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Sample records for 0-10 numeric rating

  1. Evaluation of the numeric rating scale for perception of effort during isometric elbow flexion exercise.

    PubMed

    Lampropoulou, Sofia; Nowicky, Alexander V

    2012-03-01

    The aim of the study was to examine the reliability and validity of the numerical rating scale (0-10 NRS) for rating perception of effort during isometric elbow flexion in healthy people. 33 individuals (32 ± 8 years) participated in the study. Three re-test measurements within one session and three weekly sessions were undertaken to determine the reliability of the scale. The sensitivity of the scale following 10 min isometric fatiguing exercise of the elbow flexors as well as the correlation of the effort with the electromyographic (EMG) activity of the flexor muscles were tested. Perception of effort was tested during isometric elbow flexion at 10, 30, 50, 70, 90, and 100% MVC. The 0-10 NRS demonstrated an excellent test-retest reliability [intra class correlation (ICC) = 0.99 between measurements taken within a session and 0.96 between 3 consecutive weekly sessions]. Exploratory curve fitting for the relationship between effort ratings and voluntary force, and underlying EMG showed that both are best described by power functions (y = ax ( b )). There were also strong correlations (range 0.89-0.95) between effort ratings and EMG recordings of all flexor muscles supporting the concurrent criterion validity of the measure. The 0-10 NRS was sensitive enough to detect changes in the perceived effort following fatigue and significantly increased at the level of voluntary contraction used in its assessment (p < 0.001). These findings suggest the 0-10 NRS is a valid and reliable scale for rating perception of effort in healthy individuals. Future research should seek to establish the validity of the 0-10 NRS in clinical settings.

  2. An automated system for numerically rating document image quality

    SciTech Connect

    Cannon, M.; Kelly, P.; Iyengar, S.S.; Brener, N.

    1997-04-01

    As part of the Department of Energy document declassification program, the authors have developed a numerical rating system to predict the OCR error rate that they expect to encounter when processing a particular document. The rating algorithm produces a vector containing scores for different document image attributes such as speckle and touching characters. The OCR error rate for a document is computed from a weighted sum of the elements of the corresponding quality vector. The predicted OCR error rate will be used to screen documents that would not be handled properly with existing document processing products.

  3. Deriving health state utilities for the numerical pain rating scale

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The use of patient reported outcome measures within cost-effectiveness analysis has become commonplace. However, specific measures are required that produce values, referred to as 'utilities', that are capable of generating quality adjusted life years. One such measure - the EQ-5D - has come under criticism due to the inherent limitations of its three-level response scales. In evaluations of chronic pain, the numerical pain rating scale (NPRS) which has eleven levels is routinely used which has a greater measurement range, but which can not be used in cost-effetiveness analyses. This study derived utility values for a series of EQ-5D health states that replace the pain dimensions with the NPRS, thereby allowing a potentially greater range of pain intensities to be captured and included in economic analyses. Methods Interviews were undertaken with 100 member of the general population. Health state valuations were elicited using the time trade-off approach with a ten year time horizon. Additionally, respondents were asked where the EQ-5D response scale descriptors of moderate and extreme pain lay on the 11-point NPRS scale. Results 625 valuations were undertaken across the study sample with the crude mean health state utilities showing a negative non-linear relationship with respect to increasing pain intensity. Relative to a NPRS of zero (NPRS0), the successive pain levels (NPRS1-10) had mean decrements in utility of 0.034, 0.043, 0.061, 0.121, 0.144, 0.252, 0.404, 0.575, 0.771 and 0.793, respectively. When respondents were asked to mark on the NPRS scale the EQ-5D pain descriptors of moderate and extreme pain, the median responses were '4' and '8', respectively. Conclusions These results demonstrate the potential floor effect of the EQ-5D with respect to pain and provide estimates of health reduction associated with pain intensity described by the NPRS. These estimates are in excess of the decrements produced by an application of the EQ-5D scoring tariff

  4. Evaluating the Controls on Magma Ascent Rates Through Numerical Modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, M. E.; Neuberg, J. W.

    2015-12-01

    The estimation of the magma ascent rate is a key factor in predicting styles of volcanic activity and relies on the understanding of how strongly the ascent rate is controlled by different magmatic parameters. The ability to link potential changes in such parameters to monitoring data is an essential step to be able to use these data as a predictive tool. We present the results of a suite of conduit flow models that assess the influence of individual model parameters such as the magmatic water content, temperature or bulk magma composition on the magma flow in the conduit during an extrusive dome eruption. By systematically varying these parameters we assess their relative importance to changes in ascent rate. The results indicate that potential changes to conduit geometry and excess pressure in the magma chamber are amongst the dominant controlling variables that effect ascent rate, but the single most important parameter is the volatile content (assumed in this case as only water). Modelling this parameter across a range of reported values causes changes in the calculated ascent velocities of up to 800%, triggering fluctuations in ascent rates that span the potential threshold between effusive and explosive eruptions.

  5. 16 CFR 0.10 - Office of the Executive Director.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... Section 0.10 Commercial Practices FEDERAL TRADE COMMISSION ORGANIZATION, PROCEDURES AND RULES OF PRACTICE... policies, programs and directives for the Commission. The Executive Director works closely with the Bureaus.... In addition, the Executive Director manages the Commission's facilities and administrative...

  6. 16 CFR 0.10 - Office of the Executive Director.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... Section 0.10 Commercial Practices FEDERAL TRADE COMMISSION ORGANIZATION, PROCEDURES AND RULES OF PRACTICE... policies, programs and directives for the Commission. The Executive Director works closely with the Bureaus.... In addition, the Executive Director manages the Commission's facilities and administrative...

  7. 16 CFR 0.10 - Office of the Executive Director.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... Section 0.10 Commercial Practices FEDERAL TRADE COMMISSION ORGANIZATION, PROCEDURES AND RULES OF PRACTICE... policies, programs and directives for the Commission. The Executive Director works closely with the Bureaus.... In addition, the Executive Director manages the Commission's facilities and administrative...

  8. 16 CFR 0.10 - Office of the Executive Director.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... Section 0.10 Commercial Practices FEDERAL TRADE COMMISSION ORGANIZATION, PROCEDURES AND RULES OF PRACTICE... policies, programs and directives for the Commission. The Executive Director works closely with the Bureaus.... In addition, the Executive Director manages the Commission's facilities and administrative...

  9. 16 CFR 0.10 - Office of the Executive Director.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... Section 0.10 Commercial Practices FEDERAL TRADE COMMISSION ORGANIZATION, PROCEDURES AND RULES OF PRACTICE... policies, programs and directives for the Commission. The Executive Director works closely with the Bureaus.... In addition, the Executive Director manages the Commission's facilities and administrative...

  10. A numerical procedure for analysis of finite rate reacting flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shang, H. M.; Chen, Y. S.; Chen, Z. J.; Chen, C. P.; Wang, T. S.

    1993-01-01

    Combustion processes in rocket propulsion systems are characterized by the existence of multiple, vastly differing time and length scales, as well as flow-speeds at wide variation of Mach numbers. The chemical kinetics processes in the highly active reaction zone are characterized by much smaller scales compared to fluid convective and diffusive time scales. An operator splitting procedure for transient finite rate chemistry problems has been developed using a pressure based method, which can be applied to all speed flows without difficulties. The splitting of chemical kinetics terms formed the fluid-mechanical terms of the species equation ameliorated the difficulties associated with the disparate time scales and stiffness in the set of equations which describes highly exothermic combustion. A combined efficient ordinary differential equations (ODE) solver was used to integrate the effective chemical source terms over the residence time at each grid cell. One and two dimensional reacting flow situations were carried out to demonstrate and verify the current procedure. Different chemical kinetics with different degrees of nonlinearity have also been incorporated to test the robustness and generality of the proposed method.

  11. A numerical procedure for analysis of finite rate reacting flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shang, H. M.; Chen, Y. S.; Chen, Z. J.; Chen, C. P.; Wang, T. S.

    1993-07-01

    Combustion processes in rocket propulsion systems are characterized by the existence of multiple, vastly differing time and length scales, as well as flow-speeds at wide variation of Mach numbers. The chemical kinetics processes in the highly active reaction zone are characterized by much smaller scales compared to fluid convective and diffusive time scales. An operator splitting procedure for transient finite rate chemistry problems has been developed using a pressure based method, which can be applied to all speed flows without difficulties. The splitting of chemical kinetics terms formed the fluid-mechanical terms of the species equation ameliorated the difficulties associated with the disparate time scales and stiffness in the set of equations which describes highly exothermic combustion. A combined efficient ordinary differential equations (ODE) solver was used to integrate the effective chemical source terms over the residence time at each grid cell. One and two dimensional reacting flow situations were carried out to demonstrate and verify the current procedure. Different chemical kinetics with different degrees of nonlinearity have also been incorporated to test the robustness and generality of the proposed method.

  12. The numerical response: rate of increase and food limitation in herbivores and predators.

    PubMed Central

    Bayliss, Peter; Choquenot, David

    2002-01-01

    Two types of numerical response function have evolved since Solomon first introduced the term to generalize features of Lotka-Volterra predator-prey models: (i) the demographic numerical response, which links change in consumer demographic rates to food availability; and (ii) the isocline numerical response, which links consumer abundance per se to food availability. These numerical responses are interchangeable because both recognize negative feedback loops between consumer and food abundance resulting in population regulation. We review how demographic and isocline numerical responses have been used to enhance our understanding of population regulation of kangaroos and possums, and argue that their utility may be increased by explicitly accounting for non-equilibrium dynamics (due to environmental variability and/or biological interactions) and the existence of multiple limiting factors. Interferential numerical response functions may help bridge three major historical dichotomies in population ecology (equilibrium versus non-equilibrium dynamics, extrinsic versus intrinsic regulation and demographic versus isocline numerical responses). PMID:12396515

  13. A numerical method for determining the strain rate intensity factor under plane strain conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alexandrov, S.; Kuo, C.-Y.; Jeng, Y.-R.

    2016-07-01

    Using the classical model of rigid perfectly plastic solids, the strain rate intensity factor has been previously introduced as the coefficient of the leading singular term in a series expansion of the equivalent strain rate in the vicinity of maximum friction surfaces. Since then, many strain rate intensity factors have been determined by means of analytical and semi-analytical solutions. However, no attempt has been made to develop a numerical method for calculating the strain rate intensity factor. This paper presents such a method for planar flow. The method is based on the theory of characteristics. First, the strain rate intensity factor is derived in characteristic coordinates. Then, a standard numerical slip-line technique is supplemented with a procedure to calculate the strain rate intensity factor. The distribution of the strain rate intensity factor along the friction surface in compression of a layer between two parallel plates is determined. A high accuracy of this numerical solution for the strain rate intensity factor is confirmed by comparison with an analytic solution. It is shown that the distribution of the strain rate intensity factor is in general discontinuous.

  14. A method for generating numerical pilot opinion ratings using the optimal pilot model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hess, R. A.

    1976-01-01

    A method for generating numerical pilot opinion ratings using the optimal pilot model is introduced. The method is contained in a rating hypothesis which states that the numerical rating which a human pilot assigns to a specific vehicle and task can be directly related to the numerical value of the index of performance resulting from the optimal pilot modeling procedure as applied to that vehicle and task. The hypothesis is tested using the data from four piloted simulations. The results indicate that the hypothesis is reasonable, but that the predictive capability of the method is a strong function of the accuracy of the pilot model itself. This accuracy is, in turn, dependent upon the parameters which define the optimal modeling problem. A procedure for specifying the parameters for the optimal pilot model in the absence of experimental data is suggested.

  15. Numerical calculation of relative dose rates from spherical 106Ru beta sources used in ophthalmic brachytherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Paiva, Eduardo

    Concave beta sources of 106Ru/106Rh are used in radiotherapy to treat ophthalmic tumors. However, a problem that arises is the difficult determination of absorbed dose distributions around such sources mainly because of the small range of the electrons and the steep dose gradients. In this sense, numerical methods have been developed to calculate the dose distributions around the beta applicators. In this work a simple code in Fortran language is developed to estimate the dose rates along the central axis of 106Ru/106Rh curved plaques by numerical integration of the beta point source function and results are compared with other calculated data.

  16. Numerical solution of the Penna model of biological aging with age-modified mutation rate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Magdoń-Maksymowicz, M. S.; Maksymowicz, A. Z.

    2009-06-01

    In this paper we present results of numerical calculation of the Penna bit-string model of biological aging, modified for the case of a -dependent mutation rate m(a) , where a is the parent’s age. The mutation rate m(a) is the probability per bit of an extra bad mutation introduced in offspring inherited genome. We assume that m(a) increases with age a . As compared with the reference case of the standard Penna model based on a constant mutation rate m , the dynamics of the population growth shows distinct changes in age distribution of the population. Here we concentrate on mortality q(a) , a fraction of items eliminated from the population when we go from age (a) to (a+1) in simulated transition from time (t) to next time (t+1) . The experimentally observed q(a) dependence essentially follows the Gompertz exponential law for a above the minimum reproduction age. Deviation from the Gompertz law is however observed for the very old items, close to the maximal age. This effect may also result from an increase in mutation rate m with age a discussed in this paper. The numerical calculations are based on analytical solution of the Penna model, presented in a series of papers by Coe [J. B. Coe, Y. Mao, and M. E. Cates, Phys. Rev. Lett. 89, 288103 (2002)]. Results of the numerical calculations are supported by the data obtained from computer simulation based on the solution by Coe

  17. Numerical investigation on the regression rate of hybrid rocket motor with star swirl fuel grain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Shuai; Hu, Fan; Zhang, Weihua

    2016-10-01

    Although hybrid rocket motor is prospected to have distinct advantages over liquid and solid rocket motor, low regression rate and insufficient efficiency are two major disadvantages which have prevented it from being commercially viable. In recent years, complex fuel grain configurations are attractive in overcoming the disadvantages with the help of Rapid Prototyping technology. In this work, an attempt has been made to numerically investigate the flow field characteristics and local regression rate distribution inside the hybrid rocket motor with complex star swirl grain. A propellant combination with GOX and HTPB has been chosen. The numerical model is established based on the three dimensional Navier-Stokes equations with turbulence, combustion, and coupled gas/solid phase formulations. The calculated fuel regression rate is compared with the experimental data to validate the accuracy of numerical model. The results indicate that, comparing the star swirl grain with the tube grain under the conditions of the same port area and the same grain length, the burning surface area rises about 200%, the spatially averaged regression rate rises as high as about 60%, and the oxidizer can combust sufficiently due to the big vortex around the axis in the aft-mixing chamber. The combustion efficiency of star swirl grain is better and more stable than that of tube grain.

  18. Comparison of numerical and verbal rating scales to measure pain exacerbations in patients with chronic cancer pain

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Numerical rating scales (NRS), and verbal rating scales (VRS) showed to be reliable and valid tools for subjective cancer pain measurement, but no one of them consistently proved to be superior to the other. Aim of the present study is to compare NRS and VRS performance in assessing breakthrough or episodic pain (BP-EP) exacerbations. Methods In a cross sectional multicentre study carried out on a sample of 240 advanced cancer patients with pain, background pain and BP-EP intensity in the last 24 hours were measured using both a 6-point VRS and a 0-10 NRS. In order to evaluate the reproducibility of the two scales, a subsample of 60 patients was randomly selected and the questionnaire was administered for a second time three to four hours later. The proportion of "inconsistent" (background pain intensity higher than or equal to peak pain intensity) evaluations was calculated to compare the two scales capability in discriminating between background and peak pain intensity and Cohen's K was calculated to compare their reproducibility. Results NRS revealed higher discriminatory capability than VRS in distinguishing between background and peak pain intensity with a lower proportion of patients giving inconsistent evaluations (14% vs. 25%). NRS also showed higher reproducibility when measuring pain exacerbations (Cohen's K of 0.86 for NRS vs. 0.53 for VRS) while the reproducibility of the two scales in evaluating background pain was similar (Cohen's K of 0.80 vs. 0.77). Conclusions Our results suggest that, in the measurement of cancer pain exacerbations, patients use NRS more appropriately than VRS and as such NRS should be preferred to VRS in this patient's population. PMID:20412579

  19. Modified shifted angular spectrum method for numerical propagation at reduced spatial sampling rates.

    PubMed

    Ritter, André

    2014-10-20

    The shifted angular spectrum method allows a reduction of the number of samples required for numerical off-axis propagation of scalar wave fields. In this work, a modification of the shifted angular spectrum method is presented. It allows a further reduction of the spatial sampling rate for certain wave fields. We calculate the benefit of this method for spherical waves. Additionally, a working implementation is presented showing the example of a spherical wave propagating through a circular aperture. PMID:25401659

  20. Effects of heterogeneity in aquifer permeability and biomass on biodegradation rate calculations - Results from numerical simulations

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Scholl, M.A.

    2000-01-01

    Numerical simulations were used to examine the effects of heterogeneity in hydraulic conductivity (K) and intrinsic biodegradation rate on the accuracy of contaminant plume-scale biodegradation rates obtained from field data. The simulations were based on a steady-state BTEX contaminant plume-scale biodegradation under sulfate-reducing conditions, with the electron acceptor in excess. Biomass was either uniform or correlated with K to model spatially variable intrinsic biodegradation rates. A hydraulic conductivity data set from an alluvial aquifer was used to generate three sets of 10 realizations with different degrees of heterogeneity, and contaminant transport with biodegradation was simulated with BIOMOC. Biodegradation rates were calculated from the steady-state contaminant plumes using decreases in concentration with distance downgradient and a single flow velocity estimate, as is commonly done in site characterization to support the interpretation of natural attenuation. The observed rates were found to underestimate the actual rate specified in the heterogeneous model in all cases. The discrepancy between the observed rate and the 'true' rate depended on the ground water flow velocity estimate, and increased with increasing heterogeneity in the aquifer. For a lognormal K distribution with variance of 0.46, the estimate was no more than a factor of 1.4 slower than the true rate. For aquifer with 20% silt/clay lenses, the rate estimate was as much as nine times slower than the true rate. Homogeneous-permeability, uniform-degradation rate simulations were used to generate predictions of remediation time with the rates estimated from heterogeneous models. The homogeneous models were generally overestimated the extent of remediation or underestimated remediation time, due to delayed degradation of contaminants in the low-K areas. Results suggest that aquifer characterization for natural attenuation at contaminated sites should include assessment of the presence

  1. On the efficient and reliable numerical solution of rate-and-state friction problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pipping, Elias; Kornhuber, Ralf; Rosenau, Matthias; Oncken, Onno

    2016-03-01

    We present a mathematically consistent numerical algorithm for the simulation of earthquake rupture with rate-and-state friction. Its main features are adaptive time stepping, a novel algebraic solution algorithm involving nonlinear multigrid and a fixed point iteration for the rate-and-state decoupling. The algorithm is applied to a laboratory scale subduction zone which allows us to compare our simulations with experimental results. Using physical parameters from the experiment, we find a good fit of recurrence time of slip events as well as their rupture width and peak slip. Computations in 3-D confirm efficiency and robustness of our algorithm.

  2. A comparison of the efficiency of numerical methods for integrating chemical kinetic rate equations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Radhakrishnan, K.

    1984-01-01

    The efficiency of several algorithms used for numerical integration of stiff ordinary differential equations was compared. The methods examined included two general purpose codes EPISODE and LSODE and three codes (CHEMEQ, CREK1D and GCKP84) developed specifically to integrate chemical kinetic rate equations. The codes were applied to two test problems drawn from combustion kinetics. The comparisons show that LSODE is the fastest code available for the integration of combustion kinetic rate equations. It is shown that an iterative solution of the algebraic energy conservation equation to compute the temperature can be more efficient then evaluating the temperature by integrating its time-derivative.

  3. A numerical basis for strain-gradient plasticity theory: Rate-independent and rate-dependent formulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nielsen, K. L.; Niordson, C. F.

    2014-02-01

    A numerical model formulation of the higher order flow theory (rate-independent) by Fleck and Willis [2009. A mathematical basis for strain-gradient plasticity theory - part II: tensorial plastic multiplier. Journal of the Mechanics and Physics of Solids 57, 1045-1057.], that allows for elastic-plastic loading/unloading and the interaction of multiple plastic zones, is proposed. The predicted model response is compared to the corresponding rate-dependent version of visco-plastic origin, and coinciding results are obtained in the limit of small strain-rate sensitivity. First, (i) the evolution of a single plastic zone is analyzed to illustrate the agreement with earlier published results, whereafter examples of (ii) multiple plastic zone interaction, and (iii) elastic-plastic loading/unloading are presented. Here, the simple shear problem of an infinite slab constrained between rigid plates is considered, and the effect of strain gradients, strain hardening and rate sensitivity is brought out. For clarity of results, a 1D model is constructed following a procedure suitable for generalization to 2D and 3D.

  4. A numerical investigation of oxygen concentration dependence on biodegradation rate laws in vapor intrusion.

    PubMed

    Yao, Yijun; Shen, Rui; Pennel, Kelly G; Suuberg, Eric M

    2013-12-01

    In subsurface vapor intrusion, aerobic biodegradation has been considered as a major environmental factor that determines the soil gas concentration attenuation factors for contaminants such as petroleum hydrocarbons. The site investigation has shown that oxygen can play an important role in this biodegradation rate, and this paper explores the influence of oxygen concentration on biodegradation reactions included in vapor intrusion (VI) models. Two different three dimensional (3-D) numerical models of vapor intrusion were explored for their sensitivity to the form of the biodegradation rate law. A second order biodegradation rate law, explicitly including oxygen concentration dependence, was introduced into one model. The results indicate that the aerobic/anoxic interface depth is determined by the ratio of contaminant source vapor to atmospheric oxygen concentration, and that the contaminant concentration profile in the aerobic zone was significantly influenced by the choice of rate law.

  5. A numerical investigation of oxygen concentration dependence on biodegradation rate laws in vapor intrusion.

    PubMed

    Yao, Yijun; Shen, Rui; Pennel, Kelly G; Suuberg, Eric M

    2013-12-01

    In subsurface vapor intrusion, aerobic biodegradation has been considered as a major environmental factor that determines the soil gas concentration attenuation factors for contaminants such as petroleum hydrocarbons. The site investigation has shown that oxygen can play an important role in this biodegradation rate, and this paper explores the influence of oxygen concentration on biodegradation reactions included in vapor intrusion (VI) models. Two different three dimensional (3-D) numerical models of vapor intrusion were explored for their sensitivity to the form of the biodegradation rate law. A second order biodegradation rate law, explicitly including oxygen concentration dependence, was introduced into one model. The results indicate that the aerobic/anoxic interface depth is determined by the ratio of contaminant source vapor to atmospheric oxygen concentration, and that the contaminant concentration profile in the aerobic zone was significantly influenced by the choice of rate law. PMID:24197079

  6. Experimental and Numerical Study on Tensile Strength of Concrete under Different Strain Rates

    PubMed Central

    Min, Fanlu; Yao, Zhanhu; Jiang, Teng

    2014-01-01

    The dynamic characterization of concrete is fundamental to understand the material behavior in case of heavy earthquakes and dynamic events. The implementation of material constitutive law is of capital importance for the numerical simulation of the dynamic processes as those caused by earthquakes. Splitting tensile concrete specimens were tested at strain rates of 10−7 s−1 to 10−4 s−1 in an MTS material test machine. Results of tensile strength versus strain rate are presented and compared with compressive strength and existing models at similar strain rates. Dynamic increase factor versus strain rate curves for tensile strength were also evaluated and discussed. The same tensile data are compared with strength data using a thermodynamic model. Results of the tests show a significant strain rate sensitive behavior, exhibiting dynamic tensile strength increasing with strain rate. In the quasistatic strain rate regime, the existing models often underestimate the experimental results. The thermodynamic theory for the splitting tensile strength of concrete satisfactorily describes the experimental findings of strength as effect of strain rates. PMID:24883355

  7. A numerical and experimental analysis of reactor performance and deposition rates for CVD on monofilaments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gokoglu, S. A.; Kuczmarski, M.; Veitch, L.; Tsui, P.; Chait, A.

    1990-01-01

    The computational fluid dynamics (CFD) code FLUENT is adopted to simulate a cylindrical upflow reactor designed for chemical vapor deposition (CVD) on monofilaments. Equilibrium temperature profiles along the fiber and quartz reactor wall are experimentally measured and used as boundary conditions in numerical simulations. Two-dimensional axisymmetric flow and temperature fields are calculated for hydrogen and argon; the effect of free convection is assessed. The gas and surface chemistry is included for predicting silicon deposition from silane. The model predictions are compared with experimentally measured silicon CVD rates. Inferences are made for optimum conditions to obtain uniformity.

  8. Microwave (SSM/I) Estimates of the Precipitation Rate to Improve Numerical Atmospheric Model Forecasts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Raymond, William H.; Olson, William S.

    1990-01-01

    Delay in the spin-up of precipitation early in numerical atmospheric forecasts is a deficiency correctable by diabatic initialization combined with diabatic forcing. For either to be effective requires some knowledge of the magnitude and vertical placement of the latent heating fields. Until recently the best source of cloud and rain water data was the remotely sensed vertical integrated precipitation rate or liquid water content. Vertical placement of the condensation remains unknown. Some information about the vertical distribution of the heating rates and precipitating liquid water and ice can be obtained from retrieval techniques that use a physical model of precipitating clouds to refine and improve the interpretation of the remotely sensed data. A description of this procedure and an examination of its 3-D liquid water products, along with improved modeling methods that enhance or speed-up storm development is discussed.

  9. A comparison of the efficiency of numerical methods for integrating chemical kinetic rate equations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Radhakrishnan, K.

    1984-01-01

    A comparison of the efficiency of several algorithms recently developed for the efficient numerical integration of stiff ordinary differential equations is presented. The methods examined include two general-purpose codes EPISODE and LSODE and three codes (CHEMEQ, CREK1D, and GCKP84) developed specifically to integrate chemical kinetic rate equations. The codes are applied to two test problems drawn from combustion kinetics. The comparisons show that LSODE is the fastest code currently available for the integration of combustion kinetic rate equations. An important finding is that an iterative solution of the algebraic energy conservation equation to compute the temperature can be more efficient than evaluating the temperature by integrating its time-derivative.

  10. Estimation of geopotential from satellite-to-satellite range rate data: Numerical results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thobe, Glenn E.; Bose, Sam C.

    1987-01-01

    A technique for high-resolution geopotential field estimation by recovering the harmonic coefficients from satellite-to-satellite range rate data is presented and tested against both a controlled analytical simulation of a one-day satellite mission (maximum degree and order 8) and then against a Cowell method simulation of a 32-day mission (maximum degree and order 180). Innovations include: (1) a new frequency-domain observation equation based on kinetic energy perturbations which avoids much of the complication of the usual Keplerian element perturbation approaches; (2) a new method for computing the normalized inclination functions which unlike previous methods is both efficient and numerically stable even for large harmonic degrees and orders; (3) the application of a mass storage FFT to the entire mission range rate history; (4) the exploitation of newly discovered symmetries in the block diagonal observation matrix which reduce each block to the product of (a) a real diagonal matrix factor, (b) a real trapezoidal factor with half the number of rows as before, and (c) a complex diagonal factor; (5) a block-by-block least-squares solution of the observation equation by means of a custom-designed Givens orthogonal rotation method which is both numerically stable and tailored to the trapezoidal matrix structure for fast execution.

  11. Finite Volume Numerical Methods for Aeroheating Rate Calculations from Infrared Thermographic Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Daryabeigi, Kamran; Berry, Scott A.; Horvath, Thomas J.; Nowak, Robert J.

    2003-01-01

    The use of multi-dimensional finite volume numerical techniques with finite thickness models for calculating aeroheating rates from measured global surface temperatures on hypersonic wind tunnel models was investigated. Both direct and inverse finite volume techniques were investigated and compared with the one-dimensional semi -infinite technique. Global transient surface temperatures were measured using an infrared thermographic technique on a 0.333-scale model of the Hyper-X forebody in the Langley Research Center 20-Inch Mach 6 Air tunnel. In these tests the effectiveness of vortices generated via gas injection for initiating hypersonic transition on the Hyper-X forebody were investigated. An array of streamwise orientated heating striations were generated and visualized downstream of the gas injection sites. In regions without significant spatial temperature gradients, one-dimensional techniques provided accurate aeroheating rates. In regions with sharp temperature gradients due to the striation patterns two-dimensional heat transfer techniques were necessary to obtain accurate heating rates. The use of the one-dimensional technique resulted in differences of 20% in the calculated heating rates because it did not account for lateral heat conduction in the model.

  12. 28 CFR 0.10 - Attorney General's Advisory Committee of U.S. Attorneys.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... the Associate Attorney General in formulating new programs for improvement of the criminal justice... U.S. Attorneys. 0.10 Section 0.10 Judicial Administration DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE ORGANIZATION OF THE DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE Office of the Attorney General § 0.10 Attorney General's Advisory Committee of...

  13. 28 CFR 0.10 - Attorney General's Advisory Committee of U.S. Attorneys.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... the Associate Attorney General in formulating new programs for improvement of the criminal justice... U.S. Attorneys. 0.10 Section 0.10 Judicial Administration DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE ORGANIZATION OF THE DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE Office of the Attorney General § 0.10 Attorney General's Advisory Committee of...

  14. 28 CFR 0.10 - Attorney General's Advisory Committee of U.S. Attorneys.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... the Associate Attorney General in formulating new programs for improvement of the criminal justice... U.S. Attorneys. 0.10 Section 0.10 Judicial Administration DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE ORGANIZATION OF THE DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE Office of the Attorney General § 0.10 Attorney General's Advisory Committee of...

  15. 28 CFR 0.10 - Attorney General's Advisory Committee of U.S. Attorneys.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... the Associate Attorney General in formulating new programs for improvement of the criminal justice... U.S. Attorneys. 0.10 Section 0.10 Judicial Administration DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE ORGANIZATION OF THE DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE Office of the Attorney General § 0.10 Attorney General's Advisory Committee of...

  16. 28 CFR 0.10 - Attorney General's Advisory Committee of U.S. Attorneys.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... the Associate Attorney General in formulating new programs for improvement of the criminal justice... U.S. Attorneys. 0.10 Section 0.10 Judicial Administration DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE ORGANIZATION OF THE DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE Office of the Attorney General § 0.10 Attorney General's Advisory Committee of...

  17. Gate-tunable Kondo resistivity and dephasing rate in graphene studied by numerical renormalization group calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lo, Po-Wei; Guo, Guang-Yu; Anders, Frithjof B.

    2014-05-01

    Motivated by the recent observation of the Kondo effect in graphene in transport experiments, we investigate the resistivity and dephasing rate in the Kondo regime due to magnetic impurities in graphene with different chemical potentials (μ). The Kondo effect due to either carbon vacancies or magnetic adatoms in graphene is described by the single-orbital pseudogap asymmetric Anderson impurity model which is solved by the accurate numerical renormalization group method. We find that although the Anderson impurity model considered here is a mixed-valence system, it can be driven into either the Kondo [μ >μc (critical value) >0], mixed-valency (μ ≈μc), or empty-orbital (μ <μc) regime by a gate voltage, giving rise to characteristic features in resistivity and dephasing rate in each regime. Specifically, in the case of μ <μc, the shapes of the resistivity (dephasing rate) curves for different μ are nearly identical. However, as temperature decreases, they start to increase to their maxima at a lower T /TK, but more rapidly [as (TK/T)3/2] than in normal metals [here, T (TK) denotes the (Kondo) temperature]. As T further decreases, after reaching the maximum, the dephasing rate drops more quickly than in normal metals, behaving as (T/TK)3 instead of (T/TK)2. Furthermore, the resistivity has a distinct peak above the saturation value near TK. In the case of μ >μc, in contrast, the resistivity curve has an additional broad shoulder above 10TK and the dephasing rate exhibits an interesting shoulder-peak shape. In the narrow boundary region (μ ≈μc), both the resistivity and dephasing rate curves are similar to the corresponding ones in normal metals. This explains the conventional Kondo-like resistivity from recent experiments on graphene with defects, although the distinct features in the resistivity in the other cases (μ <μc or μ >μc) were not seen in the experiments. The interesting features in the resistivity and dephasing rate are analyzed in

  18. Numerical simulation of mud erosion rate in sand-mud alternate layer and comparison with experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshida, T.; Yamaguchi, T.; Oyama, H.; Sato, T.

    2015-12-01

    For gas production from methane hydrates in sand-mud alternate layers, depressurization method is expected as feasible. After methane hydrate is dissociated, gas and water flow in pore space. There is a concern about the erosion of mud surface and it may result in flow blockage that disturbs the gas production. As a part of a Japanese National hydrate research program (MH21, funded by METI), we developed a numerical simulation of water-induced mud erosion in pore-scale sand-mud domains to model such mud erosion. The size of which is of the order of 100 micro meter. Water flow is simulated using a lattice Boltzmann method (LBM) and mud surface is treated as solid boundary with arbitrary shape, which changes with time. Periodic boundary condition is adopted at the domain boundaries, except for the surface of mud layers and the upper side. Shear stress acting on the mud surface is calculated using a momentum-exchange method. Mud layer is eroded when the shear stress exceeds a threshold coined a critical shear stress. In this study, we compared the simulated mud erosion rate with experimental data acquired from an experiment using artificial sand-mud core. As a result, the simulated erosion rate agrees well with that of the experiment.

  19. Numerical implementation of a crystal plasticity model with dislocation transport for high strain rate applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mayeur, Jason R.; Mourad, Hashem M.; Luscher, Darby J.; Hunter, Abigail; Kenamond, Mark A.

    2016-05-01

    This paper details a numerical implementation of a single crystal plasticity model with dislocation transport for high strain rate applications. Our primary motivation for developing the model is to study the influence of dislocation transport and conservation on the mesoscale response of metallic crystals under extreme thermo-mechanical loading conditions (e.g. shocks). To this end we have developed a single crystal plasticity theory (Luscher et al (2015)) that incorporates finite deformation kinematics, internal stress fields caused by the presence of geometrically necessary dislocation gradients, advection equations to model dislocation density transport and conservation, and constitutive equations appropriate for shock loading (equation of state, drag-limited dislocation velocity, etc). In the following, we outline a coupled finite element–finite volume framework for implementing the model physics, and demonstrate its capabilities in simulating the response of a [1 0 0] copper single crystal during a plate impact test. Additionally, we explore the effect of varying certain model parameters (e.g. mesh density, finite volume update scheme) on the simulation results. Our results demonstrate that the model performs as intended and establishes a baseline of understanding that can be leveraged as we extend the model to incorporate additional and/or refined physics and move toward a multi-dimensional implementation.

  20. Ensemble Monte Carlo calculation of the hole initiated impact ionization rate in bulk GaAs and silicon using a k-dependent, numerical transition rate formulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oguzman, Ismail H.; Wang, Yang; Kolnik, Jan; Brennan, Kevin F.

    1995-01-01

    The hole initiated impact ionization rate in bulk silicon and GaAs is calculated using a numerical formulation of the impact ionization transition rate incorporated into an ensemble Monte Carlo simulation. The transition rate is calculated from Fermi's golden rule using a two-body screened Coulomb interaction including a wavevector dependent dielectric function. It is found that the effective threshold for hole initiated ionization is relatively soft in both materials, that the split-off band dominates the ionization process in GaAs. and that no clear dominance by any one band is observed in silicon, though the rate out of the light hole band is greatest.

  1. Numerical study of the wave-vector dependence of the electron interband impact ionization rate in bulk GaAs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Yang; Brennan, Kevin F.

    1994-01-01

    Ensemble Monte Carlo calculations of the electron interband impact ionization rate in bulk GaAs are presented using a wave-vector (k)-dependent formulation of the ionization transition rate. The transition rate is evaluated through the use of numerically generated wavefunctions determined via a k-p calculation within the first two conduction bands at numerous points within a finely spaced three-dimensional grid in k space. The transition rate is determined to be greatest for states within the second conduction band. Is is found that the interband impact ionization transition rate in bulk GaAs is best characterized as having an exceedingly soft threshold energy. As a consequence, the dead space, defined as the distance over which the ionization probability for a given carrier is assumed to be zero, is estimated to be much larger than that estimated using a harder threshold. These results have importance in the design of the multiquantum-well avalanche photodiodes.

  2. Numerical Study of the Wave-Vector Dependence of the Electron Interband Impact Ionization Rate in Bulk GaAs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Yang; Brennan, Kevin F.

    1994-01-01

    Ensemble Monte Carlo calculations of the electron interband impact ionization rate in bulk GaAs are presented using a wave-vector (k)-dependent formulation of the ionization transition rate. The transition rate is evaluated through use of numerically generated wavefunctions determined via a k-p calculation within the first two conduction bonds at numerous points within a finely spaced three-dimensional grid in k space. The transition rate is determined to be greatest for states within the second conduction band. It is found that the interband impact ionization transition rate in bulk GaAs is best characterized as having an exceedingly "soft" threshold energy. As a consequence, the dead space, defined as the distance over which the ionization probability for a given carrier is assumed to be zero, is estimated to be-much larger than that estimated using a "harder" threshold. These results have importance in the design of multiquantum-well avalanche photodiodes.

  3. Numerous Numerals.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Henle, James M.

    This pamphlet consists of 17 brief chapters, each containing a discussion of a numeration system and a set of problems on the use of that system. The numeration systems used include Egyptian fractions, ordinary continued fractions and variants of that method, and systems using positive and negative bases. The book is informal and addressed to…

  4. Dynamic Brazilian Test of Rock Under Intermediate Strain Rate: Pendulum Hammer-Driven SHPB Test and Numerical Simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, W. C.; Niu, L. L.; Li, S. H.; Xu, Z. H.

    2015-09-01

    The tensile strength of rock subjected to dynamic loading constitutes many engineering applications such as rock drilling and blasting. The dynamic Brazilian test of rock specimens was conducted with the split Hopkinson pressure bar (SHPB) driven by pendulum hammer, in order to determine the indirect tensile strength of rock under an intermediate strain rate ranging from 5.2 to 12.9 s-1, which is achieved when the incident bar is impacted by pendulum hammer with different velocities. The incident wave excited by pendulum hammer is triangular in shape, featuring a long rising time, and it is considered to be helpful for achieving a constant strain rate in the rock specimen. The dynamic indirect tensile strength of rock increases with strain rate. Then, the numerical simulator RFPA-Dynamics, a well-recognized software for simulating the rock failure under dynamic loading, is validated by reproducing the Brazilian test of rock when the incident stress wave retrieved at the incident bar is input as the boundary condition, and then it is employed to study the Brazilian test of rock under the higher strain rate. Based on the numerical simulation, the strain-rate dependency of tensile strength and failure pattern of the Brazilian disc specimen under the intermediate strain rate are numerically simulated, and the associated failure mechanism is clarified. It is deemed that the material heterogeneity should be a reason for the strain-rate dependency of rock.

  5. Evaluating acute pain intensity relief: challenges when using an 11-point numerical rating scale.

    PubMed

    Chauny, Jean-Marc; Paquet, Jean; Lavigne, Gilles; Marquis, Martin; Daoust, Raoul

    2016-02-01

    Percentage of pain intensity difference (PercentPID) is a recognized way of evaluating pain relief with an 11-point numerical rating scale (NRS) but is not without flaws. A new metric, the slope of relative pain intensity difference (SlopePID), which consists in dividing PercentPID by the time between 2 pain measurements, is proposed. This study aims to validate SlopePID with 3 measures of subjective pain relief: a 5-category relief scale (not, a little, moderate, very, complete), a 2-category relief question ("I'm relieved," "I'm not relieved"), and a single-item question, "Wanting other medication to treat pain?" (Yes/No). This prospective cohort study included 361 patients in the emergency department who had an initial acute pain NRS > 3 and a pain intensity assessment within 90 minutes after analgesic administration. Mean age was 50.2 years (SD = 19.3) and 59% were women. Area under the curves of receiver operating characteristic curves analyses revealed similar discriminative power for PercentPID (0.83; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.79-0.88) and SlopePID (0.82; 95% CI, 0.77-0.86). Considering the "very" category from the 5-category relief scale as a substantial relief, the average cutoff for substantial relief was a decrease of 64% (95% CI, 59-69) for PercentPID and of 49% per hour (95% CI, 44-54) for SlopePID. However, when a cutoff criterion of 50% was used as a measure of pain relief for an individual patient, PercentPID underestimated pain-relieved patients by 12.1% (P < 0.05) compared with the SlopePID measurement, when pain intensity at baseline was an odd number compared with an even number (32.9% vs 45.0%, respectively). SlopePID should be used instead of PercentPID as a metric to evaluate acute pain relief on a 0 to 10 NRS.

  6. Numerical calculation of protein-ligand binding rates through solution of the Smoluchowski equation using smoothed particle hydrodynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Pan, Wenxiao; Daily, Michael; Baker, Nathan A.

    2015-05-07

    Background: The calculation of diffusion-controlled ligand binding rates is important for understanding enzyme mechanisms as well as designing enzyme inhibitors. Methods: We demonstrate the accuracy and effectiveness of a Lagrangian particle-based method, smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH), to study diffusion in biomolecular systems by numerically solving the time-dependent Smoluchowski equation for continuum diffusion. Unlike previous studies, a reactive Robin boundary condition (BC), rather than the absolute absorbing (Dirichlet) BC, is considered on the reactive boundaries. This new BC treatment allows for the analysis of enzymes with “imperfect” reaction rates. Results: The numerical method is first verified in simple systems and then applied to the calculation of ligand binding to a mouse acetylcholinesterase (mAChE) monomer. Rates for inhibitor binding to mAChE are calculated at various ionic strengths and compared with experiment and other numerical methods. We find that imposition of the Robin BC improves agreement between calculated and experimental reaction rates. Conclusions: Although this initial application focuses on a single monomer system, our new method provides a framework to explore broader applications of SPH in larger-scale biomolecular complexes by taking advantage of its Lagrangian particle-based nature.

  7. Numerical calculation of protein-ligand binding rates through solution of the Smoluchowski equation using smoothed particle hydrodynamics

    DOE PAGES

    Pan, Wenxiao; Daily, Michael; Baker, Nathan A.

    2015-05-07

    Background: The calculation of diffusion-controlled ligand binding rates is important for understanding enzyme mechanisms as well as designing enzyme inhibitors. Methods: We demonstrate the accuracy and effectiveness of a Lagrangian particle-based method, smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH), to study diffusion in biomolecular systems by numerically solving the time-dependent Smoluchowski equation for continuum diffusion. Unlike previous studies, a reactive Robin boundary condition (BC), rather than the absolute absorbing (Dirichlet) BC, is considered on the reactive boundaries. This new BC treatment allows for the analysis of enzymes with “imperfect” reaction rates. Results: The numerical method is first verified in simple systems and thenmore » applied to the calculation of ligand binding to a mouse acetylcholinesterase (mAChE) monomer. Rates for inhibitor binding to mAChE are calculated at various ionic strengths and compared with experiment and other numerical methods. We find that imposition of the Robin BC improves agreement between calculated and experimental reaction rates. Conclusions: Although this initial application focuses on a single monomer system, our new method provides a framework to explore broader applications of SPH in larger-scale biomolecular complexes by taking advantage of its Lagrangian particle-based nature.« less

  8. Effect of Flow Rate Controller on Liquid Steel Flow in Continuous Casting Mold using Numerical Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gursoy, Kadir Ali; Yavuz, Mehmet Metin

    2014-11-01

    In continuous casting operation of steel, the flow through tundish to the mold can be controlled by different flow rate control systems including stopper rod and slide-gate. Ladle changes in continuous casting machines result in liquid steel level changes in tundishes. During this transient event of production, the flow rate controller opening is increased to reduce the pressure drop across the opening which helps to keep the mass flow rate at the desired level for the reduced liquid steel level in tundish. In the present study, computational fluid dynamic (CFD) models are developed to investigate the effect of flow rate controller on mold flow structure, and particularly to understand the effect of flow controller opening on meniscus flow. First, a detailed validation of the CFD models is conducted using available experimental data and the performances of different turbulence models are compared. Then, the constant throughput casting operations for different flow rate controller openings are simulated to quantify the opening effect on meniscus region. The results indicate that the meniscus velocities are significantly affected by the flow rate controller and its opening level. The steady state operations, specified as constant throughput casting, do not provide the same mold flow if the controller opening is altered. Thus, for quality and castability purposes, adjusting the flow controller opening to obtain the fixed mold flow structure is proposed. Supported by Middle East Technical University (METU) BAP (Scientific Research Projects) Coordination.

  9. Physical and mathematical justification of the numerical Brillouin zone integration of the Boltzmann rate equation by Gaussian smearing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Illg, Christian; Haag, Michael; Teeny, Nicolas; Wirth, Jens; Fähnle, Manfred

    2016-03-01

    Scatterings of electrons at quasiparticles or photons are very important for many topics in solid-state physics, e.g., spintronics, magnonics or photonics, and therefore a correct numerical treatment of these scatterings is very important. For a quantum-mechanical description of these scatterings, Fermi's golden rule is used to calculate the transition rate from an initial state to a final state in a first-order time-dependent perturbation theory. One can calculate the total transition rate from all initial states to all final states with Boltzmann rate equations involving Brillouin zone integrations. The numerical treatment of these integrations on a finite grid is often done via a replacement of the Dirac delta distribution by a Gaussian. The Dirac delta distribution appears in Fermi's golden rule where it describes the energy conservation among the interacting particles. Since the Dirac delta distribution is a not a function it is not clear from a mathematical point of view that this procedure is justified. We show with physical and mathematical arguments that this numerical procedure is in general correct, and we comment on critical points.

  10. Numerical calculation of protein-ligand binding rates through solution of the Smoluchowski equation using smooth particle hydrodynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Pan, Wenxiao; Daily, Michael D.; Baker, Nathan A.

    2015-12-01

    We demonstrate the accuracy and effectiveness of a Lagrangian particle-based method, smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH), to study diffusion in biomolecular systems by numerically solving the time-dependent Smoluchowski equation for continuum diffusion. The numerical method is first verified in simple systems and then applied to the calculation of ligand binding to an acetylcholinesterase monomer. Unlike previous studies, a reactive Robin boundary condition (BC), rather than the absolute absorbing (Dirichlet) boundary condition, is considered on the reactive boundaries. This new boundary condition treatment allows for the analysis of enzymes with "imperfect" reaction rates. Rates for inhibitor binding to mAChE are calculated at various ionic strengths and compared with experiment and other numerical methods. We find that imposition of the Robin BC improves agreement between calculated and experimental reaction rates. Although this initial application focuses on a single monomer system, our new method provides a framework to explore broader applications of SPH in larger-scale biomolecular complexes by taking advantage of its Lagrangian particle-based nature.

  11. Experimental and Numerical Investigation on the Phase Separation Affected by Cooling Rates and Marangoni Convection in Cu-Cr Alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Fei; von Klinski-Wetzel, Katharina; Mukherjee, Rajdip; Nestler, Britta; Heilmaier, Martin

    2015-04-01

    In this work, we study the microstructures upon rapid solidification from the melt which occurs in Cu-Cr electrical contacts after switching operations. As the local cooling rates are difficult to be determined experimentally, we numerically compute the mean radius of Cr-particles from phase separation as a function of the cooling rate by utilizing a convective Cahn-Hilliard model. Based on the computationally derived correlation and on the metallographically observed microstructure, we are able to extract back the local cooling rates during heat treatment. We further examine the effect of Marangoni convection on the phase separation structure in a particularly composed simulation study. We obtain the cooling rate for a given particle size affected by the solutal Marangoni convection.

  12. A method for the direct numerical simulation of hypersonic boundary-layer instability with finite-rate chemistry

    SciTech Connect

    Marxen, Olaf; Magin, Thierry E.; Shaqfeh, Eric S.G.; Iaccarino, Gianluca

    2013-12-15

    A new numerical method is presented here that allows to consider chemically reacting gases during the direct numerical simulation of a hypersonic fluid flow. The method comprises the direct coupling of a solver for the fluid mechanical model and a library providing the physio-chemical model. The numerical method for the fluid mechanical model integrates the compressible Navier–Stokes equations using an explicit time advancement scheme and high-order finite differences. This Navier–Stokes code can be applied to the investigation of laminar-turbulent transition and boundary-layer instability. The numerical method for the physio-chemical model provides thermodynamic and transport properties for different gases as well as chemical production rates, while here we exclusively consider a five species air mixture. The new method is verified for a number of test cases at Mach 10, including the one-dimensional high-temperature flow downstream of a normal shock, a hypersonic chemical reacting boundary layer in local thermodynamic equilibrium and a hypersonic reacting boundary layer with finite-rate chemistry. We are able to confirm that the diffusion flux plays an important role for a high-temperature boundary layer in local thermodynamic equilibrium. Moreover, we demonstrate that the flow for a case previously considered as a benchmark for the investigation of non-equilibrium chemistry can be regarded as frozen. Finally, the new method is applied to investigate the effect of finite-rate chemistry on boundary layer instability by considering the downstream evolution of a small-amplitude wave and comparing results with those obtained for a frozen gas as well as a gas in local thermodynamic equilibrium.

  13. Finite Volume Numerical Methods for Aeroheating Rate Calculations from Infrared Thermographic Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Daryabeigi, Kamran; Berry, Scott A.; Horvath, Thomas J.; Nowak, Robert J.

    2006-01-01

    The use of multi-dimensional finite volume heat conduction techniques for calculating aeroheating rates from measured global surface temperatures on hypersonic wind tunnel models was investigated. Both direct and inverse finite volume techniques were investigated and compared with the standard one-dimensional semi-infinite technique. Global transient surface temperatures were measured using an infrared thermographic technique on a 0.333-scale model of the Hyper-X forebody in the NASA Langley Research Center 20-Inch Mach 6 Air tunnel. In these tests the effectiveness of vortices generated via gas injection for initiating hypersonic transition on the Hyper-X forebody was investigated. An array of streamwise-orientated heating striations was generated and visualized downstream of the gas injection sites. In regions without significant spatial temperature gradients, one-dimensional techniques provided accurate aeroheating rates. In regions with sharp temperature gradients caused by striation patterns multi-dimensional heat transfer techniques were necessary to obtain more accurate heating rates. The use of the one-dimensional technique resulted in differences of 20% in the calculated heating rates compared to 2-D analysis because it did not account for lateral heat conduction in the model.

  14. Numerical study of strain-rate effect in cold rolls forming of steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Falsafi, J.; Demirci, E.; Silberschmidt, V. V.

    2013-07-01

    Cold roll forming (CRF) is a well-known continuous manufacturing process, in which a flat strip is deformed by successive rotating pairs of tools, without changing the material thickness. In the past decades, to lessen the process-development efforts, finite-element simulations have been increasingly employed to improve the process design and predict the manufacturing-induced defects. One of the important aspects in design of the CRF process is consideration of resulting strains in the final product as the material passes through several complex forming stands. Sufficient knowledge of longitudinal strain in the workpiece is required to set various process parameters. Increasing a process speed in a roll forming operation can bring cost advantages, but the influence of the forming speed on the strain distribution should be explored. This study is focussed on a strain-rate effect in the CRF process of steel sheets. The strain-rate dependency of a plastic behaviour observed in most metals can affect the finished product's quality as well as process parameters. This paper investigates the influence of the strain rate on longitudinal strains induced in the roll forming operation by incorporating a phenomenological Johnson-Cook constitutive model, which allows studying the impact of the process speed on the output product. Taking advantage of 3D finite element analysis, a roll forming process was simulated using MCS.Marc, comprising a complete set of forming stations. Through the changing of the process speed, the strain rate impact on longitudinal peak strains and forming length was investigated. The results highlight the effect of the strain rate on edge thinning and subsequent undesirable distortions in the product.

  15. The Role of Pulse Repetition Rate in nsPEF-Induced Electroporation: A Biological and Numerical Investigation.

    PubMed

    Lamberti, Patrizia; Romeo, Stefania; Sannino, Anna; Zeni, Luigi; Zeni, Olga

    2015-09-01

    The impact of pulse repetition rate (PRR) in modulating electroporation (EP) induced by nanosecond pulsed electric fields (nsPEFs) in mammalian cells was approached here by performing both biological and numerical analysis. Plasma membrane permeabilization and viability of Jurkat cells were analyzed after exposure to 500, 1.3 MV/m, 40 ns PEFs with variable PRR (2-30 Hz). A finite-element model was used to investigate EP dynamics in a single cell under the same pulsing conditions, by looking at the time course of transmembrane voltage and pore density on the ns time scale. The biological observations showed an increased EP and reduced viability of the exposed cells at lower PRR in the considered range. The numerical analysis resulted in different dynamics of plasma membrane response when ns pulses were delivered with different PRR, consistently with a phenomenon of electrodesensitization recently hypothesized by another research group. PMID:25850084

  16. Numerical study of finite-rate supersonic combustion using parabolized equations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chitsomboon, T.; Kumar, A.; Tiwari, S. N.

    1987-01-01

    A set of partial differential equations, describing the two-dimensional supersonic chemically-reacting flow of the hydrogen-air system, is formulated such that the equations are parabolic in the streamwise direction. A fully-implicit fully-coupled finite-difference algorithm is used to develop a computer code which solves the governing equations by marching in the streamwise direction. The combustion process is modeled by a two-step finite-rate chemistry whereas turbulence is simulated by an algebraic turbulence model. Results of two calculations of internal supersonic reacting flow show fairly good agreement with the results obtained by the more costly full Navier-Stokes procedure.

  17. Numerical Modelling of Wire-EDM for Predicting Erosion Rate of Silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joshi, Kamlesh; Sharma, Gaurav; Dongre, Ganesh; Joshi, Suhas Sitaram

    2016-05-01

    Recently, a lot of work is carried out in photovoltaic industry for slicing Si ingots using non-conventional technique like wire-EDM apart from conventional techniques like inner diameter saw and multi-wire saw. It is an emerging technology in field of Si wafer slicing and has a potential to be cost efficient. It reduces the kerf-loss and produces crack-free Si wafers. In general, the process of Si wafer cutting using wire-EDM is less understood due to its complex nature. In this work, the complex phenomena like formation of plasma channel, melting and erosion of Si material has been modelled mathematically. Further, the effect of input energy parameters like current, open voltage and pulse on-time on plasma and plasma-ingot interface temperature has been studied. The model is further extended along the length of the wire to evaluate the erosion depth and rate. The effect of process parameters on erosion depth and rate was validated experimentally. The model considers variation in material removal through the `plasma flushing efficiency'.

  18. Strain-rate sensitivity of foam materials: A numerical study using 3D image-based finite element model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Yongle; Li, Q. M.; Withers, P. J.

    2015-09-01

    Realistic simulations are increasingly demanded to clarify the dynamic behaviour of foam materials, because, on one hand, the significant variability (e.g. 20% scatter band) of foam properties and the lack of reliable dynamic test methods for foams bring particular difficulty to accurately evaluate the strain-rate sensitivity in experiments; while on the other hand numerical models based on idealised cell structures (e.g. Kelvin and Voronoi) may not be sufficiently representative to capture the actual structural effect. To overcome these limitations, the strain-rate sensitivity of the compressive and tensile properties of closed-cell aluminium Alporas foam is investigated in this study by means of meso-scale realistic finite element (FE) simulations. The FE modelling method based on X-ray computed tomography (CT) image is introduced first, as well as its applications to foam materials. Then the compression and tension of Alporas foam at a wide variety of applied nominal strain-rates are simulated using FE model constructed from the actual cell geometry obtained from the CT image. The stain-rate sensitivity of compressive strength (collapse stress) and tensile strength (0.2% offset yield point) are evaluated when considering different cell-wall material properties. The numerical results show that the rate dependence of cell-wall material is the main cause of the strain-rate hardening of the compressive and tensile strengths at low and intermediate strain-rates. When the strain-rate is sufficiently high, shock compression is initiated, which significantly enhances the stress at the loading end and has complicated effect on the stress at the supporting end. The plastic tensile wave effect is evident at high strain-rates, but shock tension cannot develop in Alporas foam due to the softening associated with single fracture process zone occurring in tensile response. In all cases the micro inertia of individual cell walls subjected to localised deformation is found to

  19. Numerical investigation and thermodynamic analysis of the effect of electrolyte flow rate on performance of all vanadium redox flow batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khazaeli, Ali; Vatani, Ali; Tahouni, Nassim; Panjeshahi, Mohammad Hassan

    2015-10-01

    In flow batteries, electrolyte flow rate plays a crucial role on the minimizing mass transfer polarization which is at the compensation of higher pressure drop. In this work, a two-dimensional numerical method is applied to investigate the effect of electrolyte flow rate on cell voltage, maximum depth of discharge and pressure drop a six-cell stack of VRFB. The results show that during the discharge process, increasing electrolyte flow rate can raise the voltage of each cell up to 50 mV on average. Moreover, the maximum depth of discharge dramatically increases with electrolyte flow rate. On the other hand, the pressure drop also positively correlates with electrolyte flow rate. In order to investigate all these effects simultaneously, average energy and exergy efficiencies are introduced in this study for the transient process of VRFB. These efficiencies give insight into choosing an appropriate strategy for the electrolyte flow rate. Finally, the energy efficiency of electricity storage using VRFB is investigated and compared with other energy storage systems. The results illustrate that this kind of battery has at least 61% storage efficiency based on the second law of thermodynamics, which is considerably higher than that of their counterparts.

  20. Diastolic Calcium Release Controls the Beating Rate of Rabbit Sinoatrial Node Cells: Numerical Modeling of the Coupling Process

    PubMed Central

    Maltsev, Victor A.; Vinogradova, Tatiana M.; Bogdanov, Konstantin Y.; Lakatta, Edward G.; Stern, Michael D.

    2004-01-01

    Recent studies employing Ca2+ indicators and confocal microscopy demonstrate substantial local Ca2+ release beneath the cell plasma membrane (subspace) of sinoatrial node cells (SANCs) occurring during diastolic depolarization. Pharmacological and biophysical experiments have suggested that the released Ca2+ interacts with the plasma membrane via the ion current (INaCa) produced by the Na+/Ca2+ exchanger and constitutes an important determinant of the pacemaker rate. This study provides a numerical validation of the functional importance of diastolic Ca2+ release for rate control. The subspace Ca2+ signals in rabbit SANCs were measured by laser confocal microscopy, averaged, and calibrated. The time course of the subspace [Ca2+] displayed both diastolic and systolic components. The diastolic component was mainly due to the local Ca2+ releases; it was numerically approximated and incorporated into a SANC cellular electrophysiology model. The model predicts that the diastolic Ca2+ release strongly interacts with plasma membrane via INaCa and thus controls the phase of the action potential upstroke and ultimately the final action potential rate. PMID:15041695

  1. Numerical Simulation on Sheet Metal Forming with Rate-independent Polycrystalline Plasticity FEM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Shaorui; Li, Dayong; Peng, Yinghong

    2004-06-01

    It has long been found that, during deformation process, the crystal orientations would gradually rotate around some ideal orientations, and then would affect the later deformation properties of sheet metal. So it is very important to introduce texture model into metal forming processes. In this paper, a rate-independent polycrystalline plasticity model is developed and introduced into dynamic explicit element method. Metal flow is assumed to occur by crystallographic slip on given slip systems within each crystal. Every integration point represents a single crystal. Then cup drawing of sheet metal is studied using crystalline plasticity finite element analysis. For the rolled aluminum sheet, which contains strong {001}<110> texture, earing is formed at 45° direction after cup drawing. For the annealing aluminum sheet, due to the balance between two main textures, the flange earing tendency is not obvious. And for the soft steel sheet with a faintish orientation distribution, the flange earing tendency is not obvious, too.

  2. Numerical analysis of high strain rate failure of electro-magnetically loaded steel sheets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erice, Borja; Mohr, Dirk

    2015-09-01

    Electro-magnetic forces provide a potentially power full means in designing dynamic experiments with active control of the loading conditions. This article deals with the development of computational models to simulate the thermo-mechanical response of electro-magnetically loaded metallic structures. The model assumes linear electromagnetic constitutive equations and time-independent electric induction to estimate the Joule heating and the Lorentz forces. The latter are then taken into account when evaluating stress equilibrium. A thermo-visco-plastic model with Johnson-Cook type of temperature and strain rate dependence and combined Swift-Voce hardening is used to evaluate the material's thermo-mechanical response. As a first application, the model is used to analyse the effect of electro-magnetic loading on the ductility of advanced high strength steels.

  3. Impact of model geometry and recharge rates on catchment's residence time distributions - numerical experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neubauer, M.; Musolff, A.; Fleckenstein, J. H.

    2013-12-01

    Residence time distributions (RTD) of water in catchments are promising tools to characterize and model solute transport on a larger scale. In the last decade, much research has been conducted on the estimation and the application of RTD's. However, there are still some major issues to be addressed to complex derivation, parameterization and transient behavior. Through improved remote sensing data, the surface elevation can mostly be resolved in detail, while subsurface volumes and boundaries remain highly undetermined. Our objectives are to systematically evaluate the impact of different depths and geometries of the domain bottom and groundwater recharge rates on RTD's. The study site is a small (1.6 km2) headwater catchment located within the Harz Mountains, Germany. For this catchment long time series of climate, discharge and hydrochemistry are available while groundwater flow field and subsurface structure are less known. The site is intensively influenced by agricultural land use and exhibits strong seasonal dynamics of water flow and hydrochemistry due to the snowmelt. The modeling was performed using HydroGeoSphere, a coupled surface and subsurface model, which solves the Richards Equation for variable saturated soils. The Open Source software Paraview and R was chosen as postprocessors to perform and analyze forward particle tracking algorithms under steady state conditions. Ten depth and geometry scenarios of the domain bottom were created (5 horizontal bottom geometries - constant base and 5 variable bottom geometries - parallel to surface topography; both minimum depths ranging from 2 m to 50 m). The model's internal structure was discretized by two homogenous layers (averaged catchment representation) parallel to the input digital elevation model (2x2 m). The geometry scenarios were combined with fifteen steady state simulations for different groundwater recharge rate scenarios (0.1 mm up to 15 mm per day). Model results indicate a strong influence of

  4. Numerical Simulation of Alongshore Variation of Sediment Transport Rate Downdrift of a Tidal Inlet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keshtpoor, M.; Puleo, J. A.; Shi, F.

