves (2008), 18:169-183.

  15. Elastic Properties and Internal Friction of Two Magnesium Alloys at Elevated Temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    Freels, M.; Liaw, P. K.; Garlea, E.; Morrell, J. S.; Radiovic, M.

    2011-06-01

    The elastic properties and internal friction of two magnesium alloys were studied from 25 C to 450 C using Resonant Ultrasound Spectroscopy (RUS). The Young's moduli decrease with increasing temperature. At 200 C, a change in the temperature dependence of the elastic constants is observed. The internal friction increases significantly with increasing temperature above 200 C. The observed changes in the temperature dependence of the elastic constants and the internal friction are the result of anelastic relaxation by grain boundary sliding at elevated temperatures. Elastic properties govern the behavior of a materials subjected to stress over a region of strain where the material behaves elastically. The elastic properties, including the Young's modulus (E), shear modulus (G), bulk modulus (B), and Poisson's ratio (?), are of significant interest to many design and engineering applications. The choice of the most appropriate material for a particular application at elevated temperatures therefore requires knowledge of its elastic properties as a function of temperature. In addition, mechanical vibration can cause significant damage in the automotive, aerospace, and architectural industries and thus, the ability of a material to dissipate elastic strain energy in materials, known as damping or internal friction, is also important property. Internal friction can be the result of a wide range of physical mechanisms, and depends on the material, temperature, and frequency of the loading. When utilized effectively in engineering applications, the damping capacity of a material can remove undesirable noise and vibration as heat to the surroundings. The elastic properties of materials can be determined by static or dynamic methods. Resonant Ultrasound Spectroscopy (RUS), used in this study, is a unique and sophisticated non-destructive dynamic technique for determining the complete elastic tensor of a solid by measuring the resonant spectrum of mechanical resonance for a sample of known geometry, dimensions, and mass. In addition, RUS allows determination of internal friction, or damping, at different frequencies and temperatures. Polycrystalline pure magnesium (Mg) exhibits excellent high damping properties. However, the poor mechanical properties limit the applications of pure Mg. Although alloying can improve the mechanical properties of Mg, the damping properties are reduced with additions of alloying elements. Therefore, it becomes necessary to study and develop Mg-alloys with simultaneous high damping capacity and improved mechanical properties. Moreover, studies involving the high temperature dynamic elastic properties of Mg alloys are limited. In this study, the elastic properties and internal friction of two magnesium alloys were studied at elevated temperatures using RUS. The effect of alloy composition and grain size was investigated. The wrought magnesium alloys AZ31 and ZK60 were employed. Table 1 gives the nominal chemical compositions of these two alloys. The ZK60 alloy is a commercial extruded plate with a T5 temper, i.e. solution-treated at 535 C for two hours, quenched in hot water, and aged at 185 C for 24 hours. The AZ31 alloy is a commercial rolled plate with a H24 temper, i.e. strain hardened and partially annealed.

  16. LOST FOAM CASTING OF MAGNESIUM ALLOYS

    SciTech Connect

    Han, Qingyou; Dinwiddie, Ralph Barton; Sklad, Philip S; Currie, Kenneth; Abdelrahman, Mohamed; Vondra, Fred; Walford, Graham; Nolan, Dennis J

    2007-01-01

    The lost foam casting process has been successfully used for making aluminum and cast iron thin walled castings of complex geometries. Little work has been carried out on cast magnesium alloys using the lost foam process. The article describes the research activities at Oak Ridge National Laboratory and Tennessee Technological University on lost foam casting of magnesium alloys. The work was focused on castings of simple geometries such as plate castings and window castings. The plate castings were designed to investigate the mold filling characteristics of magnesium and aluminum alloys using an infrared camera. The pate castings were then characterized for porosity distribution. The window castings were made to test the castability of the alloys under lost foam conditions. Significant differences between lost foam aluminum casting and lost foam magnesium casting have been observed.

  17. REVIEW ARTICLE A review on magnesium alloys as biodegradable materials

    E-print Network

    Zheng, Yufeng

    REVIEW ARTICLE A review on magnesium alloys as biodegradable materials Xue-Nan GU, Yu-Feng ZHENG 100871, China © Higher Education Press and Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2010 Abstract Magnesium of biomedical magnesium alloys is based on the industrial magnesium alloys system, and another is the self

  18. Magnesium Alloy Stent Expansion Behavior Simulated by Finite Element Method

    E-print Network

    Zheng, Yufeng

    Magnesium Alloy Stent Expansion Behavior Simulated by Finite Element Method Muhammad Iqbal Sabir 1, Transient Non-uniform, Biodegradable coronary Stent, Magnesium Alloy. Abstract. Biodegradable magnesium. Magnesium alloy is brittle compared with stainless steel. This means it has less elongation than other stent

  19. Hemolysis and cytotoxicity mechanisms of biodegradable magnesium and its alloys

    E-print Network

    Zheng, Yufeng

    Hemolysis and cytotoxicity mechanisms of biodegradable magnesium and its alloys Zhen Zhen magnesium L929 cells Hemolysis ratio Magnesium ion concentration pH values Good hemocompatibility and cell compatibility are essential requirements for coronary stents, especially for bio- degradable magnesium alloy

  20. Impurity control and corrosion resistance of magnesium-aluminum alloy

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, M.; Song, GuangLing

    2013-01-01

    The corrosion resistance of magnesium alloys is very sensitive to the contents of impurity elements such as iron. In this study, a series of diecast AXJ530 magnesium alloy samples were prepared with additions of Mn and Fe. Through a comprehensive phase diagram calculation and corrosion evaluation, the mechanisms for the tolerance limit of Fe in magnesium alloy are discussed. This adds a new dimension to control the alloying impurity in terms of alloying composition design and casting conditions.

  1. An electrolytic process for magnesium and its alloys production

    SciTech Connect

    Sharma, R.

    1996-10-01

    The largest amount of magnesium is used for aluminum-magnesium alloy production. The second largest use is in desulfurization of steel. A magnesium {minus}10 weight percent (w/o) aluminum alloy can also be used in both the above processes. Pure magnesium metal is not of much use for structural purposes. However, a magnesium {minus}10 w/o aluminum alloy melt which is also suitable for structural applications, can be produced as a bottom layer in an electrolytic magnesium production cell using a potassium chloride-magnesium chloride electrolyte at {approximately} 750 C. In this situation, the magnesium production process and the cell can be similar to the aluminum production process and its cell. The magnesium-aluminum alloys can be produced by electrolysis at far less cost than these alloys produced from the respective metals. The process can also be used to produce other magnesium alloys for use in the auto industry at comparatively far less cost. The largest increase in the magnesium usage in the future is going to be only in the magnesium alloys sector.

  2. Microstructural Effects on the Spall Properties of ECAE Magnesium and Magnesium Alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, Cyril

    2015-06-01

    Magnesium and magnesium alloys are light weight materials and hence, are being increasingly employed as light armor in military applications. However, because of its limited slip systems (HCP) magnesium and magnesium alloys are relatively brittle as compared to FCC and BCC lattice structures. For this study, the effects of microstructure on the spall properties of magnesium and magnesium alloys processed using Equi-Channel Angular Extrusion (ECAE) were investigated using a 51 mm and 105 mm bore gas guns. Symmetric spall and recovery plate impact experiments were performed at impact velocities ranging from approximately 100 m/s and 400 m/s. Free surface velocity profiles of the shocked samples were obtained using Photonic Doppler Velocimetry (PDV). The spall strength and Hugoniot Elastic Limit (HEL) were extracted from the free surface velocity profiles. In addition, the microstructures of the pre-shocked and post-shocked magnesium and magnesium alloys were acquired using Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM) and Transmission Electron Microscope (TEM).

  3. The Microstructure of Mechanically Alloyed Nanocrystalline Aluminium-Magnesium

    E-print Network

    Gubicza, Jenõ

    The Microstructure of Mechanically Alloyed Nanocrystalline Aluminium-Magnesium Jen Gubicza1 analysis. Magnesium gradually goes into solid solution during ball milling and after 3 h almost all. Experimental A series of aluminium-magnesium samples were prepared from high purity aluminium (99.9%) powder

  4. Blackening of magnesium alloy using femtosecond laser.

    PubMed

    Shi, Haixia; Cui, Zeqin; Wang, Wenxian; Xu, Bingshe; Gong, Dianqing; Zhang, Wei

    2015-09-01

    Magnesium alloy, a potential structural and biodegradable material, has been increasingly attracting attention. In this paper, two structures with enhanced light absorption on an AZ31B magnesium surface are fabricated by femtosecond laser texturing. Laser power and the number of laser pulses are mainly investigated for darkening effect. After irradiation, surface characteristics are analyzed by a scanning electron microscope equipped with an energy dispersive spectrometer and laser scanning confocal microscope. The darkening effect is investigated by a spectrophotometer with an integrating sphere. Microgroove and stripe structures are obtained, which are covered with homogeneous nanoprotrusions and nanoparticles. The main surface chemical composition after laser ablation is MgO. The optimal light absorption in the visible range (wavelength of 400-800 nm) reaches about 98%, which is significantly improved compared with the untreated surface. The enhanced light absorption is mainly attributed to surface structure. Femtosecond laser surface texturing technology offers potential in the application of stealth technology, airborne devices, and biomedicine. PMID:26368903

  5. Casting Porosity-Free Grain Refined Magnesium Alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Schwam, David

    2013-08-12

    The objective of this project was to identify the root causes for micro-porosity in magnesium alloy castings and recommend remedies that can be implemented in production. The findings confirm the key role played by utilizing optimal gating and risering practices in minimizing porosity in magnesium castings.?

  6. Formability Analysis of Magnesium Alloy Sheet Bulging Using FE Simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mac Donald, B. J.; Hunt, D.; Yoshihara, S.; Manabe, K.

    2007-05-01

    There is currently much focus on the application of magnesium alloys to automotive structural components. This has arisen due to the positive environmental aspects associated with use of magnesium alloys such as weight reduction and recycling potential. In recent years many researchers have focused on the application of various forming processes to magnesium alloys. Magnesium alloys would seem highly suitable for sheet forming due to high N and r values, however, in application their formability has been inferior to, for example, aluminium alloys. It has thus been concluded that, when dealing with magnesium alloys, it is difficult to predict formability based on material properties. In order to improve formability and forming accuracy when using Mg alloys it is necessary to build a database and inference system which could decide the optimal forming parameters for complex automotive components. Currently not enough data is available to build such a database due to the limited number of studies available in literature. In this study an experimental analysis of hemispherical bulge forming at elevated temperature was undertaken in order to evaluate formability and hence build a database for forming process design. A finite element model based on the experiment has been built and validated against the experimental results. A ductile failure criterion has been integrated with the FE model and is used to predict the onset of failure. This paper discusses the development and validation of the finite element model with the ductile failure criterion and presents results from the experimental tests and FE simulations.

  7. Magnesium alloy wires as reinforcement in composite intramedullary nails.

    PubMed

    Morawska-Chochó?, Anna; Ch?opek, Jan; Domalik-Pyzik, Patrycja; Szaraniec, Barbara; Grzy?ka, Ewa

    2014-01-01

    A promising group of biomaterials assigned for the production of intramedullary nails are composites with a polylactide (PLA) matrix, reinforced with wires made of magnesium alloys and carbon fibres. The paper describes the effect of the composition of magnesium alloy wires, their number and orientation in the composite, as well as their connection with differently directed long carbon fibres, on the mechanical properties and the degradation rate of the obtained intramedullary nails. Among the tested implant prototypes, the best mechanical characteristics and a gradual and uniform course of magnesium alloy wires were exhibited by the PLA+CF1D+MgI composite nails (with a unidirectional orientation of carbon fibres and an axially oriented single Mg alloy wire). The strength of these nails became gradually decreased with the incubation time, which should allow for a gradual loading of the bone. In the case of the PLA with only magnesium alloy wires (without carbon fibres), the increase of the number of wires, on the one hand, stimulates the improvement of the nails' strength, yet on the other hand, a higher content of magnesium alloys in the PLA matrix affects the nails' faster resorption. PMID:24642977

  8. High Strength and Thermally Stable Nanostructured Magnesium Alloys and Nanocomposites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Yuan-Wei

    Magnesium and its alloys are currently in the spotlight of global research because of the need to limit energy consumption and reduce the environmental impact. In particular, their low densities compared to other structural metals make them a very attractive alternative in the automobile and aerospace industries. However, their low strength compared to other structural materials (e.g. Al and steels) has limited their widespread application. This dissertation presents the results of developing and investigation of a high strength nanostructured magnesium-aluminum alloy and composite. The nanostructured magnesium alloy is prepared by cryomilling and consolidated by spark-plasma-sintering. Focused ion beam is used to prepare micropillars with different diameters ranging from 1.5 to 8 mum and micro-compression test is conducted by nanoindenter in order to evaluate the mechanical properties. The yield strength obtained in the present study is around three times higher than conventional magnesium alloys (120 MPa vs. 370 MPa). The yield strength of the nanostructured magnesium alloy is further improved through hot extrusion, resulting in a yield strength of 550 MPa and an ultimate strength of 580 MPa. The nanostructured magnesium alloy exhibits a strong size-dependence, and a significant improvement in strength is observed when the pillar diameter is reduced to below 3.5 mum. The deformation mechanisms of the compressed pillars were characterized using transmission electron microscopy. The size-induced strengthening is attributed to a less number of dislocation sources along with a higher activity of non-basal deformation mechanisms. We have also developed a high strength and thermally stable nanostructured magnesium composite by adding diamantane. A yield strength of 500 MPa is achieved, moreover, excellent thermal stability is demonstrated in the magnesium alloy containing diamantanes. The strength and grain size are thermally stable after annealing at 400°C for 100 hours. In contrast, the yield strength of the alloy without diamantanes decreases significantly after annealing due to severe grain growth. These results suggest that diamantanes are pinning the grain boundaries and inhibiting grain growth at elevated temperatures. Finally, molecular dynamics simulations and finite element analysis are used to explore the deformation mechanisms of magnesium with different grain sizes at atomic resolutions and correct tapering effect on micro-compression test, respectively. The results in the dissertation show that nanostructured Mg-Al alloy and Mg-Al-Diamantane composite are promising materials for aerospace and automobile industries.

  9. Simulation of Stresses during Casting of Binary Magnesium-Aluminum Alloys

    E-print Network

    Beckermann, Christoph

    Simulation of Stresses during Casting of Binary Magnesium-Aluminum Alloys M.G. POKORNY, C.A. MONROE properties that are suitable for advanced stress modeling is even more limited for magnesium alloys. Recently of an AZ91 magnesium alloy in order to predict hot tears.[4] This study relied on crude estimates

  10. A crystal plasticity FE model for deformation with twin nucleation in magnesium alloys

    E-print Network

    Ghosh, Somnath

    A crystal plasticity FE model for deformation with twin nucleation in magnesium alloys Jiahao Cheng B. Polycrystalline material C. Finite elements a b s t r a c t Magnesium alloys exhibit complex performance automotive and aerospace applica- tions has resulted in magnesium alloys as candidate materials

  11. PHYSICAL REVIEW B 84, 084101 (2011) Guiding the experimental discovery of magnesium alloys

    E-print Network

    Curtarolo, Stefano

    2011-01-01

    PHYSICAL REVIEW B 84, 084101 (2011) Guiding the experimental discovery of magnesium alloys Richard 2011; published 19 August 2011) Magnesium alloys are among the lightest structural materials known and are of considerable technological interest. To develop superior magnesium alloys, experimentalists must have

  12. Effect of heat treatment on corrosion and electrochemical behaviour of AZ91D magnesium alloy

    E-print Network

    Zhou, Wei

    Effect of heat treatment on corrosion and electrochemical behaviour of AZ91D magnesium alloy N, magnesium alloy, precipitation Abstract An AZ91D ingot in the as-cast condition was homogenized by solution in mechanical properties [1­3]. Early studies on ageing of magnesium alloys showed improved strength

  13. Biodegradable Magnesium Alloys: A Review of Material Development and Applications

    PubMed Central

    Persaud-Sharma, Dharam; McGoron, Anthony

    2012-01-01

    Magnesium based alloys possess a natural ability to biodegrade due to corrosion when placed within aqueous substances, which is promising for cardiovascular and orthopedic medical device applications. These materials can serve as a temporary scaffold when placed in vivo, which is desirable for treatments when temporary supportive structures are required to assist in the wound healing process. The nature of these materials to degrade is attributed to the high oxidative corrosion rates of magnesium. In this review, a summary is presented for magnesium material development, biocorrosion characteristics, as well as a biological translation for these results. PMID:22408600

  14. Influence of Magnesium Alloy Degradation on Undifferentiated Human Cells

    PubMed Central

    Martinez-Sanchez, Adela Helvia; Luthringer, Berengere Julie Christine; Feyerabend, Frank; Jimbo, Ryo; Willumeit-Römer, Regine; Wennerberg, Ann

    2015-01-01

    Background Magnesium alloys are of particular interest in medical science since they provide compatible mechanical properties with those of the cortical bone and, depending on the alloying elements, they have the capability to tailor the degradation rate in physiological conditions, providing alternative bioresorbable materials for bone applications. The present study investigates the in vitro short-term response of human undifferentiated cells on three magnesium alloys and high-purity magnesium (Mg). Materials and Methods The degradation parameters of magnesium-silver (Mg2Ag), magnesium-gadolinium (Mg10Gd) and magnesium-rare-earth (Mg4Y3RE) alloys were analysed after 1, 2, and 3 days of incubation in cell culture medium under cell culture condition. Changes in cell viability and cell adhesion were evaluated by culturing human umbilical cord perivascular cells on corroded Mg materials to examine how the degradation influences the cellular development. Results and Conclusions The pH and osmolality of the medium increased with increasing degradation rate and it was found to be most pronounced for Mg4Y3RE alloy. The biological observations showed that HUCPV exhibited a more homogeneous cell growth on Mg alloys compared to high-purity Mg, where they showed a clustered morphology. Moreover, cells exhibited a slightly higher density on Mg2Ag and Mg10Gd in comparison to Mg4Y3RE, due to the lower alkalinisation and osmolality of the incubation medium. However, cells grown on Mg10Gd and Mg4Y3RE generated more developed and healthy cellular structures that allowed them to better adhere to the surface. This can be attributable to a more stable and homogeneous degradation of the outer surface with respect to the incubation time. PMID:26600388

  15. A Study on Factors Affecting the Degradation of Magnesium and a Magnesium-Yttrium Alloy for Biomedical Applications

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Ian; Liu, Huinan

    2013-01-01

    Controlling degradation of magnesium or its alloys in physiological saline solutions is essential for their potential applications in clinically viable implants. Rapid degradation of magnesium-based materials reduces the mechanical properties of implants prematurely and severely increases alkalinity of the local environment. Therefore, the objective of this study is to investigate the effects of three interactive factors on magnesium degradation, specifically, the addition of yttrium to form a magnesium-yttrium alloy versus pure magnesium, the metallic versus oxide surfaces, and the presence versus absence of physiological salt ions in the immersion solution. In the immersion solution of phosphate buffered saline (PBS), the magnesium-yttrium alloy with metallic surface degraded the slowest, followed by pure magnesium with metallic or oxide surfaces, and the magnesium-yttrium alloy with oxide surface degraded the fastest. However, in deionized (DI) water, the degradation rate showed a different trend. Specifically, pure magnesium with metallic or oxide surfaces degraded the slowest, followed by the magnesium-yttrium alloy with oxide surface, and the magnesium-yttrium alloy with metallic surface degraded the fastest. Interestingly, only magnesium-yttrium alloy with metallic surface degraded slower in PBS than in DI water, while all the other samples degraded faster in PBS than in DI water. Clearly, the results showed that the alloy composition, presence or absence of surface oxide layer, and presence or absence of physiological salt ions in the immersion solution all influenced the degradation rate and mode. Moreover, these three factors showed statistically significant interactions. This study revealed the complex interrelationships among these factors and their respective contributions to degradation for the first time. The results of this study not only improved our understanding of magnesium degradation in physiological environment, but also presented the key factors to consider in order to satisfy the degradation requirements for next-generation biodegradable implants and devices. PMID:23799028

  16. The development of lightweight hydride alloys based on magnesium

    SciTech Connect

    Guthrie, S.E.; Thomas, G.J.; Yang, N.Y.C.; Bauer, W.

    1996-02-01

    The development of a magnesium based hydride material is explored for use as a lightweight hydrogen storage medium. It is found that the vapor transport of magnesium during hydrogen uptake greatly influences the surface and hydride reactions in these alloys. This is exploited by purposely forming near-surface phases of Mg{sub 2}Ni on bulk Mg-Al-Zn alloys which result in improved hydrogen adsorption and desorption behavior. Conditions were found where these near-surface reactions yielded a complex and heterogeneous microstructure that coincided with excellent bulk hydride behavior. A Mg-Al alloy hydride is reported with near atmospheric plateau pressures at temperatures below 200{degrees}C. Additionally, a scheme is described for low temperature in-situ fabrication of Mg{sub 2}Ni single phase alloys utilizing the high vapor pressure of Mg.

  17. Corrosion resistance of titanium ion implanted AZ91 magnesium alloy

    SciTech Connect

    Liu Chenglong; Xin Yunchang; Tian Xiubo; Zhao, J.; Chu, Paul K.

    2007-03-15

    Degradable metal alloys constitute a new class of materials for load-bearing biomedical implants. Owing to their good mechanical properties and biocompatibility, magnesium alloys are promising in degradable prosthetic implants. The objective of this study is to improve the corrosion behavior of surgical AZ91 magnesium alloy by titanium ion implantation. The surface characteristics of the ion implanted layer in the magnesium alloys are examined. The authors' results disclose that an intermixed layer is produced and the surface oxidized films are mainly composed of titanium oxide with a lesser amount of magnesium oxide. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy reveals that the oxide has three layers. The outer layer which is 10 nm thick is mainly composed of MgO and TiO{sub 2} with some Mg(OH){sub 2}. The middle layer that is 50 nm thick comprises predominantly TiO{sub 2} and MgO with minor contributions from MgAl{sub 2}O{sub 4} and TiO. The third layer from the surface is rich in metallic Mg, Ti, Al, and Ti{sub 3}Al. The effects of Ti ion implantation on the corrosion resistance and electrochemical behavior of the magnesium alloys are investigated in simulated body fluids at 37{+-}1 deg. C using electrochemical impedance spectroscopy and open circuit potential techniques. Compared to the unimplanted AZ91 alloy, titanium ion implantation significantly shifts the open circuit potential (OCP) to a more positive potential and improves the corrosion resistance at OCP. This phenomenon can be ascribed to the more compact surface oxide film, enhanced reoxidation on the implanted surface, as well as the increased {beta}-Mg{sub 12}Al{sub 17} phase.

  18. Coating protects magnesium-lithium alloys against corrosion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1967-01-01

    Coating protects newly developed magnesium-lithium alloys against corrosion. The procedure includes heating the ingots in a salt bath and rolling them to the desired sheet thickness. The black coating, which is tough though thin and ductile, is derived mainly from chromium.

  19. Fabrication and corrosion resistance of superhydrophobic magnesium alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Libang; Zhu, Yali; Fan, Weibo; Wang, Yanping; Qiang, Xiaohu; Liu, Yanhua

    2015-08-01

    A superhydrophobic magnesium alloy (AZ91) is successfully fabricated by sulfuric acid etching, AgNO3 treatment, and dodecyl mercaptan (DM) modification. The effect of the fabrication procedure, the concentration and treatment time of sulfuric acid, AgNO3, and DM on morphology, phase structure, surface wettability, and surface composition of the AZ91 is investigated in detail. Consequently, the optimal treatment parameters are selected, and the superhydrophobic magnesium alloy with a water contact angle of 154° and a sliding angle of 5° is fabricated. The acid etching endows the AZ91 surface with rough structure while the AgNO3 treatment results in more protrusions and grooves. Meanwhile, the long hydrophobic alkyl chains are self-assembled onto the rough AZ91 surface upon DM modification. As a result, the multilayer of netlike surface with protrusions and grooves together with the coral-like structure is obtained. Additionally, the magnesium alloy with higher water contact angle has better corrosion resistance, while the magnesium alloy with the superhydrophobic property has the best corrosion resistance.

  20. Magnesium alloy ingots: Chemical and metallographic analyses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tartaglia, John M.; Swartz, Robert E.; Bentz, Rodney L.; Howard, Jane H.

    2001-11-01

    The quality of a magnesium die casting is likely dependent on the quality of the feed stockingot material. Therefore, both Daimler-Chrysler and General Motors have established quality assurance measures that include analysis of magnesium ingots. These processes include chemical analysis, corrosion testing, fast neutron activation analysis, and metallography. Optical emission spectroscopy, inductively coupled plasma spectroscopy, and gravimetric analysis are several methods for determining the chemical composition of the material. Fast neutron activation analysis, image analysis and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy are used to quantify ingot cleanliness. These experimental techniques are described and discussed in this paper, and example case studies are presented for illustration.

  1. Thermal conductivities of nanostructured magnesium oxide coatings deposited on magnesium alloys by plasma electrolytic oxidation.

    PubMed

    Shen, Xinwei; Nie, Xueyuan; Hu, Henry

    2014-10-01

    The resistances of magnesium alloys to wear, friction and corrosion can be effectively improved by depositing coatings on their surfaces. However, the coatings can also reduce the heat transfer from the coated components to the surroundings (e.g., coated cylinder bores for internal combustion of engine blocks). In this paper, nanostructured magnesium oxides were produced by plasma electrolytic oxidation (PEO) process on the magnesium alloy AJ62 under different current densities. The guarded comparative heat flow method was adopted to measure the thermal conductivities of such coatings which possess gradient nanoscale grain sizes. The aim of the paper is to explore how the current density in the PEO process affects the thermal conductivity of the nanostructured magnesium coatings. The experimental results show that, as the current density rises from 4 to 20 A/mm2, the thermal conductivity has a slight increase from 0.94 to 1.21 W/m x K, which is significantly smaller than that of the corresponding bulk magnesium oxide materials (29.4 W/m x K). This mostly attributed to the variation of the nanoscale grain sizes of the PEO coatings. PMID:25942897

  2. PITTING CORROSION ON MAGNESIUM ALLOYS : A COMPARATIVE STUDY OF FIELD DATA USING EXTREME VALUE

    E-print Network

    Maume-Deschamps, Véronique

    PITTING CORROSION ON MAGNESIUM ALLOYS : A COMPARATIVE STUDY OF FIELD DATA USING EXTREME VALUE corrosion of the magnesium alloys AZ91D and AM60B combined with different coatings on steel bolts was investigated in field corrosion tests carried out by Volvo Car Corporation. Light metals like magnesium

  3. In vitro corrosion and biocompatibility of binary magnesium alloys Xuenan Gu a

    E-print Network

    Zheng, Yufeng

    In vitro corrosion and biocompatibility of binary magnesium alloys Xuenan Gu a , Yufeng Zheng a 2 September 2008 Accepted 21 October 2008 Available online 9 November 2008 Keywords: Magnesium alloy Corrosion In vitro Cytotoxicity Hemocompatibility a b s t r a c t As bioabsorbable materials, magnesium

  4. Ordered magnesium-lithium alloys: First-principles predictions Richard H. Taylor

    E-print Network

    Hart, Gus

    Ordered magnesium-lithium alloys: First-principles predictions Richard H. Taylor Department 2010 Magnesium-lithium Mg-Li alloys are among the lightest structural materials. Although considerable Emerging technologies increasingly depend on the pro- duction of ultralight-weight materials. Magnesium

  5. Study of Forming of Magnesium Alloy by Explosive Energy

    SciTech Connect

    Ruan, Liqun; Hokamoto, Kazuyuki; Marumo, Yasuo; Yahiro, Ititoku

    2011-05-04

    Magnesium alloy is an attractive next generation material due to its high specific strength with low weight. However, magnesium alloys has few slip lines with close-packed hexagonal lattice, and generally poor ductility at room temperature, therefore it is difficult to form this material by cold forging. It is well known that the speed of deformation of metallic materials rapidly changes at the high strain rate. For some metallic materials, it is reported that the ductility also increases at the high strain rate with this speed effect. In this study, a series of high speed impulsive compressive tests were carried. By using explosives for shock wave loading, the velocity in this experiment reached 100 m/s that can't be easily obtained in normal experiment. In this paper, the possibility of forming the AZ31 extrusion magnesium alloy using explosive-impulsive pressure is investigated. And improved ductility by the effect of high-rate deformation is observed with this alloy.

  6. Effect of Strain Rate and Temperature on Fracture and Damage of Magnesium Alloy AZ31B 

    E-print Network

    Rodriguez Atencio, Ana Karina

    2015-04-29

    Due to their low density and high specific strength, magnesium and its alloys are structural metals attractive for the aerospace and automotive industries. However, wide spread use of wrought magnesium is challenged by its ...

  7. SIMULATION OF STRESSES DURING CASTING OF BINARY MAGNESIUM-ALUMINUM ALLOYS M.G. Pokorny1

    E-print Network

    Beckermann, Christoph

    SIMULATION OF STRESSES DURING CASTING OF BINARY MAGNESIUM-ALUMINUM ALLOYS M.G. Pokorny1 , C, Geesthacht, Germany Keywords: Magnesium Alloys, Casting, Stress Simulation Abstract A visco-plastic deformation model is used to predict thermal stresses during casting of binary Mg-Al alloys. The predictions

  8. The Corrosion Protection of Magnesium Alloy AZ31B

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Danford, M. D.; Mendrek, M. J.; Mitchell, M. L.; Torres, P. D.

    1997-01-01

    Corrosion rates for bare and coated Magnesium alloy AZ31B have been measured. Two coatings, Dow-23(Trademark) and Tagnite(Trademark), have been tested by electrochemical methods and their effectiveness determined. Electrochemical methods employed were the scanning reference electrode technique (SRET), the polarization resistance technique (PR) and the electrochemical impedance spectroscopy technique (EIS). In addition, general corrosion and stress corrosion methods were employed to examine the effectiveness of the above coatings in 90 percent humidity. Results from these studies are presented.

  9. The Corrosion of Magnesium and of the Magnesium Aluminum Alloys Containing Manganese

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boyer, J A

    1927-01-01

    The extensive use of magnesium and its alloys in aircraft has been seriously handicapped by the uncertainties surrounding their resistance to corrosion. This problem has been given intense study by the American Magnesium Corporation and at the request of the Subcommittee on Materials for Aircraft of the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics this report was prepared on the corrosion of magnesium. The tentative conclusions drawn from the experimental facts of this investigation are as follows: the overvoltage of pure magnesium is quite high. On immersion in salt water the metal corrodes with the liberation of hydrogen until the film of corrosion product lowers the potential to a critical value. When the potential reaches this value it no longer exceeds the theoretical hydrogen potential plus the overvoltage of the metal. Rapid corrosion consequently ceases. When aluminum is added, especially when in large amounts, the overvoltage is decreased and hydrogen plates out at a much lower potential than with pure magnesium. The addition of small amount of manganese raises the overvoltage back to practically that of pure metal, and the film is again negative.

  10. Potential applications of wrought magnesium alloys for passenger vehicles

    SciTech Connect

    Gaines, L.; Cuenca, R.; Stodolsky, F.; Wu, S.

    1995-12-31

    Vehicle weight reduction is one of the major means available for improving automotive fuel efficiency. Although high-strength steels, aluminum (Al), and polymers are already being used to achieve significant weight reductions, substantial additional weight reductions could be achieved by increased use of magnesium (Mg) and its alloys, which have very low density. Magnesium alloys are currently used in relatively small quantities for auto parts; use is generally limited to die castings, such as housings. The Center for Transportation Research at Argonne National Laboratory has performed a study for the Lightweight Materials Program within DOE`s Office of Transportation Materials to evaluate the suitability of wrought Mg and its alloys to replace steel or aluminum for automotive structural and sheet applications. This study identifies technical and economic barriers to this replacement and suggests R&D areas to enable economical large-volume use. Detailed results of the study will be published at a later date. Magnesium sheet could be used in body nonstructural and semi-structural applications, while extrusions could be used in such structural applications as spaceframes. Currently, Mg sheet has found limited use in the aerospace industry, where costs are not a major concern. The major barrier to greatly increased automotive use is high cost; two technical R&D areas are identified that could enable major reductions in costs. These are novel reduction technology and better hot-forming technology, possibly operating at lower temperatures and involving superplastic behavior.

  11. Magnesium Alloys as a Biomaterial for Degradable Craniofacial Screws

    PubMed Central

    Henderson, Sarah E.; Verdelis, Konstantinos; Maiti, Spandan; Pal, Siladitya; Chung, William L.; Chou, Da-Tren; Kumta, Prashant N.; Almarza, Alejandro J.

    2014-01-01

    Recently, magnesium (Mg) alloys have received significant attention as a potential biomaterial for degradable implants, and this study was directed at evaluating the suitability of Mg for craniofacial bone screws. The objective was to implant screws fabricated from commercially available Mg-alloys (pure Mg and AZ31) in-vivo in a rabbit mandible. First, Mg-alloy screws were compared to stainless steel screws in an in-vitro pull-out test and determined to have a similar holding strength (~40N). A finite element model of the screw was created using the pull-out test data, and the model can be used for future Mg-alloy screw design. Then, Mg-alloy screws were implanted for 4, 8, and 12 weeks, with two controls of an osteotomy site (hole) with no implant and a stainless steel screw implanted for 12 weeks. MicroCT (computed tomography) was used to assess bone remodeling and Mg-alloy degradation, both visually and qualitatively through volume fraction measurements for all time points. Histologic analysis was also completed for the Mg-alloys at 12 weeks. The results showed that craniofacial bone remodeling occurred around both Mg-alloy screw types. Pure Mg had a different degradation profile than AZ31, however bone growth occurred around both screw types. The degradation rate of both Mg-alloy screw types in the bone marrow space and the muscle were faster than in the cortical bone space at 12 weeks. Furthermore, it was shown that by alloying Mg, the degradation profile could be changed. These results indicate the promise of using Mg-alloys for craniofacial applications. PMID:24384125

  12. High-strain-rate nanoindentation behavior of fine-grained magnesium alloys

    E-print Network

    Somekawa, Hidetoshi

    The effects of temperature and alloying elements on deformation in the high-strain-rate regime were investigated by testing fine-grained magnesium alloys with an average grain size of 2 ? 3 ?m by a nanoindentation technique. ...

  13. Improved upper critical field in bulk-form magnesium diboride by mechanical alloying with carbon

    E-print Network

    Eom, Chang Beom

    Improved upper critical field in bulk-form magnesium diboride by mechanical alloying with carbon B online 11 May 2005 High-energy milling of magnesium diboride MgB2 prereacted powder renders the material studies of magnesium diboride thin films by Braccini et al.1 found Hc2 0 K 50 T for C-doped MgB2 films

  14. Mitigation of Corrosion on Magnesium Alloy by Predesigned Surface Corrosion

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xuming; Wu, Guosong; Peng, Xiang; Li, Limin; Feng, Hongqing; Gao, Biao; Huo, Kaifu; Chu, Paul K.

    2015-01-01

    Rapid corrosion of magnesium alloys is undesirable in structural and biomedical applications and a general way to control corrosion is to form a surface barrier layer isolating the bulk materials from the external environment. Herein, based on the insights gained from the anticorrosion behavior of corrosion products, a special way to mitigate aqueous corrosion is described. The concept is based on pre-corrosion by a hydrothermal treatment of Al-enriched Mg alloys in water. A uniform surface composed of an inner compact layer and top Mg-Al layered double hydroxide (LDH) microsheet is produced on a large area using a one-step process and excellent corrosion resistance is achieved in saline solutions. Moreover, inspired by the super-hydrophobic phenomenon in nature such as the lotus leaves effect, the orientation of the top microsheet layer is tailored by adjusting the hydrothermal temperature, time, and pH to produce a water-repellent surface after modification with fluorinated silane. As a result of the trapped air pockets in the microstructure, the super-hydrophobic surface with the Cassie state shows better corrosion resistance in the immersion tests. The results reveal an economical and environmentally friendly means to control and use the pre-corrosion products on magnesium alloys. PMID:26615896

  15. Mitigation of Corrosion on Magnesium Alloy by Predesigned Surface Corrosion.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xuming; Wu, Guosong; Peng, Xiang; Li, Limin; Feng, Hongqing; Gao, Biao; Huo, Kaifu; Chu, Paul K

    2015-01-01

    Rapid corrosion of magnesium alloys is undesirable in structural and biomedical applications and a general way to control corrosion is to form a surface barrier layer isolating the bulk materials from the external environment. Herein, based on the insights gained from the anticorrosion behavior of corrosion products, a special way to mitigate aqueous corrosion is described. The concept is based on pre-corrosion by a hydrothermal treatment of Al-enriched Mg alloys in water. A uniform surface composed of an inner compact layer and top Mg-Al layered double hydroxide (LDH) microsheet is produced on a large area using a one-step process and excellent corrosion resistance is achieved in saline solutions. Moreover, inspired by the super-hydrophobic phenomenon in nature such as the lotus leaves effect, the orientation of the top microsheet layer is tailored by adjusting the hydrothermal temperature, time, and pH to produce a water-repellent surface after modification with fluorinated silane. As a result of the trapped air pockets in the microstructure, the super-hydrophobic surface with the Cassie state shows better corrosion resistance in the immersion tests. The results reveal an economical and environmentally friendly means to control and use the pre-corrosion products on magnesium alloys. PMID:26615896

  16. JOURNAL OF MATERIALS SCIENCE LETTERS 20, 2001, 457459 Tensile and fatigue behavior of AZ91D magnesium alloy

    E-print Network

    Zhou, Wei

    magnesium alloy A. BAG, W. ZHOU School of Mechanical and Production Engineering, Nanyang Technological University, Nanyang Avenue, Singapore 639 789 E-mail: mwzhou@ntu.edu.sg Recently magnesium alloys, owing an important factor in limiting the use of magnesium alloys in highly stressed designs. As there have been few

  17. Modelling of Superplastic Forming of AZ31 Magnesium Alloy

    SciTech Connect

    Giuliano, G.

    2011-01-17

    In this study the constitutive equation of the superplastic AZ31 magnesium-based alloy is modelled by the power law relationship between the stress, the strain and the strain-rate and an accurate procedure for determining the constants of the material is presented. Moreover, the problem of optimizing the pressure-time load curve of a free forming process is investigated and resolved by means of a pressure jump forming process. The experimental tests, carried out to support the finite-element modelling, have shown good agreement between the numerical results and the experimental data.

  18. Preparation, characterization and wear behavior of carbon coated magnesium alloy with electroless plating nickel interlayer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mao, Yan; Li, Zhuguo; Feng, Kai; Guo, Xingwu; Zhou, Zhifeng; Dong, Jie; Wu, Yixiong

    2015-02-01

    Poor wear resistance of rare earth magnesium alloys has prevented them from wider application. In this study, composite coating (PVD carbon coating deposited on electroless plating nickel interlayer) is prepared to protect GW83 magnesium alloys against wear. The Ni + C composite coating has a dense microstructure, improved adhesion strength and hardness due to the effective support of Ni interlayer. The wear test result shows that the Ni + C composite coating can greatly prolong the wear life of the magnesium alloy. The wear track of the Ni + C coated magnesium alloy is obviously narrower and shows less abrasive particles as compared with the bare one. Abrasive wear is the wear mechanism of the coatings at the room temperature. In conclusion, the wear resistance of the GW83 magnesium alloy can be greatly improved by the Ni + C composite coating.

  19. In vitro degradation behavior and cytocompatibility of Mg–Zn–Zr alloys

    PubMed Central

    Huan, Z. G.; Leeflang, M. A.; Fratila-Apachitei, L. E.; Duszczyk, J.

    2010-01-01

    Zinc and zirconium were selected as the alloying elements in biodegradable magnesium alloys, considering their strengthening effect and good biocompatibility. The degradation rate, hydrogen evolution, ion release, surface layer and in vitro cytotoxicity of two Mg–Zn–Zr alloys, i.e. ZK30 and ZK60, and a WE-type alloy (Mg–Y–RE–Zr) were investigated by means of long-term static immersion testing in Hank’s solution, non-static immersion testing in Hank’s solution and cell-material interaction analysis. It was found that, among these three magnesium alloys, ZK30 had the lowest degradation rate and the least hydrogen evolution. A magnesium calcium phosphate layer was formed on the surface of ZK30 sample during non-static immersion and its degradation caused minute changes in the ion concentrations and pH value of Hank’s solution. In addition, the ZK30 alloy showed insignificant cytotoxicity against bone marrow stromal cells as compared with biocompatible hydroxyapatite (HA) and the WE-type alloy. After prolonged incubation for 7 days, a stimulatory effect on cell proliferation was observed. The results of the present study suggested that ZK30 could be a promising material for biodegradable orthopedic implants and worth further investigation to evaluate its in vitro and in vivo degradation behavior. PMID:20532960

  20. Formability study of magnesium alloy AZ31B

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Z. G.; Lasne, P.; Massoni, E.

    2011-08-01

    The main aim of this paper is to study the formability of the AZ31B magnesium alloy at various temperature and strain rates. The tensile tests are performed to describe the rheological behavior of material, and the constitutive law is identified with Voce law [1], which contains a softening item. The law is proved effectiveness by fitting the equation with the experimental data. Nakazima experiments with hemispherical punch have been performed at CEMEF on a hydraulic testing machine. Six strain paths are selected by performing various sample geometries [2]. The AramisOptical strain measurement system has been used to obtain principle forming limit strain. The Forming Limit Diagram (FLD) is obtained by the critical point on the specimen surface at various temperatures. It is shown that the forming limit curve is higher at high temperature. Based on the Voce law model, finite element simulations of deep drawing test have been done with the commercial finite element code FORGE® in order to investigate the feasibility of hot stamping process for AZ31. In the simulation, the punch load and the thickness distributions have been studied. Meanwhile, the cross-shaped cup deep drawing simulations have been conducted with the data provided in the conference Website. The similar conclusion are obtained that the formability of AZ31 improve at high temperature and the simulation is effective in hot stamping processing. The study results are helpful for the application of the stamping technology for the magnesium alloy sheet [3].

  1. Investigation of Deformation Dynamics in a Wrought Magnesium Alloy

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Wei; Qiao, Hua; An, Ke; Wu, Peidong; Liaw, Peter K

    2014-11-01

    In the present research, the deformation dynamics and the effect of the deformation history on plastic deformation in a wrought magnesium alloy have been studied using real-time in-situ neutron diffraction measurements under a continuous loading condition and elastic-viscoplastic self-consistent (EVPSC) polycrystal modeling. The experimental results reveal that the pre-deformation delayed the activation of the tensile twinning during subsequent compression, mainly resulting from the residual strain. No apparent detwinning occurred during unloading and even in the elastic region during reverse loading. It is believed that the grain rotation played an important role in the elastic region during reverse loading. The EVPSC model, which has been recently updated by implementing the twinning and detwinning model, was employed to characterize the deformation mechanism during the strain-path changes. The simulation result predicts well the experimental observation from the real-time in-situ neutron diffraction measurements. The present study provides a deep insight of the nature of deformation mechanisms in a hexagonal close-packed structured polycrystalline wrought magnesium alloy, which might lead to a new era of deformation-mechanism research.

  2. Influence of Surrounding Cations on the Surface Degradation of Magnesium Alloy Implants under a Compressive Pressure.

    PubMed

    Ning, Chengyun; Zhou, Lei; Zhu, Ye; Li, Ying; Yu, Peng; Wang, Shuangying; He, Tianrui; Li, Weiping; Tan, Guoxin; Wang, Yingjun; Mao, Chuanbin

    2015-12-22

    The effect of cations in the surrounding solutions on the surface degradation of magnesium alloys, a well-recognized biodegradable biomaterial, has been neglected compared with the effect of anions in the past. To better simulate the compressive environment where magnesium alloys are implanted into the body as a cardiovascular stent, a device is designed and employed in the test so that a pressure, equivalent to the vascular pressure, can be directly applied to the magnesium alloy implants when the alloys are immersed in a medium containing one of the cations (K(+), Na(+), Ca(2+), and Mg(2+)) found in blood plasma. The surface degradation behaviors of the magnesium alloys in the immersion test are then investigated using hydrogen evolution, mass loss determination, electron microscopy, pH value, and potentiodynamic measurements. The cations are found to promote the surface degradation of the magnesium alloys with the degree decreased in the order of K(+) > Na(+) > Ca(2+) > Mg(2+). The possible mechanism of the effects of the cations on the surface degradation is also discussed. This study will allow us to predict the surface degradation of magnesium alloys in the physiological environment and to promote the further development of magnesium alloys as biodegradable biomaterials. PMID:26652048

  3. Modeling the strength and ductility of magnesium alloys containing nanotwins

    SciTech Connect

    Gorti, Sarma B; Radhakrishnan, Balasubramaniam

    2013-01-01

    Magnesium alloys have been receiving much attention recently as potential lightweight alternatives to steel for automotive and other applications, but the poor formability of these alloys at low temperatures has limited their widespread adoption for automotive applications. Recent work with face centered cubic (FCC) materials has shown that introduction of twins at the nanometer scale in ultra-fine grained FCC polycrystals can provide significant increase in strength with a simultaneous improvement in ductility. This objective of this work is to explore the feasibility of extending this concept to hexagonal close packed (HCP) materials, with particular focus on using this approach to increase both strength and ductility of magnesium alloys. A crystal plasticity based finite element (CPFE) model is used to study the effect of varying the crystallographic texture and the spacing between the nanoscale twins on the strength and ductility of HCP polycrystals. Deformation of the material is assumed to occur by crystallographic slip, and in addition to the basal and prismatic slip systems, slip is also assumed to occur on the {1 0 -1 1} planes that are associated with compression twins in these materials. The slip system strength of the pyramidal systems containing the nanotwins is assumed to be much lower than the strength of the other systems, which is assumed to scale with the spacing between the nanotwins. The CPFE model is used to compute the stress-strain response for different microstrucrutral parameters, and a criterion based on a critical slip system shear strain and a critical hydrostatic stress is used to compute the limiting strength and ductility, with the ultimate goal of identifying the texture and nanotwin spacing that can lead to the optimum values for these parameters.

  4. Minimum quantity lubrication machining of aluminum and magnesium alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhowmick, Sukanta

    2011-12-01

    The use of minimum quantity lubrication (MQL) machining, i.e. drilling and tapping of aluminum and magnesium alloys using very low quantities of cutting fluids was studied and the MQL machining performance was compared to dry and conventional flooded conditions. An experimental drilling station with an MQL system was built to measure torque and thrust force responses. Uncoated and diamond-like carbon (DLC) coated HSS drills were tested against 319 Al and AZ91 alloys using 10--50 ml/h of distilled water (H 2O-MQL) and a fatty acid based MQL agent (FA-MQL). The results indicated that H2O-MQL used in conjunction with non-hydrogenated DLC (NH-DLC) coatings reduced the average torque and thrust-force compared to dry cutting and achieved a performance comparable with conventional flooded drilling. At least 103 holes could be drilled using NH-DLC in H2O-MQL and uncoated HSS in FA-MQL in drilling of both 319 Al and AZ91. MQL drilling and tapping provided a stable machining performance, which was evident from the uniform torque and force patterns and also resulted in desirable hole surface, thread quality and chip segments. The maximum temperature generated in the workpiece during MQL machining was lower than that observed in dry drilling and tapping, and comparable to flooded conditions. The mechanical properties of the material adjacent to drilled holes, as evaluated through plastic strain and hardness measurements, revealed a notable softening in case of dry drilling, with magnesium alloys exhibiting a recrystallized grain zone, but not for MQL drilling. Softened aluminum and magnesium promoted adhesion to the tools resulted built-up edge formation and consequently high torques and thrust-forces were generated. NH-DLC coatings' low COF in H 2O-MQL against 319 Al (0.10) and AZ91 (0.12) compared to uncoated HSS (0.63 and 0.65) limited the temperature increase during NH-DLC in H2 O-MQL drilling and hence both torques and thrust forces were effectively reduced.

  5. Cellular response of chondrocytes to magnesium alloys for orthopedic applications

    PubMed Central

    LIAO, YI; XU, QINGLI; ZHANG, JIAN; NIU, JIALING; YUAN, GUANGYIN; JIANG, YAO; HE, YAOHUA; WANG, XINLING

    2015-01-01

    In the present study, the effects of Mg-Nd-Zn-Zr (JDBM), brushite (CaHPO4·2H2O)-coated JDBM (C-JDBM), AZ31, WE43, pure magnesium (Mg) and Ti alloy (TC4) on rabbit chondrocytes were investigated in vitro. Adhesion experiments revealed the satisfactory morphology of chondrocytes on the surface of all samples. An indirect cytotoxicity test using MTT assay revealed that C-JDBM and TC4 exhibited results similar to those of the negative control, better than those obtained with JDBM, AZ31, WE43 and pure Mg (p<0.05). There were no statistically significant differences observed between the JDBM, AZ31, WE43 and pure Mg group (p>0.05). The results of indirect cell cytotoxicity and proliferation assays, as well as those of apoptosis assay, glycosaminoglycan (GAG) quantification, assessment of collagen II (Col II) levels and RT-qPCR revealed a similar a trend as was observed with MTT assay. These findings suggested that the JDBM alloy was highly biocompatible with chondrocytes in vitro, yielding results similar to those of AZ31, WE43 and pure Mg. Furthermore, CaHPO4·2H2O coating significantly improved the biocompatibility of this alloy. PMID:25975216

  6. MUTLI-OBJECTIVE OPTIMIZATION OF MICROSTRUCTURE IN WROUGHT MAGNESIUM ALLOYS

    SciTech Connect

    Radhakrishnan, Balasubramaniam; Gorti, Sarma B; Simunovic, Srdjan

    2013-01-01

    The microstructural features that govern the mechanical properties of wrought magnesium alloys include grain size, crystallographic texture, and twinning. Several processes based on shear deformation have been developed that promote grain refinement, weakening of the basal texture, as well as the shift of the peak intensity away from the center of the basal pole figure - features that promote room temperature ductility in Mg alloys. At ORNL, we are currently exploring the concept of introducing nano-twins within sub-micron grains as a possible mechanism for simultaneously improving strength and ductility by exploiting a potential dislocation glide along the twin-matrix interface a mechanism that was originally proposed for face-centered cubic materials. Specifically, we have developed an integrated modeling and optimization framework in order to identify the combinations of grain size, texture and twin spacing that can maximize strength-ductility combinations. A micromechanical model that relates microstructure to material strength is coupled with a failure model that relates ductility to a critical shear strain and a critical hydrostatic stress. The micro-mechanical model is combined with an optimization tool based on genetic algorithm. A multi-objective optimization technique is used to explore the strength-ductility space in a systematic fashion and identify optimum combinations of the microstructural parameters that will simultaneously maximize the strength-ductility in the alloy.

  7. Mg-Zn-Y alloys with long-period stacking ordered structure: in vitro assessments of biodegradation behavior.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Xu; Shi, Ling-ling; Xu, Jian

    2013-10-01

    Using Dulbecco's modified eagle medium (DMEM) with 10% fetal bovine serum (FBS) as simulated body fluid, degradation behavior of Mg100-3x(Zn1Y2)x (1?x?3) alloy series with long period stacking order (LPSO) structures was investigated. As indicated, with increasing the volume fraction of LPSO phase, degradation rate of the alloys is accelerated. Further refining the grain size by microalloying with zirconium and warm extrusion has a significant effect to mitigate the degradation rate of the Mg97Zn1Y2 alloy. Time-dependent behavior during degradation of the magnesium alloys can be described using an exponential decay function of WR=exp(a+bt+ct(2)), where WR is normalized residual mass/volume of the alloy. A parameter named as degradation half-life period (t0.5) is suggested to quantitatively assess the degradation rate. For the localized-corrosion controlled alloys, the t0.5 parameter physically scales with electrochemical response ?E which is a range between corrosion potential (Ecorr) and pitting potential (Ept). In comparison with conventional engineering magnesium alloys such as the AZ31, WE43, ZK60 and ZX60 alloys, extruded Mg96.83Zn1Y2Zr0.17 alloy with LPSO structure exhibits a good combination of high mechanical strength, lower biodegradation rate and good biocompatibility. PMID:23910258

  8. In vitro corrosion and biocompatibility study of phytic acid modified WE43 magnesium alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ye, C. H.; Zheng, Y. F.; Wang, S. Q.; Xi, T. F.; Li, Y. D.

    2012-02-01

    Phytic acid (PA) conversion coating on WE43 magnesium alloy was prepared by the method of immersion. The influences of phytic acid solution with different pH on the microstructure, properties of the conversion coating and the corrosion resistance were investigated by SEM, FTIR and potentiodynamic polarization method. Furthermore, the biocompatibility of different pH phytic acid solution modified WE43 magnesium alloys was evaluated by MTT and hemolysis test. The results show that PA can enhance the corrosion resistance of WE43 magnesium especially when the pH value of modified solution is 5 and the cytotoxicity of the PA coated WE43 magnesium alloy is much better than that of the bare WE43 magnesium alloy. Moreover, all the hemolysis rates of the PA coated WE43 Mg alloy were lower than 5%, indicating that the modified Mg alloy met the hemolysis standard of biomaterials. Therefore, PA coating is a good candidate to improve the biocompatibility of WE43 magnesium alloy.

  9. Evaluation of magnesium ions release, biocorrosion, and hemocompatibility of MAO/PLLA-modified magnesium alloy WE42.

    PubMed

    Lu, Ping; Cao, Lu; Liu, Yin; Xu, Xinhua; Wu, Xiangfeng

    2011-01-01

    Magnesium alloys may potentially be applied as biodegradable metallic materials in cardiovascular stent. However, the high corrosion rate hinders its clinical application. In this study, a new approach was adopted to control the corrosion rate by fabricating a biocompatible micro-arc oxidation/poly-L-lactic acid (MAO/PLLA) composite coating on the magnesium alloy WE42 substrate and the biocompatibility of the modified samples was investigated. The scanning electronic microscope (SEM) images were used to demonstrate the morphology of the samples before and after being submerged in hanks solution for 4 weeks. The degradation was evaluated through the magnesium ions release rate and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) test. The biocompatibility of the samples was demonstrated by coagulation time and hemolysis behavior. The result shows that the poly-L-lactic acid (PLLA) effectively improved the corrosion resistance by sealing the microcracks and microholes on the surface of the MAO coating. The modified samples had good compatibility. PMID:21053265

  10. Ultrastrong Magnesium Alloy via Nano-Spaced Stacking Faults

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jian, Weiwei

    Magnesium and its alloys have attracted extensive attention in recent years due to their abundance, low-density, good castability and recyclability. However, the application of Mg alloys has been substantially hindered by their relatively low strengths and limited ductility at room temperature. Outside of traditional precipitation control, Mg-alloy strengthening typically relies on two general approaches: non-traditional, esoteric processing and grain refinement. Here in this research, we processed a Mg-8.5Gd-2.3Y-1.8Ag-0.4Zr (wt.%) via conventional technique (hot-rolling at 450°C) with thickness reduction up to 88%. The main contents of this research, as well as the novelties, are discussed in the following ways. Firstly, we reported a new mechanism for producing ultrahigh strengths (yield strength: ˜575 MPa, ultimate strength: ˜600 MPa) and maintaining moderate ductility (uniform elongation: ˜ 3% to 4%) in hot rolled Mg-alloy with relatively large grain sizes (13 microm). TEM studies show that a high density of nano-spaced SFs are the main defects inside of the grains and their density increased as rolling thickness reduction increased. The strength of the processed Mg alloy was found to increase as the mean spacing between adjacent SFs decreased. Nano-spaced SFs were found to be very effective in impeding the movement of dislocations and retaining strain hardening. Activation of non-basal dislocations during tensile testing accounts for the detected moderate ductility, in addition to the capability of retaining strain hardening. Secondly, we predicted and calculated contributions from different strengthening mechanisms for the unltrahigh strength of hot rolled Mg alloy including solid solution, grain refinement, precipitation and texture evolution. The results showed that grain boundary strengthening, solid solution hardening, precipitates hardening and strong texture strengthening totally contribute 249.8 MPa to 278.5 MPa for the yield strength (˜575MPa) of 88% rolled Mg alloy. In other words, the nano-spaced SFs strengthening mechanism was the main strengthening factor, which solely contributed 326.2 MPa to 296.5 MPa, around 50% of the total yield strength. Finally, the model of interactions between basal SFs and basal dislocations and non basal dislocations were established for the first time in Mg alloy. The model showed that the strengthening was proportional to the reciprocal of the SF spacing for both types of interactions between dislocations and SFs. Therefore, decreasing the SF spacing can increase interaction force which served as a barrier for a dislocation to move, and consequently improved the macroscopic strength of materials. In summary, introducing nano-spaced SFs in Mg alloy can tremendously impede the movement of dislocations and retain strain hardening. It is expected that optimization of approaches that introduce a high density of nano-spaced SFs will enable other Mg-alloys with concurrent high strength and good ductility.

  11. The Influence of Anodized Film on Corrosion Behavior of Magnesium Alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bai, Liqun; Guo, Min; Li, Di; Qian, Jiangang; Guo, Baolan

    The influence of anodized film on corrosion and electrochemical behavior of extruded magnesium alloy AZ63, cast and die-cast magnesium alloys AZ91D were investigated by using immersion technique, electrochemical methods, SEM, EDAX, IR and XRD. The results showed anodized film could improve remarkably corrosion resistance. Protection effect was different with the same anodizing process because formation status of anodized film of different materials was different. The formation status of anodized film was related to alloy microstructure as revealed by optical and scanning electron microscopy. The formatting process and casting method strongly influences the corrosion performance by affecting on the alloy microstructure. A tentative corrosion mechanism is presented explaining the corrosion behavior of anodized magnesium alloy.

  12. Electroless deposition of Ni W P coating on AZ91D magnesium alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, W. X.; Huang, N.; He, J. G.; Jiang, Z. H.; Jiang, Q.; Lian, J. S.

    2007-03-01

    Ternary Ni-W-P alloy coating was deposited directly on AZ91D magnesium alloy by using an alkaline-citrate-based baths. Nickel sulfate and sodium tungstate were used as metal ion sources, respectively, and sodium hypophosphite was used as a reducing agent. The pH value of the electroless bath was tailored for magnesium alloy. The coating was characterized for its structure, morphology, microhardness and the corrosion properties. SEM observation showed the presence of dense and coarse nodules in the ternary coating. EDS analysis showed that the content of tungsten in the Ni-W-P alloy was 4.5 wt.%. Both the electrochemical analysis and the immersion test in 10% HCl solution revealed that the ternary Ni-W-P coating exhibited good corrosion resistance properties in protecting the AZ91D magnesium alloy.

  13. Magnesium

    MedlinePLUS

    ... supplements are available? Magnesium is available in multivitamin-mineral supplements and other dietary supplements. Forms of magnesium ... higher intakes of magnesium have a higher bone mineral density, which is important in reducing the risk ...

