Science.gov

Sample records for 0-15 cm horizons

  1. The inference of atmospheric ozone using satellite horizon measurements in the 1042 per cm band.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Russell, J. M., III; Drayson, S. R.

    1972-01-01

    Description of a method for inferring atmospheric ozone information using infrared horizon radiance measurements in the 1042 per cm band. An analysis based on this method proves the feasibility of the horizon experiment for determining ozone information and shows that the ozone partial pressure can be determined in the altitude range from 50 down to 25 km. A comprehensive error study is conducted which considers effects of individual errors as well as the effect of all error sources acting simultaneously. The results show that in the absence of a temperature profile bias error, it should be possible to determine the ozone partial pressure to within an rms value of 15 to 20%. It may be possible to reduce this rms error to 5% by smoothing the solution profile. These results would be seriously degraded by an atmospheric temperature bias error of only 3 K; thus, great care should be taken to minimize this source of error in an experiment. It is probable, in view of recent technological developments, that these errors will be much smaller in future flight experiments and the altitude range will widen to include from about 60 km down to the tropopause region.

  2. HORIZON SENSING

    SciTech Connect

    Larry G. Stolarczyk, Sc.D.

    2002-07-31

    Real-time horizon sensing (HS) on continuous mining (CM) machines is becoming an industry tool. Installation and testing of production-grade HS systems has been ongoing this quarter at Oxbow Mining Company, Monterey Coal Company (EXXON), FMC Trona, Twentymile Coal Company (RAG America), and SASOL Coal. Detailed monitoring of system function, user experience, and mining benefits is ongoing. All horizon sensor components have finished MSHA (United States) and IEC (International) certification.

  3. 47 CFR 0.15 - Functions of the Office.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Functions of the Office. 0.15 Section 0.15 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION GENERAL COMMISSION ORGANIZATION Organization Office of Media Relations § 0.15 Functions of the Office. (a) Enhance public understanding of and compliance with the Commission's regulatory...

  4. 28 CFR 0.15 - Deputy Attorney General.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ..., or political opinion. (2) Review cases decided by the Board of Immigration Appeals pursuant to 8 CFR... Register citations affecting § 0.15, see the List of CFR Sections Affected, which appears in the Finding... Executive Office of the President. (4) Coordinate and control the Department's reaction to...

  5. 28 CFR 0.15 - Deputy Attorney General.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ..., or political opinion. (2) Review cases decided by the Board of Immigration Appeals pursuant to 8 CFR... Register citations affecting § 0.15, see the List of CFR Sections Affected, which appears in the Finding... disturbances and terrorism. (5) Perform such other duties and functions as may be assigned from time to time...

  6. 28 CFR 0.15 - Deputy Attorney General.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ..., or political opinion. (2) Review cases decided by the Board of Immigration Appeals pursuant to 8 CFR... Register citations affecting § 0.15, see the List of CFR Sections Affected, which appears in the Finding... and programs and in providing overall supervision and direction to all organizational units of...

  7. HORIZON SENSING (PROPOSAL NO.51)

    SciTech Connect

    Larry G. Stolarczyk

    2003-07-30

    Real-time horizon sensing on continuous mining (CM) machines is becoming an industry tool. Installation and testing of production-grade Horizon Sensor (HS) systems has been ongoing this quarter at Monterey Coal Company (ExxonMobil), Mountain Coal Company West Elk Mine (Arch), Deserado Mining Company (Blue Mountain Energy), and The Ohio Valley Coal Company (TOVCC). Monitoring of system function, user experience, and mining benefits is ongoing. All horizon sensor components have finished MSHA (U.S.) and IEC (International) certification.

  8. HORIZON SENSING

    SciTech Connect

    Larry G. Stolarczyk

    2003-03-18

    With the aid of a DOE grant (No. DE-FC26-01NT41050), Stolar Research Corporation (Stolar) developed the Horizon Sensor (HS) to distinguish between the different layers of a coal seam. Mounted on mining machine cutter drums, HS units can detect or sense the horizon between the coal seam and the roof and floor rock, providing the opportunity to accurately mine the section of the seam most desired. HS also enables accurate cutting of minimum height if that is the operator's objective. Often when cutting is done out-of-seam, the head-positioning function facilitates a fixed mining height to minimize dilution. With this technology, miners can still be at a remote location, yet cut only the clean coal, resulting in a much more efficient overall process. The objectives of this project were to demonstrate the feasibility of horizon sensing on mining machines and demonstrate that Horizon Sensing can allow coal to be cut cleaner and more efficiently. Stolar's primary goal was to develop the Horizon Sensor (HS) into an enabling technology for full or partial automation or ''agile mining''. This technical innovation (R&D 100 Award Winner) is quickly demonstrating improvements in productivity and miner safety at several prominent coal mines in the United States. In addition, the HS system can enable the cutting of cleaner coal. Stolar has driven the HS program on the philosophy that cutting cleaner coal means burning cleaner coal. The sensor, located inches from the cutting bits, is based upon the physics principles of a Resonant Microstrip Patch Antenna (RMPA). When it is in proximity of the rock-coal interface, the RMPA impedance varies depending on the thickness of uncut coal. The impedance is measured by the computer-controlled electronics and then sent by radio waves to the mining machine. The worker at the machine can read the data via a Graphical User Interface, displaying a color-coded image of the coal being cut, and direct the machine appropriately. The Horizon Sensor

  9. Killing Horizons Kill Horizon Degrees

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bergamin, L.; Grumiller, D.

    Frequently, it is argued that the microstates responsible for the Bekenstein-Hawking entropy should arise from some physical degrees of freedom located near or on the black hole horizon. In this essay, we elucidate that instead entropy may emerge from the conversion of physical degrees of freedom, attached to a generic boundary, into unobservable gauge degrees of freedom attached to the horizon. By constructing the reduced phase space, it can be demonstrated that such a transmutation indeed takes place for a large class of black holes, including Schwarzschild.

  10. Synthesis and Hydrogen Desorption Properties of Mg1.7Al0.15Ti0.15Ni-CNT Nanocomposite Powder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Enayati, M. H.; Karimzadeh, F.; Jafari, M.; Sabooni, S.

    2015-03-01

    In this research, the effects of nanocrystallization and incorporation of aluminum, titanium, and carbon nanotubes (CNTs) on hydrogen desorption behavior of Mg2Ni alloy were investigated. Toward this purpose, nanocrystalline Mg2Ni intermetallic compound with average grain size of 20 nm was prepared by ball milling of elemental magnesium and nickel powders. Mg2Ni powder was then ball milled with aluminum and titanium powders for 20 h to dissolve these elements into the Mg2Ni structure, leading to the formation of Mg1.7Al0.15Ti0.15Ni compound. The elemental x-ray mapping analysis revealed the uniform dissolution of aluminum and titanium inside the Mg2Ni structure. Mg2Ni and Mg1.7Al0.15Ti0.15Ni compounds were further ball milled with 3 wt.% CNT for 5 h. The high-resolution field emission scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy revealed that CNTs have retained their tubular shape after ball-milling process. The hydrogen desorption properties of the samples were identified using a Sieverts-type apparatus at 473 K. The Mg2Ni, Mg2Ni-CNT, and Mg1.7Ti0.15Al0.15-CNT samples showed the desorbed hydrogen of 0.17, 0.25, and 0.28 wt.% after 1 h, respectively, indicating 47 and 65% increase in the hydrogen desorption capability of Mg2Ni via CNT addition and co-presence of aluminum-titanium-CNT. The direct hydrogen diffusion through CNTs and development of local atomic distortion due to substitution of magnesium atoms by aluminum and titanium appears to be responsible for enhancement of desorption behavior of Mg1.7Al0.15Ti0.15-3 wt.% CNT.

  11. Disorder - driven phase transition in La0.37Bi0.15Sm0.15Ca0.33MnO3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ade, Ramesh; Singh, R.

    2015-06-01

    We report the effect of disorder on the properties of La0.37Bi0.15Sm0.15Ca0.33MnO3 manganite synthesized by sol - gel method. The critical properties were investigated through various techniques such as modified - Arrott plot, Kouvel - Fisher method and critical isotherm analysis. The sample show second- order phase transition near critical point. The decrease in magnetization (M), Curie temperature (TC), evolution of spin or cluster glass behavior and the nature of phase transition compared to first - order transition in La0.67Ca0.33MnO3 are ascribed to the disorder caused by the size mismatch of the A-site cations with Bi and Sm doping at La- site.

  12. Ferroelectric properties of pulsed laser deposited Ba(Zr0.15Ti0.85)O3 thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    James, A. R.; Prakash, Chandra

    2004-02-01

    Thin films of Ba(Zr0.15Ti0.85)O3 were crystallized in situ at several different oxygen background pressures and temperatures. The optimal temperature and pressure for obtaining films with smooth surface morphology and good electrical properties was found to be 675 °C and 300 mTorr, respectively. Films grown at this temperature were found to have a Pr of 3.31 μC/cm2 and an Ec of 93.5 kV/cm. Low field dielectric measurements and C-V measurements were performed in order to study the dielectric behavior of the films. A tunability of ˜45% was recorded on the films.

  13. Growth and dislocation etching of InBi 1-xSe x ( x=0.15) single crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shah, Dimple; Pandya, G. R.; Vyas, S. M.

    2009-01-01

    Single crystals of InBi 0.85 Se .15 ( x=0.15) have been grown by the zone melting method. The freezing interface temperature gradient was 65 °C/cm and the best-quality single crystal has been obtained at growth velocity 1.5 cm/h. The crystals grown by the zone melting method have been observed to exhibit certain typical features on their top free surfaces. The energy dispersive analysis of X-ray (EDAX) technique has been used for testing the presence of constituent element of InBi:Se single crystal. A new dislocation etchant has been developed by the successive trial-error method. The dislocation etchant has been found to give reproducible etch-pits on the cleavage surface. Various standard tests for a dislocation etchant have been carried out and results are reported.

  14. Ganciclovir ophthalmic gel, 0.15%: a valuable tool for treating ocular herpes

    PubMed Central

    Colin, Joseph

    2007-01-01

    Ocular herpes simplex virus (HSV) infection remains a major cause of corneal blindness. Several topical and oral antiviral medications have been used to treat herpetic keratitis. Advances in topical ophthalmic antivirals have been made over the past several decades. The first antivirals that were discovered were cytotoxic, while the antivirals developed more recently, such as acyclovir and ganciclovir, have exceeded these drugs in both efficacy and tolerability. Commercially available outside of the US since 1996, ganciclovir ophthalmic gel, 0.15% (GCV 0.15%, European tradename: Virgan®) is sold in more than 30 countries and has become the standard of care in treating acute herpetic keratitis. GCV 0.15% has been studied in animal models of ocular herpes, in healthy volunteers, and in several clinical studies. It has been found to be safe and effective at treating acute superficial herpetic keratitis. Previous preclinical studies of ganciclovir have shown activity against several common adenovirus strains and one recent clinical study demonstrated clinical effect against adenoviral conjunctivitis. This review is intended to provide a comprehensive overview of the GCV 0.15%, including a brief summary of the etiology and available treatments for ocular HSV, an explanation of GCV 0.15% mechanism of action, a compendium of preclinical and clinical GCV 0.15% studies, and an introduction into new areas of interest involving this drug. PMID:19668521

  15. Semiclassical ultraextremal horizons

    SciTech Connect

    Matyjasek, Jerzy; Zaslavskii, O.B.

    2005-04-15

    We examine backreaction of quantum massive fields on multiply-degenerate (ultraextremal) horizons. It is shown that, under influence of the quantum backreaction, the horizon of such a kind moves to a new position near which the metric does not change its asymptotics, so the ultraextremal black holes and cosmological spacetimes do exist as self-consistent solutions of the semiclassical field equations.

  16. The 2011 Horizon Report

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, L.; Smith, R.; Willis, H.; Levine, A.; Haywood, K.

    2011-01-01

    The internationally recognized series of "Horizon Reports" is part of the New Media Consortium's Horizon Project, a comprehensive research venture established in 2002 that identifies and describes emerging technologies likely to have a large impact over the coming five years on a variety of sectors around the globe. This volume, the "2011 Horizon…

  17. Two Horizons of Fusion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lo, Mun Ling; Chik, Pakey Pui Man

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we aim to differentiate the internal and external horizons of "fusion." "Fusion" in the internal horizon relates to the structure and meaning of the object of learning as experienced by the learner. It clarifies the interrelationships among an object's critical features and aspects. It also illuminates the…

  18. The 2010 Horizon Report

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, L.; Levine, A.; Smith, R.; Stone, S.

    2010-01-01

    The annual "Horizon Report" describes the continuing work of the New Media Consortium's Horizon Project, a qualitative research project established in 2002 that identifies and describes emerging technologies likely to have a large impact on teaching, learning, or creative inquiry on college and university campuses within the next five years. The…

  19. Fuzziness at the horizon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Batic, Davide; Nicolini, Piero

    2010-08-01

    We study the stability of the noncommutative Schwarzschild black hole interior by analysing the propagation of a massless scalar field between the two horizons. We show that the spacetime fuzziness triggered by the field higher momenta can cure the classical exponential blue-shift divergence, suppressing the emergence of infinite energy density in a region nearby the Cauchy horizon.

  20. Morphological and crystallographic evolution of bainite transformation in Fe-0.15C binary alloy.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Di; Terasaki, Hidenori; Komizo, Yuichi

    2010-01-01

    In this article, an in situ observation method, combining laser scanning confocal microscopy and electron backscattering diffraction, was used to investigate the morphological and crystallographic evolution of bainite transformation in a Fe-0.15C binary alloy. The nucleation at a grain boundary and inclusions, sympathetic nucleation, and impingement event of bainitic ferrite were directly shown in real time. The variant evolution during bainite transformation and misorientation between bainitic ferrites were clarified. Strong variant selection was observed during sympathetic nucleation. PMID:19588518

  1. New Horizons at Pluto

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schenk, Paul; Nimmo, Francis

    2016-06-01

    The New Horizons mission has revealed Pluto and its moon Charon to be geologically active worlds. The familiar, yet exotic, landforms suggest that geologic processes operate similarly across the Solar System, even in its cold outer reaches.

  2. Evidence for a sedimentary siloxane horizon

    SciTech Connect

    Pellenbarg, R.E.; Tevault, D.E.

    1986-07-01

    Selected samples from two Puget Sound sediment cores have been analyzed for poly(organo)siloxanes(silicones). One core was 60 years old at 30-cm depth (ages by lead-210 dating) and showed no evidence for silicones there. The second, 15 years old at depth, exhibited silicones at depth. Clearly shown is evidence for a siloxane horizon in theses two cores, with the presence of the horizon directly related to the fact that silicones have been in widespread use only since World War II. All samples were analyzed by solvent extraction and diffuse reflectance Fourier transform infrared spectrometry. 10 references, 2 figures, 1 table.

  3. Infrared horizon locator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jalink, A., Jr. (Inventor)

    1973-01-01

    A precise method and apparatus for locating the earth's infrared horizon from space that is independent of season and latitude is described. First and second integrations of the earth's radiance profile are made from space to earth with the second delayed with respect to the first. The second integration is multiplied by a predetermined constant R and then compared with the first integration. When the two are equal the horizon is located.

  4. Firewall or smooth horizon?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ori, Amos

    2016-01-01

    Almheiri, Marolf, Polchinski, and Sully pointed out that for a sufficiently old black hole (BH), the set of assumptions known as the complementarity postulates appears to be inconsistent with the assumption of local regularity at the horizon. They concluded that the horizon of an old BH is likely to be the locus of local irregularity, a "firewall". Here I point out that if one adopts a different assumption, namely that semiclassical physics holds throughout its anticipated domain of validity, then the inconsistency is avoided, and the horizon retains its regularity. In this alternative view-point, the vast portion of the original BH information remains trapped inside the BH throughout the semiclassical domain of evaporation, and possibly leaks out later on. This appears to be an inevitable outcome of semiclassical gravity (if assumed to apply throughout its anticipated domain of validity).

  5. Thermal and magnetic properties of copper potassium tutton salt below 0. 15 K

    SciTech Connect

    Fujii, Y.; Shigi, T.

    1988-08-01

    The specific heat and the ac susceptibility of copper potassium tutton salt have been measured between 0.01 and 0.15 K. The magnetic phase transition from the paramagnetic to the canted ferromagnetic state was observed at 29.5 mK in zero field. From the obtained electronic entropy curve this salt is considered to be a Heisenberg-type ferromagnet. The copper nuclear specific heat of the hyperfine splitting is estimated to be C/sub N/ = 1.1 /times/ 10/sup /minus/5/R/(T/sup 2//(K/sup 2/)), which is one order smaller than the value calculated from previous results of the paramagnetic resonance.

  6. Optical constraints of kerogen from 0.15 to 40 microns: Comparison with meteoritic organics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Khare, Bishun N.; Thompson, W. R.; Sagan, C.; Arakawa, E. T.; Meisse, C.; Gilmour, I.

    1990-01-01

    Kerogens are dark, complex organic materials produced on the Earth primarily by geologic processing of biologic materials, but kerogens have chemical and spectral similarities to some classes of highly processed extraterrestrial organic materials. Kerogen-like solids were proposed as constitutents of the very dark reddish surfaces of some asteroids and are also spectrally similar to some carbonaceous organic residues and the Iapetus dark material. Kerogen can thus serve as a useful laboratory analog to very dark, spectrally red extraterrestrial materials; its optical constants can be used to investigate the effects of particle size, void space and mixing of bright and dark components in models of scattering by dark asteroidal, cometary, and satellite surfaces. Measurements of the optical constants of both Type 2 kerogen and of macromolecular organic residue from the Murchison carbonaceous chondrite via transmission and reflection measurements on thin films are reported. The real part of the refractive index, n, is determined by variable incidence-angle reflectance to be 1.60 + or - 0.05 from 0.4 to 2.0 micrometers wavelength. Work extending the measurement of n to longer wavelengths is in progress. The imaginary part of the refractive index, k, shows substantial structure from 0.15 to 40 micrometers. The values are accurate to + or - 20 percent in the UV and IR regions and to + or - 30 percent in the visible. The k values of organic residues were also measured from the Murchison meteorite. Comparison of the kerogen and Murchison data reveals that between 0.15 and 40 microns, Murchison has a similar structure but no bands as sharp as in kerogen, and that the k values for Murchison are significantly higher than those of kerogen.

  7. Ubiquitous CM and DM

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crowley, Sandra L.

    2000-01-01

    Ubiquitous is a real word. I thank a former Total Quality Coach for my first exposure some years ago to its existence. My version of Webster's dictionary defines ubiquitous as "present, or seeming to be present, everywhere at the same time; omnipresent." While I believe that God is omnipresent, I have come to discover that CM and DM are present everywhere. Oh, yes; I define CM as Configuration Management and DM as either Data or Document Management. Ten years ago, I had my first introduction to the CM world. I had an opportunity to do CM for the Space Station effort at the NASA Lewis Research Center. I learned that CM was a discipline that had four areas of focus: identification, control, status accounting, and verification. I was certified as a CMIl graduate and was indoctrinated about clear, concise, and valid. Off I went into a world of entirely new experiences. I was exposed to change requests and change boards first hand. I also learned about implementation of changes, and then of technical and CM requirements.

  8. UNIFORM INFALL TOWARD THE COMETARY H II REGION IN THE G34.26+0.15 COMPLEX?

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Tie; Wu, Yuefang; Zhang, Huawei E-mail: ywu@pku.edu.cn

    2013-10-10

    Gas accretion is a key process in star formation. However, gas infall detections in high-mass, star-forming regions with high spatial resolution observations are rare. Here, we report the detection of gas infall toward a cometary ultracompact H II region ({sup C)} in the G34.26+0.15 complex. The observations were made with the IRAM 30 m, the James Clerk Maxwell Telescope 15 m telescope, and the Submillimeter Array (SMA). The hot core associated with 'C' has a mass of ∼76 ± 11 M{sub ☉} and a volume density of (1.1 ± 0.2) × 10{sup 8} cm{sup –3}. The HCN (3-2) and HCO{sup +} (1-0) lines observed by single dishes and the CN (2-1) lines observed by the SMA show redshifted absorption features, indicating gas infall. We found a linear relationship between the line width and optical depth of the CN (2-1) lines. Those transitions with larger optical depths and line widths have larger absorption areas. However, the infall velocities measured from different lines seem to be constant, indicating that the gas infall is uniform. We also investigated the evolution of gas infall in high-mass, star-forming regions. A tight relationship was found between the infall velocity and the total dust/gas mass. At stages prior to the hot core phase, the typical infall velocity and mass infall rate are ∼1 km s{sup –1} and ∼10{sup –4} M{sub ☉} yr{sup –1}, respectively. While in more evolved regions, the infall velocity and mass infall rates can reach as high as several km s{sup –1} and ∼10{sup –3}-10{sup –2} M{sub ☉} yr{sup –1}, respectively. Accelerated infall has been detected toward some hypercompact H II and ultracompact H II regions. However, the acceleration phenomenon is not seen in more evolved ultracompact H II regions (e.g., G34.26+0.15)

  9. Stable predictive control horizons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Estrada, Raúl; Favela, Antonio; Raimondi, Angelo; Nevado, Antonio; Requena, Ricardo; Beltrán-Carbajal, Francisco

    2012-04-01

    The stability theory of predictive and adaptive predictive control for processes of linear and stable nature is based on the hypothesis of a physically realisable driving desired trajectory (DDT). The formal theoretical verification of this hypothesis is trivial for processes with a stable inverse, but it is not for processes with an unstable inverse. The extended strategy of predictive control was developed with the purpose of overcoming methodologically this stability problem and it has delivered excellent performance and stability in its industrial applications given a suitable choice of the prediction horizon. From a theoretical point of view, the existence of a prediction horizon capable of ensuring stability for processes with an unstable inverse was proven in the literature. However, no analytical solution has been found for the determination of the prediction horizon values which guarantee stability, in spite of the theoretical and practical interest of this matter. This article presents a new method able to determine the set of prediction horizon values which ensure stability under the extended predictive control strategy formulation and a particular performance criterion for the design of the DDT generically used in many industrial applications. The practical application of this method is illustrated by means of simulation examples.

  10. Boosted apparent horizons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akcay, Sarp

    Boosted black holes play an important role in General Relativity (GR), especially in relation to the binary black hole problem. Solving Einstein vac- uum equations in the strong field regime had long been the holy grail of numerical relativity until the significant breakthroughs made in 2005 and 2006. Numerical relativity plays a crucial role in gravitational wave detection by providing numerically generated gravitational waveforms that help search for actual signatures of gravitational radiation exciting laser interferometric de- tectors such as LIGO, VIRGO and GEO600 here on Earth. Binary black holes orbit each other in an ever tightening adiabatic inspiral caused by energy loss due to gravitational radiation emission. As the orbits shrinks, the holes speed up and eventually move at relativistic speeds in the vicinity of each other (separated by ~ 10M or so where 2M is the Schwarzschild radius). As such, one must abandon the Newtonian notion of a point mass on a circular orbit with tangential velocity and replace it with the concept of black holes, cloaked behind spheroidal event horizons that become distorted due to strong gravity, and further appear distorted because of Lorentz effects from the high orbital velocity. Apparent horizons (AHs) are 2-dimensional boundaries that are trapped surfaces. Conceptually, one can think of them as 'quasi-local' definitions for a black hole horizon. This will be explained in more detail in chapter 2. Apparent horizons are especially important in numerical relativity as they provide a computationally efficient way of describing and locating a black hole horizon. For a stationary spacetime, apparent horizons are 2-dimensional cross-sections of the event horizon, which is itself a 3-dimensional null surface in spacetime. Because an AH is a 2-dimensional cross-section of an event horizon, its area remains invariant under distortions due to Lorentz boosts although its shape changes. This fascinating property of the AH can be

  11. Instability of enclosed horizons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kay, Bernard S.

    2015-03-01

    We point out that there are solutions to the scalar wave equation on dimensional Minkowski space with finite energy tails which, if they reflect off a uniformly accelerated mirror due to (say) Dirichlet boundary conditions on it, develop an infinite stress-energy tensor on the mirror's Rindler horizon. We also show that, in the presence of an image mirror in the opposite Rindler wedge, suitable compactly supported arbitrarily small initial data on a suitable initial surface will develop an arbitrarily large stress-energy scalar near where the two horizons cross. Also, while there is a regular Hartle-Hawking-Israel-like state for the quantum theory between these two mirrors, there are coherent states built on it for which there are similar singularities in the expectation value of the renormalized stress-energy tensor. We conjecture that in other situations with analogous enclosed horizons such as a (maximally extended) Schwarzschild black hole in equilibrium in a (stationary spherical) box or the (maximally extended) Schwarzschild-AdS spacetime, there will be similar stress-energy singularities and almost-singularities—leading to instability of the horizons when gravity is switched on and matter and gravity perturbations are allowed for. All this suggests it is incorrect to picture a black hole in equilibrium in a box or a Schwarzschild-AdS black hole as extending beyond the past and future horizons of a single Schwarzschild (/Schwarzschild-AdS) wedge. It would thus provide new evidence for 't Hooft's brick wall model while seeming to invalidate the picture in Maldacena's ` Eternal black holes in AdS'. It would thereby also support the validity of the author's matter-gravity entanglement hypothesis and of the paper ` Brick walls and AdS/CFT' by the author and Ortíz.

  12. 21-cm Intensity Mapping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Tzu-Ching; GBT-HIM Team

    2016-01-01

    The redshifted 21-cm emission from neutral hydrogen has emerged as a powerful probe for large-scale structure; a significant fraction of the observable universe can be mapped in the Intensity Mapping regime out to high redshifts. At redshifts around unity, the 21-cm emission traces the matter distribution and can be used to measure the Baryon Acoustic Oscillation (BAO) signature and constrain dark energy properties. I will describe our HI Intensity Mapping program at the Green Bank Telescope (GBT), aiming at measuring the 21cm power spectrum at z=0.8. A 800-MHz multi-beam focal-plane array for the GBT is currently under construction in order to facilitate a large-scale survey for BAO and the redshift-space distortion measurements for cosmological constraints.

  13. Evaluation of the SC-1/megasonic clean for sub-0.15 micron particle removal

    SciTech Connect

    Adkins, C.L.J.; Resnick, P.J.; Clews, P.J.; Thomas, E.V.; Korbe, N.C.; Cannaday, S.T.

    1994-07-01

    A statistical design of experiments approach has been employed to evaluate the particle removal efficacy of the SC-1/megasonic clean for sub-0.15 {mu}m inorganic particles. The effects of megasonic input power, solution chemistry, bath temperature, and immersion time have been investigated. Immersion time was not observed to be a statistically significant factor. The NH{sub 4}OH/H{sub 2}O{sub 2} ratio was significant, but varying the molar H{sub 2}O{sub 2} concentration had no effect on inorganic particle removal. Substantially diluted chemistries, performed with high megasonic input power and moderate-to-elevated temperatures, was shown to be very effective for small particle removal. Bath composition data show extended lifetimes can be obtained when high purity chemicals are used at moderate (eg., 45{degrees}C) temperature. Transition metal surface concentrations and surface roughness have been measured after dilute SC-1 processing and compared to metallic contamination following traditional SC-1.

  14. The mass function of ω Centauri down to 0.15 Msolar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sollima, A.; Ferraro, F. R.; Bellazzini, M.

    2007-11-01

    By means of deep FORS1/VLT and ACS/Hubble Space Telescope observations of a wide area in the stellar system ω Cen we measured the luminosity function of main-sequence stars down to R = 22.6 and IF814W = 24.5. The luminosity functions obtained have been converted into mass functions and compared with analytical initial mass functions (IMFs) available in the literature. The mass function obtained, reaching M ~ 0.15Msolar, can be well reproduced by a broken power law with indices α = -2.3 for M > 0.5Msolar and α = -0.8 for M < 0.5Msolar. Since the stellar populations of ω Cen have been proved to be actually unaffected by dynamical evolution processes, the mass function measured in this stellar system should represent the best approximation of the IMF of a star cluster. The comparison with the MF measured in other Galactic globular clusters suggests that possible primordial differences in the slope of the low-mass end of their MF could exist. Based on observations collected at the European Southern Observatory within the observing program 74.D-0369(B). Also based on observations with the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope, obtained at the Space Telescope Science Institute, which is operated by the Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy, Inc., under NASA contract NAS5-26555. E-mail: antonio.sollima@bo.astro.it

  15. Spacetimes containing slowly evolving horizons

    SciTech Connect

    Kavanagh, William; Booth, Ivan

    2006-08-15

    Slowly evolving horizons are trapping horizons that are ''almost'' isolated horizons. This paper reviews their definition and discusses several spacetimes containing such structures. These include certain Vaidya and Tolman-Bondi solutions as well as (perturbatively) tidally distorted black holes. Taking into account the mass scales and orders of magnitude that arise in these calculations, we conjecture that slowly evolving horizons are the norm rather than the exception in astrophysical processes that involve stellar-scale black holes.

  16. Pulsed Laser Deposition of BaCe(sub 0.85)Y(sub 0.15)0(sub 3) FILMS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dynys, F. W.; Sayir, A.

    2006-01-01

    Pulsed laser deposition has been used to grow nanostructured BaCe(sub 0.85)Y(sub 0.15)0(sub 3) films. The objective is to enhance protonic conduction by reduction of membrane thickness. Sintered samples and laser targets were prepared by sintering BaCe(sub 0.85)Y(sub 0.15)O(sub 3) powders derived by solid state synthesis. Films 2 to 6 m thick were deposited by KrF excimer laser on Si and porous Al2O3 substrates. Nanocrystalline films were fabricated at deposition temperatures of 600-800 C deg at O2 pressure of 30 mTorr and laser fluence of 1.2 J/cm square. Films were characterized by x-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy and electrical impedance spectroscopy. Dense single phase BaCe(sub 0.85)Y((sub 0.15) 0(sub 3) films with a columnar growth morphology is observed, preferred crystal growth was found to be dependent upon deposition temperature and substrate type. Electrical conductivity of bulk samples produced by solid state sintering and thin film samples were measured over a temperature range of 100 C deg to 900 C deg in moist argon. Electrical conduction of the fabricated films was 1 to 4 orders of magnitude lower than the sintered bulk samples. With respect to the film growth direction, activation energy for electrical conduction is 3 times higher in the perpendicular direction than the parallel direction.

  17. Halogens in CM Chondrites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Menard, J. M.; Caron, B.; Jambon, A.; Michel, A.; Villemant, B.

    2013-09-01

    We set up an extraction line of halogens (fluorine, chlorine) by pyrohydrolysis with 50 mg of rock. We analyzed 7 CM2 chondrites found in Antarctica and found that the Cl content of meteorites with an intact fusion crust is higher than those without.

  18. Refraction near the horizon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schaefer, Bradley E.; Liller, William

    1990-01-01

    Variations in astronomical refraction near the horizon are examined. Sunset timings, a sextant mounted on a tripod, and a temperature profile are utilized to derive the variations in refraction data, collected from 7 locations. It is determined that the refraction ranges from 0.234 to 1.678 deg with an rms deviation of 0.16, and it is observed that the variation is larger than previously supposed. Some applications for the variation of refraction value are discussed.

  19. Perovskite Sr₁-xCexCoO₃-δ (0.05 ≤ x ≤ 0.15) as superior cathodes for intermediate temperature solid oxide fuel cells.

    PubMed

    Yang, Wei; Hong, Tao; Li, Shuai; Ma, Zhaohui; Sun, Chunwen; Xia, Changrong; Chen, Liquan

    2013-02-01

    Perovskite Sr(1-x)Ce(x)CoO(3-δ) (0.05 ≤ x ≤ 0.15) have been prepared by a sol-gel method and studied as cathodes for intermediate temperature solid oxide fuel cells. As SOFC cathodes, Sr(1-x)Ce(x)CoO(3-δ) materials have sufficiently high electronic conductivities and excellent chemical compatibility with SDC electrolyte. The peak power density of cells with Sr(0.95)Ce(0.05)CoO(3-δ) is 0.625 W cm(-2) at 700 °C. By forming a composite cathode with an oxygen ion conductor SDC, the peak power density of the cell with Sr(0.95)Ce(0.05)CoO(3-δ)-30 wt %SDC composite cathode, reaches 1.01 W cm(-2) at 700 °C, better than that of Sm(0.5)Sr(0.5)CoO(3)-based cathode. All these results demonstrates that Sr(1-x)Ce(x)CoO(3-δ) (0.05 ≤ x ≤ 0.15)-based materials are promising cathodes for an IT-SOFC. PMID:23336216

  20. Gravitational Horizon(3)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Chao Yuan

    2012-05-01

    Anomalous decelerations of spacecraft Pioneer-10,11,etc could be interpreted as signal delay effect between speed of gravity and that of light as reflected in virtual scale, similar to covarying virtual scale effect in relative motion (http://arxiv.org/html/math-ph/0001019v5).A finite speed of gravity faster than light could be inferred (http://arXiv.org/html/physics/0001034v2). Measurements of gravitational variations by paraconical pendulum during a total solar eclipse infer the same(http://arXiv.org/html/physics/0001034v9). A finite Superluminal speed of gravity is the necessary condition to imply that there exists gravitational horizon (GH). Such "GH" of our Universe would stretch far beyond the cosmic event horizon of light. Dark energy may be owing to mutually interactive gravitational horizons of cousin universes. Sufficient condition for the conjecture is that the dark energy would be increasing with age of our Universe since accelerated expansion started about 5 Gyr ago, since more and more arrivals of "GH" of distant cousin universes would interact with "GH" of our Universe. The history of dark energy variations between then and now would be desirable(http://arXiv.org/html/physics/0001034). In "GH" conjecture, the neighborhood of cousin universes would be likely boundless in 4D-space-time without begining or end. The dark energy would keep all universes in continually accelerated expansion to eventual fragmentation. Fragments would crash and merge into bangs, big or small, to form another generation of cousin universes. These scenarios might offer a clue to what was before the big bang.

  1. New Horizons at Pluto

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2007-01-01

    Artist's concept of the New Horizons spacecraft as it approaches Pluto and its largest moon, Charon, in July 2015. The craft's miniature cameras, radio science experiment, ultraviolet and infrared spectrometers and space plasma experiments will characterize the global geology and geomorphology of Pluto and Charon, map their surface compositions and temperatures, and examine Pluto's atmosphere in detail. The spacecraft's most prominent design feature is a nearly 7-foot (2.1-meter) dish antenna, through which it will communicate with Earth from as far as 4.7 billion miles (7.5 billion kilometers) away.

  2. Internet's critical path horizon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valverde, S.; Solé, R. V.

    2004-03-01

    Internet is known to display a highly heterogeneous structure and complex fluctuations in its traffic dynamics. Congestion seems to be an inevitable result of user's behavior coupled to the network dynamics and it effects should be minimized by choosing appropriate routing strategies. But what are the requirements of routing depth in order to optimize the traffic flow? In this paper we analyse the behavior of Internet traffic with a topologically realistic spatial structure as described in a previous study [S.-H. Yook et al., Proc. Natl Acad. Sci. USA 99, 13382 (2002)]. The model involves self-regulation of packet generation and different levels of routing depth. It is shown that it reproduces the relevant key, statistical features of Internet's traffic. Moreover, we also report the existence of a critical path horizon defining a transition from low-efficient traffic to highly efficient flow. This transition is actually a direct consequence of the web's small world architecture exploited by the routing algorithm. Once routing tables reach the network diameter, the traffic experiences a sudden transition from a low-efficient to a highly-efficient behavior. It is conjectured that routing policies might have spontaneously reached such a compromise in a distributed manner. Internet would thus be operating close to such critical path horizon.

  3. Horizon thermodynamics and spacetime mappings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faraoni, Valerio; Vitagliano, Vincenzo

    2014-03-01

    When black holes are dynamical, event horizons are replaced by apparent and trapping horizons. Conformal and Kerr-Schild transformations are widely used in relation to dynamical black holes, and we study the behavior under such transformations of quantities related to the thermodynamics of these horizons, such as the Misner-Sharp-Hernandez mass (internal energy), the Kodama vector, surface gravity, and temperature. The transformation properties are not those expected on the basis of naive arguments.

  4. HORIZON SENSING (PROPOSAL NO.51)

    SciTech Connect

    Larry G. Stolarczyk

    2003-07-01

    Real-time horizon sensing on continuous mining machines is becoming an industry tool. Installation and testing of production-grade Horizon Sensor (HS) systems continued this quarter at Monterey Coal Company (ExxonMobil), Mountain Coal Company West Elk Mine (Arch), and Ohio Valley Coal Company (OVC). Monitoring of system function, user experience, and mining benefits is ongoing. All horizon sensor components have finished MSHA (U.S.) and IEC (International) certification.

  5. Transverse deformations of extreme horizons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Carmen; Lucietti, James

    2016-04-01

    We consider the inverse problem of determining all extreme black hole solutions to the Einstein equations with a prescribed near-horizon geometry. We investigate this problem by considering infinitesimal deformations of the near-horizon geometry along transverse null geodesics. We show that, up to a gauge transformation, the linearised Einstein equations reduce to an elliptic PDE for the extrinsic curvature of a cross-section of the horizon. We deduce that for a given near-horizon geometry there exists a finite dimensional moduli space of infinitesimal transverse deformations. We then establish a uniqueness theorem for transverse deformations of the extreme Kerr horizon. In particular, we prove that the only smooth axisymmetric transverse deformation of the near-horizon geometry of extreme Kerr, such that cross-sections of the horizon are marginally trapped surfaces, corresponds to that of the extreme Kerr black hole. Furthermore, we determine all smooth and biaxisymmetric transverse deformations of the near-horizon geometry of the five-dimensional extreme Myers-Perry black hole with equal angular momenta. We find a three parameter family of solutions such that cross-sections of the horizon are marginally trapped, which is more general than the known black hole solutions. We discuss the possibility that they correspond to new five-dimensional vacuum black holes.

  6. Technologies on the Horizon: Teachers Respond to the Horizon Report

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hodges, Charles B.; Prater, Alyssa H.

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate teachers' beliefs regarding the integration of technologies from the 2011 K-12 edition of the "Horizon Report" into their local, public school contexts. Teachers read the "Horizon Report" and then participated in an asynchronous, threaded discussion focusing on technologies they…

  7. Hollow Sodium Tungsten Bronze (Na0.15WO3) Nanospheres: Preparation, Characterization, and Their Adsorption Properties

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    We report herein a facile method for the preparation of sodium tungsten bronzes hollow nanospheres using hydrogen gas bubbles as reactant for chemical reduction of tungstate to tungsten and as template for the formation of hollow nanospheres at the same time. The chemical composition and the crystalline state of the as-prepared hollow Na0.15WO3nanospheres were characterized complementarily, and the hollow structure formation mechanism was proposed. The hollow Na0.15WO3nanospheres showed large Brunauer–Emment–Teller specific area (33.8 m2 g−1), strong resistance to acids, and excellent ability to remove organic molecules such as dye and proteins from aqueous solutions. These illustrate that the hollow nanospheres of Na0.15WO3should be a useful adsorbent. PMID:20596394

  8. Hollow Sodium Tungsten Bronze (Na0.15WO3) Nanospheres: Preparation, Characterization, and Their Adsorption Properties.

    PubMed

    Hou, Jing; Zuo, Guanke; Shen, Guangxia; Guo, He; Liu, Hui; Cheng, Ping; Zhang, Jingyan; Guo, Shouwu

    2009-01-01

    We report herein a facile method for the preparation of sodium tungsten bronzes hollow nanospheres using hydrogen gas bubbles as reactant for chemical reduction of tungstate to tungsten and as template for the formation of hollow nanospheres at the same time. The chemical composition and the crystalline state of the as-prepared hollow Na0.15WO3nanospheres were characterized complementarily, and the hollow structure formation mechanism was proposed. The hollow Na0.15WO3nanospheres showed large Brunauer-Emment-Teller specific area (33.8 m2 g-1), strong resistance to acids, and excellent ability to remove organic molecules such as dye and proteins from aqueous solutions. These illustrate that the hollow nanospheres of Na0.15WO3should be a useful adsorbent. PMID:20596394

  9. Telescopic horizon scanning.

    PubMed

    Koenderink, Jan

    2014-12-20

    The problem of "distortionless" viewing with terrestrial telescopic systems (mainly "binoculars") remains problematic. The so called "globe effect" is only partially counteracted in modern designs. Theories addressing the phenomenon have never reached definitive closure. In this paper, we show that exact distortionless viewing with terrestrial telescopic systems is not possible in general, but that it is in principle possible in-very frequent in battle field and marine applications-the case of horizon scanning. However, this involves cylindrical optical elements. For opto-electronic systems, a full solution is more readily feasible. The solution involves a novel interpretation of the relevant constraints and objectives. For final design decisions, it is not necessary to rely on a corpus of psychophysical (or ergonomic) data, although one has to decide whether the instrument is intended as an extension of the eye or as a "pictorial" device. PMID:25608206

  10. Resolving Lifshitz Horizons

    SciTech Connect

    Harrison, Sarah; Kachru, Shamit; Wang, Huajia; /Stanford U., ITP /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /SLAC

    2012-04-24

    Via the AdS/CFT correspondence, ground states of field theories at finite charge density are mapped to extremal black brane solutions. Studies of simple gravity + matter systems in this context have uncovered wide new classes of extremal geometries. The Lifshitz metrics characterizing field theories with non-trivial dynamical critical exponent z {ne} 1 emerge as one common endpoint in doped holographic toy models. However, the Lifshitz horizon exhibits mildly singular behaviour - while curvature invariants are finite, there are diverging tidal forces. Here we show that in some of the simplest contexts where Lifshitz metrics emerge, Einstein-Maxwell-dilaton theories, generic corrections lead to a replacement of the Lifshitz metric, in the deep infrared, by a re-emergent AdS{sub 2} x R{sup 2} geometry. Thus, at least in these cases, the Lifshitz scaling characterizes the physics over a wide range of energy scales, but the mild singularity is cured by quantum or stringy effects.

  11. Fluctuating black hole horizons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mei, Jianwei

    2013-10-01

    In this paper we treat the black hole horizon as a physical boundary to the spacetime and study its dynamics following from the Gibbons-Hawking-York boundary term. Using the Kerr black hole as an example we derive an effective action that describes, in the large wave number limit, a massless Klein-Gordon field living on the average location of the boundary. Complete solutions can be found in the small rotation limit of the black hole. The formulation suggests that the boundary can be treated in the same way as any other matter contributions. In particular, the angular momentum of the boundary matches exactly with that of the black hole, suggesting an interesting possibility that all charges (including the entropy) of the black hole are carried by the boundary. Using this as input, we derive predictions on the Planck scale properties of the boundary.

  12. The New Horizons Spacecraft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fountain, Glen H.; Kusnierkiewicz, David Y.; Hersman, Christopher B.; Herder, Timothy S.; Coughlin, Thomas B.; Gibson, William C.; Clancy, Deborah A.; Deboy, Christopher C.; Hill, T. Adrian; Kinnison, James D.; Mehoke, Douglas S.; Ottman, Geffrey K.; Rogers, Gabe D.; Stern, S. Alan; Stratton, James M.; Vernon, Steven R.; Williams, Stephen P.

    2008-10-01

    The New Horizons spacecraft was launched on 19 January 2006. The spacecraft was designed to provide a platform for seven instruments designated by the science team to collect and return data from Pluto in 2015. The design meets the requirements established by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Announcement of Opportunity AO-OSS-01. The design drew on heritage from previous missions developed at The Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory (APL) and other missions such as Ulysses. The trajectory design imposed constraints on mass and structural strength to meet the high launch acceleration consistent with meeting the AO requirement of returning data prior to the year 2020. The spacecraft subsystems were designed to meet tight resource allocations (mass and power) yet provide the necessary control and data handling finesse to support data collection and return when the one-way light time during the Pluto fly-by is 4.5 hours. Missions to the outer regions of the solar system (where the solar irradiance is 1/1000 of the level near the Earth) require a radioisotope thermoelectric generator (RTG) to supply electrical power. One RTG was available for use by New Horizons. To accommodate this constraint, the spacecraft electronics were designed to operate on approximately 200 W. The travel time to Pluto put additional demands on system reliability. Only after a flight time of approximately 10 years would the desired data be collected and returned to Earth. This represents the longest flight duration prior to the return of primary science data for any mission by NASA. The spacecraft system architecture provides sufficient redundancy to meet this requirement with a probability of mission success of greater than 0.85. The spacecraft is now on its way to Pluto, with an arrival date of 14 July 2015. Initial in-flight tests have verified that the spacecraft will meet the design requirements.

  13. The Horizon Report. 2007 Edition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    New Media Consortium, 2007

    2007-01-01

    This fourth edition of the New Media Consortium's (NMC) annual "Horizon Report" describes the continuing work of the Horizon Project, a research-oriented effort that seeks to identify and describe emerging technologies likely to have a large impact on teaching, learning, or creative expression within higher education. Drawing on ongoing…

  14. The Horizon Report. 2006 Edition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    New Media Consortium, 2006

    2006-01-01

    This third edition of the New Media Consortium's (NMC) annual "Horizon Report" describes the continuing work of the Horizon Project, a research-oriented effort that seeks to identify and describe emerging technologies likely to have a large impact on teaching, learning, or creative expression within higher education. Drawing on ongoing discussions…

  15. The Horizon Report. 2004 Edition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    New Media Consortium, 2004

    2004-01-01

    This first edition of the New Media Consortium's (NMC) annual "Horizon Report" details findings of the Horizon Project, a research-oriented effort that seeks to identify and describe emerging technologies likely to have a large impact on teaching, learning, or creative expression within higher education. Drawing on an ongoing series of interviews…

  16. The Horizon Report. 2005 Edition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    New Media Consortium, 2005

    2005-01-01

    This second edition of the New Media Consortium's (NMC) annual "Horizon Report" describes the continuing work of the Horizon Project, a research-oriented effort that seeks to identify and describe emerging technologies likely to have a large impact on teaching, learning, or creative expression within higher education. Drawing on an ongoing series…

  17. Magnetotransport and thermal properties characterization of 55 K superconductor SmFeAsO0.85F0.15

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Srivastava, Amit; Pal, Anand; Singh, Saurabh; Shekhar, C.; Singh, H. K.; Awana, V. P. S.; Srivastava, O. N.

    2013-09-01

    This report fairly underlines the magneto-transport, thermal properties characterization and bulk superconductivity in the FeAs-based SmFeAsO0.85F0.1. The phase formation and structure are confirmed by Rietveld analysis of room temperature powder X-ray diffraction (XRD) data. Electron microscopy was employed to unravel the micro structural details, such as perfection of the lattice and the grain morphology including size and boundaries. The electrical and magnetic measurements have been carried out to confirm the bulk superconductivity and understand the nature of electrical transport in the normal and superconducting state. The intra-grain critical current density (Jc) with applied magnetic field is calculated from isothermal DC magnetization (MH) plots using conventional Bean critical state model. Superconductivity is observed at transition temperature (Tc) above 55 K without HPHT (high pressure high temperature) synthesis route. The value of Jc is found to be around 5.26 × 104 A/cm2 at 5 K in zero field. The dependence of thermally activated flux flow energy (U/kB) on the applied magnetic field has been observed. AC susceptibility measurements were performed for 55 K superconducting SmFeAsO0.85F0.15 sample at various amplitude of applied AC drive field and its granular nature is confirmed. The parent compound SmFeAsO is found to be magnetic with Fe spin density wave (SDW) like order below 150 K, on the other hand the F doped SmFeAsO0.85F0.15 sample is bulk superconducting at below 55 K. Both Fe (SDW) at 150 K for SmFeAsO and 55 K superconductivity in case of SmFeAsO0.85F0.15 sample has confirmed by Specific heat [Cp(T)] measurement too. Further Sm orders anti-ferro-magnetically at 4.5 K for non-superconducting and at 3.5 K for superconducting samples, also the entropy change is reduced significantly for the later than the former. Summarily complete physical property characterization for both non-superconducting SmFeAsO and 55 K superconductor SmFeAsO0.85F0.15

  18. Magnetic field penetration depth of La(1.85)Sr(0.15)CuO4 measured by muon spin relaxation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kossler, W. J.; Kempton, J. R.; Yu, X. H.; Schone, H. E.; Uemura, Y. J.

    1987-01-01

    Muon-spin-relaxation measurements have been performed on a high-Tc superconductor La(1.85)Sr(0.15)CuO4. In an external transverse magnetic field of 500 G, a magnetic field penetration depth of 2000 A at T = 10 K has been determined from the muon-spin-relaxation rate which increased with decreasing temperature below Tc. From this depth and the Pauli susceptibility, the superconducting carrier density is estimated at 3 x 10 to the 21st per cu cm. The zero-field relaxation rates above and below Tc were equal, which suggests that the superconducting state in this sample is not associated with detectable static magnetic ordering.

  19. Enhanced electric field tunable dielectric properties of Ba(Sn0.15Ti0.85)O3 thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, S. N.; Zhai, J. W.; Gao, L. N.; Yao, X.; Hung, T. F.; Xu, Z. K.

    2008-11-01

    Highly (100)-oriented barium stannate titanate Ba(Sn0.15Ti0.85)O3 (BTS) thin films were deposited on SrTiO3 (STO) and Nb doped SrTiO3 (NSTO) single-crystal substrates through sol-gel process, respectively. Coplanar capacitance and parallel plate capacitance structure configurations were formed by preparing interdigital electrodes (IDEs) and parallel plate electrodes (PPEs) on BTS thin film. The tunability of films with IDE was 45.54%, while the tunability of films with PPE was only 11.54% at the frequency of 1 MHz with an applied electric field of 80 kV/cm. This result showed that the tunability in the a-b plane contributes markedly to the measurements obtained with the IDE.

  20. Large pyroelectric figure of merits for Sr-modified Ba0.85Ca0.15Zr0.1Ti0.9O3 ceramics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patel, Satyanarayan; Chauhan, Aditya; Vaish, Rahul

    2016-02-01

    In the present work ferroelectric, dielectric and pyroelectric properties of Sr-modified Ba0.85Ca0.15Zr0.1Ti0.9O3 ceramics were investigated. A significant increase in polarization has been observed, from 16 μC/cm2 to 25 μC/cm2 for 15% Sr added BCZT compositions. Correspondingly an improvement in dielectric constant, from 2743 to 4040, was observed at room temperature (1 MHz). It was found that Curie-Weiss temperature (TCW) decreases from 357 K to 308 K for 15% Sr containing BCZT ceramics. Simultaneously, it also enhances the order-disorder to displacing phase transition as γ varies from 1.91 to 1.31. Pyroelectric coefficient was found to be 25 μC/cm2K at 308 K. Finally, pyroelectric figures of merit (FOMs) for voltage responsivity (Fv), current responsivity (Fi), detectivity (Fd), energy harvesting (Fe) and new energy harvesting (Fe∗) are calculated. A large improvement in pyroelectric FOMs indicates that it might be a potential material for pyroelectric applications.

  1. Quantitative x-ray diffraction analysis of bimodal damage distributions in Tm implanted Al0.15Ga0.85N

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Magalhães, S.; Fialho, M.; Peres, M.; Lorenz, K.; Alves, E.

    2016-04-01

    In this work radial symmetric x-ray diffraction scans of Al0.15Ga0.85N thin films implanted with Tm ions were measured to determine the lattice deformation and crystal quality as functions of depth. The alloys were implanted with 300 keV Tm with 10° off-set to the sample normal to avoid channelling, with fluences varying between 1013 Tm cm-2 and 5  ×  1015 Tm cm-2. Simulations of the radial 2θ-ω scans were performed under the frame of the dynamical theory of x-ray diffraction assuming Gaussian distributions of the lattice strain induced by implantation defects. The structure factor of the individual layers is multiplied by a static Debye-Waller factor in order to take into account the effect of lattice disorder due to implantation. For higher fluences two asymmetric Gaussians are required to describe well the experimental diffractograms, although a single asymmetric Gaussian profile for the deformation is found in the sample implanted with 1013 Tm cm-2. After thermal treatment at 1200 °C, the crystal quality partially recovers as seen in a reduction of the amplitude of the deformation maximum as well as the total thickness of the deformed layer. Furthermore, no evidence of changes with respect to the virgin crystal mosaicity is found after implantation and annealing.

  2. Mn-doped 0.15BiInO3-0.85PbTiO3 piezoelectric films deposited by pulsed laser deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Sun Young; Ko, Song Won; Lee, Soonil; Trolier-McKinstry, Susan

    2012-05-01

    Undoped, 0.5 and 1.0 mol. % Mn-doped 0.15BiInO3-0.85PbTiO3 films were grown on PbTiO3/Pt/Ti/SiO2/Si substrates by pulsed laser deposition. Phase-pure perovskite films were obtained at a substrate temperature of 585 °C irrespective of Mn doping level. The 0.5 mol. % Mn-doped films showed a room temperature permittivity of 480 and a dielectric loss tangent of 0.015 at 100 kHz after 650 °C post-deposition annealing. The coercive field and remanent polarization were 80 kV/cm and 29 µC/cm2, respectively. The ferroelectric transition temperature of the films ranged from 535 to 585 °C. The e31,f piezoelectric coefficient was -7.1 C/m2. X-ray diffraction and phase transition temperature data showed that the Mn atoms substitute on the Ti-site as Mn3+; the resulting films have p-type conduction characteristics.

  3. Synthesis and electrochemical performance of LiNi{sub 0.7}Co{sub 0.15}Mn{sub 0.15}O{sub 2} as gradient cathode material for lithium batteries

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Lipeng; Dong, Tao; Yu, Xianjin; Dong, Yunhui; Zhao, Zengdian; Li, Heng

    2012-11-15

    Highlights: ► The gradient precursors Ni{sub 0.7}Co{sub 0.15}Mn{sub 0.15}(OH){sub 2} is prepared by hydroxide co-precipitating. ► The cathode materials is synthesized by mixing the precursor with 5% excess LiOH·H{sub 2}O. ► The XRD results show that cathode materials present layered α-NaFeO{sub 2} typical crystal. ► Material sintered at 850 °C shows the best performance, with high-capacity and recyclability. -- Abstract: LiNi{sub 0.7}Co{sub 0.15}Mn{sub 0.15}O{sub 2} as a cathode material for lithium batteries was synthesized by mixing hydroxide co-precipitated precursors with 5% excess LiOH·H{sub 2}O. Its structural and electrochemical properties were investigated using X-ray diffractometry, scanning electron microscopy, galvanostatic charge–discharge test, and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. The results indicated that well-ordering layered LiNi{sub 0.7}Co{sub 0.15}Mn{sub 0.15}O{sub 2} cathode materials were successfully prepared in air at 750, 800, and 850°C with α-NaFeO{sub 2} typical crystal. The results of charge–discharge test demonstrated that the gradient cathode material sintered at 850 °C exhibited the best electrochemical performance with the initial discharge capacity of 164 mA h g{sup −1} at 0.2 C and lower electrochemical impedance. Nickel has low price. LiNiO{sub 2} cathode materials have high specific capacity, their theoretical capacity is 274 mA h g{sup −1} and with low self-discharge rate. So the Ni, Co, Mn ternary layer-structural compounds with high Ni content are showing to be promising cathode materials for lithium batteries. The techniques and research results in this paper are utilizable for the study of this kind of lithium battery materials.

  4. Disorder - driven phase transition in La{sub 0.37}Bi{sub 0.15}Sm{sub 0.15}Ca{sub 0.33}MnO{sub 3}

    SciTech Connect

    Ade, Ramesh; Singh, R.

    2015-06-24

    We report the effect of disorder on the properties of La{sub 0.37}Bi{sub 0.15}Sm{sub 0.15}Ca{sub 0.33}MnO{sub 3} manganite synthesized by sol – gel method. The critical properties were investigated through various techniques such as modified - Arrott plot, Kouvel - Fisher method and critical isotherm analysis. The sample show second- order phase transition near critical point. The decrease in magnetization (M), Curie temperature (T{sub C}), evolution of spin or cluster glass behavior and the nature of phase transition compared to first - order transition in La{sub 0.67}Ca{sub 0.33}MnO{sub 3} are ascribed to the disorder caused by the size mismatch of the A-site cations with Bi and Sm doping at La- site.

  5. Thermal and electric properties of Nd(1.85)Ce(0.15)CuO(4-y) and Pr(1.85)Ce(0.15)CuO(4-y)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lim, Z. S.; Han, K. H.; Lee, Sung-Ik; Jeong, Yoon H.; Song, Y. S.; Park, Y. W.

    1991-01-01

    Electric resistivity, magnetic susceptibility, thermoelectric power, and Hall coefficient of Nd(1.85)Ce(0.15)CuO(4-y) and Pr(1.85)Ce(0.15)CuO(4-y) whose onset temperature of the superconductivity are 24 and 23 K were measured. Experimental results show many interesting features. In particular, the Hall coefficients are negative and relatively flat as a function of temperature. However, the temperature dependence of the thermoelectric power (TEP) for these two samples shows the positive sign for both samples in contrast to the previous results. Moreover, TEP for both samples remains flat in the normal state below 250 K, but decreases rapidly above 250 K. TEP of only Pr(1.85)Ce(0.15)CuO(4-y) shows a peak near 50 K. Finally, onset temperatures of sudden drop of TEP are higher than those of resistance drop. The physical properties of these samples produced at different conditions such as different heat treatment temperatures, atmospheres were also measured. TEP and resistance measurement show that oxygen deficiency is essential to produce better superconducting samples. Correlation between TEP and superconductivity for these different samples are discussed.

  6. Thermal and electric properties of Nd(1.85)Ce(0.15)CuO(4-y) and Pr(1.85)Ce(0.15)CuO(4-y)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lim, Z. S.; Han, K. H.; Lee, Sung-Ik; Jeong, Yoon H.; Song, Y. S.; Park, Y. W.

    1990-01-01

    Electric resistivity, magnetic susceptibility, thermoelectric power, and Hall coefficient of Nd(1.85)Ce(0.15)CuO(4-y) and Pr(1.85)Ce(0.15)CuO(4-y) whose onset temperature of the superconductivity are 24 K and 23 K were measured. Experimental results show many interesting features. In particular, the Hall coefficients are negative and relatively flat as a function of temperature. However, the temperature dependence of the thermoelectric power (TEP) for these two samples shows the positive sign for both samples in contrast to the previous results. Moreover TEP for both samples remains flat in the normal state below 250 K, but decreases rapidly above 250 K. TEP of only Pr(1.85)Ce(0.15)CuO(4-y) shows a peak near 50 K. Finally onset temperatures of sudden drop of TEP are higher than those of resistance drop. The physical properties of these samples produced at different conditions such as different heat treatment temperatures, atmospheres were also measured. TEP and resistance measurement show that oxygen deficiency is essential to produce better superconducting samples. Correlation between TEP and superconductivity for these different samples will be discussed.

  7. Social pharmacology: expanding horizons.

    PubMed

    Maiti, Rituparna; Alloza, José Luis

    2014-01-01

    In the current modern and global society, social changes are in constant evolution due to scientific progress (technology, culture, customs, and hygiene) and produce the freedom in individuals to take decisions by themselves or with their doctors toward drug consumption. In the arena of marketed drug products which includes society, individual, administration, and pharmaceutical industry, the young discipline emerged is social pharmacology or sociopharmacology. This science arises from clinical pharmacology, and deals with different parameters, which are important in creating knowledge on marketed drugs. However, the scope of "social pharmacology" is not covered by the so-called "Phase IV" alone, but it is the science that handles the postmarketing knowledge of drugs. The social pharmacology studies the "life cycle" of any marketed pharmaceutical product in the social terrain, and evaluates the effects of the real environment under circumstances totally different in the drug development process. Therefore, there are far-reaching horizons, plural, and shared predictions among health professionals and other, for beneficial use of a drug, toward maximizing the benefits of therapy, while minimizing negative social consequences. PMID:24987168

  8. Social Pharmacology: Expanding horizons

    PubMed Central

    Maiti, Rituparna; Alloza, José Luis

    2014-01-01

    In the current modern and global society, social changes are in constant evolution due to scientific progress (technology, culture, customs, and hygiene) and produce the freedom in individuals to take decisions by themselves or with their doctors toward drug consumption. In the arena of marketed drug products which includes society, individual, administration, and pharmaceutical industry, the young discipline emerged is social pharmacology or sociopharmacology. This science arises from clinical pharmacology, and deals with different parameters, which are important in creating knowledge on marketed drugs. However, the scope of “social pharmacology” is not covered by the so-called “Phase IV” alone, but it is the science that handles the postmarketing knowledge of drugs. The social pharmacology studies the “life cycle” of any marketed pharmaceutical product in the social terrain, and evaluates the effects of the real environment under circumstances totally different in the drug development process. Therefore, there are far-reaching horizons, plural, and shared predictions among health professionals and other, for beneficial use of a drug, toward maximizing the benefits of therapy, while minimizing negative social consequences. PMID:24987168

  9. Near-horizon Kerr magnetosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gralla, Samuel E.; Lupsasca, Alexandru; Strominger, Andrew

    2016-05-01

    We exploit the near-horizon conformal symmetry of rapidly spinning black holes to determine universal properties of their magnetospheres. Analytic expressions are derived for the limiting form of the magnetosphere in the near-horizon region. The symmetry is shown to imply that the black hole Meissner effect holds for free Maxwell fields but is generically violated for force-free fields. We further show that in the extremal limit, near-horizon plasma particles are infinitely boosted relative to accretion flow. Active galactic nuclei powered by rapidly spinning black holes are therefore natural sites for high-energy particle collisions.

  10. Unconventional superconductivity in CaFe0.85Co0.15AsF evidenced by torque measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, Hong; Li, X. J.; Mu, G.; Hu, T.

    Out-of-plane angular dependent torque measurements were performed on CaFe0.85Co0.15AsF single crystals. Abnormal superconducting fluctuation, featured by enhanced diamagnetism with magnetic field, is detected up to about 1.5 times superconducting transition temperature Tc. Compared to cuprate superconductors, the fluctuation effect in iron-based superconductor is less pronounced. Anisotropy parameter γ is obtained from the mixed state torque data and it is found that γ shows both magnetic field and temperature depenence, pointing to multiband superconductivity. The temperature dependence of penetration depth λ (T) suggests unconventional superconductivity in CaFe0.85Co0.15AsF.