    2013-12-01

    Indian River Inlet is located at the midpoint of the Atlantic-facing Delaware coast and connects Delaware inland bays (Rehoboth Bay to the north and Indian River Bay due west) to the Atlantic Ocean. In late 1930's the US Army Corps of Engineers constructed twin jetties to provide a safe channel for navigational and recreational purposes. Offshore extended jetties interrupted the alongshore sediment transport that resulted in severe downdrift beach recession. The main concern is the retreat of the shoreline toward the inland infrastucture, such as State Route 1, within 1000 m downdrift of the inlet. In recent years the rate of sediment loss from the downdrift beach has increased and the sediment bypassing system was not able to mitigate the shoreline recession. Here, NearCOM, that couples a wave model, a nearshore circulation model, and a sediment transport model is applied to simulate the hydrodynamics and sediment transport under the impact of tide and wave forcing in the inlet adjacent area at the downdrift beach. The main goal is to understand the patterns of sediment transport and causes of erosion near the morphologically complex inlet. Simulations are carried out for the dominant wave cases with the high probability of occurrence. In addition, the offshore boundary is forced with conditions observed during Hurricane Felix to obtain the beach response to a severe wave case. The effect of applied wave cases on the alongshore variability of sediment transport will be discussed to address the causes of downdrift beach erosion.

  5. Numerical analysis of reaction-diffusion effects on species mixing rates in turbulent premixed methane-air combustion

    SciTech Connect

    Richardson, E.S.; Grout, R.W.; Chen, J.H.; Sankaran, R.

    2010-03-15

    The scalar mixing time scale, a key quantity in many turbulent combustion models, is investigated for reactive scalars in premixed combustion. Direct numerical simulations (DNS) of three-dimensional, turbulent Bunsen flames with reduced methane-air chemistry have been analyzed in the thin reaction zones regime. Previous conclusions from single step chemistry DNS studies are confirmed regarding the role of dilatation and turbulence-chemistry interactions on the progress variable dissipation rate. Compared to the progress variable, the mixing rates of intermediate species is found to be several times greater. The variation of species mixing rates are explained with reference to the structure of one-dimensional premixed laminar flames. According to this analysis, mixing rates are governed by the strong gradients which are imposed by flamelet structures at high Damkoehler numbers. This suggests a modeling approach to estimate the mixing rate of individual species which can be applied, for example, in transported probability density function simulations. Flame-turbulence interactions which modify the flamelet based representation are analyzed. (author)

  6. A critical analysis of the accuracy of several numerical techniques for combustion kinetic rate equations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Radhadrishnan, Krishnan

    1993-01-01

    A detailed analysis of the accuracy of several techniques recently developed for integrating stiff ordinary differential equations is presented. The techniques include two general-purpose codes EPISODE and LSODE developed for an arbitrary system of ordinary differential equations, and three specialized codes CHEMEQ, CREK1D, and GCKP4 developed specifically to solve chemical kinetic rate equations. The accuracy study is made by application of these codes to two practical combustion kinetics problems. Both problems describe adiabatic, homogeneous, gas-phase chemical reactions at constant pressure, and include all three combustion regimes: induction, heat release, and equilibration. To illustrate the error variation in the different combustion regimes the species are divided into three types (reactants, intermediates, and products), and error versus time plots are presented for each species type and the temperature. These plots show that CHEMEQ is the most accurate code during induction and early heat release. During late heat release and equilibration, however, the other codes are more accurate. A single global quantity, a mean integrated root-mean-square error, that measures the average error incurred in solving the complete problem is used to compare the accuracy of the codes. Among the codes examined, LSODE is the most accurate for solving chemical kinetics problems. It is also the most efficient code, in the sense that it requires the least computational work to attain a specified accuracy level. An important finding is that use of the algebraic enthalpy conservation equation to compute the temperature can be more accurate and efficient than integrating the temperature differential equation.

  7. A Comparison of Pain Assessment Measures in Pediatric Sickle Cell Disease: Visual Analog Scale Versus Numeric Rating Scale.

    PubMed

    Myrvik, Matthew P; Drendel, Amy L; Brandow, Amanda M; Yan, Ke; Hoffmann, Raymond G; Panepinto, Julie A

    2015-04-01

    Given the availability of various pain severity scales, greater understanding of the agreement between pain scales is warranted. We compared Visual Analog Scale (VAS) and Numeric Rating Scale (NRS) pain severity ratings in children with sickle cell disease (SCD) to identify the relationship and agreement between pain scale ratings. Twenty-eight patients (mean ± SD age, 14.65 ± 3.12 y, 50% female) receiving pain interventions within the emergency department completed serial VAS and NRS pain severity ratings every 30 minutes. Data were used to calculate the relationship (Spearman correlation) and agreement (Bland-Altman approach) between the VAS and NRS. One hundred twenty-eight paired VAS-NRS measurements were obtained. VAS and NRS ratings were significantly correlated for the initial assessment (rs = 0.88, P < 0.001) and all assessments (rs = 0.87, P < 0.001). Differences between VAS and NRS means were -0.52 (P = 0.006) for the initial assessment and -0.86 (P < 0.001) across all assessments. The difference between VAS and NRS ratings decreased as pain severity increased across all assessments (P = 0.027), but not the initial assessment. Within pediatric patients with SCD, VAS and NRS ratings were found to trend together; however, VAS scores were found to be significantly lower than NRS scores across assessments. The agreement between the 2 measures improved at increasing levels of pain severity. These findings demonstrate that the VAS and NRS are similar, but cannot be used interchangeably when assessing self-reported pain in SCD.

  8. Quantifying the feedback of evaporation and transpiration rates to soil moisture dynamics and meteorological condition changes by a numerical model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Ye; Shao, Wei; Vlček, Lukáš; Langhammer, Jakub

    2015-04-01

    Evapotranspiration drives the hydrological process through energy-driven water-phase changes between systems of soil-vegetation-atmosphere. Evapotranspiration performs a rather complex process attributable to the spatial and temporal variation of soil-vegetation-atmosphere system. For vegetation-covered land surfaces, the transpiration process is governed by the stomatal behavior and water uptake from the root zone, and evaporation is related with the interception of rainfall and radiation on the canopy and soil surface. This study is emphasized on describing the hydrological process and energy cycle in a basic hydrological response unit, a hillslope. The experimental hillslope is located in an experimental catchment of the Bohemian Forest Mountains' headwaters in the Czech Republic, where is mostly covered by dead Norway spruce forest (Picea abies) stands caused by balk beetle outbreak. High-frequency monitoring network of the hydro-climatic data, soil pore water pressure and soil temperature has been launched since 2012. To conceptualize the land-surface energy and water fluxes in a complex hillslope, a soil-vegetation-atmosphere transport (SVAT) model, coupled with a multi-phase soil physics process (i.e. the water, vapor and heat flow transport) is used. We selected an 8-week basis dataset from 2013 as a pilot for partitioning the evapotranspiration into three interactive components: transpiration (Et), canopy interception evaporation (Ei), and soil evaporation (Es), by using this numerical model. Within such model framework, the sensitive feedback of evapotranspiration rates to rainfall intensity, soil moisture, and solar radiation will be examined by conducting numerical experiments to better understand the mechanism of evapotranspiration process under various influencing factors. Such application study and followed numerical simulations provide a new path for quantifying the behaviors of the soil-vegetation-atmosphere system.

  9. Numerical Simulation of the Combustion of Fuel Droplets: Finite Rate Kinetics and Flame Zone Grid Adaptation (CEFD)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gogos, George; Bowen, Brent D.; Nickerson, Jocelyn S.

    2002-01-01

    The NASA Nebraska Space Grant (NSGC) & EPSCoR programs have continued their effort to support outstanding research endeavors by funding the Numerical Simulation of the Combustion of Fuel Droplets study at the University of Nebraska at Lincoln (UNL). This team of researchers has developed a transient numerical model to study the combustion of suspended and moving droplets. The engines that propel missiles, jets, and many other devices are dependent upon combustion. Therefore, data concerning the combustion of fuel droplets is of immediate relevance to aviation and aeronautical personnel, especially those involved in flight operations. The experiments being conducted by Dr. Gogos and Dr. Nayagam s research teams, allow investigators to gather data for comparison with theoretical predictions of burning rates, flame structures, and extinction conditions. The consequent improved hndamental understanding droplet combustion may contribute to the clean and safe utilization of fossil hels (Williams, Dryer, Haggard & Nayagam, 1997, 72). The present state of knowledge on convective extinction of he1 droplets derives fiom experiments conducted under normal gravity conditions. However, any data obtained with suspended droplets under normal gravity are grossly affected by gravity. The need to obtain experimental data under microgravity conditions is therefore well justified and addresses one of the goals of NASA s Human Exploration and Development of Space (HEDS) microgravity combustion experiment.

  10. Numerical exploration of Kaldorian interregional macrodynamics: stability and the trade threshold for business cycles under fixed exchange rates.

    PubMed

    Asada, Toichiro; Douskos, Christos; Markellos, Panagiotis

    2011-01-01

    The stability of equilibrium and the possibility of generation of business cycles in a discrete interregional Kaldorian macrodynamic model with fixed exchange rates are explored using numerical methods. One of the aims is to illustrate the feasibility and effectiveness of the numerical approach for dynamical systems of moderately high dimensionality and several parameters. The model considered is five-dimensional with four parameters, the speeds of adjustment of the goods markets and the degrees of economic interactions between the regions through trade and capital movement. Using a grid search method for the determination of the region of stability of equilibrium in two-dimensional parameter subspaces, and coefficient criteria for the flip bifurcation - and Hopf bifurcation - curve, we determine the stability region in several parameter ranges and identify Hopf bifurcation curves when they exist. It is found that interregional cycles emerge only for sufficient interregional trade. The relevant threshold is predicted by the model at 14 - 16 % of trade transactions. By contrast, no minimum level of capital mobility exists in a global sense as a requirement for the emergence of interregional cycles; the main conclusion being, therefore, that cycles may occur for very low levels of capital mobility if trade is sufficient. Examples of bifurcation and Lyapunov exponent diagrams illustrating the occurrence of cycles or period doubling, and examples of the development of the occurring cycles, are given. Both supercritical and subcritical bifurcations are found to occur, the latter type indicating coexistence of a point and a cyclical attractor.

  11. Interfacial kinematics and governing mechanisms under the influence of high strain rate impact conditions: Numerical computations of experimental observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raoelison, R. N.; Sapanathan, T.; Padayodi, E.; Buiron, N.; Rachik, M.

    2016-11-01

    This paper investigates the complex interfacial kinematics and governing mechanisms during high speed impact conditions. A robust numerical modelling technique using Eulerian simulations are used to explain the material response of the interface subjected to a high strain rate collision during a magnetic pulse welding. The capability of this model is demonstrated using the predictions of interfacial kinematics and revealing the governing mechanical behaviours. Numerical predictions of wave formation resulted with the upward or downward jetting and complex interfacial mixing governed by wake and vortex instabilities corroborate the experimental observations. Moreover, the prediction of the material ejection during the simulation explains the experimentally observed deposited particles outside the welded region. Formations of internal cavities along the interface is also closely resemble the resulted confined heating at the vicinity of the interface appeared from those wake and vortex instabilities. These results are key features of this simulation that also explains the potential mechanisms in the defects formation at the interface. These results indicate that the Eulerian computation not only has the advantage of predicting the governing mechanisms, but also it offers a non-destructive approach to identify the interfacial defects in an impact welded joint.

  12. Numerical Simulations of Turbulent Molecular Clouds Regulated by Radiation Feedback Forces. I. Star Formation Rate and Efficiency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raskutti, Sudhir; Ostriker, Eve C.; Skinner, M. Aaron

    2016-10-01

    Radiation feedback from stellar clusters is expected to play a key role in setting the rate and efficiency of star formation in giant molecular clouds. To investigate how radiation forces influence realistic turbulent systems, we have conducted a series of numerical simulations employing the Hyperion radiation hydrodynamics solver, considering the regime that is optically thick to ultraviolet and optically thin to infrared radiation. Our model clouds cover initial surface densities between Σ cl,0∼ 10--300 M⊙ pc-2, with varying initial turbulence. We follow them through turbulent, self-gravitating collapse, star cluster formation, and cloud dispersal by stellar radiation. All our models display a log-normal distribution of gas surface density Σ for an initial virial parameter αvir,0=2, the log-normal standard deviation is σln Σ =1-1.5 and the star formation rate coefficient ɛff,ρ=0.3-0.5, both of which are sensitive to turbulence but not radiation feedback. The net star formation efficiency (SFE) ɛfinal increases with Σcl,0 and decreases with α vir,0. We interpret these results via a simple conceptual framework, whereby steady star formation increases the radiation force, such that local gas patches at successively higher Σ become unbound. Based on this formalism (with fixed σln Σ), we provide an analytic upper bound on ɛfinal, which is in good agreement with our numerical results. The final SFE depends on the distribution of Eddington ratios in the cloud and is strongly increased by the turbulent compression of gas.

  13. An investigation of the effect of pore scale flow on average geochemical reaction rates using direct numerical simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Molins, Sergi; Trebotich, David; Steefel, Carl; Shen, Chaopeng

    2012-03-30

    The scale-dependence of geochemical reaction rates hinders their use in continuum scale models intended for the interpretation and prediction of chemical fate and transport in subsurface environments such as those considered for geologic sequestration of CO{sub 2}. Processes that take place at the pore scale, especially those involving mass transport limitations to reactive surfaces, may contribute to the discrepancy commonly observed between laboratory-determined and continuum-scale or field rates. Here, the dependence of mineral dissolution rates on the pore structure of the porous media is investigated by means of pore scale modeling of flow and multicomponent reactive transport. The pore scale model is composed of high-performance simulation tools and algorithms for incompressible flow and conservative transport combined with a general-purpose multicomponent geochemical reaction code. The model performs direct numerical simulation of reactive transport based on an operator-splitting approach to coupling transport and reactions. The approach is validated with a Poiseuille flow single-pore experiment and verified with an equivalent 1-D continuum-scale model of a capillary tube packed with calcite spheres. Using the case of calcite dissolution as an example, the high-resolution model is used to demonstrate that nonuniformity in the flow field at the pore scale has the effect of decreasing the overall reactivity of the system, even when systems with identical reactive surface area are considered. The effect becomes more pronounced as the heterogeneity of the reactive grain packing increases, particularly where the flow slows sufficiently such that the solution approaches equilibrium locally and the average rate becomes transport-limited.

  14. An investigation of the effect of pore scale flow on average geochemical reaction rates using direct numerical simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Molins, Sergi; Trebotich, David; Steefel, Carl I.; Shen, Chaopeng

    2012-03-30

    The scale-dependence of geochemical reaction rates hinders their use in continuum scale models intended for the interpretation and prediction of chemical fate and transport in subsurface environments such as those considered for geologic sequestration of CO2. Processes that take place at the pore scale, especially those involving mass transport limitations to reactive surfaces, may contribute to the discrepancy commonly observed between laboratory-determined and continuum-scale or field rates. In this study we investigate the dependence of mineral dissolution rates on the pore structure of the porous media by means of pore scale modeling of flow and multicomponent reactive transport. The pore scale model is composed of high-performance simulation tools and algorithms for incompressible flow and conservative transport combined with a general-purpose multicomponent geochemical reaction code. The model performs direct numerical simulation of reactive transport based on an operator-splitting approach to coupling transport and reactions. The approach is validated with a Poiseuille flow single-pore experiment and verified with an equivalent 1-D continuum-scale model of a capillary tube packed with calcite spheres. Using the case of calcite dissolution as an example, the high-resolution model is used to demonstrate that nonuniformity in the flow field at the pore scale has the effect of decreasing the overall reactivity of the system, even when systems with identical reactive surface area are considered. In conclusion, the effect becomes more pronounced as the heterogeneity of the reactive grain packing increases, particularly where the flow slows sufficiently such that the solution approaches equilibrium locally and the average rate becomes transport-limited.

  15. Creation of 0.10 cm-1 Resolution, Quantitative, Infrared Spectral Libraries for Gas Samples

    SciTech Connect

    Sharpe, Steven W.; Sams, Robert L.; Johnson, Timothy J.; Chu, P M.; Rhoderick, G C.; Guenther, F R.; Steven D. Christensen; Arthur J. Sedlacek

    2002-02-01

    The National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) and the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) are independently creating quantitative, approximately 0.10 cm-1 resolution, infrared spectral libraries of vapor phase compounds. The NIST library will consist of approximately 100 vapor phase spectra of volatile hazardous air pollutants (HAPs) and suspected greenhouse gases. The PNNL library will consist of approximately 400 vapor phase spectra associated with DOE's remediation mission. A critical part of creating and validating any quantitative work involves independent verification based on inter-laboratory comparisons. The two laboratories use significantly different sample preparation and handling techniques. NIST uses gravimetric dilution and a continuous flowing sample while PNNL uses partial pressure dilution and a static sample. Agreement is generally found to be within the statistical uncertainties of the Beer's law fit and less than 3 percent of the total integrate d band areas for the 4 chemicals used in this comparison. There does appear to be a small systematic difference between the PNNL and NIST data, however. Possible sources of the systematic difference will be discussed as well as technical details concerning the sample preparation and the procedures for overcoming instrumental artifacts.

  16. The Effects of Changes in the Order of Verbal Labels and Numerical Values on Children's Scores on Attitude and Rating Scales

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Betts, Lucy; Hartley, James

    2012-01-01

    Research with adults has shown that variations in verbal labels and numerical scale values on rating scales can affect the responses given. However, few studies have been conducted with children. The study aimed to examine potential differences in children's responses to Likert-type rating scales according to their anchor points and scale…

  17. An analysis of lower-dimensional approximations to the scalar dissipation rate using direct numerical simulations of plane jet flames

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Jackie; Sankaran, Ramanan; Hawkes, Evatt R

    2009-05-01

    The difficulty of experimental measurements of the scalar dissipation rate in turbulent flames has required researchers to estimate the true three-dimensional (3D) scalar dissipation rate from one-dimensional (1D) or two-dimensional (2D) gradient measurements. In doing so, some relationship must be assumed between the true values and their lower dimensional approximations. We develop these relationships by assuming a form for the statistics of the gradient vector orientation, which enables several new results to be obtained and the true 3D scalar dissipation PDF to be reconstructed from the lower-dimensional approximations. We use direct numerical simulations (DNS) of turbulent plane jet flames to examine the orientation statistics, and verify our assumptions and final results. We develop and validate new theoretical relationships between the lower-dimensional and true moments of the scalar dissipation PDF assuming a log-normal true PDF. We compare PDFs reconstructed from lower-dimensional gradient projections with the true values and find an excellent agreement for a 2D simulated measurement and also for a 1D simulated measurement perpendicular to the mean flow variations. Comparisons of PDFs of thermal dissipation from DNS with those obtained via reconstruction from 2D experimental measurements show a very close match, indicating this PDF is not unique to a particular flame configuration. We develop a technique to reconstruct the joint PDF of the scalar dissipation and any other scalar, such as chemical species or temperature. Reconstructed conditional means of the hydroxyl mass fraction are compared with the true values and an excellent agreement is obtained.

  18. Narrative descriptions should replace grades and numerical ratings for clinical performance in medical education in the United States

    PubMed Central

    Hanson, Janice L.; Rosenberg, Adam A.; Lane, J. Lindsey

    2013-01-01

    Background: In medical education, evaluation of clinical performance is based almost universally on rating scales for defined aspects of performance and scores on examinations and checklists. Unfortunately, scores and grades do not capture progress and competence among learners in the complex tasks and roles required to practice medicine. While the literature suggests serious problems with the validity and reliability of ratings of clinical performance based on numerical scores, the critical issue is not that judgments about what is observed vary from rater to rater but that these judgments are lost when translated into numbers on a scale. As the Next Accreditation System of the Accreditation Council on Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) takes effect, medical educators have an opportunity to create new processes of evaluation to document and facilitate progress of medical learners in the required areas of competence. Proposal and initial experience: Narrative descriptions of learner performance in the clinical environment, gathered using a framework for observation that builds a shared understanding of competence among the faculty, promise to provide meaningful qualitative data closely linked to the work of physicians. With descriptions grouped in categories and matched to milestones, core faculty can place each learner along the milestones' continua of progress. This provides the foundation for meaningful feedback to facilitate the progress of each learner as well as documentation of progress toward competence. Implications: This narrative evaluation system addresses educational needs as well as the goals of the Next Accreditation System for explicitly documented progress. Educators at other levels of education and in other professions experience similar needs for authentic assessment and, with meaningful frameworks that describe roles and tasks, may also find useful a system built on descriptions of learner performance in actual work settings. Conclusions: We

  19. Psychometric Properties of the Pain Numeric Rating Scale When Applied to Multiple Body Regions among Professional Musicians

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Background Despite the broad popularity of a numeric rating scale (NRS) its psychometric properties are not well known. The objective was to determine if there is any difference in the discrimination ability of the NRS when used for measuring pain severity separately in different body regions. Methods Cross-sectional survey study of 630 professional musicians. Item Response Theory (IRT) was used to define the psychometric properties of the NRS. Results The discrimination ability of the pain NRS was dependent on the body area to which it was applied. The discrimination was low 0.5 (95% CI 0.4. to 0.7) for the hand region and perfect for the shoulder and upper part of the neck– 3.2 (95% CI 1.2 to 5.2) and 10.5 (95% CI 10.0 to 10.9), respectively. Both shoulder and neck NRSs showed a great shift towards higher levels of pain severity meaning that the ability of the NRS to discriminate low levels of pain is poor. NRS scores obtained from all other regions did not demonstrate any discrimination ability. Conclusions The pain NRS might have different psychometric properties depending on the body area to which it is applied. Overall, the modest discrimination ability of the pain NRS implies that it should be used in screening questionnaires with some reservations. PMID:27603011

  20. Numerical assessment of the reduction of specific absorption rate by adding high dielectric materials for fetus MRI at 3 T.

    PubMed

    Luo, Minmin; Hu, Can; Zhuang, Yayun; Chen, Wufan; Liu, Feng; Xin, Sherman Xuegang

    2016-08-01

    The specific absorption rate (SAR) is an important issue to be considered in fetus MRI at 3 T due to the high radiofrequency energy deposited inside the body of pregnant woman. The high dielectric material (HDM) has shown its potential for enhancing B1 field and reducing SAR in MRI. The aim of this study is to assess the feasibility of SAR reduction by adding an HDM to the fetus MRI. The feasibility of SAR reduction is numerically assessed in this study, using a birdcage coil in transmission loaded with an electromagnetic pregnant woman model in the SEMCAD-EM solver. The HDMs with different geometric arrangements and dielectric constants are manually optimized. The B1+ ${B_1}^ + $ homogeneity is also considered while calculating the optimized fetus 10 g local SAR among different strategies in the application of HDM. The optimum maximum fetus 10 g local SAR was obtained as 2.25 W/kg, by using two conformal pads placed left and right with the dielectric constant to be 400, reduced by 24.75% compared to that without the HDM. It indicated that the SAR can be significantly reduced with strategic placement of the HDM and the use of HDM may provide a simple, effective and low-cost method for reducing the SAR for the fetus MRI at 3 T. PMID:26985683

  1. 17 CFR 270.0-10 - Small entities under the Investment Company Act for purposes of the Regulatory Flexibility Act.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 17 Commodity and Securities Exchanges 4 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Small entities under the Investment Company Act for purposes of the Regulatory Flexibility Act. 270.0-10 Section 270.0-10 Commodity... Regulatory Flexibility Act. (a) General. For purposes of Commission rulemaking in accordance with...

  2. 17 CFR 270.0-10 - Small entities under the Investment Company Act for purposes of the Regulatory Flexibility Act.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 17 Commodity and Securities Exchanges 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Small entities under the Investment Company Act for purposes of the Regulatory Flexibility Act. 270.0-10 Section 270.0-10 Commodity... Regulatory Flexibility Act. (a) General. For purposes of Commission rulemaking in accordance with...

  3. 17 CFR 270.0-10 - Small entities under the Investment Company Act for purposes of the Regulatory Flexibility Act.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 17 Commodity and Securities Exchanges 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Small entities under the Investment Company Act for purposes of the Regulatory Flexibility Act. 270.0-10 Section 270.0-10 Commodity... Regulatory Flexibility Act. (a) General. For purposes of Commission rulemaking in accordance with...

  4. 17 CFR 270.0-10 - Small entities under the Investment Company Act for purposes of the Regulatory Flexibility Act.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 17 Commodity and Securities Exchanges 3 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Small entities under the Investment Company Act for purposes of the Regulatory Flexibility Act. 270.0-10 Section 270.0-10 Commodity... Regulatory Flexibility Act. (a) General. For purposes of Commission rulemaking in accordance with...

  5. 17 CFR 270.0-10 - Small entities under the Investment Company Act for purposes of the Regulatory Flexibility Act.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 17 Commodity and Securities Exchanges 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Small entities under the Investment Company Act for purposes of the Regulatory Flexibility Act. 270.0-10 Section 270.0-10 Commodity... Regulatory Flexibility Act. (a) General. For purposes of Commission rulemaking in accordance with...

  6. Numerical Investigation of Earthquake Nucleation on a Laboratory-Scale Heterogeneous Fault with Rate-and-State Friction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Higgins, N.; Lapusta, N.

    2014-12-01

    Many large earthquakes on natural faults are preceded by smaller events, often termed foreshocks, that occur close in time and space to the larger event that follows. Understanding the origin of such events is important for understanding earthquake physics. Unique laboratory experiments of earthquake nucleation in a meter-scale slab of granite (McLaskey and Kilgore, 2013; McLaskey et al., 2014) demonstrate that sample-scale nucleation processes are also accompanied by much smaller seismic events. One potential explanation for these foreshocks is that they occur on small asperities - or bumps - on the fault interface, which may also be the locations of smaller critical nucleation size. We explore this possibility through 3D numerical simulations of a heterogeneous 2D fault embedded in a homogeneous elastic half-space, in an attempt to qualitatively reproduce the laboratory observations of foreshocks. In our model, the simulated fault interface is governed by rate-and-state friction with laboratory-relevant frictional properties, fault loading, and fault size. To create favorable locations for foreshocks, the fault surface heterogeneity is represented as patches of increased normal stress, decreased characteristic slip distance L, or both. Our simulation results indicate that one can create a rate-and-state model of the experimental observations. Models with a combination of higher normal stress and lower L at the patches are closest to matching the laboratory observations of foreshocks in moment magnitude, source size, and stress drop. In particular, we find that, when the local compression is increased, foreshocks can occur on patches that are smaller than theoretical critical nucleation size estimates. The additional inclusion of lower L for these patches helps to keep stress drops within the range observed in experiments, and is compatible with the asperity model of foreshock sources, since one would expect more compressed spots to be smoother (and hence have

  7. Cycling Stability Performance of La0.75Mg0.25Ni3.5Si0.10 Hydrogen Storage Alloy in Discharge-Charge System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Zhaojiang; Huang, Lei; Wan, Qi; Li, Xu; Guang, Ma; Li, Ping

    2014-12-01

    La0.75Mg0.25Ni3.5Si0.10 hydrogen storage alloy was prepared by vacuum induction melting furnace and subsequently heated treatment at 940°C for 8 h and cooled to room temperature in the oven. The electrochemical properties of La0.75Mg0.25Ni3.5Si0.10 compound were measured by LAND CT2001A battery test system. The morphologies of the samples were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The surface state of samples was analyzed by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). It was found that the charge-discharge rate plays the key impact on the cycling stability of the alloy. During the cycle test, the prepared La0.75Mg0.25Ni3.5Si0.10 compound presented an excellent capacity retention at the charge-discharge of 1 C while the capacity of sample declined rapidly at 0.2 C. The excellent cycling stability performance of La0.75Mg0.25Ni3.5Si0.10 electrode at 1 C could be attributed to the less powder and less oxidation of surface effective active elements. The pulverization inevitably leads to the separation of the part of the cracking alloy and the electrode, resulting in reduction of the effective active substance and increasing attenuation of the capacity per cycle. In addition, on the analysis of the different cut-off potential effects on the electrode, it was found that the La0.75Mg0.25Ni3.5Si0.10 electrode shows good comprehensive electrochemical properties at 1 C cut-off 0.6-0.7 V. During charging, heavy overcharge will not be conducive to cycling stability performance during the charging test.

  8. 13C(n,α0)10Be cross section measurement with sCVD diamond detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kavrigin, P.; Griesmayer, E.; Belloni, F.; Plompen, A. J. M.; Schillebeeckx, P.; Weiss, C.

    2016-06-01

    This paper presents 13C(n, α0)10Be cross section measurements performed at the Van de Graaff facility of the Joint Research Centre Geel. The 13C(n, α0)10Be cross section was measured relative to the 12C(n, α0)9Be cross section at 14.3 MeV and 17.0 MeV neutron energies. The measurements were performed with an sCVD (single-crystal chemical vapor deposition) diamond detector which acted as sample and as sensor simultaneously. A novel analysis technique was applied, which is based on the pulse-shape analysis of the detector's ionization current. This technique resulted in an efficient separation of background events and consequently in a well-determined selection of the nuclear reaction channels 12C(n, α0)9Be and 13C(n, α0)10Be.

  9. Effects of emission layer doping on the spatial distribution of charge and host recombination rate density in organic light emitting devices: A numerical study

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Yanli; Zhou, Maoqing; Zheng, Tingcai; Yao, Bo; Peng, Yingquan

    2013-12-28

    Based on drift-diffusion theory, a numerical model of the doping of a single energy level trap in the emission layer of an organic light emitting device (OLED) was developed, and the effects of doping of this single energy level trap on the distribution of the charge density, the recombination rate density, and the electric field in single- and double-layer OLEDs were studied numerically. The results show that by doping the n-type (p-type) emission layer with single energy electron (hole) traps, the distribution of the recombination rate density can be tuned and shifted, which is useful for improvement of the device performance by reduced electrode quenching or for realization of desirable special functions, e.g., emission spectrum tuning in multiple dye-doped white OLEDs.

  10. Estimating the designated use attainment decision error rates of US Environmental Protection Agency's proposed numeric total phosphorus criteria for Florida, USA, colored lakes.

    PubMed

    McLaughlin, Douglas B

    2012-01-01

    The utility of numeric nutrient criteria established for certain surface waters is likely to be affected by the uncertainty that exists in the presence of a causal link between nutrient stressor variables and designated use-related biological responses in those waters. This uncertainty can be difficult to characterize, interpret, and communicate to a broad audience of environmental stakeholders. The US Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) has developed a systematic planning process to support a variety of environmental decisions, but this process is not generally applied to the development of national or state-level numeric nutrient criteria. This article describes a method for implementing such an approach and uses it to evaluate the numeric total P criteria recently proposed by USEPA for colored lakes in Florida, USA. An empirical, log-linear relationship between geometric mean concentrations of total P (a potential stressor variable) and chlorophyll a (a nutrient-related response variable) in these lakes-that is assumed to be causal in nature-forms the basis for the analysis. The use of the geometric mean total P concentration of a lake to correctly indicate designated use status, defined in terms of a 20 µg/L geometric mean chlorophyll a threshold, is evaluated. Rates of decision errors analogous to the Type I and Type II error rates familiar in hypothesis testing, and a 3rd error rate, E(ni) , referred to as the nutrient criterion-based impairment error rate, are estimated. The results show that USEPA's proposed "baseline" and "modified" nutrient criteria approach, in which data on both total P and chlorophyll a may be considered in establishing numeric nutrient criteria for a given lake within a specified range, provides a means for balancing and minimizing designated use attainment decision errors.

  11. Catalytic behaviour and copper leaching of Cu0.10Zn0.90Al1.90Fe0.10O4 spinel for catalytic wet air oxidation of phenol.

    PubMed

    Xu, Aihua; Sun, Chenglin

    2012-06-01

    A Cu0.10Zn0.90Al1.90Fe0.10O4 spinel catalyst prepared by the sol-gel method was tested for catalytic wet air oxidation (CWAO) of phenol. The catalyst showed high activity for phenol degradation. During successive test at 170 degrees C, 100% phenol conversion and 95% chemical oxygen demand (COD) removal were observed. Results from scanning electron microscopy (SEM), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR) and X-ray diffraction (XRD) indicated that the catalyst structure remained unchanged during reaction. From the analysis of temperature programmed reduction (TPR), diffuse reflectance UV-Vis spectra (DR UV-Vis) and activity assay at basic solution pH, it can be suggested that the highly dispersed copper ions on the catalyst surface were almost completely dissolved into the reaction solution, whereas the tetra-coordinated copper ions were not only stable against leaching but also active towards phenol degradation.

  12. Catalytic behaviour and copper leaching of Cu0.10Zn0.90Al1.90Fe0.10O4 spinel for catalytic wet air oxidation of phenol.

    PubMed

    Xu, Aihua; Sun, Chenglin

    2012-06-01

    A Cu0.10Zn0.90Al1.90Fe0.10O4 spinel catalyst prepared by the sol-gel method was tested for catalytic wet air oxidation (CWAO) of phenol. The catalyst showed high activity for phenol degradation. During successive test at 170 degrees C, 100% phenol conversion and 95% chemical oxygen demand (COD) removal were observed. Results from scanning electron microscopy (SEM), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR) and X-ray diffraction (XRD) indicated that the catalyst structure remained unchanged during reaction. From the analysis of temperature programmed reduction (TPR), diffuse reflectance UV-Vis spectra (DR UV-Vis) and activity assay at basic solution pH, it can be suggested that the highly dispersed copper ions on the catalyst surface were almost completely dissolved into the reaction solution, whereas the tetra-coordinated copper ions were not only stable against leaching but also active towards phenol degradation. PMID:22856307

  13. Magnetic, dielectric, magnetoelectric properties and impedance spectroscopy of multiferroic Bi1-xNdxFe1-yCoyO3 (x=0, 0.10, 0.15, 0.20, y=0, 0.10) nanoceramics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bera, K. P.; Mandal, P. R.; Nath, T. K.

    2015-06-01

    Single phase multiferroic Bi1-xNdxFe1-yCoyO3 (x=0, 0.10, 0.15, 0.20; y = 0, 0.10) nanoparticles (average particle size 20-80 nm) were synthesized by novel chemical sol-gel route. The detailed microstructural analysis has been performed using HRXRD, HRTEM and FESEM techniques. The Rietveld refinement of the XRD data reveals that the samples are well crystalline with distorted rhombohedral structure having R3c space group without having any iron rich impurity phases. A noticeably large value of dielectric constant (880) and low tan δ loss (0.04) are observed for the sample Bi0.9Nd0.1Fe0.9Co0.1O3 at 100 Hz at room temperature. An anomaly near the Neel temperature in dielectric measurement has been observed for the samples with x = 0.10 and y = 0.0, 0.10. This anomaly has also been found in temperature dependent dielectric loss curve. A spectacular enhancement of Ms (7.26 emu/gm) and coercivity Hc (1.75 T) has been observed for Bi0.9Nd0.1Fe0.9Co0.1O3 nanoceramics revealing ferromagnetic ordering at the ground state (5 K). We have also observed well saturated P-E Hystersis loops with a remanent polarization (Pr) of 0.2 µC/ cm2 and coercive field Ec of 5 kV/cm for Bi0.9Nd0.1Fe0.9Co0.1O3 nanoceramics.

  14. Comparison of heat transfer in liquid and slush nitrogen by numerical simulation of cooling rates for French straws used for sperm cryopreservation.

    PubMed

    Sansinena, M; Santos, M V; Zaritzky, N; Chirife, J

    2012-05-01

    Slush nitrogen (SN(2)) is a mixture of solid nitrogen and liquid nitrogen, with an average temperature of -207 °C. To investigate whether plunging a French plastic straw (commonly used for sperm cryopreservation) in SN(2) substantially increases cooling rates with respect to liquid nitrogen (LN(2)), a numerical simulation of the heat conduction equation with convective boundary condition was used to predict cooling rates. Calculations performed using heat transfer coefficients in the range of film boiling confirmed the main benefit of plunging a straw in slush over LN(2) did not arise from their temperature difference (-207 vs. -196 °C), but rather from an increase in the external heat transfer coefficient. Numerical simulations using high heat transfer (h) coefficients (assumed to prevail in SN(2)) suggested that plunging in SN(2) would increase cooling rates of French straw. This increase of cooling rates was attributed to a less or null film boiling responsible for low heat transfer coefficients in liquid nitrogen when the straw is placed in the solid-liquid mixture or slush. In addition, predicted cooling rates of French straws in SN(2) tended to level-off for high h values, suggesting heat transfer was dictated by heat conduction within the liquid filled plastic straw.

  15. Numerical investigations of the spreading-rate dependence of anomalous skewness of marine magnetic anomalies due to seafloor spreading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boswell, S. M.; Zheng, L.; Gordon, R. G.; Dyment, J.

    2011-12-01

    An improved understanding of the spreading-rate dependence of anomalous skewness from magnetic anomalies due to seafloor spreading will allow for better constraints on apparent polar wander paths, plate reconstructions, and the magnetic and thermal structure of oceanic lithosphere. Anomalous skewness, which is the difference between experimentally determined skewness and skewness expected from simple magnetization models with vertical reversal boundaries, has been observed to vary as a function of spreading rate, decreasing with increasing spreading rate and becoming negligible at spreading half-rates exceeding about 55 mm/a [Roest et al. 1992; Dyment et al. 1994]. In our analysis, we determine model-based estimates of anomalous skewness as a function of spreading rate for each anomaly. We do so by creating many synthetic profiles using the model of Dyment and Arkani-Hamed (1995), which was specifically constructed to produce anomalies with anomalous skewness consistent with observed anomalies. We experimentally determine the phase shift that causes the resulting synthetic magnetic anomaly to best match a profile produced from a "standard" model for anomalies due to seafloor spreading that assumes simple vertical reversal boundaries. We present results for those anomalies between 12r and 33r from which reliable paleomagnetic poles may potentially be determined. Differences in anomalous skewness for different anomalies determined at the same spreading rate can be attributed to the sequence effect, that is, the effect on the shape of a magnetic anomaly above seafloor of a single polarity chron of the magnetization of neighboring blocks of lithosphere magnetized during other chrons. We find that the sequence effect is smaller than we expected with the largest difference being between the results for anomaly 25r and those for anomaly 33r, for which the difference is 14 degrees at a 10 mm/a half-rate. Results for other anomalies lie between these two. We also infer a

  16. Detailed study of the direct numerical observation of the Kramers turnover in the LiNC⇌LiCN isomerization rate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Müller, P. L. García; Hernandez, Rigoberto; Benito, R. M.; Borondo, F.

    2012-11-01

    According to Kramers, rates of molecular process are expected to follow a rise and fall from low friction (at little to no interaction with the environment) to high friction (at typical liquid densities and above). This so-called Kramers turnover was recently observed and delineated in the case of the LiNC⇌LiCN isomerization reaction in the presence of an argon bath [P. García-Müller, R. Hernandez, R. M. Benito, and F. Borondo, Phys. Rev. Lett. 101, 178302 (2008)], 10.1103/PhysRevLett.101.178302. The rates were obtained using direct molecular dynamics of an all-atom representation and the Langevin dynamics of a projected representation. We now provide further evidence that the forward and backward rates are indeed exhibiting the turnover. The rates are also seen to agree remarkably well with the Pollak-Grabert-Hänggi rate formulas in regimes satisfying the theory underlying assumptions. At higher temperatures, when the theory is expected to fail, the solvated LiCN isomerization continues to exhibit activated dynamics following the turnover.

  17. Investigation of numerical viscosities and dissipation rates of second-order TVD-MUSCL schemes for implicit large-eddy simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bidadi, Shreyas; Rani, Sarma L.

    2015-01-01

    Monotonically integrated large-eddy simulation (MILES) approach utilizes the dissipation inherent to shock-capturing schemes to emulate the role played by explicit subgrid-scale eddy diffusivity at the high-wavenumber end of the turbulent energy spectrum. In the current study, a novel formulation is presented for quantifying the numerical viscosity inherent to Roe-based second-order TVD-MUSCL schemes for the Euler equations. Using this formulation, the effects of numerical viscosity and dissipation rate on implicit large-eddy simulations of turbulent flows are investigated. At first, the three-dimensional (3-D) finite-volume extension of the original Roe's flux, including Roe's Jacobian matrix, is presented. The fluxes are then extended to second-order using van Leer's MUSCL extrapolation technique. Starting from the 3-D Roe-MUSCL flux, an expression is derived for the numerical viscosity as a function of flux limiter and characteristic speed for each conserved variable, distance between adjacent cell centers, and a scaling parameter. Motivated by Thornber et al. [16] study, the high numerical viscosity inherent to TVD-MUSCL schemes is mitigated using a z-factor that depends on local Mach number. The TVD limiters, along with the z-factor, were initially applied to the 1-D shock-tube and 2-D inviscid supersonic wedge flows. Spatial profiles of numerical viscosities are plotted, which provide insights into the role of these limiters in controlling the dissipative nature of Roe's flux while maintaining monotonicity and stability in regions of high gradients. Subsequently, a detailed investigation was performed of decaying homogeneous isotropic turbulence with varying degrees of compressibility. Spectra of numerical viscosity and dissipation rate are presented, which clearly demonstrate the effectiveness of the z-factor both in narrowing the wavenumber range in which dissipation occurs, and in shifting the location of dissipation peak closer to the cut-off wavenumber

  18. Physical and numerical sources of computational inefficiency in integration of chemical kinetic rate equations: Etiology, treatment and prognosis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pratt, D. T.; Radhakrishnan, K.

    1986-01-01

    The design of a very fast, automatic black-box code for homogeneous, gas-phase chemical kinetics problems requires an understanding of the physical and numerical sources of computational inefficiency. Some major sources reviewed in this report are stiffness of the governing ordinary differential equations (ODE's) and its detection, choice of appropriate method (i.e., integration algorithm plus step-size control strategy), nonphysical initial conditions, and too frequent evaluation of thermochemical and kinetic properties. Specific techniques are recommended (and some advised against) for improving or overcoming the identified problem areas. It is argued that, because reactive species increase exponentially with time during induction, and all species exhibit asymptotic, exponential decay with time during equilibration, exponential-fitted integration algorithms are inherently more accurate for kinetics modeling than classical, polynomial-interpolant methods for the same computational work. But current codes using the exponential-fitted method lack the sophisticated stepsize-control logic of existing black-box ODE solver codes, such as EPISODE and LSODE. The ultimate chemical kinetics code does not exist yet, but the general characteristics of such a code are becoming apparent.

  19. Numerical solution to the Boltzmann equation for use in calculating pumping rates in a CO sub 2 discharge laser. Master's thesis

    SciTech Connect

    Honey, D.A.

    1989-12-01

    The collisional Boltzmann equation was solved numerically to obtain excitation rates for use in a CO{sub 2} laser design program. The program was written in Microsoft QuickBasic for use on the IBM Personal Computer or equivalent. Program validation involved comparisons of computed transport coefficients with experimental data and previous theoretical work. Four different numerical algorithms were evaluated in terms of accuracy and efficiency. L-U decomposition was identified as the preferred approach. The calculated transport coefficients were found to agree with empirical data within one to five percent. The program was integrated into a CO{sub 2} laser design program. Studies were then performed to evaluate the effects on predicted laser output power and energy density as parameters affecting electron kinetics were changed. Plotting routines were written for both programs.

  20. Theoretical investigation of wave-vector-dependent analytical and numerical formulations of the interband impact-ionization transition rate for electrons in bulk silicon and GaAs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kolnik, Jan; Wang, Yang; Oguzman, Ismail H.; Brennan, Kevin F.

    1994-01-01

    The electron interband impact-ionization rate for both silicon and gallium arsenide is calculated using an ensemble Monte Carlo simulation with the expressed purpose of comparing different formulations of the interband ionization transition rate. Specifically, three different treatments of the transition rate are examined: the traditional Keldysh formula, a new k-dependent analytical formulation first derived by W. Quade, E. Scholl, and M. Rudan (1993), and a more exact, numerical method of Y. Wang and K. F. Brennan (1994). Although the completely numerical formulation contains no adjustable parameters and as such provides a very reliable result, it is highly computationally intensive. Alternatively, the Keldysh formular, although inherently simple and computationally efficient, fails to include the k dependence as well as the details of the energy band structure. The k-dependent analytical formulation of Quade and co-workers overcomes the limitations of both of these models but at the expense of some new parameterization. It is found that the k-dependent analytical method of Quade and co-workers produces very similar results to those obtained with the completely numerical model for some quantities. Specifically, both models predict that the effective threshold for impact ionization in GaAs and silicon is quite soft, that the majority of ionization events originate from the second conduction band in both materials, and that the transition rate is k dependent. Therefore, it is concluded that the k-dependent analytical model can qualitatively reproduce results similar to those obtained with the numerical model yet with far greater computational efficiency. Nevertheless, there exist some important drawbacks to the k-dependent analytical model of Quade and co-workers: These are that it does not accurately reproduce the quantum yield data for bulk silicon, it requires determination of a new parameter, related physically to the overlap intergrals of the Bloch state which

  1. Theoretical Investigation of Wave-Vector-Dependent Analytical and Numerical Formulations of the Interband Impact-Ionization Transition Rate for Electron in Bulk Silicon and GaAs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kolnik, Jan; Wang, Yang; Oguzman, Ismail H.; Brennan, Kevin F.

    1994-01-01

    The electron interband impact-ionization rate for both silicon and gallium arsenide is calculated using an ensemble Monte Carlo simulation with the expressed purpose of comparing different formulations of the interband ionization transition rate. Specifically, three different treatments of the transition rate are examined: the traditional Keldysh formula, a new k-dependent analytical formulation first derived by W. Quade, E Scholl, and M. Rudan, and a more exact, numerical method of Y. Wang and K. F. Brennan. Although the completely numerical formulation contains no adjustable parameters and as such provides a very reliable result, it is highly computationally intensive. Alternatively, the Keldysh formula, although inherently simple and computationally efficient, fails to include the k dependence as well as the details of the energy band structure. The k-dependent analytical formulation of Quade and co-workers overcomes the limitations of both of these models but at the expense of some new parameterization. It is found that the k-dependent analytical method of Quade and co-workers produces very similar results to those obtained with (he completely numerical model for some quantities. Specifically, both models predict that the effective threshold for impact ionization in GaAs and silicon is quite soft, that the majority of ionization events originate from the second conduction band in both materials, and that the transition rate is k dependent. Therefore, it is concluded that the k-dependent analytical model can qualitatively reproduce results similar to those obtained with the numerical model yet with far greater computational efficiency. Nevertheless, there exist some important drawbacks to the k-dependent analytical model of Quade and co-workers: These are that it does not accurately reproduce the quantum yield data for bulk silicon, it requires determination of a new parameter, related physically to (he overlap integrals of the Bloch state which can only be

  2. Experimental and Numerical Investigation into the Effect of Strain Rate Changes on Failure of AA7075 at the Elevated Temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zand, H.; Zhalehfar, F.; Vafaeesefat, A.

    2016-08-01

    This paper represents the temperature-dependent study which is performed on AA7075. This was performed through the application of deep drawing experiments at high temperature of 250, 300, 350, 400, 450 and 500°C and different forming speeds. FEM study is applied at room and 300 and 400 0C temperature with different strain rates. Softening model is used to model the thermo-mechanical constitutive equation. Forming limit curve models (based on M-K model) were used in the analysis of simulation results in order to predict the onset of necking. Simulation results were compared with experimental data to evaluate the accuracy of onset of necking simulation and failure location prediction

  3. Optimization of pumping rate and recharge through numerical modeling with special reference to small coral island aquifer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banerjee, Pallavi; Singh, V. S.

    The groundwater is the only source of availability of fresh water in tiny coral islands. In the past decades, there has been growing demand for fresh water to meet the need of domestic besides other purposes. The aquifer system on these islands is fragile besides being subjected to various stresses like high subsurface discharge, increased abstraction, improper disposal of waste water and tidal waves of ocean all of which subject the aquifer prone to sea water intrusion and thus reduction and deterioration the water quality. Therefore, understanding the aquifer’s behavior and then work out a sustainable option for fresh water is essential. The paper concerns optimizing of pumping and artificial recharge paces to reduce the effects of various stresses over tiny and fragile lens-shaped coral island aquifer system. The density driven ground water flow was simulated using SEAWAT (MODFLOW and MT3D based computer program) model. Detailed hydrogeological investigations were carried out to determine the quantity of freshwater that could be pumped to avoid the seawater intrusion into the aquifer through modeling. Initial heads, physical parameters and boundary conditions of the study area have been defined in the model based on field data, geophysical measurements and interpretations and hydrogeological studies. The model was calibrated by obtaining a match of computed and observed values of the water table, as hydraulic head is much more sensitive to pumping rates than any other stress. A few sentences about: flow model were utilized to derive optimal pumping rate; the effect of artificial recharge through the model, has also proved that the salt-water intrusion could be stopped by raising the water level through temporarily storing the artificially recharged water post construction of subsurface dam near the coast.

  4. Blood alcohol concentration at 0.06 and 0.10% causes a complex multifaceted deterioration of body movement control.

    PubMed

    Modig, Fredrik; Fransson, Per-Anders; Magnusson, Måns; Patel, Mitesh

    2012-02-01

    Alcohol-related falls are recognized as a major contributor to the occurrence of traumatic brain injury. The control of upright standing balance is complex and composes of contributions from several partly independent mechanisms such as appropriate information from multiple sensory systems and correct feedback and feed forward movement control. Analysis of multisegmented body movement offers a rarely used option for detecting the fine motor problems associated with alcohol intoxication. The study aims were to investigate whether (1) alcohol intoxication at 0.06 and 0.10% blood alcohol concentration (BAC) affected the body movements under unperturbed and perturbed standing; and (2) alcohol affected the ability for sensorimotor adaptation. Body movements were recorded in 25 participants (13 women and 12 men, mean age 25.1 years) at five locations (ankle, knee, hip, shoulder, and head) during quiet standing and during balance perturbations from pseudorandom pulses of calf muscle vibration over 200s with eyes closed or open. Tests were performed at 0.00, 0.06, and 0.10% BAC. The study revealed several significant findings: (1) an alcohol dose-specific effect; (2) a direction-specific stability decrease from alcohol intoxication; (3) a movement pattern change related to the level of alcohol intoxication during unperturbed standing and perturbed standing; (4) a sensorimotor adaptation deterioration with increased alcohol intoxication; and (5) that vision provided a weaker contribution to postural control during alcohol intoxication. Hence, alcohol intoxication at 0.06 and 0.10% BAC causes a complex multifaceted deterioration of human postural control.

  5. Assessment of external heat transfer coefficient during oocyte vitrification in liquid and slush nitrogen using numerical simulations to determine cooling rates.

    PubMed

    Santos, M V; Sansinena, M; Zaritzky, N; Chirife, J

    2012-01-01

    In oocyte vitrification, plunging directly into liquid nitrogen favor film boiling and strong nitrogen vaporization. A survey of literature values of heat transfer coefficients (h) for film boiling of small metal objects with different geometries plunged in liquid nitrogen revealed values between 125 to 1000 W per per square m per K. These h values were used in a numerical simulation of cooling rates of two oocyte vitrification devices (open-pulled straw and Cryotop), plunged in liquid and slush nitrogen conditions. Heat conduction equation with convective boundary condition was considered a linear mathematical problem and was solved using the finite element method applying the variational formulation. COMSOL Multiphysics was used to simulate the cooling process of the systems. Predicted cooling rates for OPS and Cryotop when cooled at -196 degree C (liquid nitrogen) or -207 degree C (average for slush nitrogen) for heat transfer coefficients estimated to be representative of film boiling, indicated lowering the cooling temperature produces only a maximum 10 percent increase in cooling rates; confirming the main benefit of plunging in slush over liquid nitrogen does not arise from their temperature difference. Numerical simulations also demonstrated that a hypothetical four-fold increase in the cooling rate of vitrification devices when plunging in slush nitrogen would be explained by an increase in heat transfer coefficient. This improvement in heat transfer (i.e., high cooling rates) in slush nitrogen is attributed to less or null film boiling when a sample is placed in slush (mixture of liquid and solid nitrogen) because it first melts the solid nitrogen before causing the liquid to boil and form a film.

  6. A Numerical Investigation of the Extinction of Low Strain Rate Diffusion Flames by an Agent in Microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Puri, Ishwar K.

    2004-01-01

    Our goal has been to investigate the influence of both dilution and radiation on the extinction process of nonpremixed flames at low strain rates. Simulations have been performed by using a counterflow code and three radiation models have been included in it, namely, the optically thin, the narrowband, and discrete ordinate models. The counterflow flame code OPPDIFF was modified to account for heat transfer losses by radiation from the hot gases. The discrete ordinate method (DOM) approximation was first suggested by Chandrasekhar for solving problems in interstellar atmospheres. Carlson and Lathrop developed the method for solving multi-dimensional problem in neutron transport. Only recently has the method received attention in the field of heat transfer. Due to the applicability of the discrete ordinate method for thermal radiation problems involving flames, the narrowband code RADCAL was modified to calculate the radiative properties of the gases. A non-premixed counterflow flame was simulated with the discrete ordinate method for radiative emissions. In comparison with two other models, it was found that the heat losses were comparable with the optically thin and simple narrowband model. The optically thin model had the highest heat losses followed by the DOM model and the narrow-band model.

  7. Integral quantification of contaminant mass flow rates in a contaminated aquifer: conditioning of the numerical inversion of concentration-time series.

    PubMed

    Herold, Maria; Ptak, Thomas; Bayer-Raich, Marti; Wendel, Thomas; Grathwohl, Peter

    2009-04-15

    A series of integral pumping tests (IPTs) has been conducted at a former gasworks site to quantify the contaminant mass flow rates and average concentration in groundwater along three control planes across the groundwater flow direction. The measured concentration-time series were analysed numerically with the help of the inversion code CSTREAM and a flow and transport model representing the highly heterogeneous aquifer. Since the control planes cover the entire downstream width of the potentially contaminated area, they allow conclusions to be drawn about the current location and spread of the contaminant plume. Previous evaluations of integral pumping tests could calculate three scenarios concerning the spread of the plume around the IPT well: (i) the plume is located to the right of the pumping well, (ii) to the left, or (iii) is distributed symmetrically around it. To create a more realistic picture of the plume position, a series of direct-push monitoring wells were installed along one control plane. The concentrations found in these wells were included in the numerical analysis to condition the numerical inversion results, and allowed the identification of a more pronounced plume centre and fringe, which supports the development of optimised remediation strategies. PMID:19167131

  8. Integral quantification of contaminant mass flow rates in a contaminated aquifer: Conditioning of the numerical inversion of concentration-time series

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herold, Maria; Ptak, Thomas; Bayer-Raich, Marti; Wendel, Thomas; Grathwohl, Peter

    2009-04-01

    A series of integral pumping tests (IPTs) has been conducted at a former gasworks site to quantify the contaminant mass flow rates and average concentration in groundwater along three control planes across the groundwater flow direction. The measured concentration-time series were analysed numerically with the help of the inversion code CSTREAM and a flow and transport model representing the highly heterogeneous aquifer. Since the control planes cover the entire downstream width of the potentially contaminated area, they allow conclusions to be drawn about the current location and spread of the contaminant plume. Previous evaluations of integral pumping tests could calculate three scenarios concerning the spread of the plume around the IPT well: (i) the plume is located to the right of the pumping well, (ii) to the left, or (iii) is distributed symmetrically around it. To create a more realistic picture of the plume position, a series of direct-push monitoring wells were installed along one control plane. The concentrations found in these wells were included in the numerical analysis to condition the numerical inversion results, and allowed the identification of a more pronounced plume centre and fringe, which supports the development of optimised remediation strategies.

  9. Integral quantification of contaminant mass flow rates in a contaminated aquifer: conditioning of the numerical inversion of concentration-time series.

    PubMed

    Herold, Maria; Ptak, Thomas; Bayer-Raich, Marti; Wendel, Thomas; Grathwohl, Peter

    2009-04-15

    A series of integral pumping tests (IPTs) has been conducted at a former gasworks site to quantify the contaminant mass flow rates and average concentration in groundwater along three control planes across the groundwater flow direction. The measured concentration-time series were analysed numerically with the help of the inversion code CSTREAM and a flow and transport model representing the highly heterogeneous aquifer. Since the control planes cover the entire downstream width of the potentially contaminated area, they allow conclusions to be drawn about the current location and spread of the contaminant plume. Previous evaluations of integral pumping tests could calculate three scenarios concerning the spread of the plume around the IPT well: (i) the plume is located to the right of the pumping well, (ii) to the left, or (iii) is distributed symmetrically around it. To create a more realistic picture of the plume position, a series of direct-push monitoring wells were installed along one control plane. The concentrations found in these wells were included in the numerical analysis to condition the numerical inversion results, and allowed the identification of a more pronounced plume centre and fringe, which supports the development of optimised remediation strategies.

  10. Fluvial Discharge Rates of Martian Gullies: Slope Measurements From Stereo HiRISE Images and Numerical Modeling of Sediment Transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parsons, R. A.; Nimmo, F.; Kreslavsky, M.

    2008-12-01

    Using a stereo pair of HiRISE images of a crater slope incised by fourteen gullies at -37.86 N, 217.92 E we calculate relative elevation changes between pairs of hand-selected points. Using the method of Kreslavsky [1]. The background slope on which the gullies are located has a slope of 22 degrees. Out of the five gullies we analyzed, all show a steadily decreasing slope from an average of 30 ± 4 degrees at the alcove to 16 ± 2 degrees at the apron. These measurements are in agreement with previous gully slope measurements done at MOLA resolution in a different region [2]. The slope beyond the base of the gully aprons is 4±1 degrees. The depth of alcove incision in nine of the gullies is 17±8.5~m. We take advantage of this slope and incision data to determine the evolution of a one-dimensional gully profile over time with a 1D sediment transport model [3]. The shear stress applied to the channel bed by flowing water is τ = ρ g h sinθ where h is the channel depth, g is gravity, and h is the channel depth. The rate of transport is non-linearly related to τ/τrg where the reference stress for a gravel bed is τrg = 0.035 ( (s-1)ρ g Dg ) where s is the ratio of sediment to water density, ρ is 1000~m3, and Dg is the sediment grainsize. The two significant unknowns in applying the theory to Martian gullies are the sediment grainsize and channel depth. We ran simulations for various channel depths and grainsizes to get a range of water discharges and simulation times that result in alcoves 25~m deep. Erosion is rapid due to the high slopes; incision rates decrease with decreasing channel depth and increasing grainsize. For grains 20~cm in diameter and a conservatively low channel depth of 20~cm, alcove incision occurs over a 5~h period, discharging a volume of 8500 m3 of water. These discharges assume a 1~m wide channel and a constant, bank-full discharge over the duration of the simulation. Gullies are spaced about every 500~m along the slope. If liquid water

  11. Impacts of a Sub-Slab Aggregate Layer and a Sub-Aggregate Membrane on Radon Entry Rate: A Numerical Study

    SciTech Connect

    Bonnefous, Y.C.; Gadgil, A.J.; Revzan, K.L.; Fisk, W.J.; Riley, W.J.

    1993-01-01

    A subslab aggregate layer can increase the radon entry rate into a building by up to a factor of 5. We use a previously tested numerical technique to investigate and confirm this phenomenon. Then we demonstrate that a sub-aggregate membrane has the potential to significantly reduce the increase in radon entry rate due to the aggregate layer, even when a gap exists between the perimeter of the membrane and the footer. Such membranes greatly reduce diffusion of radon from the soil into the aggregate and are impermeable to flow. Radon entry through the basement floor slab is limited to radon entry through the holes in the membrane. In addition, a sub-aggregate membrane is predicted to improve the performance of active sub-slab ventilation systems and makes passive systems more promising.

  12. Computation of the time-varying flow rate from an artesian well in central Dade County, Florida, by analytical and numerical simulation methods

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Merritt, Michael L.

    1995-01-01

    To construct a digital simulation of a plume of brackish water in the surficial Biscayne aquifer of central Dade County, Florida, that originated from a flowing artesian well, it was necessary to quantify the rate of spillage and the consequent point-source loading of the aquifer. However, a flow-rate measurement (2,350 gallons per minute) made 2 months after drilling of the well in 1944 was inconsistent with later measurements (1,170 gallons per minute) in 1964, 1965, and 1969. Possible explanations were the: (1) drawdown of the aquifer over time; (2) raising of the altitude at which the water was discharged; (3) installation of 80 feet of 8-inch liner; (4) an increase in the density of the flowing water; and (5) gradual deterioration of the well casing. The first approach to reconciling the measured flow rates was to apply a form of the equation for constant-drawdown analysis often used to estimate aquifer transmissivity. Next, a numerical simulation analysis was made that pro- vided the means to account for friction loss in the well and recharge across vertically adjacent con- fining layers and from lateral boundaries. The numerical analysis required the construction of a generalized model of the subsurface from the surficial Biscayne aquifer to the cavernous, dolomitic Boulder Zone at a depth of 3,000 feet. Calibration of the generalized flow model required that the moddle confining unit of the Floridan aquifer system separating the artesian flow zone in the Upper Floridan aquifer from the Lower Floridan aquifer (the Boulder Zone) have a vertical hydraulic conductivity of at least 1 foot per day. The intermediate confining unit separating the flow zone from the surficial Biscayne aquifer was assigned a much lower hydraulic conductivity (0.01 foot per day or less). The model indicated that the observed mounding of Upper Floridan aquifer heads along the axis of the Florida Peninsula was related to the variable depth of the freshwater and brackish-water zone

  13. Process advances to achieve ultra-shallow junctions for 0.10 μm technology requirements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bertuch, Adam F.; Zhao, Zhiyong; Downey, Daniel F.; Falk, Scott W.