  14. In Vitro Biocompatibility and Endothelialization of Novel Magnesium-Rare Earth Alloys for Improved Stent Applications

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Nan; Watson, Nevija; Xu, Zhigang; Chen, Yongjun; Waterman, Jenora; Sankar, Jagannathan; Zhu, Donghui

    2014-01-01

    Magnesium (Mg) based alloys are the most advanced cardiovascular stent materials. This new generation of stent scaffold is currently under clinical evaluation with encouraging outcomes. All these Mg alloys contain a certain amount of rare earth (RE) elements though the exact composition is not yet disclosed. RE alloying can usually enhance the mechanical strength of different metal alloys but their toxicity might be an issue for medical applications. It is still unclear how RE elements will affect the magnesium (Mg) alloys intended for stent materials as a whole. In this study, we evaluated MgZnCaY-1RE, MgZnCaY-2RE, MgYZr-1RE, and MgZnYZr-1RE alloys for cardiovascular stents applications regarding their mechanical strength, corrosion resistance, hemolysis, platelet adhesion/activation, and endothelial biocompatibility. The mechanical properties of all alloys were significantly improved. Potentiodynamic polarization showed that the corrosion resistance of four alloys was at least 3–10 times higher than that of pure Mg control. Hemolysis test revealed that all the materials were non-hemolytic while little to moderate platelet adhesion was found on all materials surface. No significant cytotoxicity was observed in human aorta endothelial cells cultured with magnesium alloy extract solution for up to seven days. Direct endothelialization test showed that all the alloys possess significantly better capability to sustain endothelial cell attachment and growth. The results demonstrated the promising potential of these alloys for stent material applications in the future. PMID:24921251

  15. HOLZ line analysis of lattice parameters in magnesium alloys.

    PubMed

    Rossouw, C J; Venkatesan, K

    2001-01-01

    A method of refining lattice parameters from deficit higher-order Laue zone (HOLZ) line data from large angle convergent beam electron diffraction (LACBED) data is presented, relying on distances between nearest neighbour intersections alone in order to minimize effects of distortion over the field of view. Use is made of a dynamical correction deltak to the fast electron wavevector k for kinematic analysis. This correction term is shown to depend on the specific HOLZ beam under consideration, as well as the zone axis and eigenvalue associated with the branch index of the relevant dispersion surface. This method is applied to analysis of data from magnesium alloys, where momentum filtering induced by the LACBED method facilitates HOLZ contrast from a relatively low index zone axis (where contrast is not detectable with conventional CBED), and contrast is enhanced at elevated temperatures from a higher index zone axis. Although the accuracy of refined lattice parameters from these sets of data is shown to be no better than 0.1%, it is felt that issues arising out of the analysis may be of some interest, particularly since these are non-ideal specimens. Full eigen-state analysis of the fast electron wavefunction is presented, and issues related to the influence of the dispersion surface on deficit HOLZ line behaviour are discussed. PMID:11794614

  16. Warm Deep Drawing Of Rectangular Cups With Magnesium Alloy AZ31 Sheets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, L. M.; Palumbo, G.; Zhang, S. H.; Tricarico, L.

    2007-05-01

    Recently, magnesium alloys have been widely applied in automotive and electronic industries as the lightest weight structural and functional materials. Warm forming of magnesium alloys has attracted much attention due to the very poor formability of Mg alloys at room temperature. The formability of magnesium alloy sheet at elevated temperature is significantly affected by the processing parameters. Among them the forming temperature, the punch speed, the geometrical shape of the blank, the blank holder force and the lubrication are probably the most relevant. In this research, the deep drawing of rectangular cups with AZ31 sheets was conducted at elevated temperatures with different process parameters. The finite element analyses were performed to investigate the effects of the process parameters on the formability of rectangular cup drawing and to predict the process defects during the process. The material yield condition was modeled using the isotropic Von Mises criterion. The flow stress data were obtained from tensile tests.

  17. Effect of hot working on the damping capacity and mechanical properties of AZ31 magnesium alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, K.; Kang, C.; Kim, K.

    2015-04-01

    Magnesium alloys have received much attention for their lightweight and other excellent properties, such as low density, high specific strength, and good castability, for use in several industrial and commercial applications. However, both magnesium and its alloys show limited room-temperature formability owing to the limited number of slip systems associated with their hexagonal close-packed crystal structure. It is well known that crystallographic texture plays an important role in both plastic deformation and macroscopic anisotropy of magnesium alloys. Many authors have concentrated on improving the room- temperature formability of Mg alloys. However, despite having a lot of excellent properties in magnesium alloy, the study for various properties of magnesium alloy have not been clarified enough yet. Mg alloys are known to have a good damping capacity compared to other known metals and their alloys. Also, the damping properties of metals are generally recognized to be dependent on microstructural factors such as grain size and texture. However, there are very few studies on the relationship between the damping capacity and texture of Magnesium alloys. Therefore, in this study, specimens of the AZ31 magnesium alloy, were processed by hot working, and their texture and damping property investigated. A 60 mm × 60 mm × 40 mm rectangular plate was cut out by machining an ingot of AZ31 magnesium alloy (Mg-3Al-1Zn in mass%), and rolling was carried out at 673 K to a rolling reduction of 30%. Then, heat treatment was carried out at temperatures in the range of 573-723 K for durations in the range of 30-180 min. The samples were immediately quenched in oil after heat treatment to prevent any change in the microstructure. Texture was evaluated on the compression planes by the Schulz reflection method using nickel-filtered Cu K? radiation. Electron backscatter diffraction measurements were conducted to observe the spatial distribution of various orientations. Specimens for damping capacity measurements were machined from the rolled specimen, to have a length of 120 mm, width of 20 mm, and thickness of 1 mm. The damping capacity was measured with a flexural internal friction measurement machine at room temperature. It was found that the damping capacity increases with both increasing heat-treatment temperature and time, due to grain growth and the increased pole densities of textures.

  18. Corrosion resistance of aluminum-magnesium alloys in glacial acetic acid

    SciTech Connect

    Zaitseva, L.V.; Romaniv, V.I.

    1984-05-01

    Vessels for the storage and conveyance of glacial acetic acid are produced from ADO and AD1 aluminum, which are distinguished by corrosion resistance, weldability and workability in the hot and cold conditions but have low tensile strength. Aluminum-magnesium alloys are stronger materials close in corrosion resistance to technical purity aluminum. An investigation was made of the basic alloying components on the corrosion resistance of these alloys in glacial acetic acid. Both the base metal and the weld joints were tested. With an increase in temperature the corrosion rate of all of the tested materials increases by tens of times. The metals with higher magnesium content show more pitting damage. The relationship of the corrosion resistance of the alloys to magnesium content is confirmed by the similar intensity of failure of the joint metal of all of the investigated alloys and by electrochemical investigations. The data shows that AMg3 alloy is close to technically pure ADO aluminum. However, the susceptibility of even this material to local corrosion eliminates the possibility of the use of aluminum-magnesium alloys as reliable constructional materials in glacial acetic acid.

  19. Effects of Alloying Elements on Microstructure and Properties of Magnesium Alloys for Tripling Ball

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, D. H.; Geng, Z. W.; Chen, L.; Wu, Z.; Diao, H. Y.; Song, M.; Zhou, P. F.

    2015-10-01

    In order to find good candidate materials for degradable fracturing ball applications, Mg-Al-Zn-Cu alloys with different contents of aluminum, zinc, and copper were prepared by ingot metallurgy. The effects of aluminum, zinc, and copper additions on the microstructure, compressive strength, and rapid decomposition properties of the alloys have been investigated using scanning electron microscopy, compressive tests, and immersion tests. The results show that the addition of high contents Al (15 to 20 wt pct) in pure magnesium promotes a large number of network-like ?-Mg17All2 phases, which helps produce more micro-thermocouples to accelerate the corrosion process in 3 wt pct potassium chloride (KCl) at 366 K (93 °C). Adding different Zn contents improves the compressive properties of Mg-20Al alloys drastically. However, it decreases the decomposition rate in 3 wt pct KCl at 366 K (93 °C). Small amount of Cu will slightly reduce the compressive strength of Mg-20Al-5Zn alloy but dramatically increase its decomposition rate.

  20. Studies on the inuence of chloride ion and pH on the corrosion and electrochemical behaviour of AZ91D magnesium alloy

    E-print Network

    Zhou, Wei

    91D magnesium alloy R. AMBAT, N.N. AUNG and W. ZHOU School of Mechanical and Production Engineering in revised form 20 January 2000 Key words: AZ91D alloy, chloride ion, corrosion, die-cast, ingot, magnesium of morphology. The corrosion product consisted of magnesium hydroxide, fallen b particles and magnesium

  1. Magnesium alloys for temporary implants in osteosynthesis: In vivo studies of their degradation and interaction with bone

    E-print Network

    Giger, Christine

    Magnesium alloys for temporary implants in osteosynthesis: In vivo studies of their degradation 2011 Accepted 4 November 2011 Available online 11 November 2011 Keywords: Magnesium Biodegradation t This study investigates the bone and tissue response to degrading magnesium pin implants in the grow- ing rat

  2. The influence of microstructure on the fracture and tensile properties of die cast and thixomolded magnesium alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Thoma, P.E.; Hays, C.; Baik, A.

    1999-08-01

    In this investigation, the fracture and tensile properties of die cast and thixomolded magnesium alloys are compared and shown to be dependent on the microstructure of the test specimens. The principal features of a die cast structure that inhibit crack propagation and contribute to high ductility are the presence of highly structured primary {alpha}-magnesium dendrites and a continuous network of the {alpha}-magnesium phase. The lower tensile properties of thixomolded magnesium alloys are attributed to the presence of nodular {alpha}-magnesium dendrites. Cracks propagate around the nodular dendrites through the divorced eutectic that surrounds the nodular {alpha}-magnesium dendrites. In the thixomolded alloys, there is also a less developed continuous network of the {alpha}-magnesium phase.

  3. Design of experiment (DOE) study of biodegradable magnesium alloy synthesized by mechanical alloying using fractional factorial design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salleh, Emee Marina; Ramakrishnan, Sivakumar; Hussain, Zuhailawati

    2014-06-01

    The biodegradable nature of magnesium (Mg) makes it a most highlighted and attractive to be used as implant materials. However, rapid corrosion rate of Mg alloys especially in electrolytic aqueous environment limits its performance. In this study, Mg alloy was mechanically milled by incorporating manganese (Mn) as alloying element. An attempt was made to study both effect of mechanical alloying and subsequent consolidation processes on the bulk properties of Mg-Mn alloys. 2k-2 factorial design was employed to determine the significant factors in producing Mg alloy which has properties closes to that of human bones. The design considered six factors (i.e. milling time, milling speed, weight percentage of Mn, compaction pressure, sintering temperature and sintering time). Density and hardness were chosen as the responses for assessing the most significant parameters that affected the bulk properties of Mg-Mn alloys. The experimental variables were evaluated using ANOVA and regression model. The main parameter investigated was compaction pressure.

  4. [Research on the mechanical properties of bone scaffold reinforced by magnesium alloy/bioceramics composite with stereolithography double channels].

    PubMed

    Li, Changhai; Lian, Qin; Zhuang, Pei; Wang, Junzhong; Li, Dichen

    2015-02-01

    Focusing on the poor mechanical strength of porous bioceramics bone scaffold, and taking into account of the good mechanical properties of biodegradable magnesium alloy, we proposed a novel method to fabricate magnesium alloy/bioceramics composite bone scaffold with stereolithography double channels. Firstly, a scaffold structure without mutually connected double channels was designed. Then, an optimized bioceramics scaffold was fabricated according to stereolithography and gel-casing. Molten AZ31 magnesium alloy was perfused into the secondary channel of scaffold by low-pressure casting, and magnesium alloy/bioceramics composite bone scaffold was obtained when magnesium alloy was solidified. The compression test showed that the strength of bioceramics scaffold with only one channel and without magnesium alloy was (9.76 ± 0.64) MPa, while the strength of magnesium alloy/bioceramics composite scaffold with double channels was (17.25 ± 0.88) MPa. It can be concluded that the magnesium alloy/bioceramics composite is obviously able to improve the scaffold strength. PMID:25997270

  5. One-step electrochemical fabrication of bilayered MgO/polymer coating on magnesium alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Jun; Zhang, Ren-Hui; Peng, Zhen-Jun; Liu, Bai-Xing

    2014-09-01

    This research demonstrates a novel one-step electrochemical method to fabricate thick bilayer coatings on magnesium alloy in acid phosphate electrolyte containing aniline monomer and styrene-acrylic emulsion (SAE) with pulsed DC voltage. The morphologies, XRD and FTIR results show that the bilayer coating consists of an inner oxide layer and an outer polyaniline (PANI)/SAE composite layer. It is believed that the bilayered structure achieved results from a hybrid process combining electropolymerization (EPM) of aniline, electrophoretic deposition (EPD) of SAE and plasma electrolyte oxidation (PEO) of magnesium alloy substrate. Electrochemical corrosion tests indicate that the bilayer coating can provide superior corrosion protection to the magnesium alloy substrate in 3.5 wt.% NaCl solution.

  6. Corrosion Behavior of AZ91D Magnesium Alloy in Three Different Physiological Environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Juncen; Li, Qing; Zhang, Haixiao; Chen, Funan

    2014-01-01

    Magnesium alloys have been considered as promising biomedical materials and were studied in different physiological environments. In this work, corrosion behavior of AZ91D magnesium alloy in artificial saliva, simulated body fluid (SBF), and 3.5 wt.% NaCl solution was investigated using electrochemical techniques and a short-term immersion test. In contrast with other physiological environments, the amount of aggressive ions in artificial saliva is small. In addition, a protective film is formed on the surface of samples in artificial saliva. Experimental results suggest that corrosion resistance of AZ91D magnesium alloy in artificial saliva is better than that in c-SBF and 3.5 wt.% NaCl solution.

  7. The aluminium-scandium-lithium-magnesium system as a potential source of superplastically formable alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Emigh, R.A.

    1990-07-01

    Alloys from the aluminum-lithium-scandium-magnesium system have been cast and rolled for study. The goal is to evaluate this system for the development of superplastically formable, high strength alloys. Aluminum-scandium-magnesium alloys have shown potential as superplastic alloys. These alloys rely on small Al{sub 3}Sc (ordered L1{sub 2}) precipitates for grain structure stabilization and strengthening. Additional precipitation strengthening is required to raise their strength to levels sufficient for aircraft applications. The addition of lithium provides this additional strengthening through the formation of Al{sub 3}Li({delta}{prime}). To produce the alloys studied in this research, a unique induction melting furnace was constructed that incorporates special features to produce aluminum-lithium alloys with low hydrogen content. The furnace also features a water cooled, copper casting mold to achieve a moderately rapid solidification rate. This is because the amount of scandium used (0.5 wt %) is in excess of the solubility limit and Al{sub 3}Sc cannot be re-solutionized to any extent. It is therefore desired to super-saturate the matrix with as much scandium as possible for later precipitation. Two high lithium alloys were produced, ALS2 (nominal composition Al-2.2Li-O.5 Sc) and AlS4 (nominal composition Al-2.0Li-2.2Mg-0.5Sc) that were strengthened with {delta}{prime} (Al{sub 3}Li). These alloys exhibited strength and ductility superior to those of aluminum-lithium-(magnesium)-zirconium alloys. This is because the scandium containing alloys have developed a finer grain structure and the Al{sub 3}Sc precipitates contribute to the alloys strength. 41 refs., 29 figs.

  8. Thermodynamic criteria for the removal of impurities from end-of-life magnesium alloys by evaporation and flux treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hiraki, Takehito; Takeda, Osamu; Nakajima, Kenichi; Matsubae, Kazuyo; Nakamura, Shinichiro; Nagasaka, Tetsuya

    2011-06-01

    In this paper, the possibility of removing impurities during magnesium recycling with pyrometallurgical techniques has been evaluated by using a thermodynamic analysis. For 25 different elements that are likely to be contained in industrial magnesium alloys, the equilibrium distribution ratios between the metal, slag and gas phases in the magnesium remelting process were calculated assuming binary systems of magnesium and an impurity element. It was found that calcium, gadolinium, lithium, ytterbium and yttrium can be removed from the remelted end-of-life (EoL) magnesium products by oxidization. Calcium, cerium, gadolinium, lanthanum, lithium, plutonium, sodium, strontium and yttrium can be removed by chlorination with a salt flux. However, the other elements contained in magnesium alloy scrap are scarcely removed and this may contribute toward future contamination problems. The third technological option for the recycling of EoL magnesium products is magnesium recovery by a distillation process. Based on thermodynamic considerations, it is predicted that high-purity magnesium can be recovered through distillation because of its high vapor pressure, yet there is a limit on recoverability that depends on the equilibrium vapor pressure of the alloying elements and the large energy consumption. Therefore, the sustainable recycling of EoL magnesium products should be an important consideration in the design of advanced magnesium alloys or the development of new refining processes.

  9. Influence of cobalt on the properties of load-sensitive magnesium alloys.

    PubMed

    Klose, Christian; Demminger, Christian; Mroz, Gregor; Reimche, Wilfried; Bach, Friedrich-Wilhelm; Maier, Hans Jürgen; Kerber, Kai

    2012-01-01

    In this study, magnesium is alloyed with varying amounts of the ferromagnetic alloying element cobalt in order to obtain lightweight load-sensitive materials with sensory properties which allow an online-monitoring of mechanical forces applied to components made from Mg-Co alloys. An optimized casting process with the use of extruded Mg-Co powder rods is utilized which enables the production of magnetic magnesium alloys with a reproducible Co concentration. The efficiency of the casting process is confirmed by SEM analyses. Microstructures and Co-rich precipitations of various Mg-Co alloys are investigated by means of EDS and XRD analyses. The Mg-Co alloys' mechanical strengths are determined by tensile tests. Magnetic properties of the Mg-Co sensor alloys depending on the cobalt content and the acting mechanical load are measured utilizing the harmonic analysis of eddy-current signals. Within the scope of this work, the influence of the element cobalt on magnesium is investigated in detail and an optimal cobalt concentration is defined based on the performed examinations. PMID:23344376

  10. Influence of Cobalt on the Properties of Load-Sensitive Magnesium Alloys

    PubMed Central

    Klose, Christian; Demminger, Christian; Mroz, Gregor; Reimche, Wilfried; Bach, Friedrich-Wilhelm; Maier, Hans Jürgen; Kerber, Kai

    2013-01-01

    In this study, magnesium is alloyed with varying amounts of the ferromagnetic alloying element cobalt in order to obtain lightweight load-sensitive materials with sensory properties which allow an online-monitoring of mechanical forces applied to components made from Mg-Co alloys. An optimized casting process with the use of extruded Mg-Co powder rods is utilized which enables the production of magnetic magnesium alloys with a reproducible Co concentration. The efficiency of the casting process is confirmed by SEM analyses. Microstructures and Co-rich precipitations of various Mg-Co alloys are investigated by means of EDS and XRD analyses. The Mg-Co alloys' mechanical strengths are determined by tensile tests. Magnetic properties of the Mg-Co sensor alloys depending on the cobalt content and the acting mechanical load are measured utilizing the harmonic analysis of eddy-current signals. Within the scope of this work, the influence of the element cobalt on magnesium is investigated in detail and an optimal cobalt concentration is defined based on the performed examinations. PMID:23344376

  11. Characterization of fold defects in AZ91D and AE42 magnesium alloy permanent mold castings

    SciTech Connect

    Bichler, L.; Ravindran, C.

    2010-03-15

    Casting premium-quality magnesium alloy components for aerospace and automotive applications poses unique challenges. Magnesium alloys are known to freeze rapidly prior to filling a casting cavity, resulting in misruns and cold shuts. In addition, melt oxidation, solute segregation and turbulent metal flow during casting contribute to the formation of fold defects. In this research, formation of fold defects in AZ91D and AE42 magnesium alloys cast via the permanent mold casting process was investigated. Computer simulations of the casting process predicted the development of a turbulent metal flow in a critical casting region with abrupt geometrical transitions. SEM and light optical microscopy examinations revealed the presence of folds in this region for both alloys. However, each alloy exhibited a unique mechanism responsible for fold formation. In the AZ91D alloy, melt oxidation and velocity gradients in the critical casting region prevented fusion of merging metal front streams. In the AE42 alloy, limited solubility of rare-earth intermetallic compounds in the {alpha}-Mg phase resulted in segregation of Al{sub 2}RE particles at the leading edge of a metal front and created microstructural inhomogeneity across the fold.

  12. Thermodynamic properties of calcium-magnesium alloys determined by emf measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Newhouse, JM; Poizeau, S; Kim, H; Spatocco, BL; Sadoway, DR

    2013-02-28

    The thermodynamic properties of calcium-magnesium alloys were determined by electromotive force (emf) measurements using a Ca(in Bi)vertical bar CaF2 vertical bar Ca(in Mg) cell over the temperature range 713-1048 K. The activity and partial molar Gibbs free energy of calcium in magnesium were calculated for nine Ca-Mg alloys, calcium mole fractions varying from x(ca) = 0.01 to 0.80. Thermodynamic properties of magnesium in calcium and the molar Gibbs free energy of mixing were estimated using the Gibbs-Duhem relationship. In the all-liquid region at 1010 K, the activity of calcium in magnesium was found to range between 8.8 x 10(-4) and 0.94 versus pure calcium. The molecular interaction volume model (MIVM) was used to model the activity coefficient of Ca and Mg in Ca-Mg liquid alloys. Based on this work, Ca-Mg alloys show promise as the negative electrode of a liquid metal battery in which calcium is the itinerant species: alloying with Mg results in both a decrease in operating temperature and suppression of Ca metal solubility in the molten salt electrolyte. (C) 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Preparation of aluminium-magnesium alloys and some valuable salts from used beverage cans.

    PubMed

    Rabah, Mahmoud A

    2003-01-01

    The purpose of this work is to recover standard aluminium-magnesium alloy(s) and some valuable salts from used beverage cans (UBCs). The suggested method updated the current recycling technology by augmenting removal of the coating paint, decreasing magnesium loss during melting process and improving hydrochloric acid leaching of the formed slag. Iron impurity present in the leaching solution, was removed by oxidation using oxygen gas or hydrogen peroxide and filtered as goethite. Results obtained revealed that a mixture of methyl ethyl ketone/dimethyl formamide entirely removes the paint coating at room temperature. The process compares favorably to the current methods involving firing or swell peeling. The coating decomposes to titanium dioxide by heating at 750 degrees C for 30 min. Standard compositions of Al-Mg alloys are formulated using secondary magnesium. The extent of recovery (R) of these alloy(s) is a function of the melting time and temperature and type of the flux. The maximum (R) value amounts to 94.4%. Sodium borate/chloride mix decreases magnesium loss to a minimum. The extent of leaching valuable salts from the slag increases with increasing the molarity, stoichiometric ratio and leaching temperature of the acid used. Removal of iron is a function of the potential of the oxidation process. Stannous chloride has been recovered from the recovered and dried salts by distillation at 700-750 degrees C. PMID:12623092

  14. A. Bag, W. Zhou, D. Taplin and E. S. Dwarakadasa, Fatigue Behaviour of AZ91D Magnesium Alloy and its Composite Reinforced with SiC, in Magnesium Technology 2000, eds. H. I. Kaplan, J. N. Hryn

    E-print Network

    Zhou, Wei

    A. Bag, W. Zhou, D. Taplin and E. S. Dwarakadasa, Fatigue Behaviour of AZ91D Magnesium Alloy and its Composite Reinforced with SiC, in Magnesium Technology 2000, eds. H. I. Kaplan, J. N. Hryn and B. B. Clow, Nashville, Tennessee, Mar. 2000, pp. 345-348. FATIGUE BEHAVIOUR OF AZ91D MAGNESIUM ALLOY

  15. An Investigation to Double Hit Deformation Behavior of AZ31 Magnesium Alloy

    SciTech Connect

    Shamsi, M.; Hanzaki, A. Zarei; Naei, H.

    2007-04-07

    In recent years magnesium alloys have been used in different industries due to their outstanding properties. The hot deformation processes are recognized to be the most applicable forming routes for these alloys. These are usually performed through multi-stage straining. Accordingly the static restoration processes may play important roles on their final microstructure and mechanical properties. In the present work double hit compression tests were applied on AZ31 magnesium alloy. The results were analyzed relying on the fractional softening relationship. The effects of strain rate and inter-pass time were discussed. Microstructural observations were addressed to describe the effects of static recrystallization on the double hit deformation behavior of AZ31 alloy.

  16. Study on the blood compatibility and biodegradation properties of magnesium alloys.

    PubMed

    Mochizuki, Akira; Kaneda, Hideki

    2015-02-01

    Lately, several magnesium alloys have been investigated as a new class of biomaterials owing to their excellent biodegradability in living tissues. In this study, we considered AZ series of Mg alloy containing aluminum (3% to 9%) and zinc (1%) as a model magnesium alloy, and investigated their biodegradation in whole blood and blood compatibility in vitro. The results of the elution property of metal ions determined using chromogenic assay and the associated pH change show that the degradation resistance of the AZ series alloys in blood is improved by alloying aluminum. Furthermore, the blood compatibility of the alloys was investigated in terms of their hemolysis, factor Xa-like activity, using spectrophotometry and chromogenic assay, respectively, and coagulation time measurements (prothrombin time and activated partial thromboplastin time). The results indicated that the blood compatibility of the AZ series alloys is excellent, irrespective of the alloy composition. The excellent blood compatibility with the coagulation system could be attributed to the eluted Mg(2+) ion, which suppresses the activation of certain coagulation factors in the intrinsic and/or extrinsic coagulation pathways. In terms of the degradation resistance of the AZ series alloys in blood, the results of pH change in blood and the amount of the eluted metal ions indicate that the performance is markedly improved with an increase in aluminum content. PMID:25492190

  17. Direct writing of polymeric coatings on magnesium alloy for tracheal stent applications.

    PubMed

    Perkins, Jessica; Xu, Zhigang; Smith, Christopher; Roy, Abhijit; Kumta, Prashant N; Waterman, Jenora; Conklin, Dawn; Desai, Salil

    2015-05-01

    This paper investigates the direct-write inkjet method for depositing multi-layer coatings of biodegradable polymers on magnesium alloy surface. Immersion studies were conducted on Poly(lactic-co-glycolic) acid (PLGA), polycaprolactone (PCL), and poly-ester urethane urea (PEUU) coatings to determine the corrosion behavior of different samples based on their varying degradation properties. Using the inductively coupled plasma spectroscopy, a reduction in magnesium ion concentration was observed from the polymer-coated samples indicative of the lower corrosion rates as compared to the uncoated Mg substrate. Findings also showed correlation between the release of the magnesium ions and the health of fully differentiated normal human bronchial epithelial (NHBE) cells via evaluation of key biomarkers of inflammation and toxicity, cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), respectively. The induction of COX-2 gene expression was proportional to the increase in magnesium exposure. In addition, the release of higher magnesium content from uncoated and PCL polymer coated samples resulted in lower LDH activity based on the favorable response of the NHBE cells. PEUU and PLGA polymer coatings provided good barrier layer corrosion protection. This research evaluates candidate polymer coatings as a source for therapeutic agents and barrier layer to control the corrosion of magnesium alloys for tracheal applications. PMID:25348845

  18. K? X-rays from magnesium, some of its compounds and alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Misra, U. D.; Watson, L. M.

    1987-10-01

    Magnesium K?3,4 satellite spectra along with the K?1,2 diagram line and the K?' satellite line from magnesium, its oxide, halides, sulphate, acetate and binary alloys with silver, cadmium, indium, tin and antimony have been recorded in direct excitation using a Johann-type crystal spectrometer with a MoS2 crystal (2d = 12.30 Å). It is found that the chemical environment surrounding the emitting atoms affects the satellite intensity ratio (IK?4/IK?3) strongly. No obvious trend between the electronegativity differences of the compounds and the intensity ratios of the K?4/K?3 satellites is evident. No linear relationship between the satellite intensity ratios (IK?4/IK?3) and the magnesium content in the alloy is observed as reported by Baun and Fischer for the aluminium system. The origin of the K?3 and K?4 satellites is discussed.

  19. Laser beam welding of AZ31B-H24 magnesium alloy.

    SciTech Connect

    Leong, K. H.

    1998-09-29

    The laser beam weldability of AZ31B magnesium alloy was examined with high power CW CO{sub 2} and pulsed Nd:YAG lasers. The low viscosity and surface tension of the melt pool make magnesium more difficult to weld than steel. Welding parameters necessary to obtain good welds were determined for both CW CO{sub 2} and pulsed Nd:YAG lasers. The weldability of the magnesium alloy was significantly better with the Nd:YAG laser. The cause of this improvement was attributed to the higher absorption of the Nd:YAG beam. A lower threshold beam irradiance was required for welding, and a more stable weldpool was obtained.

  20. Structure-property relations and modeling of small crack fatigue behavior of various magnesium alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernard, Jairus Daniel

    Lightweight structural components are important to the automotive and aerospace industries so that better fuel economy can be realized. Magnesium alloys in particular are being examined to fulfill this need due to their attractive stiffness- and strength-to-weight ratios when compared to other materials. However, when introducing a material into new roles, one needs to properly characterize its mechanical properties. Fatigue behavior is especially important considering aerospace and automotive component applications. Therefore, quantifying the structure-property relationships and accurately predicting the fatigue behavior for these materials are vital. This study has two purposes. The first is to quantify the structure-property relationships for the fatigue behavior in an AM30 magnesium alloy. The second is to use the microstructural-based MultiStage Fatigue (MSF) model in order to accurately predict the fatigue behavior of three magnesium alloys: AM30, Elektron 21, and AZ61. While some studies have previously quantified the MSF material constants for several magnesium alloys, detailed research into the fatigue regimes, notably the microstructurally small crack (MSC) region, is lacking. Hence, the contribution of this work is the first of its kind to experimentally quantify the fatigue crack incubation and MSC regimes that are used for the MultiStage Fatigue model. Using a multi-faceted experimental approach, these regimes were explored with a replica method that used a dual-stage silicone based compound along with previously published in situ fatigue tests. These observations were used in calibrating the MultiStage Fatigue model.

  1. Applications of Computer Simulation Methods in Plastic Forming Technologies for Magnesium Alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, S. H.; Zheng, W. T.; Shang, Y. L.; Wu, X.; Palumbo, G.; Tricarico, L.

    2007-05-17

    Applications of computer simulation methods in plastic forming of magnesium alloy parts are discussed. As magnesium alloys possess very poor plastic formability at room temperature, various methods have been tried to improve the formability, for example, suitable rolling process and annealing procedures should be found to produce qualified magnesium alloy sheets, which have the reduced anisotropy and improved formability. The blank can be heated to a warm temperature or a hot temperature; a suitable temperature field is designed, tools should be heated or the punch should be cooled; suitable deformation speed should be found to ensure suitable strain rate range. Damage theory considering non-isothermal forming is established. Various modeling methods have been tried to consider above situations. The following situations for modeling the forming process of magnesium alloy sheets and tubes are dealt with: (1) modeling for predicting wrinkling and anisotropy of sheet warm forming; (2) damage theory used for predicting ruptures in sheet warm forming; (3) modeling for optimizing of blank shape and dimensions for sheet warm forming; (4) modeling in non-steady-state creep in hot metal gas forming of AZ31 tubes.

  2. Modeling of microstructure evolution of magnesium alloy during the high pressure die casting process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Mengwu; Xiong, Shoumei

    2012-07-01

    Two important microstructure characteristics of high pressure die cast magnesium alloy are the externally solidified crystals (ESCs) and the fully divorced eutectic which form at the filling stage of the shot sleeve and at the last stage of solidification in the die cavity, respectively. Both of them have a significant influence on the mechanical properties and performance of magnesium alloy die castings. In the present paper, a numerical model based on the cellular automaton (CA) method was developed to simulate the microstructure evolution of magnesium alloy during cold-chamber high pressure die casting (HPDC) process. Modeling of dendritic growth of magnesium alloy with six-fold symmetry was achieved by defining a special neighbourhood configuration and calculating of the growth kinetics from complete solution of the transport equations. Special attention was paid to establish a nucleation model considering both of the nucleation of externally solidified crystals in the shot sleeve and the massive nucleation in the die cavity. Meanwhile, simulation of the formation of fully divorced eutectic was also taken into account in the present CA model. Validation was performed and the capability of the present model was addressed by comparing the simulated results with those obtained by experiments.

  3. Mechanical and corrosion properties of Al/Ti film on magnesium alloy AZ31B

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeng, Rong-Chang; Jiang, Ke; Li, Shuo-Qi; Zhang, Fen; Cui, Hong-Zhi; Han, En-Hou

    2015-03-01

    Preparation of titanium film on magnesium substrate faces a challenge due to non-Fickian inter-diffusion between titanium and magnesium. Aluminum can build a bridge between titanium and magnesium. Al/Ti duplex coatings were deposited on magnesium alloy AZ31B using magnetron sputtering (MS). The low temperature diffusion bonding behavior of the Mg/Al/Ti coating was investigated through SEM and its affiliated EDS. The phase structure and critical load of the coatings were examined by means of XRD and scratch tests, respectively. The results demonstrated that the bonding strength was significantly improved after a post heat treatment (HT) at a temperature of 210°C. The diffusion mechanism of the interfaces of Mg/Al and Al/Ti in the coating was discussed based on the analysis of formation energy of vacancies and diffusion rates. The Al/Ti dual layer enhanced the corrosion resistance of the alloy. And the HT process further increased the corrosion resistance of the coated alloy. This result implies that a post HTat a lower temperature after MS is an effective approach to enhance the bonding strength and corrosion resistance of the Al/Ti film on Mg alloys.

  4. Anisotropy and Asymmetry of Yield in Magnesium Alloys at Room Temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robson, Joseph

    2014-10-01

    Mechanical anisotropy and asymmetry are often pronounced in wrought magnesium alloys and are detrimental to formability and service performance. Single crystals of magnesium are highly anisotropic due to the large difference in critical resolved shear stress between the softest and hardest deformation modes. Polycrystalline magnesium alloys exhibit lower anisotropy, influenced by texture, solute level, and precipitates. In this work, a fundamental study of the effects of alloying, precipitate formation, and texture on the change in anisotropy and asymmetry from the pure magnesium single crystal case to polycrystalline alloys has been performed. It is demonstrated that much of the reduction in anisotropy and asymmetry arises from overall strengthening as solute, precipitates, and grain boundary effects are accounted for. Precipitates are predicted to be more effective than solute in reducing anisotropy and asymmetry, but shape and habit are critical since precipitates produce highly anisotropic strengthening. A small deviation from an ideal basal texture (15 deg spread) has a very strong effect in reducing anisotropy and asymmetry, similar in magnitude to the maximum effect produced by precipitation. Elasto-plastic modeling suggests that this is due to a contribution from basal slip to initial plastic deformation, even when global yield is not controlled by this mode.

  5. Hot cracking in tungsten inert gas welding of magnesium alloy AZ91D

    E-print Network

    Zhou, Wei

    Hot cracking in tungsten inert gas welding of magnesium alloy AZ91D W. Zhou*, T. Z. Long and C. K of the plates were produced using tungsten inert gas (TIG) welding method. The TIG arc was also used to deposit welding beads on some of the thin plates. No cracking was found in the butt joints. However, hot cracking

  6. Forge Welding of Magnesium Alloy to Aluminum Alloy Using a Cu, Ni, or Ti Interlayer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamagishi, Hideki; Sumioka, Junji; Kakiuchi, Shigeki; Tomida, Shogo; Takeda, Kouichi; Shimazaki, Kouichi

    2015-08-01

    The forge-welding process was examined to develop a high-strength bonding application of magnesium (Mg) alloy to aluminum (Al) alloy under high-productivity conditions. The effect of the insert material on the tensile strength of the joints, under various preheat temperatures and pressures, was investigated by analyzing the reaction layers of the bonded interface. The tensile strengths resulting from direct bonding, using pure copper (Cu), pure nickel (Ni), and pure titanium (Ti) inserts were 56, 100, 119, and 151 MPa, respectively. The maximum joint strength reached 93 pct with respect to the Mg cast billet. During high-pressure bonding, a microscopic plastic flow occurred that contributed to an anchor effect and the generation of a newly formed surface at the interface, particularly prominent with the Ti insert in the form of an oxide layer. The bonded interfaces of the maximum-strength inserts were investigated using scanning electron microscopy-energy-dispersive spectroscopy and electron probe microanalysis. The diffusion reaction layer at the bonded interface consisted of brittle Al-Mg intermetallics having a thickness of approximately 30 ?m. In contrast, for the three inserts, the thicknesses of the diffusion reaction layer were infinitely thin. For the pure Ti insert, exhibiting the maximum tensile strength value among the inserts tested, focused ion beam-transmission electron microscopy-EDS analysis revealed a 60-nm-thick Al-Ti reaction layer, which had formed at the bonded interface on the Mg alloy side. Thus, a high-strength Al-Mg bonding method in air was demonstrated, suitable for mass production.

  7. Biomimetic hydrophobic surface fabricated by chemical etching method from hierarchically structured magnesium alloy substrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yan; Yin, Xiaoming; Zhang, Jijia; Wang, Yaming; Han, Zhiwu; Ren, Luquan

    2013-09-01

    As one of the lightest metal materials, magnesium alloy plays an important role in industry such as automobile, airplane and electronic product. However, magnesium alloy is hindered due to its high chemical activity and easily corroded. Here, inspired by typical plant surfaces such as lotus leaves and petals of red rose with super-hydrophobic character, the new hydrophobic surface is fabricated on magnesium alloy to improve anti-corrosion by two-step methodology. The procedure is that the samples are processed by laser first and then immersed and etched in the aqueous AgNO3 solution concentrations of 0.1 mol/L, 0.3 mol/L and 0.5 mol/L for different times of 15 s, 40 s and 60 s, respectively, finally modified by DTS (CH3(CH2)11Si(OCH3)3). The microstructure, chemical composition, wettability and anti-corrosion are characterized by means of SEM, XPS, water contact angle measurement and electrochemical method. The hydrophobic surfaces with microscale crater-like and nanoscale flower-like binary structure are obtained. The low-energy material is contained in surface after DTS treatment. The contact angles could reach up to 138.4 ± 2°, which hydrophobic property is both related to the micro-nano binary structure and chemical composition. The results of electrochemical measurements show that anti-corrosion property of magnesium alloy is improved. Furthermore, our research is expected to create some ideas from natural enlightenment to improve anti-corrosion property of magnesium alloy while this method can be easily extended to other metal materials.

  8. Magnesium

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Guidelines for Americans and the U.S. Department of Agriculture's food guidance system, ChooseMyPlate . Where can I find ... on food sources of magnesium: U.S. Department of Agriculture's (USDA) National Nutrient Database Nutrient List for magnesium ( ...

  9. Microstructural development of diffusion-brazed austenitic stainless steel to magnesium alloy using a nickel interlayer

    SciTech Connect

    Elthalabawy, Waled M.; Khan, Tahir I.

    2010-07-15

    The differences in physical and metallurgical properties of stainless steels and magnesium alloys make them difficult to join using conventional fusion welding processes. Therefore, the diffusion brazing of 316L steel to magnesium alloy (AZ31) was performed using a double stage bonding process. To join these dissimilar alloys, the solid-state diffusion bonding of 316L steel to a Ni interlayer was carried out at 900 deg. C followed by diffusion brazing to AZ31 at 510 deg. C. Metallographic and compositional analyses show that a metallurgical bond was achieved with a shear strength of 54 MPa. However, during the diffusion brazing stage B{sub 2} intermetallic compounds form within the joint and these intermetallics are pushed ahead of the solid/liquid interface during isothermal solidification of the joint. These intermetallics had a detrimental effect on joint strengths when the joint was held at the diffusion brazing temperature for longer than 20 min.

  10. The effect of PVD coatings on the wear behaviour of magnesium alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Altun, Hikmet Sen, Sadri

    2007-10-15

    In this study, AlN/TiN was coated on magnesium alloys using physical vapour deposition (PVD) technique of DC magnetron sputtering, and the influence of the coating on the wear behaviour of the alloys was examined. A physical vapour deposition system for coating processes, a reciprocating wear system for wear tests, a universal hardness equipment for hardness measurement, a X-ray diffractometer (XRD) for compositional analysis of the coating, and a scanning electron microscopy (SEM) for surface examinations were used. It was determined that the wear resistance of the magnesium alloys can be increased by PVD coatings. However, small structural defects which could arise from the coating process or substrate were observed in the coating layers.

  11. Microstructure and Corrosion Characterization of Squeeze Cast AM50 Magnesium Alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sachdeva, Deepika; Tiwari, Shashank; Sundarraj, Suresh; Luo, Alan A.

    2010-12-01

    Squeeze casting of magnesium alloys potentially can be used in lightweight chassis components such as control arms and knuckles. This study documents the microstructural analysis and corrosion behavior of AM50 alloys squeeze cast at different pressures between 40 and 120 MPa and compares them with high-pressure die cast (HPDC) AM50 alloy castings and an AM50 squeeze cast prototype control arm. Although the corrosion rates of the squeeze cast samples are slightly higher than those observed for the HPDC AM50 alloy, the former does produce virtually porosity-free castings that are required for structural applications like control arms and wheels. This outcome is extremely encouraging as it provides an opportunity for additional alloy and process development by squeeze casting that has remained relatively unexplored for magnesium alloys compared with aluminum. Among the microstructural parameters analyzed, it seems that the ?-phase interfacial area, indicating a greater degree of ? network, leads to a lower corrosion rate. Weight loss was the better method for determining corrosion behavior in these alloys that contain a large fraction of second phase, which can cause perturbations to an overall uniform surface corrosion behavior.

  12. A fundamental study on the structural integrity of magnesium alloys joined by friction stir welding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rao, Harish Mangebettu

    The goal of this research is to study the factors that influence the physical and mechanical properties of lap-shear joints produced using friction stir welding. This study focuses on understanding the effect of tool geometry and weld process parameters including the tool rotation rate, tool plunge depth and dwell time on the mechanical performance of similar magnesium alloy and dissimilar magnesium to aluminum alloy weld joints. A variety of experimental activities were conducted including tensile and fatigue testing, fracture surface and failure analysis, microstructure characterization, hardness measurements and chemical composition analysis. An investigation on the effect of weld process conditions in friction stir spot welding of magnesium to magnesium produced in a manner that had a large effective sheet thickness and smaller interfacial hook height exhibited superior weld strength. Furthermore, in fatigue testing of friction stir spot welded of magnesium to magnesium alloy, lap-shear welds produced using a triangular tool pin profile exhibited better fatigue life properties compared to lap-shear welds produced using a cylindrical tool pin profile. In friction stir spot welding of dissimilar magnesium to aluminum, formation of intermetallic compounds in the stir zone of the weld had a dominant effect on the weld strength. Lap-shear dissimilar welds with good material mixture and discontinues intermetallic compounds in the stir zone exhibited superior weld strength compared to lap-shear dissimilar welds with continuous formation of intermetallic compounds in the stir zone. The weld structural geometry like the interfacial hook, hook orientation and bond width also played a major role in influencing the weld strength of the dissimilar lap-shear friction stir spot welds. A wide scatter in fatigue test results was observed in friction stir linear welds of aluminum to magnesium alloys. Different modes of failure were observed under fatigue loading including crack propagation into the top sheet, into the bottom sheet, and interfacial separation. Investigation of the tested welds revealed that the voids in the weld nugget reduced the weld strength, resulting in lower fatigue life. A thin layer of IMCs formed along the faying surface which accelerated the fatigue failure.

  13. Magnesium

    MedlinePLUS

    ... nuts (especially almonds). Other sources include dairy products, meats, chocolate, and coffee. Water with a high mineral ... loss in older women with osteoporosis. Also, taking estrogen along with magnesium plus calcium and a multivitamin ...

  14. A Feasiblity Study on Spot Friction Welding of Magnesium Alloy AZ31

    SciTech Connect

    Santella, Michael L; Pan, Dr. Tsung-Yu; Frederick, David Alan; Schwartz, William

    2007-01-01

    Spot friction welding (SFW) is a novel variant of the linear friction stir welding process with the potential to create strong joints between similar, as well as dissimilar sheet metals. It is particularly suitable for soft, low melting point metals such as aluminum, magnesium, and their alloys where resistance spot welding can cause defects such as voids, trapped gas and micro-cracks due to the intense heat requirement for joint formation. Up to now, spot friction welding has focused primarily on aluminum alloys. This paper presents a feasibility study on spot friction welding of AZ31, a wrought magnesium alloy available in sheet form. Lap joints of 1.58-mm-thick magnesium alloy AZ31B-O sheet were produced by spot friction welding. The spot welds were made in 2 sec with 15-mm-diameter pin tool rotating at 500-2,000 rpm. The tool was inserted into 2-sheet stack-ups to depths of either 2.4 or 2.8 mm relative to the top sheet surface. Tensile-shear testing showed that joint strengths up to 4.75 kN were obtained. The removal of surface oxides from the sheets prior to welding increased lap shear strengths about 50% at the 2.4-mm insertion depth and it promoted failure by nugget pull-out rather than by interface separation.

  15. Magnesium alloys as body implants: fracture mechanism under dynamic and static loadings in a physiological environment.

    PubMed

    Choudhary, Lokesh; Raman, R K Singh

    2012-02-01

    It is essential that a metallic implant material possesses adequate resistance to cracking/fracture under the synergistic action of a corrosive physiological environment and mechanical loading (i.e. stress corrosion cracking (SCC)), before the implant can be put to actual use. This paper presents a critique of the fundamental issues with an assessment of SCC of a rapidly corroding material such as magnesium alloys, and describes an investigation into the mechanism of SCC of a magnesium alloy in a physiological environment. The SCC susceptibility of the alloy in a simulated human body fluid was established by slow strain rate tensile (SSRT) testing using smooth specimens under different electrochemical conditions for understanding the mechanism of SCC. However, to assess the life of the implant devices that often possess fine micro-cracks, SCC susceptibility of notched specimens was investigated by circumferential notch tensile (CNT) testing. CNT tests also produced important design data, i.e. threshold stress intensity for SCC (KISCC) and SCC crack growth rate. Fractographic features of SCC were examined using scanning electron microscopy. The SSRT and CNT results, together with fractographic evidence, confirmed the SCC susceptibility of both smooth and notched specimens of a magnesium alloy in the physiological environment. PMID:22075121

  16. Laser surface modification of Ti and TiC coatings on magnesium alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, J. M.; Lee, S. G.; Park, J. S.; Kim, H. G.

    2014-12-01

    In order to enhance the surface properties of magnesium alloy, a highly intense laser surface melting process following plasma spraying of Ti or TiC on AZ31 alloy were employed. When laser surface melting was applied to Ti coated magnesium alloy, the formation of fine Ti particle dispersed surface layer on the substrate occurred. The corrosion potential of the AZ31 alloy with Ti dispersed surface was significantly increased in 3.5 wt % NaCl solution. Additionally, an improved hardness was observed for the laser treated specimens as compared to the untreated AZ31 alloy. Laser melting process following plasma thermal deposition was also applied for obtaining in situ TiC coating layer on AZ31 alloy. The TiC coating layer could be successfully formed via in situ reaction between pure titanium and carbon powders. Incomplete TiC formation was observed in the plasma sprayed specimen, while completely transformed TiC layer was found after post laser melting process. It was also confirmed that the laser post treatment induced enhanced adhesion strength between the coating and the substrate.

  17. Texture Control by Selective Deformation Mechanism Activation in Magnesium Alloy 

    E-print Network

    Foley, David Christopher

    2014-07-01

    by) the development of visco-plastic self-consistent crystal plasticity modeling predictions thanks to the efforts of my colleagues. This work will further the development of advanced manufacturing and design using wrought Mg alloys....

  18. Research on super-hydrophobic surface of biodegradable magnesium alloys used for vascular stents.

    PubMed

    Wan, Peng; Wu, Jingyao; Tan, LiLi; Zhang, Bingchun; Yang, Ke

    2013-07-01

    Micro-nanometer scale structure of nubby clusters overlay was constructed on the surface of an AZ31 magnesium alloy by a wet chemical method. The super-hydrophobicity was achieved with a water contact angle of 142° and a sliding angle of about 5°. The microstructure and composition of the super-hydrophobic surface were characterized by SEM and FTIR. Potentiodynamic polarization and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy were used to evaluate the corrosion behavior, and the hemocompatibility of the super-hydrophobic surface was investigated by means of hemolytic and platelet adhesion tests. Results showed that the super-hydrophobic treatment could improve the corrosion resistance of magnesium alloys in PBS and inhibit blood platelet adhesion on the surface, which implied excellent hemocompatibility with controlled degradation. PMID:23623110

  19. Fatigue behaviour of friction stir processed AZ91 magnesium alloy produced by high pressure die casting

    SciTech Connect

    Cavaliere, P. . E-mail: pasquale.cavaliere@unile.it; De Marco, P.P.

    2007-03-15

    The room temperature fatigue properties of AZ91 magnesium alloy produced by high pressure die casting (HPDC) as cast, heat treated, friction stir processed (FSP) and FSP and heat treated were studied. The fatigue properties of the material were evaluated for the HPDC magnesium alloy in the as-received state and after a solution treatment at 415 deg. C for 2 h and an ageing treatment at 220 deg. C for 4 h. The heat treatment resulted in a significant increase in the fatigue properties of the HPDC material, while no significance influence of heat treatment was recorded in the FSP condition. The morphology of fracture surfaces was examined by employing a field emission gun scanning electron microscope (FEGSEM)

  20. Electrodeposition of high corrosion resistance Cu/Ni-P coating on AZ91D magnesium alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Shan; Cao, Fahe; Chang, Linrong; Zheng, JunJun; Zhang, Zhao; Zhang, Jianqing; Cao, Chunan

    2011-08-01

    High corrosion resistance Cu/Ni-P coatings were electrodeposited on AZ91D magnesium alloy via suitable pretreatments, such as one-step acid pickling-activation, once zinc immersion and environment-friendly electroplated copper as the protective under-layer, which made Ni-P deposit on AZ91D Mg alloy in acid plating baths successfully. The pH value and current density for Ni-P electrodeposition were optimized to obtain high corrosion resistance. With increasing the phosphorous content of the Ni-P coatings, the deposits were found to gradually transform to amorphous structure and the corrosion resistance increased synchronously. The anticorrosion ability of AZ91D Mg alloy was greatly improved by the amorphous Ni-P deposits, which was investigated by potentiodynamic polarization curve and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS). The corrosion current density ( Icorr) of the coated Mg alloy substrate is about two orders of magnitude less than that of the uncoated.

  1. Thin hydroxyapatite coating on AZ91D magnesium alloy fabricated via RF-magnetron sputtering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mukhametkaliyev, T. M.; Surmeneva, M. A.; Mueller, M.; Prymak, O.; Epple, M.; Surmenev, R. A.

    2015-11-01

    In this study the morphology, composition, structure and wettability of radiofrequency (RF) magnetron sputter-deposited hydroxyapatite (HA) coating deposited on the surface of AZ91D magnesium alloy were investigated. The results revealed that the fabricated coating is uniform, homogeneous with the structure of the stoichiometric HA. The deposition of the HA coating did not change significantly the surface wettability of the bare alloy, however water contact angle dynamics in the case of the HA coated substrates revealed a lower rate of a droplet spreading over the surface.

  2. On the use of magnesium alloys for aerospace and defense mirrors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woodard, Kenneth S.; Comstock, Lovell E.; Wamboldt, Leonard; Crifasi, Joseph C.

    2014-06-01

    Extreme light-weighting is important in many aerospace and defense applications but the cost associated with beryllium or other exotic materials can be prohibitive. The current standard for producing cost effective, high performance mirrors is to diamond machine mirror blanks from aluminum alloy stock. About 80% material removal is the limit for geometrical lightweighting while still retaining the structural integrity required for optical fabrication. To reduce weight further requires alternative materials. This paper summarizes the status of diamond machined finishing and coating of magnesium alloys to produce cost effective, lightweight mirrors with high, broadband reflectivity and low scatter finish.

  3. Modelling and Design of Magnesium and High Entropy Alloys Through Combining Statistical and Physical Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toda-Caraballo, Isaac; Rivera-Díaz-del-Castillo, Pedro E. J.

    2015-01-01

    Physical and statistical models are combined to describe and design magnesium and high entropy alloys. A principal component analysis is applied to merge material datasets, and it is shown that limits in properties can be envisaged. Extrapolation techniques can be employed to devise properties of non-existing alloys, such as specific heat capacity, melting point and Young's modulus. These in turn can be input to physical models to predict, for example, yield strength and modulus of toughness. The tools described herein can readily be used for materials discovery, and are being implemented in the Accelerated Metallurgy project.

  4. Yield Asymmetry Design of Magnesium Alloys by Integrated Computational Materials Engineering

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Dongsheng; Joshi, Vineet V.; Lavender, Curt A.; Khaleel, Mohammad A.; Ahzi, Said

    2013-11-01

    Deformation asymmetry of magnesium alloys is an important factor on machine design in automobile industry. Represented by the ratio of compressive yield stress (CYS) against tensile yield stress (TYS), deformation asymmetry is strongly related to microstructure, characterized by texture and grain size. Modified intermediate phi-model, a polycrystalline viscoplasticity model, is used to predict the deformation behavior of magnesium alloys with different grain sizes. Validated with experimental results, integrated computational materials engineering is applied to find out the route in achieving desired asymmetry by thermomechanical processing. In some texture, for example, rolled texture, CYS/TYS is smaller than 1 under different loading directions. In some texture, for example, extruded texture, asymmetry is large along normal direction. Starting from rolled texture, the asymmetry will increased to close to 1 along rolling direction after compressed to a strain of 0.2. Our model shows that grain refinement increases CYS/TYS. Besides texture control, grain refinement can also optimize the yield asymmetry. After the grain size decreased to a critical value, CYS/TYS reaches to 1 since CYS increases much faster than TYS. By tailoring the microstructure using texture control and grain refinement, it is achievable to optimize yield asymmetry in wrought magnesium alloys.

  5. Strain-Controlled Low-Cycle Fatigue Properties of a Newly Developed Extruded Magnesium Alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Begum, S.; Chen, D. L.; Xu, S.; Luo, Alan A.

    2008-12-01

    To reduce fuel consumption and greenhouse gas emissions, magnesium alloys are being considered for automotive and aerospace applications due to their low density, high specific strength and stiffness, and other attractive traits. Structural applications of magnesium components require low-cycle fatigue (LCF) behavior, since cyclic loading or thermal stresses are often encountered. The aim of this article was to study the cyclic deformation characteristics and evaluate LCF behavior of a recently developed AM30 extruded magnesium alloy. This alloy exhibited a strong cyclic hardening characteristic, with a cyclic strain-hardening exponent of 0.33 compared to the monotonic strain-hardening exponent of 0.15. With increasing total strain amplitude, both plastic strain amplitude and mean stress increased and fatigue life decreased. A significant difference between the tensile and compressive yield stresses occurred, leading to asymmetric hysteresis loops at high strain amplitudes due to twinning in compression and subsequent detwinning in tension. A noticeable change in the modulus was observed due to the pseudoelastic behavior of this alloy. The Coffin-Manson law and Basquin equation could be used to describe the fatigue life. At low strain ratios the alloy showed strong cyclic hardening, which became less significant as the strain ratio increased. The lower the strain ratio, the lower the stress amplitude and mean stress but the higher the plastic strain amplitude, corresponding to a longer fatigue life. Fatigue life also increased with increasing strain rate. Fatigue crack initiation occurred from the specimen surface and crack propagation was mainly characterized by striation-like features. Multiple initiation sites at the specimen surface were observed at higher strain amplitudes.

  6. Friction Stir Lap Welding of Magnesium Alloy to Steel: A Preliminary Investigation

    SciTech Connect

    Jana, Saumyadeep; Hovanski, Yuri; Grant, Glenn J.

    2010-12-01

    An initial study was made to evaluate the feasibility of joining Magnesium alloy AZ31 sheet to galvanized steel sheet in lap configuration using friction stir welding (FSW). Two different automotive sheet steels were used for comparative evaluation of the dissimilar joining potential; a 0.8mm thick, electro galvanized (EG) mild steel, and a 1.5mm thick hot dipped galvanized (HDG) high-strength, low-alloy steel (HSLA). These steels were joined to 2.33mm thick AZ31B magnesium sheet. A single FSW tool design was used for both dissimilar welds, and process parameters were kept the same. Average peak load for the AZ31-1.5 mm steel weld joint in lap shear mode was found to be 6.3 ± 1.0 kN. For the AZ31-0.8 mm steel weld, joint strength was 5.1 ± 1.5 kN. Microstructural investigation indicates melting of the Zn coating at the interface and subsequent alloying with the Mg sheet resulting in formation of solidified Zn-Mg alloy layer at AZ31/steel interface.

  7. An Environmentally Friendly Process Involving Refining and Membrane-Based Electrolysis for Magnesium Recovery from Partially Oxidized Scrap Alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guan, Xiaofei; Pal, Uday B.; Powell, Adam C.

    2013-10-01

    Magnesium is recovered from partially oxidized scrap alloy by combining refining and solid oxide membrane (SOM) electrolysis. In this combined process, a molten salt eutectic flux (45 wt.% MgF2-55 wt.% CaF2) containing 10 wt.% MgO and 2 wt.% YF3 was used as the medium for magnesium recovery. During refining, magnesium and its oxide are dissolved from the scrap into the molten flux. Forming gas is bubbled through the flux and the dissolved magnesium is removed via the gas phase and condensed in a separate condenser at a lower temperature. The molten flux has a finite solubility for magnesium and acts as a selective medium for magnesium dissolution, but not aluminum or iron, and therefore the magnesium recovered has high purity. After refining, SOM electrolysis is performed in the same reactor to enable electrolysis of the dissolved magnesium oxide in the molten flux producing magnesium at the cathode and oxygen at the SOM anode. During SOM electrolysis, it is necessary to decrease the concentration of the dissolved magnesium in the flux to improve the faradaic current efficiency and prevent degradation of the SOM. Thus, for both refining and SOM electrolysis, it is very important to measure and control the magnesium solubility in the molten flux. High magnesium solubility facilitates refining whereas lower solubility benefits the SOM electrolysis process. Computational fluid dynamics modeling was employed to simulate the flow behavior of the flux stirred by the forming gas. Based on the modeling results, an optimized design of the stirring tubes and its placement in the flux are determined for efficiently removing the dissolved magnesium and also increasing the efficiency of the SOM electrolysis process.

  8. Study of second phase in bioabsorbable magnesium alloys: Phase stability evaluation via Dmol{sup 3} calculation

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Huazhe; Liu, Chen; Wan, Peng; Tan, Lili; Yang, Ke

    2013-11-01

    Thermodynamical stabilities of four conventional second phases as well as magnesium matrix in bioabsorbable magnesium alloys were investigated theoretically via computer calculation method. Model of individual phase and systems including phase and four water molecular (phase-4H{sub 2}O) were established to simulate the in vitro and in vivo environment. Local orbital density functional theory approach was applied to calculate the total energy for the individual phase and phase-4H{sub 2}O system. The results demonstrated that all the second phases possessed higher phase stability compared with magnesium matrix, but the phase stability was quite different for different types of second phases or second phase-4H{sub 2}O systems. Furthermore, a schematic process of inflammation reaction caused by magnesium alloy implants was proposed for the further evaluation on biocompatibility of different second phases.

