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Sample records for 02-03 4-class gsr

  1. GSR particles and their evidential value

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kotrly, Marek; Turková, Ivana

    2010-06-01

    Analysis of gunshot residues (GSR) is one of major areas in microparticle investigation. Results of the analysis usually have a high evidential value, but some information about potential secondary contamination by GSR is needed to maintain its value. A three-year study was carried out for ascertaining the level of possible secondary contamination monitoring GSR particles in urban means of transports in Prague (underground, trams, busses), taxi cars, randomly chosen civil vehicles, vehicles and trains of suburban transport, at places with a high concentration of people (supermarkets, hypermarkets, banks and financial institutions, premises of post offices). We also performed sampling at premises of the Institute of Criminalistics Prague (common areas, corridors, laboratory rooms), at police stations and in patrol cars of the Police of the Czech Republic, including Prague Metropolitan Police. Next, persons form selected professional groups of inhabitants (policemen, car mechanics, civilians without contact with a firearm and people who are in contact with hunting weapons - huntsmen and gamekeepers) were sampled as well.

  2. GSR2005--continuity of the ENFSI proficiency test on identification of GSR by SEM/EDX.

    PubMed

    Niewoehner, Ludwig; Andrasko, Jan; Biegstraaten, Jan; Gunaratnam, Lawrence; Steffen, Sylvia; Uhlig, Steffen; Antoni, Sabine

    2008-01-01

    Within the framework of the ENFSI Expert Working Group "Firearms" a proficiency test on the detection and identification of GSR by energy-dispersive scanning electron microanalysis (SEM/EDX) is carried out in a 2 years term. The latest test was performed in 2005/2006 and was denoted as GSR2005. Seventy-five laboratories from 28 countries participated in this proficiency test and submitted in total 83 independent data-sets. The participating laboratories were requested to determine the total number of PbSbBa containing particles on a synthetic test sample following their own laboratory specific methods of automated GSR particle search and detection by SEM/EDX. Furthermore size and position of the detected particles had to be reported by the laboratories and were evaluated statistically. The results were compiled by means of z-scores according to the IUPAC and EURACHEM guidelines-assessing individual laboratory achievements (inter-laboratory) as well as intra-laboratory performance-and were compared to the results of the previous proficiency test run GSR2003 (1). The comparison shows that there is a noticeable improvement in the method's detection capability.

  3. Automated SEM-EDS GSR Analysis for Turkish Ammunitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cakir, Ismail; Uner, H. Bulent

    2007-04-01

    In this work, Automated Scanning Electron Microscopy with Energy Dispersive X-ray Spectrometry (SEM-EDS) was used to characterize 7.65 and 9mm cartridges Turkish ammunition. All samples were analyzed in a SEM Jeol JSM-5600LV equipped BSE detector and a Link ISIS 300 (EDS). A working distance of 20mm, an accelerating voltage of 20 keV and gunshot residue software was used in all analysis. Automated search resulted in a high number of particles analyzed containing gunshot residues (GSR) unique elements (PbBaSb). The obtained data about the definition of characteristic GSR particles was concordant with other studies on this topic.

  4. Automated SEM-EDS GSR Analysis for Turkish Ammunitions

    SciTech Connect

    Cakir, Ismail; Uner, H. Bulent

    2007-04-23

    In this work, Automated Scanning Electron Microscopy with Energy Dispersive X-ray Spectrometry (SEM-EDS) was used to characterize 7.65 and 9mm cartridges Turkish ammunition. All samples were analyzed in a SEM Jeol JSM-5600LV equipped BSE detector and a Link ISIS 300 (EDS). A working distance of 20mm, an accelerating voltage of 20 keV and gunshot residue software was used in all analysis. Automated search resulted in a high number of particles analyzed containing gunshot residues (GSR) unique elements (PbBaSb). The obtained data about the definition of characteristic GSR particles was concordant with other studies on this topic.