    1999-06-01

    Ion implants of 11B+, 49BF2+, 31P+ and 75As+ at energies as low as 0.25 keV at various doses were implanted and rapid thermal annealed (RTA) with controlled O2 levels in N2 ambient to investigate the effects of oxygen during anneal. For each of these implant species, an optimal RTA ambient of O2 in N2 is established which maximizes retained dose and uniformity while minimizing oxidation enhanced diffusion (OED) and other oxygen related diffusion effects. TEM analysis was performed for all species and energy thresholds identified (at 1e15/cm2), below which no extended-defects or loops were observed to form and hence a regime where transient enhanced diffusion (TED) should not affect dopant diffusion. In this energy regime with anneals in a low ppm O2 in N2 ambient, the contributions from TED, OED, BED (boridation enhanced diffusion or other dopant enhanced diffusion effects) are minimized/eliminated. With these enhanced diffusion mechanisms under control, the effects of minimizing the thermal diffusion by controlled "slow" and "fast" spike anneals (<0.1s) are investigated. Taking advantage of these various processing techniques, source/drain extension requirements to satisfy the National Technology Roadmap (NTRS) requirements at the 0.10 μm node are satisfied for the p-extension by both B (0.25 to 0.5 keV) and BF2 (1.1 to 2.2 keV). In addition, n-extension requirements are meet for As+ (1.0 to 2.0 keV), and P+ (1.0 to 5.0 keV) for contact junctions are reviewed for the NTRS requirements at 0.10μm geometries.

  14. Development and numerical/experimental characterization of a lab-scale flat flame reactor allowing the analysis of pulverized solid fuel devolatilization and oxidation at high heating rates.

    PubMed

    Lemaire, R; Menanteau, S

    2016-01-01

    This paper deals with the thorough characterization of a new experimental test bench designed to study the devolatilization and oxidation of pulverized fuel particles in a wide range of operating conditions. This lab-scale facility is composed of a fuel feeding system, the functioning of which has been optimized by computational fluid dynamics. It allows delivering a constant and time-independent mass flow rate of fuel particles which are pneumatically transported to the central injector of a hybrid McKenna burner using a carrier gas stream that can be inert or oxidant depending on the targeted application. A premixed propane/air laminar flat flame stabilized on the porous part of the burner is used to generate the hot gases insuring the heating of the central coal/carrier-gas jet with a thermal gradient similar to those found in industrial combustors (>10(5) K/s). In the present work, results issued from numerical simulations performed a priori to characterize the velocity and temperature fields in the reaction chamber have been analyzed and confronted with experimental measurements carried out by coupling particle image velocimetry, thermocouple and two-color pyrometry measurements so as to validate the order of magnitude of the heating rate delivered by such a new test bench. Finally, the main features of the flat flame reactor we developed have been discussed with respect to those of another laboratory-scale system designed to study coal devolatilization at a high heating rate. PMID:26827350

  15. Development and numerical/experimental characterization of a lab-scale flat flame reactor allowing the analysis of pulverized solid fuel devolatilization and oxidation at high heating rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lemaire, R.; Menanteau, S.

    2016-01-01

    This paper deals with the thorough characterization of a new experimental test bench designed to study the devolatilization and oxidation of pulverized fuel particles in a wide range of operating conditions. This lab-scale facility is composed of a fuel feeding system, the functioning of which has been optimized by computational fluid dynamics. It allows delivering a constant and time-independent mass flow rate of fuel particles which are pneumatically transported to the central injector of a hybrid McKenna burner using a carrier gas stream that can be inert or oxidant depending on the targeted application. A premixed propane/air laminar flat flame stabilized on the porous part of the burner is used to generate the hot gases insuring the heating of the central coal/carrier-gas jet with a thermal gradient similar to those found in industrial combustors (>105 K/s). In the present work, results issued from numerical simulations performed a priori to characterize the velocity and temperature fields in the reaction chamber have been analyzed and confronted with experimental measurements carried out by coupling particle image velocimetry, thermocouple and two-color pyrometry measurements so as to validate the order of magnitude of the heating rate delivered by such a new test bench. Finally, the main features of the flat flame reactor we developed have been discussed with respect to those of another laboratory-scale system designed to study coal devolatilization at a high heating rate.

  16. Morphologies of ˜190,000 Galaxies at z = 0-10 Revealed with HST Legacy Data. I. Size Evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shibuya, Takatoshi; Ouchi, Masami; Harikane, Yuichi

    2015-08-01

    We present the redshift evolution of the galaxy effective radius re obtained from the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) samples of ˜190,000 galaxies at z = 0-10. Our HST samples consist of 176,152 photo-z galaxies at z = 0-6 from the 3D-HST+CANDELS catalog and 10,454 Lyman break galaxies (LBGs) at z = 4-10 identified in the Cosmic Assembly Near-infrared Deep Extragalactic Legacy Survey (CANDELS), HUDF 09/12, and HFF parallel fields, providing the largest data set to date for galaxy size evolution studies. We derive re with the same technique over the wide redshift range of z = 0-10, evaluating the optical-to-UV morphological K correction and the selection bias of photo-z galaxies+LBGs as well as the cosmological surface-brightness dimming effect. We find that re values at a given luminosity significantly decrease toward high z, regardless of statistics choices (e.g., {r}{{e}}\\propto {(1+z)}-1.10+/- 0.06 for median). For star-forming galaxies, there is no evolution of the power-law slope of the size-luminosity relation and the median Sérsic index (n˜ 1.5). Moreover, the re distribution is well represented by log-normal functions whose standard deviation {σ }{ln{r}{{e}}} does not show significant evolution within the range of {σ }{ln{r}{{e}}}˜ 0.45-0.75. We calculate the stellar-to-halo size ratio from our re measurements and the dark-matter halo masses estimated from the abundance-matching study, and we obtain a nearly constant value of {r}{{e}}/{r}{vir}=1.0%-3.5% at z = 0-8. The combination of the re-distribution shape+standard deviation, the constant {r}{{e}}/{r}{vir}, and n˜ 1.5 suggests a picture in which typical high-z star-forming galaxies have disk-like stellar components in a sense of dynamics and morphology over cosmic time of z˜ 0-6. If high-z star-forming galaxies are truly dominated by disks, the {r}{{e}}/{r}{vir} value and the disk-formation model indicate that the specific angular momentum of the disk normalized by the host halo is {j

  17. Numerical rate equation modelling of a 1.61 μm pumped ~2 μm Tm 3+-doped tellurite fibre laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richards, Billy D. O.; Evans, Craig A.; Ikonić, Zoran; Harrison, Paul; Tsang, Yuen H.; Binks, David J.; Lousteau, Joris; Jha, Animesh

    2008-04-01

    Near- and mid-infrared fibre lasers find many applications in areas such as remote and chemical sensing, lidar and medicine, and tellurite fibres offer advantages over other common fibre glasses such a lower phonon energy and higher rare-earth ion solubility than silicate glasses, and greater chemical and environmental stability than fluoride glasses. Rate equation modelling is a very useful tool for the characterisation and performance prediction of new rare earth transitions in these novel fibre materials. We present the numerical rate equation modelling results for a ~2 μm Tm 3+-doped tellurite fibre laser when pumped with a 1.6 μm Er 3+/Yb 3+-doped double-clad silica fibre laser. A maximum slope efficiency of 76% with respect to launched pump power was achieved in the experimental fibre laser set up with a 32 cm long fibre. The high slope efficiency is very close to the Stokes efficiency limit of ~82% which is due to the in-band pumping scheme employed and the lack of pump excited state absorption. The two-level rate equations involving absorption and emission between the Tm 3+: 3H 6 and 3F 4 levels have been solved iteratively using a fourth-order Runge-Kutta algorithm and the results compared with the experimental results. For the 32 cm fibre with output coupler reflectivities of 12%, 50%, 70% and 90%, the respective theoretical slope efficiencies of 73%, 64%, 53% and 29% are in very good agreement with the experimentally measured values of 76%, 60%, 48% and 33%.

  18. Numerical Boundary Condition Procedures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1981-01-01

    Topics include numerical procedures for treating inflow and outflow boundaries, steady and unsteady discontinuous surfaces, far field boundaries, and multiblock grids. In addition, the effects of numerical boundary approximations on stability, accuracy, and convergence rate of the numerical solution are discussed.

  19. Are large concentration of atomic H storable in tritium-impregnated solid in H2 below 0.10 K

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosen, G.; Webeler, R. W. H.

    1979-01-01

    The storage and release of atomic hydrogen produced by the beta decay of tritium contained in a crystalline solid H2 matrix at concentrations greater than 2% and temperatures below 0.80 K are investigated. The temperature of a sample chamber containing tritium-impregnated H2 and placed in the mixing chamber of a dilution refrigerator was measured as the chamber was heated and cooled in order to determine the rates of energy storage and release. It is found that for samples containing 1.2 wt.% tritium, after storage at 0.054 K for 40 h, an increase in sample temperature to a trigger point of 0.17 K leads to an energy release due to the destabilization of atomic H in H2 as predicted by the phenomenological rate process theory. For a tritium weight fraction of 2.5%, energy releases were triggered at 0.54 and 0.82 K after storage at 0.080 K, indicating the trapping of H atoms at the sites of T2 and HT molecules in the sample. The application of a 15 kG magnetic field is shown to increase the storage capacity of T2 traps while reducing that of HT traps, and to lower the trigger temperatures of both. Results suggest that the direct conversion of nuclear energy to chemical energy may become technically feasible in the future.

  20. Numerical analysis of specific absorption rate in the human head due to a 13.56 MHz RFID-based intra-ocular pressure measurement system.

    PubMed

    Hirtl, Rene; Schmid, Gernot

    2013-09-21

    A modern wireless intra-ocular pressure monitoring system, based on 13.56 MHz inductively coupled data transmission, was dosimetrically analyzed with respect to the specific absorption rate (SAR) induced inside the head and the eye due to the electromagnetic field exposure caused by the reader antenna of the transmission system. The analysis was based on numerical finite difference time domain computations using a high resolution anatomical eye model integrated in a modern commercially available anatomical model of a male head. Three different reader antenna configurations, a 7-turn elliptic (30 mm × 50 mm) antenna at 12 mm distance from the eye, a flexible circular antenna (60 mm diameter, 8 turns on 2 mm substrate) directly attached to the skin, and a circular 7-turn antenna (30 mm diameter at 12 mm distance to the eye) were analyzed, respectively. Possible influences of the eye-lid status (closed or opened) and the transponder antenna contained in a contact lens directly attached to the eye were taken into account. The results clearly demonstrated that for typical reader antenna currents required for proper data transmission, the SAR values remain far below the limits for localized exposure of the head, as defined by the International Commission for Non-Ionizing Radiation Protection. Particularly the induced SAR inside the eye was found to be substantially (orders of magnitudes for typical reader antenna currents in the order of 1 A turn) below values which have been reported to be critical with respect to thermally induced adverse health effects in eye tissues. PMID:24002053

  1. Numerical analysis of specific absorption rate in the human head due to a 13.56 MHz RFID-based intra-ocular pressure measurement system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirtl, Rene; Schmid, Gernot

    2013-09-01

    A modern wireless intra-ocular pressure monitoring system, based on 13.56 MHz inductively coupled data transmission, was dosimetrically analyzed with respect to the specific absorption rate (SAR) induced inside the head and the eye due to the electromagnetic field exposure caused by the reader antenna of the transmission system. The analysis was based on numerical finite difference time domain computations using a high resolution anatomical eye model integrated in a modern commercially available anatomical model of a male head. Three different reader antenna configurations, a 7-turn elliptic (30 mm × 50 mm) antenna at 12 mm distance from the eye, a flexible circular antenna (60 mm diameter, 8 turns on 2 mm substrate) directly attached to the skin, and a circular 7-turn antenna (30 mm diameter at 12 mm distance to the eye) were analyzed, respectively. Possible influences of the eye-lid status (closed or opened) and the transponder antenna contained in a contact lens directly attached to the eye were taken into account. The results clearly demonstrated that for typical reader antenna currents required for proper data transmission, the SAR values remain far below the limits for localized exposure of the head, as defined by the International Commission for Non-Ionizing Radiation Protection. Particularly the induced SAR inside the eye was found to be substantially (orders of magnitudes for typical reader antenna currents in the order of 1 A turn) below values which have been reported to be critical with respect to thermally induced adverse health effects in eye tissues.

  2. Practical Dyspnea Assessment: Relationship Between the 0–10 Numerical Rating Scale and the Four-Level Categorical Verbal Descriptor Scale of Dyspnea Intensity

    PubMed Central

    Wysham, Nicholas G.; Miriovsky, Benjamin J.; Currow, David C.; Herndon, James E.; Samsa, Gregory P.; Wilcock, Andrew; Abernethy, Amy P.

    2016-01-01

    Context Measurement of dyspnea is important for clinical care and research. Objectives To characterize the relationship between the 0–10 Numerical Rating Scale (NRS) and four-level categorical Verbal Descriptor Scale (VDS) for dyspnea assessment. Methods This was a substudy of a double-blind randomized controlled trial comparing palliative oxygen to room air for relief of refractory breathlessness in patients with life-limiting illness. Dyspnea was assessed with both a 0–10 NRS and a four-level categorical VDS over the one-week trial. NRS and VDS responses were analyzed in cross section and longitudinally. Relationships between NRS and VDS responses were portrayed using descriptive statistics and visual representations. Results Two hundred twenty-six participants contributed responses. At baseline, mild and moderate levels of breathlessness were reported by 41.9% and 44.6% of participants, respectively. NRS scores demonstrated increasing mean and median levels for increasing VDS intensity, from a mean (SD) of 0.6 (±1.04) for VDS none category to 8.2 (1.4) for VDS severe category. The Spearman correlation coefficient was strong at 0.78 (P < 0.0001). Based on the distribution of NRS scores within VDS categories, we calculated test characteristics of two different cutpoint models. Both models yielded 75% correct translations from NRS to VDS; however, Model A was more sensitive for moderate or greater dyspnea, with fewer misses downcoded. Conclusion There is strong correlation between VDS and NRS measures for dyspnea. Proposed practical cutpoints for the relationship between the dyspnea VDS and NRS are 0 for none, 1–4 for mild, 5–8 for moderate, and 9–10 for severe. PMID:26004401

  3. Teamwork for Oversight of Processes and Systems (TOPS). Implementation guide for TOPS version 2.0, 10 August 1992

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strand, Albert A.; Jackson, Darryl J.

    As the nation redefines priorities to deal with a rapidly changing world order, both government and industry require new approaches for oversight of management systems, particularly for high technology products. Declining defense budgets will lead to significant reductions in government contract management personnel. Concurrently, defense contractors are reducing administrative and overhead staffing to control costs. These combined pressures require bold approaches for the oversight of management systems. In the Spring of 1991, the DPRO and TRW created a Process Action Team (PAT) to jointly prepare a Performance Based Management (PBM) system titled Teamwork for Oversight of Processes and Systems (TOPS). The primary goal is implementation of a performance based management system based on objective data to review critical TRW processes with an emphasis on continuous improvement. The processes are: Finance and Business Systems, Engineering and Manufacturing Systems, Quality Assurance, and Software Systems. The team established a number of goals: delivery of quality products to contractual terms and conditions; ensure that TRW management systems meet government guidance and good business practices; use of objective data to measure critical processes; elimination of wasteful/duplicative reviews and audits; emphasis on teamwork--all efforts must be perceived to add value by both sides and decisions are made by consensus; and synergy and the creation of a strong working trust between TRW and the DPRO. TOPS permits the adjustment of oversight resources when conditions change or when TRW systems performance indicate either an increase or decrease in surveillance is appropriate. Monthly Contractor Performance Assessments (CPA) are derived from a summary of supporting system level and process-level ratings obtained from objective process-level data. Tiered, objective, data-driven metrics are highly successful in achieving a cooperative and effective method of measuring

  4. Teamwork for Oversight of Processes and Systems (TOPS). Implementation guide for TOPS version 2.0, 10 August 1992

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Strand, Albert A.; Jackson, Darryl J.

    1992-01-01

    As the nation redefines priorities to deal with a rapidly changing world order, both government and industry require new approaches for oversight of management systems, particularly for high technology products. Declining defense budgets will lead to significant reductions in government contract management personnel. Concurrently, defense contractors are reducing administrative and overhead staffing to control costs. These combined pressures require bold approaches for the oversight of management systems. In the Spring of 1991, the DPRO and TRW created a Process Action Team (PAT) to jointly prepare a Performance Based Management (PBM) system titled Teamwork for Oversight of Processes and Systems (TOPS). The primary goal is implementation of a performance based management system based on objective data to review critical TRW processes with an emphasis on continuous improvement. The processes are: Finance and Business Systems, Engineering and Manufacturing Systems, Quality Assurance, and Software Systems. The team established a number of goals: delivery of quality products to contractual terms and conditions; ensure that TRW management systems meet government guidance and good business practices; use of objective data to measure critical processes; elimination of wasteful/duplicative reviews and audits; emphasis on teamwork--all efforts must be perceived to add value by both sides and decisions are made by consensus; and synergy and the creation of a strong working trust between TRW and the DPRO. TOPS permits the adjustment of oversight resources when conditions change or when TRW systems performance indicate either an increase or decrease in surveillance is appropriate. Monthly Contractor Performance Assessments (CPA) are derived from a summary of supporting system level and process-level ratings obtained from objective process-level data. Tiered, objective, data-driven metrics are highly successful in achieving a cooperative and effective method of measuring

  5. Magneto-transport studies on Bi2Te2+xSe1-x (x = 0.05 and 0.10) topological insulators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Irfan, Bushra; Chatterjee, Ratnamala

    2016-09-01

    Bi2Te2Se is one of the most promising three dimensional topological insulators, for the study of surface states. In this work, we report the results of transport and magneto-transport behavior of Bi2Te2+xSe1-x (x =0.05 and 0.10) single crystals grown using modified Bridgeman technique. Resistance versus temperature measurements show semiconducting behavior for x = 0.05 and 0.10 crystals. Linear magnetoresistance is observed for Bi2Te2.05Se0.95 (i.e. x =0.05 ) whereas, Bi2Te2.10Se0.90 (x =0.10 ) single crystal shows a conductance fluctuations at low magnetic field.

  6. Numerical Evaluation of Strain Rate Effect on Mechanical and Electromechanical Coupling Responses in BaTiO3 Single-Crystal Nanofilm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Xiao Bao; Yang, Xin Hua; Cao, Wei Zhong

    2014-02-01

    The mechanical and electromechanical coupling responses of a ferroelectric single-crystal nanofilm under displacement loading at different strain rates have been simulated using the molecular dynamics method based on the shell model. While the linear stress-strain relation is independent of the strain rate, strong strain rate dependence is exhibited in the electromechanical coupling response for strain rates between 0 ns-1 and 0.5 ns-1. There is an approximate semilogarithmic linear relationship between the polarization stability strain and the strain rate. With increasing strain rate, local 180° domain switches take place sequentially from inside to outside in the stable domain structure evolution, and the number of domain walls increases. However, after the strain rate exceeds 0.5 ns-1, it has almost no effect on the␣domain structure. This work is helpful for improving ferroelectric device design and expanding ferroelectric application fields.

  7. Calculation of Inter-Subchannel Turbulent Mixing Rate and Heat Transfer in a Triangular-Arrayed Rod Bundle Using Direct Numerical Simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Yudov, Yury V.

    2006-07-01

    The direct numerical simulation, extended to boundary - fitted coordinate, has been carried out for a fully-developed turbulent flow thermal hydraulics in a triangular rod bundle. The rod bundle is premised to be an infinite array. The spacer grid effects are ignored. The purpose of this work is to verify DNS methodology to be applied for deriving coefficients for inter-subchannel turbulent mixing and heat transfer on a rod. These coefficients are incorporated in subchannel analysis codes. To demonstrate the validity of this methodology, numerical calculation was performed for the bundle with the pitch to diameter ratio 1.2, at friction Reynolds number of 600 and Prandtl number of 1. The results for the hydraulic parameters are compared with published DNS data, and the results for the heat exchange coefficients -- with those obtained using semi-empirical correlations. (authors)

  8. Evaluation of dispersive mixing, extension rate and bubble size distribution using numerical simulation of a non-Newtonian fluid in a twin-screw mixer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rathod, Maureen L.

    Initially 3D FEM simulation of a simplified mixer was used to examine the effect of mixer configuration and operating conditions on dispersive mixing of a non-Newtonian fluid. Horizontal and vertical velocity magnitudes increased with increasing mixer speed, while maximum axial velocity and shear rate were greater with staggered paddles. In contrast, parallel paddles produced an area of efficient dispersive mixing between the center of the paddle and the barrel wall. This study was expanded to encompass the complete nine-paddle mixing section using power-law and Bird-Carreau fluid models. In the center of the mixer, simple shear flow was seen, corresponding with high [special character omitted]. Efficient dispersive mixing appeared near the barrel wall at all flow rates and near the barrel center with parallel paddles. Areas of backflow, improving fluid retention time, occurred with staggered paddles. The Bird-Carreau fluid showed greater influence of paddle motion under the same operating conditions due to the inelastic nature of the fluid. Shear-thinning behavior also resulted in greater maximum shear rate as shearing became easier with decreasing fluid viscosity. Shear rate distributions are frequently calculated, but extension rate calculations have not been made in a complex geometry since Debbaut and Crochet (1988) defined extension rate as the ratio of the third to the second invariant of the strain rate tensor. Extension rate was assumed to be negligible in most studies, but here extension rate is shown to be significant. It is possible to calculate maximum stable bubble diameter from capillary number if shear and extension rates in a flow field are known. Extension rate distributions were calculated for Newtonian and non-Newtonian fluids. High extension and shear rates were found in the intermeshing region. Extension is the major influence on critical capillary number and maximum stable bubble diameter, but when extension rate values are low shear rate has

  9. Computation of the time-varying flow rate from an artesian well in central Dade County, Florida, by analytical and numerical simulation methods

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Merritt, Michael L.

    1997-01-01

    Simulation modeling techniques can by used advantageously in estimating artesian flow rates of wells in the upper Floridan Aquifer or for estimating transmissivity based in measured flow rates. The generalized aquifer model was useful in testing conceptual models of the relation between the various aquifers and confining layers beneath the surface of Dade County.

  10. Pressure distributions obtained on a 0.10-scale model of the space shuttle Orbiter's forebody in the AEDC 16T propulsion wind tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Siemers, P. M., III; Henry, M. W.

    1986-01-01

    Pressure distribution test data obtained on a 0.10-scale model of the forward fuselage of the Space Shuttle Orbiter are presented without analysis. The tests were completed in the AEDC 16T Propulsion Wind Tunnel. The 0.10-scale model was tested at angles of attack from -2 deg to 18 deg and angles of side slip from -6 to 6 deg at Mach numbers from 0.25 to 1/5 deg. The tests were conducted in support of the development of the Shuttle Entry Air Data System (SEADS). In addition to modeling the 20 SEADS orifices, the wind-tunnel model was also instrumented with orifices to match Development Flight Instrumentation (DFI) port locations that existed on the Space Shuttle Orbiter Columbia (OV-102) during the Orbiter Flight Test program. This DFI simulation has provided a means of comparisons between reentry flight pressure data and wind-tunnel and computational data.

  11. Fabrication, spectral and laser performance of 5 at.% Yb3+ doped (La0.10Y0.90)2O3 transparent ceramic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Haojia; Yang, Qiuhong; Lu, Shenzhou; Huang, Dongdong; Wang, Yonggang; Wei, Zhiyi; Wang, Qing; Zhang, Yongdong

    2013-02-01

    A 5 at.% Yb3+ doped (La0.10Y0.90)2O3 transparent ceramic was fabricated with nano-powders and sintered in H2 atmosphere. Spectroscopic properties and laser performance of Yb:(La0.10Y0.90)2O3 ceramic were studied. The ceramic exhibits excellent spectroscopic properties, with broad absorption and emission bands, and its refractive index (n) is close to 2. The gain cross-section (σg) was calculated at different population inversion ratio (β) values. In addition, among Yb3+ doped YAG crystal, Y2O3 and (YLa)2O3 ceramic, (YLa)2O3 ceramic has the least pump intensity (Imin) of 1.25 KW cm-2. Furthermore, a diode-pumped C-W ceramic laser output has been demonstrated at 1075 nm with a slope-efficiency of 60.2%.

  12. Neutron powder diffraction study and magnetic properties in LaMn1-xCuxO3 (x=0.05, 0.10 and 0.15)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samantaray, B.; Srivastava, S. K.; Mohanty, S.; Ravi, S.; Dhiman, I.; Das, A.

    2010-05-01

    LaMn1-xCuxO3 (x=0.05 to 0.15) samples were prepared and their crystal structure and magnetic properties were studied by recording neutron powder diffraction patterns and M-H loops at different temperatures. Even though the samples were free from impurity, the x=0.05 and 0.10 samples are found to crystallize in mixture of R3¯c and Pnma space group with dominate fraction of former one. The phase fraction for x=0.10 sample is found to vary with temperature especially below the ferromagnetic TC. The x=0.15 sample could be refined based on Pnma space group. The patterns at low temperatures could be refined by considering magnetic reflections corresponding to ferromagnetic structure. The magnetic moments of Mn ion are found to be along b axis with typical value of 3.40(3)μB for x=0.10 sample. From the analysis of the diffraction patterns and the magnetization data, it is found that x=0.15 sample exhibit spin canting.

  13. Numerical Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Siegler, Robert S.; Braithwaite, David W.

    2016-01-01

    In this review, we attempt to integrate two crucial aspects of numerical development: learning the magnitudes of individual numbers and learning arithmetic. Numerical magnitude development involves gaining increasingly precise knowledge of increasing ranges and types of numbers: from non-symbolic to small symbolic numbers, from smaller to larger…

  14. Rates, causes, and dynamic of long-term landscape evolution of the South Atlantic "passive continental margin", Brazil and Namibia, as revealed by thermo-kinematic numerical modeling.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christian, Stippich; Anton, Glasmacher Ulrich; Peter, Christian, Hackspacher

    2014-05-01

    The aim of the research is to quantify the long-term landscape evolution of the South Atlantic passive continental margin (SAPCM) in SE-Brazil and NW-Namibia. Excellent onshore outcrop conditions and complete rift to post-rift archives between Sao Paulo and Porto Alegre and in the transition from Namibia to Angola (onshore Walvis ridge) allow a high precision quantification of exhumation, and uplift rates, influencing physical parameters, long-term acting forces, and process-response systems. Research will integrate the published and partly published thermochronological data from Brazil and Namibia, and test lately published new concepts on causes of long-term landscape evolution at rifted margins. The climate-continental margin-mantle coupled process-response system is caused by the interaction between endogenous and exogenous forces, which are related to the mantle-process driven rift - drift - passive continental margin evolution of the South Atlantic, and the climate change since the Early/Late Cretaceous climate maximum. Special emphasis will be given to the influence of long-living transform faults such as the Florianopolis Fracture Zone (FFZ) on the long-term topography evolution of the SAPCM's. A long-term landscape evolution model with process rates will be achieved by thermo-kinematic 3-D modeling (software code PECUBE and FastCape). Testing model solutions obtained for a multidimensional parameter space against the real thermochronological and geomorphological data set, the most likely combinations of parameter rates, and values can be constrained. The data and models will allow separating the exogenous and endogenous forces and their process rates.

  15. Ozone concentration and pulmonary response relationships for 6. 6-hour exposures with five hours of moderate exercise to 0. 08, 0. 10, and 0. 12 ppm

    SciTech Connect

    Horstman, D.H.; Folinsbee, L.J.; Ives, P.J.; Abdul-Salaam, S.; McDonnell, W.F. )

    1990-11-01

    The magnitudes of pulmonary responses we previously observed (1) following 6.6-h exposures to 0.12 ppm ozone (O3) suggested that responses would also occur with similar exposures at lower O3 concentrations. The objective of this study was to determine the extent of pulmonary function decrements, respiratory discomfort, and increased airway reactivity to methacholine induced by exposure to O3 below 0.12 ppm. Separate 6.6-h chamber exposures to 0.00, 0.08, 0.10, and 0.12 ppm O3 included six 50-min periods of moderate exercise (VE approximately equal to 39 L/min, HR approximately equal to 115 bpm, and VO2 approximately equal to 1.5 L/min). Each exercise period was followed by 10 min of rest. A 35-min lunch break was included midway through the exposure. Although not intended as an exact simulation, the overall duration, intensity, and metabolic requirements of the exercise performed were representative of a day of moderate to heavy work or play. Preexposure FEV1 averaged 4.39 L, and essentially no change (+0.03 L) occurred with exposure to 0.00 ppm O3. Significant decreases (p less than 0.01) of -0.31, -0.30, and -0.54 L were observed with exposures to 0.08, 0.10, and 0.12 ppm, respectively. The provocative dose of methacholine required to increase airway resistance by 100% (PD100) was 58 cumulative inhalation units (CIU) following exposure to 0.00 ppm and was significantly reduced (p less than 0.01) to 37 CIU at 0.08, 31 CIU at 0.10, and 26 CIU at 0.12 ppm O3; reductions in PD100 are considered indicative of increases in nonspecific airway responsiveness.

  16. Numerical simulation of a Trombe wall to predict the energy storage rate and time duration of room heating during the non-sunny periods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rabani, Mehran; Kalantar, Vali; Faghih, Ahmadreza K.; Rabani, Mehrdad; Rabani, Ramin

    2013-10-01

    In this paper, 2D numerical simulation of the Trombe wall performance and indoor air environment under unsteady state condition for a room located in Yazd, Iran are studied. The governing equations involve mass, momentum and energy conservation, which are discretized by the finite volume method after non-dimensionalization. The SIMPLER algorithm is used for coupling the velocity and pressure. The average absorbed solar radiation on the Trombe wall has been defined for different hours of the coldest period of the year (21 January-19 February) in Yazd. All equations have been solved together using a FORTAN code. The main aim of this research is to investigate the time duration of room heating during the non-sunny periods. The stored energy of the wall being delivered to the inside room was defined for different materials of the Trombe wall. The results show that the Trombe wall made of paraffin wax can keep the room warmer in comparison with other materials for about 9 h.

  17. Flow rates in the East Pacific rise (21/sup 0/N) hot springs, and numerical investigations of two regimes of hydrothermal circulation

    SciTech Connect

    Converse, D.R.

    1985-01-01

    Flow rates of 0.7 to 2.4 m/s were measured in the hot springs on the East Pacific Rise (21/sup 0/N). We estimate that the Southwest, National Geographic, and the OBS vents collectively discharge 2 x 10/sup 8/ watts and 150 kg H/sub 2/O/S. The lifetimes of hot springs can not exceed 40,000 years because of the limited heat supply. Mechanical or chemical clogging of the flow routes may shorten these lifetime significantly. We predict that less than 3% of the sulfide particles debouched by the hot springs settle near the vents.

  18. A QUARTER-CENTURY OF OBSERVATIONS OF COMET 10P/TEMPEL 2 AT LOWELL OBSERVATORY: CONTINUED SPIN-DOWN, COMA MORPHOLOGY, PRODUCTION RATES, AND NUMERICAL MODELING

    SciTech Connect

    Knight, Matthew M.; Schleicher, David G.; Schwieterman, Edward W.; Christensen, Samantha R.; Farnham, Tony L.

    2012-11-01

    We report on photometry and imaging of Comet 10P/Tempel 2 obtained at Lowell Observatory from 1983 through 2011. We measured a nucleus rotation period of 8.950 {+-} 0.002 hr from 16 nights of imaging acquired between 2010 September and 2011 January. This rotation period is longer than the period we previously measured in 1999, which was itself longer than the period measured in 1988, and demonstrates that Tempel 2 is continuing to spin down, presumably due to torques caused by asymmetric outgassing. A nearly linear jet was observed which varied little during a rotation cycle in both R and CN images acquired during the 1999 and 2010 apparitions. We measured the projected direction of this jet throughout the two apparitions and, under the assumption that the source region of the jet was near the comet's pole, determined a rotational pole direction of R.A./decl. = 151 Degree-Sign /+59 Degree-Sign from CN measurements and R.A./decl. = 173 Degree-Sign /+57 Degree-Sign from dust measurements (we estimate a circular uncertainty of 3 Degree-Sign for CN and 4 Degree-Sign for dust). Different combinations of effects likely bias both gas and dust solutions and we elected to average these solutions for a final pole direction of R.A./decl. = 162 Degree-Sign {+-} 11 Degree-Sign /+58 Degree-Sign {+-} 1 Degree-Sign . Photoelectric photometry was acquired on 3 nights in 1983, 2 nights in 1988, 19 nights in 1999/2000, and 10 nights in 2010/2011. The activity exhibited a steep 'turn-on' {approx}3 months prior to perihelion (the exact timing of which varies) and a relatively smooth decline after perihelion. The activity during the 1999 and 2010 apparitions was similar; limited data in 1983 and 1988 (along with IUE data from the literature) were systematically higher and the difference cannot be explained entirely by the smaller perihelion distance. We measured a 'typical' composition, in agreement with previous investigators. Monte Carlo numerical modeling with our pole solution best

  19. Pore Pressure Evolution in Shallow Subduction Earthquake Sequences and Effects on Aseismic Slip Transients -- Numerical Modeling With Rate and State Friction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Y.; Rice, J. R.

    2005-12-01

    In 3D modeling of long tectonic loading and earthquake sequences on a shallow subduction fault [Liu and Rice, 2005], with depth-variable rate and state friction properties, we found that aseismic transient slip episodes emerge spontaneously with only a simplified representation of effects of metamorphic fluid release. That involved assumption of a constant in time but uniformly low effective normal stress in the downdip region. As suggested by observations in several major subduction zones [Obara, 2002; Rogers and Dragert, 2003; Kodaira et al, 2004], the presence of fluids, possibly released from dehydration reactions beneath the seismogenic zone, and their pressurization within the fault zone may play an important role in causing aseismic transients and associated non-volcanic tremors. To investigate the effects of fluids in the subduction zone, particularly on the generation of aseismic transients and their various features, we develop a more complete physical description of the pore pressure evolution (specifically, pore pressure increase due to supply from dehydration reactions and shear heating, decrease due to transport and dilatancy during slip), and incorporate that into the rate and state based 3D modeling. We first incorporated two important factors, dilatancy and shear heating, following Segall and Rice [1995, 2004] and Taylor [1998]. In the 2D simulations (slip varies with depth only), a dilatancy-stabilizing effect is seen which slows down the seismic rupture front and can prevent rapid slip from extending all the way to the trench, similarly to Taylor [1998]. Shear heating increases the pore pressure, and results in faster coseismic rupture propagation and larger final slips. In the 3D simulations, dilatancy also stabilizes the along-strike rupture propagation of both seismic and aseismic slips. That is, aseismic slip transients migrate along the strike faster with a shorter Tp (the characteristic time for pore pressure in the fault core to re

  20. Validating the turbulence parameterization schemes of a numerical model using eddy dissipation rate and turbulent kinetic energy measurements in terrain-disrupted airflow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chan, P. W.

    2010-10-01

    A number of turbulence parameterization schemes are available in the latest version (6.0) of the Regional Atmospheric Modelling System (RAMS). Chan in Meteorol Atmos Phys 103:145-157, (2009), studied the performance of these schemes by simulating the eddy dissipation rate (EDR) distribution in the vicinity of the Hong Kong International Airport (HKIA) and comparing with the EDR measurements of remote-sensing instruments at the airport. For the e-l (turbulent kinetic energy - mixing length) scheme considered in that study, the asymptotic mixing length was assumed to be a constant. This assumption is changed in the present paper, a variable asymptotic mixing length is chosen and simulations of EDR fields are repeated for terrain-disrupted airflow in the vicinity of HKIA. It is found that, with a variable asymptotic mixing length, the performance of the e-l scheme is greatly improved. With suitable choice of the empirical constants in the turbulence closure, the accuracy of the EDR profile (in comparison with LIDAR and wind profiler measurements) is found to be comparable with that predicted by the Deardorff scheme. A study on the sensitivity of the simulation results to these empirical constants has also been performed. Moreover, as a follow-up of the previous study of Chan in Meteorol Atmos Phys 103:145-157, (2009), case studies have been conducted on the following issues of the model simulation of turbulence for aviation application: (a) the effect of vertical gridding on the simulation results, (b) possibility of false alarm (such as over-forecasting of EDR value) in light turbulence cases, and (c) the performance in the simulation of other turbulence intensity metric for aviation purpose, e.g. TKE.

  1. Numerical nebulae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rijkhorst, Erik-Jan

    2005-12-01

    The late stages of evolution of stars like our Sun are dominated by several episodes of violent mass loss. Space based observations of the resulting objects, known as Planetary Nebulae, show a bewildering array of highly symmetric shapes. The interplay between gasdynamics and radiative processes determines the morphological outcome of these objects, and numerical models for astrophysical gasdynamics have to incorporate these effects. This thesis presents new numerical techniques for carrying out high-resolution three-dimensional radiation hydrodynamical simulations. Such calculations require parallelization of computer codes, and the use of state-of-the-art supercomputer technology. Numerical models in the context of the shaping of Planetary Nebulae are presented, providing insight into their origin and fate.

  2. Investigation of dielectric and electrical behaviour of nanocrystalline Zn1-xMnxO (x=0 to 0.10) semiconductors synthesized by mechanical alloying

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choudhury, S.; Sain, S.; Mandal, M. K.; Pradhan, S. K.; Meikap, A. K.

    2016-07-01

    The results on the measurement of electric and dielectric behaviour and capacitance-voltage characteristics of Zn1-xMnxO (x=0 to 0.10) nanocrystalline semiconductors are reported. Direct current conductivity increases with the increase Mn concentration and its thermal behavior can be explained by adiabatic polaronic hopping model. The alternating current conductivity obeys a power law of temperature and frequency. The temperature exponent p strongly depends on Mn concentration. The temperature dependence of frequency exponent s suggests that the overlapping large polaron conduction model is the appropriate conduction mechanism for the investigated samples. The interfacial boundaries and grain contribution to the dielectric properties can be identified by the analysis of complex impedance. Relaxation behaviour of the samples can be explained from the analysis of the electric modulus. Formation of Schottky diode can be described from capacitance-voltage characteristic of the samples and different diode parameters can be extracted from it.

  3. Ozone-concentration and pulmonary-response relationships for 6. 6-hour exposures with five hours of moderate exercise to 0. 08, 0. 10, and 0. 12 ppm

    SciTech Connect

    Horstman, D.H.; Folinsbee, L.J.; Ives, P.J.; Salaam, S.A.; McDonnell, W.F.

    1990-01-01

    The magnitudes of pulmonary responses the authors previously observed (1) following 6.6-h exposure to 0.12 ppm ozone (O{sub 3}) suggested that responses would also occur with similar exposures at lower O{sub 3} concentrations. The objective of the study was to determine the extent of pulmonary function decrements, respiratory discomfort, and increased airway reactivity to methacholine induced by exposure to O{sub 3} below 0.12 ppm. Separate 6.6-h chamber exposures to 0.00, 0.08, 0.10, and 0.12 ppm O3 included six 50-min periods of moderate exercise (VE = 39 L/min, HR = 115 bpm, and VO2 = 1.5 L/min). Each exercise period was followed by 10 min of rest. A 35-min lunch break was included midway through the exposure. Although not intended as an exact simulation, the overall duration, intensity, and metabolic requirements of the exercise performed were representative of a day of moderate to heavy work or play. Preexposure FEV, averaged 4.39 L, and essentially no change (+0.03 L) occurred with exposure to 0.00 ppm O{sub 3}. Significant decreases (p<0.01) of -0.31, -0.30, and -0.54 L were observed with exposures to 0.08, 0.10, and 0.12 ppm, respectively. The study concludes that exposure to O{sub 3} at levels often found in ambient air while engaged in activity representative of a typical day of moderate to heavy work or play induced clinically meaningful pulmonary responses.

  4. Numerical Relativity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baker, John G.

    2009-01-01

    Recent advances in numerical relativity have fueled an explosion of progress in understanding the predictions of Einstein's theory of gravity, General Relativity, for the strong field dynamics, the gravitational radiation wave forms, and consequently the state of the remnant produced from the merger of compact binary objects. I will review recent results from the field, focusing on mergers of two black holes.

  5. Numerical Integration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sozio, Gerry

    2009-01-01

    Senior secondary students cover numerical integration techniques in their mathematics courses. In particular, students would be familiar with the "midpoint rule," the elementary "trapezoidal rule" and "Simpson's rule." This article derives these techniques by methods which secondary students may not be familiar with and an approach that…

  6. Theoretical study of hole initiated impact ionization in bulk silicon and GaAs using a wave-vector-dependent numerical transition rate formulation within an ensemble Monte Carlo calculation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oguzman, Ismail H.; Wang, Yang; Kolnik, Jan; Brennan, Kevin F.

    1995-01-01

    In this paper, calculations of the hole initiated interband impact ionization rate in bulk silicon and GaAs are presented based on an ensemble Monte Carlo simulation with the inclusion of a wave-vector-dependent numerical transition rate formulation. The ionization transition rate is determined for each of the three valence bands, heavy, light, and split-off, using Fermi's golden rule with a two-body, screened Coulomb interaction. The dielectric function used within the calculation is assumed to be wave-vector-dependent. Calculations of the field-dependent impact ionization rate as well as the quantum yield are presented. It is found from both the quantum yield results and examination of the hole distribution function that the effective threshold energy for hole initiated impact ionization is relatively soft, similar to that predicted for the corresponding electron initiated ionization events occur more frequently than either heavy or split-offf initiated ionization events in bulk silicon over the applied electric field strengths examined here, 250-500 kV/cm. Conversely,in GaAs, the vast majority of hole initated ionization events originate from holes within the split-off band.

  7. Structural and dynamic electromagnetic properties of Ni0.27 Cu0.10 Zn0.63 Alx Fe2-x O4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hossen, M. Belal; Hossain, A. K. M. Akther

    2015-08-01

    The influence of Al substitution on the structural and electromagnetic properties of Ni0.27Cu0.10Zn0.63AlxFe2 - xO4; (where x = 0.0 to x = 0.16 with step = 0.02) prepared by the combustion technique, has been investigated. X-ray diffraction analysis confirms the presence of single phase cubic spinel structure without any secondary phase. The lattice constant, theoretical density, bulk density and average grain size decreases with increasing Al content. B-H loops have been traced for all the compositions and the various hysteresis parameters like saturation induction, coercivity, remanance, remanance ratio and power loss have been studied as a function of Al content. The saturation induction and the initial permeability increases with sintering temperature up to 1150 °C where the maximum bulk density is obtained, while for higher sintering temperature they decrease. The variation of complex initial permeability for Al substituted NiCuZn ferrites can be presented as a form of semicircle so called the Cole-Cole plot and the relaxation phenomena were explained with various shapes of the plots. The analysis of complex impedance spectra by an equivalent circuit model were used to separate the grain and grain boundary resistance of various Ni0.27 Cu0.10 Zn0.63 Alx Fe2 - x O4 . The impedance plot showed the first semicircle at high frequency which corresponds to grain effect and the second semicircle at lower frequency which corresponds to grain boundary (conduction phenomenon). Both grain and grain boundary resistance increases with increasing Al content and the relative increase of grain resistance is larger than the grain boundary resistance. The frequency dependent conductivity results support the double (Jonscher's modified) power law,σT (ω) = σ (o) +A1 ω n1 +A2 ω n2 , and the results showed evidence of three types of conduction process at room temperature: (i) low frequency conductivity is due to long-range ordering (frequency independent or its tendency

  8. Structure, phase transition and impedance of Zn1- x Li x O (0.10 ≤ x ≤ 0.70) ceramic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmadu, U.; Salaudeen, Islamiyat Temitope

    2016-07-01

    Structural transformations of Li-doped Zn1- x Li x O (0.10 ≤ x ≤ 0.70) which was synthesised by solid-state reaction were investigated. XRD carried out on powder specimens of the samples show that they are polycrystalline in nature with a hexagonal wurtzite structure having minor impurities. The result indicates the maximum limit of substitution of Zn atoms by Li is at x = 0.4. The lattice parameter a reduced from 3.01 to 2.99 Å, while c reduced from 5.21 to 5.19 Å. However, the Zn-O bond length reduced from 1.88 to 1.87 Å for the undoped, to x = 0.60 for the doped, respectively. The c/ a ratio is 1.73 and is almost constant for all samples. The grain size of the (100) peak of the undoped ZnO is 41.73 nm and that of x = 0.10 is 41.76 nm. For x = 0.2-0.70, the grain size is 41.72 nm indicating that the grain size is almost independent of doping. The SEM results indicate a variation of grain size from 2.18 to 5.15 µm for the undoped ZnO to x = 0.50, which shows increase in grain size and reduction in grain boundaries as doping increases. The results show that x = 0.50 has the highest grain size and the one with the highest transition temperature is x = 0.6. DTA results indicate the structural phase transition temperature of the doped ZnO ranged from ~371 to ~409 K and increased as the amount of Li increases. A single arc is observed in all the impedance plots of the ZnO together with the presence of a relaxation process which is non-Debye. The impedance data show reduced resistance with increase in lithium content. A general increase in dielectric constant with increase in lithium content is observed.

  9. Pressure distributions obtained on a 0.10-scale model of the Space Shuttle Orbiter's forebody in the Ames Unitary Plan Wind Tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Siemers, P. M., III; Henry, M. W.

    1986-01-01

    Pressure distribution test data obtained on a 0.10-scale model of the forward fuselage of the Space Shuttle Orbiter are presented without analysis. The tests were completed in the Ames Unitary Wind Tunnel (UPWT). The UPWT tests were conducted in two different test sections operating in the continuous mode, the 8 x 7 feet and 9 x 7 feet test sections. Each test section has its own Mach number range, 1.6 to 2.5 and 2.5 to 3.5 for the 9 x 7 feet and 8 x 7 feet test section, respectively. The test Reynolds number ranged from 1.6 to 2.5 x 10 to the 6th power ft and 0.6 to 2.0 x 10 to the 6th power ft, respectively. The tests were conducted in support of the development of the Shuttle Entry Air Data System (SEADS). In addition to modeling the 20 SEADS orifices, the wind-tunnel model was also instrumented with orifices to match Development Flight Instrumentation (DFI) port locations that existed on the Space Shuttle Columbia (OV-102) during the Orbiter Flight test program. This DFI simulation has provided a means for comparisons between reentry flight pressure data and wind-tunnel and computational data.

  10. The experimental cascade curves of EAS at E sub 0 10(17) eV obtained by the method of detection of Cherenkov pulse shape

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fomin, Y. A.; Kalmykov, G. B.; Khristiansen, M. V.; Motova, M. V.; Nechin, Y. A.; Prosin, V. V.; Zhukov, V. Y.; Efimov, N. N.; Grigoriev, V. M.; Nikiforova, E. S.

    1985-01-01

    The individual cascade curves of EAS with E sub 0 10 to the 17th power eV/I to 3/ were studied by detection of EAS Cherenkov light pulses. The scintillators located at the center of the Yakutsk EAS array within a 500-m radius circle were used to select the showers and to determine the main EAS parameters. The individual cascade curves N(t) were obtained using the EAS Cherenkov light pulses satisfying the following requirements: (1) the signal-to-noise ratio fm/delta sub n 15, (2) the EAS axis-detector distance tau sub 350 m, (3) the zenith angle theta 30 deg, (4) the probability for EAS to be detected by scintillators W 0.8. Condition (1) arises from the desire to reduce the amplitude distortion of Cherenkov pulses due to noise and determines the range of EAS sizes, N(t). The resolution times of the Cherenkov pulse shape detectors are tau sub 0 approx. 23 ns which results in distortion of a pulse during the process of the detection. The distortion of pulses due to the finiteness of tau sub 0 value was estimated. It is shown that the rise time of pulse becomes greater as tau sub 0.5/tau sub 0 ratio decreases.

  11. Identifying the sources of ferromagnetism in sol-gel synthesized Zn1-xCoxO (0≤x≤0.10) nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beltrán, J. J.; Barrero, C. A.; Punnoose, A.

    2016-08-01

    We have carefully investigated the structural, optical and electronic properties and related them with changes in the magnetism of sol-gel synthesized Zn1-xCoxO (0≤x≤0.10) nanoparticles. Samples with x≤0.05 were free of spurious phases. Samples with x≤0.03 were found to be with only high spin Co2+ ions into ZnO structure, whereas sample with x=0.05, exhibited the presence of high spin Co2+ and low spin Co3+. We found that the intensity of the main EPR peak associated with Co2+ varies with the nominal Co content in a similar manner as the saturation magnetization and coercive field do. These results point out that the ferromagnetism in these samples should directly be correlated with the presence of divalent cobalt ions. Bound magnetic polaron (BMP) model and the charge transfer model are insufficient to explain the ferromagnetic properties of Zn1-xCoxO nanoparticles. The room temperature ferromagnetism (RTFM) may be originated from a combination of several factors such as the interaction of high spin Co2+ ions, perturbation/alteration and/or changes in the electronic structure of ZnO close to the valence band edge and grain boundary effects.

  12. Dielectric characterization of (1-x)PMN-xPT (x = 0.07 and 0.10) ceramics synthesized by an ethylene glycol-based soft chemical route.

    PubMed

    Tailor, Hamel N; Bokov, Alexei A; Ye, Zuo-Guang

    2011-09-01

    Materials based on relaxor ferroelectrics have become one of the most important families of functional materials being explored for such applications as sensors/actuators, micro-electromechanical systems (MEMS), non-volatile random access memories, and high-energy-density capacitors. Fabrication of high-quality relaxor-based ceramics remains, however, a challenging task. In this work, a new soft chemical synthetic method for the preparation of the complex perovskite-based relaxor ferroelectric solid solutions, (1-x)Pb(Mg(1/3)Nb(2/3))O(3)-xPbTiO(3) was developed using ethylene glycol as the solvent. Ceramics with compositions of x = 0.07 and 0.10 were prepared and it was found that a 10% stoichiometric excess of Pb(2+) was required to compensate for lead oxide volatility at the high temperatures used for sintering. The ceramics produced by this method show excellent dielectric properties at room temperature, such as a high dielectric constant (~20 000) and low loss over a large temperatures range (tan δ < 0.01 between 20 and 200°C). The temperature dependence of the dielectric constant exhibits typical relaxor ferroelectric behavior, fitting a quadratic law which describes the high-temperature slope of ε'(T) peak. The frequency dispersion of the temperature of maximum permittivity satisfies the Vogel-Fulcher law.

  13. [The level of DNA damage and DNA reparation rate in cells of earthworms sampled from natural populations for numerous generations inhabited territories with anthropogenically enhanced levels of radionuclides in soil].

    PubMed

    Kaneva, A V; Belykh, E S; Maystrenko, T A; Shadrin, D M; Pylina, Ya I; Velegzhaninov, I O

    2015-01-01

    Low doses of ionizing radiation and chemical toxic agent effects on biological systems on different organization levels have been studied by numerous researchers. But there is a clear lack of experimental data that allow one to reveal molecular and cellular adaptations of plants and animals from natural populations to adverse effects of environmental factors. The present study was aimed to assess genotoxic effects in earthworms Aporrectodea caliginosa Savigny and Lumbricus rubellus Hoffmeister sampled from the populations that during numerous generations inhabited the territories with a technogeneously enhanced content of natural origin radionuclides and heavy metals in soil. The levels ofthe DNA damage detected with alkaline and neutral versions of Comet-assay in invertebrates from contaminated territories were established not to differ from the spontaneous level found in the animals from the reference population. At the same time the rate of the DNA damage reparation induced in A. caliginosa sampled from the contaminated sites with additional acute γ-irradiation (4 Gy) was found to be considerably higher as compared with earthworms from the reference population.

  14. Magnetic and structural characteristics of multiferroic Fe3O4/(Bi3.25Nd0.65Eu0.10)Ti3O12 composite thin films deposited by metalorganic chemical vapor deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kobune, Masafumi; Furotani, Ryosuke; Fujita, Satoshi; Kikuchi, Kazuki; Kikuchi, Takeyuki; Fujisawa, Hironori; Shimizu, Masaru; Fukumuro, Naoki

    2016-10-01

    Ferromagnetic magnetite (Fe3O4) thin films for magnetoelectric multiferroic applications were deposited on (200) (Bi3.25Nd0.65Eu0.10)Ti3O12 (BNEuT)/(101) Nb:TiO2 substrates by metalorganic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD) using an iron(III) tris(2,2,6,6-tetramethyl-3,5-heptanedionato) precursor as the iron source. The BNEuT film utilized as a ferroelectric template material was in the form of freestanding nanoplates with narrow spaces between them. The effects of deposition conditions such as the deposition time and substrate temperature on the magnetic and structural characteristics of the Fe3O4/BNEuT composite films were investigated. All the films consisted of mostly single-phase Fe3O4 with a cubic inverse-spinel structure. When deposition was carried out at temperatures of 400-420 °C, the filling rates of particles introduced into the narrow spaces between the BNEuT nanoplates exhibited high values of 76-89% including the amorphous phase. This suggested that the deposition in this temperature range made progress according to the growth mechanism of MOCVD in the surface reaction rate determining state. Room-temperature magnetic moment-magnetic field curves for Fe3O4 thin films deposited at 400-500 °C for 60 min exhibited narrow rectangular hysteresis loops, indicating typical soft magnetic characteristics.

  15. Development of ferroelectric correlations in the quantum paraelectric and antiferrodistortive regimes in BaxSr1-xTiO3 (x ≤ 0.10)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hassnain Jaffari, G.; Mehmood, Zahid; Iqbal, Asad M.; Hasanain, S. K.; Ismat Shah, S.

    2014-08-01

    The dielectric response ɛ ( T ) of BaxSr1-xTiO3 (x ≤ 0.1) for compositions at and below the critical composition for the ferroelectric transition has been studied. With progressive Ba substitution, the growth of ferroelectric correlations and the weakening of the Antiferrodistortive (AFD) and the quantum paraelectric (QPE) effects have been studied by monitoring the changes in both the in and out of phase parts of the dielectric response. For the compositions close to pure SrTiO3 (x = 0 and x = 0.02), the temperature dependence exhibits a continuous rise in the in-phase part and no ferroelectric peak, consistent with the QPE behavior. With increasing Ba substitution, the low temperature behavior of the in phase part ɛ ' progressively changes from a continuous rise to exhibit a weak maximum and finally to a well developed cusp. For higher Ba concentrations, the low temperature peak (T ˜ 50K), which corresponds to ferroelectric correlations, becomes increasingly sharper until at the critical composition, x = 0.10, the system shows a single well defined ferroelectric peak. However, the out of phase response of the x = 0.1 composition exhibited a succession of three BaTiO3 type ferroelectric transitions. For x ≤ 0.04, the out of phase part shows evidence of an ordering around T ˜ 100K, which is the expected AFD ordering temperature. The deviations of the ɛ ' ( T ) data from the Curie-Weiss law have been analyzed within the frame work of two different theoretical models. It was determined that the dielectric behavior for lower concentrations of Ba (up to x ≤ 0.08) was explainable in terms of a model of non-interacting regions which are themselves homogeneously polarized and undergo a second order phase transition. For the phase boundary composition, i.e., x = 0.1, on the other hand, the data are explainable in terms of the Sherrington and Kirkpatrick model which includes the effects of weak correlations between the polar regions characterized by a glassy

  16. Double-exposure strategy using OPC and simulation and the performance on wafer with sub-0.10-μm design rule in ArF lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oh, Se-Young; Kim, Wan-Ho; Yune, Hyoung-Soon; Kim, Hee-Bom; Kim, Seo-Min; Ahn, Chang-Nam; Shin, Ki-Soo

    2002-07-01

    , registration between two stitched regions and stitching itself in the boundary. It is found from the experiment that total DOF of DE (double exposure) is 0.5 um and the total EL of DE is 10.0% in this paper. At present, it is very difficult to ensure stable process margin for the sub-0.10 um patterning. But there is a promising technology called stitching with special optimization. In addition, this technology will be nominated as an eternal candidate process whenever our lithography is in the adversity at the limits of his days.

  17. Understanding of the Effects of Ionic Strength on the Bimolecular Rate Constant between Structurally Identified Redox Enzymes and Charged Substrates Using Numerical Simulations on the Basis of the Poisson-Boltzmann Equation.

    PubMed

    Sugimoto, Yu; Kitazumi, Yuki; Shirai, Osamu; Yamamoto, Masahiro; Kano, Kenji

    2016-03-31

    To understand electrostatic interactions in biomolecules, the bimolecular rate constants (k) between redox enzymes and charged substrates (in this study, redox mediators in the electrode reaction) were evaluated at various ionic strengths (I) for the mediated bioelectrocatalytic reaction. The k value between bilirubin oxidase (BOD) and positively charged mediators increased with I, while that between BOD and negatively charged mediators decreased with I. The opposite trend was observed for the reaction of glucose oxidase (GOD). In the case of noncharged mediators, the k value was independent of I for both BOD and GOD. These results reflect the electrostatic interactions between the enzymes and the mediators. Furthermore, we estimated k/k° (k° being the thermodynamic rate constant) by numerical simulation (finite element method) based on the Poisson-Boltzmann (PB) equation. By considering the charges of individual atoms involved in the amino acids around the substrate binding sites in the enzymes, the simulated k/k° values well reproduced the experimental data. In conclusion, k/k° can be predicted by PB-based simulation as long as the crystal structure of the enzyme and the substrate binding site are known. PMID:26956542

  18. Room temperature long range ferromagnetic ordering in Ni{sub 0.58}Zn{sub 0.42}Co{sub 0.10}Cu{sub 0.10}Fe{sub 1.8}O{sub 4} nano magnetic system

    SciTech Connect

    Sarveena, Chand, Jagdish; Verma, S.; Singh, M.; Kotnala, R. K.; Batoo, K. M.

    2015-06-24

    The structural and magnetic behavior of sol-gel autocombustion synthesized nanocrystalline Ni{sub 0.58}Zn{sub 0.42}Co{sub 0.10}Cu{sub 0.10}Fe{sub 1.8}O{sub 4} have been investigated by X-ray diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), Mössbauer spectroscopy and vibrating sample magnetometer(VSM). Sample of high purity and high homogeneity was obtained by calcination at low temperature (500°C) resulting in nanoparticles of average diameter ∼15nm as determined by XRD and further confirmed by TEM. X-ray diffraction (XRD) and selective area diffraction (SAED) confirmed the single phase of the sample. Mössbauer results are supported by magnetization data. Well defined sextets and appearance of hysteresis at room temperature indicate the existence of ferromagnetic coupling at room temperature finding material utility in magnetic storage data. The existence of iron in ferric state confirmed by isomer shift is a clear evidence of improved magnetic properties of the present system.

  19. FINAL REPORT INTEGRATED DM1200 MELTER TESTING OF BUBBLER CONFIGURATIONS USING HLW AZ-101 SIMULANTS VSL-04R4800-4 REV 0 10/5/04

    SciTech Connect

    KRUGER AA; MATLACK KS; GONG W; BARDAKCI T; D'ANGELO NA; LUTZE W; CALLOW RA; BRANDYS M; KOT WK; PEGG IL

    2011-12-29

    This report documents melter and off-gas performance results obtained on the DM1200 HLW Pilot Melter during processing of AZ-101 HLW simulants. The tests reported herein are a subset of six tests from a larger series of tests described in the Test Plan for the work; results from the other tests have been reported separately. The solids contents of the melter feeds were based on the WTP baseline value for the solids content of the feeds from pretreatment which changed during these tests from 20% to 15% undissolved solids resulting in tests conducted at two feed solids contents. Based on the results of earlier tests with single outlet 'J' bubblers, initial tests were performed with a total bubbling rate of 651 pm. The first set of tests (Tests 1A-1E) addressed the effects of skewing this total air flow rate back and forth between the two installed bubblers in comparison to a fixed equal division of flow between them. The second set of tests (2A-2D) addressed the effects of bubbler depth. Subsequently, as the location, type and number of bubbling outlets were varied, the optimum bubbling rate for each was determined. A third (3A-3C) and fourth (8A-8C) set of tests evaluated the effects of alternative bubbler designs with two gas outlets per bubbler instead of one by placing four bubblers in positions simulating multiple-outlet bubblers. Data from the simulated multiple outlet bubblers were used to design bubblers with two outlets for an additional set of tests (9A-9C). Test 9 was also used to determine the effect of small sugar additions to the feed on ruthenium volatility. Another set of tests (10A-10D) evaluated the effects on production rate of spiking the feed with chloride and sulfate. Variables held constant to the extent possible included melt temperature, plenum temperature, cold cap coverage, the waste simulant composition, and the target glass composition. The feed rate was increased to the point that a constant, essentially complete, cold cap was achieved

  20. Numerical simulations in combustion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chung, T. J.

    1989-01-01

    This paper reviews numerical simulations in reacting flows in general and combustion phenomena in particular. It is shown that use of implicit schemes and/or adaptive mesh strategies can improve convergence, stability, and accuracy of the solution. Difficulties increase as turbulence and multidimensions are considered, particularly when finite-rate chemistry governs the given combustion problem. Particular attention is given to the areas of solid-propellant combustion dynamics, turbulent diffusion flames, and spray droplet vaporization.

  1. Deuteron NMR study of dynamics and of coexistence of paraelectric and ferroelectric phases in Rb0.90(ND4)0.10D2AsO4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pinto, Nicholas J.; Howell, Francis L.; Schmidt, V. Hugo

    1993-09-01

    The deuteron glass Rb1-x(ND4)xD2AsO4 (DRADA) is a mixed crystal of RbD2AsO4 (DRDA) and ND4D2AsO4 (DADA). Deuteron nuclear magnetic resonance has been performed on the acid and ammonium deuterons. The crystal studied has an ammonium concentration (x=0.10) that puts it in the coexistence region of the phase diagram. Line-shape measurements of the ammonium deuterons show the coexistence of the ferroelectric (FE) and paraelectric (PE) phases as the temperature is lowered below the ferroelectric-phase-transition temperature Tc. The acid deuteron line shape on the other hand is found to broaden as the temperature is reduced but is unaffected by the ferroelectric transition. Spin-lattice-relaxation measurements have been performed and the activation energies for the relaxation processes have been computed. The relaxation-rate anomaly for acid deuterons in the ferroelectric-transition range indicates a short correlation length for the FE phase in the coexistence region of the phase diagram.