  9. Evaluation of magnesium-yttrium alloy as an extraluminal tracheal stent.

    PubMed

    Luffy, Sarah A; Chou, Da-Tren; Waterman, Jenora; Wearden, Peter D; Kumta, Prashant N; Gilbert, Thomas W

    2014-03-01

    Tracheomalacia is a relatively rare problem, but can be challenging to treat, particularly in pediatric patients. Due to the presence of mechanically deficient cartilage, the trachea is unable to resist collapse under physiologic pressures of respiration, which can lead to acute death if left untreated. However, if treated, the outcome for patients with congenital tracheomalacia is quite good because the cartilage tends to spontaneously mature over a period of 12 to 18 months. The present study investigated the potential for the use of degradable magnesium-3% yttrium alloy (W3) to serve as an extraluminal tracheal stent in a canine model. The host response to the scaffold included the formation of a thin, vascularized capsule consisting of collagenous tissue and primarily mononuclear cells. The adjacent cartilage structure was not adversely affected as observed by bronchoscopic, gross, histologic, and mechanical analysis. The W3 stents showed reproducible spatial and temporal fracture patterns, but otherwise tended to corrode quite slowly, with a mix of Ca and P rich corrosion product formed on the surface and observed focal regions of pitting. The study showed that the approach to use degradable magnesium alloys as an extraluminal tracheal stent is promising, although further development of the alloys is required to improve the resistance to stress corrosion cracking and improve the ductility. PMID:23554285

  10. Diffusion Bonding Behavior and Characterization of Joints Made Between 316L Stainless Steel Alloy and AZ31 Magnesium Alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elthalabawy, Waled Mohamed

    The 316L austenitic stainless steel and AZ31 magnesium alloy have physical and mechanical properties which makes these alloys suitable in a number of high technology based industries such as the aerospace and automotive sectors. However, for these alloys to be used in engineering applications, components must be fabricated and joined successfully. The differences in the physical and metallurgical properties between these two alloys prevents the use of conventional fusion welding processes commonly employed in aerospace and transport industry. Therefore, alternative techniques need to be developed and diffusion bonding technology is a process that has considerable potential to join these two dissimilar alloys. In this research work both solid-state and transient liquid phase (TLP) bonding processes were applied. The solid-state bonding of 316L steel to AZ31 magnesium alloy was possible at a bonding temperature of 550°C for 120 minutes using a pressure of 1.3 MPa. The interface characterization of the joint showed a thin intermetallic zone rich in Fe-Al was responsible for providing a metallurgical bond. However, low joint shear strengths were recorded and this was attributed to the poor surface to surface contact. The macro-deformation of the AZ31 alloy prevented the use of higher bonding pressures and longer bonding times. In order to overcome these problems, the TLP bonding process was implemented using pure Cu and Ni foils as interlayers which produced a eutectic phase at the bonding temperature. This research identified the bonding mechanism through microstructural and differential scanning calorimetry investigations. The microstructural characterization of the TLP joints identified intermetallics which became concentrated along the 316L steel/AZ31 bond interface due to the "pushing effect" of the solid/liquid interface during isothermal solidification stage of bonding. The size and concentration of the intermetallics had a noticeable effect on the final joint strength properties. TLP bonding using electrodeposited coatings of Cu and Ni were used as a way of controlling the volume of eutectic liquid formed at the joint. Theoretical and experimental work showed that the use of thin coatings was successful in reducing the size and amount of intermetallics formed at the joint and this had the effect on increasing joint shear strength values.

  11. Twinning-detwinning behavior during cyclic deformation of magnesium alloy

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Lee, Soo Yeol; Wang, Huamiao; Gharghouri, Michael A.

    2015-05-26

    In situ neutron diffraction has been used to examine the deformation mechanisms of a precipitation-hardened and extruded Mg-8.5wt.%Al alloy subjected to (i) compression followed by reverse tension (texture T1) and (ii) tension followed by reverse compression (texture T2). Two starting textures are used: (1) as-extruded texture, T1, in which the basal pole of most grains is normal to the extrusion axis and a small portion of grains are oriented with the basal pole parallel to the extrusion axis; (2) a reoriented texture, T2, in which the basal pole of most grains is parallel to the extrusion axis. For texture T1,more »the onset of extension twinning corresponds well with the macroscopic elastic-plastic transition during the initial compression stage. The non-linear macroscopic stress/strain behavior during unloading after compression is more significant than during unloading after tension. For texture T2, little detwinning occurs after the initial tension stage, but almost all of the twinned volumes are detwinned during loading in reverse compression.« less

  12. Twinning-detwinning behavior during cyclic deformation of magnesium alloy

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Soo Yeol; Wang, Huamiao; Gharghouri, Michael A.

    2015-05-26

    In situ neutron diffraction has been used to examine the deformation mechanisms of a precipitation-hardened and extruded Mg-8.5wt.%Al alloy subjected to (i) compression followed by reverse tension (texture T1) and (ii) tension followed by reverse compression (texture T2). Two starting textures are used: (1) as-extruded texture, T1, in which the basal pole of most grains is normal to the extrusion axis and a small portion of grains are oriented with the basal pole parallel to the extrusion axis; (2) a reoriented texture, T2, in which the basal pole of most grains is parallel to the extrusion axis. For texture T1, the onset of extension twinning corresponds well with the macroscopic elastic-plastic transition during the initial compression stage. The non-linear macroscopic stress/strain behavior during unloading after compression is more significant than during unloading after tension. For texture T2, little detwinning occurs after the initial tension stage, but almost all of the twinned volumes are detwinned during loading in reverse compression.

  13. Analysis of Nugget Formation During Resistance Spot Welding on Dissimilar Metal Sheets of Aluminum and Magnesium Alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Yi; Li, Jinglong

    2014-10-01

    The nugget formation of resistance spot welding (RSW) on dissimilar material sheets of aluminum and magnesium alloys was studied, and the element distribution, microstructure, and microhardness distribution near the joint interface were analyzed. It was found that the staggered high regions at the contact interface of aluminum and magnesium alloy sheets, where the dissimilar metal melted together, tended to be the preferred nucleation regions of nugget. The main technical problem of RSW on dissimilar metal sheets of aluminum and magnesium alloys was the brittle-hard Al12Mg17 intermetallic compounds distributed in the nugget, with hardness much higher than either side of the base materials. Microcracks tended to generate at the interface of the nugget and base materials, which affected weld quality and strength.

  14. Research on microstructures of sub-rapidly solidified AZ61 Magnesium Alloy

    SciTech Connect

    Teng Haitao; Zhang Xiaoli; Zhang Zhongtao; Li Tingju; Cockcroft, Steve

    2009-06-15

    AZ61 magnesium alloy foils of 0.5-3.0 mm thick were successfully produced by using sub-rapid solidification technique. Microstructures of conventionally solidified (CS) and sub-rapidly solidified (sub-RS) alloys were examined by optical microscope (OM) and scanning electron microscope (SEM). The results showed that the cellular grain of 1.8-13.5 {mu}m can be obtained during sub-rapid solidification process. Phase compositions and microdistribution of the alloying elements in the foils were analyzed by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and electron probe microanalyzer (EPMA), respectively. The eutectic transformation L {yields} {alpha}-Mg + {beta}-Mg{sub 17}Al{sub 12} and microsegregation in conventionally solidified AZ61 alloy were remarkably suppressed in sub-rapid solidification process. As a consequence, the alloying elements Al, Zn, Mn showed much higher solid solubility and the sub-rapid solidification microstructures dominantly consisted of supersaturated {alpha}-Mg solid solution. Meanwhile, the {beta}-Mg{sub 17}Al{sub 12} phases located in the {alpha}-Mg grain boundaries are largely decreased due to high solidification cooling rate.

  15. Surface characteristics and corrosion behaviour of WE43 magnesium alloy coated by SiC film

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, M.; Cheng, Y.; Zheng, Y. F.; Zhang, X.; Xi, T. F.; Wei, S. C.

    2012-01-01

    Amorphous SiC film has been successfully fabricated on the surface of WE43 magnesium alloy by plasma enhanced chemical vapour deposition (PECVD) technique. The microstructure and elemental composition were analyzed by transmission electron microscopy (TEM), glancing angle X-ray diffraction (GAXRD) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), respectively. The immersion test indicated that SiC film could efficiently slow down the degradation rate of WE43 alloy in simulated body fluid (SBF) at 37 ± 1 °C. The indirect toxicity experiment was conducted using L929 cell line and the results showed that the extraction medium of SiC coated WE43 alloys exhibited no inhibitory effect on L929 cell growth. The in vitro hemocompatibility of the samples was investigated by hemolysis test and blood platelets adhesion test, and it was found that the hemolysis rate of the coated WE43 alloy decreased greatly, and the platelets attached on the SiC film were slightly activated with a round shape. It could be concluded that SiC film prepared by PECVD made WE43 alloy more appropriate to biomedical application.

  16. Column and Plate Compressive Strengths of Aircraft Structural Martials Extruded 0-1HTA Magnesium Alloy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heimerl, George J; Niles, Donald E

    1947-01-01

    Column and plate compressive strengths of extruded 0-1HTA magnesium alloy were determined both within and beyond the elastic range from tests of flat end H-section columns and from local instability tests of H-, Z-, and channel section columns. These tests are part of an extensive research investigation to provide data on the structural strength of various aircraft materials. The results are presented in the form of curves and charts that are suitable for use in the design and analysis of aircraft structures.

  17. Interactions between laser and arc plasma during laser-arc hybrid welding of magnesium alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Liming; Chen, Minghua

    2011-09-01

    This paper presents the results of the investigation on the interactions between laser and arc plasma during laser-arc hybrid welding on magnesium alloy AZ31B using the spectral diagnose technique. By comparably analyzing the variation in plasma information (the shape, the electron temperature and density) of single tungsten inert gas (TIG) welding with the laser-arc hybrid welding, it is found that the laser affects the arc plasma through the keyhole forming on the workpiece. Depending on the welding parameters there are three kinds of interactions taking place between laser and arc plasma.

  18. Microstructural characterization of ultrasonic impact treated aluminum-magnesium alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tran, Kim Ngoc Thi

    Aluminum 5456-H116 has high as-welded strength, is formable, and highly corrosion resistant, however, it can become sensitized when exposed to elevated temperatures for a prolonged time. Sensitization results in the formation of a continuous ? phase at the grain boundaries that is anodic to the matrix. Thus the grain boundaries become susceptible to stress corrosion cracking (SCC) and intergranular corrosion cracking (IGC). Cracking issues on aluminum superstructures have prompted the use of a severe plastic deformation processes, such as ultrasonic impact treatment (UIT), to improve SCC resistance. This study correlated the effects of UIT on the properties of 5456-H116 alloy to the microstructural evolution of the alloy and helped develop a fundamental understanding of the mechanisms that cause the microstructural evolution. Ultrasonic impact treatment produces a deformed layer at the surface ˜ 10 to 18 µm thick that is characterized by micro-cracks, tears, and voids. Ultrasonic impact treatment results in grain refinement within the deformation layer and extending below the deformed layer. The microstructure exhibits weak crystallographic texture with larger fraction of high angle grain boundaries. Nanocrystalline grains within the deformation layer vary in size from 2 to 200 nm in diameter and exhibit curved or wavy grain boundaries. The nanocrystalline grains are thermally stable up to 300°C. Above 300°C, grain growth occurs with an activation energy of ˜ 32 kJ/mol. Below the deformation layer, the microstructure is characterized by submicron grains, complex structure of dislocations, sub-boundaries, and Moiré fringes depicting overlapping grains. The deformation layer does not exhibit the presence of a continuous ? phase, however below the deformation layer; a continuous ? phase along the grain boundaries is present. In general the highest hardness and yield strength is at the UIT surface which is attributed to the formation of nanocrystalline grains. Although the highest hardness and yield strength was observed at the UIT surface, the results were mixed with some lower values. The lower hardness and yield strength values at the UIT surface are attributed to the voids and micro cracking/micro voids observed in the deformation layer. The fracture mode was transgranular ductile fracture with micro void coalescence and dimples. Both UIT and untreated material exhibit similar levels of intergranular corrosion susceptibility. Corrosive attack was intergranular with slightly deeper attack in the untreated material. Numerical simulation modeling showed that the calculated residual stress under the tool, ˜80 MPa, is of the same order of magnitude as the compressive residual stresses measured by XRD measurements near the surface. Modeling also showed that high effective strains were induced almost immediately. The UIT process also resulted in rapid localized heating to a maximum temperature of ˜32°C during the first eleven pin tool cycles. The model also showed that during UIT processing, the material undulates as the pin tool impacts and retracts from the surface of the material. The undulations represent the elastic response of the surface to the compressive stresses built up during a pin tool cycle.

  19. Magnesium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bechtel, H.; Bulian, W.; Bungardt, K.; Gürs, K.; Gürs, U.; Helling, W.; Kyri, H.; Laue, H. J.; Mahler, W.; Matting, A.; Meyer, F. R.; Mialki, W.; Ritter, F.; Ruge, J.; Saur, G.; Simon, W.; Strnat, K.; Weber, R.; Weigand, H. H.; Weik, H.; Ziesler, H.; Borchers, Heinz; Schmidt, Ernst

    Magnesium wird überwiegend durch Schmelzflußelektrolyse hergestellt. Das dabei anfallende Reinmagnesium hat einen Mg-Gehalt von etwa 99,9%. Hauptbeimengung ist das Eisen; Silizium und Aluminium sind nur in Spuren vorhanden. Der Anwendungsumfang des Reinmagnesiums ist gering; dagegen werden Magnesiumlegierungen zunehmend, insbesondere für den Druckguß verwendet. Neben den bis etwa zum Jahre 1950 allein gebräuchlichen Mg-Mn-, Mg-Al- und Mg-Al-Zn-Legierungen werden heute mehr und mehr die besonders warmfesten Legierungen mit Zusätzen von Zirkon, Thorium und Seltenen Erden hergestellt (siehe dazu auch Abschnitt Seltene Erden). Als Umhüllungsmaterial für Uranstäbe dient die Legierung Magnox A 12, die nach [H 3] neben 1 % Al noch geringe Mengen an Ca und Ba enthält. In den in Deutschland üblichen Kurzzeichen (DIN 1729) werden die chemischen Symbole und der ungefähre Gehalt der wichtigsten Legierungselemente angegeben. Gußlegierungen werden zusätzlich durch ein G (Sandguß oder Kokillenguß) oder ein D (Druckguß) gekennzeichnet (siehe Tab. 5).

  20. Structure of magnesium alloy MA14 after multistep isothermal forging and subsequent isothermal rolling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nugmanov, D. R.; Sitdikov, O. Sh.; Markushev, M. V.

    2015-10-01

    Optical metallography and electron microscopy have been used to analyze the structural changes in magnesium MA14 alloy subjected to processing that combines multistep isothermal forging and isothermal rolling. It has been found that forging of a bulk workpiece leads to the formation of a structure, 85-90% of which consists of recrystallized grains with an average size of less than 5 µm. Subsequent rolling results in a completely recrystallized structure with a grain size of 1-2 µm. It is shown that the resultant structural states are characterized by grain size nonuniformity inherited from the initial hot-pressed semi-finished product. The nature and features of crystallization processes that take place in the alloy during processing are discussed.

  1. Wear Behavior Characterization for the Screening of Magnesium-based Alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McGhee, Paul R.

    This research is focused on the development of a systematic approach to evaluate the selection of materials for Mg-based alloys under wear conditions for biomedical applications. A pilot study was carried out in order to establish an accurate and reliable wear testing technique for magnesium and its alloys. This pilot study was conducted on aluminum (Al) and pure Mg, and showed that aluminum has a lower wear rate compared to Mg. The technique displayed good repeatability and high precision. For the main study, an ERC Mg-based alloy was to be compared with pure Mg. The same technique, when applied to pure Mg from a different vendor, produced up to 90% scatter in the data. Microstructure was studied to see if it had any correlation with the scatter. It was discovered that Mg ingot from the second vendor had outsized grains that contributed to the disproportional scatter in the wear data. Increasing the stroke length during wear testing was required so that the wear data would be averaged over multiple grains and reduces the variation in computed wear rates. In the main study, wear behavior and friction properties were analyzed using microtribometery, mechanical stylus profilometry, and microindentation. Surface morphology and microstructure were characterized using optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, and optical profilometry. For the main study, pure Mg and the ERC alloy as-cast and extruded conditions were compared. Pure Mg and MZCR alloys were extruded at 350°C and 400°C, respectively. Mg and MZCR alloy were cast at 350°C and heat treated at 510°C. The extruded specimens were divided into two sections, cross-section and longitudinal section. Wear tests were carried out under the applied normal load 0.5 N - 2.5 N in 0.5 N increments sliding at a rate of 0.2 Hz for 240 passes. The results show that the alloying and extrusion processes increase the hardness of the MZCR alloy significantly up to 80%. The as-cast MZCR has a lower resistance to wear compared to as-cast pure Mg. However, the extrusion process enhances the alloy wear resistance as the extrusion ratio increases. On the other hand, the extrusion process on Mg decreases its wear resistance and hardness properties. The wear resistance was greater in the cross-section for the pure Mg with extrusion ratio of 10 and for the MZCR alloy extruded at ratios of 10 and 50. The cross-section of the MZCR alloys had the lowest amount of wear compared to the longitudinal section.

  2. Corrosion Behavior of Mg-6Al-1Zn+XRE Magnesium Alloy with Minor Addition of Yttrium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manivannan, S.; Babu, S. P. Kumaresh; Sundarrajan, Srinivasan

    2015-04-01

    The effect of yttrium addition on the microstructure of Mg-6Al-1Zn alloy was investigated by optical microscopy, x-ray diffraction analysis, and scanning electron microscopy. The experimental alloys were prepared by melting high-purity Mg, Al, Zn, and Y, respectively. Melting was carried out in a Inconel 718 crucible under SF6 and ultra pure Ar (99.999%) gas mixture environment using electric arc furnace. The corrosion behavior of Mg-6Al-1Zn+ xYttrium ( x = 0.5, 1.0 and 1.5 wt.% Y) magnesium alloy with different levels of yttrium additions was studied in 3.5 wt.% NaCl solution. Microstructure of yttrium-added alloy shows that higher grainrefinement is obtained in Mg-6Al-1Zn+0.5wt.%Y. Increasing yttrium content reduces the size of ?-grain and alters the distribution of the ?-phase (Mg17Al12) from continuous network morphology to small and dispersive distribution. It forms secondary intermetallic phase Al2Y which has high melting point along the grain boundary. The corrosion resistance of Mg-6Al-1Zn magnesium alloy improved with addition of Yttrium. It was confirmed by the results of electrochemical polarization test. Based on the polarization curves, it is seen that fine precipitates of Al-Y intermetallic phase in Mg-6Al-1Zn alloy decrease the corrosion current density, thereby improving the corrosion resistance of the Mg-6Al-1Zn magnesium alloy.

  3. The Origin of Fracture in the I-ECAP of AZ31B Magnesium Alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gzyl, Michal; Rosochowski, Andrzej; Boczkal, Sonia; Qarni, Muhammad Jawad

    2015-11-01

    Magnesium alloys are very promising materials for weight-saving structural applications due to their low density, comparing to other metals and alloys currently used. However, they usually suffer from a limited formability at room temperature and low strength. In order to overcome those issues, processes of severe plastic deformation (SPD) can be utilized to improve mechanical properties, but processing parameters need to be selected with care to avoid fracture, very often observed for those alloys during forming. In the current work, the AZ31B magnesium alloy was subjected to SPD by incremental equal-channel angular pressing (I-ECAP) at temperatures varying from 398 K to 525 K (125 °C to 250 °C) to determine the window of allowable processing parameters. The effects of initial grain size and billet rotation scheme on the occurrence of fracture during I-ECAP were investigated. The initial grain size ranged from 1.5 to 40 µm and the I-ECAP routes tested were A, BC, and C. Microstructures of the processed billets were characterized before and after I-ECAP. It was found that a fine-grained and homogenous microstructure was required to avoid fracture at low temperatures. Strain localization arising from a stress relaxation within recrystallized regions, namely twins and fine-grained zones, was shown to be responsible for the generation of microcracks. Based on the I-ECAP experiments and available literature data for ECAP, a power law between the initial grain size and processing conditions, described by a Zener-Hollomon parameter, has been proposed. Finally, processing by various routes at 473 K (200 °C) revealed that route A was less prone to fracture than routes BC and C.

  4. Characterization of calcium containing plasma electrolytic oxidation coatings on AM50 magnesium alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Srinivasan, P. Bala; Liang, J.; Blawert, C.; Störmer, M.; Dietzel, W.

    2010-04-01

    An attempt was made to produce calcium containing plasma electrolytic oxidation (PEO) coatings on AM50 magnesium alloy using an alkaline electrolyte. This study was performed in three alkaline electrolytes containing calcium hydroxide and sodium phosphate with three different mass ratios viz., 1:2.5, 1:5 and 1:7.5. All the three coatings produced were found to contain Ca and P in appreciable amounts. The concentration of P was found to be higher in the coatings obtained in the electrolytes with higher concentration of phosphate ions. Even though all the three coatings were found to be constituted with magnesium oxide and magnesium phosphate phases, X-ray diffraction analyses revealed that the phase composition was influenced by the phosphate ion concentration/conductivity of the electrolyte. Further, the PEO coating obtained in the 1:7.5 ratio electrolyte was found to contain di-calcium phosphate (monetite) and calcium peroxide phases, which were absent in the other two coatings. Potentiodynamic polarization studies performed in 0.1 M NaCl solution showed that the coatings obtained from the 1:5 ratio electrolyte possessed a superior corrosion resistance, which is attributed to the combined effect of thickness, compactness and phase/chemical composition of this coating.

  5. Stamping of Thin-Walled Structural Components with Magnesium Alloy AZ31 Sheets

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, F.-K.; Chang, C.-K.

    2005-08-05

    In the present study, the stamping process for manufacturing cell phone cases with magnesium alloy AZ31 sheets was studied using both the experimental approach and the finite element analysis. In order to determine the proper forming temperature and set up a fracture criterion, tensile tests and forming limit tests were first conducted to obtain the mechanical behaviors of AZ31 sheets at various elevated temperatures. The mechanical properties of Z31 sheets obtained from the experiments were then adopted in the finite element analysis to investigate the effects of the process parameters on the formability of the stamping process of cell phone cases. The finite element simulation results revealed that both the fracture and wrinkle defects could not be eliminated at the same time by adjusting blank-holder force or blank size. A drawbead design was then performed using the finite element simulations to determine the size and the location of drawbead required to suppress the wrinkle defect. An optimum stamping process, including die geometry, forming temperature, and blank dimension, was then determined for manufacturing the cell phone cases. The finite element analysis was validated by the good agreement between the simulation results and the experimental data. It confirms that the cell phone cases can be produced with magnesium alloy AZ31 sheet by the stamping process at elevated temperatures.

  6. Identification of an advanced constitutive model of Magnesium alloy AZ31B

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Z. G.; Massoni, E.

    2011-05-01

    The main aim of this paper is to study the flow behavior of the AZ31B magnesium alloy by means of tensile tests performed in extended ranges of temperature and strain rates. The flow stress-strain curves analyzed by power law type constitutive equation [1] can only fit well with experimental curves at the work-hardening stage. A new mathematical model is studied to describe the softening behavior of material based on tensile experiments. The relative parameters are obtained by fitting the equation with the experimental data. The genetic algorithm has been used to obtain the global optimal fitting parameters. The comparison between the fitted and experimental data proves the effectiveness of the model. The results indicate that this model leads to a better simulation of the flow stress during the softening stage than that of the power law equation. Based on this model, the deep drawing process has been simulated with the commercial finite element code FORGE®. The punch load and thickness distribution of AZ31 sheet have been studied. The study of the results is helpful to the application of the stamping technology for the magnesium alloy sheet.

  7. Manufacture of gradient micro-structures of magnesium alloys using two stage extrusion dies

    SciTech Connect

    Hwang, Yeong-Maw; Huang, Tze-Hui; Alexandrov, Sergei; Naimark, Oleg Borisovich; Jeng, Yeau-Ren

    2013-12-16

    This paper aims to manufacture magnesium alloy metals with gradient micro-structures using hot extrusion process. The extrusion die was designed to have a straight channel part combined with a conical part. Materials pushed through this specially-designed die generate a non-uniform velocity distribution at cross sections inside the die and result in different strain and strain rate distributions. Accordingly, a gradient microstructure product can be obtained. Using the finite element analysis, the forming temperature, effective strain, and effective strain rate distributions at the die exit were firstly discussed for various inclination angles in the conical die. Then, hot extrusion experiments with a two stage die were conducted to obtain magnesium alloy products with gradient micro-structures. The effects of the inclination angle on the grain size distribution at cross sections of the products were also discussed. Using a die of an inclination angle of 15°, gradient micro-structures of the grain size decreasing gradually from 17 ?m at the center to 4 ?m at the edge of product were achieved.

  8. Experimental investigation of anisotropy evolution of AZ31 magnesium alloy sheets under tensile loading

    SciTech Connect

    Tari, D. Ghaffari; Worswick, M. J.

    2011-05-04

    Increasing demand for lighter final products has created new opportunities for the application of new light weight materials. Due to high strength to density ratio and good magnetic resistance properties, magnesium alloys are good candidates to replace steel and aluminum for same application. However, limited numbers of active slip deformation mechanisms, result in a decreased formability at room temperature. Furthermore, wrought magnesium alloys have an initial crystallographic texture, remained from the prior rolling operations, which makes them highly anisotropic. In this paper, tensile tests are performed at room temperature and 200 deg. C at different strain rates and orientations relative to the rolling direction, including rolling, 30 deg., 45 deg., 60 deg. and transverse orientation. The strain rates adopted for these experiments varied from 0.001 to 1.0. The testing results show the effect of temperature on the strain rate sensitivity of AZ31 sheets. The extent of deformation is continuously recorded using two separate high temperature extensometers. The results of testing show an increase in the r-values with the plastic deformation. The strain rate sensitivity of AZ31 increased as the temperature was elevated. At higher strain rates the measured r-values are larger and the slope of its evolution with the plastic strain is steeper.

  9. Semisolid die forging process, microstructures and properties of AZ31 magnesium alloy mobile telephone shells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guan, Ren-Guo; Chen, Li-Qing; Cao, Fu-Rong; Zhao, Zhan-Yong; Ren, Yong

    2011-12-01

    A semisolid slurry of AZ31 magnesium alloy was prepared by vibrating wavelike sloping plate process, and the semisolid die forging process, microstructures, and properties of the magnesium alloy mobile telephone shell were investigated. The semisolid forging process was performed on a YA32-315 four-column universal hydraulic press. The microstructures were observed by optical microscopy, the hardness was analyzed with a model 450SVD Vickers hardometer, the mechanical properties was measured with a CMT5105 tensile test machine, and the fractograph of elongated specimens was observed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The results reveal that with the increase of die forging force, the microstructures of the product become fine and dense. A lower preheating temperature and a longer dwell time are favorable to the formation of fine and dense microstructures. The optimum process conditions of preparing mobile telephone shells with excellent surface quality and microstructures are a die forging force of 2000 kN, a die preheating temperature of 250°C, and a dwell time of 240 s. After solution treatment at 430°C and aging at 220°C for 8 h, the Vickers hardness is 61.7 and the ultimate tensile strength of the product is 193 MPa. Tensile fractographs show the mixing mechanisms of quasi-cleavage fracture and ductile fracture.

  10. Solidification, growth mechanisms, and associated properties of Al-Si and magnesium lightweight casting alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Hosch, Timothy

    2010-05-16

    Continually rising energy prices have inspired increased interest in weight reduction in the automotive and aerospace industries, opening the door for the widespread use and development of lightweight structural materials. Chief among these materials are cast Al-Si and magnesium-based alloys. Utilization of Al-Si alloys depends on obtaining a modified fibrous microstructure in lieu of the intrinsic flake structure, a process which is incompletely understood. The local solidification conditions, mechanisms, and tensile properties associated with the flake to fiber growth mode transition in Al-Si eutectic alloys are investigated here using bridgman type gradient-zone directional solidification. Resulting microstructures are examined through quantitative image analysis of two-dimensional sections and observation of deep-etched sections showing three-dimensional microstructural features. The transition was found to occur in two stages: an initial stage dominated by in-plane plate breakup and rod formation within the plane of the plate, and a second stage where the onset of out-of-plane silicon rod growth leads to the formation of an irregular fibrous structure. Several microstructural parameters were investigated in an attempt to quantify this transition, and it was found that the particle aspect ratio is effective in objectively identifying the onset and completion velocity of the flake to fiber transition. The appearance of intricate out-of-plane silicon instability formations was investigated by adapting a perturbed-interface stability analysis to the Al-Si system. Measurements of silicon equilibrium shape particles provided an estimate of the anisotropy of the solid Si/liquid Al-Si system and incorporation of this silicon anisotropy into the model was found to improve prediction of the instability length scale. Magnesium alloys share many of the benefits of Al-Si alloys, with the added benefit of a 1/3 lower density and increased machinability. Magnesium castings often contain additions of heavier elements, such as zinc, zirconium, and rare earth elements, which significantly improve high temperature performance. However, additions of these elements can lead to macrosegregational effects in castings, which are detectable by radiographic scans. The effect of these flow-line indications on alloy mechanical properties is not well quantified. An examination of these flow-line indications and their effects on mechanical properties in three magnesium-based casting alloys was performed here in order to determine the best practice for dealing with affected castings. Preliminary results suggest the flow-lines do not measurably impact bulk material properties. Three additional methods of characterizing three-dimensional material structures are also presented: a minimum spanning tree analysis is utilized to quantify local structure in Cu-Zr liquid phase simulations obtained from molecular dynamics; the radial distribution function is applied to directionally solidified Al-Si structures in an attempt to extract local spacing data; and the critical diameter measurement is also defined and applied to irregular eutectic Al-Si structures.

  11. Effects of the types of overlap on the mechanical properties of FSSW welded AZ series magnesium alloy joints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Dan; Shen, Jun; Wang, Lin-Zhi

    2012-03-01

    The effects of the types of overlap on the mechanical properties of the friction stir spot welding (FSSW) welded AZ series magnesium alloy joints were investigated by microstructural observations, microhardness tests, and tensile tests. The results show that the microstructure of the stir zone adjacent to the periphery of the rotating pin is mainly composed of the upper sheet. The average distance D between the longitudinal segment of the curved interface and the keyhole periphery, the tensile shear force, and the microhardness of the stir zone of the FSSW welded AZ61 alloy joint are the highest in all samples. During FSSW of AZ31 and AZ61 dissimilar magnesium alloys, the irregular deformation of the longitudinal segment of the curved interface appears, while the microhardness of the stir zone is higher when AZ61 alloy is the upper sheet. Moreover, the microhardness of the stir zone increases initially and then decreases sharply in the longitudinal test position.

  12. Recycling of AZ40 Magnesium Alloy Scraps by Hydriding-Dehydriding and Subsequent Consolidation Processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haiping, Zhou; Lianxi, Hu; Yu, Sun; Heng, Wang

    2015-09-01

    The hydriding-dehydriding process was used to recycle AZ40 magnesium (Mg) alloy scraps, and the microstructure nanocrystallization was realized. X-ray diffraction analysis, scanning electron microscopy, and transmission electron microscopy were carried out to characterize the microstructure. After mechanically milling in hydrogen for 72 h, matrix Mg was completely turned into nanocrystalline MgH2, with an average crystallite size of about 10 nm. And then, the MgH2 phase was completely transformed into Mg again through vacuum dehydriding treatment at 300 °C for 192 min, with an average crystallite size of about 20 nm. In addition, the nanocrystalline alloy powders were hot-pressed and extruded into bars. The average grain size of the bars was about 500 nm, which had reached the size of ultrafine-grain. Meanwhile, the yield strength and ultimate tensile strength of the as-extruded bars reached about 312 and 497 MPa, respectively. The results indicate that hydriding-dehydriding process is a feasible method for recycling of Mg alloy scraps, and it is expected to have a good application prospect in preparing ultrafine-grain Mg alloys.

  13. Fatigue properties of magnesium alloy AZ91 processed by severe plastic deformation.

    PubMed

    Fintová, Stanislava; Kunz, Ludvík

    2015-02-01

    Fatigue properties of cast AZ91 magnesium alloy processed by severe plastic deformation were investigated and compared with the properties of the initial cast state. The severe plastic deformation was carried out by equal channel angular pressing (ECAP). The ECAP treatment resulted in a bimodal structure. The bimodality consists in a coexistence of fine grained areas with higher content of Mg17Al12 particles and areas exhibiting larger grains and lower density of Mg17Al12 particles. Improvement of the basic mechanical properties of AZ91 (yield stress, tensile strength and ductility) by ECAP was significant. Also the improvement of the fatigue life in the low-cycle fatigue region was substantial. However the improvement of the fatigue strength in the high-cycle fatigue region was found to be negligible. The endurance limit based on 10(7) cycles for the cast alloy was 80 MPa and for the alloy processed by ECAP 85 MPa. The cyclic plastic response in both states was qualitatively similar; initial softening was followed by a long cyclic hardening. Fatigue cracks in cast alloy initiate in cyclic slip bands which were formed in areas of solid solution. In the case of severe plastic deformed material with bimodal structure two substantially different mechanisms of crack initiation were observed. Crack initiation in slip bands was a preferred process in the areas with large grains whereas the grain boundaries cracking was a characteristic mechanism in the fine grained regions. PMID:25498295

  14. Corrosion behavior of magnesium alloy AZ91 and its MMC in NaCl solution

    SciTech Connect

    Chan, W.M.; Cheng, F.T.; Leung, L.K.; Horylev, R.J.; Yue, T.M.

    1997-12-01

    The corrosion behaviors of magnesium alloy AZ91C and its Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}(short fiber)-reinforced metal matrix composite (MMC) in alkaline solutions (pH 10.5) containing chloride were compared using potentiodynamic polarization measurements, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) and immersion tests. Dependence of polarization characteristics (corrosion potential and corrosion current density) on chloride concentration was similar for both materials. The corrosion potential E{sub corr} decreased linearly with the logarithm of chloride concentration, while the corrosion current density i{sub corr} increased rapidly at chloride concentrations larger than 0.1%, with the i{sub corr} for the MMC consistently higher than that for AZ91C, reaching a factor of about 3 in3.5% sodium chloride solution. EIS data indicated that the protective film on the MMC was inferior to that on the matrix alloy. With stirring and at frequencies higher than 5 Hz, the electrode/electrolyte interface might be described by the simplified Randles model for both materials. Immersion tests showed that the corrosion rate of the MMC, in terms of weight loss, was about 7 times that of the matrix alloy. Thus the present investigation indicated that in alkaline solutions containing chloride ions, the presence of Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} short fibers in the alloy did not drastically alter the corrosion behavior, but significantly reduced its corrosion resistance.

  15. Transient Liquid Phase Diffusion Bonding of Magnesium Alloy (Mg-AZ31) to Titanium Alloy (Ti-6Al-4V)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atieh, Anas Mahmoud

    The magnesium alloy Mg-AZ31 and titanium alloy Ti-6Al-4V have physical characteristics and mechanical properties that makes it attractive for a wide range of engineering applications in the aerospace and automotive industries. However, the differences in melting temperature and coefficient of thermal expansion hinder the use of traditional fusion welding techniques. Transient liquid phase (TLP) bonding of magnesium alloy Mg-AZ31 and titanium alloy Ti-6Al- 4V was performed and different interlayer types and configurations were used to facilitate joint formation. The joining of these alloys using Ni foils was successful at a bonding temperature of 515°C, bonding pressure 0.2 MPa, for bonding time of 5 minutes. At the Ni/Mg-AZ31 bond interface, the formation of a eutectic liquid between Mg and Ni was observed. The formation of Mg2Ni and Mg3AlNi2 were identified along the bond interface resulting in an isothermally solidified joint. At the Ni/Ti-6Al-4V interface, the solid-state diffusion process results in joint formation. The use of double Ni-Cu sandwich joint resulted in further enhancement in joint formation and this produced joints with greater shear strength values. The configuration of Mg-AZ31/Cu- Ni/Ti-6Al-4V or Mg-AZ31/Ni-Cu/Ti-6Al-4V influence the mechanism of bonding and the type of intermetallics formed within the joint. The application of thin Ni electrodeposited coatings resulted in further enhancements of joint quality due to better surface-to-surface contact and a reduction in the formation of intermetallics at the joint. The effect of Cu nano-particles in the coatings was found to decrease the eutectic zone width and this resulted in an increase the shear strength of the joints. The highest shear strength of 69 MPa was possible with bonds made using coatings containing Cu nano-particle dispersion.

  16. Continuum damage model for bioresorbable magnesium alloy devices - Application to coronary stents.

    PubMed

    Gastaldi, D; Sassi, V; Petrini, L; Vedani, M; Trasatti, S; Migliavacca, F

    2011-04-01

    The main drawback of a conventional stenting procedure is the high risk of restenosis. The idea of a stent that "disappears" after having fulfilled its mission is very intriguing and fascinating, since it can be expected that the stent mass decreases in time to allow the gradual transmission of the mechanical load to the surrounding tissues owing to controlled dissolution by corrosion. Magnesium and its alloys are appealing materials for designing biodegradable stents. The objective of this work is to develop, in a finite element framework, a model of magnesium degradation that is able to predict the corrosion rate, thus providing a valuable tool for the design of bioresorbable stents. Continuum damage mechanics is suitable for modeling several damage mechanisms, including different types of corrosion. In this study, the damage is assumed to be the superposition of stress corrosion and uniform microgalvanic corrosion processes. The former describes the stress-mediated localization of the corrosion attack through a stress-dependent evolution law, while the latter affects the free surface of the material exposed to an aggressive environment. Comparisons with experimental tests show that the developed model can reproduce the behavior of different magnesium alloys subjected to static corrosion tests. The study shows that parameter identification for a correct calibration of the model response on the results of uniform and stress corrosion experimental tests is reachable. Moreover, three-dimensional stenting procedures accounting for interaction with the arterial vessel are simulated, and it is shown how the proposed modeling approach gives the possibility of accounting for the combined effects of an aggressive environment and mechanical loading. PMID:21316623

  17. Nanostructured calcium phosphate coatings on magnesium alloys: characterization and cytocompatibility with mesenchymal stem cells.

    PubMed

    Iskandar, Maria Emil; Aslani, Arash; Tian, Qiaomu; Liu, Huinan

    2015-05-01

    This article reports the deposition and characterization of nanostructured calcium phosphate (nCaP) on magnesium-yttrium alloy substrates and their cytocompatibility with bone marrow derived mesenchymal stem cells (BMSCs). The nCaP coatings were deposited on magnesium and magnesium-yttrium alloy substrates using proprietary transonic particle acceleration process for the dual purposes of modulating substrate degradation and BMSC adhesion. Surface morphology and feature size were analyzed using scanning electron microscopy and quantitative image analysis tools. Surface elemental compositions and phases were analyzed using energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction, respectively. The deposited nCaP coatings showed a homogeneous particulate surface with the dominant feature size of 200-500 nm in the long axis and 100-300 nm in the short axis, and a Ca/P atomic ratio of 1.5-1.6. Hydroxyapatite was the major phase identified in the nCaP coatings. The modulatory effects of nCaP coatings on the sample degradation and BMSC behaviors were dependent on the substrate composition and surface conditions. The direct culture of BMSCs in vitro indicated that multiple factors, including surface composition and topography, and the degradation-induced changes in media composition, influenced cell adhesion directly on the sample surface, and indirect adhesion surrounding the sample in the same culture. The alkaline pH, the indicator of Mg degradation, played a role in BMSC adhesion and morphology, but not the sole factor. Additional studies are necessary to elucidate BMSC responses to each contributing factor. PMID:25917827

  18. Effect of Tricalcium Magnesium Silicate Coating on the Electrochemical and Biological Behavior of Ti-6Al-4V Alloys

    PubMed Central

    Hadipour, Mohammadreza; Nadernezhad, Ali; Aghaie, Ermia; Behnamian, Yashar; Abu Osman, Noor Azuan

    2015-01-01

    In the current study, a sol-gel-synthesized tricalcium magnesium silicate powder was coated on Ti-6Al-4V alloys using plasma spray method. Composition of feed powder was evaluated by X-ray diffraction technique before and after the coating process. Scanning electron microscopy and atomic force microscopy were used to study the morphology of coated substrates. The corrosion behaviors of bare and coated Ti-6Al-4V alloys were examined using potentiodynamic polarization test and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy in stimulated body fluids. Moreover, bare and coated Ti-6Al-4V alloys were characterized in vitro by culturing osteoblast and mesenchymal stem cells for several days. Results demonstrated a meaningful improvement in the corrosion resistance of Ti-6Al-4V alloys coated with tricalcium magnesium silicate compared with the bare counterparts, by showing a decrease in corrosion current density from 1.84 ?A/cm2 to 0.31 ?A/cm2. Furthermore, the coating substantially improved the bioactivity of Ti-6Al-4Valloys. Our study on corrosion behavior and biological response of Ti-6Al-4V alloy coated by tricalcium magnesium silicate proved that the coating has considerably enhanced safety and applicability of Ti-6Al-4V alloys, suggesting its potential use in permanent implants and artificial joints. PMID:26383641

  19. Evaluation of Magnesium Die-Casting Alloys for Elevated Temperature Applications: Microstructure, Tensile Properties, and Creep Resistance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Suming; Easton, Mark A.; Abbott, Trevor B.; Nie, Jian-Feng; Dargusch, Matthew S.; Hort, Norbert; Gibson, Mark A.

    2015-08-01

    Several families of magnesium die-casting alloys have been developed to operate at the elevated temperatures experienced in automotive powertrain applications. Most alloys are based on the Mg-Al system with alloying additions such as silicon, strontium, calcium, and rare earth elements (RE), although alloys with RE as the primary alloying constituent are also considered. This work presents an evaluation of the tensile properties and creep resistance of the most common magnesium die-casting alloys, in conjunction with the analysis of microstructure. The alloys investigated include AS31 (Mg-3Al-1Si), AJ52 (Mg-5Al-2Sr), MRI153A (Mg-9Al-1Ca-0.1Sr), MRI153M (Mg-8Al-1Ca-0.3Sr), MRI230D (Mg-6.5Al-2Ca-1Sn-0.3Sr), AXJ530 (Mg-5Al-3Ca-0.2Sr), AE42 (Mg-4Al-2RE), AE44 (Mg-4Al-4RE), and AM-HP2+ (Mg-3.5RE-0.4Zn). It is shown that, among the various alloys evaluated, MRI230D, AXJ530, and AM-HP2+ have higher yield strength than the Al alloy A380, but the ductility is relatively low at room temperature for these alloys. In contrast, AS31 and the AE series alloys have very good room temperature ductility, but their yield strength is lower than that of A380. In terms of creep resistance, MRI230D, AXJ530, AE44, and AM-HP2+ are all comparable to the Al alloy counterpart at 423 K and 448 K (150 °C and 175 °C). Microstructural factors that are most important to the strength and creep resistance of the Mg die-casting alloys are discussed.

  20. Warm Deep Drawing of Rectangular Parts of AZ31 Magnesium Alloy Sheet Adopting Variable Blank Holder Force

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ying-hong, Peng; Qun-feng, Chang; Da-yong, Li; Xiao-qin, Zeng

    2007-05-01

    AZ31 magnesium alloy sheet with good shape and formability is fabricated by warm cross rolling. Uniaxial tensile tests are conducted using a Gleeble 3500 thermal - mechanical simulator, and the mechanical properties of AZ31 magnesium alloy sheet are analyzed. A warm deep drawing process of square part is also simulated by the finite element method. The influences of blank holder force on the formability are numerically investigated. A double-action hydraulic press that can realize adjustable blank holder forces is developed and its working principle and control system are introduced. Some warm deep drawing experiments of square parts of AZ31 magnesium alloy sheet are also performed. Different variation schemes of the blank holder force with the stroke of the punch are tested, and the experiment results are compared. Results show that the suitable blank holder force variation scheme is a ladder curve with the punch stroke. Adopting the variable blank holder force technique can improve 13.2% of the drawing depth of square parts of AZ31 magnesium alloy sheet.

  1. Comparative study on the biodegradation and biocompatibility of silicate bioceramic coatings on biodegradable magnesium alloy as biodegradable biomaterial

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Razavi, M.; Fathi, M. H.; Savabi, O.; Razavi, S. M.; Hashemibeni, B.; Yazdimamaghani, M.; Vashaee, D.; Tayebi, L.

    2014-03-01

    Many clinical cases as well as in vivo and in vitro assessments have demonstrated that magnesium alloys possess good biocompatibility. Unfortunately, magnesium and its alloys degrade too quickly in physiological media. In order to improve the biodegradation resistance and biocompatibility of a biodegradable magnesium alloy, we have prepared three types of coating include diopside (CaMgSi2O6), akermanite (Ca2MgSi2O6) and bredigite (Ca7MgSi4O16) coating on AZ91 magnesium alloy through a micro-arc oxidation (MAO) and electrophoretic deposition (EPD) method. In this research, the biodegradation and biocompatibility behavior of samples were evaluated in vitro and in vivo. The in vitro analysis was performed by cytocompatibility and MTT-assay and the in vivo test was conducted on the implantation of samples in the greater trochanter of adult rabbits. The results showed that diopside coating has the best bone regeneration and bredigite has the best biodegradation resistance compared to others.

  2. Solidification, growth mechanisms, and associated properties of aluminum-silicon and magnesium lightweight casting alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hosch, Timothy Al

    Continually rising energy prices have inspired increased interest in weight reduction in the automotive and aerospace industries, opening the door for the widespread use and development of lightweight structural materials. Chief among these materials are cast Al-Si and magnesium-based alloys. Utilization of Al-Si alloys depends on obtaining a modified fibrous microstructure in lieu of the intrinsic flake structure, a process which is incompletely understood. The local solidification conditions, mechanisms, and tensile properties associated with the flake to fiber growth mode transition in Al-Si eutectic alloys are investigated here using bridgman type gradient-zone directional solidification. Resulting microstructures are examined through quantitative image analysis of two-dimensional sections and observation of deep-etched sections showing three-dimensional microstructural features. The transition was found to occur in two stages: an initial stage dominated by in-plane plate breakup and rod formation within the plane of the plate, and a second stage where the onset of out-of-plane silicon rod growth leads to the formation of an irregular fibrous structure. Several microstructural parameters were investigated in an attempt to quantify this transition, and it was found that the particle aspect ratio is effective in objectively identifying the onset and completion velocity of the flake to fiber transition. The appearance of intricate out-of-plane silicon instability formations was investigated by adapting a perturbed-interface stability analysis to the Al-Si system. Measurements of silicon equilibrium shape particles provided an estimate of the anisotropy of the solid Si/liquid Al-Si system and incorporation of this silicon anisotropy into the model was found to improve prediction of the instability length scale. Magnesium alloys share many of the benefits of Al-Si alloys, with the added benefit of a 1/3 lower density and increased machinability. Magnesium castings often contain additions of heavier elements, such as zinc, zirconium, and rare earth elements, which significantly improve high temperature performance. However, additions of these elements can lead to macrosegregational effects in castings, which are detectable by radiographic scans. The effect of these flow-line indications on alloy mechanical properties is not well quantified. An examination of these flow-line indications and their effects on mechanical properties in three magnesiumbased casting alloys was performed here in order to determine the best practice for dealing with affected castings. Preliminary results suggest the flow-lines do not measurably impact bulk material properties. Three additional methods of characterizing three-dimensional material structures are also presented: a minimum spanning tree analysis is utilized to quantify local structure in Cu-Zr liquid phase simulations obtained from molecular dynamics; the radial distribution function is applied to directionally solidified Al-Si structures in an attempt to extract local spacing data; and the critical diameter measurement is also defined and applied to irregular eutectic Al-Si structures.

  3. Increased corrosion resistance of the AZ80 magnesium alloy by rapid solidification.

    PubMed

    Aghion, E; Jan, L; Meshi, L; Goldman, J

    2015-11-01

    Magnesium (Mg) and Mg-alloys are being considered as implantable biometals. Despite their excellent biocompatibility and good mechanical properties, their rapid corrosion is a major impediment precluding their widespread acceptance as implantable biomaterials. Here, we investigate the potential for rapid solidification to increase the corrosion resistance of Mg alloys. To this end, the effect of rapid solidification on the environmental and stress corrosion behavior of the AZ80 Mg alloy vs. its conventionally cast counterpart was evaluated in simulated physiological electrolytes. The microstructural characteristics were examined by optical microscopy, SEM, TEM, and X-ray diffraction analysis. The corrosion behavior was evaluated by immersion, salt spraying, and potentiodynamic polarization. Stress corrosion resistance was assessed by Slow Strain Rate Testing. The results indicate that the corrosion resistance of rapidly solidified ribbons is significantly improved relative to the conventional cast alloy due to the increased Al content dissolved in the ?-Mg matrix and the correspondingly reduced presence of the ?-phase (Mg17 Al12 ). Unfortunately, extrusion consolidated solidified ribbons exhibited a substantial reduction in the environmental performance and stress corrosion resistance. This was mainly attributed to the detrimental effect of the extrusion process, which enriched the iron impurities and increased the internal stresses by imposing a higher dislocation density. In terms of immersion tests, the average corrosion rate of the rapidly solidified ribbons was <0.4 mm/year compared with ?2 mm/year for the conventionally cast alloy and 26 mm/year for the rapidly solidified extruded ribbons. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part B: Appl Biomater, 103B: 1541-1548, 2015. PMID:25491147

  4. Failure Analysis of Warm Stamping of Magnesium Alloy Sheet Based on an Anisotropic Damage Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, P. J.; Chen, Z. H.; Dong, C. F.

    2014-11-01

    Based on the frame work of continuum damage mechanics, a research work of anisotropic damage evolution in warm stamping process of magnesium alloy sheets has been carried out by means of a combined experimental-numerical method. The aim was to predict formability of warm stamping of AZ31 Mg alloy sheets by taking the thermal and damage effects into account. In the presented work, a temperature-dependent anisotropic yield function suitable for cold rolling sheet metals together with an anisotropic damage model was implemented into the a VUMAT subroutine for ABAQUS/EXPLICIT. The evolution of internal damage in the form of void growth and coalescence in AZ31 Mg alloy sheet was observed by means of scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Moreover, a coupled thermo-mechanical simulation of the stamping process was performed using the implemented code at different temperatures. The parameters employed in the simulation were determined by the standard tensile tests and algebraic manipulation. The overall anisotropic damage process from crack initiation to final propagation in local area of blank was simulated. Numerical results show that the prediction of the site of crack initiation and the orientation of crack propagation are consistent with the data observed in warm stamping experiments.

  5. Failure Analysis of Warm Stamping of Magnesium Alloy Sheet Based on an Anisotropic Damage Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, P. J.; Chen, Z. H.; Dong, C. F.

    2014-08-01

    Based on the frame work of continuum damage mechanics, a research work of anisotropic damage evolution in warm stamping process of magnesium alloy sheets has been carried out by means of a combined experimental-numerical method. The aim was to predict formability of warm stamping of AZ31 Mg alloy sheets by taking the thermal and damage effects into account. In the presented work, a temperature-dependent anisotropic yield function suitable for cold rolling sheet metals together with an anisotropic damage model was implemented into the a VUMAT subroutine for ABAQUS/EXPLICIT. The evolution of internal damage in the form of void growth and coalescence in AZ31 Mg alloy sheet was observed by means of scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Moreover, a coupled thermo-mechanical simulation of the stamping process was performed using the implemented code at different temperatures. The parameters employed in the simulation were determined by the standard tensile tests and algebraic manipulation. The overall anisotropic damage process from crack initiation to final propagation in local area of blank was simulated. Numerical results show that the prediction of the site of crack initiation and the orientation of crack propagation are consistent with the data observed in warm stamping experiments.

  6. Biocorrosion resistance of coated magnesium alloy by microarc oxidation in electrolyte containing zirconium and calcium salts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Ya-Ming; Guo, Jun-Wei; Wu, Yun-Feng; Liu, Yan; Cao, Jian-Yun; Zhou, Yu; Jia, De-Chang

    2014-09-01

    The key to use magnesium alloys as suitable biodegradable implants is how to adjust their degradation rates. We report a strategy to prepare biocompatible ceramic coating with improved biocorrosion resistance property on AZ91D alloy by microarc oxidation (MAO) in a silicate-K2ZrF6 solution with and without Ca(H2PO4)2 additives. The microstructure and biocorrosion of coatings were characterized by XRD and SEM, as well as electrochemical and immersion tests in simulated body fluid (SBF). The results show that the coatings are mainly composed of MgO, Mg2SiO4, m-ZrO2 phases, further Ca containing compounds involve the coating by Ca(H2PO4)2 addition in the silicate-K2ZrF6 solution. The corrosion resistance of coated AZ91D alloy is significantly improved compared with the bare one. After immersing in SBF for 28 d, the Si-Zr5-Ca0 coating indicates a best corrosion resistance performance.

  7. Achieving high strength and high ductility in magnesium alloy using hard-plate rolling (HPR) process

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Hui–Yuan; Yu, Zhao–Peng; Zhang, Lei; Liu, Chun–Guo; Zha, Min; Wang, Cheng; Jiang, Qi–Chuan

    2015-01-01

    Magnesium alloys are highly desirable for a wide range of lightweight structural components. However, rolling Mg alloys can be difficult due to their poor plasticity, and the strong texture yielded from rolling often results in poor plate forming ability, which limits their further engineering applications. Here we report a new hard-plate rolling (HPR) route which achieves a large reduction during a single rolling pass. The Mg-9Al-1Zn (AZ91) plates processed by HPR consist of coarse grains of 30–60??m, exhibiting a typical basal texture, fine grains of 1–5??m and ultrafine (sub) grains of 200–500?nm, both of the latter two having a weakened texture. More importantly, the HPR was efficient in gaining a simultaneous high strength and uniform ductility, i.e., ~371?MPa and ~23%, respectively. The superior properties should be mainly attributed to the cooperation effect of the multimodal grain structure and weakened texture, where the former facilitates a strong work hardening while the latter promotes the basal slip. The HPR methodology is facile and effective, and can avoid plate cracking that is prone to occur during conventional rolling processes. This strategy is applicable to hard-to-deform materials like Mg alloys, and thus has a promising prospect for industrial application. PMID:26603776

  8. Rate sensitivity and tension–compression asymmetry in AZ31B magnesium alloy sheet

    PubMed Central

    Kurukuri, Srihari; Worswick, Michael J.; Ghaffari Tari, Dariush; Mishra, Raja K.; Carter, Jon T.

    2014-01-01

    The constitutive response of a commercial magnesium alloy rolled sheet (AZ31B-O) is studied based on room temperature tensile and compressive tests at strain rates ranging from 10?3 to 103?s?1. Because of its strong basal texture, this alloy exhibits a significant tension–compression asymmetry (strength differential) that is manifest further in terms of rather different strain rate sensitivity under tensile versus compressive loading. Under tensile loading, this alloy exhibits conventional positive strain rate sensitivity. Under compressive loading, the flow stress is initially rate insensitive until twinning is exhausted after which slip processes are activated, and conventional rate sensitivity is recovered. The material exhibits rather mild in-plane anisotropy in terms of strength, but strong transverse anisotropy (r-value), and a high degree of variation in the measured r-values along the different sheet orientations which is indicative of a higher degree of anisotropy than that observed based solely upon the variation in stresses. This rather complex behaviour is attributed to the strong basal texture, and the different deformation mechanisms being activated as the orientation and sign of applied loading are varied. A new constitutive equation is proposed to model the measured compressive behaviour that captures the rate sensitivity of the sigmoidal stress–strain response. The measured tensile stress–strain response is fit to the Zerilli–Armstrong hcp material model. PMID:24711496

  9. Stability of body-centered cubic iron-magnesium alloys in the Earth's inner core.

    PubMed

    Kádas, Krisztina; Vitos, Levente; Johansson, Börje; Ahuja, Rajeev

    2009-09-15

    The composition and the structure of the Earth's solid inner core are still unknown. Iron is accepted to be the main component of the core. Lately, the body-centered cubic (bcc) phase of iron was suggested to be present in the inner core, although its stability at core conditions is still in discussion. The higher density of pure iron compared with that of the Earth's core indicates the presence of light element(s) in this region, which could be responsible for the stability of the bcc phase. However, so far, none of the proposed composition models were in full agreement with seismic observations. The solubility of magnesium in hexagonal Fe has been found to increase significantly with increasing pressure, suggesting that Mg can also be an important element in the core. Here, we report a first-principles density functional study of bcc Fe-Mg alloys at core pressures and temperatures. We show that at core conditions, 5-10 atomic percent Mg stabilizes the bcc Fe both dynamically and thermodynamically. Our calculated density, elastic moduli, and sound velocities of bcc Fe-Mg alloys are consistent with those obtained from seismology, indicating that the bcc-structured Fe-Mg alloy is a possible model for the Earth's inner core. PMID:19805214

  10. Achieving high strength and high ductility in magnesium alloy using hard-plate rolling (HPR) process.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hui-Yuan; Yu, Zhao-Peng; Zhang, Lei; Liu, Chun-Guo; Zha, Min; Wang, Cheng; Jiang, Qi-Chuan

    2015-01-01

    Magnesium alloys are highly desirable for a wide range of lightweight structural components. However, rolling Mg alloys can be difficult due to their poor plasticity, and the strong texture yielded from rolling often results in poor plate forming ability, which limits their further engineering applications. Here we report a new hard-plate rolling (HPR) route which achieves a large reduction during a single rolling pass. The Mg-9Al-1Zn (AZ91) plates processed by HPR consist of coarse grains of 30-60??m, exhibiting a typical basal texture, fine grains of 1-5??m and ultrafine (sub) grains of 200-500?nm, both of the latter two having a weakened texture. More importantly, the HPR was efficient in gaining a simultaneous high strength and uniform ductility, i.e., ~371?MPa and ~23%, respectively. The superior properties should be mainly attributed to the cooperation effect of the multimodal grain structure and weakened texture, where the former facilitates a strong work hardening while the latter promotes the basal slip. The HPR methodology is facile and effective, and can avoid plate cracking that is prone to occur during conventional rolling processes. This strategy is applicable to hard-to-deform materials like Mg alloys, and thus has a promising prospect for industrial application. PMID:26603776

  11. Grain Boundary Segregation of Rare-Earth Elements in Magnesium Alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robson, Joseph D.; Haigh, Sarah J.; Davis, Bruce; Griffiths, David

    2015-10-01

    Small additions of rare-earth (RE) elements have been shown to have a powerful effect in modifying the texture of wrought magnesium alloys, giving a highly beneficial effect in improving their formability. Recent work has shown that segregation of RE atoms to grain boundaries is important in producing this texture change. In this work, two Mg-RE systems have been studied Mg-Y and Mg-Nd using high-resolution scanning transmission electron microscopy that permits both imaging and elemental analysis with a spatial resolution of better than 0.1 nm. The Mg-Y alloy, where the solubility and level of addition are relatively high, showed the RE texture change effect. This was accompanied by clustering of Y on the grain boundaries, consistent with previous studies of the Mg-Gd system. The Mg-Nd alloy, where the solubility and level of addition are relatively low, showed no texture change and no segregation. In this case, impurity elements binding the RE into insoluble particles, rendering it ineffective. The results are analyzed by modifying a previous model for the solute drag effect on boundaries expected due to the RE additions. This predicts that both Gd and Y will strongly inhibit boundary motion, with Gd being approximately twice as effective as Y.