  11. Ganciclovir ophthalmic gel 0.15% for the treatment of acute herpetic keratitis: background, effectiveness, tolerability, safety, and future applications

    PubMed Central

    Chou, Timothy Y; Hong, Bennett Y

    2014-01-01

    Eye disease due to herpes simplex virus (HSV) is a leading cause of ocular morbidity and the number one infectious cause of unilateral corneal blindness in the developed parts of the globe. Recurrent keratitis can result in progressive corneal scarring, thinning, and vascularization. Antiviral agents employed against HSV have primarily been nucleoside analogs. Early generation drugs included idoxuridine, iododesoxycytidine, vidarabine, and trifluridine. While effective, they tended to have low bioavailability and measurable local cellular toxicity due to their nonselective mode of action. Acyclovir 0.3% ointment is a more selective agent, and had become a first-line topical drug for acute HSV keratitis in Europe and other places outside of the US. Ganciclovir 0.15% gel is the most recently approved topical treatment for herpes keratitis. Compared to acyclovir 0.3% ointment, ganciclovir 0.15% gel has been shown to be better tolerated and no less effective in several Phase II and III trials. Additionally, topical ganciclovir does not cause adverse systemic side effects and is therapeutic at lower concentrations. Based on safety, efficacy, and tolerability, ganciclovir 0.15% gel should now be considered a front-line topical drug in the treatment of dendritic herpes simplex epithelial keratitis. Topics of future investigation regarding other potential uses for ganciclovir gel may include the prophylaxis of recurrent HSV epithelial keratitis, treatment of other forms of ocular disease caused by herpesviruses and adenovirus, and ganciclovir gel as an adjunct to antitumor therapy. PMID:25187721

  12. HORIZON SENSING (PROPOSAL No.51)

    SciTech Connect

    Larry G. Stolarczyk, Sc.D.

    2002-04-30

    Real-time horizon sensing on continuous mining machines is becoming an industry tool. Installation and testing of production-grade HS systems has been ongoing this quarter at Monterey Coal Company (EXXON), FMC Trona, Twentymile Coal Company (RAG America), and SASOL Coal. Detailed monitoring of system function, user experience, and mining benefits is ongoing. All horizon sensor components have finished MSHA (U.S.) and IEC (International) certification.

  13. A comprehensive investigation of structural, morphological, hydrogen absorption and magnetic properties of MmNi4.22Co0.48Mn0.15Al0.15 alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zareii, Seyyed Mojtaba; Arabi, Hadi; Pourarian, Faiz

    2014-05-01

    A comprehensive study of structural, morphological, hydrogen absorption and magnetic properties of MmNi4.22 Co0.48Mn0.15Al0.15 alloy as a promising hydrogen storage media was investigated. The X-ray diffraction (XRD) profiles show that the alloy maintains its crystal structure (hexagonal LaNi5-type) even after 30 hydrogenation/dehydrogenation (H/D) cycles. However, the XRD peaks are found to be slightly broadened after cycling. SEM images reveal that particles size of the cycled sample decreases, with more uniform particle size distribution compared to noncycled ones. The pressure-composition (PC) isotherms and kinetics curves of hydrogen absorption reaction were obtained at different working temperatures by using a homemade Sievert apparatus. The enthalpy and entropy of hydride formation of the alloy were evaluated. Furthermore, the Jander diffusion and Johnson-Mehl-Avrami models as the fitting models were employed to study the kinetic mechanism of hydriding reaction and its activation energy. The room temperature magnetic measurements indicate that the milling and H/D cycling change the magnetic properties of the as-annealed alloy.

  14. Ramp-edge junctions between superconducting Nd1.85Ce0.15CuO4 and La1.85Sr0.15CuO4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoek, M.; Coneri, F.; Renshaw Wang, X.; Hilgenkamp, H.

    2016-03-01

    We have fabricated in-plane ramp-edge junctions between Nd1.85Ce0.15CuO4 (NCCO) and La1.85Sr0.15CuO4 (LSCO) where both layers are superconducting. At the interface, we find an insulating barrier in electronic transport. The barrier is shown to be a tunneling barrier with a combination of inelastic and elastic tunneling, the former is indicated by the appearance of the LSCO phonon density of states in {{{d}}}2I/{{d}}{V}2 measurements and the latter is inferred from the temperature dependence of the conductance. The energy scale of the barrier is smaller than would be expected from band alignment found by considering the cuprates as degenerate semiconductors. It is closest to the scenario where hybridization of the O 2p valence band states dictate band alignment. Additional experiments with overdoped interlayers of Nd1.8Ce0.2CuO4 and La1.75Sr0.25CuO4 show that the origin of the barrier is most likely a combination of electronic depletion mainly in the NCCO and a strain effect in the LSCO.

  15. Lithium-Rich Layered Oxide Li1.18 Ni0.15 Co0.15 Mn0.52 O2 as the Cathode Material for Hybrid Sodium-Ion Batteries.

    PubMed

    Wei, Zhixuan; Gao, Yu; Wang, Lei; Zhang, Chaoyang; Bian, Xiaofei; Fu, Qiang; Wang, Chunzhong; Wei, Yingjin; Du, Fei; Chen, Gang

    2016-08-01

    Li-rich layered oxide Li1.18 Ni0.15 Co0.15 Mn0.52 O2 (LNCM) is, for the first time, examined as the positive electrode for hybrid sodium-ion battery and its Na(+) storage properties are comprehensively studied in terms of galvanostatic charge-discharge curves, cyclic voltammetry and rate capability. LNCM in the proposed sodium-ion battery demonstrates good rate capability whose discharge capacity reaches about 90 mA h g(-1) at 10 C rate and excellent cycle stability with specific capacity of about 105 mA h g(-1) for 200 cycles at 5 C rate. Moreover, ex situ ICP-OES suggests interesting mixed-ions migration processes: In the initial two cycles, only Li(+) can intercalate into the LNCM cathode, whereas both Li(+) and Na(+) work together as the electrochemical cycles increase. Also the structural evolution of LNCM is examined in terms of ex situ XRD pattern at the end of various charge-discharge scans. The strong insight obtained from this study could be beneficial to the design of new layered cathode materials for future rechargeable sodium-ion batteries. PMID:27320123

  16. Low-temperature specific heat of magnetic superconductors Dy0.6Y0.4Rh3.85Ru0.15B4 and Dy0.6Y0.4Rh4B4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Terekhov, A. V.; Zolochevskii, I. V.; Ishchenko, L. A.; Zaleski, A.; Khlybov, E. P.; Lachenkov, S. A.

    2016-03-01

    Specific heat CM(T) of polycrystalline Dy0.6Y0.4Rh4B4 and Dy0.6Y0.4Rh3.85Ru0.15B4 was studied in the temperature range of 0.5-9 K and magnetic fields 0-10 kOe for the first time. It was found that the λ-anomaly in the specific heat exists at Tc ≈ 6 K for Dy0.6Y0.4Rh4B4 and at Tc ≈ 6.6 K for Dy0.6Y0.4Rh3.85Ru0.15B4. It is suppressed in a magnetic field and shifted to lower temperatures. Partial substitution of Rh by Ru enhances superconductivity, presumably, due to stronger inner magnetism of the dysprosium sublattice in Dy0.6Y0.4Rh4B4 as compared with Dy0.6Y0.4Rh3.85Ru0.15B4. Furthermore, it was observed that the molar heat capacity CM(T) of Dy0.6Y0.4Rh3.85Ru0.15B4 increases with decreasing temperature for T < 4 K. In Dy0.6Y0.4Rh4B4, an increase in CM(T) with decreasing temperature is accompanied by the appearance of a maximum at Tmax = 1.5 K, which might be a manifestation of the magnetic phase transition in the dysprosium subsystem at this temperature.

  17. Unusual magnetoresistance in cubic B20 Fe0.85Co0.15Si chiral magnets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, S. X.; Chen, Fei; Kang, Jian; Zang, Jiadong; Shu, G. J.; Chou, F. C.; Chien, C. L.

    2016-06-01

    The B20 chiral magnets with broken inversion symmetry and C4 rotation symmetry have attracted much attention. The broken inversion symmetry leads to the Dzyaloshinskii–Moriya that gives rise to the helical and Skyrmion states. We report the unusual magnetoresistance (MR) of B20 chiral magnet Fe0.85Co0.15Si that directly reveals the broken C4 rotation symmetry and shows the anisotropic scattering by Skyrmions with respect to the current directions. The intimacy between unusual MR and broken symmetry is well confirmed by theoretically studying an effective Hamiltonian with spin–orbit coupling. The unusual MR serves as a transport signature for the Skyrmion phase.

  18. Remarkable magnetostructural coupling around the magnetic transition in CeCo0.85Fe0.15Si

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Correa, V. F.; Betancourth, D.; Sereni, J. G.; Caroca Canales, N.; Geibel, C.

    2016-09-01

    We report a detailed study of the magnetic properties of CeCo0.85Fe0.15Si under high magnetic fields (up to 16 Tesla) measuring different physical properties such as specific heat, magnetization, electrical resistivity, thermal expansion and magnetostriction. CeCo0.85Fe0.15Si becomes antiferromagnetic at {{T}N}≈ 6.7 K. However, a broad tail (onset at {{T}X}≈ 13 K) in the specific heat precedes that second order transition. This tail is also observed in the temperature derivative of the resistivity. However, it is particularly noticeable in the thermal expansion coefficient where it takes the form of a large bump centered at T X . A high magnetic field practically washes out that tail in the resistivity. But surprisingly, the bump in the thermal expansion coefficient becomes a well pronounced peak fully split from the magnetic transition at T N . Concurrently, the magnetoresistance also switches from negative to positive above T N . The magnetostriction is considerable and irreversible at low temperature (\\frac{Δ L}{L}(16~T)∼ 4× {{10}-4} at 2 K) when the magnetic interactions dominate. A broad jump in the field dependence of the magnetostriction observed at low T may be the signature of a weak ongoing metamagnetic transition. Taking altogether the results indicate the importance of the lattice effects on the development of the magnetic order in these alloys.

  19. A 0.15-scale study of configuration effects on the aerodynamic interaction between main rotor and fuselage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trept, Ted

    1984-01-01

    Hover and forward flight tests were conducted to investigate the mutual aerodynamic interaction between the main motor and fuselage of a conventional helicopter configuration. A 0.15-scale Model 222 two-bladed teetering rotor was combined with a 0.15-scale model of the NASA Ames 40x80-foot wind tunnel 1500 horsepower test stand fairing. Configuration effects were studied by modifying the fairing to simulate a typical helicopter forebody. Separation distance between rotor and body were also investigated. Rotor and fuselage force and moment as well as pressure data are presented in graphical and tabular format. Data was taken over a range of thrust coefficients from 0.002 to 0.007. In forward flight speed ratio was varied from 0.1 to 0.3 with shaft angle varying from +4 to -12 deg. The data show that the rotors effect on the fuselage may be considerably more important to total aircraft performance than the effect of the fuselage on the rotor.

  20. Remarkable magnetostructural coupling around the magnetic transition in CeCo0.85Fe0.15Si.

    PubMed

    Correa, V F; Betancourth, D; Sereni, J G; Caroca Canales, N; Geibel, C

    2016-09-01

    We report a detailed study of the magnetic properties of CeCo0.85Fe0.15Si under high magnetic fields (up to 16 Tesla) measuring different physical properties such as specific heat, magnetization, electrical resistivity, thermal expansion and magnetostriction. CeCo0.85Fe0.15Si becomes antiferromagnetic at [Formula: see text] K. However, a broad tail (onset at [Formula: see text] K) in the specific heat precedes that second order transition. This tail is also observed in the temperature derivative of the resistivity. However, it is particularly noticeable in the thermal expansion coefficient where it takes the form of a large bump centered at T X . A high magnetic field practically washes out that tail in the resistivity. But surprisingly, the bump in the thermal expansion coefficient becomes a well pronounced peak fully split from the magnetic transition at T N . Concurrently, the magnetoresistance also switches from negative to positive above T N . The magnetostriction is considerable and irreversible at low temperature ([Formula: see text] at 2 K) when the magnetic interactions dominate. A broad jump in the field dependence of the magnetostriction observed at low T may be the signature of a weak ongoing metamagnetic transition. Taking altogether the results indicate the importance of the lattice effects on the development of the magnetic order in these alloys. PMID:27357448

  1. Deepwater Horizon Situation Report #5

    SciTech Connect

    2010-06-10

    At approximately 11:00 pm EDT April 20, 2010 an explosion occurred aboard the Deepwater Horizon mobile offshore drilling unit (MODU) located 52 miles Southeast of Venice, LA and 130 miles southeast of New Orleans, LA. The MODU was drilling an exploratory well and was not producing oil at the time of the incident. The Deepwater Horizon MODU sank 1,500 feet northwest of the well site. Detailed information on response and recovery operations can be found at: http://www.deepwaterhorizonresponse.com/go/site/2931/

  2. An AlN/Al0.85Ga0.15N high electron mobility transistor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baca, Albert G.; Armstrong, Andrew M.; Allerman, Andrew A.; Douglas, Erica A.; Sanchez, Carlos A.; King, Michael P.; Coltrin, Michael E.; Fortune, Torben R.; Kaplar, Robert J.

    2016-07-01

    An AlN barrier high electron mobility transistor (HEMT) based on the AlN/Al0.85Ga0.15N heterostructure was grown, fabricated, and electrically characterized, thereby extending the range of Al composition and bandgap for AlGaN channel HEMTs. An etch and regrowth procedure was implemented for source and drain contact formation. A breakdown voltage of 810 V was achieved without a gate insulator or field plate. Excellent gate leakage characteristics enabled a high Ion/Ioff current ratio greater than 107 and an excellent subthreshold slope of 75 mV/decade. A large Schottky barrier height of 1.74 eV contributed to these results. The room temperature voltage-dependent 3-terminal off-state drain current was adequately modeled with Frenkel-Poole emission.

  3. Unusual magnetoresistance in cubic B20 Fe0.85Co0.15Si chiral magnets

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Huang, S. X.; Chen, Fei; Kang, Jian; Zang, Jiadong; Shu, G. J.; Chou, F. C.; Chien, C. L.

    2016-06-24

    The B20 chiral magnets with broken inversion symmetry and C4 rotation symmetry have attracted much attention. The broken inversion symmetry leads to the Dzyaloshinskii–Moriya that gives rise to the helical and Skyrmion states.Wereport the unusual magnetoresistance (MR) of B20 chiral magnet Fe0.85Co0.15Si that directly reveals the broken C4 rotation symmetry and shows the anisotropic scattering by Skyrmions with respect to the current directions. The intimacy between unusual MR and broken symmetry is well confirmed by theoretically studying an effective Hamiltonian with spin–orbit coupling. In conclusion, the unusual MR serves as a transport signature for the Skyrmion phase.

  4. The ferroelectricity in perovskite K0.85Ba0.15TaO3+0.075 nanocrystallites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shang, Mingyu; Xu, Chong; Chen, Yan; Ding, Qingfeng; Yuan, Hongming; Sun, Fengyue; Feng, Shouhua

    2015-08-01

    The perovskite K0.85Ba0.15TaO3+0.075 nanocrystallites have been synthesized by mild hydrothermal method for the first time. The powder X-ray diffraction analysis indicates that the crystallographic structure is a primitive cubic, space group Pm-3m with a unit cell edge a=4.00 Å. Heavily Ba doped in K-site was achieved in the perovskite structure with excess oxygen to balance the charge. The chemical substitution changes the crystal structure and electronic structure of KTaO3, which has an impact on its polarization property and induce a ferroelectric phase. The temperature-dependent dielectric response from 300 K to 600 K and hysteresis loop at 300 K provide direct evidence for the ferroelectric character. Its Curie temperature has been obtained from relative dielectric and thermal analysis (TC=460 K).

  5. Nonlinear structure-composition relationships in the Ge1-ySny/Si(100) (y<0.15) system

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Beeler, R.; Roucka, R.; Chizmeshya, A. V. G.; Kouvetakis, J.; Menéndez, J.

    2011-07-26

    The compositional dependence of the cubic lattice parameter in Ge1-ySny alloys has been revisited. Large 1000-atom supercell ab initio simulations confirm earlier theoretical predictions that indicate a positive quadratic deviation from Vegard's law, albeit with a somewhat smaller bowing coefficient, θ = 0.047 Å, than found from 64-atom cell simulations (θ = 0.063 Å). On the other hand, measurements from an extensive set of alloy samples with compositions y < 0.15 reveal a negative deviation from Vegard's law. The discrepancy with earlier experimental data, which supported the theoretical results, is traced back to an unexpected compositional dependence of the residualmore » strain after growth on Si substrates. The experimental bowing parameter for the relaxed lattice constant of the alloys is found to be θ = -0.066 Å. Possible reasons for the disagreement between theory and experiment are discussed in detail.« less

  6. Citrate-complexation synthesized Ce0.85Gd0.15O2-δ (GDC15) as solid electrolyte for intermediate temperature SOFC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anjaneya, K. C.; Manjanna, J.; Nayaka, G. P.; Ashwin Kumar, V. M.; Govindaraj, G.; Ganesha, K. N.

    2014-08-01

    A typical Ce0.85Gd0.15O2-δ (GDC15) composition of CeO2-Gd2O3 system is synthesized by modified sol-gel technique known as citrate-complexation. TG-DTA, XRD, FT-IR, Raman, FE-SEM/EDX and ac-impedance analysis are carried out for structural and electrical characterization. XRD pattern confirmed the well crystalline cubic fluorite structure of GDC15 after calcining at 873 K. Raman spectral bands at 463, 550 and 600 cm-1 are also in agreement with these structural features. FE-SEM image shows well-defined grains separated from grain boundary and good densification. Ac-impedance studies reveal that GDC15 has oxide ionic conductivity similar to that reported for Ce0.9Gd0.1O2-δ (GDC10) and Ce0.8Gd0.2O2-δ (GDC20). Ionic and electronic transference numbers at 673 K are found to be 0.95 and 0.05, respectively. This indicates the possible application of GDC15 as a potential electrolyte for IT-SOFCs.

  7. Highly Reliable 0.15 μm/14 F2 Cell Ferroelectric Random Access Memory Capacitor Using SrRuO3 Buffer Layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heo, Jang‑Eun; Bae, Byoung‑Jae; Yoo, Dong‑Chul; Nam, Sang‑Don; Lim, Ji‑Eun; Im, Dong‑Hyun; Joo, Suk‑Ho; Jung, Yong‑Ju; Choi, Suk‑Hun; Park, Soon‑Oh; Kim, Hee‑Seok; Chung, U‑In; Moon, Joo‑Tae

    2006-04-01

    We investigated a novel technique of modifying the interface between a Pb(ZrxTi1-x)O3 (PZT) thin film and electrodes for high density 64 Mbit ferroelectric random access memory (FRAM) device. Using a SrRuO3 buffer layer, we successfully developed highly reliable 0.15 μm/14 F2 cell FRAM capacitors with 75-nm-thick polycrystalline PZT thin films. The SrRuO3 buffer layer greatly enhanced ferroelectric characteristics due to the decrease in interfacial defect density. In PZT capacitors with a total thickness of 180 nm for whole capacitor stack, a remnant polarization of approximately 42 μC/cm2 was measured with a 1.4 V operation. In addition, an opposite state remnant polarization loss of less than 15% was observed after baking at 150 °C for 100 h. In particular, we found that the SrRuO3 buffer layer also played a key role in inhibiting the diffusion of Pb and O from the PZT thin films.

  8. NIF featured on BBC "Horizon"

    ScienceCinema

    Brian Cox

    2010-09-01

    The National Ignition Facility, the world's largest laser system, located at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, was featured in the BBC broadcast "Horizon" hosted by physicist Brian Cox. Here is the NIF portion of the program, which was entitled "Can We Make A Star On Earth?" This video is used with the express permission of the BBC.

  9. Common Ground: Expanding Our Horizons.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McDevitt, Michele J.

    In "Common Ground: Dialogue, Understanding, and the Teaching of Composition," Kurt Spellmeyer seeks to familiarize students and teachers with the linguistic and cultural no-man's-land separating them. Reinstating the value of two writing conventions often used by traditional students--expressive and commonplaces--can help expand on the horizons of…

  10. New Horizons in Education, 2000.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ho, Kwok Keung, Ed.

    2000-01-01

    This document contains the May and November 2000 issues of "New Horizons in Education," with articles in English and Chinese. The May issue includes the following articles: "A Key to Successful Environmental Education: Teacher Trainees' Attitude, Behaviour, and Knowledge" (Kevin Chung Wai Lui, Eric Po Keung Tsang, Sing Lai Chan); "Critical…

  11. New Horizons Mission to Pluto

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Delgado, Luis G.

    2011-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews the trajectory that will take the New Horizons Mission to Pluto. Included are photographs of the spacecraft, the launch vehicle, the assembled vehicle as it is being moved to the launch pad and the launch. Also shown are diagrams of the assembled parts with identifying part names.

  12. NIF featured on BBC "Horizon"

    SciTech Connect

    Brian Cox

    2010-01-12

    The National Ignition Facility, the world's largest laser system, located at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, was featured in the BBC broadcast "Horizon" hosted by physicist Brian Cox. Here is the NIF portion of the program, which was entitled "Can We Make A Star On Earth?" This video is used with the express permission of the BBC.

  13. Accretion and origin of organic horizons in Mississippi delta

    SciTech Connect

    Kosters, E.C.; Chmura, G.L.; McBride, R.A.

    1986-05-01

    Barataria basin is a large-scale interdistributary basin of the Mississippi delta, measuring about 150 km from its apex to the Gulf of Mexico. The basin developed about 2500 years ago as a result of the interplay of different deltaic distributary systems. The data base consists of about one hundred 7.5-cm-diameter, 3 to 10-m-deep vibracores, and about fifty 15-cm-diameter, 50-cm-deep hand-held cores. Lithology, moisture/ash data, x-ray radiographs, pollen counts, and carbon isotope information are some of the parameters used to aid in the interpretation of the sedimentary and ecological origin of the different organic horizons. Organic facies are (incipient) organic-poor marsh (5-35% organic matter by dry weight), organic-rich marsh (35-75% organic matter), and true peat (75% organic matter). Organic facies occur as more or less distinct horizons; contacts between organic and detrital clastic strata are generally sharp. Each horizon of a certain quality range is thought to be the result of somewhat similar original conditions, such as botanical parent material, salinity regime, detrital clastic influx, and subsidence rates.

  14. Sound velocities of bcc-Fe and Fe0.85Si0.15 alloy at high pressure and temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jin; Lin, Jung-Fu; Alatas, Ahmet; Bi, Wenli

    2014-08-01

    Studying the velocity-density profiles of iron and iron-silicon alloy at high pressures and temperatures is critical for understanding the Earth’s core as well as the interiors of other planetary bodies. Here we have investigated the compressional wave velocity (VP) and density (ρ) profiles of polycrystalline bcc-Fe and Fe0.85Si0.15 alloy (8 wt.% Si) using in situ high-energy resolution inelastic X-ray scattering (HERIX) and synchrotron X-ray diffraction spectroscopies in an externally-heated diamond anvil cell (EHDAC) up to 15 GPa and 700 K. Based on the measured velocity-density (VP-ρ) and velocity-pressure (VP-P) relations of bcc-Fe at simultaneous high pressure and temperature (P-T) conditions, our results show a strong VP reduction at elevated temperatures at a constant density. Comparison of the VP-ρ profiles between the bcc-Fe and bcc-Fe0.85Si0.15 alloy indicates that the alloying effect of additional 8 wt.% Si on the VP-ρ relationship of bcc-Fe is predominant via a constant density decrease of approximately 0.6 g/cm3 (7%). Compared with the literature velocity results for bcc and hcp Fe-Si alloys, the bcc-Fe and Fe-Si alloys exhibit higher VP than their hcp phase counterparts at the given bcc-hcp transition pressures. Our results here strongly support the notion that high temperature has a strong effect on the VP of Fe and that the VP-ρ profile of Fe can be affected by structural and magnetic transitions. Analyses on literature elastic constants of the bcc Fe-Si alloys, as a function of P-T and Si content, show that the bcc phase displays extremely high VP anisotropy of 16-30% and VS splitting anisotropy of 40-90% at high temperatures, while the addition of Si further enhances the anisotropy. Due to the extremely high elastic anisotropy of the bcc Fe-Si alloy, a certain portion of the bcc Fe-Si alloy with the lattice-preferred orientation may produce VP and VS anisotropies to potentially account for the observed seismic anisotropy in the inner core.

  15. The Malcolm horizon: History and future

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Malcolm, R.

    1984-01-01

    The development of the Malcolm Horizon, a peripheral vision horizon used in flight simulation, is discussed. A history of the horizon display is presented as well as a brief overview of vision physiology, and the role balance plays is spatial orientation. Avenues of continued research in subconscious cockpit instrumentation are examined.

  16. Serpentine Nanotubes in CM Chondrites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zega, Thomas J.; Garvie, Laurence A. J.; Dodony, Istvan; Buseck, Peter R.

    2004-01-01

    The CM chondrites are primitive meteorites that formed during the early solar system. Although they retain much of their original physical character, their matrices and fine-grained rims (FGRs) sustained aqueous alteration early in their histories [1- 3]. Serpentine-group minerals are abundant products of such alteration, and information regarding their structures, compositions, and spatial relationships is important for determining the reactions that produced them and the conditions under which they formed. Our recent work on FGRs and matrices of the CM chondrites has revealed new information on the structures and compositions of serpentine-group minerals [4,5] and has provided insights into the evolution of these primitive meteorites. Here we report on serpentine nanotubes from the Mighei and Murchison CM chondrites [6].

  17. Variation of the lunar highland surface roughness at baseline 0.15-100 km and the relationship to relative age

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yokota, Y.; Gwinner, K.; Oberst, J.; Haruyama, J.; Matsunaga, T.; Morota, T.; Noda, H.; Araki, H.; Ohtake, M.; Yamamoto, S.; Gläser, P.; Ishihara, Y.; Honda, C.; Hirata, N.; Demura, H.

    2014-03-01

    We report the surface roughness analysis of the lunar highlands for the baseline range 0.15-100 km. We use the Median Differential Slope αm to investigate the scale dependency of the roughness and derive the global αm distribution from SELENE Laser Altimeter and Terrain Camera data. While αm(l) versus baseline l (km) plots vary among different highland types, all highlands commonly show a peak at 3-30 km. The Pre-Nectarian surface shows a relatively large αm(20-30 km). Our analysis is supported by the simulation of synthetic surface cratering models and crater statistics. In our simulation, a peak of αm(30 km) is successfully reproduced. The actual crater density shows good correlation with an empirical roughness indicator. However, a large part of the Nectarian surface shows a peak at 6-9 km baseline. This peak may be caused by secondary craters and ejecta deposit textures from the Nectarian system basins.

  18. Fermion tunneling from dynamical horizons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Di Criscienzo, R.; Vanzo, L.

    2008-06-01

    The instability against emission of fermionic particles by the trapping horizon of an evolving black hole is analyzed and confirmed using the Hamilton-Jacobi tunneling method. This method automatically selects one special expression for the surface gravity of a changing horizon. The results also apply to point masses embedded in an expanding universe. As a bonus of the tunneling method, we gain the insight that the surface gravity still defines a temperature parameter as long as the evolution is sufficiently slow that the black-hole pass through a sequence of quasi-equilibrium states, and that black holes should be semi-classically unstable even in a hypothetical world without bosonic fields.

  19. Penrose inequality and apparent horizons

    SciTech Connect

    Ben-Dov, Ishai

    2004-12-15

    A spherically symmetric spacetime is presented with an initial data set that is asymptotically flat, satisfies the dominant energy condition, and such that on this initial data M<{radical}(A/16{pi}), where M is the total mass and A is the area of the apparent horizon. This provides a counterexample to a commonly stated version of the Penrose inequality, though it does not contradict the true Penrose inequality.

  20. New Horizons Tracks an Asteroid

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2007-01-01

    The two 'spots' in this image are a composite of two images of asteroid 2002 JF56 taken on June 11 and June 12, 2006, with the Multispectral Visible Imaging Camera (MVIC) component of the New Horizons Ralph imager. In the bottom image, taken when the asteroid was about 3.36 million kilometers (2.1 million miles) away from the spacecraft, 2002 JF56 appears like a dim star. At top, taken at a distance of about 1.34 million kilometers (833,000 miles), the object is more than a factor of six brighter. The best current, estimated diameter of the asteroid is approximately 2.5 kilometers.

    The asteroid observation was a chance for the New Horizons team to test the spacecraft's ability to track a rapidly moving object. On June 13 New Horizons came to within about 102,000 kilometers of the small asteroid, when the spacecraft was nearly 368 million kilometers (228 million miles) from the Sun and about 273 million kilometers (170 million miles) from Earth.

  1. 344 cm x 86 cm low mass vacuum window

    SciTech Connect

    Reimers, R.M.; Porter, J.; Meneghetti, J.; Wilde, S.; Miller, R.

    1983-08-01

    The LBL Heavy Ion Spectrometer System (HISS) superconducting magnet contains a 1 m x 3.45 m x 2 m vacuum tank in its gap. A full aperture thin window was needed to minimize background as the products of nuclear collisions move from upstream targets to downstream detectors. Six windows were built and tested in the development process. The final window's unsupported area is 3m/sup 2/ with a 25 cm inward deflection. The design consists of a .11 mm Nylon/aluminum/polypropylene laminate as a gas seal and .55 mm woven aramid fiber for strength. Total mass is 80 milligrams per cm/sup 2/. Development depended heavily on past experience and testing. Safety considerations are discussed.

  2. New Horizons Launch Contingency Effort

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Yale; Lear, Matthew H.; McGrath, Brian E.; Heyler, Gene A.; Takashima, Naruhisa; Owings, W. Donald

    2007-01-01

    On 19 January 2006 at 2:00 PM EST, the NASA New Horizons spacecraft (SC) was launched from the Cape Canaveral Air Force Station (CCAFS), FL, onboard an Atlas V 551/Centaur/STAR™ 48B launch vehicle (LV) on a mission to explore the Pluto Charon planetary system and possibly other Kuiper Belt Objects. It carried a single Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generator (RTG). As part of the joint NASA/US Department of Energy (DOE) safety effort, contingency plans were prepared to address the unlikely events of launch accidents leading to a near-pad impact, a suborbital reentry, an orbital reentry, or a heliocentric orbit. As the implementing organization. The Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory (JHU/APL) had expanded roles in the New Horizons launch contingency effort over those for the Cassini mission and Mars Exploration Rovers missions. The expanded tasks included participation in the Radiological Control Center (RADCC) at the Kennedy Space Center (KSC), preparation of contingency plans, coordination of space tracking assets, improved aerodynamics characterization of the RTG's 18 General Purpose Heat Source (GPHS) modules, and development of spacecraft and RTG reentry breakup analysis tools. Other JHU/APL tasks were prediction of the Earth impact footprints (ElFs) for the GPHS modules released during the atmospheric reentry (for purposes of notification and recovery), prediction of the time of SC reentry from a potential orbital decay, pre-launch dissemination of ballistic coefficients of various possible reentry configurations, and launch support of an Emergency Operations Center (EOC) on the JHU/APL campus. For the New Horizons launch, JHU/APL personnel at the RADCC and at the EOC were ready to implement any real-time launch contingency activities. A successful New Horizons launch and interplanetary injection precluded any further contingency actions. The New Horizons launch contingency was an interagency effort by several organizations. This paper

  3. BACE0.85Y0.15O3-DELTA Based Materials for Inovative Monolithic Solid Oxide Fuel Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krezhov, Kiril; Vladikova, Daria

    2016-07-01

    Solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs) offer a promising green technology of direct conversion of chemical energy of fuel into electricity. Among the families of metal oxides, which can be successfully used as electrodes (cathodes or anodes) in SOFC, certain members of the large family of transition-metal oxides with perovskite structure ABO _{3} were found very prospective to fulfil most of the features required for preparation of mixed ionic-electronic conductor (MIEC) oxide materials for SOFCs operated in the intermediate temperature range. In this regard Barium cerate with Y-substitution at the B-site (Ce site) is well known for excellent conduction capabilities in the temperature range 400-800 °C as a result from the proton motion in the crystal lattice. Doping with Y ^{3+} is very effective and the proton conductivity in BaCe _{1-x}Y _{x}O _{3-δ} increases with the increasing of the dopant concentration up to x =0.2. However, the phase behaviour of the composition BCY20 (x=0.20) is very complicated. Even at room temperature the crystalline structure remains contradictory because various structures of monoclinic, rhombohedral and orthorhombic symmetry are reported. The characterization of the chemical composition and stability, oxygen stoichiometry and cationic ratios of each synthesized phase is of great importance to understand the defect-chemistry that would govern the transport properties. We report on oxygen-deficient BaCe _{0.85}Y _{0.15}O _{3-δ} (BCY15) perovskites prepared by auto-combustion with following calcination at high temperature. The structural details of powder, dense and porous samples of materials based on BCY15 were investigated from full profile analysis of neutron and x-ray diffraction patterns. The materials were used recently as cathode, anode and central membrane in an innovative monolithic design of SOFC.

  4. The New Horizons Radio Science Experiment (REX)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tyler, G. L.; Linscott, I. R.; Bird, M. K.; Hinson, D. P.; Strobel, D. F.; Pätzold, M.; Summers, M. E.; Sivaramakrishnan, K.

    2008-10-01

    The New Horizons (NH) Radio Science Experiment, REX, is designed to determine the atmospheric state at the surface of Pluto and in the lowest few scale heights. Expected absolute accuracies in n, p, and T at the surface are 4ṡ1019 m-3, 0.1 Pa, and 3 K, respectively, obtained by radio occultation of a 4.2 cm- λ signal transmitted from Earth at 10-30 kW and received at the NH spacecraft. The threshold for ionospheric observations is roughly 2ṡ109 e- m-3. Radio occultation experiments are planned for both Pluto and Charon, but the level of accuracy for the neutral gas is expected to be useful at Pluto only. REX will also measure the nightside 4.2 cm- λ thermal emission from Pluto and Charon during the time NH is occulted. At Pluto, the thermal scan provides about five half-beams across the disk; at Charon, only disk integrated values can be obtained. A combination of two-way tracking and occultation signals will determine the Pluto system mass to about 0.01 percent, and improve the Pluto-Charon mass ratio. REX flight equipment augments the NH radio transceiver used for spacecraft communications and tracking. Implementation of REX required realization of a new CIC-SCIC signal processing algorithm; the REX hardware implementation requires 1.6 W, and has mass of 160 g in 520 cm3. Commissioning tests conducted after NH launch demonstrate that the REX system is operating as expected.

  5. AMR on the CM-2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berger, Marsha J.; Saltzman, Jeff S.

    1992-01-01

    We describe the development of a structured adaptive mesh algorithm (AMR) for the Connection Machine-2 (CM-2). We develop a data layout scheme that preserves locality even for communication between fine and coarse grids. On 8K of a 32K machine we achieve performance slightly less than 1 CPU of the Cray Y-MP. We apply our algorithm to an inviscid compressible flow problem.

  6. Transparent magnetic state in single crystal Nd(1.85)Ce(0.15)CuO(4-y) superconductors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zuo, F.

    1995-01-01

    Several experimental studies have been reported as evidence of Josephson coupling between the superconducting layers in the highly anisotropic oxide such as the Bi2Sr2CaCu2O8 and Tl2Ba2CuO6 systems. These include the large penetration depth of 100 mu m measured, ac and dc Josephson effects. Recently two critical temperatures corresponding to Josephson coupling in between the layers and the Berezinskii-Kosterlitz-Thouless transition in the ab-plane have been directly observed in the transport measurements. If the field is applied parallel to the superconducting layers, the magnetic excitation is not the conventional Abrikosov vortices, but the Josephson vortices which extend lambda(sub ab) in the c-axis direction and lambda(sub J) = gamma s in the plane (s is the interlayer distance, gamma is the anisotropy constant). Because of the weak screening effect associated with the Josephson vortices, there have been predictions of magnetic transparent states at magnetic field above a characteristic field H(sub J), a behavior distinctively different from that of the type-II superconductors. In this paper, we report an experimental result which illustrates a transition from the Meissner state to the magnetic transparent state in single crystal of Nd(1.85)Ce(0.15)CuO(4-y). Magnetization has been measured as a function of temperature and field in the magnetic field parallel or close to ab-plane geometry. For a fixed magnetic field, the magnetization shows a two-step transition in M(T); for a fixed temperature, the magnetization shows an abrupt change to almost zero value above a characteristic field H(sub J), an indication of magnetic transparent state. The data of magnetization as a function of field clearly deviates from the behavior predicted by the Abrikosov theory for type-II superconductors. Instead, the data fit well into the picture of Josephson decoupling between the CuO2 layers.

  7. Topological deformation of isolated horizons

    SciTech Connect

    Liko, Tomas

    2008-03-15

    We show that the Gauss-Bonnet term can have physical effects in four dimensions. Specifically, the entropy of a black hole acquires a correction term that is proportional to the Euler characteristic of the cross sections of the horizon. While this term is constant for a single black hole, it will be a nontrivial function for a system with dynamical topologies such as black-hole mergers: it is shown that for certain values of the Gauss-Bonnet parameter, the second law of black-hole mechanics can be violated.

  8. Cardiovascular rhythms in the 0.15-Hz band: common origin of identical phenomena in man and dog in the reticular formation of the brain stem?

    PubMed

    Perlitz, Volker; Lambertz, Manfred; Cotuk, Birol; Grebe, Reinhard; Vandenhouten, Ralf; Flatten, Guido; Petzold, Ernst Richard; Schmid-Schönbein, Holger; Langhorst, Peter

    2004-09-01

    Selected examples from experiments in humans and dogs with time series of reticular neurons, respiration, arterial blood pressure and cutaneous forehead blood content fluctuations were analysed using multiscaled time-frequency distribution, post-event-scan and pointwise transinformation. We found in both experiments a "0.15-Hz rhythm" exhibiting periods of spindle waves (increasing and decreasing amplitudes), phase synchronized with respiration at 1:2 and 1:1 integer number ratios. At times of wave-epochs and n:m phase synchronization, the 0.15-Hz rhythm appeared in heart rate and arterial blood pressure. As phase synchronization of the 0.15-Hz rhythm with respiration was established at a 1:1 integer number ratio, all cardiovascular-respiratory oscillations were synchronized at 0.15 Hz. Analysis of a canine experiment supplied evidence that the emergence of the 0.15-Hz rhythm and n:m phase synchronization appears to result from a decline in the level of the general activity of the organism associated with a decline in the level of activity of reticular neurons in the lower brainstem network. These findings corroborate the notion of the 0.15-Hz rhythm as a marker of the "trophotropic mode of operation" first introduced by W.R. Hess. PMID:15138824

  9. Variable horizon in a peridynamic medium

    SciTech Connect

    Silling, Stewart A.; Littlewood, David J.; Seleson, Pablo

    2015-12-10

    Here, a notion of material homogeneity is proposed for peridynamic bodies with variable horizon but constant bulk properties. A relation is derived that scales the force state according to the position-dependent horizon while keeping the bulk properties unchanged. Using this scaling relation, if the horizon depends on position, artifacts called ghost forces may arise in a body under a homogeneous deformation. These artifacts depend on the second derivative of the horizon and can be reduced by employing a modified equilibrium equation using a new quantity called the partial stress. Bodies with piecewise constant horizon can be modeled without ghost forces by using a simpler technique called a splice. As a limiting case of zero horizon, both the partial stress and splice techniques can be used to achieve local-nonlocal coupling. Computational examples, including dynamic fracture in a one-dimensional model with local-nonlocal coupling, illustrate the methods.

  10. Variable horizon in a peridynamic medium.

    SciTech Connect

    Silling, Stewart Andrew; Littlewood, David John; Seleson, Pablo

    2014-10-01

    A notion of material homogeneity is proposed for peridynamic bodies with vari- able horizon but constant bulk properties. A relation is derived that scales the force state according to the position-dependent horizon while keeping the bulk properties un- changed. Using this scaling relation, if the horizon depends on position, artifacts called ghost forces may arise in a body under homogeneous deformation. These artifacts de- pend on the second derivative of horizon and can be reduced by use of a modified equilibrium equation using a new quantity called the partial stress . Bodies with piece- wise constant horizon can be modeled without ghost forces by using a technique called a splice between the regions. As a limiting case of zero horizon, both partial stress and splice techniques can be used to achieve local-nonlocal coupling. Computational examples, including dynamic fracture in a one-dimensional model with local-nonlocal coupling, illustrate the methods.

  11. Variable horizon in a peridynamic medium

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Silling, Stewart A.; Littlewood, David J.; Seleson, Pablo

    2015-12-10

    Here, a notion of material homogeneity is proposed for peridynamic bodies with variable horizon but constant bulk properties. A relation is derived that scales the force state according to the position-dependent horizon while keeping the bulk properties unchanged. Using this scaling relation, if the horizon depends on position, artifacts called ghost forces may arise in a body under a homogeneous deformation. These artifacts depend on the second derivative of the horizon and can be reduced by employing a modified equilibrium equation using a new quantity called the partial stress. Bodies with piecewise constant horizon can be modeled without ghost forcesmore » by using a simpler technique called a splice. As a limiting case of zero horizon, both the partial stress and splice techniques can be used to achieve local-nonlocal coupling. Computational examples, including dynamic fracture in a one-dimensional model with local-nonlocal coupling, illustrate the methods.« less

  12. Smooth horizons and quantum ripples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golovnev, Alexey

    2015-05-01

    Black holes are unique objects which allow for meaningful theoretical studies of strong gravity and even quantum gravity effects. An infalling and a distant observer would have very different views on the structure of the world. However, a careful analysis has shown that it entails no genuine contradictions for physics, and the paradigm of observer complementarity has been coined. Recently this picture was put into doubt. In particular, it was argued that in old black holes a firewall must form in order to protect the basic principles of quantum mechanics. This AMPS paradox has already been discussed in a vast number of papers with different attitudes and conclusions. Here we want to argue that a possible source of confusion is the neglect of quantum gravity effects. Contrary to widespread perception, it does not necessarily mean that effective field theory is inapplicable in rather smooth neighbourhoods of large black hole horizons. The real offender might be an attempt to consistently use it over the huge distances from the near-horizon zone of old black holes to the early radiation. We give simple estimates to support this viewpoint and show how the Page time and (somewhat more speculative) scrambling time do appear.

  13. Theory underlying the peripheral vision horizon device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Money, K. E.

    1984-01-01

    Peripheral Vision Horizon Device (PVHD) theory states that the likelihood of pilot disorientation in flight is reduced by providing an artificial horizon that provides orientation information to peripheral vision. In considering the validity of the theory, three areas are explored: the use of an artificial horizon device over some other flight instrument; the use of peripheral vision over foveal vision; and the evidence that peripheral vision is well suited to the processing of orientation information.

  14. Optical Characterization and 2,525 micron Lasing of Cr(2+):Cd(0.85)Mn(0.15)Te

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, V. R.; Wu, X.; Hoemmerich, U.; Trivedi, S. B.; Grasza, K.; Yu, Z.

    1997-01-01

    static acentric electric crystal field or the coupling of asymmetric phonons can force electric-dipole transitions by the admixture of wave functions with opposite parity. Tetrahedral sites lack inversion symmetry which provides the odd-parity field necessary to relax the parity selection rule. Therefore, high absorption and emission cross sections are observed. An enhanced radiative emission rate is also expected to reduce the detrimental effect of non-radiative decay. Motivated by the initial results on Cr doped ZnS and ZnSe, we have started a comprehensive effort to study Cr(2+) doped II-VI semiconductors for solid-state laser applications. In this paper we present the optical properties and the demonstration of mid-infrared lasing from Cr doped Cd(0.85)Mn(0.15)Te.

  15. Spectroscopy of a weakly isolated horizon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Ge-Rui; Huang, Yong-Chang

    2016-06-01

    The spectroscopy of a weakly isolated horizon has been investigated. We obtain an equally spaced entropy spectrum with its quantum equal to the one given by Bekenstein (Phys Rev D 7:2333, 1973). We demonstrate that the quantization of entropy and area is a generic property of horizons which exists in a wide class of spacetimes admitting weakly isolated horizons. Our method based on the tunneling method also indicates that the entropy quantum of black hole horizons is closely related to Hawking temperature.

  16. Thermoelectric Properties of Cu-Doped n-Type Bi2Te2.85Se0.15 Prepared by Liquid Phase Growth Using a Sliding Boat

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kitagawa, Hiroyuki; Matsuura, Tsukasa; Kato, Toshihito; Kamata, Kin-ya

    2015-06-01

    N-type Bi2Te2.85Se0.15 thermoelectric materials were prepared by liquid phase growth (LPG) using a sliding boat, a simple and short fabrication process for Bi2Te3-related materials. Cu was selected as a donor dopant, and its effect on thermoelectric properties was investigated. Thick sheets and bars of Cu x Bi2 Te2.85Se0.15 ( x=0-0.25) of 1-2mm in thickness were obtained using the process. X-ray diffraction patterns and scanning electron micrographs showed that the in-plane direction tended to correspond to the hexagonal c-plane, which is the preferred direction for thermoelectric conversion. Cu-doping was effective in controlling conduction type and carrier (electron) concentration. The conduction type was p-type for undoped Bi2Te2.85Se0.15 and became n-type after Cu-doping. The Hall carrier concentration was increased by Cu-doping. Small resistivity was achieved in Cu0.02Bi2Te2.85Se0.15 owing to an optimized amount of Cu-doping and high crystal orientation. As a result, the maximum power factor near 310K for Cu0.02Bi2Te2.85Se0.15 was approximately 4×10-3W/K2m and had good reproducibility. Furthermore, the thermal stability of Cu0.02Bi2Te2.85Se0.15 was also confirmed by thermal cycling measurements of electrical resistivity. Thus, n-type Bi2Te2.85Se0.15 with a large power factor was prepared using the present LPG process.

  17. Dielectric and ferroelectric properties of Ba(Sn{sub 0.15}Ti{sub 0.85})O{sub 3} thin films grown by a sol-gel process

    SciTech Connect

    Zhai Jiwei; Shen Bo; Yao Xi; Zhang Liangying

    2004-09-01

    Ferroelectric Ba(Sn{sub 0.15}Ti{sub 0.85})O{sub 3} (BTS) thin films were deposited on LaNiO{sub 3}-coated silicon substrates via a sol-gel process. Films showed a strong (1 0 0) preferred orientation depending upon annealing temperature and concentration of the precursor solution. The dependence of dielectric and ferroelectric properties on film orientation has been studied. The leakage current density of thin films at 100 kV/cm was 7 x 10{sup -7} A/cm{sup 2} and 5 x 10{sup -5} A/cm{sup 2} and their capacitor tunability was 54 and 25% at an applied field of 200 kV/cm (measurement frequency of 1 MHz) for the thin films deposited with 0.1 and 0.4 M spin-on solution, respectively. This work clearly reveals the highly promising potential of BTS compared with BST films for application in tunable microwave devices.

  18. The NMC Horizon Report: 2014 Library Edition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, L.; Adams Becker, S.; Estrada, V.; Freeman, A.

    2014-01-01

    The internationally recognized "NMC Horizon Report" series and regional "NMC Technology Outlooks" are part of the NMC Horizon Project, a 12-year effort established in 2002 that annually identifies and describes emerging technologies likely to have a large impact over the coming five years in every sector of education around the…

  19. Reconceptualizing Knowledge at the Mathematical Horizon

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zazkis, Rina; Mamolo, Ami

    2011-01-01

    This article extends the notion of "knowledge at the mathematical horizon" or "horizon knowledge" introduced by Ball and colleagues as a part of teachers' subject matter knowledge. Our focus is on teachers' mathematical knowledge beyond the school curriculum, that is, on mathematics learnt during undergraduate college or university studies. We…

  20. The Horizon Report: 2010 Museum Edition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, L.; Witchey, H.; Smith, R.; Levine, A.; Haywood, K.

    2010-01-01

    The internationally recognized series of "Horizon Reports" is part of the New Media Consortium's Horizon Project, a comprehensive research venture established in 2002 that identifies and describes emerging technologies likely to have a large impact over the coming five years on a variety of sectors around the globe. This volume, the "2010 Horizon…

  1. Expanding your horizons in science and mathematics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Palmer, Cynthia E. A.

    1995-01-01

    The purpose of the 'Expanding Your Horizons in Science and Mathematics' program is to interest young women in grades six through twelve in a variety of careers where mathematics and science are important. Progress in encouraging young women to take courses in mathematics, science, and technological subjects is discussed. Also included are adult, student, and organizational information packets used for 'Expanding Your Horizons' conferences.

  2. Horizon Report: 2009 Economic Development Edition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, L.; Levine, A.; Scott, C.; Smith, R.; Stone, S.

    2009-01-01

    The New Media Consortium's Horizon Project is an ongoing research project that seeks to identify and describe emerging technologies likely to have a large impact in education and other industries around the world over a five-year time period. The chief products of the project are the "Horizon Reports", an annual series of publications that…

  3. Horizon Report: 2010 K-12 Edition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, L.; Smith, R.; Levine, A.; Haywood, K.

    2010-01-01

    The "Horizon Report" series is the most visible outcome of the New Media Consortium's Horizon Project, an ongoing research effort established in 2002 that identifies and describes emerging technologies likely to have a large impact on teaching, learning, research, or creative expression within education around the globe. This volume, the "2010…

  4. The NMC Horizon Report: 2015 Museum Edition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, L.; Adams Becker, S.; Estrada, V.; Freeman, A.

    2015-01-01

    The internationally recognized series of "Horizon Reports" is part of the New Media Consortium's Horizon Project, a comprehensive research venture established in 2002 that identifies and describes emerging technologies likely to have a large impact over the coming years on a variety of sectors around the globe. This "2015 Horizon…

  5. GaP ring-like nanostructures on GaAs (100) with In{sub 0.15}Ga{sub 0.85}As compensation layers

    SciTech Connect

    Prongjit, Patchareewan Pankaow, Naraporn Boonpeng, Poonyasiri Thainoi, Supachok Panyakeow, Somsak Ratanathammaphan, Somchai

    2013-12-04

    We present the fabrication of GaP ring-like nanostructures on GaAs (100) substrates with inserted In{sub 0.15}Ga{sub 0.85}As compensation layers. The samples are grown by droplet epitaxy using solid-source molecular beam epitaxy. The dependency of nanostructural and optical properties of GaP nanostructures on In{sub 0.15}Ga{sub 0.85}As layer thickness is investigated by ex-situ atomic force microscope (AFM) and photoluminescence (PL). It is found that the characteristics of GaP ring-like structures on GaAs strongly depend on the In{sub 0.15}Ga{sub 0.85}As layer thickness.

  6. Strain-relaxation and critical thickness of epitaxial La1.85Sr0.15CuO4 films

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Meyer, Tricia L; Jiang, Lu; Park, Sungkyun; Egami, Takeshi; Lee, Ho Nyung

    2015-12-08

    We report the thickness-dependent strain-relaxation behavior and the associated impacts upon the superconductivity in epitaxial La1.85Sr0.15CuO4 films grown on different substrates, which provide a range of strain. We have found that the critical thickness for the onset of superconductivity in La1.85Sr0.15CuO4 films is associated with the finite thickness effect and epitaxial strain. In particular, thin films with tensile strain greater than ~0.25% revealed no superconductivity. We attribute this phenomenon to the inherent formation of oxygen vacancies that can be minimized via strain relaxation.

  7. Effects of NiO on the conductivity of Ce0.85Sm0.15O1.925 and on electrochemical properties of the cathode/electrolyte interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Haopeng; Liu, Xiaomei; Bi, Hailin; Yu, Shenglong; Han, Fei; Sun, Jialing; Zhu, Lili; Yu, Huamin; Pei, Li

    2016-07-01

    Ce0.85Sm0.15O1.925 (SDC) and Ce0.85Sm0.15O1.925-0.5 at.% NiO (SDCN) are investigated as electrolytes for solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs). Impedance spectroscopy measurements reveal that the grain boundary resistance can be significantly reduced by adding 0.5 at.% NiO to SDC. Symmetric cells of the BaCo0.7Fe0.2Nb0.1O3-δ (BCFN) electrode on SDC and SDCN electrolytes are fabricated and the electrochemical properties of the electrode/electrolyte interface are investigated. The polarization resistance of the BCFN electrode on the SDCN electrolyte is much lower than that of the BCFN electrode on the SDC electrolyte, mainly because of the increase in the electrolyte conductivity and the decrease in the Si content at the electrode/electrolyte interface. NiO is able to restrict the diffusion of the siliceous impurity from the electrolyte to the electrode/electrolyte interface. Single cells based on SDC and SDCN electrolytes are fabricated using Ni0.9Cu0.1Ox-SDC as the anode and BCFN as the cathode. At 800 °C, the maximum power density of the SDCN-based cell is 0.745 W cm-2, which is much higher than that of the SDC-based cell.

  8. Dynamic in situ observations of electrical and structural changes in thin thermoelectric (Bi{sub 0.15}Sb{sub 0.85}){sub 2}Te{sub 3} films

    SciTech Connect

    Bertram, Katrin; Stordeur, Matthias; Heyroth, Frank; Leipner, Hartmut S.

    2009-09-15

    Thin films of (Bi{sub 0.15}Sb{sub 0.85}){sub 2}Te{sub 3} were prepared by dc magnetron sputter deposition on different substrates. It is well known that thermal treatment of as-deposited p-type (Bi{sub 0.15}Sb{sub 0.85}){sub 2}Te{sub 3} films leads to an enhancement of the power factor. Whereas up to now only the initial (as deposited) and the final (after annealing) film stages have been investigated, here, the dynamic changes of sputter-deposited film properties have been observed by in situ measurements. The enhancement of the power factor shows a significant dependence on thermal treatment. The best thermoelectric films have been prepared at a substrate temperature of 170 deg. C, with a power factor of 24.4 muW/(cm K{sup 2}). The changes in the Seebeck and Hall coefficients are caused by the enhancement in the Hall mobility after annealing. In situ x-ray diffractometry shows the generation of additional Te in dependence of the temperature. This is also confirmed by energy-dispersive x-ray microanalysis and the corresponding mapping in a scanning electron microscope. It is supposed that the locally well-defined Te enrichment is the reason for the improvement in the integral film transport properties.

  9. Quasilocal approach to general universal horizons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maciel, Alan

    2016-05-01

    Theories of gravity with a preferred foliation usually display arbitrarily fast signal propagation, changing the black hole definition. A new inescapable barrier, the universal horizon, has been defined and many static and spherically symmetric examples have been studied in the literature. Here, we translate the usual definition of the universal horizon in terms of an optical scalar built with the preferred flow defined by the preferred spacetime foliation. The new expression has the advantages of being of quasilocal nature and independent of specific spacetime symmetries in order to be well defined. Therefore, we propose it as a definition for general quasilocal universal horizons. Using the new formalism, we show that there is no universal analog of cosmological horizons for Friedmann-Lemaître-Robertson-Walker models for any scale factor function, and we also state that quasilocal universal horizons are restricted to trapped regions of the spacetime. Using the evolution equation, we analyze the formation of universal horizons under a truncated Hořava-Lifshitz theory, in spherical symmetry, showing the existence of regions in parameter space where the universal horizon formation cannot be smooth from the center, under some physically reasonable assumptions. We conclude with our view on the next steps for the understanding of black holes in nonrelativistic gravity theories.

  10. Production and decay of evolving horizons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nielsen, Alex B.; Visser, Matt

    2006-07-01

    We consider a simple physical model for an evolving horizon that is strongly interacting with its environment, exchanging arbitrarily large quantities of matter with its environment in the form of both infalling material and outgoing Hawking radiation. We permit fluxes of both lightlike and timelike particles to cross the horizon, and ask how the horizon grows and shrinks in response to such flows. We place a premium on providing a clear and straightforward exposition with simple formulae. To be able to handle such a highly dynamical situation in a simple manner we make one significant physical restriction—that of spherical symmetry—and two technical mathematical restrictions: (1) we choose to slice the spacetime in such a way that the spacetime foliations (and hence the horizons) are always spherically symmetric. (2) Furthermore, we adopt Painlevé Gullstrand coordinates (which are well suited to the problem because they are nonsingular at the horizon) in order to simplify the relevant calculations. Of course physics results are ultimately independent of the choice of coordinates, but this particular coordinate system yields a clean physical interpretation of the relevant physics. We find particularly simple forms for surface gravity, and for the first and second law of black hole thermodynamics, in this general evolving horizon situation. Furthermore, we relate our results to Hawking's apparent horizon, Ashtekar and co-worker's isolated and dynamical horizons, and Hayward's trapping horizon. The evolving black hole model discussed here will be of interest, both from an astrophysical viewpoint in terms of discussing growing black holes and from a purely theoretical viewpoint in discussing black hole evaporation via Hawking radiation.

  11. 21 cm Power Spectrum Upper Limits from PAPER-64

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shiraz Ali, Zaki; Parsons, Aaron; Pober, Jonathan; Team PAPER

    2016-01-01

    We present power spectrum results from the 64 antenna deployment of the Donald C. Backer Precision Array for Probing the Epoch of Reionization (PAPER-64). We find an upper limit of Δ2≤(22.4 mK)2 over the range 0.15cm power spectrum constraints to date. In addition, we use these results to place lower limits on the spin temperature at a redshift of 8.4. We find that the spin temperature is at least 10K for a neutral fraction between 15% and 80%. This further suggests that there was heating in the early universe through various sources such as x-ray binaries.

  12. NEW HORIZONS IN SENSOR DEVELOPMENT

    PubMed Central

    Intille, Stephen S.; Lester, Jonathan; Sallis, James F.; Duncan, Glen

    2011-01-01

    Background Accelerometery and other sensing technologies are important tools for physical activity measurement. Engineering advances have allowed developers to transform clunky, uncomfortable, and conspicuous monitors into relatively small, ergonomic, and convenient research tools. New devices can be used to collect data on overall physical activity and in some cases posture, physiological state, and location, for many days or weeks from subjects during their everyday lives. In this review article, we identify emerging trends in several types of monitoring technologies and gaps in the current state of knowledge. Best practices The only certainty about the future of activity sensing technologies is that researchers must anticipate and plan for change. We propose a set of best practices that may accelerate adoption of new devices and increase the likelihood that data being collected and used today will be compatible with new datasets and methods likely to appear on the horizon. Future directions We describe several technology-driven trends, ranging from continued miniaturization of devices that provide gross summary information about activity levels and energy expenditure, to new devices that provide highly detailed information about the specific type, amount, and location of physical activity. Some devices will take advantage of consumer technologies, such as mobile phones, to detect and respond to physical activity in real time, creating new opportunities in measurement, remote compliance monitoring, data-driven discovery, and intervention. PMID:22157771

  13. [Visual illusions and moving horizon].

    PubMed

    Zhdan'ko, I M; Chulaevskiĭ, A O; Kovalenko, P A

    2012-09-01

    Results of psychological "additional investigation" of the crash of Boeing-737, "Aeroflot-Nord" on 14.09.2008 near Perm are presented. 37 pilots from the one of the leading airline companies sensed the attitude and rolling out the aircraft to the forward flight under the moving horizon with straight display of bank and tangage (view from the aircraft to the ground) in model conditions. 29 pilots (78.4%) made a mistake at determining the roll direction and tangage, they made a mistake at determining the roll direction 61 times (16.4%) and 44 times at determining the tangage direction, in other words they confused left and right bank and also nose-up and nose-down. Visual illusions of mobility of space and handling of ground (instead of aircraft) during the flight were revealed in pilots. These illusions may be the important cause of the following crashes. The necessity of "back" faultless display of bank in all aircrafts of civil aviation and development of computer complex for training of visual spatial orientation is proved. PMID:23156114

  14. Enhancement in optical and structural properties of Zn0.85Mg0.15O nanorods over thin films synthesized by hydrothermal chemical treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murkute, P.; Sehara, N.; Ghadi, H.; Pandey, S. K.; Maity, S.; Chakrabarti, S.

    2016-02-01

    We are reporting an enhancement in optical properties by changing the structure of Zn0.85Mg0.15O thin films through formation of crystalline hexagonal nanorods. Zn0.85Mg0.15O thin films were deposited on Si (100) substrate using dielectric sputter followed by annealing in oxygen ambient at temperatures of 700, 800 and 900° C for 10 seconds to reduce oxygen vacancies defects. Deposited thin film annealed at 900 °C (sample A) measured highest peak intensity and it was subjected to controlled the hydrothermal bath conditioning for forming hexagonal nanorods. Four samples were dipped in 2 different solutions with variable molar ratio of zinc nitrate hexahydrate and hexamethylentetramine for 2 and 3 hours, respectively. Samples processed in solution 1 (1:1) ratio for 2 and 3 hours were named B and C and those in solution 2 (2:1) were D and E, respectively. Photoluminescence measurement at 18K demonstrates exciton near-band-edge (NBE) emission peak at 3.61eV from Zn0.85Mg0.15O sample A whereas other samples exhibited slight blue shift along with bimodal peaks. The other peak observed at lower energy 3.43eV corresponds to transitions due to presence of ZnO phase in Zn0.85Mg0.15O. All samples compared to sample A exhibited more than 10 times increment in peak intensities with sample B producing the highest (~ 20 times). Nanorods formation was confirmed using crosssectional SEM imaging. X-ray diffraction measurements revealed that all Zn0.85Mg0.15O samples had (002) preferred crystal orientation with peak position at 34.7°. All nanorods samples measured lower reflectance compared to sample A, indicating high absorption in nanorods due to high scattering of light at the nanorods surface.