  2. Polarized and depolarized Raman spectra of liquid carbon disulfide in the pressure range 0-10 kbar. I. Vibration frequencies, C-S bond length, and Fermi resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ikawa, S.; Whalley, Edward

    1986-09-01

    The effect of pressure on the polarized and depolarized Raman spectra of liquid carbon disulphide, i.e., the peak frequencies, bandwidths, and relative intensities of both the allowed ν1 and 2ν2 bands and the interaction-induced ν2 and ν3 bands, have been measured at 22 °C up to 10 kbar. This paper discusses the effect of pressure on the frequencies and on the relative isotropic intensity of the ν1 and 2ν2 bands. The frequency of the ν1 band increases linearly with pressure, within the experimental uncertainty, at the rate 0.16±0.01 cm-1 kbar-1, and the frequencies of the ν2, ν3, and 2ν2 bands decrease nonlinearly. The frequency shifts are described by second-order perturbation theory with the molecular anharmonicity and the intermolecular interaction as perturbations. The leading terms of the shifts consist of the same derivative of the interaction potential, multiplied by different anharmonicity constants, and the shifts of the ν1 and 2ν2 bands suggests that the C-S bond length decreases at the rate 2×10-4 Å kbar-1. The relative isotropic intensity of the 2ν2 and ν1 bands increases with pressure at the rate 0.050 kbar-1, whereas the anisotropic 2ν2 intensity relative to the isotropic ν1 intensity is independent of pressure to the experimental precision of ˜0.005. The effect of pressure on the second derivative of the isotropic and anisotropic parts of the polarizability with respect to the bend coordinate was estimated as 1.1×10-43 C m2 V-1 kbar-1 and ˜0, respectively, from these values.

  3. Cut-Off Points for Mild, Moderate, and Severe Pain on the Numeric Rating Scale for Pain in Patients with Chronic Musculoskeletal Pain: Variability and Influence of Sex and Catastrophizing

    PubMed Central

    Boonstra, Anne M.; Stewart, Roy E.; Köke, Albère J. A.; Oosterwijk, René F. A.; Swaan, Jeannette L.; Schreurs, Karlein M. G.; Schiphorst Preuper, Henrica R.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: The 0–10 Numeric Rating Scale (NRS) is often used in pain management. The aims of our study were to determine the cut-off points for mild, moderate, and severe pain in terms of pain-related interference with functioning in patients with chronic musculoskeletal pain, to measure the variability of the optimal cut-off points, and to determine the influence of patients’ catastrophizing and their sex on these cut-off points. Methods: 2854 patients were included. Pain was assessed by the NRS, functioning by the Pain Disability Index (PDI) and catastrophizing by the Pain Catastrophizing Scale (PCS). Cut-off point schemes were tested using ANOVAs with and without using the PSC scores or sex as co-variates and with the interaction between CP scheme and PCS score and sex, respectively. The variability of the optimal cut-off point schemes was quantified using bootstrapping procedure. Results and conclusion: The study showed that NRS scores ≤ 5 correspond to mild, scores of 6–7 to moderate and scores ≥8 to severe pain in terms of pain-related interference with functioning. Bootstrapping analysis identified this optimal NRS cut-off point scheme in 90% of the bootstrapping samples. The interpretation of the NRS is independent of sex, but seems to depend on catastrophizing. In patients with high catastrophizing tendency, the optimal cut-off point scheme equals that for the total study sample, but in patients with a low catastrophizing tendency, NRS scores ≤ 3 correspond to mild, scores of 4–6 to moderate and scores ≥7 to severe pain in terms of interference with functioning. In these optimal cut-off schemes, NRS scores of 4 and 5 correspond to moderate interference with functioning for patients with low catastrophizing tendency and to mild interference for patients with high catastrophizing tendency. Theoretically one would therefore expect that among the patients with NRS scores 4 and 5 there would be a higher average PDI score for those with low

  4. Numerical simulation of emulsified fuel spray combustion with puffing and micro-explosion

    SciTech Connect

    Watanabe, Hirotatsu; Matsushita, Yohsuke; Aoki, Hideyuki; Miura, Takatoshi

    2010-05-15

    The purpose of this study was to develop numerical simulation of spray combustion of emulsified fuel with considering puffing and micro-explosion. First, a mathematical model for puffing was proposed. In the proposed puffing model, the rate of mass change of a droplet during puffing was expressed by the evaporation rate of dispersed water and the mass change rate due to fine droplets spouted from the droplet surface. The mass change rate due to fine droplets was related to the evaporation rate of the dispersed water and each liquid content. This model had only one experimental parameter. The essential feature of this model was that it was simple to apply to numerical simulation of spray combustion. First, the validity of the proposed puffing model was investigated with the experimental results for a single droplet. The calculated results for a single droplet with the experimental parameter varying from 5.0 to 10 were in good agreement with the experimental results. Moreover, numerical simulation of spray combustion of emulsified fuel was carried out. The occurrence of puffing and micro-explosion was determined by the inner droplet temperature. When micro-explosion occurred, a droplet changed to vapor rapidly. When the proposed puffing model was used in numerical simulation of spray combustion, the experimental parameter in the puffing model was determined for each droplet by random numbers within the range 5.0-10. The calculated results of spray combustion of emulsified fuel without considering puffing or micro-explosions were different from the experimental results even where combustion reactions were almost terminated. Meanwhile, the calculated results when considering puffing and micro-explosions were in good agreement with experimental results at the same location. (author)

  5. Investigation of a new lead-free Bi0.5(Na0.40K0.10)TiO3-(Ba0.7Sr0.3)TiO3 piezoelectric ceramic

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Lead-free piezoelectric compositions of the (1-x)Bi0.5(Na0.40K0.10)TiO3-x(Ba0.7Sr0.3)TiO3 system (when x = 0, 0.05, 0.10, 0.15, and 0.20) were fabricated using a solid-state mixed oxide method and sintered between 1,050°C and 1,175°C for 2 h. The effect of (Ba0.7Sr0.3)TiO3 [BST] content on phase, microstructure, and electrical properties was investigated. The optimum sintering temperature was 1,125°C at which all compositions had densities of at least 98% of their theoretical values. X-ray diffraction patterns that showed tetragonality were increased with the increasing BST. Scanning electron micrographs showed a slight reduction of grain size when BST was added. The addition of BST was also found to improve the dielectric and piezoelectric properties of the BNKT ceramic. A large room-temperature dielectric constant, εr (1,609), and piezoelectric coefficient, d33 (214 pC/N), were obtained at an optimal composition of x = 0.10. PMID:22221833

  6. Results of an air data probe investigation utilizing a 0.10 scale orbiter forebody (model 57-0) in the Ames Research Center 14-foot wind tunnel (OA220)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Esparza, V.; Thornton, D. E.

    1976-01-01

    Results are presented of a 0.10 scale orbiter forebody test with left and right mounted air data probes (ADP) as well as a flight test probe (nose boom). Left and right ADP data were obtained at Mach numbers of .3, .4, .5, .6, .7, .8, .85, .9, .95, .98, 1.05 and 1.1 through a Reynolds number range of 1.3 to 4.4 million. Nose boom data were obtained at Mach numbers of .3, .4, .5, .6, .7, .9 and .98.

  7. Luminescence and dielectric properties of c-axis oriented (Bi1.90Eu0.10)(V1-zMoz)O5.5 ferroelectric thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Wei; Zou, Changwei; Xie, Mubiao; Bao, Dinghua

    2016-05-01

    (Bi1.90Eu0.10)(V1-zMoz)O5.5 (z = 0, 0.05, 0.10, 0.15 and 0.20) thin films with c-axis oriented were prepared on Pt(111)/Ti/SiO2/Si substrates by using chemical solution deposition method. The effect of Mo6+ concentration on the structure, luminescence properties and dielectric properties of the thin films were characterized systematically. X-ray diffraction data indicates that the thin films with low Mo6+-doping content can remain Bi2VO5.5 structure. When the Mo6+-doping content z reaches to 0.15, the thin films are a mixture of diphase with the main phase Bi2VO5.5 and secondary phase Bi2MoO6. Under UV irradiation, all the thin films emit a bright red or orange emission which origin from Eu3+. With increasing Mo6+-doping content z, the relative intensity of the Red and Orange emissions show obviously change. The value of Red/Orange ratio first decrease, and it reached minimum when z is 0.15, then it recover to the initial value. The variation trend of the Red/Orange ratio reflects the change of the lattice symmetry. Dielectric constant of the thin films increased with the increasing of the Mo6+ concentration while dielectric loss decreased. The decrease of the quantities of oxygen vacancies and the generation of Bi2MoO6 phase are responsible for the improvement of electric properties. These results explain that Eu3+ion can be used as an effective luminescent probe in (Bi1.90Eu0.10)(V1-zMoz)O5.5 (z = 0, 0.05, 0.10, 0.15 and 0.20) thin films, and the electric properties of the thin films can be improved by Mo6+ doping.

  8. Studies of electrical conductivity and complex initial permeability of multiferroic xBa0.95Sr0.05TiO3-(1-x)BiFe0.90Gd0.10O3 ceramics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miah, Mohammad J.; Khan, M. N. I.; Hossain, A. K. M. Akther

    2016-07-01

    Multiferroic xBa0.95Sr0.05TiO3-(1-x)BiFe0.90Gd0.10O3 [xBST-(1-x)BFGO] (x = 0.00, 0.10 and 0.20) ceramics were prepared by the standard solid-state reaction technique. Crystal structure of the ceramics was determined by X-ray diffraction pattern. All the compositions exhibited rhombohedral crystal structure. The tolerance factor `t' varied from 0.847 to 0.864. The AC conductivity spectrum followed the Jonscher's power law. The Nyquist plots indicated that only grains have the contribution to the resistance in this material and the values of grain resistance (Rg) increased with BST content. The real part of complex initial permeability decreased with the increase in frequency and increased with increasing BST content. Magnetoelectric coefficient was determined for all compositions. The maximum value of magnetoelectric coefficient was found to be 1.467 mV.cm-1.Oe-1 for x = 0.20.

  9. Composition and temperature dependence of ferroelectric and pyroelectric properties of (1 − x)[PMN–PT(65/35)]–xPZ (0 ≤ x ≤ 0.10) ceramics

    SciTech Connect

    Jiang, Tong; Li, Qiang; Yan, Qingfeng; Luo, Nengneng; Zhang, Yiling; Chu, Xiangcheng

    2014-11-15

    Highlights: • PMN–PT–PZ ceramics with PZ content smaller than 0.10 mol% were synthesized. • T{sub rt} of the PMN–PT–PZ ceramics increased linearly with the increase of PZ constant. • A mutation of the ferroelectric and pyroelectric properties was observed near T{sub rt}. - Abstract: (1 − x)[Pb(Mg{sub 1/3}Nb{sub 2/3})O{sub 3}–PbTiO{sub 3} (65/35)]–xPbZrO{sub 3} (PMN–PT–PZ) ceramics near morphotropic phase boundary with 0 ≤ x ≤ 0.10 were synthesized via the conventional solid-state reaction method. X-ray diffraction and variable temperature dielectric property characterization indicated that the rhombohedral to tetragonal phase transition temperature (T{sub rt}) increased linearly with the increase of PZ constant. The composition and temperature dependence of their ferroelectric and pyroelectric properties were also investigated. The results showed that there appeared mutation for remnant polarization, coercive field, as well as pyroelectric coefficient at the temperate range near T{sub rt}, which was ascribed to the reorientation of dipoles caused by the rhombohedral–tetragonal phase transition.

  10. Multiferroic properties of Pb{sub 0.90}Sr{sub 0.10}TiO{sub 3}-CoFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} nanostructured bilayered thin film

    SciTech Connect

    Bala, Kanchan Kotnala, R. K.; Negi, N. S.

    2015-05-15

    Pb{sub 0.90}Sr{sub 0.10}TiO{sub 3}-CoFe{sub 2}O{sub 4}(PST10-CFO) nanostructured bilayered thin film were grown on Si (100) substrate by using metallo-organic decomposition chemical route and spin coating technique. Results show that PST (pervoskite structure) and CFO (spinel) phase coexist in the bilayered thin films, annealed at 650°C for 2hr and no obvious impurity phase can be detected. The structural, surface morphology and micro structural properties were confirmed by X-Ray diffraction (XRD), atomic force microscope (AFM) respectively. Excellent ferroelectric behavior at different voltage was observed, with two platinum electrodes only at surface of the bilayer thin film. A room temperature ferromagnetic behavior was observed in the bilayered Pb{sub 0.90}Sr{sub 0.10}TiO{sub 3}-CoFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} nanostructured thin film. The saturation magnetization and variation in coercivity value of the bilayer thin film is lower than that of the pure CFO film in the presence of non ferromagnetic PST layer which is the attributed that the significant coupling between the two phases.

  11. Sub-10 μm grain size, Ba1-xCaxTi0.9Zr0.1O3 (x = 0.10 and x = 0.15) piezoceramics processed using a reduced thermal treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reyes-Montero, A.; Pardo, L.; López-Juárez, R.; González, A. M.; Rea-López, S. O.; Cruz, M. P.; Villafuerte-Castrejón, M. E.

    2015-06-01

    The solid-state synthesis of Ba1-xCaxTi0.9Zr0.1O3 (x = 0.10, 0.15) (BCTZ) powder and the processing method of ceramics, by the use of reduced synthesis time and temperature (1250 °C for 2 h), are reported. Homogeneous and dense (≥95%) ceramic microstructures with sub-10 μm grain size were obtained under all sintering conditions. A comparative study of their ferro-piezoelectric properties as a function of sintering temperatures is presented. The study shows the role of the grain size effect for improving both piezoelectric and ferroelectric properties of these materials. With an increase of the sintering temperature, grain growth was promoted; therefore, higher ferro-piezoelectric values were obtained (at 1400 °C, for x = 0.10: d33 = 300 pC/N, {{d}31}=-150 pC/N, kp = 48% for x = 0.15: d33 = 410 pC/N, d31 =-154 pC/N, kp = 50%). In addition, a diffuse phase transition is observed in these BCTZ ceramics with a Curie temperature near 100 °C at 1 kHz.

  12. Numerical models of complex diapirs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Podladchikov, Yu.; Talbot, C.; Poliakov, A. N. B.

    1993-12-01

    Numerically modelled diapirs that rise into overburdens with viscous rheology produce a large variety of shapes. This work uses the finite-element method to study the development of diapirs that rise towards a surface on which a diapir-induced topography creeps flat or disperses ("erodes") at different rates. Slow erosion leads to diapirs with "mushroom" shapes, moderate erosion rate to "wine glass" diapirs and fast erosion to "beer glass"- and "column"-shaped diapirs. The introduction of a low-viscosity layer at the top of the overburden causes diapirs to develop into structures resembling a "Napoleon hat". These spread lateral sheets.

  13. Numerical simulation of small perturbation transonic flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seebass, A. R.; Yu, N. J.

    1976-01-01

    The results of a systematic study of small perturbation transonic flows are presented. Both the flow over thin airfoils and the flow over wedges were investigated. Various numerical schemes were employed in the study. The prime goal of the research was to determine the efficiency of various numerical procedures by accurately evaluating the wave drag, both by computing the pressure integral around the body and by integrating the momentum loss across the shock. Numerical errors involved in the computations that affect the accuracy of drag evaluations were analyzed. The factors that effect numerical stability and the rate of convergence of the iterative schemes were also systematically studied.

  14. Strain and vacancy cluster behavior of vanadium and tungsten-doped Ba[Zr{sub 0.10}Ti{sub 0.90}]O{sub 3} ceramics

    SciTech Connect

    Moura, F.; Simoes, A. Z.; Cavalcante, L. S.; Zampieri, M.; Varela, J. A.; Longo, E.; Zaghete, M. A.; Simoes, M. L.

    2008-01-21

    Strain and vacancy clusters behavior of polycrystalline vanadium (V) and tungsten (W)-doped Ba[Zr{sub 0.10}Ti{sub 0.90}]O{sub 3}, (BZT:2%V) and (BZT:2%W) ceramics obtained by the mixed oxide method was evaluated. Substitution of V and W reduces the distortion of octahedral clusters, decreasing the Raman modes. Electron paramagnetic resonance data indicate that the addition of dopants leads to defects and symmetry changes in the BZT lattice. Remnant polarization and coercive field are affected by V and W substitution due the electron-relaxation mode. The unipolar strain E curves as a function of electric field reach its maximum value for BZT:2%V and BZT:2%W ceramics.

  15. Synthesis, electrical and thermal properties of Bi{sub 4}V{sub 2−x}Y{sub x}O{sub 11} (x=0.0 and 0.10) ceramics

    SciTech Connect

    Sahu, S. Roy, M.

    2014-04-24

    Polycrystalline ceramic samples of Bi{sub 4}V{sub 2−x}Y{sub x}O{sub 11} (x=0.0 and 0.10) have been synthesized by standard solid state reaction method. The formation of the compounds has been verified by room temperature (RT) X-ray diffraction. The frequency and temperature dependent dielectric constant of both the compounds have been measured. The dielectric studies indicate that the materials are highly lossy. The dc conductivity of the materials has been measured as a function of temperature from RT to 653K and their activation energies were calculated using Arrhenius relation σ = σ{sub o}exp(-Ea/kT). The specific heat and heat flow of both the compounds were determined as a function of temperature using Modulated Differential Scanning Calorimetry (MDSC)

  16. High-Speed Wind-Tunnel Investigation of the Lateral Stability Characteristics of a 0.10-Scale Model of the Grumman XF9F-2 Airplane, TED No. NACA DE 301

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Polhamus, Edward C.; King, Thomas J., Jr.

    1949-01-01

    An investigation was made in the Langley high-speed 7- by 10-foot tunnel to determine the high-speed lateral and directional stability characteristics of a 0.10-scale model of the Grumman XF9F-2 airplane in the Mach number range from 0.40 to 0.85. The results indicate that static lateral and directional stability is present throughout the Mach number range investigated although in the Mach number range from 0.75 to 0.85 there is an appreciable decrease in rolling moment due to sideslip. Calculations of the dynamic stability indicate that according to current flying-quality requirements the damping of the lateral oscillation, although probably satisfactory for the sea-level condition, may not be satisfactory for the majority of the altitude conditions investigated

  17. Dielectric, ferroelectrics properties and impedance spectroscopy analysis of the [(Na0.535K0.480)0.966Li0.058](Nb0.90Ta0.10)O3-based lead-free ceramics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saidi, M.; Chaouchi, A.; D'Astorg, S.; Rguiti, M.; Courtois, C.

    2015-04-01

    Polycrystalline of [(Na0.535K0.480)0.966Li0.058](Nb0.90Ta0.10)O3 samples were prepared using the high-temperature solid-state reaction technique. X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis indicates the formation of a single-phase with orthorhombic structure. AC impedance plots were used as tool to analyze the electrical behavior of the sample as a function of frequency at different temperatures. The AC impedance studies revealed the presence of grain effect, from 425°C onwards. Complex impedance analysis indicated non-Debye type dielectric relaxation. The Nyquist plot showed the negative temperature coefficient of resistance (NTCR) characteristic of NKLNT. The AC conductivity results were used to correlate with the barrier hopping (CBH) model to evaluate the binding energy (Wm), the minimum hopping distance (Rmin), the density of states at Fermi level (N(Ef)), and the activation energy of the compound.

  18. Effects of Zn Substitution on Dielectric and Piezoelectric Properties of (Na0.54K0.46)0.96Li0.04(Nb0.90Ta0.10)O3 Ceramics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Byeon, Sunmin; Yoo, Juhyun

    2012-09-01

    In this study, in order to develop lead-free composition ceramics for piezoelectric actuator and sensor applications, (Na0.54K0.46)0.96Li0.04(Nb0.90Ta0.10)1-2x/5ZnxO3 (x = 0-1.5 mol %) composition ceramics were fabricated by a conventional sintering technique at 1110 °C for 5 h. The piezoelectric properties of resultant ceramics were studied with a special emphasis on the influence of Zn-substitution amount. The crystal structure of the specimen exhibited a pure perovskite phase with the coexistence of two phases (orthorhombic and tetragonal phases). However, the phases included tetragonal-rich phases to some extent. The scanning electron microscopy (SEM) images indicated that grain size increased with increasing the content of Zn substitution. High physical properties, namely, piezoelectric constant d33 = 265 pC/N, electromechanical coupling factor kp = 47.5%, dielectric constant ɛr = 1223, and measured density ρ= 4.84 g/cm3 were obtained from the composition ceramic with x = 0.5 mol %. The mechanical quality factor (Qm) was improved from 54 of pure (Na0.54K0.46)0.96Li0.04(Nb0.90Ta0.10)O3 (abbreviated as NKLNT) to 106 by 1.5 mol % Zn substitution. The results reflect that the material is a promising candidate for lead-free high-performance piezoelectric device applications, such as piezoelectric actuators and sensors.

  19. Numerical predictions in acoustics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hardin, Jay C.

    1992-01-01

    Computational Aeroacoustics (CAA) involves the calculation of the sound produced by a flow as well as the underlying flowfield itself from first principles. This paper describes the numerical challenges of CAA and recent research efforts to overcome these challenges. In addition, it includes the benefits of CAA in removing restrictions of linearity, single frequency, constant parameters, low Mach numbers, etc. found in standard acoustic analyses as well as means for evaluating the validity of these numerical approaches. Finally, numerous applications of CAA to both classical as well as modern problems of concern to the aerospace industry are presented.

  20. Numerical predictions in acoustics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hardin, Jay C.

    Computational Aeroacoustics (CAA) involves the calculation of the sound produced by a flow as well as the underlying flowfield itself from first principles. This paper describes the numerical challenges of CAA and recent research efforts to overcome these challenges. In addition, it includes the benefits of CAA in removing restrictions of linearity, single frequency, constant parameters, low Mach numbers, etc. found in standard acoustic analyses as well as means for evaluating the validity of these numerical approaches. Finally, numerous applications of CAA to both classical as well as modern problems of concern to the aerospace industry are presented.

  1. Numerical simulations of plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Dnestrovskii, Y.N.; Kostomarov, D.P.

    1986-01-01

    This book presents a modern, consistent, and systematic development of numerical computer simulation of plasmas in controlled thermonuclear fusion. The authors focus on recent Soviet research in mathematical modeling of Tokomak plasmas and present kinetic hydrodynamic and transport models.

  2. Rocket engine numerical simulator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davidian, Ken

    1993-01-01

    The topics are presented in viewgraph form and include the following: a rocket engine numerical simulator (RENS) definition; objectives; justification; approach; potential applications; potential users; RENS work flowchart; RENS prototype; and conclusion.

  3. Rocket engine numerical simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davidian, Ken

    1993-01-01

    The topics are presented in view graph form and include the following: a definition of the rocket engine numerical simulator (RENS); objectives; justification; approach; potential applications; potential users; RENS work flowchart; RENS prototype; and conclusions.

  4. Doping effect on the structural properties of Cu1-x(Ni, Zn, Al and Fe)xO samples (00.10): An experimental and computational study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amaral, J. B.; Araujo, R. M.; Pedra, P. P.; Meneses, C. T.; Duque, J. G. S.; dos S. Rezende, M. V.

    2016-09-01

    In this work, the effect of insertion of transition metal, TM (=Ni, Zn, Al and Fe), ions in Cu1-xTMxO samples (00.10) prepared via co-precipitation method is studied through experimental and computational methods. The analyses of X-ray diffraction (XRD) patterns using Rietveld refinement show that i) at x=0, all samples present a monoclinic crystal system with space group C2/c and ii) for increasing the TM-doping, Ni and Zn-doped samples show a small amount of spurious phases for concentrations above x=0.05. Based on these results, a defect disorder study for using atomistic computational simulations which is based on the lattice energy minimization technique is employed to predict the location of the dopant ions in the structure. In agreement with XRD data, our computational results indicate that the trivalent (Al and Fe ions) are more favorable to be incorporated into CuO matrix than the divalent (Ni and Zn ions).

  5. Synthesis and crystal structure of 4-(2-ammonio­eth­yl)morpholin-4-ium di­chlorido­diiodido­cadmate/chlorido­tri­iodido­cadmate (0.90/0.10)

    PubMed Central

    Mahbouli Rhouma, Najla; Rayes, Ali; Mezzadri, Francesco; Calestani, Gianluca; Loukil, Mohamed

    2016-01-01

    The crystal structure of the title compound, (C6H16N2O)[CdCl1.90I2.10], a new organic–inorganic hybrid salt synthesized in the form of single crystals, consists of discrete statistically distributed di­chlorido­diiodido­cadmate/chlorido­tri­iodido­cadmate anions (occupancy ratio 0.90:0.10) and 4-(2-ammonio­eth­yl)morpholin-4-ium cations, [NH3(CH2)2NH(CH2)4O]2+. The cations are linked by inter­molecular N—H⋯O hydrogen bonds, forming corrugated chains extending parallel to the c axis. The [CdCl1.90I2.10]2− tetra­halidocadmate anions lie between the chains to maximize the electrostatic inter­actions and are connected with the organic cations via N—H⋯Cl and C—H⋯Cl(I) hydrogen bonds developing in the ab plane and leading to the formation of a three-dimensional network structure. The tetra­coordinate CdII atom has a distorted tetra­hedral conformation, with a τ4 index of 0.87. PMID:27746929

  6. In-situ Electric Field-Induced Modulation of Photoluminescence in Pr-doped Ba0.85Ca0.15Ti0.90Zr0.10O3 Lead-Free Ceramics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Hai Ling; Wu, Xiao; Chung, Tat Hang; Kwok, K. W.

    2016-06-01

    Luminescent materials with dynamic photoluminescence activity have aroused special interest because of their potential widespread applications. One proposed approach of directly and reversibly modulating the photoluminescence emissions is by means of introducing an external electric field in an in-situ and real-time way, which has only been focused on thin films. In this work, we demonstrate that real-time electric field-induced photoluminescence modulation can be realized in a bulk Ba0.85Ca0.15Ti0.90Zr0.10O3 ferroelectric ceramic doped with 0.2 mol% Pr3+, owing to its remarkable polarization reversal and phase evolution near the morphotropic phase boundary. Along with in-situ X-ray diffraction analysis, our results reveal that an applied electric field induces not only typical polarization switching and minor crystal deformation, but also tetragonal-to-rhombohedral phase transformation of the ceramic. The electric field-induced phase transformation is irreversible and engenders dominant effect on photoluminescence emissions as a result of an increase in structural symmetry. After it is completed in a few cycles of electric field, the photoluminescence emissions become governed mainly by the polarization switching, and thus vary reversibly with the modulating electric field. Our results open a promising avenue towards the realization of bulk ceramic-based tunable photoluminescence activity with high repeatability, flexible controllability, and environmental-friendly chemical process.

  7. In-situ Electric Field-Induced Modulation of Photoluminescence in Pr-doped Ba0.85Ca0.15Ti0.90Zr0.10O3 Lead-Free Ceramics

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Hai Ling; Wu, Xiao; Chung, Tat Hang; Kwok, K. W.

    2016-01-01

    Luminescent materials with dynamic photoluminescence activity have aroused special interest because of their potential widespread applications. One proposed approach of directly and reversibly modulating the photoluminescence emissions is by means of introducing an external electric field in an in-situ and real-time way, which has only been focused on thin films. In this work, we demonstrate that real-time electric field-induced photoluminescence modulation can be realized in a bulk Ba0.85Ca0.15Ti0.90Zr0.10O3 ferroelectric ceramic doped with 0.2 mol% Pr3+, owing to its remarkable polarization reversal and phase evolution near the morphotropic phase boundary. Along with in-situ X-ray diffraction analysis, our results reveal that an applied electric field induces not only typical polarization switching and minor crystal deformation, but also tetragonal-to-rhombohedral phase transformation of the ceramic. The electric field-induced phase transformation is irreversible and engenders dominant effect on photoluminescence emissions as a result of an increase in structural symmetry. After it is completed in a few cycles of electric field, the photoluminescence emissions become governed mainly by the polarization switching, and thus vary reversibly with the modulating electric field. Our results open a promising avenue towards the realization of bulk ceramic-based tunable photoluminescence activity with high repeatability, flexible controllability, and environmental-friendly chemical process. PMID:27339815

  8. High charge-discharge performance of Pb0.98La0.02(Zr0.35Sn0.55Ti0.10)0.995O3 antiferroelectric ceramics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Chenhong; Liu, Zhen; Chen, Xuefeng; Yan, Shiguang; Cao, Fei; Dong, Xianlin; Wang, Genshui

    2016-08-01

    The energy storage performance and charge-discharge properties of Pb0.98La0.02(Zr0.35Sn0.55Ti0.10)0.995O3 (PLZST) antiferroelectric ceramics were investigated through directly measuring the hysteresis loops and pulse discharge current-time curves. The energy density only varies 0.2% per degree from 25 °C to 85 °C, and the energy efficiency maintains at about 90%. Furthermore, an approximate calculating model of maximum power density pmax was established for the discharge process. Under a relatively high working electric field (8.2 kV/mm), this ceramics possess a greatly enhanced power density of 18 MW/cm3. Moreover, the pulse power properties did not show degradation until 1500 times of charge-discharge cycling. The large released energy density, high energy efficiency, good temperature stability, greatly enhanced power density, and excellent fatigue endurance combined together make this PLZST ceramics an ideal candidate for pulse power applications.

  9. Numerical Techniques in Acoustics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baumeister, K. J. (Compiler)

    1985-01-01

    This is the compilation of abstracts of the Numerical Techniques in Acoustics Forum held at the ASME's Winter Annual Meeting. This forum was for informal presentation and information exchange of ongoing acoustic work in finite elements, finite difference, boundary elements and other numerical approaches. As part of this forum, it was intended to allow the participants time to raise questions on unresolved problems and to generate discussions on possible approaches and methods of solution.

  10. Frontiers in Numerical Relativity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evans, Charles R.; Finn, Lee S.; Hobill, David W.

    2011-06-01

    Preface; Participants; Introduction; 1. Supercomputing and numerical relativity: a look at the past, present and future David W. Hobill and Larry L. Smarr; 2. Computational relativity in two and three dimensions Stuart L. Shapiro and Saul A. Teukolsky; 3. Slowly moving maximally charged black holes Robert C. Ferrell and Douglas M. Eardley; 4. Kepler's third law in general relativity Steven Detweiler; 5. Black hole spacetimes: testing numerical relativity David H. Bernstein, David W. Hobill and Larry L. Smarr; 6. Three dimensional initial data of numerical relativity Ken-ichi Oohara and Takashi Nakamura; 7. Initial data for collisions of black holes and other gravitational miscellany James W. York, Jr.; 8. Analytic-numerical matching for gravitational waveform extraction Andrew M. Abrahams; 9. Supernovae, gravitational radiation and the quadrupole formula L. S. Finn; 10. Gravitational radiation from perturbations of stellar core collapse models Edward Seidel and Thomas Moore; 11. General relativistic implicit radiation hydrodynamics in polar sliced space-time Paul J. Schinder; 12. General relativistic radiation hydrodynamics in spherically symmetric spacetimes A. Mezzacappa and R. A. Matzner; 13. Constraint preserving transport for magnetohydrodynamics John F. Hawley and Charles R. Evans; 14. Enforcing the momentum constraints during axisymmetric spacelike simulations Charles R. Evans; 15. Experiences with an adaptive mesh refinement algorithm in numerical relativity Matthew W. Choptuik; 16. The multigrid technique Gregory B. Cook; 17. Finite element methods in numerical relativity P. J. Mann; 18. Pseudo-spectral methods applied to gravitational collapse Silvano Bonazzola and Jean-Alain Marck; 19. Methods in 3D numerical relativity Takashi Nakamura and Ken-ichi Oohara; 20. Nonaxisymmetric rotating gravitational collapse and gravitational radiation Richard F. Stark; 21. Nonaxisymmetric neutron star collisions: initial results using smooth particle hydrodynamics

  11. Freddie Fish. A Primary Environmental Study of Basic Numerals, Sets, Ordinals and Shapes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kraynak, Ola

    This teacher's guide and study guide are an environmental approach to mathematics education in the primary grades. The mathematical studies of the numerals 0-10, ordinals, number sets, and basic shapes - diamond, circle, square, rectangle, and triangle - are developed through the story of Freddie Fish and his search for clean water. The…

  12. Numerical ability predicts mortgage default.

    PubMed

    Gerardi, Kristopher; Goette, Lorenz; Meier, Stephan

    2013-07-01

    Unprecedented levels of US subprime mortgage defaults precipitated a severe global financial crisis in late 2008, plunging much of the industrialized world into a deep recession. However, the fundamental reasons for why US mortgages defaulted at such spectacular rates remain largely unknown. This paper presents empirical evidence showing that the ability to perform basic mathematical calculations is negatively associated with the propensity to default on one's mortgage. We measure several aspects of financial literacy and cognitive ability in a survey of subprime mortgage borrowers who took out loans in 2006 and 2007, and match them to objective, detailed administrative data on mortgage characteristics and payment histories. The relationship between numerical ability and mortgage default is robust to controlling for a broad set of sociodemographic variables, and is not driven by other aspects of cognitive ability. We find no support for the hypothesis that numerical ability impacts mortgage outcomes through the choice of the mortgage contract. Rather, our results suggest that individuals with limited numerical ability default on their mortgage due to behavior unrelated to the initial choice of their mortgage.

  13. Numerical ability predicts mortgage default.

    PubMed

    Gerardi, Kristopher; Goette, Lorenz; Meier, Stephan

    2013-07-01

    Unprecedented levels of US subprime mortgage defaults precipitated a severe global financial crisis in late 2008, plunging much of the industrialized world into a deep recession. However, the fundamental reasons for why US mortgages defaulted at such spectacular rates remain largely unknown. This paper presents empirical evidence showing that the ability to perform basic mathematical calculations is negatively associated with the propensity to default on one's mortgage. We measure several aspects of financial literacy and cognitive ability in a survey of subprime mortgage borrowers who took out loans in 2006 and 2007, and match them to objective, detailed administrative data on mortgage characteristics and payment histories. The relationship between numerical ability and mortgage default is robust to controlling for a broad set of sociodemographic variables, and is not driven by other aspects of cognitive ability. We find no support for the hypothesis that numerical ability impacts mortgage outcomes through the choice of the mortgage contract. Rather, our results suggest that individuals with limited numerical ability default on their mortgage due to behavior unrelated to the initial choice of their mortgage. PMID:23798401

  14. Numerical ability predicts mortgage default

    PubMed Central

    Gerardi, Kristopher; Goette, Lorenz; Meier, Stephan

    2013-01-01

    Unprecedented levels of US subprime mortgage defaults precipitated a severe global financial crisis in late 2008, plunging much of the industrialized world into a deep recession. However, the fundamental reasons for why US mortgages defaulted at such spectacular rates remain largely unknown. This paper presents empirical evidence showing that the ability to perform basic mathematical calculations is negatively associated with the propensity to default on one’s mortgage. We measure several aspects of financial literacy and cognitive ability in a survey of subprime mortgage borrowers who took out loans in 2006 and 2007, and match them to objective, detailed administrative data on mortgage characteristics and payment histories. The relationship between numerical ability and mortgage default is robust to controlling for a broad set of sociodemographic variables, and is not driven by other aspects of cognitive ability. We find no support for the hypothesis that numerical ability impacts mortgage outcomes through the choice of the mortgage contract. Rather, our results suggest that individuals with limited numerical ability default on their mortgage due to behavior unrelated to the initial choice of their mortgage. PMID:23798401

  15. Structure, sintering behavior, and microwave dielectric properties of (1 − x) CaWO{sub 4}–xYLiF{sub 4} (0.02 ≤ x ≤ 0.10) ceramics

    SciTech Connect

    Bian, Jian Jiang Ding, Yao Min

    2015-07-15

    Highlights: • Structure, sinterability, and dielectric properties of CaWO{sub 4}–YLiF{sub 4} were studied. • CaWO{sub 4} can be densified (TD 97%) at 750 °C/2 h by YLiF{sub 4} doping. • Excellent microwave dielectric properties could be obtained. - Abstract: Structures and sintering behaviors of (1 − x) CaWO{sub 4}–xYLiF{sub 4} (0.02 ≤ x ≤ 0.10) ceramic have been investigated by X-ray powder diffraction (XRD), dilatometry, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) in this work. The microwave dielectric properties were measured with a network analyzer at the frequency of about 8–15 GHz. Limited solid solution could be formed within the compositional range of x < 0.1. The sintering temperature of CaWO{sub 4} could successfully be reduced to ∼750 °C/2 h by doping with small amount of YLiF{sub 4}. An optimized microwave dielectric properties with ϵ{sub r} = 10.5, Q × f = 73 000 GHz and τ{sub f} = −37.7 ppm/°C could be obtained after sintered at the 750 °C for 2 h for x = 0.04 compositions. XRD and back scattering SEM analysis indicated that the (1 − x) CaWO{sub 4}–xYLiF{sub 4} (x = 0.04) ceramic could be chemically compatible with Ag after sintering at 750 °C/2 h.

  16. Toward Scientific Numerical Modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kleb, Bil

    2007-01-01

    Ultimately, scientific numerical models need quantified output uncertainties so that modeling can evolve to better match reality. Documenting model input uncertainties and verifying that numerical models are translated into code correctly, however, are necessary first steps toward that goal. Without known input parameter uncertainties, model sensitivities are all one can determine, and without code verification, output uncertainties are simply not reliable. To address these two shortcomings, two proposals are offered: (1) an unobtrusive mechanism to document input parameter uncertainties in situ and (2) an adaptation of the Scientific Method to numerical model development and deployment. Because these two steps require changes in the computational simulation community to bear fruit, they are presented in terms of the Beckhard-Harris-Gleicher change model.

  17. Protostellar Jets: Numerical Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vitorino, B. F.; Jatenco-Pereira, V.; Opher, R.

    1998-11-01

    Numerical simulations of astrophysical jets have been made in order to study their collimation and internal structure. Recently Ouyed & Pudritz (1997) did numerical simulations of axi-simetric magnetocentrifugal jets from a keplerian acretion disk employing the eulerian finite difference code Zeus-2D. During their simulation, it was raised a steady state jet confirming a lot of results of the MHD winds steady state theory. Following this scenario we did tridimensional numerial simulations of this model allowing the jet, after a perturbation, evolve into a not steady state producing the helical features observed in some protostellar jets.

  18. Development of ferroelectric correlations in the quantum paraelectric and antiferrodistortive regimes in Ba{sub x}Sr{sub 1-x}TiO{sub 3} (x ≤ 0.10)

    SciTech Connect

    Hassnain Jaffari, G.; Mehmood, Zahid; Iqbal, Asad M.; Hasanain, S. K.; Ismat Shah, S.

    2014-08-28

    The dielectric response ε(T)  of Ba{sub x}Sr{sub 1-x}TiO{sub 3} (x ≤ 0.1) for compositions at and below the critical composition for the ferroelectric transition has been studied. With progressive Ba substitution, the growth of ferroelectric correlations and the weakening of the Antiferrodistortive (AFD) and the quantum paraelectric (QPE) effects have been studied by monitoring the changes in both the in and out of phase parts of the dielectric response. For the compositions close to pure SrTiO{sub 3} (x = 0 and x = 0.02), the temperature dependence exhibits a continuous rise in the in-phase part and no ferroelectric peak, consistent with the QPE behavior. With increasing Ba substitution, the low temperature behavior of the in phase part ε{sup ′} progressively changes from a continuous rise to exhibit a weak maximum and finally to a well developed cusp. For higher Ba concentrations, the low temperature peak (T ∼ 50K), which corresponds to ferroelectric correlations, becomes increasingly sharper until at the critical composition, x = 0.10, the system shows a single well defined ferroelectric peak. However, the out of phase response of the x = 0.1 composition exhibited a succession of three BaTiO{sub 3} type ferroelectric transitions. For x≤0.04, the out of phase part shows evidence of an ordering around T ∼ 100K, which is the expected AFD ordering temperature. The deviations of the ε{sup ′}(T) data from the Curie-Weiss law have been analyzed within the frame work of two different theoretical models. It was determined that the dielectric behavior for lower concentrations of Ba (up to x ≤ 0.08) was explainable in terms of a model of non-interacting regions which are themselves homogeneously polarized and undergo a second order phase transition. For the phase boundary composition, i.e., x = 0.1, on the other hand, the data are explainable in terms of the Sherrington and Kirkpatrick model which includes the effects

  19. Numerical Estimation in Preschoolers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berteletti, Ilaria; Lucangeli, Daniela; Piazza, Manuela; Dehaene, Stanislas; Zorzi, Marco

    2010-01-01

    Children's sense of numbers before formal education is thought to rely on an approximate number system based on logarithmically compressed analog magnitudes that increases in resolution throughout childhood. School-age children performing a numerical estimation task have been shown to increasingly rely on a formally appropriate, linear…

  20. Approaches to Numerical Relativity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    d'Inverno, Ray

    2005-07-01

    Introduction Ray d'Inverno; Preface C. J. S. Clarke; Part I. Theoretical Approaches: 1. Numerical relativity on a transputer array Ray d'Inverno; 2. Some aspects of the characteristic initial value problem in numerical relativity Nigel Bishop; 3. The characteristic initial value problem in general relativity J. M. Stewart; 4. Algebraic approachs to the characteristic initial value problem in general relativity Jõrg Frauendiener; 5. On hyperboidal hypersurfaces Helmut Friedrich; 6. The initial value problem on null cones J. A. Vickers; 7. Introduction to dual-null dynamics S. A. Hayward; 8. On colliding plane wave space-times J. B. Griffiths; 9. Boundary conditions for the momentum constraint Niall O Murchadha; 10. On the choice of matter model in general relativity A. D. Rendall; 11. A mathematical approach to numerical relativity J. W. Barrett; 12. Making sense of the effects of rotation in general relativity J. C. Miller; 13. Stability of charged boson stars and catastrophe theory Franz E. Schunck, Fjodor V. Kusmartsev and Eckehard W. Mielke; Part II. Practical Approaches: 14. Numerical asymptotics R. Gómez and J. Winicour; 15. Instabilities in rapidly rotating polytropes Scott C. Smith and Joan M. Centrella; 16. Gravitational radiation from coalescing binary neutron stars Ken-Ichi Oohara and Takashi Nakamura; 17. 'Critical' behaviour in massless scalar field collapse M. W. Choptuik; 18. Goudunov-type methods applied to general relativistic gravitational collapse José Ma. Ibánez, José Ma. Martí, Juan A. Miralles and J. V. Romero; 19. Astrophysical sources of gravitational waves and neutrinos Silvano Bonazzola, Eric Gourgoulhon, Pawel Haensel and Jean-Alain Marck; 20. Gravitational radiation from triaxial core collapse Jean-Alain Marck and Silvano Bonazzola; 21. A vacuum fully relativistic 3D numerical code C. Bona and J. Massó; 22. Solution of elliptic equations in numerical relativity using multiquadrics M. R. Dubal, S. R. Oliveira and R. A. Matzner; 23

  1. Linguistic Influence on Numerical Development.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Park, Mangoo

    2000-01-01

    Discusses linguistic influence on children's numerical development. Describes and reviews recent papers that address the relationship between number naming systems and children's numerical concepts. (Contains 20 references.) (ASK)

  2. Modelling heart rate kinetics.

    PubMed

    Zakynthinaki, Maria S

    2015-01-01

    The objective of the present study was to formulate a simple and at the same time effective mathematical model of heart rate kinetics in response to movement (exercise). Based on an existing model, a system of two coupled differential equations which give the rate of change of heart rate and the rate of change of exercise intensity is used. The modifications introduced to the existing model are justified and discussed in detail, while models of blood lactate accumulation in respect to time and exercise intensity are also presented. The main modification is that the proposed model has now only one parameter which reflects the overall cardiovascular condition of the individual. The time elapsed after the beginning of the exercise, the intensity of the exercise, as well as blood lactate are also taken into account. Application of the model provides information regarding the individual's cardiovascular condition and is able to detect possible changes in it, across the data recording periods. To demonstrate examples of successful numerical fit of the model, constant intensity experimental heart rate data sets of two individuals have been selected and numerical optimization was implemented. In addition, numerical simulations provided predictions for various exercise intensities and various cardiovascular condition levels. The proposed model can serve as a powerful tool for a complete means of heart rate analysis, not only in exercise physiology (for efficiently designing training sessions for healthy subjects) but also in the areas of cardiovascular health and rehabilitation (including application in population groups for which direct heart rate recordings at intense exercises are not possible or not allowed, such as elderly or pregnant women).

  3. Modelling Heart Rate Kinetics

    PubMed Central

    Zakynthinaki, Maria S.

    2015-01-01

    The objective of the present study was to formulate a simple and at the same time effective mathematical model of heart rate kinetics in response to movement (exercise). Based on an existing model, a system of two coupled differential equations which give the rate of change of heart rate and the rate of change of exercise intensity is used. The modifications introduced to the existing model are justified and discussed in detail, while models of blood lactate accumulation in respect to time and exercise intensity are also presented. The main modification is that the proposed model has now only one parameter which reflects the overall cardiovascular condition of the individual. The time elapsed after the beginning of the exercise, the intensity of the exercise, as well as blood lactate are also taken into account. Application of the model provides information regarding the individual’s cardiovascular condition and is able to detect possible changes in it, across the data recording periods. To demonstrate examples of successful numerical fit of the model, constant intensity experimental heart rate data sets of two individuals have been selected and numerical optimization was implemented. In addition, numerical simulations provided predictions for various exercise intensities and various cardiovascular condition levels. The proposed model can serve as a powerful tool for a complete means of heart rate analysis, not only in exercise physiology (for efficiently designing training sessions for healthy subjects) but also in the areas of cardiovascular health and rehabilitation (including application in population groups for which direct heart rate recordings at intense exercises are not possible or not allowed, such as elderly or pregnant women). PMID:25876164

  4. Frequency-dependent numerical dynamics in mosquitofish.

    PubMed Central

    Horth, Lisa; Travis, Joseph

    2002-01-01

    Altering the genetic composition of a population can alter several aspects of its numerical dynamics. Whether natural populations routinely contain the genetic variation capable of affecting the stability of those dynamics is less clear. Here we report a study of experimental populations of mosquitofish (Gambusia holbrooki), designed to examine this issue. The experiment examined the numerical effects of varying the initial relative frequency of a rare male genotype. A higher relative frequency of the rare, melanic genotype produced higher mortality rates in melanic males, higher mortality rates in females, higher juvenile abundance, and fewer fluctuations in the numbers of females across time. This work demonstrates that a natural population can harbour genetic variants in a single gender that are capable of inducing qualitative differences in the numerical dynamics of the opposite gender, through the effects of negative frequency-dependent selection. PMID:12427317

  5. Hybrid undulator numerical optimization

    SciTech Connect

    Hairetdinov, A.H.; Zukov, A.A.

    1995-12-31

    3D properties of the hybrid undulator scheme arc studied numerically using PANDIRA code. It is shown that there exist two well defined sets of undulator parameters which provide either maximum on-axis field amplitude or minimal higher harmonics amplitude of the basic undulator field. Thus the alternative between higher field amplitude or pure sinusoidal field exists. The behavior of the undulator field amplitude and harmonics structure for a large set of (undulator gap)/(undulator wavelength) values is demonstrated.

  6. Numerical Simulations of Thermobaric Explosions

    SciTech Connect

    Kuhl, A L; Bell, J B; Beckner, V E; Khasainov, B

    2007-05-04

    A Model of the energy evolution in thermobaric explosions is presented. It is based on the two-phase formulation: conservation laws for the gas and particle phases along with inter-phase interaction terms. It incorporates a Combustion Model based on the mass conservation laws for fuel, air and products; source/sink terms are treated in the fast-chemistry limit appropriate for such gas dynamic fields. The Model takes into account both the afterburning of the detonation products of the booster with air, and the combustion of the fuel (Al or TNT detonation products) with air. Numerical simulations were performed for 1.5-g thermobaric explosions in five different chambers (volumes ranging from 6.6 to 40 liters and length-to-diameter ratios from 1 to 12.5). Computed pressure waveforms were very similar to measured waveforms in all cases - thereby proving that the Model correctly predicts the energy evolution in such explosions. The computed global fuel consumption {mu}(t) behaved as an exponential life function. Its derivative {dot {mu}}(t) represents the global rate of fuel consumption. It depends on the rate of turbulent mixing which controls the rate of energy release in thermobaric explosions.

  7. Numerical computation of Pop plot

    SciTech Connect

    Menikoff, Ralph

    2015-03-23

    The Pop plot — distance-of-run to detonation versus initial shock pressure — is a key characterization of shock initiation in a heterogeneous explosive. Reactive burn models for high explosives (HE) must reproduce the experimental Pop plot to have any chance of accurately predicting shock initiation phenomena. This report describes a methodology for automating the computation of a Pop plot for a specific explosive with a given HE model. Illustrative examples of the computation are shown for PBX 9502 with three burn models (SURF, WSD and Forest Fire) utilizing the xRage code, which is the Eulerian ASC hydrocode at LANL. Comparison of the numerical and experimental Pop plot can be the basis for a validation test or as an aid in calibrating the burn rate of an HE model. Issues with calibration are discussed.

  8. Pneumotachometer counts respiration rate of human subject

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Graham, O.

    1964-01-01

    To monitor breaths per minute, two rate-to-analog converters are alternately used to read and count the respiratory rate from an impedance pneumograph sequentially displayed numerically on electroluminescent matrices.

  9. Electrochemical performance of LiFe(1-x)MnxPO4 (x = 0, 0.10, 0.15, 0.2) synthesized by solid state process as cathode material for Li-ion battery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Triwibowo, J.; Priyono, S.; Purawiardi, R. I.; Ratri, C. R.; Suwandi, E.

    2016-02-01

    Mn-doped LiFePO4 was synthesized through solid state process. Starting materials as LiOH.2H2O, Fe2O3, MnO2, H3PO4 and citric acid were technical grade materials. Synthesis process was conducted in two step heating process. The first heating process was purposed to remove organic materials at temperature of 320 °C for 10 hours in inert atmosphere. Subsequently, the second heating process was conducted at 800 °C for 8 hours also in inert atmosphere. Obtained phase was further observed by means of XRD. Morphology of the obtained powder was analyzed by SEM. The electrochemical performance was observed by cyclic voltammetry with the potential range 2 - 4.2 V under the scan rate mV/s. The rate capability of the obtained material was determined by charge-discharge test under various C-rates (0.5-10C) for potential range of 2 - 4.2 V.

  10. Numerical Analysis Objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henderson, Michael

    1997-08-01

    The Numerical Analysis Objects project (NAO) is a project in the Mathematics Department of IBM's TJ Watson Research Center. While there are plenty of numerical tools available today, it is not an easy task to combine them into a custom application. NAO is directed at the dual problems of building applications from a set of tools, and creating those tools. There are several "reuse" projects, which focus on the problems of identifying and cataloging tools. NAO is directed at the specific context of scientific computing. Because the type of tools is restricted, problems such as tools with incompatible data structures for input and output, and dissimilar interfaces to tools which solve similar problems can be addressed. The approach we've taken is to define interfaces to those objects used in numerical analysis, such as geometries, functions and operators, and to start collecting (and building) a set of tools which use these interfaces. We have written a class library (a set of abstract classes and implementations) in C++ which demonstrates the approach. Besides the classes, the class library includes "stub" routines which allow the library to be used from C or Fortran, and an interface to a Visual Programming Language. The library has been used to build a simulator for petroleum reservoirs, using a set of tools for discretizing nonlinear differential equations that we have written, and includes "wrapped" versions of packages from the Netlib repository. Documentation can be found on the Web at "http://www.research.ibm.com/nao". I will describe the objects and their interfaces, and give examples ranging from mesh generation to solving differential equations.

  11. Direct numerical simulation of reacting flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Riley, J. J.; Metcalfe, R. W.

    1984-01-01

    The objectives of this work are: (1) to extend the technique of direct numerical simulations to turbulent, chemically reacting flows, (2) to test the validity of the method by comparing computational results with laboratory data, and (3) to use the simulations to gain a better understanding of the effects of turbulence on chemical reactions. The effects of both the large scale structure and the smaller scale turbulence on the overall reaction rates are addressed. The relationship between infinite reaction rate and finite reaction rate chemistry is compared with some of the results of calculations with existing theories and laboratory data. The direct numerical simulation method involves the numerical solution of the detailed evolution of the complex turbulent velocity and concentration fields. Using very efficient numerical methods (e.g., pseudospectral methods), the fully nonlinear (possibly low pass filtered) equations of motion are solved and no closure assumptions or turbulence models are used. Statistical data are obtained by performing spatial, temporal, and/or ensemble averages over the computed flow fields.

  12. Numerical analysis of a vortex controlled diffuser

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spall, Robert E.

    1993-01-01

    A numerical study of a prototypical vortex controlled diffuser is performed. The basic diffuser geometry consists of a step expansion in a pipe of area ratio 2.25:1. The incompressible Reynolds averaged Navier-Stokes equations, employing the K-epsilon turbulence model, are solved. Results are presented for bleed rates ranging from 1 to 7 percent. Diffuser efficiencies in excess of 80 percent are obtained. Reattachment lengths are reduced by a factor of up to 3. These results are in qualitative agreement with previous experimental work. However, differences in some basic details of experimentally observed and the present numerically generated flowfields exist. The effect of swirl is also investigated.

  13. Numerical Propulsion System Simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Naiman, Cynthia

    2006-01-01

    The NASA Glenn Research Center, in partnership with the aerospace industry, other government agencies, and academia, is leading the effort to develop an advanced multidisciplinary analysis environment for aerospace propulsion systems called the Numerical Propulsion System Simulation (NPSS). NPSS is a framework for performing analysis of complex systems. The initial development of NPSS focused on the analysis and design of airbreathing aircraft engines, but the resulting NPSS framework may be applied to any system, for example: aerospace, rockets, hypersonics, power and propulsion, fuel cells, ground based power, and even human system modeling. NPSS provides increased flexibility for the user, which reduces the total development time and cost. It is currently being extended to support the NASA Aeronautics Research Mission Directorate Fundamental Aeronautics Program and the Advanced Virtual Engine Test Cell (AVETeC). NPSS focuses on the integration of multiple disciplines such as aerodynamics, structure, and heat transfer with numerical zooming on component codes. Zooming is the coupling of analyses at various levels of detail. NPSS development includes capabilities to facilitate collaborative engineering. The NPSS will provide improved tools to develop custom components and to use capability for zooming to higher fidelity codes, coupling to multidiscipline codes, transmitting secure data, and distributing simulations across different platforms. These powerful capabilities extend NPSS from a zero-dimensional simulation tool to a multi-fidelity, multidiscipline system-level simulation tool for the full development life cycle.

  14. Confidence in Numerical Simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Hemez, Francois M.

    2015-02-23

    This PowerPoint presentation offers a high-level discussion of uncertainty, confidence and credibility in scientific Modeling and Simulation (M&S). It begins by briefly evoking M&S trends in computational physics and engineering. The first thrust of the discussion is to emphasize that the role of M&S in decision-making is either to support reasoning by similarity or to “forecast,” that is, make predictions about the future or extrapolate to settings or environments that cannot be tested experimentally. The second thrust is to explain that M&S-aided decision-making is an exercise in uncertainty management. The three broad classes of uncertainty in computational physics and engineering are variability and randomness, numerical uncertainty and model-form uncertainty. The last part of the discussion addresses how scientists “think.” This thought process parallels the scientific method where by a hypothesis is formulated, often accompanied by simplifying assumptions, then, physical experiments and numerical simulations are performed to confirm or reject the hypothesis. “Confidence” derives, not just from the levels of training and experience of analysts, but also from the rigor with which these assessments are performed, documented and peer-reviewed.

  15. Rythmos Numerical Integration Package

    2006-09-01

    Rythmos numerically integrates transient differential equations. The differential equations can be explicit or implicit ordinary differential equations ofr formulated as fully implicit differential-algebraic equations. Methods include backward Euler, forward Euler, explicit Runge-Kutta, and implicit BDF at this time. Native support for operator split methods and strict modularity are strong design goals. Forward sensitivity computations will be included in the first release with adjoint sensitivities coming in the near future. Rythmos heavily relies on Thyra formore » linear algebra and nonlinear solver interfaces to AztecOO, Amesos, IFPack, and NOX in Tilinos. Rythmos is specially suited for stiff differential equations and thos applictions where operator split methods have a big advantage, e.g. Computational fluid dynamics, convection-diffusion equations, etc.« less

  16. Learning numerical progressions.

    PubMed

    Vitz, P C; Hazan, D N

    1974-01-01

    Learning of simple numerical progressions and compound progressions formed by combining two or three simple progressions is investigated. In two experiments, time to solution was greater for compound vs simple progressions; greater the higher the progression's solution level; and greater if the progression consisted of large vs small numbers. A set of strategies is proposed to account for progression learning based on the assumption S computes differences between integers, differences between differences, etc., in a hierarchical fashion. Two measures of progression difficulty, each a summary of the strategies, are proposed; C1 is a count of the number of differences needed to solve a progression; C2 is the same count with higher level differences given more weight. The measures accurately predict in both experiments the mean time to solve 16 different progressions with C2 being somewhat superior. The measures also predict the learning difficulty of 10 other progressions reported by Bjork (1968).

  17. Rythmos Numerical Integration Package

    SciTech Connect

    Coffey, Todd S.; Bartlett, Roscoe A.

    2006-09-01

    Rythmos numerically integrates transient differential equations. The differential equations can be explicit or implicit ordinary differential equations ofr formulated as fully implicit differential-algebraic equations. Methods include backward Euler, forward Euler, explicit Runge-Kutta, and implicit BDF at this time. Native support for operator split methods and strict modularity are strong design goals. Forward sensitivity computations will be included in the first release with adjoint sensitivities coming in the near future. Rythmos heavily relies on Thyra for linear algebra and nonlinear solver interfaces to AztecOO, Amesos, IFPack, and NOX in Tilinos. Rythmos is specially suited for stiff differential equations and thos applictions where operator split methods have a big advantage, e.g. Computational fluid dynamics, convection-diffusion equations, etc.

  18. Numerical studies of silica precipitation/dissolution

    SciTech Connect

    Lai, C.H.; Bodvarsson, G.S.; Witherspoon, P.A.

    1985-01-01

    In this paper we describe our numerical simulator PIC (pressure-temperature-chemistry), and also present the methods we use to reduce error due to numerical diffusion. Examples of the application of this approach to two problems are included. The first problem involves non-isothermal flow of supersaturated silica through single fractures. The precipitation of silica in the fractures is modeled and the resulting permeability and flow rate decreases are calculated. The second problem involves field data collected at the Ellidaar geothermal field in Iceland. After 15 years of fluid production, significant declines in pressure and temperature have been observed along with changes in silica concentrations. In order to illustrate the applicability of our model to such data, we have developed a simple numerical model that fits well with the observed production history. The applicability of our coupled method of analyzing the changing reservoir conditions is demonstrated, and the result is a more detailed understanding of the geothermal system.

  19. Numerical Modeling of Ablation Heat Transfer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ewing, Mark E.; Laker, Travis S.; Walker, David T.

    2013-01-01

    A unique numerical method has been developed for solving one-dimensional ablation heat transfer problems. This paper provides a comprehensive description of the method, along with detailed derivations of the governing equations. This methodology supports solutions for traditional ablation modeling including such effects as heat transfer, material decomposition, pyrolysis gas permeation and heat exchange, and thermochemical surface erosion. The numerical scheme utilizes a control-volume approach with a variable grid to account for surface movement. This method directly supports implementation of nontraditional models such as material swelling and mechanical erosion, extending capabilities for modeling complex ablation phenomena. Verifications of the numerical implementation are provided using analytical solutions, code comparisons, and the method of manufactured solutions. These verifications are used to demonstrate solution accuracy and proper error convergence rates. A simple demonstration of a mechanical erosion (spallation) model is also provided to illustrate the unique capabilities of the method.

  20. Numerical approach for unstructured quantum key distribution.

    PubMed

    Coles, Patrick J; Metodiev, Eric M; Lütkenhaus, Norbert

    2016-05-20

    Quantum key distribution (QKD) allows for communication with security guaranteed by quantum theory. The main theoretical problem in QKD is to calculate the secret key rate for a given protocol. Analytical formulas are known for protocols with symmetries, since symmetry simplifies the analysis. However, experimental imperfections break symmetries, hence the effect of imperfections on key rates is difficult to estimate. Furthermore, it is an interesting question whether (intentionally) asymmetric protocols could outperform symmetric ones. Here we develop a robust numerical approach for calculating the key rate for arbitrary discrete-variable QKD protocols. Ultimately this will allow researchers to study 'unstructured' protocols, that is, those that lack symmetry. Our approach relies on transforming the key rate calculation to the dual optimization problem, which markedly reduces the number of parameters and hence the calculation time. We illustrate our method by investigating some unstructured protocols for which the key rate was previously unknown.