  5. Final Report. DOE Computational Nanoscience Project DE-FG02-03ER46096: Integrated Multiscale Modeling of Molecular Computing Devices

    SciTech Connect

    Cummings, Peter

    2009-11-15

    The document is the final report of the DOE Computational Nanoscience Project DE-FG02-03ER46096: Integrated Multiscale Modeling of Molecular Computing Devices. It included references to 62 publications that were supported by the grant.

  6. Integrated Ion Beam Analysis (IBA) in Gunshot Residue (GSR) characterisation.

    PubMed

    Romolo, F S; Christopher, M E; Donghi, M; Ripani, L; Jeynes, C; Webb, R P; Ward, N I; Kirkby, K J; Bailey, M J

    2013-09-10

    Gunshot Residue (GSR) is residual material from the discharge of a firearm, which frequently provides crucial information in criminal investigations. Changes in ammunition manufacturing are gradually phasing out the heavy metals on which current forensic GSR analysis is based, and the latest Heavy Metal Free (HMF) primers urgently demand new forensic solutions. Proton scanning microbeam Ion Beam Analysis (IBA), in conjunction with the Scanning Electron Microscope equipped with an Energy Dispersive X-ray Spectrometer (SEM-EDS), can be introduced into forensic analysis to solve both new and old problems, with a procedure entirely commensurate with current forensic practice. Six cartridges producing GSR particles known to be interesting in casework by both experience and the literature were selected for this study. A standard procedure to relocate the same particles previously analysed by SEM-EDS, based on both secondary electron (SE) and X-ray imaging was developed and tested. Elemental Particle Induced X-ray Emission (PIXE) mapping of the emitted X-rays allowed relocation in a scan of 10 μm × 10 μm of even a 1 μm GSR particle. The comparison between spectra from the same particle obtained by SEM-EDS and IBA-PIXE showed that the latter is much more sensitive at mid-high energies. Results that are very interesting in a forensic context were obtained with particles from a cartridge containing mercury fulminate in the primer. Particle-induced gamma-ray emission (PIGE) maps of a particles from HMF cartridges allowed identification of Boron and Sodium in particles from hands using the (10)B(p,α1γ)(7)Be, (11)B(p,p1γ)(11)B and (23)Na(p,p1γ)(23)Na reactions, which is extraordinary in a forensic context. The capability for quantitative analysis of elements within individual particles by IBA was also demonstrated, giving the opportunity to begin a new chapter in the research on GSR particles. The integrated procedure that was developed, which makes use of all the IBA

  7. Evaluation of gunshot residue (GSR) evidence: Surveys of prevalence of GSR on clothing and frequency of residue types.

    PubMed

    Hannigan, Thomas J; McDermott, Sean D; Greaney, Claire M; O'Shaughnessy, John; O'Brien, Cliona M

    2015-12-01

    The evaluative approach is a logical approach to interpreting scientific findings in criminal cases, applying knowledge regarding the transfer, persistence and recovery of particulate material. The application of this approach to interpreting the finding of gunshot residue on the clothing of a suspect requires knowledge of background levels of GSR on clothing and on the frequency of different residue types in a particular environment. The cuffs of 100 upper outer garments submitted to a forensic laboratory in connection with non-firearms offences were sampled for gunshot residue. No 3-component lead/antimony/barium particles were found on 98 of them. Two 3-component particles were found on one of them and one 3-component particle was found on another. The frequency of occurrence of various particle types regarded as consistent with GSR was also explored. The findings show that, while 3-component particles were somewhat more likely to be encountered by chance on clothing than on hands, they are still relatively uncommon events. To investigate the frequency of occurrence of particular residue types, 100 discharged rounds of ammunition recovered at crime scenes were sampled and the types of residue present were determined. The results show that some residue types are significantly more common than others. Both sets of data will be of value in evaluating the significance of finding GSR on clothing of suspects in criminal cases.