  15. Microbial community composition shapes enzyme patterns in topsoil and subsoil horizons along a latitudinal transect in Western Siberia

    PubMed Central

    Schnecker, Jörg; Wild, Birgit; Takriti, Mounir; Eloy Alves, Ricardo J.; Gentsch, Norman; Gittel, Antje; Hofer, Angelika; Klaus, Karoline; Knoltsch, Anna; Lashchinskiy, Nikolay; Mikutta, Robert; Richter, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    Soil horizons below 30 cm depth contain about 60% of the organic carbon stored in soils. Although insight into the physical and chemical stabilization of soil organic matter (SOM) and into microbial community composition in these horizons is being gained, information on microbial functions of subsoil microbial communities and on associated microbially-mediated processes remains sparse. To identify possible controls on enzyme patterns, we correlated enzyme patterns with biotic and abiotic soil parameters, as well as with microbial community composition, estimated using phospholipid fatty acid profiles. Enzyme patterns (i.e. distance-matrixes calculated from these enzyme activities) were calculated from the activities of six extracellular enzymes (cellobiohydrolase, leucine-amino-peptidase, N-acetylglucosaminidase, chitotriosidase, phosphatase and phenoloxidase), which had been measured in soil samples from organic topsoil horizons, mineral topsoil horizons, and mineral subsoil horizons from seven ecosystems along a 1500 km latitudinal transect in Western Siberia. We found that hydrolytic enzyme activities decreased rapidly with depth, whereas oxidative enzyme activities in mineral horizons were as high as, or higher than in organic topsoil horizons. Enzyme patterns varied more strongly between ecosystems in mineral subsoil horizons than in organic topsoils. The enzyme patterns in topsoil horizons were correlated with SOM content (i.e., C and N content) and microbial community composition. In contrast, the enzyme patterns in mineral subsoil horizons were related to water content, soil pH and microbial community composition. The lack of correlation between enzyme patterns and SOM quantity in the mineral subsoils suggests that SOM chemistry, spatial separation or physical stabilization of SOM rather than SOM content might determine substrate availability for enzymatic breakdown. The correlation of microbial community composition and enzyme patterns in all horizons

  16. Black holes with bottle-shaped horizons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yu; Teo, Edward

    2016-06-01

    We present a new class of four-dimensional AdS black holes with noncompact event horizons of finite area. The event horizons are topologically spheres with one puncture, with the puncture pushed to infinity in the form of a cusp. Because of the shape of their event horizons, we call such black holes "black bottles." The solution was obtained as a special case of the Plebański-Demiański solution, and may describe either static or rotating black bottles. For certain ranges of parameters, an acceleration horizon may also appear in the space-time. We study the full parameter space of the solution, and the various limiting cases that arise. In particular, we show how the rotating black hole recently discovered by Klemm arises as a special limit.

  17. Horizon Entropy from Quantum Gravity Condensates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oriti, Daniele; Pranzetti, Daniele; Sindoni, Lorenzo

    2016-05-01

    We construct condensate states encoding the continuum spherically symmetric quantum geometry of a horizon in full quantum gravity, i.e., without any classical symmetry reduction, in the group field theory formalism. Tracing over the bulk degrees of freedom, we show how the resulting reduced density matrix manifestly exhibits a holographic behavior. We derive a complete orthonormal basis of eigenstates for the reduced density matrix of the horizon and use it to compute the horizon entanglement entropy. By imposing consistency with the horizon boundary conditions and semiclassical thermodynamical properties, we recover the Bekenstein-Hawking entropy formula for any value of the Immirzi parameter. Our analysis supports the equivalence between the von Neumann (entanglement) entropy interpretation and the Boltzmann (statistical) one.

  18. Horizon Entropy from Quantum Gravity Condensates.

    PubMed

    Oriti, Daniele; Pranzetti, Daniele; Sindoni, Lorenzo

    2016-05-27

    We construct condensate states encoding the continuum spherically symmetric quantum geometry of a horizon in full quantum gravity, i.e., without any classical symmetry reduction, in the group field theory formalism. Tracing over the bulk degrees of freedom, we show how the resulting reduced density matrix manifestly exhibits a holographic behavior. We derive a complete orthonormal basis of eigenstates for the reduced density matrix of the horizon and use it to compute the horizon entanglement entropy. By imposing consistency with the horizon boundary conditions and semiclassical thermodynamical properties, we recover the Bekenstein-Hawking entropy formula for any value of the Immirzi parameter. Our analysis supports the equivalence between the von Neumann (entanglement) entropy interpretation and the Boltzmann (statistical) one. PMID:27284642

  19. Information Horizons in Complex Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sneppen, Kim

    2005-03-01

    We investigate how the structure constrain specific communication in social-, man-made and biological networks. We find that human networks of governance and collaboration are predictable on teat-a-teat level, reflecting well defined pathways, but globally inefficient (1). In contrast, the Internet tends to have better overall communication abilities, more alternative pathways, and is therefore more robust. Between these extremes are the molecular network of living organisms. Further, for most real world networks we find that communication ability is favored by topology on small distances, but disfavored at larger distances (2,3,4). We discuss the topological implications in terms of modularity and the positioning of hubs in the networks (5,6). Finally we introduce some simple models which demonstarte how communication may shape the structure of in particular man made networks (7,8). 1) K. Sneppen, A. Trusina, M. Rosvall (2004). Hide and seek on complex networks [cond-mat/0407055] 2) M. Rosvall, A. Trusina, P. Minnhagen and K. Sneppen (2004). Networks and Cities: An Information Perspective [cond-mat/0407054]. In PRL. 3) A. Trusina, M. Rosvall, K. Sneppen (2004). Information Horizons in Networks. [cond-mat/0412064] 4) M. Rosvall, P. Minnhagen, K. Sneppen (2004). Navigating Networks with Limited Information. [cond-mat/0412051] 5) S. Maslov and K. Sneppen (2002). Specificity and stability in topology of protein networks Science 296, 910-913 [cond-mat/0205380]. 6) A. Trusina, S. Maslov, P. Minnhagen, K. Sneppen Hierarchy Measures in Complex Networks. Phys. Rev. Lett. 92, 178702 [cond-mat/0308339]. 7) M. Rosvall and K. Sneppen (2003). Modeling Dynamics of Information Networks. Phys. Rev. Lett. 91, 178701 [cond-mat/0308399]. 8) B-J. Kim, A. Trusina, P. Minnhagen, K. Sneppen (2003). Self Organized Scale-Free Networks from Merging and Regeneration. nlin.AO/0403006. In European Journal of Physics.

  20. New Horizons Investigations of Charon and Pluto's Small Moons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weaver, Harold A.; Stern, S. A.; Young, L. A.; Olkin, C. B.; Ennico, K.; Moore, J. M.; McKinnon, W. B.; Spencer, J. R.; Grundy, W. M.; Cruikshank, D. P.; Gladstone, G. P.; Summers, M. E.; Bagenal, F.

    2015-11-01

    During the flyby of the Pluto system in July 2014, the instruments on the New Horizons spacecraft (Weaver et al. 2008, Space Sci. Rev. 140, 75) acquired spatially resolved measurements of Charon and Pluto's small moons (Styx, Nix, Kerberos, and Hydra). The sunlit hemisphere of Charon was mapped in panchromatic light with resolutions as high as 0.15 km/pix using LORRI, and in four different color bands (400-550 nm, 540-700 nm, 780-975 nm, 860-910 nm; the latter is centered on a weak CH4 band) with resolutions as high as 1.4 km/pix using MVIC. Composition maps of Charon were obtained with the LEISA infrared spectral imager in the wavelength range 1.25-2.50 microns, with a spectral resolving power of ~250 and with spatial resolutions up to 4.9 km/pix. Solar occultation observations with the Alice ultraviolet spectrograph, and radio occultation measurements with REX, were used to search for an atmosphere around Charon. Nix was observed by LORRI in panchromatic light at 0.30 km/pix, by MVIC in color at 2.0 km/pix, and by LEISA at 3.6 km/pix (the latter to be downlinked later). Hydra was observed by LORRI in panchromatic light at 1.1 km/pix, in color at 4.6 km/pix, and by LEISA at 14.9 km/pix (the latter to be downlinked later). Limited resolved measurements of Kerberos (2.0 km/pix panchromatic; 8.0 km/pix color) and Styx (3.2 km/pix panchromatic; 8.0 km/pix color) were also obtained but have not yet been downlinked. An extensive series of unresolved, photometric measurements of Pluto's small moons were obtained with LORRI during several months preceeding closest approach in mid-July, which place tight constraints on their shapes and rotational states.The New Horizons data have revealed that Charon has surprisingly diverse terrain, with evidence of tectonics and a heterogeneous crustal composition. Nix and Hydra are highly elongated bodies with high average albedos (suggesting water-ice dominated surfaces) and significant albedo and color variations over their surfaces

  1. 77 FR 8877 - ICD-9-CM Coordination and Maintenance (C&M) Committee Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-02-15

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Disease Control and Prevention ICD-9-CM Coordination and Maintenance (C&M... Standards Staff, announces the following meeting. Name: ICD-9-CM Coordination and Maintenance (C&M... attend the ICD- 9-CM C&M meeting on March 5, 2012, must submit their name and organization by February...

  2. Enhanced refrigeration capacity and magnetic entropy change in La0.55Ce0.15Sr0.3MnO3 manganite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anwar, M. S.; Koo, Bon Heun

    2015-07-01

    The temperature dependent of the isothermal magnetic entropy change, Δ S M ( T), and the field dependence of the refrigeration capacity, RC, have been investigated in La0.7- x Ce x Sr0.30MnO3 ( x = 0.0 and 0.15). An enhanced RC and Δ S M ( T) were observed in La0.55Ce0.15Sr0.30MnO3. Under a magnetic field change of 2 T, the maximum improvement of 20% of Δ S M ( T) and 40% of RC, in comparison with La0.7Sr0.30MnO3, was observed. Moreover, Curie temperature of the La0.7Sr0.30MnO3 can tuned by adjusting the Ce concentration and makes this attractive for magnetic refrigeration at desired temperature. [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  3. Continuous wave and passively Q-switched Nd:Lu0.15Y0.85VO4 laser with 885 nm direct pumping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Qi-nan; Zhao, Bin; Zhang, Tao; Li, Rei; Liu, Xiang-mei; Zheng, Ya-hui; Liu, Xiao-jun

    2015-05-01

    The 885 nm direct pumping directly into the 4F3/2 emitting level of Nd3+ is applied on an Nd:Lu0.15Y0.85VO4 crystal. The maximum output power of 2.8 W for continuous wave (CW) operation is obtained. For Q-switched operation, the maximum average output power is 1.2 W with pulse repetition of 23.69 kHz and pulse width of 35 ns at the pump power of 27.9 W. The high-quality fundamental transverse mode can be observed owing to the reduction of thermal effect for Nd:Lu0.15Y0.85VO4 crystal by 885 nm direct pumping.

  4. Chemical Reduction of Nd 1.85 Ce 0.15 CuO 4− δ Powders in Supercritical Sodium Ammonia Solutions

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Dias, Yasmin; Wang, Hui; Zhou, Haiqing; Lin, Feng; Lan, Yucheng

    2015-01-01

    Nd 1.85 Ce 0.15 CuO 4− δ powders are chemically reduced in supercritical sodium ammonia solutions from room temperature to 350°C. The crystallographic structure of the reduced powders is investigated from Rietveld refinement of X-ray powder diffraction. The atomic positions are maintained constant within experimental errors while temperature factors of all atoms increase significantly after the chemical treatments, especially of Nd/Ce atoms. The ammonothermally reduced Nd 1.85 Ce 0.15 CuO 4− δ powders show diamagnetic below 24 K which is contributed to the lower oxygen content and higher temperature factors of atoms in the treated compound.more » The ammonothermal method paves a new way to reduce oxides in supercritical solutions near room temperature.« less

  5. Doping of single crystals of the solid solution Bi/sub 2/Te/Sub 2. 85/Se/sub 0. 15/ with indium

    SciTech Connect

    Svechnikova, T.E.; Chizhevskaya, S.N.; Polikarpova, N.V.

    1987-12-01

    Perfect single crystals of the solid solution Bi/sub 2/Te/sub 2.85/Se/sub 0.15/ doped with In/sub 2/Te/sub 3/ (0.2 up to 5 mole % in the charge) were prepared by Czochralski's method with replenishment from the liquid phase. The indium content in the melts and in the single crystals was determined by the method of atomic-absorption spectroscopy. The effective distribution factor of indium in the solid solution Bi/sub 2/Te/sub 2.85/Se/sub 0.15/ equals /approx/ 0.5. Increasing the indium concentration in the solid solution decreases the electrical and thermal conductivity of the lattice.

  6. NOx emissions retrofit at Reliant Energy, W.A. Parish Generating Station, Unit 7: Achieving 0.15 lb/MBtu

    SciTech Connect

    Gessner, T.M.; Hoh, R.H.; Ray, B.; Dorazio, T.; Jennings, P.; Sikorski, K.

    1999-07-01

    The current Clean Air Act (CAA), Title 1 regulations require States to develop implementation plans (SIPs) which address NO{sub x} emissions as part of the ozone non-attainment requirements. The EPA has recommended NO{sub x} limits of 0.15 lb/MBtu for utility boilers. In this paper, Reliant Energy and ABB C-E Services, Inc. will discuss a project where 0.15 lb NO{sub x}/MBtu can be achieved with the TFS 2000{trademark} R firing system and highly reactive Powder River Basin (PRB) fuels. Reliant Energy will retrofit their W.A. Parish Unit 7 with this system in the first quarter of 1999. This is part of Reliant Energy's drive to lower NO{sub x} emissions and meet future air quality requirements at the W.Q. Parish station.

  7. Crystal structure and electrical properties of Ca {sub x}WO{sub 3} (0.01 {<=} x {<=} 0.15) prepared by hybrid microwave synthesis

    SciTech Connect

    Guo Juan . E-mail: guojuan@ssc.iphy.ac.cn; Dong Cheng; Yang Lihong; Fu Guangcai; Chen Hong

    2006-03-09

    Calcium tungsten bronzes Ca {sub x}WO{sub 3} (0.01 {<=} x {<=} 0.15) were synthesized by hybrid microwave method from mixtures of CaO, WO{sub 3} and tungsten powder. Single-phased samples can be obtained by microwave heating within 40 min. With the increase of calcium content, the crystal structure of Ca {sub x}WO{sub 3} transforms from orthorhombic (0.01 {<=} x {<=} 0.02) to tetragonal (0.03 {<=} x {<=} 0.11) and then to cubic (0.12 {<=} x {<=} 0.15). The average size of crystallites is in the range 1-5 {mu}m. All samples show semiconductor behaviour in their temperature dependence of resistivity. The electrical conduction mechanism changes from variable-range hopping to the thermally activated mechanism when x > 0.12.

  8. Ferroelectric domain structures in <001>-oriented K{sub 0.15}Na{sub 0.85}NbO{sub 3} lead-free single crystal

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Yan; Wong, Chi-Man; Yau, Hei-Man; Dai, Jiyan; Deng, Hao; Luo, Haosu; Wang, Danyang; Yan, Zhibo; Chan, Helen L. W.

    2015-03-15

    In this work, ferroelectric domain structures of <001 >-oriented K{sub 0.15}Na{sub 0.85}NbO{sub 3} single crystal are characterized. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) observation revealed high-density of laminate domain structures in the crystal and the lattices of the neighboring domains are found to be twisted in a small angle. Superlattice diffraction spots of 1/2 (eeo) and 1/2 (ooe) in electron diffraction patterns are observed in the crystal, revealing the a{sup +}a{sup +}c{sup −} tilting of oxygen octahedral in the perovskite structure. The piezoresponse of domains and in-situ poling responses of K{sub 0.15}Na{sub 0.85}NbO{sub 3} crystal are observed by piezoresponse force microscopy (PFM), and the results assure its good ferroelectric properties.

  9. Magnetic order in geometrically frustrated Gd2(Ti1-xZrx)2O7 (x=0.02 and 0.15) single crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liao, Da-Qian; Lees, M. R.; Baker, D. W.; Paul, D. Mck.; Balakrishnan, G.

    2011-02-01

    Single crystals of Gd2(Ti1-xZrx)2O7 with x=0.02 and 0.15 have been used to investigate the effects of Zr doping on the properties of the geometrically frustrated antiferromagnet Gd2Ti2O7. Powder and single-crystal x-ray data, along with optical birefringence measurements, reveal that the x=0.02 sample retains the cubic Fd3¯m structure of pure Gd2Ti2O7, while the x=0.15 composition adopts a tetragonal I41/amd structure. Low-temperature magnetization and specific heat measurements show that for Gd2(Ti0.98Zr0.02)2O7 there are two magnetic transitions at TN1=1.02 K and TN2=0.70 K, but for Gd2(Ti0.85Zr0.15)2O7 a single transition is observed at TN=1.02 K. Changes in the specific heat with a magnetic field applied along the [110] and the [111] directions are used to construct the H-T phase diagrams for both samples.

  10. Thickness dependent optical properties of PEMA and (PEMA)0.85/(ZnO)0.15 nanocomposite films deposited by spray pyrolysis technique on ITO substrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thakur, Anjna; Thakur, Priya; Yadav, Kamlesh

    2016-05-01

    In this paper, poly (ethyl methacrylate) (PEMA) and (PEMA)0.85/(ZnO)0.15 nanocomposite films for 2, 3, 4 and 5 minutes have been deposited by spray pyrolysis technique on indium tin oxide (ITO) coated substrate. The effect of thickness of the film on the morphological and optical properties of PEMA and (PEMA)0.85/(ZnO)0.15 nanocomposite films are studied. The morphological and optical properties of pure PEMA and (PEMA)0.85/(ZnO)0.15 nanocomposite films are compared. The field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM) shows that as the thickness of film increases, uniformity of films increases. It is found from UV-Visible spectra that the energy band gap decreases with increasing the deposition time and refractive index increases with increasing the thickness of the film. The band gap of the nanocomposites is found less than the pure polymer film and opposite trend is observed for refractive index. The optical absorption of PEMA/ZnO nanocomposite films is higher than pure PEMA film. The thickness of the nanocomposite film plays a significant role in the tunability of the optical properties.

  11. Giant low-field magnetocaloric effect in single-crystalline EuTi0.85Nb0.15O3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roy, S.; Khan, N.; Mandal, P.

    2016-02-01

    The magnetocaloric effect in ferromagnetic single crystal EuTi0.85Nb0.15O3 has been investigated using magnetization and heat capacity measurements. EuTi0.85Nb0.15O3 undergoes a continuous ferromagnetic phase transition at TC = 9.5 K due to the long range ordering of magnetic moments of Eu2+ (4f7). With the application of magnetic field, the spin entropy is strongly suppressed and a giant magnetic entropy change is observed near TC. The values of entropy change ΔSm and adiabatic temperature change ΔTad are as high as 51.3 J kg-1 K-1 and 22 K, respectively, for a field change of 0-9 T. The corresponding magnetic heating/cooling capacity is 700 J kg-1. This compound also shows large magnetocaloric effect even at low magnetic fields. In particular, the values of ΔSm reach 14.7 and 23.8 J kg-1 K-1 for field changes of 0-1 T and 0-2 T, respectively. The low-field giant magnetocaloric effect, together with the absence of thermal and field hysteresis makes EuTi0.85Nb0.15O3 a very promising candidate for low temperature magnetic refrigeration.

  12. Fluoride solid electrolytes: investigation of the tysonite-type solid solutions La1-xBaxF3-x (x < 0.15).

    PubMed

    Chable, Johann; Dieudonné, Belto; Body, Monique; Legein, Christophe; Crosnier-Lopez, Marie-Pierre; Galven, Cyrille; Mauvy, Fabrice; Durand, Etienne; Fourcade, Sébastien; Sheptyakov, Denis; Leblanc, Marc; Maisonneuve, Vincent; Demourgues, Alain

    2015-12-01

    Pure tysonite La1-xBaxF3-x solid solutions for x < 0.15 were prepared by solid state synthesis in a platinum tube under an azote atmosphere with subsequent quenching for 0.07 ≤x < 0.15. The solid solutions were studied by X-ray, electron and neutron diffractions and by (19)F NMR and impedance spectroscopy. The evolution of the cell parameters obeying Vegard's rule was determined for 0 < x≤ 0.15 and atomic position parameters were accurately refined for x = 0.03, 0.07 and 0.10. The chemical pressure induced by large Ba(2+) cations leads to an increase of the unit cell parameters. Fluorine environment and mobilities are discussed on the basis of the results of neutron diffraction and (19)F solid state NMR. The F1 subnetwork is lacunar; fluorine exchange occurs according to the order: F1-F1 and F1-F2,3. 2D EXSY NMR spectra of La0.97Ba0.03F2.97 reveal, for the first time, a chemical exchange between F2 and F3 sites that requires two successive jumps. The ionic conductivity was evaluated from sintered pellets and different shaping methods were compared. The only structural features which could explain the conductivity maximum are a crossover together with a smaller dispersion of F1-F1,2,3 distances at x = 0.05-0.07. PMID:26246328

  13. Preferential orientation and thermoelectric properties of n-type Bi2Te2.85Se0.15 alloys by mechanical alloying and equal channel angular extrusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, X. A.; Yang, J. Y.; Zhu, W.; Bao, S. Q.; Duan, X. K.; Xiao, C. J.; Li, K.

    2007-09-01

    Starting from elemental bismuth, tellurium and selenium powders, n-type Bi2Te2.85Se0.15 solid solution with a fine microstructure was prepared by mechanical alloying and equal channel angular extrusion (ECAE) in the present work. The effect of extrusion temperature on the microstructure and thermoelectric properties of the as-ECAEed samples was investigated. A preferentially oriented microstructure with the basal planes (0 0 l) in the parallel direction to extrusion was formed, and the orientation factors F of the (0 0 l) planes of the 703 K and 753 K ECAEed Bi2Te2.85Se0.15 alloys were 0.26 and 0.28, respectively. The electrical resistivity and the Seebeck coefficient decreased, and the thermal conductivity increased with increasing extrusion temperature. The electrical and thermal transmission performances were strongly affected by the preferentially oriented microstructure and the preferential orientation improved the thermoelectric properties of the ECAEed Bi2Te2.85Se0.15 alloys in the parallel direction to extrusion. The maximum dimensionless figure of merit was obtained when extruded at 753 K at a testing temperature of 343 K, ZT = 0.66.

  14. Deformation Behavior and Microstructure Evolution of the Cu-2Ni-0.5Si-0.15Ag Alloy During Hot Compression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yi; Volinsky, Alex A.; Xu, Qian-Qian; Chai, Zhe; Tian, Baohong; Liu, Ping; Tran, Hai T.

    2015-12-01

    Hot deformation behavior of the Cu-2Ni-0.5Si-0.15Ag alloy was investigated by hot compression tests using the Gleeble-1500D thermo-simulator in the 873 K to 1073 K (600 °C to 800 °C) temperatures range with the 0.01 to 5 s-1 strain rate. The flow stress strongly depends on the deformation parameters, including temperature and strain rate. The flow stress decreases with the deformation temperature and increases with the strain rate. The constitutive relationship between the peak stress, the strain rate, and the deformation temperature can be described by the Zener-Hollomon Z parameter in the hyperbolic sine function with the hot deformation activation energy of 316 kJ/mol. The dynamic recrystallization (DRX) is one of the important softening mechanisms of the Cu-2Ni-0.5Si-0.15Ag alloy during hot deformation. The DRX behavior of the Cu-2Ni-0.5Si-0.15Ag alloy is strongly affected by the Z parameter. Lower Z parameter leads to more adequate DRX proceeding.

  15. Energy Transfer in Rare Earth Ion Clusters and Fluorescence from Rare Earth Doped LANTHANUM(1.85)STRONTIUM(0.15)COPPER -OXYGEN(4) Superconductors.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tissue, Brian Max

    1988-12-01

    Laser spectroscopy of rare earth ions in solids was used to study mechanisms of non-resonant energy transfer within rare earth clusters, and to detect insulating, impurity phases in rare earth doped La_{1.85 }Sr_{0.15}CuO _4 superconductors. The mechanisms of phonon-assisted, non-resonant energy transfer were studied in well-defined dimer sites in Er^{3+ }:SrF_2 and Pr ^{3+}:CaF_2. Application of a magnetic field to Er^{3+} :SrF_2 greatly increased the energy transfer rate. The magnetic field dependence in Er^{3+}:SrF _2 indicates that the mechanism of non-resonant energy transfer is a two-phonon, resonant process (Orbach process). Application of a magnetic field to Pr ^{3+}:CaF_2 had no effect on the energy transfer rate because no significant Zeeman splittings occurred. The temperature dependence of the energy transfer rate in Pr^{3+ }:CaF_2 showed the mechanism to be a one-phonon-assisted process at low temperatures and predominantly an Orbach process above 10 K. In the second part of this thesis, laser spectroscopy of a Eu ^{3+} probe ion is developed to detect impurity phases in La_{1.85 }Sr_{0.15}CuO _4 superconductors. Two impurity phases were found in polycrystalline La_ {1.85}Sr_{0.15} CuO_4: unreacted La _2O_3 starting material, and a La-silicate phase, which formed from contamination during sintering. The spectroscopic technique was found to be more than 100 times more sensitive than powder x -ray diffraction to detect minor impurity phases. In preparing the superconductors, several studies were made on the effect of Pr^{3+}, Eu ^{3+}, Bi^{3+ }, and fluorine dopants on the superconducting properties of La_{1.85}Sr _{0.15}CuO_4 and La_2Cuo_4 . Pr^{3+}, Eu ^{3+}, Bi^ {3+}, and F_2 doping all decreased the superconductivity in La_ {1.85}Sr^{0.15} CuO_4. Treating semi-conducting La_2CuO_4 in F_2 gas converted it to a superconductor with an onset T_{rm c} of 30-35 K.

  16. Compositional Homogeneity of CM Parent Bodies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vernazza, P.; Marsset, M.; Beck, P.; Binzel, R. P.; Birlan, M.; Cloutis, E. A.; DeMeo, F. E.; Dumas, C.; Hiroi, T.

    2016-09-01

    CM chondrites are the most common type of hydrated meteorites, making up ∼1.5% of all falls. Whereas most CM chondrites experienced only low-temperature (∼0°C–120°C) aqueous alteration, the existence of a small fraction of CM chondrites that suffered both hydration and heating complicates our understanding of the early thermal evolution of the CM parent body(ies). Here, we provide new constraints on the collisional and thermal history of CM-like bodies from a comparison between newly acquired spectral measurements of main-belt Ch/Cgh-type asteroids (70 objects) and existing laboratory spectral measurements of CM chondrites. It first appears that the spectral variation observed among CM-like bodies is essentially due to variations in the average regolith grain size. Second, the spectral properties of the vast majority (unheated) of CM chondrites resemble both the surfaces and the interiors of CM-like bodies, implying a “low” temperature (<300°C) thermal evolution of the CM parent body(ies). It follows that an impact origin is the likely explanation for the existence of heated CM chondrites. Finally, similarly to S-type asteroids and (2) Pallas, the surfaces of large (D > 100 km)—supposedly primordial—Ch/Cgh-type main-belt asteroids likely expose the interiors of the primordial CM parent bodies, a possible consequence of impacts by small asteroids (D < 10 km) in the early solar system.

  17. Compositional Homogeneity of CM Parent Bodies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vernazza, P.; Marsset, M.; Beck, P.; Binzel, R. P.; Birlan, M.; Cloutis, E. A.; DeMeo, F. E.; Dumas, C.; Hiroi, T.

    2016-09-01

    CM chondrites are the most common type of hydrated meteorites, making up ˜1.5% of all falls. Whereas most CM chondrites experienced only low-temperature (˜0°C–120°C) aqueous alteration, the existence of a small fraction of CM chondrites that suffered both hydration and heating complicates our understanding of the early thermal evolution of the CM parent body(ies). Here, we provide new constraints on the collisional and thermal history of CM-like bodies from a comparison between newly acquired spectral measurements of main-belt Ch/Cgh-type asteroids (70 objects) and existing laboratory spectral measurements of CM chondrites. It first appears that the spectral variation observed among CM-like bodies is essentially due to variations in the average regolith grain size. Second, the spectral properties of the vast majority (unheated) of CM chondrites resemble both the surfaces and the interiors of CM-like bodies, implying a “low” temperature (<300°C) thermal evolution of the CM parent body(ies). It follows that an impact origin is the likely explanation for the existence of heated CM chondrites. Finally, similarly to S-type asteroids and (2) Pallas, the surfaces of large (D > 100 km)—supposedly primordial—Ch/Cgh-type main-belt asteroids likely expose the interiors of the primordial CM parent bodies, a possible consequence of impacts by small asteroids (D < 10 km) in the early solar system.

  18. Optimization of the electrochemical performance of a Ni/Ce0.9Gd0.1O2-δ-impregnated La0.57Sr0.15TiO3 anode in hydrogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xia, Tian; Brüll, Annelise; Grimaud, Alexis; Fourcade, Sébastien; Mauvy, Fabrice; Zhao, Hui; Grenier, Jean-Claude; Bassat, Jean-Marc

    2014-09-01

    A-site deficient perovskite La0.57Sr0.15TiO3 (LSTO) materials are synthesized by a modified polyacrylamide gel route. X-ray diffraction pattern of LSTO indicates an orthorhombic structure. The thermal expansion coefficient of LSTO is 10.0 × 10-6 K-1 at 600 °C in 5%H2/Ar. LSTO shows an electrical conductivity of 2 S cm-1 at 600 °C in 3%H2O/H2. A new composite material, containing the porous LSTO backbone impregnated with small amounts of Ce0.9Gd0.1O2-δ (CGO) (3.4-8.3 wt.%) and Ni/Cu (2.0-6.3 wt.%), is investigated as an alternative anode for solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs). Because of the substantial electro-catalytic activity of the fine and well-dispersed Ni particles on the surface of the ceramic framework, the polarization resistance of 6.3%Ni-8.3%CGO-LSTO anode reaches 0.73 Ω cm2 at 800 °C in 3%H2O/H2. In order to further improve the anodic performance, corn starch and carbon black are used as pore-formers to optimize the microstructure of anodes.

  19. Transport of four pharmaceuticals in different horizons of three soil types

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kodesova, Radka; Svatkova, Paula; Klement, Ales; Jaksik, Ondrej; Golovko, Oksana; Fer, Miroslav; Kocarek, Martin; Nikodem, Antonin; Grabic, Roman

    2015-04-01

    Soil structure, which varies in different soil types and the horizons of these soil types, has a significant impact on water flow and contaminant transport in soils. Transport of many contaminants is in addition strongly influenced by their sorption on soil particles. Transport of four pharmaceuticals (sulfamethoxazole, trimethoprim, atenolol and carbamazepine) was studied in soil columns (a diameter of 10.5 cm and a height of 13 cm) taken from all diagnostic horizons of three different soil types (Haplic Luvisol, Greyic Phaeozem and Haplic Cambisol). The irrigation by water contaminated by a mixture of all four compounds followed by ponding infiltration of distilled water was simulated and water outflow and solute concentrations from the bottom of the soil sample was monitored in time. The highest infiltration rates were observed for soil samples from the Bt horizons of the Greyic Phaeozem that exhibited prismatic structure, followed by rates observed in the Ap horizons of the Haplic Luvisol, Greyic Phaeozem and Haplic Cambisol (due to their granular soil structure and presence of root channels). The lowest infiltration rate was measured for the Bw horizon of the Haplic Cambisol, which had a poorly developed soil structure and a low fraction of macropores. Compound discharge was however also highly affected by their sorption on solids. The highest mobility was observed for sulfamethoxazole followed by carbamazepine atenolol and trimethoprim, which corresponds to measured sorption isotherms. Mobility of ionizable compounds in different soil samples was influenced by pH (i.e. degree and form of their ionization) and sites available for absorption. Mobility of sulfamethoxazole decreased with decreasing pH (i.e. the largest sorption measured in horizons of the Haplic Cambisol). While mobility of atenolol and trimethoprim decreased with increasing base cation saturation, and with increasing organic matter content for carbamazepine. As result of both affects (i.e. soil

  20. Sorption of acetochlor, S-metolachlor, and atrazine in surface and subsurface soil horizons of Argentina.

    PubMed

    Bedmar, Francisco; Daniel, Peter E; Costa, José L; Giménez, Daniel

    2011-09-01

    Understanding herbicide sorption within soil profiles is the first step to predicting their behavior and leaching potential. Laboratory studies were conducted to determine the influence of surface and subsurface soil properties on acetochlor, atrazine, and S-metolachlor sorption. Soil samples were taken from horizons A, B, and C of two loamy soils of the humid pampas of Argentina under no-till management; horizon A was divided into two layers, A(0) (0-5 cm) and A(1) (5 cm to the full thickness of an A horizon). Sorption isotherms were determined from each sampled horizon using the batch equilibrium method and seven concentrations (0, 0.1, 0.5, 2.0, 5.0, 10.0, and 20.0 mg L(-1)). Sorption affinity of herbicides was approximated by the Freundlich equation. The sorption strength K(f) (mg(1 - 1/n) kg(-1) L(1/n) ) over the soils and horizons studied followed the order S-metolachlor (16.51-29.19) > atrazine (4.85-12.34) ≥ acetochlor (5.17-11.97), which was closely related to the hydrophobicity of herbicides expressed as octanol-water partition coefficient (K(OW) ). The K(f) values of the three herbicides were positively correlated with soil organic carbon, with a significance of p < 0.01. Values of K(f) for the three herbicides decreased with depth in the two soils, indicating greater sorption onto surficial soil horizons and possibly a delayed transport toward subsurface soils and subsequent pollution of groundwater. PMID:21692102

  1. Gas-Phase Oxidation of Cm+ and Cm2+ -- Thermodynamics of neutral and ionized CmO

    SciTech Connect

    Gibson, John K; Haire, Richard G.; Santos, Marta; Pires de Matos, Antonio; Marcalo, Joaquim

    2008-12-08

    Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry was employed to study the products and kinetics of gas-phase reactions of Cm+ and Cm2+; parallel studies were carried out with La+/2+, Gd+/2+ and Lu+/2+. Reactions with oxygen-donor molecules provided estimates for the bond dissociation energies, D[M+-O](M = Cm, Gd, Lu). The first ionization energy, IE[CmO], was obtained from the reactivity of CmO+ with dienes, and the second ionization energies, IE[MO+](M = Cm, La, Gd, Lu), from the rates of electron-transfer reactions from neutrals to the MO2+ ions. The following thermodynamic quantities for curium oxide molecules were obtained: IE[CmO]= 6.4+-0.2 eV; IE[CmO+]= 15.8+-0.4 eV; D[Cm-O]= 710+-45 kJ mol-1; D[Cm+-O]= 670+-40 kJ mol-1; and D[Cm2+-O]= 342+-55 kJ mol-1. Estimates for the M2+-O bond energies for M = Cm, La, Gd and Lu are all intermediate between D[N2-O]and D[OC-O]--i.e., 167 kJ mol-1< D[M2+-O]< 532 kJ mol-1 -- such that the four MO2+ ions fulfill the thermodynamic requirement for catalytic O-atom transport from N2O to CO. It was demonstrated that the kinetics are also favorable and that the CmO2+, LaO2+, GdO2+ and LuO2+ dipositive ions each catalyze the gas-phase oxidation of CO to CO2 by N2O. The CmO2+ ion appeared during the reaction of Cm+ with O2 when the intermediate, CmO+, was not collisionally cooled -- although its formation is kinetically and/or thermodynamically unfavorable, CmO2+ is a stable species.

  2. Star-Paths, Stones and Horizon Astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brady, Bernadette

    2015-05-01

    Archaeoastronomers tend to approach ancient monuments focusing on the landscape and the horizon calendar events of sun and moon and, due to problems with precession, generally ignore the movement of the stars. However, locating the position of solar calendar points on the horizon can have other uses apart from calendar and/or cosmological purposes. This paper firstly suggests that the stars do not need to be ignored. By considering the evidence of the Phaenomena, a sky poem by Aratus of Soli, a third century BC Greek poet, and his use of second millennium BC star lore fragments, this paper argues that the stars were a part of the knowledge of horizon astronomy. Aratus' poem implied that the horizon astronomy of the late Neolithic and Bronze Age periods included knowledge of star-paths or 'linear constellations' that were defined by particular horizon calendar events and other azimuths. Knowledge of such star-paths would have enabled navigation and orientation, and by using permanent markers, constructed or natural, to define these paths, they were immune to precession as the stones could redefine a star-path for a future generation. Finally the paper presents other possible intentions behind the diverse orientation of passage tombs and some megalithic sites.

  3. On the Bartnik mass of apparent horizons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mantoulidis, Christos; Schoen, Richard

    2015-10-01

    In this paper we characterize the intrinsic geometry of apparent horizons (outermost marginally outer trapped surfaces) in asymptotically flat spacetimes; that is, the Riemannian metrics on the two sphere which can arise. Furthermore we determine the minimal ADM mass of a spacetime containing such an apparent horizon. The results are conveniently formulated in terms of the quasi-local mass introduced by Bartnik (1989 Phys. Rev. Lett. 62 2346-8). The Hawking mass provides a lower bound for Bartnik’s quasilocal mass on apparent horizons by way of Penrose’s conjecture on time symmetric slices, proven in 1997 by Huisken and Ilmanen (2001 J. Differ. Geom. 59 353-437) and in full generality in 1999 by Bray (2001 J. Differ. Geom. 59 177-267). We compute Bartnik’s mass for all non-degenerate apparent horizons and show that it coincides with the Hawking mass. As a corollary we disprove a conjecture due to Gibbons in the spirit of Thorne’s hoop conjecture (Gibbons 2009 arXiv:0903.1580), and construct a new large class of examples of apparent horizons with the integral of the negative part of the Gauss curvature arbitrarily large.

  4. Pedotransfer functions for Irish soils - estimation of bulk density (ρb) per horizon type

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reidy, B.; Simo, I.; Sills, P.; Creamer, R. E.

    2016-01-01

    Soil bulk density is a key property in defining soil characteristics. It describes the packing structure of the soil and is also essential for the measurement of soil carbon stock and nutrient assessment. In many older surveys this property was neglected and in many modern surveys this property is omitted due to cost both in laboratory and labour and in cases where the core method cannot be applied. To overcome these oversights pedotransfer functions are applied using other known soil properties to estimate bulk density. Pedotransfer functions have been derived from large international data sets across many studies, with their own inherent biases, many ignoring horizonation and depth variances. Initially pedotransfer functions from the literature were used to predict different horizon type bulk densities using local known bulk density data sets. Then the best performing of the pedotransfer functions were selected to recalibrate and then were validated again using the known data. The predicted co-efficient of determination was 0.5 or greater in 12 of the 17 horizon types studied. These new equations allowed gap filling where bulk density data were missing in part or whole soil profiles. This then allowed the development of an indicative soil bulk density map for Ireland at 0-30 and 30-50 cm horizon depths. In general the horizons with the largest known data sets had the best predictions, using the recalibrated and validated pedotransfer functions.

  5. Pedotransfer functions for Irish soils - estimation of bulk density (ρb) per horizon type

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reidy, B.; Simo, I.; Sills, P.; Creamer, R. E.

    2015-10-01

    Soil bulk density is a key property in defining soil characteristics. It describes the packing structure of the soil and is also essential for the measurement of soil carbon stock and nutrient assessment. In many older surveys this property was neglected and in many modern surveys this property is omitted due to cost both in laboratory and labour and in cases where the core method cannot be applied. To overcome these oversights pedotransfer functions are applied using other known soil properties to estimate bulk density. Pedotransfer functions have been derived from large international datasets across many studies, with their own inherent biases, many ignoring horizonation and depth variances. Initially pedotransfer functions from the literature were used to predict different horizon types using local known bulk density datasets. Then the best performing of the pedotransfer functions, were selected to recalibrate and then were validated again using the known data. The predicted co-efficient of determination was 0.5 or greater in 12 of the 17 horizon types studied. These new equations allowed gap filling where bulk density data was missing in part or whole soil profiles. This then allowed the development of an indicative soil bulk density map for Ireland at 0-30 and 30-50 cm horizon depths. In general the horizons with the largest known datasets had the best predictions, using the recalibrated and validated pedotransfer functions.

  6. Radio Occultation Measurements of Pluto's Atmosphere with New Horizons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hinson, D. P.; Linscott, I.; Tyler, G. L.; Bird, M. K.; Paetzold, M.; Strobel, D. F.; Summers, M. E.; Woods, W. W.; Stern, A.; Weaver, H. A., Jr.; Olkin, C.; Young, L. A.; Ennico Smith, K.; Gladstone, R.; Greathouse, T.; Kammer, J.; Parker, A. H.; Parker, J. W.; Retherford, K. D.; Schindhelm, E.; Singer, K. N.; Steffl, A.; Tsang, C.; Versteeg, M.

    2015-12-01

    The reconnaissance of the Pluto System by New Horizons included radio occultations at both Pluto and Charon. This talk will present the latest results from the Pluto occultation. The REX instrument onboard New Horizons received and recorded uplink signals from two 70-m antennas and two 34-m antennas of the NASA Deep Space Network - each transmitting 20 kW at 4.2-cm wavelength - during a diametric occultation by Pluto. At the time this was written only a short segment of data at occultation entry (193°E, 17°S) was available for analysis. The REX measurements extend unequivocally to the surface, providing the first direct measure of the surface pressure and the temperature structure in Pluto's lower atmosphere. Preliminary analysis yields a surface pressure of about 10 microbars, smaller than expected. Data from occultation exit (16°E, 15°N) are scheduled to arrive on the ground in late August 2015. Those observations will yield an improved estimate of the surface pressure, a second temperature profile, and a measure of the diameter of Pluto with a precision of a few hundred meters.

  7. Multiferroic properties of nanocrystalline BiFe1-xNixO3 (x=0.0-0.15) perovskite ceramics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chaudhari, Yogesh; Mahajan, Chandrashekhar M.; Singh, Amrita; Jagtap, Prashant; Chatterjee, Ratnamala; Bendre, Subhash

    2015-12-01

    Ni doped BiFeO3 (x=0, 0.05, 0.1 and 0.15) nanocrystalline ceramics were synthesized by the solution combustion method (SCM) to obtain optimal multiferroic properties. The effect of Ni doping on structural, morphological, ferroelectric, magnetic and dielectric properties of BiFeO3 was studied. The structural investigations by using X-ray diffraction (XRD) pattern confirmed that BiFe1-xNixO3 ceramics have rhombhohedral perovskite structure. The ferroelectric hysteresis measurements for BiFe1-xNixO3 (x=0, 0.05, 0.1, 0.15) compound at room temperature found to exhibit unsaturated behavior and presents partial reversal of polarization. The magnetic measurements demonstrated an enhancement of ferromagnetic property due to Ni doping in BiFeO3 when compared with undoped BiFeO3. The variation of dielectric constant with temperature in BiFe0.9Ni0.1O3 and BiFe0.85Ni0.15O3 samples evidenced an apparent dielectric anomaly around 350 °C and 300 °C which corresponds to antiferromagnetic to paramagnetic phase transition of (TN) of BiFeO3. The dependence of room temperature dielectric properties on frequency signifies that both dielectric constant (ε) and dielectric loss (tan δ) are the strong function of frequency. The results show that solution combustion method leads to synthesis of an excellent and reproducible BiFe1-xNixO3 multiferroic ceramics.

  8. Application of antiferromagnetic-Fermi-liquid theory to NMR experiments in La1.85Sr0.15CuO4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monien, H.; Monthoux, P.; Pines, D.

    1991-01-01

    NMR experiments on La1.85Sr0.15CuO4 by Kitaoka et al. and Imai et al. are analyzed using the phenomenological antiferromagnetic (AF) Fermi liquid theory of Millis, Monien, and Pines, and the results are compared with those previously obtained for YBa2Cu3O7 and YBa2Cu3O6.63. A one-component model, with hyperfine couplings that are unchanged from those found previously for YBa2Cu3O7 and YBa2Cu3O6.63, and parameters obtained from experiment, provide a quantitative fit to the data. At all temperatures the antiferromagnetic correlations found in La1.85Sr0.15CuO4 are stronger than those found for the Y-Ba-Cu-O samples with the result that the characteristic energy for the antiferromagnetic paramagnons that describe the AF spin dynamics is quite low (0.15CuO4, YBa2Cu3O7, and YBa2Cu3O6.63, and find that it displays a linear temperature dependence for all three materials. Our results support the proposal that the properties of a nearly antiferromagnetic Fermi liquid are genuinely novel, and suggest that both the spin and charge aspects of the normal-state properties of the cuprate oxide superconductors can be quantitatively explained in terms of quasiparticles coupled to antiferromagnetic paramagnons whose characteristic energy scale is

  9. Holography of 3D flat cosmological horizons.

    PubMed

    Bagchi, Arjun; Detournay, Stéphane; Fareghbal, Reza; Simón, Joan

    2013-04-01

    We provide a first derivation of the Bekenstein-Hawking entropy of 3D flat cosmological horizons in terms of the counting of states in a dual field theory. These horizons appear in the flat limit of nonextremal rotating Banados-Teitleboim-Zanelli black holes and are remnants of the inner horizons. They also satisfy the first law of thermodynamics. We study flat holography as a limit of AdS(3)/CFT(2) to semiclassically compute the density of states in the dual theory, which is given by a contraction of a 2D conformal field theory, exactly reproducing the bulk entropy in the limit of large charges. We comment on how the dual theory reproduces the bulk first law and how cosmological bulk excitations are matched with boundary quantum numbers. PMID:25166977

  10. Sintering of BaCe(0.85)Y(0.15)O3-(Beta) With/Without SrTiO Dopant

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dynys, Fred; Sayir, Ali; Heimann, Paula J.

    2004-01-01

    The sintering behavior of BaCe(0.85)Y(0.15)O3-(Beta) doped with SrTiO is described. Complete reaction and crystallization of perovskite phase by solid state was achieved by calcining at 1200 degrees C for 24 hours.Smaples were sintered at 1450 degrees C, 1550 degrees C, and 1650 degrees C. SrTiOsub3 enhanced sintering, while optimal dopant level was different for powders synthesized by solid state and co-precipitation. Both powders exhibit similar grain growth behavior.

  11. Wind-tunnel free-flight investigation of a 0.15-scale model of the F-106B airplane with vortex flaps

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yip, Long P.

    1987-01-01

    An investigation to determine the effects of vortex flaps on the flight dynamic characteristics of the F-106B in the area of low-speed, high-angle-of-attack flight was undertaken on a 0.15-scale model of the airplane in the Langley 30- by 60-Foot Tunnel. Static force tests, dynamic forced-oscillation tests, as well as free-flight tests were conducted to obtain a data base on the flight characteristics of the F-106B airplane with vortex flaps. Vortex flap configurations tested included a full-span gothic flap, a full-span constant-chord flap, and a part-span gothic flap.

  12. Critical state and low-field electrodynamics in LaO{sub 0.85}F{sub 0.15}FeAs superconductor polycrystals

    SciTech Connect

    Gerashchenko, O. V.; Kholmetskii, A. L.; Mashlan, M.; Yarman, T.; Aldushchenkov, A. V.; Okunev, I. S.; Lomonosov, V. A.; Makhnach, L. V.

    2015-06-15

    The penetration of a weak magnetic field into LaO{sub 0.85}F{sub 0.15}FeAs polycrystalline superconductors is investigated using two mutually complementing techniques: measurement of the higher harmonics of nonlinear magnetization and the current-voltage characteristics. The dependences of the critical current density and resistivity on the temperature and magnetic field strength are determined. The results confirm the theory of the critical state in the low-field electrodynamics of a Josephson medium. The universality of this theoretical concept is demonstrated for a new class of ceramic superconductors.

  13. Preferential Flow Paths Allow Deposition of Mobile Organic Carbon Deep into Soil B Horizons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marin-Spiotta, E.; Chadwick, O.; Kramer, M. G.

    2009-12-01

    Most of our understanding of soil carbon (C) dynamics derives from the top 10 to 20 cm, although globally the majority of the bulk soil C pool is found below those depths. Mineral associated C in deep soil is more stable than that held in surface horizons, and its long-term persistence may contribute to sequestration of anthropogenic C. Carbon can enter deep soil horizons in multiple ways: through biologically-mediated or abiotic physical mixing, illuviation, root inputs, or through a physical disturbance that would cause the burial of an originally shallow organic horizon. In this study, we investigated the role of dissolved organic matter (DOM) in the transport and stabilization of soil C in tropical rainforest volcanic soils, where high rainfall, a highly productive forest, and dominance of highly reactive, non-crystalline minerals contribute to large soil C stocks at depth with long mean residence times. DOM plays an important role in many biological and chemical processes in soils, including nutrient transfer within and across ecosystems. Carbon storage in these soils is linked to movement of both DOC and particulate organic C along infiltration pathways. Climate and soil mineralogical properties create the right conditions for C to be pumped from the organic horizons where microbial activity is highest, to deep mineral horizons, where the potential for stabilization is greatest. High rainfall preserves hydrated short-range order minerals that are subject to strong shrinkage during occasional drought periods. The resulting cracks in subsurface B horizons become pathways for DOM complexed with Fe and Al moving in soil solution during subsequent wet periods. Preferential flow of these organically rich solutes and/or colloids moves C to depth where C, Fe and Al are preferentially deposited on near-vertical crack surfaces and along near-horizonal flow surfaces at horizon boundaries. Long-term deposition forms discontinuous Fe- and OM-cemented lamella that serve to

  14. East Rim of Endeavour Crater on Horizon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2009-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site]

    A high point on the distant eastern rim of Endeavour Crater is visible on the horizon in this image taken by the panoramic camera (Pancam) on NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity on March 8, 2009, during the 1,821st Martian day, or sol, of the rover's mission on Mars.

    That portion of Endeavour's rim is about 34 kilometers (21 miles) away from Opportunity's position west of the crater when the image was taken. The width of the image covers approximately one degree of the horizon.

  15. North Rim of Endeavour Crater on Horizon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2009-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site]

    A northern portion of the rim of Endeavour Crater is visible on the horizon of this image taken by the panoramic camera (Pancam) on NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity on March 7, 2009, during the 1,820st Martian day, or sol, of the rover's mission on Mars.

    That portion of Endeavour's rim is about 20 kilometers (12 miles) away from Opportunity's position west of the crater when the image was taken. The width of the image covers approximately one degree of the horizon.

  16. Expanding your horizons in science and mathematics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1985-01-01

    Through the presentation of its Expanding Your Horizons in Science and Mathematics career education conferences for secondary school young women, the Math/Science Network continues its efforts to remove the educational, psychological, and cultural barriers which prevent women from entering math-and science-based careers. The Expanding Your Horizons conferences were presented on 77 college, university and high school campuses across the United States. This year, these unique one day conferences reached 15,500 students, 3,000 parents and educators, and involved 3,000 career women who volunteered their services as conference planners, workshop leaders, speakers, and role models.

  17. Hair-brane ideas on the horizon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martinec, Emil J.; Niehoff, Ben E.

    2015-11-01

    We continue an examination of the microstate geometries program begun in arXiv:1409.6017, focussing on the role of branes that wrap the cycles which degenerate when a throat in the geometry deepens and a horizon forms. An associated quiver quantum mechanical model of minimally wrapped branes exhibits a non-negligible fraction of the gravitational entropy, which scales correctly as a function of the charges. The results suggest a picture of AdS3/CFT2 duality wherein the long string that accounts for BTZ black hole entropy in the CFT description, can also be seen to inhabit the horizon of BPS black holes on the gravity side.

  18. Horizons and plane waves: A review

    SciTech Connect

    Hubeny, Veronika E.; Rangamani, Mukund

    2003-11-06

    We review the attempts to construct black hole/string solutions in asymptotically plane wave spacetimes. First, we demonstrate that geometries admitting a covariantly constant null Killing vector cannot admit event horizons, which implies that pp-waves can't describe black holes. However, relaxing the symmetry requirements allows us to generate solutions which do possess regular event horizons while retaining the requisite asymptotic properties. In particular, we present two solution generating techniques and use them to construct asymptotically plane wave black string/brane geometries.

  19. Aerosol physical properties from satellite horizon inversion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gray, C. R.; Malchow, H. L.; Merritt, D. C.; Var, R. E.; Whitney, C. K.

    1973-01-01

    The feasibility is investigated of determining the physical properties of aerosols globally in the altitude region of 10 to 100 km from a satellite horizon scanning experiment. The investigation utilizes a horizon inversion technique previously developed and extended. Aerosol physical properties such as number density, size distribution, and the real and imaginary components of the index of refraction are demonstrated to be invertible in the aerosol size ranges (0.01-0.1 microns), (0.1-1.0 microns), (1.0-10 microns). Extensions of previously developed radiative transfer models and recursive inversion algorithms are displayed.

  20. Hair from the Isolated Horizon Perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corichi, A.; Sudarsky, D.

    2002-12-01

    The recently introduced Isolated Horizons (IH) formalism has become a powerful tool for realistic black hole physics. In particular, it generalizes the zeroth and first laws of black hole mechanics in terms of quasi-local quantities and serves as a starting point for quantum entropy calculations. In this note we consider theories which admit hair, and analyze some new results that the IH provides, when considering solitons and stationary solutions. Furthermore, the IH formalism allows to state uniqueness conjectures (i.e. horizon 'no-hair conjectures') for the existence of solutions.

  1. Disorder induced superconductor-insulator transition in epitaxial La1.85Sr0.15CuO4 thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jang, Han-Byul; Yang, Chan-Ho

    La2-xSrxCuO4is a well-known superconducting system showing various electronic properties as a function of Sr content. Especially, epitaxial thin layers of the compound show enormous increase of superconducting critical temperature (Tc) by a compressive strain. It has been reported that Tc can be controlled by misfit strain, thickness, and oxygen annealing. In this study, we report structural and transport properties of high quality epitaxial La1.85Sr0.15CuO4thin films. According to x-ray diffraction study, c-axis lattice parameter shows no significant change for various film thicknesses and the in-plane lattice parameters of the films are coherently matched with that of substrate. Electronic transport measurements show a clear superconductor-to-insulator transition (SIT), accompanying variation of Tc depending on film thickness. These results are analyzed by using the McMillan equation to find the relation between the Tc and a disorder correlating with film thickness. We have found the disorder exhibits an explicit power-law behavior with respect to film thickness in our La1.85Sr0.15CuO4 thin films.

  2. Raman effect, structural and dielectric properties of sol-gel synthesized polycrystalline GaFe1-xZrxO3 (0≤x≤0.15)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Rajeev; Mall, Ashish Kumar; Gupta, Rajeev

    2016-05-01

    Polycrystalline ceramic samples of Zirconium (Zr)-doped GaFeO3 (GaFe1-xZrxO3) were studied using powder X-ray diffraction, complex impedance spectroscopy and Raman spectroscopic measurements to understand the effect of Zr doping on the structural and dielectric properties. The samples with varying Zr content were prepared by Sol-Gel method. X-ray data analysis confirmed the formation of single phase material without formation of any secondary phases and all are crystallized in Pc21n orthorhombic symmetry. Rietveld refinement of the X-ray data suggested an increase in the lattice constants due to size effect and decreases on x = 0.15 due to the effect of change in interplanner spacing. Impedance studies on the samples showed that the dielectric constant increases while loss tangent decrease as the Zr content increases. Raman scattering on GaFe1-xZrxO3 (x = 0, 0.05, 0.10, & 0.15) used to understand the composition dependence on phonon modes at room temperature. On Zr doping, Raman modes frequencies shifts to lower energies consistent with the X-ray data.

  3. Effect of granularity and annealing conditions on the magneto-resistance of the electron doped superconductor Nd1.85Ce0.15CuO4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raveendran, N. Radhikesh; Amaladass, E. P.; Janaki, J.; Mani, Awadhesh

    2016-05-01

    A single phase polycrystalline sample of Nd1.85Ce0.15CuO4 has been synthesized and well characterized. Detailed studies on electrical resistivity behavior of this system as a function of temperature and magnetic field reveal interesting features attributable to the granularity effects. These features have been qualitatively understood based on the interplay of Josephson junction coupling and quasi particle tunneling which dictates the evolution of the observed temperature and field dependent resistivity behavior of Nd1.85Ce0.15CuO4 system. The studies also reveal significant changes with respect to annealing conditions, indicating that such compounds are very sensitive to annealing conditions. It has been observed that prolonged annealing in Argon atmosphere leads to a decrease in normal state resistivity. This is associated with a decrease in the S-I-S type Josephson tunnel junctions perhaps due to improved inter-granular coupling, nevertheless they could not be completely eliminated.

  4. Electrical study and dielectric relaxation behavior in nanocrystalline Ce0.85Gd0.15O2- δ material at intermediate temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar Baral, Ashok; Sankaranarayanan, V.

    2010-02-01

    The nanocrystalline material of 15 mol% Gd-doped ceria (Ce0.85Gd0.15O2- δ ) was prepared by citrate auto ignition method. The electrical study and dielectric relaxation technique were applied to investigate the ionic transport process in this nanocrystalline material with an average grain size of 13 nm and the dynamic relaxation parameters are deduced in the temperature range of 300-600°C. The ionic transference number in the material is found to be 0.85 at 500°C at ambient conditions. The oxygen ionic conduction in the nanocrystalline Ce0.85Gd0.15O2- δ material follows the hopping mechanism. The grain boundary relaxation is found to be associated with migration of charge carriers. The frequency spectra of modulus M″ exhibited a dielectric relaxation peak corresponding to defect associates (Gd-Vo^{_{_{{blacksquare blacksquare}}}})^{_{_{{blacksquare}}}}. The material exhibits very low values of migration energy and association energy of the oxygen vacancies in the long-range motion, i.e., 0.84 and 0.07 eV, respectively.

  5. Fully reversible hydrogen absorption and desorption reactions with Sc(Al{sub 1-x}Mg{sub x}), x=0.0, 0.15, 0.20

    SciTech Connect

    Sahlberg, Martin; Zlotea, Claudia; Latroche, Michel; Andersson, Yvonne

    2011-01-15

    The hydrogen storage properties of Sc(Al{sub 1-x}Mg{sub x}), x=0.0, 0.15, 0.20, have been studied by X-ray powder diffraction, thermal desorption spectroscopy, pressure-composition-isotherms and scanning electron microscopy techniques. Hydrogen is absorbed from the gas phase at 70 kPa and 400 {sup o}C under the formation of ScH{sub 2} and aluminium with magnesium in solid solution. The reaction is fully reversible in vacuum at 500 {sup o}C and shows the hydrogenation-disproportionation-desorption-recombination (HDDR) behaviour. The activation energy of desorption was determined by the Kissinger method to 185 kJ/mol. The material is stable up to at least six absorption-desorption cycles and there is no change in particle size during cycling. -- Graphical abstract: XRD pattern of Sc(Al{sub 1-x}Mg{sub x}). From the top: x=0, 0.15, 0.20. The hydrogen absorption properties were studied by thermal desorption spectroscopy, pressure-composition-isotherms and scanning electron microscopy techniques. Display Omitted

  6. Alpha self-irradiation effect on the local structure of the U0.85Am0.15O2±x solid solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prieur, D.; Martin, P. M.; Lebreton, F.; Delahaye, T.; Jankowiak, A.; Laval, J.-P.; Scheinost, A. C.; Dehaudt, P.; Blanchart, P.

    2012-10-01

    Uranium-americium mixed oxides are promising fuels for achieving an efficient Am recycling. Previous studies on U0.85Am0.15O2±x materials showed that the high α activity of 241Am induces pellet swelling which is a major issue for cladding materials design. In this context, X-ray Diffraction and X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy measurements were used to study self-irradiation effects on U0.85Am0.15O2±x local structure and to correlate these results with those obtained at the macroscopic scale. For a cumulative α decay dose equal to 0.28 dpa, it was shown that non-defective fluorite solid solutions were achieved and therefore, that the fluorite structure is stable for the studied doses. In addition, both interatomic distance and lattice parameter expansions were observed, which only partially explains the macroscopic swelling. As expected, an increase of the structural disorder with self-irradiation was also observed.

  7. Enhanced electrochemical performance and storage property of LiNi0.815Co0.15Al0.035O2 via Al gradient doping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duan, Jianguo; Hu, Guorong; Cao, Yanbing; Tan, Chaopu; Wu, Ceng; Du, Ke; Peng, Zhongdong

    2016-09-01

    LiNi1-x-yCoxAlyO2 is a commonly used Ni-rich cathode material because of its relatively low cost, excellent rate capability and high gravimetric energy density. Surface modification is an efficient way to overcome the shortcomings of Ni-rich cathodes such as poor cycling stability and poor thermal stability. A high-powered concentration-gradient cathode material with an average composition of LiNi0.815Co0.15Al0.035O2 (LGNCAO) has been successfully synthesized by using spherical concentration-gradient Ni0.815Co0.15Al0.035(OH)2 (GNCA)as the starting material. An efficient design of the Al3+ precipitation method is developed, which enables obtaining spherical GNCA with ∼10 μm particle size and high tap density. In LGNCAO, the nickel and cobalt concentration decreases gradually whereas the aluminum concentration increases from the centre to the outer layer of each particle. Electrochemical performance and storage properties of LGNCAO have been investigated comparatively. The LGNCAO displays better electrochemical performance and improved storage stability than LNCAO.

  8. Zinc substitution effects on the superconducting properties of Nd sub 1. 85 Ce sub 0. 15 CuO sub 4-. delta

    SciTech Connect

    Garcia-Vazquez, V.; Mazumdar, S.; Falco, C.M.; Barlingay, C.; Risbud, S.H.

    1990-01-01

    With the discovery of the electron superconductors, a new dimension was added to research in the field of high-temperature superconductivity. Studies of these materials should help elucidate the mechanism responsible for high-temperature superconductivity, as well as improve strategies for finding new superconductors. In this paper, we discuss the superconducting structural properties of Nd{sub 1.85}Ce{sub 0.15}(Cu{sub 1-y}Zn{sub y})O{sub 4} as a function of the Zn concentration y. Detailed comparisons with previous results of similar substitution studies in the single-CuO{sub 2}-layer hole superconductor La{sub 1.85}Sr{sub 0.15}CuO{sub 4} also are made. We have found that the non-magnetic element Zn has a detrimental effect on the T{prime}-phase electron superconductor, and that this effect is as strong as in the T-phase hole superconductor. Theoretical implications and the question of electron-hole symmetry are also discussed.

  9. Zinc substitution effects on the superconducting properties of Nd{sub 1.85}Ce{sub 0.15}CuO{sub 4-{delta}}

    SciTech Connect

    Garcia-Vazquez, V.; Mazumdar, S.; Falco, C.M.; Barlingay, C.; Risbud, S.H.