  12. Laser Keyhole Welding of Dissimilar Ti-6Al-4V Titanium Alloy to AZ31B Magnesium Alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, M.; Wang, Z. M.; Li, X. Y.; Zeng, X. Y.

    2012-01-01

    Laser keyhole welding of Ti-6Al-4V titanium alloy to AZ31B magnesium alloy was developed, and the correlations of process parameters, joint properties, and bonding mechanism were studied. The results show that the offset from the laser beam center on AZ31B side to the edge of the weld seam plays a big role in the joint properties by changing the power density irradiated at the Ti-Mg initial interface. The optimal range of the offset is 0.3 to 0.4mm in the present study. Some lamellar and granular Ti-rich mixtures are observed in the fusion zone, which is formed by intermixing melted Ti-6Al-4V with liquid AZ31B. The maximum ultimate tensile strength of the joints reaches 266 MPa. Furthermore, the fracture surface consists of scraggly remaining weld metal and smooth Ti surface. The higher the failure strength, the smaller the proportion of smooth Ti surface to whole interface is. Finally, the bonding mechanism of the interfacial layer is summarized by the morphologies and test results of fracture surfaces.

  13. Tribology and Tool Wear of Hot Dip Galvanized Zinc Magnesium Alloys on Cold Rolled Steel Sheets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raab, A. E.; Berger, E.; Freudenthaler, J.; Leomann, F.; Walch, C.

    2011-05-01

    Recently zinc based coatings on cold rolled steel with improved functionality in terms of forming and/or corrosion behaviour have been intensively investigated in the steel industry1,2,3. One of the most promising products are zinc magnesium alloys produced in hot dip galvanizing process. These coatings were already introduced in construction industry a few years ago1. With some modifications the improved properties of the coating are also interesting for automotive industry. In the present work the tribological potential of hot dip galvanized zinc magnesium coatings (HDG/ZM) produced at an industrial line under regular production, was studied in terms of sliding properties, adhesive and abrasive tool wear. First a short introduction into surface morphology of HDG/ZM will be given. For the tribological characterization of the material, which is the main topic of the contribution, different tests were performed on hot dip galvanised zinc magnesium material and results were compared with classic hot dip galvanized zinc coating (HDG/Z). The investigations are mainly based on the strip draw test which allows the determination of the friction coefficient directly by using a constant contact pressure. Deep drawing property was tested by forming model cups. The abrasive tool wear was tested using a standard test for material used in automotive industry. The adhesive tool wear was investigated by characterizing the coating material transferred to the tool in the strip draw test. All performed tests show an improved drawability of HDG/ZM compared to classical HDG/Z reference material. However the most promising difference between HDG/ZM and HDG/Z is that galling was found to be less for HDG/ZM than for HDG/Z. Therefore HDG/ZM is an interesting system not only with respect to corrosion protection but also in terms of tribology and provides clear advantages in formability.

  14. Tribology and Tool Wear of Hot Dip Galvanized Zinc Magnesium Alloys on Cold Rolled Steel Sheets

    SciTech Connect

    Raab, A. E.; Berger, E.; Freudenthaler, J.; Leomann, F.; Walch, C.

    2011-05-04

    Recently zinc based coatings on cold rolled steel with improved functionality in terms of forming and/or corrosion behaviour have been intensively investigated in the steel industry. One of the most promising products are zinc magnesium alloys produced in hot dip galvanizing process. These coatings were already introduced in construction industry a few years ago. With some modifications the improved properties of the coating are also interesting for automotive industry. In the present work the tribological potential of hot dip galvanized zinc magnesium coatings (HDG/ZM) produced at an industrial line under regular production, was studied in terms of sliding properties, adhesive and abrasive tool wear.First a short introduction into surface morphology of HDG/ZM will be given. For the tribological characterization of the material, which is the main topic of the contribution, different tests were performed on hot dip galvanised zinc magnesium material and results were compared with classic hot dip galvanized zinc coating (HDG/Z). The investigations are mainly based on the strip draw test which allows the determination of the friction coefficient directly by using a constant contact pressure. Deep drawing property was tested by forming model cups. The abrasive tool wear was tested using a standard test for material used in automotive industry. The adhesive tool wear was investigated by characterizing the coating material transferred to the tool in the strip draw test.All performed tests show an improved drawability of HDG/ZM compared to classical HDG/Z reference material. However the most promising difference between HDG/ZM and HDG/Z is that galling was found to be less for HDG/ZM than for HDG/Z. Therefore HDG/ZM is an interesting system not only with respect to corrosion protection but also in terms of tribology and provides clear advantages in formability.

  15. In vitro and in vivo studies of biodegradable fine grained AZ31 magnesium alloy produced by equal channel angular pressing.

    PubMed

    Ratna Sunil, B; Sampath Kumar, T S; Chakkingal, Uday; Nandakumar, V; Doble, Mukesh; Devi Prasad, V; Raghunath, M

    2016-02-01

    The objective of the present work is to investigate the role of different grain sizes produced by equal channel angular pressing (ECAP) on the degradation behavior of magnesium alloy using in vitro and in vivo studies. Commercially available AZ31 magnesium alloy was selected and processed by ECAP at 300°C for up to four passes using route Bc. Grain refinement from a starting size of 46?m to a grain size distribution of 1-5?m was successfully achieved after the 4th pass. Wettability of ECAPed samples assessed by contact angle measurements was found to increase due to the fine grain structure. In vitro degradation and bioactivity of the samples studied by immersing in super saturated simulated body fluid (SBF 5×) showed rapid mineralization within 24h due to the increased wettability in fine grained AZ31 Mg alloy. Corrosion behavior of the samples assessed by weight loss and electrochemical tests conducted in SBF 5× clearly showed the prominent role of enhanced mineral deposition on ECAPed AZ31 Mg in controlling the abnormal degradation. Cytotoxicity studies by MTT colorimetric assay showed that all the samples are viable. Additionally, cell adhesion was excellent for ECAPed samples particularly for the 3rd and 4th pass samples. In vivo experiments conducted using New Zealand White rabbits clearly showed lower degradation rate for ECAPed sample compared with annealed AZ31 Mg alloy and all the samples showed biocompatibility and no health abnormalities were noticed in the animals after 60days of in vivo studies. These results suggest that the grain size plays an important role in degradation management of magnesium alloys and ECAP technique can be adopted to achieve fine grain structures for developing degradable magnesium alloys for biomedical applications. PMID:26652384

  16. Punchless Drawing of Magnesium Alloy Sheet under Cold Condition and its Computation

    SciTech Connect

    Yamashita, Minoru; Hattori, Toshio; Sato, Joji

    2011-01-17

    The punchless drawing with Maslennikov's technique was applied to the circular cup drawing of magnesium alloy AZ31B sheet under cold condition. The elastic rubber ring was used instead of the 'hard' punch, where the compressed ring dragged the sheet inward the die cavity. Attainable circumferential strain of the blank was increased by this technique with repetitive drawing operation. Thickness of the rubber pad affected little the attainable strain. The shape appearance became better when a harder rubber was used. The cup forming by single drawing operation was also tested using a small die shoulder radius. The LDR of 1.250 was obtained with the straight cup wall. Further, the computation of the punchless drawing was also conducted for the single drawing operation. The computed deformation pattern was well consistent with the corresponding experimental result.

  17. a Manganese Oxide Contained Coating for Biodegradable AZ31B Magnesium Alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Tingting; Tan, Lili; Xiong, Dangsheng; Zhang, Bingchun; Yang, Ke

    A manganese oxide contained coating was prepared on biodegradable AZ31B magnesium alloy to control the degradation of AZ31B and improve its biocompatibility. Morphology, composition, and corrosion resistance of the coating were studied. The SEM observations showed that the coating was approximately 4-6 ?m in thickness with net-like microcracks. The XPS analysis indicated that the coating was mainly composed of MgO, Mg(OH)2, MnO2, Mn2O3, and Mn3O4. It was found that AZ31B with such coating showed better corrosion resistance in simulated blood plasma through electrochemical and immersion tests. The hemolytic assay indicated that the treated AZ31B had no hemolytic effect.

  18. Fiber laser cutting of AZ31 magnesium alloy: numerical and experimental investigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Huafeng; Li, Juli; He, Min; Wu, Xiao; Sun, Tao

    2015-10-01

    Fiber laser cutting of AZ31B magnesium alloy is considered. A three-dimensional (3D) finite element model (FEM) for simulation of the transient temperature field in laser cutting process is developed. The FEM take into account of the thermal physical parameters change with temperature, the moving heat source, the surface effect element, the reasonable boundary conditions, etc. The temperature evolution, the temperature gradient, the kerf shape and dimensions are simulated. Kerf width are measured using the Olympus optical microscopy and is compared with the predicted value. The microhardness near the kerf is measured by a Vickers microhardness tester. The results show that the maximum temperature gradually increased with the increase of cutting time. The workpiece temperature rise to 135.72°C from the room temperature. The simulated kerf width are in good agreement with measured results. The heat affected zone is not obvious and the microhardness change little perpendicular to laser cutting direction.

  19. Effect of preheat on TIG welding of AZ61 magnesium alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Jun; Xu, Nan

    2012-04-01

    The effects of preheat treatments on the microstructures and mechanical properties of tungsten inert gas (TIG)-welded AZ61 magnesium alloy joints were studied by microstructural observations, microhardness tests and tensile tests. The results showed that the volume fraction of the lamellar ?-Mg17(Al,Zn)12 intermetallic compound of in fusion zone (FZ) increased from 15% to 66% with an increase in preheat temperature. Moreover, the microhardness of the FZ and the ultimate tensile strength of the welded joints reached their maximum values when the preheat temperature was 300°C because more lamellar ?-Mg17(Al,Zn)12 intermetallic compounds were distributed at the ?-Mg grain boundaries and no cracks and pores formed in the FZ of the welded joint.

  20. Constitutive acoustic-emission elastic-stress behavior of magnesium alloy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, J. H., Jr.; Emerson, G. P.

    1977-01-01

    Repeated laoding and unloading of a magnesium alloy below the macroscopic yield stress result in continuous acoustic emissions which are generally repeatable for a given specimen and which are reproducible between different specimens having the same load history. An acoustic emission Bauschinger strain model is proposed to describe the unloading emission behavior. For the limited range of stress examined, loading and unloading stress delays of the order of 50 MN/sq m are observed, and they appear to be dependent upon the direction of loading, the stress rate, and the stress history. The stress delay is hypothesized to be the manifestation of an effective friction stress. The existence of acoustic emission elastic stress constitutive relations is concluded, which provides support for a previously proposed concept for the monitoring of elastic stresses by acoustic emission.

  1. Application Of Phenol/Amine Copolymerized Film Modified Magnesium Alloys: Anticorrosion And Surface Biofunctionalization.

    PubMed

    Chen, Si; Zhang, Jiang; Chen, Yingqi; Zhao, Sheng; Chen, Meiyun; Li, Xin; Maitz, Manfred F; Wang, Jin; Huang, Nan

    2015-11-11

    Magnesium metal as degradable metallic material is one of the most researched areas, but its rapid degradation rate restricts its development. The current anticorrosion surface modification methods require expensive equipment and complicated operation processes and cannot continue to introduce biofunction on modified surface. In this study, the GAHD conversion coatings were fabricated on the surface of magnesium alloys (MZM) by incubating in the mixture solution of gallic acid (GA) and hexamethylenediamine (HD) to decrease the corrosion rate and provide primary amines (-NH2), carboxyl (-COOH), and quinone groups, which is supposed to introduce biomolecules on MZM. Chemical structures of the MZM-GAHD and MZM-HEP-GAHD were explored by analyzing the results of FTIR and XPS comprehensively. Furthermore, it was proved that the heparin (HEP) molecules were successfully immobilized on MZM-GAHD surface through carbodiimide method. The evaluation of platelet adhesion and clotting time test showed that MZM-HEP-GAHD had higher anticoagulation than MZM-GAHD. Through electrochemical detection (polarization curves and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy Nyquist spectrum) and immersion test (Mg(2+) concentration and weight loss), it was proved that compared to MZM, both the MZM-GAHD and MZM-HEP-GAHD significantly improved the corrosion resistance. Finally, in vivo experimentation indicated that mass loss had no significant difference between MZM-1:1, MZM-HEP-1:1, and MZM. However, the trend still suggested that MZM-1:1 and MZM-HEP-1:1 possessed corrosion resistance property. PMID:26479205

  2. Electrochemical behaviors of the magnesium alloy substrates in various pretreatment solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Yanping; Yu, Gang; Hu, Bonian; Lei, Xiping; Yi, Haibo; Zhang, Jun

    2010-02-01

    Interface reactions and film features of AZ91D magnesium alloy in pickling, activation and zinc immersion solutions have been investigated. The surface morphologies of the specimens were observed with scanning electron microscope (SEM). Electrochemical behaviors of AZ91D magnesium alloy in the baths of pickling, activation and zinc immersion were analyzed based on the open circuit potential (OCP) - time curves in various solutions. The results show that the corrosive rate in HNO 3 + CrO 3 or HNO 3 + H 3PO 4 pickling solution was more rapid than in KMnO 4 pickling-activation solution. Both ? phase and ? phase of the substrates were uniformly corroded in HNO 3 + CrO 3 or HNO 3 + H 3PO 4 pickling solution, the coarse surface can augment the mechanical occlusive force between the subsequent coatings and the substrates, so coatings with good adhesion can be obtained. In HF activation solution, the chromic compound formed via HNO 3 + CrO 3 pickling was removed and a compact MgF 2 film was formed on the substrate surface. In K 4P 2O 7 activation solution, the corrosion products formed via HNO 3 + H 3PO 4 pickling were removed, a new thin film of oxides and hydroxides was formed on the substrate surface. In KMnO 4 pickling-activation solution, a film of manganic oxides and phosphates was adhered on the substrate surface. Zinc film was symmetrically produced via K 4P 2O 7 activation or KMnO 4 pickling-activation, so it was good interlayer for Ni or Cu electroplating. Asymmetrical zinc film was produced because the MgF 2 film obtained in the HF activation solution had strong adhesive attraction and it was not suitable for interlayer for electroplating. However, the substrate containing compact MgF 2 film without zinc immersion was fit for direct electroless Ni-P plating.

  3. Multi-Objective Optimization of a Wrought Magnesium Alloy for High Strength and Ductility

    SciTech Connect

    Radhakrishnan, Balasubramaniam; Gorti, Sarma B; Patton, Robert M; Simunovic, Srdjan

    2013-01-01

    An optimization technique is coupled with crystal plasticity based finite element (CPFE) computations to aid the microstructural design of a wrought magnesium alloy for improved strength and ductility. The initial microstructure consists of a collection of sub-micron sized grains containing deformation twins. The variables used in the simulations are crystallographic texture, and twin spacing within the grains. It is assumed that plastic deformation occurs mainly by dislocation slip on two sets of slip systems classified as hard and soft modes. The hard modes are those slip systems that are inclined to the twin planes and the soft mode consists of dislocation glide along the twin plane. The CPFE code calculates the stress-strain response of the microstructure as a function of the microstructural parameters and the length-scale of the features. A failure criterion based on a critical shear strain and a critical hydrostatic stress is used to define ductility. The optimization is based on the sequential generation of an initial population defined by the texture and twin spacing variables. The CPFE code and the optimizer are coupled in parallel so that new generations are created and analyzed dynamically. In each successive generation, microstructures that satisfy at least 90% of the mean strength and mean ductility in the current generation are retained. Multiple generation runs based on the above procedure are carried out in order to obtain maximum strength-ductility combinations. The implications of the computations for the design of a wrought magnesium alloy are discussed. Research sponsored by the Laboratory Directed Research and Development Program of Oak Ridge National Laboratory, managed by UT-Battelle, LLC, for the U. S. Department of Energy.

  4. Finite-Element Damage Analysis for Failure Prediction of Warm Hydroforming Tubular Magnesium Alloy Sheets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chan, L. C.

    2015-02-01

    Bursting has been recognized by many researchers as a common failure mode in the tube hydroforming (THF) process. Therefore, the prediction of the bursting that occurs during the THF process has received much attention in the manufacturing industry and research institutions. Effective prediction of failure can reduce significantly the number of practical trials required to obtain the desired products. However, the prediction of such bursting for magnesium-based (Mg-based) alloy can be a rather difficult issue due to the nonlinear nature of the model used to describe the deformation process at elevated temperatures. This article proposes the failure prediction of Mg-based alloy during the THF process at elevated temperatures by using the Marciniak and Kuczynski (M-K) model. In the study, numerical simulation was performed by the finite-element (FE) analysis commercial software ABAQUS, with the material model assumed to be elastic-plastic. The constitutive model of Mg-based alloy (AZ31B) tube at different elevated temperatures, for instance at 493 K, 523 K, and 553 K, was represented by the Fields-Backofen constitutive equation, with material parameters collected from relevant literature. Accordingly, THF experiments were conducted by a self-developed thermal hydroforming attachment coping with an existing hydraulic power press to validate the prediction of the numerical results. The geometrical parameters for the specimen tubes used in the experiment were Ø22 × 150 mm, and 1.5 mm wall thickness. The numerical and the experimental results were demonstrated to have good agreement. The results of the simulation and the THF experiments imply that the model proposed in this study can provide a reliable prediction of the failure analysis of the Mg-based alloy tube during the THF process.

  5. Analysis of Solid State Bonding in the Extrusion Process of Magnesium Alloys --Numerical Prediction and Experimental Verification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alharthi, Nabeel H.

    The automotive industry developments focused on increasing fuel efficiency are accomplished by weight reduction of vehicles, which consequently results in less negative environmental impact. Usage of low density materials such as Magnesium alloys is an approach to replace heavier structural components. One of the challenges in deformation processing of Magnesium is its low formability attributed to the hexagonal close packed (hcp) crystal structure. The extrusion process is one of the most promising forming processes for Magnesium because it applies a hydrostatic compression state of stress during deformation resulting in improved workability. Many researchers have attempted to fully understand solid state bonding during deformation in different structural materials such as Aluminum, Copper and other metals and alloys. There is a lack of sufficient understanding of the extrusion welding in these materials as well as very limited knowledge on this subject for hollow profiles made from Magnesium alloys. The weld integrity and the characteristic of the welding microstructure are generally unknown. In this dissertation three related research projects are investigated by using different tools such as microstructure characterization, mechanical testing, thermo-mechanical physical simulation and finite element numerical modeling. Project 1: Microstructure characterization supported by mechanical testing of the extrusion welding regions in Magnesium alloy AM30 extrudate. The microstructure characterization was conducted using Light Optical Microscopy (LOM), in addition to LOM the electron backscattered diffraction (EBSD) technique was implemented to characterize in depth the deformed and welded microstructure. Project 2: Finite element numerical simulation of AM30 extrudate to model different process parameters and their influence on localized state variables such as strain, strain rate, temperature and normal pressure within the weld zone. Project 3: Physical simulation of the extrusion welding by using Gleeble 3500 thermo-mechanical simulator to create deformation welds in Magnesium alloy AM30 samples in compression test under various temperatures and strain rates conditions. Based on the obtained results from the performed research projects and literature review, a new qualitative criterion of extrusion welding has been introduced as contribution to the field. The criterion and its analysis have provided better understanding of material response to processing parameters and assisted in selecting the processing windows for good practices in the extrusion process. In addition, the new approach contributed to better understanding and evaluating the quality of the solid state bonding of Mg alloy. Accordingly, the criteria help to avoiding formation of potential mechanical and metallurgical imperfections.

  6. Transient Heat and Material Flow Modeling of Friction Stir Processing of Magnesium Alloy using Threaded Tool

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, Zhenzhen; Zhang, Wei; Choo, Hahn; Feng, Zhili

    2012-01-01

    A three-dimensional transient computational fluid dynamics (CFD) model was developed to investigate the material flow and heat transfer during friction stir processing (FSP) in an AZ31B magnesium alloy. The material was assumed to be a non-Newtonian viscoplastic fluid, and the Zener-Hollomon parameter was used to describe the dependence of material viscosity on temperature and strain rate. The material constants used in the constitutive equation were determined experimentally from compression tests of the AZ31B Mg alloy under a wide range of strain rates and temperatures. A dynamic mesh method, combining both Lagrangian and Eulerian formulations, was used to capture the material flow induced by the movement of the threaded tool pin. Massless inert particles were embedded in the simulation domain to track the detailed history of material flow. The actual FSP was also carried out on a wrought Mg plate where temperature profiles were recorded by embedding thermocouples. The predicted transient temperature history was found to be consistent with that measured during FSP. Finally, the influence of the thread on the simulated results of thermal history and material flow was studied by comparing two models: one with threaded pin and the other with smooth pin surface.

  7. Comparative analysis of the friction stir welded aluminum-magnesium alloy joint grain structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaikina, A. A.; Sizova, O. V.; Novitskaya, O. S.

    2015-10-01

    A comparative test of the friction stir welded aluminum-magnesium alloy joint microstructure for plates of a different thickness was carried out. Finding out the structuring regularities in the weld nugget zone, that is the strongest zone of the weld, the effects of temperature-deformational conditions on the promotion of a metal structure refinement mechanism under friction stir welding can be determined. In this research friction stir welded rolled plates of an AMg5M alloy; 5 and 8 mm thick were investigated. Material fine structure pictures of the nugget zone were used to identify and measure subgrain and to define a second phase location. By means of optical microscopy it was shown that the fine-grained structure developed in the nugget zone. The grain size was 5 flm despite the thickness of the plates. In the sample 5.0 mm thick grains were coaxial, while in the sample 8.0 mm thick grains were elongate at a certain angle to the tool travel direction.

  8. ZM-21 magnesium alloy corrosion properties and cryogenic to elevated temperature mechanical properties

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Montana, J. W.; Nelson, E. E.

    1972-01-01

    The mechanical properties of bare ZM-21 magnesium alloy flat tensile specimens were determined for test temperatures of +400 F, +300 F, +200 F, +80 F, 0 F, -100 F, -200 F, and -320 F. The ultimate tensile and yield strengths of the material increased with decreasing temperature with a corresponding reduction in elongation values. Stress corrosion tests performed under: (1) MSFC atmospheric conditions; (2) 95% relative humidity; and (3) submerged in 100 ppm chloride solution for 8 weeks indicated that the alloy is not susceptible to stress corrosion. The corrosion tests indicated that the material is susceptible to attack by crevice corrosion in high humidity and chemical type attack by chloride solution. Atmospheric conditions at MSFC did not produce any adverse effects on the material, probably due to the rapid formation of a protective oxide coating. In both the mechanical properties and the stress corrosion evaluations the test specimens which were cut transverse to the rolling direction had superior properties when compared to the longitudinal properties.

  9. Microstructural and textural evolution of AZ61 magnesium alloy sheet during bidirectional cyclic bending

    SciTech Connect

    Huo, Qinghuan; Yang, Xuyue Ma, Jijun; Sun, Huan; Qin, Jia; Jiang, Yupei

    2013-05-15

    In this work, the microstructural and textural evolution in the sheets of AZ61 magnesium alloy was studied by means of bidirectional cyclic bending for 8 passes at 623 K. The bended samples were examined by optical microscopy and electron backscatter diffraction analysis. The results showed that a gradient structure with fine grains about 3 ?m in the regions near two surfaces and, in contrast, coarse grains in the middle of the sheet were formed. The evident grain refinement was attributed to twin-assisted dynamic recrystallization and continuous dynamic recrystallization induced by kink bands. The texture intensity was clearly reduced, resulting in a negative gradient distribution, with the texture intensity decreases from the center of the sheet to two surfaces. The weakened texture greatly facilitated the reduction of the yield strength. A higher fracture elongation and a slightly improved ultimate tensile strength were achieved concurrently. - Highlights: • The AZ61 Mg alloy is deformed at 623 K by bidirectional cyclic bending. • A symmetric gradient distribution of fine grains along the thickness is formed. • The basal texture in the regions near two surfaces is weakened significantly.

  10. Atomistic analysis of short range interaction and local chemical order in LPSO structures of Magnesium alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fronzi, Marco; Kimizuka, Hajime; Matsubara, Kazuki; Ogata, Shigenobu

    2013-03-01

    Magnesium alloys have been object of interest as lightweight material with high strength weight ratio. In particular Long Period Stacking Ordered (LPSO) structure phases show to have a strong influence in enhancing mechanical properties of such kind alloys. However the chemical order of the interacting atomic species in the Mg lattice has not been fully understood. We perform first principles Density Functional Theory (DFT) calculation to compute formation energies as well as interaction energies of the doping atoms in both Faced Centered Cubic (FCC) and Hexagonal Close Packed (HCP) Mg lattices. In particular we consider the Mg-Al-Gd and Mg-Zn-Y ternary systems. We also calculate activation energies for vacancy assisted doping atoms diffusion in order to perform a further analysis of the kinetics of the process. In order to describe short range interaction and cluster formation in the Mg matrix, we build an on lattice potential based on first principles DFT interaction energies. By means of these inter-atomic potentials, we perform Monte Carlo simulations to analyze the chemical order occurring in LPSO Mg-Al-Gd structures.

  11. Surface composite nanostructures of AZ91 magnesium alloy induced by high current pulsed electron beam treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, M. C.; Hao, S. Z.; Wen, H.; Huang, R. F.

    2014-06-01

    High current pulsed electron beam (HCPEB) treatment was conducted on an AZ91 cast magnesium alloy with accelerating voltage 27 kV, energy density 3 J/cm2 and pulse duration 2.5 ?s. The surface microstructure was characterized by optical microscope (OM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscope (SEM) equipped with energy dispersive spectrometer (EDS), and transmission electron microscope (TEM). The surface corrosion property was tested with electrochemical method in 3.5 wt.% NaCl solution. It is found that after 1 pulse of HCPEB treatment, the initial eutectic ? phase and Mg17Al12 particles started to dissolve in the surface modified layer of depth ˜15 ?m. When using 15 HCPEB pulses, the Al content in surface layer increased noticeably, and the phase structure was modified as composite nanostructures consisted of nano-grained Mg3.1Al0.9 domains surrounded by network of Mg17Al12 phase. The HCPEB treated samples showed an improved corrosion resistance with cathodic current density decreased by two orders of magnitude as compared to the initial AZ91 alloy.

  12. Corrosion behaviour of magnesium alloys coated with TiN by cathodic arc deposition in NaCl and Na{sub 2}SO{sub 4} solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Altun, Hikmet Sinici, Hakan

    2008-03-15

    Magnesium-based light-metal alloys belong to a class of structural materials with increasing industrial attention. Magnesium alloys show the lowest density among the engineering metallic materials, low cost and large availability. However, the limitations according to mechanical strength and the low corrosion resistance restrict their practical application. In this study, TiN was coated on magnesium-based AZ91 magnesium-aluminium-zinc alloy using cathodic arc PVD process. The corrosion behaviours of uncoated and coated magnesium alloys in 1% NaCl, 3% NaCl and 3% Na{sub 2}SO{sub 4} solutions and the influence of the coatings on the corrosion behaviour of the substrate were investigated utilizing potentiodynamic polarization tests. A potentiostat for electrochemical corrosion tests, a cathodic arc physical vapour deposition coating system for coating processes, a scanning electron microscopy for surface examination and elemental analysis of the coatings were used in this study. It was determined that corrosion resistance of magnesium alloys can be increased with TiN coating on the alloys using cathodic arc PVD process.

  13. Insitu grown superhydrophobic Zn-Al layered double hydroxides films on magnesium alloy to improve corrosion properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Meng; Pang, Xiaolu; Wei, Liang; Gao, Kewei

    2015-05-01

    A hierarchical superhydrophobic zinc-aluminum layered double hydroxides (Zn-Al LDHs) film has been fabricated on a magnesium alloy substrate via a facile hydrothermal crystallization method following chemical modification. The characteristics of the films were investigated by X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electronic microscope (SEM), and energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS). XRD patterns and SEM images showed that the micro/nanoscale hierarchical LDHs film surfaces composed of ZnO nanorods and Zn-Al LDHs nanowalls structures. The static contact angle (CA) for the prepared surfaces was observed at around 165.6°. The corrosion resistance of the superhydrophobic films was estimated by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) and potentiondynamic polarization measurement. EIS and polarization measurements revealed that the superhydrophobic Zn-Al LDHs coated magnesium alloy had better corrosion resistance in neutral 3.5 wt.% NaCl solution.

  14. Tensile properties of AZ11A-0 magnesium-alloy sheet under rapid-heating and constant temperature

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kurg, Ivo M

    1956-01-01

    Specimens of AZ31A-0 magnesium alloy sheet were heated to rupture at nominal rates of 0.2 F to 100 F per second under constant tensile load conditions. The data are presented and compared with the results of conventional tensile stress-strain tests at elevated temperatures after 1.2-hour exposure. A temperature-rate parameter was used to construct master curves from which stresses and temperatures for yield and rupture can be predicted under rapid-heating conditions. A comparison of the elevated-temperature tensile properties of AZ31A-0 and HK31XA-H24 magnesium-alloy sheet under both constant-temperature and rapid-heating conditions is included.

  15. The Effect of SiC Particle Addition During FSW on Microstructure and Mechanical Properties of AZ31 Magnesium Alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abbasi, M.; Abdollahzadeh, A.; Bagheri, B.; Omidvar, H.

    2015-11-01

    Welding and joining of magnesium alloys exert a profound effect on magnesium application expansion, especially in ground and air transportations where large-size, complex components are required. Due to specific physical properties of magnesium, its welding requires great control. In general, the solid-state nature of friction stir welding (FSW) process has been found to produce a low concentration of defects. In the current research, specimens from AZ31 magnesium alloy were welded together using the friction stir process with previously inserted SiC powder particles in the nugget zone. In other words, during the FSW process, the pre-placed SiC particles were stirred throughout the nugget zone of the weld. The results indicated that proper values of rotation and translation speeds led to good appearance of weld zone and suitable distribution of SiC particles producing increased weld strength. The comparison of the microstructures and mechanical properties of FS-welded AZ31 with those of FS-welded one using pre-placed SiC particles showed that the addition of SiC particles decreased the grain size and increased the strength and the formability index.

  16. Application of neutron diffraction in characterization of texture evolution during high-temperature creep in magnesium alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Vogel, Sven C; Sediako, Dimitry; Shook, S; Sediako, A

    2010-01-01

    A good combination of room-temperature and elevated temperature strength and ductility, good salt-spray corrosion resistance and exceUent diecastability are frequently among the main considerations in development of a new alloy. Unfortunately, there has been much lesser effort in development of wrought-stock alloys for high temperature applications. Extrudability and high temperature performance of wrought material becomes an important factor in an effort to develop new wrought alloys and processing technologies. This paper shows some results received in creep testing and studies of in-creep texture evolution for several wrought magnesium alloys developed for use in elevated-temperature applications. These studies were performed using E3 neutron spectrometer of the Canadian Neutron Beam Centre in Chalk River, ON, and HIPPO time-of-flight (TOF) spectrometer at Los Alamos Neutron Science Center, NM.

  17. A Review of Stress-Corrosion Cracking and Corrosion Fatigue of Magnesium Alloys for Biodegradable Implant Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jafari, Sajjad; Harandi, Shervin Eslami; Singh Raman, R. K.

    2015-05-01

    Magnesium (Mg) alloys have recently attracted great attention as potential biodegradable materials for temporary implant applications. It is essential for any implant material to have adequate resistance to cracking or fracture in actual body environments. The most important mechanisms by which implants may fail are stress corrosion cracking (SCC) and corrosion fatigue (CF). This article presents an overview of the current knowledge of SCC and CF of Mg alloys in chloride-containing corrosive environments including simulated body fluid (SBF) and the associated fracture mechanisms, as well as critical relevance to biodegradable implant applications.

  18. Dual-beam laser welding of AZ31B magnesium alloy in zero-gap lap joint configuration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harooni, Masoud; Carlson, Blair; Kovacevic, Radovan

    2014-03-01

    Porosity within laser welds of magnesium alloys is one of the main roadblocks to achieving high quality joints. One of the causes of pore formation is the presence of pre-existing coatings on the surface of magnesium alloy such as oxide or chromate layers. In this study, single-beam and dual-beam laser heat sources are investigated in relation to mitigation of pores resulting from the presence of the as-received oxide layer on the surface of AZ31B-H24 magnesium alloy during the laser welding process. A fiber laser with a power of up to 4 kW is used to weld samples in a zero-gap lap joint configuration. The effect of dual-beam laser welding with different beam energy ratios is studied on the quality of the weld bead. The purpose of this paper is to identify the beam ratio that best mitigates pore formation in the weld bead. The laser molten pool and the keyhole condition, as well as laser-induced plasma plume are monitored in real-time by use of a high speed charge-coupled device (CCD) camera assisted with a green laser as an illumination source. Tensile and microhardness tests were used to measure the mechanical properties of the laser welded samples. Results showed that a dual-beam laser configuration can effectively mitigate pore formation in the weld bead by a preheating-welding mechanism.

  19. Effect of alloying elements on the texture and the anisotropy of the mechanical properties of magnesium alloys with REM, lithium, and aluminum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Betsofen, S. Ya.; Rokhlin, L. L.; Wu, R.; Lozovan, A. A.; Voskresenskaya, I. I.

    2014-11-01

    The formation of the texture and the anisotropy of the mechanical properties in extruded rods of commercial alloys MA5, MA18, MA21 and also experimental Mg-Y-based and Mg-Y-Ce-based alloys are studied by X-ray diffraction and the measurement of the hardness and the tensile and compressive properties. It is shown that the magnesium alloys can be separated into three groups according to the anisotropy of the mechanical properties. The first group consists of the alloys not containing rare-earth metals and lithium, and the second group is the alloys with yttrium for which the yield strength in the axial direction of the rods are significantly higher than those in the transverse direction. The alloys of the first group demonstrate a substantial excess of the yield strength in the axial direction in the tension tests as compared to those in compression tests, and the second group alloys do not demonstrate such a difference. The ceriumand lithium-containing alloys (the third group) exhibit a weak anisotropy of the strength properties. A method for estimating the anisotropy of the strength properties is developed on the basis of calculation of the Taylor factors for basal slip averaged over all orientations of crystallites, and a quantitative method is developed for determining the phase composition by measuring the solid solution lattice parameter.

  20. Microstructure and corrosion behavior of die-cast AM60B magnesium alloys in a complex salt solution: A slow positron beam study

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Y.F.; Qin, Q.L.; Yang, W.; Wen, W.; Zhai, T.; Yu, B.; Liu, D.Y.; Luo, A.; Song, GuangLing

    2014-01-01

    The microstructure and corrosion behavior of high pressure die-cast (HPDC) and super vacuum die-cast (SVDC) AM60B magnesium alloys were investigated in a complex salt solution using slow positron beam technique and potentiodynamic polarization tests. The experiments revealed that a CaCO3 film was formed on the surface of the alloys and that the rate of CaCO3 formation for the SVDC alloy with immersion time was slower than that of the HPDC alloy. The larger volume fraction of b-phase in the skin layer of the SVDC alloy than that of the HPDC alloy was responsible for the better corrosion resistance.

  1. Infiltration and wetting of alumina particulate preforms by aluminum and aluminum-magnesium alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Jonas, T.R.; Cornie, J.A.; Russel, K.C.

    1995-06-01

    The infiltration and wetting of alumina particulates by Al and by Al-Mg alloys was studied through pressure infiltration experiments. In these experiments, a noninvasive capacitance technique was used to determine the infiltration front position as a function of time. An unsaturated slug flow model was used to interpret the infiltration results and determine capillary pressures characteristic of the infiltration process. The characteristic capillary pressures for Al, Al-2Mg, and Al-3Mg at 750 C and Al-2Mg at 850 C were not significantly different. Therefore, contrary to usual belief, Mg did not significantly aid the pressure infiltration process. At 750 C, the maximum values of the contact angle calculated from these capillary pressure were 106 deg for Al and 105 deg for Al-2Mg and Al-3Mg. These contact angle values indicate substantial removal of the oxide layer on the surface of the liquid metal during the infiltration process. The small difference in the contact angles indicates that magnesium had little effect on the wetting of alumina by aluminum. The small effect of Mg on the wetting may be due to absence of reactive wetting at the infiltration speeds present in the experiments and to partial disruption of the oxide layer on the surface of the liquid metal during the infiltration process.

  2. Layer-by-Layer Assembly of a Self-Healing Anticorrosion Coating on Magnesium Alloys.

    PubMed

    Fan, Fan; Zhou, Chunyu; Wang, Xu; Szpunar, Jerzy

    2015-12-16

    Fabrication of self-healing anticorrosion coatings has attracted attention as it has the ability to extend the service life and prevent the substrate from corrosive attack. However, a coating system with a rapid self-healing ability and an improved corrosion resistance is rarely reported. In this work, we developed a self-healing anticorrosion coating on a magnesium alloy (AZ31). The coating comprises a cerium-based conversion layer, a graphene oxide layer, and a branched poly(ethylene imine) (PEI)/poly(acrylic acid) (PAA) multilayer. We incorporated the graphene oxide as corrosion inhibitors and used the PEI/PAA multilayers to provide the self-healing ability to the coating systems. X-ray diffraction (XRD) and Raman spectroscopy were used to characterize the composition of the multilayers, and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) was used to analyze the surface morphology. The electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) results illustrate the improved corrosion resistance of the coating. The proposed coating also has a rapid self-healing ability in the presence of water. PMID:26583562

  3. CHARACTERIZATION AND FORMABILITY OF CONTINUOUS-CAST AZ31B MAGNESIUM ALLOY SHEETS

    SciTech Connect

    Rohatgi, Aashish; Herling, Darrell R.; Nyberg, Eric A.

    2009-09-24

    The goal of this work is to understand the inter-relationship between the initial properties of continuous-cast magnesium alloy (AZ31B) sheets and their subsequent formability and post-formed mechanical performance for use in cost-effective, lightweight, automotive body panels. As-received sheets, provided by the Automotive Metals Division (AMD-602) team, were characterized by surface roughness measurements using mechanical profilometry. The arithmetic mean deviation of profile (Ra) and the maximum two-point height of profile (Ry) of the as-received sheets ranged from ~0.2-2 ?m and ~2-15 ?m, respectively. Several commercial lubricants were evaluated by thermal analysis and the liquid phase of the lubricants was found to evaporate/decompose upon heating leaving behind a solid residue upon heating to temperatures exceeding ~125-150°C. Elevated temperature bending-under-tension (BUT) friction tests were conducted at 350°C and the coefficient-of-friction values ranged from a minimum of ~0.1 (for tungsten disulfide lubricant) to ~0.7 when no lubricant was used. These results, in conjunction with those from the forming trials conducted by the AMD-602 team, will be eventually used to determine the role of sheet-die friction in determining the formability of AZ31B sheets.

  4. In situ phase contrast imaging of spall and cracking in vitreous carbon, polymethylmethacrylate, and magnesium alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramos, Kyle; Jensen, Brian; Pierce, Timothy; Montgomery, David; Liu, Cheng; Zubelewicz, Aleksander; Rougier, Esteban; Iverson, Adam; Carlson, Carl; Dattelbaum, Dana; Brown, Eric; Fezzaa, Kamel

    2015-06-01

    In impact-generated compression and tension experiments, velocimetry diagnostics are used to detect dynamically created interfaces associated with material damage by observing wave interactions with free surfaces. Interpretation of these wave interactions becomes increasingly more difficult when the interfaces are sufficiently heterogeneous and oblique to the shock front. Therefore, phase contrast imaging of gas gun driven impacts has been performed at the Advanced Photon Source. Damage nucleation, propagation, and coalescence have been studied in multiple configurations for vitreous carbon, polymethylmethacrylate, and several magnesium alloys including AZ31B and AMX602. Uniaxial tension was used for obtaining spall strength and dynamic stress intensity factors. Complex tension, created from wave release off of concave and convex surfaces, was used to investigate shear dependence and stochasticity of cracking. Phase contrast images will be presented to illustrate the range of damage responses exhibited across the different classes of material in their respective microstructure and the use of concave and convex surfaces to create complex tension in planar geometries. We gratefully acknowledge Sector 32 and DCS at the APS.

  5. Geometric adaption of biodegradable magnesium alloy scaffolds to stabilise biological myocardial grafts. Part I.

    PubMed

    Bauer, M; Schilling, T; Weidling, M; Hartung, D; Biskup, Ch; Wriggers, P; Wacker, F; Bach, Fr-W; Haverich, A; Hassel, T

    2014-03-01

    Synthetic patch materials currently in use have major limitations, such as high susceptibility to infections and lack of contractility. Biological grafts are a novel approach to overcome these limitations, but do not always offer sufficient mechanical durability in early stages after implantation. Therefore, a stabilising structure based on resorbable magnesium alloys could support the biological graft until its physiologic remodelling. To prevent early breakage in vivo due to stress of non-determined forming, these scaffolds should be preformed according to the geometry of the targeted myocardial region. Thus, the left ventricular geometry of 28 patients was assessed via standard cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The resulting data served as a basis for a finite element simulation (FEM). Calculated stresses and strains of flat and preformed scaffolds were evaluated. Afterwards, the structures were manufactured by abrasive waterjet cutting and preformed according to the MRI data. Finally, the mechanical durability of the preformed and flat structures was compared in an in vitro test rig. The FEM predicted higher durability of the preformed scaffolds, which was proven in the in vitro test. In conclusion, preformed scaffolds provide extended durability and will facilitate more widespread use of regenerative biological grafts for surgical left ventricular reconstruction. PMID:24264726

  6. Experimental data confirm numerical modeling of the degradation process of magnesium alloys stents.

    PubMed

    Wu, Wei; Chen, Shanshan; Gastaldi, Dario; Petrini, Lorenza; Mantovani, Diego; Yang, Ke; Tan, Lili; Migliavacca, Francesco

    2013-11-01

    Biodegradable magnesium alloy stents (MAS) could present improved long-term clinical performances over commercial bare metal or drug-eluting stents. However, MAS were found to show limited mechanical support for diseased vessels due to fast degradation. Optimizing stent design through finite element analysis (FEA) is an efficient way to improve such properties. Following previous FEA works on design optimization and degradation modeling of MAS, this work carried out an experimental validation for the developed FEA model, thus proving its practical applicability of simulating MAS degradation. Twelve stent samples of AZ31B were manufactured according to two MAS designs (an optimized one and a conventional one), with six samples of each design. All the samples were balloon expanded and subsequently immersed in D-Hanks' solution for a degradation test lasting 14 days. The experimental results showed that the samples of the optimized design had better corrosion resistance than those of the conventional design. Furthermore, the degradation process of the samples was dominated by uniform and stress corrosion. With the good match between the simulation and the experimental results, the work shows that the FEA numerical modeling constitutes an effective tool for design and thus the improvement of novel biodegradable MAS. PMID:23128160

  7. Friction properties of protective DLC films on magnesium alloy in aqueous NaCl solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Junho; Kim, Jongduk; Nakao, Setsuo; Ikeyama, Masami; Kato, Takahisa

    2007-04-01

    Friction properties of DLC films deposited on magnesium alloy, AZ31 (Mg-3%Al-1%Zn) were investigated using a ball-on-flat type reciprocal friction tester in aqueous 0.05 M NaCl solution. The DLC, DLC/interlayer and Si-DLC films were prepared on the sputter-deposited AZ31 films on glass substrates using a bi-polar type plasma based ion implantation and deposition (PBII&D). The DLC/interlayer/AZ31 sample shows good friction and wear properties in NaCl solution, but the large corrosion pits were developed on the surface during the friction test in NaCl solution. The low adhesion strength and high internal stress of the DLC coatings on the AZ31 are the reason for the poor corrosion properties in corrosive NaCl solution. The Si-DLC coating on the AZ31 has high adhesion strength and a low internal stress, and no large corrosion pits are observed on the surface after the friction test in NaCl solution. The Si-DLC coating also shows stable friction properties.

  8. Degradation behaviors of surface modified magnesium alloy wires in different simulated physiological environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xuan; Shi, Chao; Bai, Jing; Guo, Chao; Xue, Feng; Lin, Ping-Hua; Chu, Cheng-Lin

    2014-09-01

    The degradation behaviors of the novel high-strength AZ31B magnesium alloy wires after surface modification using micro-arc-oxidization (MAO) and subsequently sealing with poly-L-lactic acid (PLLA) in different simulated physiological environments were investigated. The results show the surface MAO micropores could be physically sealed by PLLA, thus forming an effective protection to corrosion resistance for the wires. In simulated gastric fluid (SGF) at a low pH value (1.5 or 2.5), the treated wires have a high degradation rate with a rapid decrease of mass, diameter, mechanical properties and a significant increase of pH value of the immersion fluid. However, surface modification could effectively reduce the degradation rate of the treated wires in SGF with a pH value above 4.0. For the treated wires in simulated intestinal fluid at pH = 8.5, their strength retention ability is higher than that in strong acidic SGF. And the loss rate of mass is faster than that of diameter, while the pH value of the immersion fluid decreases. It should be noted that the modified wires in simulated body environment have the best strength retention ability. The wires show the different degradation behaviors indicating their different degradation mechanisms, which are also proposed in this work.

  9. Effects of CH3OH Addition on Plasma Electrolytic Oxidation of AZ31 Magnesium Alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Yongyi; Chen, Li; Yan, Zongcheng; Zhang, Yalei

    2015-09-01

    Plasma electrolytic oxidation (PEO) films on AZ31 magnesium alloys were prepared in alkaline silicate electrolytes (base electrolyte) with the addition of different volume concentrations of CH3OH, which was used to adjust the thickness of the vapor sheath. The compositions, morphologies, and thicknesses of ceramic layers formed with different CH3OH concentrations were determined via X-ray diffraction (XRD), energy-dispersive spectroscopy (EDS), and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Corrosion behavior of the oxide films was evaluated in 3.5 wt.% NaCl solution using potentiodynamic polarization tests. PEO coatings mainly comprised Mg, MgO, and Mg2SiO4. The addition of CH3OH in base electrolytes affected the thickness, pores diameter, and Mg2SiO4 content in the films. The films formed in the electrolyte containing 12% CH3OH exhibited the highest thickness. The coatings formed in the electrolyte containing different concentrations of CH3OH exhibited similar corrosion resistance. The energy consumption of PEO markedly decreased upon the addition of CH3OH to the electrolytes. The result is helpful for energy saving in the PEO process. supported by National Natural Science Foundation of China (No. 21376088), the Project of Production, Education and Research, Guangdong Province and Ministry of Education (Nos. 2012B09100063, 2012A090300015), and Guangzhou Science and Technology Plan Projects of China (No. 2014Y2-00042)

  10. Effect of microstructure on the zinc phosphate conversion coatings on magnesium alloy AZ91

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van Phuong, Nguyen; Moon, Sungmo; Chang, Doyon; Lee, Kyu Hwan

    2013-01-01

    The effect of the microstructure, particularly of ?-Mg17Al12 phase, on the formation and growth of zinc phosphate conversion coatings on magnesium alloy AZ91 (AZ91) was studied. The zinc phosphate coatings were formed on AZ91 with different microstructures produced by heat treatment. The effect of the microstructure on the zinc phosphate coatings were examined using optical microscope (OM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), coatings weight and etching weight balances, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and salt immersion test. Results showed that as-cast AZ91 contained a high volume fraction of the ?-Mg17Al12 phase and it was dissolved into ?-Mg phase during heat treatment at 400 °C. The ?-phase became center for hydrogen evolution during phosphating reaction (cathodic sites). The decreased volume fraction of the ?-phase caused decreasing both coatings weight and etching weight of the phosphating process. However, it increased the crystal size of the coatings and improved corrosion resistance of AZ91 by immersing in 0.5 M NaCl solution. Results also showed that the structure of the zinc phosphate conversion on AZ91 consisted of two layers: an outer crystal Zn3(PO4)2·4H2O (hopeite) and an inner which was mainly composed of MgZn2(PO4)2 and Mg3(PO4)2. A mechanism for the formation of two layers of the coatings was also proposed in this study.

  11. Spectroscopic study of plasma during electrolytic oxidation of magnesium-aluminium alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jovovi?, J.

    2014-12-01

    Plasma during Electrolytic Oxidation (PEO) of magnesium-aluminium alloys is studied in this work by means of Optical Emission Spectroscopy (OES). Spectral line shapes of the H?, Al II 704.21 nm and Mg II 448.11 nm line are analyzed to measure plasma electron number density Ne. From the H? line profile, two PEO processes characterized by relatively low electron number densities Ne ? 1015 cm-3 and Ne ? 2 × 1016 cm-3 were discovered while the shape and shift of Al II and Mg II lines revealed the third process characterized by large electron density Ne = (1-2) × 1017 cm-3. Low Ne processes, related with breakdown in gas bubbles and on oxide surface, are not influenced by anode material or electrolyte composition. The ejection of evaporated anode material through oxide layer is designated here as third PEO process. Using the Boltzmann plot technique, electron temperature of 4000 K and 33000 K is determined from relative intensities of Mg I and O II lines, respectively. Several difficulties in the analysis of spectral line shapes are met during this study and the ways to overcome some of the obstacles are demonstrated.

  12. Influence of circumferential notch and fatigue crack on the mechanical integrity of biodegradable magnesium-based alloy in simulated body fluid.

    PubMed

    Bobby Kannan, M; Singh Raman, R K; Witte, F; Blawert, C; Dietzel, W

    2011-02-01

    Applications of magnesium alloys as biodegradable orthopaedic implants are critically dependent on the mechanical integrity of the implant during service. In this study, the mechanical integrity of an AZ91 magnesium alloy was studied using a constant extension rate tensile (CERT) method. The samples in two different geometries that is, circumferentially notched (CN), and circumferentially notched and fatigue cracked (CNFC), were tested in air and in simulated body fluid (SBF). The test results show that the mechanical integrity of the AZ91 magnesium alloy decreased substantially (?50%) in both the CN and CNFC samples exposed to SBF. Fracture surface analysis revealed secondary cracks suggesting stress corrosion cracking susceptibility of the alloy in SBF. PMID:21210510

  13. In-vitro characterization of stress corrosion cracking of aluminium-free magnesium alloys for temporary bio-implant applications.

    PubMed

    Choudhary, Lokesh; Singh Raman, R K; Hofstetter, Joelle; Uggowitzer, Peter J

    2014-09-01

    The complex interaction between physiological stresses and corrosive human body fluid may cause premature failure of metallic biomaterials due to the phenomenon of stress corrosion cracking. In this study, the susceptibility to stress corrosion cracking of biodegradable and aluminium-free magnesium alloys ZX50, WZ21 and WE43 was investigated by slow strain rate tensile testing in a simulated human body fluid. Slow strain rate tensile testing results indicated that each alloy was susceptible to stress corrosion cracking, and this was confirmed by fractographic features of transgranular and/or intergranular cracking. However, the variation in alloy susceptibility to stress corrosion cracking is explained on the basis of their electrochemical and microstructural characteristics. PMID:25063163

  14. Quantitative Analysis of Composition Change in AZ31 Magnesium Alloy Using CF-LIBS After Laser Material Processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Dehua; Cao, Yu; Zhong, Rong; Chen, Xiaojing

    2015-11-01

    The concentration of elements in molten metal of AZ31 magnesium alloy after long pulsed Nd:YAG laser processing was quantitatively analyzed by using calibration-free laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (CF-LIBS). The composition change in AZ31 magnesium alloy under different laser pulse width was also investigated. The experimental results showed that CF-LIBS can obtain satisfactory quantitative or semi-quantitative results for matrix or major elements, while only qualitative analysis was possible for minor or trace elements. Moreover, it is found that the chemical composition of molten metal will change after laser processing. The concentration of magnesium in molten metal is lower than that present in the base metal. The Mg loss increases with an increase of pulse width in the laser processing. This result shows that the selective vaporization of different elements is affected by the pulse width during laser processing. supported by National Natural Science Foundation of China (Nos. 61405147, 51375348) and the Scientific Research Fund of Zhejiang Provincial Education Department, China (No. Y201430387)

  15. Biocorrosion and osteoconductivity of PCL/nHAp composite porous film-based coating of magnesium alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdal-hay, Abdalla; Amna, Touseef; Lim, Jae Kyoo

    2013-04-01

    The present study was aimed at designing a novel porous hydroxyapatite/poly(?-caprolactone) (nHAp/PCL) hybrid nanocomposite matrix on a magnesium substrate with high and low porosity. The coated samples were prepared using a dip-coating technique in order to enhance the bioactivity and biocompatibility of the implant and to control the degradation rate of magnesium alloys. The mechanical and biocompatible properties of the coated and uncoated samples were investigated and an in vitro test for corrosion was conducted by electrochemical polarization and measurement of weight loss. The corrosion test results demonstrated that both the pristine PCL and nHAp/PCL composites showed good corrosion resistance in SBF. However, during the extended incubation time, the composite coatings exhibited more uniform and superior resistance to corrosion attack than pristine PCL, and were able to survive severe localized corrosion in physiological solution. Furthermore, the bioactivity of the composite film was determined by the rapid formation of uniform CaP nanoparticles on the sample surfaces during immersion in SBF. The mechanical integrity of the composite coatings displayed better performance (˜34% higher) than the uncoated samples. Finally, our results suggest that the nHAp incorporated with novel PCL composite membranes on magnesium substrates may serve as an excellent 3-D platform for cell attachment, proliferation, migration, and growth in bone tissue. This novel as-synthesized nHAp/PCL membrane on magnesium implants could be used as a potential material for orthopedic applications in the future.

  16. Tailoring the degradation and biological response of a magnesium-strontium alloy for potential bone substitute application.

    PubMed

    Han, Junjie; Wan, Peng; Ge, Ye; Fan, Xinmin; Tan, Lili; Li, Jianjun; Yang, Ke

    2016-01-01

    Bone defects are very challenging in orthopedic practice. There are many practical and clinical shortcomings in the repair of the defect by using autografts, allografts or xenografts, which continue to motivate the search for better alternatives. The ideal bone grafts should provide mechanical support, fill osseous voids and enhance the bone healing. Biodegradable magnesium-strontium (Mg-Sr) alloys demonstrate good biocompatibility and osteoconductive properties, which are promising biomaterials for bone substitutes. The aim of this study was to evaluate and pair the degradation of Mg-Sr alloys for grafting with their clinical demands. The microstructure and performance of Mg-Sr alloys, in vitro degradation and biological properties including in vitro cytocompatibility and in vivo implantation were investigated. The results showed that the as-cast Mg-Sr alloy exhibited a rapid degradation rate compared with the as-extruded alloy due to the intergranular distribution of the second phase and micro-galvanic corrosion. However, the initial degradation could be tailored by the coating protection, which was proved to be cytocompatible and also suitable for bone repair observed by in vivo implantation. The integrated fracture calluses were formed and bridged the fracture gap without gas bubble accumulation, meanwhile the substitutes simultaneously degraded. In conclusion, the as-cast Mg-Sr alloy with coating is potential to be used for bone substitute alternative. PMID:26478374

  17. Improved stress corrosion cracking resistance of a novel biodegradable EW62 magnesium alloy by rapid solidification, in simulated electrolytes.

    PubMed

    Hakimi, O; Aghion, E; Goldman, J

    2015-06-01

    The high corrosion rate of magnesium (Mg) and Mg-alloys precludes their widespread acceptance as implantable biomaterials. Here, we investigated the potential for rapid solidification (RS) to increase the stress corrosion cracking (SCC) resistance of a novel Mg alloy, Mg-6%Nd-2%Y-0.5%Zr (EW62), in comparison to its conventionally cast (CC) counterpart. RS ribbons were extrusion consolidated in order to generate bioimplant-relevant geometries for testing and practical use. Microstructural characteristics were examined by SEM. Corrosion rates were calculated based upon hydrogen evolution during immersion testing. The surface layer of the tested alloys was analyzed by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). Stress corrosion resistance was assessed by slow strain rate testing and fractography. The results indicate that the corrosion resistance of the RS alloy is significantly improved relative to the CC alloy due to a supersaturated Nd enrichment that increases the Nd2O3 content in the external oxide layer, as well as a more homogeneous structure and reduced grain size. These improvements contributed to the reduced formation of hydrogen gas and hydrogen embrittlement, which reduced the SCC sensitivity relative to the CC alloy. Therefore, EW62 in the form of a rapidly solidified extruded structure may serve as a biodegradable implant for biomedical applications. PMID:25842129

  18. Modeling High Temperature Deformation Behavior of Large-Scaled Mg-Al-Zn Magnesium Alloy Fabricated by Semi-continuous Casting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jianping; Xia, Xiangsheng

    2015-09-01

    In order to improve the understanding of the hot deformation and dynamic recrystallization (DRX) behaviors of large-scaled AZ80 magnesium alloy fabricated by semi-continuous casting, compression tests were carried out in the temperature range from 250 to 400 °C and strain rate range from 0.001 to 0.1 s-1 on a Gleeble 1500 thermo-mechanical machine. The effects of the temperature and strain rate on the hot deformation behavior have been expressed by means of the conventional hyperbolic sine equation, and the influence of the strain has been incorporated in the equation by considering its effect on different material constants for large-scaled AZ80 magnesium alloy. In addition, the DRX behavior has been discussed. The result shows that the deformation temperature and strain rate exerted remarkable influences on the flow stress. The constitutive equation of large-scaled AZ80 magnesium alloy for hot deformation at steady-state stage (? = 0.5) was The true stress-true strain curves predicted by the extracted model were in good agreement with the experimental results, thereby confirming the validity of the developed constitutive relation. The DRX kinetic model of large-scaled AZ80 magnesium alloy was established as X d = 1 - exp[-0.95((? - ?c)/?*)2.4904]. The rate of DRX increases with increasing deformation temperature, and high temperature is beneficial for achieving complete DRX in the large-scaled AZ80 magnesium alloy.