  8. Glutathione reductase gsr-1 is an essential gene required for Caenorhabditis elegans early embryonic development.

    PubMed

    Mora-Lorca, José Antonio; Sáenz-Narciso, Beatriz; Gaffney, Christopher J; Naranjo-Galindo, Francisco José; Pedrajas, José Rafael; Guerrero-Gómez, David; Dobrzynska, Agnieszka; Askjaer, Peter; Szewczyk, Nathaniel J; Cabello, Juan; Miranda-Vizuete, Antonio

    2016-07-01

    Glutathione is the most abundant thiol in the vast majority of organisms and is maintained in its reduced form by the flavoenzyme glutathione reductase. In this work, we describe the genetic and functional analysis of the Caenorhabditis elegans gsr-1 gene that encodes the only glutathione reductase protein in this model organism. By using green fluorescent protein reporters we demonstrate that gsr-1 produces two GSR-1 isoforms, one located in the cytoplasm and one in the mitochondria. gsr-1 loss of function mutants display a fully penetrant embryonic lethal phenotype characterized by a progressive and robust cell division delay accompanied by an aberrant distribution of interphasic chromatin in the periphery of the cell nucleus. Maternally expressed GSR-1 is sufficient to support embryonic development but these animals are short-lived, sensitized to chemical stress, have increased mitochondrial fragmentation and lower mitochondrial DNA content. Furthermore, the embryonic lethality of gsr-1 worms is prevented by restoring GSR-1 activity in the cytoplasm but not in mitochondria. Given the fact that the thioredoxin redox systems are dispensable in C. elegans, our data support a prominent role of the glutathione reductase/glutathione pathway in maintaining redox homeostasis in the nematode.

  9. Gaia Reference frame determination: the AVU/GSR pipeline

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vecchiato, Alberto; Abbas, Ummi; Becciani, Ugo; Bianchi, Luca; Bucciarelli, Beatrice; Crosta, Mariateresa; Lattanzi, Mario G.

    2015-08-01

    The main goal of the Gaia ESA mission is the production of a 5 parameters astrometric catalog - i.e. including positions, parallaxes and the two components of the proper motions - of about 1 billion stars of our Galaxy at an accuracy level going from the few micro-arcseconds of the brightest objects to some ~100 micro-arcseconds of the faintests. This goal will be reached by means of high-precision astrometric measurements conducted by a satellite sweeping continuously the celestial sphere during its 5-years mission.A fundamental step toward the realization of this catalog is the so-called ''Sphere Reconstruction'', which determines the celestial reference frame using the observations of a subset of up to 100 million ''primary stars'' among those observed by Gaia.From a mathematical point of view, these observations translate into a large number of equations, linearized with respect to the unknown parameters around known initial values, whose solution in the least-squares sense eventually provides the catalog with its errors, and determines the Gaia reference frame.This represents an extremely challenging problem because of the high accuracy of the observations and of the large number of unknowns involved. The former issue implies that an adequately accurate relativistic astrometric model has to be used, while the huge number of unknowns and observations puts this task at the forefront of the High-Performance Computing problems.These challenges, and the absolute character of the Gaia measurements and results, calls for a careful scientific validation of the sphere reconstruction, as it was done for the previous HIPPARCOS mission. For these reasons the Gaia Data Processing and Analysis Consortium (DPAC) decided to replicate the baseline process, named AGIS (Astrometric Global Iterative Solution) with another independent solution, named GSR (Global Sphere Reconstruction) which uses a different astrometric model and different algorithms for the system solution

  10. 7 CFR 28.4 - Classing offices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Classing offices. 28.4 Section 28.4 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards, Inspections, Marketing... § 28.4 Classing offices. Classing Offices shall be maintained at points designated by the...

  11. Evaluation of Consideration and Incorporation of Green and Sustainable Remediation (GSR) Practices in Army Environmental Remediation. Volume 2. Pilot Project GSR Evaluation Reports

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-08-27

    minimize disturbed areas - Consider non- intrusive investigation techniques (e.g., geophysical methods) to identify items like USTs and buried drums...remainder of the RI field investigation ( intrusive investigation and MC sampling) will be conducted starting in spring of 2012. Thus, this GSR...pits and trenches. Single point anomaly and grid locations will be also be selected for intrusive investigation. These areas will be intrusively

  12. The Bayesian approach to reporting GSR analysis results: some first-hand experiences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Charles, Sebastien; Nys, Bart

    2010-06-01

    The use of Bayesian principles in the reporting of forensic findings has been a matter of interest for some years. Recently, also the GSR community is gradually exploring the advantages of this method, or rather approach, for writing reports. Since last year, our GSR group is adapting reporting procedures to the use of Bayesian principles. The police and magistrates find the reports more directly accessible and useful in their part of the criminal investigation. In the lab we find that, through applying the Bayesian principles, unnecessary analyses can be eliminated and thus time can be freed on the instruments.