    1990-12-31

    With the discovery of the electron superconductors, a new dimension was added to research in the field of high-temperature superconductivity. Studies of these materials should help elucidate the mechanism responsible for high-temperature superconductivity, as well as improve strategies for finding new superconductors. In this paper, we discuss the superconducting structural properties of Nd{sub 1.85}Ce{sub 0.15}(Cu{sub 1-y}Zn{sub y})O{sub 4} as a function of the Zn concentration y. Detailed comparisons with previous results of similar substitution studies in the single-CuO{sub 2}-layer hole superconductor La{sub 1.85}Sr{sub 0.15}CuO{sub 4} also are made. We have found that the non-magnetic element Zn has a detrimental effect on the T{prime}-phase electron superconductor, and that this effect is as strong as in the T-phase hole superconductor. Theoretical implications and the question of electron-hole symmetry are also discussed.

  10. Space Launch Initiative: New Capabilities ... New Horizons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dumbacher, Daniel L.

    2002-01-01

    This paper presents NASA's Space Launch Initiative (SLI) with new capabilities and new horizons. The topics include: 1) Integrated Space Transportation Plan; 2) SLI: The Work of an Nation; 3) SLI Goals and Status; 4) Composites and Materials; and 5) SLI & DoD/USAF Collaboration. This paper is presented in viewgraph form.

  11. Space Launch Initiative: New Capabilities - New Horizons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dumbacher, Daniel; Smith, Dennis E. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    This paper presents NASA's Space Launch Initiative (SLI) with new capabilities and new horizons. The topics include: 1) Integrated Space Transportation Plan; 2) SLI: The Work of a Nation; 3) SLI Goals and Status; 4) Composites and Materials; and 5) SLI and DOD/USAF Collaboration. This paper is in viewgraph form.

  12. Automatic star-horizon angle measurement system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koerber, K.; Koso, D. A.; Nardella, P. C.

    1969-01-01

    Automatic star horizontal angle measuring aid for general navigational use incorporates an Apollo type sextant. The eyepiece of the sextant is replaced with two light detectors and appropriate circuitry. The device automatically determines the angle between a navigational star and a unique point on the earths horizon as seen on a spacecraft.

  13. The NMC Horizon Report: 2013 Museum Edition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, L.; Adams Becker, S.; Freeman, A.

    2013-01-01

    The "NMC Horizon Report: 2013 Museum Edition," is a co-production with the Marcus Institute for Digital Education in the Arts (MIDEA), and examines six emerging technologies for their potential impact on and use in education and interpretation within the museum environment: BYOD (Bring Your Own Device), crowdsourcing, electronic…

  14. Gateway's Horizon: A Center of Excellence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Herring, Jayne; Colony, Lee

    2007-01-01

    This article describes Gateway Technical College's Horizon Center for Transportation Technology, located in Kenosha, Wisconsin, which was the product of collaboration with business and industry, community support and a U.S. Department of Labor (DOL) grant. The center, which opened this fall, is a prime example of a sustainable community…

  15. On the differentiability order of horizons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szeghy, D.

    2016-06-01

    Let M be a time oriented Lorentzian manifold and H\\subset M a horizon. We will show that the differentiability order of the horizon can change only once along a generator, i.e. the following holds. If γ :I\\to H is a generator, thus, an inextendable past directed light-like geodesic on the horizon, where I=(α ,β ) or [α ,β ), then there exists a unique parameter {t}0\\in [α ,β ] and a positive integer k≥slant 1 such that the following is true. The horizon H is exactly of class {C}k at γ (t), for every t\\in ({t}0,β ), moreover H is only differentiable, but not of class {C}1 at every point γ (t), for which t\\in (α ,{t}0]. Moreover, if γ (α ) is the endpoint of only one generator then for a suitable space-like submanifold R\\subset H the first cut point of R along γ is γ (α ). Furthermore, all the points γ (t), for which t\\in [α ,{t}0], are non-injectivity points of R along γ . Moreover, if H is smooth at an interior point of γ, then H is smooth at every point of γ. MSC 53C50

  16. New Concepts on the Educational Horizon.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilchrist, Robert S.; Mitchell, Edna

    Four dimensions in education provide a basis for discussing future horizons: (1) curriculum development, (2) teacher education, (3) administration and organization, and (4) research and development. These areas are interdependent, and one cannot be improved or changed without affecting the other areas. Within these areas, some of the broad changes…

  17. New Horizons in Mathematics and Science Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thorson, Annette, Ed.

    2001-01-01

    This journal, intended for classroom teachers, provides a collection of essays organized around the theme of new horizons in mathematics and science education as well as a guide to instructional materials related to the theme. Topics addressed in the essays include digital libraries, the future of science curricula, integrated curricula, and…

  18. Agriculture’s Ethical Horizon, book review

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Roughly 6.5 billion people inhabit the earth, but over 1 billion people regularly go hungry. This food shortfall poses an ethical dilemma for agriculture, and Agriculture's Ethical Horizon grapples with this dilemma. It argues that agricultural productivity has been the quintessential value of agr...

  19. Apparent horizons in binary black hole spacetimes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shoemaker, Deirdre Marie

    Over the last decade, advances in computing technology and numerical techniques have lead to the possible theoretical prediction of astrophysically relevant waveforms in numerical simulations. With the building of gravitational wave detectors such as the Laser Interferometric Gravitational-Wave Observatory, we stand at the epoch that will usher in the first experimental study of strong field general relativity. One candidate source for ground based detection of gravitational waveforms, the orbit and merger of two black holes, is of great interest to the relativity community. The binary black hole problem is the two-body problem in general relativity. It is a stringent dynamical test of the theory. The problem involves the evolution of the Einstein equation, a complex system of non-linear, dynamic, elliptic-hyperbolic equations intractable in closed form. Numerical relativists are now developing the technology to evolve the Einstein equation using numerical simulations. The generation of these numerical I codes is a ``theoretical laboratory'' designed to study strong field phenomena in general relativity. This dissertation reports the successful development and application of the first multiple apparent horizon tracker applied to the generic binary black hole problem. I have developed a method that combines a level set of surfaces with a curvature flow method. This method, which I call the level flow method, locates the surfaces of any apparent horizons in the spacetime. The surface location then is used to remove the singularities from the computational domain in the evolution code. I establish the following set of criteria desired in an apparent horizon tracker: (1)The robustness of the tracker due to its lack of dependence on small changes to the initial guess; (2)The generality of the tracker in its applicability to generic spacetimes including multiple back hole spacetimes; and (3)The efficiency of the tracker algorithm in CPU time. I demonstrate the apparent

  20. The Pluto System As Seen By New Horizons Spacecraft

    NASA Video Gallery

    The Pluto system as NASA’s New Horizons spacecraft saw it in July 2015. This animation, made with real images taken by New Horizons, begins with Pluto flying in for its close-up on July 14; we then...

  1. SETAC launches global horizon scanning/research prioritization project

    EPA Science Inventory

    The SETAC World Council is pleased to announce the initiation of a Global Horizon Scanning and Prioritization Project aimed at identifying geographically specific research needs to address stressor impacts on environmental quality. In recent years, horizon scanning and research ...

  2. Inflow measurements made with a laser velocimeter on a helicopter model in forward flight. Volume 4: Tapered planform blades at an advance ratio of 0.15

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Althoff, Susan L.; Elliott, Joe W.; Sailey, Richard H.

    1988-01-01

    An experimental investigation was conducted in the 14- by 22-Foot Subsonic Tunnel at NASA Langley Research Center to measure the inflow into the scale model helicopter rotor in forward flight (mu sub infinity = 0.15). The measurements were made with a two-component Laser Velocimeter (LV) one chord above the plane formed by the path of the rotor tips (tip path plane). A conditional sampling technique was employed to determine the position of the rotor at the time that each velocity measurement was made so that the azimuthal fluctuations in velocity could be determined. Measurements were made at a total of 146 separate locations in order to clearly define the inflow character. This data is presented herein without analysis. In order to increase the availability of the resulting data, both the mean and azimuthally dependent values are included as part of this report on two 5.25 inch floppy disks in MS-DOS format.

  3. (Ba0.85Ca0.15)(Zr0.1Ti0.9)O3 Ceramics Synthesized by a Gel-Casting Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiong, Wei

    2016-05-01

    (Ba0.85Ca0.15)(Zr0.1Ti0.9)O3 (BCZT) powder was synthesized by a solid-state reaction method, then the ceramics were fabricated by gel-casting and die-pressing routes, respectively. Piezoelectric coefficient (d 33 ) was measured by the d 33 m; Planar mode electromechanical coupling coefficient (k p ), dielectric loss (tanδ) and relative permittivity (ɛ r ) were measured by the impedance analyzer. Results of measurements showed that in the range of tested sintering temperature (1300-1500°C), gel-casting samples showed better piezoelectric and electromechanical coupling coefficients (d 33 = 395 pC/N, k p = 0.44) compared with die-pressing samples, and comparable dielectric properties were also observed. (tanδ = 0.037, ɛ r = 3267).

  4. Structure study of BaCe0.85Y0.15O3-Δ as solid state fuel cell material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krezhov, K.; Vladikova, D.; Raikova, G.; Genov, I.; Malakova, T.; Dimitrov, D.; Svab, E.; Fabian, M.

    2016-03-01

    The structural details of powder, dense and porous samples of BaCe0.85Y0.15O3-δ (BCY15) used recently in an innovative monolithic design of SOFC were studied from multiple Rietveld analysis of neutron and x-ray diffraction patterns. The 3-layered monolithic assembly built from BCY15 material works as oxide ion conductor in the oxygen space, as proton conductor in the hydrogen area and as mixed conductor in the central membrane. We find that in all the samples of studied BCY15 based materials there are no indications of difference in crystallographic symmetry and the structure refinements did produce best agreement factors in orthorhombic Pnma space group.

  5. Inflow Measurements Made with a Laser Velocimeter on a Helicopter Model in Forward Flight. Volume 1: Rectangular Planform Blades at an Advance Ration of 0.15

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elliott, Joe W.; Althoff, Susan L.; Sailey, Richard H.

    1988-01-01

    An experimental investigation was conducted in the 14- by 22-Foot Subsonic Tunnel at NASA Langley to measure the inflow into a scale model helicopter rotor in forward flight (microinf = 0.15). The measurements were made with a two component Laser Velocimeter (LV) one chord above the plane formed by the path of the rotor tips (tip path plane). A conditional sampling technique was employed to determine the azimuthal position of the rotor at the time each velocity measurement was made so that the azimuthal fluctuations in velocity could be determined. Measurements were made at a total of 147 separate locations in order to clearly define the inflow character. This data is presented without analysis. In order to increase the availability of the resulting data, both the mean and azimuthally dependent values are included as part of this report on two 5.25 inch floppy disks in Microsoft Corporation MS-DOS format.

  6. Debye’s temperature and heat capacity for Sr0.15Ba0.85Bi2Nb2O9 relaxor ferroelectric ceramic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peláiz-Barranco, A.; González-Abreu, Y.; Saint-Grégoire, P.; Guerra, J. D. S.; Calderón-Piñar, F.

    2016-02-01

    A lead-free relaxor ferroelectric, Sr0.15Ba0.85Bi2Nb2O9, was synthesized via solid-state reaction and the temperature-dependence of the heat capacity was measured in a wide temperature range. The dielectric permittivity was also measured between 500Hz and 5MHz in the same temperature range. No anomaly has been detected in the heat capacity curve for the whole temperature range covered in the present experiments, while broad peaks have been observed in the dielectric permittivity with high frequency dispersion. A typical relaxor behavior has been observed from the dielectric analysis. The Debye’s temperature has showed a minimum value near the freezing temperature. The results are discussed considering the spin-glass model and the high frequency dispersion, which has been observed for the studied relaxor system.

  7. Inspection of an end quenched 0.15%-0.2% C, 0.6%-0.9% Mn steel jominy bar with photothermal radiometric techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yue; Baddour, Natalie; Mandelis, Andreas; Wang, Chinhua

    2004-08-01

    The effect of the cooling rate on hardness and thermal conductivity in a metallurgical Jominy bar made of 0.15%-0.2% C, 0.6%-0.9% Mn (AISI 1018) steel, by means of a water end-quenched heat treatment process without diffusion-controlled case depth, is studied with photothermal radiometry (PTR). It is concluded that our two PTR techniques, common-mode rejection demodulation and conventional 50% duty-cycle square-wave frequency scan, are sensitive to low hardness values and gradients, unlike the high values all previous photothermal studies have dealt with to-date. Both PTR methods have yielded an anticorrelation between thermal conductivity and microhardness in this case as in previous cases with heat-treated and diffusion-controlled case depth profiles. It is shown that the cooling rate strongly affects both hardness and thermal conductivity in the Jominy-bar heat-treating process.

  8. Strain Relaxation in Thin Films of La1.85Sr0.15CuO4 Grown by Pulsed Laser Deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaytseva, I.; Cieplak, M. Z.; Abal'Oshev, A.; Berkowski, M.; Domukhovski, V.; Paszkowicz, W.; Shalimov, A.

    2007-01-01

    X-ray diffraction, resistivity, and susceptibility measurements are used to examine the effects of film thickness d (from 17 to 250 nm) on the structural and superconducting properties of La1.85Sr0.15CuO4 films grown by pulsed laser deposition on SrLaAlO4 substrates. For each d the film sgrow with a variable strain, ranging from a large compressive strain in the thinnest films to a negligible or tensile strain in thick films. Our results indicate that the tensile strain is not caused by the off-stoichiometric layer at the substrate-film interface. Instead, it may be caused by the extreme oxygen deficiency in some of the films.

  9. Nonlinear structure-composition relationships in the Ge1-ySny/Si(100) (y<0.15) system

    SciTech Connect

    Beeler, R.; Roucka, R.; Chizmeshya, A. V. G.; Kouvetakis, J.; Menéndez, J.

    2011-07-26

    The compositional dependence of the cubic lattice parameter in Ge1-ySny alloys has been revisited. Large 1000-atom supercell ab initio simulations confirm earlier theoretical predictions that indicate a positive quadratic deviation from Vegard's law, albeit with a somewhat smaller bowing coefficient, θ = 0.047 Å, than found from 64-atom cell simulations (θ = 0.063 Å). On the other hand, measurements from an extensive set of alloy samples with compositions y < 0.15 reveal a negative deviation from Vegard's law. The discrepancy with earlier experimental data, which supported the theoretical results, is traced back to an unexpected compositional dependence of the residual strain after growth on Si substrates. The experimental bowing parameter for the relaxed lattice constant of the alloys is found to be θ = -0.066 Å. Possible reasons for the disagreement between theory and experiment are discussed in detail.

  10. (Ba0.85Ca0.15)(Zr0.1Ti0.9)O3 Ceramics Synthesized by a Gel-Casting Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiong, Wei

    2016-08-01

    (Ba0.85Ca0.15)(Zr0.1Ti0.9)O3 (BCZT) powder was synthesized by a solid-state reaction method, then the ceramics were fabricated by gel-casting and die-pressing routes, respectively. Piezoelectric coefficient ( d 33 ) was measured by the d 33 m; Planar mode electromechanical coupling coefficient ( k p ), dielectric loss ( tanδ) and relative permittivity ( ɛ r ) were measured by the impedance analyzer. Results of measurements showed that in the range of tested sintering temperature (1300-1500°C), gel-casting samples showed better piezoelectric and electromechanical coupling coefficients ( d 33 = 395 pC/N, k p = 0.44) compared with die-pressing samples, and comparable dielectric properties were also observed. ( tanδ = 0.037, ɛ r = 3267).

  11. Metallic Nonsuperconducting Phase and D -Wave Superconductivity in Zn-Substituted La{sub 1.85}Sr{sub 0.15}CuO{sub 4}

    SciTech Connect

    Karpinska, K.; Cieplak, Marta Z.; Guha, S.; Malinowski, A.; Skoskiewicz, T.; Plesiewicz, W.; Berkowski, M.; Boyce, B.; Lemberger, Thomas R.; Lindenfeld, P.

    2000-01-03

    Measurements of the resistivity, magnetoresistance, and penetration depth were made on films of La{sub 1.85} Sr{sub 0.15} CuO{sub 4} , with up to 12 at. % of Zn substituted for the Cu. The results show that the quadratic temperature dependence of the inverse square of the penetration depth, indicative of d -wave superconductivity, is not affected by doping. The suppression of superconductivity leads to a metallic nonsuperconducting phase, as expected for a pairing mechanism related to spin fluctuations. The metal-insulator transition occurs in the vicinity of k{sub F}l{approx_equal}1 , and appears to be disorder driven, with the carrier concentration unaffected by doping. (c) 1999 The American Physical Society.

  12. Condyloma eradication: self-therapy with 0.15-0.5% podophyllotoxin versus 20-25% podophyllin preparations--an integrated safety assessment.

    PubMed

    Longstaff, E; von Krogh, G

    2001-04-01

    Topical application of podophyllin solution, long considered the therapy of first choice against condylomata acuminata, can no longer be recommended due to its low efficacy and gross toxicity. Self-treatment with 0.15-0.5% purified podophyllotoxin preparations, applied twice daily for 3 days, is now advocated as the alternative first-line therapy of choice, when significant improvement is conveniently, and cost-effectively, accomplished within a few weeks. This review provides a summary of the comparative efficacy and utility of podophyllin versus podophyllotoxin as well as a compilation of in vivo and in vitro safety evaluations. In light of overwhelming safety and efficacy data in favor of podophyllotoxin-derived products, it is concluded that podophyllin preparations have no place in the modern treatment portfolio for anogenital warts. PMID:11350195

  13. Characterization of phase transformation during hot compressive deformation in a β-stabilized Ti–45Al–7Nb–0.4W–0.15B alloy

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Bin; Liu, Yong Huang, Lan; Li, Huizhong; He, Yuehui

    2015-07-15

    A β-stabilized Ti–45Al–7Nb–0.4W–0.15B (at.%) alloy was hot deformed by uniaxial compression and the phase evolution during the compression was characterized with X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy and electron probe microanalysis. The results show that modest deformation stress during hot compression restrains the γ → α transformation and the decomposition of β phase. The restrained γ → α transformation is a result of a modified equilibrium of the γ and α phases due to the applied stress, and the restrained β decomposition is a kinetic effect due to the decelerated diffusion of β-stabilizing elements caused by the compressive stress. - Highlights: • In β-stabilized TiAl alloys, hot deformation has great influence on the equilibrium of the γ, α, and β phases. • Deformation restrains the γ → α transformation. • Deformation inhibits the decomposition of the β phase.

  14. Magnetoelectric properties of (Ba0.85Ca0.15)(Zr0.1Ti0.9)O3 - CoFe2O4 particulate composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paul Praveen, J.; Vinitha Reddy, M.; Das, Dibakar

    2016-05-01

    0.7[(Ba0.85Ca0.15)(Zr0.1Ti0.9)O3)]-0.3[CoFe2O4] multiferroic particulate ceramic composite with (0-3) connectivity has been synthesized by wet chemical methods. BCZT-CFO composite showed both polarization-electric field and magnetic hysteresis loops simultaneously at room temperature. A high dielectric constant of 2160 and tangent loss factor of 0.6 has been obtained. Magnetoelectric (ME) voltage coefficient (αME =dE/dH) of the composite was measured as a function of applied d.c magnetic field at different frequencies. At resonance frequency (365kHz) the composite showed a maximum αME of 102mV/cm.Oe. It was observed that the transverse ME coefficient is 1.8 times higher than the longitudinal ME coefficient. The magnetoelectric properties of this composite has been studied in detail in this work and correlated with its structure.

  15. Progress in Metal-Supported Axial-Injection Plasma Sprayed Solid Oxide Fuel Cells Using Nanostructured NiO-Y0.15Zr0.85O1.925 Dry Powder Anode Feedstock

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Metcalfe, C.; Harris, J.; Kuhn, J.; Marr, M.; Kesler, O.

    2013-06-01

    A composite NiO-Y0.15Zr0.85O1.925 (YSZ) agglomerated feedstock having nanoscale NiO and YSZ primary particles was used to fabricate anodes having sub-micrometer structure. These anodes were incorporated into two different metal-supported SOFC architectures, which differ in the order of electrode deposition. The composition of the composite Ni-YSZ anodes is controllable by selection of the agglomerate size fraction and standoff distance, while the porosity is controllable by selection of agglomerate size fraction and addition of a sacrificial pore-forming material. A bi-layer anode was fabricated having a total porosity of 33% for the diffusion layer and 23% porosity for the functional layer. A power density of 630 mW/cm2 was obtained at 750 °C in humidified H2 with cells having the bi-layer anode deposited on the metal support. Cells having the cathode deposited on the metal support showed poor performance due to a significant number of vertical cracks through the electrolyte, allowing excessive gas cross-over between the anode and the cathode compartments.

  16. 8-cm mercury ion thruster system technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1974-01-01

    The technology status of 8-cm diameter electron bombardment ion thrusters is presented. Much of the technology resulting from the 5-cm diameter thruster has been adapted and improved upon to increase the reliability, durability, and efficiency of the 8-cm thruster. Technology discussed includes: dependence of neutralizer tip erosion upon neutralizer flow rate; impregnated and rolled-foil insert cathode performance and life testing; neutralizer position studies; thruster ion beam profile measurements; high voltage pulse ignition; high utilization ion machined accelerator grids; deposition internal and external to the thruster; thruster vectoring systems; thruster cycling life testing and thruster system weights for typical mission applications.

  17. Occurrence of perched saturation and interflow over an argillic horizon in a low relief hillslope.

    SciTech Connect

    Greco, James; Jackson, Rhett, C.

    2009-03-01

    Abstract. Many of the soils in the south-eastern US are characterized by an argillic, or clay horizon, that largely parallels the soil surface at depths ranging from a few centimeters to 100 cen-timeters. The degree to which these argillic horizons alter subsurface movement of infiltrated water is not well known. Interflow, or throughflow, is shallow lateral subsurface flow that moves over a horizon that restricts percolation. This research investigates how often and under what conditions a relatively deep (20-150+cm) argillic horizon on low slope (2-6%) hillsides causes interflow to oc-cur. Research is being conducted at the Savannah River Site, Aiken, South Carolina, on a small zero-order watershed. In the first phase of this research, a high resolution topographic map of the clay layer was developed. This map will be used to instrument designated “low” spots with max rise piezo-meters in order to determine if there is channelized subsurface flow. In situ conductivities of the clay layer and the surface horizons were measured using an Amoozegar meter, and bulk density samples were taken and measured. Along with soil topographic measurements, data-logging piezometers have been installed to measure the piezometric head above, in, and below the argillic horizon to further investigate interflow as a potential hydraulic routing mechanism. The stream that drains the catchment was instrumented with a 2’ H flume and data-logging pressure transducer to measure stream flow. Climate data including precipitation, barometric pressure and temperature, are being continuously collected in an open area approximately ¼ mile from the study site. Combining the shallow surface and subsurface piezometric heads with stream flow rates, we should be able to determine if and when the clay layer is contributing to inter-flow.

  18. Structure and ferroelectric studies of (Ba{sub 0.85}Ca{sub 0.15})(Ti{sub 0.9}Zr{sub 0.1})O{sub 3} piezoelectric ceramics

    SciTech Connect

    Venkata Ramana, E.; Mahajan, A.; Graça, M.P.F.; Mendiratta, S.K.; Monteiro, J.M.; Valente, M.A.

    2013-10-15

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • (Ba{sub 0.85}Ca{sub 0.15})(Ti{sub 0.9}Zr{sub 0.1})O{sub 3} (BCTZO) ceramic was synthesized by the ceramic method. • In situ XRD and Raman spectra showed the phase transition of BCTZO around 360 K. • The ceramics showed a tunability of 82% at 40 kV cm{sup −1} electric field. • BCTZO exhibited good quality factor of 111 at microwave frequencies. • Piezoforce microscopy studies indicated the switchability of ferroelectric domains. - Abstract: We have synthesized and studied the structural and ferroelectric properties of lead-free 0.5(Ba{sub 0.7}Ca{sub 0.3})TiO{sub 3}–0.5Ba(Zr{sub 0.2}Ti{sub 0.8})O{sub 3} ceramics in the temperature region of its ferroelectric transition. The synthesized material showed high dielectric constant, low loss and good pyroelectric figure of merit. From the temperature dependent X-ray diffraction measurements, we determined the tricritical point to be in the temperature range of 303–400 K. The dielectric measurements indicate a diffuse ferroelectric phase transition (DPT) around 360 K in agreement with the X-ray measurements. We studied the evolution of Raman spectra with temperature to understand the nature of phase transition in BaTiO{sub 3} (BTO) and the BCTZO. The results indicates that the transition of ferroelectric–paraelectric state is not sharp as in the case of BTO and the polar state persists through the paraelectric state. In general, our study indicates that there are ferroelectric domains of nanometer size beyond the commonly defined transition temperature. The observation of local piezoelectric hysteresis loop indicated the existence of intrinsic ferroelectric property of the ceramic at the nanoscale. The ceramics exhibited electric field tunable dielectric properties with a tunability of 82% at an applied DC field of 40 kV cm{sup −1}, low dielectric loss of 0.001 and room temperature pyroelectric coefficient of 6 × 10{sup −8} C cm{sup −2} K{sup −1} and the

  19. Fluctuation conductivity and possible pseudogap state in FeAs-based superconductor EuFeAsO0.85F0.15

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Solovjov, A. L.; Omelchenko, L. V.; Terekhov, A. V.; Rogacki, K.; Vovk, R. V.; Khlybov, E. P.; Chroneos, A.

    2016-07-01

    The study of excess conductivity σ \\prime (T) in the textured polycrystalline FeAs-based superconductor EuFeAsO0.85F0.15 ({T}{{c}}=11 {{K}}) prepared by the solid state synthesis is reported for the first time. The σ \\prime (T) analysis has been performed within the local pair (LP) model based on the assumption of the LPs formation in cuprate high-T c superconductors (cuprates) below the pseudogap (PG) temperature {T}* \\gg {T}{{c}}. Similarly to the cuprates, near {T}{{c}} σ \\prime (T) is adequately described by the 3D term of the Aslamasov–Larkin (AL) theory but the range of the 3D-AL fluctuations, {{Δ }}{T}3{{D}}, is relatively short. Above the crossover temperature {T}0≈ 11.7 {{K}} σ \\prime (T) is described by the 2D Maki–Thompson (MT) fluctuation term of the Hikami–Larkin theory. But enhanced 2D-MT fluctuation contribution being typical for the magnetic superconductors is observed. Within the LP model the PG parameter, {{{Δ }}}* (T), was determined for the first time. It is shown that {{{Δ }}}* (T) demonstrates the narrow maximum at {T}s≈ 160 {{K}} followed by the descending linear length down to {T}{SDW}={T}{NFe}≈ 133 {{K}}. Observed small {{Δ }}{T}3{{D}}, enlarged 2D σ \\prime (T) and linear {{{Δ }}}* (T) are considered to be the evidence of the enhanced magnetic interaction in EuFeAsO0.85F0.15. Importantly, the slop of the linear {{{Δ }}}* (T) and its length are found to be the same as it is revealed for SmFeAsO0.85. The results suggest both the similarity of the magnetic interaction processes in different Fe-pnictides and applicability of the LP model to the σ \\prime (T) analysis even in magnetic superconductors.

  20. Suppression of superconductivity in La1.85Sr0.15Cu1-yNiyO4: The relevance of local lattice distortions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haskel, D.; Stern, E. A.; Polinger, V.; Dogan, F.

    2001-02-01

    The effect of Ni substitution upon the local structure of La1.85Sr0.15Cu1-yNiyO4 is commonly neglected when addressing the Ni-induced destruction of the superconducting state at y≈0.03 and a metal-insulator transition at y≈0.05. It is also sometimes assumed that direct substitution of a dopant into the CuO2 planes has a detrimental effect on superconductivity due to in-plane lattice distortions around the dopants. We present here results from angular-dependent x-ray absorption fine structure (XAFS) measurements at the Ni, La and Sr K-edges of oriented powders of La1.85Sr0.15Cu1-yNiyO4 with y=0.01, 0.03, 0.06. A special magnetic alignment geometry allowed us to measure pure ĉ and ab̂ oriented XAFS at the Ni K-edge in identical fluorescence geometries. Both the near-edge absorption spectra (XANES) and the XAFS unequivocally show that the NiO6 octahedra are largely contracted along the c-axis, by ≈ 0.16 Å. Surprisingly, the Ni-O planar bonds and the Ni-O-Cu/Ni planar buckling angle are nearly identical to their Cu counterparts. The NiO6 octahedral contraction drives the macroscopic ĉ-axis contraction observed with Ni-doping. The local ĉ-axis strongly fluctuates, due to the different NiO6 and CuO6 octahedral configurations and the much stronger bonding of a La+3 ion than a Sr+2 ion to the O(2) apical oxygens. We discuss the relevance of these findings to the mechanisms of Tc suppresion and hole-localization by Ni dopants.

  1. Rindler-like Horizon in Spherically Symmetric Spacetime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Jinbo; He, Tangmei; Zhang, Jingyi

    2016-02-01

    In this paper, the Rindler-like horizon in a spherically symmetric spacetime is proposed. It is showed that just like the Rindler horizon in Minkowski spacetimes, there is also a Rindler-like horizon to a family of special observers in general spherically symmetric spacetimes. The entropy of this type of horizon is calculated with the thin film brick-wall model. The significance of entropy is discussed. Our results imply some connection between Bekeinstein-Hawking entropy and entanglement entropy.

  2. Rindler-like Horizon in Spherically Symmetric Spacetime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Jinbo; He, Tangmei; Zhang, Jingyi

    2016-07-01

    In this paper, the Rindler-like horizon in a spherically symmetric spacetime is proposed. It is showed that just like the Rindler horizon in Minkowski spacetimes, there is also a Rindler-like horizon to a family of special observers in general spherically symmetric spacetimes. The entropy of this type of horizon is calculated with the thin film brick-wall model. The significance of entropy is discussed. Our results imply some connection between Bekeinstein-Hawking entropy and entanglement entropy.

  3. Chilled Mirror Dew Point Hygrometer (CM) Handbook

    SciTech Connect

    Ritsche, MT

    2005-01-01

    The CM systems have been developed for the ARM Program to act as a moisture standard traceable to National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST). There are three CM systems that are each fully portable, self-contained, and require only 110 V AC power. The systems include a CM sensor, air sampling and filtration system, a secondary reference (Rotronic HP043 temperature and relative humidity sensor) to detect system malfunctions, a data acquisition system, and data storage for more than one month of 1-minute data. The CM sensor directly measures dew point temperature at 1 m, air temperature at 2 m, and relative humidity at 2 m. These measurements are intended to represent self-standing data streams that can be used independently or in combinations.

  4. Astrophysics with the 60-cm telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zverko, J.

    2014-03-01

    Observational programs and selection from scientific results with the 60-cm telescope achieved at the Skalnaté Pleso Observatory since its putting into operation is reviewed: novae, eclipsing and interacting binaries, symbiotic stars, cataclysmic variables, chemically peculiar stars, comets. Possible targets among newly detected binaries are proposed for determining orbital parameters using the new spectrograph of the 60-cm telescope at the Stará Lesná Observatory.

  5. Status of the JPL Horizons Ephemeris System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giorgini, Jon D.

    2015-08-01

    Since 1996, the NASA/Jet Propulsion Laboratory on-line Horizons system has provided open access to the latest JPL orbit solutions through customizable ephemeris generation and searches. Currently, high-precision ephemerides for more than 683,000 objects are available: all known solar system bodies, several dozen spacecraft, system barycenters, and some libration points.Since inception, Horizons has produced 150 million ephemeris products in response to 70.4 million connections by 800,000 unique IP addresses. Recent usage is typically 6000 unique users requesting 4,000,000 ephemeris products per month.Horizons is freely accessible without an account and may be used and automated through any of three interfaces: interactive telnet connection, web-browser form, or by sending e-mail command-files.Asteroid and comet ephemerides are numerically integrated on request using JPL's DASTCOM5 database of initial conditions which is kept current by a separate process; as new measurements and discoveries are reported by the Minor Planet Center, they are automatically processed into new JPL orbit solutions. Radar targets and other objects of high interest have their orbit solutions manually examined and updated into the database.For asteroids and comets, SPK files may be dynamically created using Horizons. This is effectively a recording of the integrator output. The binary files may then be efficiently interpolated by user software to exactly reproduce the trajectory without having to duplicate the numerically integrated n-body dynamical model or PPN equations of motion.Other Horizons output is numerical and in the form of plain-text observer, vector, osculating element, and close-approach tables. More than one hundred quantities can be requested in various time-scales and coordinate systems. For asteroids and comets, statistical uncertainties can be mapped to output times to assess position and motion uncertainties.Horizons is consistent with the DE431 solar system solution

  6. Strain accommodation through facet matching in La{sub 1.85}Sr{sub 0.15}CuO{sub 4}/Nd{sub 1.85}Ce{sub 0.15}CuO{sub 4} ramp-edge junctions

    SciTech Connect

    Hoek, M.; Coneri, F.; Poccia, N.; Renshaw Wang, X.; Hilgenkamp, H.; Ke, X.; Van Tendeloo, G.

    2015-08-01

    Scanning nano-focused X-ray diffraction and high-angle annular dark-field scanning transmission electron microscopy are used to investigate the crystal structure of ramp-edge junctions between superconducting electron-doped Nd{sub 1.85}Ce{sub 0.15}CuO{sub 4} and superconducting hole-doped La{sub 1.85}Sr{sub 0.15}CuO{sub 4} thin films, the latter being the top layer. On the ramp, a new growth mode of La{sub 1.85}Sr{sub 0.15}CuO{sub 4} with a 3.3° tilt of the c-axis is found. We explain the tilt by developing a strain accommodation model that relies on facet matching, dictated by the ramp angle, indicating that a coherent domain boundary is formed at the interface. The possible implications of this growth mode for the creation of artificial domains in morphotropic materials are discussed.

  7. Correlated alteration effects in CM carbonaceous chondrites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Browning, Lauren B.; McSween, Harry Y., Jr.; Zolensky, Michael E.

    1996-07-01

    Three parameters are proposed to determine the relative extent of alteration in CM chondrites. The mineralogic alteration index monitors the relative progress of coupled substitutions in the progressive alteration of cronstedtite to Mg-serpentine and increases with increasing alteration. To calculate values of this index, an algorithm has been developed to estimate the average matrix phyllosilicate composition in individual CM chondrites. The second parameter is the volume percent of isolated matrix silicates, which decreases with progressive alteration due to mineral hydration. Finally, the volume percent of chondrule alteration monitors the extent of chondrule phyllosilicate production and increases as alteration proceeds. These parameters define the first CM alteration scale that relies on multiple indicators of progressive alteration. The following relative order of increasing alteration is established by this model: Murchison ≤ Bells < Pollen ≤ Murray < Mighei < Nogoya < Cold Bokkeveld. The relative degree of aqueous processing Cochabamba and Boriskino experienced is less precisely constrained, although both fall near the middle of this sequence. A comparison between the mineralogic alteration index and literature values for the whole-rock chemistry of CM chondrites reveals several correlations. A positive, nearly linear correlation between bulk H content and progressive CM alteration suggests an approximately constant production rate of new phyllosilicates relative to the mineralogical transition from cronstedtite to Mg-serpentine. The abundance of trapped planetary 36Ar decreases systematically in progressively altered CM chondrites, suggesting the wholesale destruction of primary noble gas carrier phase (s) by aqueous reactions. Because low temperature fluid-rock reactions are generally associated with large isotopic mass fractionation factors, we also compared our model predictions with δ18O values for bulk CM samples. Although some of these data are

  8. Correlated Alteration Effects in CM Carbonaceous Chondrites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zolensky, Michael E.; Browning, Lauren B.; McSween, Harry Y., Jr.

    1996-01-01

    Three parameters are proposed to determine the relative extent of alteration in CM chondrites. The mineralogic alteration index monitors the relative progress of coupled substitutions in the progressive alteration of cronstedtite to Mg-serpentine, and increases with increasing alteration. To calculate values of this index, an algorithm has been developed to estimate the average matrix phyllosilicate composition in individual CM chondrites. The second parameter is the volume percent of isolated matrix silicates, which decreases with progressive alteration due to mineral hydration. Finally, the volume percent of chondrule alteration monitors the extent of chondrule phyllosilicate production, and increases as alteration proceeds. These parameters define the first CM alteration scale that-relies on multiple indicators of progressive alteration. The following relative order of increasing alteration is established by this model: Murchison less than or equal to Bells less than Pollen less than or equal to Murray less than Mighei less than Nogoya less than Cold Bokkeveld. Bulk delta18O values generally increase with progressive alteration, providing additional support for this sequence. The relative degree of aqueous processing Cochabamba and Boriskino experienced is less precisely constrained, although both fall near the middle of this sequence. A comparison between the mineralogic alteration index and literature values of the whole-rock chemistry of CM chondrites reveals several correlations. For example, a positive, nearly linear correlation between bulk H content and progressive CM alteration suggests an approximately constant production rate of new phyllosilicates relative to the mineralogical transition from cronstedtite to Mg-serpentine. Furthermore, the abundance of trapped planetary Ar-36 decreases systematically in progressively altered CM chondrites, suggesting the wholesale destruction of primary noble gas carrier phase(s) by aqueous reactions. Multiple

  9. Rogue events in the group velocity horizon

    PubMed Central

    Demircan, Ayhan; Amiranashvili, Shalva; Brée, Carsten; Mahnke, Christoph; Mitschke, Fedor; Steinmeyer, Günter

    2012-01-01

    The concept of rogue waves arises from a mysterious and potentially calamitous phenomenon of oceanic surfaces. There is mounting evidence that they are actually commonplace in a variety of different physical settings. A set of defining criteria has been advanced; this set is of great generality and therefore applicable to a wide class of systems. The question arises naturally whether there are generic mechanisms responsible for extreme events in different systems. Here we argue that under suitable circumstances nonlinear interaction between weak and strong waves results in intermittent giant waves with all the signatures of rogue waves. To obtain these circumstances only a few basic conditions must be met. Then reflection of waves at the so-called group-velocity horizon occurs. The connection between rogue waves and event horizons, seemingly unrelated physical phenomena, is identified as a feature common in many different physical systems. PMID:23152941

  10. Horizon ratio bound for inflationary fluctuations.

    PubMed

    Dodelson, Scott; Hui, Lam

    2003-09-26

    We demonstrate that the gravity wave background amplitude implies a robust upper bound on the wavelength-to-horizon ratio at the end of inflation: lambda/H(-1) less than or approximately equal e(60), as long as the cosmic energy density does not drop faster than radiation subsequent to inflation. This limit implies that N, the number of e-folds between horizon exit and the end of inflation for wave modes of interest, is less, similar 60 plus a model-dependent factor-for vast classes of slow-roll models, N less than or approximately equal 67. As an example, this bound solidifies the tension between observations of the cosmic microwave background anisotropies and chaotic inflation with a phi(4) potential by closing the escape hatch of large N (<62). PMID:14525296

  11. Horizon Missions Technology Study. [for space exploration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, John L.

    1992-01-01

    The purpose of the HMT Study was to develop and demonstrate a systematic methodology for identifying and evaluating innovative technology concepts offering revolutionary, breadkthrough-type capabilities for advanced space missions and for assessing their potential mission impact. The methodology is based on identifying the new functional, operational and technology capabilities needed by hypothetical 'Horizon' space missions that have performance requirements that cannot be met, even by extrapolating known space technologies. Nineteen Horizon Missions were selected to represent a collective vision of advanced space missions of the mid-21st century. The missions typically would occur beyond the lifetime of current or planned space assets. The HM methodology and supporting data base may be used for advanced technology planning, advanced mission planning and multidisciplinary studies and analyses.

  12. Dynamical AdS strings across horizons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishii, Takaaki; Murata, Keiju

    2016-03-01

    We examine the nonlinear classical dynamics of a fundamental string in anti-de Sitter spacetime. The string is dual to the flux tube between an external quark-antiquark pair in {N}=4 super Yang-Mills theory. We perturb the string by shaking the endpoints and compute its time evolution numerically. We find that with sufficiently strong perturbations the string continues extending and plunges into the Poincaré horizon. In the evolution, effective horizons are also dynamically created on the string worldsheet. The quark and antiquark are thus causally disconnected, and the string transitions to two straight strings. The forces acting on the endpoints vanish with a power law whose slope depends on the perturbations. The condition for this transition to occur is that energy injection exceeds the static energy between the quark-antiquark pair.

  13. Horizon crossing and inflation with large {eta}

    SciTech Connect

    Kinney, William H.

    2005-07-15

    I examine the standard formalism of calculating curvature perturbations in inflation at horizon crossing, and derive a general relation which must be satisfied for the horizon-crossing formalism to be valid. This relation is satisfied for the usual cases of power-law and slow-roll inflation. I then consider a model for which the relation is strongly violated, and the curvature perturbation evolves rapidly on superhorizon scales. This model has Hubble slow-roll parameter {eta}=3, but predicts a scale-invariant spectrum of density perturbations. I consider the case of hybrid inflation with large {eta}, and show that such solutions do not solve the '{eta} problem' in supergravity. These solutions correspond to field evolution which has not yet relaxed to the inflationary attractor solution, and may make possible new, more natural models on the string landscape.

  14. Finding apparent horizons in numerical relativity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thornburg, Jonathan

    1996-10-01

    We review various algorithms for finding apparent horizons in 3+1 numerical relativity. We then focus on one particular algorithm, in which we pose the apparent horizon equation H≡∇ini+Kijninj-K=0 as a nonlinear elliptic (boundary-value) PDE on angular-coordinate space for the horizon shape function r=h(θ,φ), finite difference this PDE, and use Newton's method or a variant to solve the finite difference equations. We describe a method for computing the Jacobian matrix of the finite differenced H(h) sH (sh) function by symbolically differentiating the finite difference equations, giving the Jacobian elements directly in terms of the finite difference molecule coefficients used in computing sH (sh). Assuming the finite differencing scheme commutes with linearization, we show how the Jacobian elements may be computed by first linearizing the continuum H(h) equations, then finite differencing the linearized continuum equations. (This is essentially just the ``Jacobian part'' of the Newton-Kantorovich method for solving nonlinear PDEs.) We tabulate the resulting Jacobian coefficients for a number of different sH (sh) and Jacobian computation schemes. We find this symbolic differentiation method of computing the Jacobian to be much more efficient than the usual numerical-perturbation method, and also much easier to implement than is commonly thought. When solving the discrete sH (sh)=0 equations, we find that Newton's method generally shows robust convergence. However, we find that it has a small (poor) radius of convergence if the initial guess for the horizon position contains significant high-spatial-frequency error components, i.e., angular Fourier components varying as (say) cosmθ with m>~8. (Such components occur naturally if spacetime contains significant amounts of high-frequency gravitational radiation.) We show that this poor convergence behavior is not an artifact of insufficient resolution in the finite difference grid; rather, it appears to be caused

  15. Detection of Thermal 2 cm and 1 cm Formaldehyde Emission in NGC 7538

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Liang; Araya, E. D.; Hofner, P.; Kurtz, S.; Pihlstrom, Y.

    2011-05-01

    Formaldehyde is a tracer of high density gas in massive star forming regions. The K-doublet lines from the three lowest rotational energy levels of ortho-formaldehyde correspond to wavelengths of 6, 2 and 1 cm. Thermal emission of these transitions is rare, and maser emission has only been detected in the 6 cm line. NGC 7538 is an active site of massive star formation in the Galaxy, and one of only a few regions known to harbor 6 cm formaldehyde (H2CO) masers. Using the NRAO 100 m Green Bank Telescope (GBT), we detected 2 cm H2CO emission toward NGC 7538 IRS1. The velocity of the 2 cm H2CO line is very similar to the velocity of one of the 6 cm H2CO masers but the linewidth is greater. To investigate the nature of the 2 cm emission, we conducted observations of the 1 cm H2CO transition, and obtained a cross-scan map of the 2 cm line. We detected 1 cm emission and found that the 2 cm emission is extended (greater than 30"), which implies brightness temperatures of ˜0.2 K. Assuming optically thin emission, LTE, and that the 1 cm and 2 cm lines originate from the same volume of gas, both these detections are consistent with thermal emission of gas at ˜30 K. We conclude that the 1 cm and 2 cm H2CO lines detected with the GBT are thermal, which implies molecular densities above ˜105 cm-3. LY acknowledges support from WIU. PH acknowledges partial support from NSF grant AST-0908901.

  16. New Horizons Pluto Flyby Guest Operations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simon, M.; Turney, D.; Fisher, S.; Carr, S. S.

    2015-12-01

    On July 14, 2015, after 9.5 years of cruise, NASA's New Horizons spacecraft flew past the Pluto system to gather first images humankind had ever seen on Pluto and its five moons. While much has been discovered about the Pluto system since New Horizons launch in 2006, the system has never been imaged at high resolution and anticipation of the "First Light" of the Pluto system had been anticipated by planetary enthusiasts for decades. The Johns Hopkins Applied Physics Laboratory (APL), which built and operates New Horizons, was the focal point for gathering three distinct groups: science and engineering team members; media and public affairs representatives; and invited public, including VIP's. Guest operations activities were focused on providing information primarily to the invited public and VIP's. High level objectives for the Guest Operations team was set to entertain and inform the general public, offer media reaction shots, and to deconflict activities for the guests from media activities wherever possible. Over 2000 people arrived at APL in the days surrounding closest approach for guest, science or media operations tracks. Reaction and coverage of the Guest Operations events was universally positive and global in impact: iconic pictures of the auditorium waving flags during the moment of closest approach were published in media outlets on every continent. Media relations activities ensured coverage in all key media publications targeted for release, such as the New York Times, Science, Le Monde, and Nature. Social and traditional media coverage of the events spanned the globe. Guest operations activities are designed to ensure that a guest has a memorable experience and leaves with a lifelong memory of the mission and their partnership in the activity. Results, lessons learned, and other data from the New Horizons guest operations activity will be presented and analyzed.

  17. Controls and occurance of interflow over a restrictive argillic horizon in a low gradient hillslope.

    SciTech Connect

    Greco, James, L. III

    2008-02-01

    Interflow (throughflow or lateral flow), is shallow lateral subsurface flow that moves over a horizon that restricts percolation. Interflow is important for a number of reasons. First, rapid saturated interflow through macropores can travel to streams and alluvial aquifers with high celerity. Also, experimental studies have shown that interflow can be an important source of baseflow and stormflow. Because interflow travels through a biologically active region of soil with roots and relatively high OM content, the final outcome is the potential contamination of surface water bodies from subsurface water. Many of the soils in the southeastern US are characterized by an argillic, or clay horizon, that largely parallels the soil surface at depths ranging from a few centimeters to hundreds of centimeters. The degree to which these argillic horizons alter subsurface movement of infiltrated water is not well known. This research investigates how often and under what conditions a relatively deep (20-150+cm) argillic horizon on low slope (2-12%) hillsides causes interflow to occur.

  18. Finding KBO flyby targets for New Horizons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spencer, John; Trilling, David; Buie, Marc; Parker, Alex; Tholen, David; Stern, S. Alan

    2014-02-01

    We propose to continue the search for Kuiper Belt Objects (KBOs) that can be reached by the New Horizons spacecraft after its 2015 Pluto flyby. This first flyby of a small (~50 km) KBO would revolutionize our understanding of KBOs, providing information that can be extrapolated to hundreds of thousands of similar KBOs. Our 2011 search discovered three objects that could be targeted with only about twice the fuel that New Horizons has available during excellent seeing, but seeing was insufficient to achieve this depth over the entire search area in 2012 or 2013. Deepening the search in 2014, taking advantage of lower star density and the shrinking search area, has a good chance of finding a targetable object given sufficiently good seeing, especially with Hyper Suprime Cam. We expect about 2.5 targetable objects with R less 26.0 in the HSC field of view. We will also refine the orbits of previously discovered objects, including ones that can be observed from a distance by New Horizons on its passage through the Kuiper Belt.

  19. Finding KBO flyby targets for New Horizons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spencer, John; Trilling, David; Buie, Marc; Parker, Alex; Tholen, David; Stern, S. Alan

    2014-08-01

    We propose to continue the search for Kuiper Belt Objects (KBOs) that can be reached by the New Horizons spacecraft after its 2015 Pluto flyby, by following up on KBOs discovered in 2014A. The first flyby of a small (~50 km) KBO would revolutionize our understanding of KBOs, providing information that can be extrapolated to hundreds of thousands of similar KBOs. Our 2011 search discovered two objects that could be targeted with less than twice the fuel that New Horizons has available, during excellent seeing, but seeing was insufficient to achieve this depth over the entire search area in 2012 or 2013. Deepening the search with time allocated in 2014A, taking advantage of lower star density and the shrinking search area, has a chance of finding a targetable object given sufficiently good seeing, especially with Hyper Suprime Cam. 2014B follow-up is essential to produce orbits good enough to determine targetability, and allow recovery in 2015. We will also continue to refine the orbits of other previously discovered objects, including ones that can be observed from a distance by New Horizons on its passage through the Kuiper Belt.

  20. Accurate, reliable prototype earth horizon sensor head

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schwarz, F.; Cohen, H.

    1973-01-01

    The design and performance is described of an accurate and reliable prototype earth sensor head (ARPESH). The ARPESH employs a detection logic 'locator' concept and horizon sensor mechanization which should lead to high accuracy horizon sensing that is minimally degraded by spatial or temporal variations in sensing attitude from a satellite in orbit around the earth at altitudes in the 500 km environ 1,2. An accuracy of horizon location to within 0.7 km has been predicted, independent of meteorological conditions. This corresponds to an error of 0.015 deg-at 500 km altitude. Laboratory evaluation of the sensor indicates that this accuracy is achieved. First, the basic operating principles of ARPESH are described; next, detailed design and construction data is presented and then performance of the sensor under laboratory conditions in which the sensor is installed in a simulator that permits it to scan over a blackbody source against background representing the earth space interface for various equivalent plant temperatures.

  1. Horizon Science Experiment for Mars Global Surveyor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, T. Z.

    1997-07-01

    The Mars Horizon Sensor Assembly on the MGS orbiter monitors the orientation of the spacecraft relative to the limb by sensing atmospheric emission in the 15 mu m CO2 band. These data are used to maintain nadir pointing for the remote sensing instrument suite. The set of 5.5deg tall triangular fields of view normally straddle the limb, and cover quadrants 90deg apart around the limb. As an engineering device, the MHSA benefits from Mars' atmosphere being spatially bland at 15 mu m. However, these data will carry information about the thermal state of the atmosphere, which is subject to diurnal, seasonal, latitudinal, and dust-storm related variations, as well as possible wave effects. The Mariner 7 IRS, Mariner 9 IRIS, and Viking IRTM all demonstrated such variability. The Horizon Science Experiment (HORSE) is intended to glean new insight into atmospheric variation from the MGS horizon sensors, with continuous data flow to the Earth in the engineering stream, and a rapid buildup of spatial coverage. MHSA data will also be used to monitor atmospheric thermal behavior during the aerobraking of MGS in late 1997.

  2. Probing lepton asymmetry with 21 cm fluctuations

    SciTech Connect

    Kohri, Kazunori; Oyama, Yoshihiko; Sekiguchi, Toyokazu; Takahashi, Tomo E-mail: oyamayo@post.kek.jp E-mail: tomot@cc.saga-u.ac.jp

    2014-09-01

    We investigate the issue of how accurately we can constrain the lepton number asymmetry ξ{sub ν}=μ{sub ν}/T{sub ν} in the Universe by using future observations of 21 cm line fluctuations and cosmic microwave background (CMB). We find that combinations of the 21 cm line and the CMB observations can constrain the lepton asymmetry better than big-bang nucleosynthesis (BBN). Additionally, we also discuss constraints on ξ{sub ν} in the presence of some extra radiation, and show that the 21 cm line observations can substantially improve the constraints obtained by CMB alone, and allow us to distinguish the effects of the lepton asymmetry from the ones of extra radiation.

  3. CV and CM chondrite impact melts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lunning, Nicole G.; Corrigan, Catherine M.; McSween, Harry Y.; Tenner, Travis J.; Kita, Noriko T.; Bodnar, Robert J.

    2016-09-01

    Volatile-rich and typically oxidized carbonaceous chondrites, such as CV and CM chondrites, potentially respond to impacts differently than do other chondritic materials. Understanding impact melting of carbonaceous chondrites has been hampered by the dearth of recognized impact melt samples. In this study we identify five carbonaceous chondrite impact melt clasts in three host meteorites: a CV3red chondrite, a CV3oxA chondrite, and a regolithic howardite. The impact melt clasts in these meteorites respectively formed from CV3red chondrite, CV3oxA chondrite, and CM chondrite protoliths. We identified these impact melt clasts and interpreted their precursors based on their texture, mineral chemistry, silicate bulk elemental composition, and in the case of the CM chondrite impact melt clast, in situ measurement of oxygen three-isotope signatures in olivine. These impact melts typically contain euhedral-subhedral olivine microphenocrysts, sometimes with relict cores, in glassy groundmasses. Based on petrography and Raman spectroscopy, four of the impact melt clasts exhibit evidence for volatile loss: these melt clasts either contain vesicles or are depleted in H2O relative to their precursors. Volatile loss (i.e., H2O) may have reduced the redox state of the CM chondrite impact melt clast. The clasts that formed from the more oxidized precursors (CV3oxA and CM chondrites) exhibit phase and bulk silicate elemental compositions consistent with higher intrinsic oxygen fugacities relative to the clast that formed from a more reduced precursor (CV3red chondrite). The mineral chemistries and assemblages of the CV and CM chondrite impact melt clasts identified here provide a template for recognizing carbonaceous chondrite impact melts on the surfaces of asteroids.

  4. Study of surface cross-hatch and misfit dislocation structure in In(0.15)Ga(0.85)As/GaAs grown by chemical beam epitaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beanland, R.; Aindow, M.; Joyce, T. B.; Kidd, P.; Lourenco, M.; Goodhew, P. J.

    1995-04-01

    It is well known that a cross-hatch develops on the surface of low-misfit strained semiconductor layers which undergo relaxation by the introduction of arrays of a/2(101) misfit dislocations in the interface between the strained layer and substrate. Here we present a study of the detailed structure of these surface striations and their development with thickness in a series of In(x)Ga(1-x)As single layers on (001)GaAs, where x is close to 0.15. Using atomic force microscopy, it is found that the striations are in fact almost triangular ridges with rounded tops separated by V-shaped grooves. They are not slip traces. These ridges are found to be asymmetric in distribution, with those parallel to (1(bar)10) far higher than those parallel to (110). The spacing and height of the ridges increases with layer thickness. The structure also becomes more disordered in the case of thicker layers, with ridges running for shorter lengths and having more complex profiles. Using transmission electron microscopy, it is possible to link the ridges to dislocations lying above, and parallel to, the interface which result from repeated operation of multiplication sources.

  5. Microstructures of La 1.85Sr 0.15CuO 4 doped with Ni at high doping level

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, X. S.; Jiang, S. S.; Pan, F. M.; Lin, J.; Xu, N.; Mao Zhiqiang; Xu Gaoji; Zhang Yuheng

    1996-02-01

    Ceramic superconductors of La 1.85Sr 0.15Cu 1- yNi yO 4 with 0.00 ≤ y ≤ 0.50 were synthesized. There is no impurity phase detected in the entire Ni doped region. The structure of these Ni-doped samples was characterized by X-ray diffraction studies. The atomic structural parameters were obtained by Rietveld refinements for the Ni-doped samples with y ≤ 0.50. Some meaningful bond distances were determined according to the refined results. According to the variations of some bond distances with y, the whole doping range could be divided into two regions: low doping level (LDL) and high doping level (HDL). The bond length between the two apical oxygen atoms in the CuO 6 octahedra for the Ni-doped samples increased with increasing content of Ni in the LDL, and decreased in the HDL. The average bond distance of LaO was not changed in the whole doping region. The metal-insulator transition was also observed in this Ni-doped system.

  6. Experimental investigation of a 0.15 scale model of a conformal variable-ramp inlet for the F-16 airplane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hawkins, J. E.

    1980-01-01

    A 0.15 scale model of a proposed conformal variable-ramp inlet for the Multirole Fighter was tested from Mach 0.8 to 2.2 at a wide range of angles of attack and sideslip. Inlet ramp angle was varied to optimize ramp angle as a function of engine airflow, Mach number, angle of attack, and angle of sideslip. Several inlet configuration options were investigated to study their effects on inlet operation and to establish the final flight configuration. These variations were cowl sidewall cutback, cowl lip bluntness, boundary layer bleed, and first-ramp leading edge shape. Diagnostic and engine face instrumentation were used to evaluate inlet operation at various inlet stations and at the inlet/engine interface. Pressure recovery and stability of the inlet were satisfactory for the proposed application. On the basis of an engine stability audit of the worst-case instantaneous distortion patterns, no inlet/engine compatibility problems are expected for normal operations.

  7. Fatigue Crack Propagation in Intercritically Tempered Fe-9Ni-0.1C and Fe-4Mn-0.15C

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, H. J.; Schwartz, L. H.

    1983-06-01

    Fatigue crack propagation was studied for two intercritically tempered cryogenic steels, Fe-9Ni-0.1C and Fe-4Mn-0.15C, at both intermediate (stage II) and low (stage I, near threshold) stress intensity ranges. Propagation rates were determined for varying intercritical tempering times corresponding to varying amounts of retained austenite and untempered martensite. The results show that the heat treatments that optimize impact fracture properties in the nickel steel are also beneficial with respect to the fatigue crack propagation rate in stage I, while no beneficial effect beyond that attributable to carbon redistribution was observed for stage II. For the manganese steel, heat treatments leading to increased concentrations of retained austenite also increased the threshold stress even though no improvement in fracture toughness was observed. To clarify the origin of this improved behavior, the fracture surface was analyzed by Mössbauer Spectroscopy and Auger Electron Microprobe. The Mössbauer results indicated that the retained austenite in the crack path is transformed to martensite as was earlier shown in this laboratory for Charpy specimens. Auger composition analysis suggested a tendency for a stage I crack tip to avoid the mechanically induced brittle untempered martensite in the Fe-Mn steel, while no such preference was observed for stage II.

  8. Effect of phosphorus additions on the sintering and transport properties of proton conducting BaZr0.85Y0.15O3-δ

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soares, H. S.; Zhang, X.; Antunes, I.; Frade, J. R.; Mather, G. C.; Fagg, D. P.

    2012-07-01

    The influence of phosphorous additions on the sintering and electrical transport properties of the proton-conducting perovskite BaZr0.85Y0.15O3-δ (BZY) has been studied with a view to the use of phosphates as typical dispersants for the formation of stabilised solid suspensions or as possible sintering aids. P2O5 additions, (1-x)BZY·xP2O5, monotonously promote densification in the intermediate compositional range 0.04≤x≤0.08. Nonetheless, BZY reacts with phosphorous forming the phase Ba3(PO4)2 at temperatures as low as 600 °C. The associated loss of Ba from the perovskite, leads to a decrease in the perovskite lattice parameter, the formation of yttria-based impurity phases and impaired grain growth. Such reaction has an extremely detrimental effect on bulk and grain boundary conductivities. It is, therefore, vital that the current results are taken into account by the protonics community when attempting to prepare the stabilised solid suspensions of BZY nanopowders required for thin ceramic applications. Alternative dispersants to phosphate esters must be found.

  9. Damage development during low cycle fatigue of carbon-black loaded SBR. [Styrene butadiene rubber containing 0, 15, 25, and 35 wt % carbon black

    SciTech Connect

    Lesuer, D.; Goldberg, A.; Hiromoto, D.; Patt, J.

    1984-06-18

    Fatigue of elastomers is a subject that has received considerable study over the years. This paper explores the problem of damage accumulation in a series of styrene butadiene rubber (SBR) based compounds containing 0, 15, 25, and 35 wt % carbon-black under conditions in which a limited number of higher stress cycles have been applied to the material (referred to here as low cycle fatigue). Damage development in elastomers can take many forms. Generally speaking, one can classify the degradation as mechanical or chemical in origin. The most obvious form of mechanical damage is flaw or cut growth, while typical examples of chemical damage include chain scission or thermal oxidation. The fatigue crack growth relationship given in Equation 1 obviously only applies to flaw growth. However, it does an excellent job of following the data and exhibits the threshold behavior observed in both SBR and SBR-35 at room temperature. At higher temperatures, the damaged material shows an increasing deviation from threshold behavior. The obvious implication is that some thermally activated damage mechanism is degrading the material. In previous work, carbon-black loaded SBR subjected to a high temperature, high stress environment was shown to undergo a thermal-mechanical oxidation process. Certainly, this process is a candidate for a damage mechanism in these studies. 6 references, 14 figures, 1 table.

  10. Synthesis and Characterization of Ba(Zr0.15Ti0.85)O3 Nano Powders by Oxalate Precipitation Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Lei; Wang, Xiaohui; Qiao, Bin; Gui, Zhilun; Li, Longtu

    2006-08-01

    Barium zirconate titanate (BZT) is considered to be an important dielectric material for the fabrication of multilayer ceramic capacitors (MLCCs). The synthesis of nanocrystalline powders of high purity is the key to improving the performance of BZT-based ceramics. In this study, we developed Ba(Zr0.15Ti0.85)O3 nano powders with a perovskite structure and a homogeneous granularity through the oxalate precipitation method. The average particle size of the powders can be controlled from 30 to 100 nm at different calcining temperatures. The sintering property of the powders is superior to that of powders prepared by the conventional solid-state method, such that the more compact ceramics with a smaller grain size can be obtained at a sintering temperature of 1250 °C. The dielectric property of the ferroelectric-powder-based ceramics was so excellent for the development of dielectric materials for base-metal electrode multilayer ceramic capacitors (BME MLCCs) with a large capacitance.

  11. Oxygen nonstoichiometry of tetragonal La2-xSr(x)CuO4-δ (x = 0.15-1.2) and in situ XPS studies at elevated temperatures.