  19. Evaluating the improvement of corrosion residual strength by adding 1.0 wt.% yttrium into an AZ91D magnesium alloy

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Qiang; Liu Yaohui; Fang Shijie; Song Yulai; Zhang Dawei; Zhang Lina; Li Chunfang

    2010-06-15

    The influence of yttrium on the corrosion residual strength of an AZ91D magnesium alloy was investigated detailedly. Scanning electron microscope was employed to analyze the microstructure and the fractography of the studied alloys. The microstructure of AZ91D magnesium alloy is remarkably refined due to the addition of yttrium. The electrochemical potentiodynamic polarization curve of the studied alloy was performed with a CHI 660b electrochemical station in the three-electrode system. The result reveals that yttrium significantly promotes the overall corrosion resistance of AZ91D magnesium alloy by suppressing the cathodic reaction in corrosion process. However, the nucleation and propagation of corrosion pits on the surface of the 1.0 wt.% Y modified AZ91D magnesium alloy indicate that pitting corrosion still emerges after the addition of yttrium. Furthermore, stress concentration caused by corrosion pits should be responsible for the drop of corrosion residual strength although the addition of yttrium remarkably weakens the effect of stress concentration at the tip of corrosion pits in loading process.

  20. Reactive sputter deposition of alumina films on magnesium alloy by double cathode glow-discharge plasma technique

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou Chenghou; Xu Jiang; Jiang Shuyun

    2010-02-15

    In order to overcome the problem of the corrosion resistance of AZ31 magnesium alloy, the nanocrystalline Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} film was deposited on AZ31 magnesium alloy by double cathode glow-discharge plasma technique. The microstructure, chemical composition and elemental chemical state of the sputter-deposited nanocrystalline Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} film were analyzed by means of scanning electron microscopy equipped with an energy dispersive spectroscope, X-ray diffraction), transmission electron microscope and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The results indicated that the sputter-deposited nanocrystalline Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} film consisted of single {theta}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} phase with average grain size about 60 nm. The hardness and the elastic modulus of the as-deposited nanocrystalline Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} film were about 17.21 GPa and 217 GPa measured by nanoindentation instrument, respectively. The corrosion behavior of the sputter-deposited nanocrystalline Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} film in 3.5%NaCl solution was investigated by potentiodynamic polarization and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. The amount of porosity for the sputter-deposited nanocrystalline Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} film calculated by two electrochemical methods was equal to 0.0086% and 0.168%, respectively. The sputter-deposited nanocrystalline Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} film exhibited excellent corrosion resistance, which was attributed to its dense enough structure to prevent magnesium alloy from corrosion in aggressive solutions.

  1. Electroless Ni-P/Ni-B duplex coatings for improving the hardness and the corrosion resistance of AZ91D magnesium alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, W. X.; Jiang, Z. H.; Li, G. Y.; Jiang, Q.; Lian, J. S.

    2008-06-01

    The Ni-P/Ni-B duplex coatings were deposited on AZ91D magnesium alloy by electroless plating process and their structure, morphology, microhardness and corrosion resistance were evaluated. The duplex coatings were prepared using dual baths (acidic hypophosphite- and alkaline borohydride-reduced electroless nickel baths) with Ni-P as the inner layer. The coatings were amorphous in as-plated condition and crystallized and produced nickel borides upon heat-treatment. SEM observations showed that the duplex interface on the magnesium alloy was uniform and the compatibility between the layers was good. The Ni-P/Ni-B coatings microhardness and corrosion resistance of having Ni-B coating as the outer layer was higher than Ni-P coatings. The Ni-P/Ni-B duplex coatings on AZ91D magnesium alloy with high hardness and good corrosion resistance properties would expand their scope of applications.

  2. Direct current induced suppression of the Portevin-Le Chatelier serrated deformation in the aluminum-magnesium alloy 5056

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shibkov, A. A.; Denisov, A. A.; Zheltov, M. A.; Zolotov, A. E.; Gasanov, M. F.; Kochegarov, S. S.

    2015-02-01

    The effect of direct current induced suppression of the Portevin-Le Chatelier serrated deformation in the aluminum-magnesium alloy 5056 has been revealed experimentally. This effect manifests itself as an increase in the critical plastic strain, which precedes the onset of serrations in the stress-strain curve, with an increase in the current density in the range from 15 to 60 A/mm2. It has been shown that the observed effect is not related to the Joule heating of the entire specimen. Possible mechanisms of the phenomenon have been discussed.

  3. Investigation of the effect of electric current on serrated deformation and acoustic emission in the aluminum-magnesium alloy 5056

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shibkov, A. A.; Denisov, A. A.; Zheltov, M. A.; Zolotov, A. E.; Gasanov, M. F.; Ivolgin, V. I.

    2015-06-01

    The effect of direct electric current on the serrated deformation of the aluminum-magnesium alloy 5056 has been studied using the acoustic emission method and high-speed video filming of propagating deformation bands. The phenomenon of the electric current-induced suppression of low-frequency acoustic emission signals has been revealed in the range of 1 Hz-2 kHz, which is connected with the development of Portevin-Le Chatelier deformation bands. The characteristic times of damping and growth of plastic instabilities and acoustic signals caused by them after current turn-on and turn-off, respectively, have been estimated.

  4. Effects of Variations in Salt-Spray Conditions on the Corrosion Mechanisms of an AE44 Magnesium Alloy

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Martin, Holly J.; Horstemeyer, M. F.; Wang, Paul T.

    2010-01-01

    The understanding of how corrosion affects magnesium alloys is of utmost importance as the automotive and aerospace industries have become interested in the use of these lightweight alloys. However, the standardized salt-spray test does not produce adequate corrosion results when compared with field data, due to the lack of multiple exposure environments. This research explored four test combinations through three sets of cycles to determine how the corrosion mechanisms of pitting, intergranular corrosion, and general corrosion were affected by the environment. Of the four test combinations, Humidity-Drying was the least corrosive, while the most corrosive test condition was Salt Spray-Humidity-Drying.more »The differences in corrosivity of the test conditions are due to the various reactions needed to cause corrosion, including the presence of chloride ions to cause pit nucleation, the presence of humidity to cause galvanic corrosion, and the drying phase which trapped chloride ions beneath the corrosion by-products.« less

  5. Microstructure and texture evolution of Mg-3Zn-1Al magnesium alloy during large-strain electroplastic rolling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Yan-bin; Guan, Lei; Tang, Guo-yi; Cheng, Bo; Liu, Da-bo

    2015-04-01

    Large-strain deformation by single electroplastic rolling (EPR) was imposed on AZ31 magnesium alloy strips. During EPR at low temperature (150-250°C), numerous twins formed in the alloy. After EPR at a high temperature (350°C), the number of twins reduced and some dynamic recrystallization (DRX) grains formed at grain boundaries and twinned regions. The synergic thermal and athermal effects generated by electropulsing, which promoted dislocation motion, induced a few small DRX grains, and ductile bandings were mainly responsible for large-strain deformation during EPR. The inclination angle of the basal pole stemmed from the counterbalance of the inclination direction of the basal pole between the DRX grains and deformed coarse grains.

  6. Magnesium industry overview

    SciTech Connect

    Clow, B.B.

    1996-10-01

    Magnesium products provide an excellent strength-to-weight ratio, good fatigue strength, high impact strength, good corrosion resistance, high-speed machinability, and good thermal and electrical conductivities. As a result, applications are expanding in almost every industry. Dozens of automotive components are now made of magnesium, including steering wheels, valve covers, and seat frames. Magnesium alloys are also used in computer housings, in-line roller skates, golf clubs, tennis racquets, and baseball bats. Good strength and stiffness at both room and elevated temperatures make magnesium alloys especially valuable for aerospace applications. This article presents an overview of magnesium technology, world production, increasing demand, and recycling.

  7. Role of biomineralization on the degradation of fine grained AZ31 magnesium alloy processed by groove pressing.

    PubMed

    Sunil, B Ratna; Kumar, Arun Anil; Sampath Kumar, T S; Chakkingal, Uday

    2013-04-01

    Groove pressing (GP) has been successfully adopted to achieve fine grain size up to 7 ?m in AZ31 magnesium alloy with an initial grain size of 55 ?m. The effect of microstructural evolution and surface features on wettability, corrosion resistance, bioactivity and cell adhesion were investigated with an emphasis to study the influence of deposited phases when the samples were immersed in simulated body fluid (SBF 5×). The role of microstructure was also evaluated without any surface treatments or coatings on the material. GPed samples exhibit improved hydrophilicity compared to the annealed sample. After immersion in SBF, specimens were characterized using scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy dispersive X-ray (EDAX) analysis and X-ray diffraction (XRD) methods. More amount of white precipitates composed of hydroxyapatite and magnesium phosphate along with magnesium hydroxide was observed on the surfaces of groove pressed specimens as compared to the annealed specimens with an increase in immersion time in SBF. Corrosion behavior of the samples estimated using potentiodynamic polarization curves indicate good corrosion resistance for GPed samples before and after immersion in SBF. The MTT assay using rat skeletal muscle (L6) cells revealed that both the processed and unprocessed samples are nontoxic and cell adhesion was promising for GPed sample. PMID:23827614

  8. A New Constitutive Model for AZ31B Magnesium Alloy Sheet Deformed at Elevated Temperatures and Various Strain Rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, Duc-Toan

    2014-12-01

    In this study, a new constitutive model is established for AZ31B magnesium alloy sheet at elevated temperatures and strain rates in order to describe two competing mechanisms for deformation, i.e. both work-hardening and softening stage of AZ31B magnesium alloy sheet. Stress-strain curves obtained by conducting uni-axial tensile tests at elevated and strain rates were first separated at the maximum stress and corresponding strain values. Voce's law [25] was then employed to fit separated hardening and softening stage. A MATLAB tool is used to determine material parameters by using least square fitting method at various temperatures and strain rate. The mergence of separated work-hardening and softening equations is in good agreement with experimental data. The parameters of fitting curves are utilized to determine them as a function of temperature and strain rate using a surface fitting method. The final equation is then implemented to predict stress-strain curves at various temperatures and strain rates. The proposed equation showed the good comparability between the simulation results and the corresponding experiments.

  9. Mesoscale Modeling and Validation of Texture Evolution during Asymmetric Rooling and Static Recrystallization of Magnesium Alloy AZ31B

    SciTech Connect

    Radhakrishnan, Balasubramaniam; Gorti, Sarma B; Stoica, Grigoreta M; Muralidharan, Govindarajan; Stoica, Alexandru Dan; Wang, Xun-Li; Specht, Eliot D; Kenik, Edward A; Muth, Thomas R

    2012-01-01

    The focus of the present research is to develop an integrated deformation and recrystallization model for magnesium alloys at the microstructural length scale. It is known that in magnesium alloys nucleation of recrystallized grains occurs at various microstructural inhomogeneities such as twins and localized deformation bands. However, there is a need to develop models that can predict the evolution of the grain structure and texture developed during recrystallization and grain growth, especially when the deformation process follows a complicated deformation path such as in asymmetric rolling. The deformation model is based on a crystal plasticity approach implemented at the length scale of the microstructure that includes deformation mechanisms based on dislocation slip and twinning. The recrystallization simulation is based on a Monte Carlo technique that operates on the output of the deformation simulations. The nucleation criterion during recrystallization is based on the local stored energy and the Monte Carlo technique is used to simulate the growth of the nuclei due to local stored energy differences and curvature. The model predictions are compared with experimental data obtained through electron backscatter analysis and neutron diffraction.

  10. Optimizing Diffusion Bonding Parameters in AA6061-T6 Aluminum and AZ80 Magnesium Alloy Dissimilar Joints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joseph Fernandus, M.; Senthilkumar, T.; Balasubramanian, V.; Rajakumar, S.

    2012-11-01

    The main difficulty when joining magnesium (Mg) and aluminum (Al) alloys by fusion welding lies in the formation of oxide films and brittle intermetallic in the bond region which affects the integrity of the joints. However, diffusion bonding is a suitable process to join these two materials as no such characteristic defects are produced at the joints. The diffusion bonding process parameters such as bonding temperature, bonding pressure, holding time, and surface roughness of the specimen play a major role in determining the joint strength. In this investigation, an attempt was made to develop empirical relationships to predict the strengths of diffusion bonded AZ80 magnesium and AA6061 aluminum alloys dissimilar joints from the process parameters based on central composite factorial design. Response surface methodology was applied to optimize the process parameters to attain the maximum shear strength and bonding strength of the joint. From this investigation, it was found that the bonds produced with the temperature of 405.87 °C, pressure of 7.87 MPa, holding time of 29.02 min and surface roughness of 0.10 ?m exhibited maximum shear strength and bonding strength of 57.70 and 76.90 MPa, respectively. The intermetallic formation at the interface was identified.

  11. 75 FR 48360 - Magnesium From China and Russia

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-10

    ...Review)] Magnesium From China and Russia AGENCY: United States International Trade...China and pure and alloy magnesium from Russia...China and pure and alloy magnesium from Russia would be likely to lead to...

  12. Thermodynamic investigation of the effect of alkali metal impuries on the processing of aluminum and magnesium alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Shengjun

    2006-12-01

    Aluminum and magnesium alloys are widely used in the automobile and aerospace industries as structural materials due to their light weight, high specific strength and good formability. However, they suffer from the poor hot rolling characteristics due to undesired impurities like calcium, potassium, lithium and sodium. They increase the hydrogen solubility in the melt and promote the formation of porosity in aluminum castings. During fabrication of aluminum alloys, they cause the hot-shortness and embrittlement due to cracking. They also led to "blue haze" corrosion which promotes the discoloration of aluminum under humid condition. The removal of these elements increases overall melt loss of aluminum alloys when aluminum products are remelted and recast. Na is one of the common impurities in the Al and Mg alloys. In industry, primary Al is produced by the Hall-Heroult process, through the electrolysis of the mixture of molten alumina and cryolite (Al2O3+Na 3AlF6), the latter being added to lower the melting point. Therefore, Al inevitably contains some Na (>0.002%) without further treatment. The Na content in Al is influenced by the thermodynamics and kinetics of the electrolysis. Similarly, in the electrolytic production and subsequent processing of Mg, Mg is commonly in contact with molten salt mixtures of NaCl and MgCl 2. Consequently, 2--20 wt. ppm Na is often found in Mg alloys. Besides originating from the industrial production process, Na can be introduced in laboratory experiments from alumina crucibles by the reaction between the molten Al-Mg alloys and the Na2O impurity in the alumina crucible. The trace element K plays a similar role in Al alloys although it is seldom discussed. No systematic theoretic research has been carried out to investigate the behavior of these impurities during the processing of aluminum alloys. The thermodynamic description of the Al-Ca-K-Li-Mg-Na system is needed to understand the effects of Ca, K, Li and Na on phase stability of aluminum and magnesium alloys. As the first step of the thermodynamic description of the high-order system, the constitutive-binary systems were modeled in the present work using the CALPHAD technique combined with first-principles calculations. Then, ternaries and higher order systems can be modeled. For ternary systems without experimental data, the thermodynamic description is extrapolated by combining three constitutive-binary systems. Alkali-metal induced high temperature embrittlement (HTE) and loss of ductility were investigated in Al-Li, Al-Mg and Mg-Li alloys. It was discovered that the alkali-metal-rich liquid-2 phase is the cause of HTE and the loss of ductility is proportional to the mole fraction of the liquid phase and the grain size. The calculated results are consistent with experimental observations in the literature and were used to determine HTE safe and sensitive zones, maximum and critical hot-rolling temperatures and the maximum allowable Na content in alloys, which can be used to industrial processing of Al and Mg alloys. The degree of HTE is proportional to the mole fraction of the liquid-2 phase and the grain size.

  13. Surface coating from phosphonate ionic liquid electrolyte for the enhancement of the tribological performance of magnesium alloy.

    PubMed

    Jiménez, Ana Eva; Rossi, Antonella; Fantauzzi, Marzia; Espinosa, Tulia; Arias-Pardilla, Joaquin; Martínez-Nicolás, Ginés; Bermúdez, María-Dolores

    2015-05-20

    A chronoamperometric method has been applied for the growth of a surface coating on AZ31B magnesium alloy, using the imidazolium alkylphosphonate room-temperature ionic liquid 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium ethylphosphonate ([EMIM][EtPO3H]) as electrolyte. A surface coating layer is obtained after 4 h under a constant voltage bias of -0.8 V with respect to the standard electrode. The coating nucleation and growth process correlates well with a 3D progressive mechanism. X-ray photoelectron spectrometry (XPS) analysis of [EMIM][EtPO3H] shows new P 2p and O 1s peaks after its use as electrolyte, as a consequence of reaction between the phosphonate anion and the magnesium substrate. Angle-resolved XPS (ARXPS) analysis of [EMIM][EtPO3H] did not show any change in the composition of the surface before and after chronoamperometry, since the sampling depth (1.5 nm at the highest emission angle) is larger than the cation and anion sizes (ca. 7 and 5 Å, respectively). Characterization of the coating was made by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), focussed ion beam SEM, energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, XPS, and ARXPS. FIB-SEM shows that the coating presents a mean thickness of 374 (±36) nm and contains magnesium and aluminum phosphates. Linear reciprocating tribological tests under variable load show that the presence of the coating can reduce friction coefficients of the coated AZ31B against steel up to 32% and wear rates up to 90%, with respect to the uncoated alloy. PMID:25905426

  14. In vivo assessment of the host reactions to the biodegradation of the two novel magnesium alloys ZEK100 and AX30 in an animal model

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Most studies on biodegradable magnesium implants published recently use magnesium-calcium-alloys or magnesium-aluminum-rare earth-alloys. However, since rare earths are a mixture of elements and their toxicity is unclear, a reduced content of rare earths is favorable. The present study assesses the in vivo biocompatibility of two new magnesium alloys which have a reduced content (ZEK100) or contain no rare earths at all (AX30). Methods 24 rabbits were randomized into 4 groups (AX30 or ZEK100, 3 or 6 months, respectively) and cylindrical pins were inserted in their tibiae. To assess the biodegradation ?CT scans and histological examinations were performed. Results The ?CT scans showed that until month three ZEK100 degrades faster than AX30, but this difference is leveled out after 6 months. Histology revealed that both materials induce adverse host reactions and high numbers of osteoclasts in the recipient bone. The mineral apposition rates of both materials groups were high. Conclusions Both alloys display favorable degradation characteristics, but they induce adverse host reactions, namely an osteoclast-driven resorption of bone and a subsequent periosteal formation of new bone. Therefore, the biocompatibility of ZEK100 and AX30 is questionable and further studies, which should focus on the interactions on cellular level, are needed. PMID:22429539

  15. Film Breakdown and Nano-Porous Mg(OH)2 Formation from Corrosion of Magnesium Alloys in Salt Solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Brady, Michael P; Rother, Gernot; Anovitz, Lawrence {Larry} M; Littrell, Ken; Unocic, Kinga A; Elsentriecy, Hassan H; Song, GuangLing; Thomson, Jeffery K; Gallego, Nidia C; Davis, Dr. Bruce

    2015-01-01

    Small angle neutron scattering (SANS) and cross-section scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) were used to study film formation by magnesium alloys AZ31B (Mg-3Al-1Zn base) and ZE10A (Elektron 717, E717: Mg-1Zn + Nd, Zr) in H2O and D2O with and without 1 or 5 wt.% NaCl. No SANS scattering changes were observed after 24 h D2O or H2O exposures compared with unreacted alloy, consistent with relatively dense MgO-base film formation. However, exposure to 5 wt.% NaCl resulted in accelerated corrosion, with resultant SANS scattering changes detected. The SANS data indicated both particle and rough surface scattering, but with no preferential size features. The films formed in 5 wt.% NaCl consisted of a thin, inner MgO-base layer, and a nano-porous and filamentous Mg(OH)2 outer region tens of microns thick. Chlorine was detected extending to the inner MgO-base film region, with segregation of select alloying elements also observed in the inner MgO, but not the outer Mg(OH)2. Modeling of the SANS data suggested that the outer Mg(OH)2 films had very high surface areas, consistent with loss of film protectiveness. Implications for the NaCl corrosion mechanism, and the potential utility of SANS for Mg corrosion, are discussed.

  16. Forming-Limit Diagrams for Magnesium AZ31B and ZEK100 Alloy Sheets at Elevated Temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antoniswamy, Aravindha R.; Carpenter, Alexander J.; Carter, Jon T.; Hector, Louis G.; Taleff, Eric M.

    2013-11-01

    Modern design and manufacturing methodologies for magnesium (Mg) sheet panels require formability data for use in computer-aided design and computer-aided engineering tools. To meet this need, forming-limit diagrams (FLDs) for AZ31B and ZEK100 wrought Mg alloy sheets were developed at elevated temperatures for strain rates of 10-3 and 10-2 s-1. The elevated temperatures investigated range from 250 to 450 °C for AZ31B and 300 to 450 °C for ZEK100. The FLDs were generated using data from uniaxial tension, biaxial bulge, and plane-strain bulge tests, all carried out until specimen rupture. The unique aspect of this study is that data from materials with consistent processing histories were produced using consistent testing techniques across all test conditions. The ZEK100 alloy reaches greater major true strains at rupture, by up to 60%, than the AZ31B alloy for all strain paths at all temperatures and strain rates examined. Formability limits decrease only slightly with a decrease in temperature, less than 30% decrease for AZ31B and less than 35% decrease for ZEK100 as the temperature decreases from 450 to 300 °C. This suggests that forming processes at 250-300 °C are potentially viable for manufacturing complex Mg components.

  17. Effect of Minor Alloying Elements on Localized Corrosion Behavior of Aluminum-Copper-Magnesium based Solid Solution Alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aburada, Tomohiro

    2011-12-01

    The effects and mechanistic roles of a minor alloying element, Ni, on the localized corrosion behavior were explored by studying (Al75Cu 17Mg8)97Ni3 and Al70Cu 18Mg12 amorphous alloys. To explore the minor alloying element limited to the outer surface layers, the corrosion behavior of Al70Cu 18Mg12 amorphous alloy in solutions with and without Ni 2+ was also studied. Both Ni alloying and Ni2+ in solution improved the localized corrosion resistance of the alloys by ennobling the pitting and repassivation potentials. Pit growth by the selective dissolution of Al and Mg was also suppressed by Ni alloying. Remaining Cu and Ni reorganized into a Cu-rich polycrystalline nanoporous structure with continuous ligaments in pits. The minor Ni alloying and Ni2+ in solution suppressed the coarsening of the ligaments in the dealloyed nanoporous structure. The presence of relatively immobile Ni atoms at the surface suppressed the surface diffusion of Cu, which reduced the coarsening of the nanoporous structure, resulting in the formation of 10 to 30 nm wide Cu ligaments. Two mechanistic roles of minor alloying elements in the improvement of the pitting corrosion resistance of the solid solution alloys are elucidated. The first role is the suppression of active dissolution by altering the atomic structure. Ni in solid solution formed stronger bonds with Al, and reduces the probability of weaker Al-Al bonds. The second role is to hinder dissolution by producing a greater negative shift of the true interfacial potential at the dissolution front under the dealloyed layer due to the greater Ohmic resistance through the finer porous structure. These effects contributed to the elevation of pitting potentials by ennobling the applied potential required to produce enough dissolution for the stabilization of pits. Scientifically, this thesis advances the state of understanding of alloy dissolution, particularly the role of minor alloying elements on preferential oxidation at the atomic, nanometer, and micrometer scales. Technological implementations of the findings of the research are also discussed, including a new route to synthesize nanoporous materials with tunable porosity and new corrosion mitigation strategies for commercial Al-based alloys containing the detrimental Al2CuMg phase.

  18. A high-specific-strength and corrosion-resistant magnesium alloy.

    PubMed

    Xu, Wanqiang; Birbilis, Nick; Sha, Gang; Wang, Yu; Daniels, John E; Xiao, Yang; Ferry, Michael

    2015-12-01

    Ultra-lightweight alloys with high strength, ductility and corrosion resistance are desirable for applications in the automotive, aerospace, defence, biomedical, sporting and electronic goods sectors. Ductility and corrosion resistance are generally inversely correlated with strength, making it difficult to optimize all three simultaneously. Here we design an ultralow density (1.4?g?cm(-3)) Mg-Li-based alloy that is strong, ductile, and more corrosion resistant than Mg-based alloys reported so far. The alloy is Li-rich and a solute nanostructure within a body-centred cubic matrix is achieved by a series of extrusion, heat-treatment and rolling processes. Corrosion resistance from the environment is believed to occur by a uniform lithium carbonate film in which surface coverage is much greater than in traditional hexagonal close-packed Mg-based alloys, explaining the superior corrosion resistance of the alloy. PMID:26480229

  19. Application of Stand-off Double-Pulse Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy in Elemental Analysis of Magnesium Alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qi, Lifeng; Sun, Lanxiang; Xin, Yong; Cong, Zhibo; Li, Yang; Yu, Haibin

    2015-08-01

    In this study, a stand-off and collinear double pulse laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (DP LIBS) system was designed, and the magnesium alloy samples at a distance of 2.5 m away from the LIBS system were measured. The effect of inter-pulse delay on spectra was studied, and the signal enhancement was observed compared to the single pulse LIBS (SP LIBS). The morphology of the ablated crater on the sample indicated a higher efficiency of surface pretreatment in DP LIBS. The calibration curves of Ytterbium (Y) and Zirconium (Zr) were investigated. The square of the correlation coefficient of the calibration curve of element Y reached up to 0.9998. supported by National Natural Science Foundation of China (No. 61473279), the National High-Tech Research and Development Program of China (863 Program) (No. 2012AA040608) and Equipment Development Programs of the Chinese Academy of Sciences (No. YZ201247)

  20. Variant selection of twins with low Schmid factors in cross grain boundary twin pairs in a magnesium alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Z.-Z.; Zhang, Y. D.; Wagner, F.; Juan, P.-A.; Berbenni, S.; Capolungo, L.; Lecomte, J.-S.; Richeton, T.

    2015-04-01

    Samples of magnesium AZ31 alloys are deformed in compression at room temperature under a strain rate of 1×10-3 s-1. The initial texture with respect to the loading direction is favorable for {10-12}<-1011> extension twinning during the deformation. At an engineering strain of 2.75%, many extension twins are found to be connected with each other at grain boundaries, forming cross grain boundary twin pairs. Some have low positive or even negative Schmid factors (SFs). The variant selection of them are interpreted in terms of shear accommodations. The observed twin variants require the least or no accommodation through deformation modes with high CRSSs, but the most or more accommodation through those with low CRSSs.

  1. Effect of Rare-Earth Additions on the Texture of Wrought Magnesium Alloys: The Role of Grain Boundary Segregation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robson, Joseph D.

    2014-07-01

    Magnesium alloys that contain certain rare-earth (RE) additions are known to have improved formability and this can be partly attributed to the different texture they display after recrystallization. Previous experimental work has identified segregation of RE to grain boundaries and dislocations as being potentially important in producing this change in behavior. In the present paper, two classical models (Langmuir-McClean and Cahn-Lücke-Stüwe) are used to explore the likely effect of RE additions on grain boundary solute concentration and drag. It is demonstrated that a wide range of RE elements are predicted to segregate strongly to grain boundaries due to the large atomic size misfit with magnesium. The maximum level of segregation is produced for elements such as Y or Gd that combine a high misfit and high bulk solubility. Segregated Y is predicted to produce a solute drag pressure on migrating boundaries several orders of magnitude greater than that obtained by Al or Zn additions. It is demonstrated that while this drag is predicted to be insufficient to strongly retard static recrystallization under typical annealing conditions, it is expected to suppress dynamic recrystallization by any mechanism requiring boundary migration.

  2. Influence of Applied Voltage and Film-Formation Time on Microstructure and Corrosion Resistance of Coatings Formed on Mg-Zn-Zr-Ca Bio-magnesium Alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yandong, Yu; Shuzhen, Kuang; Jie, Li

    2015-09-01

    The influence of applied voltage and film-formation time on the microstructure and corrosion resistance of coatings formed on a Mg-Zn-Zr-Ca novel bio-magnesium alloy has been investigated by micro-arc oxidation (MAO) treatment. Phase composition and microstructure of as-coated samples were analyzed by the x-ray diffraction, energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy. And the porosity and average of micro-pore aperture of the surface on ceramic coatings were analyzed by general image software. Corrosion microstructure of as-coated samples was caught by a microscope digital camera. The long-term corrosion resistance of as-coated samples was tested in simulated body fluid for 30 days. The results showed that the milky white smooth ceramic coating formed on the Mg-Zn-Zr-Ca novel bio-magnesium alloy was a compound of MgO, Mg2SiO4 and MgSiO3, and its corrosion resistance was significantly improved compared with that of the magnesium substrate. In addition, when the MAO applied voltage were 450 V and 500 V and film-formation time were 9 min and 11 min, the surface micro-morphology and the corrosion resistance of as-coated samples were relatively improved. The results provided a theoretical foundation for the application of the Mg-Zn-Zr-Ca novel bio-magnesium alloy in biomedicine.

  3. Investigation of corrosion behavior of biodegradable magnesium alloys using an online-micro-flow capillary flow injection inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry setup with electrochemical control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ulrich, A.; Ott, N.; Tournier-Fillon, A.; Homazava, N.; Schmutz, P.

    2011-07-01

    The development of biodegradable metallic materials designed for implants or medical stents is new and is one of the most interesting new fields in material science. Besides biocompatibility, a detailed understanding of corrosion mechanisms and dissolution processes is required to develop materials with tailored degradation behavior. The materials need to be sufficiently stable as long as they have to fulfill their medical task. However, subsequently they should dissolve completely in a controlled manner in terms of maximum body burden. This study focuses on the elemental and time resolved dissolution processes of a magnesium rare earth elements alloy which has been compared to pure magnesium with different impurity level. The here described investigations were performed using a novel analytical setup based on a micro-flow capillary online-coupled via a flow injection system to a plasma mass spectrometer. Differences in element-specific and time-dependent dissolution were monitored for various magnesium alloys in contact with sodium chloride or mixtures of sodium and calcium chloride as corrosive media. The dissolution behavior strongly depends on bulk matrix elements, secondary alloying elements and impurities, which are usually present even in pure magnesium.

  4. The influence of milling parameters on the material hardness in the case of magnesium alloy AZ61A

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grigora?, C. C.; Brabie, G.

    2015-11-01

    This study was conducted in order to determine the material hardness value due to modification of the milling cutting parameters. The alloy hardness was analysed as a function of different cutting parameters for milling operations (speed, feed and depth of cut), using a face mill. A total number of 17 samples were machined using parameters obtained by combining the input parameters. The total number of combinations is reduced by a preoptimization, using the DesignExpert software. The cutting process was performed in dry conditions, and it was recorded that dry cutting magnesium-aluminium alloy AZ61A with the used parameters did not lead to chip ignition. The surface hardness was determined based on the Vickers scale (HV), its values ranging from 110.59 [HV] to 121.37 [HV]. The obtained results showed that the feed has a significant contribution in the surface harness modification. The application of the Taguchi method reveals that the material hardness can be improved, together with the manufacturing time, by means of the speed, feed and depth of cut maximization.

  5. Comparative study of CW, nanosecond- and femtosecond-pulsed laser microcutting of AZ31 magnesium alloy stents.

    PubMed

    Gökhan Demir, Ali; Previtali, Barbara

    2014-06-01

    Magnesium alloys constitute an interesting solution for cardiovascular stents due to their biocompatibility and biodegradability in human body. Laser microcutting is the industrially accepted method for stent manufacturing. However, the laser-material interaction should be well investigated to control the quality characteristics of the microcutting process that concern the surface roughness, chemical composition, and microstructure of the final device. Despite the recent developments in industrial laser systems, a universal laser source that can be manipulated flexibly in terms of process parameters is far from reality. Therefore, comparative studies are required to demonstrate processing capabilities. In particular, the laser pulse duration is a key factor determining the processing regime. This work approaches the laser microcutting of AZ31 Mg alloy from the perspective of a comparative study to evaluate the machining capabilities in continuous wave (CW), ns- and fs-pulsed regimes. Three industrial grade machining systems were compared to reach a benchmark in machining quality, productivity, and ease of postprocessing. The results confirmed that moving toward the ultrashort pulse domain the machining quality increases, but the need for postprocessing remains. The real advantage of ultrashort pulsed machining was the ease in postprocessing and maintaining geometrical integrity of the stent mesh after chemical etching. Resultantly, the overall production cycle time was shortest for fs-pulsed laser system, despite the fact that CW laser system provided highest cutting speed. PMID:24985208

  6. Investigation into the hot workability of the as-extruded WE43 magnesium alloy using processing map.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lixiao; Fang, Gang; Leeflang, Sander; Duszczyk, Jurek; Zhou, Jie

    2014-04-01

    The research concerned the characterization of the hot-working behavior of the as-extruded WE43 magnesium alloy potentially for biomedical applications and the construction of processing maps to guide the choice of forming process parameters. Isothermal uniaxial compression tests were performed over a temperature range of 350-480°C and strain rate range of 0.001-10s(-1). Flow stresses obtained were used to construct processing maps. Domains in processing maps corresponding to relevant deformation mechanisms, i.e., dynamic recrystallization (DRX), dynamic recovery (DRV) and flow instability, were identified, according to power dissipation efficiency and flow instability parameter values. Microstructures of compression-tested specimens were examined to validate these deformation mechanisms. Two mechanisms of DRX nucleation, i.e., particle-stimulated nucleation (PSN) and grain boundary bulging, were found to be operative at the low-temperature and high-temperature DRX domains, respectively. Flow instability was related to adiabatic shear bands and abnormal grain growth. An optimum condition for the hot working of this alloy was determined to be at a temperature of 475°C and a strain rate of 0.1s(-1). PMID:24508713

  7. Hydroxyapatite (HA)/poly-L-lactic acid (PLLA) dual coating on magnesium alloy under deformation for biomedical applications.

    PubMed

    Diez, Mathilde; Kang, Min-Ho; Kim, Sae-Mi; Kim, Hyoun-Ee; Song, Juha

    2016-02-01

    The introduction of a protective coating layer to highly corrosive magnesium (Mg) has been proposed as one of the common approaches for improved corrosion resistance of Mg-based implants as load-bearing biomedical applications. However, only few studies have focused on the mechanical stability of the coated Mg under practical conditions where significant deformation of the load-bearing implants is induced during the surgical operation or under physiological environments. Therefore, in this study, we developed a dual coating system composed of an interlayer hydroxyapatite (HA) and a top layer poly-L-lactic acid (PLLA) to improve the coating stability under deformation of Mg alloy (WE43) substrate. The HA interlayer was directly formed on the Mg alloy surface, followed by dip-coating of PLLA. As the interlayer, HA improved the adhesion of PLLA by modulating nano- and microscale roughness, in addition to its inherently good bonding strength to Mg. The flexible and deformable top coating PLLA layer mitigated crack propagation in the HA layer under deformation. Thus, the dual coating layer provided good protection to the underlying WE43 from corrosion regardless of deformation. The enhanced corrosion behavior of dual-coated WE43 exhibited better mechanical and biological performance compared to the non-coated or single-coated WE43. Therefore, this dual coating layer on Mg is expected to accelerate Mg-based applications in biomedical devices. PMID:26704551

  8. Titanium and Magnesium Co-Alloyed Hematite Thin Films for Photoelectrochemical Water Splitting

    SciTech Connect

    Tang, H.; Yin, W. J.; Matin, M. A.; Wang, H.; Deutsch, T.; Al-Jassim, M. M.; Turner, J. A.; Yan, Y.

    2012-04-01

    Using a combination of density functional theory calculation and materials synthesis and characterization we examine the properties of charge-compensated Ti and Mg co-alloyed hematite thin films for the application of photoelectrochemical (PEC) water splitting. We find that the charge-compensated co-alloying results in the following effects: (1) It enhances the solubility of Mg and Ti, which leads to reduced electron effective mass and therefore increased electron mobility; (2) It tunes the carrier density and therefore allows the optimization of electrical conductivity; and (3) It reduces the density of charged defects and therefore reduces carrier recombination. As a result, the Ti and Mg co-alloyed hematite thin films exhibit improved water oxidation photocurrent magnitudes as compared to pure hematite thin films. Our results suggest that charge-compensated co-alloying is a plausible approach for engineering hematite for the application of PEC water splitting.

  9. Dry Sliding Wear Characteristics of Gravity Die-Cast Magnesium Alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poddar, Palash; Das, Arpan; Sahoo, K. L.

    2014-04-01

    The paper deals with the wear behavior of conventional cast Mg-Sn-based alloys. The alloys were studied through pin- on- disk wear test under four different loading conditions; namely, 9.8, 19.6, 29.4, and 39.2 N. The study highlights the cumulative wear loss, volumetric wear loss, dry sliding wear rate, and coefficient of friction of the alloys. The volumetric wear increased with increasing applied load. The wear mechanism was studied with scanning electron microscope. The wear occurs mainly by plowing mechanism and also by delamination. During wear, extensive plastic deformation and work hardening occurred. Microstructural analysis has been carried out for all the alloys at different loading conditions.

  10. Reduction mechanism of surface oxide in aluminum alloy powders containing magnesium studied by x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy using synchrotron radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Kimura, A.; Shibata, M.; Kondoh, K.; Takeda, Y.; Katayama, M.; Kanie, T.; Takada, H.

    1997-06-01

    We investigated the reduction mechanism of surface oxide on aluminum alloy powders containing magnesium, by x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy using synchrotron radiation (SR-XPS). The reduction is the initial reaction in a new aluminum nitridation method developed by one of the authors. In heating the powders to 823 K, magnesium soluted in the powders moves from the inner region to the surface at temperatures below 573 K, and finally, above 773 K, the magnesium reduces the aluminum oxide of powder surfaces by chemical reaction, which breaks the surface oxide films, and metallic aluminum appears on the topmost surface of the powders. These results suggest that the SR-XPS system is very useful for dynamic chemical reaction analysis of the surface via {ital in situ} measurement. {copyright} {ital 1997 American Institute of Physics.}

  11. Cyclic Deformation Behavior of a Rare-Earth Containing Extruded Magnesium Alloy: Effect of Heat Treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mirza, F. A.; Chen, D. L.; Li, D. J.; Zeng, X. Q.

    2015-03-01

    The present study was aimed at evaluating strain-controlled cyclic deformation behavior of a rare-earth (RE) element containing Mg-10Gd-3Y-0.5Zr (GW103K) alloy in different states (as-extruded, peak-aged (T5), and solution-treated and peak-aged (T6)). The addition of RE elements led to an effective grain refinement and weak texture in the as-extruded alloy. While heat treatment resulted in a grain growth modestly in the T5 state and significantly in the T6 state, a high density of nano-sized and bamboo-leaf/plate-shaped ?' (Mg7(Gd,Y)) precipitates was observed to distribute uniformly in the ?-Mg matrix. The yield strength and ultimate tensile strength, as well as the maximum and minimum peak stresses during cyclic deformation in the T5 and T6 states were significantly higher than those in the as-extruded state. Unlike RE-free extruded Mg alloys, symmetrical hysteresis loops in tension and compression and cyclic stabilization were present in the GW103K alloy in different states. The fatigue life of this alloy in the three conditions, which could be well described by the Coffin-Manson law and Basquin's equation, was equivalent within the experimental scatter and was longer than that of RE-free extruded Mg alloys. This was predominantly attributed to the presence of the relatively weak texture and the suppression of twinning activities stemming from the fine grain sizes and especially RE-containing ?' precipitates. Fatigue crack was observed to initiate from the specimen surface in all the three alloy states and the initiation site contained some cleavage-like facets after T6 heat treatment. Crack propagation was characterized mainly by the characteristic fatigue striations.

  12. Two- and three- dimensional studies of dendritic morphology in magnesium alloy by means of synchrotron X-ray microtomography and cellular automaton modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, M.; Guo, Z.; Xiong, S.

    2015-06-01

    Magnesium is the lightest structural material. As one of the dominant microstructure features, dendritic pattern determines the mechanical behaviour and performance of magnesium alloys. Dendritic topological observation was carried out on Mg-based alloy using synchrotron X-ray micro-tomography and the microstructure pattern of ?-Mg dendrite was obtained. It was found that the ?-Mg dendrite grew with eighteen primary stems, of which six lay in the (0001) basal plane, and the other twelve in the (1010) plane. An according numerical model based on the cellular automata method was developed. By defining a specific capturing functional mechanism, simulation of ?-Mg dendrite in 3-D with eighteen branches was successfully achieved. The simulation results show that the model could reasonably describe the evolution of the dendritic microstructure and the subsequent dendrite morphology agrees well with that observed in the synchrotron X-ray tomography experiment.

  13. The development and characterization of a novel aluminum-copper-magnesium P/M alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boland, Christopher Daniel

    Powder metallurgy (P/M) is a metal fabrication process that is characterized by high yield and ability to be automated, as well as the resultant part complexity and reproducibility. This press and sinter process is favoured by the automotive industry. Aluminum alloy P/M parts are particularly attractive because they have a high strength to weight ratio and they can be made to have high corrosion and wear resistance. There are few commercial Al P/M alloys currently in use and they occupy a small portion of the market. To expand the use of aluminum in the industry a new alloy was created, modeled after the wrought AC2024 family of alloys. P/M 2324, with a nominal composition of Al-4.4Cu-1.5Mg, was assessed using physical, chemical and mechanical methods to help maximize alloy properties through processing. The objective of this work was to develop a viable industrial alloy. The investigation of 2324 included the evaluation of starting powders, starting composition, processing methods, secondary treatments, and industrial response. All blending and compacting was completed at Dalhousie University, while sintering was undertaken at Dalhousie and GKN Sinter Metals. The green alloy was assessed for best compaction pressure using green density and strength. The sintered alloy was assessed to determine the best press and sinter variables, using dimensional change, sintered density, apparent hardness, tensile properties and microscopy. These same sintered properties were tested to determine if sintering done on a laboratory scale could be replicated industrially. The viability of heat treatment was tested using differential scanning calorimetry, hardness and tensile properties. The alloy was also subject to modifications of Cu and Mg amounts, as well as to the addition of tin to the base composition. It was determined that compaction at 400MPa and sintering at 600°C for 20min produced the best properties for the sintered bodies. The resultant mechanical properties were attributed to a high sintered density (2.68g/cm 3 or 97% of theoretical) and strengthening mechanisms present in the Al-Cu-Mg system. These mechanisms included possible secondary phases formed in the alloy seen using microscopy and differential scanning calorimetry analyses. A T6 heat treatment of solutionizing at 495°C for 1.5h, water quench and aging for 10h was found to improve the properties of 2324. Modifications to Cu and Mg alloying additions produced few gains. However, the presence of 0.2Sn (w/o) was found to enhance the alloy. Resultant properties of the optimal alloy included an apparent hardness of 76.6HRE and an ultimate tensile strength of 367MPa. Also studied was the discrepancy observed in sintering at GKN and Dalhousie and the mechanisms at work with the addition of Sn. 2324 was adapted successfully to P/M applications. It was capable of performing against an established Al P/M industry standard, and with further testing its uses can undoubtedly be expanded.

  14. Explosion bonding: aluminum-magnesium alloys bonded to austenitic stainless steel

    SciTech Connect

    Patterson, R.A.

    1982-01-01

    The explosion bonding of 5000 series aluminum alloys to 300 series stainless steel alloys is summarized. The process technique involves a parallel gap arrangement with copper or aluminum bonding aids. Successful bonds have been achieved using either a single shot process for joining the trilayer clad or a sequential shot technique for each metal component. Bond success is monitored through a combined metallographic and tensile strength evaluation. Tensile properties are shown to be strongly dependent upon process parameters and the amount of intermetallic formation at the aluminum bond interface. Empirical data has been compared with experimental and destructive test results to determine the optimum procedures.

  15. Nondestructive evaluation of an environmentally friendly conversion coating for magnesium alloys using optical measurement techniques 

    E-print Network

    Zuniga, David

    2006-10-30

    with a pioneering piece of equipment to provide some meaningful data to my research. Thanks to Dr. Orla Wilson for her patience, her guidance and willingness to help. Thanks to Dr. Viktor Hadjiev for his expertise and enthusiasm. Thanks... sequence describing the two major constituents of the alloy. In the case of AZ91E-T6, the two major alloying elements are aluminum designated by the capital letter A and zinc, designated by the capital letter Z. The next two digits are two numbers...

  16. MAGNESIUM ALLOYS IN US MILITARY APPLICATIONS: PAST, CURRENT AND FUTURE SOLUTIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Mathaudhu, Suveen N.; Nyberg, Eric A.

    2010-02-26

    Since the 1940’s Mg-alloys have been used for military applications, from aircraft components to ground vehicles. The drive for usage was primarily availability and lightweighting of military systems. But the promise of widespread military usage was not met largely based on corrosion and flammability concerns, poor mechanical behavior and inferior ballistic response. This review paper will cover historical, current and potential future applications with a focus on scientific, engineering and social barriers relevant to integration of Mg-alloy. It will also present mechanical and physical property improvements solutions which are currently being developed to address these issues.

  17. Deformation Twin Nucleation and Growth Characterization in Magnesium Alloys Using Novel EBSD Pattern Analysis and Machine Learning Tools

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rampton, Travis M.

    Deformation twinning in Magnesium alloys both facilitates slip and forms sites for failure. Currently, basic studies of twinning in Mg are facilitated by electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) which is able to extract a myriad of information relating to crystalline microstructures. Although much information is available via EBSD, various problems relating to deformation twinning have not been solved. This dissertation provides new insights into deformation twinning in Mg alloys, with particular focus on AZ31. These insights were gained through the development of new EBSD and related machine learning tools that extract more information beyond what is currently accessed. The first tool relating to characterization of deformed and twinned materials focuses on surface topography crack detection. The intensity map across EBSD images contains vital information that can be used to detect evolution of surface roughness and crack formation, which typically occurs at twin boundaries. The method of topography recovery resulted in reconstruction errors as low as 2% over a 500 microm length. The method was then applied to a 3 microm x 3 microm area of twinned Tantalum which experienced topographic alterations. The topography of Ta correlated with other measured changes in the microstructure. Additionally, EBSD images were used to identify the presence of cracks in Nickel microstructures. Several cracks were identified on the Ni specimen, demonstrating that cracks as thin as 34 nm could be measured. A further EBSD based tool developed for this study was used to identify thin compression twins in Mg; these are often missed in a traditional EBSD scan due to their size relative to the electron probe. This tool takes advantage of crystallographic relationships that exist between parent and twinned grains; common planes that exist in both grains lead to bands of consistent intensity as a scan crosses a twin. Hence, twin boundaries in a microstructure can be recognized, even when they are associated with thin twins. Proof of concept was performed on known twins in Inconel 600, Tantalum, and Magnesium AZ31. This method was then used to search for undetected twins in a Mg AZ31 structure, revealing nearly double the number of twins compared with those initially measured by standard procedures. To uncover the driving forces behind deformation twinning in Mg, a machine learning framework was developed to leverage all of the data available from EBSD and use that to create a physics based models of twin nucleation and growth. The resultant models for nucleation and growth were measured to be up to 86.5% and 96.1% accurate respectively. Each model revealed a unique combination of crystallographic attributes that affected twinning in the AZ3.

  18. Factors contributing to plastic strain amplification in slip dominated deformation of magnesium alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sinclair, C. W.; Martin, G.; Lebensohn, R. A.

    2015-12-01

    While plastic strains are never distributed uniformly in polycrystals, it has recently been shown experimentally that the distribution can be extremely heterogeneous in magnesium polycrystals even when the deformation is dominated by slip. Here, we attempt to provide insight into the (macroscopic) factors that contribute to this strain amplification and to explain, from a local perspective, the origins of this strain amplification. To do this, full field VPFFT crystal plasticity simulations have been performed under the simplifying assumption that twinning is inoperative. It is shown that the experimentally observed heterogeneity can be reproduced when a sufficiently high anisotropy in slip system strength is assumed. This can be further accentuated by a weakening of the texture.

  19. The Effect of Thermomechanical Processing on the Tensile, Fatigue, and Creep Behavior of Magnesium Alloy AM60

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Zhe; Huang, J; Decker, R; Lebeau, S; Walker, Larry R; Cavin, Odis Burl; Watkins, Thomas R; Boehlert, C. J.

    2011-01-01

    Tensile, fatigue, fracture toughness, and creep experiments were performed on a commercially available magnesium-aluminum alloy (AM60) after three processing treatments: (1) as-THIXOMOLDED (as-molded), (2) THIXOMOLDED then thermomechanically processed (TTMP), and (3) THIXOMOLDED then TTMP then annealed (annealed). The TTMP procedure resulted in a significantly reduced grain size and a tensile yield strength greater than twice that of the as-molded material without a debit in elongation to failure ({epsilon}{sub f}). The as-molded material exhibited the lowest strength, while the annealed material exhibited an intermediate strength but the highest {epsilon}{sub f} (>1 pct). The TTMP and annealed materials exhibited fracture toughness values almost twice that of the as-molded material. The as-molded material exhibited the lowest fatigue threshold values and the lowest fatigue resistance. The annealed material exhibited the greatest fatigue resistance, and this was suggested to be related to its balance of tensile strength and ductility. The fatigue lives of each material were similar at both room temperature (RT) and 423 K (150 C). The tensile-creep behavior was evaluated for applied stresses ranging between 20 and 75 MPa and temperatures between 373 and 473 K (100 and 200 C). During both the fatigue and creep experiments, cracking preferentially occurred at grain boundaries. Overall, the results indicate that thermomechanical processing of AM60 dramatically improves the tensile, fracture toughness, and fatigue behavior, making this alloy attractive for structural applications. The reduced creep resistance after thermomechanical processing offers an opportunity for further research and development.

  20. Microstructure and interfacial reactions of soldering magnesium alloy AZ31B

    SciTech Connect

    Liu Liming; Wu Zhonghui

    2010-01-15

    In this paper, economic and innoxious solder alloys with low melting temperature were designed for AZ31B. Their chemical composition and relevant parameters were investigated for a high-performance structure of bonding region. Results of microstructure observation showed that Zn-enriched phases disappeared and {alpha}-Mg existed in the joints in the form of coarse dendrites by increasing the concentration of Mg in the solder alloys. Water cooling with a high cooling rate was adopted in experiments. Experimental research showed that high cooling rate restricted the grains of {alpha}-Mg as the equiaxed dendrites, which was about 1/5 of the coarse dendrite but their number was more than 40-50 times. Both morphology with typical fracture and the analysis on X-ray diffraction fracture indicated that equiaxed dendrites significantly improved the mechanical property of the joints. Necking phenomenon occurred in the bonding region was in favor of the improvement of joint shear strength.

  1. Surface characterization and cytocompatibility evaluation of silanized magnesium alloy AZ91 for biomedical applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Witecka, Agnieszka; Yamamoto, Akiko; Dybiec, Henryk; Swieszkowski, Wojciech

    2012-12-01

    Mg alloys with high Al contents have superior corrosion resistance in aqueous environments, but poor cytocompatibility compared to that of pure Mg. We have silanized the cast AZ91 alloy to improve its cytocompatibility using five different silanes: ethyltriethoxysilane (S1), 3-aminopropyltriethoxysilane (S2), 3-isocyanatopyltriethoxysilane (S3), phenyltriethoxysilane (S4) and octadecyltriethoxysilane (S5). The surface hydrophilicity/hydrophobicity was evaluated by water contact angle measurements. X-ray photoelectron analysis was performed to investigate the changes in surface states and chemical composition. All silane reagents increased adsorption of the albumin to the modified surface. In vitro cytocompatibility evaluation revealed that silanization improved cell growth on AZ91 modified by silane S1. Measurement of the concentration of Mg2+ ions released during the cell culture indicated that silanization does not affect substrate degradation.

  2. Ignition and combustion of aluminum/magnesium alloy particles in O2 at high pressures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roberts, Ted A.; Burton, Rodney L.; Krier, Herman

    1993-01-01

    The ignition and combustion of Al, Mg, and Al/Mg alloy particles in 99 percent O2/1 percent N2 mixtures is investigated at high temperatures and pressures for rocket engine applications. The 20-micron particles contain 0, 5, 10, 20, 40, 60, 80, and 100 wt pct Mg alloyed with Al, and are ignited in oxygen using the reflected shock in a single-pulse shock tube near the endwall. Using this technique, the ignition delay and combustion times of the particles are measured at temperatures up to 3250 K as a function of Mg content for oxygen pressures of 8.5, 17, and 34 atm. An ignition model is developed that employs a simple lumped capacitance energy equation and temperature and pressure dependent particle and gas properties. Good agreement is achieved between the measured and predicted trends in the ignition delay times.

  3. Combined effect of pulse electron beam treatment and thin hydroxyapatite film on mechanical features of biodegradable AZ31 magnesium alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Surmeneva, M. A.; Tyurin, A. I.; Teresov, A. D.; Koval, N. N.; Pirozhkova, T. S.; Shuvarin, I. A.; Surmenev, R. A.

    2015-11-01

    The morphology, elemental, phase composition, nanohardness, and Young's modulus of the hydroxyapatite (HA) coating deposited via radio frequency (RF) magnetron sputtering onto the AZ31 surface were investigated by atomic force microscopy (AFM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX), X-ray diffraction (XRD), and nanoindentationtechniques. The calcium phosphate (Ca/P) molar ratio of the HA coating deposited via RF-magnetron sputtering onto AZ31 substrates according to EDX was 1.57+0.03. The SEM experiments revealed significant differences in the morphology of the HA film deposited on untreated and treated with the pulsed electron beam (PEB) AZ31 substrate. Nanoindentation studies demonstrated significant differences in the mechanical responses of the HA film deposited on the initial and PEB-modified AZ31 substrates. The nanoindentation hardness and the Young's modulus of the HA film on the magnesium alloy modified using the PEB treatment were higher than that of the HA layer on the untreated substrate. Moreover, the HA film fabricated onto the PEB-treated surface was more resistant to plastic deformation than the same film on the untreated AZ31 surface.

  4. Biodegradable poly-lactic acid based-composite reinforced unidirectionally with high-strength magnesium alloy wires.

    PubMed

    Li, X; Chu, C L; Liu, L; Liu, X K; Bai, J; Guo, C; Xue, F; Lin, P H; Chu, Paul K

    2015-05-01

    Biodegradable poly-lactic acid (PLA)--based composites reinforced unidirectionally with high-strength magnesium alloy wires (MAWs) are fabricated by a heat-compressing process and the mechanical properties and degradation behavior are studied experimentally and theoretically. The composites possess improved strengthening and toughening properties. The bending strength and impact strength of the composites with 40 vol% MAWs are 190 MPa and 150 kJ/m(2), respectively, although PLA has a low viscosity and an average molecular weight of 60,000 g/mol. The mechanical properties of the composites can be further improved by internal structure modification and interface strengthening and a numerical model incorporating the equivalent section method (ESM) is proposed for the bending strength. Micro arc oxidization (MAO) of the MAWs is an effective interfacial strengthening method. The composites exhibit high strength retention during degradation and the PLA in the composite shows a smaller degradation rate than pure PLA. The novel biodegradable composites have large potential in bone fracture fixation under load-bearing conditions. PMID:25725562

  5. Numerical Assessment of the Role of Slip and Twinning in Magnesium Alloy AZ31B During Loading Path Reversal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Huamiao; Wu, Peidong; Wang, Jian

    2015-07-01

    Magnesium alloy AZ31B plastically deforms via twinning and slip. Corresponding to the unidirectional nature of twinning, the activity of twinning/detwinning is directly related to loading history and materials texture. Using the elastic viscoplastic self-consistent model implementing with the twinning and detwinning model (EVPSC-TDT), we revisited experimental data of AZ31B sheets under four different strain paths: (1) tension-compression-tension along rolling direction, (2) tension-compression-tension along transverse direction, (3) compression-tension-compression along rolling direction, and (4) compression-tension-compression along transverse direction, and identified the dominant deformation mechanisms with respect to the strain path. We captured plastic deformation behaviors observed in experiments and quantitatively interpreted experimental observations in terms of the activities of different deformation mechanisms and the evolution of texture. It is found that the in-plane pre-tension has slight effect on the subsequent deformation, and the pre-compression and the reverse tension after compression have significant effect on the subsequent deformation. The inelastic behavior under compressive unloading is found to be insignificant at a small strain level but pronounced at a large strain level. Such significant effect is mainly ascribed to the activity of twinning and detwinning.

  6. Mechanical properties and microstructures of a magnesium alloy gas tungsten arc welded with a cadmium chloride flux

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Z.D.; Liu, L.M. Shen, Y.; Wang, L.

    2008-01-15

    Gas tungsten arc (GTA) welds were prepared on 5-mm thick plates of wrought magnesium AZ31B alloy, using an activated flux. The microstructural characteristics of the weld joint were investigated using optical and scanning microscopy, and the fusion zone microstructure was compared with that of the base metal. The elemental distribution was also investigated by electron probe microanalysis (EPMA). Mechanical properties were determined by standard tensile tests on small-scale specimens. The as-welded fusion zone prepared using a CdCl{sub 2} flux exhibited a larger grain size than that prepared without flux; the microstructure consisted of matrix {alpha}-Mg, eutectic {alpha}-Mg and {beta}-Al{sub 12}Mg{sub 17}. The HAZ was observed to be slightly wider for the weld prepared with a CdCl{sub 2} flux compared to that prepared without flux; thus the tensile strength was lower for the flux-prepared weld. The fact that neither Cd nor Cl was detected in the weld seam by EPMA indicates that the CdCl{sub 2} flux has a small effect on convection in the weld pool.

  7. Abnormal distribution of microhardness in tungsten inert gas arc butt-welded AZ61 magnesium alloy plates

    SciTech Connect

    Xu Nan; Shen Jun; Xie Weidong; Wang Linzhi; Wang Dan; Min Dong

    2010-07-15

    In this study, the effects of heat input on the distribution of microhardness of tungsten inert gas (TIG) arc welded hot-extruded AZ61 magnesium alloy joints were investigated. The results show that with an increase of heat input, the distributions of microhardness at the top and bottom of the welded joints are different because they are determined by both the effect of grain coarsening and the effect of dispersion strengthening. With an increase of the heat input, the microhardness of the heat-affected zone (HAZ) at the top and bottom of welded joints and the fusion zone (FZ) at the bottom of welded joints decreased gradually, while the microhardness of the FZ at the top of welded joints decreased initially and then increased sharply. The reason for the abnormal distribution of microhardness of the FZ at the top of the welded joints is that this area is close to the heat source during welding and then large numbers of hard {beta}-Mg{sub 17}(Al,Zn){sub 12} particles are precipitated. Hence, in this case, the effect of dispersion strengthening dominated the microhardness.

  8. Improvement of laser keyhole formation with the assistance of arc plasma in the hybrid welding process of magnesium alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Liming; Hao, Xinfeng

    2009-11-01

    In the previous work, low-power laser/arc hybrid welding technique is used to weld magnesium alloy and high-quality weld joints are obtained. In order to make clear the interactions between low-power laser pulse and arc plasma, the effect of arc plasma on laser pulse is studied in this article. The result shows that the penetration of low-power laser welding with the assistance of TIG arc is more than two times deeper than that of laser welding alone and laser welding transforms from thermal-conduction mode to keyhole mode. The plasma behaviors and spectra during the welding process are studied, and the transition mechanism of laser-welding mode is analyzed in detail. It is also found that with the assistance of arc plasma, the threshold value of average power density to form keyhole welding for YAG laser is only 3.3×10 4 W/cm 2, and the average peak power density is 2.6×10 5 W/cm 2 in the present experiment. Moreover, the distribution of energy density during laser pulse is modulated to improve the formation and stability of laser keyholes.