  13. Feasibility of using a biowatch to monitor GSR as a measure of radiologists' stress and fatigue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krupinski, Elizabeth A.; MacKinnon, Lea; Reiner, Bruce I.

    2015-03-01

    We have been investigating the impact of fatigue on diagnostic performance of radiologists interpreting medical images. In previous studies we found evidence that eye strain could be objectively measured and that it correlates highly with degradations in diagnostic accuracy as radiologists work long hours. Eye strain however can be difficult to measure in a non-invasive and continuous manner over the work day so we have been investigating other ways to measure physiological stress and fatigue. In this study we evaluated the feasibility of using a commercially available biowatch to measure galvanic skin response (GSR), a well known indicator of stress. 10 radiology residents wore the biowatch for about 8 hours during their normal work day and data were automatically collected at 10 Hz. They completed the Swedish Occupational Fatigue Inventory (SOFI) at the start and finish of the day. GSR values (microsiemens) ranged from 0.14 to 38.27 with an average of 0.50 (0.28 median). Overall GSR tended to be fairly constant as the day progressed, but there were definite spikes indicating higher levels of stress. SOFI scores indicated greater levels of fatigue and stress at the end of the work day. Although further work is needed, GSR measurements obtained via an easy to wear watch may provide a means to monitor stress/fatigue and alert radiologists when to take a break from interpreting images to avoid making errors.

  14. A stress sensor based on Galvanic Skin Response (GSR) controlled by ZigBee.

    PubMed

    Villarejo, María Viqueira; Zapirain, Begoña García; Zorrilla, Amaia Méndez

    2012-01-01

    Sometimes, one needs to control different emotional situations which can lead the person suffering them to dangerous situations, in both the medium and short term. There are studies which indicate that stress increases the risk of cardiac problems. In this study we have designed and built a stress sensor based on Galvanic Skin Response (GSR), and controlled by ZigBee. In order to check the device's performance, we have used 16 adults (eight women and eight men) who completed different tests requiring a certain degree of effort, such as mathematical operations or breathing deeply. On completion, we appreciated that GSR is able to detect the different states of each user with a success rate of 76.56%. In the future, we plan to create an algorithm which is able to differentiate between each state.

  15. A Stress Sensor Based on Galvanic Skin Response (GSR) Controlled by ZigBee

    PubMed Central

    Villarejo, María Viqueira; Zapirain, Begoña García; Zorrilla, Amaia Méndez

    2012-01-01

    Sometimes, one needs to control different emotional situations which can lead the person suffering them to dangerous situations, in both the medium and short term. There are studies which indicate that stress increases the risk of cardiac problems. In this study we have designed and built a stress sensor based on Galvanic Skin Response (GSR), and controlled by ZigBee. In order to check the device's performance, we have used 16 adults (eight women and eight men) who completed different tests requiring a certain degree of effort, such as mathematical operations or breathing deeply. On completion, we appreciated that GSR is able to detect the different states of each user with a success rate of 76.56%. In the future, we plan to create an algorithm which is able to differentiate between each state. PMID:22778631

  16. Confirmatory analysis of field-presumptive GSR test sample using SEM/EDS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toal, Sarah J.; Niemeyer, Wayne D.; Conte, Sean; Montgomery, Daniel D.; Erikson, Gregory S.