    PubMed

    Alyoshin, V A; Romanova, I P; Mikhailova, D; Oswald, S; Senyshyn, A; Ehrenberg, H

    2010-12-30

    The peculiarities of oxygen nonstoichiometry (δ) in tetragonal La(2-x)Sr(x)CuO(4-δ) solid solution with x(Sr) = 0.15-1.2 were studied by XRD, NPD, in situ high-temperature XPS, and chemical analysis. Temperature dependences of oxygen nonstoichiometry, δ = δ(T), were obtained for different Sr contents at 1 bar of O(2). Two types of charge compensation during replacement of lanthanum by strontium are discussed: an increase of the average copper oxidation state and a formation of oxygen vacancies. The average copper oxidation state V(Cu) exhibits a maximum of 2.32 at x(Sr) = 0.6, while δ increases with x(Sr). Oxygen vacancies are unambiguously located on the 4c site ({CuO(2)} plane) for compositions with different strontium contents, which electronic state is described by the O 2p core electron peak at about 531 eV. Thermal stability of the solid solution in a vacuum is associated with the extraction of practically the entire oxygen from CuO(2) layers and the formation of Cu(+) at least in the near-surface region. The higher average copper oxidation state after synthesis in the Sr-rich phases in comparison with the Sr-poor compositions prevents oxygen removal and the formation of Cu(+) and, therefore, stabilizes the structure during heating in a vacuum. PMID:21133400

  12. Anisotropy of the upper critical fields and the paramagnetic Meissner effect in La1.85Sr0.15CuO4 single crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Felner, I.; Tsindlekht, M. I.; Drachuck, G.; Keren, A.

    2013-02-01

    Optimally doped La1.85Sr0.15CuO4 single crystals have been investigated by dc and ac magnetic measurements. These crystals have rectangular needle-like shapes with the long needle axis parallel to the crystallographic c axis (c-crystal) or parallel to the basal planes (a-crystal). In both crystals, the temperature dependence of the upper critical fields (HC2) and the surface critical field (HC3) were measured. The H-T phase diagram is presented. Close to TC = 35 K, for the c-crystal, {\\boldsymbol{\\gamma}}^{c}={H}_{{C3}}^{c}/{H}_{{C2}}^{c}=1.8 0(2), whereas for the a-crystal the {\\boldsymbol{\\gamma}}^{a}={H}_{{C3}}^{a}/{H}_{{C2}}^{a}=4.0(2) obtained is much higher than 1.69, predicted by the ideal mathematical model. At low applied dc fields, positive field-cooled branches known as the ‘paramagnetic Meissner effect’ (PME) are observed; their magnitude is inversely proportional to H. The anisotropic PME is observed in both a- and c-crystals, only when the applied field is along the basal planes. It is speculated that the high γa and the PME are connected to each other.

  13. Anisotropy of the upper critical fields and the paramagnetic Meissner effect in La1.85Sr0.15CuO4 single crystals.

    PubMed

    Felner, I; Tsindlekht, M I; Drachuck, G; Keren, A

    2013-02-13

    Optimally doped La(1.85)Sr(0.15)CuO(4) single crystals have been investigated by dc and ac magnetic measurements. These crystals have rectangular needle-like shapes with the long needle axis parallel to the crystallographic c axis (c-crystal) or parallel to the basal planes (a-crystal). In both crystals, the temperature dependence of the upper critical fields (H(C2)) and the surface critical field (H(C3)) were measured. The H-T phase diagram is presented. Close to T(C) = 35 K, for the c-crystal, γ(C) = H(C3)(c)/H(C2)(c) = 1.80(2), whereas for the a-crystal the γ(a) = H(C3)(a)/H(C2)(a) = 4.0(2) obtained is much higher than 1.69, predicted by the ideal mathematical model. At low applied dc fields, positive field-cooled branches known as the 'paramagnetic Meissner effect' (PME) are observed; their magnitude is inversely proportional to H. The anisotropic PME is observed in both a- and c-crystals, only when the applied field is along the basal planes. It is speculated that the high γ(a) and the PME are connected to each other. PMID:23315336

  14. Electrical and Structural Real-Time Changes in Thin Thermoelectric (Bi0.15Sb0.85)2Te3 Films by Dynamic Thermal Treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rothe, K.; Stordeur, M.; Heyroth, F.; Syrowatka, F.; Leipner, H. S.

    2010-09-01

    A recent trend in thermoelectrics is miniaturization of generators or Peltier coolers using the broad spectrum of thin-film and nanotechnologies. Power supplies for energy self-sufficient micro and sensor systems are a wide application field for such generators. It is well known that thermal treatment of as-deposited p-type (Bi0.15Sb0.85)2Te3 films leads to enhancement of their power factors. Whereas up to now only the start (as-deposited) and the end (after annealing) film stages were investigated, herein for the first time, the dynamical changes of sputter-deposited film properties have been observed by real-time measurements. The electrical conductivity shows a distinct, irreversible increase during a thermal cycle of heating to about 320°C followed by cooling to room temperature. The interpretation of the Seebeck and Hall coefficients points to an enhancement in Hall mobility after annealing. In situ x-ray diffractometry shows the generation of an additional Te phase depending on temperature. This is also confirmed by energy-dispersive x-ray microanalysis and the corresponding mapping by scanning electron microscopy. It is presumed that the Te enrichment in a separate, locally well-defined phase is the reason for the improvement in the integral film transport properties.

  15. Zn0.85Cd0.15Se active layers on graded-composition InxGa1-xAs buffer layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Müller, B. H.; Lantier, R.; Sorba, L.; Heun, S.; Rubini, S.; Lazzarino, M.; Franciosi, A.; Napolitani, E.; Romanato, F.; Drigo, A. V.; Lazzarini, L.; Salviati, G.

    1999-06-01

    We investigated the structural and optical properties of Zn0.85Cd0.15Se epilayers for blue optical emission on lattice-matched InxGa1-xAs buffer layers. Both the II-VI layers and the III-V buffers were grown by molecular beam epitaxy on GaAs(001) wafers. A parabolic In concentration profile within the graded-composition InxGa1-xAs buffers was selected to control strain relaxation and minimize the concentration of threading dislocations. Dislocation-free II-VI growth was readily achieved on the graded buffers, with a Rutherford backscattering yield ratio reduced by a factor of 3 and a deep-level emission intensity reduced by over two orders of magnitude relative to those observed following direct II-VI growth on GaAs. The surface morphology of the materials, however, was found to replicate the crosshatched pattern of the underlying InxGa1-xAs substrates.

  16. Pressure dependence of the electronic structure of a [311] piezoelectric Ga0.85In0.15As/AlAs superlattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reparaz, J. S.; Muniz, L. R.; Goñi, A. R.; Alonso, M. I.; Rozas, G.; Fainstein, A.; Saravanan, S.; Vaccaro, P. O.

    2010-09-01

    We have studied the electronic subband structure of a piezoelectric [311] Ga0.85In0.15As/AlAs superlattice by means of high-hydrostatic pressure and excitation-power-dependent photoluminescence at 78 K. In particular, we unraveled the origin of two optical transitions at around 1.96 and 2 eV at ambient pressure, which were recently found to give rise to an unexpectedly strong resonant enhancement of the acoustic-phonon Raman scattering for such samples with permanent built-in piezoelectric fields [G. Rozas , Phys. Rev. B 77, 165314 (2008)10.1103/PhysRevB.77.165314]. Here we demonstrate that these transitions are doubly indirect, in real and reciprocal space, corresponding to radiative recombination processes between electrons at the X valleys of the AlAs barriers and heavy holes at the Γ point of the Brillouin zone but confined to the GaInAs quantum wells. In addition, the partial screening of the piezoelectric field induced by carrier photoexcitation under illumination becomes largely suppressed for pressures above 1.1 GPa due to conduction-band Γ-X crossover effects.

  17. Crystal structure, magnetism, and superconductivity of YBa2(Cu1-xFex)3O7+y with x=0.05-0.15

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katano, S.; Matsumoto, T.; Matsushita, A.; Hatano, T.; Funahashi, S.

    1990-02-01

    Neutron scattering experiments and magnetic-susceptibility measurements have been performed to investigate the structural and magnetic properties of YBa2(Cu1-xFex)3O7+y with x=0.05, 0.10 (superconductors), and 0.15 (nonsuperconductor). Rietveld refinements of neutron diffraction at room temperature indicate that the Fe atoms occupy both the Cu(1) ``chain'' and Cu(2) ``plane'' sites-the occupation of the Cu(2) sites is about 30% of the total Fe content. Neutron-diffraction measurements down to 5.5 K indicate no evidence of long-range magnetic order; however, neutron small-angle scattering as a function of temperature shows a cusplike anomaly around 20 K. This suggests that the Fe-doped YBa2Cu3O7 system undergoes spin-glass ordering at low temperatures; accordingly, in the superconducting samples superconductivity and spin-glass coexist. Magnetic susceptibility for the nonsuperconducting sample gives further evidence for the spin-glass order. The results obtained are discussed in connection with the superconducting properties of this system.

  18. Pinning mechanism in electron-doped HTS Nd_{1.85}Ce_{0.15}CuO_{4-\\delta } epitaxial films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guarino, A.; Leo, A.; Grimaldi, G.; Martucciello, N.; Dean, C.; Kunchur, M. N.; Pace, S.; Nigro, A.

    2014-12-01

    The electrical transport properties of c-axis oriented Nd1.85Ce0.15CuO4 - δ superconducting films have been investigated to analyze the pinning mechanism in this material. The samples were grown on SrTiO3 substrates using the dc sputtering high-pressure technique, whereas a detailed analysis of the structure and local composition of the films has been achieved using high-resolution electron microscopy and x-ray microanalysis. Magneto-resistance and current-voltage measurements, in the temperature range from 1.6 to 300 K and in magnetic field up to 9 T, have been reported. In particular, the anisotropic coefficient defined as the ratio between the parallel upper critical field, {{H}c2}\\parallel ab, and the perpendicular one, {{H}c2}\\parallel c, has been evaluated, pointing out the high anisotropy of this compound. Furthermore, the vortex activation energy as a function of the applied magnetic field, parallel and perpendicular to the CuO2 planes, has been derived and compared with the flux-pinning forces to enlighten the peculiar nature of pinning centers in this material.

  19. Carrier leakage into the continuum in diagonal GaAs/Al{sub 0.15}GaAs terahertz quantum cascade lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Albo, Asaf Hu, Qing

    2015-12-14

    The maximum operating temperature reported so far for THz-QCLs is ∼200 K. With the well-known degradation mechanism of thermally activated LO-phonon scattering, one straightforward strategy to improve their temperature performances is the use of diagonal structures in which the upper-to-lower state scattering time is lengthened. However, the effectiveness of this method for achieving room temperature operation remains to be demonstrated. Here, we studied the temperature degradation of highly diagonal GaAs/Al{sub 0.15}GaAs THz-QCLs. By analyzing their output power dependence on temperature, we identified the physical mechanism that limits their performance to be thermally activated leakage into the continuum, as evidenced by the large activation energy of ∼80 meV extracted from the Arrhenius plot. This observation is further supported by a careful analysis of current-voltage characteristics, especially in regions of high biases. In order to significantly improve the temperature performances of diagonal THz-QCLs, this leakage should be eliminated.

  20. Low temperature neutron diffraction study of Nd1-xSrxCrO3 (0.05≤x≤0.15)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chakraborty, Keka R.; Mukherjee, S.; Kaushik, S. D.; Rayaprol, S.; Prajapat, C. L.; Singh, M. R.; Siruguri, V.; Tyagi, A. K.; Yusuf, S. M.

    2014-06-01

    Low temperature magnetic structure of Sr substituted NdCrO3 has been investigated using neutron diffraction in the temperature range of 2-300 K. We carried out a low temperature magnetization study in the temperature range 5-300 K. The Rietveld analysis of neutron diffraction patterns led us to conclude that the Cr moments have a Gy type of alignment of spins while the Nd moments align in a -Cz type fashion for all three samples. The weighted average Cr3+/4+ ions moments were 3.19(7), 2.77(3) and 2.57(7) μB close to its theoretical Cr3+ moment value namely 3 μB at 2 K for the x=0.05, 0.1 and 0.15 samples respectively. While the Nd3+ moments for the three samples at 2 K were 3.0(1), 2.39(8) and 2.2(2), respectively.

  1. Measurement of the Proton Spin Function g1(x,Q2) for Q2 from 0.15 to 1.6 GeV with CLAS

    SciTech Connect

    Renee Fatemi; Alexander Skabelin; Volker Burkert; Donald Crabb; Raffaella De Vita; Sebastian Kuhn; Ralph Minehart

    2003-11-01

    Double-polarization asymmetries for inclusive ep scattering were measured at Jefferson Lab using 2.6 and 4.3 GeV longitudinally polarized electrons incident on a longitudinally polarized NH{sub 3} target in the CLAS detector. The polarized structure function g{sub 1}(x,Q{sup 2}) was extracted throughout the nucleon resonance region and into the deep inelastic regime, for Q{sup 2} = 0.15-1.64 GeV{sup 2}. The contributions to the first moment {Gamma}{sub 1}(Q{sup 2}) = g{sub 1}(x,Q{sup 2})dx were determined up to Q{sup 2}=1.2 GeV{sup 2}. Using a parameterization for g{sub 1} in the unmeasured low x regions, the complete first moment was estimated over this Q{sup 2} region. A rapid change in {Gamma}{sub 1} is observed for Q{sup 2} < 1 GeV{sup 2}, with a sign change near Q{sup 2} = 0.3 GeV{sup 2}, indicating dominant contributions from the resonance region. At Q{sup 2}=1.2 GeV{sup 2} our data are below the pQCD evolved scaling value.

  2. Magnetic and magnetocaloric properties of La0.85(Na1-xKx)0.15MnO3 ceramics produced by reactive spark plasma sintering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Regaieg, Y.; Sicard, L.; Monnier, J.; Koubaa, M.; Ammar-Merah, S.; Cheikhrouhou, A.

    2014-05-01

    La0.85(Na1-xKx)0.15MnO3 (0 ≤ x ≤ 1) ceramics were synthesized from the raw La(OH)3, NaOH, KOH, and MnO2 powders using Reactive Spark Plasma Sintering. All the compounds were obtained as pure, dense, and ultrafine grained pellets. The Rietveld refinement of the X-Ray powder diffraction shows that all our synthesized samples are single phase and crystallize in the distorted rhombohedral system with R-3c space group. The thermal variation of their magnetization under a magnetic applied field of 50 mT shows a paramagnetic to ferromagnetic transition at a Curie temperature very close to room temperature. The magnetic entropy change, deduced from magnetization measurements versus magnetic applied field up to 5 T at several temperatures exhibits a maximum |ΔSM|max which slightly increases with increasing K content. The relative cooling power values, inferred from the |ΔSM| vs T peak broadening, vary slightly with the potassium content, reaching, values between 316 and 289 Jkg-1, in an applied magnetic field of 5 T, when x increases from 0 to 1. Technically, these large values make the prepared materials very promising for domestic magnetic refrigeration.

  3. Fatigue of LiNi0.8Co0.15Al0.05O2 in commercial Li ion batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kleiner, Karin; Dixon, Ditty; Jakes, Peter; Melke, Julia; Yavuz, Murat; Roth, Christina; Nikolowski, Kristian; Liebau, Verena; Ehrenberg, Helmut

    2015-01-01

    The degradation of LiNi0.8Co0.15Al0.05O2 (LNCAO), a cathode material in lithium-ion-batteries, was studied using in situ powder diffraction and in situ Ni K edge X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS). The fatigued material was taken from a 7 Ah battery which was cycled for 34 weeks under defined durability conditions. Meanwhile, a cell was stored, as reference, under controlled conditions without electrochemical treatment. The fatigued LNCAO used in this study showed a capacity loss of 26% ± 9% compared to the non-cycled material. During charge and discharge the local and the overall structure of LNCAO was investigated by X-ray near edge structure (XANES) analysis, the extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) analysis and by using Rietveld refinement of in situ powder diffraction patterns. Both powder diffraction and XAS revealed additional, rhombohedral phases which do not change with electrochemical cycling. Moreover, a phase with the lattice parameters of fully lithiated LNCAO was still present in the fatigued material at high potentials, while it was absent in the non-fatigued reference material. The coexistence of these phases is described by domains within the LNCAO particles, in correlation with the observed fatigue.

  4. Preparation and conductivity of composite apatite La9.33Si6O26 (LSO) - Zr0.85Y0.15O1.925 (YSZ)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noviyanti, Atiek Rostika; Irwansyah, Ferli S.; Hidayat, Sahrul; Hardian, Arie; Syarif, Dani Gustaman; Yuliyati, Yati B.; Hastiawan, Iwan

    2016-02-01

    A great challenge to reduce high operating temperature of solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) to intermediate temperature SOFC (IT-SOFC, 500-750 °C), is the development of solid electrolyte materials with high ionic conductivity at intermediate temperature range. In response to this challenge, here we report a novel composite material La9.33Si6O26 (LSO)-Zr0.85Y0.15O1.925 (YSZ). LSO-YSZ composite synthesis was carried out by combining LSO with commercial YSZ (9:1, 8:2, 7:3) using hydrothermal method. In order to get dense pellet, all of the product were sintered at 1450 °C for 3 hours. X-ray diffraction pattern of the entire pellets show typical both of LSO and YSZ pattern which indicate that the composite was succesfully formed. The highest conductivity was detected in YSZ-7LSO (YSZ:LSO = 7: 3), i.e 1.72 × 10-4 Scm-1 at 700 °C and also has low activation energy (0.88 eV). This result suggests that the LSO-YSZ composite materials are good oxide ion conductor and potential to be used as an alternative solid electrolyte in IT-SOFC technology.

  5. Thermoelectric and magnetic properties of Ca{sub 3}Co{sub 4–x}Cu{sub x}O{sub 9+δ} with x = 0.00, 0.05, 0.07, 0.10 and 0.15

    SciTech Connect

    Bhaskar, Ankam; Lin, Z.R.; Liu, Chia-Jyi

    2013-11-15

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Resistivity of all the samples exhibits nonmetallic to metallic behavior in the low temperature region. • Ca{sub 3}Co{sub 3.85}Cu{sub 0.15}O{sub 9+δ} shows the highest dimensionless figure of merit. • The observed effective magnetic moments decrease with increasing Cu content. - Abstract: Ca{sub 3}Co{sub 4–x}Cu{sub x}O{sub 9+δ} (x = 0.00, 0.05, 0.07, 0.10 and 0.15) samples were prepared by conventional solid-state synthesis and their thermoelectric properties were systematically investigated. The thermopower of all the samples was positive, indicating that the predominant carriers are holes over the entire temperature range. Ca{sub 3}Co{sub 3.85}Cu{sub 0.15}O{sub 9+δ} had the highest power factor of 2.17 μW cm{sup −1} K{sup −2} at 141 K, representing an improvement of about 64.4% compared to undoped Ca{sub 3}Co{sub 4}O{sub 9+δ}. Magnetization measurements indicated that all the samples exhibit a low-spin state of cobalt ions. The observed effective magnetic moments decreased with increasing copper content.

  6. The late Barremian Halimedides horizon of the Dolomites (Southern Alps, Italy)

    PubMed Central

    Lukeneder, Alexander; Uchman, Alfred; Gaillard, Christian; Olivero, Davide

    2012-01-01

    A new trace fossil marker level, the Halimedides horizon, is proposed for the Lower Cretaceous pelagic to hemipelagic succession of the Puez area (Southern Alps, Italy). The horizon occurs in the middle part of the late Barremian Gerhardtia sartousiana Zone (Gerhardtia sartousiana Subzone). It is approximately 20 cm thick and restricted to the uppermost part of the Puez Limestone Member (marly limestones; Hauterivian–Barremian; Puez Formation). It is fixed to the top 20 cm of bed P1/204. The grey–whitish limestone bed of the G. sartousiana Zone is penetrated by Aptian red marls–siltstones of the Redbed Member. The horizon is documented for the first time from the Southern Alps, including the Dolomites, and can be correlated with other Mediterranean localities. The trace fossil assemblage of this marker bed with the co-occurrence of Halimedides, Spongeliomorpha and Zoophycos sheds light on the Lower Cretaceous sedimentological history and current system of the Puez area within the Dolomites. It also highlights the palaeoenvironmental evolution of basins and plateaus and provides insights into the late Barremian interval. PMID:27087717

  7. The Multidimensional Curriculum Model (MdCM)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vidergor, Hava E.

    2010-01-01

    The multidimensional Curriculum Model (MdCM) helps teachers to better prepare gifted and able students for our changing world, acquiring much needed skills. It is influenced by general learning theory of constructivism, notions of preparing students for 21st century, Teaching the Future Model, and current comprehensive curriculum models for…

  8. The 150/220 cm Schmidt telescope.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bao, Ke-Ren; Li, De-Pei; Yi, Mei-Liang; Zhu, Li-Qing; Li, Chang-Jin; Xu, Jian-Hua; Zhu, Neng-Hong; Wang, Lang-Juan; Zheng, Yi-Jin

    1990-09-01

    This paper deals with the overall design of the 150/220 cm Schmidt telescope. The optics, main structure, main mirror cell and the focus keeping device, achromatic Schmidt control cell, hydrostatic bearing of polar axis, drive, CCD auto-guider, and multi microcomputer control system are discussed in detail.

  9. Characterization of 8-cm engineering model thruster

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williamson, W. S.

    1984-01-01

    Development of 8 cm ion thruster technology which was conducted in support of the Ion Auxiliary Propulsion System (IAPS) flight contract (Contract NAS3-21055) is discussed. The work included characterization of thruster performance, stability, and control; a study of the effects of cathode aging; environmental qualification testing; and cyclic lifetesting of especially critical thruster components.

  10. Synthesis and characterization of La0.75Ca0.15Sr0.05Ba0.05MnO3-Ni0.9Zn0.1Fe2O4 multiferroic composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahaman, Md. D.; Setu, S. H.; Saha, S. K.; Akther Hossain, A. K. M.

    2015-07-01

    In the present work, we report on structural, dielectric, impedance spectroscopic studies and magnetoelectric properties of (1-x) La0.75Ca0.15Sr0.05Ba0.05MnO3 (LCSBMO)+(x) Ni0.9Zn0.1Fe2O4 (NZFO) (x=0.0, 0.1, 0.2, 0.4, 0.6, 0.8 and 1.0) composites. The composites were prepared by the solid state reaction route. The coexistence of a cubic spinel NZFO phase and a tetragonal LCSBMO phase in the composites is confirmed by the X-ray diffraction measurement. Scanning electron microscopy images reveal that NZFO particles were distributed non-uniformly with some porosity in the LCSBMO matrix. Frequency dependent dielectric constant shows usual dielectric dispersion behavior, which may be attributed to the Maxwell-Wagner type interfacial polarization. At higher frequencies (≥105 Hz), due to electronic and ionic polarizations only, the dielectric constant is independent of frequency. Complex impedance shows semicircular arc due to the domination of grain boundary resistance and electric modulus confirms the presence of hopping conduction. The AC conductivity (σAC) obeys the power law and the linearity of logω2 versus logσAC plots indicates that the conduction mechanism is due to small polaron hopping. Low frequency dispersion in permeability is due to domain wall motion and the frequency stability of permeability indicates that the arrangement of the magnetic moment in the polarization process can keep up with the external field. The maximum magnetoelectric voltage coefficient of ~40 mV Oe-1 cm-1 for x=0.8.

  11. Pressure dependence of optical transitions in In{sub 0.15}Ga{sub 0.85}N/GaN multiple quantum wells

    SciTech Connect

    Shan, W.; Ager, J.W. III, and; Walukiewicz, W.; Haller, E.E. |; McCluskey, M.D.; Johnson, N.M.; Bour, D.P.

    1998-10-01

    The effects of hydrostatic pressure on optical transitions in In{sub 0.15}Ga{sub 0.85}N/GaN multiple quantum wells (MQW{close_quote}s) have been studied. The optical transition associated with confined electron and hole states in the MQW{close_quote}s was found to shift linearly to higher energy with pressure but exhibit a significantly weaker pressure dependence compared to bulklike thick epitaxial-layer samples. Similar pressure coefficients obtained by both photomodulation and photoluminescence measurements rule out the possibility of the transition involving localized states deep in the band gap. We found that the difference in the compressibility of In{sub x}Ga{sub 1{minus}x}N and GaN induces a tensile strain in the compressively strained In{sub x}Ga{sub 1{minus}x}N well layers, partially compensating the externally applied hydrostatic pressure. This mechanical effect is primarily responsible for the smaller pressure dependence of the optical transitions in the In{sub x}Ga{sub 1{minus}x}N/GaN MQW{close_quote}s. In addition, the pressure-dependent measurements allow us to identify a spectral feature observed at an energy below the GaN band gap. We conclude that this feature is due to transitions from ionized Mg acceptor states to the conduction band in the {ital p}-type GaN cladding layer rather than a confined transition in the MQW{close_quote}s. {copyright} {ital 1998} {ital The American Physical Society}

  12. Water deuterium fractionation in the high-mass star-forming region G34.26+0.15 based on Herschel/HIFI data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coutens, A.; Vastel, C.; Hincelin, U.; Herbst, E.; Lis, D. C.; Chavarría, L.; Gérin, M.; van der Tak, F. F. S.; Persson, C. M.; Goldsmith, P. F.; Caux, E.

    2014-12-01

    Understanding water deuterium fractionation is important for constraining the mechanisms of water formation in interstellar clouds. Observations of HDO and H_2^{18}O transitions were carried out towards the high-mass star-forming region G34.26+0.15 with the Heterodyne Instrument for the Far-Infrared (HIFI) instrument onboard the Herschel Space Observatory, as well as with ground-based single-dish telescopes. 10 HDO lines and three H_2^{18}O lines covering a broad range of upper energy levels (22-204 K) were detected. We used a non-local thermal equilibrium 1D analysis to determine the HDO/H2O ratio as a function of radius in the envelope. Models with different water abundance distributions were considered in order to reproduce the observed line profiles. The HDO/H2O ratio is found to be lower in the hot core (˜3.5 × 10-4-7.5 × 10-4) than in the colder envelope (˜1.0 × 10-3-2.2 × 10-3). This is the first time that a radial variation of the HDO/H2O ratio has been found to occur in a high-mass source. The chemical evolution of this source was modelled as a function of its radius and the observations are relatively well reproduced. The comparison between the chemical model and the observations leads to an age of ˜105 yr after the infrared dark cloud stage.

  13. The transformation behavior of Cu-8.0Ni-1.8Si-0.6Sn-0.15Mg alloy during isothermal heat treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Lei Qian; Li Zhou Zhu Anyin; Qiu Wenting; Liang Shuquan

    2011-09-15

    The transformation behavior of Cu-8.0Ni-1.8Si-0.6Sn-0.15Mg alloy during isothermal heat treatment has been studied by transmission electron microscope observation. On the basis of micro-hardness measurement, time-temperature-property curves of the alloy have been established, and nose-temperatures of curves are about 650 deg. C. Discontinuous precipitates appeared as the samples isothermal heat treated at 550 deg. C, while continuous precipitates appeared as the samples isothermal heat treated at temperatures below 550 deg. C and above 650 deg. C. {beta}-Ni{sub 3}Si, {delta}-Ni{sub 2}Si and {delta}'-Ni{sub 2}Si precipitates were observed in the specimens. The crystal orientation relationships between copper matrix and precipitates were determined as (02-bar 2-bar){sub Cu} || (01-bar 1-bar){sub {beta}} || (010){sub {delta}}, [100]{sub Cu} || [100]{sub {beta}} || [001]{sub {delta}};(02-bar 2-bar){sub Cu} || (01-bar 1-bar){sub {beta}} || (100){sub {delta}} ', [100]{sub Cu} || [100]{sub {beta}} || [001]{sub {delta}} '. - Highlights: {yields} TTP curves have been established and their nose-tip temperatures are about 650 deg. C. {yields} Discontinuous precipitation appeared during isothermal treated at 550 deg. C. {yields} Continuous precipitation appeared when temperature is below 550 deg. C and above 650 deg. C. {yields} Crystal orientations relationships are: (02-bar 2-bar){sub Cu} || (01-bar 1-bar){sub {beta}} || (010){sub {delta}}, [100]{sub Cu} || [100]{sub {beta}} || [001]{sub {delta}};(02-bar 2-bar){sub Cu} || (01-bar 1-bar){sub {beta}} || (100){sub {delta}} ', [100]{sub Cu} || [100]{sub {beta}} || [001]{sub {delta}} '.

  14. Effect of Defects on Decay of Voltage and Capacity for Li[Li0.15Ni0.2Mn0.6]O2 Cathode Material.

    PubMed

    Yan, Wuwei; Liu, Yongning; Guo, Shengwu; Jiang, Tao

    2016-05-18

    Lithium-rich manganese metal layered oxides are very promising cathode materials for high-energy-density lithium-ion batteries, but improvement in voltage decay and capacity fade is a great challenge, which is mainly related to the structural instability or reconstruction of material's surface. Defects, such as part lattice distortions, local cation disordering and atomic ununiformity, often aggravate the further structural changes upon cycling. In this paper, we found that PEG contributed to form better layered structure, well crystallinity, uniform composition and polyhedral nanoparticles for Li[Li0.15Ni0.2Mn0.6]O2 (LNMO). On the basis of the comparative trial, a mechanism of electronegativity difference is proposed to elucidate cation nonuniform distribution. Higher electronegativity of Ni (1.91) than Mn (1.55) show a stronger ability of attraction between Ni and O atoms, and then led to Ni atoms show stronger diffusion driving force toward particle surface to contact the rich O atoms during sintering in air. However, PEG polymer can form a better barrier for more O atoms to attract Ni and Mn atoms on particle surface so that facilitated a uniform distribution. The electrochemical test indicated that the decay of discharge capacity and working voltage was mitigated, which was identified by the result of HRTEM analysis that the initial less defect structure obviously retarded the phase transformation from the layered to spinel after 50 cycles. Therefore, defects are crucial for understanding the voltage fade and capacity decay, and the improvement of performance also demonstrates that designing optimum compositions and ordering atomic arrangements will contribute to stabilize the surface structure and restrain inherent phase transitions. PMID:27116571

  15. Ferromanganese crusts from Necker Ridge, Horizon Guyot and S.P. Lee Guyot: Geological considerations

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hein, J.R.; Manheim, F. T.; Schwab, W.C.; Davis, A.S.

    1985-01-01

    Necker Ridge, Horizon Guyot and S.P. Lee Guyot in the Central Pacific were sampled, seismically surveyed, and photographed by bottom cameras in order to better understand the distribution, origin, and evolution of ferromanganese crusts. Necker Ridge is over 600 km long with a rugged crest, pods of sediment to 146 m thick, slopes that average 12?? to 20??, and debris aprons that cover some of the lower flanks. Substrate lithologies are mostly hyaloclastite, volcaniclastic breccia, and minor alkalic basalt. Horizon Guyot, 300 km long and 75 km wide, is capped by at least 160 m of sediment, which buries stepped terraces. Substrate lithologies are similar to those on Necker Ridge, although previous workers sampled much tholeiitic basalt on Horizon. S.P. Lee Guyot, 125 km long and 80 km wide, is capped by at least 300 m of sediment, and contains talus aprons along its lower flanks. Ferromanganese-encrusted rocks were recovered in every dredge and are thickest on Necker Ridge. Crust thicknesses average about 2.5, 1.5, and 0.8 cm for Necker, Horizon, and S.P. Lee, respectively. Crusts range from smooth or porous surfaces to knobby and botryoidal. The entire crust is laminated, however, two distinct layers commonly exist, separated by a paper-thin layer of phosphorite. The dominant mineral of all crusts is vernadite (??-MnO2), while quartz, feldspar, apatite, and, in three rocks todorokite, are minor phases. Quartz and feldspar decrease with decreasing latitude of occurrence, and is suggested to be related to eolian input. On the average, apatite also increases within the crusts with decreasing latitude of occurrence, which may be related to high biological productivity in the zone of equatorial upwelling. Phosphorite substrates are more abundant on Necker Ridge and S.P. Lee Guyot than they are on Horizon Guyot. Seamount ferromanganese nodules are distinct from abyssal nodules in their chemistry and internal structure. ?? 1985.

  16. Hydrogen-Broadened Water from 50 to 300 cm-1 and 1300 to 4000 cm-1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, L.; Peterson, D.; Plymate, C.

    1995-01-01

    To support remote sensing of the outer planets, absorption spectra of H2O broadened by H2 were recorded at room temperature using two Fourier transform spectrometers. The data from 1300 to 4000 cm-1 were obtained at 0.012 cm-1 resolution with the McMath FTS located at Kitt Peak National Observatory/National Solar Observatory. The remainder of the spectral data from 55 to 320 cm-1 were taken at 0.0056 cm-1 with the Bruker FTS.

  17. Time Horizon and Social Scale in Communication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krantz, D. H.

    2010-12-01

    In 2009 our center (CRED) published a first version of The Psychology of Climate Change Communication. In it, we attempted to summarize facts and concepts from psychological research that could help guide communication. While this work focused on climate change, most of the ideas are at least partly applicable for communication about a variety of natural hazards. Of the many examples in this guide, I mention three. Single-action bias is the human tendency to stop considering further actions that might be needed to deal with a given hazard, once a single action has been taken. Another example is the importance of group affiliation in motivating voluntary contributions to joint action. A third concerns the finding that group participation enhances understanding of probabilistic concepts and promotes action in the face of uncertainty. One current research direction, which goes beyond those included in the above publication, focuses on how time horizons arise in the thinking of individuals and groups, and how these time horizons might influence hazard preparedness. On the one hand, individuals sometimes appear impatient, organizations look for immediate results, and officials fail to look beyond the next election cycle. Yet under some laboratory conditions and in some subcultures, a longer time horizon is adopted. We are interested in how time horizon is influenced by group identity and by the very architecture of planning and decision making. Institutional changes, involving long-term contractual relationships among communities, developers, insurers, and governments, could greatly increase resilience in the face of natural hazards. Communication about hazards, in the context of such long-term contractual relationships might look very different from communication that is first initiated by immediate threat. Another new direction concerns the social scale of institutions and of communication about hazards. Traditionally, insurance contracts share risk among a large

  18. The horizon of the lightest black hole

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calmet, Xavier; Casadio, Roberto

    2015-09-01

    We study the properties of the poles of the resummed graviton propagator obtained by resumming bubble matter diagrams which correct the classical graviton propagator. These poles have been previously interpreted as black holes precursors. Here, we show using the horizon wave-function formalism that these poles indeed have properties which make them compatible with being black hole precursors. In particular, when modeled with a Breit-Wigner distribution, they have a well-defined gravitational radius. The probability that the resonance is inside its own gravitational radius, and thus that it is a black hole, is about one half. Our results confirm the interpretation of these poles as black hole precursors.

  19. Generic isolated horizons and their applications

    PubMed

    Ashtekar; Beetle; Dreyer; Fairhurst; Krishnan; Lewandowski; Wisniewski

    2000-10-23

    The notion of isolated horizons is extended to allow for distortion and rotation. Space-times containing a black hole, itself in equilibrium but possibly surrounded by radiation, satisfy these conditions. The framework has three types of applications: (i) it provides new tools to extract physics from strong field geometry; (ii) it leads to a generalization of the zeroth and first laws of black hole mechanics and sheds new light on the "origin" of the first law; and (iii) it serves as a point of departure for black hole entropy calculations in nonperturbative quantum gravity. PMID:11030951

  20. Peripheral Vision Horizon Display (PVHD). Corrected Copy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1984-01-01

    A Canadian invention, the peripheral vision horizon display (PVHD), shows promise in alleviating vertigo or disorientation in pilots flying under instrument conditions and easing the piloting task when flying in weather or other conditions requiring close attention to aircraft attitude instruments. A diversity of research and applied work was being done to investigate and validate the benefits of the PVHD during the years immediately preceding this conference. Organizers of the conference were able to assemble a group of outstanding presenters representing academic, industrial, and military. The theoretical foundation and applied use of the PVHD are discussed, and results from operational tests are presented.

  1. Art, the Urban Skyscraper, and Horizon Astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mooney, J. D.

    2016-01-01

    This presentation delineates the historiography and the iconography of my urban public sculptures which use skyscrapers as today's standing stones, markers for horizon astronomy. From 1977 to the present time, my work has engaged the public to “look up and see.” Through ephemeral works in the sky and over the water to large-scale rooftop sculptures in Los Angeles, Chicago, Atlanta, and Europe, viewers are oriented to the Milky Way, the summer triangle, and other celestial phenomena. This new urban scale art, transformative in context and gesture, has become part of the new cultural landscape.

  2. Prolate horizons and the Penrose inequality

    SciTech Connect

    Tippett, Benjamin K.

    2009-05-15

    The Penrose inequality has so far been proven in cases of spherical symmetry and in cases of zero extrinsic curvature. The next simplest case worth exploring would be nonspherical, nonrotating black holes with nonzero extrinsic curvature. Following Karkowski et al.'s construction of prolate black holes, we define initial data on an asymptotically flat spacelike 3-surface with nonzero extrinsic curvature that may be chosen freely. This gives us the freedom to define the location of the apparent horizon such that the Penrose inequality is violated. We show that the dominant energy condition is violated at the poles for all cases considered.

  3. Black hole thermodynamics from Euclidean horizon constraints.

    PubMed

    Carlip, S

    2007-07-13

    To explain black hole thermodynamics in quantum gravity, one must introduce constraints to ensure that a black hole is actually present. I show that for a large class of black holes, such "horizon constraints" allow the use of conformal field theory techniques to compute the density of states, reproducing the Bekenstein-Hawking entropy in a nearly model-independent manner. One standard string theory approach to black hole entropy arises as a special case, lending support to the claim that the mechanism may be "universal." I argue that the relevant degrees of freedom are Goldstone-boson-like excitations arising from the weak breaking of symmetry by the constraints. PMID:17678209

  4. European scientists' proposals for HORIZON 2000+

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1994-10-01

    This programme, which has been given the name Horizon 2000+, will be presented to the press at 0900h on Monday 17 October 1994 at ESA Headquarters in Paris by Professor Lodewijk Woltjer, who chaired the committee of European scientific community representatives set up to consider the proposals submitted, and Professor Roger Bonnet, ESA's Science Programme Director. Journalists wishing to attend this press breakfast are requested to complete and return the attached form, if possible by fax: (33.1) 42.73.76.90.

  5. 15 cm multipole gas ion thruster

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Isaacson, G. C.; Kaufman, H. R.

    1976-01-01

    A 15-cm multipole thruster was operated on argon and xenon. The multipole approach used has been shown capable of low discharge losses and flat ion beam profiles with a minimum of redesign. This approach employs low magnetic field strengths and flat or cylindrical sheet-metal parts, hence is suited to rapid optimization and scaling. Only refractory metal cathodes were used in this investigation.

  6. Influences upon the lead isotopic composition of organic and mineral horizons in soil profiles from the National Soil Inventory of Scotland (2007-09).

    PubMed

    Farmer, John G; Graham, Margaret C; Eades, Lorna J; Lilly, Allan; Bacon, Jeffrey R

    2016-02-15

    Some 644 individual soil horizons from 169 sites in Scotland were analyzed for Pb concentration and isotopic composition. There were three scenarios: (i) 36 sites where both top and bottom (i.e. lowest sampled) soil horizons were classified as organic in nature, (ii) 67 with an organic top but mineral bottom soil horizon, and (iii) 66 where both top and bottom soil horizons were mineral. Lead concentrations were greater in the top horizon relative to the bottom horizon in all but a few cases. The top horizon (206)Pb/(207)Pb ratio was lesser (outside analytical error) than the corresponding bottom horizon (206)Pb/(207)Pb ratio at (i) 64%, (ii) 94% and (iii) 73% of sites, and greater at only (i) 8%, (ii) 3% and (iii) 8% of sites. A plot of (208)Pb/(207)Pb vs. (208)Pb/(206)Pb ratios showed that the Pb in organic top (i, ii) and bottom (i) horizons was consistent with atmospherically deposited Pb of anthropogenic origin. The (206)Pb/(207)Pb ratio of the organic top horizon in (ii) was unrelated to the (206)Pb/(207)Pb ratio of the mineral bottom horizon as demonstrated by the geographical variation in the negative shift in the ratio, a result of differences in the mineral horizon values arising from the greater influence of radiogenic Pb in the north. In (iii), the lesser values of the (206)Pb/(207)Pb ratio for the mineral top horizon relative to the mineral bottom horizon were consistent with the presence of anthropogenic Pb, in addition to indigenous Pb, in the former. Mean anthropogenic Pb inventories of 1.5 and 4.5 g m(-2) were obtained for the northern and southern halves of Scotland, respectively, consistent with long-range atmospheric transport of anthropogenic Pb (mean (206)Pb/(207)Pb ratio~1.16). For cultivated agricultural soils (Ap), this corresponded to about half of the total Pb inventory in the top 30 cm of the soil column. PMID:26674702

  7. Constraining dark matter through 21-cm observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valdés, M.; Ferrara, A.; Mapelli, M.; Ripamonti, E.

    2007-05-01

    Beyond reionization epoch cosmic hydrogen is neutral and can be directly observed through its 21-cm line signal. If dark matter (DM) decays or annihilates, the corresponding energy input affects the hydrogen kinetic temperature and ionized fraction, and contributes to the Lyα background. The changes induced by these processes on the 21-cm signal can then be used to constrain the proposed DM candidates, among which we select the three most popular ones: (i) 25-keV decaying sterile neutrinos, (ii) 10-MeV decaying light dark matter (LDM) and (iii) 10-MeV annihilating LDM. Although we find that the DM effects are considerably smaller than found by previous studies (due to a more physical description of the energy transfer from DM to the gas), we conclude that combined observations of the 21-cm background and of its gradient should be able to put constrains at least on LDM candidates. In fact, LDM decays (annihilations) induce differential brightness temperature variations with respect to the non-decaying/annihilating DM case up to ΔδTb = 8 (22) mK at about 50 (15) MHz. In principle, this signal could be detected both by current single-dish radio telescopes and future facilities as Low Frequency Array; however, this assumes that ionospheric, interference and foreground issues can be properly taken care of.

  8. Mapmaking for precision 21 cm cosmology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dillon, Joshua S.; Tegmark, Max; Liu, Adrian; Ewall-Wice, Aaron; Hewitt, Jacqueline N.; Morales, Miguel F.; Neben, Abraham R.; Parsons, Aaron R.; Zheng, Haoxuan

    2015-01-01

    In order to study the "Cosmic Dawn" and the Epoch of Reionization with 21 cm tomography, we need to statistically separate the cosmological signal from foregrounds known to be orders of magnitude brighter. Over the last few years, we have learned much about the role our telescopes play in creating a putatively foreground-free region called the "EoR window." In this work, we examine how an interferometer's effects can be taken into account in a way that allows for the rigorous estimation of 21 cm power spectra from interferometric maps while mitigating foreground contamination and thus increasing sensitivity. This requires a precise understanding of the statistical relationship between the maps we make and the underlying true sky. While some of these calculations would be computationally infeasible if performed exactly, we explore several well-controlled approximations that make mapmaking and the calculation of map statistics much faster, especially for compact and highly redundant interferometers designed specifically for 21 cm cosmology. We demonstrate the utility of these methods and the parametrized trade-offs between accuracy and speed using one such telescope, the upcoming Hydrogen Epoch of Reionization Array, as a case study.

  9. Polyhedral Serpentine Grains in CM Chondrites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zega, Thomas J.; Garvie, Laurence A. J.; Dodony, Istvan; Stroud, Rhonda M.; Buseck, Peter R.

    2005-01-01

    CM chondrites are primitive rocks that experienced aqueous alteration in the early solar system. Their matrices and fine-grained rims (FGRs) sustained the effects of alteration, and the minerals within them hold clues to the aqueous reactions. Sheet silicates are an important product of alteration, and those of the serpentine group are abundant in the CM2 chondrites. Here we expand on our previous efforts to characterize the structure and chemistry of serpentines in CM chondrites and report results on a polyhedral form that is structurally similar to polygonal serpentine. Polygonal serpentine consists of tetrahedral (T) sheets joined to M(2+)-centered octahedral (O) sheets (where (M2+) is primarily Mg(2+) and Fe(2+)), which give rise to a 1:1 (TO) layered structure with a 0.7-nm layer periodicity. The structure is similar to chrysotile in that it consists of concentric lizardite layers wrapped around the fiber axis. However, unlike the rolled-up chrysotile, the tetrahedral sheets of the lizardite layers are periodically inverted and kinked, producing sectors. The relative angles between sectors result in 15- and 30-sided polygons in terrestrial samples.

  10. The effect of soil horizon and mineral type on the distribution of siderophores in soil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmed, Engy; Holmström, Sara J. M.

    2014-04-01

    Iron is a key component of the chemical architecture of the biosphere. Due to the low bioavailability of iron in the environment, microorganisms have developed specific uptake strategies like production of siderophores. Siderophores are operationally defined as low-molecular-mass biogenic Fe(III)-binding compounds, that can increase the bioavailability of iron by promoting the dissolution of iron-bearing minerals. In the present study, we investigated the composition of dissolved and adsorbed siderophores of the hydroxamate family in the soil horizons of podzol and the effect of specific mineral types on siderophores. Three polished mineral specimens of 3 cm × 4 cm × 3 mm (apatite, biotite and oligioclase) were inserted in the soil horizons (O (organic), E (eluvial) and B (upper illuvial)). After two years, soil samples were collected from both the bulk soil of the whole profile and from the soil attached to the mineral surfaces. The concentration of ten different fungal tri-hydroxamates within ferrichromes, fusigen and coprogens families, and five bacterial hydroxamates within the ferrioxamine family were detected. All hydroxamate types were determined in both soil water (dissolved) and soil methanol (adsorbed) extracts along the whole soil profile by high-performance liquid chromatography coupled to electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (HPLC-ESI-MS); hence, the study is the most extensive of its kind. We found that coprogens and fusigen were present in much higher concentrations in bulk soil than were ferrioxamines and ferrichromes. On the other hand, the presence of the polished mineral completely altered the distribution of siderophores. In addition, each mineral had a unique interaction with the dissolved and adsorbed hydroxamates in the different soil horizons. Thus siderophore composition in the soil environment is controlled by the chemical, physical and biological characteristics of each soil horizon and also by the available mineral types.

  11. 78 FR 54298 - Horizons ETFs Management (USA) LLC and Horizons ETF Trust; Notice of Application

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-09-03

    .... Applicants currently intend that the initial series of the Trust will be the Horizons Active Global Dividend... through either the NSCC or DTC; or (ii) in the case of Funds holding non-U.S. investment (``Global Funds... holder of Shares of a Global Fund would be subject to unfavorable income tax treatment if the...

  12. Killing horizons around a uniformly accelerating and rotating particle

    SciTech Connect

    Farhoosh, H.; Zimmerman, R.L.

    1980-08-15

    The structure of the Killing horizon surrounding a uniformly accelerating and rotating particle which is emitting gravitational radiation is investigated. When expressed in terms of a coordinate system which is rigidly fixed to the particle undergoing uniform acceleration, the two inner horizons and ergoregion are similar to the horizons and ergoregion in the Kerr solution. These compact surfaces are distorted by the acceleration, being elongated in the forward direction and contracted in the backward direction. In addition to the two horizons that are similar to the Kerr solution, there is an additional noncompact horizon and an additional ergoregion which are caused by the acceleration. In general, the two ergoregions are disjoint, but as the acceleration parameter is sufficiently increased these ergoregions coalesce. A further increase of the acceleration will cause the two outer horizons to become degenerate and the ergoregion to vanish. An increase in the rotation parameter causes effects similar to those in the Kerr metric.

  13. Killing horizons around a uniformly accelerating and rotating particle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farhoosh, Hamid; Zimmerman, Robert L.

    1980-08-01

    The structure of the Killing horizon surrounding a uniformly accelerating and rotating particle which is emitting gravitational radiation is investigated. When expressed in terms of a coordinate system which is rigidly fixed to the particle undergoing uniform acceleration, the two inner horizons and ergoregion are similar to the horizons and ergoregion in the Kerr solution. These compact surfaces are distorted by the acceleration, being elongated in the forward direction and contracted in the backward direction. In addition to the two horizons that are similar to the Kerr solution, there is an additional noncompact horizon and an additional ergoregion which are caused by the acceleration. In general, the two ergoregions are disjoint, but as the acceleration parameter is sufficiently increased these ergoregions coalesce. A further increase of the acceleration will cause the two outer horizons to become degenerate and the ergoregion to vanish. An increase in the rotation parameter causes effects similar to those in the Kerr metric.

  14. Impacts of Deepwater Horizon Oil on Marsh Sediment Biogeochemistry in Barataria Bay, LA, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mills, C. T.; Windham-Myers, L.; Waldrop, M. P.; Krabbenhoft, D. P.; Marvin-DiPasquale, M. C.; Orem, W. H.; Piazza, S.; Haw, M.; McFarland, J.; Varonka, M. S.

    2012-12-01

    Oil from the Deepwater Horizon spill came ashore on many salt marsh islands in Barataria Bay, LA in summer 2010, coating plants and settling on the sediment surface. In coordination with a plant community study of affected marshes, we investigated impacts of oiling on marsh sediment microbial biogeochemistry. Sediment samples (upmost 2 cm) were collected along transects perpendicular and parallel to the shore at three oiled and three non-oiled sites in both July and Oct. 2011. Samples from both collections were analyzed for sediment characteristics, total and methylmercury, and microbial membrane phospholipid fatty acids (PLFAs) which are a proxy for viable microbial cell numbers. Sediment DNA collected in Oct. 2011 was analyzed for bacterial, fungal, and archaeal community composition and abundance as well as various enzyme activities. Select Oct. 2011 samples were assayed to determine the rates of terminal electron accepting processes (oxygen demand, denitrification, iron reduction, sulfate reduction, methanogenesis). All sites had similar sediment characteristics. Impacts on sediment biogeochemistry were greatest at marsh edges, and reduced microbial abundance appeared to be more important than changes in microbial community structure. In July 2011, the mean PLFA concentration in oiled marsh edge sediments (0.15±0.03 μmol g-1; 95% CI; n=9) was substantially lower than for non-oiled sites (0.33±0.08 μmol g-1; n=9). Mean PLFA concentrations for interior marsh samples were more similar for oiled (0.30±0.08 μmol g-1; n=8) and non-oiled (0.37±0.04 μmol g-1; n=9) sites. This PLFA pattern was also observed in Oct. 2011 samples, and other measures of microbial abundance and activity showed similar trends. Cellulase, phosphatase, and chitinase mean activities were nearly twice as great in non-oiled versus oiled edge sites. Lower microbial activity in oiled sites was also inferred by somewhat lower denitrification and sulfate reduction potentials. Conversely, both

  15. On the accretion process in a high-mass star forming region. A multitransitional THz Herschel-HIFI study of ammonia toward G34.26+0.15

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hajigholi, M.; Persson, C. M.; Wirström, E. S.; Black, J. H.; Bergman, P.; Olofsson, A. O. H.; Olberg, M.; Wyrowski, F.; Coutens, A.; Hjalmarson, Å.; Menten, K. M.

    2016-01-01

    Aims: Our aim is to explore the gas dynamics and the accretion process in the early phase of high-mass star formation. Methods: The inward motion of molecular gas in the massive star forming region G34.26+0.15 is investigated by using high-resolution profiles of seven transitions of ammonia at THz frequencies observed with Herschel-HIFI. The shapes and intensities of these lines are interpreted in terms of radiative transfer models of a spherical, collapsing molecular envelope. An accelerated Lambda Iteration (ALI) method is used to compute the models. Results: The seven ammonia lines show mixed absorption and emission with inverse P-Cygni-type profiles that suggest infall onto the central source. A trend toward absorption at increasingly higher velocities for higher excitation transitions is clearly seen in the line profiles. The J = 3 ← 2 lines show only very weak emission, so these absorption profiles can be used directly to analyze the inward motion of the gas. This is the first time a multitransitional study of spectrally resolved rotational ammonia lines has been used for this purpose. Broad emission is, in addition, mixed with the absorption in the 10-00 ortho-NH3 line, possibly tracing a molecular outflow from the star forming region. The best-fitting ALI model reproduces the continuum fluxes and line profiles, but slightly underpredicts the emission and absorption depth in the ground-state ortho line 10-00. An ammonia abundance on the order of 10-9 relative to H2 is needed to fit the profiles. The derived ortho-to-para ratio is approximately 0.5 throughout the infalling cloud core similar to recent findings for translucent clouds in sight lines toward W31C and W49N. We find evidence of two gas components moving inwards toward the central region with constant velocities: 2.7 and 5.3 km s-1, relative to the source systemic velocity. Attempts to model the inward motion with a single gas cloud in free-fall collapse did not succeed. Herschel is an ESA space

  16. Gribov's horizon and the ghost dressing function

    SciTech Connect

    Boucaud, Ph.; Leroy, J. P.; Le Yaouanc, A.; Micheli, J.; Pene, O.; Rodriguez-Quintero, J.

    2009-11-01

    We study a relation recently derived by K. Kondo at zero momentum between the Zwanziger's horizon function, the ghost dressing function and Kugo's functions u and w. We agree with this result as far as bare quantities are considered. However, assuming the validity of the horizon gap equation, we argue that the solution w(0)=0 is not acceptable since it would lead to a vanishing renormalized ghost dressing function. On the contrary, when the cutoff goes to infinity, u(0){yields}{infinity}, w(0){yields}-{infinity} such that u(0)+w(0){yields}-1. Furthermore w and u are not multiplicatively renormalizable. Relaxing the gap equation allows w(0)=0 with u(0){yields}-1. In both cases the bare ghost dressing function, F(0,{lambda}), goes logarithmically to infinity at infinite cutoff. We show that, although the lattice results provide bare results not so different from the F(0,{lambda})=3 solution, this is an accident due to the fact that the lattice cutoffs lie in the range 1-3 GeV{sup -1}. We show that the renormalized ghost dressing function should be finite and nonzero at zero momentum and can be reliably estimated on the lattice up to powers of the lattice spacing; from published data on a 80{sup 4} lattice at {beta}=5.7 we obtain F{sub R}(0,{mu}=1.5 GeV){approx_equal}2.2.

  17. Energy and information near black hole horizons

    SciTech Connect

    Freivogel, Ben

    2014-07-01

    The central challenge in trying to resolve the firewall paradox is to identify excitations in the near-horizon zone of a black hole that can carry information without injuring a freely falling observer. By analyzing the problem from the point of view of a freely falling observer, I arrive at a simple proposal for the degrees of freedom that carry information out of the black hole. An infalling observer experiences the information-carrying modes as ingoing, negative energy excitations of the quantum fields. In these states, freely falling observers who fall in from infinity do not encounter a firewall, but freely falling observers who begin their free fall from a location close to the horizon are ''frozen'' by a flux of negative energy. When the black hole is ''mined,'' the number of information-carrying modes increases, increasing the negative energy flux in the infalling frame without violating the equivalence principle. Finally, I point out a loophole in recent arguments that an infalling observer must detect a violation of unitarity, effective field theory, or free infall.

  18. Cool horizons lead to information loss

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chowdhury, Borun D.

    2013-10-01

    There are two evidences for information loss during black hole evaporation: (i) a pure state evolves to a mixed state and (ii) the map from the initial state to final state is non-invertible. Any proposed resolution of the information paradox must address both these issues. The firewall argument focuses only on the first and this leads to order one deviations from the Unruh vacuum for maximally entangled black holes. The nature of the argument does not extend to black holes in pure states. It was shown by Avery, Puhm and the author that requiring the initial state to final state map to be invertible mandates structure at the horizon even for pure states. The proof works if black holes can be formed in generic states and in this paper we show that this is indeed the case. We also demonstrate how models proposed by Susskind, Papadodimas et al. and Maldacena et al. end up making the initial to final state map non-invertible and thus make the horizon "cool" at the cost of unitarity.

  19. ICD-10-CM/PCS: Transferring Knowledge from ICD-9-CM

    PubMed Central

    Sand, Jaime N.; Elison-Bowers, Patt

    2013-01-01

    The transition to ICD-10-CM/PCS has expanded educational opportunities for educators and trainers who are taking on the responsibility of training coders on the new system. Coding education currently faces multiple challenges in the areas of how to train the new workforce, what might be the most efficient method of providing that training, how much retraining of the current workforce with ICD-9-CM training will be required, and how to meet the national implementation deadline of 2014 in the most efficacious manner. This research sought to identify if there was a difference between a group of participants with no knowledge of ICD-9-CM and those with some knowledge of ICD-9-CM in scores on an ICD-10-CM/PCS quiz. Results indicate a difference, supporting the idea of knowledge transfer between the systems and providing additional insight into coding education. PMID:23861677

  20. Radiation from quantum weakly dynamical horizons in loop quantum gravity.

    PubMed

    Pranzetti, Daniele

    2012-07-01

    We provide a statistical mechanical analysis of quantum horizons near equilibrium in the grand canonical ensemble. By matching the description of the nonequilibrium phase in terms of weakly dynamical horizons with a local statistical framework, we implement loop quantum gravity dynamics near the boundary. The resulting radiation process provides a quantum gravity description of the horizon evaporation. For large black holes, the spectrum we derive presents a discrete structure which could be potentially observable. PMID:23031096

  1. Dynamical horizons: energy, angular momentum, fluxes, and balance laws.

    PubMed

    Ashtekar, Abhay; Krishnan, Badri

    2002-12-23

    Dynamical horizons are considered in full, nonlinear general relativity. Expressions of fluxes of energy and angular momentum carried by gravitational waves across these horizons are obtained. Fluxes are local, the energy flux is positive, and change in the horizon area is related to these fluxes. The flux formulas also give rise to balance laws analogous to the ones obtained by Bondi and Sachs at null infinity and provide generalizations of the first and second laws of black-hole mechanics. PMID:12484807

  2. Mapping Cosmic Structure Using 21-cm Hydrogen Signal at Green Bank Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voytek, Tabitha; GBT 21-cm Intensity Mapping Group

    2011-05-01

    We are using the Green Bank Telescope to make 21-cm intensity maps of cosmic structure in a 0.15 Gpc^3 box at redshift of z 1. The intensity mapping technique combines the flux from many galaxies in each pixel, allowing much greater mapping speed than the traditional redshift survey. Measurement is being made at z 1 to take advantage of a window in frequency around 700 MHz where terrestrial radio frequency interference (RFI) is currently at a minimum. This minimum is due to a reallocation of this frequency band from analog television to wide area wireless internet and public service usage. We will report progress of our attempt to detect autocorrelation of the 21-cm signal. The ultimate goal of this mapping is to use Baryon Acoustic Oscillations to provide more precise constraints to dark energy models.

  3. Horizons versus singularities in spherically symmetric space-times

    SciTech Connect

    Bronnikov, K. A.; Elizalde, E.; Odintsov, S. D.; Zaslavskii, O. B.

    2008-09-15

    We discuss different kinds of Killing horizons possible in static, spherically symmetric configurations and recently classified as 'usual', 'naked', and 'truly naked' ones depending on the near-horizon behavior of transverse tidal forces acting on an extended body. We obtain the necessary conditions for the metric to be extensible beyond a horizon in terms of an arbitrary radial coordinate and show that all truly naked horizons, as well as many of those previously characterized as naked and even usual ones, do not admit an extension and therefore must be considered as singularities. Some examples are given, showing which kinds of matter are able to create specific space-times with different kinds of horizons, including truly naked ones. Among them are fluids with negative pressure and scalar fields with a particular behavior of the potential. We also discuss horizons and singularities in Kantowski-Sachs spherically symmetric cosmologies and present horizon regularity conditions in terms of an arbitrary time coordinate and proper (synchronous) time. It turns out that horizons of orders 2 and higher occur in infinite proper times in the past or future, but one-way communication with regions beyond such horizons is still possible.

  4. Gravitational anomaly and Hawking radiation near a weakly isolated horizon

    SciTech Connect

    Wu Xiaoning; Huang Chaoguang; Sun Jiarui

    2008-06-15

    Based on the idea of the work by Wilczek and his collaborators, we consider the gravitational anomaly near a weakly isolated horizon. We find that there exists a universal choice of tortoise coordinate for any weakly isolated horizon. Under this coordinate, the leading behavior of a quite arbitrary scalar field near a horizon is a 2-dimensional chiral scalar field. This means we can extend the idea of Wilczek and his collaborators to more general cases and show the relation between gravitational anomaly and Hawking radiation is a universal property of a black hole horizon.

  5. Gravitational anomaly and Hawking radiation near a weakly isolated horizon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Xiaoning; Huang, Chao-Guang; Sun, Jia-Rui

    2008-06-01

    Based on the idea of the work by Wilczek and his collaborators, we consider the gravitational anomaly near a weakly isolated horizon. We find that there exists a universal choice of tortoise coordinate for any weakly isolated horizon. Under this coordinate, the leading behavior of a quite arbitrary scalar field near a horizon is a 2-dimensional chiral scalar field. This means we can extend the idea of Wilczek and his collaborators to more general cases and show the relation between gravitational anomaly and Hawking radiation is a universal property of a black hole horizon.

  6. Into the Kuiper Belt: New Horizons Post-Pluto

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harrison Parker, Alex; Spencer, John; Benecchi, Susan; Binzel, Richard; Borncamp, David; Buie, Marc; Fuentes, Cesar; Gwyn, Stephen; Kavelaars, JJ; Noll, Keith; Petit, Jean-Marc; Porter, Simon; Showalter, Mark; Stern, S. Alan; Sterner, Ray; Tholen, David; Verbiscer, Anne; Weaver, Hal; Zangari, Amanda

    2015-11-01

    New Horizons is now beyond Pluto and flying deeper into the Kuiper Belt. In the summer of 2014, a Hubble Space Telescope Large Program identified two candidate Cold Classical Kuiper Belt Objects (KBOs) that were within reach of New Horizons' remaining fuel budget. Here we present the selection of the Kuiper Belt flyby target for New Horizons' post-Pluto mission, our state of knowledge regarding this target and the potential 2019 flyby, the status of New Horizons' targeting maneuver, and prospects for near-future long-range observations of other KBOs.

  7. Criticality and surface tension in rotating horizon thermodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hansen, Devin; Kubizňák, David; Mann, Robert B.

    2016-08-01

    We study a modified horizon thermodynamics and the associated criticality for rotating black hole spacetimes. Namely, we show that under a virtual displacement of the black hole horizon accompanied by an independent variation of the rotation parameter, the radial Einstein equation takes a form of a ‘cohomogeneity two’ horizon first law, δ E=Tδ S+{{Ω }}δ J-σ δ A, where E and J are the horizon energy (an analogue of the Misner–Sharp mass) and the horizon angular momentum, Ω is the horizon angular velocity, A is the horizon area, and σ is the surface tension induced by the matter fields. For fixed angular momentum, the above equation simplifies and the more familiar (cohomogeneity one) horizon first law δ E=Tδ S-Pδ V is obtained, where P is the pressure of matter fields and V is the horizon volume. A universal equation of state is obtained in each case and the corresponding critical behavior is studied.