  9. Characterization of High Strain Rate Mechanical behavior of AZ31 magnesium alloy using 3D Digital Image Correlation

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Yanli; Xu, Hanbing; ERDMAN III, DONALD L; Starbuck, J Michael; Simunovic, Srdjan

    2011-01-01

    Characterization of the material mechanical behavior at sub-Hopkinson regime (0.1 to 1000 s{sup -1}) is very challenging due to instrumentation limitations and the complexity of data analysis involved in dynamic loading. In this study, AZ31 magnesium alloy sheet specimens are tested using a custom designed servo-hydraulic machine in tension at nominal strain rates up to 1000 s{sup -1}. In order to resolve strain measurement artifacts, the specimen displacement is measured using 3D Digital Image correlation instead from actuator motion. The total strain is measured up to {approx} 30%, which is far beyond the measurable range of electric resistance strain gages. Stresses are calculated based on the elastic strains in the tab of a standard dog-bone shaped specimen. Using this technique, the stresses measured for strain rates of 100 s{sup -1} and lower show little or no noise comparing to load cell signals. When the strain rates are higher than 250 s{sup -1}, the noises and oscillations in the stress measurements are significantly decreased from {approx} 250 to 50 MPa. Overall, it is found that there are no significant differences in the elongation, although the material exhibits slight work hardening when the strain rate is increased from 1 to 100 s{sup -1}.

  10. Effect of the addition CNTs on performance of CaP/chitosan/coating deposited on magnesium alloy by electrophoretic deposition.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jie; Wen, Zhaohui; Zhao, Meng; Li, Guozhong; Dai, Changsong

    2016-01-01

    CaP/chitosan/carbon nanotubes (CNTs) coating on AZ91D magnesium alloy was prepared via electrophoretic deposition (EPD) followed by conversion in a phosphate buffer solution (PBS). The bonding between the layer and the substrate was studied by an automatic scratch instrument. The phase compositions and microstructures of the composite coatings were determined by using X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier-transformed infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), Raman spectroscopy and scanning electron microscope (SEM). The element concentration and gentamicin concentration were respectively determined by inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometer (ICP-OES) test and ultraviolet spectrophotometer (UV). The cell counting kit (CCK) assay was used to evaluate the cytotoxicity of samples to SaOS-2 cells. The results showed that a few CNTs with their original tubular morphology could be found in the CaP/chitosan coating and they were beneficial for the crystal growth of phosphate and improvement of the coating bonding when the addition amount of CNTs in 500ml of electrophoretic solution was from 0.05g to 0.125g. The loading amount of gentamicin increased and the releasing speed of gentamicin decreased after CNTs was added into the CaP/chitosan coating for immersion loading and EPD loading. The cell viability of Mg based CaP/chitosan/CNTs was higher than that of Mg based CaP/chitosan from 16days to 90days. PMID:26478396

  11. Energy-Saving Melting and Revert Reduction Technology (E-SMARRT): Lost Foam Thin Wall - Feasibility of Producing Lost Foam Castings in Aluminum and Magnesium Based Alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Fasoyinu, Yemi; Griffin, John A.

    2014-03-31

    With the increased emphasis on vehicle weight reduction, production of near-net shape components by lost foam casting will make significant inroad into the next-generation of engineering component designs. The lost foam casting process is a cost effective method for producing complex castings using an expandable polystyrene pattern and un-bonded sand. The use of un-bonded molding media in the lost foam process will impose less constraint on the solidifying casting, making hot tearing less prevalent. This is especially true in Al-Mg and Al-Cu alloy systems that are prone to hot tearing when poured in rigid molds partially due to their long freezing range. Some of the unique advantages of using the lost foam casting process are closer dimensional tolerance, higher casting yield, and the elimination of sand cores and binders. Most of the aluminum alloys poured using the lost foam process are based on the Al-Si system. Very limited research work has been performed with Al-Mg and Al-Cu type alloys. With the increased emphasis on vehicle weight reduction, and given the high-strength-to-weight-ratio of magnesium, significant weight savings can be achieved by casting thin-wall (? 3 mm) engineering components from both aluminum- and magnesium-base alloys.

  12. Detection of defects in laser welding of AZ31B magnesium alloy in zero-gap lap joint configuration by a real-time spectroscopic analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harooni, Masoud; Carlson, Blair; Kovacevic, Radovan

    2014-05-01

    The effect of surface oxide layer existing at the lap-joint faying surface of magnesium sheets is investigated on the keyhole dynamics of the weld pool and weld bead qualities. It is observed that by removing the oxide layer from the faying surface of the lap joint, a high quality weld can be achieved in the laser welding process. However, the presence of an oxide layer deteriorates the quality of the weld by forming pores at the interface of the two overlapped sheets. The purpose of this paper is to identify the correlation between the integrity of the weld and the interaction between the laser and material. A spectroscopy sensor was applied to detect the spectra emitted from a plasma plume during the laser welding of AZ31B magnesium alloy in a zero-gap lap joint configuration. The electron temperature was calculated by applying a Boltzmann plot method based on the detected spectra, and the correlation between the pore formation and the spectral signals was studied. The laser molten pool and the keyhole condition were monitored in real-time by a high speed charge-coupled device (CCD) camera. A green laser was used as an illumination source in order to detect the influence of the oxide layer on the dynamic behavior of the molten pool. Results revealed that the detected spectrum and weld defects had a meaningful correlation for real-time monitoring of the weld quality during laser welding of magnesium alloys.

  13. Architectural optimization of an epoxy-based hybrid sol-gel coating for the corrosion protection of a cast Elektron21 magnesium alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murillo-Gutiérrez, N. V.; Ansart, F.; Bonino, J.-P.; Kunst, S. R.; Malfatti, C. F.

    2014-08-01

    An epoxy-based hybrid sol-gel coating was prepared in various architectural configurations has been studied for the corrosion protection of a cast Elektron21 magnesium alloy. The creation of a single layer of this coating presents defects consisting of macro-pores and protuberances, which opens access for corrosive species to reach the metallic substrate. These defects are suspected to result from the high reactivity of the substrate, as well as to the irregular topography of the substrate disrupted by the microstructure of the own magnesium alloy. Hence, a sol-gel coating in bilayer architecture is proposed, where the first layer would “inert” the surface of the magnesium substrate, and the second layer would cover the defects of the first layer and also thickening the coating. The morphological characteristics of the sol-gel coatings were analyzed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and their corrosion behavior was evaluated by OCP (open circuit potential) monitoring and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) in chloride media. It is shown that both the architectural arrangement and the individual thickness of the first and second layers have an important influence on the anticorrosion performances of the protective system, just as much as its global thickness.

  14. Characterization of adiabatic shear bands in AM60B magnesium alloy under ballistic impact

    SciTech Connect

    Zou, D.L.; Zhen, L. Xu, C.Y.; Shao, W.Z.

    2011-05-15

    Adiabatic shear bands in Mg alloy under ballistic impact at a velocity of 0.5 km.s{sup -1} were characterized by means of optical microscope, scanning electron microscope, transmission electron microscope and indenter technique. The results show that adiabatic shear bands were formed around the impacted crater, and the deformed and transformed bands were distinguished by etching colors in metallographic observation. TEM observation shows that the deformed bands were composed of the elongated grains and high density dislocations, while the transformed bands composed of the ultrafine and equiaxed grains were confirmed. In initial stage, the severe localized plastic deformation led to the formation of elongated grains in the deformed bands. With localized strain increasing, the severe localized deformation assisted with the plastic temperature rising led to the severe deformation grains evolved into the ultrafine and equiaxed grains, while the deformed bands were developed into transformed bands. The formation of the ultrafine and equiaxed grains in the transformed bands should be attributed to the twinning-induced rotational dynamic recrystallization mechanism. High microhardness in the bands was obtained because of the strain hardening, grain refining and content concentration. - Research Highlights: {yields} Deformed and transformed bands are found in Mg alloy under ballistic impact. {yields} The microstructures in the deformed and transformed bands are characterized. {yields} The evolution process of the microstructure in the bands is discussed.

  15. Phase field simulation on microstructure evolution in solidification and aging process of squeeze cast magnesium alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, H. W.; Han, G. M.; Han, Z. Q.; Liu, B. C.

    2015-06-01

    Phase-field models have been developed to simulate the dendritic growth in pressurized solidification of Mg-Al alloy during squeeze casting and the precipitation of multivariant ?-Mg17Al12 phases during the subsequent aging process. For the pressurized solidification, the effects of pressure on the Gibbs free energy and chemical potential of solid and liquid phases, and the solute diffusion coefficient were considered. For the precipitation during aging process, the effects of elastic strain energy, anisotropy of interfacial energy, and anisotropy of interface mobility coefficient were considered. The results showed that the dendritic growth rate tends to increase and the secondary dendrite arms are more developed as the pressure is increased from 0.1 to 100MPa, which showed a good agreement with the experimental results of direct squeeze casting of Mg-Al alloy. The 2D and 3D simulated precipitates had lath shapes with lozenge ends, and the precipitate variants were parallel to the basal plane and oriented in directions with an angular interval of 60 degrees, which is in good agreement with experimental observations.

  16. Effect of pulse duration on heat transfer and solidification development in laser-melt magnesium alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guan, Yingchun; Zhou, Wei; Zheng, Hongyu; Hong, Minghui; Zhu, Ying; Qi, Bojin

    2015-05-01

    Compared to CW CO2 laser, Nd:YAG pulse laser is more suitable for some material processing due to higher absorptivity. However, surface ripples and microstructure inhomogeneities are main disadvantages during pulse laser melting on materials. Experiments were carried out to examine how laser melting influences surface topography and microstructure development of AZ91D Mg alloy. The laser-melt surface was characterized using Talysurf profiler, optical microscope and scanning electron microscope. Temperature distribution of molten pool was calculated from heat flow model to understand how heat transfer and fluid flow influence kinetics of rapid solidification under non-equilibrium conditions. The results implicate solidification behavior on microstructure evolution of laser-melt materials. At optimized parameters, thermally driven Marangoni flow became uniform, resulting in low height of ripples on top surface and less discrete bands in cross-sectional microstructure simultaneously, thereby improving homogeneity of microstructure in the molten pool.

  17. Recrystallization and superplasticity at 300 C in an aluminum-magnesium alloy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hales, S. J.; Mcnelley, T. R.; Mcqueen, H. J.

    1991-01-01

    Variations in thermomechanical processing (TMP) which regulate the microstructural characteristics and superplastic response of an Al-10Mg-0.1Zr alloy at 300 C were evaluated. Mechanical property data revealed that the superplastic ductility can be enhanced by simultaneously increasing the total rolling strain, the reduction per pass, and the duration of reheating intervals between passes during isothermal rolling. Texture and microscopy data were consistent with the development of a refined microstructure by recovery-dominated processes, i.e., continuous recrystallization, during the processing. The mechanisms by which a refined substructure can be progressively converted into a fine-grained structure during repeated cycles of deformation and annealing are addressed. A qualitative description of the complex sequence of developments leading to a microstructure better suited to support superplastic response is presented.

  18. Enhancement of the mechanical properties of AZ31 magnesium alloy via nanostructured hydroxyapatite thin films fabricated via radio-frequency magnetron sputtering.

    PubMed

    Surmeneva, M A; Tyurin, A I; Mukhametkaliyev, T M; Pirozhkova, T S; Shuvarin, I A; Syrtanov, M S; Surmenev, R A

    2015-06-01

    The structure, composition and morphology of a radio-frequency (RF) magnetron sputter-deposited dense nano-hydroxyapatite (HA) coating that was deposited on the surface of an AZ31 magnesium alloy were characterized using AFM, SEM, EDX and XRD. The results obtained from SEM and XRD experiments revealed that the bias applied during the deposition of the HA coating resulted in a decrease in the grain and crystallite size of the film having a crucial role in enhancing the mechanical properties of the fabricated biocomposites. A maximum hardness of 9.04 GPa was found for the HA coating, which was prepared using a bias of -50 V. The hardness of the HA film deposited on the grounded substrate (GS) was found to be 4.9 GPa. The elastic strain to failure (H/E) and the plastic deformation resistance (H(3)/E(2)) for an indentation depth of 50 nm for the HA coating fabricated at a bias of -50 V was found to increase by ~30% and ~74%, respectively, compared with the coating deposited at the GS holder. The nanoindentation tests demonstrated that all of the HA coatings increased the surface hardness on both the microscale and the nanoscale. Therefore, the results revealed that the films deposited on the surface of the AZ31 magnesium alloy at a negative substrate bias can significantly enhance the wear resistance of this resorbable alloy. PMID:25792410

  19. In vitro and in vivo biocompatibility and corrosion behaviour of a bioabsorbable magnesium alloy coated with octacalcium phosphate and hydroxyapatite.

    PubMed

    Hiromoto, Sachiko; Inoue, Motoki; Taguchi, Tetsushi; Yamane, Misao; Ohtsu, Naofumi

    2015-01-01

    Octacalcium phosphate (OCP) and hydroxyapatite (HAp) coatings were formed on Mg-3 mass% Al-1 mass% Zn (AZ31) magnesium alloy by a single-step chemical solution deposition method. Chemically polished AZ31 (Cpol-AZ31) and HAp- and OCP-coated AZ31 (HAp- and OCP-AZ31) were immersed in a medium for 52 weeks or implanted in transgenic mice for 16 weeks to examine the long-term corrosion behaviour and in situ inflammation behaviour. In the medium, Mg-ion release was restricted for the initial several days and the corrosion rate thereafter was suppressed by approximately one-half with the HAp and OCP coatings. HAp-AZ31 showed a ?20% lower corrosion rate than OCP-AZ31. Tissues of the transgenic mouse emit fluorescence in proportion to the degree of inflammation in situ. The luminescence intensity level was too low to be a problem regardless of the coatings. A thinner fibrous tissue layer was formed around OCP- and HAp-AZ31 than around Cpol-AZ31, indicating that the HAp and OCP coatings suppressed corrosion and foreign-body reaction in vivo. Visible pits were formed in filiform and round shapes in vitro and in vivo, respectively. Corrosion was observed underneath the coatings, and almost uniform corrosion took place in vitro, while local corrosion was predominant in vivo. These differences in corrosion morphology are attributed to the adhesion of tissues and the lower diffusivity on the surface in vivo than that in vitro. Dissolution behaviour of OCP crystals in vivo was different from that in vitro. It was demonstrated that the HAp and OCP coatings developed have great potential for a biocompatible and corrosion protection coating. PMID:25257316

  20. Formation behavior of basal texture under the high temperature plane strain compression deformation in AZ80 magnesium alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, K.; Okayasu, K.; Fukutomi, H.

    2015-04-01

    The formation behavior of basal texture during high temperature deformation of AZ80 magnesium alloys in single phase was investigated by plane strain compression deformation. Three kinds of specimens with different initial textures were machined out from an extruded bar having a <101¯0> texture. Plane strain compression tests were conducted at temperatures of 623K and 723K and a strain rate of 5.0×10-2s-1, with a strain range of between - 0.4 and -1.0. After deformation, the specimens were immediately quenched in oil. Texture measurement was carried out on the compression planes by the Schulz reflection method using nickel filtered Cu K? radiation. Electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) measurements were also conducted in order to examine the spatial distribution of orientations. Three kinds of specimens named A, B and C were prepared from the same extruded bar. In the specimens A, B and C, {0001} was distributed preferentially parallel to ND, TD, and RD, respectively. After deformation, texture evaluation was conducted on the mid-plane section. At the plane strain compression deformation, peaks appeared in the true stress-true strain curves irrespective of the kinds of specimen used. It was found that the main components and the pole densities of the textures vary depending on deformation condition and initial texture. Six kinds of texture components were observed after deformation. The (0001)<101¯0> has formed regardless of the initial texture. There are two types of texture components; one exists before the deformation, and the other does not. Either types are considered to have stable orientations for plane strain compression. Also, the basal texture is composed of two crystal orientation components - (0001)<101¯0> and (0001)<112¯0>. When (0001) existed before deformation, an extremely sharp (0001) (compression plane) texture is formed.

  1. Mechanisms operating during continuous dynamic recrystallization in an aluminum-4magnesium-0.3scandium alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dougherty, Lisa Marie

    The mechanisms operating during continuous static and continuous dynamic recrystallization in the heat-treatable aluminum alloy Al-4Mg-0.3Sc have been determined. Bulk tensile specimens were fabricated from cold-worked material in the peak-aged and over-aged conditions. These specimens were superplastically tested at 733 K and a strain rate of 10-3 sec -1 to final elongations exceeding 300%. During the early stages of superplastic testing, every specimen dynamically recrystallized to a fine grain structure A series of specimens from both the peak-aged and over-aged conditions were deformed to intermediate true strains of 0.1, 0.2, 0.4 and 0.8, and quenched under load with a liquid nitrogen spray. Post-mortem TEM examinations revealed microstructural changes with increasing strain in the specimen gauge sections such as subgrain growth, inhomogeneous dislocation distribution, and increasing complexity of dislocation interactions with particles, boundaries and other dislocations. These observations indicate the importance of dislocation dynamics during continuous dynamic recrystallization. Orientation imaging microscopy (OIM) revealed a variation in texture with distance from the surface of the specimen. A rolling texture dominated near the center of the specimen and randomized with increasing strain. A rotated cube texture dominated near the surface and sharpened with increasing strain. In-situ TEM experiments were used to directly observe the mechanisms operating during continuous static and continuous dynamic recrystallization. The static process was observed to occur much more rapidly than the dynamic process. The dominant mechanism of continuous static recrystallization appears to be the rapid generation of dislocations at sources in grain boundaries and at grain boundary triple points. These dislocations slip across the subgrains and either interact with other dislocations or enter nearby grain boundaries. Low-angle grain boundaries were observed to disintegrate, but the mechanism by which this occurred was unclear. The primary mechanism of continuous dynamic recrystallization appears to be the process of subgrain rotation, manifested as the migration and disintegration of dislocation structures and the disintegration of subgrain boundary triple points. Subgrain rotation resulting in increased boundary misorientation was not observed; however, the restraints imposed by the thin foil geometry of the tensile TEM samples may be the reason for this.

  2. Optimizing critical current density through composition and microstructure in mechanically alloyed magnesium diboride

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Senkowicz, Ben James

    Carbon doped MgB2 is an emerging superconductor with potential for operation in the 0-10 Tesla range at 4.2 K or 3-4 T up to ˜25 K. In order to be a viable conductor option, mid to high-field Jc(H) must be improved from Jc(8T,4.2K) ˜ 3x10 4 A/cm2 typical of conductors made by in-situ powder in tube reaction. Jc(H) is controlled by H* (a function of Hc2 and flux pinning), flux pinning itself (largely a function of grain size), and connectivity. Current in-situ wires are limited by a trade-off between connectivity and grain size because aggressive sintering heat treatments grow grains. In order to escape this dilemma, this work examines bulk C-doped MgB2 made by sintering pre-reacted powder. An engineering approach was adopted, studying the effect of processing parameters on our primary metric, Jc(H). In this work we used high energy ball milling to simultaneously do the following: (1) Alloy MgB2 with C, (2) refine grains, (3) break up oxide sintering barriers on particle surfaces, and (4) disperse second phases on a fine scale. By this method we obtained extremely fine 20-30 nm grains even after heat treatment at 1000°C---probably due to dispersed second phases retarding grain growth. Heat treatment optimization revealed a temperature window between 900°C and 1000°C (depending on composition and milling time) which was sufficiently hot for sintering, but did not result in excessive grain growth. In this way (combined with hot isostatic pressing) we were able to repeatedly obtain Jc(8T,4.2K) = 7x10 4 A/cm2 or higher---within a factor of 2 of optimized NbTi. An additional benefit of this work is the discovery that C-solubility in MgB2 is a strong function of T for T < 1150°C, which could open the door for further processing strategies.

  3. Magnesium Research and Technology Development

    SciTech Connect

    Nyberg, Eric A.; Joost, William; Smith, Mark T.

    2009-12-30

    The Magnesium Research and Technical Development (MR&TD) project supports efforts to increase using magnesium in automotive applications, including improving technology, lowering costs and increasing the knowledge needed to enable alloy and manufacturing process optimization. MR&TD supports the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)/United States Automotive Materials Partnership (USAMP) Magnesium Front End Research and Development (MFERD) project in collaboration with China and Canada. The MR&TD projects also maintains the magnesium bibliographic database at magnesium.pnl.gov.

  4. In vitro and in vivo corrosion of the novel magnesium alloy Mg-La-Nd-Zr: influence of the measurement technique and in vivo implant location.

    PubMed

    Reifenrath, J; Marten, A-K; Angrisani, N; Eifler, R; Weizbauer, A

    2015-08-01

    For the evaluation of new magnesium-based alloys, many different in vitro and in vivo methods are used. It was the aim of the current study to perform in vitro and in vivo corrosion studies of the new alloy Mg-La-Nd-Zr for its evaluation as a promising new degradable material and to compare commonly used evaluation methods. Die casted and subsequent extruded cylindrical pins (Ø1.5?mm; length 7?mm, [Formula: see text]) were implanted subcutaneously ([Formula: see text]), intramuscular ([Formula: see text]) and intramedullary ([Formula: see text]) in female Lewis rats with a postoperative follow up of 8 weeks; subsequent ?-computed tomographical analyses (XTremeCT and ?CT80) were performed as well as weight analysis prior to and after implantation. Cubes (5?mm??×??4?mm??×??4?mm; surface area, 1.12?cm(2); [Formula: see text]) were used for in vitro corrosion (HBSS and RPMI 1640 + 10% FBS medium) and cytocompatibility studies (L929 cells). First of all it could be stated that implant location strongly influences the in vivo corrosion rate. In particular, intramedullary implanted pins corroded faster than pins in a subcutaneous or intramuscular environment. Considering the different evaluation methods, the calculated ex vivo ?CT-based corrosion rates resulted in comparable values to the corrosion rates calculated by the weight loss method, especially after chromatic acid treatment of the explanted pins. The in vitro methods used tend to show similar corrosion rates compared to in vivo corrosion, especially when a RPMI medium was used, and therefore are suitable to predict corrosion trends prior to in vivo studies. Regarding cytocompatibility, the novel magnesium alloy Mg-La-Nd-Zr showed sufficient cell viability and therefore can be considered as a promising alloy for further applications. PMID:26267552

  5. Controlling microstructure and texture in magnesium alloy sheet by shear-based deformation processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sagapuram, Dinakar

    Application of lightweight Mg sheet is limited by its low workability, both in production of sheet (typically by multistep hot and cold-rolling) and forming of sheet into components. Large strain extrusion machining (LSEM), a constrained chip formation process, is used to create Mg alloy AZ31B sheet in a single deformation step. The deformation in LSEM is shown to be intense simple shear that is confined to a narrow zone, which results in significant deformation-induced heating up to ~ 200°C and reduces the need for pre-heating to realize continuous sheet forms. This study focuses on the texture and microstructure development in the sheet processed by LSEM. Interestingly, deep, highly twinned steady-state layer develops in the workpiece subsurface due to the compressive field ahead of the shear zone. The shear deformation, in conjunction with this pre-deformed twinned layer, results in tilted-basal textures in the sheet with basal planes tilted well away from the surface. These textures are significantly different from those in rolled sheet, where basal planes are nearly parallel to the surface. By controlling the strain path, the basal plane inclination from the surface could be varied in the range of 32-53°. B-fiber (basal plane parallel to LSEM shear plane), associated with basal slip, is the major texture component in the sheet. An additional minor C2-fiber component appears above 250°C due to the thermal activation of pyramidal slip. Together with these textures, microstructure ranges from severely cold-worked to (dynamically) recrystallized type, with the corresponding grain sizes varying from ultrafine- (~ 200 nm) to fine- (2 mum) grained. Small-scale limiting dome height (LDH) confirmed enhanced formability (~ 50% increase in LDH) of LSEM sheet over the conventional rolled sheet. Premature, twinning-driven shear fractures are observed in the rolled sheet with the basal texture. In contrast, LSEM sheet with a tilted-basal texture favorably oriented for basal slip exhibits ductile tensile-type fracture. A two-fold increase in ductility is also observed for the LSEM sheet under uniaxial tensile testing without significant changes in the strength. Among texture and microstructure (grain size), texture is shown to be more critical for Mg sheet formability. However, in conjunction with a favorable texture, fine recrystallized microstructure provides for additional enhancement of strain-hardening capacity and formability. In-situ imaging of material flow during uniaxial tensile testing revealed new, interesting flow localization phenomena and fracture behavior. It is shown that the deformation behavior of Mg sheet is highly texture dependent, and also radically different from that of conventional ductile metals both in terms of necking and fracture. The implications of these observations for the LDH test results and formability of Mg sheet, in general, are briefly discussed.

  6. Influence of heat treatment on bond strength and corrosion resistance of sol-gel derived bioglass-ceramic coatings on magnesium alloy.

    PubMed

    Shen, Sibo; Cai, Shu; Xu, Guohua; Zhao, Huan; Niu, Shuxin; Zhang, Ruiyue

    2015-05-01

    In this study, bioglass-ceramic coatings were prepared on magnesium alloy substrates through sol-gel dip-coating route followed by heat treatment at the temperature range of 350-500°C. Structure evolution, bond strength and corrosion resistance of samples were studied. It was shown that increasing heat treatment temperature resulted in denser coating structure as well as increased interfacial residual stress. A failure mode transition from cohesive to adhesive combined with a maximum on the measured bond strength together suggested that heat treatment enhanced the cohesion strength of coating on the one hand, while deteriorated the adhesion strength of coating/substrate on the other, thus leading to the highest bond strength of 27.0MPa for the sample heat-treated at 450°C. This sample also exhibited the best corrosion resistance. Electrochemical tests revealed that relative dense coating matrix and good interfacial adhesion can effectively retard the penetration of simulated body fluid through the coating, thus providing excellent protection for the underlying magnesium alloy. PMID:25728582

  7. Effect of biologically relevant ions on the corrosion products formed on alloy AZ31B: an improved understanding of magnesium corrosion.

    PubMed

    Jang, Yongseok; Collins, Boyce; Sankar, Jagannathan; Yun, Yeoheung

    2013-11-01

    Simulated physiological solutions mimicking human plasma have been utilized to study the in vitro corrosion of biodegradable metals. However, corrosion and corrosion product formation are different for different solutions with varied responses and, hence, the prediction of in vivo degradation behavior is not feasible based on these studies alone. This paper reports the role of physiologically relevant salts and their concentrations on the corrosion behavior of a magnesium alloy (AZ31B) and subsequent corrosion production formation. Immersion tests were performed for three different concentrations of Ca(2+), HPO4(2-), HCO3(-) to identify the effect of each ion on the corrosion of AZ31B assessed at 1, 3 and 10 days. Time-lapse morphological characterization of the samples was performed using X-ray computed tomography and scanning electron microscopy. The chemical composition of the surface corrosion products was determined by electron dispersive X-ray spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction. The results show that: (1) calcium is not present in the corrosion product layer when only Cl(-) and OH(-) anions are available; (2) the presence of phosphate induces formation of a densely packed amorphous magnesium phosphate corrosion product layer when HPO4(2-) and Cl(-) are present in solution; (3) octacalcium phosphate and hydroxyapatite (HAp) are deposited on the surface of the magnesium alloy when HPO4(2-) and Ca(2+) are present together in NaCl solution (this coating limits localized corrosion and increases general corrosion resistance); (4) addition of HCO3(-) accelerates the overall corrosion rate, which increases with increasing bicarbonate concentration; (5) the corrosion rate decreases due to the formation of insoluble HAp on the surface when HCO3(-), Ca(2+), and HPO4(2-) are present together. PMID:23535231

  8. EFFECT OF Sn AND Pb ADDITIONS ON MICROSTRUCTURE OF Mg-6Al-1Zn AS-CAST MAGNESIUM ALLOYS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hou, Haibo; Zhu, Tianping; Wang, Yuxin; Gao, Wei

    2013-07-01

    Much attention has been paid to Mg alloys given that Mg alloys are the most promising lightweight metallic material. They have found applications in automobile and other fields where weight saving is of great significance. Mg-Al-Zn alloy system (AZ series), including AZ91 and AZ61 Mg alloys, is widely used in industry. We have studied the enhancement of mechanical properties by adding alloying elements Sn and Pb. This paper reports our study on the microstructure and element distribution of the alloys with small amounts of tin (Sn) and lead (Pb) additions.

  9. In situ monitoring of corrosion mechanisms and phosphate inhibitor surface deposition during corrosion of zinc-magnesium-aluminium (ZMA) alloys using novel time-lapse microscopy.

    PubMed

    Sullivan, James; Cooze, Nathan; Gallagher, Callum; Lewis, Tom; Prosek, Tomas; Thierry, Dominique

    2015-01-01

    In situ time-lapse optical microscopy was used to examine the microstructural corrosion mechanisms in three zinc-magnesium-aluminium (ZMA) alloy coated steels immersed in 1% NaCl pH 7. Preferential corrosion of MgZn(2) lamellae within the eutectic phases was observed in all the ZMA alloys followed by subsequent dissolution of Zn rich phases. The total extent and rate of corrosion, measured using time-lapse image analysis and scanning vibrating electrode technique (SVET) estimated mass loss, decreased as Mg and Al alloying additions were increased up to a level of 3 wt% Mg and 3.7 wt% Al. This was probably due to the increased presence of MgO and Al(2)O(3) at the alloy surface retarding the kinetics of cathodic oxygen reduction. The addition of 1 × 10(-2) mol dm(-3) Na(3)PO(4) to 1% NaCl pH 7 had a dramatic influence on the corrosion mechanism for a ZMA with passivation of anodic sites through phosphate precipitation observed using time-lapse image analysis. Intriguing rapid precipitation of filamentous phosphate was also observed and it is postulated that these filaments nucleate and grow due to super saturation effects. Polarisation experiments showed that the addition of 1 × 10(-2) mol dm(-3) Na(3)PO(4) to the 1% NaCl electrolyte promoted an anodic shift of 50 mV in open circuit potential for the ZMA alloy with a reduction in anodic current of 2.5 orders of magnitude suggesting that it was acting primarily as an anodic inhibitor supporting the inferences from the time-lapse investigations. These phosphate additions resulted in a 98% reduction in estimated mass loss as measured by SVET demonstrating the effectiveness of phosphate inhibitors for this alloy system. PMID:25912828

  10. Materials Science and Engineering B 176 (2011) 17781784 Contents lists available at ScienceDirect

    E-print Network

    Zheng, Yufeng

    2011-01-01

    the concentrations of aluminum and rare-earth elements added to magnesium in order to ensure the biosafety evaluation showed that the 100% concentrated cast and extruded ZK60 alloy extracts resulted in significantly and total protein amount increased with the gradual dilution of the extracts, but the protein normalized ALP

  11. Magnesium Oxide

    MedlinePLUS

    Magnesium is an element your body needs to function normally. Magnesium oxide may be used for different reasons. Some ... to relieve heartburn, sour stomach, or acid indigestion. Magnesium oxide also may be used as a laxative ...

  12. Combined effect of non-equilibrium solidification and thermal annealing on microstructure evolution and hardness behavior of AZ91 magnesium alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Z. Z.; Yang, W.; Chen, S. H.; Yu, H.; Xu, Z. F.

    2014-06-01

    Non-equilibrium solidification of commercial AZ91 magnesium alloy was performed by copper mold spray-casting technique and the thermal stability property of as-formed meta-stable microstructure was investigated by subsequent annealing at different temperatures and times. Remarkable grain refinement appears with increasing cooling rate during solidification process, which is accompanied by a visible cellular/dendrite transition for the grain morphology of primary phase. Moreover, the non-equilibrium solidified alloy exhibits obvious precipitation hardening effect upon annealing at 200 °C, and the precipitation mode of ?-Mg17Al12 phase changes from discontinuous to continuous with extending isothermal time from 4 h to 16 h, which generates an increase of resultant micro-hardness value. After solid solution treatment at the elevated temperature of 420 °C, the volume fraction of ?-Mg17Al12 phase decreases and a notable grain growth phenomenon occurs, which give rise to a reduction of hardness in comparison with that of as-quenched alloy.

  13. Magnesium for Future Autos

    SciTech Connect

    Nyberg, Eric A.; Luo, Alan A.; Sadayappan, Kumar; Shi, Wenfang

    2008-10-01

    In the quest for better fuel economy and improved environmental performance, magnesium may well become a metal of choice for constructing lighter, more efficient vehicles. Magnesium is the lightest structural metal, yet it has a high strength-to-weight ratio makes it comparable to steel in many applications. The world’s automakers already use magnesium for individual components. But new alloys and processing methods are needed before the metal can become economically and technologically feasible as a major automotive structural material. This article will explore the formation, challenges and initial results of an international collaboration—the Magnesium Front End Research and Development (MFERD) project—that is leveraging the expertise and resources of Canada, China and the United States to advance the creation of magnesium-intensive vehicles. The MFERD project aims to develop the enabling technologies and knowledge base that will lead to a vehicles that are 50-60 percent lighter, equally affordable, more recyclable and of equal or better quality when compared to today’s vehicles. Databases of information also will be captured in models to enable further alloy and manufacturing process optimization. Finally, a life-cycle analysis of the magnesium used will be conducted.

  14. Effects of Processing Parameters on the Grain Refinement of Magnesium Alloy by Equal-Channel Angular Extrusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, S. X.; Chang, C. P.; Kao, P. W.

    2009-02-01

    The Mg-3 pct Al-1 pct Zn (AZ31) alloy has been used as a model material for understanding the grain-refinement process of a Mg alloy fabricated by equal-channel angular extrusion (ECAE). The effects of ECAE processing parameters on grain refinement have also been studied; it was found that these effects are quite different from those for fcc metals. A multitemperature extrusion procedure has been developed, which can produce an ultrafine-grained AZ31 alloy having a grain size 0.37 ?m. For the AZ31 alloy, this ultrafine-grained alloy has a record high strength accompanied by reasonably good tensile ductility. The success of the development of this ECAE procedure proves that ECAE can offer a good opportunity for the development of high-strength Mg alloys.

  15. The Bolting of Magnesium Components in Car Engines

    E-print Network

    Cambridge, University of

    1 The Bolting of Magnesium Components in Car Engines Sarennah J.P. Longworth Newnham College vehicles. At present this is achieved through the use of ultralight steels, aluminium alloys and magnesium alloys for some body parts. Magnesium has the highest strength-to-weight ratio of any structural metal

  16. NUCLEATION PHENOMENON IN SiC PARTICULATE REINFORCED MAGNESIUM COMPOSITE

    E-print Network

    Zhou, Wei

    NUCLEATION PHENOMENON IN SiC PARTICULATE REINFORCED MAGNESIUM COMPOSITE Y. Cai, D. Taplin, M.J. Tan performance of matrix metals and alloys. Most magnesium alloy based MMCs are produced via a casting process into the last freezing interdendritic regions. For magnesium based composites, both particle pushing (or capture

  17. High-compactness coating grown by plasma electrolytic oxidation on AZ31 magnesium alloy in the solution of silicate-borax

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, M. J.; Wang, X. J.; Zhang, M. F.

    2012-10-01

    A ceramic coating was formed on the surface of AZ31 magnesium alloy by plasma electrolytic oxidation (PEO) in the silicate solution with and without borax doped. The composition, morphology, elements and roughness as well as mechanical property of the coating were investigated by X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscope (SEM), energy dispersive X-ray spectrometry (EDS), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), atomic force microscopy (AFM) and reciprocal-sliding tribometer. The results show that the PEO coating is mainly composed of magnesia. When using borax dope, boron element is permeating into the coating and the boron containing phase exist in the form of amorphous. In addition, the microhardness and compactness of the PEO coating are improved significantly due to doped borax.

  18. Materials Science and Engineering A 418 (2006) 341356 Microstructural effects of AZ31 magnesium alloy on its

    E-print Network

    Tong, Wei

    2006-01-01

    Materials Science and Engineering A 418 (2006) 341­356 Microstructural effects of AZ31 magnesium, Wei Tongc a Colorado School of Mines, Metallurgical and Materials Engineering Department, Center curves were computed with the digital image correlation (DIC) technique. Initial yield point, ultimate

  19. Nano-hydroxyapatite reinforced AZ31 magnesium alloy by friction stir processing: a solid state processing for biodegradable metal matrix composites.

    PubMed

    Ratna Sunil, B; Sampath Kumar, T S; Chakkingal, Uday; Nandakumar, V; Doble, Mukesh

    2014-04-01

    Friction stir processing (FSP) was successfully adopted to fabricate nano-hydroxyapatite (nHA) reinforced AZ31 magnesium alloy composite as well as to achieve fine grain structure. The combined effect of grain refinement and the presence of embedded nHA particles on enhancing the biomineralization and controlling the degradation of magnesium were studied. Grain refinement from 56 to ~4 and 2 ?m was observed at the stir zones of FSP AZ31 and AZ31-nHA composite respectively. The immersion studies in super saturated simulated body fluid (SBF 5×) for 24 h suggest that the increased wettability due to fine grain structure and nHA particles present in the AZ31-nHA composite initiated heterogeneous nucleation which favored the early nucleation and growth of calcium-phosphate mineral phase. The nHA particles as nucleation sites initiated rapid biomineralization in the composite. After 72 h of immersion the degradation due to localized pitting was observed to be reduced by enhanced biomineralization in both the FSPed AZ31 and the composite. Also, best corrosion behavior was observed for the composite before and after immersion test. MTT assay using rat skeletal muscle (L6) cells showed negligible toxicity for all the processed and unprocessed samples. However, cell adhesion was observed to be more on the composite due to the small grain size and incorporated nHA. PMID:24375146

  20. Magnesium basics

    PubMed Central

    Ketteler, Markus

    2012-01-01

    As a cofactor in numerous enzymatic reactions, magnesium fulfils various intracellular physiological functions. Thus, imbalance in magnesium status—primarily hypomagnesaemia as it is seen more often than hypermagnesaemia—might result in unwanted neuromuscular, cardiac or nervous disorders. Measuring total serum magnesium is a feasible and affordable way to monitor changes in magnesium status, although it does not necessarily reflect total body magnesium content. The following review focuses on the natural occurrence of magnesium and its physiological function. The absorption and excretion of magnesium as well as hypo- and hypermagnesaemia will be addressed. PMID:26069819

  1. Study on the Indentation Creep Behavior of Mg-4Al-RE-0.8Ca Magnesium Alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yaocheng; Yang, Li; Huang, Zedong; Dai, Jun

    2015-11-01

    The indentation creep behavior of Mg-4Al-RE-0.8Ca (AEC4108) alloy was investigated with a homemade apparatus. The microstructure of the AEC4108 alloy and the chemical composition of the precipitation phases in the alloy before and after creep test were investigated by scanning electron microscope and energy-dispersive spectroscopy. The results reveal that the steady-state indentation creep rate of the AEC4108 alloy is increased with increasing temperature and applied stress. The logarithm of the steady-state creep rates is linearly related to the logarithm of the stress and the reciprocal of the absolute temperature. The indentation creep parameters of AEC4108 alloy are correlated using an empirical equation dot{\\varepsilon }_{s} = 1.253 × 10^{ - 8} × \\upsigma^{3.2} { exp }[ { - 33.89/( {RT} )} ]. The thin acicular Al11La3 and the bone-shaped Al2Ca are precipitated along the grain boundaries, and the granular Al2La is formed within the grain. The indentation creep rate of AEC4108 alloy is controlled by the grain boundary slipping led by viscous dislocation movement. The indentation creep resistance of the AEC4108 alloy under temperature 398-448 K and stress 55-95 MPa is guaranteed by the precipitated phases with high thermal stability pinning at the grain boundary and within the grain.

  2. LJournal of Alloys and Compounds 270 (1998) 8894 Reduction of magnesium orthovanadate Mg (VO )3 4 2

    E-print Network

    Marks, Laurence D.

    1998-01-01

    properties in terms of high selectivity Mg V O was prepared by heating Mg V O powder to3 2 6 3 2 8 features often exhibit sis (TGA) in a flowing gas of 7% H in N . Polycrystalline4 4 2 2 excellent catalytic and conversion [1­5]. In the Mg­V­O system, magnesium 9208C for 12 h in flowing 7% H in N . Mg V O crystals2 2 3

  3. Composite titanium nitride layers produced on the AZ91D magnesium alloy by a hybrid method including hydrothermal modification of the layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tacikowski, M.; Grzonka, J.; P?oci?ski, T.; Jakie?a, R.; Pisarek, M.; Wierzcho?, T.

    2015-08-01

    The microstructure and properties of the composite TiN-Ti-Al type titanium nitride surface layer with a sub-layer of titanium and aluminium produced on AZ91D magnesium alloy using a hybrid PVD method including final sealing by hydrothermal treatment were investigated. The results were analysed in terms of the microstructure-properties correlation, to approach the role of the sub-layers and the mechanisms involved in the properties improvement. The microstructure investigations indicate that the composite titanium nitride layers are tight and have nano-crystalline, diffusive character and multi zone microstructure of the type TixOy-TiN-Ti-Al-Al3Mg2-Al12Mg17. The significant corrosion resistance improvement of the AZ91D alloy obtained using the sealed composite titanium nitride layers was found to be the result of a synergistic mechanism which combined hydrothermal treatment of the layer with an action of aluminium sub-layer which is critical to make the sealing effective. The diffusive bonding via Mg-Al zone improves adhesion and the load bearing capacity of titanium nitride layers in wear conditions.

  4. Microstructure stability of ultra-fine grained magnesium alloy AZ31 processed by extrusion and equal-channel angular pressing (EX–ECAP)

    SciTech Connect

    Stráská, Jitka; Jane?ek, Miloš; ?ížek, Jakub; Stráský, Josef; Hadzima, Branislav

    2014-08-15

    Thermal stability of the ultra-fine grained (UFG) microstructure of magnesium AZ31 alloy was investigated. UFG microstructure was achieved by a combined two-step severe plastic deformation process: the extrusion (EX) and subsequent equal-channel angular pressing (ECAP). This combined process leads to refined microstructure and enhanced microhardness. Specimens with UFG microstructure were annealed isochronally at temperatures 150–500 °C for 1 h. The evolution of microstructure, mechanical properties and dislocation density was studied by electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD), microhardness measurements and positron annihilation spectroscopy (PAS). The coarsening of the fine-grained structure at higher temperatures was accompanied by a gradual decrease of the microhardness and decrease of dislocation density. Mechanism of grain growth was studied by general equation for grain growth and Arrhenius equation. Activation energies for grain growth were calculated to be 115, 33 and 164 kJ/mol in temperature ranges of 170–210 °C, 210–400 °C and 400–500 °C (443–483 K, 483–673 K and 673–773 K), respectively. - Highlights: • Microhardness of UFG AZ31 alloy decreases with increasing annealing temperature. • This fact has two reasons: dislocation annihilations and/or grain growth. • The activation energies for grain growth were calculated for all temperature ranges.

  5. The Features of Fracture Behavior of an Aluminum-Magnesium Alloy AMg6 Under High-Rate Straining

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skripnyak, N. V.

    2015-09-01

    The results of investigation of fracture dynamics of rolled sheet specimens of an AMg6 alloy are presented for the range of strain rates from 10-3 to 103 s-1. It is found out that the presence of nanostructured surface layers on the thin AMg6 rolled sheets results in improved strength characteristics within the above range of strain rates. A modified model of a deforming medium is proposed to describe the plastic flow and fracture of the AMg6 alloy.

  6. The Effects of Adding Elements of Zinc and Magnesium on Ag-Cu Eutectic Alloy for Warming Acupuncture

    PubMed Central

    Park, Il Song; Kim, Keun Sik; Lee, Min Ho

    2013-01-01

    The warming acupuncture for hyperthermia therapy is made of STS304. However, its needle point cannot be reached to a desirable temperature due to heat loss caused by low thermal conductivity, and the quantification of stimulation condition and the effective standard establishment of warming acupuncture are required as a heat source. Accordingly, in this study, after Ag-Cu alloys with different composition ratios were casted and then mixed with additives to improve their physical and mechanical properties, the thermal conductivity and biocompatibility of the alloy specimens were evaluated for selecting suitable material. Ag-Cu binary alloys and ternary alloys added 5?wt% Zn or 2?wt% Mg were casted and then cold drawn to manufacture needles for acupuncture, and their physical properties, thermal conductivity, and biocompatibility were evaluated for their potential use in warming acupuncture. The results of this study showed that the physical and mechanical properties of the Ag-Cu alloys were improved by additives and that the thermal conductivity, machinability, and biocompatibility of the Ag-Cu alloys were improved by Mg addition. PMID:24078827

  7. Nanophasic biodegradation enhances the durability and biocompatibility of magnesium alloys for the next-generation vascular stents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mao, Lin; Shen, Li; Niu, Jialin; Zhang, Jian; Ding, Wenjiang; Wu, Yu; Fan, Rong; Yuan, Guangyin

    2013-09-01

    Biodegradable metal alloys emerge as a new class of biomaterials for tissue engineering and medical devices such as cardiovascular stents. Deploying biodegradable materials to fabricate stents not only obviates a second surgical intervention for implant removal but also circumvents the long-term foreign body effect of permanent implants. However, these materials for stents suffer from an un-controlled degradation rate, acute toxic responses, and rapid structural failure presumably due to a non-uniform, fast corrosion process. Here we report that highly uniform, nanophasic degradation is achieved in a new Mg alloy with unique interstitial alloying composition as the nominal formula Mg-2.5Nd-0.2Zn-0.4Zr (wt%, hereafter, denoted as JDBM). This material exhibits highly homogeneous nanophasic biodegradation patterns as compared to other biodegradable metal alloy materials. Consequently it has significantly reduced degradation rate determined by electrochemical characterization. The in vitro cytotoxicity test using human vascular endothelial cells indicates excellent biocompatibility and potentially minimal toxic effect on arterial vessel walls. Finally, we fabricated a cardiovascular stent using JDBM and performed in vivo long-term assessment via implantation of this stent in an animal model. The results confirmed the reduced degradation rate in vivo, excellent tissue compatibility and long-term structural and mechanical durability. Thus, this new Mg-alloy with highly uniform nanophasic biodegradation represents a major breakthrough in the field and a promising material for manufacturing the next generation biodegradable vascular stents.

  8. Magnesium Hydroxide

    MedlinePLUS

    Magnesium hydroxide is used on a short-term basis to treat constipation.This medication is sometimes prescribed ... Magnesium hydroxide come as a tablet and liquid to take by mouth. It usually is taken as ...

  9. Rheological behavior and microstructural evolution of semi-solid hypereutectic aluminum-silicon-magnesium-copper alloys using rheoforming process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tebib, Mehand

    The aim of the current study was to investigate the rheological behavior and microstructural evolution of hypereutectic Al-Si-Cu and Al-Si-Mg-Cu alloys using conventional and modified SEED process (Swirled Enthalpy Equilibration Device). In the first part; the feasibility of semi-solid processing of hypereutectic Al-Si-Cu A390 alloys using a novel rheoforming process was investigated. A combination of the SEED process, isothermal holding using insulation and addition of solid alloy during swirling was introduced as a novel method to improve the processability of semi-solid A390 slurries. The effects of isothermal holding and the addition of solid alloy on the temperature gradient between the centre and the wall and on the formation of alpha-Al particles were examined. In addition, phosphorus and strontium were added to the molten metal to refine the primary and eutectic silicon structure to facilitate semi-solid processing. It was found that the combination of the SEED process with two additional processing steps can produce semisolid 390 alloys that can be rheoformed. In the second part, the effects of Mg additions ranging from 6 to 15% on the solidification behaviour of hypereutectic Al-155i-xMg-4Cu alloys was investigated using thermodynamic calculations, thermal analysis and extensive microstructural examination. The Mg level strongly influenced the microstructural evolution of the primary Mg2Si phase as well as the solidification behaviour. Thermodynamic predictions using ThermoCalc software reported the occurrence of six reactions, comprising the formation of primary Mg2 Si, two pre-eutectic binary reactions, forming either Mg2Si + Si or Mg2Si + alpha-Al phases, the main ternary eutectic reaction forming Mg2Si + Si + alpha-Al, and two post-eutectic reactions resulting in the precipitation of the Q-Al5Mg8Cu 2Si6 and theta-Al2Cu phases, respectively. Microstructures of the four alloys studied confirmed the presence of these phases, in addition to that of the pi-Al8Mg3FeSi 6 phase. The presence of the pi-phase was also confirmed by thermal analysis. In the third part, the effects of P and Sr on the microstructure of hypereutectic Al-155i14Mg-4Cu alloy were studied. The microstructural examination and phase identification were carried out using optical microscopy and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The effects of individual and combined additions of P and Sr on the eutectic arrest in Al-155i14Mg-4Cu alloy were examined using thermal analysis. The mean size of primary Mg2Si decreases from about 350 mum to less than 60 mum and the morphology changes from coarse dendritic type or equiaxed to polygonal type. In addition, the morphology of the eutectic Mg2Si phase changes from coarse Chinese script to fine fiber-like, while that of the eutectic Si phase changes from coarse acicular shape to a fine fibrous form. With Sr addition, the morphology of the pi-Fe phase evolved from Chinese script to a fine twin platelet form. Furthermore, the thermal analysis results reveal that the addition of Sr or Sr and P reduces the temperature of eutectic nucleation and growth. Finally, the rheological behaviour and microstructure of semi-solid hypereutectic A390, P-refined A390, Al-15Si-10.5Mg-4Cu and Al-15Si-13.5Mg-4Cu alloys were investigated by using parallel plate viscometry. The flow deformation of these alloys in the semi-solid state was characterized at different deformation rates and at variable solid fractions. The calculated viscosity for variable shear rate was deduced using the analytical method developed by Laxmanan and Flemings. Microstructures of the four alloys, after partial solidification, were examined in order to characterize the flow behaviour during deformation. (Abstract shortened by UMI.)

  10. Corrosion Performance of Anodized AZ91D Magnesium Alloy: Effect of the Anodizing Potential on the Film Structure and Corrosion Behavior

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Oliveira, Mara Cristina Lopes; Pereira, Viviam Serra Marques; Correa, Olandir Vercino; Antunes, Renato Altobelli

    2013-10-01

    Die-cast AZ91D magnesium alloy samples have been submitted for anodizing at different potentials. Anodizing was conducted in an environmentally friendly solution which comprised 3 M KOH + 1 M Na2SiO3 at room temperature. The surface treatment was performed electrolytically at four different potentials: 3, 5, 8, and 10 V. The corrosion resistance was evaluated by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy and potentiodynamic polarization curves obtained after 7 days of immersion in a 3.5 wt.% NaCl solution at room temperature. The porosity of the anodic films was estimated by means of the linear polarization method. SEM images revealed that the surface oxide was thicker for the anodic films obtained at 3 and 5 V. The films obtained at these potentials were more porous than those formed at 8 and 10 V. The results showed that the thickness of the anodic film had a significant effect on the corrosion behavior of the AZ91D, whereas the influence of the initial porosity was not significant.

  11. Study of Mechanical Properties of AZ91 Magnesium Alloy Welded by Laser Process Taking into Account the Anisotropy Microhardness and Residual Stresses by X-Ray Diffraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kouadri, A.; Barrallier, L.

    2011-07-01

    The objective of this investigation was to study the mechanical properties of a magnesium alloy welded by a CO2 laser. Residual stresses were measured by X-ray diffraction. They were calculated by the classic sin2 ? method in the isotropic zones by using the orientation distribution function (ODF) in the textured zones. The results demonstrated that laser welding results in the formation of several different zones with different microstructural and mechanical properties. Welding principally leads to a reduction in grain size and a new distribution of phases. The most remarkable observation was that of a superficial layer on the surface of the welded zone. This layer has a marked crystallographic texture, a reduction in the level of aluminum, and an elevated microhardness. These characteristics disappear at a depth of 200 ?m under the welded zone. These modifications can be explained by the nature of the solidification, which occurs under nonequilibrium conditions resulting in an equiaxial columnar transition. This transition is evident also within the profile of residual tensile stresses, which are at their maximum at the interface between the superficial layer and the rest of the welded zone. These results are explained by the anisotropic properties of the textured layer in relation to the plasticity.

  12. Corrosion behavior of Ti-Al-N/Ti-Al duplex coating on AZ31 magnesium alloy in NaCl aqueous solution

    SciTech Connect

    Wu Guosong; Wang Xuemin; Ding Kejian; Zhou Yuanyuan; Zeng Xiaoqin

    2009-08-15

    In this study, Ti-Al-N/Ti-Al duplex coating was deposited on AZ31 magnesium alloy by magnetron sputtering with a Ti/Al composite target. Scanning electron microscopy and Auger electron spectroscopy were applied to investigate the morphology and elemental concentration of the obtained coating, respectively. The top layer was Ti-Al-N film with a Ti:Al:O:N ratio of 0.32:0.84:0.08:1, and the bottom layer was Ti-Al film with a Ti:O:Al ratio of 1.94:0.12:1. Each layer of this coating presented a developed columnar structure. The polarization test and immersion test were used to investigate corrosion behavior of the coated sample in 3.5 wt.% NaCl aqueous solution. The results showed that this duplex coating could protect the substrate effectively in NaCl aqueous solution. Nevertheless, several through-thickness micropores in the coating finally induced the failure of the coated AZ31 in the immersion test.

  13. The mechanical properties and microstructures of AZ91D magnesium alloy processed by selective laser cladding with Al powder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Pengyu; Zhang, Zhihui; Ren, Luquan

    2014-08-01

    This work focuses on the effects of selective laser cladding using Al powder on the properties and microstructure of Mg alloy AZ91D, with different experimental parameters. The scanning strategy was inspired by the alternately hard-soft shell surface structures. The microstructure was greatly refined. Furthermore, the growth of the ?-Mg17Al12 dendrite was curbed. The treatment depth is ~900 ?m. The UTS, YS and microhardness were notably increased. However, the ductility was decreased by a part. The output power of 2200 W and the scanning speed of 180 mm/min are the optimum combination. The resulting wear resistance was thus the highest of all.

  14. In Vitro Corrosion and Cytocompatibility Properties of Nano-Whisker Hydroxyapatite Coating on Magnesium Alloy for Bone Tissue Engineering Applications

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Huawei; Yan, Xueyu; Ling, Min; Xiong, Zuquan; Ou, Caiwen; Lu, Wei

    2015-01-01

    We report here the successful fabrication of nano-whisker hydroxyapatite (nHA) coatings on Mg alloy by using a simple one-step hydrothermal process in aqueous solution. The nHA coating shows uniform structure and high crystallinity. Results indicate that nHA coating is promising for improving the in vitro corrosion and cytocompatibility properties of Mg-based implants and devices for bone tissue engineering. In addition, the simple hydrothermal deposition method used in the current study is also applicable to substrates with complex shapes or surface geometries. PMID:25789500

  15. The influence of laser pulse waveform on laser-TIG hybrid welding of AZ31B magnesium alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Gang; Luo, Zhimin

    2011-01-01

    By dividing laser pulse duration into two parts, three kinds of laser waveforms are designed, including a high power density pulse (HPDP) laser in a short duration set at the beginning of the laser waveform. This paper aims to find out the laser pulse waveform and idiographic critical values of HPDP, which can affect the magnesium penetration in laser-tungsten inert gas (TIG) hybrid welding. Results show that when the laser pulse duration of HPDP is not more than 0.4 ms, the welding penetration values of lasers with HPDP are larger than otherwise. Also, the welding penetration values of laser with HPDP have increased by up to 26.1%. It has been found that with HPDP, the laser can form the keyhole more easily because the interaction between laser and the plate is changed, when the TIG arc preheats the plate. Besides, the laser with high power density and short duration strikes on the plates so heavily that the corresponding background power can penetrate into the bottom of the keyhole and maintain the keyhole open, which facilitates the final welding penetration.

  16. Darkening effect on AZ31B magnesium alloy surface induced by nanosecond pulse Nd:YAG laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guan, Y. C.; Zhou, W.; Zheng, H. Y.; Li, Z. L.

    2013-09-01

    Permanent darkening effect was achieved on surface of AZ31B Mg alloy irradiated with nanosecond pulse Nd:YAG laser, and special attention was made to examine how surface structure as well as oxidation affect the darkening effect. Experiments were carried out to characterize morphological evolution and chemical composition of the irradiated areas by optical reflection spectrometer, Talysurf surface profiler, SEM, EDS, and XPS. The darkening effect was found to be occurred at the surface under high laser energy. Optical spectra showed that the induced darkening surface was uniform over the spectral range from 200 nm to 1100 nm. SEM and surface profiler showed that surface morphology of darkening areas consisted of large number of micron scale cauliflower-like clusters and protruding particles. EDS and XPS showed that compared to non-irradiated area, oxygen content at the darkening areas increased significantly. It was proposed a mechanism that involved trapping of light in the surface morphology and chemistry variation of irradiated areas to explain the laser-induced darkening effect on AZ31B Mg alloy.

  17. Determination of the degradation mechanism for polychlorinated biphenyl congeners using mechanically alloyed magnesium/palladium in methanol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Devor, Robert William

    Polychlorinated biphenyls are a ubiquitous environmental contaminant that can be found today throughout the world in soils and sediments, lakes and rivers, and flora and fauna. PCBs have percolated throughout the food chain, so that almost every human being has a detectable amount of the contaminant within their blood stream. Existing remediation methods include incineration, dredging and landfilling, and microbial degradation, but all of these methods have drawbacks that limit their effectiveness as treatment options. Recently, the use of zero-valent metals as a means of reductive dechlorination has been explored. Using a combination of zerovalent magnesium and catalytic palladium, a successful bimetallic system capable of degrading PCBs has been created and optimized. Determining the mechanism for the reductive dechlorination has proven to be an arduous task, but experimental evidence has suggested three possible radical-type mechanisms for the use Mg/Pd specifically in methanol (as compared to aqueous systems). These possible mechanisms differ in the type of hydrogen species that replaces the chlorine atom on the PCB. Thermodynamic information has also aided in narrowing down which of the suggested pathways is most likely. It appears likely that the hydrogen involved in the dechlorination has the form of a "hydride-like" radical, which is a form of electron-rich atomic hydrogen. According to the literature, Pd catalysts create this species within the first few subsurface layers of the palladium in the presence of molecular hydrogen. Further work will be necessary to confirm that the "hydride-like" radical is actually the species involved in the dechlorination.

  18. In-situ white beam microdiffraction study of the deformation behavior in polycrystalline magnesium alloy during uniaxial loading

    SciTech Connect

    Advanced Light Source; Tamura, Nobumichi; Lynch, P.A.; Stevenson, A.W.; Liang, D.; Parry, D.; Wilkins, S.; Madsen, I.C.; Bettles, C.; Tamura, N.; Geandier, G.