    2014-09-01

    RedXDefense has developed an automated red-light/green-light field presumptive lead test using a sampling pad which can be subsequently processed in a Scanning Electron Microscope for GSR confirmation. The XCAT's sampling card is used to acquire a sample from a suspect's hands on the scene and give investigators an immediate presumptive as to the presence of lead possibly from primer residue. Positive results can be obtained after firing as little as one shot. The same sampling card can then be sent to a crime lab and processed on the SEM for GSR following ASTM E-1588-10 Standard Guide for Gunshot Residue Analysis by Scanning Electron Microscopy/Energy Dispersive X-Ray Spectrometry, in the same manner as the existing tape lifts currently used in the field. Detection of GSR-characteristic particles (fused lead, barium, and antimony) as small as 0.8 microns (0.5 micron resolution) has been achieved using a JEOL JSM-6480LV SEM equipped with an Oxford Instruments INCA EDS system with a 50mm2 SDD detector, 350X magnification, in low-vacuum mode and in high vacuum mode after coating with carbon in a sputter coater. GSR particles remain stable on the sampling pad for a minimum of two months after chemical exposure (long term stability tests are in progress). The presumptive result provided by the XCAT yields immediate actionable intelligence to law enforcement to facilitate their investigation, without compromising the confirmatory test necessary to further support the investigation and legal case.

  17. The evaluation of a new technology for gunshot residue (GSR) analysis in the field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hondrogiannis, Ellen; Andersen, Danielle; Miziolek, Andrzej W.

    2013-05-01

    There continues to be a need for improved technology to be used in theater to quickly and accurately identify the person who shot any weapon during a terrorist attack as well as to link a suspect to the actual weapon fired during a crime. Beyond this, in areas of conflict it would be desirable to have the capability to establish the source country for weaponry and ammunition. Gunshot residue (GSR) analysis is a reasonably well-studied technology area. Recent scientific publications have reported that the residues have a rich composition of both organic and inorganic compounds. For the purposes of identifying the manufacturer or country of origin for the ammunition, the inorganic components of GSR appear to be especially promising since their presence in the propellant and primer formulations are either specific to a given chemical formula, or they represent impurities in the manufacturing process that can be unique to a manufacturer or the source country for the chemicals used for propellants and primers. The Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS) technology has already demonstrated considerable capability for elemental fingerprinting, especially for inorganic/metallic components. A number of reports have demonstrated LIBS capability in forensics for matching materials such as inks, fabrics, paper, glass, and paint. This work describes the encouraging results of an initial study to assess a new commercial field-portable (battery operated) LIBS system for GSR analysis with gunshot residues having been collected from inside cartridge casings from 3 different ammunition manufacturers.

  18. An assessment of firework particle persistence on the hands and related police force practices in relation to GSR evidence.

    PubMed

    Grima, Matthew; Hanson, Robert; Tidy, Helen

    2014-06-01

    In a previous study by Grima et al. Sci. Justice 52 (1) (2012) 49, it was shown that background particles can aid in the exclusion of firework particles which are indistinguishable from GSR. Issues relating to the persistence of such particle populations were presented. The scope of this project was to examine persistence on the hands in the context of possible post-display scene contamination and how this can affect GSR evidence, especially in light of possible GSR/firework mixtures. Persistence was investigated by recovering firework residues eight hours post-display following contact of the hands with bedding. In addition, particle profiling was carried out using SEM-EDX. Firework particle populations exhibited strong persistence in all displays, with not less than 667 particles persisting in each scenario. This factor challenges GSR evidence, especially if personnel stationed at display sites enter scenes of crime or come into contact with suspects after a display. A survey of UK police force practices following firework displays showed that authorities are not aware of the impact particle transfer may have on GSR evidence. Recommendations for the implementation of basic hygiene practices for particle transfer control have also been made.

  19. The influence of surface chemistry on GSR particles: using XPS to complement SEM/EDS analytical techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwoeble, A. J.; Strohmeier, Brian R.; Piasecki, John D.