  8. Detailed modelling of the 21-cm forest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Semelin, B.

    2016-01-01

    The 21-cm forest is a promising probe of the Epoch of Reionization. The local state of the intergalactic medium (IGM) is encoded in the spectrum of a background source (radio-loud quasars or gamma-ray burst afterglow) by absorption at the local 21-cm wavelength, resulting in a continuous and fluctuating absorption level. Small-scale structures (filaments and minihaloes) in the IGM are responsible for the strongest absorption features. The absorption can also be modulated on large scales by inhomogeneous heating and Wouthuysen-Field coupling. We present the results from a simulation that attempts to preserve the cosmological environment while resolving some of the small-scale structures (a few kpc resolution in a 50 h-1 Mpc box). The simulation couples the dynamics and the ionizing radiative transfer and includes X-ray and Lyman lines radiative transfer for a detailed physical modelling. As a result we find that soft X-ray self-shielding, Ly α self-shielding and shock heating all have an impact on the predicted values of the 21-cm optical depth of moderately overdense structures like filaments. A correct treatment of the peculiar velocities is also critical. Modelling these processes seems necessary for accurate predictions and can be done only at high enough resolution. As a result, based on our fiducial model, we estimate that LOFAR should be able to detect a few (strong) absorptions features in a frequency range of a few tens of MHz for a 20 mJy source located at z = 10, while the SKA would extract a large fraction of the absorption information for the same source.

  9. A 30-cm diameter argon ion source

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sovey, J. S.

    1976-01-01

    A 30 cm diameter argon ion source was evaluated. Ion source beam currents up to 4a were extracted with ion energies ranging from 0.2 to 1.5 KeV. An ion optics scaling relation was developed for predicting ion beam extraction capability as a function of total extraction voltage, gas type, and screen grid open area. Ignition and emission characteristics of several hollow cathode geometries were assessed for purposes of defining discharge chamber and neutralizer cathodes. Also presented are ion beam profile characteristics which exhibit broad beam capability well suited for ion beam sputtering applications.

  10. Isotope shifts in methane near 6000/cm

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fox, K.; Halsey, G. W.; Jennings, D. E.

    1976-01-01

    Isotope shifts for cleanly resolved vibrational-rotational absorption lines of CH4-12 and CH4-13 were measured by a 5-m focal length Littrow spectrometer in the 6000/cm range. The methane isotopes were held in separate absorption cells: 20 torr of CH4-13 in a 1-m cell, and 5 torr of CH4-12 in a White cell of 4-m optical path length. Measured shifts for the cleanly resolved singlets R(0), R(1), Q(1) and P(1) are summarized in tabular form.

  11. An engineering model 30 cm ion thruster

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Poeschel, R. L.; King, H. J.; Schnelker, D. E.

    1973-01-01

    Thruster development at Hughes Research Laboratories and NASA Lewis Research Center has brought the 30-cm mercury bombardment ion thruster to the state of an engineering model. This thruster has been designed to have sufficient internal strength for direct mounting on gimbals, to weigh 7.3 kg, to operate with a corrected overall efficiency of 71%, and to have 10,000 hours lifetime. Subassemblies, such as the ion optical system, isolators, etc., have been upgraded to meet launch qualification standards. This paper presents a summary of the design specifications and performance characteristics which define the interface between the thruster module and the remainder of the propulsion system.

  12. Fuel elements of research reactor CM

    SciTech Connect

    Kozlov, A.V.; Morozov, A.V.; Vatulin, A.V.; Ershov, S.A.

    2013-07-01

    In 1961 the CM research reactor was commissioned at the Research Institute of Atomic Reactors (Dimitrovgrad, Russia), it was intended to carry on investigations and the production of transuranium nuclides. The reactor is of a tank type. Original fuel assembly contained plate fuels that were spaced with vanes and corrugated bands. Nickel was used as a cladding material, fuel meat was produced from UO{sub 2} + electrolytic nickel composition. Fuel plates have been replaced by self-spacing cross-shaped dispersion fuels clad in stainless steel. In 2005 the reactor was updated. The purpose of this updating was to increase the quantity of irradiation channels in the reactor core and to improve the neutron balance. The updating was implemented at the expense of 20 % reduction in the quantity of fuel elements in the core which released a space for extra channels and decreased the mass of structural materials in the core. The updated reactor is loaded with modified standard fuel elements with 20 % higher uranium masses. At the same time stainless steel in fuel assembly shrouds was substituted by zirconium alloy. Today in progress are investigations and work to promote the second stage of reactor updating that involve developments of cross-shaped fuel elements having low neutron absorption matrix materials. This article gives an historical account of the design and main technical changes that occurred for the CM reactor since its commissioning.

  13. Redundant Array Configurations for 21 cm Cosmology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dillon, Joshua S.; Parsons, Aaron R.

    2016-08-01

    Realizing the potential of 21 cm tomography to statistically probe the intergalactic medium before and during the Epoch of Reionization requires large telescopes and precise control of systematics. Next-generation telescopes are now being designed and built to meet these challenges, drawing lessons from first-generation experiments that showed the benefits of densely packed, highly redundant arrays—in which the same mode on the sky is sampled by many antenna pairs—for achieving high sensitivity, precise calibration, and robust foreground mitigation. In this work, we focus on the Hydrogen Epoch of Reionization Array (HERA) as an interferometer with a dense, redundant core designed following these lessons to be optimized for 21 cm cosmology. We show how modestly supplementing or modifying a compact design like HERA’s can still deliver high sensitivity while enhancing strategies for calibration and foreground mitigation. In particular, we compare the imaging capability of several array configurations, both instantaneously (to address instrumental and ionospheric effects) and with rotation synthesis (for foreground removal). We also examine the effects that configuration has on calibratability using instantaneous redundancy. We find that improved imaging with sub-aperture sampling via “off-grid” antennas and increased angular resolution via far-flung “outrigger” antennas is possible with a redundantly calibratable array configuration.

  14. 30-cm electron cyclotron plasma generator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goede, Hank

    1987-01-01

    Experimental results on the development of a 30-cm-diam electron cyclotron resonance plasma generator are presented. This plasma source utilizes samarium-cobalt magnets and microwave power at a frequency of 4.9 GHz to produce a uniform plasma with densities of up to 3 x 10 to the 11th/cu cm in a continuous fashion. The plasma generator contains no internal structures, and is thus inherently simple in construction and operation and inherently durable. The generator was operated with two different magnetic geometries. One used the rare-earth magnets arranged in an axial line cusp configuration, which directly showed plasma production taking place near the walls of the generator where the electron temperature was highest but with the plasma density peaking in the central low B-field regions. The second configuration had magnets arranged to form azimuthal line cusps with approximately closed electron drift surfaces; this configuration showed an improved electrical efficiency of about 135 eV/ion.

  15. Combining galaxy and 21-cm surveys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cohn, J. D.; White, Martin; Chang, Tzu-Ching; Holder, Gil; Padmanabhan, Nikhil; Doré, Olivier

    2016-04-01

    Acoustic waves travelling through the early Universe imprint a characteristic scale in the clustering of galaxies, QSOs and intergalactic gas. This scale can be used as a standard ruler to map the expansion history of the Universe, a technique known as baryon acoustic oscillations (BAO). BAO offer a high-precision, low-systematics means of constraining our cosmological model. The statistical power of BAO measurements can be improved if the `smearing' of the acoustic feature by non-linear structure formation is undone in a process known as reconstruction. In this paper, we use low-order Lagrangian perturbation theory to study the ability of 21-cm experiments to perform reconstruction and how augmenting these surveys with galaxy redshift surveys at relatively low number densities can improve performance. We find that the critical number density which must be achieved in order to benefit 21-cm surveys is set by the linear theory power spectrum near its peak, and corresponds to densities achievable by upcoming surveys of emission line galaxies such as eBOSS and DESI. As part of this work, we analyse reconstruction within the framework of Lagrangian perturbation theory with local Lagrangian bias, redshift-space distortions, {k}-dependent noise and anisotropic filtering schemes.

  16. THE METALLICITY OF THE CM DRACONIS SYSTEM

    SciTech Connect

    Terrien, Ryan C.; Fleming, Scott W.; Mahadevan, Suvrath; Deshpande, Rohit; Bender, Chad F.; Ramsey, Lawrence W.; Feiden, Gregory A.

    2012-11-20

    The CM Draconis system comprises two eclipsing mid-M dwarfs of nearly equal mass in a 1.27 day orbit. This well-studied eclipsing binary has often been used for benchmark tests of stellar models, since its components are among the lowest mass stars with well-measured masses and radii ({approx}< 1% relative precision). However, as with many other low-mass stars, non-magnetic models have been unable to match the observed radii and effective temperatures for CM Dra at the 5%-10% level. To date, the uncertain metallicity of the system has complicated comparison of theoretical isochrones with observations. In this Letter, we use data from the SpeX instrument on the NASA Infrared Telescope Facility to measure the metallicity of the system during primary and secondary eclipses, as well as out of eclipse, based on an empirical metallicity calibration in the H and K near-infrared (NIR) bands. We derive an [Fe/H] = -0.30 {+-} 0.12 that is consistent across all orbital phases. The determination of [Fe/H] for this system constrains a key dimension of parameter space when attempting to reconcile model isochrone predictions and observations.

  17. Fission probabilities of 242Am,243Cm , and 244Cm induced by transfer reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kessedjian, G.; Jurado, B.; Barreau, G.; Marini, P.; Mathieu, L.; Tsekhanovich, I.; Aiche, M.; Boutoux, G.; Czajkowski, S.; Ducasse, Q.

    2015-04-01

    We have measured the fission probabilities of 242Am,243Cm , and 244Cm induced by the transfer reactions 243Am(3He,4He) ,243Am(3He,t ) , and 243Am(3He,d ) , respectively. The details of the experimental procedure and a rigorous uncertainty analysis, including a correlation matrix, are presented. For 243Cm our data show clear structures well below the fission threshold. To our knowledge, it is the first time that these structures have been observed for this nucleus. We have compared the measured fission probabilities to calculations based on the statistical model to obtain information on the fission barriers of the produced fissioning nuclei.

  18. Aliphatic amines in Antarctic CR2, CM2, and CM1/2 carbonaceous chondrites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aponte, José C.; McLain, Hannah L.; Dworkin, Jason P.; Elsila, Jamie E.

    2016-09-01

    Meteoritic water-soluble organic compounds provide a unique record of the processes that occurred during the formation of the solar system and the chemistry preceding the origins of life on Earth. We have investigated the molecular distribution, compound-specific δ13C isotopic ratios and enantiomeric compositions of aliphatic monoamines present in the hot acid-water extracts of the carbonaceous chondrites LAP 02342 (CR2), GRA 95229 (CR2), LON 94101 (CM2), LEW 90500 (CM2), and ALH 83100 (CM1/2). Analyses of the concentration of monoamines in these meteorites revealed: (a) the CR2 chondrites studied here contain higher concentrations of monoamines relative to the analyzed CM2 chondrites; (b) the concentration of monoamines decreases with increasing carbon number; and (c) isopropylamine is the most abundant monoamine in these CR2 chondrites, while methylamine is the most abundant amine species in these CM2 and CM1/2 chondrites. The δ13C values of monoamines in CR2 chondrite do not correlate with the number of carbon atoms; however, in CM2 and CM1/2 chondrites, the 13C enrichment decreases with increasing monoamine carbon number. The δ13C values of methylamine in CR2 chondrites ranged from -1 to +10‰, while in CM2 and CM1/2 chondrites the δ13C values of methylamine ranged from +41 to +59‰. We also observed racemic compositions of sec-butylamine, 3-methyl-2-butylamine, and sec-pentylamine in the studied carbonaceous chondrites. Additionally, we compared the abundance and δ13C isotopic composition of monoamines to those of their structurally related amino acids. We found that monoamines are less abundant than amino acids in CR2 chondrites, with the opposite being true in CM2 and CM1/2 chondrites. We used these collective data to evaluate different primordial synthetic pathways for monoamines in carbonaceous chondrites and to understand the potential common origins these molecules may share with meteoritic amino acids.

  19. Overcoming the Challenges of 21cm Cosmology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pober, Jonathan

    The highly-redshifted 21cm line of neutral hydrogen is one of the most promising and unique probes of cosmology for the next decade and beyond. The past few years have seen a number of dedicated experiments targeting the 21cm signal from the Epoch of Reionization (EoR) begin operation, including the LOw-Frequency ARray (LOFAR), the Murchison Widefield Array (MWA), and the Donald C. Backer Precision Array for Probing the Epoch of Reionization (PAPER). For these experiments to yield cosmological results, they require new calibration and analysis algorithms which will need to achieve unprecedented levels of separation between the 21cm signal and contaminating foreground emission. Although much work has been spent developing these algorithms over the past decade, their success or failure will ultimately depend on their ability to overcome the complications associated with real-world systems and their inherent complications. The work in this dissertation is closely tied to the late-stage commissioning and early observations with PAPER. The first two chapters focus on developing calibration algorithms to overcome unique problems arising in the PAPER system. To test these algorithms, I rely on not only simulations, but on commissioning observations, ultimately tying the success of the algorithm to its performance on actual, celestial data. The first algorithm works to correct gain-drifts in the PAPER system caused by the heating and cooling of various components (the amplifiers and above ground co-axial cables, in particular). It is shown that a simple measurement of the ambient temperature can remove ˜ 10% gain fluctuations in the observed brightness of calibrator sources. This result is highly encouraging for the ability of PAPER to remove a potentially dominant systematic in its power spectrum and cataloging measurements without resorting to a complicated system overhaul. The second new algorithm developed in this dissertation solves a major calibration challenge not

  20. Designing new biocompatible glass-forming Ti75-x Zr10 Nbx Si15 (x = 0, 15) alloys: corrosion, passivity, and apatite formation.

    PubMed

    Abdi, Somayeh; Oswald, Steffen; Gostin, Petre Flaviu; Helth, Arne; Sort, Jordi; Baró, Maria Dolors; Calin, Mariana; Schultz, Ludwig; Eckert, Jürgen; Gebert, Annett

    2016-01-01

    Glass-forming Ti-based alloys are considered as potential new materials for implant applications. Ti75 Zr10 Si15 and Ti60 Zr10 Nb15 Si15 alloys (free of cytotoxic elements) can be produced as melt-spun ribbons with glassy matrix and embedded single β-type nanocrystals. The corrosion and passivation behavior of these alloys in their homogenized melt-spun states have been investigated in Ringer solution at 37°C in comparison to their cast multiphase crystalline counterparts and to cp-Ti and β-type Ti-40Nb. All tested materials showed very low corrosion rates as expressed in corrosion current densities icorr  < 50 nA/cm(2). Electrochemical and surface analytical studies revealed a high stability of the new alloys passive states in a wide potential range. This corresponds to low passive current densities ipass  = 2 ± 1 µA/cm(2) based on the growth of oxide films with thickness d <10 nm. A homogeneous constituent distribution in the melt-spun alloys is beneficial for stable surface passivity. The addition of Nb does not only improve the glass-forming ability and the mechanical properties but also supports a high pitting resistance even at extreme anodic polarization up to 4V versus SCE were oxide thickness values of d ∼35 nm are reached. With regard to the corrosion properties, the Nb-containing nearly single-phase glassy alloy can compete with the β-type Ti-40Nb alloy. SBF tests confirmed the ability for formation of hydroxyapatite on the melt-spun alloy surfaces. All these properties recommend the new glass-forming alloys for application as wear- and corrosion-resistant coating materials for implants. PMID:25611821

  1. Landsat-4 horizon scanner flight performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bilanow, S.; Chen, L. C.

    1984-01-01

    This paper presents an analysis of the flight data from a new design of horizon scanner flown on Landsat-4. The salient features in the data are described and demonstrated by data plots. High frequency noise must be filtered out to achieve good accuracy, but this is effectively done by 128-point averaging. Sun and moon interference effects are identified. The effects of earth oblateness and spacecraft altitude variations are modeled, and the residual systematic errors are analyzed. Most of the residual errors are apparently explained by the effects of earth radiance variation, with the winter polar regions showing the highest variability in the attitude measurements due to winter stratosphere temperature variations. In general, this sensor provides improved accuracy over those flown on previous missions.

  2. Black Hole Observations - Towards the Event Horizon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Britzen, Silke

    Black Holes are probably the most elusive solutions of Einstein's theory of General Relativity. Despite numerous observations of the direct galactic environment and indirect influence of astrophysical black holes (e.g. jets, variable emission across the wavelength spectrum, feedback processes, etc.) -- a direct proof of their existence is still lacking. This article highlights some aspects deduced from many observations and concentrates on the experimental results with regard to black holes with masses from millions to billions of solar masses. The focus will be on the challenges and remaining questions. The Event Horizon Telescopce (EHT) project to image the photon sphere of Sgr A* and its potential is briefly sketched. This instrumental approach shall lead to highest resolution observations of the supermassive black hole at the center of the Milky Way (Sgr A*).

  3. Horizon complementarity in elliptic de Sitter space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hackl, Lucas; Neiman, Yasha

    2015-02-01

    We study a quantum field in elliptic de Sitter space dS4/Z2—the spacetime obtained from identifying antipodal points in dS4. We find that the operator algebra and Hilbert space cannot be defined for the entire space, but only for observable causal patches. This makes the system into an explicit realization of the horizon complementarity principle. In the absence of a global quantum theory, we propose a recipe for translating operators and states between observers. This translation involves information loss, in accordance with the fact that two observers see different patches of the spacetime. As a check, we recover the thermal state at the de Sitter temperature as a state that appears the same to all observers. This thermal state arises from the same functional that, in ordinary dS4, describes the Bunch-Davies vacuum.

  4. The 30-cm ion thruster power processor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herron, B. G.; Hopper, D. J.

    1978-01-01

    A power processor unit for powering and controlling the 30 cm Mercury Electron-Bombardment Ion Thruster was designed, fabricated, and tested. The unit uses a unique and highly efficient transistor bridge inverter power stage in its implementation. The system operated from a 200 to 400 V dc input power bus, provides 12 independently controllable and closely regulated dc power outputs, and has an overall power conditioning capacity of 3.5 kW. Protective circuitry was incorporated as an integral part of the design to assure failure-free operation during transient and steady-state load faults. The implemented unit demonstrated an electrical efficiency between 91.5 and 91.9 at its nominal rated load over the 200 to 400 V dc input bus range.

  5. 70-cm radar observations of 433 Eros

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Campbell, D. B.; Pettengill, G. H.; Shapiro, I. I.

    1976-01-01

    Radar observations of 433 Eros were made at the Arecibo Observatory using a wavelength of 70 cm during the close approach of Eros to earth in mid-January, 1975. A peak radar cross section of plus or minus 15 sq km was observed. The spectral broadening obtained was approximately 30 Hz, which is consistent with a value of 16 km for the maximum radius of the asteroid. The surface of Eros appears to be relatively rough at the scale of a wavelength as compared to the surfaces of the terrestrial planets and the moon. The composition of the surface is not well determined, except that it cannot be a highly conducting metal. A single measurement each of round-trip echo times delay and Doppler shift was made.

  6. NASA 30 Cm Ion Thruster Development Status

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patterson, Michael J.; Haag, Thomas W.; Rawlin, Vincent K.; Kussmaul, Michael T.

    1995-01-01

    A 30 cm diameter xenon ion thruster is under development at NASA to provide an ion propulsion option for missions of national interest and it is an element of the NASA Solar Electric Propulsion Technology Applications Readiness (NSTAR) program established to validate ion propulsion for space flight applications. The thruster has been developed to an engineering model level and it incorporates innovations in design, materials, and fabrication techniques compared to those employed to conventional ion thrusters. The performance of both functional and engineering model thrusters has been assessed including thrust stand measurements, over an input power range of 0.5-2.3 kW. Attributes of the engineering model thruster include an overall mass of 6.4 kg, and an efficiency of 65 percent and thrust of 93 mN at 2.3 kW input power. This paper discusses the design, performance, and lifetime expectations of the functional and engineering model thrusters under development at NASA.

  7. Opportunity Spies 'Endurance' on the Horizon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    This image taken by the Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity's panoramic camera shows the eastern plains that stretch beyond the small crater where the rover landed. In the distance, the rim of a larger crater dubbed 'Endurance' can be seen.

    This color mosaic was taken on the 32nd martian day, or sol, of the rover's mission and spans 20 degrees of the horizon. It was taken while Opportunity was parked at the north end of the outcrop, in front of the rock region dubbed 'El Capitan' and facing east.

    The features seen at the horizon are the near and far rims of 'Endurance,' the largest crater within about 6 kilometers (4 miles) of the lander. Using orbital data from the Mars Orbiter Camera on NASA's Mars Global Surveyor spacecraft, scientists estimated the crater to be 160 meters (175 yards) in diameter, and about 720 meters (half a mile) away from the lander.

    The highest point visible on 'Endurance' is the highest point on the far wall of the crater; the sun is illuminating the inside of the far wall.

    Between the location where the image was taken at 'El Capitan' and 'Endurance' are the flat, smooth Meridiani plains, which scientists believe are blanketed in the iron-bearing mineral called hematite. The dark horizontal feature near the bottom of the picture is a small, five-meter (16-feet) crater, only 50 meters (164 feet) from Opportunity's present position. When the rover leaves the crater some 2 to 3 weeks from now, 'Endurance' is one of several potential destinations.

  8. Air-shower spectroscopy at horizons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fargion, D.

    2006-07-01

    Downward cosmic rays are mostly revealed on the ground by their air-showers diluted and filtered secondary μμ traces and/or by their (Cerenkov - Fluorescent) light because of the high altitude numerous and luminous electromagnetic ee,γ shower component. Horizontal and upward air-showers are even more suppressed by deeper atmosphere opacity and by the Earth shadows. In such noise-free horizontal and upward directions rare Ultra High Cosmic rays and rarer neutrino induced air-showers may shine, mostly mediated by resonant PeV ν¯+e→W interactions in air or by higher energy tau air-showers originated by ν skimming the Earth. At high altitude (mountains, planes, balloons) the air density is so rarefied that nearly all common air-showers might be observed at their maximal growth at a tuned altitude and direction. The arrival angle samples different distances and the corresponding most probable primary cosmic ray energy. The larger and larger distances (between observer and C.R. interaction) make wider and wider the shower area and it enlarges the probability of being observed (up to three orders of magnitude more than vertical showers); the observation of a maximal electromagnetic shower development may amplify the signal by two three orders of magnitude (with respect to a suppressed shower at sea level); the peculiar altitude angle range (ten twenty km height and ≃80 90 zenith angle) may disentangle at best the primary cosmic ray energy and composition. Even from existing mountain observatories the up-going air-showers may trace, above the horizons, PeV EeV high energy cosmic rays and, below the horizons, PeV EeV neutrino astronomy: their early signals may be captured in already existing gamma telescopes such as Magic at Canarie, while facing the Earth edges during (useless) cloudy nights.

  9. THERMAL CONDUCTIVITY OF THE POTENTIAL REPOSITORY HORIZON

    SciTech Connect

    J.E. BEAN

    2004-09-27

    The primary purpose of this report is to assess the spatial variability and uncertainty of bulk thermal conductivity in the host horizon for the repository at Yucca Mountain. More specifically, the lithostratigraphic units studied are located within the Topopah Spring Tuff (Tpt) and consist of the upper lithophysal zone (Tptpul), the middle nonlithophysal zone (Tptpmn), the lower lithophysal zone (Tptpll), and the lower nonlithophysal zone (Tptpln). Design plans indicate that approximately 81 percent of the repository will be excavated in the Tptpll, approximately 12 percent in the Tptpmn, and the remainder in the Tptul and Tptpln (BSC 2004 [DIRS 168370]). This report provides three-dimensional geostatistical estimates of the bulk thermal conductivity for the four stratigraphic layers of the repository horizon. The three-dimensional geostatistical estimates of matrix and lithophysal porosity, dry bulk density, and matrix thermal conductivity are also provided. This report provides input to various models and calculations that simulate heat transport through the rock mass. These models include the ''Drift Degradation Analysis, Multiscale Thermohydrologic Model, Ventilation Model and Analysis Report, Igneous Intrusion Impacts on Waste Packages and Waste Forms, Drift-Scale Coupled Processes (DST and TH Seepage) Models'', and ''Drift Scale THM Model''. These models directly or indirectly provide input to the total system performance assessment (TSPA). The main distinguishing characteristic among the lithophysal and nonlithophysal units is the percentage of large-scale (centimeters-meters) voids within the rock. The Tptpul and Tptpll, as their names suggest, have a higher percentage of lithophysae than the Tptpmn and the Tptpln. Understanding the influence of the lithophysae is of great importance to understanding bulk thermal conductivity.

  10. New Horizons Risk Communication Strategy, Planning, Implementation, and Lessons Learned

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dawson, Sandra A.

    2006-01-01

    This paper discusses the risk communication goals, strategy, planning process and product development for the New Horizons mission, including lessons from the Cassini mission that were applied in that effort, and presents lessons learned from the New Horizons effort that could be applicable to future missions.

  11. The Horizon Report: 2010 Australia-New Zealand Edition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, L.; Smith, R.; Levine, A.; Haywood, K.

    2010-01-01

    The internationally recognized series of "Horizon Reports" is part of the New Media Consortium's Horizon Project, a comprehensive research venture established in 2002 that identifies and describes emerging technologies likely to have a large impact over the coming five years on a variety of sectors around the globe. This volume, the "2010 Horizon…

  12. The NMC Horizon Report: 2013 Higher Education Edition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, L.; Adams Becker, S.; Cummins, M.; Estrada, V.; Freeman, A.; Ludgate, H.

    2013-01-01

    The internationally recognized "NMC Horizon Report" series and regional "NMC Technology Outlooks" are part of the NMC Horizon Project, a comprehensive research venture established in 2002 that identifies and describes emerging technologies likely to have a large impact over the coming five years in education around the globe.…

  13. The Horizon Report: 2009 Australia-New Zealand Edition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, L.; Levine, A.; Smith, R.; Smythe, T.; Stone, S.

    2009-01-01

    The New Media Consortium's Horizon Project is an ongoing research project that aims to identify and describe emerging technologies likely to have a large impact on teaching, learning, or creative inquiry within education around the globe over a five-year time period. The project's central products are the "Horizon Reports", an annual series of…

  14. The NMC Horizon Report: 2013 K-12 Edition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, L.; Adams Becker, S.; Cummins, M.; Estrada V.; Freeman, A.; Ludgate, H.

    2013-01-01

    "The NMC Horizon Report" series is the most visible outcome of the New Media Consortium (NMC) Horizon Project, an ongoing research effort established in 2002 that identifies and describes emerging technologies likely to have a large impact on teaching, learning, research, or creative expression within education around the globe. This…

  15. The NMC Horizon Report: 2012 Higher Education Edition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, L.; Adams, S.; Cummins, M.

    2012-01-01

    The internationally recognized "NMC Horizon Report" series and regional "NMC Technology Outlooks" are part of the NMC Horizon Project, a comprehensive research venture established in 2002 that identifies and describes emerging technologies likely to have a large impact over the coming five years in education around the globe. This volume, the "NMC…

  16. A Fusion of Horizons: Students' Encounters with "Will and Wave"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Myers, James L.

    2006-01-01

    In a case study, I applied philosophical hermeneutic principles in an advanced level EFL writing class in Taiwan. A "fusion of horizons" occurs at the junction of two intertwined interpretations: one from our socio-historical tradition and the other from our experience of novel phenomena. I explored students' hermeneutic horizons in relation to…

  17. The NMC Horizon Report: 2011 K-12 Edition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, L.; Adams, S.; Haywood, K.

    2011-01-01

    "The NMC Horizon Report" series is the most visible outcome of the New Media Consortium. (NMC) Horizon Project, an ongoing research effort established in 2002 that identifies and describes emerging technologies likely to have a large impact on teaching, learning, research, or creative expression within education around the globe. This volume, "The…

  18. NEW JERSEY APPROACH TO OUTERBRIDGE CROSSING BRIDGE, NOTE DISTANT HORIZON ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    NEW JERSEY APPROACH TO OUTERBRIDGE CROSSING BRIDGE, NOTE DISTANT HORIZON NEW YORK SKYLINE AND ALMOST IN THE MIDDLE OF THE HORIZON THE TWIN TOWERS OF THE VERRAZANO-NARROWS BRIDGE - Outerbridge Crossing Bridge, Spanning Arthur Kill from New Jersey to Staten Island, Staten Island (subdivision), Richmond County, NY

  19. The NMC Horizon Report: 2015 Higher Education Edition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, L.; Adams Becker, S.; Estrada, V.; Freeman, A.

    2015-01-01

    The "NMC Horizon Report: 2015 Higher Education Edition" is a collaborative effort between the New Media Consortium (NMC) and the EDUCAUSE Learning Initiative (ELI). This 12th edition describes annual findings from the NMC Horizon Project, an ongoing research project designed to identify and describe emerging technologies likely to have…

  20. The NMC Horizon Report: 2014 K-12 Edition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, L.; Adams Becker, S.; Estrada, V.; Freeman, A.

    2014-01-01

    "The NMC Horizon Report" series is the most visible outcome of the New Media Consortium (NMC) Horizon Project, an ongoing research effort established in 2002 that identifies and describes emerging technologies likely to have a large impact on teaching, learning, research, or creative expression within every sector of education in some 65…

  1. Radio Occultation Measurements of Pluto’s Atmosphere with New Horizons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hinson, David P.; Linscott, Ivan; Tyler, Len; Bird, Mike; Paetzold, Martin; Strobel, Darrell; Summers, Mike; Woods, Will; Stern, Alan; Weaver, Hal; Olkin, Cathy; Young, Leslie; Ennico, Kimberly; Gladstone, Randy; Greathouse, Tommy; Kammer, Josh; Parker, Alex; Parker, Joel; Retherford, Kurt; Schindhelm, Eric; Singer, Kelsi; Steffl, Andrew; Tsang, Con; Versteeg, Maarten

    2015-11-01

    The reconnaissance of the Pluto System by New Horizons included radio occultations at both Pluto and Charon. This talk will present the latest results from the Pluto occultation. The REX instrument onboard New Horizons received and recorded uplink signals from two 70-m antennas and two 34-m antennas of the NASA Deep Space Network - each transmitting 20 kW at 4.2-cm wavelength - during a diametric occultation by Pluto. At the time this was written only a short segment of data at occultation entry (193°E, 17°S) was available for analysis. The REX measurements extend unequivocally to the surface, providing the first direct measure of the surface pressure and the temperature structure in Pluto’s lower atmosphere. Data from occultation exit (16°E, 15°N) are scheduled to arrive on the ground in late August 2015. Those observations will yield an improved estimate of the surface pressure, a second temperature profile, and a measure of the diameter of Pluto with a precision of a few hundred meters. This work is supported by the NASA New Horizons Mission.

  2. An Experiment to Detect Lunar Horizon Glow with the Lunar Orbit Laser Altimeter Laser Ranging Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, David E.; Zuber, Maria T.; Barker, Michael; Mazarico, Erwan; Neumann, Gregory A.; McClanahan, Timothy P.; Sun, Xiaoli

    2016-04-01

    Lunar horizon glow (LHG) was an observation by the Apollo astronauts of a brightening of the horizon around the time of sunrise. The effect has yet to be fully explained or confirmed by instruments on lunar orbiting spacecraft despite several attempts. The Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter (LRO) spacecraft carries the laser altimeter (LOLA) instrument which has a 2.5 cm aperture telescope for Earth-based laser ranging (LR) mounted and bore-sighted with the high gain antenna (HGA). The LR telescope is connected to LOLA by a fiber-glass cable to one of its 5 detectors. For the LGH experiments the LR telescope is pointed toward the horizon shortly before lunar sunrise with the intent of observing any forward scattering of sunlight due to the presence of dust or particles in the field of view. Initially, the LR telescope is pointed at the dark lunar surface, which provides a measure of the dark count, and moves toward the lunar limb so as to measure the brightness of the sky just above the lunar limb immediately prior to lunar sunrise. At no time does the sun shine directly into the LR telescope, although the LR telescope is pointed as close to the sun as the 1.75-degree field of view permits. Experiments show that the LHG signal seen by the astronauts can be detected with a four-second integration of the noise counts.

  3. Evaluation of Argonne 9-cm and 10-cm Annular Centrifugal Contactors for SHINE Solution Processing

    SciTech Connect

    Wardle, Kent E.; Pereira, Candido; Vandegrift, George

    2015-02-01

    Work is in progress to evaluate the SHINE Medical Technologies process for producing Mo-99 for medical use from the fission of dissolved low-enriched uranium (LEU). This report addresses the use of Argonne annular centrifugal contactors for periodic treatment of the process solution. In a letter report from FY 2013, Pereira and Vandegrift compared the throughput and physical footprint for the two contactor options available from CINC Industries: the V-02 and V-05, which have rotor diameters of 5 cm and 12.7 cm, respectively. They suggested that an intermediately sized “Goldilocks” contactor might provide a better balance between throughput and footprint to meet the processing needs for the uranium extraction (UREX) processing of the SHINE solution to remove undesired fission products. Included with the submission of this letter report are the assembly drawings for two Argonne-design contactors that are in this intermediate range—9-cm and 10-cm rotors, respectively. The 9-cm contactor (drawing number CE-D6973A, stamped February 15, 1978) was designed as a single-stage unit and built and tested in the late 1970s along with other size units, both smaller and larger. In subsequent years, a significant effort to developed annular centrifugal contactors was undertaken to support work at Hanford implementing the transuranic extraction (TRUEX) process. These contactors had a 10-cm rotor diameter and were fully designed as multistage units with four stages per assembly (drawing number CMT-E1104, stamped March 14, 1990). From a technology readiness perspective, these 10-cm units are much farther ahead in the design progression and, therefore, would require significantly less re-working to make them ready for UREX deployment. Additionally, the overall maximum throughput of ~12 L/min is similar to that of the 9-cm unit (10 L/min), and the former could be efficiently operated over much of the same range of throughput. As a result, only the 10-cm units are considered here

  4. Fluctuations in horizon-fluid lead to negative bulk viscosity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhattacharya, Swastik; Shankaranarayanan, S.

    2016-03-01

    Einstein equations projected on to a black-hole horizon give rise to Navier-Stokes equations. Horizon-fluids typically possess unusual features like negative bulk viscosity, and it is not clear whether a statistical-mechanical description exists for such fluids. In this work, we provide an explicit derivation of the Bulk viscosity of the horizon-fluid based on the theory of fluctuations à la Kubo. The main advantage of our approach is that our analysis remains for the most part independent of the details of the underlying microscopic theory and hence the conclusions reached here are model independent. We show that the coefficient of bulk viscosity for the horizon-fluid matches exactly with the value found from the equations of motion for the horizon-fluid.

  5. Observations of the Geometry of Horizon-Based Optical Navigation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Christian, John; Robinson, Shane

    2016-01-01

    NASA's Orion Project has sparked a renewed interest in horizon-based optical navigation(OPNAV) techniques for spacecraft in the Earth-Moon system. Some approaches have begun to explore the geometry of horizon-based OPNAV and exploit the fact that it is a conic section problem. Therefore, the present paper focuses more deeply on understanding and leveraging the various geometric interpretations of horizon-based OPNAV. These results provide valuable insight into the fundamental workings of OPNAV solution methods, their convergence properties, and associated estimate covariance. Most importantly, the geometry and transformations uncovered in this paper lead to a simple and non-iterative solution to the generic horizon-based OPNAV problem. This represents a significant theoretical advancement over existing methods. Thus, we find that a clear understanding of geometric relationships is central to the prudent design, use, and operation of horizon-based OPNAV techniques.

  6. What Lies Within: Contributions of the Organic Horizon to Forest Soil Respiration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Julia, P.; Phillips, C. L.; Bond, B. J.

    2008-12-01

    Soil respiration rates can exhibit tremendous spatial variability, making it difficult to ascertain the proximal causes of CO2 production. In coniferous forest soils, a large proportion of CO2 is produced in the organic layer, and better characterizing the organisms and chemical composition of this heterogeneous horizon may contribute to a predictive understanding of soil respiration rates. In this study we sought to 1) identify characteristics of organic soil that could serve as predictors of soil respiration rates, including the presence/absence of fungal mats, and 2) determine the proportion of total surface efflux derived from the organic horizon seasonally. Working in an old-growth Douglas-fir stand in the Central Oregon Cascades (HJ Andrews LTER), we found that fungal mats of the Piloderma genus colonized over 56% of the forest floor, and organic horizons containing these mats had on average 10% higher surface efflux rates than neighboring non-mat soils. In addition to containing fungal mats, we found the organic horizon contained significantly more fine root biomass than the top 10cm of mineral soil. By measuring moisture and CO2 concentrations throughout mat and non-mat soil profiles, we evaluated CO2 production within soil horizons using the principles of Fick's First Law and the diffusion gradient method. We found that the organic layers produced roughly half of the net CO2 flux and that higher surface efflux rates are associated with higher percent contributions of production in the organic layer. We also examined correlations between respiration rate and a suite of soil biological, physical, and chemical characteristics. While none of these factors correlated directly with surface efflux rates, we found litter depth to be an important variable that correlated with soil water content and pH, and we found that mat soils tended to have deeper litter than non-mat soils. This work indicates that in a mature coniferous forest, the organic horizon serves as a

  7. From 20cm to 1.5m: Is Digging Deeper Necessary?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fissore, C.; Nater, E. A.; Dalzell, B. J.; Kolka, R.; Perry, C.

    2011-12-01

    Quantification of belowground carbon (C) currently stored in forest ecosystems is far from complete, especially for deeper soil horizons. Given logistical difficulties of sampling deep soils over large areas, much attention has been given to estimate deep SOC stocks indirectly. It is unknown whether C content in the top 20 cm of the mineral soil is an effective index for deep soil C storage across broad ranges of climate, forest type, and soil characteristics. The US Forest Service has a large record of aboveground and belowground (up to 20 cm depth) C data that could potentially be used to quantify deep SOC stocks if a suitable indirect estimation method can be developed. We followed and extended USDA FS Forest Inventory Analysis protocols to sample forest sites in the Midwest U.S. to determine C content up to 1.5m depth over a range of forest and soil types. Preliminary results show that, at hardwood sites, C percent in the top 20 cm of the mineral soil predicted only 28% of deep soil C in sandy soils and 20% in loamy soils. On a mass basis (mg C/cm3), such relationship was even weaker, suggesting that a number of biophysical variables affect SOC storage along the soil profile. Ongoing analyses will identify whether including additional factors such as forest type and soil chemical-physical characteristics will strengthen this relationship. The use of fractionation techniques and stable and radioactive isotopes will help illustrate SOC stabilization mechanisms.

  8. Detecting the 21 cm forest in the 21 cm power spectrum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ewall-Wice, Aaron; Dillon, Joshua S.; Mesinger, Andrei; Hewitt, Jacqueline

    2014-07-01

    We describe a new technique for constraining the radio-loud population of active galactic nuclei at high redshift by measuring the imprint of 21 cm spectral absorption features (the 21 cm forest) on the 21 cm power spectrum. Using semi-numerical simulations of the intergalactic medium and a semi-empirical source population, we show that the 21 cm forest dominates a distinctive region of k-space, k ≳ 0.5 Mpc- 1. By simulating foregrounds and noise for current and potential radio arrays, we find that a next-generation instrument with a collecting area of the order of ˜ 0.1 km2 (such as the Hydrogen Epoch of Reionization Array) may separately constrain the X-ray heating history at large spatial scales and radio-loud active galactic nuclei of the model we study at small ones. We extrapolate our detectability predictions for a single radio-loud active galactic nuclei population to arbitrary source scenarios by analytically relating the 21 cm forest power spectrum to the optical depth power spectrum and an integral over the radio luminosity function.

  9. Engineering model 8-cm thruster subsystem

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herron, B. G.; Hyman, J.; Hopper, D. J.; Williamson, W. S.; Dulgeroff, C. R.; Collett, C. R.

    1978-01-01

    An Engineering Model (EM) 8 cm Ion Thruster Propulsion Subsystem was developed for operation at a thrust level 5 mN (1.1 mlb) at a specific impulse 1 sub sp = 2667 sec with a total system input power P sub in = 165 W. The system dry mass is 15 kg with a mercury-propellant-reservoir capacity of 8.75 kg permitting uninterrupted operation for about 12,500 hr. The subsystem can be started from a dormant condition in a time less than or equal to 15 min. The thruster has a design lifetime of 20,000 hr with 10,000 startup cycles. A gimbal unit is included to provide a thrust vector deflection capability of + or - 10 degrees in any direction from the zero position. The EM subsystem development program included thruster optimization, power-supply circuit optimization and flight packaging, subsystem integration, and subsystem acceptance testing including a cyclic test of the total propulsion package.

  10. The 15 cm diameter ion thruster research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilbur, P. J.

    1974-01-01

    The startup reliability of a 15 cm diameter mercury bombardment ion thruster which employs a pulsed high voltage tickler electrode on the main and neutralizer cathodes is examined. Startup of the thruster is achieved 100% of the time on the main cathode and 98.7% of the time on the neutralizer cathode over a 3640 cycle test. The thruster was started from a 20 C initial condition and operated for an hour at a 600 mA beam current. An energy efficiency of 75% and a propellant utilization efficiency of 77% was achieved over the complete cycle. The effect of a single cusp magnetic field thruster length on its performance is discussed. Guidelines are formulated for the shaping of magnetic field lines in thrusters. A model describing double ion production in mercury discharges is presented. The production route is shown to occur through the single ionic ground state. Photographs of the interior of an operating-hollow cathode are presented. A cathode spot is shown to be present if the cathode is free of low work-function surfaces. The spot is observed if a low work-function oxide coating is applied to the cathode insert. Results show that low work-function oxide coatings tend to migrate during thruster operation.

  11. A disconnect between O horizon and mineral soil carbon - Implications for soil C sequestration

    SciTech Connect

    Garten Jr, Charles T

    2009-01-01

    Changing inputs of carbon to soil is one means of potentially increasing carbon sequestration in soils for the purpose of mitigating projected increases in atmospheric CO{sub 2} concentrations. The effect of manipulations of aboveground carbon input on soil carbon storage was tested in a temperate, deciduous forest in east Tennessee, USA. A 4.5-year experiment included exclusion of aboveground litterfall and supplemental litter additions (three times ambient) in an upland and a valley that differed in soil nitrogen availability. The estimated decomposition rate of the carbon stock in the O horizon was greater in the valley than in the upland due to higher litter quality (i.e., lower C/N ratios). Short-term litter exclusion or addition had no effect on carbon stock in the mineral soil, measured to a depth of 30 cm, or the partitioning of carbon in the mineral soil between particulate- and mineral-associated organic matter. A two-compartment model was used to interpret results from the field experiments. Field data and a sensitivity analysis of the model were consistent with little carbon transfer between the O horizon and the mineral soil. Increasing aboveground carbon input does not appear to be an effective means of promoting carbon sequestration in forest soil at the location of the present study because a disconnect exists in carbon dynamics between O horizon and mineral soil. Factors that directly increase inputs to belowground soil carbon, via roots, or reduce decomposition rates of organic matter are more likely to benefit efforts to increase carbon sequestration in forests where carbon dynamics in the O horizon are uncoupled from the mineral soil.

  12. A disconnect between O horizon and mineral soil carbon - Implications for soil C sequestration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garten, Charles T., Jr.

    2009-03-01

    Changing inputs of carbon to soil is one means of potentially increasing carbon sequestration in soils for the purpose of mitigating projected increases in atmospheric CO 2 concentrations. The effect of manipulations of aboveground carbon input on soil carbon storage was tested in a temperate, deciduous forest in east Tennessee, USA. A 4.5-year experiment included exclusion of aboveground litterfall and supplemental litter additions (three times ambient) in an upland and a valley that differed in soil nitrogen availability. The estimated decomposition rate of the carbon stock in the O horizon was greater in the valley than in the upland due to higher litter quality (i.e., lower C/N ratios). Short-term litter exclusion or addition had no effect on carbon stock in the mineral soil, measured to a depth of 30 cm, or the partitioning of carbon in the mineral soil between particulate- and mineral-associated organic matter. A two-compartment model was used to interpret results from the field experiments. Field data and a sensitivity analysis of the model were consistent with little carbon transfer between the O horizon and the mineral soil. Increasing aboveground carbon input does not appear to be an effective means of promoting carbon sequestration in forest soil at the location of the present study because a disconnect exists in carbon dynamics between O horizon and mineral soil. Factors that directly increase inputs to belowground soil carbon, via roots, or reduce decomposition rates of organic matter are more likely to benefit efforts to increase carbon sequestration in forests where carbon dynamics in the O horizon are uncoupled from the mineral soil.

  13. Deposition rate and substrate temperature effects on the structure and properties of bulk-sputtered OFHC Cu and Cu-0.15Zr. [Oxygen-Free High-Conductivity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hecht, R. J.; Mullaly, J. R.

    1975-01-01

    Bulk-sputtered OFHC Cu and Cu-0.15 Zr used as inner walls of advanced regeneratively cooled thrust chambers are evaluated as to microstructure, surface topography, and fractography. It is found that under conditions of low substrate temperature, crystallite size and openness of the structure increase with increasing deposition rate for both materials. At elevated temperatures, an equiaxed ductile structure of OFHC Cu is produced only at low deposition rates; at higher deposition rate, open structures are observed with recrystallized equiaxed grains within large poorly bonded crystallites. The Cu-0.15 Zr alloy sputtered from the hollow cathode using a diode discharge shows open-type structures for all conditions evaluated. The use of a triode discharge in generating a dense non-voided structure of Cu-0.15 Zr is discussed.

  14. 76 FR 55427 - Horizon Technology Finance Corporation, et al.; Notice of Application

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-07

    ... COMMISSION Horizon Technology Finance Corporation, et al.; Notice of Application August 31, 2011. AGENCY...(a) of the Act. Applicants: Horizon Technology Finance Corporation (the ``Company''), Horizon Technology Finance Management LLC (the ``Investment Adviser''), Longview SBIC GP LLC (the ``General...

  15. A sub-cm micromachined electron microscope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feinerman, A. D.; Crewe, D. A.; Perng, D. C.; Shoaf, S. E.; Crewe, A. V.

    1993-01-01

    A new approach for fabricating macroscopic (approximately 10x10x10 mm(exp 3)) structures with micron accuracy has been developed. This approach combines the precision of semiconductor processing and fiber optic technologies. A (100) silicon wafer is anisotropically etched to create four orthogonal v-grooves and an aperture on each 10x12 mm die. Precision 308 micron optical fibers are sandwiched between the die to align the v-grooves. The fiber is then anodically bonded to the die above and below it. This procedure is repeated to create thick structures and a stack of 5 or 6 die will be used to create a miniature scanning electron microscope (MSEM). Two die in the structure will have a segmented electrode to deflect the beam and correct for astigmatism. The entire structure is UHV compatible. The performance of an SEM improves as its length is reduced and a sub-cm 2 keV MSEM with a field emission source should have approximately 1 nm resolution. A low voltage high resolution MSEM would be useful for the examination of biological specimens and semiconductors with a minimum of damage. The first MSEM will be tested with existing 6 micron thermionic sources. In the future a micromachined field emission source will be used. The stacking technology presented in this paper can produce an array of MSEMs 1 to 30 mm in length with a 1 mm or larger period. A key question being addressed by this research is the optimum size for a low voltage MSEM which will be determined by the required spatial resolution, field of view, and working distance.

  16. Horizon shells and BMS-like soldering transformations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blau, Matthias; O'Loughlin, Martin

    2016-03-01

    We revisit the theory of null shells in general relativity, with a particular emphasis on null shells placed at horizons of black holes. We study in detail the considerable freedom that is available in the case that one solders two metrics together across null hypersurfaces (such as Killing horizons) for which the induced metric is invariant under translations along the null generators. In this case the group of soldering transformations turns out to be infinite dimensional, and these solderings create non-trivial horizon shells containing both massless matter and impulsive gravitational wave components. We also rephrase this result in the language of Carrollian symmetry groups. To illustrate this phenomenon we discuss in detail the example of shells on the horizon of the Schwarzschild black hole (with equal interior and exterior mass), uncovering a rich classical structure at the horizon and deriving an explicit expression for the general horizon shell energy-momentum tensor. In the special case of BMS-like soldering supertranslations we find a conserved shell-energy that is strikingly similar to the standard expression for asymptotic BMS supertranslation charges, suggesting a direct relation between the physical properties of these horizon shells and the recently proposed BMS supertranslation hair of a black hole.

  17. Physical process first law for bifurcate Killing horizons

    SciTech Connect

    Amsel, Aaron J.; Marolf, Donald; Virmani, Amitabh

    2008-01-15

    The physical process version of the first law for black holes states that the passage of energy and angular momentum through the horizon results in a change in area ({kappa}/8{pi}){delta}A={delta}E-{omega}{delta}J, so long as this passage is quasistationary. A similar physical process first law can be derived for any bifurcate Killing horizon in any spacetime dimension d{>=}3 using much the same argument. However, to make this law nontrivial, one must show that sufficiently quasistationary processes do in fact occur. In particular, one must show that processes exist for which the shear and expansion remain small, and in which no new generators are added to the horizon. Thorne, MacDonald, and Price considered related issues when an object falls across a d=4 black hole horizon. By generalizing their argument to arbitrary d{>=}3 and to any bifurcate Killing horizon, we derive a condition under which these effects are controlled and the first law applies. In particular, by providing a nontrivial first law for Rindler horizons, our work completes the parallel between the mechanics of such horizons and those of black holes for d{>=}3. We also comment on the situation for d=2.

  18. Possible New Horizons Fundamental Contribution to Cosmology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conn Henry, Richard; Murthy, Jayant

    2016-01-01

    The New Horizons (NH) spacecraft (S. Alan Stern, PI) is now past Pluto, and in our poster we explore the possibility of making observations, using the NH P-Alice ultraviolet spectrometer, of the cosmic diffuse ultraviolet background radiation, particularily at high northern and southern Galactic latitudes. In the paper, "The Mystery of the Cosmic Diffuse Ultraviolet Background Radiation," by Richard Conn Henry, Jayant Murthy, James Overduin, Joshua Tyler, ApJ, 798:14 (25pp), 2015 January 1, we demonstrated the existence of a second component of the diffuse far ultraviolet background radiation beyond that provided by dust-scattered starlight. The critical question is, does that second component (of unknown origin) extend shortward of the Lyman limit of 912 Å? If it does, then it seems likely that we have discovered the source of the reionization of the Universe that occurred some time after recombination. As things stand at the moment, there is no known source that has been demonstrated to be capable of performing the reionization: reionization that clearly did occur. Our current understanding of P-Alice suggests that it may well be capable of demonstrating the presence (or absence) of such ionizing cosmic diffuse radiation. At low Galactic latitudes, all such radiation would be totally erased by the presence, in large quantities, of interstellar neutral hydrogen; this will allow us to test the reality of any such flux that we may discover at higher Galactic latitudes.

  19. Lunar horizon glow and the Clementine mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zook, H. A.; Potter, A. E.

    1994-01-01

    The Clementine spacecraft is to be launched into Earth orbit in late January for subsequent insertion into lunar orbit in late February, 1994. There, its primary mission is to produce -- over a period of about two months -- a new photographic map of the entire surface of the Moon; this will be done, in a variety of wavelengths and spatial resolutions, in a manner greatly superior to that previously accomplished for the whole Moon. It will then go on to fly by and photograph the asteroid Geographos. A secondary goal that has been accepted for this mission is to take a series of photographs designed to capture images of, and determine the brightness and extent of, the Lunar Horizon Glow (LHG). One form of LHG is caused by the solar stimulation of emission from Na and K atoms in the lunar exosphere. The scale height of this exosphere is of the order of 100 km. There are also brighter LHG components, with much smaller scale heights, that appear to be caused by scattered off of an exospheric lunar dust cloud.

  20. Perturbative string thermodynamics near black hole horizons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mertens, Thomas G.; Verschelde, Henri; Zakharov, Valentin I.

    2015-06-01

    We provide further computations and ideas to the problem of near-Hagedorn string thermodynamics near (uncharged) black hole horizons, building upon our earlier work [1]. The relevance of long strings to one-loop black hole thermodynamics is emphasized. We then provide an argument in favor of the absence of α'-corrections for the (quadratic) heterotic thermal scalar action in Rindler space. We also compute the large k limit of the cigar orbifold partition functions (for both bosonic and type II superstrings) which allows a better comparison between the flat cones and the cigar cones. A discussion is made on the general McClain-Roth-O'Brien-Tan theorem and on the fact that different torus embeddings lead to different aspects of string thermodynamics. The black hole/string correspondence principle for the 2d black hole is discussed in terms of the thermal scalar. Finally, we present an argument to deal with arbitrary higher genus partition functions, suggesting the breakdown of string perturbation theory (in g s ) to compute thermodynam-ical quantities in black hole spacetimes.

  1. Large Dust Devil on Horizon, Sol 468

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    This movie clip shows a large, distant dust devil -- a whirlwind that lofts dust into the air -- as a dark shape on the horizon near the right side of the images. This dust devil was about 5 kilometers (3 miles) away from NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Spirit, and may have been up to 200 meters or yards in diameter. Smaller dust devils closer to the rover appear bright against the dark ground. Spirit's navigation camera took these images on the rover's 468th martian day, or sol (April 27, 2005.) Contrast has been enhanced for anything in the images that changes from frame to frame, that is, for the dust devil. The number of seconds elapsed since the first frame is indicated at lower left of the images, typically 20 seconds between frames.

    Scientists expected dust devils since before Spirit landed. The landing area inside Gusev Crater is filled with dark streaks left behind when dust devils pick dust up from an area. It is also filled with bright 'hollows,' which are dust-filled miniature craters. Dust covers most of the terrain. Winds flow into and out of Gusev crater every day. The Sun heats the surface so that the surface is warm to the touch even though the atmosphere at 2 meters (6 feet) above the surface would be chilly. That temperature contrast causes convection. Mixing the dust, winds, and convection can trigger dust devils.

  2. LANDSAT-4 horizon scanner performance evaluation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bilanow, S.; Chen, L. C.; Davis, W. M.; Stanley, J. P.

    1984-01-01

    Representative data spans covering a little more than a year since the LANDSAT-4 launch were analyzed to evaluate the flight performance of the satellite's horizon scanner. High frequency noise was filtered out by 128-point averaging. The effects of Earth oblateness and spacecraft altitude variations are modeled, and residual systematic errors are analyzed. A model for the predicted radiance effects is compared with the flight data and deficiencies in the radiance effects modeling are noted. Correction coefficients are provided for a finite Fourier series representation of the systematic errors in the data. Analysis of the seasonal dependence of the coefficients indicates the effects of some early mission problems with the reference attitudes which were computed by the onboard computer using star trackers and gyro data. The effects of sun and moon interference, unexplained anomalies in the data, and sensor noise characteristics and their power spectrum are described. The variability of full orbit data averages is shown. Plots of the sensor data for all the available data spans are included.

  3. Quantum correlations through event horizons: Fermionic versus bosonic entanglement

    SciTech Connect

    Martin-Martinez, Eduardo; Leon, Juan

    2010-03-15

    We disclose the behavior of quantum and classical correlations among all the different spatial-temporal regions of a space-time with an event horizon, comparing fermionic with bosonic fields. We show the emergence of conservation laws for entanglement and classical correlations, pointing out the crucial role that statistics plays in the information exchange (and more specifically, the entanglement tradeoff) across horizons. The results obtained here could shed new light on the problem of information behavior in noninertial frames and in the presence of horizons, giving better insight into the black-hole information paradox.

  4. Quantum correlations through event horizons: Fermionic versus bosonic entanglement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martín-Martínez, Eduardo; León, Juan

    2010-03-01

    We disclose the behavior of quantum and classical correlations among all the different spatial-temporal regions of a space-time with an event horizon, comparing fermionic with bosonic fields. We show the emergence of conservation laws for entanglement and classical correlations, pointing out the crucial role that statistics plays in the information exchange (and more specifically, the entanglement tradeoff) across horizons. The results obtained here could shed new light on the problem of information behavior in noninertial frames and in the presence of horizons, giving better insight into the black-hole information paradox.

  5. Horizon scan of global conservation issues for 2011.

    PubMed

    Sutherland, William J; Bardsley, Sarah; Bennun, Leon; Clout, Mick; Côté, Isabelle M; Depledge, Michael H; Dicks, Lynn V; Dobson, Andrew P; Fellman, Liz; Fleishman, Erica; Gibbons, David W; Impey, Andrew J; Lawton, John H; Lickorish, Fiona; Lindenmayer, David B; Lovejoy, Thomas E; Nally, Ralph Mac; Madgwick, Jane; Peck, Lloyd S; Pretty, Jules; Prior, Stephanie V; Redford, Kent H; Scharlemann, Jörn P W; Spalding, Mark; Watkinson, Andrew R

    2011-01-01

    This review describes outcomes of a 2010 horizon-scanning exercise building upon the first exercise conducted in 2009. The aim of both horizon scans was to identify emerging issues that could have substantial impacts on the conservation of biological diversity, and to do so sufficiently early to encourage policy-relevant, practical research on those issues. Our group included professional horizon scanners and researchers affiliated with universities and non- and inter-governmental organizations, including specialists on topics such as invasive species, wildlife diseases and coral reefs. We identified 15 nascent issues, including new greenhouse gases, genetic techniques to eradicate mosquitoes, milk consumption in Asia and societal pessimism. PMID:21126797

  6. Area Theorem and Smoothness of Compact Cauchy Horizons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minguzzi, E.

    2015-10-01

    We obtain an improved version of the area theorem for not necessarily differentiable horizons which, in conjunction with a recent result on the completeness of generators, allows us to prove that under the null energy condition every compactly generated Cauchy horizon is smooth and compact. We explore the consequences of this result for time machines, topology change, black holes and cosmic censorship. For instance, it is shown that compact Cauchy horizons cannot form in a non-empty spacetime which satisfies the stable dominant energy condition wherever there is some source content.

  7. Ectomycorrhizal-Dominated Boreal and Tropical Forests Have Distinct Fungal Communities, but Analogous Spatial Patterns across Soil Horizons

    PubMed Central

    McGuire, Krista L.; Allison, Steven D.; Fierer, Noah; Treseder, Kathleen K.

    2013-01-01

    Fungi regulate key nutrient cycling processes in many forest ecosystems, but their diversity and distribution within and across ecosystems are poorly understood. Here, we examine the spatial distribution of fungi across a boreal and tropical ecosystem, focusing on ectomycorrhizal fungi. We analyzed fungal community composition across litter (organic horizons) and underlying soil horizons (0–20 cm) using 454 pyrosequencing and clone library sequencing. In both forests, we found significant clustering of fungal communities by site and soil horizons with analogous patterns detected by both sequencing technologies. Free-living saprotrophic fungi dominated the recently-shed leaf litter and ectomycorrhizal fungi dominated the underlying soil horizons. This vertical pattern of fungal segregation has also been found in temperate and European boreal forests, suggesting that these results apply broadly to ectomycorrhizal-dominated systems, including tropical rain forests. Since ectomycorrhizal and free-living saprotrophic fungi have different influences on soil carbon and nitrogen dynamics, information on the spatial distribution of these functional groups will improve our understanding of forest nutrient cycling. PMID:23874569

  8. Investigations on the electronic transport and piezoresistivity properties of Ni{sub 2−X}Mn{sub 1+X}Ga (X = 0 and 0.15) Heusler alloys under hydrostatic pressure

    SciTech Connect

    Devarajan, U.; Kalai Selvan, G.; Sivaprakash, P.; Arumugam, S.; Singh, Sanjay; Esakki Muthu, S.; Roy Barman, S.

    2014-12-22

    The resisitivity of Ni{sub 2−X}Mn{sub 1+X}Ga (X = 0 and 0.15) magnetic shape memory alloys has been investigated as a function of temperature (4–300 K) and hydrostatic pressure up to 30 kilobars. The resistivity is suppressed (X = 0) and enhanced (X = 0.15) with increasing pressure. A change in piezoresistivity with respect to pressure and temperature is observed. The negative and positive piezoresistivity increases with pressure for both the alloys. The residual resistivity and electron-electron scattering factor as a function of pressure reveal that for Ni{sub 2}MnGa the electron-electron scattering is predominant, while the X = 0.15 specimen is dominated by the electron-magnon scattering. The value of electron-electron scattering factor is positive for both the samples, and it is decreasing (negative trend) for Ni{sub 2}MnGa and increasing (positive trend) for X = 0.15 with pressure. The martensite transition temperature is found to be increased with the application of external pressure for both samples.

  9. PROCESS OF PRODUCING Cm$sup 244$ AND Cm$sup 24$$sup 5$

    DOEpatents

    Manning, W.M.; Studier, M.H.; Diamond, H.; Fields, P.R.

    1958-11-01

    A process is presented for producing Cm and Cm/sup 245/. The first step of the process consists in subjecting Pu/sup 2339/ to a high neutron flux and subsequently dissolving the irradiated material in HCl. The plutonium is then oxidized to at least the tetravalent state and the solution is contacted with an anion exchange resin, causing the plutonium values to be absorbed while the fission products and transplutonium elements remain in the effluent solution. The effluent solution is then contacted with a cation exchange resin causing the transplutonium, values to be absorbed while the fission products remain in solution. The cation exchange resin is then contacted with an aqueous citrate solution and tbe transplutonium elements are thereby differentially eluted in order of decreasing atomic weight, allowing collection of the desired fractions.

  10. Exact event horizon of a black hole merger

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Emparan, Roberto; Martínez, Marina

    2016-08-01

    We argue that the event horizon of a binary black hole merger, in the extreme-mass-ratio limit where one of the black holes is much smaller than the other, can be described in an exact analytic way. This is done by tracing in the Schwarzschild geometry a congruence of null geodesics that approaches a null plane at infinity. Its form can be given explicitly in terms of elliptic functions, and we use it to analyze and illustrate the time-evolution of the horizon along the merger. We identify features such as the line of caustics at which light rays enter the horizon, and the critical point at which the horizons touch. We also compute several quantities that characterize these aspects of the merger.