    2007-01-19

    Scanning white beam X-ray microdiffraction has been used to study the heterogeneous grain deformation in a polycrystalline Mg alloy (MgAZ31). The high spatial resolution achieved on beamline 7.3.3 at the Advanced Light Source provides a unique method to measure the elastic strain and orientation of single grains as a function of applied load. To carry out in-situmeasurements a light weight (~;;0.5kg) tensile stage, capable of providing uniaxial loads of up to 600kg, was designed to collect diffraction data on the loading and unloading cycle. In-situ observation of the deformation process provides insight about the crystallographic deformation mode via twinning and dislocation slip.

  19. Magnesium Recycling of Partially Oxidized, Mixed Magnesium-Aluminum Scrap Through Combined Refining and Solid Oxide Membrane (SOM) Electrolysis Processes

    SciTech Connect

    Guan, Xiaofei; Zink, Peter; Pal, Uday

    2012-03-11

    Pure magnesium (Mg) is recycled from 19g of partially oxidized 50.5wt.%Mg-Aluminum (Al) alloy. During the refining process, potentiodynamic scans (PDS) were performed to determine the electrorefining potential for magnesium. The PDS show that the electrorefining potential increases over time as the Mg content inside the Mg-Al scrap decreases. Up to 100% percent of magnesium is refined from the Mg-Al scrap by a novel refining process of dissolving magnesium and its oxide into a flux followed by vapor phase removal of dissolved magnesium and subsequently condensing the magnesium vapors in a separate condenser. The solid oxide membrane (SOM) electrolysis process is employed in the refining system to enable additional recycling of magnesium from magnesium oxide (MgO) in the partially oxidized Mg-Al scrap. The combination of the refining and SOM processes yields 7.4g of pure magnesium; could not collect and weigh all of the magnesium recovered.

  20. Magnesium Recycling of Partially Oxidized, Mixed Magnesium-Aluminum Scrap through Combined Refining and Solid Oxide Membrane Electrolysis Processes

    SciTech Connect

    Xiaofei Guan; Peter A. Zink; Uday B. Pal; Adam C. Powell

    2012-01-01

    Pure magnesium (Mg) is recycled from 19g of partially oxidized 50.5wt.% Mg-Aluminum (Al) alloy. During the refining process, potentiodynamic scans (PDS) were performed to determine the electrorefining potential for magnesium. The PDS show that the electrorefining potential increases over time as the magnesium content inside the Mg-Al scrap decreases. Up to 100% percent of magnesium is refined from the Mg-Al scrap by a novel refining process of dissolving magnesium and its oxide into a flux followed by vapor phase removal of dissolved magnesium and subsequently condensing the magnesium vapor. The solid oxide membrane (SOM) electrolysis process is employed in the refining system to enable additional recycling of magnesium from magnesium oxide (MgO) in the partially oxidized Mg-Al scrap. The combination of the refining and SOM processes yields 7.4g of pure magnesium.

  1. [Influence of different surface machining treatments of resorbable implants made from different magnesium-calcium alloys on their degradation--a pilot study in rabbit models].

    PubMed

    von der Höh, N; Krause, A; Hackenbroich, C; Bormann, D; Lucas, A; Meyer-Lindenberg, A

    2006-12-01

    To examine the influence of different surface machining treatments of resorbable implants 3x5 mm cylinders of magnesium-calcium-alloys with plane, rough or sand blasted surface and different concentrations of calcium (0.4 %, 0.8 %, 1.2 % und 2.0 %) were implanted into the distal femur condylus of 18 New Zealand White Rabbits. They were placed into the spongy-cortical passage. During six weeks the animals were examined daily and x-rayed weekly. After euthanasia the bone was explanted and scanned in a microcomputed tomograph. The implants were well tolerated by the rabbits, neither lameness nor signs of pain occured. Wound healing was mostly without complications. Eight of 36 implants (22 %) showed dehiscence of suture within first ten days, whereby implants made of 1,2 % MgCa were mainly affected (six of 12 cases, 50 %). At the place of insertion all implants induced obvious callus genesis which could be seen in MgCa 1,2-cylinders with plane surface and MgCa 0,8-cylinders with rough and sand blasted surface the most. Influence of different calcium concentrations on degradation behaviour could not be discovered. They showed different stages of resorption. Concerning the different surface machining treatments sand blasted implants showed the highest degree of degradation which could be seen by the totally loss of structure in micro-computed examinations. These implants also showed in six of 36 cases a clinical occurrence of gas production. Rough implants showed an irregular degradation with high degree of resorption of some implants and signs of degradation only in the border area of others. Cylindricity maintained in plane implants. They showed loss of structure only in border areas. PMID:17233279

  2. Evaluation of microstructural eects on corrosion behaviour of AZ91D magnesium

    E-print Network

    Zhou, Wei

    Evaluation of microstructural eects on corrosion behaviour of AZ91D magnesium alloy Rajan Ambat(OH)2 with small amounts b phase, magnesium-aluminium oxide and MgH2 while for die-cast, the product: Magnesium alloys; AZ91D; Ingot; Die-cast; Microstructure; Corrosion 0010-938X/00/$ - see front matter 7 2000

  3. SIMULATION OF POROSITY AND HOT TEARS IN A SQUEEZE CAST MAGNESIUM CONTROL ARM

    E-print Network

    Beckermann, Christoph

    SIMULATION OF POROSITY AND HOT TEARS IN A SQUEEZE CAST MAGNESIUM CONTROL ARM K.D. Carlson1 , C: Magnesium Alloys, Casting, Shrinkage Porosity, Hot Tears, Modeling Abstract Simulations are performed and hot tears in squeeze casting of magnesium alloys. Introduction Both shrinkage porosity and hot tears

  4. Residual Stresses and Tensile Properties of Friction Stir Welded AZ31B-H24 Magnesium Alloy in Lap Configuration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naik, Bhukya Srinivasa; Cao, Xinjin; Wanjara, Priti; Friedman, Jacob; Chen, Daolun

    2015-08-01

    AZ31B-H24 Mg alloy sheets with a thickness of 2 mm were friction stir welded in lap configuration using two tool rotational rates of 1000 and 1500 rpm and two welding speeds of 10 and 20 mm/s. The residual stresses in the longitudinal and transverse directions of the weldments were determined using X-ray diffraction. The shear tensile behavior of the lap joints was evaluated at low [233 K (-40 °C)], room [298 K (25 °C)], and elevated [453 K (180 °C)] temperatures. The failure load was highest for the lower heat input condition that was obtained at a tool rotational rate of 1000 rpm and a welding speed of 20 mm/s for all the test temperatures, due to the smaller hooking height, larger effective sheet thickness, and lower tensile residual stresses, as compared to the other two welding conditions that were conducted at a higher tool rotational rate or lower welding speed. The lap joints usually fractured on the advancing side of the top sheet near the interface between the thermo-mechanically affected zone and the stir zone. Elevated temperature testing of the weld assembled at a tool rotational rate of 1000 rpm and a welding speed of 20 mm/s led to the failure along the sheet interface in shear fracture mode due to the high integrity of the joint that exhibited large plastic deformation and higher total energy absorption.

  5. Corrosion resistance of Zn-Al layered double hydroxide/poly(lactic acid) composite coating on magnesium alloy AZ31

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeng, Rong-Chang; Li, Xiao-Ting; Liu, Zhen-Guo; Zhang, Fen; Li, Shuo-Qi; Cui, Hong-Zhi

    2015-08-01

    A Zn-Al layered double hydroxide (ZnAl-LDH) coating consisted of uniform hexagonal nano-plates was firstly synthesized by co-precipitation and hydrothermal treatment on the AZ31 alloy, and then a poly(lactic acid) (PLA) coating was sealed on the top layer of the ZnAl-LDH coating using vacuum freeze-drying. The characteristics of the ZnAl-LDH/PLA composite coatings were investigated by means of XRD, SEM, FTIR and EDS. The corrosion resistance of the coatings was assessed by potentiodynamic polarization and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS). The results showed that the ZnAl-LDH coating contained a compact inner layer and a porous outer layer, and the PLA coating with a strong adhesion to the porous outer layer can prolong the service life of the ZnAl-LDH coating. The excellent corrosion resistance of this composite coating can be attributable to its barrier function, ion-exchange and self-healing ability.

  6. Magnesium compounds

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kramer, D.A.

    2010-01-01

    Seawater and natural brines accounted for about 40 percent of U.S. magnesium compounds production in 2009. Dead-burned magnesia was produced by Martin Marietta Magnesia Specialties from well brines in Michigan. Caustic-calcined magnesia was recovered from seawater by Premier Chemicals in Florida, from well brines in Michigan by Martin Marietta and from magnesite in Nevada by Premier Chemicals. Intrepid Potash-Wendover, and Great Salt Lake Minerals Corp. recovered magnesium chloride brines from the Great Salt Lake in Utah. Magnesium hydroxide was produced from seawater by SPI Pharma in Delaware and Premier Chemicals in Florida, and by Martin Marietta from its operation mentioned above.

  7. Magnesium compounds

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kramer, D.A.

    2011-01-01

    Seawater and natural brines accounted for about 54 percent of U.S. magnesium compounds production in 2010. Dead-burned magnesia was produced by Martin Marietta Magnesia Specialties from well brines in Michigan. Caustic-calcined magnesia was recovered from seawater by Premier Magnesia in Florida, from well brines in Michigan by Martin Marietta and from magnesite in Nevada by Premier Magnesia. Intrepid Potash-Wendover and Great Salt Lake Minerals Corp. recovered magnesium chloride brines from the Great Salt Lake in Utah. Magnesium hydroxide was produced from seawater by SPI Pharma in Delaware and Premier Magnesia in Florida, and by Martin Marietta from its operation mentioned above.

  8. Lightweight Heat Pipes Made from Magnesium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosenfeld, John N.; Zarembo, Sergei N.; Eastman, G. Yale

    2010-01-01

    Magnesium has shown promise as a lighter-weight alternative to the aluminum alloys now used to make the main structural components of axially grooved heat pipes that contain ammonia as the working fluid. Magnesium heat-pipe structures can be fabricated by conventional processes that include extrusion, machining, welding, and bending. The thermal performances of magnesium heat pipes are the same as those of equal-sized aluminum heat pipes. However, by virtue of the lower mass density of magnesium, the magnesium heat pipes weigh 35 percent less. Conceived for use aboard spacecraft, magnesium heat pipes could also be attractive as heat-transfer devices in terrestrial applications in which minimization of weight is sought: examples include radio-communication equipment and laptop computers.

  9. Production of magnesium metal

    DOEpatents

    Blencoe, James G. (Harriman, TN) [Harriman, TN; Anovitz, Lawrence M. (Knoxville, TN) [Knoxville, TN; Palmer, Donald A. (Oliver Springs, TN) [Oliver Springs, TN; Beard, James S. (Martinsville, VA) [Martinsville, VA

    2010-02-23

    A process of producing magnesium metal includes providing magnesium carbonate, and reacting the magnesium carbonate to produce a magnesium-containing compound and carbon dioxide. The magnesium-containing compound is reacted to produce magnesium metal. The carbon dioxide is used as a reactant in a second process. In another embodiment of the process, a magnesium silicate is reacted with a caustic material to produce magnesium hydroxide. The magnesium hydroxide is reacted with a source of carbon dioxide to produce magnesium carbonate. The magnesium carbonate is reacted to produce a magnesium-containing compound and carbon dioxide. The magnesium-containing compound is reacted to produce magnesium metal. The invention further relates to a process for production of magnesium metal or a magnesium compound where an external source of carbon dioxide is not used in any of the reactions of the process. The invention also relates to the magnesium metal produced by the processes described herein.

  10. Magnesium: Engineering the Surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, X. B.; Yang, H. Y.; Abbott, T. B.; Easton, M. A.; Birbilis, N.

    2012-06-01

    Magnesium (Mg) and its alloys provide numerous benefits as lightweight materials; however, industrial deployment of Mg in most instances requires anticorrosion coatings. Engineering the Mg surface is an area that has been undergoing intense research recently. Surface engineering commences with the "pretreatment" step, which can be used to modify the surface composition and morphology, resulting in surface enrichment or depletion of alloying elements. Following this, electrochemical plating (including electro- and electroless plating) and conversion coatings have emerged as common means of coating Mg. In this study, we present the key aspects relating to the science and technology associated with pretreatment, electrochemical plating, and conversion coatings. This is followed by experimental examples of engineered surfaces of industrial relevance.

  11. Production of magnesium metal

    DOEpatents

    Blencoe, James G. (Harriman, TN); Anovitz, Lawrence M. (Knoxville, TN); Palmer, Donald A. (Oliver Springs, TN); Beard, James S. (Martinsville, VA)

    2012-04-10

    A process of producing magnesium metal includes providing magnesium carbonate, and reacting the magnesium carbonate to produce a magnesium-containing compound and carbon dioxide. The magnesium-containing compound is reacted to produce magnesium metal. The carbon dioxide is used as a reactant in a second process. In another embodiment of the process, a magnesium silicate is reacted with a caustic material to produce magnesium hydroxide. The magnesium hydroxide is reacted with a source of carbon dioxide to produce magnesium carbonate. The magnesium carbonate is reacted to produce a magnesium-containing compound and carbon dioxide. The magnesium-containing compound is reacted to produce magnesium metal. The invention also relates to the magnesium metal produced by the processes described herein.

  12. Magnesium compounds

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kramer, D.A.

    2012-01-01

    Seawater and natural brines accounted for about 57 percent of magnesium compounds produced in the United States in 2011. Dead-burned magnesia was produced by Martin Marietta Magnesia Specialties LLC from well brines in Michigan. Caustic-calcined magnesia was recovered from seawater by Premier Magnesia LLC in Florida, from well brines in Michigan by Martin Marietta and from magnesite in Nevada by Premier Magnesia. Intrepid Potash Wendover LLC and Great Salt Lake Minerals Corp. recovered magnesium chloride brines from the Great Salt Lake in Utah. Magnesium hydroxide was produced from seawater by SPI Pharma Inc. in Delaware and Premier Magnesia in Florida, and by Martin Marietta from its brine operation in Michigan.

  13. Magnesium compounds

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kramer, D.A.

    2002-01-01

    Seawater and natural brines accounted for about 60% of US magnesium compounds production in 2001. Dead-burned and caustic-calcined magnesias were recovered from seawater in Florida by Premier Chemicals. They were also recovered from Michigan well brines by Dow Chemical, Martin Marietta Magnesia Specialties and Rohm & Haas. And Premier Chemicals recovered dead-burned and caustic-calcined magnesias from magnesite in Nevada. Reilly Industries and Great Salt Lake Minerals recovered magnesium chloride brines from the Great Salt Lake in Utah.

  14. Alkalization is responsible for antibacterial effects of corroding magnesium.

    PubMed

    Rahim, Muhammad Imran; Eifler, Rainer; Rais, Bushra; Mueller, Peter P

    2015-11-01

    Magnesium alloys are presently investigated as potential medical implant materials for temporary applications. Magnesium has been reported to have antibacterial activities and could therefore be used to prevent antibiotic treatment-resistant bacterial implant infections. For characterizing the effects of magnesium on infectious bacteria, bioluminescent S. aureus or P. aeruginosa were employed. The proliferation of both types of bacteria was suppressed in the presence of metallic magnesium and also in aqueous magnesium corrosion extracts. Of the two soluble corrosion products, magnesium ions were well tolerated while antibacterial activities correlated with increased pH levels of the supernatants. The alkaline pH alone was sufficient for the antibacterial effects which were completely abolished when the pH of the corrosion supernatants was neutralized. These results demonstrate that pH increases are necessary and sufficient for the antibacterial activity of metallic magnesium. In an animal model magnesium implants showed an enhanced but variable resistance to bacterial colonization. PMID:25974048

  15. Magnesium compounds

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kramer, D.A.

    2001-01-01

    Seawater and natural brines accounted for about 63% of US magnesium compounds production during 2000. Premier Services in Florida, Dow Chemical in Michigan, Martin Marietta Magnesia Specialties, and Rohm & Haas recovered dead-burned and caustic-calcined magnesias from seawater. And Premier Services' recoveries, in Nevada, were from magnasite.

  16. Magnesium compounds

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kramer, D.A.

    2004-01-01

    Dead-burned and caustic-calcined magnesias were recovered from seawater by Premier Chemicals in Florida; from well brines in Michigan by Dow Chemical, Martin Marietta Magnesia Specialties, and Rohm & Haas; and from magnesite in Nevada by Premier Chemicals. Reilly Industries and Great Salt Lake Minerals recovered magnesium chloride brines from the Great Salt Lake in Utah.

  17. Magnesium compounds

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kramer, D.A.

    2007-01-01

    Seawater and natural brines accounted for about 52 percent of U.S. magnesium compounds production in 2006. Dead-burned magnesia was produced by Martin Marietta Magnesia Specialties from well brines in Michigan. Caustic-calcined magnesia was recovered from sea-water by Premier Chemicals in Florida; from well brines in Michigan by Martin Marietta and Rohm and Haas; and from magnesite in Nevada by Premier Chemicals. Intrepid Potash-Wendover and Great Salt Lake Minerals recovered magnesium chloride brines from the Great Salt Lake in Utah. Magnesium hydroxide was produced from brucite by Applied Chemical Magnesias in Texas, from seawater by SPI Pharma in Delaware and Premier Chemicals in Florida, and by Martin Marietta and Rohm and Haas from their operations mentioned above. About 59 percent of the magnesium compounds consumed in the United States was used for refractories that are used mainly to line steelmaking furnaces. The remaining 41 percent was consumed in agricultural, chemical, construction, environmental and industrial applications.

  18. MMMaaattteeerrriiiaaalllsss SSSeeemmmiiinnnaaarrr Hot Forming and Formability of Light Alloys for Vehicle Components

    E-print Network

    MMMaaattteeerrriiiaaalllsss SSSeeemmmiiinnnaaarrr Hot Forming and Formability of Light Alloys. Aluminum and magnesium alloys are two groups of light alloys particularly promising for economically reducing the mass of vehicle structures. However, formabilities of both alloy groups have limitations, from

  19. Immunological Response to Biodegradable Magnesium Implants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pichler, Karin; Fischerauer, Stefan; Ferlic, Peter; Martinelli, Elisabeth; Brezinsek, Hans-Peter; Uggowitzer, Peter J.; Löffler, Jörg F.; Weinberg, Annelie-Martina

    2014-04-01

    The use of biodegradable magnesium implants in pediatric trauma surgery would render surgical interventions for implant removal after tissue healing unnecessary, thereby preventing stress to the children and reducing therapy costs. In this study, we report on the immunological response to biodegradable magnesium implants—as an important aspect in evaluating biocompatibility—tested in a growing rat model. The focus of this study was to investigate the response of the innate immune system to either fast or slow degrading magnesium pins, which were implanted into the femoral bones of 5-week-old rats. The main alloying element of the fast-degrading alloy (ZX50) was Zn, while it was Y in the slow-degrading implant (WZ21). Our results demonstrate that degrading magnesium implants beneficially influence the immune system, especially in the first postoperative weeks but also during tissue healing and early bone remodeling. However, rodents with WZ21 pins showed a slightly decreased phagocytic ability during bone remodeling when the degradation rate reached its maximum. This may be due to the high release rate of the rare earth-element yttrium, which is potentially toxic. From our results we conclude that magnesium implants have a beneficial effect on the innate immune system but that there are some concerns regarding the use of yttrium-alloyed magnesium implants, especially in pediatric patients.

  20. SOLID STATE JOINING OF MAGNESIUM TO STEEL

    SciTech Connect

    Jana, Saumyadeep; Hovanski, Yuri; Pilli, Siva Prasad; Field, David P.; Yu, Hao; Pan, Tsung-Yu; Santella, M. L.

    2012-06-04

    Friction stir welding and ultrasonic welding techniques were applied to join automotive magnesium alloys to steel sheet. The effect of tooling and process parameters on the post-weld microstructure, texture and mechanical properties was investigated. Static and dynamic loading were utilized to investigate the joint strength of both cast and wrought magnesium alloys including their susceptibility and degradation under corrosive media. The conditions required to produce joint strengths in excess of 75% of the base metal strength were determined, and the effects of surface coatings, tooling and weld parameters on weld properties are presented.

  1. Comparison of Lost Foam Casting of AM60B Alloy and A356 Alloy

    SciTech Connect

    Han, Qingyou; Dinwiddie, Ralph Barton; Sklad, Philip S; Currie, Kenneth; Vondra, Fred; Abdelrahman, Mohamed; Walford, Graham; Nolan, Dennis J; Nedkova, Teodora

    2007-01-01

    The article describes the research activities at Oak Ridge National Laboratory and Tennessee Technological University on lost foam casting of magnesium alloys. The work was focused on castings of simple geometries such as plate castings and window castings in order to compare the difference in castability between magnesium alloys and aluminum alloy using the lost foam casting process. Significant differences between lost foam aluminum casting and lost foam magnesium casting have been observed.

  2. Magnesium compounds

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kramer, D.A.

    2006-01-01

    In 2005, seawater and natural brines accounted for 51% of US magnesium compounds production. World magnesia production was estimated to be 14.5 Mt. Most of the production came from China, North Korea, Russia and Turkey. Although no specific production figures are available, Japan and the United States are estimated to account for almost one-half of the world's capacity from seawater and brines.

  3. Magnesium compounds

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kramer, D.A.

    2003-01-01

    Seawater and natural brines accounted for about 60 percent of U.S. magnesium compounds production during 2002. Dead-burned and caustic-calcined magnesias were recovered from seawater by Premier Chemicals in Florida. They were also recovered from well brines in Michigan by Dow Chemical, Martin Marietta Magnesia Specialties and Rohm & Haas. And they were recovered from magnesite in Nevada by Premier Chemicals.

  4. alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, Z. B.; Liu, J. J.; Wang, R.; Liu, X. Y.; Wang, J.; Sun, N. K.; Si, P. Z.

    2014-06-01

    Structural, magnetic and magnetostrictive properties of Tb0.4Nd0.6(Fe0.8Co0.2) x (1.50 ? x ? 1.90) alloys have been investigated by means of X-ray diffraction (XRD), a vibrating sample magnetometer and a standard strain technique. XRD analysis shows the presence of single Laves phase with a cubic MgCu2-type structure for the high Nd content alloy around the composition of x = 1.80, which tends to be formed by curing at relatively low annealing temperature. The easy direction of magnetization at room temperature is observed toward <111> axis, accompanied by a rhombohedral distortion with a large spontaneous magnetostriction ?111. An optimized effect on the linear anisotropic magnetostriction, 360 ppm at 3 kOe, was observed for the high Nd content Tb0.4Nd0.6(Fe0.8Co0.2)1.80 alloy, which can be attributed to its single Laves phase, the large ?111 (~1,520 ppm) of the MgCu2-type (Tb,Nd)(Fe,Co)2 phase and the good soft magnetic behaviors.

  5. Effect of the loading mode on the evolution of the deformation mechanisms in randomly textured magnesium

    E-print Network

    Gubicza, Jenõ

    magnesium polycrystals e Comparison of experimental and modeling results K. Mathis a, * , G. Csiszar b, c of the loading mode dependence of the deformation mechanisms in randomly textured cast magnesium is presented. All rights reserved. 1. Introduction Magnesium alloys represent the lowest density structural metals

  6. Strong, Ductile Magnesium-Zinc Nanocomposites MICHAEL DE CICCO, HIROMI KONISHI, GUOPING CAO, HONG SEOK CHOI,

    E-print Network

    Lakes, Roderic

    Strong, Ductile Magnesium-Zinc Nanocomposites MICHAEL DE CICCO, HIROMI KONISHI, GUOPING CAO, HONG SiC nanoparticles are demonstrated to influence the solidification of magnesium- zinc alloys) with an ultrasonic cavitation based disper- sion of nanoparticles in metal melts. Nanoparticle reinforced magnesium

  7. Solid electrolyte based sensor for monitoring the magnesium level during reclamation of aluminum scrap

    SciTech Connect

    Fergus, J.W.; Hui, S.

    1996-10-01

    Aluminum alloy scrap often contains excess magnesium which must be removed during recycling by a process referred to as demagging. The efficiency of this process could be improved with an in-situ magnesium sensor, which could be used to optimize the process parameters to the changing magnesium content. The sensor developed in this work consists of a galvanic cell with a magnesium fluoride (MgF{sub 2}) solid electrolyte and a molten magnesium reference electrode. The voltage output of the sensor changes by about 100 mV for the change in magnesium content which occurs during the demagging process (5 wt% to 0.1 wt%) and is in excellent agreement with thermodynamic measurements using molten chloride electrolytes. This paper focuses on the effect of silicon, which is a common alloying element in aluminum alloys, on the output of an electrochemical magnesium sensor.

  8. Aluminum battery alloys

    DOEpatents

    Thompson, D.S.; Scott, D.H.

    1984-09-28

    Aluminum alloys suitable for use as anode structures in electrochemical cells are disclosed. These alloys include iron levels higher than previously felt possible, due to the presence of controlled amounts of manganese, with possible additions of magnesium and controlled amounts of gallium.

  9. Aluminum battery alloys

    DOEpatents

    Thompson, David S. (Richmond, VA); Scott, Darwin H. (Mechanicsville, VA)

    1985-01-01

    Aluminum alloys suitable for use as anode structures in electrochemical cs are disclosed. These alloys include iron levels higher than previously felt possible, due to the presence of controlled amounts of manganese, with possible additions of magnesium and controlled amounts of gallium.

  10. Solid solution lithium alloy cermet anodes

    DOEpatents

    Richardson, Thomas J.

    2013-07-09

    A metal-ceramic composite ("cermet") has been produced by a chemical reaction between a lithium compound and another metal. The cermet has advantageous physical properties, high surface area relative to lithium metal or its alloys, and is easily formed into a desired shape. An example is the formation of a lithium-magnesium nitride cermet by reaction of lithium nitride with magnesium. The reaction results in magnesium nitride grains coated with a layer of lithium. The nitride is inert when used in a battery. It supports the metal in a high surface area form, while stabilizing the electrode with respect to dendrite formation. By using an excess of magnesium metal in the reaction process, a cermet of magnesium nitride is produced, coated with a lithium-magnesium alloy of any desired composition. This alloy inhibits dendrite formation by causing lithium deposited on its surface to diffuse under a chemical potential into the bulk of the alloy.

  11. Effect of friction stir processing on the microstructure and hardness of an aluminum-zinc-magnesium-copper alloy with nickel additives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naeem, Haider T.; Mohammed, Kahtan S.; Ahmad, Khairel R.

    2015-10-01

    The main object of this study is to investigate the effect of friction stir processing (FSP) on the microstructure and hardness of Al-Zn-Mg-Cu alloys that were produced via casting with the addition of 5 wt % nickel. Furthermore, a single-pass FSP with a rotational speed of 1500 rpm and a traveling speed of 40 mm/min was performed on the alloys. The FSP-treated cast alloys were homogenized, aged at 120°C for 24 h, retrogressed at 180°C for 30 min, and then re-aged at 120°C for 24 h. Microstructural evaluations via optical microscopy and scanning electron microscopy, as well as with energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy were conducted. In addition, X-ray diffraction analysis was performed to detect the intermetallics and phases of the Al-Zn-Mg-Cu-Ni alloys. Before FSP, the microstructural observations indicated the presence of coarse Ni dispersed particles with a precipitate phase within the matrix. After FSP treatment, the grain refinement led to the uniform space distribution of Ni dispersed particles in the stir zone. The Vickers hardness values for the Al-Zn-Mg-Cu-Ni alloy increased after age tempering at T6 and retrogression and re-aging (RRA) treatment because of the increased precipitation and particles dispersity. The hardness of the Al-Zn-Mg-Cu-Ni alloy was enhanced after FSP and a series of heat treatments, especially the RRA process, because of the stirring action of the FSP tool, the grain refinement, the appearance of additional precipitates, and the refinement of dispersed Ni particles.

  12. A Processing Map for Hot Deformation of an Ultrafine-Grained Aluminum-Magnesium-Silicon Alloy Prepared by Mechanical Milling and Hot Extrusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asgharzadeh, Hamed; Rahbar Niazi, Masoud; Simchi, Abdolreza

    2015-12-01

    Uniaxial compression test at different temperatures [573 K to 723 K (300 °C to 450 °C)] and strain rates (0.01 to 1 s-1) was employed to study the hot deformation behavior of an ultrafine-grained (UFG) Al6063 alloy prepared by the powder metallurgy route. The UFG alloy with an average grain size of ~0.3 µm was prepared by mechanical milling of a gas-atomized aluminum alloy powder for 20 hours followed by hot powder extrusion at 723 K (450 °C). To elaborate the effect of grain size, the aluminum alloy powder was extruded without mechanical milling to attain a coarse-grained (CG) structure with an average grain size of about 2.2 µm. By employing the dynamic materials model, processing maps for the hot deformation of the UFG and CG Al alloy were constructed. For investigation of microstructural evolutions and deformation instability occurring upon hot working, optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy coupled with electron backscattered diffraction and transmission electron microscopy were utilized. It is shown that the grain refinement increases the deformation flow stress while reducing the strain hardening and power dissipation efficiency during the deformation process at the elevated temperatures. Restoration mechanisms, including dynamic recovery and recrystallization are demonstrated to control microstructural evolutions and thus the deformation behavior. Coarsening of the grain structure in the UFG alloy is illustrated, particularly when the deformation is performed at high temperatures and low strain rates. The manifestations of instability are observed in the form of cracking and void formation.

  13. Studies of hydrogen embrittlement and stress-corrosion cracking in an aluminum-zinc-magnesium alloy. [5. 6 Zn - 2. 6 Mg

    SciTech Connect

    Ciaraldi, S.W.; Nelson, J.L.; Yeske, R.A.; Pugh, E.N.

    1980-01-01

    Tensile tests have been carried out on a high-purity A1-5.6 Zn-2.6 Mg alloy hydrogenated by exposure to moist air. Results indicate that internal hydrogen embrittlement occurs by the formation and rupture of a stress-induced hydride at the grain boundaries. The hydride, identified by electron diffraction as A1H/sub 3/, is shown to be unstable in laboratory air, reverting to aluminum. The hydride phase was not detected in specimens failed by SCC, despite evidence that hydrogen is transported ahead of advancing stress-corrosion cracks, and this leads to the possibility that a basically different mechanism may be responsible for SCC in this alloy.

  14. Reprint of: The history of biodegradable magnesium implants: A review.

    PubMed

    Witte, Frank

    2015-09-01

    Today, more than 200 years after the first production of metallic magnesium by Sir Humphry Davy in 1808, biodegradable magnesium-based metal implants are currently breaking the paradigm in biomaterial science to develop only highly corrosion resistant metals. This groundbreaking approach to temporary metallic implants is one of the latest developments in biomaterials science that is being rediscovered. It is a challenging topic, and several secrets still remain that might revolutionize various biomedical implants currently in clinical use. Magnesium alloys were investigated as implant materials long ago. A very early clinical report was given in 1878 by the physician Edward C. Huse. He used magnesium wires as ligature for bleeding vessels. Magnesium alloys for clinical use were explored during the last two centuries mainly by surgeons with various clinical backgrounds, such as cardiovascular, musculoskeletal and general surgery. Nearly all patients benefited from the treatment with magnesium implants. Although most patients experienced subcutaneous gas cavities caused by rapid implant corrosion, most patients had no pain and almost no infections were observed during the postoperative follow-up. This review critically summarizes the in vitro and in vivo knowledge and experience that has been reported on the use of magnesium and its alloys to advance the field of biodegradable metals. PMID:26235343

  15. The history of biodegradable magnesium implants: a review.

    PubMed

    Witte, Frank

    2010-05-01

    Today, more than 200years after the first production of metallic magnesium by Sir Humphry Davy in 1808, biodegradable magnesium-based metal implants are currently breaking the paradigm in biomaterial science to develop only highly corrosion resistant metals. This groundbreaking approach to temporary metallic implants is one of the latest developments in biomaterials science that is being rediscovered. It is a challenging topic, and several secrets still remain that might revolutionize various biomedical implants currently in clinical use. Magnesium alloys were investigated as implant materials long ago. A very early clinical report was given in 1878 by the physician Edward C. Huse. He used magnesium wires as ligature for bleeding vessels. Magnesium alloys for clinical use were explored during the last two centuries mainly by surgeons with various clinical backgrounds, such as cardiovascular, musculoskeletal and general surgery. Nearly all patients benefited from the treatment with magnesium implants. Although most patients experienced subcutaneous gas cavities caused by rapid implant corrosion, most patients had no pain and almost no infections were observed during the postoperative follow-up. This review critically summarizes the in vitro and in vivo knowledge and experience that has been reported on the use of magnesium and its alloys to advance the field of biodegradable metals. PMID:20172057

  16. A Coherency Strain Model for Hexagonal-Close-Packed Alloys Christopher N. Varney1

    E-print Network

    Hart, Gus

    illustrate the method for magnesium alloys containing calcium and yttrium, two common additives in magnesium alloys. Yttrium and hcp calcium both exhibit a significant lattice mismatch with respect to magnesium, 12 of these quantities and the method with which to calculate them can be found in References [1, 2]. Overall, yttrium

  17. Enhancements in Magnesium Die Casting Impact Properties

    SciTech Connect

    David Schwam; John F. Wallace; Yulong Zhu; Srinath Viswanathan; Shafik Iskander

    2000-06-30

    The need to produce lighter components in transportation equipment is the main driver in the increasing demand for magnesium castings. In many automotive applications, components can be made of magnesium or aluminum. While being lighter, often times the magnesium parts have lower impact and fatigue properties than the aluminum. The main objective of this study was to identify potential improvements in the impact resistance of magnesium alloys. The most common magnesium alloys in automotive applications are AZ91D, AM50 and AM60. Accordingly, these alloys were selected as the main candidates for the study. Experimental quantities of these alloys were melted in an electrical furnace under a protective atmosphere comprising sulfur hexafluoride, carbon dioxide and dry air. The alloys were cast both in a permanent mold and in a UBE 315 Ton squeeze caster. Extensive evaluation of tensile, impact and fatigue properties was conducted at CWRU on permanent mold and squeeze cast test bars of AZ91, AM60 and AM50. Ultimate tensile strength values between 20ksi and 30ksi were obtained. The respective elongations varied between 25 and 115. the Charpy V-notch impact strength varied between 1.6 ft-lb and 5 ft-lb depending on the alloy and processing conditions. Preliminary bending fatigue evaluation indicates a fatigue limit of 11-12 ksi for AM50 and AM60. This is about 0.4 of the UTS, typical for these alloys. The microstructures of the cast specimens were investigated with optical and scanning electron microscopy. Concomitantly, a study of the fracture toughness in AM60 was conducted at ORNL as part of the study. The results are in line with values published in the literature and are representative of current state of the art in casting magnesium alloys. The experimental results confirm the strong relationship between aluminum content of the alloys and the mechanical properties, in particular the impact strength and the elongation. As the aluminum content increases from about 5% in AM50 to over 9% in AZ91, more of the intermetallic Mg17Al12 is formed in the microstructure. For instance, for 15 increase in the aluminum content from AM50 to AM60, the volume fraction of eutectic present in the microstructure increases by 35%! Eventually, the brittle Mg17Al12 compound forms an interconnected network that reduces ductility and impact resistance. The lower aluminum in AM50 and AM60 are therefore a desirable feature in applications that call for higher impact resistance. Further improvement in impact resistance depends on the processing condition of the casting. Sound castings without porosity and impurities will have better mechanical properties. Since magnesium oxidizes readily, good melting and metal transfer practices are essential. The liquid metal has to be protected from oxidation at all times and entrainment of oxide films in the casting needs to be prevented. In this regard, there is evidence that us of vacuum to evacuate air from the die casting cavity can improve the quality of the castings. Fast cooling rates, leading to smaller grain size are beneficial and promote superior mechanical properties. Micro-segregation and banding are two additional defect types often encountered in magnesium alloys, in particular in AZ91D. While difficult to eliminate, segregation can be minimized by careful thermal management of the dies and the shot sleeve. A major source of segregation is the premature solidification in the shot sleeve. The primary solid dendrites are carried into the casting and form a heterogeneous structure. Furthermore, during the shot, segregation banding can occur. The remedies for this kind of defects include a hotter shot sleeve, use of insulating coatings on the shot sleeve and a short lag time between pouring into the shot sleeve and the shot.

  18. Choline Magnesium Trisalicylate

    MedlinePLUS

    Choline magnesium trisalicylate is used to relieve the pain, tenderness, inflammation (swelling), and stiffness caused by arthritis and painful ... used to relieve pain and lower fever. Choline magnesium trisalicylate is in a class of nonsteroidal anti- ...

  19. Magnesium and Space Flight

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Scott M.; Zwart, Sara R.

    2015-01-01

    Magnesium is an essential nutrient for muscle, cardiovascular, and bone health on Earth, and during space flight. We sought to evaluate magnesium status in 43 astronauts (34 male, 9 female; 47 ± 5 years old, mean ± SD) before, during, and after 4–6-month space missions. We also studied individuals participating in a ground analog of space flight (head-down-tilt bed rest; n = 27 (17 male, 10 female), 35 ± 7 years old). We evaluated serum concentration and 24-h urinary excretion of magnesium, along with estimates of tissue magnesium status from sublingual cells. Serum magnesium increased late in flight, while urinary magnesium excretion was higher over the course of 180-day space missions. Urinary magnesium increased during flight but decreased significantly at landing. Neither serum nor urinary magnesium changed during bed rest. For flight and bed rest, significant correlations existed between the area under the curve of serum and urinary magnesium and the change in total body bone mineral content. Tissue magnesium concentration was unchanged after flight and bed rest. Increased excretion of magnesium is likely partially from bone and partially from diet, but importantly, it does not come at the expense of muscle tissue stores. While further study is needed to better understand the implications of these findings for longer space exploration missions, magnesium homeostasis and tissue status seem well maintained during 4–6-month space missions. PMID:26670248

  20. Magnesium and Space Flight.

    PubMed

    Smith, Scott M; Zwart, Sara R

    2015-01-01

    Magnesium is an essential nutrient for muscle, cardiovascular, and bone health on Earth, and during space flight. We sought to evaluate magnesium status in 43 astronauts (34 male, 9 female; 47 ± 5 years old, mean ± SD) before, during, and after 4-6-month space missions. We also studied individuals participating in a ground analog of space flight (head-down-tilt bed rest; n = 27 (17 male, 10 female), 35 ± 7 years old). We evaluated serum concentration and 24-h urinary excretion of magnesium, along with estimates of tissue magnesium status from sublingual cells. Serum magnesium increased late in flight, while urinary magnesium excretion was higher over the course of 180-day space missions. Urinary magnesium increased during flight but decreased significantly at landing. Neither serum nor urinary magnesium changed during bed rest. For flight and bed rest, significant correlations existed between the area under the curve of serum and urinary magnesium and the change in total body bone mineral content. Tissue magnesium concentration was unchanged after flight and bed rest. Increased excretion of magnesium is likely partially from bone and partially from diet, but importantly, it does not come at the expense of muscle tissue stores. While further study is needed to better understand the implications of these findings for longer space exploration missions, magnesium homeostasis and tissue status seem well maintained during 4-6-month space missions. PMID:26670248

  1. Evaluation of Al3Mg2 precipitates and Mn-rich phase in aluminum-magnesium alloy based on scanning transmission electron microscopy imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu, Yakun; Cullen, David A; Kar, Soumya; Free, Michael P; Allard Jr, Lawrence Frederick

    2012-01-01

    Scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) were used to observe intergranular and intragranular -phase (Al3Mg2) formation and growth in as-received sample and long-term (~ 1 year) thermally treated samples of 5083-H131 alloy. Rod-shaped and equiaxed particles rich in Mn, Fe, and Cr were present in the as-received and heat treated samples. The -phase precipitated along grain boundaries as well as around and between preexisting Mn-Fe-Cr rich particles. The measured thickness of -phase along grain boundaries was lower than Zener Hillert diffusion model predicted value and the potential reasons were theoretically analyzed. Dislocation networks, grain boundaries, and different preexisting particles were observed to contribute to Mg diffusion and -phase precipitation.

  2. Improved biological performance of magnesium by micro-arc oxidation

    PubMed Central

    Ma, W.H.; Liu, Y.J.; Wang, W.; Zhang, Y.Z.

    2014-01-01

    Magnesium and its alloys have recently been used in the development of lightweight, biodegradable implant materials. However, the corrosion properties of magnesium limit its clinical application. The purpose of this study was to comprehensively evaluate the degradation behavior and biomechanical properties of magnesium materials treated with micro-arc oxidation (MAO), which is a new promising surface treatment for developing corrosion resistance in magnesium, and to provide a theoretical basis for its further optimization and clinical application. The degradation behavior of MAO-treated magnesium was studied systematically by immersion and electrochemical tests, and its biomechanical performance when exposed to simulated body fluids was evaluated by tensile tests. In addition, the cell toxicity of MAO-treated magnesium samples during the corrosion process was evaluated, and its biocompatibility was investigated under in vivo conditions. The results of this study showed that the oxide coating layers could elevate the corrosion potential of magnesium and reduce its degradation rate. In addition, the MAO-coated sample showed no cytotoxicity and more new bone was formed around it during in vivo degradation. MAO treatment could effectively enhance the corrosion resistance of the magnesium specimen and help to keep its original mechanical properties. The MAO-coated magnesium material had good cytocompatibility and biocompatibility. This technique has an advantage for developing novel implant materials and may potentially be used for future clinical applications. PMID:25517917

  3. Life-Cycle Assessment of the Recycling of Magnesium Vehicle Components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ehrenberger, Simone; Friedrich, Horst E.

    2013-10-01

    Life-cycle assessment is basically the assessment of a product from the cradle to the grave. Ideally, a product is recycled after its useful life is complete and the end-of-life of the first life cycle leads to the beginning of a new product system. For the end-of-life of magnesium vehicle parts, there are various possible paths to a second life cycle. When magnesium parts are dismantled or magnesium is separated after shredding, the resulting magnesium alloys can be used for secondary, noncritical applications. However, the typical case for magnesium components is that the magnesium postconsumer scrap ends up in the nonferrous metals fraction that consists primarily of aluminum, magnesium, and heavy metals. Today, aluminum is typically fed into a second life cycle as a secondary alloy, and magnesium becomes part of the aluminum cycle as an alloy addition. In this article, we evaluate the environmental effects of using magnesium in the aluminum cycle. We also assess the influence of end-of-life scenarios on the overall environmental impact of a component's life cycle. The primary focus of our analysis is the evaluation of the effects of magnesium vehicle components on greenhouse gas emissions.

  4. The Effect of Alloying Elements on the Shear Strength of the Lap Joint of AZ31B Magnesium Alloy to Q235 Steel by Hybrid Laser-TIG Welding Technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Liming; Qi, Xiaodong; Zhang, Zhaodong

    2012-06-01

    Welding between AZ31B Mg alloy and Q235 mild steel was examined in this study. The effects of welding parameters were first investigated on the penetration depth into the steel and the shear strength of the joints. The optimum parameters and the maximum shear strength were obtained. Based on these parameters, alloying elements in the form of interlayers were added into the joints, and the shear strength was improved as high as 98 pct of the AZ31B Mg alloy. Microstructures of the joints were inspected with a scanning electron microscope and an electron probe micro-analyzer. Two bonding modes were proposed, and their effects on the joint shear strength were discussed. It is suggested that the bonding changed from nonmetallurgical to "semimetallurgical" mode with the addition of the interlayers, which contributed to the enhancement of the shear strength. Micro-hardness profiles were measured in the fusion zone of the joints, and their influence on the joint strength was also discussed. Intermediate phases that distributed uniformly in the fusion zone strengthened the microstructures, and thus, the shear strength was elevated. An empirical trend for Cu and Ni interlayer selection was proposed.

  5. The development of binary MgeCa alloys for use as biodegradable materials within bone

    E-print Network

    Zheng, Yufeng

    Magnesium alloys would dissolve readily in aqueous solu- tion especially that contains chloride ion [1 > 0.05) of serum magnesium was detected at different degradation stages. All these results revealed

  6. Friction Tests in Magnesium Tube Hydroforming at Elevated Temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    Hwang, Yeong-Maw; Wang, Kuo-Hsing; Kuo, Tsung-Yu

    2011-05-04

    In metal forming, lubricants have a variety of functions. The top priority is usually reduction of friction in order to increase the formability of the materials and reduce tool wear. Because magnesium alloys have very poor formability at room temperature, it is essential to manufacture a part from Magnesium alloys at elevated temperatures. The aim of this paper is to present a friction test method to evaluate the performance of different kinds of lubricants and determine their coefficients of friction at elevated temperatures in tube hydroforming of magnesium alloys. A self-designed experimental apparatus is used to carry out the experiments of friction tests. The coefficient of friction between the tube and die at guiding zone is determined. The effects of the internal pressure, the axial feeding velocity and temperatures on the friction forces and coefficients of friction for different lubricants are discussed.

  7. A new smoothed particle hydrodynamics non-Newtonian model for friction stir welding: Process modeling and simulation of microstructure evolution in a magnesium alloy

    SciTech Connect

    Pan, Wenxiao; Li, Dongsheng; Tartakovsky, Alexandre M.; Ahzi, Said; Khraisheh, Marwan; Khaleel, Mohammad A.

    2013-09-06

    We present a new smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH) model for friction stir welding (FSW). FSW has found broad commercial application in the marine, aerospace, rail and automotive industries. Development of the FSW process for each new application, however, has remained largely empirical. Few established numerical modeling techniques have been developed that can explain and predict important features of the process physics involved in FSW. This is particularly true in the areas of material ?ow, mixing mechanisms, and void formation. In this paper we present a novel modeling approach to simulate FSW that may have signi?cant advantages over current ?nite element or ?nite di?erence based methods. Unlike traditional grid-based methods, Lagrangian particle methods such as SPH can simulate the dynamics of interfaces, large material deformations, and the material’s strain and temperature history without employing complex tracking schemes. Three-dimensional simulations of FSW on AZ31 Mg alloy are presented. Numerical results are in a close quantitative agreement with experimental observations.

  8. Magnesium in disease

    PubMed Central

    Wanner, Christoph

    2012-01-01

    Although the following text will focus on magnesium in disease, its role in healthy subjects during physical exercise when used as a supplement to enhance performance is also noteworthy. Low serum magnesium levels are associated with metabolic syndrome, Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) and hypertension; consequently, some individuals benefit from magnesium supplementation: increasing magnesium consumption appears to prevent high blood pressure, and higher serum magnesium levels are associated with a lower risk of developing a metabolic syndrome. There are, however, conflicting study results regarding magnesium administration with myocardial infarction with and without reperfusion therapy. There was a long controversy as to whether or not magnesium should be given as a first-line medication. As the most recent trials have not shown any difference in outcome, intravenous magnesium cannot be recommended in patients with myocardial infarction today. However, magnesium has its indication in patients with torsade de pointes and has been given successfully to patients with digoxin-induced arrhythmia or life-threatening ventricular arrhythmias. Magnesium sulphate as an intravenous infusion also has an important established therapeutic role in pregnant women with pre-eclampsia as it decreases the risk of eclamptic seizures by half compared with placebo. PMID:26069818

  9. Magnesium in depression.

    PubMed

    Serefko, Anna; Szopa, Aleksandra; Wla?, Piotr; Nowak, Gabriel; Radziwo?-Zaleska, Maria; Skalski, Micha?; Poleszak, Ewa

    2013-01-01

    Magnesium is one of the most essential mineral in the human body, connected with brain biochemistry and the fluidity of neuronal membrane. A variety of neuromuscular and psychiatric symptoms, including different types of depression, was observed in magnesium deficiency. Plasma/serum magnesium levels do not seem to be the appropriate indicators of depressive disorders, since ambiguous outcomes, depending on the study, were obtained. The emergence of a new approach to magnesium compounds in medical practice has been seen. Apart from being administered as components of dietary supplements, they are also perceived as the effective agents in treatment of migraine, alcoholism, asthma, heart diseases, arrhythmias, renal calcium stones, premenstrual tension syndrome etc. Magnesium preparations have an essential place in homeopathy as a remedy for a range of mental health problems. Mechanisms of antidepressant action of magnesium are not fully understood yet. Most probably, magnesium influences several systems associated with development of depression. The first information on the beneficial effect of magnesium sulfate given hypodermically to patients with agitated depression was published almost 100 years ago. Numerous pre-clinical and clinical studies confirmed the initial observations as well as demonstrated the beneficial safety profile of magnesium supplementation. Thus, magnesium preparations seem to be a valuable addition to the pharmacological armamentarium for management of depression. PMID:23950577

  10. Sea water magnesium fuel cell power supply

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hahn, Robert; Mainert, Jan; Glaw, Fabian; Lang, K.-D.

    2015-08-01

    An environmentally friendly magnesium fuel cell system using seawater electrolyte and atmospheric oxygen was tested under practical considerations for use as maritime power supply. The hydrogen rate and therefore the power density of the system were increased by a factor of two by using hydrogen evolution cathodes with a gas separation membrane instead of submerged cathodes without gas separation. Commercial magnesium AZ31 rolled sheet anodes can be dissolved in seawater for hydrogen production, down to a thickness below 100 ?m thickness, resulting in hydrogen generation efficiency of the anode of over 80%. A practical specific energy/energy density of the alloy of more than 1200 Wh/kg/3000 Wh/l was achieved when coupled to a fuel cell with atmospheric air breathing cathode. The performance of several AZ31 alloy anodes was tested as well as the influence of temperature, electrolyte concentration and anode - cathode separation. The excess hydrogen produced by the magnesium hydrogen evolving cell, due to the negative difference effect, is proportional to the cell current in case of the AZ31 alloys, which simplifies system control considerably. Stable long-term operation of the system was demonstrated at low pressures which can be maintained in an open-seawater-submerged hydrogen generator.

  11. Cellular Magnesium Matrix Foam Composites for Mechanical Damping Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shunmugasamy, Vasanth Chakravarthy; Mansoor, Bilal; Gupta, Nikhil

    2015-10-01

    The damping characteristics of metal alloys and metal matrix composites are relevant to the automotive, aerospace, and marine structures. Use of lightweight materials can help in increasing payload capacity and in decreasing fuel consumption. Lightweight composite materials possessing high damping capabilities that can be designed as structural members can greatly benefit in addressing these needs. In this context, the damping properties of lightweight metals such as aluminum and magnesium and their respective composites have been studied in the existing literature. This review focuses on analyzing the damping properties of aluminum and magnesium alloys and their cellular composites. The damping properties of various lightweight alloys and composites are compared on the basis of their density to understand the potential for weight saving in structural applications. Magnesium alloys are observed to possess better damping properties in comparison to aluminum. However, aluminum matrix syntactic foams reinforced with silicon carbide hollow particles possess a damping capacity and density comparable to magnesium alloy. By using the data presented in the study, composites with specific compositions and properties can be selected for a given application. In addition, the comparison of the results helps in identifying the areas where attention needs to be focused to address the future needs.

  12. Magnesium in diet

    MedlinePLUS

    Magnesium is an essential mineral for human nutrition. ... Apathy Confusion Fatigue Insomnia Irritability Muscle twitching Poor memory Reduced ability to learn Moderate deficiency symptoms: Heart ( ...

  13. Al and Zn Impurity Diffusion in Binary and Ternary Magnesium Solid-Solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Kammerer, Catherine; Kulkarni, Nagraj S; Warmack, Robert J Bruce; Sohn, Yong Ho

    2014-01-01

    Magnesium alloys are considered for implementation into structural components where energy-efficiency and light-weighting are important. Two of the most common alloying elements in magnesium alloys are Aluminum and Zinc. The present work examines impurity diffusion coefficients of Al and Zn in Mg(Zn) and Mg(Al) binary solid solutions, respectively. Experimental investigation is carried out with ternary diffusion couples with polycrystalline alloys. Concentration profiles were measured by electron microprobe micro-analysis and the impurity diffusion coefficients were determined by the Hall Method. Results of Al and Zn impurity diffusion in Mg solid solutions are reported, and examined as a function of composition of Mg solid solution.

  14. Mechanochemical processing for metals and metal alloys

    DOEpatents

    Froes, Francis H. (Moscow, ID); Eranezhuth, Baburaj G. (Moscow, ID); Prisbrey, Keith (Moscow, ID)

    2001-01-01

    A set of processes for preparing metal powders, including metal alloy powders, by ambient temperature reduction of a reducible metal compound by a reactive metal or metal hydride through mechanochemical processing. The reduction process includes milling reactants to induce and complete the reduction reaction. The preferred reducing agents include magnesium and calcium hydride powders. A process of pre-milling magnesium as a reducing agent to increase the activity of the magnesium has been established as one part of the invention.

  15. Inhibition of mouse-killing behaviour in magnesium-deficient rats: effect of pharmacological doses of magnesium pidolate, magnesium aspartate, magnesium lactate, magnesium gluconate and magnesium chloride.

    PubMed

    Bac, P; Pages, N; Herrenknecht, C; Teste, J F

    1995-03-01

    Magnesium deprivation induced interspecific aggressive behaviour (muricidal behaviour) in rats undoubtedly attributable to magnesium deficiency since magnesium chloride, by correcting magnesium deficiency, suppressed it. Inhibition of magnesium deficiency-induced behaviour by various magnesium salts should enable the classification of the therapeutic effects of these salts. Consequently we compared the effects of various magnesium salts used therapeutically on the inhibition of the acute muricidal behaviour induced by magnesium deficiency. All the magnesium salts used (chloride, pidolate, aspartate, gluconate, lactate) suppressed the muricidal behaviour. There was no significant difference in the duration of the treatment needed to inhibit this comportment for each of the salts studied. In contrast, significant differences appeared, concerning the different phases of muricidal behaviour. Magnesium pidolate significantly increased the attack latency (P < 0.05). By repeating the muricidal assays, we showed that magnesium pidolate treated rats had a muricidal behaviour rate which was lower than that of the other magnesium salt-treated rat groups. Consequently, it can be assumed that all the magnesium salts used had an acute anti-muricidal, perhaps anti-stress, effect and that magnesium pidolate presented, on this experimental model the greatest efficacy. PMID:7669506

  16. Analysis Methods of Magnesium Chips

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohmann, Sven; Ditze, André; Scharf, Christiane

    2015-09-01

    The quality of recycled magnesium from chips depends strongly on their exposure to inorganic and organic impurities that are added during the production processes. Different kinds of magnesium chips from these processes were analyzed by several methods. In addition, the accuracy and effectiveness of the methods are discussed. The results show that the chips belong either to the AZ91, AZ31, AM50/60, or AJ62 alloy. Some kinds of chips show deviations from the above-mentioned normations. Different impurities result mainly from transition metals and lime. The water and oil content does not exceed 25%, and the chip size is not more than 4 mm in the diameter. The sieve analysis shows good results for oily and wet chips. The determination of oil and water shows better results for the application of a Soxhlet compared with the addition of lime and vacuum distillation. The most accurate values for the determination of water and oil are obtained by drying at 110°C (for water) and washing with acetone (for oil) by hand.

  17. Analysis Methods of Magnesium Chips

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohmann, Sven; Ditze, André; Scharf, Christiane

    2015-11-01

    The quality of recycled magnesium from chips depends strongly on their exposure to inorganic and organic impurities that are added during the production processes. Different kinds of magnesium chips from these processes were analyzed by several methods. In addition, the accuracy and effectiveness of the methods are discussed. The results show that the chips belong either to the AZ91, AZ31, AM50/60, or AJ62 alloy. Some kinds of chips show deviations from the above-mentioned normations. Different impurities result mainly from transition metals and lime. The water and oil content does not exceed 25%, and the chip size is not more than 4 mm in the diameter. The sieve analysis shows good results for oily and wet chips. The determination of oil and water shows better results for the application of a Soxhlet compared with the addition of lime and vacuum distillation. The most accurate values for the determination of water and oil are obtained by drying at 110°C (for water) and washing with acetone (for oil) by hand.

  18. Constraining magnesium cycling in marine sediments using magnesium isotopes

    E-print Network

    Paytan, Adina

    Constraining magnesium cycling in marine sediments using magnesium isotopes J.A. Higgins *, D Abstract Magnesium concentrations in deep-sea sediment pore-fluids typically decrease down core due to net and differentiate these processes, we have measured magnesium isotopes in pore-fluids and sediment samples from

  19. Method for production of magnesium

    DOEpatents

    Diaz, Alexander F. (Cambridge, MA); Howard, Jack B. (Winchester, MA); Modestino, Anthony J. (Hanson, MA); Peters, William A. (Lexington, MA)

    1998-01-01

    A continuous process for the production of elemental magnesium is described. Magnesium is made from magnesium oxide and a light hydrocarbon gas. In the process, a feed stream of the magnesium oxide and gas is continuously fed into a reaction zone. There the magnesium oxide and gas are reacted at a temperature of about 1400.degree. C. or greater in the reaction zone to provide a continuous product stream of reaction products, which include elemental magnesium. The product stream is continuously quenched after leaving the reaction zone, and the elemental magnesium is separated from other reaction products.

  20. Method for production of magnesium

    DOEpatents

    Diaz, A.F.; Howard, J.B.; Modestino, A.J.; Peters, W.A.

    1998-07-21

    A continuous process for the production of elemental magnesium is described. Magnesium is made from magnesium oxide and a light hydrocarbon gas. In the process, a feed stream of the magnesium oxide and gas is continuously fed into a reaction zone. There the magnesium oxide and gas are reacted at a temperature of about 1400 C or greater in the reaction zone to provide a continuous product stream of reaction products, which include elemental magnesium. The product stream is continuously quenched after leaving the reaction zone, and the elemental magnesium is separated from other reaction products. 12 figs.

  1. Method of forming magnesium alloy sheets

    DOEpatents

    Mualidharan, Govindarajan; Muth, Thomas R.; Harper, David C.

    2015-12-22

    A machine for asymmetric rolling of a work-piece includes pair of rollers disposed in an arrangement to apply opposing, asymmetric rolling forces to roll a work-piece therebetween, wherein a surface of the work-piece is rolled faster than an opposite surface of the work-piece; and an exit constraint die rigidly disposed adjacent an exit side of the pair of rollers so that, as the work-piece exits the pair of rollers, the work-piece contacts the exit constraint die to constrain curling of the work-piece.

  2. Magnesium blood test

    MedlinePLUS

    Magnesium - blood ... A blood sample is needed. ... When the needle is inserted to draw blood, some people feel slight pain. Others feel a prick or stinging. Afterward, there may be some throbbing or a slight bruise. This soon ...

  3. Interstellar magnesium abundances

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murray, M. J.; Dufton, P. L.; Hibbert, A.; York, D. G.

    1984-01-01

    An improved evaluation of the Mg II 1240 A doublet oscillator strength is used in conjunction with recently published Copernicus observations to derive accurate Mg II column densities toward 74 stars. These imply an average of 40 percent of interstellar magnesium is in the gaseous phase. Magnesium depletion is examined as a function of various interstellar extinction and density parameters, and the results are briefly discussed in terms of current depletion theories.