  1. Numerical approach for unstructured quantum key distribution.

    PubMed

    Coles, Patrick J; Metodiev, Eric M; Lütkenhaus, Norbert

    2016-01-01

    Quantum key distribution (QKD) allows for communication with security guaranteed by quantum theory. The main theoretical problem in QKD is to calculate the secret key rate for a given protocol. Analytical formulas are known for protocols with symmetries, since symmetry simplifies the analysis. However, experimental imperfections break symmetries, hence the effect of imperfections on key rates is difficult to estimate. Furthermore, it is an interesting question whether (intentionally) asymmetric protocols could outperform symmetric ones. Here we develop a robust numerical approach for calculating the key rate for arbitrary discrete-variable QKD protocols. Ultimately this will allow researchers to study 'unstructured' protocols, that is, those that lack symmetry. Our approach relies on transforming the key rate calculation to the dual optimization problem, which markedly reduces the number of parameters and hence the calculation time. We illustrate our method by investigating some unstructured protocols for which the key rate was previously unknown. PMID:27198739

  2. Numerical approach for unstructured quantum key distribution

    PubMed Central

    Coles, Patrick J.; Metodiev, Eric M.; Lütkenhaus, Norbert

    2016-01-01

    Quantum key distribution (QKD) allows for communication with security guaranteed by quantum theory. The main theoretical problem in QKD is to calculate the secret key rate for a given protocol. Analytical formulas are known for protocols with symmetries, since symmetry simplifies the analysis. However, experimental imperfections break symmetries, hence the effect of imperfections on key rates is difficult to estimate. Furthermore, it is an interesting question whether (intentionally) asymmetric protocols could outperform symmetric ones. Here we develop a robust numerical approach for calculating the key rate for arbitrary discrete-variable QKD protocols. Ultimately this will allow researchers to study ‘unstructured' protocols, that is, those that lack symmetry. Our approach relies on transforming the key rate calculation to the dual optimization problem, which markedly reduces the number of parameters and hence the calculation time. We illustrate our method by investigating some unstructured protocols for which the key rate was previously unknown. PMID:27198739

  3. Developmental Change in Numerical Estimation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Slusser, Emily B.; Santiago, Rachel T.; Barth, Hilary C.

    2013-01-01

    Mental representations of numerical magnitude are commonly thought to undergo discontinuous change over development in the form of a "representational shift." This idea stems from an apparent categorical shift from logarithmic to linear patterns of numerical estimation on tasks that involve translating between numerical magnitudes and spatial…

  4. Numerical Relativity and Astrophysics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lehner, Luis; Pretorius, Frans

    2014-08-01

    Throughout the Universe many powerful events are driven by strong gravitational effects that require general relativity to fully describe them. These include compact binary mergers, black hole accretion, and stellar collapse, where velocities can approach the speed of light and extreme gravitational fields (ΦNewt/c2≃1) mediate the interactions. Many of these processes trigger emission across a broad range of the electromagnetic spectrum. Compact binaries further source strong gravitational wave emission that could directly be detected in the near future. This feat will open up a gravitational wave window into our Universe and revolutionize our understanding of it. Describing these phenomena requires general relativity, and—where dynamical effects strongly modify gravitational fields—the full Einstein equations coupled to matter sources. Numerical relativity is a field within general relativity concerned with studying such scenarios that cannot be accurately modeled via perturbative or analytical calculations. In this review, we examine results obtained within this discipline, with a focus on its impact in astrophysics.

  5. Numerical distance effect in patients with schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Pourrahimi, Ali Mohammad; Mazhari, Shahrzad; Shabani, Mohammad; Tabrizi, Yousef Moghadas; Sheibani, Vahid

    2016-03-23

    There is growing evidence showing that mental representation of numbers is impaired in patients with schizophrenia. Yet, no study has examined the distance effect in the patients. We assessed the distance effect using two number size comparison tasks, with different number references (5 and 7) in 23 patients and 28 healthy individuals. Response times and error rates significantly increased when the distances between the centered references and the targets decreased in both groups. However, patients responded significantly slower and had more error rates compared to controls. Our finding indicates distance effect in patients is similar to the controls, indicating an automatic numerical processing is preserved in patients with schizophrenia.

  6. Influence of Ar addition on ozone generation in a non-thermal plasma—a numerical investigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Hsin Liang; Lee, How Ming; Chen, Shiaw Huei; Wei, Ta Chin; Been Chang, Moo

    2010-10-01

    A numerical model based on a dielectric barrier discharge is developed in this study to investigate the influence of Ar addition on ozone generation. The simulation results show good agreement with the experimental data, confirming the validity of the numerical model. The mechanisms regarding how the Ar addition affects ozone generation are investigated with the assistance of a numerical simulation by probing into the following two questions, (1) why the ozone concentration just slightly decreases in the low specific input energy (SIE, the ratio of discharge power to gas flow rate) region even if the inlet O2 concentration is substantially decreased and (2) why the variation of the increased rate of ozone concentration with SIE (i.e. the variation in the slope of ozone concentration versus SIE) is more significant for an O2/Ar mixture plasma. As SIE is relatively low, ozone decomposition through electron-impact and radical attack reactions is less significant because of low ozone concentration and gas temperature. Therefore, the ozone concentration depends mainly on the amount of oxygen atoms generated. The simulation results indicate that the amount of oxygen atoms generated per electronvolt for Ar concentrations of 0%, 10%, 30%, 50% and 80% are 0.178, 0.174, 0.169, 0.165 and 0.166, respectively, explaining why the ozone concentration does not decrease linearly with the inlet O2 concentration in the low SIE region. On the other hand, the simulation results show that increasing Ar concentration would lead to a lower reduced field and a higher gas temperature. The former would lead to an increase in the rate constant of e + O3 → e + O + O2 while the latter would result in a decrease in the rate constant of O + O2 + M → O3 + M and an increase in that of O3 + O → 2O2. The changes in the rate constants of these reactions would have a negative effect on ozone generation, which is the rationale for the second question.

  7. Numerical Simulation of Airflow Fields in Two Typical Nasal Structures of Empty Nose Syndrome: A Computational Fluid Dynamics Study

    PubMed Central

    Di, Meng-Yang; Jiang, Zhe; Gao, Zhi-Qiang; Li, Zhi; An, Yi-Ran; Lv, Wei

    2013-01-01

    Background The pathogenesis of empty nose syndrome (ENS) has not been elucidated so far. Though postulated, there remains a lack of experimental evidence about the roles of nasal aerodynamics on the development of ENS. Objective To investigate the nasal aerodynamic features of ENS andto explore the role of aerodynamic changes on the pathogenesis of ENS. Methods Seven sinonasal models were numerically constructed, based on the high resolution computed tomography images of seven healthy male adults. Bilateral radical inferior/middle turbinectomy were numerically performed to mimic the typical nasal structures of ENS-inferior turbinate (ENS-IT) and ENS-middle turbinate (ENS-MT). A steady laminar model was applied in calculation. Velocity, pressure, streamlines, air flux and wall shear stress were numerically investigated. Each parameter of normal structures was compared with those of the corresponding pathological models of ENS-IT and ENS-MT, respectively. Results ENS-MT: Streamlines, air flux distribution, and wall shear stress distribution were generally similar to those of the normal structures; nasal resistances decreased. Velocities decreased locally, while increased around the sphenopalatine ganglion by 0.20±0.17m/s and 0.22±0.10m/s during inspiration and expiration, respectively. ENS-IT: Streamlines were less organized with new vortexes shown near the bottom wall. The airflow rates passing through the nasal olfactory area decreased by 26.27%±8.68% and 13.18%±7.59% during inspiration and expiration, respectively. Wall shear stresses, nasal resistances and local velocities all decreased. Conclusion Our CFD simulation study suggests that the changes in nasal aerodynamics may play an essential role in the pathogenesis of ENS. An increased velocity around the sphenopalatine ganglion in the ENS-MT models could be responsible for headache in patients with ENS-MT. However, these results need to be validated in further studies with a larger sample size and more

  8. Numerical Asymptotic Solutions Of Differential Equations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thurston, Gaylen A.

    1992-01-01

    Numerical algorithms derived and compared with classical analytical methods. In method, expansions replaced with integrals evaluated numerically. Resulting numerical solutions retain linear independence, main advantage of asymptotic solutions.

  9. Highly Parallel, High-Precision Numerical Integration

    SciTech Connect

    Bailey, David H.; Borwein, Jonathan M.

    2005-04-22

    This paper describes a scheme for rapidly computing numerical values of definite integrals to very high accuracy, ranging from ordinary machine precision to hundreds or thousands of digits, even for functions with singularities or infinite derivatives at endpoints. Such a scheme is of interest not only in computational physics and computational chemistry, but also in experimental mathematics, where high-precision numerical values of definite integrals can be used to numerically discover new identities. This paper discusses techniques for a parallel implementation of this scheme, then presents performance results for 1-D and 2-D test suites. Results are also given for a certain problem from mathematical physics, which features a difficult singularity, confirming a conjecture to 20,000 digit accuracy. The performance rate for this latter calculation on 1024 CPUs is 690 Gflop/s. We believe that this and one other 20,000-digit integral evaluation that we report are the highest-precision non-trivial numerical integrations performed to date.

  10. Ferrofluids: Modeling, numerical analysis, and scientific computation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tomas, Ignacio

    This dissertation presents some developments in the Numerical Analysis of Partial Differential Equations (PDEs) describing the behavior of ferrofluids. The most widely accepted PDE model for ferrofluids is the Micropolar model proposed by R.E. Rosensweig. The Micropolar Navier-Stokes Equations (MNSE) is a subsystem of PDEs within the Rosensweig model. Being a simplified version of the much bigger system of PDEs proposed by Rosensweig, the MNSE are a natural starting point of this thesis. The MNSE couple linear velocity u, angular velocity w, and pressure p. We propose and analyze a first-order semi-implicit fully-discrete scheme for the MNSE, which decouples the computation of the linear and angular velocities, is unconditionally stable and delivers optimal convergence rates under assumptions analogous to those used for the Navier-Stokes equations. Moving onto the much more complex Rosensweig's model, we provide a definition (approximation) for the effective magnetizing field h, and explain the assumptions behind this definition. Unlike previous definitions available in the literature, this new definition is able to accommodate the effect of external magnetic fields. Using this definition we setup the system of PDEs coupling linear velocity u, pressure p, angular velocity w, magnetization m, and magnetic potential ϕ We show that this system is energy-stable and devise a numerical scheme that mimics the same stability property. We prove that solutions of the numerical scheme always exist and, under certain simplifying assumptions, that the discrete solutions converge. A notable outcome of the analysis of the numerical scheme for the Rosensweig's model is the choice of finite element spaces that allow the construction of an energy-stable scheme. Finally, with the lessons learned from Rosensweig's model, we develop a diffuse-interface model describing the behavior of two-phase ferrofluid flows and present an energy-stable numerical scheme for this model. For a

  11. Aerodynamic design using numerical optimization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murman, E. M.; Chapman, G. T.

    1983-01-01

    The procedure of using numerical optimization methods coupled with computational fluid dynamic (CFD) codes for the development of an aerodynamic design is examined. Several approaches that replace wind tunnel tests, develop pressure distributions and derive designs, or fulfill preset design criteria are presented. The method of Aerodynamic Design by Numerical Optimization (ADNO) is described and illustrated with examples.

  12. A Vocabulary for Numerical Control.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Campbell, Clifton Paul

    This glossary presents a standardized nomenclature for numerical control. It defines and describes some 286 technical words, terms, abbreviations, and acronyms which form a specialized vocabulary. The aim of this glossary is to provide a means for arriving at some common understanding of terminology for numerical control technology. Numerous…

  13. Note on symmetric BCJ numerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Chih-Hao; Du, Yi-Jian; Feng, Bo

    2014-08-01

    We present an algorithm that leads to BCJ numerators satisfying manifestly the three properties proposed by Broedel and Carrasco in [42]. We explicitly calculate the numerators at 4, 5 and 6-points and show that the relabeling property is generically satisfied.

  14. Numerical simulation of dusty plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Winske, D.

    1995-09-01

    The numerical simulation of physical processes in dusty plasmas is reviewed, with emphasis on recent results and unresolved issues. Three areas of research are discussed: grain charging, weak dust-plasma interactions, and strong dust-plasma interactions. For each area, we review the basic concepts that are tested by simulations, present some appropriate examples, and examine numerical issues associated with extending present work.

  15. Numerical integration of analytic functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milovanović, Gradimir V.; Tošić, Dobrilo ð.; Albijanić, Miloljub

    2012-09-01

    A weighted generalized N-point Birkhoff-Young quadrature of interpolatory type for numerical integration of analytic functions is considered. Special cases of such quadratures with respect to the generalized Gegenbauer weight function are derived.

  16. Numerical Simulation of Nix's Rotation

    NASA Video Gallery

    This is a numerical simulation of the orientation of Nix as seen from the center of the Pluto system. It has been sped up so that one orbit of Nix around Pluto takes 2 seconds instead of 25 days. L...

  17. Numerical Optimization Using Computer Experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trosset, Michael W.; Torczon, Virginia

    1997-01-01

    Engineering design optimization often gives rise to problems in which expensive objective functions are minimized by derivative-free methods. We propose a method for solving such problems that synthesizes ideas from the numerical optimization and computer experiment literatures. Our approach relies on kriging known function values to construct a sequence of surrogate models of the objective function that are used to guide a grid search for a minimizer. Results from numerical experiments on a standard test problem are presented.

  18. Bidirectional Modulation of Numerical Magnitude.

    PubMed

    Arshad, Qadeer; Nigmatullina, Yuliya; Nigmatullin, Ramil; Asavarut, Paladd; Goga, Usman; Khan, Sarah; Sander, Kaija; Siddiqui, Shuaib; Roberts, R E; Cohen Kadosh, Roi; Bronstein, Adolfo M; Malhotra, Paresh A

    2016-05-01

    Numerical cognition is critical for modern life; however, the precise neural mechanisms underpinning numerical magnitude allocation in humans remain obscure. Based upon previous reports demonstrating the close behavioral and neuro-anatomical relationship between number allocation and spatial attention, we hypothesized that these systems would be subject to similar control mechanisms, namely dynamic interhemispheric competition. We employed a physiological paradigm, combining visual and vestibular stimulation, to induce interhemispheric conflict and subsequent unihemispheric inhibition, as confirmed by transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS). This allowed us to demonstrate the first systematic bidirectional modulation of numerical magnitude toward either higher or lower numbers, independently of either eye movements or spatial attention mediated biases. We incorporated both our findings and those from the most widely accepted theoretical framework for numerical cognition to present a novel unifying computational model that describes how numerical magnitude allocation is subject to dynamic interhemispheric competition. That is, numerical allocation is continually updated in a contextual manner based upon relative magnitude, with the right hemisphere responsible for smaller magnitudes and the left hemisphere for larger magnitudes.

  19. Bidirectional Modulation of Numerical Magnitude.

    PubMed

    Arshad, Qadeer; Nigmatullina, Yuliya; Nigmatullin, Ramil; Asavarut, Paladd; Goga, Usman; Khan, Sarah; Sander, Kaija; Siddiqui, Shuaib; Roberts, R E; Cohen Kadosh, Roi; Bronstein, Adolfo M; Malhotra, Paresh A

    2016-05-01

    Numerical cognition is critical for modern life; however, the precise neural mechanisms underpinning numerical magnitude allocation in humans remain obscure. Based upon previous reports demonstrating the close behavioral and neuro-anatomical relationship between number allocation and spatial attention, we hypothesized that these systems would be subject to similar control mechanisms, namely dynamic interhemispheric competition. We employed a physiological paradigm, combining visual and vestibular stimulation, to induce interhemispheric conflict and subsequent unihemispheric inhibition, as confirmed by transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS). This allowed us to demonstrate the first systematic bidirectional modulation of numerical magnitude toward either higher or lower numbers, independently of either eye movements or spatial attention mediated biases. We incorporated both our findings and those from the most widely accepted theoretical framework for numerical cognition to present a novel unifying computational model that describes how numerical magnitude allocation is subject to dynamic interhemispheric competition. That is, numerical allocation is continually updated in a contextual manner based upon relative magnitude, with the right hemisphere responsible for smaller magnitudes and the left hemisphere for larger magnitudes. PMID:26879093

  20. Bidirectional Modulation of Numerical Magnitude

    PubMed Central

    Arshad, Qadeer; Nigmatullina, Yuliya; Nigmatullin, Ramil; Asavarut, Paladd; Goga, Usman; Khan, Sarah; Sander, Kaija; Siddiqui, Shuaib; Roberts, R. E.; Cohen Kadosh, Roi; Bronstein, Adolfo M.; Malhotra, Paresh A.

    2016-01-01

    Numerical cognition is critical for modern life; however, the precise neural mechanisms underpinning numerical magnitude allocation in humans remain obscure. Based upon previous reports demonstrating the close behavioral and neuro-anatomical relationship between number allocation and spatial attention, we hypothesized that these systems would be subject to similar control mechanisms, namely dynamic interhemispheric competition. We employed a physiological paradigm, combining visual and vestibular stimulation, to induce interhemispheric conflict and subsequent unihemispheric inhibition, as confirmed by transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS). This allowed us to demonstrate the first systematic bidirectional modulation of numerical magnitude toward either higher or lower numbers, independently of either eye movements or spatial attention mediated biases. We incorporated both our findings and those from the most widely accepted theoretical framework for numerical cognition to present a novel unifying computational model that describes how numerical magnitude allocation is subject to dynamic interhemispheric competition. That is, numerical allocation is continually updated in a contextual manner based upon relative magnitude, with the right hemisphere responsible for smaller magnitudes and the left hemisphere for larger magnitudes. PMID:26879093

  1. The distant type Ia supernova rate

    SciTech Connect

    Pain, R.; Fabbro, S.; Sullivan, M.; Ellis, R.S.; Aldering, G.; Astier, P.; Deustua, S.E.; Fruchter, A.S.; Goldhaber, G.; Goobar, A.; Groom, D.E.; Hardin, D.; Hook, I.M.; Howell, D.A.; Irwin, M.J.; Kim, A.G.; Kim, M.Y.; Knop, R.A.; Lee, J.C.; Perlmutter, S.; Ruiz-Lapuente, P.; Schahmaneche, K.; Schaefer, B.; Walton, N.A.

    2002-05-20

    We present a measurement of the rate of distant Type Ia supernovae derived using 4 large subsets of data from the Supernova Cosmology Project. Within this fiducial sample,which surveyed about 12 square degrees, thirty-eight supernovae were detected at redshifts 0.25--0.85. In a spatially flat cosmological model consistent with the results obtained by the Supernova Cosmology Project, we derive a rest-frame Type Ia supernova rate at a mean red shift z {approx_equal} 0.55 of 1.53 {sub -0.25}{sub -0.31}{sup 0.28}{sup 0.32} x 10{sup -4} h{sup 3} Mpc{sup -3} yr{sup -1} or 0.58{sub -0.09}{sub -0.09}{sup +0.10}{sup +0.10} h{sup 2} SNu(1 SNu = 1 supernova per century per 10{sup 10} L{sub B}sun), where the first uncertainty is statistical and the second includes systematic effects. The dependence of the rate on the assumed cosmological parameters is studied and the redshift dependence of the rate per unit comoving volume is contrasted with local estimates in the context of possible cosmic star formation histories and progenitor models.

  2. The Distant Type Ia Supernova Rate

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Pain, R.; Fabbro, S.; Sullivan, M.; Ellis, R. S.; Aldering, G.; Astier, P.; Deustua, S. E.; Fruchter, A. S.; Goldhaber, G.; Goobar, A.; Groom, D. E.; Hardin, D.; Hook, I. M.; Howell, D. A.; Irwin, M. J.; Kim, A. G.; Kim, M. Y.; Knop, R. A.; Lee, J. C.; Perlmutter, S.; Ruiz-Lapuente, P.; Schahmaneche, K.; Schaefer, B.; Walton, N. A.

    2002-05-28

    We present a measurement of the rate of distant Type Ia supernovae derived using 4 large subsets of data from the Supernova Cosmology Project. Within this fiducial sample, which surveyed about 12 square degrees, thirty-eight supernovae were detected at redshifts 0.25--0.85. In a spatially flat cosmological model consistent with the results obtained by the Supernova Cosmology Project, we derive a rest-frame Type Ia supernova rate at a mean red shift z {approx_equal} 0.55 of 1.53 {sub -0.25}{sub -0.31}{sup 0.28}{sup 0.32} x 10{sup -4} h{sup 3} Mpc{sup -3} yr{sup -1} or 0.58{sub -0.09}{sub -0.09}{sup +0.10}{sup +0.10} h{sup 2} SNu(1 SNu = 1 supernova per century per 10{sup 10} L{sub B}sun), where the first uncertainty is statistical and the second includes systematic effects. The dependence of the rate on the assumed cosmological parameters is studied and the redshift dependence of the rate per unit comoving volume is contrasted with local estimates in the context of possible cosmic star formation histories and progenitor models.

  3. New fine structure cooling rate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoegy, W. R.

    1976-01-01

    One of the dominant electron cooling processes in the ionosphere is caused by electron impact induced fine structure transitions among the ground state levels of atomic oxygen. This fine structure cooling rate is based on theoretical cross sections. Recent advances in the numerical cross section determinations to include polarization effects and more accurate representations of the atomic target result in new lower values. These cross sections are employed in this paper to derive a new fine structure cooling rate which is between 40% and 60% of the currently used rate. A new generalized formula is presented for the cooling rate (from which the fine structure cooling rate is derived), valid for arbitrary mass and temperature difference of the colliding particles and arbitrary inelastic energy difference.

  4. Numerical MHD codes for modeling astrophysical flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koldoba, A. V.; Ustyugova, G. V.; Lii, P. S.; Comins, M. L.; Dyda, S.; Romanova, M. M.; Lovelace, R. V. E.

    2016-05-01

    We describe a Godunov-type magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) code based on the Miyoshi and Kusano (2005) solver which can be used to solve various astrophysical hydrodynamic and MHD problems. The energy equation is in the form of entropy conservation. The code has been implemented on several different coordinate systems: 2.5D axisymmetric cylindrical coordinates, 2D Cartesian coordinates, 2D plane polar coordinates, and fully 3D cylindrical coordinates. Viscosity and diffusivity are implemented in the code to control the accretion rate in the disk and the rate of penetration of the disk matter through the magnetic field lines. The code has been utilized for the numerical investigations of a number of different astrophysical problems, several examples of which are shown.

  5. Numeral Incorporation in Japanese Sign Language

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ktejik, Mish

    2013-01-01

    This article explores the morphological process of numeral incorporation in Japanese Sign Language. Numeral incorporation is defined and the available research on numeral incorporation in signed language is discussed. The numeral signs in Japanese Sign Language are then introduced and followed by an explanation of the numeral morphemes which are…

  6. Numerical Package in Computer Supported Numeric Analysis Teaching

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tezer, Murat

    2007-01-01

    At universities in the faculties of Engineering, Sciences, Business and Economics together with higher education in Computing, it is stated that because of the difficulty, calculators and computers can be used in Numerical Analysis (NA). In this study, the learning computer supported NA will be discussed together with important usage of the…

  7. Numerical integration of subtraction terms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seth, Satyajit; Weinzierl, Stefan

    2016-06-01

    Numerical approaches to higher-order calculations often employ subtraction terms, both for the real emission and the virtual corrections. These subtraction terms have to be added back. In this paper we show that at NLO the real subtraction terms, the virtual subtraction terms, the integral representations of the field renormalization constants and—in the case of initial-state partons—the integral representation for the collinear counterterm can be grouped together to give finite integrals, which can be evaluated numerically. This is useful for an extension towards next-to-next-to-leading order.

  8. Numerical Modelling of Gelating Aerosols

    SciTech Connect

    Babovsky, Hans

    2008-09-01

    The numerical simulation of the gel phase transition of an aerosol system is an interesting and demanding task. Here, we follow an approach first discussed in [6, 8] which turns out as a useful numerical tool. We investigate several improvements and generalizations. In the center of interest are coagulation diffusion systems, where the aerosol dynamics is supplemented with diffusive spreading in physical space. This leads to a variety of scenarios (depending on the coagulation kernel and the diffusion model) for the spatial evolution of the gelation area.

  9. Determination of rate distributions from kinetic experiments.

    PubMed Central

    Steinbach, P J; Chu, K; Frauenfelder, H; Johnson, J B; Lamb, D C; Nienhaus, G U; Sauke, T B; Young, R D

    1992-01-01

    Rate processes in proteins are often not adequately described by simple exponential kinetics. Instead of modeling the kinetics in the time domain, it can be advantageous to perform a numerical inversion leading to a rate distribution function f(lambda). The features observed in f(lambda) (number, positions, and shapes of peaks) can then be interpreted. We discuss different numerical techniques for obtaining rate distribution functions, with special emphasis on the maximum entropy method. Examples are given for the application of these techniques to flash photolysis data of heme proteins. PMID:1540692

  10. Rater variables associated with ITER ratings.

    PubMed

    Paget, Michael; Wu, Caren; McIlwrick, Joann; Woloschuk, Wayne; Wright, Bruce; McLaughlin, Kevin

    2013-10-01

    Advocates of holistic assessment consider the ITER a more authentic way to assess performance. But this assessment format is subjective and, therefore, susceptible to rater bias. Here our objective was to study the association between rater variables and ITER ratings. In this observational study our participants were clerks at the University of Calgary and preceptors who completed online ITERs between February 2008 and July 2009. Our outcome variable was global rating on the ITER (rated 1-5), and we used a generalized estimating equation model to identify variables associated with this rating. Students were rated "above expected level" or "outstanding" on 66.4 % of 1050 online ITERs completed during the study period. Two rater variables attenuated ITER ratings: the log transformed time taken to complete the ITER [β = -0.06, 95 % confidence interval (-0.10, -0.02), p = 0.002], and the number of ITERs that a preceptor completed over the time period of the study [β = -0.008 (-0.02, -0.001), p = 0.02]. In this study we found evidence of leniency bias that resulted in two thirds of students being rated above expected level of performance. This leniency bias appeared to be attenuated by delay in ITER completion, and was also blunted in preceptors who rated more students. As all biases threaten the internal validity of the assessment process, further research is needed to confirm these and other sources of rater bias in ITER ratings, and to explore ways of limiting their impact.

  11. Conditional Convergence of Numerical Series

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gomez, E.; Plaza, A.

    2002-01-01

    One of the most astonishing properties when studying numerical series is that the sum is not commutative, that is the sum may change when the order of its elements is altered. In this note an example is given of such a series. A well-known mathematical proof is given and a MATLAB[C] program used for different rearrangements of the series…

  12. Numerical calculations of flow fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, D.; Vogel, J. M.

    1973-01-01

    Numerical calculations were made of flow fields generated by various aerodynamic configurations. Data cover flow fields generated by a finitely thick lifting three dimensional wing with subsonic tips moving at supersonic speeds, cross flow instability associated with lifting delta wing configurations such as space shuttles, and flow fields produced by a lifting elliptic cone. Finite difference techniques were used to determine elliptic cone flow.

  13. The Origin of Roman Numerals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dapre, P. A.

    1977-01-01

    A theory on the origin of Roman numerals proposes that the principal numbers can be stylized in terms of a square. It is speculated that the abacus or its equivalents, such as the counter or chequer-board, was used to count before the alphabet became common. (SW)

  14. Metrics for Numerical Control Operators.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cooper, Gloria S., Ed.; Magisos, Joel H., Ed.

    Designed to meet the job-related metric measurement needs of students preparing to be numerical control operators, this instructional package is one of eight for the manufacturing occupations cluster, part of a set of 55 packages for metric instruction in different occupations. The package is intended for students who already know the occupational…

  15. Numerical investigations of gaseous spherical diffusion flames

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lecoustre, Vivien R.

    Spherical diffusion flames have several unique characteristics that make them attractive from experimental and theoretical perspectives. They can be modeled with one spatial dimension, which frees computational resources for detailed chemistry, transport, and radiative loss models. This dissertation is a numerical study of two classes of spherical diffusion flames: hydrogen micro-diffusion flames, emphasizing kinetic extinction, and ethylene diffusion flames, emphasizing sooting limits. The flames were modeled using a one-dimensional, time-accurate diffusion flame code with detailed chemistry and transport. Radiative losses from products were modeled using a detailed absorption/emission statistical narrow band model and the discrete ordinates method. During this work the code has been enhanced by the implementation of a soot formation/oxidation model using the method of moments. Hydrogen micro-diffusion flames were studied experimentally and numerically. The experiments involved gas jets of hydrogen. At their quenching limits, these flames had heat release rates of 0.46 and 0.25 W in air and in oxygen, respectively. These are the weakest flames ever observed. The modeling results confirmed the quenching limits and revealed high rates of reactant leakage near the limits. The effects of the burner size and mass flow rate were predicted to have a significant impact on the flame chemistry and species distribution profiles, favoring kinetic extinction. Spherical ethylene diffusion flames at their sooting limits were also examined. Seventeen normal and inverse spherical flames were considered. Initially sooty, these flames were experimentally observed to reach their sooting limits 2 s after ignition. Structure of the flames at 2 s was considered, with an emphasis on the relationships among local temperature, carbon to oxygen atom ratio (C/O), and scalar dissipation rate. A critical C/O ratio was identified, along with two different sooting limit regimes. Diffusion flames

  16. Numerical discrimination is mediated by neural coding variation.

    PubMed

    Prather, Richard W

    2014-12-01

    One foundation of numerical cognition is that discrimination accuracy depends on the proportional difference between compared values, closely following the Weber-Fechner discrimination law. Performance in non-symbolic numerical discrimination is used to calculate individual Weber fraction, a measure of relative acuity of the approximate number system (ANS). Individual Weber fraction is linked to symbolic arithmetic skills and long-term educational and economic outcomes. The present findings suggest that numerical discrimination performance depends on both the proportional difference and absolute value, deviating from the Weber-Fechner law. The effect of absolute value is predicted via computational model based on the neural correlates of numerical perception. Specifically, that the neural coding "noise" varies across corresponding numerosities. A computational model using firing rate variation based on neural data demonstrates a significant interaction between ratio difference and absolute value in predicting numerical discriminability. We find that both behavioral and computational data show an interaction between ratio difference and absolute value on numerical discrimination accuracy. These results further suggest a reexamination of the mechanisms involved in non-symbolic numerical discrimination, how researchers may measure individual performance, and what outcomes performance may predict.

  17. 3D Numerical simulations of oblique subduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malatesta, C.; Gerya, T.; Scambelluri, M.; Crispini, L.; Federico, L.; Capponi, G.

    2012-04-01

    In the past 2D numerical studies (e.g. Gerya et al., 2002; Gorczyk et al., 2007; Malatesta et al., 2012) provided evidence that during intraoceanic subduction a serpentinite channel forms above the downgoing plate. This channel forms as a result of hydration of the mantle wedge by uprising slab-fluids. Rocks buried at high depths are finally exhumed within this buoyant low-viscosity medium. Convergence rate in these 2D models was described by a trench-normal component of velocity. Several present and past subduction zones worldwide are however driven by oblique convergence between the plates, where trench-normal motion of the subducting slab is coupled with trench-parallel displacement of the plates. Can the exhumation mechanism and the exhumation rates of high-pressure rocks be affected by the shear component of subduction? And how uprise of these rocks can vary along the plate margin? We tried to address these questions performing 3D numerical models that simulate an intraoceanic oblique subduction. The models are based on thermo-mechanical equations that are solved with finite differences method and marker-in-cell techniques combined with multigrid approach (Gerya, 2010). In most of the models a narrow oceanic basin (500 km-wide) surrounded by continental margins is depicted. The basin is floored by either layered or heterogeneous oceanic lithosphere with gabbro as discrete bodies in serpentinized peridotite and a basaltic layer on the top. A weak zone in the mantle is prescribed to control the location of subduction initiation and therefore the plate margins geometry. Finally, addition of a third dimension in the simulations allowed us to test the role of different plate margin geometries on oblique subduction dynamics. In particular in each model we modified the dip angle of the weak zone and its "lateral" geometry (e.g. continuous, segmented). We consider "continuous" weak zones either parallel or increasingly moving away from the continental margins

  18. Numerical simulation of electrochemical desalination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hlushkou, D.; Knust, K. N.; Crooks, R. M.; Tallarek, U.

    2016-05-01

    We present an effective numerical approach to simulate electrochemically mediated desalination of seawater. This new membraneless, energy efficient desalination method relies on the oxidation of chloride ions, which generates an ion depletion zone and local electric field gradient near the junction of a microchannel branch to redirect sea salt into the brine stream, consequently producing desalted water. The proposed numerical model is based on resolution of the 3D coupled Navier-Stokes, Nernst-Planck, and Poisson equations at non-uniform spatial grids. The model is implemented as a parallel code and can be employed to simulate mass-charge transport coupled with surface or volume reactions in 3D systems showing an arbitrarily complex geometrical configuration.

  19. Numerical Modeling of LCROSS experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sultanov, V. G.; Kim, V. V.; Matveichev, A. V.; Zhukov, B. G.; Lomonosov, I. V.

    2009-06-01

    The mission objectives of the Lunar Crater Observation and Sensing Satellite (LCROSS) include confirming the presence or absence of water ice in a permanently shadowed crater in the Moon's polar regions. In this research we present results of numerical modeling of forthcoming LCROSS experiment. The parallel FPIC3D gas dynamic code with implemented realistic equations of state (EOS) and constitutive relations [1] was used. New wide--range EOS for lunar ground was developed. We carried out calculations of impact of model body on the lunar surface at different angels. Situations of impact on dry and water ice--contained lunar ground were also taken into account. Modeling results are given for crater's shape and size along with amount of ejecta. [4pt] [1] V.E. Fortov, V.V. Kim, I.V. Lomonosov, A.V. Matveichev, A.V. Ostrik. Numerical modeling of hypervelocity impacts, Intern J Impact Engeneering, 33, 244-253 (2006)

  20. Numerical simulation of heat exchanger

    SciTech Connect

    Sha, W.T.

    1985-01-01

    Accurate and detailed knowledge of the fluid flow field and thermal distribution inside a heat exchanger becomes invaluable as a large, efficient, and reliable unit is sought. This information is needed to provide proper evaluation of the thermal and structural performance characteristics of a heat exchanger. It is to be noted that an analytical prediction method, when properly validated, will greatly reduce the need for model testing, facilitate interpolating and extrapolating test data, aid in optimizing heat-exchanger design and performance, and provide scaling capability. Thus tremendous savings of cost and time are realized. With the advent of large digital computers and advances in the development of computational fluid mechanics, it has become possible to predict analytically, through numerical solution, the conservation equations of mass, momentum, and energy for both the shellside and tubeside fluids. The numerical modeling technique will be a valuable, cost-effective design tool for development of advanced heat exchangers.

  1. Numerical simulation of electrochemical desalination.

    PubMed

    Hlushkou, D; Knust, K N; Crooks, R M; Tallarek, U

    2016-05-18

    We present an effective numerical approach to simulate electrochemically mediated desalination of seawater. This new membraneless, energy efficient desalination method relies on the oxidation of chloride ions, which generates an ion depletion zone and local electric field gradient near the junction of a microchannel branch to redirect sea salt into the brine stream, consequently producing desalted water. The proposed numerical model is based on resolution of the 3D coupled Navier-Stokes, Nernst-Planck, and Poisson equations at non-uniform spatial grids. The model is implemented as a parallel code and can be employed to simulate mass-charge transport coupled with surface or volume reactions in 3D systems showing an arbitrarily complex geometrical configuration.

  2. Numerical modeling of Waianae Harbor

    SciTech Connect

    Mader, C.L.; Lucas, S.

    1985-01-01

    The Waianae harbor problem is an example of the use of numerical modeling techniques available at JTRE of the University of Hawaii to assist in the evaluation of oceanographic fluid dynamic flow problems. The numerical techniques are available to assist in the modeling of many problems of interest to the Hawaii Ocean Experiment. One application that has received considerable effort is the formation, propagation, and run-up of tsunami waves. The interaction of tsunami waves with the island chain is an important problem that needs more study. The models can be used to study storm surge interaction with the Hawaii islands and current and circulation around and through the islands. It is important that the modeling not be limited to the usual nonlinear shallow-water models, since they are inappropriate for many of the problems of interest to the Hawaii Ocean Experiment. 6 references, 5 figures.

  3. Numerical simulation of electrochemical desalination.

    PubMed

    Hlushkou, D; Knust, K N; Crooks, R M; Tallarek, U

    2016-05-18

    We present an effective numerical approach to simulate electrochemically mediated desalination of seawater. This new membraneless, energy efficient desalination method relies on the oxidation of chloride ions, which generates an ion depletion zone and local electric field gradient near the junction of a microchannel branch to redirect sea salt into the brine stream, consequently producing desalted water. The proposed numerical model is based on resolution of the 3D coupled Navier-Stokes, Nernst-Planck, and Poisson equations at non-uniform spatial grids. The model is implemented as a parallel code and can be employed to simulate mass-charge transport coupled with surface or volume reactions in 3D systems showing an arbitrarily complex geometrical configuration. PMID:27089841

  4. Development of a numerical pump testing framework.

    PubMed

    Kaufmann, Tim A S; Gregory, Shaun D; Büsen, Martin R; Tansley, Geoff D; Steinseifer, Ulrich

    2014-09-01

    It has been shown that left ventricular assist devices (LVADs) increase the survival rate in end-stage heart failure patients. However, there is an ongoing demand for an increased quality of life, fewer adverse events, and more physiological devices. These challenges necessitate new approaches during the design process. In this study, computational fluid dynamics (CFD), lumped parameter (LP) modeling, mock circulatory loops (MCLs), and particle image velocimetry (PIV) are combined to develop a numerical Pump Testing Framework (nPTF) capable of analyzing local flow patterns and the systemic response of LVADs. The nPTF was created by connecting a CFD model of the aortic arch, including an LVAD outflow graft to an LP model of the circulatory system. Based on the same geometry, a three-dimensional silicone model was crafted using rapid prototyping and connected to an MCL. PIV studies of this setup were performed to validate the local flow fields (PIV) and the systemic response (MCL) of the nPTF. After validation, different outflow graft positions were compared using the nPTF. Both the numerical and the experimental setup were able to generate physiological responses by adjusting resistances and systemic compliance, with mean aortic pressures of 72.2-132.6 mm Hg for rotational speeds of 2200-3050 rpm. During LVAD support, an average flow to the distal branches (cerebral and subclavian) of 24% was found in the experiments and the nPTF. The flow fields from PIV and CFD were in good agreement. Numerical and experimental tools were combined to develop and validate the nPTF, which can be used to analyze local flow fields and the systemic response of LVADs during the design process. This allows analysis of physiological control parameters at early development stages and may, therefore, help to improve patient outcomes.

  5. A Numerical Study of Hypersonic Forebody/Inlet Integration Problem

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kumar, Ajay

    1991-01-01

    A numerical study of hypersonic forebody/inlet integration problem is presented in the form of the view-graphs. The following topics are covered: physical/chemical modeling; solution procedure; flow conditions; mass flow rate at inlet face; heating and skin friction loads; 3-D forebogy/inlet integration model; and sensitivity studies.

  6. Numerical Integration of Elastoviscoplasticity Model with Stiff Hardening and Softening

    SciTech Connect

    Vorobiev, O.Y.; Lomov, I.N; Glenn, L.A.; Rubin, M.B.

    2000-02-01

    The constitutive equations for viscoplasticity typically are stiff differential equations and require special numerical methods to integrate them efficiently. The objective of this paper is to propose a class of rate-dependent viscoplastic constitutive equations which can be integrated by an efficient explicit scheme that includes the first order effect of pressure and plastic strain hardening.

  7. Cuba: Multidimensional numerical integration library

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hahn, Thomas

    2016-08-01

    The Cuba library offers four independent routines for multidimensional numerical integration: Vegas, Suave, Divonne, and Cuhre. The four algorithms work by very different methods, and can integrate vector integrands and have very similar Fortran, C/C++, and Mathematica interfaces. Their invocation is very similar, making it easy to cross-check by substituting one method by another. For further safeguarding, the output is supplemented by a chi-square probability which quantifies the reliability of the error estimate.

  8. Requirements definition by numerical simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hickman, James J.; Kostas, Chris; Tsang, Kang T.

    1994-10-01

    We are investigating the issues involved in requirements definition for narcotics interdiction: how much of a particular signature is possible, how does this amount change for different conditions, and what is the temporal relationship in various scenarios. Our approach has been to simulate numerically the conditions that arise during vapor or particulate transport. The advantages of this approach are that (1) a broad range of scenarios can be rapidly and inexpensively analyzed by simulation, and (2) simulations can display quantities that are difficult or impossible to measure. The drawback of this approach is that simulations cannot include all of the phenomena present in a real measurement, and therefore the fidelity of the simulation results is always an issue. To address this limitation, we will ultimately combine the results of numerical simulations with measurements of physical parameters for inclusion in the simulation. In this paper, we discuss these issues and how they apply to the current problems in narcotics interdictions, especially cargo containers. We also show the results of 1D and 3D numerical simulations, and compare these results with analytical solutions. The results indicate that this approach is viable. We also present data from 3D simulations of vapor transport in a loaded cargo container and some of the issues present in this ongoing work.

  9. In Praise of Numerical Computation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yap, Chee K.

    Theoretical Computer Science has developed an almost exclusively discrete/algebraic persona. We have effectively shut ourselves off from half of the world of computing: a host of problems in Computational Science & Engineering (CS&E) are defined on the continuum, and, for them, the discrete viewpoint is inadequate. The computational techniques in such problems are well-known to numerical analysis and applied mathematics, but are rarely discussed in theoretical algorithms: iteration, subdivision and approximation. By various case studies, I will indicate how our discrete/algebraic view of computing has many shortcomings in CS&E. We want embrace the continuous/analytic view, but in a new synthesis with the discrete/algebraic view. I will suggest a pathway, by way of an exact numerical model of computation, that allows us to incorporate iteration and approximation into our algorithms’ design. Some recent results give a peek into how this view of algorithmic development might look like, and its distinctive form suggests the name “numerical computational geometry” for such activities.

  10. Numerical simulation of conservation laws

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chang, Sin-Chung; To, Wai-Ming

    1992-01-01

    A new numerical framework for solving conservation laws is being developed. This new approach differs substantially from the well established methods, i.e., finite difference, finite volume, finite element and spectral methods, in both concept and methodology. The key features of the current scheme include: (1) direct discretization of the integral forms of conservation laws, (2) treating space and time on the same footing, (3) flux conservation in space and time, and (4) unified treatment of the convection and diffusion fluxes. The model equation considered in the initial study is the standard one dimensional unsteady constant-coefficient convection-diffusion equation. In a stability study, it is shown that the principal and spurious amplification factors of the current scheme, respectively, are structurally similar to those of the leapfrog/DuFort-Frankel scheme. As a result, the current scheme has no numerical diffusion in the special case of pure convection and is unconditionally stable in the special case of pure diffusion. Assuming smooth initial data, it will be shown theoretically and numerically that, by using an easily determined optimal time step, the accuracy of the current scheme may reach a level which is several orders of magnitude higher than that of the MacCormack scheme, with virtually identical operation count.

  11. Numerical Simulation of Taylor Cone-Jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toledo, Ronne

    The Taylor cone-jet is a particular type of electrohydrodynamic phenomenon where electrostatic stresses and surface tension effects shape the interface of the jet in a peculiar conical shape. A thin jet is issued from the cone apex that further breaks up into a fine aerosol. Due to its monodispersive properties, this fine aerosol has found a number of applications, ranging from mass spectrometry, colloidal space propulsion, combustion, nano-fabrication, coating/painting, and many others. In this study, a general non-dimensional analysis is performed to derive the governing equations and boundary conditions. In accordance with the observations of Gamero-Castano (2010), noting that droplet electric potential is insensitive to the flow rate conditions, a particular set of characteristic parameters is proposed, based on the terminal jet diameter. In order to solve the non-dimensional set of governing equations and boundary conditions, a numerical method combining the Boundary Element Method and the Finite Volume Method is developed. Results of electric current have shown good agreement with numerical and experimental data available in the literature. The main feature of the algorithm developed is related to the decoupling of the electrostatic from the hydrodynamic problem, allowing us to accurately prescribe the far field electric potential boundary conditions away from the hydrodynamic computational domain used to solve the hydrodynamics of the transition region near the cone apex.

  12. Entropy Splitting and Numerical Dissipation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yee, H. C.; Vinokur, M.; Djomehri, M. J.

    1999-01-01

    A rigorous stability estimate for arbitrary order of accuracy of spatial central difference schemes for initial-boundary value problems of nonlinear symmetrizable systems of hyperbolic conservation laws was established recently by Olsson and Oliger (1994) and Olsson (1995) and was applied to the two-dimensional compressible Euler equations for a perfect gas by Gerritsen and Olsson (1996) and Gerritsen (1996). The basic building block in developing the stability estimate is a generalized energy approach based on a special splitting of the flux derivative via a convex entropy function and certain homogeneous properties. Due to some of the unique properties of the compressible Euler equations for a perfect gas, the splitting resulted in the sum of a conservative portion and a non-conservative portion of the flux derivative. hereafter referred to as the "Entropy Splitting." There are several potential desirable attributes and side benefits of the entropy splitting for the compressible Euler equations that were not fully explored in Gerritsen and Olsson. The paper has several objectives. The first is to investigate the choice of the arbitrary parameter that determines the amount of splitting and its dependence on the type of physics of current interest to computational fluid dynamics. The second is to investigate in what manner the splitting affects the nonlinear stability of the central schemes for long time integrations of unsteady flows such as in nonlinear aeroacoustics and turbulence dynamics. If numerical dissipation indeed is needed to stabilize the central scheme, can the splitting help minimize the numerical dissipation compared to its un-split cousin? Extensive numerical study on the vortex preservation capability of the splitting in conjunction with central schemes for long time integrations will be presented. The third is to study the effect of the non-conservative proportion of splitting in obtaining the correct shock location for high speed complex shock

  13. Numerical Simulations of Acoustically Driven, Burning Droplets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, H.-C.; Karagozian, A. R.; Smith, O. I.; Urban, Dave (Technical Monitor)

    1999-01-01

    This computational study focuses on understanding and quantifying the effects of external acoustical perturbations on droplet combustion. A one-dimensional, axisymmetric representation of the essential diffusion and reaction processes occurring in the vicinity of the droplet stagnation point is used here in order to isolate the effects of the imposed acoustic disturbance. The simulation is performed using a third order accurate, essentially non-oscillatory (ENO) numerical scheme with a full methanol-air reaction mechanism. Consistent with recent microgravity and normal gravity combustion experiments, focus is placed on conditions where the droplet is situated at a velocity antinode in order for the droplet to experience the greatest effects of fluid mechanical straining of flame structures. The effects of imposed sound pressure level and frequency are explored here, and conditions leading to maximum burning rates are identified.

  14. Numerical Analysis of Convection/Transpiration Cooling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glass, David E.; Dilley, Arthur D.; Kelly, H. Neale

    1999-01-01

    An innovative concept utilizing the natural porosity of refractory-composite materials and hydrogen coolant to provide CONvective and TRANspiration (CONTRAN) cooling and oxidation protection has been numerically studied for surfaces exposed to a high heat flux, high temperature environment such as hypersonic vehicle engine combustor walls. A boundary layer code and a porous media finite difference code were utilized to analyze the effect of convection and transpiration cooling on surface heat flux and temperature. The boundary, layer code determined that transpiration flow is able to provide blocking of the surface heat flux only if it is above a minimum level due to heat addition from combustion of the hydrogen transpirant. The porous media analysis indicated that cooling of the surface is attained with coolant flow rates that are in the same range as those required for blocking, indicating that a coupled analysis would be beneficial.

  15. Numerical Analysis of Convection/Transpiration Cooling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glass, David E.; Dilley, Arthur D.; Kelly, H. Neale

    1999-01-01

    An innovative concept utilizing the natural porosity of refractory-composite materials and hydrogen coolant to provide CONvective and TRANspiration (CONTRAN) cooling and oxidation protection has been numerically studied for surfaces exposed to a high heat flux high temperature environment such as hypersonic vehicle engine combustor walls. A boundary layer code and a porous media finite difference code were utilized to analyze the effect of convection and transpiration cooling on surface heat flux and temperature. The boundary layer code determined that transpiration flow is able to provide blocking of the surface heat flux only if it is above a minimum level due to heat addition from combustion of the hydrogen transpirant. The porous media analysis indicated that cooling of the surface is attained with coolant flow rates that are in the same range as those required for blocking, indicating that a coupled analysis would be beneficial.

  16. Numerical Studies of Impurities in Fusion Plasmas

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Hulse, R. A.

    1982-09-01

    The coupled partial differential equations used to describe the behavior of impurity ions in magnetically confined controlled fusion plasmas require numerical solution for cases of practical interest. Computer codes developed for impurity modeling at the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory are used as examples of the types of codes employed for this purpose. These codes solve for the impurity ionization state densities and associated radiation rates using atomic physics appropriate for these low-density, high-temperature plasmas. The simpler codes solve local equations in zero spatial dimensions while more complex cases require codes which explicitly include transport of the impurity ions simultaneously with the atomic processes of ionization and recombination. Typical applications are discussed and computational results are presented for selected cases of interest.

  17. Numerical model of a nasal septal perforation.

    PubMed

    Grant, Orla; Bailie, Neil; Watterson, John; Cole, Jonathan; Gallagher, Geraldine; Hanna, Brendan

    2004-01-01

    This paper describes numerical simulation of airflow in a nose with a nasal septal perforation. Diseased airflow is compared to airflow in a healthy nasal model. The healthy model has been generated from CT scans from the Antrim Area Hospital ENT clinic and is close to being anatomically accurate. The nasal septal perforation has been superimposed on the healthy geometry using image manipulation software. The flow is modeled as laminar, steady state, with the flow rates corresponding to quiet breathing at rest approximately 165 ml/sec. Healthy flow patterns show that the majority of the flow travels close to nasal septum, in the region close to the middle turbinate. In the diseased case, high shear stresses concentrated at the posterior region of the perforation explain bleeding associated with nasal perforations.

  18. Numerical simulation of fueling in tokamaks

    SciTech Connect

    Attenberger, S.E.; Houlberg, W.A.; Milora, S.L.

    1982-04-01

    We describe the numerical simulation of fueling and particle transport in both present and future tokamak plasmas. Models for pellet ablation and plasma density behavior after pellet injection are compared with experimental results in ISX and PDX plasmas and then extended to fusion reactor conditions. The role of fast ion ablation due to intense neutral beam injection and fusion alphas is examined along with pellet size and velocity considerations. In plasmas with high pumping efficiency (which may be obtained with divertor operation), pellet injection can significantly reduce fueling rates while maintaining more flexibility in control of the density profile than afforded by gas puffing. When fueling is dominated by gas puffing or high recycle from the walls or limiter, control of the fueling and density profiles is reduced and particle fluxes to the wall increase.

  19. Towards numerical prediction of cavitation erosion

    PubMed Central

    Fivel, Marc; Franc, Jean-Pierre; Chandra Roy, Samir

    2015-01-01

    This paper is intended to provide a potential basis for a numerical prediction of cavitation erosion damage. The proposed method can be divided into two steps. The first step consists in determining the loading conditions due to cavitation bubble collapses. It is shown that individual pits observed on highly polished metallic samples exposed to cavitation for a relatively small time can be considered as the signature of bubble collapse. By combining pitting tests with an inverse finite-element modelling (FEM) of the material response to a representative impact load, loading conditions can be derived for each individual bubble collapse in terms of stress amplitude (in gigapascals) and radial extent (in micrometres). This step requires characterizing as accurately as possible the properties of the material exposed to cavitation. This characterization should include the effect of strain rate, which is known to be high in cavitation erosion (typically of the order of several thousands s−1). Nanoindentation techniques as well as compressive tests at high strain rate using, for example, a split Hopkinson pressure bar test system may be used. The second step consists in developing an FEM approach to simulate the material response to the repetitive impact loads determined in step 1. This includes a detailed analysis of the hardening process (isotropic versus kinematic) in order to properly account for fatigue as well as the development of a suitable model of material damage and failure to account for mass loss. Although the whole method is not yet fully operational, promising results are presented that show that such a numerical method might be, in the long term, an alternative to correlative techniques used so far for cavitation erosion prediction. PMID:26442139

  20. Direct numerical simulation of turbulent reacting flows

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, J.H.

    1993-12-01

    The development of turbulent combustion models that reflect some of the most important characteristics of turbulent reacting flows requires knowledge about the behavior of key quantities in well defined combustion regimes. In turbulent flames, the coupling between the turbulence and the chemistry is so strong in certain regimes that is is very difficult to isolate the role played by one individual phenomenon. Direct numerical simulation (DNS) is an extremely useful tool to study in detail the turbulence-chemistry interactions in certain well defined regimes. Globally, non-premixed flames are controlled by two limiting cases: the fast chemistry limit, where the turbulent fluctuations. In between these two limits, finite-rate chemical effects are important and the turbulence interacts strongly with the chemical processes. This regime is important because industrial burners operate in regimes in which, locally the flame undergoes extinction, or is at least in some nonequilibrium condition. Furthermore, these nonequilibrium conditions strongly influence the production of pollutants. To quantify the finite-rate chemistry effect, direct numerical simulations are performed to study the interaction between an initially laminar non-premixed flame and a three-dimensional field of homogeneous isotropic decaying turbulence. Emphasis is placed on the dynamics of extinction and on transient effects on the fine scale mixing process. Differential molecular diffusion among species is also examined with this approach, both for nonreacting and reacting situations. To address the problem of large-scale mixing and to examine the effects of mean shear, efforts are underway to perform large eddy simulations of round three-dimensional jets.

  1. Dynamics of quantum cascade lasers: numerics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van der Sande, Guy; Verschaffelt, Guy

    2016-04-01

    Since the original demonstration of terahertz quantum-cascade lasers (QCLs), the performance of these devices has shown rapid improvement. QCLs can now deliver milliwatts or more of continuous-wave radiation throughout the terahertz frequency range (300 GHz to 10 THz). Therefore, QCLs have become widely used in various applications such as spectroscopy, metrology or free-space telecommunications. For many of these applications there is a need for compact tuneable quantum cascade lasers. Nowadays most tuneable QCLs are based on a bulky external cavity configuration. We explore the possibility of tuning the operating wavelength through a fully integrated on-chip wavelength selective feedback applied to a dual wavelength QCL. Our numerical and analytical analyses are based on rate equation models describing the dynamics of QCLs extended to include delayed filtered optical feedback. We demonstrate the possibility to tune the operating wavelength by altering the absorption and/or amplification of the signal in the delayed feedback path. The tuning range of a laser is limited by the spectral width of its gain. For inter-band semiconductor lasers this spectral width is typically several tens of nm. Hence, the laser cavity supports the existence of multiple modes and on chip wavelength selective feedback has been demonstrated to be a promising tuning mechanism. We have selected a specific QCL gain structure with four energy levels and with two lasing transitions in the same cascade. In this scheme, the two lasing modes use a common upper level. Hence, the two modes compete in part for the same carriers to account for their optical gain. We have added delayed wavelength specific filtered optical feedback to the rate equation model describing these transitions. We have calculated the steady states and their stability in the absence of delay for the feedback field and studied numerically the case with non-zero delay. We have proven that wavelength tuning of a dual wavelength

  2. Towards numerical prediction of cavitation erosion.

    PubMed

    Fivel, Marc; Franc, Jean-Pierre; Chandra Roy, Samir

    2015-10-01

    This paper is intended to provide a potential basis for a numerical prediction of cavitation erosion damage. The proposed method can be divided into two steps. The first step consists in determining the loading conditions due to cavitation bubble collapses. It is shown that individual pits observed on highly polished metallic samples exposed to cavitation for a relatively small time can be considered as the signature of bubble collapse. By combining pitting tests with an inverse finite-element modelling (FEM) of the material response to a representative impact load, loading conditions can be derived for each individual bubble collapse in terms of stress amplitude (in gigapascals) and radial extent (in micrometres). This step requires characterizing as accurately as possible the properties of the material exposed to cavitation. This characterization should include the effect of strain rate, which is known to be high in cavitation erosion (typically of the order of several thousands s(-1)). Nanoindentation techniques as well as compressive tests at high strain rate using, for example, a split Hopkinson pressure bar test system may be used. The second step consists in developing an FEM approach to simulate the material response to the repetitive impact loads determined in step 1. This includes a detailed analysis of the hardening process (isotropic versus kinematic) in order to properly account for fatigue as well as the development of a suitable model of material damage and failure to account for mass loss. Although the whole method is not yet fully operational, promising results are presented that show that such a numerical method might be, in the long term, an alternative to correlative techniques used so far for cavitation erosion prediction. PMID:26442139

  3. Evolution of Planetesimals. II. Numerical Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aarseth, S. J.; Lin, D. N. C.; Palmer, P. L.

    1993-01-01

    We continue our investigation of the dynamical evolution and coagulation process of planetesimals With a numerical N-body scheme, we simulate gravitational scattering and physical collisions among a system of planetesimals. The results of these simulations confirm our earlier analytical results that dynamical equilibrium is attained with a velocity dispersion comparable to the surface escape velocity of those planetesimals which contribute most of the system mass. In such an equilibrium, the rate of energy transfer from the systematic shear to dispersive motion, induced by gravitational scattering, is balanced by the rate of energy dissipation resulting from physical collisions. We also confirm that dynamical friction can lead to energy equipartition between an abundant population of low-mass field planetesimals and a few collisionally induced mergers with larger masses. These effects produce mass segregation in phase space and runaway coagulation. Collisions also lead to coagulation and evolution of the mass spectrum. The mergers of two field planetesimals can provide sufficient mass differential with other planetesimals for dynamical friction to induce energy equipartition and mass segregation. For small velocity dispersions, the more massive planetesimals produce relatively large gravitational focusing factors. Consequently, the growth time scale decreases with mass and runaway coagulation is initiated. Our numerical simulations show that, provided there is sufficient supply of low-mass planetesimals, runaway coagulation can lead to the formation of protoplanetary cores with masses comparable to a significant fraction of an Earth mass. We estimate that, at 1 AU, the characteristic time scale for the initial stages of planetesimal growth is ˜104 yr and ˜105 yr for the growth to protoplanetary cores. At Jupiter's present distance, these time scales are an order of magnitude longer.

  4. Advanced Numerical Model for Irradiated Concrete

    SciTech Connect

    Giorla, Alain B.

    2015-03-01

    In this report, we establish a numerical model for concrete exposed to irradiation to address these three critical points. The model accounts for creep in the cement paste and its coupling with damage, temperature and relative humidity. The shift in failure mode with the loading rate is also properly represented. The numerical model for creep has been validated and calibrated against different experiments in the literature [Wittmann, 1970, Le Roy, 1995]. Results from a simplified model are shown to showcase the ability of numerical homogenization to simulate irradiation effects in concrete. In future works, the complete model will be applied to the analysis of the irradiation experiments of Elleuch et al. [1972] and Kelly et al. [1969]. This requires a careful examination of the experimental environmental conditions as in both cases certain critical information are missing, including the relative humidity history. A sensitivity analysis will be conducted to provide lower and upper bounds of the concrete expansion under irradiation, and check if the scatter in the simulated results matches the one found in experiments. The numerical and experimental results will be compared in terms of expansion and loss of mechanical stiffness and strength. Both effects should be captured accordingly by the model to validate it. Once the model has been validated on these two experiments, it can be applied to simulate concrete from nuclear power plants. To do so, the materials used in these concrete must be as well characterized as possible. The main parameters required are the mechanical properties of each constituent in the concrete (aggregates, cement paste), namely the elastic modulus, the creep properties, the tensile and compressive strength, the thermal expansion coefficient, and the drying shrinkage. These can be either measured experimentally, estimated from the initial composition in the case of cement paste, or back-calculated from mechanical tests on concrete. If some

  5. Numerical methods for molecular dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Skeel, R.D.

    1991-01-01

    This report summarizes our research progress to date on the use of multigrid methods for three-dimensional elliptic partial differential equations, with particular emphasis on application to the Poisson-Boltzmann equation of molecular biophysics. This research is motivated by the need for fast and accurate numerical solution techniques for three-dimensional problems arising in physics and engineering. In many applications these problems must be solved repeatedly, and the extremely large number of discrete unknowns required to accurately approximate solutions to partial differential equations in three-dimensional regions necessitates the use of efficient solution methods. This situation makes clear the importance of developing methods which are of optimal order (or nearly so), meaning that the number of operations required to solve the discrete problem is on the order of the number of discrete unknowns. Multigrid methods are generally regarded as being in this class of methods, and are in fact provably optimal order for an increasingly large class of problems. The fundamental goal of this research is to develop a fast and accurate numerical technique, based on multi-level principles, for the solutions of the Poisson-Boltzmann equation of molecular biophysics and similar equations occurring in other applications. An outline of the report is as follows. We first present some background material, followed by a survey of the literature on the use of multigrid methods for solving problems similar to the Poisson-Boltzmann equation. A short description of the software we have developed so far is then given, and numerical results are discussed. Finally, our research plans for the coming year are presented.

  6. Statistical theory of asteroid escape rates.

    PubMed

    Jaffé, Charles; Ross, Shane D; Lo, Martin W; Marsden, Jerrold; Farrelly, David; Uzer, T

    2002-07-01

    Transition states in phase space are identified and shown to regulate the rate of escape of asteroids temporarily captured in circumplanetary orbits. The transition states, similar to those occurring in chemical reaction dynamics, are then used to develop a statistical semianalytical theory for the rate of escape of asteroids temporarily captured by Mars. Theory and numerical simulations are found to agree to better than 1%. These calculations suggest that further development of transition state theory in celestial mechanics, as an alternative to large-scale numerical simulations, will be a fruitful approach to mass transport calculations. PMID:12097024

  7. Statistical theory of asteroid escape rates.

    PubMed

    Jaffé, Charles; Ross, Shane D; Lo, Martin W; Marsden, Jerrold; Farrelly, David; Uzer, T

    2002-07-01

    Transition states in phase space are identified and shown to regulate the rate of escape of asteroids temporarily captured in circumplanetary orbits. The transition states, similar to those occurring in chemical reaction dynamics, are then used to develop a statistical semianalytical theory for the rate of escape of asteroids temporarily captured by Mars. Theory and numerical simulations are found to agree to better than 1%. These calculations suggest that further development of transition state theory in celestial mechanics, as an alternative to large-scale numerical simulations, will be a fruitful approach to mass transport calculations.