  11. Complementary and Alternative Medicine (CAM): Expanding Horizons of Health Care

    MedlinePlus

    ... Past Issues Special Section CAM Expanding Horizons of Health Care Past Issues / Winter 2009 Table of Contents For ... and why it is important to tell your health care providers about your use of CAM. We hope ...

  12. The absence of horizon in black-hole formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ho, Pei-Ming

    2016-08-01

    With the back-reaction of Hawking radiation taken into consideration, the work of Kawai, Matsuo and Yokokura [1] has shown that, under a few assumptions, the collapse of matter does not lead to event horizon nor apparent horizon. In this paper, we relax their assumptions and elaborate on the space-time geometry of a generic collapsing body with spherical symmetry. The geometry outside the collapsing sphere is found to be approximated by the geometry outside the white-hole horizon, hence the collapsing matter remains outside the Schwarzschild radius. As particles in Hawking radiation are created in the vicinity of the collapsing matter, the information loss paradox is alleviated. Assuming that the collapsing body evaporates within finite time, there is no event horizon.

  13. Entanglement entropy of a black hole and isolated horizon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Jianhua; Hu, Shuangqi; Zhao, Ren

    2013-02-01

    Using Unruh-Verlinde temperature obtained by entropic force, we directly calculate partition functions of quantum field in Schwarzschild spacetime via quantum statistical method and derive the expression of the black hole statistical entropy. In our calculation the lower limit of integral is the location of isolated horizon introduced in loop quantum gravity and the upper limit of integral is infinity. So the obtained entropy is the statistical entropy from isolated horizon to the infinite. In our calculation there are not the cutoff and approximation. The results showed that, as long as proper Immirzi parameters are selected, the entropy obtained by loop quantum gravity is consistent with the quantum statistical entropy outside the black hole horizon. Therefore the black hole entropy is a quantum entanglement entropy outside the isolated horizon.

  14. Note on electrical and thermodynamic properties of isolated horizons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Gerui; Wu, Xiaoning; Gao, Sijie

    2015-03-01

    The electrical laws and Carnot cycle of isolated horizons (IH) are investigated in this paper. We establish Ohm's law and Joule's law of isolated horizons and find that the conceptual picture of black holes (membrane paradigm) can also apply to this kind of quasilocal black holes. We also investigate the geometrical properties near nonrotating IHs and find that under the first-order approximation of r , there exist a Killing vector ∂∂u/ and a Hamiltonian conjugate to it, so this vector can be thought to be a physical observer. We calculate the energy as measured at infinity of a particle at rest outside a nonrotating IH, and we use this result to construct a reversible Carnot cycle with the isolated horizon as a cold reservoir, which confirms the thermodynamic nature of isolated horizons.

  15. JERSEY APPROACH VIADUCT LOOKING EAST, NOTE VERRAZANO TOWERS ON HORIZON ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    JERSEY APPROACH VIADUCT LOOKING EAST, NOTE VERRAZANO TOWERS ON HORIZON TO LEFT - Goethals Bridge, Spanning Arthur Kill from New Jersey to Staten Island, Staten Island (subdivision), Richmond County, NY

  16. Universal properties of the near-horizon optical geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gibbons, G. W.; Warnick, C. M.

    2009-03-01

    Making use of the fact that the optical geometry near a static nondegenerate Killing horizon is asymptotically hyperbolic, we investigate some universal features of black-hole horizons. Applying the Gauss-Bonnet theorem allows us to establish some general properties of gravitational lensing, valid for all black holes. Hyperbolic geometry allows us to find rates for the loss of scalar, vector, and fermionic “hair” as objects fall quasistatically towards the horizon, extending previous results for Schwarzschild to all static Killing horizons. In the process we find the Liénard-Wiechert potential for hyperbolic space and calculate the force between electrons mediated by neutrinos, extending the flat space result of Feinberg and Sucher. We further demonstrate how these techniques allow us to derive the exact Copson-Linet potential due to a point charge in a Schwarzschild background in a simple fashion.

  17. The Cauchy horizon singularity inside Kerr black holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burko, Lior M.; Khanna, Gaurav

    2016-03-01

    The numerical technology that allows for the careful evolution of linearized fields inside Kerr black holes and the study of their behavior approaching the Cauchy horizon singularity includes a number of interesting aspects. The latter include compactified hyperboloidal coordinates and foliation, mixed type hyperbolic-elliptic PDE, and initial data evolution where all equal-coordinate hypersurfaces are spacelike. We review the need for the numerical technology that allows for the solution of the spin-2 Teukolsky equation inside Kerr black holes, and discuss the main features thereof. We present new results about the numerical properties of the Cauchy horizon singularity and their correspondence with the predictions of perturbative analysis. We then discuss present directions of study, which include the sub-dominant azimuthal modes, approaching the Cauchy horizon singularity along timelike directions, approaching the Marolf-Ori (``outflying'') singularity and the studying the fields along the Cauchy horizon.

  18. Universal properties of the near-horizon optical geometry

    SciTech Connect

    Gibbons, G. W.; Warnick, C. M.

    2009-03-15

    Making use of the fact that the optical geometry near a static nondegenerate Killing horizon is asymptotically hyperbolic, we investigate some universal features of black-hole horizons. Applying the Gauss-Bonnet theorem allows us to establish some general properties of gravitational lensing, valid for all black holes. Hyperbolic geometry allows us to find rates for the loss of scalar, vector, and fermionic ''hair'' as objects fall quasistatically towards the horizon, extending previous results for Schwarzschild to all static Killing horizons. In the process we find the Lienard-Wiechert potential for hyperbolic space and calculate the force between electrons mediated by neutrinos, extending the flat space result of Feinberg and Sucher. We further demonstrate how these techniques allow us to derive the exact Copson-Linet potential due to a point charge in a Schwarzschild background in a simple fashion.

  19. Cutoffs, stretched horizons, and black hole radiators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaloper, Nemanja

    2012-11-01

    We argue that if the UV cutoff of an effective field theory with many low energy degrees of freedom is of the order, or below, the scale of the stretched horizon in a black hole background, which in turn is significantly lower than the Planck scale, the black hole radiance rate may not be enhanced by the emission of all the light IR modes. Instead, there may be additional suppressions hidden in the UV completion of the field theory, which really control which light modes can be emitted by the black hole. It could turn out that many degrees of freedom cannot be efficiently emitted by the black hole, and so the radiance rate may be much smaller than its estimate based on the counting of the light IR degrees of freedom. If we apply this argument to the Randall-Sundrum II (RS2) brane world, it implies that the emission rates of the low energy conformal field theory modes will be dramatically suppressed: its UV completion is given by the bulk gravity on AdS5×S5, and the only bulk modes which could be emitted by a black hole are the 4-dimensional (4D) s waves of bulk modes with small 5-dimensional momentum, or equivalently, small 4D masses. Further, their emission is suppressed by bulk warping, which lowers the radiation rate much below the IR estimate, yielding a radiation flux ˜(TBHL)2LHawking˜(TBH/MPl)2NLHawking, where LHawking is the Hawking radiation rate of a single light species. This follows directly from low conformal field theory cutoff μ˜L-1≪MPl, a large number of modes N≫1 and the fact that 4D gravity in RS2 is induced, MPl2≃Nμ2.

  20. Output-feedback control of combined sewer networks through receding horizon control with moving horizon estimation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joseph-Duran, Bernat; Ocampo-Martinez, Carlos; Cembrano, Gabriela

    2015-10-01

    An output-feedback control strategy for pollution mitigation in combined sewer networks is presented. The proposed strategy provides means to apply model-based predictive control to large-scale sewer networks, in-spite of the lack of measurements at most of the network sewers. In previous works, the authors presented a hybrid linear control-oriented model for sewer networks together with the formulation of Optimal Control Problems (OCP) and State Estimation Problems (SEP). By iteratively solving these problems, preliminary Receding Horizon Control with Moving Horizon Estimation (RHC/MHE) results, based on flow measurements, were also obtained. In this work, the RHC/MHE algorithm has been extended to take into account both flow and water level measurements and the resulting control loop has been extensively simulated to assess the system performance according different measurement availability scenarios and rain events. All simulations have been carried out using a detailed physically based model of a real case-study network as virtual reality.

  1. A horizon scan of global conservation issues for 2015.

    PubMed

    Sutherland, William J; Clout, Mick; Depledge, Michael; Dicks, Lynn V; Dinsdale, Jason; Entwistle, Abigail C; Fleishman, Erica; Gibbons, David W; Keim, Brandon; Lickorish, Fiona A; Monk, Kathryn A; Ockendon, Nancy; Peck, Lloyd S; Pretty, Jules; Rockström, Johan; Spalding, Mark D; Tonneijck, Femke H; Wintle, Bonnie C

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents the results of our sixth annual horizon scan, which aims to identify phenomena that may have substantial effects on the global environment, but are not widely known or well understood. A group of professional horizon scanners, researchers, practitioners, and a journalist identified 15 topics via an iterative, Delphi-like process. The topics include a novel class of insecticide compounds, legalisation of recreational drugs, and the emergence of a new ecosystem associated with ice retreat in the Antarctic. PMID:25433442

  2. Supertranslations and Superrotations at the Black Hole Horizon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donnay, Laura; Giribet, Gaston; González, Hernán A.; Pino, Miguel

    2016-03-01

    We show that the asymptotic symmetries close to nonextremal black hole horizons are generated by an extension of supertranslations. This group is generated by a semidirect sum of Virasoro and Abelian currents. The charges associated with the asymptotic Killing symmetries satisfy the same algebra. When considering the special case of a stationary black hole, the zero mode charges correspond to the angular momentum and the entropy at the horizon.

  3. A horizon scan of global conservation issues for 2013.

    PubMed

    Sutherland, William J; Bardsley, Sarah; Clout, Mick; Depledge, Michael H; Dicks, Lynn V; Fellman, Liz; Fleishman, Erica; Gibbons, David W; Keim, Brandon; Lickorish, Fiona; Margerison, Ceri; Monk, Kathryn A; Norris, Kenneth; Peck, Lloyd S; Prior, Stephanie V; Scharlemann, Jörn P W; Spalding, Mark D; Watkinson, Andrew R

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents the findings of our fourth annual horizon-scanning exercise, which aims to identify topics that increasingly may affect conservation of biological diversity. The 15 issues were identified via an iterative, transferable process by a team of professional horizon scanners, researchers, practitioners, and a journalist. The 15 topics include the commercial use of antimicrobial peptides, thorium-fuelled nuclear power, and undersea oil production. PMID:23219597

  4. Supertranslations and Superrotations at the Black Hole Horizon.

    PubMed

    Donnay, Laura; Giribet, Gaston; González, Hernán A; Pino, Miguel

    2016-03-01

    We show that the asymptotic symmetries close to nonextremal black hole horizons are generated by an extension of supertranslations. This group is generated by a semidirect sum of Virasoro and Abelian currents. The charges associated with the asymptotic Killing symmetries satisfy the same algebra. When considering the special case of a stationary black hole, the zero mode charges correspond to the angular momentum and the entropy at the horizon. PMID:26991167

  5. Optical Navigation Preparations for New Horizons Pluto Flyby

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Owen, William M., Jr.; Dumont, Philip J.; Jackman, Coralie D.

    2012-01-01

    The New Horizons spacecraft will encounter Pluto and its satellites in July 2015. As was the case for the Voyager encounters with Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus and Neptune, mission success will depend heavily on accurate spacecraft navigation, and accurate navigation will be impossible without the use of pictures of the Pluto system taken by the onboard cameras. We describe the preparations made by the New Horizons optical navigators: picture planning, image processing algorithms, software development and testing, and results from in-flight imaging.

  6. Thermodynamics of cosmological horizons in f(T) gravity

    SciTech Connect

    Bamba, Kazuharu; Geng, Chao-Qiang E-mail: geng@phys.nthu.edu.tw

    2011-11-01

    We explore thermodynamics of the apparent horizon in f(T) gravity with both equilibrium and non-equilibrium descriptions. We find the same dual equilibrium/non-equilibrium formulation for f(T) as for f(R) gravity. In particular, we show that the second law of thermodynamics can be satisfied for the universe with the same temperature outside and inside the apparent horizon.

  7. Deformation of codimension-2 surfaces and horizon thermodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Li-Ming

    2011-03-01

    The deformation equation of a spacelike submanifold with an arbitrary codimension is given by a general construction without using local frames. In the case of codimension-1, this equation reduces to the evolution equation of the extrinsic curvature of a spacelike hypersurface. In the more interesting case of codimension-2, after selecting a local null frame, this deformation equation reduces to the well known (cross) focusing equations. We show how the thermodynamics of trapping horizons is related to these deformation equations in two different formalisms: with and without introducing quasilocal energy. In the formalism with the quasilocal energy, the Hawking mass in four dimension is generalized to higher dimension, and it is found that the deformation of this energy inside a marginal surface can be also decomposed into the contributions from matter fields and gravitational radiation as in the four dimension. In the formalism without the quasilocal energy, we generalize the definition of slowly evolving future outer trapping horizons proposed by Booth to past trapping horizons. The dynamics of the trapping horizons in FLRW universe is given as an example. Especially, the slowly evolving past trapping horizon in the FLRW universe has close relation to the scenario of slow-roll inflation. Up to the second order of the slowly evolving parameter in this generalization, the temperature (surface gravity) associated with the slowly evolving trapping horizon in the FLRW universe is essentially the same as the one defined by using the quasilocal energy.

  8. A new atlas of infrared methane spectra between 1120 per cm and 1800 per cm

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blatherwick, R. D.; Goldman, A.; Lutz, B. L.; Silvaggio, P. M.; Boese, R. W.

    1979-01-01

    An atlas of 1339 methane absorption lines in the range 1120 to 1800 reciprocal centimeters, including the nu(4) and nu(2) bands, is presented. Laboratory spectra were obtained by a Nicolet Fourier transform Michelson interferometer with a resolution of approximately 0.06 reciprocal cm and a path length of 6.35 m of 0.98, 4.86 and 19.97 torr. Observed spectra are also compared with spectral intensities calculated line-by-line on the basis of tabulated intensities of the observed spectral lines.

  9. RESOLVING THE INNER JET STRUCTURE OF 1924-292 WITH THE EVENT HORIZON TELESCOPE

    SciTech Connect

    Lu Rusen; Fish, Vincent L.; Doeleman, Sheperd S.; Weintroub, Jonathan; Moran, James M.; Primiani, Rurik; Young, Ken H.; Bower, Geoffrey C.; Plambeck, Richard; Wright, Melvyn; Freund, Robert; Marrone, Daniel P.; Friberg, Per; Tilanus, Remo P. J.; Ho, Paul T. P.; Inoue, Makoto; Honma, Mareki; Oyama, Tomoaki; Krichbaum, Thomas P.; Shen Zhiqiang; and others

    2012-09-20

    We present the first 1.3 mm (230 GHz) very long baseline interferometry model image of an active galactic nucleus (AGN) jet using closure phase techniques with a four-element array. The model image of the quasar 1924-292 was obtained with four telescopes at three observatories: the James Clerk Maxwell Telescope on Mauna Kea in Hawaii, the Arizona Radio Observatory's Submillimeter Telescope in Arizona, and two telescopes of the Combined Array for Research in Millimeter-wave Astronomy in California in 2009 April. With the greatly improved resolution compared with previous observations and robust closure phase measurement, the inner jet structure of 1924-292 was spatially resolved. The inner jet extends to the northwest along a position angle of -53 Degree-Sign at a distance of 0.38 mas from the tentatively identified core, in agreement with the inner jet structure inferred from lower frequencies, and making a position angle difference of {approx}80 Degree-Sign with respect to the centimeter jet. The size of the compact core is 0.15 pc with a brightness temperature of 1.2 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 11} K. Compared with those measured at lower frequencies, the low brightness temperature may argue in favor of the decelerating jet model or particle-cascade models. The successful measurement of closure phase paves the way for imaging and time resolving Sgr A* and nearby AGNs with the Event Horizon Telescope.

  10. O-band quantum-confined Stark effect optical modulator from Ge/Si{sub 0.15}Ge{sub 0.85} quantum wells by well thickness tuning

    SciTech Connect

    Chaisakul, Papichaya E-mail: papichaya.chaisakul@u-psud.fr; Marris-Morini, Delphine Vakarin, Vladyslav; Vivien, Laurent; Frigerio, Jacopo; Chrastina, Daniel; Isella, Giovanni

    2014-11-21

    We report an O-band optical modulator from a Ge/Si{sub 0.15}Ge{sub 0.85} multiple quantum well (MQW). Strong O-band optical modulation in devices commonly operating within E-band wavelength range can be achieved by simply decreasing the quantum well thickness. Both spectral photocurrent and optical transmission studies are performed to evaluate material characteristics and device performance from a surface-illuminated diode and a waveguide modulator, respectively. These results demonstrate the potential of using Ge/Si{sub 0.15}Ge{sub 0.85} MQWs for the realization of future on-chip wavelength-division multiplexing systems with optical modulators operating at different wavelengths over a wide spectral range.

  11. Strain-relaxation and critical thickness of epitaxial La1.85Sr0.15CuO4 films

    SciTech Connect

    Meyer, Tricia L; Jiang, Lu; Park, Sungkyun; Egami, Takeshi; Lee, Ho Nyung

    2015-12-08

    We report the thickness-dependent strain-relaxation behavior and the associated impacts upon the superconductivity in epitaxial La1.85Sr0.15CuO4 films grown on different substrates, which provide a range of strain. We have found that the critical thickness for the onset of superconductivity in La1.85Sr0.15CuO4 films is associated with the finite thickness effect and epitaxial strain. In particular, thin films with tensile strain greater than ~0.25% revealed no superconductivity. We attribute this phenomenon to the inherent formation of oxygen vacancies that can be minimized via strain relaxation.

  12. LARGE PIEZOELECTRIC EFFECT IN LOW-TEMPERATURE-SINTERED LEAD-FREE (Ba0.85Ca0.15)(Zr0.1Ti0.9)O3 THICK FILMS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Zuyong; Shi, Dongqi; Dou, Shixue; Hu, Yihua; Tang, Xingui

    2012-09-01

    High-quality piezoelectric (Ba0.85Ca0.15)(Zr0.1Ti0.9)O3 thick films with dense and homogenous microstructures were fabricated at a low sintering temperature (900°C) using a CuBi2O4 sintering aid. The 10 μm thick film exhibited a high longitudinal piezoelectric constant d33,eff of 210 pC/N with estimated unconstrained d33 value of 560 pC/N very close to that in the corresponding bulks. Such excellent piezoelectric effect in the low-temperature sintered (Ba0.85Ca0.15)(Zr0.1Ti0.9)O3 thick films is comparable to the case of lead-based PZT thick films, and may be a promising application in lead-free microdevices such as piezoelectric microelectromechanical systems (MEMS).

  13. Magnetic correlations in the magnetocaloric materials Mn3GaC and Mn3GaC0.85N0.15 studied by neutron polarization analysis and neutron depolarization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Çakr, Ö.; Acet, M.; Farle, M.; Wildes, A.

    2016-04-01

    Partially substituting carbon by nitrogen in the antiperovskite compound Mn3GaC increases the first order antiferromagnetic/ferromagnetic transition temperature and at the same time causes the high-temperature long-range ferromagnetism to weaken. To show that the weakening is related to the diminishing of ferromagnetic domain formation, we undertake neutron depolarization and neutron polarization analysis experiments on Mn3GaC and Mn3GaC0.85N0.15. Polarization analysis experiments show that strong ferromagnetic correlations are present at high temperatures in the paramagnetic states of both Mn3GaC and Mn3GaC0.85N0.15 and that these correlations vanish in the antiferromagnetic state. Neutron depolarization studies show that above the first order transition temperature, ferromagnetic domain formation is present in Mn3GaC but is absent in Mn3GaC0.85N0.15. The relationship between ferromagnetic domain formation and transitional hysteresis is brought forward for these two important magnetocaloric materials.

  14. Influence of nickel doping on oxygen-ionic conductivity of the n = 1 Ruddlesden-Popper Phases La1.85Ca0.15(Cu1-xNix)O4-δ (δ = 0.0905)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Midouni, Adnene; Houchati, Mohamed Ikbal; Othman, Walid Belhaj; Chniba-Boudjada, Nassira; Ceretti, Monica; Paulus, Werner; Jaouadi, Mouna; Hamzaoui, Ahmed Hichem

    2016-08-01

    The results of the synthesis and characterization of the optimally doped La1.85Ca0.15(Cu1-xNix)O4-δ solid solution with x = 0, 0.1, 0.2 and 0.3 are reported. The versatility of these La1.85Ca0.15(Cu1-xNix)O4-δ materials is explained on the basis of structural features and the ability to accommodate oxygen nonstoichiometry. According to powder X-ray and neutron diffraction data, La1.85Ca0.15(Cu1-xNix)O4-δ adopts the tetragonal structure with oxygen vacancies occurring preferentially at the Oap sites within the {(La/Ca)O} layers of the perovskite blocks and the oxygen deviation from stoichiometry δ was found to be δ=0.0905(6). The bulk conductivity indicated an Arrhenius-type thermally activated process and oxygen vacancies are the possible ionic charge carriers at T=270 °C. An increase of the conductivity was detected when Ni was introduced. With nickel ratio variation, a strong correlation was observed between the Cu(Ni)-Oap apical bond length variation and the conductivity variation through controlling the O2- ion migration.

  15. Reverse bias voltage testing of 8 cm x 8cm silicon solar cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woike, T.; Stotlar, S.; Lungu, C.

    1991-01-01

    A study is described of the reverse I-V characteristics of the largest space qualified silicon solar cells currently available (8 x 8 cm) and of reverse bias voltage (RBV) testing performed on these cells. This study includes production grade cells, both with and without cover glass. These cells span the typical output range seen in production. Initial characteristics of these cells are measured at both 28 and 60 C. These measurements show weak correlation between cell output and reverse characteristics. Analysis is presented to determine the proper conditions for RBV stress to simulate shadowing effects on a particular array design. After performing the RBV stress the characteristics of the stressed cells are remeasured. The degradation in cell performance is highly variable which exacerbates cell mismatching over time. The effect of this degradation on array lifetime is also discussed. Generalization of these results to other array configurations is also presented.

  16. A Per-baseline, Delay-spectrum Technique for Accessing the 21 cm Cosmic Reionization Signature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parsons, Aaron R.; Pober, Jonathan C.; Aguirre, James E.; Carilli, Christopher L.; Jacobs, Daniel C.; Moore, David F.

    2012-09-01

    A critical challenge in measuring the power spectrum of 21 cm emission from cosmic reionization is compensating for the frequency dependence of an interferometer's sampling pattern, which can cause smooth-spectrum foregrounds to appear unsmooth and degrade the separation between foregrounds and the target signal. In this paper, we present an approach to foreground removal that explicitly accounts for this frequency dependence. We apply the delay transformation introduced in Parsons & Backer to each baseline of an interferometer to concentrate smooth-spectrum foregrounds within the bounds of the maximum geometric delays physically realizable on that baseline. By focusing on delay modes that correspond to image-domain regions beyond the horizon, we show that it is possible to avoid the bulk of smooth-spectrum foregrounds. We map the point-spread function of delay modes to k-space, showing that delay modes that are uncorrupted by foregrounds also represent samples of the three-dimensional power spectrum, and can be used to constrain cosmic reionization. Because it uses only spectral smoothness to differentiate foregrounds from the targeted 21 cm signature, this per-baseline analysis approach relies on spectrally and spatially smooth instrumental responses for foreground removal. For sufficient levels of instrumental smoothness relative to the brightness of interfering foregrounds, this technique substantially reduces the level of calibration previously thought necessary to detect 21 cm reionization. As a result, this approach places fewer constraints on antenna configuration within an array, and in particular, facilitates the adoption of configurations that are optimized for power-spectrum sensitivity. Under these assumptions, we demonstrate the potential for the Precision Array for Probing the Epoch of Reionization (PAPER) to detect 21 cm reionization at an amplitude of 10 mK2 near k ~ 0.2 h Mpc-1 with 132 dipoles in 7 months of observing.

  17. A PER-BASELINE, DELAY-SPECTRUM TECHNIQUE FOR ACCESSING THE 21 cm COSMIC REIONIZATION SIGNATURE

    SciTech Connect

    Parsons, Aaron R.; Pober, Jonathan C.; Aguirre, James E.; Moore, David F.; Carilli, Christopher L.; Jacobs, Daniel C.

    2012-09-10

    A critical challenge in measuring the power spectrum of 21 cm emission from cosmic reionization is compensating for the frequency dependence of an interferometer's sampling pattern, which can cause smooth-spectrum foregrounds to appear unsmooth and degrade the separation between foregrounds and the target signal. In this paper, we present an approach to foreground removal that explicitly accounts for this frequency dependence. We apply the delay transformation introduced in Parsons and Backer to each baseline of an interferometer to concentrate smooth-spectrum foregrounds within the bounds of the maximum geometric delays physically realizable on that baseline. By focusing on delay modes that correspond to image-domain regions beyond the horizon, we show that it is possible to avoid the bulk of smooth-spectrum foregrounds. We map the point-spread function of delay modes to k-space, showing that delay modes that are uncorrupted by foregrounds also represent samples of the three-dimensional power spectrum, and can be used to constrain cosmic reionization. Because it uses only spectral smoothness to differentiate foregrounds from the targeted 21 cm signature, this per-baseline analysis approach relies on spectrally and spatially smooth instrumental responses for foreground removal. For sufficient levels of instrumental smoothness relative to the brightness of interfering foregrounds, this technique substantially reduces the level of calibration previously thought necessary to detect 21 cm reionization. As a result, this approach places fewer constraints on antenna configuration within an array, and in particular, facilitates the adoption of configurations that are optimized for power-spectrum sensitivity. Under these assumptions, we demonstrate the potential for the Precision Array for Probing the Epoch of Reionization (PAPER) to detect 21 cm reionization at an amplitude of 10 mK{sup 2} near k {approx} 0.2 h Mpc{sup -1} with 132 dipoles in 7 months of observing.

  18. ALICE: the ultraviolet imaging spectrograph aboard the New Horizons Pluto mission spacecraft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stern, S. Alan; Scherrer, John; Slater, David C.; Gladstone, G. R.; Dirks, Greg; Stone, John; Davis, Michael; Versteeg, Marteen; Siegmund, O. H. W.

    2005-09-01

    The ALICE instrument is a lightweight (4.4 kg), low-power (4.4 W) imaging spectrograph that is planned to fly aboard the New Horizons mission to Pluto/Charon and the Kuiper Belt. Its primary job is to detect a variety of important atomic and molecular species in Pluto's atmosphere, and to determine their relative abundances as a function of altitude so that a complete picture of Pluto's atmospheric composition and structure can be determined for the first time. ALICE would also be used to search for an atmosphere around Pluto's moon, Charon, as well as the Kuiper Belt Objects (KBOs) that New Horizons hopes to fly by after Pluto-Charon. The New Horizons ALICE design, based on the Rosetta ALICE instrument design now en route to Comet 67P/ Churyumov-Gerasimenko aboard the European Space Agency's Rosetta spacecraft, incorporates an off-axis telescope feeding a Rowland-circle spectrograph with a 520-1870 Å spectral passband, a spectral point spread function of 3-6 Å FWHM, and an instantaneous spatial field-of-view of 6 degrees. Two separate input apertures that feed the telescope allow for both airglow and solar occultation observations during the mission. The focal plane camera is an imaging microchannel plate (MCP) double delay-line detector with dual solar-blind opaque photocathodes (KBr and CsI) and a focal surface that matches the 15-cm diameter Rowland-circle. Data taking modes include both histogram and pixel list exposures. We describe the scientific objectives of ALICE as well as the design, build, and environmental testing results of the flight model.

  19. Intrinsic geometry of a tidally deformed Kerr horizon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poisson, Eric

    2013-04-01

    The intrinsic metric of a tidally deformed black-hole horizon can be presented in a coordinate system adapted to the horizon's null generators, with one coordinate acting as a running parameter along each generator, and two coordinates acting as constant generator labels. The metric is invariant under reparametrizations of the generators, and as such the horizon's intrinsic geometry is known to be gauge invariant. We consider a Kerr black hole deformed by a slowly-evolving external tidal field, and describe the intrinsic geometry of its event horizon in terms of the electric and magnetic tidal moments that characterize the tidal environment. When the black hole is slowly rotating, the horizon's geometry can be described in terms of a deviation from an otherwise spherical surface, and the deformation can be characterized by gauge invariant Love numbers. Some aspects of this tidal deformation have direct analogues in Newtonian physics. Some do not, and I will describe the similarities and differences between the tidal deformation of rotating black holes in general relativity and rotating fluid bodies in Newtonian physics.

  20. Beyond the veil: Inner horizon instability and holography

    SciTech Connect

    Balasubramanian, Vijay; Levi, Thomas S.

    2004-11-15

    We show that scalar perturbations of the eternal, rotating Banados-Teitelboim-Zanelli (BTZ) black hole should lead to an instability of the inner (Cauchy) horizon, preserving strong cosmic censorship. Because of backscattering from the geometry, plane-wave modes have a divergent stress tensor at the event horizon, but suitable wave packets avoid this difficulty, and are dominated at late times by quasinormal behavior. The wave packets have cuts in the complexified coordinate plane that are controlled by requirements of continuity, single-valuedness, and positive energy. Due to a focusing effect, regular wave packets nevertheless have a divergent stress energy at the inner horizon, signaling an instability. We propose that this instability, which is localized behind the event horizon, is detected holographically as a breakdown in the semiclassical computation of dual conformal field theory (CFT) expectation values in which the analytic behavior of wave packets in the complexified coordinate plane plays an integral role. In the dual field theory, this is interpreted as an encoding of physics behind the horizon in the entanglement between otherwise independent CFTs.

  1. Quantization of Horizon Entropy and the Thermodynamics of Spacetime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skákala, Jozef

    2014-06-01

    This is a review of my work published in the papers of Skakala (JHEP 1201:144, 2012; JHEP 1206:094, 2012) and Chirenti et al. (Phys. Rev. D 86:124008, 2012; Phys. Rev. D 87:044034, 2013). It offers a more detailed discussion of the results than the accounts in those papers, and it links my results to some conclusions recently reached by other authors. It also offers some new arguments supporting the conclusions in the cited articles. The fundamental idea of this work is that the semiclassical quantization of the black hole entropy, as suggested by Bekenstein (Phys. Rev. D 7:2333-2346, 1973), holds (at least) generically for the spacetime horizons. We support this conclusion by two separate arguments: (1) we generalize Bekenstein's lower bound on the horizon area transition to a much wider class of horizons than only the black-hole horizon, and (2) we obtain the same entropy spectra via the asymptotic quasi-normal frequencies of some particular spherically symmetric multi-horizon spacetimes (in the way proposed by Maggiore (Phys. Rev. Lett. 100:141301, 2008)). The main result of this paper supports the conclusions derived by Kothawalla et al. (Phys. Rev. D 78:104018, 2008) and Kwon and Nam (Class. Quant. Grav. 28:035007, 2011), on the basis of different arguments.

  2. Dynamical horizon entropy and equilibrium thermodynamics of generalized gravity theories

    SciTech Connect

    Wu Shaofeng; Ge Xianhui; Yang Guohong; Zhang Pengming

    2010-02-15

    We study the relation between the thermodynamics and field equations of generalized gravity theories on the dynamical trapping horizon with sphere symmetry. We assume the entropy of a dynamical horizon as the Noether charge associated with the Kodama vector and point out that it satisfies the second law when a Gibbs equation holds. We generalize two kinds of Gibbs equations to Gauss-Bonnet gravity on any trapping horizon. Based on the quasilocal gravitational energy found recently for f(R) gravity and scalar-tensor gravity in some special cases, we also build up the Gibbs equations, where the nonequilibrium entropy production, which is usually invoked to balance the energy conservation, is just absorbed into the modified Wald entropy in the Friedmann-Robertson-Walker spacetime with slowly varying horizon. Moreover, the equilibrium thermodynamic identity remains valid for f(R) gravity in a static spacetime. Our work provides an alternative treatment to reinterpret the nonequilibrium correction and supports the idea that the horizon thermodynamics is universal for generalized gravity theories.

  3. Electrochemical properties of the Sm 0.5Sr 0.5CoO 3-La 0.8Sr 0.2Ga 0.8Mg 0.15Co 0.05O 3 (LSGMC5)/LSGMC5 interface modified by an LSGMC5 interlayer synthesized using the citrate method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Shizhong; Zhong, Hao; Zou, Yuman

    A La 0.8Sr 0.2Ga 0.8Mg 0.15Co 0.05O 3 (LSGMC5) interlayer synthesized using the citrate method was added between an Sm 0.5Sr 0.5CoO 3 (SSC)-LSGMC5 electrode and an LSGMC5 electrolyte pellet synthesized using a solid-state reaction, and we found that the electrode activity was improved dramatically. The SEM images of the samples demonstrated that the contact between the electrode and the interlayer was much better than the contact between the electrode and electrolyte without the interlayer. The addition of the interlayer resulted in an increased three-phase boundary length and electrode/electrolyte two-phase interfacial area. An SSC-LSGMC5 electrode sintered at 1123 K deposited onto an interlayer sintered at 1673 K exhibited the highest performance among the samples studied. The electrode resistance was about 0.08 Ω cm 2 at near equilibrium conditions, and the cathodic overpotential at a current density of 1 A cm -2 was only about 70 mV at 973 K in oxygen. The introduction of the interlayer did not change the oxygen reaction mechanism, and the significant increase in electrode performance was due to the increase in the number of active sites for oxygen reduction.

  4. Inorganic Horizon Development and Metal Concentrations in a Peat Deposit in Congaree National Park, SC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Werts, S. P.; Wesselschmidt, N.

    2012-12-01

    Congaree National Park, near Columbia, South Carolina, is a closed canopy floodplain forest that contains one of the United States' largest contiguous track of old-growth bottomland forest. A portion of the park contains a groundwater fed muckswamp and is in the footprint of several ancient meanders of the Congaree River. Within one ancient meander lies an extensive peat deposit that is in itself 3.5 meters thick. Within the top 20 cm of this peat, however, an inorganic horizon has developed and varies in thickness laterally throughout the deposit. Through the use of particle size analysis, δ13C and δ15N data and heavy metal concentrations as determined by ICP-CID, we propose that this inorganic horizon has developed from association with vertical translocation of soil material from the upper portions of the peat to the layers below. This can be seen through the accumulation of clays in the lower portions of the inorganic layer and the accumulation of heavy metals in the peat just below the inorganic layer. We believe that this is occurring as an artifact of large seasonal changes in the water table in this portion of the park as plant productivity and drawdown is high in the spring and summer followed by a rise in the water table in the winter, as seen through local piezometer data. This removal of organic material from the upper peat deposits will have implications of water quality and the local carbon cycle associated with the park and the Congaree River.

  5. Ferromanganese crusts from Necker Ridge, Horizon Guyot and S.P. Lee Guyot: geological considerations

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hein, James R.; Manheim, Frank T.; Schwab, William C.; Davis, Alice S.

    1985-01-01

    Ferromanganese-encrusted rocks were recovered in every dredge and are thickest on Necker Ridge. Crust thicknesses average about 2.5, 1.5, and 0.8 cm for Necker, Horizon, and S.P. Lee, respectively. Crusts range from smooth or porous surfaces to knobby and botryoidal. The entire crust is laminated, however, two distinct layers commonly exist, separated by a paper-thin layer of phosphorite. The dominant mineral of all crusts is vernadite (δ-MnO2), while quartz, feldspar, apatite, and, in three rocks todorokite, are minor phases. Quartz and feldspar decrease with decreasing latitude of occurrence, and is suggested to be related to eolian input. On the average, apatite also increases within the crusts with decreasing latitude of occurrence, which may be related to high biological productivity in the zone of equatorial upwelling. Phosphorite substrates are more abundant on Necker Ridge and S.P. Lee Guyot than they are on Horizon Guyot. Seamount ferromanganese nodules are distinct from abyssal nodules in their chemistry and internal structure.

  6. PAPER-64 Constraints on Reionization: The 21 cm Power Spectrum at z = 8.4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ali, Zaki S.; Parsons, Aaron R.; Zheng, Haoxuan; Pober, Jonathan C.; Liu, Adrian; Aguirre, James E.; Bradley, Richard F.; Bernardi, Gianni; Carilli, Chris L.; Cheng, Carina; DeBoer, David R.; Dexter, Matthew R.; Grobbelaar, Jasper; Horrell, Jasper; Jacobs, Daniel C.; Klima, Pat; MacMahon, David H. E.; Maree, Matthys; Moore, David F.; Razavi, Nima; Stefan, Irina I.; Walbrugh, William P.; Walker, Andre

    2015-08-01

    In this paper, we report new limits on 21 cm emission from cosmic reionization based on a 135 day observing campaign with a 64-element deployment of the Donald C. Backer Precision Array for Probing the Epoch of Reionization in South Africa. This work extends the work presented in Parsons et al. with more collecting area, a longer observing period, improved redundancy-based calibration, improved fringe-rate filtering, and updated power-spectral analysis using optimal quadratic estimators. The result is a new 2σ upper limit on Δ2(k) of (22.4 mK)2 in the range 0.15\\lt k\\lt 0.5h {{Mpc}}-1 at z = 8.4. This represents a three-fold improvement over the previous best upper limit. As we discuss in more depth in a forthcoming paper, this upper limit supports and extends previous evidence against extremely cold reionization scenarios. We conclude with a discussion of implications for future 21 cm reionization experiments, including the newly funded Hydrogen Epoch of Reionization Array.

  7. A receding horizon approach for dynamic UAV mission management

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cassandras, Christos G.; Li, Wei

    2003-09-01

    We consider a setting where multiple UAVs form a team cooperating to visit multiple targets to collect rewards associated with them. The team objective is to maximize the total reward accumulated over a given time interval. Complicating factors include uncertainties regarding the locations of targets and the effectiveness of collecting rewards, differences among vehicle capabilities, and the fact that rewards are time-varying. We describe a Receding Horizon (RH) control scheme which dynamically assigns vehicles to targets and simultaneously determines associated trajectories. This scheme is based on solving a sequence of optimization problems over a planning horizon and executing them over a shorter action horizon. We also describe a simulated battlespace environment designed to test UAV team missions and to illustrate how the RH scheme can achieve optimal performance with high probability.

  8. Asymptotically Lifshitz spacetimes with universal horizons in (1 +2 ) dimensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basu, Sayandeb; Bhattacharyya, Jishnu; Mattingly, David; Roberson, Matthew

    2016-03-01

    Hořava gravity theory possesses global Lifshitz space as a solution and has been conjectured to provide a natural framework for Lifshitz holography. We derive the conditions on the two-derivative Hořava gravity Lagrangian that are necessary for static, asymptotically Lifshitz spacetimes with flat transverse dimensions to contain a universal horizon, which plays a similar thermodynamic role as the Killing horizon in general relativity. Specializing to z =2 in 1 +2 dimensions, we then numerically construct such regular solutions over the whole spacetime. We calculate the mass for these solutions and show that, unlike the asymptotically anti-de Sitter case, the first law applied to the universal horizon is straightforwardly compatible with a thermodynamic interpretation.

  9. Thermodynamics of event horizons in (2+1)-dimensional gravity

    SciTech Connect

    Reznik, B. )

    1992-03-15

    Although gravity in 2+1 dimensions is very different in nature from gravity in 3+1 dimensions, it is shown that the laws of thermodynamics for event horizons can be manifested also for (2+1)-dimensional gravity. The validity of the classical laws of horizon mechanics is verified in general and exemplified for the (2+1)-dimensional analogues of Reissner-Nordstroem and Schwarzschild--de Sitter spacetimes. We find that the entropy is given by 1/4{ital L}, where {ital L} is the length of the horizon. A consequence of having consistent thermodynamics is that the second law fixes the sign of Newton's constant to be positive.

  10. Black hole thermodynamics from near-horizon conformal quantum mechanics

    SciTech Connect

    Camblong, Horacio E.; Ordonez, Carlos R.

    2005-05-15

    The thermodynamics of black holes is shown to be directly induced by their near-horizon conformal invariance. This behavior is exhibited using a scalar field as a probe of the black hole gravitational background, for a general class of metrics in D spacetime dimensions (with D{>=}4). The ensuing analysis is based on conformal quantum mechanics, within a hierarchical near-horizon expansion. In particular, the leading conformal behavior provides the correct quantum statistical properties for the Bekenstein-Hawking entropy, with the near-horizon physics governing the thermodynamics from the outset. Most importantly: (i) this treatment reveals the emergence of holographic properties; (ii) the conformal coupling parameter is shown to be related to the Hawking temperature; and (iii) Schwarzschild-like coordinates, despite their 'coordinate singularity', can be used self-consistently to describe the thermodynamics of black holes.

  11. Deepwater Horizon oil spill monitoring using airborne multispectral infrared imagery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Sylvia S.; Lewis, Paul E.

    2011-06-01

    On April 28, 2010, the Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA) Airborne Spectral Photometric Environmental Collection Technology (ASPECT) aircraft was deployed to Gulfport, Mississippi to provide airborne remotely sensed air monitoring and situational awareness data and products in response to the Deepwater Horizon oil spill disaster. The ASPECT aircraft was released from service on August 9, 2010 after having flown over 85 missions that included over 325 hours of flight operation. This paper describes several advanced analysis capabilities specifically developed for the Deepwater Horizon mission to correctly locate, identify, characterize, and quantify surface oil using ASPECT's multispectral infrared data. The data products produced using these advanced analysis capabilities provided the Deepwater Horizon Incident Command with a capability that significantly increased the effectiveness of skimmer vessel oil recovery efforts directed by the U.S. Coast Guard, and were considered by the Incident Command as key situational awareness information.

  12. Bivalve Shell Horizons in Seafloor Pockmarks of the Last Glacial-interglacial Transition Suggest a Thousand Years of Methane Emissions in the Arctic Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ambrose, W. G., Jr.; Panieri, G.; Schneider, A.; Plaza-Faverola, A. A.; Carroll, M.; Åström, E. K. L.; Locke, W. L.; Carroll, J.

    2015-12-01

    We studied discrete bivalve shell horizons, in two gravity cores from seafloor pockmarks on the Vestnesa Ridge (ca. 1200 m water depth), western Svalbard (79° 00' N, 06° 55' W) to provide insight into the temporal and spatial dynamics of seabed methane seeps. The shell beds, are dominated by two genera of the family Vesicomyidae: Phreagena s.l. and Isorropodon sp. were 20-30cm thick centered at 250-400cm depth in the cores. The carbon isotope composition of inorganic (δ13C from -13.02‰ to +2.364‰) and organic (δ13C from -29.283‰ to -21.33‰) shell material indicates that these taxa derived their energy primarily from endosymbiotic chemosynthetic bacteria feeding on methane. In addition, negative δ13C values for planktonic foraminifera (-6.7‰ to -3.1‰), micritic concretions identified as methane-derived authigenic carbonates and pyrite encrusted fossil worm tubes at the shell horizons indicate a sustained paleo-methane seep environment. Combining sedimentation rates with 14C ages for bivalve material from the shell horizons, we estimate the horizons persisted for about 1000 years between approximately 17,707 to 16,680 yrs. BP (corrected). The major seepage event over a 1000 -year time interval was most likely triggered by tectonic stress and the subsequent release of over-pressurized fluids.

  13. Bivalve shell horizons in seafloor pockmarks of the last glacial-interglacial transition: a thousand years of methane emissions in the Arctic Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ambrose, William G.; Panieri, Giuliana; Schneider, Andrea; Plaza-Faverola, Andreia; Carroll, Michael L.; Åström, Emmelie K. L.; Locke, William L.; Carroll, JoLynn

    2015-12-01

    We studied discrete bivalve shell horizons in two gravity cores from seafloor pockmarks on the Vestnesa Ridge (˜1200 m water depth) and western Svalbard (79°00' N, 06°55' W) to provide insight into the temporal and spatial dynamics of seabed methane seeps. The shell beds, dominated by two genera of the family Vesicomyidae: Phreagena s.l. and Isorropodon sp., were 20-30 cm thick and centered at 250-400 cm deep in the cores. The carbon isotope composition of inorganic (δ13C from -13.02‰ to +2.36‰) and organic (δ13C from -29.28‰ to -21.33‰) shell material and a two-end member mixing model indicate that these taxa derived between 8% and 43% of their nutrition from chemosynthetic bacteria. In addition, negative δ13C values for planktonic foraminifera (-6.7‰ to -3.1‰), concretions identified as methane-derived authigenic carbonates, and pyrite-encrusted fossil worm tubes at the shell horizons indicate a sustained paleo-methane seep environment. Combining sedimentation rates with 14C ages for bivalve material from the shell horizons, we estimate the horizons persisted for about 1000 years between approximately 17,707 and 16,680 years B.P. (corrected). The seepage event over a 1000 year time interval was most likely associated with regional stress-related faulting and the subsequent release of overpressurized fluids.

  14. Priority Questions and Horizon Scanning for Conservation: A Comparative Study

    PubMed Central

    Kark, Salit; Sutherland, William J.; Shanas, Uri; Klass, Keren; Achisar, Hila; Dayan, Tamar; Gavrieli, Yael; Justo-Hanani, Ronit; Mandelik, Yael; Orion, Nir; Pargament, David; Portman, Michelle; Reisman-Berman, Orna; Safriel, Uriel N.; Schaffer, Gad; Steiner, Noa; Tauber, Israel; Levin, Noam

    2016-01-01

    Several projects aimed at identifying priority issues for conservation with high relevance to policy have recently been completed in several countries. Two major types of projects have been undertaken, aimed at identifying (i) policy-relevant questions most imperative to conservation and (ii) horizon scanning topics, defined as emerging issues that are expected to have substantial implications for biodiversity conservation and policy in the future. Here, we provide the first overview of the outcomes of biodiversity and conservation-oriented projects recently completed around the world using this framework. We also include the results of the first questions and horizon scanning project completed for a Mediterranean country. Overall, the outcomes of the different projects undertaken (at the global scale, in the UK, US, Canada, Switzerland and in Israel) were strongly correlated in terms of the proportion of questions and/or horizon scanning topics selected when comparing different topic areas. However, some major differences were found across regions. There was large variation among regions in the percentage of proactive (i.e. action and response oriented) versus descriptive (non-response oriented) priority questions and in the emphasis given to socio-political issues. Substantial differences were also found when comparing outcomes of priority questions versus horizon scanning projects undertaken for the same region. For example, issues related to climate change, human demography and marine ecosystems received higher priority as horizon scanning topics, while ecosystem services were more emphasized as current priority questions. We suggest that future initiatives aimed at identifying priority conservation questions and horizon scanning topics should allow simultaneous identification of both current and future priority issues, as presented here for the first time. We propose that further emphasis on social-political issues should be explicitly integrated into future

  15. Priority Questions and Horizon Scanning for Conservation: A Comparative Study.

    PubMed

    Kark, Salit; Sutherland, William J; Shanas, Uri; Klass, Keren; Achisar, Hila; Dayan, Tamar; Gavrieli, Yael; Justo-Hanani, Ronit; Mandelik, Yael; Orion, Nir; Pargament, David; Portman, Michelle; Reisman-Berman, Orna; Safriel, Uriel N; Schaffer, Gad; Steiner, Noa; Tauber, Israel; Levin, Noam

    2016-01-01

    Several projects aimed at identifying priority issues for conservation with high relevance to policy have recently been completed in several countries. Two major types of projects have been undertaken, aimed at identifying (i) policy-relevant questions most imperative to conservation and (ii) horizon scanning topics, defined as emerging issues that are expected to have substantial implications for biodiversity conservation and policy in the future. Here, we provide the first overview of the outcomes of biodiversity and conservation-oriented projects recently completed around the world using this framework. We also include the results of the first questions and horizon scanning project completed for a Mediterranean country. Overall, the outcomes of the different projects undertaken (at the global scale, in the UK, US, Canada, Switzerland and in Israel) were strongly correlated in terms of the proportion of questions and/or horizon scanning topics selected when comparing different topic areas. However, some major differences were found across regions. There was large variation among regions in the percentage of proactive (i.e. action and response oriented) versus descriptive (non-response oriented) priority questions and in the emphasis given to socio-political issues. Substantial differences were also found when comparing outcomes of priority questions versus horizon scanning projects undertaken for the same region. For example, issues related to climate change, human demography and marine ecosystems received higher priority as horizon scanning topics, while ecosystem services were more emphasized as current priority questions. We suggest that future initiatives aimed at identifying priority conservation questions and horizon scanning topics should allow simultaneous identification of both current and future priority issues, as presented here for the first time. We propose that further emphasis on social-political issues should be explicitly integrated into future

  16. A Horizon Scan of Global Conservation Issues for 2016.

    PubMed

    Sutherland, William J; Broad, Steven; Caine, Jacqueline; Clout, Mick; Dicks, Lynn V; Doran, Helen; Entwistle, Abigail C; Fleishman, Erica; Gibbons, David W; Keim, Brandon; LeAnstey, Becky; Lickorish, Fiona A; Markillie, Paul; Monk, Kathryn A; Mortimer, Diana; Ockendon, Nancy; Pearce-Higgins, James W; Peck, Lloyd S; Pretty, Jules; Rockström, Johan; Spalding, Mark D; Tonneijck, Femke H; Wintle, Bonnie C; Wright, Katherine E

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents the results of our seventh annual horizon scan, in which we aimed to identify issues that could have substantial effects on global biological diversity in the future, but are not currently widely well known or understood within the conservation community. Fifteen issues were identified by a team that included researchers, practitioners, professional horizon scanners, and journalists. The topics include use of managed bees as transporters of biological control agents, artificial superintelligence, electric pulse trawling, testosterone in the aquatic environment, building artificial oceanic islands, and the incorporation of ecological civilization principles into government policies in China. PMID:26688445

  17. Near-horizon solution for Dvali-Gabadadze-Porrati perturbations

    SciTech Connect

    Sawicki, Ignacy; Song, Yong-Seon; Hu, Wayne

    2007-03-15

    We develop a scaling ansatz for the master equation in Dvali, Gabadadze, Porrati cosmologies, which allows us to solve the equations of motion for perturbations off the brane during periods when the on-brane evolution is scale free. This allows us to understand the behavior of the gravitational potentials outside the horizon at high redshifts and close to the horizon today. We confirm that the results of Koyama and Maartens are valid at scales relevant for observations such as galaxy-ISW correlations. At larger scales, there is an additional suppression of the potential which reduces the growth rate even further and would strengthen the integrated Sachs-Wolf effect.

  18. Earth, Meet Pluto: The New Horizons Education and Communications Partnership

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buckley, M.

    2015-12-01

    The unique partnership between the NASA New Horizons education/communications and public affairs programs tapped into the excitement of visiting an unexplored planet in a new region of the solar system - resulting in unprecedented public participation in and coverage of a planetary mission. With a range of hands-on learning experiences, Web materials and online , the program provided opportunities for students, educators, museums, science centers, the media, Web surfers and other members of the public to ride along on the first mission to Pluto and the Kuiper Belt. The programs leveraged resources, materials and expertise to address a wide range of traditional and nontraditional audiences while providing consistent messages and information on this historic NASA endeavor. The E/C program included a variety of formal lesson plans and learning materials — based on New Horizons science and engineering goals, and aligned with National Research Council's National Science Education Standards — that continue to help students in grades K-12 learn more about science, technology, engineering and mathematics. College students designed and built an actual flight instrument on New Horizons and held internships with the spacecraft integration and test team. New Horizons E/C programs went well beyond the classroom, from a chance for people to send their names to Pluto on board the New Horizons spacecraft before launch, to opportunities for the public to access milestone events and the first-ever close-up views of Pluto in places such as museums, science centers and libraries, TV and the Web — as well as thousands who attended interactive "Plutopalooza" road shows across the country. Teamed with E/C was the public affairs strategy to communicate New Horizons news and messages to media, mission stakeholders, the scientific community and the public. These messages include various aspects of New Horizons, including the progress of the mission and key milestones and achievements

  19. A horizon scan of global conservation issues for 2014.

    PubMed

    Sutherland, William J; Aveling, Rosalind; Brooks, Thomas M; Clout, Mick; Dicks, Lynn V; Fellman, Liz; Fleishman, Erica; Gibbons, David W; Keim, Brandon; Lickorish, Fiona; Monk, Kathryn A; Mortimer, Diana; Peck, Lloyd S; Pretty, Jules; Rockström, Johan; Rodríguez, Jon Paul; Smith, Rebecca K; Spalding, Mark D; Tonneijck, Femke H; Watkinson, Andrew R

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents the output of our fifth annual horizon-scanning exercise, which aims to identify topics that increasingly may affect conservation of biological diversity, but have yet to be widely considered. A team of professional horizon scanners, researchers, practitioners, and a journalist identified 15 topics which were identified via an iterative, Delphi-like process. The 15 topics include a carbon market induced financial crash, rapid geographic expansion of macroalgal cultivation, genetic control of invasive species, probiotic therapy for amphibians, and an emerging snake fungal disease. PMID:24332318

  20. A horizon scan of global conservation issues for 2014

    PubMed Central

    Sutherland, William J.; Aveling, Rosalind; Brooks, Thomas M.; Clout, Mick; Dicks, Lynn V.; Fellman, Liz; Fleishman, Erica; Gibbons, David W.; Keim, Brandon; Lickorish, Fiona; Monk, Kathryn A.; Mortimer, Diana; Peck, Lloyd S.; Pretty, Jules; Rockström, Johan; Rodríguez, Jon Paul; Smith, Rebecca K.; Spalding, Mark D.; Tonneijck, Femke H.; Watkinson, Andrew R.

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents the output of our fifth annual horizon-scanning exercise, which aims to identify topics that increasingly may affect conservation of biological diversity, but have yet to be widely considered. A team of professional horizon scanners, researchers, practitioners, and a journalist identified 15 topics which were identified via an iterative, Delphi-like process. The 15 topics include a carbon market induced financial crash, rapid geographic expansion of macroalgal cultivation, genetic control of invasive species, probiotic therapy for amphibians, and an emerging snake fungal disease. PMID:24332318

  1. Robust Consumption-Investment Problem on Infinite Horizon

    SciTech Connect

    Zawisza, Dariusz

    2015-12-15

    In our paper we consider an infinite horizon consumption-investment problem under a model misspecification in a general stochastic factor model. We formulate the problem as a stochastic game and finally characterize the saddle point and the value function of that game using an ODE of semilinear type, for which we provide a proof of an existence and uniqueness theorem for its solution. Such equation is interested on its own right, since it generalizes many other equations arising in various infinite horizon optimization problems.

  2. Morphology and magneto-transport properties of electron doped La{sub 0.85}Te{sub 0.15}MnO{sub 3} thin film deposited on LaAlO{sub 3} substrate

    SciTech Connect

    Bhat, Irshad; Husain, Shahid; Patil, S.I.

    2014-09-15

    Graphical abstract: Resistivity versus temperature plots of La{sub 0.85}Te{sub 0.15}MnO{sub 3} thin film under the applied magnetic field of 0 T, 5 T and 8 T. - Highlights: • La{sub 0.85}Te{sub 0.15}MnO{sub 3} manganite thin film is deposited on LaAlO{sub 3} using PLD technique. • Film is deposited at 750 °C, and is highly crystalline, single phase and c-axis oriented. • The film consists of grains with an average diameter of 60 nm. • Resistivity plots display double insulator-metal transitions. • XPS results confirm the electron doped (n-type) nature of the film. - Abstract: We report the structural, electronic transport and X-ray photoemission spectroscopic study of 100 nm thin film of La{sub 0.85}Te{sub 0.15}MnO{sub 3} grown on (0 0 1) LaAlO{sub 3} single crystal substrate by pulsed laser deposition. XRD results confirm that the film has good crystalline quality, single phase, and has a c-axis orientation. The atomic force microscopic (AFM) results showed that the film consists of grains with an average diameter of 60 nm. The resistivity measurement showed double insulator-metal transitions in absence and as well as in presence of the magnetic field. The resistivity peaks are ascribed to the intrinsic contribution of LTMO film and the tunnelling of spin-polarized electrons at grain boundaries. X-ray photoemission spectroscopy measurements suggest that Te ions are in the Te{sup 4+} state, while the Mn ions are forced to stay in the Mn{sup 2+} and Mn{sup 3+} valence state.

  3. Microwave property improvement of Ca[(Li1/3Nb2/3)0.95Zr0.15]O3+δ perovskite by A-site substitution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Mingzhe; Xiong, Gang; Ding, Zhao

    2016-04-01

    The crystal structure and microwave dielectric properties of Ca[(Li1/3Nb2/3)0.95Zr0.15]O3+δ ceramic (CLNZ) are tuned by A-site substitution of Sr2+ and Ba2+ ions in the present paper. The tuning effect on the crystal structure is investigated by the X-ray diffraction (XRD) pattern and it illustrates that single phase of orthorhombic perovskite structure is formed, however, minor amount of BaNb2O6-type second phase is also detected in (Ca1‑xBax)[(Li1/3Nb2/3)0.95Zr0.15]O3+δ ceramics (CBLNZ) in the range of x ≥ 0.025, while pure perovskite phase is obtained in (Ca1‑xSrx)[(Li1/3Nb2/3)0.95Zr0.15]O3+δ ceramics (CSLNZ) in the whole investigation range of 0 ≤ x ≤ 0.2. With the increase of x value, the unit cell volumes of both CBLNZ and CSLNZ perovskites gradually expand, which results in the degradation of the vibration bond strength between the B-site ions and oxygen in the perovskites. The microscopic structure related thermal parameters in CSLNZ and CBLNZ perovskites are analyzed in terms of Clausius-Mossotti equation to reveal the original contributors in the temperature coefficients. The results show that both Sr2+ and Ba2+ substitution can effectively improve the permittivity and Qf value, especially, improve the temperature coefficient of CLNZ ceramic in a certain range.

  4. Sintering of BaCe(sub 0.85)Y(sub 0.15)O(sub 3-delta) with/without SrTiO3 Dopant

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dynys, F.; Sayir, A.; Heimann, P. J.

    2004-01-01

    The perovskite composition, BaCe(sub 0.85)Y(sub 0.15)O(sub 3-delta), displays excellent protonic conduction at high temperatures making it a desirable candidate for hydrogen separation membranes. This paper reports on the sintering behavior of BaCe(sub 0.85)Y(sub 0.15)O(sub 3-delta) powders doped with SrTiO3. Two methods were used to synthesize BaCe(sub 0.85)Y(sub 0.15)O(sub 3-delta) powders: (1) solid state reaction and (2) wet chemical co-precipitation. Co-precipitated powder crystallized into the perovskite phase at 1000 C for 4 hrs. Complete reaction and crystallization of the perovskite phase by solid state was achieved by calcining at 1200 C for 24 hrs. Solid state synthesis produced a coarser powder with an average particle size of 1.3 microns and surface area of 0.74 sq m/g. Co-precipitation produced a finer powder with a average particle size of 65 nm and surface area of 14.9 sq m/g. Powders were doped with 1, 2, 5, and 10 mole % SrTiO3. Samples were sintered at 1450 C, 1550 C and 1650 C. SrTiO3 enhances sintering, optimal dopant level is different for powders synthesized by solid state and co-precipitation. Both powders exhibit similar grain growth behavior. Dopant levels of 5 and 10 mole % SrTiO3 significantly enhances the grain size.

  5. The structure, magnetostriction, and hysteresis of (Tb0.3Dy0.7Fe1.9)1-x(Tb0.15Ho0.85Fe1.9)x alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Bowen; Lv, Yan; Li, Guolu; Huang, Wenmei; Weng, Ling; Cui, Baozhi

    2015-05-01

    The (Tb0.3Dy0.7Fe1.9)1-x(Tb0.15Ho0.85Fe1.9)x alloys were prepared in an arc furnace under high purity argon. The as-cast samples wrapped in Mo foil were sealed in a silica tube filled with high purity argon and were homogenized at 1000 °C for 1 day and at 950 °C for 5 days. Then, the homogenized specimens with 5 mm in diameter and 8 mm in length were annealed under the magnetic field of 320 kA/m. The static measurement of magnetostriction (λ//, λ⊥) was made by standard strain gauge, and the magnetization M was measured by a vibrating sample magnetometer. It is found that the main phase of annealed (Tb0.3Dy0.7Fe1.9)1-x(Tb0.15Ho0.85Fe1.9)x alloys is the (Tb,Dy,Ho)Fe2 phase with the MgCu2-type structure. The magnetostriction λ// and magnetization M of (Tb0.3Dy0.7Fe1.9)1-x(Tb0.15Ho0.85Fe1.9)x alloys increases with increasing x from x = 0.1 to x = 0.3 when H < 240 kA/m. The hysteresis becomes small with increasing x when x ≤ 0.3. For magnetically annealed rod alloys, the magnetostriction markedly increases and reaches 1080 × 10-6 for x = 0.3 when H = 240 kA/m.

  6. Through the looking glass: why the `cosmic horizon' is not a horizon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Oirschot, Pim; Kwan, Juliana; Lewis, Geraint F.

    2010-06-01

    The present standard model of cosmology, Λ cold dark matter (ΛCDM), contains some intriguing coincidences. Not only are the dominant contributions to the energy density approximately of the same order at the present epoch, but we also note that contrary to the emergence of cosmic acceleration as a recent phenomenon, the time-averaged value of the deceleration parameter over the age of the Universe is nearly zero. Curious features like these in ΛCDM give rise to a number of alternate cosmologies being proposed to remove them, including models with an equation of state w = -1/3. In this paper, we examine the validity of some of these alternate models and we also address some persistent misconceptions about the Hubble sphere and the event horizon that lead to erroneous conclusions about cosmology. Research undertaken as part of the Commonwealth Cosmology Initiative (CCI: http://www.thecci.org), an international collaboration supported by the Australian Research Council. E-mail: pimvanoirschot@gmail.com

  7. Synthesis, structural and vibrational properties of Bi{sub 0.8}La{sub 0.15}A{sub 0.05}FeO{sub 3} (A = Ca, Sr)

    SciTech Connect

    Sharma, Poorva E-mail: poorva.aks@gmail.com; Kumar, Ashwini; Varshney, Dinesh E-mail: poorva.aks@gmail.com

    2015-06-24

    The polycrystalline Bi{sub 0.8}La{sub 0.15}A{sub 0.05}FeO{sub 3} (A = Ca, Sr) was synthesized by solid state reaction route to study the structural and vibrational properties. X-ray diffraction patterns confirmed the formation of single-phase perovskite structure. Rietveld–refined crystal structure parameters revealed the existence of rhombohedral R3c symmetry in the prepared sample. The blue shift of phonon modes is attributed to lower atomic mass of La{sup 3+} and A = (Ca, Sr) substitution at Bi site in BiFeO{sub 3}.