  4. Rechargeable Magnesium Power Cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koch, Victor R.; Nanjundiah, Chenniah; Orsini, Michael

    1995-01-01

    Rechargeable power cells based on magnesium anodes developed as safer alternatives to high-energy-density cells like those based on lithium and sodium anodes. At cost of some reduction in energy density, magnesium-based cells safer because less susceptible to catastrophic meltdown followed by flames and venting of toxic fumes. Other advantages include ease of handling, machining, and disposal, and relatively low cost.

  5. Ultra-light alloys and their utilization on aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Portevin, A M; Defleury, R

    1924-01-01

    We will arbitrarily call alloys having a specific gravity of less than 2 "ultra-light", in order to distinguish them from "light" alloys with a specific gravity of 2 to 3. Thus far it has been possible to make ultra-light alloys only by employing a large proportion of magnesium.

  6. 76 FR 62040 - Pure Magnesium From the People's Republic of China: Final Results of Expedited Third Sunset...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-06

    ..., pursuant to section 751(c) of the Act. See Initiation of Five-Year ``Sunset'' Review, 76 FR 31588 (June 1... Value: Antidumping Duty Investigation of Pure Magnesium From the Russian Federation, 60 FR 25691 (May 12..., thorium, zirconium and rare earths. Excluded from the scope of the order are alloy primary magnesium...

  7. 21 CFR 184.1434 - Magnesium phosphate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ...3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Magnesium phosphate. 184.1434 Section 184.1434...Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1434 Magnesium phosphate. (a) Magnesium phosphate includes both magnesium...

  8. 21 CFR 184.1434 - Magnesium phosphate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ...2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Magnesium phosphate. 184.1434 Section 184.1434 Food and...Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1434 Magnesium phosphate. (a) Magnesium phosphate includes both magnesium phosphate,...

  9. 21 CFR 184.1434 - Magnesium phosphate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ...2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Magnesium phosphate. 184.1434 Section 184.1434 Food and...Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1434 Magnesium phosphate. (a) Magnesium phosphate includes both magnesium phosphate,...

  10. 21 CFR 184.1434 - Magnesium phosphate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ...2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Magnesium phosphate. 184.1434 Section 184.1434 Food and...Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1434 Magnesium phosphate. (a) Magnesium phosphate includes both magnesium phosphate,...

  11. 21 CFR 184.1431 - Magnesium oxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ...the colorless, crystalline mineral periclase. It is produced...relatively dense white powder (heavy) by heating magnesium hydroxide...C for 12 hours) produces heavy magnesium oxide. Light magnesium oxide is converted to heavy magnesium oxide by...

  12. Production and Refining of Magnesium Metal from Turkey Originating Dolomite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demiray, Yeliz; Yücel, Onuralp

    2012-06-01

    In this study crown magnesium produced from Turkish calcined dolomite by the Pigeon Process was refined and corrosion tests were applied. By using factsage thermodynamic program metalothermic reduction behavior of magnesium oxide and silicate formation structure during this reaction were investigated. After thermodynamic studies were completed, calcination of dolomite and it's metalothermic reduction at temperatures of 1473 K, 1523 K and within a vacuum (varied from 20 to 200 Pa) and refining of crown magnesium was studied. Different flux compositions consisting of MgCl2, KCl, CaCl2, MgO, CaF2, NaCl, and SiO2 with and without B2O3 additions were selected for the refining process. These tests were carried out at 963 K for 15, 30 and 45 minutes setting time. Considerable amount of iron was transferred into the sludge phase and its amount decreased from 0.08% to 0.027%. This refined magnesium was suitable for the production of various magnesium alloys. As a result of decreasing iron content, minimum corrosion rate of refined magnesium was obtained 2.35 g/m2/day. The results are compared with previous studies.

  13. Comparison of Selective Laser Melted Titanium and Magnesium Implants Coated with PCL

    PubMed Central

    Matena, Julia; Petersen, Svea; Gieseke, Matthias; Teske, Michael; Beyerbach, Martin; Kampmann, Andreas; Escobar, Hugo Murua; Gellrich, Nils-Claudius; Haferkamp, Heinz; Nolte, Ingo

    2015-01-01

    Degradable implant material for bone remodeling that corresponds to the physiological stability of bone has still not been developed. Promising degradable materials with good mechanical properties are magnesium and magnesium alloys. However, excessive gas production due to corrosion can lower the biocompatibility. In the present study we used the polymer coating polycaprolactone (PCL), intended to lower the corrosion rate of magnesium. Additionally, improvement of implant geometry can increase bone remodeling. Porous structures are known to support vessel ingrowth and thus increase osseointegration. With the selective laser melting (SLM) process, defined open porous structures can be created. Recently, highly reactive magnesium has also been processed by SLM. We performed studies with a flat magnesium layer and with porous magnesium implants coated with polymers. The SLM produced magnesium was compared with the titanium alloy TiAl6V4, as titanium is already established for the SLM-process. For testing the biocompatibility, we used primary murine osteoblasts. Results showed a reduced corrosion rate and good biocompatibility of the SLM produced magnesium with PCL coating. PMID:26068455

  14. Comparison of Selective Laser Melted Titanium and Magnesium Implants Coated with PCL.

    PubMed

    Matena, Julia; Petersen, Svea; Gieseke, Matthias; Teske, Michael; Beyerbach, Martin; Kampmann, Andreas; Murua Escobar, Hugo; Gellrich, Nils-Claudius; Haferkamp, Heinz; Nolte, Ingo

    2015-01-01

    Degradable implant material for bone remodeling that corresponds to the physiological stability of bone has still not been developed. Promising degradable materials with good mechanical properties are magnesium and magnesium alloys. However, excessive gas production due to corrosion can lower the biocompatibility. In the present study we used the polymer coating polycaprolactone (PCL), intended to lower the corrosion rate of magnesium. Additionally, improvement of implant geometry can increase bone remodeling. Porous structures are known to support vessel ingrowth and thus increase osseointegration. With the selective laser melting (SLM) process, defined open porous structures can be created. Recently, highly reactive magnesium has also been processed by SLM. We performed studies with a flat magnesium layer and with porous magnesium implants coated with polymers. The SLM produced magnesium was compared with the titanium alloy TiAl6V4, as titanium is already established for the SLM-process. For testing the biocompatibility, we used primary murine osteoblasts. Results showed a reduced corrosion rate and good biocompatibility of the SLM produced magnesium with PCL coating. PMID:26068455

  15. 21 CFR 184.1434 - Magnesium phosphate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Magnesium phosphate. 184.1434 Section 184.1434... Listing of Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1434 Magnesium phosphate. (a) Magnesium phosphate includes both magnesium phosphate, dibasic, and magnesium phosphate, tribasic. Magnesium phosphate,...

  16. 21 CFR 184.1434 - Magnesium phosphate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Magnesium phosphate. 184.1434 Section 184.1434... GRAS § 184.1434 Magnesium phosphate. (a) Magnesium phosphate includes both magnesium phosphate, dibasic, and magnesium phosphate, tribasic. Magnesium phosphate, dibasic (MgHPO4·3H2O, CAS Reg. No....

  17. 21 CFR 184.1434 - Magnesium phosphate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Magnesium phosphate. 184.1434 Section 184.1434... Listing of Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1434 Magnesium phosphate. (a) Magnesium phosphate includes both magnesium phosphate, dibasic, and magnesium phosphate, tribasic. Magnesium phosphate,...

  18. 21 CFR 184.1434 - Magnesium phosphate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Magnesium phosphate. 184.1434 Section 184.1434... Listing of Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1434 Magnesium phosphate. (a) Magnesium phosphate includes both magnesium phosphate, dibasic, and magnesium phosphate, tribasic. Magnesium phosphate,...

  19. 21 CFR 184.1434 - Magnesium phosphate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Magnesium phosphate. 184.1434 Section 184.1434 Food... Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1434 Magnesium phosphate. (a) Magnesium phosphate includes both magnesium phosphate, dibasic, and magnesium phosphate, tribasic. Magnesium phosphate, dibasic...

  20. Calcium carbonate with magnesium overdose

    MedlinePLUS

    The combination of calcium carbonate and magnesium is commonly found in antacids, which are medicines that provide heartburn relief. Calcium carbonate with magnesium overdose occurs when someone accidentally or ...

  1. Aluminum Hydroxide and Magnesium Hydroxide

    MedlinePLUS

    Aluminum Hydroxide, Magnesium Hydroxide are antacids used together to relieve heartburn, acid indigestion, and upset stomach. They may be used to ... with stomach acid and neutralize it. Aluminum Hydroxide, Magnesium Hydroxide are available without a prescription.This medication ...

  2. Magnesium Metabolism and its Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Swaminathan, R

    2003-01-01

    Magnesium is the fourth most abundant cation in the body and plays an important physiological role in many of its functions. Magnesium balance is maintained by renal regulation of magnesium reabsorption. The exact mechanism of the renal regulation is not fully understood. Magnesium deficiency is a common problem in hospital patients, with a prevalence of about 10%. There are no readily available and easy methods to assess magnesium status. Serum magnesium and the magnesium tolerance test are the most widely used. Measurement of ionised magnesium may become more widely available with the availability of ion selective electrodes. Magnesium deficiency and hypomagnesaemia can result from a variety of causes including gastrointestinal and renal losses. Magnesium deficiency can cause a wide variety of features including hypocalcaemia, hypokalaemia and cardiac and neurological manifestations. Chronic low magnesium state has been associated with a number of chronic diseases including diabetes, hypertension, coronary heart disease, and osteoporosis. The use of magnesium as a therapeutic agent in asthma, myocardial infarction, and pre-eclampsia is also discussed. Hypermagnesaemia is less frequent than hypomagnesaemia and results from failure of excretion or increased intake. Hypermagnesaemia can lead to hypotension and other cardiovascular effects as well as neuromuscular manifestations. Causes and management of hypermagnesaemia are discussed. PMID:18568054

  3. Effect of the addition of low rare earth elements (lanthanum, neodymium, cerium) on the biodegradation and biocompatibility of magnesium.

    PubMed

    Willbold, Elmar; Gu, Xuenan; Albert, Devon; Kalla, Katharina; Bobe, Katharina; Brauneis, Maria; Janning, Carla; Nellesen, Jens; Czayka, Wolfgang; Tillmann, Wolfgang; Zheng, Yufeng; Witte, Frank

    2015-01-01

    Rare earth elements are promising alloying element candidates for magnesium alloys used as biodegradable devices in biomedical applications. Rare earth elements have significant effects on the high temperature strength as well as the creep resistance of alloys and they improve magnesium corrosion resistance. We focused on lanthanum, neodymium and cerium to produce magnesium alloys with commonly used rare earth element concentrations. We showed that low concentrations of rare earth elements do not promote bone growth inside a 750 ?m broad area around the implant. However, increased bone growth was observed at a greater distance from the degrading alloys. Clinically and histologically, the alloys and their corrosion products caused no systematic or local cytotoxicological effects. Using microtomography and in vitro experiments, we could show that the magnesium-rare earth element alloys showed low corrosion rates, both in in vitro and in vivo. The lanthanum- and cerium-containing alloys degraded at comparable rates, whereas the neodymium-containing alloy showed the lowest corrosion rates. PMID:25278442

  4. Modeling of the Thermal Field in Dissimilar Alloy Ultrasonic Welding

    E-print Network

    Jedrasiak, P.; Shercliff, H. R.; Chen, Y. C.; Wang, L.; Prangnell, P.; Robson, J.

    2014-12-10

    This paper describes a finite element model for predicting the temperature field in high power ultrasonic welding aluminum AA6111 to two dissimilar alloys, magnesium AZ31, and low carbon steel DC04. Experimental thermocouple and other evidence...

  5. Magnesium - its role in CKD.

    PubMed

    M de Francisco, Angel L; Rodríguez, Mariano

    2013-01-01

    Magnesium containing compounds present promising oral phosphate binders for the treatment of hyperphosphataemia in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD). However, the impact of magnesium in CKD patients still remains unclear in clinical routine practice. Therefore, this publication provides a practicable overview of knowledge about the physiological role of magnesium in general and in particular in CKD patients. Prevalence of hypomagnesaemia is high in the general population and especially in intensive care unit patients, but often not being detected. Magnesium deficiency increases the risk for several diseases, like diabetes mellitus type 2, hypertension and atherosclerosis. Moderate hypermagnesaemia, however, seems to have beneficial effects on vascular calcification and mortality rates in CKD patients. On the other hand, higher serum magnesium levels are reported to be linked to lower PTH levels and results on the effects on bone are controversial. In addition, low magnesium levels are associated with low bone mass, osteoporosis and vascular calcification. In dialysis patients serum magnesium levels are dependent mainly on the dialysate magnesium concentration. To confirm the potential delay of arterial calcification and improved survival outcomes by long-term intervention with magnesium powered randomized studies are required in dialysis patients. Since a recent trial revealed that a phosphate binder containing a combination of magnesium carbonate and calcium acetate was as effective as the polymer-based agent sevelamer hydrochloride and had an equally good tolerability profile, it is time for a re-examination of the role of magnesium in CKD patients. PMID:23640095

  6. Magnesium in Prevention and Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Gröber, Uwe; Schmidt, Joachim; Kisters, Klaus

    2015-01-01

    Magnesium is the fourth most abundant mineral in the body. It has been recognized as a cofactor for more than 300 enzymatic reactions, where it is crucial for adenosine triphosphate (ATP) metabolism. Magnesium is required for DNA and RNA synthesis, reproduction, and protein synthesis. Moreover, magnesium is essential for the regulation of muscular contraction, blood pressure, insulin metabolism, cardiac excitability, vasomotor tone, nerve transmission and neuromuscular conduction. Imbalances in magnesium status—primarily hypomagnesemia as it is seen more common than hypermagnesemia—might result in unwanted neuromuscular, cardiac or nervous disorders. Based on magnesium’s many functions within the human body, it plays an important role in prevention and treatment of many diseases. Low levels of magnesium have been associated with a number of chronic diseases, such as Alzheimer’s disease, insulin resistance and type-2 diabetes mellitus, hypertension, cardiovascular disease (e.g., stroke), migraine headaches, and attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). PMID:26404370

  7. Microstructure and Aging of Powder-Metallurgy Al Alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blackburn, L. B.

    1987-01-01

    Report describes experimental study of thermal responses and aging behaviors of three new aluminum alloys. Alloys produced from rapidly solidified powders and contain 3.20 to 5.15 percent copper, 0.24 to 1.73 percent magnesium, 0.08 to 0.92 percent iron, and smaller amounts of manganese, nickel, titanium, silicon, and zinc. Peak hardness achieved at lower aging temperatures than with standard ingot-metallurgy alloys. Alloys of interest for automobile, aircraft, and aerospace applications.

  8. Highly Soluble Alkoxide Magnesium Salts for Rechargeable Magnesium Batteries

    SciTech Connect

    Liao, Chen; Guo, Bingkun; Jiang, Deen; Custelcean, Radu; Mahurin, Shannon Mark; Sun, Xiao-Guang; Dai, Sheng

    2014-01-01

    A unique class of air-stable and non-pyrophoric magnesium electrolytes has been developed based on alkoxide magnesium compounds. The crystals obtained from this class of electrolytes exhibit a unique structure of tri-magnesium cluster, [Mg3Cl3(OR)2(THF)6]+ [(THF)MgCl3] . High reversible capacities and good rate capabilities were obtained in Mg-Mo6S8 batteries using these new electrolytes at both 20 and 50 oC.

  9. Magnesium fluoride recovery method

    DOEpatents

    Gay, Richard L. (Canoga Park, CA); McKenzie, Donald E. (Woodland Hills, CA)

    1989-01-01

    A method of obtaining magnesium fluoride substantially free from radioactive uranium from a slag containing the same and having a radioactivity level of at least about 7000 pCi/gm. The slag is ground to a particle size of about 200 microns or less. The ground slag is contacted with an acid under certain prescribed conditions to produce a liquid product and a particulate solid product. The particulate solid product is separated from the liquid and treated at least two more times with acid to produce a solid residue consisting essentially of magnesium fluoride substantially free of uranium and having a residual radioactivity level of less than about 1000 pCi/gm. In accordance with a particularly preferred embodiment of the invention a catalyst and an oxidizing agent are used during the acid treatment and preferably the acid is sulfuric acid having a strength of about 1.0 Normal.

  10. [Magnesium and pregnancy].

    PubMed

    Yamasaki, Mineo

    2012-08-01

    Blood levels of total Mg, ionized Mg and intracellular ionized Mg of platelet were lowered in the 2nd trimester of gestation and thereafter. Urinary excretion of Mg does not change during the whole period of pregnancy. According to our results of animal experiments, intestinal absorption of Mg does not increase during pregnancy compared with non-pregnant state. These data suggest pregnant women tend to become magnesium deficiency. This is reflected in the fact that Mg metabolic parameters of pregnant women with preeclampsia are relatively reduced compared with those of healthy gravidae. In the obstetrical practice Mg has other significance, because magnesium sulfate is frequently used as a drug of choice in the therapy of threatened premature delivery and eclampsia. Mg plays important roles in physiology and pharmacology during gestation. PMID:22846356

  11. Constraining magnesium cycling in marine sediments using magnesium isotopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Higgins, J. A.; Schrag, D. P.

    2010-09-01

    Magnesium concentrations in deep-sea sediment pore-fluids typically decrease down core due to net precipitation of dolomite or clay minerals in the sediments or underlying crust. To better characterize and differentiate these processes, we have measured magnesium isotopes in pore-fluids and sediment samples from Ocean Drilling Program sites (1082, 1086, 1012, 984, 1219, and 925) that span a range of oceanographic settings. At all sites, magnesium concentrations decrease with depth. At sites where diagenetic reactions are dominated by the respiration of organic carbon, pore-fluid ? 26Mg values increase with depth by as much as 2‰. Because carbonates preferentially incorporate 24Mg (low ? 26Mg), the increase in pore-fluid ? 26Mg values at these sites is consistent with the removal of magnesium in Mg-carbonate (dolomite). In contrast, at sites where the respiration of organic carbon is not important and/or weatherable minerals are abundant, pore-fluid ? 26Mg values decrease with depth by up to 2‰. The decline in pore-fluid ? 26Mg at these sites is consistent with a magnesium sink that is isotopically enriched relative to the pore-fluid. The identity of this enriched magnesium sink is likely clay minerals. Using a simple 1D diffusion-advection-reaction model of pore-fluid magnesium, we estimate rates of net magnesium uptake/removal and associated net magnesium isotope fractionation factors for sources and sinks at all sites. Independent estimates of magnesium isotope fractionation during dolomite precipitation from measured ? 26Mg values of dolomite samples from sites 1082 and 1012 are very similar to modeled net fractionation factors at these sites, suggesting that local exchange of magnesium between sediment and pore-fluid at these sites can be neglected. Our results indicate that the magnesium incorporated in dolomite is 2.0-2.7‰ depleted in ? 26Mg relative to the precipitating fluid. Assuming local exchange of magnesium is minor at the rest of the studied sites, our results suggest that magnesium incorporated into clay minerals is enriched in ? 26Mg by 0‰ to +1.25‰ relative to the precipitating fluid. This work demonstrates the utility of magnesium isotopes as a tracer for magnesium sources/sinks in low-temperature aqueous systems.

  12. Low brain magnesium in migraine

    SciTech Connect

    Ramadan, N.M.; Halvorson, H.; Vande-Linde, A.; Levine, S.R.; Helpern, J.A.; Welch, K.M.

    1989-10-01

    Brain magnesium was measured in migraine patients and control subjects using in vivo 31-Phosphorus Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy. pMg and pH were calculated from the chemical shifts between Pi, PCr and ATP signals. Magnesium levels were low during a migraine attack without changes in pH. We hypothesize that low brain magnesium is an important factor in the mechanism of the migraine attack.

  13. Mineral of the month: magnesium

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kramer, Deborah A.

    2005-01-01

    Magnesium, often confused with last month’s mineral of the month manganese, is valued primarily because of its light weight and high strength-to-weight ratio. Magnesium is the eighth most abundant element and constitutes about 2 percent of the Earth’s crust. It is the third most plentiful element dissolved in seawater, with a concentration averaging 0.13 percent. Magnesium is found in over 60 minerals, and also is recovered from seawater, wells, and lake brines and bitterns.

  14. Destabilization of magnesium hydride through interface engineering

    E-print Network

    Dam, Bernard

    Destabilization of magnesium hydride through interface engineering Lennard Mooij #12;Destabilization of magnesium hydride through interface engineering PROEFSCHRIFT ter verkrijging van de graad van . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10 1.3 Magnesium hydride . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13 1

  15. 21 CFR 582.1425 - Magnesium carbonate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Magnesium carbonate. 582.1425 Section 582.1425...General Purpose Food Additives § 582.1425 Magnesium carbonate. (a) Product. Magnesium carbonate. (b) Conditions of use....

  16. 21 CFR 582.1428 - Magnesium hydroxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Magnesium hydroxide. 582.1428 Section 582.1428...General Purpose Food Additives § 582.1428 Magnesium hydroxide. (a) Product. Magnesium hydroxide. (b) Conditions of use....

  17. 21 CFR 582.1425 - Magnesium carbonate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Magnesium carbonate. 582.1425 Section 582.1425...General Purpose Food Additives § 582.1425 Magnesium carbonate. (a) Product. Magnesium carbonate. (b) Conditions of use....

  18. 21 CFR 582.1428 - Magnesium hydroxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Magnesium hydroxide. 582.1428 Section 582.1428...General Purpose Food Additives § 582.1428 Magnesium hydroxide. (a) Product. Magnesium hydroxide. (b) Conditions of use....

  19. 21 CFR 582.1425 - Magnesium carbonate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Magnesium carbonate. 582.1425 Section 582.1425...General Purpose Food Additives § 582.1425 Magnesium carbonate. (a) Product. Magnesium carbonate. (b) Conditions of use....

  20. 21 CFR 582.1428 - Magnesium hydroxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Magnesium hydroxide. 582.1428 Section 582.1428...General Purpose Food Additives § 582.1428 Magnesium hydroxide. (a) Product. Magnesium hydroxide. (b) Conditions of use....

  1. 21 CFR 582.1425 - Magnesium carbonate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Magnesium carbonate. 582.1425 Section 582.1425...General Purpose Food Additives § 582.1425 Magnesium carbonate. (a) Product. Magnesium carbonate. (b) Conditions of use....

  2. 76 FR 69284 - Pure Magnesium From China

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-11-08

    ...731-TA-696 (Third Review)] Pure Magnesium From China Determination On the basis...of the antidumping duty order on pure magnesium from China would be likely to lead to...4274 (October 2011), entitled Pure Magnesium from China: Investigation No....

  3. 21 CFR 582.1428 - Magnesium hydroxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Magnesium hydroxide. 582.1428 Section 582.1428...General Purpose Food Additives § 582.1428 Magnesium hydroxide. (a) Product. Magnesium hydroxide. (b) Conditions of use....

  4. 21 CFR 582.1425 - Magnesium carbonate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Magnesium carbonate. 582.1425 Section 582.1425...General Purpose Food Additives § 582.1425 Magnesium carbonate. (a) Product. Magnesium carbonate. (b) Conditions of use....

  5. 21 CFR 582.1428 - Magnesium hydroxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Magnesium hydroxide. 582.1428 Section 582.1428...General Purpose Food Additives § 582.1428 Magnesium hydroxide. (a) Product. Magnesium hydroxide. (b) Conditions of use....

  6. 76 FR 56396 - Magnesium Metal from the Russian Federation: Final Results of Antidumping Duty Administrative Review

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-13

    ... of Antidumping Duty Administrative Review, 76 FR 26247 (May 6, 2011) (Preliminary Results). We... FR 13128 (March 10, 2011). The subject merchandise includes the following pure and alloy magnesium... Granular Form From the People's Republic of China, 66 FR 49345 (September 27, 2001), Notice of...

  7. The origins of high hardening and low ductility in magnesium.

    PubMed

    Wu, Zhaoxuan; Curtin, W A

    2015-10-01

    Magnesium is a lightweight structural metal but it exhibits low ductility-connected with unusual, mechanistically unexplained, dislocation and plasticity phenomena-which makes it difficult to form and use in energy-saving lightweight structures. We employ long-time molecular dynamics simulations utilizing a density-functional-theory-validated interatomic potential, and reveal the fundamental origins of the previously unexplained phenomena. Here we show that the key ?c + a? dislocation (where ?c + a? indicates the magnitude and direction of slip) is metastable on easy-glide pyramidal II planes; we find that it undergoes a thermally activated, stress-dependent transition to one of three lower-energy, basal-dissociated immobile dislocation structures, which cannot contribute to plastic straining and that serve as strong obstacles to the motion of all other dislocations. This transition is intrinsic to magnesium, driven by reduction in dislocation energy and predicted to occur at very high frequency at room temperature, thus eliminating all major dislocation slip systems able to contribute to c-axis strain and leading to the high hardening and low ductility of magnesium. Enhanced ductility can thus be achieved by increasing the time and temperature at which the transition from the easy-glide metastable dislocation to the immobile basal-dissociated structures occurs. Our results provide the underlying insights needed to guide the design of ductile magnesium alloys. PMID:26390153

  8. The origins of high hardening and low ductility in magnesium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Zhaoxuan; Curtin, W. A.

    2015-10-01

    Magnesium is a lightweight structural metal but it exhibits low ductility--connected with unusual, mechanistically unexplained, dislocation and plasticity phenomena--which makes it difficult to form and use in energy-saving lightweight structures. We employ long-time molecular dynamics simulations utilizing a density-functional-theory-validated interatomic potential, and reveal the fundamental origins of the previously unexplained phenomena. Here we show that the key dislocation (where indicates the magnitude and direction of slip) is metastable on easy-glide pyramidal II planes; we find that it undergoes a thermally activated, stress-dependent transition to one of three lower-energy, basal-dissociated immobile dislocation structures, which cannot contribute to plastic straining and that serve as strong obstacles to the motion of all other dislocations. This transition is intrinsic to magnesium, driven by reduction in dislocation energy and predicted to occur at very high frequency at room temperature, thus eliminating all major dislocation slip systems able to contribute to c-axis strain and leading to the high hardening and low ductility of magnesium. Enhanced ductility can thus be achieved by increasing the time and temperature at which the transition from the easy-glide metastable dislocation to the immobile basal-dissociated structures occurs. Our results provide the underlying insights needed to guide the design of ductile magnesium alloys.

  9. Minerals yearbook, 1993: Magnesium and magnesium compounds. Annual report

    SciTech Connect

    Kramer, D.A.

    1994-09-01

    U.S. primary magnesium metal production declined slightly in 1993 and imports, primarily from Russia and Ukraine, provided an increased percentage of domestic demand. In addition, inventories of magnesium increased significantly from the low level at the end of 1992. These increases in inventories and imports prompted two of the three U.S. producers to announce cutbacks in production rates near the end of 1993. This oversupply situation was reflected in free market prices for primary magnesium during the year. Prices dropped steadily through the first three quarters of 1993 before rebounding slightly during the last 3 months.

  10. Synthesis of magnesium diboride by magnesium vapor infiltration process (MVIP)

    DOEpatents

    Serquis, Adriana C. (Los Alamos, NM); Zhu, Yuntian T. (Los Alamos, NM); Mueller, Frederick M. (Los Alamos, NM); Peterson, Dean E. (Los Alamos, NM); Liao, Xiao Zhou (Los Alamos, NM)

    2003-01-01

    A process of preparing superconducting magnesium diboride powder by heating an admixture of solid magnesium and amorphous boron powder or pellet under an inert atmosphere in a Mg:B ratio of greater than about 0.6:1 at temperatures and for time sufficient to form said superconducting magnesium diboride. The process can further include exposure to residual oxygen at high synthesis temperatures followed by slow cooling. In the cooling process oxygen atoms dissolved into MgB.sub.2 segregated to form nanometer-sized coherent Mg(B,O) precipitates in the MgB.sub.2 matrix, which can act as flux pinning centers.

  11. Role of Cellular Magnesium in Human Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Long, Samantha; Romani, Andrea MP

    2015-01-01

    Magnesium is required for many of the major organs to function and plays a crucial role in human and mammalian physiology. Magnesium is essential for the structure of bones and teeth, acts as a cofactor for more than 300 enzymes in the body, including binding to ATP for kinase reactions, and affects permeability of excitable membranes and neuromuscular transmission. Despite these essential roles, much is still unknown about magnesium physiology and homeostasis. Currently, nutritionists believe that the general population intakes insufficient magnesium daily through the diet. The effects of magnesium deficiency are, for the most part undetected, and simple, widespread assessments of magnesium intake remain unavailable for humans. Many of the patients admitted to hospitals or medical care facilities are unaware of their low magnesium levels. Moreover, because magnesium is predominantly an intracellular cation (>99%), serum magnesium levels remain a poor predictor of tissue magnesium content and availability. This review will discuss the effects of magnesium deficiency in various pathologies affecting the human population. The underlying causes for magnesium depletion in major physiological systems will be examined along with the involved signaling pathways and the main roles of magnesium homeostasis. Where possible (e.g. alcoholism), the implications of administering supplemental magnesium will be discussed. Ultimately, this review will advocate for the necessity of identifying easy and reproducible methods to assess serum and cellular magnesium levels and to identify magnesium deficiency in order to alleviate related pathological conditions. PMID:25839058

  12. 21 CFR 184.1431 - Magnesium oxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Magnesium oxide. 184.1431 Section 184.1431 Food... Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1431 Magnesium oxide. (a) Magnesium oxide (MgO, CAS Reg. No... bulky white powder (light) or a relatively dense white powder (heavy) by heating magnesium hydroxide...

  13. 21 CFR 184.1431 - Magnesium oxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Magnesium oxide. 184.1431 Section 184.1431 Food... GRAS § 184.1431 Magnesium oxide. (a) Magnesium oxide (MgO, CAS Reg. No. 1309-48-4) occurs naturally as... a relatively dense white powder (heavy) by heating magnesium hydroxide or carbonate. Heating...

  14. Mineral resource of the month: magnesium

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kramer, Deborah A.

    2012-01-01

    Magnesium is the eighthmost abundant element in Earth’s crust, and the second-most abundant metal ion in seawater. Although magnesium is found in more than 60 minerals, only brucite, dolomite, magnesite and carnallite are commercially important for their magnesium content. Magnesium and its compounds also are recovered from seawater, brines found in lakes and wells, and bitterns (salts).

  15. 21 CFR 184.1431 - Magnesium oxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Magnesium oxide. 184.1431 Section 184.1431 Food... Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1431 Magnesium oxide. (a) Magnesium oxide (MgO, CAS Reg. No... bulky white powder (light) or a relatively dense white powder (heavy) by heating magnesium hydroxide...

  16. 21 CFR 184.1426 - Magnesium chloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Magnesium chloride. 184.1426 Section 184.1426 Food... Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1426 Magnesium chloride. (a) Magnesium chloride (MgC12·6H2O, CAS... mineral bischofite. It is prepared by dissolving magnesium oxide, hydroxide, or carbonate in...

  17. 21 CFR 184.1426 - Magnesium chloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Magnesium chloride. 184.1426 Section 184.1426 Food... Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1426 Magnesium chloride. (a) Magnesium chloride (MgC12·6H2O, CAS... mineral bischofite. It is prepared by dissolving magnesium oxide, hydroxide, or carbonate in...

  18. 21 CFR 184.1426 - Magnesium chloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Magnesium chloride. 184.1426 Section 184.1426 Food... Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1426 Magnesium chloride. (a) Magnesium chloride (MgC12·6H2O, CAS... mineral bischofite. It is prepared by dissolving magnesium oxide, hydroxide, or carbonate in...

  19. 21 CFR 184.1431 - Magnesium oxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Magnesium oxide. 184.1431 Section 184.1431 Food and... Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1431 Magnesium oxide. (a) Magnesium oxide (MgO, CAS Reg. No. 1309-48-4... powder (light) or a relatively dense white powder (heavy) by heating magnesium hydroxide or...

  20. 21 CFR 184.1443 - Magnesium sulfate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Magnesium sulfate. 184.1443 Section 184.1443 Food... Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1443 Magnesium sulfate. (a) Magnesium sulfate (MgSO4·7H2O, CAS... magnesium oxide, hydroxide, or carbonate with sulfuric acid and evaporating the solution to...

  1. 21 CFR 184.1443 - Magnesium sulfate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Magnesium sulfate. 184.1443 Section 184.1443 Food... Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1443 Magnesium sulfate. (a) Magnesium sulfate (MgSO4·7H2O, CAS... magnesium oxide, hydroxide, or carbonate with sulfuric acid and evaporating the solution to...

  2. 21 CFR 184.1426 - Magnesium chloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Magnesium chloride. 184.1426 Section 184.1426 Food... GRAS § 184.1426 Magnesium chloride. (a) Magnesium chloride (MgC12·6H2O, CAS Reg. No. 7786-30-3) is a... prepared by dissolving magnesium oxide, hydroxide, or carbonate in aqueous hydrochloric acid solution...

  3. 21 CFR 184.1431 - Magnesium oxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Magnesium oxide. 184.1431 Section 184.1431 Food... Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1431 Magnesium oxide. (a) Magnesium oxide (MgO, CAS Reg. No... bulky white powder (light) or a relatively dense white powder (heavy) by heating magnesium hydroxide...

  4. 21 CFR 184.1443 - Magnesium sulfate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Magnesium sulfate. 184.1443 Section 184.1443 Food... Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1443 Magnesium sulfate. (a) Magnesium sulfate (MgSO4·7H2O, CAS... magnesium oxide, hydroxide, or carbonate with sulfuric acid and evaporating the solution to...

  5. 21 CFR 184.1426 - Magnesium chloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Magnesium chloride. 184.1426 Section 184.1426 Food... Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1426 Magnesium chloride. (a) Magnesium chloride (MgC12·6H2O, CAS... mineral bischofite. It is prepared by dissolving magnesium oxide, hydroxide, or carbonate in...

  6. 21 CFR 184.1428 - Magnesium hydroxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Magnesium hydroxide. 184.1428 Section 184.1428 Food... Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1428 Magnesium hydroxide. (a) Magnesium hydroxide (Mg(OH)2, CAS... a white precipitate by the addition of sodium hydroxide to a water soluble magnesium salt or...

  7. 21 CFR 184.1428 - Magnesium hydroxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Magnesium hydroxide. 184.1428 Section 184.1428... GRAS § 184.1428 Magnesium hydroxide. (a) Magnesium hydroxide (Mg(OH)2, CAS Reg. No. 1309-42-8) occurs... addition of sodium hydroxide to a water soluble magnesium salt or by hydration of reactive grades...

  8. 21 CFR 184.1443 - Magnesium sulfate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Magnesium sulfate. 184.1443 Section 184.1443 Food... GRAS § 184.1443 Magnesium sulfate. (a) Magnesium sulfate (MgSO4·7H2O, CAS Reg. No. 10034-99-8) occurs naturally as the mineral epsomite. It is prepared by neutralization of magnesium oxide, hydroxide,...

  9. 21 CFR 184.1443 - Magnesium sulfate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Magnesium sulfate. 184.1443 Section 184.1443 Food... Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1443 Magnesium sulfate. (a) Magnesium sulfate (MgSO4·7H2O, CAS... magnesium oxide, hydroxide, or carbonate with sulfuric acid and evaporating the solution to...

  10. Interfacial characteristics of squeeze-cast SiC reinforced AZ91D magnesium-based composites

    SciTech Connect

    Lo, J.; Carpenter, G.J.C.; Charest, M.

    1996-10-01

    The method of producing magnesium-based composites with silicon carbide (SiC) particulates embedded in the matrix of magnesium AZ91D alloy by the squeeze-casting technique are described. This method involves the fabrication of a SiC particulate preform and the subsequent squeezing of molten magnesium into the preform. In this study, alumina, aluminum phosphate and a proprietary binder were used for the fabrication of SiC particulate preforms. The procedures employed in the fabrication of SiC/AZ91D composites are presented, together with the results of characterization of the composites using optical and transmission electron microscopy. Special attention is given to the reaction products in the bulk alloy and at the interfaces between SiC particles and the AZ91D matrix alloy.

  11. Confession of a Magnesium Battery.

    PubMed

    Bucur, Claudiu B; Gregory, Thomas; Oliver, Allen G; Muldoon, John

    2015-09-17

    Magnesium is an ideal metal anode that has nearly double the volumetric capacity of lithium metal with a very negative reduction potential of -2.37 vs SHE. A significant advantage of magnesium is the apparent lack of dendrite formation during charging, which overcomes major safety and performance challenges encountered with using lithium metal anodes. Here, we highlight major recent advances in nonaqueous Mg electrochemistry, notably the development of electrolytes and cathodes, and discuss some of the challenges that must be overcome to realize a practical magnesium battery. PMID:26722727

  12. Switchable mirrors based on nickel-magnesium films

    SciTech Connect

    Richardson,Thomas J.; Slack, Jonathan L.; Armitage, Robert D.; Kostecki, Robert; Farangis, Baker; Rubin, Michael D.

    2001-01-16

    A new type of electrochromic mirror electrode based on reversible uptake of hydrogen in nickel magnesium alloy films is reported. Thin,magnesium-rich Ni-Mg films prepared on glass substrates by cosputtering from Ni and Mg targets are mirror-like in appearance and have low visible transmittance. Upon exposure to hydrogen gas or on reduction in alkaline electrolyte, the films take up hydrogen and become transparent. When hydrogen is removed, the mirror properties are recovered. The transition is believed to result from reversible formation of Mg2NiH4 and MgH2. A thin overlayer of palladium was found to enhance the kinetics of hydrogen insertion and extraction,and to protect the metal surface against oxidation.

  13. The effect of rare earth elements on the texture and formability of asymmetrically rolled magnesium sheet

    SciTech Connect

    Alderman, Dr. Martyn; Cavin, Odis Burl; Davis, Dr. Bruce; Muralidharan, Govindarajan; Muth, Thomas R; Peter, William H; Randman, David; Watkins, Thomas R

    2011-01-01

    The lack of formability is a serious issue when considering magnesium alloys for various applications. Standard symmetric rolling introduces a strong basal texture that decreases the formability; however, asymmetric rolling has been put forward as a possible route to produce sheet with weaker texture and greater ductility. It has also been shown in recent work that weaker textures can be produced through the addition of rare earth elements to magnesium alloys. Therefore, this study has been carried out to investigate the effect of rare earth additions on the texture changes during asymmetric rolling. Two alloys have been used, AZ31B and ZEK100. The effect that the rare earth additions have on the texture of asymmetrically rolled sheet and the subsequent changes in formability will be discussed.

  14. Heat storage in alloy transformations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Birchenall, C. E.

    1980-01-01

    The feasibility of using metal alloys as thermal energy storage media was investigated. The elements selected as candidate media were limited to aluminum, copper, magnesium, silicon, zinc, calcium, and phosphorus on the basis of low cost and latent heat of transformation. Several new eutectic alloys and ternary intermetallic phases were determined. A new method employing X-ray absorption techniques was developed to determine the coefficients of thermal expansion of both the solid and liquid phases and the volume change during phase transformation. The method and apparatus are discussed and the experimental results are presented for aluminum and two aluminum-eutectic alloys. Candidate materials were evaluated to determine suitable materials for containment of the metal alloys. Graphite was used to contain the alloys during the volume change measurements. Silicon carbide was identified as a promising containment material and surface-coated iron alloys were also evaluated. System considerations that are pertinent if alloy eutectics are used as thermal energy storage media are discussed. Potential applications to solar receivers and industrial furnaces are illustrated schematically.

  15. 21 CFR 862.1495 - Magnesium test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ...to measure magnesium levels in serum and plasma. Magnesium measurements are used in...treatment of hypomagnesemia (abnormally low plasma levels of magnesium) and hypermagnesemia (abnormally high plasma levels of magnesium). (b)...

  16. 21 CFR 862.1495 - Magnesium test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ...to measure magnesium levels in serum and plasma. Magnesium measurements are used in...treatment of hypomagnesemia (abnormally low plasma levels of magnesium) and hypermagnesemia (abnormally high plasma levels of magnesium). (b)...

  17. 21 CFR 862.1495 - Magnesium test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ...to measure magnesium levels in serum and plasma. Magnesium measurements are used in...treatment of hypomagnesemia (abnormally low plasma levels of magnesium) and hypermagnesemia (abnormally high plasma levels of magnesium). (b)...

  18. 21 CFR 862.1495 - Magnesium test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ...to measure magnesium levels in serum and plasma. Magnesium measurements are used in...treatment of hypomagnesemia (abnormally low plasma levels of magnesium) and hypermagnesemia (abnormally high plasma levels of magnesium). (b)...

  19. 21 CFR 862.1495 - Magnesium test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ...to measure magnesium levels in serum and plasma. Magnesium measurements are used in...treatment of hypomagnesemia (abnormally low plasma levels of magnesium) and hypermagnesemia (abnormally high plasma levels of magnesium). (b)...

  20. Magnesium and fetal growth

    SciTech Connect

    Weaver, K.

    1988-01-01

    Fetal growth retardation and premature labor are major problems in perinatal medicine today and account for a great deal of the observed fetal morbidity. While the neonatal death rate has steadily declined over the past decade, there has been a lack of concommitant decrease in these two leading problems. Magnesium (Mg/sup ++/) plays a major role in both of these areas of concern. The fact that it is used as a treatment for premature labor has led investigators to look at low Mg/sup ++/ as a possible cause of this poorly understood phenomenon. The second major cause of small for gestational age infants is intrauterine growth retardation, a condition which may be of either fetal or maternal origin. In either case, Mg/sup ++/ may be implicated since it exerts a strong influence on the underlying pathophysiology of placental failure and maternal hypertension. Both of these conditions are mediated by vascular and platelet hyperactivity as well as by and increase in the ration of thromboxane to prostacyclin. Studies in both the human and animal species are beginning to show how Mg/sup ++/ interacts in these conditions to produce such a damaging fetal outcome. The recent use of Doppler velocimetry of the developing fetus has shown reduced fetal vascular and maternal uterine vascular compliance as early as 14 weeks of gestation in those who would be so affected.

  1. Modern production process for magnesium

    SciTech Connect

    Wilson, C.B.

    1996-10-01

    There are currently two major routes practiced industrially for the production of primary magnesium metal. The first of these is the electrolysis of magnesium chloride and the second is the thermal reduction of magnesium oxide. Within these two major categories, there are many variations of the technologies in the industry. The dominant production method is the electrolysis of magnesium chloride and this is carried out by The Dow Chemical Company, Norsk Hydro, Magcorp, and the plants in the Former Soviet Union. Each of the processes at these facilities uses a different means of feed preparation and this in turn causes the electrolytic cell end of the processes to be different also. The second technology is the thermal reduction of magnesium oxide, and there are at least three different variations which are practiced industrially. The first of these is the Pidgeon process which reacts dolime (MgO{center_dot}CaO) with ferro-silicon (FeSi) to form a di-calcium silicate and magnesium metal at an elevated (about 1,200 C) temperature and reduced pressure in an externally heated retort. Timminco uses this process to produce a very high purity magnesium. The second process reacts the same starting raw materials at similar (about 1,250 C) temperatures in an internally heated reactor under reduced pressure. This is done by Brasmag in Brazil. The final variation of the ferro-silicon process is the Magnetherm{reg_sign} process developed by Pechiney and practiced by pechiney and Alcoa. This system uses slag resistance heating and very high (about 1,550 C) temperatures. This paper will examine each of these production methods and discuss both their merits and their weaknesses.

  2. Fracturing behavior of aluminum alloys with welded joints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Polyakov, V. V.; Kolubaev, E. A.; Salita, D. S.; Dmitriev, A. A.; Lependin, A. A.

    2015-10-01

    In this paper, properties of aluminum-magnesium alloys with welded joints are investigated. The joints are produced by the friction stir welding under various conditions. This fact is used for studying the principles and patterns of defect structure development. Mechanical properties are evaluated by static tension tests. The impact of welding process conditions on loading curves and strength properties is analysed. Fracture surface structures for samples with and without welded joints are studied, and results are compared. It is revealed, that differences in deformation behavior and mechanical properties of aluminum-magnesium alloys produced under different welding process conditions are caused by developing of structure defects in a welded joints, mostly, nonuniformities/discontinuities of various types. The obtained results can be used for improvement and development of new welding process conditions for aluminum-magnesium alloys.

  3. Magnesium outdiffusion through magnetite films grown on magnesium oxide (001) (abstract)

    E-print Network

    Diebold, Ulrike

    Magnesium outdiffusion through magnetite films grown on magnesium oxide (001) (abstract) K. A. Shaw of magnesium in the uppermost layers of the film, and indicate a concentration gradient, with the highest concentrations of magnesium in the surface layer. X-ray fluorescence in scanning electron microscopy

  4. 21 CFR 184.1426 - Magnesium chloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ...7786-30-3) is a colorless, deliquescent, crystalline material that occurs naturally as the mineral bischofite. It is prepared by dissolving magnesium oxide, hydroxide, or carbonate in aqueous hydrochloric acid solution and crystallizing out magnesium...

  5. 21 CFR 582.5431 - Magnesium oxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Nutrients and/or Dietary Supplements 1 § 582.5431 Magnesium oxide. (a) Product. Magnesium oxide. (b) Conditions of use....

  6. 21 CFR 582.5434 - Magnesium phosphate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Nutrients and/or Dietary Supplements 1 § 582.5434 Magnesium phosphate. (a) Product. Magnesium phosphate (di- and tribasic)....

  7. 21 CFR 582.5443 - Magnesium sulfate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Nutrients and/or Dietary Supplements 1 § 582.5443 Magnesium sulfate. (a) Product. Magnesium sulfate. (b) Conditions of use....

  8. 21 CFR 582.5434 - Magnesium phosphate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Nutrients and/or Dietary Supplements 1 § 582.5434 Magnesium phosphate. (a) Product. Magnesium phosphate (di- and tribasic)....

  9. 21 CFR 582.5431 - Magnesium oxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Nutrients and/or Dietary Supplements 1 § 582.5431 Magnesium oxide. (a) Product. Magnesium oxide. (b) Conditions of use....

  10. 21 CFR 582.5431 - Magnesium oxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Nutrients and/or Dietary Supplements 1 § 582.5431 Magnesium oxide. (a) Product. Magnesium oxide. (b) Conditions of use....

  11. Magnesium/Calcium Competition at Excitable Membranes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Belzer, Bill; Fry, Panni

    1998-01-01

    Considers some consequences of altering intracellular calcium supply by magnesium concentration changes. Focuses on using this procedure as an exercise with allied health students as they witness therapeutic uses of magnesium and other calcium entry inhibitors. (DDR)

  12. Manufacturing of SiCp Reinforced Magnesium Composite Tubes by Hot Extrusion Processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hwang, Yeong-Maw; Huang, Song-Jeng; Huang, Yu-San

    2011-05-01

    Magnesium alloys have higher specific strength compared with other metals, such as aluminum, copper and steel. Nevertheless, their ductility is still not good for further metal forming and their strength is not large enough for real structure applications. The aim of this paper is to develop magnesium alloy composite tubes reinforced with SiC particulates by the stir-casting method and hot extrusion processes. At first, AZ61/SiCp composite ingots reinforced with 5 wt% SiC particulates are fabricated by the melt-stirring technique. Then, finite element simulations are conducted to analyze the plastic flow of magnesium alloy AZ61 within the die and the temperature distribution of the products. AZ61/SiCp composite tubes are manufactured by hot extrusion using a specially designed die-set for obtaining uniform thickness distribution tubes. Finally, the mechanical properties of the reinforced AZ61/SiCp composite and Mg alloy AZ61 tubes are compared with those of the billets to manifest the advantages of extrusion processes and reinforcement of SiC particulates. The microstructures of the billet and extruded tubes are also observed. Through the improvement of the strength of the tube product, its life cycle can be extended and the energy consumption can be reduced, and eventually the environmental sustainability is achieved.

  13. Manufacturing of SiCp Reinforced Magnesium Composite Tubes by Hot Extrusion Processes

    SciTech Connect

    Hwang, Yeong-Maw; Huang, Song-Jeng; Huang, Yu-San

    2011-05-04

    Magnesium alloys have higher specific strength compared with other metals, such as aluminum, copper and steel. Nevertheless, their ductility is still not good for further metal forming and their strength is not large enough for real structure applications. The aim of this paper is to develop magnesium alloy composite tubes reinforced with SiC particulates by the stir-casting method and hot extrusion processes. At first, AZ61/SiCp composite ingots reinforced with 5 wt% SiC particulates are fabricated by the melt-stirring technique. Then, finite element simulations are conducted to analyze the plastic flow of magnesium alloy AZ61 within the die and the temperature distribution of the products. AZ61/SiCp composite tubes are manufactured by hot extrusion using a specially designed die-set for obtaining uniform thickness distribution tubes. Finally, the mechanical properties of the reinforced AZ61/SiCp composite and Mg alloy AZ61 tubes are compared with those of the billets to manifest the advantages of extrusion processes and reinforcement of SiC particulates. The microstructures of the billet and extruded tubes are also observed. Through the improvement of the strength of the tube product, its life cycle can be extended and the energy consumption can be reduced, and eventually the environmental sustainability is achieved.

  14. 21 CFR 184.1440 - Magnesium stearate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Magnesium stearate. 184.1440 Section 184.1440 Food... Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1440 Magnesium stearate. (a) Magnesium stearate (Mg(C17H34COO)2, CAS Reg. No. 557-04-0) is the magnesium salt of stearic acid. It is produced as a white precipitate...

  15. 21 CFR 184.1440 - Magnesium stearate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Magnesium stearate. 184.1440 Section 184.1440 Food... Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1440 Magnesium stearate. (a) Magnesium stearate (Mg(C17H34COO)2, CAS Reg. No. 557-04-0) is the magnesium salt of stearic acid. It is produced as a white precipitate...

  16. 21 CFR 184.1440 - Magnesium stearate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Magnesium stearate. 184.1440 Section 184.1440 Food... GRAS § 184.1440 Magnesium stearate. (a) Magnesium stearate (Mg(C17H34COO)2, CAS Reg. No. 557-04-0) is the magnesium salt of stearic acid. It is produced as a white precipitate by the addition of...

  17. 21 CFR 184.1440 - Magnesium stearate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Magnesium stearate. 184.1440 Section 184.1440 Food... Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1440 Magnesium stearate. (a) Magnesium stearate (Mg(C17H34COO)2, CAS Reg. No. 557-04-0) is the magnesium salt of stearic acid. It is produced as a white precipitate...

  18. 21 CFR 184.1425 - Magnesium carbonate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Magnesium carbonate. 184.1425 Section 184.1425 Food... Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1425 Magnesium carbonate. (a) Magnesium carbonate (molecular formula approximately (MgCO3)4·Mg(OH)2·5H2O, CAS Reg. No. 39409-82-0) is also known as magnesium...

  19. 21 CFR 184.1440 - Magnesium stearate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Magnesium stearate. 184.1440 Section 184.1440 Food... Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1440 Magnesium stearate. (a) Magnesium stearate (Mg(C17H34COO)2, CAS Reg. No. 557-04-0) is the magnesium salt of stearic acid. It is produced as a white precipitate...

  20. 21 CFR 184.1425 - Magnesium carbonate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Magnesium carbonate. 184.1425 Section 184.1425... GRAS § 184.1425 Magnesium carbonate. (a) Magnesium carbonate (molecular formula approximately (MgCO3)4·Mg(OH)2·5H2O, CAS Reg. No. 39409-82-0) is also known as magnesium carbonate hydroxide. It is a...

  1. Struvite precipitation and phosphorus removal using magnesium sacrificial anode.

    PubMed

    Kruk, Damian J; Elektorowicz, Maria; Oleszkiewicz, Jan A

    2014-04-01

    Struvite precipitation using magnesium sacrificial anode as the only source of magnesium is presented. High-purity magnesium alloy cast anode was found to be very effective in recovery of high-quality struvite from water solutions and from supernatant of fermented waste activated sludge from a wastewater treatment plant that does not practice enhanced biological phosphorus removal. Struvite purity was strongly dependent on the pH and the electric current density. Optimum pH of the 24 mM phosphorus and 46 mM ammonia solution (1:1.9 P:N ratio) was in the broad range between 7.5 and 9.3, with struvite purity exceeding 90%. Increasing the current density resulted in elevated struvite purity. No upper limits were observed in the studied current range of 0.05-0.2 A. Phosphorus removal rate was proportional to the current density and comparable for tests with water solutions and with the supernatant from fermented sludge. The highest P-removal rate achieved was 4.0 mg PO4-P cm(-2) h(-1) at electric current density of 45 A m(-2). Initial substrate concentrations affected the rate of phosphorus removal. The precipitated struvite accumulated in bulk liquid with significant portions attached to the anode surface from which regular detachment occurred. PMID:24387911

  2. Novel Nonflammable Electrolytes for Secondary Magnesium Batteries and High Voltage Electrolytes for Electrochemcial Supercapacitors

    SciTech Connect

    Dr. Brian Dixon

    2008-12-30

    Magnesium has been used successfully in primary batteries, but its use in rechargeable cells has been stymied by the lack of suitable non-aqueous electrolyte that can conduct Mg+2 species, combined with poor stripping and plating properties. The development of a suitable cathode material for rechargeable magnesium batteries has also been a roadblock, but a nonflammable electrolyte is key. Likewise, the development of safe high voltage electrochemical supercapaitors has been stymied by the use of flammable solvents in the liquid electrolyte; to wit, acetonitrile. The purpose of the research conducted in this effort was to identify useful compositions of magnesium salts and polyphosphate solvents that would enable magnesium ions to be cycled within a secondary battery design. The polyphosphate solvents would provide the solvent for the magnesium salts while preventing the electrolyte from being flammable. This would enable these novel electrolytes to be considered as an alternative to THF-based electrolytes. In addition, we explored several of these solvents together with lithium slats for use as high voltage electrolytes for carbon-based electrochemical supercapacitors. The research was successful in that: 1) Magnesium imide dissolved in a phosphate ester solvent that contains a halogented phosphate ester appears to be the preferred electrolyte for a rechargeable Mg cell. 2) A combination of B-doped CNTs and vanadium phosphate appear to be the cathode of choice for a rechargeable Mg cell by virtue of higher voltage and better reversibility. 3) Magnesium alloys appear to perform better than pure magnesium when used in combination with the novel polyphosphate electrolytes. Also, this effort has established that Phoenix Innovationâ??s family of phosphonate/phosphate electrolytes together with specific lithium slats can be used in supercapacitor systems at voltages of greater than 10V.

  3. 21 CFR 184.1426 - Magnesium chloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ...2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Magnesium chloride. 184.1426 Section 184.1426 Food and...Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1426 Magnesium chloride. (a) Magnesium chloride (MgC12 ·6H2 O, CAS Reg. No....

  4. 21 CFR 184.1426 - Magnesium chloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ...2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Magnesium chloride. 184.1426 Section 184.1426 Food and...Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1426 Magnesium chloride. (a) Magnesium chloride (MgC12 ·6H2 O, CAS Reg. No....

  5. 21 CFR 184.1426 - Magnesium chloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ...2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Magnesium chloride. 184.1426 Section 184.1426 Food and...Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1426 Magnesium chloride. (a) Magnesium chloride (MgC12 ·6H2 O, CAS Reg. No....

  6. 21 CFR 184.1426 - Magnesium chloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ...2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Magnesium chloride. 184.1426 Section 184.1426 Food and...Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1426 Magnesium chloride. (a) Magnesium chloride (MgC12 ·6H2 O, CAS Reg. No....

  7. 21 CFR 184.1428 - Magnesium hydroxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Magnesium hydroxide. 184.1428 Section 184.1428... Listing of Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1428 Magnesium hydroxide. (a) Magnesium hydroxide... is prepared as a white precipitate by the addition of sodium hydroxide to a water soluble...

  8. 21 CFR 582.5431 - Magnesium oxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Magnesium oxide. 582.5431 Section 582.5431 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Supplements 1 § 582.5431 Magnesium oxide. (a) Product. Magnesium oxide. (b) Conditions of use. This...

  9. 21 CFR 582.5443 - Magnesium sulfate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Magnesium sulfate. 582.5443 Section 582.5443 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Supplements 1 § 582.5443 Magnesium sulfate. (a) Product. Magnesium sulfate. (b) Conditions of use....

  10. 21 CFR 582.2437 - Magnesium silicate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Magnesium silicate. 582.2437 Section 582.2437 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Magnesium silicate. (a) Product. Magnesium silicate. (b) Tolerance. 2 percent. (c) Limitations,...

  11. 21 CFR 582.1425 - Magnesium carbonate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Magnesium carbonate. 582.1425 Section 582.1425 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Additives § 582.1425 Magnesium carbonate. (a) Product. Magnesium carbonate. (b) Conditions of use....

  12. 21 CFR 582.5431 - Magnesium oxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Magnesium oxide. 582.5431 Section 582.5431 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Supplements 1 § 582.5431 Magnesium oxide. (a) Product. Magnesium oxide. (b) Conditions of use. This...

  13. 21 CFR 182.2437 - Magnesium silicate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Magnesium silicate. 182.2437 Section 182.2437 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR... Magnesium silicate. (a) Product. Magnesium silicate. (b) Tolerance. 2 percent. (c) Limitations,...

  14. 21 CFR 582.1431 - Magnesium oxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Magnesium oxide. 582.1431 Section 582.1431 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Additives § 582.1431 Magnesium oxide. (a) Product. Magnesium oxide. (b) Conditions of use. This substance...

  15. 21 CFR 582.1431 - Magnesium oxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Magnesium oxide. 582.1431 Section 582.1431 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Additives § 582.1431 Magnesium oxide. (a) Product. Magnesium oxide. (b) Conditions of use. This substance...

  16. 21 CFR 582.5443 - Magnesium sulfate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Magnesium sulfate. 582.5443 Section 582.5443 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Supplements 1 § 582.5443 Magnesium sulfate. (a) Product. Magnesium sulfate. (b) Conditions of use....

  17. 21 CFR 582.5443 - Magnesium sulfate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Magnesium sulfate. 582.5443 Section 582.5443 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Supplements 1 § 582.5443 Magnesium sulfate. (a) Product. Magnesium sulfate. (b) Conditions of use....

  18. 21 CFR 582.1431 - Magnesium oxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Magnesium oxide. 582.1431 Section 582.1431 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Additives § 582.1431 Magnesium oxide. (a) Product. Magnesium oxide. (b) Conditions of use. This substance...

  19. 21 CFR 582.2437 - Magnesium silicate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Magnesium silicate. 582.2437 Section 582.2437 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Magnesium silicate. (a) Product. Magnesium silicate. (b) Tolerance. 2 percent. (c) Limitations,...

  20. 21 CFR 582.1428 - Magnesium hydroxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Magnesium hydroxide. 582.1428 Section 582.1428 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Additives § 582.1428 Magnesium hydroxide. (a) Product. Magnesium hydroxide. (b) Conditions of use....