  8. Numerical methods for multibody systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glowinski, Roland; Nasser, Mahmoud G.

    1994-01-01

    This article gives a brief summary of some results obtained by Nasser on modeling and simulation of inequality problems in multibody dynamics. In particular, the augmented Lagrangian method discussed here is applied to a constrained motion problem with impulsive inequality constraints. A fundamental characteristic of the multibody dynamics problem is the lack of global convexity of its Lagrangian. The problem is transformed into a convex analysis problem by localization (piecewise linearization), where the augmented Lagrangian has been successfully used. A model test problem is considered and a set of numerical experiments is presented.

  9. Numerical Simulation of Cocontinuous Blends

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Junseok; Lowengrub, John

    2004-11-01

    In strongly sheared emulsions, experiments (Galloway and Macosko 2002) have shown that systems consisting of one continuous (matrix) and one dispersed (drops) phase may undergo a coalescence cascade leading to a system in which both phases are continuous, (sponge-like). Such configurations may have desirable mechanical and electrical properties and thus have wide ranging applications. Using a new and improved diffuse-inteface method (accurate surface tension force formulation, volume-preservation, and efficient nonlinear multigrid solver) developed by Kim and Lowengrub 2004, we perform numerical simulations of cocontinuous blends and determine the conditions for formation. We also characterize their rheology.

  10. Disruptive Innovation in Numerical Hydrodynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Waltz, Jacob I.

    2012-09-06

    We propose the research and development of a high-fidelity hydrodynamic algorithm for tetrahedral meshes that will lead to a disruptive innovation in the numerical modeling of Laboratory problems. Our proposed innovation has the potential to reduce turnaround time by orders of magnitude relative to Advanced Simulation and Computing (ASC) codes; reduce simulation setup costs by millions of dollars per year; and effectively leverage Graphics Processing Unit (GPU) and future Exascale computing hardware. If successful, this work will lead to a dramatic leap forward in the Laboratory's quest for a predictive simulation capability.

  11. Results from Numerical General Relativity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baker, John G.

    2011-01-01

    For several years numerical simulations have been revealing the details of general relativity's predictions for the dynamical interactions of merging black holes. I will review what has been learned of the rich phenomenology of these mergers and the resulting gravitational wave signatures. These wave forms provide a potentially observable record of the powerful astronomical events, a central target of gravitational wave astronomy. Asymmetric radiation can produce a thrust on the system which may accelerate the single black hole resulting from the merger to high relative velocity.

  12. Numerical study of rock blasting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stefanov, Yu. P.; Bakeev, R. A.; Yudin, A. S.; Kuznetsova, N. S.

    2015-10-01

    The paper presents numerical simulation results on fracture of a concrete block due to dynamic explosive loads applied to the walls of a blast hole. Considered in the study is the influence of the pulse shape and rock properties on the pattern of irreversible deformation and cracking. It is found that a fractured zone bounded by a plastically deformed contour always arises around the explosion site. Comparison of elastoplastic deformation and fracture induced in the concrete block by explosion pulses of different durations and amplitudes shows that shorter pulses with higher amplitudes and steeper rise times provide a higher blasting efficiency.

  13. Numerical simulation of Ulysses nutation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garciamarirrodriga, C.; Zeischka, J.; Boslooper, E. C.

    1993-04-01

    The in-orbit instability of the Ulysses spacecraft was numerically simulated. The thermal excitation from the solar flux, the flexible axial boom, and the deployment mechanism were modeled and analyzed. In order to model a non-isolated mechanical system, the link between thermal, structural, and multibody dynamics packages is considered. The simulation shows that the nutation build-up was originated by the solar input on the axial boom coupled with the nutational frequency of the spacecraft. The results agree with the observed behavior.

  14. Magnetic properties of the suction-cast bulk amorphous alloy: (Fe0.61Co0.10Zr0.025Hf0.025Ti0.02W0.02B0.20)96Y4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Błoch, K.

    2015-09-01

    This paper presents the results of studies into the structural and magnetic properties of the bulk amorphous alloy: (Fe0.61Co0.10Zr0.025Hf0.025Ti0.02W0.02B0.20)96Y4, fabricated in the form of rods of length: 20 mm, and diameters: 1 mm and 2 mm. The samples were produced using the suction-casting method. The amorphicity of the investigated alloy, in the as-quenched state, was verified using X-ray diffractometry and Mössbauer spectroscopy. Studies of the magnetic susceptibility disaccommodation and the approach to magnetic saturation facilitated the conclusion that the investigated alloy, obtained in the form of rods of 2 mm diameter, can be characterized by a higher packing density of atoms; this was further confirmed by the results of Mössbauer spectroscopy.

  15. Frequency-dependent impedance spectroscopy on the 0.925(Bi0.5Na0.40K0.10)TiO3-0.075(Ba0.70Sr0.30)TiO3 ceramic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ullah, Amir; Rahman, Muneeb-ur; Iqbal, Muhammad Javid; Ahn, Chang Won; Kim, Ill Won; Ullah, Aman

    2016-06-01

    The electrical properties of the 0.925(Bi0.5(Na0.40K0.10)TiO3-0.075(Ba0.70Sr0.30)TiO3 (0.925BNKT-0.075BST) ceramic were investigated by using AC impedance spectroscopy over a wide range of frequencies (10 -2 ~ 105 Hz). The X-ray diffraction patterns confirmed the formation of a single-phase compound. A single semicircular arc in the impedance spectrum indicates that the main contribution of the bulk resistance ( R b ) were due to grain effects, with Rb decreasing with increasing temperature. The conductivity of the ceramics increased with increasing temperature, and the activation energy resulting from the DC conductivity was 0.86 eV. The ceramic displayed a typical negative temperature coefficient of resistance (NTCR) behavior, like that of a semiconductor.

  16. Numerical Propulsion System Simulation Architecture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Naiman, Cynthia G.

    2004-01-01

    The Numerical Propulsion System Simulation (NPSS) is a framework for performing analysis of complex systems. Because the NPSS was developed using the object-oriented paradigm, the resulting architecture is an extensible and flexible framework that is currently being used by a diverse set of participants in government, academia, and the aerospace industry. NPSS is being used by over 15 different institutions to support rockets, hypersonics, power and propulsion, fuel cells, ground based power, and aerospace. Full system-level simulations as well as subsystems may be modeled using NPSS. The NPSS architecture enables the coupling of analyses at various levels of detail, which is called numerical zooming. The middleware used to enable zooming and distributed simulations is the Common Object Request Broker Architecture (CORBA). The NPSS Developer's Kit offers tools for the developer to generate CORBA-based components and wrap codes. The Developer's Kit enables distributed multi-fidelity and multi-discipline simulations, preserves proprietary and legacy codes, and facilitates addition of customized codes. The platforms supported are PC, Linux, HP, Sun, and SGI.

  17. Numerical tests of stochastic tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ru-Shan, Wu; Xiao-Bi, Xie

    1991-05-01

    The method of stochastic tomography proposed by Wu is tested numerically. This method reconstructs the heterospectra (power spectra of heterogeneities) at all depths of a non-uniform random medium using measured joint transverse-angular coherence functions (JTACF) of transmission fluctuations on an array. The inversion method is based on a constrained least-squares inversion implemented via the singular value decomposition. The inversion is also applicable to reconstructions using transverse coherence functions (TCF) or angular coherence functions (ACF); these are merely special cases of JTACF. Through the analysis of sampling functions and singular values, and through numerical examples of reconstruction using theoretically generated coherence functions, we compare the resolution and robustness of reconstructions using TCF, ACF and JTACF. The JTACF can `focus' the coherence analysis at different depths and therefore has a better depth resolution than TCF and ACF. In addition, the JTACF contains much more information than the sum of TCF and ACF, and has much better noise resistance properties than TCF and ACF. Inversion of JTACF can give a reliable reconstruction of heterospectra at different depths even for data with 20% noise contamination. This demonstrates the feasibility of stochastic tomography using JTACF.

  18. Numerical simulation of shrouded propellers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Afjeh, Abdollah A.

    1991-01-01

    A numerical model was developed for the evaluation of the performance characteristics of a shrouded propeller. Using this model, a computational study was carried out to investigate the feasibility of improving the aerodynamic performance of a propeller by encasing it in a shroud. The propeller blade was modeled by a segmented bound vortex positioned along the span of the blade at its quarter-chord-line. The shroud was modeled by a number of discrete vortex rings. Due to the mutual dependence of shroud and propeller vortex strengths and the propeller vortex wake an iterative scheme was employed. Three shroud configurations were considered: a cylindrical and two conical shrouds. The computed performance of the shrouded propeller was compared with that of a free propeller of identical propeller geometry. The numerical results indicated that the cylindrical shroud outperformed the conical shroud configurations for the cases considered. Furthermore, when compared to the free propeller performance, the cylindrical shroud showed a considerable performance enhancement over the free propeller. However, the improvements were found to decrease with an increase in the advance ratio and to virtually diminish at advance ratios of about 2.5.

  19. Growth rate of Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    Marr, A G

    1991-01-01

    It should be possible to predict the rate of growth of Escherichia coli of a given genotype in a specified environment. The idea that the rate of synthesis of ATP determines the rate of growth and that the yield of ATP determines the yield of growth is entrenched in bacterial physiology, yet this idea is inconsistent with experimental results. In minimal media the growth rate and yield vary with the carbon source in a manner independent of the rate of formation and yield of ATP. With acetate as the carbon source, anapleurotic reactions, not ATP synthesis, limit the growth rate. For acetate and other gluconeogenic substrates the limiting step appears to be the formation of triose phosphate. I conclude that the rate of growth is controlled by the rate of formation of a precursor metabolite and, thus, of monomers such as amino acids derived from it. The protein-synthesizing system is regulated according to demand for protein synthesis. I examine the conjecture that the signal for this regulation is the ratio of uncharged tRNA to aminoacyl-tRNA, that this signal controls the concentration of guanosine tetraphosphate, and that the concentration of guanosine tetraphosphate controls transcription of rrn genes. Differential equations describing this system were solved numerically for steady states of growth; the computed values of ribosomes and guanosine tetraphosphate and the maximal growth rate agree with experimental values obtained from the literature of the past 35 years. These equations were also solved for dynamical states corresponding to nutritional shifts up and down. PMID:1886524

  20. Numerical modeling of fluidic flow meters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choudhury, D.; Patel, B. R.

    1992-05-01

    The transient fluid flow in fluidic flow meters has been modeled using Creare.x's flow modeling computer program FLUENT/BFC that solves the Navier-Stokes equations in general curvilinear coordinates. The numerical predictions of fluid flow in a fluidic flow meter have been compared with the available experimental results for a particular design, termed the PC-4 design. Overall flow structures such as main jet bending, and primary and secondary vortices predicted by FLUENT/BFC are in excellent agreement with flow visualization results. The oscillation frequencies of the PC-4 design have been predicted for a range of flow rates encompassing laminar and turbulent flow and the results are in good agreement with experiments. The details of the flow field predictions reveal that an important factor that determines the onset of oscillations in the fluidic flow meter is the feedback jet momentum relative to the main jet momentum. The insights provided by the analysis of the PC-4 fluidic flow meter design have led to an improved design. The improved design has sustained oscillations at lower flow rates compared with the PC-4 design and has a larger rangeability.

  1. Numerical modeling of chemical vapor deposition (CVD) in a horizontal reactor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sheikholeslami, M. Z.; Jasinski, T.; Fretz, K. W.

    1988-01-01

    In the present numerical prediction of the deposition rate of silicon from silane in a CVD process, the conservation equations for mass, momentum, energy, and chemical species are solved on a staggered grid using the SIMPLE algorithm, while the rate of chemical reactions in the gas phase and on the susceptor surface is obtained from an Arrhenius rate equation. Predicted deposition rates as a function of position along the susceptor with and without the gas phase chemical reaction are compared with the available experimental and numerical data; agreement is excellent except at the leading edge of the susceptor, where the deposition rate is overpredicted.

  2. 20 CFR 30.910 - Will an impairment that cannot be assigned a numerical percentage using the AMA's Guides be...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... dysfunction of the nervous system, and cannot be assigned a numerical percentage using the AMA's Guides, will... documented physical dysfunctions of the nervous system can be assigned numerical percentages using the AMA's... numerical percentage using the AMA's Guides be included in the impairment rating? 30.910 Section...

  3. Numerical simulation of sprites halo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bochkov, E. I.; Babich, L. P.; Kutsyk, I. M.

    2014-03-01

    In the framework of C. Wilson's hypothesis substantiating a possibility of electric discharge development in the Earth's atmosphere at high altitudes above thunderclouds, numerical simulations were executed of the discharge exciting the sprite halo with realistic variations of thundercloud dipole moment transferred to the ground by positive lightning discharge. For various values of time and altitude, at which the avalanche-to-streamer transition occurs, optical radiation was calculated in the 1 P, 2 P, and 1 N bands of the nitrogen molecule and Meinel's band of the N{2/+} ion. The calculated brightness and space-time evolution of the luminescence are consistent with the data of the field observations of the halo luminescence.

  4. Numerical simulation of cocontinuous morphologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Junseok

    2005-11-01

    In strongly sheared emulsions, experiments (e.g., Galloway and Macosko 2001) have shown that systems consisting of one continuous (matrix) and one dispersed (drops) phase may undergo a coalescence cascade leading to a system in which both phases are continuous, i.e., cocontinuous, (sponge-like). Such configurations may have desirable diffusional, mechanical and electrical properties and thus have wide-ranging applications. Using a diffuse interface method developed by Kim and Lowengrub 2001, we perform numerical simulations of the interface length per unit area as a function of volume fractions in 2-d. In this approach, interfaces have small but finite thickness and limited chemical diffusion is used to change the topology of interfaces. In this presentation, we discuss the effects of the viscosity ratio, surface tension, and flow on interface length per unit area and compare it with experiment results. The use of adaptive mesh refinement techniques recently developed by Kim, Wise and Lowengrub will also be discussed.

  5. Numerical calculations of flow fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, D. M.; Vogel, J. M.

    1972-01-01

    The solutions to the equations of motion for inviscid fluid flow around a pointed elliptic cone at incidence are presented. The numerical method used, MacCormack's second order preferential predictor-corrector finite difference approximation, is applied to the fluid flow equations derived in conservation-law form. The entropy boundary condition, hitherto unused for elliptic cone problems, is investigated and compared to reflection boundary condition solutions. The stagnation streamline movement of the inclined elliptic cone is noted and surface pressure coefficients are plotted. Also presented are solutions for an elliptic cone and a circular cone at zero incidence and a circular cone at a small angle of attack. Comparisons are made between these present solutions and previously published theory.

  6. Comprehensive numerical modelling of tokamaks

    SciTech Connect

    Cohen, R.H.; Cohen, B.I.; Dubois, P.F.

    1991-01-03

    We outline a plan for the development of a comprehensive numerical model of tokamaks. The model would consist of a suite of independent, communicating packages describing the various aspects of tokamak performance (core and edge transport coefficients and profiles, heating, fueling, magnetic configuration, etc.) as well as extensive diagnostics. These codes, which may run on different computers, would be flexibly linked by a user-friendly shell which would allow run-time specification of packages and generation of pre- and post-processing functions, including workstation-based visualization of output. One package in particular, the calculation of core transport coefficients via gyrokinetic particle simulation, will become practical on the scale required for comprehensive modelling only with the advent of teraFLOP computers. Incremental effort at LLNL would be focused on gyrokinetic simulation and development of the shell.

  7. Numerical simulation of vortex breakdown

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shi, X.

    1985-01-01

    The breakdown of an isolated axisymmetric vortex embedded in an unbounded uniform flow is examined by numerical integration of the complete Navier-Stokes equations for unsteady axisymmetric flow. Results show that if the vortex strength is small, the solution approaches a steady flow and the vortex is stable. If the strength is large enough, the solution remains unsteady and a recirculating zone will appear near the axis, its form and internal structure resembling those of the axisymmetric breakdown bubbles with multi-cells observed by Faler and Leibovich (1978). For apppropriate combinations of flow parameters, the flow reveals quasi-periodicity. Parallel calculations with the quasi-cylindrical approximation indicate that so far as predicting of breakdown is concerned, its results coincide quite well with the results mentioned above. Both show that the vortex breakdown has little concern with the Reynolds number or with the critical classification of the upstream flow, at least for the lower range of Reynolds numbers.

  8. Numerical Modeling of Turbulent Combustion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ghoneim, A. F.; Chorin, A. J.; Oppenheim, A. K.

    1983-01-01

    The work in numerical modeling is focused on the use of the random vortex method to treat turbulent flow fields associated with combustion while flame fronts are considered as interfaces between reactants and products, propagating with the flow and at the same time advancing in the direction normal to themselves at a prescribed burning speed. The latter is associated with the generation of specific volume (the flame front acting, in effect, as the locus of volumetric sources) to account for the expansion of the flow field due to the exothermicity of the combustion process. The model was applied to the flow in a channel equipped with a rearward facing step. The results obtained revealed the mechanism of the formation of large scale turbulent structure in the wake of the step, while it showed the flame to stabilize on the outer edges of these eddies.

  9. Numerical simulation of oscillating magnetrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palevsky, A.; Bekefi, G.; Drobot, A. T.

    1981-08-01

    The temporal evolution of the current, voltage, and RF fields in magnetron-type devices is simulated by a two-dimensional, electromagnetic, fully relativistic particle-in-cell code. The simulation allows for the complete geometry of the anode vane structure, space-charge-limited cathode emission and the external power source, and is applied to a 54-vane inverted relativistic magnetron at a voltage of 300 kV and a magnetic field of 0.17 T. Fields in the RF structure and the anode-cathode gap are solved from Maxwell's equations so that results contain all the two-dimensional resonances of the system, and the numerical solution yields a complete space-time history of the particle momenta. In the presence of strong RF fields, the conventional definition of voltages is found to be inappropriate, and a definition is developed to reduce to the conventional results.

  10. Numerical experiments in homogeneous turbulence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rogallo, R. S.

    1981-01-01

    The direct simulation methods developed by Orszag and Patternson (1972) for isotropic turbulence were extended to homogeneous turbulence in an incompressible fluid subjected to uniform deformation or rotation. The results of simulations for irrotational strain (plane and axisymmetric), shear, rotation, and relaxation toward isotropy following axisymmetric strain are compared with linear theory and experimental data. Emphasis is placed on the shear flow because of its importance and because of the availability of accurate and detailed experimental data. The computed results are used to assess the accuracy of two popular models used in the closure of the Reynolds-stress equations. Data from a variety of the computed fields and the details of the numerical methods used in the simulation are also presented.

  11. Numerical classification of coding sequences

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Collins, D. W.; Liu, C. C.; Jukes, T. H.

    1992-01-01

    DNA sequences coding for protein may be represented by counts of nucleotides or codons. A complete reading frame may be abbreviated by its base count, e.g. A76C158G121T74, or with the corresponding codon table, e.g. (AAA)0(AAC)1(AAG)9 ... (TTT)0. We propose that these numerical designations be used to augment current methods of sequence annotation. Because base counts and codon tables do not require revision as knowledge of function evolves, they are well-suited to act as cross-references, for example to identify redundant GenBank entries. These descriptors may be compared, in place of DNA sequences, to extract homologous genes from large databases. This approach permits rapid searching with good selectivity.

  12. Seafloor weathering buffering climate: numerical experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farahat, N. X.; Archer, D. E.; Abbot, D. S.

    2013-12-01

    Continental silicate weathering is widely held to consume atmospheric CO2 at a rate controlled in part by temperature, resulting in a climate-weathering feedback [Walker et al., 1981]. It has been suggested that weathering of oceanic crust of warm mid-ocean ridge flanks also has a CO2 uptake rate that is controlled by climate [Sleep and Zahnle, 2001; Brady and Gislason, 1997]. Although this effect might not be significant on present-day Earth [Caldeira, 1995], seafloor weathering may be more pronounced during snowball states [Le Hir et al., 2008], during the Archean when seafloor spreading rates were faster [Sleep and Zahnle, 2001], and on waterworld planets [Abbot et al., 2012]. Previous studies of seafloor weathering have made significant contributions using qualitative, generally one-box, models, and the logical next step is to extend this work using a spatially resolved model. For example, experiments demonstrate that seafloor weathering reactions are temperature dependent, but it is not clear whether the deep ocean temperature affects the temperature at which the reactions occur, or if instead this temperature is set only by geothermal processes. Our goal is to develop a 2-D numerical model that can simulate hydrothermal circulation and resulting alteration of oceanic basalts, and can therefore address such questions. A model of diffusive and convective heat transfer in fluid-saturated porous media simulates hydrothermal circulation through porous oceanic basalt. Unsteady natural convection is solved for using a Darcy model of porous media flow that has been extensively benchmarked. Background hydrothermal circulation is coupled to mineral reaction kinetics of basaltic alteration and hydrothermal mineral precipitation. In order to quantify seafloor weathering as a climate-weathering feedback process, this model focuses on hydrothermal reactions that influence carbon uptake as well as ocean alkalinity: silicate rock dissolution, calcium and magnesium leaching

  13. Numerical Simulations of the Geodynamo and Scaling Laws

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oruba, L.; Dormy, E.

    2013-12-01

    State of the art numerical models of the Geodynamo are still performed in a parameter regime extremely remote from the values relevant to the physics of the Earth core. In order to establish a connection between dynamo modeling and the geophysical motivation, it is necessary to use scaling laws. Such laws establish the dependency of essential quantities (such as the magnetic field strength) on measured or controlled quantities. They allow for a direct confrontation of advanced models with geophysical constraints. We will present a detailed analysis of scaling laws based on a wide database of 185 direct numerical simulations (courtesy of U. Christensen) and test various existing scaling laws. Our main concern is to stress the risks of a direct numerical fit free from physical insight. We show that different a priori hypothesis can yield contradictory dependences, in particular concerning the dependence of the magnetic field strength on the rotation rate as well as on the viscosity.

  14. NUMERICAL SIMULATION OF NATURAL GAS-SWIRL BURNER

    SciTech Connect

    Ala Qubbaj

    2005-03-01

    A numerical simulation of a turbulent natural gas jet diffusion flame at a Reynolds number of 9000 in a swirling air stream is presented. The numerical computations were carried out using the commercially available software package CFDRC. The instantaneous chemistry model was used as the reaction model. The thermal, composition, flow (velocity), as well as stream function fields for both the baseline and air-swirling flames were numerically simulated in the near-burner region, where most of the mixing and reactions occur. The results were useful to interpret the effects of swirl in enhancing the mixing rates in the combustion zone as well as in stabilizing the flame. The results showed the generation of two recirculating regimes induced by the swirling air stream, which account for such effects. The present investigation will be used as a benchmark study of swirl flow combustion analysis as a step in developing an enhanced swirl-cascade burner technology.

  15. Analysis of single ring infiltrometer test by direct numerical modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Réfloch, Aurore; Oxarango, Laurent; Rossier, Yvan; Gaudet, Jean Paul

    2016-04-01

    The well field of the Lyon metropolitan area provides drinking water to approximately 1,300,000 inhabitants. It is equipped with 12 infiltration basins. These basins have two main goals: sustaining the water table in times of peak demand for water, and preventing a possible contamination from the Rhône river by inverting groundwater flow direction. The water infiltration under the basins is thus crucial for the overall hydrogeologic behavior of the site. In order to characterize this phenomenon, a set of infiltrometer tests were performed to estimate the soil hydraulic properties. The soil is a coarse alluvial deposits. In order to deal with its sparse granulometric curve, a large single ring infiltrometer (1 meter in diameter) was used. A constant hydraulic head (=0.07 m) was imposed during the test. Two kinds of data are recorded: the amount of water infiltrated over time and the extension of the moisture stain around the ring. The main hydraulic properties are estimated using Richard's equation in a 2D axi-symmetric configuration. Simulations are performed using a finite element commercial software package (Comsol Multiphysics 5.1). According to simplified numerical models, an average homogeneous saturated permeability of the alluvial deposits is estimated at 5.0 10-6 m.s-1. However, such a simple model is not able to represent accurately the moisture stain at the soil surface. More complex models introduce anisotropy of permeability in the alluvium layer, with mono or bi-layer domain. In these cases, experimental and modeling results are consistent, both for the amount of water infiltrated over time and the extension of the moisture stain around the ring. The hydraulic anisotropy in the soil could be due to the stratified nature of alluvial deposits and to soil compaction during the construction of infiltration basins. Keywords: Single ring infiltrometer test, artificial aquifer recharge, numerical modeling.

  16. Kramers' rate for systems with multiplicative noise.

    PubMed

    Rosas, Alexandre; Pinto, Italo'Ivo Lima Dias; Lindenberg, Katja

    2016-07-01

    Kramers' rate for the passage of trajectories X(t) over an energy barrier due to thermal or other fluctuations is usually associated with additive noise. We present a generalization of Kramers' rate for systems with multiplicative noise. We show that the expression commonly used in the literature for multiplicative noise is not correct, and we present results of numerical integrations of the Langevin equation for dX(t)/dt evolving in a quartic bistable potential which corroborate our claim. PMID:27575071

  17. Kramers' rate for systems with multiplicative noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosas, Alexandre; Pinto, Italo'Ivo Lima Dias; Lindenberg, Katja

    2016-07-01

    Kramers' rate for the passage of trajectories X (t ) over an energy barrier due to thermal or other fluctuations is usually associated with additive noise. We present a generalization of Kramers' rate for systems with multiplicative noise. We show that the expression commonly used in the literature for multiplicative noise is not correct, and we present results of numerical integrations of the Langevin equation for d X (t )/d t evolving in a quartic bistable potential which corroborate our claim.

  18. Numerical Simulation of Nanostructure Growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hwang, Helen H.; Bose, Deepak; Govindan, T. R.; Meyyappan, M.

    2004-01-01

    Nanoscale structures, such as nanowires and carbon nanotubes (CNTs), are often grown in gaseous or plasma environments. Successful growth of these structures is defined by achieving a specified crystallinity or chirality, size or diameter, alignment, etc., which in turn depend on gas mixture ratios. pressure, flow rate, substrate temperature, and other operating conditions. To date, there has not been a rigorous growth model that addresses the specific concerns of crystalline nanowire growth, while demonstrating the correct trends of the processing conditions on growth rates. Most crystal growth models are based on the Burton, Cabrera, and Frank (BCF) method, where adatoms are incorporated into a growing crystal at surface steps or spirals. When the supersaturation of the vapor is high, islands nucleate to form steps, and these steps subsequently spread (grow). The overall bulk growth rate is determined by solving for the evolving motion of the steps. Our approach is to use a phase field model to simulate the growth of finite sized nanowire crystals, linking the free energy equation with the diffusion equation of the adatoms. The phase field method solves for an order parameter that defines the evolving steps in a concentration field. This eliminates the need for explicit front tracking/location, or complicated shadowing routines, both of which can be computationally expensive, particularly in higher dimensions. We will present results demonstrating the effect of process conditions, such as substrate temperature, vapor supersaturation, etc. on the evolving morphologies and overall growth rates of the nanostructures.

  19. Interagency mechanical operations group numerical systems group

    SciTech Connect

    1997-09-01

    This report consists of the minutes of the May 20-21, 1971 meeting of the Interagency Mechanical Operations Group (IMOG) Numerical Systems Group. This group looks at issues related to numerical control in the machining industry. Items discussed related to the use of CAD and CAM, EIA standards, data links, and numerical control.

  20. The Language of Numerical Control: A Glossary.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Campbell, Clifton Paul

    Numerical control, a technique for automatically controlling equipment, is a system in which machine actions are determined by symbolic data recorded on a suitable media. This glossary of standardized nomenclature for numerical control defines and describes some 286 technical words and terms. Numerous entries are defined and described as they…

  1. [Resting heart rate and cardiovascular disease].

    PubMed

    Brito Díaz, Buenaventura; Alemán Sánchez, José Juan; Cabrera de León, Antonio

    2014-07-01

    Heart rate reflects autonomic nervous system activity. Numerous studies have demonstrated that an increased heart rate at rest is associated with cardiovascular morbidity and mortality as an independent risk factor. It has been shown a link between cardiac autonomic balance and inflammation. Thus, an elevated heart rate produces a micro-inflammatory response and is involved in the pathogenesis of endothelial dysfunction. In turn, decrease in heart rate produces benefits in congestive heart failure, myocardial infarction, atrial fibrillation, obesity, hyperinsulinemia, insulin resistance, and atherosclerosis. Alteration of other heart rate-related parameters, such as their variability and recovery after exercise, is associated with risk of cardiovascular events. Drugs reducing the heart rate (beta-blockers, calcium antagonists and inhibitors of If channels) have the potential to reduce cardiovascular events. Although not recommended in healthy subjects, interventions for reducing heart rate constitute a reasonable therapeutic goal in certain pathologies.

  2. Nucleation rate in monotectic alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Falk, F.

    Cooling a melt of a monotectic system into the miscibility gap results in nucleation of fluid droplets in a fluid matrix prior to solidification. For homogeneous nucleation the temperature dependence of the nucleation rate is calculated. As material parameters the chemical potential of the species involved, the diffusion constant of the fluid, and the surface tension between adjacent phases are important. Since their temperature dependence is not well known from experiments, different theoretical models are used and their influence is discussed. The surface tension turns out to be the most crucial parameter in determining the nucleation rate. For AlIn numerical results are presented. In this system the undercooling with respect to homogeneous nucleation increases from zero at the critical point to 100 K at a composition near the monotectic point.

  3. Numerical homogenization on approach for stokesian suspensions.

    SciTech Connect

    Haines, B. M.; Berlyand, L. V.; Karpeev, D. A.

    2012-01-20

    In this technical report we investigate efficient methods for numerical simulation of active suspensions. The prototypical system is a suspension of swimming bacteria in a Newtonian fluid. Rheological and other macroscopic properties of such suspensions can differ dramatically from the same properties of the suspending fluid alone or of suspensions of similar but inactive particles. Elongated bacteria, such as E. coli or B. subtilis, swim along their principal axis, propelling themselves with the help of flagella, attached at the anterior of the organism and pushing it forward in the manner of a propeller. They interact hydrodynamically with the surrounding fluid and, because of their asymmetrical shape, have the propensity to align with the local flow. This, along with the dipolar nature of bacteria (the two forces a bacterium exerts on a fluid - one due to self-propulsion and the other opposing drag - have equal magnitude and point in opposite directions), causes nearby bacteria to tend to align, resulting in a intermittent local ordering on the mesoscopic scale, which is between the microscopic scale of an individual bacterium and the macroscopic scale of the suspension (e.g., its container). The local ordering is sometimes called a collective mode or collective swimming. Thanks to self-propulsion, collective modes inject momentum into the fluid in a coherent way. This enhances the local strain rate without changing the macroscopic stress applied at the boundary of the container. The macroscopic effective viscosity of the suspension is defined roughly as the ratio of the applied stress to the bulk strain rate. If local alignment and therefore local strain-rate enhancement, are significant, the effective viscosity can be appreciably lower than that of the corresponding passive suspension or even of the surrounding fluid alone. Indeed, a sevenfold decrease in the effective viscosity was observed in experiments with B. subtilis. More generally, local collective

  4. The Effects of Drip Irrigation and Fertilizer Rate on Corn Yield and Soil Salinity in the Arkansas River Valley

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A field experiment was conducted at the Arkansas Valley Research Center (AVRC) in 2005 to test the effects of irrigation type and scheduling and fertilizer rate on corn yield and soil salinity. Four N (0, 60, 120, and 180 lb N/acre) and four manure (0, 10, 20, and 30 t/acre) application rates were ...

  5. Reconnection rates of magnetic fields

    SciTech Connect

    Park, W.; Monticello, D.A.; White, R.B.

    1983-05-01

    The Sweet-Parker and Petschek scalings of magnetic reconnection rate are modified to include the effect of the viscosity. The modified scalings show that the viscous effect can be important in high-..beta.. plasmas. The theoretical reconnection scalings are compared with numerical simulation results in a tokamak geometry for three different cases: a forced reconnection driven by external coils, the nonlinear m = 1 resistive internal kink, and the nonlinear m = 2 tearing mode. In the first two cases, the numerical reconnection rate agrees well with the modified Sweet-Parker scaling, when the viscosity is sufficiently large. When the viscosity is negligible, a steady state which was assumed in the derivation of the reconnection scalings is not reached and the current sheet in the reconnection layer either remains stable through sloshing motions of the plasma or breaks up to higher m modes. When the current sheet remains stable, a rough comparison with the Sweet-Parker scaling is obtained. In the nonlinear m = 2 tearing mode case where the instability is purely resistive, the reconnection occurs on the slower dissipation time scale (Psi/sub s/ approx. eta). In addition, experimental data of the nonlinear m = 1 resistive internal kink in tokamak discharges are analyzed and are found to give reasonable agreement with the modified Sweet-Parker scaling.

  6. Numerical wave propagation in ImageJ.

    PubMed

    Piedrahita-Quintero, Pablo; Castañeda, Raul; Garcia-Sucerquia, Jorge

    2015-07-20

    An ImageJ plugin for numerical wave propagation is presented. The plugin provides ImageJ, the well-known software for image processing, with the capability of computing numerical wave propagation by the use of angular spectrum, Fresnel, and Fresnel-Bluestein algorithms. The plugin enables numerical wave propagation within the robust environment provided by the complete set of built-in tools for image processing available in ImageJ. The plugin can be used for teaching and research purposes. We illustrate its use to numerically recreate Poisson's spot and Babinet's principle, and in the numerical reconstruction of digitally recorded holograms from millimeter-sized and pure phase microscopic objects.

  7. Explicit BCJ numerators of nonlinear simga model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Du, Yi-Jian; Fu, Chih-Hao

    2016-09-01

    In this paper, we investigate the color-kinematics duality in nonlinear sigma model (NLSM). We present explicit polynomial expressions for the kinematic numerators (BCJ numerators). The calculation is done separately in two parametrization schemes of the theory using Kawai-Lewellen-Tye relation inspired technique, both lead to polynomial numerators. We summarize the calculation in each case into a set of rules that generates BCJ numerators for all multilplicities. In Cayley parametrization we find the numerator is described by a particularly simple formula solely in terms of momentum kernel.

  8. Quantifying Numerical Dissipation due to Filtering in Implicit LES

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cadieux, Francois; Domaradzki, Julian Andrzej

    2015-11-01

    Numerical dissipation plays an important role in LES and has given rise to the widespread use of implicit LES in the academic community. Recent results demonstrate that even with higher order codes, the use of stabilizing filters can act as a source of numerical dissipation strong enough to compare to an explicit subgrid-scale model (Cadieux et al., JFE 136-6). The amount of numerical dissipation added by such filtering operation in the simulation of a laminar separation bubble is quantified using a new method developed by Schranner et al., Computers & Fluids 114. It is then compared to a case where the filter is turned off, as well as the subgrid-scale dissipation that would be added by the σ model. The sensitivity of the method to the choice of subdomain location and size is explored. The effect of different derivative approximations and integration methods is also scrutinized. The method is shown to be robust and accurate for large subdomains. Results show that without filtering, numerical dissipation in the high order code is negligible, and that the filtering operation at the resolution considered adds substantial numerical dissipation in the same regions and at a similar rate as the σ subgrid-scale model would. NSF grant CBET-1233160.

  9. Numerical simulations of a diode laser BPH treatment system

    SciTech Connect

    Esch, V; London, R A; Papademetriou, S

    1999-02-23

    Numerical simulations are presented of the laser-tissue interaction of a diode laser system for treating benign prostate hyperplasia. The numerical model includes laser light transport, heat transport, cooling due to blood perfusion, thermal tissue damage, and enthalpy of tissue damage. Comparisons of the simulation results to clinical data are given. We report that a reasonable variation from a standard set of input data produces heating times which match those measured in the clinical trials. A general trend of decreasing damage volume with increasing heating time is described. We suggest that the patient-to- patient variability seen in the data can be explained by differences in fundamental biophysical properties such as the optical coefficients. Further work is identified, including the measurement and input to the model of several specific data parameters such as optical coefficients, blood perfusion cooling rate, and coagulation rates.

  10. Numerical simulations of a diode laser BPH treatment system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    London, Richard A.; Esch, Victor C.; Papademetriou, Stephanos

    1999-06-01

    Numerical simulations are presented of the laser-tissue interaction of a diode laser system for treating benign prostate hyperplasia. The numerical model includes laser light transport, heat transport, cooling due to blood perfusion, thermal tissue damage, and enthalpy of tissue damage. Comparisons of the stimulation results to clinical data are given. We report that a reasonable variation from a standard set of input data produces heating times which match those measured in the clinical trials. A general trend of decreasing damage volume with increasing heating time is described. We suggest that the patient-to-patient variability seen in the data can be explained by differences in fundamental biophysical properties such as the optical coefficients. Further work is identified, including the measurement and input to the model of several specific data parameters such as optical coefficients, blood perfusion cooling rate, and coagulation rates.

  11. Raters & Rating Scales.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lopez, Winifred A.; Stone, Mark H.

    1998-01-01

    The first article in this section, "Rating Scales and Shared Meaning," by Winifred A. Lopez, discusses the analysis of rating scale data. The second article, "Rating Scale Categories: Dichotomy, Double Dichotomy, and the Number Two," by Mark H. Stone, argues that dichotomies in rating scales are more useful than multiple ratings. (SLD)

  12. Numerical Modeling of Nanoelectronic Devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klimeck, Gerhard; Oyafuso, Fabiano; Bowen, R. Chris; Boykin, Timothy

    2003-01-01

    Nanoelectronic Modeling 3-D (NEMO 3-D) is a computer program for numerical modeling of the electronic structure properties of a semiconductor device that is embodied in a crystal containing as many as 16 million atoms in an arbitrary configuration and that has overall dimensions of the order of tens of nanometers. The underlying mathematical model represents the quantummechanical behavior of the device resolved to the atomistic level of granularity. The system of electrons in the device is represented by a sparse Hamiltonian matrix that contains hundreds of millions of terms. NEMO 3-D solves the matrix equation on a Beowulf-class cluster computer, by use of a parallel-processing matrix vector multiplication algorithm coupled to a Lanczos and/or Rayleigh-Ritz algorithm that solves for eigenvalues. In a recent update of NEMO 3-D, a new strain treatment, parameterized for bulk material properties of GaAs and InAs, was developed for two tight-binding submodels. The utility of the NEMO 3-D was demonstrated in an atomistic analysis of the effects of disorder in alloys and, in particular, in bulk In(x)Ga(l-x)As and in In0.6Ga0.4As quantum dots.

  13. Effects of SrRuO{sub 3} buffer layer thickness on multiferroic (Bi{sub 0.90}La{sub 0.10})(Fe{sub 0.95}Mn{sub 0.05})O{sub 3} thin films

    SciTech Connect

    Wu Jiagang; Wang, John

    2009-09-01

    Multiferroic (Bi{sub 0.90}La{sub 0.10})(Fe{sub 0.95}Mn{sub 0.05})O{sub 3} (BLFMO) thin films were deposited on SrRuO{sub 3} (SRO) buffered Pt/TiO{sub 2}/SiO{sub 2}/Si(100) substrates with variable buffer layer thicknesses by using off-axis radio frequency sputtering. The orientation of BLFMO thin films is dependent on the SRO buffer layer thickness, which leads to a change in ferroelectric behavior. Due to the low leakage currents arising from the orientation change in association with the variation in SRO buffer layer thickness and the La and Mn codoping, well saturated P-E hysteresis loops (2P{sub r}approx210.0 muC/cm{sup 2} and 2E{sub c}approx525.5 kV/cm) are shown for the (111)-oriented BLFMO thin film at room temperature and 1 kHz. It also demonstrates little ferroelectric fatigue on 10{sup 9} switching cycles. Moreover, the BLFMO thin film exhibits the enhanced magnetic behavior as compared to pure BFO thin films, due to the canting of antiferromagnetically ordered spins.

  14. Numerical modeling of injection experiments at The Geysers

    SciTech Connect

    Pruess, K.; Enedy, S.

    1993-01-01

    Data from injection experiments in the southeast Geysers are presented that show strong interference (both negative and positive) with a neighboring production well. Conceptual and numerical models are developed that explain the negative interference (decline of production rate) in terms of heat transfer limitations and water-vapor relative permeability effects. Recovery and over-recovery following injection shut-in are attributed to boiling of injected fluid, with heat of vaporization provided by the reservoir rocks.

  15. Numerical modeling of injection experiments at The Geysers

    SciTech Connect

    Pruess, Karsten; Enedy, Steve

    1993-01-28

    Data from injection experiments in the southeast Geysers are presented that show strong interference (both negative and positive) with a neighboring production well. Conceptual and numerical models are developed that explain the negative interference (decline of production rate) in terms of heat transfer limitations and water-vapor relative permeability effects. Recovery and overrecovery following injection shut-in are attributed to boiling of injected fluid, with heat of vaporization provided by the reservoir rocks.

  16. Numerical analysis of a microwave torch with axial gas injection

    SciTech Connect

    Gritsinin, S. I.; Davydov, A. M.; Kossyi, I. A.; Kulumbaev, E. B.; Lelevkin, V. M.

    2013-07-15

    The characteristics of a microwave discharge in an argon jet injected axially into a coaxial channel with a shortened inner electrode are numerically analyzed using a self-consistent equilibrium gas-dynamic model. The specific features of the excitation and maintenance of the microwave discharge are determined, and the dependences of the discharge characteristics on the supplied electromagnetic power and gas flow rate are obtained. The calculated results are compared with experimental data.

  17. Numerical Simulations of High Enthalpy Pulse Facilities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, Gregory J.; Edwards, Thomas A. (Technical Monitor)

    1995-01-01

    Axisymmetric flows within shock tubes and expansion tubes are simulated including the effects of finite rate chemistry and both laminar and turbulent boundary layers. The simulations demonstrate the usefulness of computational fluid dynamics for characterizing the flows in high enthalpy pulse facilities. The modeling and numerical requirements necessary to simulate these flows accurately are also discussed. Although there is a large body of analysis which explains and quantifies the boundary layer growth between the shock and the interface in a shock tube, there is a need for more detailed solutions. Phenomena such as thermochemical nonequilibrium. or turbulent transition behind the shock are excluded in the assumptions of Mirels' analysis. Additionally there is inadequate capability to predict the influence of the boundary layer on the expanded gas behind the interface. Quantifying the gas in this region is particularly important in expansion tubes because it is the location of the test gas. Unsteady simulations of the viscous flow in shock tubes are computationally expensive because they must follow features such as a shock wave over the length of the facility and simultaneously resolve the small length scales within the boundary layer. As a result, efficient numerical algorithms are required. The numerical approach of the present work is to solve the axisymmetric gas dynamic equations using an finite-volume formulation where the inviscid fluxes are computed with a upwind TVD scheme. Multiple species equations are included in the formulation so that finite-rate chemistry can be modeled. The simulations cluster grid points at the shock and interface and translate this clustered grid with these features to minimize numerical errors. The solutions are advanced at a CFL number of less than one based on the inviscid gas dynamics. To avoid limitations on the time step due to the viscous terms, these terms are treated implicitly. This requires a block tri

  18. Numerical Simulations of Disk-Planet Interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Angelo, Gennaro

    2003-06-01

    The aim of this thesis is the study the dynamical interactions occurring between a forming planet and its surrounding protostellar environment. This task is accomplished by means of both 2D and 3D numerical simulations. The first part of this work concerned global simulations in 3D. These were intended to investigate large-scale effects caused by a Jupiter-size body still in the process of accreting matter from its surroundings. Simulations show that, despite a density gap forms along the orbital path, Jupiter-mass protoplanets still accrete at a rate on the order of 0.01 Earth's masses per year when they are embedded in a minimum-mass Solar nebula. In the same conditions, the migration time scale due to gravitational torques by the disk is around 100000 years. The second part of the work was dedicated to perform 2D calculations, by employing a nested-grid technique. This method allows to carry out global simulations of planets orbiting in disks and, at the same time, to resolve in great detail the dynamics of the flow inside the Roche lobe of both massive and low-mass planets. Regardless of the planet mass, the high resolution supplied by the nested-grid technique permits an evaluation of the torques, resulting from short and very short range gravitational interactions, more reliable than the one previously estimated with the aid of numerical methods. Likewise, the mass flow onto the planet is computed in a more accurate fashion. Resulting migration time scales are in the range from 20000 years, for intermediate-mass planets, to 1000000 years, for very low-mass as well as high-mass planets. Circumplanetary disks form inside of the Roche lobe of Jupiter-size secondaries. In order to evaluate the consequences of the flat geometry on the local flow structure around planets, 3D nested-grid simulations were carried out to investigate a range of planetary masses spanning from 1.5 Earth's masses to one Jupiter's mass. Outcomes show that migration rates are relatively

  19. Playing Linear Numerical Board Games Promotes Low-Income Children's Numerical Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Siegler, Robert S.; Ramani, Geetha B.

    2008-01-01

    The numerical knowledge of children from low-income backgrounds trails behind that of peers from middle-income backgrounds even before the children enter school. This gap may reflect differing prior experience with informal numerical activities, such as numerical board games. Experiment 1 indicated that the numerical magnitude knowledge of…

  20. Numerical analysis of decoy state quantum key distribution protocols

    SciTech Connect

    Harrington, Jim W; Rice, Patrick R

    2008-01-01

    Decoy state protocols are a useful tool for many quantum key distribution systems implemented with weak coherent pulses, allowing significantly better secret bit rates and longer maximum distances. In this paper we present a method to numerically find optimal three-level protocols, and we examine how the secret bit rate and the optimized parameters are dependent on various system properties, such as session length, transmission loss, and visibility. Additionally, we show how to modify the decoy state analysis to handle partially distinguishable decoy states as well as uncertainty in the prepared intensities.

  1. A new representation of wells in numerical reservoir simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Yu Ding; Renard, G. )

    1994-05-01

    Numerical PI's are used to relate wellblock and wellbore pressures and the flow rate of a well in reservoir simulations by finite difference. This approach is based on an equivalent wellblock radius'', r[sub eq,o]. When nonuniform grids are used, r[sub eq,o] may create an error in wellbore pressure or oil rate. This paper presents a new well representation. The analytical solution for near-well pressure is included by modifying the transmissibilities between gridblocks so that flow around as well is described fully. The new method is applicable to non-uniform grids and nonisolated wells.

  2. Numerical studies of transverse curvature effects on transonic flow stability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Macaraeg, M. G.; Daudpota, Q. I.

    1992-01-01

    A numerical study of transverse curvature effects on compressible flow temporal stability for transonic to low supersonic Mach numbers is presented for axisymmetric modes. The mean flows studied include a similar boundary-layer profile and a nonsimilar axisymmetric boundary-layer solution. The effect of neglecting curvature in the mean flow produces only small quantitative changes in the disturbance growth rate. For transonic Mach numbers (1-1.4) and aerodynamically relevant Reynolds numbers (5000-10,000 based on displacement thickness), the maximum growth rate is found to increase with curvature - the maximum occurring at a nondimensional radius (based on displacement thickness) between 30 and 100.

  3. Relativistic positioning systems: Numerical simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Puchades Colmenero, Neus

    The position of users located on the Earth's surface or near it may be found with the classic positioning systems (CPS). Certain information broadcast by satellites of global navigation systems, as GPS and GALILEO, may be used for positioning. The CPS are based on the Newtonian formalism, although relativistic post-Newtonian corrections are done when they are necessary. This thesis contributes to the development of a different positioning approach, which is fully relativistic from the beginning. In the relativistic positioning systems (RPS), the space-time position of any user (ship, spacecraft, and so on) can be calculated with the help of four satellites, which broadcast their proper times by means of codified electromagnetic signals. In this thesis, we have simulated satellite 4-tuples of the GPS and GALILEO constellations. If a user receives the signals from four satellites simultaneously, the emission proper times read -after decoding- are the user "emission coordinates". In order to find the user "positioning coordinates", in an appropriate almost inertial reference system, there are two possibilities: (a) the explicit relation between positioning and emission coordinates (broadcast by the satellites) is analytically found or (b) numerical codes are designed to calculate the positioning coordinates from the emission ones. Method (a) is only viable in simple ideal cases, whereas (b) allows us to consider realistic situations. In this thesis, we have designed numerical codes with the essential aim of studying two appropriate RPS, which may be generalized. Sometimes, there are two real users placed in different positions, which receive the same proper times from the same satellites; then, we say that there is bifurcation, and additional data are needed to choose the real user position. In this thesis, bifurcation is studied in detail. We have analyzed in depth two RPS models; in both, it is considered that the satellites move in the Schwarzschild's space

  4. Complete thermodynamically consistent kinetic model of particle nucleation and growth: Numerical study of the applicability of the classical theory of homogeneous nucleation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chesnokov, Evgeni N.; Krasnoperov, Lev N.

    2007-04-01

    conclusion is particularly important for nucleation from supersaturated water vapor, since these processes for water molecules at and below the atmospheric pressure are in the low pressure limit, and the rate constants can be several orders of magnitude lower than the gas kinetic. In addition, the impact of the thermodynamic inconsistency of the previously developed partially reversible kinetic numerical models was assessed. At typical experimental conditions for water nucleation, S0=10 and Θ =10 (T=250K), the error in the particle nucleation rate introduced by the thermodynamic inconsistency exceeds one order of magnitude.

  5. Numerical study of an underground heat tube

    SciTech Connect

    Sulaiman, F.

    1989-01-01

    The energy consumption of the air-to-air heat pump can be reduced, especially in winter, by using the soil as a heat source. A system of buried tube through which air is passed, has great potential in supplying higher temperature air than the ambient air, to the outside heat exchanger of the heat pump. Heat transfer from the soil to the tube, including the possibility of formation of ice lenses around the tube, was investigated over a period of time in a cold season. Models of ice formation were developed in two types of tube, the circular tube and the square tube. Latent heat released due to the formation of ice were included in the models. Computer simulation utilizing finite difference equations were developed, using the explicit method, where forward differences were used in time and central differences were used in space. The numerical results show the effects of increasing the moisture content of the soil, increasing the air flow rate in the tube, and the release of latent heat when soil freezes. The formation of ice around the tube played a significant role in achieving a stabilized output air temperature at a short time.

  6. Numerical Modeling of Ocular Dysfunction in Space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nelson, Emily S.; Mulugeta, Lealem; Vera, J.; Myers, J. G.; Raykin, J.; Feola, A. J.; Gleason, R.; Samuels, B.; Ethier, C. R.

    2014-01-01

    Upon introduction to microgravity, the near-loss of hydrostatic pressure causes a marked cephalic (headward) shift of fluid in an astronaut's body. The fluid shift, along with other factors of spaceflight, induces a cascade of interdependent physiological responses which occur at varying time scales. Long-duration missions carry an increased risk for the development of the Visual Impairment and Intracranial Pressure (VIIP) syndrome, a spectrum of ophthalmic changes including posterior globe flattening, choroidal folds, distension of the optic nerve sheath, kinking of the optic nerve and potentially permanent degradation of visual function. In the cases of VIIP found to date, the initial onset of symptoms occurred after several weeks to several months of spaceflight, by which time the gross bodily fluid distribution is well established. We are developing a suite of numerical models to simulate the effects of fluid shift on the cardiovascular, central nervous and ocular systems. These models calculate the modified mean volumes, flow rates and pressures that are characteristic of the altered quasi-homeostatic state in microgravity, including intracranial and intraocular pressures. The results of the lumped models provide initial and boundary data to a 3D finite element biomechanics simulation of the globe, optic nerve head and retrobulbar subarachnoid space. The integrated set of models will be used to investigate the evolution of the biomechanical stress state in the ocular tissues due to long-term exposure to microgravity.

  7. Externally fed star formation: a numerical study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohammadpour, Motahareh; Stahler, Steven W.

    2013-08-01

    We investigate, through a series of numerical calculations, the evolution of dense cores that are accreting external gas up to and beyond the point of star formation. Our model clouds are spherical, unmagnetized configurations with fixed outer boundaries, across which gas enters subsonically. When we start with any near-equilibrium state, we find that the cloud's internal velocity also remains subsonic for an extended period, in agreement with observations. However, the velocity becomes supersonic shortly before the star forms. Consequently, the accretion rate building up the protostar is much greater than the benchmark value c_s^3/G, where cs is the sound speed in the dense core. This accretion spike would generate a higher luminosity than those seen in even the most embedded young stars. Moreover, we find that the region of supersonic infall surrounding the protostar races out to engulf much of the cloud, again in violation of the observations, which show infall to be spatially confined. Similar problematic results have been obtained by all other hydrodynamic simulations to date, regardless of the specific infall geometry or boundary conditions adopted. Low-mass star formation is evidently a quasi-static process, in which cloud gas moves inward subsonically until the birth of the star itself. We speculate that magnetic tension in the cloud's deep interior helps restrain the infall prior to this event.

  8. Numerical Modeling of Suspension HVOF Spray

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jadidi, M.; Moghtadernejad, S.; Dolatabadi, A.

    2016-02-01

    A three-dimensional two-way coupled Eulerian-Lagrangian scheme is used to simulate suspension high-velocity oxy-fuel spraying process. The mass, momentum, energy, and species equations are solved together with the realizable k-ɛ turbulence model to simulate the gas phase. Suspension is assumed to be a mixture of solid particles [mullite powder (3Al2O3·2SiO2)], ethanol, and ethylene glycol. The process involves premixed combustion of oxygen-propylene, and non-premixed combustion of oxygen-ethanol and oxygen-ethylene glycol. One-step global reaction is used for each mentioned reaction together with eddy dissipation model to compute the reaction rate. To simulate the droplet breakup, Taylor Analogy Breakup model is applied. After the completion of droplet breakup, and solvent evaporation/combustion, the solid suspended particles are tracked through the domain to determine the characteristics of the coating particles. Numerical simulations are validated against the experimental results in the literature for the same operating conditions. Seven or possibly eight shock diamonds are captured outside the nozzle. In addition, a good agreement between the predicted particle temperature, velocity, and diameter, and the experiment is obtained. It is shown that as the standoff distance increases, the particle temperature and velocity reduce. Furthermore, a correlation is proposed to determine the spray cross-sectional diameter and estimate the particle trajectories as a function of standoff distance.

  9. Numerical simulation of tulip flame dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Cloutman, L.D.

    1991-11-30

    A finite difference reactive flow hydrodynamics program based on the full Navier-Stokes equations was used to simulate the combustion process in a homogeneous-charge, constant-volume combustion bomb in which an oddly shaped flame, known as a tulip flame'' in the literature, occurred. The tulip flame'' was readily reproduced in the numerical simulations, producing good agreement with the experimental flame shapes and positions at various times. The calculations provide sufficient detail about the dynamics of the experiment to provide some insight into the physical mechanisms responsible for the peculiar flame shape. Several factors seem to contribute to the tulip formation. The most important process is the baroclinic production of vorticity by the flame front, and this rate of production appears to be dramatically increased by the nonaxial flow generated when the initial semicircular flame front burns out along the sides of the chamber. The vorticity produces a pair of vortices behind the flame that advects the flame into the tulip shape. Boundary layer effects contribute to the details of the flame shape next to the walls of the chamber, but are otherwise not important. 24 refs.

  10. Numerical simulation of tulip flame dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Cloutman, L.D.

    1991-11-30

    A finite difference reactive flow hydrodynamics program based on the full Navier-Stokes equations was used to simulate the combustion process in a homogeneous-charge, constant-volume combustion bomb in which an oddly shaped flame, known as a ``tulip flame`` in the literature, occurred. The ``tulip flame`` was readily reproduced in the numerical simulations, producing good agreement with the experimental flame shapes and positions at various times. The calculations provide sufficient detail about the dynamics of the experiment to provide some insight into the physical mechanisms responsible for the peculiar flame shape. Several factors seem to contribute to the tulip formation. The most important process is the baroclinic production of vorticity by the flame front, and this rate of production appears to be dramatically increased by the nonaxial flow generated when the initial semicircular flame front burns out along the sides of the chamber. The vorticity produces a pair of vortices behind the flame that advects the flame into the tulip shape. Boundary layer effects contribute to the details of the flame shape next to the walls of the chamber, but are otherwise not important. 24 refs.

  11. Recent deformation rates on Venus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grimm, Robert E.

    1994-11-01

    Constraints on the recent geological evolution of Venus may be provided by quantitative estimates of the rates of the principal resurfacing processes, volcanism and tectonism. This paper focuses on the latter, using impact craters as strain indicators. The total postimpact tectonic strain lies in the range 0.5-6.5%, which defines a recent mean strain rate of 10-18-10-17/s when divided by the mean surface age. Interpretation of the cratering record as one of pure production requires a decline in resurfacing rates at about 500 Ma (catastrophic resurfacing model). If distributed tectonic resurfacing contributed strongly before that time, as suggested by the widespread occurrence of tessera as inliers, the mean global strain rate must have been at least approximately 10-15/s, which is also typical of terrestrial active margins. Numerical calculations of the response of the lithosphere to inferred mantle convective forces were performed to test the hypothesis that a decrease in surface strain rate by at least two orders of magnitude could be caused by a steady decline in heat flow over the last billion years. Parameterized convection models predict that the mean global thermal gradient decreases by only about 5 K/km over this time; even with the exponential dependence of viscosity upon temperature, the surface strain rate drops by little more than one order of magnitude. Strongly unsteady cooling and very low thermal gradients today are necessary to satisfy the catastrophic model. An alternative, uniformitarian resurfacing hypothesis holds that Venus is resurfaced in quasi-random 'patches' several hundred kilometers in size that occur in response to changing mantle convection patterns.

  12. Selective impairment in manipulating Arabic numerals.

    PubMed

    Cipolotti, L; Warrington, E K; Butterworth, B

    1995-03-01

    This paper describes an acalculic patient (B.A.L.) with an unusual selective deficit in manipulating arabic numerals. The patient was unimpaired in reading aloud letters, words and written number names but unable to read aloud single arabic numerals. Furthermore, his ability to produce the next number in the sequence and his ability to produce answers to simple addition and subtraction was relatively spared when the stimuli were presented as number names but impaired when the stimuli were presented as arabic numerals. Using magnitude comparison tasks it was demonstrated that his knowledge of cardinal values of arabic numerals was preserved. His impairment in manipulating arabic numerals was interpreted in terms of a deficit in the connection between format specific number codes and the verbal numeral production system.

  13. Realization of small intrinsic hysteresis with large magnetic entropy change in La{sub 0.8}Pr{sub 0.2}(Fe{sub 0.88}Si{sub 0.10}Al{sub 0.02}){sub 13} by controlling itinerant-electron characteristics

    SciTech Connect

    Fujita, A.; Matsunami, D.; Yako, H.

    2014-03-24

    Tuning of phase-transition characteristics in La(Fe{sub x}Si{sub 1−x}){sub 13} was conducted in view of the correlation between microscopic itinerant electron natures and macroscopic thermodynamic (magnetocaloric) quantities. To realize a small hysteresis loss Q{sub H} accompanied by a large magnetic entropy change ΔS{sub M} in La(Fe{sub x}Si{sub 1−x}){sub 13}, two types of modulation based on itinerant electron characteristics, namely, the Fermi-level shift and the magnetovolume effect were combined by complex partial substitution of Al and Pr. Ab-initio calculations predict the reduction of a transition hysteresis owing to the Fermi-level shift after partial substitution of Al. On the other hand, the chemical pressure arisen from partial substitution of Pr enhances ΔS{sub M} through magnetovolume effect. The selective enhancement of ΔS{sub M} apart from Q{sub H} by the magnetovolume effect is well explained by the phenomenological Landau model. Consequently, ΔS{sub M} of La{sub 0.8}Pr{sub 0.2}(Fe{sub 0.88}Si{sub 0.10}Al{sub 0.02}){sub 13} is −18 J/kg K under a magnetic field change of 0–1.2 T, while the maximum value of Q{sub H} becomes 1/6 of that for La(Fe{sub 0.88}Si{sub 0.12}){sub 13}.

  14. Light-induced changes in magnetism in a coordination polymer heterostructure, Rb0.24Co[Fe(CN)6]0.74@K0.10Co[Cr(CN)6]0.70·nH2O and the role of the shell thickness on the properties of both core and shell.

    PubMed

    Risset, Olivia N; Quintero, Pedro A; Brinzari, Tatiana V; Andrus, Matthew J; Lufaso, Michael W; Meisel, Mark W; Talham, Daniel R

    2014-11-01

    Particles of formula Rb0.24Co[Fe(CN)6]0.74@K0.10Co[Cr(CN)6]0.70·nH2O with a light-responsive rubidium cobalt hexacyanoferrate (RbCoFe) core and a magnetic potassium cobalt hexacyanochromate (KCoCr) shell have been prepared and exhibit light-induced changes in the magnetization of the normally light-insensitive KCoCr shell, a new property resulting from the synergy between the core and shell of a coordination polymer heterostructure. A single batch of 135 ± 12 nm RbCoFe particles are used as seeds to generate three different core@shell samples, with KCoCr shell thicknesses of approximately 11, 23 and 37 nm, to probe the influence of the shell thickness over the particles' morphology and structural and magnetic properties. Synchrotron powder X-ray diffraction reveals that structural changes in the shell accompany the charge transfer induced spin transition (CTIST) of the core, giving direct evidence that the photomagnetic response of the shell is magnetomechanical in origin. The depth to which the KCoCr shell contributes to changes in magnetization is estimated to be approximately 24 nm when using a model that assumes a constant magnetic response of the core within the series of particles. In turn, the presence of the shell changes the nature of the CTIST of the core. As opposed to the usually observed first order transition exhibiting hysteresis, the CTIST becomes continuous in the core@shell particles.