  8. Study of the angular-dependence of the L-alpha and L-beta radiation produced by 0-15 kev photons incident on Au targets of various thicknesses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Requena, Sebastian; Williams, Scott

    2011-03-01

    We report the results of experiments involving the L-alpha and L-beta x-ray lines produced by 0-15 keV bremsstrahlung incident on gold targets of various thicknesses at forward-scattered angles ranging from 20 to 160 degrees. Previous reports [1, 2] have shown the L-beta peaks to be isotropic and the L-alpha peaks to be anisotropic due to the symmetry/asymmetry associated with the orbital being filled during the transition. The relative intensities are compared to the predictions of the Monte Carlo code, PENELOPE.

  9. Alpha self-irradiation effect on the local structure of the U{sub 0.85}Am{sub 0.15}O{sub 2{+-}x} solid solution

    SciTech Connect

    Prieur, D.; Martin, P.M.; Scheinost, A.C.; Dehaudt, P.

    2012-10-15

    Uranium-americium mixed oxides are promising fuels for achieving an efficient Am recycling. Previous studies on U{sub 0.85}Am{sub 0.15}O{sub 2{+-}x} materials showed that the high {alpha} activity of {sup 241}Am induces pellet swelling which is a major issue for cladding materials design. In this context, X-ray Diffraction and X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy measurements were used to study self-irradiation effects on U{sub 0.85}Am{sub 0.15}O{sub 2{+-}x} local structure and to correlate these results with those obtained at the macroscopic scale. For a cumulative {alpha} decay dose equal to 0.28 dpa, it was shown that non-defective fluorite solid solutions were achieved and therefore, that the fluorite structure is stable for the studied doses. In addition, both interatomic distance and lattice parameter expansions were observed, which only partially explains the macroscopic swelling. As expected, an increase of the structural disorder with self-irradiation was also observed. - Graphical abstract: X-ray Diffraction and X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy measurements were performed on U{sub 0.85}Am{sub 0.15}O{sub 2{+-}x}, exhibiting various cumulative {alpha} decay doses, in order to study self-irradiation effects on local structure and to correlate these results with those obtained at the macroscopic scale. Thus, it was shown that the fluorite structure is stable for the studied doses. In addition, both interatomic distance and lattice parameter expansions were observed, explaining partially the macroscopic swelling. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Non-defective fluorite U{sub 0.85}Am{sub 0.15}O{sub 2{+-}x} solid solutions were achieved. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The fluorite structure is stable for the studied doses. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A lattice parameter increase was observed, which partially explains the macroscopic swelling. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The increase of the structural disorder can be understood from the ballistic effect associated

  10. Erratum: VLA H92α and H115β Recombination Line Observations of the Galactic Center H II Regions: The Sickle (G0.18-0.04) and the Pistol (G0.15-0.05)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lang, Cornelia C. Lang; Goss, W. M.; Wood, D. O. S.

    1997-06-01

    In the paper ``VLA H92α and H115β Recombination Line Observations of the Galactic Center H II Regions: The Sickle (G0.18-0.04) and the Pistol (G0.15-0.05)'' by Cornelia C. Lang, W. M. Goss, and D. O. S. Wood (ApJ, 474, 275 [1997]), an error occurred in Figure 9. Figure 9a was printed twice, and Figure 9b was omitted. The correct version of Figure 9b is presented here.

  11. Lessons Learned From CM-2 Modal Testing and Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McNelis, Mark E.; Goodnight, Thomas W.; Carney, Kelly S.; Otten, Kim D.

    2002-01-01

    The Combustion Module-2 (CM-2) is a space experiment that launches on Shuttle mission STS-107 in the SPACEHAB Double Research Module. The CM-2 flight hardware is installed into SPACEHAB single and double racks. The CM-2 flight hardware was vibration tested in the launch configuration to characterize the structure's modal response. Cross-orthogonality between test and analysis mode shapes were used to assess model correlation. Lessons learned for pre-test planning and model verification are discussed.

  12. Visualization on massively parallel computers using CM/AVS

    SciTech Connect

    Krogh, M.F.; Hansen, C.D.

    1993-09-01

    CM/AVS is a visualization environment for the massively parallel CM-5 from Thinking Machines. It provides a backend to the standard commercially available AVS visualization product. At the Advanced Computing Laboratory at Los Alamos National Laboratory, we have been experimenting and utilizing this software within our visualization environment. This paper describes our experiences with CM/AVS. The conclusions reached are applicable to any implimentation of visualization software within a massively parallel computing environment.

  13. Energy Levels of the Nitrate Radical Below 2000 CM-1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stanton, J. F.; Simmons, C. S.

    2012-06-01

    Highly sophisticated quantum chemistry techniques have been employed to build a three-state diabatic Hamiltonian for the nitrate radical (NO_3). Eigenvalues of this Hamiltonian (which includes effects beyond the Born-Oppenheimer approximation) are consistent with the known ``vibrational'' levels of NO_3 up to ca. 2100 cm-1 above the zero-point level; with a small empirical adjustment of the diabatic coupling strength, calculated levels are within 20 cm-1 of the measured level positions for those that have been observed experimentally. Of the eleven states with e' symmetry calculated below 2000 cm-1, nine of these have been observed either in the gas phase by Hirota and collaborators as well as Neumark and Johnston, or in frozen argon by Jacox. However, the Hamiltonian produces two levels that have not been seen experimentally: one calculated to lie at 1075 cm-1 (which is the third e' state, above ν_4 and 2ν_4) and another at 1640 cm-1 which is best assigned as one of the two e' sublevels of 4ν_4. A significant result is that the state predicted at 1075 cm-1 is not far enough above the predicted 2ν_4 level (777 cm-1 v. ca. 760 cm-1 from experiment) to be plausibly assigned as 3ν_4 (which is at 1155 cm-1: experimental position: 1173 cm-1), nor is its nodal structure consistent with such an idea. Rather, it is quite unambiguously the ν_3 level. Given the fidelity of the results generated by this model Hamiltonian as compared to experiment, it can safely be concluded that the prominent infrared band seen at 1492 cm-1 (corresponding to a calculated level at 1500 cm-1) is not ν_3, but rather a multiquantum state best viewed as a sublevel of the ν_3 + ν_4 combination.

  14. Higher Horizons: An Evaluation of an Expanded Team Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hartford Public Schools, CT.

    The original Higher Horizons Program or HH 100, was established in 1965 as a ninth grade compensatory model which could be used to demonstrate that some of the more salient ravages of educational deprivation could be corrected effectively, and at the high school level. So as to demonstrate that secondary school compensatory education could…

  15. Knowledge Concerning the Mathematical Horizon: A Close View

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Guberman, Raisa; Gorev, Dvora

    2015-01-01

    The main objective of this study is to identify components of teachers' mathematical knowledge for teaching, associated with the knowledge of mathematical horizon (KMH) in order to describe this type of knowledge from the viewpoint of elementary school mathematics teachers. The research population of this study consisted of 118 elementary school…

  16. Solution to the cosmological horizon problem proposed by Zee

    SciTech Connect

    Pollock, M.D.

    1981-08-15

    Applying a theory of gravity with broken symmetry, Zee has suggested a solution to the cosmological horizon problem. His idea has been criticized on two independent grounds by Linde and by Sato. In this paper, we suggest answers to both these criticisms.

  17. New Horizons: An Empowerment Program for Egyptian Adolescent Girls.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Swanson, Julie Hanson

    New Horizons is a nonschool program that demystifies and communicates essential information on basic life skills and reproductive health to Egyptian girls and young women aged 9-20. The program consists of 100 hour-long sessions, each including an introduction to a specific topic, review of group knowledge level, discussion around key points…

  18. Community Colleges Broadening Horizons through Service Learning, 2006-2009

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robinson, Gail

    2007-01-01

    This brief introduces "Community Colleges Broadening Horizons through Service Learning," the American Association of Community Colleges' (AACC's) fifth national Learn and Serve America grant project and describes its grantee college programs. The goals of this grant project are to build on established foundations to integrate service learning…

  19. Breaking an Abelian gauge symmetry near a black hole horizon

    SciTech Connect

    Gubser, Steven S.

    2008-09-15

    I argue that coupling the Abelian Higgs model to gravity plus a negative cosmological constant leads to black holes which spontaneously break the gauge invariance via a charged scalar condensate slightly outside their horizon. This suggests that black holes can superconduct.

  20. Colorful Horizons with Charge in Anti-de Sitter Space

    SciTech Connect

    Gubser, Steven S.

    2008-11-07

    An Abelian gauge symmetry can be spontaneously broken near a black hole horizon in anti-de Sitter space using a condensate of non-Abelian gauge fields. A second order phase transition is shown to separate Reissner-Nordstroem-anti-de Sitter solutions from a family of symmetry-breaking solutions which preserve a diagonal combination of gauge invariance and spatial rotational invariance.

  1. New Horizons for Learning: An Interview with Dee Dickinson

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Windham, Scott; Dickinson, Dee

    2005-01-01

    This article presents an interview with Dee Dickinson, founder and chief learning officer of New Horizons for Learning, a nonprofit international education network whose mission is to identify, communicate, and help implement effective teaching and learning strategies. Founded in 1980 and now operating largely through its Web site, New Horizons…

  2. Apparent horizons in D-dimensional Robinson-Trautman spacetime

    SciTech Connect

    Svitek, Otakar

    2009-05-01

    We derive the higher dimensional generalization of Penrose-Tod equation describing apparent horizons in Robinson-Trautman spacetimes. New results concerning the existence and uniqueness of its solutions in four dimensions are proven. Namely, previous results of Tod [1] are generalized to nonvanishing cosmological constant.

  3. 7. PHOTOGRAPHIC COPY OF ORIGINAL CONSTRUCTION DRAWING, DATED 1918, HORIZONAL ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    7. PHOTOGRAPHIC COPY OF ORIGINAL CONSTRUCTION DRAWING, DATED 1918, HORIZONAL SLIDING WINDOW DETAIL, WAR DEPARTMENT, MANUAL OF THE CONSTRUCTION DIVISION OF THE ARMY, WAR EMERGENCY CONSTRUCTION, SECTION C, ENGINEERING DIVISION, PLATE 5, CONSOLIDATED SUPPLY COMPANY PRINTERS, WASHINGTON - Fort Bliss, 7th Cavalry Buildings, U.S. Army Air Defence Artillery Center & Fort Bliss, El Paso, El Paso County, TX

  4. SOLUBLE ALUMINUM IN ACIDIFIED ORGANIC HORIZONS OF FOREST SOILS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Concentrations of labile and total Al in soil extracts were measured as a function of equilibrium solution pH in six forest soil organic horizons acidified with HNO, (0-20 cmol H+.kg-1) under controlled conditions of ionic strength (0.05 M NaNO3), temperature (23 C), and solution...

  5. The high water-holding capacity of petrocalcic horizons

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Petrocalcic soil horizons occur in most arid and semi-arid ecosystems around the world, often within the plant rooting zone. Little is known, however, about the water holding characteristic of soils indurated with calcium carbonate. We conducted a replicated experiment to define the soil-water relea...

  6. Star/horizon simulator used to test space guidance system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmidt, W. C.

    1967-01-01

    Star/horizon simulator is used for alignment and optical plus photoelectric tests of the sextant for the Apollo guidance and navigation system optical unit assembly. The unit is basically a refractive collimator with a two inch objective lens system and a twenty-four inch focal length.

  7. Black Hole Physics with the Event Horizon Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ozel, Feryal

    2016-01-01

    The Event Horizon Telescope is an experiment that is being performed on a large and ever-increasing array of radio telescopes that span the Earth from Hawaii to Chile and from the South Pole to Arizona. When data will be taken with the full array, it will image the event horizons of the supermassive black hole at the center of our Galaxy, Sagittarius A*, and the black hole at the center of M87, with an unprecedented 10 microarcssecond resolution. This will allow us to take the first ever pictures of black holes at 1.3 and 0.85 mm wavelengths and look for the shadow that is a direct evidence for a black hole predicted by the theory of General Relativity. In addition, the Event Horizon Telescope will also enable us to study the process by which black holes accrete matter and grow in mass. I will discuss the theoretical developments in simulating the properties of the black hole accretion flows and their expected images using state-of-the-art algorithms and high performance computing. Interpreting the upcoming observations within this theoretical framework will open new horizons in black hole astrophysics.

  8. Ecological Impacts of the Deepwater Horizon Oil Spill (Bogota, Columbia)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Deepwater Horizon oil spill (DWH) was the largest environmental disaster and response effort in US History, with nearly 800 million liters spilled. Vast areas of the Gulf of Mexico were contaminated with oil, including deep ocean communities, protected species, over 1600 km o...

  9. Survey of New Horizons International Music Association Musicians

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coffman, Don

    2009-01-01

    This study analysed survey responses from 1652 New Horizons International Music Association (NHIMA) musicians in the United States and Canada to better understand older adults' experiences in making music. The purpose of this study was threefold: (a) ascertain the extent of NHIMA musicians' musical backgrounds and their current involvement in…

  10. Ecological impacts of the Deepwater Horizon oil spill

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Deepwater Horizon oil spill (DWH) was the largest environmental disaster and response effort in United States history, with nearly 800 million liters of crude oil spilled. Vast areas of the Gulf of Mexico were contaminated with oil, including deep ocean communities and over 1...

  11. Ecological Impacts during the Deepwater Horizon Oil Spill

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Deepwater Horizon (DWH) oil spill was the largest spill and response effort in United States history. Nearly 800 million L of oil was spilled in the Gulf of Mexico, and nearly 7 million L of chemical dispersants were applied in at the ocean surface and subsea1. The DWH spill ...

  12. A MIP Model for Rolling Horizon Surgery Scheduling.

    PubMed

    Luo, Li; Luo, Yong; You, Yang; Cheng, Yuanjun; Shi, Yingkang; Gong, Renrong

    2016-05-01

    Most surgery scheduling is done 1 day in advance. Caused by lack of overall planning, this scheduling scheme often results in unbalanced occupancy time of the operating rooms. So we put forward a rolling horizon mixed integer programming model for the scheduling. Rolling horizon scheduling refers to a scheduling scheme in which cyclic surgical requests are taken into account. Surgical requests are updated daily. The completed surgeries are eliminated, and new surgeries are added to the scheduling list. Considering day-to-day demand for surgery, we develop a non-rolling scheduling model (NRSM) and a rolling horizon scheduling model (RSM). By comparing the two, we find that the quality of surgery scheduling is significantly influenced by the variation in demand from day to day. A rolling horizon scheduling will enable a more flexible planning of the pool of surgeries that have not been scheduled into this main blocks, and hence minimize the idle time of operating rooms. The strategy of the RSM helps balance the occupancy time among operating rooms. Using surgical data from five departments of the West China Hospital (WCH), we generate surgical demands randomly to compare the NRSM and the RSM. The results show the operating rooms' average utilization rate using RSM is significantly higher than when applying NRSM. PMID:27071394

  13. How Big Is the Earth? A Calculation beyond Your Horizon

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kibble, Bob

    2011-01-01

    A consequence of the curvature of the Earth is that distant ships apparently disappear over the horizon. This article shows how you can use a simple photograph to help students obtain a reasonable estimate of the size of the Earth using little more than the mathematics of Pythagoras. (Contains 5 figures.)

  14. Gravitational black hole hair from event horizon supertranslations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Averin, Artem; Dvali, Gia; Gomez, Cesar; Lüst, Dieter

    2016-06-01

    We discuss BMS supertranslations both at null-infinity BMS- and on the horizon {BMS}^{mathscr{H}} for the case of the Schwarzschild black hole. We show that both kinds of supertranslations lead to infinetly many gapless physical excitations. On this basis we construct a quotient algebra mathcal{A}equiv {BMS}^{mathscr{H}}/{BMS}- using suited superpositions of both kinds of transformations which cannot be compensated by an ordinary BMS-supertranslation and therefore are intrinsically due to the presence of an event horizon. We show that transformations in mathcal{A} are physical and generate gapless excitations on the horizon that can account for the gravitational hair as well as for the black hole entropy. We identify the physics of these modes as associated with Bogolioubov-Goldstone modes due to quantum criticality. Classically the number of these gapless modes is infinite. However, we show that due to quantum criticality the actual amount of information-carriers becomes finite and consistent with Bekenstein entropy. Although we only consider the case of Schwarzschild geometry, the arguments are extendable to arbitrary space-times containing event horizons.

  15. The Horizon Project Call to Scholarship: 2007-8

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    New Media Consortium, 2007

    2007-01-01

    With the release of the fourth edition in the annual "Horizon Report, the New Media Consortium (NMC) has undertaken a concerted, international effort to describe a research agenda and call to scholarship based on the six practices and technologies featured in the report. The community was invited to participate in this process, contribute to the…

  16. CFT/gravity correspondence on the isolated horizon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghosh, Amit; Pranzetti, Daniele

    2014-12-01

    A quantum isolated horizon can be modelled by an SU (2) Chern-Simons theory on a punctured 2-sphere. We show how a local 2-dimensional conformal symmetry arises at each puncture inducing an infinite set of new observables localised at the horizon which satisfy a Kac-Moody algebra. By means of the isolated horizon boundary conditions, we represent the gravitational flux degrees of freedom in terms of the zero modes of the Kac-Moody algebra defined on the boundary of a punctured disk. In this way, our construction encodes a precise notion of CFT/gravity correspondence. The higher modes in the algebra represent new nongeometric charges which can be represented in terms of free matter field degrees of freedom. When computing the CFT partition function of the system, these new states induce an extra degeneracy factor, representing the density of horizon states at a given energy level, which reproduces the Bekenstein's holographic bound for an imaginary Immirzi parameter. This allows us to recover the Bekenstein-Hawking entropy formula without the large quantum gravity corrections associated with the number of punctures.

  17. Rethinking Classroom Management: A New Perspective, a New Horizon

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Toprakci, Erdal

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to suggest a new perspective and a new horizon by analyzing the concept of classroom management in the literature of traditional classroom management from a scientific and dictionary view. It may be said that there are serious problems regarding the settlement of the meaning of "classroom management" in the educational…

  18. Physics from the News: The Deepwater Horizon Disaster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bartlett, Albert

    2010-10-01

    A surprising (at least to me) phenomenon from hydrostatics may have played a role in initiating the blowout and fire (April 20, 2010) that burned for two days before sinking the drilling ship the Deepwater Horizon, resulting in a large and environmentally destructive oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico.

  19. Ecological Impacts During the Deepwater Horizon Oil Spill Response

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Deepwater Horizon (DWH) oil spill was the largest environmental disaster and response effort in U.S. history, with nearly 800 million liters of crude oil spilled. Vast areas of the Gulf of Mexico were contaminated with oil, including deep-ocean communities and over 1,600 kilo...

  20. What happens to Petrov classification, on horizons of axisymmetric dirty black holes

    SciTech Connect

    Tanatarov, I. V.; Zaslavskii, O. B.

    2014-02-15

    We consider axisymmetric stationary dirty black holes with regular non-extremal or extremal horizons, and compute their on-horizon Petrov types. The Petrov type (PT) in the frame of the observer crossing the horizon can be different from that formally obtained in the usual (but singular in the horizon limit) frame of an observer on a circular orbit. We call this entity the boosted Petrov type (BPT), as the corresponding frame is obtained by a singular boost from the regular one. The PT off-horizon can be more general than PT on-horizon and that can be more general than the BPT on horizon. This is valid for all regular metrics, irrespective of the extremality of the horizon. We analyze and classify the possible relations between the three characteristics and discuss the nature and features of the underlying singular boost. The three Petrov types can be the same only for space-times of PT D and O off-horizon. The mutual alignment of principal null directions and the generator in the vicinity of the horizon is studied in detail. As an example, we also analyze a special class of metrics with utra-extremal horizons (for which the regularity conditions look different from the general case) and compare their off-horizon and on-horizon algebraic structure in both frames.

  1. New Horizons: Bridge to the Beginning - to Pluto and Beyond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weir, H. M.; Hallau, K. G.; Seaton, P.; Beisser, K.; New Horizons Education; Public Outreach Team

    2010-12-01

    Launched on Jan. 19, 2006, NASA’s New Horizons mission to Pluto and the Kuiper Belt will help us understand worlds at the edge of our solar system by making the first reconnaissance of Pluto and Charon - a "double planet" and the last planet in our solar system to be visited by spacecraft. However, New Horizons’ closest approach to Pluto will not occur until July 14, 2015, and the majority of the craft's time over the next 5 years will be spent in "hibernation." The Education and Public Outreach (EPO) team, however, will not be hibernating as we wait for New Horizons to reach its destination. With three distinct tools-- Educator Fellows, online learning modules and a planetarium program--the team seeks to excite and engage teachers, students and the public with information about the journey to Pluto and beyond. In the past year, the specially selected educators who participate as New Horizons Educator Fellows have trained more than 1,000 teachers across the U.S. on the New Horizons mission and the science behind it. Thousands more students, parents, educators, and citizens have learned about New Horizons from the mission's scientists, engineers and outreach professionals. New Horizons Fellows also distribute another EPO tool: online learning modules. These classroom-ready learning modules consist of educator guides, student handouts, detailed activities, and potential adaptations for students with special needs or disabilities. Some also offer online interactives to convey complex and dynamic concepts. The modules are web-accessible for both students and teachers, and are aligned with relevant national standards. The third tool is a highly visual way to engage the general public and supplement educational programs: a planetarium program that highlights the New Horizons mission from launch to destination Pluto. This program focuses on the engineering design of the spacecraft, with a focus on the concept of the electromagnetic spectrum. In the unique environment

  2. Structural and magnetic properties with large reversible magnetocaloric effect in (La1-xPrx)0.85Ag0.15MnO3 (0.0 ≤ x ≤ 0.5) compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osman Ayaş, Ali; Akyol, Mustafa; Ekicibil, Ahmet

    2016-04-01

    We report on the effect of Pr doping on structural, magnetic and magnetocaloric properties in (La1-xPrx)0.85Ag0.15MnO3 (0.0 ≤ x ≤ 0.5) compounds. The main crystal structure has been studied by performing X-ray diffraction method and structural analysis based on Rietveld method where it is found that although samples at low concentration level (x ≤ 0.2) have rhombohedral phase ?, others (x ≥ 0.3) have orthorhombic (Pbnm) phase. Scanning electron microscope images show that the average particle size decreases by increasing Pr amount in the main structure. It is observed that the second-order transition temperature from ferromagnetic to paramagnetic phase is dramatically decreased from 262 to 138 K by increasing Pr concentration in (La1-xPrx)0.85Ag0.15MnO3. On the other hand, all samples have also antiferromagnetic coupling observed below TN ~ 50 K. The maximum magnetic entropy change (-ΔSM)max and relative cooling power values were found in the range of 7.90-2.88 J/kg K and 213.32-153.50 J/kg, respectively, under 50 kOe field change in our samples. It can be argued that particularly the compounds LPAM with x = 0.0, 0.1 and 0.2 are expected to be promising candidate for magnetic refrigeration.

  3. Sub-10 μm grain size, Ba1-xCaxTi0.9Zr0.1O3 (x = 0.10 and x = 0.15) piezoceramics processed using a reduced thermal treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reyes-Montero, A.; Pardo, L.; López-Juárez, R.; González, A. M.; Rea-López, S. O.; Cruz, M. P.; Villafuerte-Castrejón, M. E.

    2015-06-01

    The solid-state synthesis of Ba1-xCaxTi0.9Zr0.1O3 (x = 0.10, 0.15) (BCTZ) powder and the processing method of ceramics, by the use of reduced synthesis time and temperature (1250 °C for 2 h), are reported. Homogeneous and dense (≥95%) ceramic microstructures with sub-10 μm grain size were obtained under all sintering conditions. A comparative study of their ferro-piezoelectric properties as a function of sintering temperatures is presented. The study shows the role of the grain size effect for improving both piezoelectric and ferroelectric properties of these materials. With an increase of the sintering temperature, grain growth was promoted; therefore, higher ferro-piezoelectric values were obtained (at 1400 °C, for x = 0.10: d33 = 300 pC/N, {{d}31}=-150 pC/N, kp = 48% for x = 0.15: d33 = 410 pC/N, d31 =-154 pC/N, kp = 50%). In addition, a diffuse phase transition is observed in these BCTZ ceramics with a Curie temperature near 100 °C at 1 kHz.

  4. Investigation of the effect of Ag addition on the critical current density of the high-temperature superconductor Nd1.85Ce0.15CuO4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Radhikesh Raveendran, N.; Vinod, K.; Amaladass, E. P.; Janaki, J.; Mani, Awadhesh

    2016-07-01

    We have synthesized a Nd1.85Ce0.15CuO4 + Ag composite system with the aim of studying the effect of Ag addition in the electron-doped system Nd1.85Ce0.15CuO4 on its superconducting and magnetic properties. Measurements of magnetization using a vibration sample magnetometer indicate a systematic increase in diamagnetic shielding upon Ag addition. A subsequent analysis of the critical current density using the Bean model indicates a small but significant increase in intra-grain critical current density upon Ag addition. From the study of the dependence of electrical resistivity on the temperature and electrical current, an increase in inter-granular critical current has also been evidenced upon Ag addition. These results correlate well with the earlier reports of a similar improvement in the properties on the hole-doped ceramic superconductor/Ag composites. Possible reasons for the enhancement of JC have been described and discussed. Magnetic characterization by AC susceptibility using a SQUID magnetometer has been presented for a representative composition, which enabled delineation of the inter- and intra-granular transitions.

  5. Magneto-transport properties of La0.75Ca0.15Sr0.1MnO3 with YBa2Cu3O7-δ addition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zghal, E.; Koubaa, M.; Berthet, P.; Sicard, L.; Cheikhrouhou-Koubaa, W.; Decorse-Pascanut, C.; Cheikhrouhou, A.; Ammar-Merah, S.

    2016-09-01

    We report the structural, magnetic, electrical and magentoresistance properties of (La0.75Ca0.15Sr0.1MnO3)1-x(YBa2Cu3O7-δ)x (with x=0, 0.025, 0.05, 0.075, 0.1, 0.2, and 0.3) composites synthesized through sol-gel method. The powder X-ray diffraction patterns indicate no evidence of reaction between La0.75Ca0.15Sr0.1MnO3 (LCSMO) and YBa2Cu3O7-δ (YBCO). The addition of YBCO induces a reduction of the total magnetization while the Curie temperature remains almost constant (∼312 K). The behavior of the electrical resistivity evolves differently depending on the doping level. Above the paramagnetic-insulating transition temperature the resistivity data were best-fitted by using the adiabatic small polaron and variable range hopping models. Ferromagnetic-metallic regime in the composites seems to emanate from the electron-phonon or/and electron-magnon scattering processes. With increasing the YBCO doping content (until x=0.1), the positive magnetoresistance (MR) of YBCO phase dominates the negative MR of LCSMO one, which gives rise to the decreasing of MR of the composites.

  6. Power and capacity fade mechanism of LiNi0.8Co0.15Al0.0502composite cathodes in high-power lithium-ion batteries

    SciTech Connect

    Kostecki, Robert; McLarnon, Frank

    2003-09-01

    High-power Li-ion cells that were tested at elevatedtemperatures showed a significant impedance rise, which was associatedprimarily with the LiNi0.8Co0.15Al0.05O2 cathode. By systematicallycollecting thousands of Raman spectra from 50 x 80 mm areas at 0.9 mmspatial resolution, and integrating the respective bands of the cathodecomponents for each spectrum, we were able to produce color-coded,semi-quantitative composition maps of cathode surfaces. Raman microscopyimages of cathodes from tested cells revealed that cell cycling orstorage at elevated temperatures led to significant changes in theLiNi0.8Co0.15Al0.05O2/elemental-carbon surface concentration ratio. Theloss of conductive carbon correlated with the power and capacity fade ofthe tested cathodes. The cathode surface state of charge (SOC) variedbetween individual grains of active material, and at some locations thespectra indicated the presence of fully charged material, despite thedeep cell discharge at the end of testing.

  7. Rare-earth energy levels in Nd2CuO4, Pr2CuO4, and the electron superconductor Pr1.85Ce0.15CuO4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loong, C.-K.; Soderholm, L.

    1993-11-01

    The magnetic excitation spectra of the electron superconductor Pr1.85Ce0.15CuO4 and related parent compounds Pr2CuO4 and Nd2CuO4 have been determined by inelastic neutron scattering. We observe crystal-field transitions up to about 100 meV within the Pr3+ 3H4 and Nd3+ 4I9/2 Russell-Saunders ground multiplets in these materials. We find that a crystal-field treatment of the Pr3+ and Nd3+ ions can adequately explain the observed excitation spectra for both Pr2CuO4 and Nd2CuO4. The obtained crystal-field parameters are close to values estimated from a superposition-model calculation and Mössbauer data. The Pr3+ and Nd3+ wave functions are found to have significant (~=20%) admixture of some states belonging to higher J multiplets. The calculated contributions to the susceptibility of Pr2CuO4 and Nd2CuO4 from the crystal-field states agree well with experiments. The observed crystal-field transitions in the superconductor Pr1.85Ce0.15CuO4 shift to slightly lower energies and are broadened significantly relative to the present compound due to chemical disorder from Ce doping.

  8. Volcanic resurfacing of Io between Galileo and New Horizons Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coman, E.; Phillips, C. B.

    2011-12-01

    Io is the most geologically active object in our solar system. Due to its tumultuous volcanism, determining Io's resurfacing rate will allow better characterization of the subsurface structure, thermal state, and history of tidal heating of this small moon. Numerous active volcanic centers were documented during the Galileo mission in the late 1990's and early 2000's, and the opportunity to discover more of these centers was presented with the flyby of New Horizons in 2007. Previous authors (i.e. Spencer et al. 2007) have compared Galileo SSI and New Horizons LORRI images with similar viewing geometry, and have found multiple new potential features such as dark lava flows and bright plume deposits emplaced between the two flybys. The purpose of this study was to measure the extent of these changes on Io. Because an ISIS camera model does not yet exist for LORRI, a direct ratio image for comparison with the Galileo SSI images could not be created. By changing the stretch of the Galileo SSI images to match those of New Horizons as closely as possible, we were able to create a rough ratio image for the active center locations. We used these ratio images to measure the areal extent of the new deposits, taking careful precautions to measure more changes in shape than brightness, as brightness variations can be caused by certain surface materials being viewed at different phase angles between the Galileo and New Horizons flybys. This presentation will report our measurement findings. We then are able to use our measurements of the total area covered by new volcanic features to make estimates of the resurfacing rate of Io. Spencer, J.R. et al. (2007), Io Volcanism Seen by New Horizons: A Major Eruption of the Tvashtar Volcano, Science, 318, 240, DOI:10.1126/science.1147621.

  9. "The 5 cm Rule": Biopower, Sexuality and Schooling

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Allen, Louisa

    2009-01-01

    This paper explores "the 5 cm rule", a regulation around student contact discovered during an investigation of the sexual culture of schooling with 16-19-year-olds in New Zealand. Implemented to stem "inappropriate and unwanted" touching, it stipulates that students must maintain a physical distance of 5 cm at all times. It is argued this rule…

  10. Design and Performance of 40 cm Ion Optics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Soulas, George C.

    2001-01-01

    A 40 cm ion thruster is being developed at the NASA Glenn Research Center to obtain input power and propellant throughput capabilities of 10 kW and 550 kg. respectively. The technical approach here is a continuation of the "derating" technique used for the NSTAR ion thruster. The 40 cm ion thruster presently utilizes the NSTAR ion optics aperture geometry to take advantage of the large database of lifetime and performance data already available. Dome-shaped grids were chosen for the design of the 40 cm ion optics because this design is naturally suited for large-area ion optics. Ion extraction capabilities and electron backstreaming limits for the 40 cm ion optics were estimated by utilizing NSTAR 30 cm ion optics data. A preliminary service life assessment showed that the propellant throughput goal of 550 kg of xenon may be possible with molybdenum 40 cm ion optics. One 40 cm ion optics' set has been successfully fabricated to date. Additional ion optics' sets are presently being fabricated. Preliminary performance tests were conducted on a laboratory model 40 cm ion thruster.

  11. Photofraction of a 5 cm x 2 cm BGO scintillator. [bismuth germanate crystal for use in cosmic gamma ray detector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dunphy, P. P.; Forrest, D. J.

    1985-01-01

    The photofraction of a 5.1 cm x 2.0 cm bismuth germanate (BGO) scintillator was measured over a gamma-ray energy range of 0.2 to 6.1 MeV. Several methods, used to minimize the effect of room scattering on the measurement, are discussed. These include a gamma-gamma coincidence technique, a beta-gamma coincidence technique, and the use of sources calibrated with a standard 7.6 cm x 7.6 cm sodium iodide scintillator.

  12. On further generalization of the rigidity theorem for spacetimes with a stationary event horizon or a compact Cauchy horizon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rácz, István

    2000-01-01

    A rigidity theorem that applies to smooth electrovacuum spacetimes which represent either (A) an asymptotically flat stationary black hole or (B) a cosmological spacetime with a compact Cauchy horizon ruled by closed null geodesics was given in a recent paper by Friedrich et al (1999 Commun. Math. Phys. 204 691-707). Here we enlarge the framework of the corresponding investigations by allowing the presence of other types of matter fields. In the first part the matter fields are involved merely implicitly via the assumption that the dominant energy condition is satisfied. In the second part Einstein-Klein-Gordon (EKG), Einstein-[non-Abelian]-Higgs (E[nA]H), Einstein-[Maxwell]-Yang-Mills-dilaton (E[M]YMd) and Einstein-Yang-Mills-Higgs (EYMH) systems are studied. The black hole event horizon or, respectively, the compact Cauchy horizon of the considered spacetimes is assumed to be a smooth non-degenerate null hypersurface. It is proved that there exists a Killing vector field in a one-sided neighbourhood of the horizon in EKG, E[nA]H, E[M]YMd and EYMH spacetimes. This Killing vector field is normal to the horizon, moreover, the associated matter fields are also shown to be invariant with respect to it. The presented results provide generalizations of the rigidity theorems of Hawking (for case A) and of Moncrief and Isenberg (for case B) and, in turn, they strengthen the validity of both the black hole rigidity scenario and the strong cosmic censor conjecture of classical general relativity.

  13. 78 FR 33431 - Deepwater Horizon Oil Spill; Notice of Intent To Prepare a Programmatic Environmental Impact...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-06-04

    ... Deepwater Horizon Oil Spill; Notice of Intent To Prepare a Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement for a... state natural resource trustees for the Deepwater Horizon oil spill (Trustees) intend to prepare a PEIS... discharges from the rig and from the wellhead on the seabed. The Deepwater Horizon oil spill is the...

  14. 33 CFR 147.T08-849 - DEEPWATER HORIZON Mobile Offshore Drilling Unit Safety Zone.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false DEEPWATER HORIZON Mobile Offshore... DEEPWATER HORIZON Mobile Offshore Drilling Unit Safety Zone. (a) Location. All areas within 500 meters (1640... area surrounds the DEEPWATER HORIZON, a Mobile Offshore Drilling Unit (MODU), that sank in...

  15. 78 FR 8184 - DEEPWATER HORIZON Oil Spill; Final Phase II Early Restoration Plan and Environmental Review

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-02-05

    ... DEEPWATER HORIZON Oil Spill; Final Phase II Early Restoration Plan and Environmental Review AGENCY: Interior... Addressing Injuries Resulting from the DEEPWATER HORIZON Oil Spill (Framework Agreement), notice is hereby... services injured or lost as a result of the DEEPWATER HORIZON oil spill, which occurred on or about...

  16. 77 FR 23741 - DEEPWATER HORIZON Oil Spill; Final Phase I Early Restoration Plan and Environmental Assessment

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-20

    ... Fish and Wildlife Service DEEPWATER HORIZON Oil Spill; Final Phase I Early Restoration Plan and... DEEPWATER HORIZON Oil Spill (Framework Agreement), notice is hereby given that ] the Federal and State... the DEEPWATER HORIZON oil spill, which occurred on or about April 20, 2010, in the Gulf of Mexico....

  17. 50 CFR 622.14 - Area closures related to the Deepwater Horizon oil spill.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... Horizon oil spill. 622.14 Section 622.14 Wildlife and Fisheries FISHERY CONSERVATION AND MANAGEMENT... spill. (a) Caribbean EEZ area closure related to Deepwater Horizon oil spill. Effective May 11, 2010... Web site: http://sero.nmfs.noaa.gov/deepwater_horizon_oil_spill.htm. (b) Gulf EEZ area closure...

  18. 76 FR 78016 - Deepwater Horizon Oil Spill; Draft Phase I Early Restoration Plan and Environmental Assessment

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-15

    ....S. Fish and Wildlife Service, Interior Deepwater Horizon Oil Spill; Draft Phase I Early Restoration... from the Deepwater Horizon Oil Spill, the Federal and State natural resource trustee agencies (Trustees... resources and services injured or lost as a result of the Deepwater Horizon oil spill, which occurred on...

  19. 78 FR 26319 - Deepwater Horizon Oil Spill; Proposal of Future Early Restoration Projects and Environmental Reviews

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-06

    ... National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Deepwater Horizon Oil Spill; Proposal of Future Early... Horizon oil spill (Trustees) intend to propose the additional early restoration projects described below... services, and human use services injured or lost as a result of the Deepwater Horizon oil spill...

  20. Aluminum solubility control in different horizons of a podzol

    SciTech Connect

    Zysset, M.; Blaser, P.; Luster, J.; Gehring, A.U.

    1999-10-01

    In the last two decades, the anthropogenically induced acceleration of forest soil acidification has been a topic of environmental concern. Aluminum extractability and solubility were investigated in detail in six horizons of a Typic Haplohumod (FAO:Haplic Podzol) from southern Switzerland. Pyrophosphate and oxalate extractions as well as successive acid leaching indicated that in the Ah, (AE), and Bh horizons reactive Al is mainly bound to soil organic matter, whereas in the Bs, BC1, and BC2 horizons it is of inorganic nature. In the latter three horizons, infrared (IR) spectroscopy and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) revealed the presence of imogolite. Batch equilibrium experiments at 20 C in the pH range of approximately 3.5 to 5.5 showed that the podzol profile can be divided into two parts of different Al solubility control. In the Ah and (AE) horizons, Al solubility was found to be controlled by complexation reactions to soil organic matter. Kinetic studies with samples of the Bh, Bs, BC1, and BC2 horizons showed that ion activity products with respect to both Al(OH){sub 3} and imogolite, (HO){sub 3}Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}SiOH, reached a constant value after reaction times of 16 d. For pH {gt}4.1, the compilation of all data revealed pAl + 0.5 pSi = 3.05 pH {minus} 7.04 (r{sup 2} = 0.99) and pAl = 2.87 pH {minus} 8.07 (r{sup 2} = 0.99). These data could be shown to be consistent with either Al solubility control by imogolite-type material (ITM) with a log *K{sub s}{sup 0} = 6.53 {+-} 0.09, which dissolves incongruently, or a simultaneous equilibrium with ITM and hydroxy-Al interlayers of clay minerals. For pH {lt} 4.1, data indicated solubility control by a 1:1 aluminosilicate, e.g., poorly crystalline kaolinite.

  1. [Pharmacological effects of CM6912 and its main metabolites].

    PubMed

    Morishita, H; Kushiku, K; Furukawa, T; Yamaki, Y; Izawa, M; Shibazaki, Y; Shibata, U

    1985-07-01

    Pharmacodynamic effects of ethyl 7-chloro-2,3-dihydro-5-(2-fluorophenyl)-2-oxo-1H-1,4- benzodiazepine-3-carboxylate (CM6912), a new benzodiazepine derivative, and its main metabolites (CM6913 = M1, CM7116 = M2) on the peripheral systems were investigated in several species of animals. In pentobarbital-anesthetized rabbits, CM6912 and M2 (1 or 5 mg/kg, i.v.) had little effect on blood pressure, heart rate and ECG, but it slightly reduced the respiration rate. M1 decreased the heart rate without affecting respiration, blood pressure and ECG. In conscious rabbits, CM6912 and M2 (1 mg/kg, i.v.) did not affect respiration, blood pressure, heart rate and ECG, but M1 (1 mg/kg, i.v.) increased the heart rate. CM6912 (5 or 30 mg/kg), when administered orally, also increased heart rate. In pentobarbital-anesthetized dogs, CM6912 and its metabolites (5 mg/kg, i.v.) decreased respiration and heart rate without affecting blood pressure and ECG. CM 6912 (5 mg/kg, i.v.) did not affect cardiovascular responses to the carotid occlusion, vagus stimulation, and pre- and post-ganglionic stimulation of cardiac ganglion in anesthetized dogs. CM6912 and its metabolites affected neither the spontaneous contraction nor the heart rate of isolated rabbit atria. These compounds also had no action on isolated aortic strips from rabbits. CM6912 and its metabolites did not affect the muscle tone of isolated guinea pig intestine, and it had no effects on the contractile responses to acetylcholine, histamine, serotonin and barium chloride. In isolated rabbit intestine, CM6912 and M2 slightly reduced the amplitude of contraction, while M1 had no effect. CM6912 and its metabolites did not affect the spontaneous motility of isolated non-pregnant and pregnant rat uteri as well as in situ non-pregnant rat uterus and isolated guinea pig vas deferens, including the contractile response to adrenaline. CM6912 and M2 relaxed isolated guinea pig trachea strips only at high concentrations. CM6912 and its

  2. Evaluation of CM5 Charges for Condensed-Phase Modeling.

    PubMed

    Vilseck, Jonah Z; Tirado-Rives, Julian; Jorgensen, William L

    2014-07-01

    The recently developed Charge Model 5 (CM5) is tested for its utility in condensed-phase simulations. The CM5 approach, which derives partial atomic charges from Hirshfeld population analyses, provides excellent results for gas-phase dipole moments and is applicable to all elements of the periodic table. Herein, the adequacy of scaled CM5 charges for use in modeling aqueous solutions has been evaluated by computing free energies of hydration (ΔG hyd) for 42 neutral organic molecules via Monte Carlo statistical mechanics. An optimal scaling factor for the CM5 charges was determined to be 1.27, resulting in a mean unsigned error (MUE) of 1.1 kcal/mol for the free energies of hydration. Testing for an additional 20 molecules gave an MUE of 1.3 kcal/mol. The high precision of the results is confirmed by free energy calculations using both sequential perturbations and complete molecular annihilation. Performance for specific functional groups is discussed; sulfur-containing molecules yield the largest errors. In addition, the scaling factor of 1.27 is shown to be appropriate for CM5 charges derived from a variety of density functional methods and basis sets. Though the average errors from the 1.27*CM5 results are only slightly lower than those using 1.14*CM1A charges, the broader applicability and easier access to CM5 charges via the Gaussian program are additional attractive features. The 1.27*CM5 charge model can be used for an enormous variety of applications in conjunction with many fixed-charge force fields and molecular modeling programs. PMID:25061445

  3. Value of the bipolar lead CM5 in electrocardiography.

    PubMed

    Quyyumi, A A; Crake, T; Mockus, L J; Wright, C A; Rickards, A F; Fox, K M

    1986-10-01

    Only bipolar lead recording are available during ambulatory monitoring. Their sensitivity in detecting ST segment changes in relation to standard electrocardiographic leads is not known. The magnitude and direction of ST segment changes in the bipolar lead CM5 were compared with those in standard electrocardiographic leads in patients during exercise testing and percutaneous transluminal coronary angioplasty. Thirty patients with coronary artery disease were studied during exercise tests in which ST segment depression (greater than 0.5 mm) occurred in one or more standard electrocardiographic leads and 13 patients were studied during angioplasty that resulted in ST segment change in one or more leads (I, II, III, V2, V5, and CM5). Lead CM5 was the most sensitive lead (93%) during exercise testing and also showed the greatest magnitude of ST segment change below the isoelectric line in 93% of the patients. Only two patients, one with ST segment elevation in inferior leads and one with changes restricted to septal leads, had no ST segment depression in lead CM5. When ST segment shift from the baseline electrocardiogram was measured the magnitude of depression was greatest in lead CM5 in only 63% of the patients. During angioplasty of the left anterior descending coronary artery, lead CM5 showed ST segment depression in seven patients, ST segment elevation in two, and a biphasic response in one. Two of the three patients with balloon inflation in right coronary artery developed ST segment elevation in lead CM5. Thus lead CM5 is a reliable lead for detecting subendocardial ischaemia experienced during everyday activities in anginal patients. During total occlusion of coronary arteries (as in variant angina or myocardial infarction) lead CM5 commonly shows ST segment depression and changes due to right coronary artery occlusion may not be detected. PMID:3768217

  4. Value of the bipolar lead CM5 in electrocardiography.

    PubMed Central

    Quyyumi, A A; Crake, T; Mockus, L J; Wright, C A; Rickards, A F; Fox, K M

    1986-01-01

    Only bipolar lead recording are available during ambulatory monitoring. Their sensitivity in detecting ST segment changes in relation to standard electrocardiographic leads is not known. The magnitude and direction of ST segment changes in the bipolar lead CM5 were compared with those in standard electrocardiographic leads in patients during exercise testing and percutaneous transluminal coronary angioplasty. Thirty patients with coronary artery disease were studied during exercise tests in which ST segment depression (greater than 0.5 mm) occurred in one or more standard electrocardiographic leads and 13 patients were studied during angioplasty that resulted in ST segment change in one or more leads (I, II, III, V2, V5, and CM5). Lead CM5 was the most sensitive lead (93%) during exercise testing and also showed the greatest magnitude of ST segment change below the isoelectric line in 93% of the patients. Only two patients, one with ST segment elevation in inferior leads and one with changes restricted to septal leads, had no ST segment depression in lead CM5. When ST segment shift from the baseline electrocardiogram was measured the magnitude of depression was greatest in lead CM5 in only 63% of the patients. During angioplasty of the left anterior descending coronary artery, lead CM5 showed ST segment depression in seven patients, ST segment elevation in two, and a biphasic response in one. Two of the three patients with balloon inflation in right coronary artery developed ST segment elevation in lead CM5. Thus lead CM5 is a reliable lead for detecting subendocardial ischaemia experienced during everyday activities in anginal patients. During total occlusion of coronary arteries (as in variant angina or myocardial infarction) lead CM5 commonly shows ST segment depression and changes due to right coronary artery occlusion may not be detected. PMID:3768217

  5. Evaluation of CM5 Charges for Condensed-Phase Modeling

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The recently developed Charge Model 5 (CM5) is tested for its utility in condensed-phase simulations. The CM5 approach, which derives partial atomic charges from Hirshfeld population analyses, provides excellent results for gas-phase dipole moments and is applicable to all elements of the periodic table. Herein, the adequacy of scaled CM5 charges for use in modeling aqueous solutions has been evaluated by computing free energies of hydration (ΔGhyd) for 42 neutral organic molecules via Monte Carlo statistical mechanics. An optimal scaling factor for the CM5 charges was determined to be 1.27, resulting in a mean unsigned error (MUE) of 1.1 kcal/mol for the free energies of hydration. Testing for an additional 20 molecules gave an MUE of 1.3 kcal/mol. The high precision of the results is confirmed by free energy calculations using both sequential perturbations and complete molecular annihilation. Performance for specific functional groups is discussed; sulfur-containing molecules yield the largest errors. In addition, the scaling factor of 1.27 is shown to be appropriate for CM5 charges derived from a variety of density functional methods and basis sets. Though the average errors from the 1.27*CM5 results are only slightly lower than those using 1.14*CM1A charges, the broader applicability and easier access to CM5 charges via the Gaussian program are additional attractive features. The 1.27*CM5 charge model can be used for an enormous variety of applications in conjunction with many fixed-charge force fields and molecular modeling programs. PMID:25061445

  6. Eight-cm mercury ion thruster system technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1974-01-01

    The technology status of 8 cm diameter electron bombardment ion thrusters is presented. Much of the technology resulting from the 5 cm diameter thruster has been adapted and improved upon to increase the reliability, durability, and efficiency of the 8 cm thruster. Technology discussed includes: dependence of neutralizer tip erosion upon neutralizer flow rate; impregnated and rolled-foil insert cathode performance and life testing; neutralizer position studies; thruster ion beam profile measurements; high voltage pulse ignition; high utilization ion machined accelerator grids; deposition internal and external to the thruster; thruster vectoring systems; thruster cycling life testing and thruster system weights for typical mission applications.

  7. Ion accelerator systems for high power 30 cm thruster operation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aston, G.

    1982-01-01

    Two and three-grid accelerator systems for high power ion thruster operation were investigated. Two-grid translation tests show that over compensation of the 30 cm thruster SHAG grid set spacing the 30 cm thruster radial plasma density variation and by incorporating grid compensation only sufficient to maintain grid hole axial alignment, it is shown that beam current gains as large as 50% can be realized. Three-grid translation tests performed with a simulated 30 cm thruster discharge chamber show that substantial beamlet steering can be reliably affected by decelerator grid translation only, at net-to-total voltage ratios as low as 0.05.

  8. Substrate effect on in-plane dielectric and microwave properties of Ba(Sn{sub 0.15}Ti{sub 0.85})O{sub 3} thin films

    SciTech Connect

    Song, S.N.; Zhai, J.W. Yao, X.

    2008-08-04

    The microstructure and in-plane dielectric and microwave properties of Barium tin titanate Ba(Sn{sub 0.15}Ti{sub 0.85})O{sub 3} (BTS) thin films grown on (1 0 0) LaAlO{sub 3} and (1 0 0) MgO single-crystal substrates through sol-gel process were investigated. X-ray diffraction and field emission scanning electron microscopy were used to characterize crystal structure of phases and microstructure of the thin films, respectively. Microwave properties of the films were measured from 1 to 10 GHz by the interdigital capacitor configuration. The obvious differences in the dielectric and microwave properties are attributed to the stress in the films, which result from the lattice mismatch and difference in the thermal expansion coefficients between the film and substrates. This work clearly reveals the highly promising potential of BTS films for application in tunable microwave devices.

  9. The atomic structure and chemistry of Fe-rich steps on antiphase boundaries in Ti-doped Bi{sub 0.9}Nd{sub 0.15}FeO{sub 3}

    SciTech Connect

    MacLaren, Ian Craven, Alan J.; Schaffer, Bernhard; Wang, LiQiu; Ramasse, Quentin M.; Kalantari, Kambiz; Reaney, Ian M.

    2014-06-01

    Stepped antiphase boundaries are frequently observed in Ti-doped Bi{sub 0.85}Nd{sub 0.15}FeO{sub 3}, related to the novel planar antiphase boundaries reported recently. The atomic structure and chemistry of these steps are determined by a combination of high angle annular dark field and bright field scanning transmission electron microscopy imaging, together with electron energy loss spectroscopy. The core of these steps is found to consist of 4 edge-sharing FeO{sub 6} octahedra. The structure is confirmed by image simulations using a frozen phonon multislice approach. The steps are also found to be negatively charged and, like the planar boundaries studied previously, result in polarisation of the surrounding perovskite matrix.

  10. Influence of electrode preparation on the electrochemical performance of LiNi0.8Co0.15Al0.05O2 composite electrodes for lithium-ion batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tran, Hai Yen; Greco, Giorgia; Täubert, Corina; Wohlfahrt-Mehrens, Margret; Haselrieder, Wolfgang; Kwade, Arno

    2012-07-01

    The electrode manufacturing for lithium-ion batteries is based on a complex process chain with several influencing factors. A proper tailoring of the electrodes can greatly improve both the electrochemical performances and the energy density of the battery. In the present work, some significant parameters during the preparation of LiNi0.8Co0.15Al0.05O2-based cathodes were investigated. The active material was mixed with a PVDF-binder and two conductive additives in different ratios. The electrode thickness, the degree of compacting and the conductive agent type and mixing ratio have proven to have a strong impact on the electrochemical performances of the composite electrodes, especially on their behaviour at high C-rates. Further it has been shown that the compacting has an essential influence on the mechanical properties of NCA coatings, according to their total, ductile and elastic deformation behaviour.

  11. Synthesis, magnetic properties and magnetostriction of Pr(Fe0.75Co0.15Cu0.01Nb0.04B0.05)1.93 bulk nanocrystalline synthesized under high pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Cheng-Chao; Shi, Yang-Guang; Shi, Da-Ning; Chen, Long-Qing

    2016-05-01

    Bulk nanocrystalline Pr(Fe0.75Co0.15Cu0.01Nb0.04B0.05)1.93 alloys were synthesized by annealing its melt-spinning ribbons under different pressures and temperatures. It was demonstrated that the average grain size decreases with increasing pressure from 3 GPa to 6 GPa under the same annealing temperature of 853 K but increases with increasing temperature from 823 K to 923 K under the same annealing pressure of 6 GPa. A negative correlation between the coercivity and average grain size was found in the present investigated system. Grain refinement without losing the advantage of volume fraction of magnetostrictive phase offers the sample annealed under 6 GPa and 853 K the optimized magnetostrictive property, which might make it potential material for magnetostrictive application.

  12. Superconducting properties of single crystalline FeTe1-xSex (x = 0, 0.15, 0.25, 0.35, 0.40 and 0.50)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sudesh; Kumar, R.; Varma, G. D.

    2015-06-01

    In this paper we have grown single crystalline samples of Se-doped FeTe compound using self-flux technique and studied the structural and electrical transport properties of the as-grown crystals. The samples have been grown with compositions FeTe1-xSex (x = 0, 0.15, 0.25, 0.35, 0.40 and 0.50). The as-grown samples are then investigated for their structural and superconducting properties by means of X-ray diffraction and physical property measurements. The XRD results of powdered samples reveal a single (tetragonal) phase with space group symmetry P4/nmm for all the samples. The lattice parameters are observed to reduce with increase of Se-doping at Te-site. Highest Hc2(0) (˜180 T) value has been observed for FeTe0.5Se0.5 sample.

  13. Superspin glassy behaviour of La{sub 0.7}Ca{sub 0.3}Mn{sub 0.85}Al{sub 0.15}O{sub 3} thin film

    SciTech Connect

    Kumar, Manish; Choudhary, R. J. Shukla, D. K.; Phase, D. M.

    2014-07-21

    Here, we present the low temperature magnetic behaviour of epitaxial La{sub 0.7}Ca{sub 0.3}Mn{sub 0.85}Al{sub 0.15}O{sub 3} (LCMAO) thin film through a series of DC magnetic measurements. Overall behaviour inferred from the magnetization measurements indicate that the magnetic phases created due to Al doping induced inhomogeneous distribution of Mn{sup 3+} and Mn{sup 4+} ions and oxygen vacancies present in the system act like superspins, and the strong interaction among themselves results in the superspin glassy behaviour. Interactions among the superspins are marked by the aging and zero filed memory effects. The glassy magnetic phase in LCMAO is found to follow the hierarchical model of spin glasses.

  14. First laser emission of Yb0.15:(Lu0.5Y0.5)3Al5O12 ceramics.

    PubMed

    Toci, Guido; Pirri, Angela; Li, Jiang; Xie, Tengfei; Pan, Yubai; Babin, Vladimir; Beitlerova, Alena; Nikl, Martin; Vannini, Matteo

    2016-05-01

    We report the first laser oscillation on Yb0.15:(Lu0.5Y0.5)3Al12 ceramics at room temperature. At 1030 nm we measured a maximum output power of 7.3 W with a corresponding slope efficiency of 55.4% by using an output coupler with a transmission of T = 39.2%. The spectroscopic properties are compared with those of the two parent garnets Yb:YAG and Yb:LuAG. To the best of our knowledge these are the first measurements reported in literature achieved with this new host. PMID:27137574

  15. Structural and electrical transport properties of La{sub 0.8}Sm{sub 0.05}K{sub 0.15}MnO{sub 3} manganites

    SciTech Connect

    Shaikh, M. W.; Mansuri, I.; Varshney, Dinesh

    2014-04-24

    Polycrystalline sample of single-phase La{sub 0.8}Sm{sub 0.05}K{sub 0.15}MnO{sub 3} perovskite compound have been synthesized by solid-state reaction route. X-ray diffraction patterns accompanied by Rietveld–refined crystal structure parameters reveal the rhombohedral structure with space group R 3C. Electrical resistivity infers transition from metallic to insulator phase at 537 K. The application of magnetic field of 8 T, suppresses the resistivity. The metallic resistivity is retraced by considering electron–phonon, electron–electron and electron-spin-fluctuation interactions while insulating behaviour is analysed with small polaron conduction model.

  16. Evidence for Retarded Pr ƒ; Hybridization and Tc Suppression in Y 1- xPr xSr 2Cu 2.85Re 0.15O 7

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, A.; Castro, L. F.; Zelenay, I.; Suryanarayanan, R.

    1995-08-01

    We report on the preparation, X-ray diffraction, ac susceptibility, resistivity, and thermopower of Y 1- xPr xSr 2Cu 2.85Re 0.15O 7. We find that superconductivity is sustained up to a Pr concentration of 70%, which is greater than the 55% normally found in the Y 1- xPr xBa 2Cu 3O 7 system. It is proposed that the presence of Sr retards the Pr ƒ hybridization and the Tc suppression. It is pointed out that a better knowledge of structural and defect chemistry of Pr-containing cuprates is essential before applying any definite model to account for the data, as was also proposed earlier by R. Fehrenbacher and T. M. Rice ( Phys. Rev. Lett. 70, 3471, 1993).

  17. Positive magnetoconductance in YBa 2(Cu 0.9Fe 0.1) 3O y and YBa 2(Cu 0.85Fe 0.15) 3O y

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsushita, A.; Aoki, H.; Matsumoto, T.

    1990-03-01

    The magnetoconductance was investigated for the superconductor YBa 2(Cu 0.9Fe 0.1) 3O y (Fe10) at various temperatures above Tc and for the non-superconductor YBa 2(Cu 0.85Fe 0.15) 3O y (Fe15) below 4.2 K. In Fe10 the magnetoconductance is negative above 211 K, while it is positive below 70 K where the temperature coefficient of the resistivity (TCR) is negative. The positive magnetoconductance observed in Fe10 shows a H2 dependence at lower magnetic fields. In Fe15 the magnetoconductance is negative at lower magnetic fields and turns to positive at higher magnetic fields of more than 2-3 T, and a H2 dependence is not observed. These types of behavior can be explained by a two-dimensional Anderson localization occuring at the CuO 2 plane.

  18. Magnetic susceptibility investigation of Bose-glass state in Ni0.85Cd0.15Cl2-4SC(NH2)2 at ultra-low temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, L.; Xia, J. S.; Sullivan, N. S.; Zapf, V. S.; Paduan-Filho, A.; Yu, R.; Roscilde, T.

    2012-12-01

    We report measurements of the AC susceptibility of a site-diluted quantum magnet Ni0.85Cd0.15Cl2-4SC(NH2)2 (15% Cd-doped dichloro-tetrakis-thiourea-Nickel, or Cd-DTN) down to 10 mK Below a crossover temperature Tcr ≍ 100 ~ 200mK, we find that the critical fields Hc for Bose-Einstein condensation obey the scaling relation |Hc(T)-Hc(0)| ~ Tα, with a novel and universal scaling exponent α ≍ 0.9, which is in agreement with numerical results from a theoretical model. Our findings provide strong evidence of the existence of a Bose glass phase in Cd-DTN, and they display a quantitative signature of the transition between a Bose glass and a Bose Einstein condensate.

  19. Structural and chemical analysis of pulsed laser deposited Mg xZn 1- xO hexagonal ( x = 0.15, 0.28) and cubic ( x = 0.85) thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hullavarad, S. S.; Hullavarad, N. V.; Pugel, D. E.; Dhar, S.; Venkatesan, T.; Vispute, R. D.

    2008-02-01

    Hexagonal and cubic Mg xZn 1- xO thin films corresponding to optical band gaps of 3.52 eV, 4 eV and 6.42 eV for x = 0.15, 0.28 and 0.85 compositions were grown by pulsed laser deposition technique. The crystalline quality of the films was investigated by X-ray diffraction-rocking curve measurements and indicated a high degree of crystallinity with narrow FWHM's of 0.21°-0.59°. Rutherford back scattering-channeling spectroscopy provides channeling yields of 7-14% indicating the good crystalline quality of the thin films. X-Ray photoelectron spectroscopy measurements clearly indicated different level of oxidation states of Mg and Zn.

  20. Magnetism of Fe, Ni, and Zn in Nd{sub 1.85}Ce{sub 0.15}CuO{sub 4}: Comparison of experiment and theory

    SciTech Connect

    Jayaram, B.; Chen, H.; Callaway, J.

    1995-08-01

    We have studied the magnetic and superconducting properties of Fe- , Ni- , and Zn-substituted Nd{sub 1.85}Ce{sub 0.15}CuO{sub 4} bulk materials. The normal-state magnetic susceptibility of all samples is found to follow the Curie-Weiss law between 50 and 300 K. The magnitude of local moments deduced for Fe and Ni are 2.2{mu}{sub {ital B}} and 2{mu}{sub {ital B}}, respectively. The observed moment on Ni is attributed to Ni in a 3+ valency state. A magnetic moment of 0.8{mu}{sub {ital B}} is obtained in Zn-substituted samples. This is ascribed to the localized Cu{sup 2+} spins. The {ital T}{sub {ital c}} vs 3{ital d} ion concentration ({ital x}) curves indicate that Ni inhibits the {ital T}{sub {ital c}} of this system at an anomalously higher rate. In an effort to understand the correlation between the magnitude of the magnetic moment on the 3{ital d} ion and its role in the suppression of superconductivity, we have performed density-functional cluster calculations under local-spin-density approximations. The calculations support the following inferences drawn from the experiments: (i) Ni is in a 3+ state, (ii) the moment of 0.8{mu}{sub {ital B}} observed in Zn-substituted samples is due to localized Cu{sup 2+} spins, and (iii) Zn induces a moment of almost the same magnitude in both the electron-doped and the hole-doped La{sub 1.85}Sr{sub 0.15}CuO{sub 4} systems. We have also attempted to explain qualitatively the observed {ital T}{sub {ital c}} vs {ital x} behavior in the above systems using the effective single-band {ital t}-{ital J} model.