  15. High-resolution spectroscopy of the {A}^{1}{\\rm{\\Pi }}(v^{\\prime} =0{--}10){--}{X}^{1}{{\\rm{\\Sigma }}}^{+}(v^{\\prime\\prime} =0) bands in 13C18O: term values, ro-vibrational oscillator strengths and Hönl–London corrections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lemaire, J. L.; Eidelsberg, M.; Heays, A. N.; Gavilan, L.; Federman, S. R.; Stark, G.; Lyons, J. R.; de Oliveira, N.; Joyeux, D.

    2016-08-01

    Our knowledge of astronomical environments containing CO depends on accurate molecular data to reproduce and interpret observations. The constant improvement in UV space instrumentation, both in sensitivity and resolution, requires increasingly detailed laboratory data. Following a long-term experimental campaign at the SOLEIL Synchrotron facility, we have acquired complete datasets on the CO isotopologues in the vacuum ultraviolet. Absorption spectra were recorded using the Fourier-transform spectrometer installed on the DESIRS beamline, providing a resolving power R > 106 in the 8–12 eV range. Such resolution allows the analysis of individual line positions and strengths in electronic transitions and the location of perturbations. We continue our previous work on A–X bands of 12C16O and 13C16O, reporting here measurements for the 13C18O isotopologue. Gas column densities in the differentially-pumped system were calibrated using the B {}1{{{Σ }}}+–X {}1{{{Σ }}}+({v}\\prime =0,v\\prime\\prime =0) band. Absorption bands are analyzed by synthesizing line and band profiles and fitting them to measured spectra. New results for A {}1{{\\Pi }}({v}\\prime =0{--}10)–X {}1{{{Σ }}}+(v\\prime\\prime =0) bands include precise line assignments, term values, band-integrated oscillator strengths as well as individual ro-vibrational oscillator strengths and Hönl–London corrections. For ({v}\\prime =1) our results are compared with earlier studies. The interpretation of mixed perturbing bands, complementing an earlier study, is also presented as well as precise line assignments and term values for the B {}1{{{Σ }}}+–X {}1{{{Σ }}}+(0–0) band calibrator, and the nearby B–X (1–0) and C {}1{{{Σ }}}+–X {}1{{{Σ }}}+(0–0) bands.

  16. Light-induced changes in magnetism in a coordination polymer heterostructure, Rb0.24Co[Fe(CN)6]0.74@K0.10Co[Cr(CN)6]0.70·nH2O and the role of the shell thickness on the properties of both core and shell.

    PubMed

    Risset, Olivia N; Quintero, Pedro A; Brinzari, Tatiana V; Andrus, Matthew J; Lufaso, Michael W; Meisel, Mark W; Talham, Daniel R

    2014-11-01

    Particles of formula Rb0.24Co[Fe(CN)6]0.74@K0.10Co[Cr(CN)6]0.70·nH2O with a light-responsive rubidium cobalt hexacyanoferrate (RbCoFe) core and a magnetic potassium cobalt hexacyanochromate (KCoCr) shell have been prepared and exhibit light-induced changes in the magnetization of the normally light-insensitive KCoCr shell, a new property resulting from the synergy between the core and shell of a coordination polymer heterostructure. A single batch of 135 ± 12 nm RbCoFe particles are used as seeds to generate three different core@shell samples, with KCoCr shell thicknesses of approximately 11, 23 and 37 nm, to probe the influence of the shell thickness over the particles' morphology and structural and magnetic properties. Synchrotron powder X-ray diffraction reveals that structural changes in the shell accompany the charge transfer induced spin transition (CTIST) of the core, giving direct evidence that the photomagnetic response of the shell is magnetomechanical in origin. The depth to which the KCoCr shell contributes to changes in magnetization is estimated to be approximately 24 nm when using a model that assumes a constant magnetic response of the core within the series of particles. In turn, the presence of the shell changes the nature of the CTIST of the core. As opposed to the usually observed first order transition exhibiting hysteresis, the CTIST becomes continuous in the core@shell particles. PMID:25286151

  17. Numerical Simulations of Granular Processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richardson, Derek C.; Michel, Patrick; Schwartz, Stephen R.; Ballouz, Ronald-Louis; Yu, Yang; Matsumura, Soko

    2014-11-01

    Spacecraft images and indirect observations including thermal inertia measurements indicate most small bodies have surface regolith. Evidence of granular flow is also apparent in the images. This material motion occurs in very low gravity, therefore in a completely different gravitational environment than on the Earth. Understanding and modeling these motions can aid in the interpretation of imaged surface features that may exhibit signatures of constituent material properties. Also, upcoming sample-return missions to small bodies, and possible future manned missions, will involve interaction with the surface regolith, so it is important to develop tools to predict the surface response. We have added new capabilities to the parallelized N-body gravity tree code pkdgrav [1,2] that permit the simulation of granular dynamics, including multi-contact physics and friction forces, using the soft-sphere discrete-element method [3]. The numerical approach has been validated through comparison with laboratory experiments (e.g., [3,4]). Ongoing and recently completed projects include: impacts into granular materials using different projectile shapes [5]; possible tidal resurfacing of asteroid Apophis during its 2029 encounter [6]; the Brazil-nut effect in low gravity [7]; and avalanche modeling.Acknowledgements: DCR acknowledges NASA (grants NNX08AM39G, NNX10AQ01G, NNX12AG29G) and NSF (AST1009579). PM acknowledges the French agency CNES. SRS works on the NEOShield Project funded under the European Commission’s FP7 program agreement No. 282703. SM acknowledges support from the Center for Theory and Computation at U Maryland and the Dundee Fellowship at U Dundee. Most simulations were performed using the YORP cluster in the Dept. of Astronomy at U Maryland and on the Deepthought High-Performance Computing Cluster at U Maryland.References: [1] Richardson, D.C. et al. 2000, Icarus 143, 45; [2] Stadel, J. 2001, Ph.D. Thesis, U Washington; [3] Schwartz, S.R. et al. 2012, Gran

  18. Numerical Models of Ophiolite Genesis and Obduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guilmette, C.; Beaumont, C.; Jamieson, R.

    2013-12-01

    Ophiolites are relics of oceanic lithosphere tectonically emplaced in continental settings. They are diagnostic features of continental suture zones, where they mark past plate boundaries. Even after having been studied for more than 40 years, the mechanisms involved in the genesis and subsequent obduction of ophiolites over continental margins are still debated. We present the results of 2D thermal-mechanical numerical models that successfully reproduce characteristics of natural examples like the Semail, Bay of Islands, Yarlung-Zangbo, and Coast Range ophiolites. The numerical models are upper mantle scale and use pressure-, temperature- and strain-dependent viscous-plastic rheologies. Both divergent and convergent velocity boundary conditions are used and tectonic boundary forces are monitored. The models start with the rifting of a stable continent, followed by development of an ocean ridge and accretion of oceanic lithosphere at a total rate of 3 cm/y. Once a specified ocean size/age is achieved, the velocity boundary conditions are reversed leading to convergence and the spontaneous inception of a suduction zone at the mid-ocean ridge. We present results for models including different ages of oceans (40 to 90 Ma) and different convergence velocities (5 to 15 cm/y). The interaction between the lower plate passive margin and the oceanic upper plate results in 5 different tectonic styles. These differ mainly by the presence or absence of oceanic spreading in the upper plate (back-arc basin), leading to supra-subduction zone ophiolites vs. MORB-type, and by the behaviour of the oceanic slab, e.g., slab rollback vs. breakoff. The evolution of effective slab pull is interpreted to be the major control on the resulting tectonic style. Low effective slab pull models (young oceans and fast convergence rates) fail to obduct an ophiolite. Strong effective slab pull models (old oceans and lower convergence rates) result in subduction zone retreat and spontaneous oceanic

  19. Rating Movies and Rating the Raters Who Rate Them

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Hua; Lange, Kenneth

    2010-01-01

    The movie distribution company Netflix has generated considerable buzz in the statistics community by offering a million dollar prize for improvements to its movie rating system. Among the statisticians and computer scientists who have disclosed their techniques, the emphasis has been on machine learning approaches. This article has the modest goal of discussing a simple model for movie rating and other forms of democratic rating. Because the model involves a large number of parameters, it is nontrivial to carry out maximum likelihood estimation. Here we derive a straightforward EM algorithm from the perspective of the more general MM algorithm. The algorithm is capable of finding the global maximum on a likelihood landscape littered with inferior modes. We apply two variants of the model to a dataset from the MovieLens archive and compare their results. Our model identifies quirky raters, redefines the raw rankings, and permits imputation of missing ratings. The model is intended to stimulate discussion and development of better theory rather than to win the prize. It has the added benefit of introducing readers to some of the issues connected with analyzing high-dimensional data. PMID:20802818

  20. Rating Movies and Rating the Raters Who Rate Them.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Hua; Lange, Kenneth

    2009-11-01

    The movie distribution company Netflix has generated considerable buzz in the statistics community by offering a million dollar prize for improvements to its movie rating system. Among the statisticians and computer scientists who have disclosed their techniques, the emphasis has been on machine learning approaches. This article has the modest goal of discussing a simple model for movie rating and other forms of democratic rating. Because the model involves a large number of parameters, it is nontrivial to carry out maximum likelihood estimation. Here we derive a straightforward EM algorithm from the perspective of the more general MM algorithm. The algorithm is capable of finding the global maximum on a likelihood landscape littered with inferior modes. We apply two variants of the model to a dataset from the MovieLens archive and compare their results. Our model identifies quirky raters, redefines the raw rankings, and permits imputation of missing ratings. The model is intended to stimulate discussion and development of better theory rather than to win the prize. It has the added benefit of introducing readers to some of the issues connected with analyzing high-dimensional data.

  1. Spurious Numerical Solutions Of Differential Equations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lafon, A.; Yee, H. C.

    1995-01-01

    Paper presents detailed study of spurious steady-state numerical solutions of differential equations that contain nonlinear source terms. Main objectives of this study are (1) to investigate how well numerical steady-state solutions of model nonlinear reaction/convection boundary-value problem mimic true steady-state solutions and (2) to relate findings of this investigation to implications for interpretation of numerical results from computational-fluid-dynamics algorithms and computer codes used to simulate reacting flows.

  2. The Geometric Grids of the Hieratic Numeral.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aboulfotouh, Hossam M. K.

    The paper discusses the geometrical designs of the hieratic numeral signs. It shows the regular-grid-patterns of squares upon which, the shapes of the already decoded hieratic numeral-signs, have been designed. Also, it shows the design of some hieratic numeral signs, based on subdividing the circle; and the hieratic signs of modular notation. It might reveal the basic geometrical level of understanding of anonymous ancient Egyptians who designed them some four thousand years ago.

  3. Numerical Modeling of Plasmas in which Nanoparticles Nucleate and Grow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agarwal, Pulkit

    Dusty plasmas refer to a broad category of plasmas. Plasmas such as argon-silane plasmas in which particles nucleate and grow are widely used in semiconductor processing and nanoparticle manufacturing. In such dusty plasmas, the plasma and the dust particles are strongly coupled to each other. This means that the presence of dust particles significantly affects the plasma properties and vice versa. Therefore such plasmas are highly complex and they involve several interesting phenomena like nucleation, growth, coagulation, charging and transport. Dusty plasma afterglow is equally complex and important. Especially, residual charge on dust particles carries special significance in several industrial and laboratory situations and it has not been well understood. A 1D numerical model was developed of a low-pressure capacitively-coupled plasma in which nanoparticles nucleate and grow. Polydispersity of particle size distributions can be important in such plasmas. Sectional method, which is well known in aerosol literature, was used to model the evolving particle size and charge distribution. The numerical model is transient and one-dimensional and self consistently accounts for nucleation, growth, coagulation, charging and transport of dust particles and their effect on plasma properties. Nucleation and surface growth rates were treated as input parameters. Results were presented in terms of particle size and charge distribution with an emphasis on importance of polydispersity in particle growth and dynamics. Results of numerical model were compared with experimental measurements of light scattering and light emission from plasma. Reasonable qualitative agreement was found with some discrepancies. Pulsed dusty plasma can be important for controlling particle production and/or unwanted particle deposition. In this case, it is important to understand the behavior of the particle cloud during the afterglow following plasma turn-off. Numerical model was modified to self

  4. Numerical tools for atomistic simulations.

    SciTech Connect

    Fang, H.; Gullett, Philip Michael; Slepoy, Alexander; Horstemeyer, Mark F.; Baskes, Michael I.; Wagner, Gregory John; Li, Mo

    2004-01-01

    The final report for a Laboratory Directed Research and Development project entitled 'Parallel Atomistic Computing for Failure Analysis of Micromachines' is presented. In this project, atomistic algorithms for parallel computers were developed to assist in quantification of microstructure-property relations related to weapon micro-components. With these and other serial computing tools, we are performing atomistic simulations of various sizes, geometries, materials, and boundary conditions. These tools provide the capability to handle the different size-scale effects required to predict failure. Nonlocal continuum models have been proposed to address this problem; however, they are phenomenological in nature and are difficult to validate for micro-scale components. Our goal is to separately quantify damage nucleation, growth, and coalescence mechanisms to provide a basis for macro-scale continuum models that will be used for micromachine design. Because micro-component experiments are difficult, a systematic computational study that employs Monte Carlo methods, molecular statics, and molecular dynamics (EAM and MEAM) simulations to compute continuum quantities will provide mechanism-property relations associated with the following parameters: specimen size, number of grains, crystal orientation, strain rates, temperature, defect nearest neighbor distance, void/crack size, chemical state, and stress state. This study will quantify sizescale effects from nanometers to microns in terms of damage progression and thus potentially allow for optimized micro-machine designs that are more reliable and have higher fidelity in terms of strength. In order to accomplish this task, several atomistic methods needed to be developed and evaluated to cover the range of defects, strain rates, temperatures, and sizes that a material may see in micro-machines. Therefore we are providing a complete set of tools for large scale atomistic simulations that include pre-processing of

  5. Numerical investigation of transitional compressible plane wakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harris, Paul Jeffrey

    Air flow in the wake region of a two-dimensional (plane) body with a blunt base has been studied using numerical simulations. The objective of this study is (1) to observe the behavior of large dynamic structures in the plane wake at several Mach numbers from low (almost incompressible) up to M = 2.46 and examine their effect on the base pressure, and (2) to address the nature of the instability in the shear layers bounding the wake flow at M = 2.46 and observe the structures that arise from this instability. A code was developed for this study which solves the compressible Navier-Stokes equations in two or three dimensions. This code may be used for either Direct Numerical Simulations (DNS) or Large Eddy Simulations (LES). A spatial model is used, with the computational domain arranged around the trailing edge of a two-dimensional flat plate with a blunt base. Two-dimensional simulations were carried out at Mach numbers of M = 0.25, M = 1.20, and M = 2.46. At all Mach numbers, the flow was found to be unstable with respect to sinuous (antisymmetric) disturbances, with the critical Reynolds number increasing with increasing Mach number. These disturbances grow to a periodic state, and a Karman vortex street is formed. Examination of the supersonic cases revealed that expansion fans in the flow at the corners are the primary cause of the low base pressure, and that disruptions in the expansions raise the base pressure. At M = 2.46 and Reynolds numbers starting at Re = 100, 000, an intermittent shear layer instability was also found, excited by sinuous disturbances. The two instability 2 modes interact to produce a chaotic behavior. Above Re = 200, 000, the shear layer instability appears close to the base without sinuous disturbances, forming rows of vortices in the shear layers. Preliminary three-dimensional simulations were carried out at M = 2.46, examining the variation in the growth rate of three-dimensional disturbances with spanwise wavelength.

  6. Probabilistic numerics and uncertainty in computations

    PubMed Central

    Hennig, Philipp; Osborne, Michael A.; Girolami, Mark

    2015-01-01

    We deliver a call to arms for probabilistic numerical methods: algorithms for numerical tasks, including linear algebra, integration, optimization and solving differential equations, that return uncertainties in their calculations. Such uncertainties, arising from the loss of precision induced by numerical calculation with limited time or hardware, are important for much contemporary science and industry. Within applications such as climate science and astrophysics, the need to make decisions on the basis of computations with large and complex data have led to a renewed focus on the management of numerical uncertainty. We describe how several seminal classic numerical methods can be interpreted naturally as probabilistic inference. We then show that the probabilistic view suggests new algorithms that can flexibly be adapted to suit application specifics, while delivering improved empirical performance. We provide concrete illustrations of the benefits of probabilistic numeric algorithms on real scientific problems from astrometry and astronomical imaging, while highlighting open problems with these new algorithms. Finally, we describe how probabilistic numerical methods provide a coherent framework for identifying the uncertainty in calculations performed with a combination of numerical algorithms (e.g. both numerical optimizers and differential equation solvers), potentially allowing the diagnosis (and control) of error sources in computations. PMID:26346321

  7. Nonlinear dynamics and numerical uncertainties in CFD

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yee, H. C.; Sweby, P. K.

    1996-01-01

    The application of nonlinear dynamics to improve the understanding of numerical uncertainties in computational fluid dynamics (CFD) is reviewed. Elementary examples in the use of dynamics to explain the nonlinear phenomena and spurious behavior that occur in numerics are given. The role of dynamics in the understanding of long time behavior of numerical integrations and the nonlinear stability, convergence, and reliability of using time-marching, approaches for obtaining steady-state numerical solutions in CFD is explained. The study is complemented with spurious behavior observed in CFD computations.

  8. Rocket Engine Numerical Simulator (RENS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davidian, Kenneth O.

    1997-01-01

    Work is being done at three universities to help today's NASA engineers use the knowledge and experience of their Apolloera predecessors in designing liquid rocket engines. Ground-breaking work is being done in important subject areas to create a prototype of the most important functions for the Rocket Engine Numerical Simulator (RENS). The goal of RENS is to develop an interactive, realtime application that engineers can utilize for comprehensive preliminary propulsion system design functions. RENS will employ computer science and artificial intelligence research in knowledge acquisition, computer code parallelization and objectification, expert system architecture design, and object-oriented programming. In 1995, a 3year grant from the NASA Lewis Research Center was awarded to Dr. Douglas Moreman and Dr. John Dyer of Southern University at Baton Rouge, Louisiana, to begin acquiring knowledge in liquid rocket propulsion systems. Resources of the University of West Florida in Pensacola were enlisted to begin the process of enlisting knowledge from senior NASA engineers who are recognized experts in liquid rocket engine propulsion systems. Dr. John Coffey of the University of West Florida is utilizing his expertise in interviewing and concept mapping techniques to encode, classify, and integrate information obtained through personal interviews. The expertise extracted from the NASA engineers has been put into concept maps with supporting textual, audio, graphic, and video material. A fundamental concept map was delivered by the end of the first year of work and the development of maps containing increasing amounts of information is continuing. Find out more information about this work at the Southern University/University of West Florida. In 1996, the Southern University/University of West Florida team conducted a 4day group interview with a panel of five experts to discuss failures of the RL10 rocket engine in conjunction with the Centaur launch vehicle. The

  9. Theoretical and numerical predictions of hypervelocity impact-generated plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Jianqiao; Song, Weidong Ning, Jianguo

    2014-08-15

    The hypervelocity impact generated plasmas (HVIGP) in thermodynamic non-equilibrium state were theoretically analyzed, and a physical model was presented to explore the relationship between plasma ionization degree and internal energy of the system by a group of equations including a chemical reaction equilibrium equation, a chemical reaction rate equation, and an energy conservation equation. A series of AUTODYN 3D (a widely used software in dynamic numerical simulations and developed by Century Dynamic Inc.) numerical simulations of the impacts of hypervelocity Al projectile on its targets at different incident angles were performed. The internal energy and the material density obtained from the numerical simulations were then used to calculate the ionization degree and the electron temperature. Based on a self-developed 2D smooth particle hydrodynamic (SPH) code and the theoretical model, the plasmas generated by 6 hypervelocity impacts were directly simulated and their total charges were calculated. The numerical results are in good agreements with the experimental results as well as the empirical formulas, demonstrating that the theoretical model is justified by the AUTODYN 3D and self-developed 2D SPH simulations and applicable to predict HVIGPs. The study is of significance for astrophysical and cosmonautic researches and safety.

  10. Sequential analysis of the numerical Stroop effect reveals response suppression.

    PubMed

    Cohen Kadosh, Roi; Gevers, Wim; Notebaert, Wim

    2011-09-01

    Automatic processing of irrelevant stimulus dimensions has been demonstrated in a variety of tasks. Previous studies have shown that conflict between relevant and irrelevant dimensions can be reduced when a feature of the irrelevant dimension is repeated. The specific level at which the automatic process is suppressed (e.g., perceptual repetition, response repetition), however, is less understood. In the current experiment we used the numerical Stroop paradigm, in which the processing of irrelevant numerical values of 2 digits interferes with the processing of their physical size, to pinpoint the precise level of the suppression. Using a sequential analysis, we dissociated perceptual repetition from response repetition of the relevant and irrelevant dimension. Our analyses of reaction times, error rates, and diffusion modeling revealed that the congruity effect is significantly reduced or even absent when the response sequence of the irrelevant dimension, rather than the numerical value or the physical size, is repeated. These results suggest that automatic activation of the irrelevant dimension is suppressed at the response level. The current results shed light on the level of interaction between numerical magnitude and physical size as well as the effect of variability of responses and stimuli on automatic processing.

  11. Numerical investigation of fluid flow in a chandler loop.

    PubMed

    Touma, Hisham; Sahin, Iskender; Gaamangwe, Tidimogo; Gorbet, Maud B; Peterson, Sean D

    2014-07-01

    The Chandler loop is an artificial circulatory platform for in vitro hemodynamic experiments. In most experiments, the working fluid is subjected to a strain rate field via rotation of the Chandler loop, which, in turn, induces biochemical responses of the suspended cells. For low rotation rates, the strain rate field can be approximated using laminar flow in a straight tube. However, as the rotation rate increases, the effect of the tube curvature causes significant deviation from the laminar straight tube approximation. In this manuscript, we investigate the flow and associated strain rate field of an incompressible Newtonian fluid in a Chandler loop as a function of the governing nondimensional parameters. Analytical estimates of the strain rate from a perturbation solution for pressure driven steady flow in a curved tube suggest that the strain rate should increase with Dean number, which is proportional to the tangential velocity of the rotating tube, and the radius to radius of curvature ratio of the loop. Parametrically varying the rotation rate, tube geometry, and fill ratio of the loop show that strain rate can actually decrease with Dean number. We show that this is due to the nonlinear relationship between the tube rotation rate and height difference between the two menisci in the rotating tube, which provides the driving pressure gradient. An alternative Dean number is presented to naturally incorporate the fill ratio and collapse the numerical data. Using this modified Dean number, we propose an empirical formula for predicting the average fluid strain rate magnitude that is valid over a much wider parameter range than the more restrictive straight tube-based prediction. PMID:24686927

  12. Retrieval, Analysis, and Display of Numeric Data.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berger, Mary C.; Wanger, Judith

    1982-01-01

    This introduction to online numeric database systems describes the types of databases associated with such systems, shows the major functions which they can perform (retrieval, analysis, display), and identifies the major characteristics of user interfaces. Examples of numeric database use are appended. (EJS)

  13. Intersensory Redundancy Accelerates Preverbal Numerical Competence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jordan, Kerry E.; Suanda, Sumarga H.; Brannon, Elizabeth M.

    2008-01-01

    Intersensory redundancy can facilitate animal and human behavior in areas as diverse as rhythm discrimination, signal detection, orienting responses, maternal call learning, and associative learning. In the realm of numerical development, infants show similar sensitivity to numerical differences in both the visual and auditory modalities. Using a…

  14. Nonclassicality thresholds for multiqubit states: Numerical analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Gruca, Jacek; Zukowski, Marek; Laskowski, Wieslaw; Kiesel, Nikolai; Wieczorek, Witlef; Weinfurter, Harald; Schmid, Christian

    2010-07-15

    States that strongly violate Bell's inequalities are required in many quantum-informational protocols as, for example, in cryptography, secret sharing, and the reduction of communication complexity. We investigate families of such states with a numerical method which allows us to reveal nonclassicality even without direct knowledge of Bell's inequalities for the given problem. An extensive set of numerical results is presented and discussed.

  15. Numerical Integration: One Step at a Time

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yang, Yajun; Gordon, Sheldon P.

    2016-01-01

    This article looks at the effects that adding a single extra subdivision has on the level of accuracy of some common numerical integration routines. Instead of automatically doubling the number of subdivisions for a numerical integration rule, we investigate what happens with a systematic method of judiciously selecting one extra subdivision for…

  16. Verbal Interference Suppresses Exact Numerical Representation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Frank, Michael C.; Fedorenko, Evelina; Lai, Peter; Saxe, Rebecca; Gibson, Edward

    2012-01-01

    Language for number is an important case study of the relationship between language and cognition because the mechanisms of non-verbal numerical cognition are well-understood. When the Piraha (an Amazonian hunter-gatherer tribe who have no exact number words) are tested in non-verbal numerical tasks, they are able to perform one-to-one matching…

  17. Numerical experiments on the theta pinch

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Volosevich, P. P.; Zukakishyili, G. G.

    1979-01-01

    Numerical calculation of theta pinch problems are presented. Physical processes in theta pinch systems are considered in a one dimensional, two temperature magnetohydrodynamic, approximation with allowance for end losses by longitudinal heat conductivity. The numerical calculations are compared with results of earlier experiments.

  18. Pure Left Neglect for Arabic Numerals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Priftis, Konstantinos; Albanese, Silvia; Meneghello, Francesca; Pitteri, Marco

    2013-01-01

    Arabic numerals are diffused and language-free representations of number magnitude. To be effectively processed, the digits composing Arabic numerals must be spatially arranged along a left-to-right axis. We studied one patient (AK) to show that left neglect, after right hemisphere damage, can selectively impair the computation of the spatial…

  19. NUMERICAL NOISE PM SIMULATION IN CMAQ

    EPA Science Inventory

    We have found that numerical noise in the latest release of CMAQ using the yamo advection scheme when compiled on Linux cluster with pgf90 (5.0 or 6.0). We recommend to use -C option to eliminate the numerical noise.

  20. An Integrative Theory of Numerical Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Siegler, Robert; Lortie-Forgues, Hugues

    2014-01-01

    Understanding of numerical development is growing rapidly, but the volume and diversity of findings can make it difficult to perceive any coherence in the process. The integrative theory of numerical development posits that a coherent theme is present, however--progressive broadening of the set of numbers whose magnitudes can be accurately…

  1. Pure Left Neglect for Arabic Numerals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Priftis, Konstantinos; Albanese, Silvia; Meneghello, Francesca; Pitteri, Marco

    2013-01-01

    Arabic numerals are diffused and language-free representations of number magnitude. To be effectively processed, the digits composing Arabic numerals must be spatially arranged along a left-to-right axis. We studied one patient (AK) to show that left neglect, after right hemisphere damage, can selectively impair the computation of the spatial…

  2. Numerical simulations of cryogenic cavitating flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Hyunji; Kim, Hyeongjun; Min, Daeho; Kim, Chongam

    2015-12-01

    The present study deals with a numerical method for cryogenic cavitating flows. Recently, we have developed an accurate and efficient baseline numerical scheme for all-speed water-gas two-phase flows. By extending such progress, we modify the numerical dissipations to be properly scaled so that it does not show any deficiencies in low Mach number regions. For dealing with cryogenic two-phase flows, previous EOS-dependent shock discontinuity sensing term is replaced with a newly designed EOS-free one. To validate the proposed numerical method, cryogenic cavitating flows around hydrofoil are computed and the pressure and temperature depression effect in cryogenic cavitation are demonstrated. Compared with Hord's experimental data, computed results are turned out to be satisfactory. Afterwards, numerical simulations of flow around KARI turbopump inducer in liquid rocket are carried out under various flow conditions with water and cryogenic fluids, and the difference in inducer flow physics depending on the working fluids are examined.

  3. Numerical model representation and validation strategies

    SciTech Connect

    Dolin, R.M.; Hefele, J.

    1997-10-01

    This paper describes model representation and validation strategies for use in numerical tools that define models in terms of topology, geometry, or topography. Examples of such tools include Computer-Assisted Engineering (CAE), Computer-Assisted Manufacturing (CAM), Finite Element Analysis (FEA), and Virtual Environment Simulation (VES) tools. These tools represent either physical objects or conceptual ideas using numerical models for the purpose of posing a question, performing a task, or generating information. Dependence on these numerical representations require that models be precise, consistent across different applications, and verifiable. This paper describes a strategy for ensuring precise, consistent, and verifiable numerical model representations in a topographic framework. The main assertion put forth is that topographic model descriptions are more appropriate for numerical applications than topological or geometrical descriptions. A topographic model verification and validation methodology is presented.

  4. The Validity of Reading Comprehension Rate: Reading Speed, Comprehension, and Comprehension Rates

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Skinner, Christopher H.; Williams, Jacqueline L.; Morrow, Jennifer Ann; Hale, Andre D.; Neddenriep, Christine E.; Hawkins, Renee O.

    2009-01-01

    This article describes a secondary analysis of a brief reading comprehension rate measure, percent comprehension questions correct per minute spent reading (%C/M). This measure includes reading speed (seconds to read) in the denominator and percentage of comprehension questions answered correctly in the numerator. Participants were 22 4th-, 29…

  5. Electrohydraulic forming of dual phase steels; numerical and experimental work

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hassannejadasl, Amir; Green, Daniel E.; Golovashchenko, Sergey F.

    2013-12-01

    Electrohydraulic Forming (EHF) is a high velocity forming process, in which the strain-rate in the sheet metal can reach very high values depending on the prescribed input energy, the chamber geometry, the die geometry, instrumentation efficiency and the mechanical properties of the sheet material. In EHF, a high voltage discharge between electrodes that are submerged in a water-filled chamber generates a plasma channel that leads to propagation of a shockwave through the water that forms the sheet, with or without a die, in less than a millisecond. EHF generates a complex pressure pulse history that is extremely challenging to simulate. In this work, three-dimensional finite element simulations of DP590 sheet were completed in free-forming (EHFF) and die-forming (EHDF) conditions using ABAQUS/Explicit and a combination of Eulerian and Lagrangian elements. The Johnson-Cook constitutive plasticity model was selected and the parameters were calibrated based on uniaxial tensile test data at different strain-rates. A comprehensive numerical study was carried out with a view to understanding the differences between EHFF and EHDF in terms of the history of the deformation profile of the specimen, the strain-rate history, the loading path and through-thickness stresses. Higher strain-rates and more complex strain-paths were predicted in EHDF compared to EHFF due to dynamic sheet/die interaction. Good correlation between the experimental and numerical results demonstrated the ability of numerical models to accurately predict the history of the deformation profile in both EHDF and EHFF conditions.

  6. Eulerian-Lagrangian numerical scheme for simulating advection, dispersion, and transient storage in streams and a comparison of numerical methods

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cox, T.J.; Runkel, R.L.

    2008-01-01

    Past applications of one-dimensional advection, dispersion, and transient storage zone models have almost exclusively relied on a central differencing, Eulerian numerical approximation to the nonconservative form of the fundamental equation. However, there are scenarios where this approach generates unacceptable error. A new numerical scheme for this type of modeling is presented here that is based on tracking Lagrangian control volumes across a fixed (Eulerian) grid. Numerical tests are used to provide a direct comparison of the new scheme versus nonconservative Eulerian numerical methods, in terms of both accuracy and mass conservation. Key characteristics of systems for which the Lagrangian scheme performs better than the Eulerian scheme include: nonuniform flow fields, steep gradient plume fronts, and pulse and steady point source loadings in advection-dominated systems. A new analytical derivation is presented that provides insight into the loss of mass conservation in the nonconservative Eulerian scheme. This derivation shows that loss of mass conservation in the vicinity of spatial flow changes is directly proportional to the lateral inflow rate and the change in stream concentration due to the inflow. While the nonconservative Eulerian scheme has clearly worked well for past published applications, it is important for users to be aware of the scheme's limitations. ?? 2008 ASCE.

  7. Target Heart Rate Calculator

    MedlinePlus

    ... My Saved Articles » My ACS » + - Text Size Target Heart Rate Calculator Compute your best workout Enter your age ... is your age? years. How to Check Your Heart Rate Right after you stop exercising, take your pulse: ...

  8. Numerical Modeling of the Stability of Face-Centered Cubic Metals with High Vacancy Concentration

    SciTech Connect

    Brian P. Somerday; M. I. Baskes

    1998-12-01

    The objective of this research is to assess the possibility of forming an atomically porous structure in a low-density metal, e.g., Al with vacancies up to 0.20/lattice site; and to examine the effects of hydrogen and vacancy concentration on the stability of an atomically porous structure that has been experimentally produced in nickel. The approach involves numerical modeling using the Embedded-Atom Method (EAM). High vacancy concentrations cause the Al lattice to disorder at 300K. In contrast, Ni retains the face-centered-cubic structure at 300K for vacancy concentrations up to 0.15 Vac/lattice site. Unexpectedly, the lattice with 0.15 Vac/lattice site is more stable than the lattice with 0.10 or 0.20 Vac/lattice site. The Ni systems with 0.10 and 0.15 Vac/lattice site exhibit domains consisting of uniform lattice rotations. The Ni lattice with 0.15 Vac/lattice site is more stable with an initial distribution of random vacancies compared to ordered vacancies. The equilibrium lattice structures of Ni a d Al containing vacancies and H are less ordered to structures with vacancies only at 300K.

  9. Numerical study of the ZnO growth by MOCVD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tena-Zaera, R.; Zúñiga-Pérez, J.; Martínez-Tomás, C.; Muñoz-Sanjosé, V.

    2004-03-01

    In order to analyze the growth of zinc oxide by metalorganic chemical vapor deposition, a numerical model has been developed to simulate the gas flow in a horizontal reactor. A two-inlet system, one for the Zn precursor and the other for the oxygen one, has been studied in the framework of this numerical simulation. This model takes into account the momentum conservation equation coupled with the heat transfer and mass transport of chemical species. Different Zn precursors, DiethylZinc (DEZn), DimethylZinc (DMZn) and DimethylZinc-TriethylAmine (DMZn-TEA) and oxygen precursors, ( tert-butanol, iso-propanol and acetone) as well as carrier gases (H 2 and N 2) have been considered. The effects of simulated experimental conditions on the fluid dynamics inside the reactor and, consequently, on the growth rate of ZnO layers have been analyzed.

  10. Algebraic multilevel preconditioning in isogeometric analysis: Construction and numerical studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gahalaut, K. P. S.; Tomar, S. K.; Kraus, J. K.

    2013-11-01

    We present algebraic multilevel iteration (AMLI) methods for isogeometric discretization of scalar second order elliptic problems. The construction of coarse grid operators and hierarchical complementary operators are given. Moreover, for a uniform mesh on a unit interval, the explicit representation of B-spline basis functions for a fixed mesh size $h$ is given for $p=2,3,4$ and for $C^{0}$- and $C^{p-1}$-continuity. The presented methods show $h$- and (almost) $p$-independent convergence rates. Supporting numerical results for convergence factor and iterations count for AMLI cycles ($V$-, linear $W$-, nonlinear $W$-) are provided. Numerical tests are performed, in two-dimensions on square domain and quarter annulus, and in three-dimensions on quarter thick ring.

  11. Numerical and experimental study of rotating jet flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shin, Seungwon; Che, Zhizhao; Kahouadji, Lyes; Matar, Omar; Chergui, Jalel; Juric, Damir

    2015-11-01

    Rotating jets are investigated through experimental measurements and numerical simulations. The experiments are performed on a rotating jet rig and the effects of a range of parameters controlling the liquid jet are investigated, e.g. jet flow rate, rotation speed, jet diameter, etc. Different regimes of the jet morphology are identified, and the dependence on several dimensionless numbers is studied, e.g. Reynolds number, Weber number, etc. The breakup process of droplets is visualized through high speed imaging. Full three-dimensional direct numerical simulations are performed using BLUE, a massively parallel two-phase flow code. The novel interface algorithms in BLUE track the gas-liquid interface through a wide dynamic range including ligament formation, break up and rupture. EPSRC Programme Grant, MEMPHIS, EP/K0039761/1.

  12. Numerical Estimation of the Curvature of Biological Surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Todd, P. H.

    1985-01-01

    Many biological systems may profitably be studied as surface phenomena. A model consisting of isotropic growth of a curved surface from a flat sheet is assumed. With such a model, the Gaussian curvature of the final surface determines whether growth rate of the surface is subharmonic or superharmonic. These properties correspond to notions of convexity and concavity, and thus to local excess growth and local deficiency of growth. In biological models where the major factors controlling surface growth are intrinsic to the surface, researchers thus gained from geometrical study information on the differential growth undergone by the surface. These ideas were applied to an analysis of the folding of the cerebral cortex, a geometrically rather complex surface growth. A numerical surface curvature technique based on an approximation to the Dupin indicatrix of the surface was developed. A metric for comparing curvature estimates is introduced, and considerable numerical testing indicated the reliability of this technique.

  13. Numerical simulation of viscous cavitating flow around a ship propeller

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Zhi-Feng; Fang, Shi-Liang; Wang, Xiao-Yan; Meng, Zhao-Wen; Liu, Ping-Xiang; Du, Xuan-Min

    2011-09-01

    In the present study, cavitation and a ship propeller wake are reported by computed fluid dynamics based on viscous multiphase flow theory. Some recent validation results with a hybrid grid based on unsteady Navier-Stokes (N-S) and bubble dynamics equations are presented to predict velocity, pressure and vapor volume fraction in propeller wake in a uniform inflow. Numerical predictions of sheet cavitation, tip vortex cavitation and hub vortex cavitation are in agreement with the experimental data, same as numerical predictions of longitudinal and transversal evolution of the axial velocity. Blade and shaft rate frequency of propeller is well predicted by the computed results of pressure, and tip vortex is the most important to generate the pressure field within the near wake. The overall results indicate that the present approach is reliable for prediction of cavitation and propeller wake on the condition of uniform inflow.

  14. Direct numerical simulation of a combusting droplet with convection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liang, Pak-Yan

    1992-01-01

    The evaporation and combustion of a single droplet under forced and natural convection was studied numerically from first principles using a numerical scheme that solves the time-dependent multiphase and multispecies Navier-Stokes equations and tracks the sharp gas-liquid interface cutting across an arbitrary Eulerian grid. The flow fields both inside and outside of the droplet are resolved in a unified fashion. Additional governing equations model the interphase mass, energy, and momentum exchange. Test cases involving iso-octane, n-hexane, and n-propanol droplets show reasonable comparison rate, and flame stand-off distance. The partially validated code is, thus, readied to be applied to more demanding droplet combustion situations where substantial drop deformation render classical models inadequate.

  15. Handbook of noise ratings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pearsons, K. S.; Bennett, R. L.

    1974-01-01

    The handbook was compiled to provide information in a concise form, describing the multitude of noise rating schemes. It is hoped that by describing the noise rating methods in a single volume the user will have better access to the definitions, application and calculation procedures of the current noise rating methods.

  16. Numeral-Incorporating Roots in Numeral Systems: A Comparative Analysis of Two Sign Languages

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fuentes, Mariana; Massone, Maria Ignacia; Fernandez-Viader, Maria del Pilar; Makotrinsky, Alejandro; Pulgarin, Francisca

    2010-01-01

    Numeral-incorporating roots in the numeral systems of Argentine Sign Language (LSA) and Catalan Sign Language (LSC), as well as the main features of the number systems of both languages, are described and compared. Informants discussed the use of numerals and roots in both languages (in most cases in natural contexts). Ten informants took part in…

  17. An Introduction to Numerical Control. Problems for Numerical Control Part Programming.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Campbell, Clifton P.

    This combination text and workbook is intended to introduce industrial arts students to numerical control part programming. Discussed in the first section are the impact of numerical control, training efforts, numerical control in established programs, related information for drafting, and the Cartesian Coordinate System and dimensioning…

  18. Numerical simulation and modeling of combustion in scramjets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clark, Ryan James

    In the last fifteen years the development of a viable scramjet has quickly approached the following long term goals: responsive sub-orbital space access; long-range, prompt global strike; and high-speed transportation. Nonetheless, there are significant challenges that need to be resolved. These challenges include high skin friction drag and high heat transfer rates, inherent to vehicles in sustained, hypersonic flight. Another challenge is sustaining combustion. Numerical simulation and modeling was performed to provide insight into reducing skin friction drag and sustaining combustion. Numerical simulation was used to investigate boundary layer combustion, which has been shown to reduce skin friction drag. The objective of the numerical simulations was to quantify the effect of fuel injection parameters on boundary layer combustion and ultimately on the change in the skin friction coefficient and heat transfer rate. A qualitative analysis of the results suggest that the reduction in the skin friction coefficient depends on multiple parameters and potentially an interaction between parameters. Sustained combustion can be achieved through a stabilized detonation wave. Additionally, stabilizing a detonation wave will yield rapid combustion. This will allow for a shorter and lighter-weight engine system, resulting in less required combustor cooling. A stabilized detonation wave was numerically modeled for various inlet and geometric cases. The effect of fuel concentration, inlet Mach number, and geometric configuration on the stability of a detonation wave was quantified. Correlations were established between fuel concentration, inlet speed, geometric configuration and parameters characterizing the detonation wave. A linear relationship was quantified between the fuel concentration and the parameters characterizing the detonation wave.

  19. Processing of Numerical and Proportional Quantifiers.

    PubMed

    Shikhare, Sailee; Heim, Stefan; Klein, Elise; Huber, Stefan; Willmes, Klaus

    2015-09-01

    Quantifier expressions like "many" and "at least" are part of a rich repository of words in language representing magnitude information. The role of numerical processing in comprehending quantifiers was studied in a semantic truth value judgment task, asking adults to quickly verify sentences about visual displays using numerical (at least seven, at least thirteen, at most seven, at most thirteen) or proportional (many, few) quantifiers. The visual displays were composed of systematically varied proportions of yellow and blue circles. The results demonstrated that numerical estimation and numerical reference information are fundamental in encoding the meaning of quantifiers in terms of response times and acceptability judgments. However, a difference emerges in the comparison strategies when a fixed external reference numerosity (seven or thirteen) is used for numerical quantifiers, whereas an internal numerical criterion is invoked for proportional quantifiers. Moreover, for both quantifier types, quantifier semantics and its polarity (positive vs. negative) biased the response direction (accept/reject). Overall, our results indicate that quantifier comprehension involves core numerical and lexical semantic properties, demonstrating integrated processing of language and numbers. PMID:25631283

  20. Reliability of Complex Nonlinear Numerical Simulations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yee, H. C.

    2004-01-01

    This work describes some of the procedure to ensure a higher level of confidence in the predictability and reliability (PAR) of numerical simulation of multiscale complex nonlinear problems. The focus is on relating PAR of numerical simulations with complex nonlinear phenomena of numerics. To isolate sources of numerical uncertainties, the possible discrepancy between the chosen partial differential equation (PDE) model and the real physics and/or experimental data is set aside. The discussion is restricted to how well numerical schemes can mimic the solution behavior of the underlying PDE model for finite time steps and grid spacings. The situation is complicated by the fact that the available theory for the understanding of nonlinear behavior of numerics is not at a stage to fully analyze the nonlinear Euler and Navier-Stokes equations. The discussion is based on the knowledge gained for nonlinear model problems with known analytical solutions to identify and explain the possible sources and remedies of numerical uncertainties in practical computations. Examples relevant to turbulent flow computations are included.

  1. Fine-root mortality rates in a temperate forest: Estimates using radiocarbon data and numerical modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Riley, W.J.; Gaudinski, J.B.; Torn, M.S.; Joslin, J.D.; Hanson, P.J.

    2009-09-01

    We used an inadvertent whole-ecosystem {sup 14}C label at a temperate forest in Oak Ridge, Tennessee, USA to develop a model (Radix1.0) of fine-root dynamics. Radix simulates two live-root pools, two dead-root pools, non-normally distributed root mortality turnover times, a stored carbon (C) pool, and seasonal growth and respiration patterns. We applied Radix to analyze measurements from two root size classes (< 0.5 and 0.5-2.0 mm diameter) and three soil-depth increments (O horizon, 0-15 cm and 30-60 cm). Predicted live-root turnover times were < 1 yr and 10 yr for short- and long-lived pools, respectively. Dead-root pools had decomposition turnover times of 2 yr and 10 yr. Realistic characterization of C flows through fine roots requires a model with two live fine-root populations, two dead fine-root pools, and root respiration. These are the first fine-root turnover time estimates that take into account respiration, storage, seasonal growth patterns, and non-normal turnover time distributions. The presence of a root population with decadal turnover times implies a lower amount of belowground net primary production used to grow fine-root tissue than is currently predicted by models with a single annual turnover pool.

  2. Numerical evaluation of a sensible heat balance method to determine rates of soil freezing and thawing

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In-situ determination of ice formation and thawing in soils is difficult despite its importance for many environmental processes. A sensible heat balance (SHB) method using a sequence of heat pulse probes has been shown to accurately measure water evaporation in subsurface soil, and it has the poten...

  3. Fine Root Mortality Rates in a Temperate Forest: Estimates using Radiocarbon Data and Numerical Modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Riley, William J.; Gaudinski, Julia B.; Torn, Margaret S.; JoslinJr., John D.; Hanson, Paul J

    2009-01-01

    Carbon (C) fluxes through roots are the most uncertain of all C exchanges between the atmosphere, plants, and soil. Yet the three dominant methods to characterize root C fluxes (minirhizotron, sequential coring, and isotopes) yield significantly different estimates of temperate forest root mortality turnover times. We contend that these discrepancies result from limitations in interpreting these very distinct types of observations. In this study we used a whole-ecosystem 14C label to develop, parameterize, and test a model (Radix1.0) of fine-root mortality and decomposition. Radix simulates two live roots pools (one with structural and non-structural C components), two dead root pools, non-normally distributed root mortality turnover times, a stored C pool, seasonal growth and respiration patterns, a best-fit to measurements approach to estimate model parameters, and Monte Carlo uncertainty analysis. We applied Radix at a temperate forest in Oak Ridge Tennessee using 14C measurements from two root size classes (<0.5 mm and 0.5−2.0 mm) and three soil depth increments (O horizon, 0−15, and 30−60 cm). Predicted root lifetimes were 0.1-0.9 y and 11-14 y for fast and slow live root pools respectively, and 0.1-4 y and 11-14 y for fast and slow dead root pool decomposition turnover times, respectively. We estimated that C fluxes through fine roots <2 mm diameter are ~40, 220, and 90 g C m-2 y 1 in the O horizon, 0−15 cm, and 30−60 cm depth intervals, respectively. We conclude that accurate characterization of C flows through fine roots required a model with two live fine-root pools, two dead fine-root pools, and root respiration. Further, root turnover times on the order of a decade imply different response times in biomass and growth than are currently predicted by models with a single annual turnover pool.

  4. Numerical study of supersonic combustion using a finite rate chemistry model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chitsomboon, T.; Tiwari, S. N.; Kumar, A.; Drummond, J. P.

    1986-01-01

    The governing equations of two-dimensional chemically reacting flows are presented together with a global two-step chemistry model for H2-air combustion. The explicit unsplit MacCormack finite difference algorithm is used to advance the discrete system of the governing equations in time until convergence is attained. The source terms in the species equations are evaluated implicitly to alleviate stiffness associated with fast reactions. With implicit source terms, the species equations give rise to a block-diagonal system which can be solved very efficiently on vector-processing computers. A supersonic reacting flow in an inlet-combustor configuration is calculated for the case where H2 is injected into the flow from the side walls and the strut. Results of the calculation are compared against the results obtained by using a complete reaction model.

  5. Rate theories for biologists

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Huan-Xiang

    2012-01-01

    Some of the rate theories that are most useful for modeling biological processes are reviewed. By delving into some of the details and subtleties in the development of the theories, the review will hopefully help the reader gain a more than superficial perspective. Examples are presented to illustrate how rate theories can be used to generate insight at the microscopic level into biomolecular behaviors. Attempt is made to clear up a number of misconceptions in the literature regarding popular rate theories, including the appearance of Planck’s constant in the transition-state theory and the Smoluchowski result as an upper limit for protein-protein and protein-DNA association rate constants. Future work in combining the implementation of rate theories through computer simulations with experimental probes of rate processes, and in modeling effects of intracellular environments so theories can be used for generating rate constants for systems biology studies is particularly exciting. PMID:20691138

  6. Vibrato rate adjustment.

    PubMed

    Dromey, Christopher; Carter, Neisha; Hopkin, Arden

    2003-06-01

    The goal of the present study was to document the acoustic changes that occur as singers attempt to increase or decrease their vibrato rate to match target stimuli. Eight advanced singing students produced vowels with vibrato in three registers, both naturally and while attempting to match faster or slower rate stimuli. Slower rates were associated with lower intensity and less steady vibrato. Faster rates involved increased vibrato extent in the chest register and increased intensity in the head register. Singers whose spontaneous vibrato rates were naturally either slower or faster tended to also be relatively slower or faster when matching target rates. This ability to modify rate may have beneficial effects on the artistic quality of the voice for performance. PMID:12825649

  7. Numerical Studies of High-Z Plasma in the HyperV Plasma Guns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Linchun; Messer, Sarah; Witherspoon, F. Douglas; Welch, Dale; Thoma, Carsten; Phillips, Mike; Bogatu, I. Nick; Galkin, Sergei; Macfarlane, Joe; Golovkin, Igor

    2010-11-01

    Numerical studies of railguns and coaxial guns at HyperV Technologies Corp. include simulations of hypervelocity plasma transport in the gun, plasma expansion out of the nozzle, and two or more jets merging in vacuum. Plasma detachment, merging jets temperature and charge state evolution are examined in these processes. High-Z materials, such as argon and xenon, are used throughout these simulations. The plasma moves with an initial velocity of 0-10 km/s (80-100 km/s for jet merging), the initial number density ranges from 10^15cm-3 to 10^18cm-3, and the merging jets are several centimeters in radius. The LSP code is used to perform the simulations using improved fluid algorithms and equation-of-state models from Voss and atomic data from Prism.

  8. Numerical continuation in classical mechanics and thermodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gimenez, Aleix; Chausse, Victor; Meseguer, Alvaro

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, modern numerical continuation methodologies are presented as a way of understanding and computing multiplicity of solutions in undergraduate physics problems. Mechanical and thermodynamical problems are used as a storyline to introduce the mathematical formalism required to clarify the distinction between the uniqueness and multiplicity of equilibrium solutions and the critical states of a nonlinear physical problem, as well as to illustrate how these novel numerical continuation techniques are implemented in practice. The paper provides simple numerical Matlab codes that are easily adaptable to other problems, as well as updated software and literature resources.

  9. Waste glass melter numerical and physical modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Eyler, L.L.; Peters, R.D.; Lessor, D.L.; Lowery, P.S.; Elliott, M.L.

    1991-10-01

    Results of physical and numerical simulation modeling of high-level liquid waste vitrification melters are presented. Physical modeling uses simulant fluids in laboratory testing. Visualization results provide insight into convective melt flow patterns from which information is derived to support performance estimation of operating melters and data to support numerical simulation. Numerical simulation results of several melter configurations are presented. These are in support of programs to evaluate melter operation characteristics and performance. Included are investigations into power skewing and alternating current electric field phase angle in a dual electrode pair reference design and bi-modal convective stability in an advanced design. 9 refs., 9 figs., 1 tab.

  10. Numerical models of extragalactic radio sources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burns, Jack O.; Norman, Michael L.; Clarke, David A.

    1991-01-01

    When supercomputer-implemented numerical simulations analyzing the nonlinear physics inherent in the hydrodynamic and MHD equations are applied to extragalactic radio sources, many of the complex structures observed on telescopic images are reproduced. Attention is presently given to recently obtained results from 2D and 3D numerical simulations of the formation and evolution of extended radio morphologies; these numerical models allow the exploration of such physical phenomena as the role of magnetic fields in the dynamics and emissivity of extended radio galaxies, intermittent outflow from the cores of active galaxies, fluid-jet instabilities, and the bending of collimated outflows by motion through the intergalactic medium.

  11. Confidence bands for measured economically optimal nitrogen rates

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    While numerous researchers have computed economically optimal N rate (EONR) values from measured yield – N rate data, nearly all have neglected to compute or estimate the statistical reliability of these EONR values. In this study, a simple method for computing EONR and its confidence bands is descr...

  12. Did Unilateral Divorce Laws Raise Divorce Rates in Western Europe?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kneip, Thorsten; Bauer, Gerrit

    2009-01-01

    The increase in European divorce rates over the past decades was accompanied by several changes in divorce laws. Yet for European countries, research on the effects of divorce law on the divorce rate is scarce. Most of the existing studies are based on data from North America and provide numerous, but inconsistent, results. We use fixed-effects…

  13. Rates and progenitors of type Ia supernovae

    SciTech Connect

    Wood-Vasey, William Michael

    2004-01-01

    analyzing the true sensitivity of a multi-epoch supernova search and finds a Type Ia supernova rate from z ~ 0.01-0.1 of rV = 4.26$+1.39 +0.10\\atop{-1.93 -0.10}$h3 x 10-4 SNe Ia/yr/Mpc3 from a preliminary analysis of a subsample of the SNfactory prototype search. Several unusual supernovae were found in the course of the SNfactory prototype search. One in particular, SN 2002ic, was the first SN Ia to exhibit convincing evidence for a circumstellar medium and offers valuable insight into the progenitors of Type Ia supernovae.

  14. Numerical study of conjugate transient solidification in an enclosed region

    SciTech Connect

    Viswanath, R.; Jaluria, Y.

    1995-05-01

    Solidification in an enclosed space is investigated, considering conduction in the mold wall. This gives rise to a conjugate, transient problem, with the flow in the liquid driven by thermal buoyancy. An enthalpy formulation is used for the energy equation, with a porous medium approximation for the region undergoing phase change. The governing equations are solved using primitive variables in the physical space. The control volume approach is employed to discretize the equations. The numerical simulation of the phase change process is discussed in detail. The mold is subjected to different thermal conditions at the outer surface, and the effect of these on the shape of the solid-liquid interface, rate of solid formation, and rate of heat transfer quantified. Streamlines, isotherms, and velocity profiles are also obtained. The conditions under which natural convection in the melt can be neglected are investigated. The effects of important design parameters such as the mold material and width, aspect ratio of the cavity, and heat removal rate from the mold are considered in detail. A comparison is made of the important characteristics between the conjugate and nonconjugate cases. The differences in the numerical simulation of these two cases are investigated. Of particular interest are the temperature distributions that arise in the liquid, solid, and mold. It is shown that conjugate transport must be included for a realistic simulation of practical problems.

  15. Measuring zebrafish turning rate.

    PubMed

    Mwaffo, Violet; Butail, Sachit; di Bernardo, Mario; Porfiri, Maurizio

    2015-06-01

    Zebrafish is becoming a popular animal model in preclinical research, and zebrafish turning rate has been proposed for the analysis of activity in several domains. The turning rate is often estimated from the trajectory of the fish centroid that is output by commercial or custom-made target tracking software run on overhead videos of fish swimming. However, the accuracy of such indirect methods with respect to the turning rate associated with changes in heading during zebrafish locomotion is largely untested. Here, we compare two indirect methods for the turning rate estimation using the centroid velocity or position data, with full shape tracking for three different video sampling rates. We use tracking data from the overhead video recorded at 60, 30, and 15 frames per second of zebrafish swimming in a shallow water tank. Statistical comparisons of absolute turning rate across methods and sampling rates indicate that, while indirect methods are indistinguishable from full shape tracking, the video sampling rate significantly influences the turning rate measurement. The results of this study can aid in the selection of the video capture frame rate, an experimental design parameter in zebrafish behavioral experiments where activity is an important measure.

  16. Solutions of two-factor models with variable interest rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jinglu; Clemons, C. B.; Young, G. W.; Zhu, J.

    2008-12-01

    The focus of this work is on numerical solutions to two-factor option pricing partial differential equations with variable interest rates. Two interest rate models, the Vasicek model and the Cox-Ingersoll-Ross model (CIR), are considered. Emphasis is placed on the definition and implementation of boundary conditions for different portfolio models, and on appropriate truncation of the computational domain. An exact solution to the Vasicek model and an exact solution for the price of bonds convertible to stock at expiration under a stochastic interest rate are derived. The exact solutions are used to evaluate the accuracy of the numerical simulation schemes. For the numerical simulations the pricing solution is analyzed as the market completeness decreases from the ideal complete level to one with higher volatility of the interest rate and a slower mean-reverting environment. Simulations indicate that the CIR model yields more reasonable results than the Vasicek model in a less complete market.

  17. Numerical simulation of steam injection processes with solvent

    SciTech Connect

    Zerpa, L.; Mendez, Z.

    1995-12-31

    In Venezuela during recent years, gas oil has been evaluated as an additive to increase steam injection process efficiency. The results of laboratory and field tests have shown a significant improvement in the production behavior. Despite these experiences, it is necessary to complement the information with results obtained from numerical simulation studies in order to know injection parameter effects, such as gas oil concentration, schemes and rates of injection, temperatures, etc., and also some mechanisms involved in the process. In this work, the results achieved in the numerical simulation of displacement tests with steam and gas oil are presented. A fully implicit 2-D thermal, three-phase compositional simulator was used to obtain all the data presented in this paper The numerical simulation results show a similar oil production performance to those obtained in the displacement tests with injection of gas oil and steam simultaneously. These results indicate rising of the production rate when the solvent concentration increases. They also reveal that the solvent co-injection scheme improves the productivity in relation to the gas oil pre-injection at low temperature. However, when gas oil is pre-injected at higher temperature, the oil production performance is similar to the co-injection scheme performance. This can attribute to the favorable temperature effect on the diffusion mechanisms. On the other hand, an increase of the gas oil injection rate causes a productivity reduction. In addition, the gas oil capacity to remove more viscous fractions than the original crude was verified. It was determined that the gas oil light fraction volatilization contributes to the process improvement. In general, these results confirm the benefit of using solvent and contribute to the understanding of process mechanisms.

  18. Rate Law Determination of Everyday Processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanger, Michael J.; Wiley, Russell A., Jr.; Richter, Erwin W.; Phelps, Amy J.

    2002-08-01

    In this experiment, students determined whether burning a birthday candle and flipping pennies are consistent with zero-, first-, or second-order rate laws. Students collected time-dependent data for the candle's mass or the number of pennies remaining (amount) and plotted curves of amount versus time, ln(amount) versus time, and amount-1 versus time. The linear plot of mass versus time indicates the candle experiment is consistent with a zero-order rate law, while the linear plot of ln(pennies) versus time indicates the penny experiment is consistent with a first-order rate law. Numerical values for the rate constants were determined from the slopes of the linear plots.

  19. Numerical models for high beta magnetohydrodynamic flow

    SciTech Connect

    Brackbill, J.U.

    1987-01-01

    The fundamentals of numerical magnetohydrodynamics for highly conducting, high-beta plasmas are outlined. The discussions emphasize the physical properties of the flow, and how elementary concepts in numerical analysis can be applied to the construction of finite difference approximations that capture these features. The linear and nonlinear stability of explicit and implicit differencing in time is examined, the origin and effect of numerical diffusion in the calculation of convective transport is described, and a technique for maintaining solenoidality in the magnetic field is developed. Many of the points are illustrated by numerical examples. The techniques described are applicable to the time-dependent, high-beta flows normally encountered in magnetically confined plasmas, plasma switches, and space and astrophysical plasmas. 40 refs.

  20. Symbolic-numeric interface: A review

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ng, E. W.

    1980-01-01

    A survey of the use of a combination of symbolic and numerical calculations is presented. Symbolic calculations primarily refer to the computer processing of procedures from classical algebra, analysis, and calculus. Numerical calculations refer to both numerical mathematics research and scientific computation. This survey is intended to point out a large number of problem areas where a cooperation of symbolic and numerical methods is likely to bear many fruits. These areas include such classical operations as differentiation and integration, such diverse activities as function approximations and qualitative analysis, and such contemporary topics as finite element calculations and computation complexity. It is contended that other less obvious topics such as the fast Fourier transform, linear algebra, nonlinear analysis and error analysis would also benefit from a synergistic approach.

  1. Writing arabic numerals in an agraphic patient.

    PubMed

    Delazer, M; Denes, G

    1998-09-01

    We report on the writing of Arabic numerals in a patient whose alphabetical script was restricted to graphemic jargon (Schonauer & Denes, 1994). The analysis of writing errors in Arabic script over three testing sessions (4, 10, and 13 months after stroke) confirmed the separate processing of syntactic and lexical information in number production proposed by current models. The changing error pattern over time reflected some difficulties observed in developmental studies on the acquisition of Arabic numeral writing. Errors were mostly of the syntactic type and (at a certain stage) were based on the verbal form of the numerals. As reported in neuropsychological (Noel & Seron, 1995) and developmental (Power & Dal Martello, 1990; Seron & Fayol, 1994) studies, sum relations were more difficult to transcode than product relations within complex numerals. PMID:9710492

  2. Numerical solution of a tunneling equation

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, C.Y.; Carter, M.D.; Batchelor, D.B.; Jaeger, E.F.

    1994-04-01

    A numerical method is presented to solve mode conversion equations resulting from the use of radio frequency (rf) waves to heat plasmas. The solutions of the mode conversion equations contain exponentially growing modes, and ordinary numerical techniques give large errors. To avoid the unphysical growing modes, a set of boundary conditions are found, that eliminate the unphysical modes. The mode conversion equations are then solved with the boundary conditions as a standard two-point boundary value problem. A tunneling equation (one of the mode conversion equations without power absorption) is solved as a specific example of this numerical technique although the technique itself is very general and can be easily applied to solve any mode conversion equation. The results from the numerical calculation agree very well with those found from asymptotic analysis.

  3. Numerical noise in ocean and estuarine models

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Walters, R.; Carey, G.F.

    1984-01-01

    Approximate methods for solving the shallow water equations may lead to solutions exhibiting large fictitious, numerically-induced oscillations. The analysis of the discrete dispersion relation and modal solutions of small wavelengths provides a powerful technique for assessing the sensitivity of alternative numerical schemes to irregular data which may lead to such oscillatory numerical noise. For those schemes where phase speed vanishes at a finite wavenumber or there are multiple roots for wavenumber, oscillation modes can exist which are uncoupled from the dynamics of the problem. The discrete modal analysis approach is used here to identify two classes of spurious oscillation modes associated respectively with the two different asymptotic limits corresponding to estuarine and large scale ocean models. The analysis provides further insight into recent numerical results for models which include large spatial scales and Coriolis acceleration. ?? 1984.

  4. Object-oriented numerical computing C++

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vanrosendale, John

    1994-01-01

    An object oriented language is one allowing users to create a set of related types and then intermix and manipulate values of these related types. This paper discusses object oriented numerical computing using C++.

  5. Numerical Simulation of Two-Phase Critical Flow with the Phase Change in the Nozzle Tube

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishigaki, Masahiro; Watanabe, Tadashi; Nakamura, Hideo

    Two-phase critical flow in the nozzle tube is analyzed numerically by the best estimate code TRACE and the CFD code FLUENT, and the performance of the mass flow rate estimation by the numerical codes is discussed. For the best estimate analysis by the TRACE code, the critical flow option is turned on. The mixture model is used with the cavitation model and the evaporation-condensation model for the numerical simulation by the FLUENT code. Two test cases of the two-phase critical flow are analyzed. One case is the critical flashing flow in a convergent-divergent nozzle (Super Moby Dick experiment), and the other case is the break nozzle flow for a steam generator tube rupture experiment of pressurized water reactors at Large Scale Test Facility of Japan Atomic Energy Agency. The calculation results of the mass flow rates by the numerical simulations show good agreements with the experimental results.

  6. Numerical Simulations of Thermographic Responses in Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Winfree, William P.; Cramer, K. Elliot; Zalameda, Joseph N.; Howell, Patricia A.

    2015-01-01

    Numerical simulations of thermographic responses in composite materials have been a useful for evaluating and optimizing thermographic analysis techniques. Numerical solutions are particularly beneficial for thermographic techniques, since the fabrication of specimens with realistic flaws is difficult. Simulations are presented with different ply layups that incorporated the anisotropic thermal properties that exist in each ply. The results are compared to analytical series solutions and thermal measurements on composites with flat bottom holes and delaminations.

  7. Hardware-Independent Proofs of Numerical Programs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boldo, Sylvie; Nguyen, Thi Minh Tuyen

    2010-01-01

    On recent architectures, a numerical program may give different answers depending on the execution hardware and the compilation. Our goal is to formally prove properties about numerical programs that are true for multiple architectures and compilers. We propose an approach that states the rounding error of each floating-point computation whatever the environment. This approach is implemented in the Frama-C platform for static analysis of C code. Small case studies using this approach are entirely and automatically proved

  8. Numerical vorticity creation based on impulse conservation.

    PubMed Central

    Summers, D M; Chorin, A J

    1996-01-01

    The problem of creating solenoidal vortex elements to satisfy no-slip boundary conditions in Lagrangian numerical vortex methods is solved through the use of impulse elements at walls and their subsequent conversion to vortex loops. The algorithm is not uniquely defined, due to the gauge freedom in the definition of impulse; the numerically optimal choice of gauge remains to be determined. Two different choices are discussed, and an application to flow past a sphere is sketched. PMID:11607636

  9. Numerical Study of a Convective Turbulence Encounter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Proctor, Fred H.; Hamilton, David W.; Bowles, Roland L.

    2002-01-01

    A numerical simulation of a convective turbulence event is investigated and compared with observational data. The specific case was encountered during one of NASA's flight tests and was characterized by severe turbulence. The event was associated with overshooting convective turrets that contained low to moderate radar reflectivity. Model comparisons with observations are quite favorable. Turbulence hazard metrics are proposed and applied to the numerical data set. Issues such as adequate grid size are examined.

  10. Efficient Numerical Reconstruction of Protein Folding Kinetics with Partial Path Sampling and Pathlike Variables

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Juraszek, J.; Saladino, G.; van Erp, T. S.; Gervasio, F. L.

    2013-03-01

    Numerically predicting rate constants of protein folding and other relevant biological events is still a significant challenge. We show that the combination of partial path transition interface sampling with the optimal interfaces and free-energy profiles provided by path collective variables makes the rate calculation for practical biological applications feasible and efficient. This methodology can reproduce the experimental rate constant of Trp-cage miniprotein folding with the same level of accuracy as transition path sampling at a fraction of the cost.

  11. Observed Barium Emission Rates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stenbaek-Nielsen, H. C.; Wescott, E. M.; Hallinan, T. J.

    1993-01-01

    The barium releases from the CRRES satellite have provided an opportunity for verifying theoretically calculated barium ion and neutral emission rates. Spectra of the five Caribbean releases in the summer of 1991 were taken with a spectrograph on board a U.S. Air Force jet aircraft. Because the line of sight release densities are not known, only relative rates could be obtained. The observed relative rates agree well with the theoretically calculated rates and, together with other observations, confirm the earlier detailed theoretical emission rates. The calculated emission rates can thus with good accuracy be used with photometric observations. It has been postulated that charge exchange between neutral barium and oxygen ions represents a significant source for ionization. If so. it should be associated with emissions at 4957.15 A and 5013.00 A, but these emissions were not detected.

  12. Numerical Modeling of Unsteady Thermofluid Dynamics in Cryogenic Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Majumdar, Alok

    2003-01-01

    A finite volume based network analysis procedure has been applied to model unsteady flow without and with heat transfer. Liquid has been modeled as compressible fluid where the compressibility factor is computed from the equation of state for a real fluid. The modeling approach recognizes that the pressure oscillation is linked with the variation of the compressibility factor; therefore, the speed of sound does not explicitly appear in the governing equations. The numerical results of chilldown process also suggest that the flow and heat transfer are strongly coupled. This is evident by observing that the mass flow rate during 90-second chilldown process increases by factor of ten.

  13. Numerical model of electron cyclotron resonance ion source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mironov, V.; Bogomolov, S.; Bondarchenko, A.; Efremov, A.; Loginov, V.

    2015-12-01

    Important features of the electron cyclotron resonance ion source (ECRIS) operation are accurately reproduced with a numerical code. The code uses the particle-in-cell technique to model the dynamics of ions in ECRIS plasma. It is shown that a gas dynamical ion confinement mechanism is sufficient to provide the ion production rates in ECRIS close to the experimentally observed values. Extracted ion currents are calculated and compared to the experiment for a few sources. Changes in the simulated extracted ion currents are obtained with varying the gas flow into the source chamber and the microwave power. Empirical scaling laws for ECRIS design are studied and the underlying physical effects are discussed.

  14. Thrombosis modeling in intracranial aneurysms: a lattice Boltzmann numerical algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ouared, R.; Chopard, B.; Stahl, B.; Rüfenacht, D. A.; Yilmaz, H.; Courbebaisse, G.

    2008-07-01

    The lattice Boltzmann numerical method is applied to model blood flow (plasma and platelets) and clotting in intracranial aneurysms at a mesoscopic level. The dynamics of blood clotting (thrombosis) is governed by mechanical variations of shear stress near wall that influence platelets-wall interactions. Thrombosis starts and grows below a shear rate threshold, and stops above it. Within this assumption, it is possible to account qualitatively well for partial, full or no occlusion of the aneurysm, and to explain why spontaneous thrombosis is more likely to occur in giant aneurysms than in small or medium sized aneurysms.

  15. Numerical simulation of film-cooled ablative rocket nozzles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Landrum, D. B.; Beard, R. M.

    1996-01-01

    The objective of this research effort was to evaluate the impact of incorporating an additional cooling port downstream between the injector and nozzle throat in the NASA Fast Track chamber. A numerical model of the chamber was developed for the analysis. The analysis did not model ablation but instead correlated the initial ablation rate with the initial nozzle wall temperature distribution. The results of this study provide guidance in the development of a potentially lighter, second generation ablative rocket nozzle which maintains desired performance levels.

  16. Numerical simulation of carbon arc discharge for nanoparticle synthesis

    SciTech Connect

    Kundrapu, M.; Keidar, M.

    2012-07-15

    Arc discharge with catalyst-filled carbon anode in helium background was used for the synthesis of carbon nanoparticles. In this paper, we present the results of numerical simulation of carbon arc discharges with arc current varying from 10 A to 100 A in a background gas pressure of 68 kPa. Anode sublimation rate and current voltage characteristics are compared with experiments. Distribution of temperature and species density, which is important for the estimation of the growth of nanoparticles, is obtained. The probable location of nanoparticle growth region is identified based on the temperature range for the formation of catalyst clusters.

  17. Simple numerical method for predicting steady compressible flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vonlavante, Ernst; Nelson, N. Duane

    1986-01-01

    A numerical method for solving the isenthalpic form of the governing equations for compressible viscous and inviscid flows was developed. The method was based on the concept of flux vector splitting in its implicit form. The method was tested on several demanding inviscid and viscous configurations. Two different forms of the implicit operator were investigated. The time marching to steady state was accelerated by the implementation of the multigrid procedure. Its various forms very effectively increased the rate of convergence of the present scheme. High quality steady state results were obtained in most of the test cases; these required only short computational times due to the relative efficiency of the basic method.

  18. A numerical and experimental study of confined swirling jets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nikjooy, M.; Mongia, H. C.; Samuelsen, G. S.; Mcdonell, V. G.

    1989-01-01

    A numerical and experimental study of a confined strong swirling flow is presented. Detailed velocity measurements are made using a two-component laser Doppler velocimeter (LDV) technique. Computations are performed using a differential second-moment (DSM) closure. The effect of inlet dissipation rate on calculated mean and turbulence fields is investigated. Various model constants are employed in the pressure-strain model to demonstrate their influences on the predicted results. Finally, comparison of the DSM calculations with the algebraic second-monent (ASM) closure results shows that the DSM is better suited for complex swirling flow analysis.

  19. Projected discrete ordinates methods for numerical transport problems

    SciTech Connect

    Larsen, E.W.

    1985-01-01

    A class of Projected Discrete-Ordinates (PDO) methods is described for obtaining iterative solutions of discrete-ordinates problems with convergence rates comparable to those observed using Diffusion Synthetic Acceleration (DSA). The spatially discretized PDO solutions are generally not equal to the DSA solutions, but unlike DSA, which requires great care in the use of spatial discretizations to preserve stability, the PDO solutions remain stable and rapidly convergent with essentially arbitrary spatial discretizations. Numerical results are presented which illustrate the rapid convergence and the accuracy of solutions obtained using PDO methods with commonplace differencing methods.

  20. Velocity and shear rate estimates of some non-Newtonian oscillatory flows in tubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kutev, N.; Tabakova, S.; Radev, S.

    2016-10-01

    The two-dimensional Newtonian and non-Newtonian (Carreau viscosity model used) oscillatory flows in straight tubes are studied theoretically and numerically. The corresponding analytical solution of the Newtonian flow and the numerical solution of the Carreau viscosity model flow show differences in velocity and shear rate. Some estimates for the velocity and shear rate differences are theoretically proved. As numerical examples the blood flow in different type of arteries and the polymer flow in pipes are considered.

  1. NPP ATMS Snowfall Rate Product

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meng, Huan; Ferraro, Ralph; Kongoli, Cezar; Wang, Nai-Yu; Dong, Jun; Zavodsky, Bradley; Yan, Banghua

    2015-01-01

    Passive microwave measurements at certain high frequencies are sensitive to the scattering effect of snow particles and can be utilized to retrieve snowfall properties. Some of the microwave sensors with snowfall sensitive channels are Advanced Microwave Sounding Unit (AMSU), Microwave Humidity Sounder (MHS) and Advance Technology Microwave Sounder (ATMS). ATMS is the follow-on sensor to AMSU and MHS. Currently, an AMSU and MHS based land snowfall rate (SFR) product is running operationally at NOAA/NESDIS. Based on the AMSU/MHS SFR, an ATMS SFR algorithm has been developed recently. The algorithm performs retrieval in three steps: snowfall detection, retrieval of cloud properties, and estimation of snow particle terminal velocity and snowfall rate. The snowfall detection component utilizes principal component analysis and a logistic regression model. The model employs a combination of temperature and water vapor sounding channels to detect the scattering signal from falling snow and derive the probability of snowfall (Kongoli et al., 2015). In addition, a set of NWP model based filters is also employed to improve the accuracy of snowfall detection. Cloud properties are retrieved using an inversion method with an iteration algorithm and a two-stream radiative transfer model (Yan et al., 2008). A method developed by Heymsfield and Westbrook (2010) is adopted to calculate snow particle terminal velocity. Finally, snowfall rate is computed by numerically solving a complex integral. NCEP CMORPH analysis has shown that integration of ATMS SFR has improved the performance of CMORPH-Snow. The ATMS SFR product is also being assessed at several NWS Weather Forecast Offices for its usefulness in weather forecast.

  2. Transient Numerical Modeling of Catalytic Channels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Struk, Peter M.; Dietrich, Daniel L.; Miller, Fletcher J.; T'ien, James S.

    2007-01-01

    This paper presents a transient model of catalytic combustion suitable for isolated channels and monolith reactors. The model is a lumped two-phase (gas and solid) model where the gas phase is quasi-steady relative to the transient solid. Axial diffusion is neglected in the gas phase; lateral diffusion, however, is accounted for using transfer coefficients. The solid phase includes axial heat conduction and external heat loss due to convection and radiation. The combustion process utilizes detailed gas and surface reaction models. The gas-phase model becomes a system of stiff ordinary differential equations while the solid phase reduces, after discretization, into a system of stiff ordinary differential-algebraic equations. The time evolution of the system came from alternating integrations of the quasi-steady gas and transient solid. This work outlines the numerical model and presents some sensitivity studies on important parameters including internal transfer coefficients, catalytic surface site density, and external heat-loss (if applicable). The model is compared to two experiments using CO fuel: (1) steady-state conversion through an isothermal platinum (Pt) tube and (2) transient propagation of a catalytic reaction inside a small Pt tube. The model requires internal mass-transfer resistance to match the experiments at lower residence times. Under mass-transport limited conditions, the model reasonably predicted exit conversion using global mass-transfer coefficients. Near light-off, the model results did not match the experiment precisely even after adjustment of mass-transfer coefficients. Agreement improved for the first case after adjusting the surface kinetics such that the net rate of CO adsorption increased compared to O2. The CO / O2 surface mechanism came from a sub-set of reactions in a popular CH4 / O2 mechanism. For the second case, predictions improved for lean conditions with increased external heat loss or adjustment of the kinetics as in the

  3. Explicit numerical solutions of a microbial survival model under nonisothermal conditions.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Si; Chen, Guibing

    2016-03-01

    Differential equations used to describe the original and modified Geeraerd models were, respectively, simplified into an explicit equation in which the integration of the specific inactivation rate with respect to time was numerically approximated using the Simpson's rule. The explicit numerical solutions were then used to simulate microbial survival curves and fit nonisothermal survival data for identifying model parameters in Microsoft Excel. The results showed that the explicit numerical solutions provided an easy way to accurately simulate microbial survival and estimate model parameters from nonisothermal survival data using the Geeraerd models.

  4. Two Different Methods for Numerical Solution of the Modified Burgers' Equation

    PubMed Central

    Karakoç, Seydi Battal Gazi; Başhan, Ali; Geyikli, Turabi

    2014-01-01

    A numerical solution of the modified Burgers' equation (MBE) is obtained by using quartic B-spline subdomain finite element method (SFEM) over which the nonlinear term is locally linearized and using quartic B-spline differential quadrature (QBDQM) method. The accuracy and efficiency of the methods are discussed by computing L 2 and L ∞ error norms. Comparisons are made with those of some earlier papers. The obtained numerical results show that the methods are effective numerical schemes to solve the MBE. A linear stability analysis, based on the von Neumann scheme, shows the SFEM is unconditionally stable. A rate of convergence analysis is also given for the DQM. PMID:25162064

  5. Numerical Speed of Sound and its Application to Schemes for all Speeds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liou, Meng-Sing; Edwards, Jack R.

    1999-01-01

    The concept of "numerical speed of sound" is proposed in the construction of numerical flux. It is shown that this variable is responsible for the accurate resolution of' discontinuities, such as contacts and shocks. Moreover, this concept can he readily extended to deal with low speed and multiphase flows. As a results, the numerical dissipation for low speed flows is scaled with the local fluid speed, rather than the sound speed. Hence, the accuracy is enhanced the correct solution recovered, and the convergence rate improved. We also emphasize the role of mass flux and analyze the behavior of this flux. Study of mass flux is important because the numerical diffusivity introduced in it can be identified. In addition, it is the term common to all conservation equations. We show calculated results for a wide variety of flows to validate the effectiveness of using the numerical speed of sound concept in constructing the numerical flux. We especially aim at achieving these two goals: (1) improving accuracy and (2) gaining convergence rates for all speed ranges. We find that while the performance at high speed range is maintained, the flux now has the capability of performing well even with the low: speed flows. Thanks to the new numerical speed of sound, the convergence is even enhanced for the flows outside of the low speed range. To realize the usefulness of the proposed method in engineering problems, we have also performed calculations for complex 3D turbulent flows and the results are in excellent agreement with data.

  6. Numerical simulation of oscillatons: Extracting the radiating tail

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grandclément, Philippe; Fodor, Gyula; Forgács, Péter

    2011-09-01

    Spherically symmetric, time-periodic oscillatons—solutions of the Einstein-Klein-Gordon system (a massive scalar field coupled to gravity) with a spatially localized core—are investigated by very precise numerical techniques based on spectral methods. In particular, the amplitude of their standing-wave tail is determined. It is found that the amplitude of the oscillating tail is very small, but nonvanishing for the range of frequencies considered. It follows that exactly time-periodic oscillatons are not truly localized, and they can be pictured loosely as consisting of a well (exponentially) localized nonsingular core and an oscillating tail making the total mass infinite. Finite mass physical oscillatons with a well localized core—solutions of the Cauchy-problem with suitable initial conditions—are only approximately time-periodic. They are continuously losing their mass because the scalar field radiates to infinity. Their core and radiative tail is well approximated by that of time-periodic oscillatons. Moreover the mass loss rate of physical oscillatons is estimated from the numerical data and a semiempirical formula is deduced. The numerical results are in agreement with those obtained analytically in the limit of small amplitude time-periodic oscillatons.

  7. Theoretical and numerical studies of die swell flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al-Muslimawi, Alaa H.

    2016-08-01

    This paper focuses on the theoretical and numerical predictions of die-swell flow for viscoelastic and viscoelastoplastic fluids. The theoretical results on die swell have been obtained by Tanner for a wide class of constitutive equations, including Phan-Thien Tanner (PTT), pom-pom, and general network type models. These results are compared with numerical solutions across swelling ratio, pressure drop, state of stress, and dissipation-rate for two fluid models, exponential Phan-Thien Tanner (EPTT) and Papanastasiou-Exponential Phan-Thien Tanner (Pap-EPTT). Numerically, the momentum and continuity flow equations are solved by a semi-implicit time-stepping Taylor-Galerkin/pressure-correction finite element method, whilst the constitutive equation is dealt with by a cell-vertex finite volume ( cv/fv) algorithm. This hybrid scheme is performed in a coupled fashion on the nonlinear differential equation system using discrete subcell technology on a triangular tessellation. The hyperbolic aspects of the constitutive equation are addressed discretely through upwind fluctuation distribution techniques.

  8. Numerical solution of High-kappa model of superconductivity

    SciTech Connect

    Karamikhova, R.

    1996-12-31

    We present formulation and finite element approximations of High-kappa model of superconductivity which is valid in the high {kappa}, high magnetic field setting and accounts for applied magnetic field and current. Major part of this work deals with steady-state and dynamic computational experiments which illustrate our theoretical results numerically. In our experiments we use Galerkin discretization in space along with Backward-Euler and Crank-Nicolson schemes in time. We show that for moderate values of {kappa}, steady states of the model system, computed using the High-kappa model, are virtually identical with results computed using the full Ginzburg-Landau (G-L) equations. We illustrate numerically optimal rates of convergence in space and time for the L{sup 2} and H{sup 1} norms of the error in the High-kappa solution. Finally, our numerical approximations demonstrate some well-known experimentally observed properties of high-temperature superconductors, such as appearance of vortices, effects of increasing the applied magnetic field and the sample size, and the effect of applied constant current.

  9. Numerical Simulations of Solidification in a Convecting Supercooled Melt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Ying

    2005-11-01

    We present a 2-D phase-field model with convection induced by a flow field applied to freezing into a supercooled melt of pure substance, nickle. Four-fold anisotropy is introduced to the interfacial energy. Renormalization group theory is applied to the phase-field model with convection to produce an efficient computational procedure for treating multiscales in both time and space. Numerical procedures and details of numerical parameters employed are provided, and convergence of the numerical method is demonstrated by conducting grid-function convergence tests. Dendrite structures, temperature fields, pressure fields, streamlines and velocity vector fields are presented at several different times during the dendrite growth process. Comparisons of dendrites and temperature fields with and without convection indicate that the flow field has a significant effect on the growth rate of the dendrites; in particular, it inhibits growth. In addition, the flow field influences the dendritic structural morphologies and thickness of the interface. Moreover, the dendrites behave as a solid body in the flow leading to stagnation points and other interesting flow features.

  10. Metabolic rate measurement system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koester, K.; Crosier, W.

    1980-01-01

    The Metabolic Rate Measurement System (MRMS) is an uncomplicated and accurate apparatus for measuring oxygen consumption and carbon dioxide production of a test subject. From this one can determine the subject's metabolic rate for a variety of conditions, such as resting or light exercise. MRMS utilizes an LSI/11-03 microcomputer to monitor and control the experimental apparatus.

  11. Tests of Rating Models

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Masin, Sergio Cesare; Busetto, Martina

    2010-01-01

    The study reports empirical tests of Anderson's, Haubensak's, Helson's, and Parducci's rating models when two end anchors are used for rating. The results show that these models cannot predict the judgment effect called here the Dai Pra effect. It is shown that an extension of Anderson's model is consistent with this effect. The results confirm…

  12. Extended rate equations

    SciTech Connect

    Shore, B.W.

    1981-01-30

    The equations of motion are discussed which describe time dependent population flows in an N-level system, reviewing the relationship between incoherent (rate) equations, coherent (Schrodinger) equations, and more general partially coherent (Bloch) equations. Approximations are discussed which replace the elaborate Bloch equations by simpler rate equations whose coefficients incorporate long-time consequences of coherence.

  13. Applications of Reaction Rate

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cunningham, Kevin

    2007-01-01

    This article presents an assignment in which students are to research and report on a chemical reaction whose increased or decreased rate is of practical importance. Specifically, students are asked to represent the reaction they have chosen with an acceptable chemical equation, identify a factor that influences its rate and explain how and why it…

  14. The Infant Rating Scale.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lindsay, G. A.

    1980-01-01

    A study was made of the usefulness of the Infant Rating Scale (IRS) in the early identification of learning difficulties. Thirteen hundred five-year-olds were rated by their teachers after one term in school. The structure of the IRS, its reliability, and predictive validity are examined. (Author/SJL)

  15. Mutation rates as adaptations.

    PubMed

    Maley, C

    1997-06-01

    In order to better understand life, it is helpful to look beyond the envelop of life as we know it. A simple model of coevolution was implemented with the addition of a gene for the mutation rate of the individual. This allowed the mutation rate itself to evolve in a lineage. The model shows that when the individuals interact in a sort of zero-sum game, the lineages maintain relatively high mutation rates. However, when individuals engage in interactions that have greater consequences for one individual in the interaction than the other, lineages tend to evolve relatively low mutation rates. This model suggests that one possible cause for differential mutation rates across genes may be the coevolutionary pressure of the various forms of interactions with other genes. PMID:9219670

  16. Numerical Study on Microwave Scattering by Various Plasma Objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Guibin; Zhang, Lin; He, Feng; Ouyang, Jiting

    2016-08-01

    The scattering features of microwave (MW) by planar plasma layer, plasma column and plasma-column array under different parameters have been numerically studied by the finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) method. The effects of the plasma frequency and electron collision rate on MW's reflectance, transmittance and absorptance are examined. The results show that for the planar plasma layer, the electron collision plays an important role in MW absorption and the reduction of wave reflection. In the plasma column condition, strong scattering occurs in certain directions. The scattering pattern depends on the plasma frequency, electron collision rate and column radius. A collisional, non-planar shaped plasma object like the plasma-column array can reduce significantly the wave reflection comparing with the planar plasma layer.

  17. Compressible magnetic Rayleigh-Taylor instability in stratified plasmas: Comparison of analytical and numerical results in the linear regime

    SciTech Connect

    Liberatore, S.; Jaouen, S.; Tabakhoff, E.; Canaud, B.

    2009-04-15

    Magnetic Rayleigh-Taylor instability is addressed in compressible hydrostatic media. A full model is presented and compared to numerical results from a linear perturbation code. A perfect agreement between both approaches is obtained in a wide range of parameters. Compressibility effects are examined and substantial deviations from classical Chandrasekhar growth rates are obtained and confirmed by the model and the numerical calculations.

  18. Benchmark calculations of thermal reaction rates. I - Quantal scattering theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chatfield, David C.; Truhlar, Donald G.; Schwenke, David W.

    1991-01-01

    The thermal rate coefficient for the prototype reaction H + H2 yields H2 + H with zero total angular momentum is calculated by summing, averaging, and numerically integrating state-to-state reaction probabilities calculated by time-independent quantum-mechanical scattering theory. The results are very carefully converged with respect to all numerical parameters in order to provide high-precision benchmark results for confirming the accuracy of new methods and testing their efficiency.

  19. Numerical Simulation of Two Phase Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liou, Meng-Sing

    2001-01-01

    Two phase flows can be found in broad situations in nature, biology, and industry devices and can involve diverse and complex mechanisms. While the physical models may be specific for certain situations, the mathematical formulation and numerical treatment for solving the governing equations can be general. Hence, we will require information concerning each individual phase as needed in a single phase. but also the interactions between them. These interaction terms, however, pose additional numerical challenges because they are beyond the basis that we use to construct modern numerical schemes, namely the hyperbolicity of equations. Moreover, due to disparate differences in time scales, fluid compressibility and nonlinearity become acute, further complicating the numerical procedures. In this paper, we will show the ideas and procedure how the AUSM-family schemes are extended for solving two phase flows problems. Specifically, both phases are assumed in thermodynamic equilibrium, namely, the time scales involved in phase interactions are extremely short in comparison with those in fluid speeds and pressure fluctuations. Details of the numerical formulation and issues involved are discussed and the effectiveness of the method are demonstrated for several industrial examples.

  20. Numerical multi-loop integrals and applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freitas, A.

    2016-09-01

    Higher-order radiative corrections play an important role in precision studies of the electroweak and Higgs sector, as well as for the detailed understanding of large backgrounds to new physics searches. For corrections beyond the one-loop level and involving many independent mass and momentum scales, it is in general not possible to find analytic results, so that one needs to resort to numerical methods instead. This article presents an overview of a variety of numerical loop integration techniques, highlighting their range of applicability, suitability for automatization, and numerical precision and stability. In a second part of this article, the application of numerical loop integration methods in the area of electroweak precision tests is illustrated. Numerical methods were essential for obtaining full two-loop predictions for the most important precision observables within the Standard Model. The theoretical foundations for these corrections will be described in some detail, including aspects of the renormalization, resummation of leading log contributions, and the evaluation of the theory uncertainty from missing higher orders.

  1. Numerical discrimination by frogs (Bombina orientalis).

    PubMed

    Stancher, G; Rugani, R; Regolin, L; Vallortigara, G

    2015-01-01

    Evidence has been reported for quantity discrimination in mammals and birds and, to a lesser extent, fish and amphibians. For the latter species, however, whether quantity discrimination would reflect sensitivity to number or to the continuous physical variables that covary with number is unclear. Here we reported a series of experiments with frogs (Bombina orientalis) tested in free-choice experiments for their preferences for different amounts of preys (Tenebrio molitor larvae) with systematic controls for variables such as surface area, volume, weight, and movement. Frogs showed quantity discrimination in the range of both small (1 vs. 2, 2 vs. 3, but not 3 vs. 4) and large numerousness (3 vs. 6, 4 vs. 8, but not 4 vs. 6), with clear evidence of being able to discriminate numerousness even when continuous physical variables were controlled for in the case of small numerousness (i.e., 1 vs. 2), whereas in the case of large numerousness it remains unclear whether the number or surface areas were dominant. We suggested that task demands are likely to be responsible for the activation of different systems for small and large numerousness and for their relative susceptibility to quantitative stimulus variables. PMID:25108417

  2. Numerical simulation of freeway traffic flow

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, G.; Lyrintzis, A.S.; Michalopoulos, P.G.

    1997-11-01

    A new high-order continuum model is presented in this paper. This high-order model exhibits smooth solutions rather than discontinuities, is able to describe the amplification of small disturbances on heavy traffic, and allows fluctuations of speed around the equilibrium values. Furthermore, unlike some earlier high-order models, it does not result in negative speeds at the tail of congested regions and disturbance propagation speeds greater than the flow speed. The model takes into account the relaxation time as a function of density and, in the equilibrium limit, it is consistent with the simple continuum model. A Riemann-problem-based numerical method is proposed for the solution of the new high-order model. Modeling of interrupted flow behavior such as merging, diverging, and weaving is also investigated. Based on the new high order model, the proposed numerical method and the modeling of interrupted flow, a versatile code is developed for the numerical simulation of freeway traffic flow that includes several freeway geometries. The authors compare the high-order model with the simple continuum model and the proposed numerical method with the Lax method based on 30-s and 5-min field data. The model is tested in interrupted flow situations (e.g., pipeline, merging, diverging, and weaving areas). A comparison of numerical results with limited field data shows that the high-order model performs better than the simple continuum model and describes better than a previously proposed method.

  3. Boundary acquisition for setup of numerical simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Diegert, C.

    1997-12-31

    The author presents a work flow diagram that includes a path that begins with taking experimental measurements, and ends with obtaining insight from results produced by numerical simulation. Two examples illustrate this path: (1) Three-dimensional imaging measurement at micron scale, using X-ray tomography, provides information on the boundaries of irregularly-shaped alumina oxide particles held in an epoxy matrix. A subsequent numerical simulation predicts the electrical field concentrations that would occur in the observed particle configurations. (2) Three-dimensional imaging measurement at meter scale, again using X-ray tomography, provides information on the boundaries fossilized bone fragments in a Parasaurolophus crest recently discovered in New Mexico. A subsequent numerical simulation predicts acoustic response of the elaborate internal structure of nasal passageways defined by the fossil record. The author must both add value, and must change the format of the three-dimensional imaging measurements before the define the geometric boundary initial conditions for the automatic mesh generation, and subsequent numerical simulation. The author applies a variety of filters and statistical classification algorithms to estimate the extents of the structures relevant to the subsequent numerical simulation, and capture these extents as faceted geometries. The author will describe the particular combination of manual and automatic methods used in the above two examples.

  4. Growth rates made easy.

    PubMed

    Hall, Barry G; Acar, Hande; Nandipati, Anna; Barlow, Miriam

    2014-01-01

    In the 1960s-1980s, determination of bacterial growth rates was an important tool in microbial genetics, biochemistry, molecular biology, and microbial physiology. The exciting technical developments of the 1990s and the 2000s eclipsed that tool; as a result, many investigators today lack experience with growth rate measurements. Recently, investigators in a number of areas have started to use measurements of bacterial growth rates for a variety of purposes. Those measurements have been greatly facilitated by the availability of microwell plate readers that permit the simultaneous measurements on up to 384 different cultures. Only the exponential (logarithmic) portions of the resulting growth curves are useful for determining growth rates, and manual determination of that portion and calculation of growth rates can be tedious for high-throughput purposes. Here, we introduce the program GrowthRates that uses plate reader output files to automatically determine the exponential portion of the curve and to automatically calculate the growth rate, the maximum culture density, and the duration of the growth lag phase. GrowthRates is freely available for Macintosh, Windows, and Linux. We discuss the effects of culture volume, the classical bacterial growth curve, and the differences between determinations in rich media and minimal (mineral salts) media. This protocol covers calibration of the plate reader, growth of culture inocula for both rich and minimal media, and experimental setup. As a guide to reliability, we report typical day-to-day variation in growth rates and variation within experiments with respect to position of wells within the plates.

  5. MODELING THE RATE-CONTROLLED SORPTION OF HEXAVALENT CHROMIUM.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Grove, D.B.; Stollenwerk, K.G.

    1985-01-01

    Sorption of chromium VI on the iron-oxide- and hydroxide-coated surface of alluvial material was numerically simulated with rate-controlled reactions. Reaction kinetics and diffusional processes, in the form of film, pore, and particle diffusion, were simulated and compared with experimental results. The use of empirically calculated rate coefficients for diffusion through the reacting surface was found to simulate experimental data; pore or particle diffusion is believed to be a possible rate-controlling mechanism. The use of rate equations to predict conservative transport and rate- and local-equilibrium-controlled reactions was shown to be feasible.

  6. Twinning rates in Tamilnadu.

    PubMed Central

    Rao, P S; Inbaraj, S G; Muthurathnam, S

    1983-01-01

    A prospective study of human reproduction was conducted in Tamilnadu State, South India, from 1969 to 1975. This paper reports twinning rates and relates these to maternal age, parity, and consanguinity. Birth weights and other dimensions at birth and infant mortality are also studied. The overall twinning rate was 1 in 115 births. Dizygotic twinning rates increased significantly with maternal age and parity. The measurements at birth for like-sexed twin pairs were lower than that of unlike-sexed, but the mortalities did not differ significantly. Twins, in general, had a several fold increase in mortality as compared with singletons. PMID:6886580

  7. Numerical Study of Pyrolysis of Biomass in Fluidized Beds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bellan, Josette; Lathouwers, Danny

    2003-01-01

    A report presents a numerical-simulation study of pyrolysis of biomass in fluidized-bed reactors, performed by use of the mathematical model described in Model of Fluidized Bed Containing Reacting Solids and Gases (NPO-30163), which appears elsewhere in this issue of NASA Tech Briefs. The purpose of the study was to investigate the effect of various operating conditions on the efficiency of production of condensable tar from biomass. The numerical results indicate that for a fixed particle size, the fluidizing-gas temperature is the foremost parameter that affects the tar yield. For the range of fluidizing-gas temperatures investigated, and under the assumption that the pyrolysis rate exceeds the feed rate, the optimum steady-state tar collection was found to occur at 750 K. In cases in which the assumption was not valid, the optimum temperature for tar collection was found to be only slightly higher. Scaling up of the reactor was found to exert a small negative effect on tar collection at the optimal operating temperature. It is also found that slightly better scaling is obtained by use of shallower fluidized beds with greater fluidization velocities.

  8. Numerical Modeling of Propellant Boiloff in Cryogenic Storage Tank

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Majumdar, A. K.; Steadman, T. E.; Maroney, J. L.

    2007-01-01

    This Technical Memorandum (TM) describes the thermal modeling effort undertaken at Marshall Space Flight Center to support the Cryogenic Test Laboratory at Kennedy Space Center (KSC) for a study of insulation materials for cryogenic tanks in order to reduce propellant boiloff during long-term storage. The Generalized Fluid System Simulation program has been used to model boiloff in 1,000-L demonstration tanks built for testing the thermal performance of glass bubbles and perlite insulation. Numerical predictions of boiloff rate and ullage temperature have been compared with the measured data from the testing of demonstration tanks. A satisfactory comparison between measured and predicted data has been observed for both liquid nitrogen and hydrogen tests. Based on the experience gained with the modeling of the demonstration tanks, a numerical model of the liquid hydrogen storage tank at launch complex 39 at KSC was built. The predicted boiloff rate of hydrogen has been found to be in good agreement with observed field data. This TM describes three different models that have been developed during this period of study (March 2005 to June 2006), comparisons with test data, and results of parametric studies.

  9. Some common problems in the numerical modeling of impact phenomena

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zukas, J. A.

    1993-02-01

    In 1972, in the preface of his book Impact Strength of Materials, W. Johnson noted that most engineers in the U.S.A. and U.K. graduate without familiarity with impact phenomena, save possibly rigid body impacts. Since the publication of Johnson's book, a wealth of material has appeared in print on impact phenomena spanning the velocity spectrum. There are a large number of books, conference proceedings, short courses, and even a journal devoted to impact problems. Yet the problem noted by Johnson persists. It is particularly evident when looking at computational results of impact problems. The most frequently occurring errors are the use of a computer model inappropriate to the problem, inability to recognize numerical instabilities and attributing these to physical phenomena, improper choice of computational grid, selection of an inappropriate material model or, more likely, the use of material data for a given model generated at strain rates inappropriate to the problem at hand. Most of these can be readily avoided by gaining familiarity with the basic concepts of wave propagation in solids, particularly with reference to the effect of boundaries and material interfaces, attention to the concept of strain rate and a rudimentary familiarity with the approximations involved in transforming a set of coupled nonlinear partial differential equations to a much larger set of algebraic equations. After a brief review of fundamentals, this paper addresses problems common to numerical simulation of high and low velocity impact, to illustrate these concepts.

  10. Influence of clearance model on numerical simulation of centrifugal pump

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Z.; Gao, B.; Yang, L.; Du, W. Q.

    2016-05-01

    Computing models are always simplified to save the computing resources and time. Particularly, the clearance that between impeller and pump casing is always ignored. But the completer model is, the more precise result of numerical simulation is in theory. This paper study the influence of clearance model on numerical simulation of centrifugal pump. We present such influence via comparing performance, flow characteristic and pressure pulsation of two cases that the one of two cases is the model pump with clearance and the other is not. And the results show that the head decreases and power increases so that efficiency decreases after computing with front and back cavities. Then no-leakage model would improve absolute velocity magnitude in order to reach the rated flow rate. Finally, more disturbance induced by front cavity flow and wear-ring flow would change the pressure pulsation of impeller and volute. The performance of clearance flow is important for the whole pump in performance, flow characteristic, pressure pulsation and other respects.

  11. Analysis of Oblique Wedges Using Analog and Numerical Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haq, S. S.; Koster, K.; Martin, R. S.; Flesch, L. M.

    2010-12-01

    Oblique plate motion is understood to be a primary factor in determining the style and location of deformation at many convergent margins. These margins are frequently characterized by a dominant strike-slip fault parallel to the margin, which accommodates margin-parallel motion and shear and is adjacent to partitioned and near margin-normal thrusting. We have performed a series of analog experiment in which we have simulated oblique wedges with frictional and layered, friction over viscous, rheologies. Using the detailed analysis of topography and strain from these analog models we have compared them to geometrically similar 2D and 3D numerical models. While our pure frictional analog wedges are characterized by numerous discrete thrust faults in the pro-wedge and a zone of shear between the pro-wedge and the retro-wedges, our layered wedges have a dominate shear zone that is long-lived. In all models the highest rate of contractional deformation is at the thrust front, while the highest rate of shear is isolated in a relatively narrow zone at the back of the pro-wedge. Because the layered analog wedge is better able isolate shear behind the pro-wedge it can better partition strain into dip-slip thrusting normal to the margin. Our numerical simulations support the assertion that a relatively small amount of extensional stress is needed to play a significant role in the structural evolution of convergent systems. However, the manner in which this stress is localized on discrete structures, and in particular, how the style of strain (extension or contraction) will evolve, is a strong function of rheology and its strength at depth for a given initial geometry.

  12. Verification of an Analytical Method for Measuring Crystal Nucleation Rates in Glasses from DTA Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ranasinghe, K. S.; Wei, P. F.; Kelton, K. F.; Ray, C. S.; Day, D. E.

    2004-01-01

    A recently proposed analytical (DTA) method for estimating the nucleation rates in glasses has been evaluated by comparing experimental data with numerically computed nucleation rates for a model lithium disilicate glass. The time and temperature dependent nucleation rates were predicted using the model and compared with those values from an analysis of numerically calculated DTA curves. The validity of the numerical approach was demonstrated earlier by a comparison with experimental data. The excellent agreement between the nucleation rates from the model calculations and fiom the computer generated DTA data demonstrates the validity of the proposed analytical DTA method.

  13. Saltation transport rate in unsteady wind variations.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ping; Zheng, Xiaojing

    2014-05-01

    Wind flow in the atmospheric boundary layer is usually turbulent. The gusty wind significantly influences the saltation transport which is treated as equilibrium saltation. This study performs one-dimension numerical simulations of unsteady sand saltation to discuss the effects of parameters of periodical wind variations on saltation response and sand transport rate prediction. The results show that unsteady transport rates are larger than steady rates of equivalent mean wind velocity. The ratio of unsteady/steady transport rates increases with the increase of amplitude and frequency. For the average wind velocities much larger than the threshold value, the errors of transport rates predicted by unsteady and steady model are about 10%, while for a wind velocity slightly larger than saltation threshold, the errors will be more than 200%. The sand transport rates are not zero even though the average wind velocity equals (is even smaller than) the threshold value, whereas Q must be zero in the steady model. Finally, an unsteady transport rate prediction formula is proposed which takes mean velocity, fluctuating intensity and period as independent variables. PMID:24853633

  14. Numerical evaluation of uniform beam modes.

    SciTech Connect

    Tang, Y.; Reactor Analysis and Engineering

    2003-12-01

    The equation for calculating the normal modes of a uniform beam under transverse free vibration involves the hyperbolic sine and cosine functions. These functions are exponential growing without bound. Tables for the natural frequencies and the corresponding normal modes are available for the numerical evaluation up to the 16th mode. For modes higher than the 16th, the accuracy of the numerical evaluation will be lost due to the round-off errors in the floating-point math imposed by the digital computers. Also, it is found that the functions of beam modes commonly presented in the structural dynamics books are not suitable for numerical evaluation. In this paper, these functions are rearranged and expressed in a different form. With these new equations, one can calculate the normal modes accurately up to at least the 100th mode. Mike's Arbitrary Precision Math, an arbitrary precision math library, is used in the paper to verify the accuracy.

  15. Mechanical diode: Comparing numerical and experimental characterizations

    SciTech Connect

    Sagartz, M.J.; Segalman, D.; Simmermacher, T.

    1998-02-01

    In this introductory work, joint compliance is studied in both a numerical and experimental setting. A simple bolted interface is used as the test article and compliance is measured for the joint in both compression and in tension. This simple interface is shown to exhibit a strong non-linearity near the transition from compression to tension (or vice-versa). Modeling issues pertaining to numerically solving for the compliance are addressed. It is shown that the model predictions, in spite of convergence being very sensitive to numerical artifacts of the interface model, are in good agreement with experimentally measured strains and joint compliances. The joint behavior is a mechanical analogy to a diode, i.e., in compression, the joint is very stiff, acting almost as a rigid link, while in tension the joint is relatively soft, acting as a spring.

  16. Numerical Methods for Radiation Magnetohydrodynamics in Astrophysics

    SciTech Connect

    Klein, R I; Stone, J M

    2007-11-20

    We describe numerical methods for solving the equations of radiation magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) for astrophysical fluid flow. Such methods are essential for the investigation of the time-dependent and multidimensional dynamics of a variety of astrophysical systems, although our particular interest is motivated by problems in star formation. Over the past few years, the authors have been members of two parallel code development efforts, and this review reflects that organization. In particular, we discuss numerical methods for MHD as implemented in the Athena code, and numerical methods for radiation hydrodynamics as implemented in the Orion code. We discuss the challenges introduced by the use of adaptive mesh refinement in both codes, as well as the most promising directions for future developments.

  17. Numerical shadow and geometry of quantum states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dunkl, Charles F.; Gawron, Piotr; Holbrook, John A.; Miszczak, Jarosław A.; Puchała, Zbigniew; Życzkowski, Karol

    2011-08-01

    The totality of normalized density matrices of dimension N forms a convex set {\\cal Q}_N in { R}^{N^2-1}. Working with the flat geometry induced by the Hilbert-Schmidt distance, we consider images of orthogonal projections of {\\cal Q}_N onto a two-plane and show that they are similar to the numerical ranges of matrices of dimension N. For a matrix A of dimension N, one defines its numerical shadow as a probability distribution supported on its numerical range W(A), induced by the unitarily invariant Fubini-Study measure on the complex projective manifold { C}P^{N-1}. We define generalized, mixed-state shadows of A and demonstrate their usefulness to analyse the structure of the set of quantum states and unitary dynamics therein.

  18. Tense Operators on Spaces of Numerical Events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chajda, Ivan; Länger, Helmut

    2014-10-01

    Spaces of numerical events were introduced for the sake to establish a propositional logic of physical phenomena. Since physical phenomena are variable in time, it is a natural task to develop temporal logic for this description. Hence we adopt the concept of tense operators used in classical propositional logic and in several sorts of non-classical one (e. g. Lukasiewicz many-valued logic, intuitionistic logic etc.). It turns out that the full set of states on a given space of numerical events can serve as a time scale if it is equipped with a suitable relation of time preference. A construction of tense operators is developed and a certain representation is derived. Finally, tense operators on spaces of numerical events whose elements have only the values 0 or 1 are characterized.

  19. Numerical stability in problems of linear algebra.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Babuska, I.

    1972-01-01

    Mathematical problems are introduced as mappings from the space of input data to that of the desired output information. Then a numerical process is defined as a prescribed recurrence of elementary operations creating the mapping of the underlying mathematical problem. The ratio of the error committed by executing the operations of the numerical process (the roundoff errors) to the error introduced by perturbations of the input data (initial error) gives rise to the concept of lambda-stability. As examples, several processes are analyzed from this point of view, including, especially, old and new processes for solving systems of linear algebraic equations with tridiagonal matrices. In particular, it is shown how such a priori information can be utilized as, for instance, a knowledge of the row sums of the matrix. Information of this type is frequently available where the system arises in connection with the numerical solution of differential equations.

  20. Numerical FEM modeling in dental implantology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roateşi, Iulia; Roateşi, Simona

    2016-06-01

    This paper is devoted to a numerical approach of the stress and displacement calculation of a system made up of dental implant, ceramic crown and surrounding bone. This is the simulation of a clinical situation involving both biological - the bone tissue, and non-biological - the implant and the crown, materials. On the other hand this problem deals with quite fine technical structure details - the threads, tapers, etc with a great impact in masticatory force transmission. Modeling the contact between the implant and the bone tissue is important to a proper bone-implant interface model and implant design. The authors proposed a three-dimensional numerical model to assess the biomechanical behaviour of this complex structure in order to evaluate its stability by determining the risk zones. A comparison between this numerical analysis and clinical cases is performed and a good agreement is obtained.

  1. Numerical and approximate solutions for plume rise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krishnamurthy, Ramesh; Gordon Hall, J.

    Numerical and approximate analytical solutions are compared for turbulent plume rise in a crosswind. The numerical solutions were calculated using the plume rise model of Hoult, Fay and Forney (1969, J. Air Pollut. Control Ass.19, 585-590), over a wide range of pertinent parameters. Some wind shear and elevated inversion effects are included. The numerical solutions are seen to agree with the approximate solutions over a fairly wide range of the parameters. For the conditions considered in the study, wind shear effects are seen to be quite small. A limited study was made of the penetration of elevated inversions by plumes. The results indicate the adequacy of a simple criterion proposed by Briggs (1969, AEC Critical Review Series, USAEC Division of Technical Information extension, Oak Ridge, Tennesse).

  2. Burning Rate Emulator

    NASA Video Gallery

    The Burning Rate Emulator is a gas fuel investigation attempting to emulate the burning of solids to improve our understanding of materials''flammability over a wide range of conditions. The approa...

  3. Rating the Risks.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Slovic, Paul; And Others

    1979-01-01

    Explains how people arrive at personal hazard assessments. Explores why people overestimate some hazards and underestimate others. Examines risk ratings for activities and technologies such as nuclear power, motor vehicles, pesticides, and vaccinations. (MA)

  4. National ART Success Rates

    MedlinePlus

    ... ART and Birth Defects ART and Autism 2013 Assisted Reproductive Technology National Summary Report Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share ... live-birth rate? [PDF - 1.37MB] Section 2: ART Cycles using fresh nondonor eggs or embryos What ...

  5. The ratings game

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Braben, Donald W.

    2009-04-01

    How sad to read a supposedly serious debate among distinguished physicists (February p19) about which combinations of the latest Research Assessment Exercise (RAE) ratings represent a university physics department's true strengths.

  6. Heart Rate Monitor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1984-01-01

    In the mid 70's, NASA saw a need for a long term electrocardiographic electrode suitable for use on astronauts. Heart Rate Inc.'s insulated capacitive electrode is constructed of thin dielectric film applied to stainless steel surface, originally developed under a grant by Texas Technical University. HRI, Inc. was awarded NASA license and continued development of heart rate monitor for use on exercise machines for physical fitness and medical markets.

  7. High population increase rates.

    PubMed

    1991-09-01

    In addition to its economic and ethnic difficulties, the USSR faces several pressing demographic problems, including high population increase rates in several of its constituent republics. It has now become clear that although the country's rigid centralized planning succeeded in covering the basic needs of people, it did not lead to welfare growth. Since the 1970s, the Soviet economy has remained sluggish, which as led to increase in the death and birth rates. Furthermore, the ideology that held that demography could be entirely controlled by the country's political and economic system is contradicted by current Soviet reality, which shows that religion and ethnicity also play a significant role in demographic dynamics. Currently, Soviet republics fall under 2 categories--areas with high or low natural population increase rates. Republics with low rates consist of Christian populations (Armenia, Moldavia, Georgia, Byelorussia, Russia, Lithuania, Estonia, Latvia, Ukraine), while republics with high rates are Muslim (Tadzhikistan, Uzbekistan, Turkmenistan, Kirgizia, Azerbaijan Kazakhstan). The later group has natural increase rates as high as 3.3%. Although the USSR as a whole is not considered a developing country, the later group of republics fit the description of the UNFPA's priority list. Another serious demographic issue facing the USSR is its extremely high rate of abortion. This is especially true in the republics of low birth rates, where up to 60% of all pregnancies are terminated by induced abortions. Up to 1/5 of the USSR's annual health care budget is spent on clinical abortions -- money which could be better spent on the production of contraceptives. Along with the recent political and economic changes, the USSR is now eager to deal with its demographic problems. PMID:12284289

  8. Numerical orbit generators of artificial earth satellites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kugar, H. K.; Dasilva, W. C. C.

    1984-04-01

    A numerical orbit integrator containing updatings and improvements relative to the previous ones that are being utilized by the Departmento de Mecanica Espacial e Controle (DMC), of INPE, besides incorporating newer modellings resulting from the skill acquired along the time is presented. Flexibility and modularity were taken into account in order to allow future extensions and modifications. Characteristics of numerical accuracy, processing quickness, memory saving as well as utilization aspects were also considered. User's handbook, whole program listing and qualitative analysis of accuracy, processing time and orbit perturbation effects were included as well.

  9. Numerical taxonomy on data: Experimental results

    SciTech Connect

    Cohen, J.; Farach, M.

    1997-12-01

    The numerical taxonomy problems associated with most of the optimization criteria described above are NP - hard [3, 5, 1, 4]. In, the first positive result for numerical taxonomy was presented. They showed that if e is the distance to the closest tree metric under the L{sub {infinity}} norm. i.e., e = min{sub T} [L{sub {infinity}} (T-D)], then it is possible to construct a tree T such that L{sub {infinity}} (T-D) {le} 3e, that is, they gave a 3-approximation algorithm for this problem. We will refer to this algorithm as the Single Pivot (SP) heuristic.

  10. Numerical Algorithms Based on Biorthogonal Wavelets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ponenti, Pj.; Liandrat, J.

    1996-01-01

    Wavelet bases are used to generate spaces of approximation for the resolution of bidimensional elliptic and parabolic problems. Under some specific hypotheses relating the properties of the wavelets to the order of the involved operators, it is shown that an approximate solution can be built. This approximation is then stable and converges towards the exact solution. It is designed such that fast algorithms involving biorthogonal multi resolution analyses can be used to resolve the corresponding numerical problems. Detailed algorithms are provided as well as the results of numerical tests on partial differential equations defined on the bidimensional torus.

  11. The quiet revolution of numerical weather prediction.

    PubMed

    Bauer, Peter; Thorpe, Alan; Brunet, Gilbert

    2015-09-01

    Advances in numerical weather prediction represent a quiet revolution because they have resulted from a steady accumulation of scientific knowledge and technological advances over many years that, with only a few exceptions, have not been associated with the aura of fundamental physics breakthroughs. Nonetheless, the impact of numerical weather prediction is among the greatest of any area of physical science. As a computational problem, global weather prediction is comparable to the simulation of the human brain and of the evolution of the early Universe, and it is performed every day at major operational centres across the world.

  12. Analytical and numerical methods; advanced computer concepts

    SciTech Connect

    Lax, P D

    1991-03-01

    This past year, two projects have been completed and a new is under way. First, in joint work with R. Kohn, we developed a numerical algorithm to study the blowup of solutions to equations with certain similarity transformations. In the second project, the adaptive mesh refinement code of Berger and Colella for shock hydrodynamic calculations has been parallelized and numerical studies using two different shared memory machines have been done. My current effort is towards the development of Cartesian mesh methods to solve pdes with complicated geometries. Most of the coming year will be spent on this project, which is joint work with Prof. Randy Leveque at the University of Washington in Seattle.

  13. Advances in numerical and applied mathematics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    South, J. C., Jr. (Editor); Hussaini, M. Y. (Editor)

    1986-01-01

    This collection of papers covers some recent developments in numerical analysis and computational fluid dynamics. Some of these studies are of a fundamental nature. They address basic issues such as intermediate boundary conditions for approximate factorization schemes, existence and uniqueness of steady states for time dependent problems, and pitfalls of implicit time stepping. The other studies deal with modern numerical methods such as total variation diminishing schemes, higher order variants of vortex and particle methods, spectral multidomain techniques, and front tracking techniques. There is also a paper on adaptive grids. The fluid dynamics papers treat the classical problems of imcompressible flows in helically coiled pipes, vortex breakdown, and transonic flows.

  14. Laboratory investigation and direct numerical simulation of wind effect on steep surface waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Troitskaya, Yuliya; Sergeev, Daniil; Druzhinin, Oleg; Ermakova, Olga

    2015-04-01

    particles 20 μm in diameter were injected into the airflow. The images of the illuminated particles were photographed with a digital CCD video camera at a rate of 1000 frames per second. For the each given parameters of wind and waves, a statistical ensemble of 30 movies with duration from 200 to 600 ms was obtained. Individual flow realizations manifested the typical features of flow separation, while the average vector velocity fields obtained by the phase averaging of the individual vector fields were smooth and slightly asymmetrical, with the minimum of the horizontal velocity near the water surface shifted to the leeward side of the wave profile, but do not demonstrate the features of flow separation. The wave-induced pressure perturbations, averaged over the turbulent fluctuations, were retrieved from the measured velocity fields, using the Reynolds equations. It ensures sufficient accuracy for study of the dependence of the wave increment on the wave amplitude. The dependences of the wave growth rate on the wave steepness are weakly decreasing, serving as indirect proof of the non-separated character of flow over waves. Also direct numerical simulation of the airflow over finite amplitude periodic surface wave was performed. In the experiments the primitive 3-dimensional fluid mechanics equations were solved in the airflow over curved water boundary for the following parameters: the Reynolds number Re=15000, the wave steepness ka=0-0.2, the parameter c/u*=0-10 (where u* is the friction velocity and c is the wave celerity). Similar to the physical experiment the instant realizations of the velocity field demonstrate flow separation at the crests of the waves, but the ensemble averaged velocity fields had typical structures similar to those excising in shear flows near critical levels, where the phase velocity of the disturbance coincides with the flow velocity. The wind growth rate determined by the ensemble averaged wave-induced pressure component in phase of the

  15. Hydration rate of obsidian.

    PubMed

    Friedman, I; Long, W

    1976-01-30

    The hydration rates of 12 obsidian samples of different chemical compositions were measured at temperatures from 95 degrees to 245 degrees C. An expression relating hydration rate to temperature was derived for each sample. The SiO(2) content and refractive index are related to the hydration rate, as are the CaO, MgO, and original water contents. With this information it is possible to calculate the hydration rate of a sample from its silica content, refractive index, or chemical index and a knowledge of the effective temperature at which the hydration occurred. The effective hydration temperature can be either measured or approximated from weather records. Rates have been calculated by both methods, and the results show that weather records can give a good approximation to the true EHT, particularly in tropical and subtropical climates. If one determines the EHT by any of the methods suggested, and also measures or knows the rate of hydration of the particular obsidian used, it should be possible to carry out absolute dating to +/- 10 percent of the true age over periods as short as several years and as long as millions of years. PMID:17782901

  16. Hydration rate of obsidian.

    PubMed

    Friedman, I; Long, W

    1976-01-30

    The hydration rates of 12 obsidian samples of different chemical compositions were measured at temperatures from 95 degrees to 245 degrees C. An expression relating hydration rate to temperature was derived for each sample. The SiO(2) content and refractive index are related to the hydration rate, as are the CaO, MgO, and original water contents. With this information it is possible to calculate the hydration rate of a sample from its silica content, refractive index, or chemical index and a knowledge of the effective temperature at which the hydration occurred. The effective hydration temperature can be either measured or approximated from weather records. Rates have been calculated by both methods, and the results show that weather records can give a good approximation to the true EHT, particularly in tropical and subtropical climates. If one determines the EHT by any of the methods suggested, and also measures or knows the rate of hydration of the particular obsidian used, it should be possible to carry out absolute dating to +/- 10 percent of the true age over periods as short as several years and as long as millions of years.

  17. Heart Rate Monitors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    Under a NASA grant, Dr. Robert M. Davis and Dr. William M. Portnoy came up with a new type of electrocardiographic electrode that would enable long term use on astronauts. Their invention was an insulated capacitive electrode constructed of a thin dielectric film. NASA subsequently licensed the electrode technology to Richard Charnitski, inventor of the VersaClimber, who founded Heart Rate, Inc., to further develop and manufacture personal heart monitors and to produce exercise machines using the technology for the physical fitness, medical and home markets. Same technology is on both the Home and Institutional Model VersaClimbers. On the Home Model an infrared heart beat transmitter is worn under exercise clothing. Transmitted heart rate is used to control the work intensity on the VersaClimber using the heart rate as the speedometer of the exercise. This offers advantages to a full range of users from the cardiac rehab patient to the high level physical conditioning of elite athletes. The company manufactures and markets five models of the 1*2*3 HEART RATE monitors that are used wherever people exercise to accurately monitor their heart rate. Company is developing a talking heart rate monitor that works with portable headset radios. A version of the heart beat transmitter will be available to the manufacturers of other aerobic exercise machines.

  18. Observers are consistent when rating image conspicuity.

    PubMed

    Cerf, Moran; Cleary, Daniel R; Peters, Robert J; Einhäuser, Wolfgang; Koch, Christof

    2007-11-01

    Human perception of an image's conspicuity depends on the stimulus itself and the observer's semantic interpretation. We investigated the relative contribution of the former, sensory-driven, component. Participants viewed sequences of images from five different classes-fractals, overhead satellite imagery, grayscale and colored natural scenes, and magazine covers-and graded each numerically according to its perceived conspicuity. We found significant consistency in this rating within and between observers for all image categories. In a subsequent recognition memory test, performance was significantly above chance for all categories, with the weakest memory for satellite imagery, and reaching near ceiling for magazine covers. When repeating the experiment after one year, ratings remained consistent within each observer and category, despite the absence of explicit scene memory. Our findings suggest that the rating of image conspicuity is driven by image-immanent, sensory factors common to all observers.

  19. A rumor spreading model with variable forgetting rate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Laijun; Xie, Wanlin; Gao, H. Oliver; Qiu, Xiaoyan; Wang, Xiaoli; Zhang, Shuhai

    2013-12-01

    A rumor spreading model with the consideration of forgetting rate changing over time is examined in small-world networks. The mean-field equations are derived to describe the dynamics of rumor spreading in small-world networks. Further, numerical solutions are conducted on LiveJournal, an online social blogging platform, to better understand the performance of the model. Results show that the forgetting rate has a significant impact on the final size of rumor spreading: the larger the initial forgetting rate or the faster the forgetting speed, the smaller the final size of the rumor spreading. Numerical solutions also show that the final size of rumor spreading is much larger under a variable forgetting rate compared to that under a constant forgetting rate.

  20. Calculation of molecular excitation rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flynn, George

    1993-01-01

    State-to-state collisional excitation rates for interstellar molecules observed by radio astronomers continue to be required to interpret observed line intensities in terms of local temperatures and densities. A problem of particular interest is collisional excitation of water which is important for modeling the observed interstellar masers. In earlier work supported by a different NASA Grant, excitation of water in collisions with He atoms was studied; after many years of successively more refined calculations that problem now seems to be well understood, and discrepancies with earlier experimental data for related (pressure broadening) phenomena are believed to reflect experimental errors. Because of interstellar abundances, excitation by H2, the dominant interstellar species, is much more important than excitation by He, although it has been argued that rates for excitation by these are similar. Under the current grant theoretical study of this problem has begun which is greatly complicated by the additional degrees of freedom which must be included both in determining the interaction potential and also in the molecular scattering calculation. We have now computed the interaction forces for nearly a thousand molecular geometries and are close to having an acceptable global fit to these points which is necessary for the molecular dynamics calculations. Also, extensive modifications have been made to the molecular scattering code, MOLSCAT. These included coding the rotational basis sets and coupling matrix elements required for collisions of an asymmetric top with a linear rotor. A new method for numerical solution of the coupled equations has been incorporated. Because of the long-ranged nature of the water-hydrogen interaction it is necessary to integrate the equations to rather large intermolecular separations, and the integration methods previously available in MOLSCAT are not ideal for such cases. However, the method used by Alexander in his HIBRIDON code is