    2010-06-01

    Gunshot residue particles (GSR) were examined using scanning electron microscopy/energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (SEM/EDS) to illustrate the size, shape, morphology, and elemental composition normally observed in particulate resulting from a discharged firearm. Determining the presence of lead (Pb), antimony (Sb), and barium (Ba), barring other elemental tags, fused together in a single particle with the correct morphology, is all that is required for the positive identification of GSR. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), however, can reveal more detailed information on surface chemistry than SEM/EDS. XPS is a highly surface-sensitive (<= ~10 nm), non-destructive, analytical technique that provides qualitative information for all elements except hydrogen and helium. Nanometer-scale sampling depth and its ability to provide unique chemical state information make XPS a potential technique for providing important knowledge on the surface chemistry of GSR that complements results obtained from SEM/EDS analysis.

  20. Selenoprotein TRXR-1 and GSR-1 are essential for removal of old cuticle during molting in Caenorhabditis elegans

    PubMed Central

    Stenvall, Jörgen; Fierro-González, Juan Carlos; Swoboda, Peter; Saamarthy, Karunakar; Cheng, Qing; Cacho-Valadez, Briseida; Arnér, Elias S. J.; Persson, Olof P.; Miranda-Vizuete, Antonio; Tuck, Simon

    2011-01-01

    Selenoproteins, in particular thioredoxin reductase, have been implicated in countering oxidative damage occurring during aging but the molecular functions of these proteins have not been extensively investigated in different animal models. Here we demonstrate that TRXR-1 thioredoxin reductase, the sole selenoprotein in Caenorhabditis elegans, does not protect against acute oxidative stress but functions instead together with GSR-1 glutathione reductase to promote the removal of old cuticle during molting. We show that the oxidation state of disulfide groups in the cuticle is tightly regulated during the molting cycle, and that when trxr-1 and gsr-1 function is reduced, disulfide groups in the cuticle remain oxidized. A selenocysteine-to-cysteine TRXR-1 mutant fails to rescue molting defects. Furthermore, worms lacking SELB-1, the C. elegans homolog of Escherichia coli SelB or mammalian EFsec, a translation elongation factor known to be specific for selenocysteine in E. coli, fail to incorporate selenocysteine, and display the same phenotype as those lacking trxr-1. Thus, TRXR-1 function in the reduction of old cuticle is strictly selenocysteine dependent in the nematode. Exogenously supplied reduced glutathione reduces disulfide groups in the cuticle and induces apolysis, the separation of old and new cuticle, strongly suggesting that molting involves the regulated reduction of cuticle components driven by TRXR-1 and GSR-1. Using dauer larvae, we demonstrate that aged worms have a decreased capacity to molt, and decreased expression of GSR-1. Together, our results establish a function for the selenoprotein TRXR-1 and GSR-1 in the removal of old cuticle from the surface of epidermal cells. PMID:21199936

  1. Final Report for DOE Grant DE-FG02-03ER25579; Development of High-Order Accurate Interface Tracking Algorithms and Improved Constitutive Models for Problems in Continuum Mechanics with Applications to Jetting

    SciTech Connect

    Puckett, Elbridge Gerry; Miller, Gregory Hale

    2012-10-14

    Much of the work conducted under the auspices of DE-FG02-03ER25579 was characterized by an exceptionally close collaboration with researchers at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL). For example, Andy Nonaka, one of Professor Miller's graduate students in the Department of Applied Science at U. C. Davis (UCD) wrote his PhD thesis in an area of interest to researchers in the Applied Numerical Algorithms Group (ANAG), which is a part of the National Energy Research Supercomputer Center (NERSC) at LBNL. Dr. Nonaka collaborated closely with these researchers and subsequently published the results of this collaboration jointly with them, one article in a peer reviewed journal article and one paper in the proceedings of a conference. Dr. Nonaka is now a research scientist in the Center for Computational Sciences and Engineering (CCSE), which is also part of the National Energy Research Supercomputer Center (NERSC) at LBNL. This collaboration with researchers at LBNL also included having one of Professor Puckett's graduate students in the Graduate Group in Applied Mathematics (GGAM) at UCD, Sarah Williams, spend the summer working with Dr. Ann Almgren, who is a staff scientist in CCSE. As a result of this visit Sarah decided work on a problem suggested by the head of CCSE, Dr. John Bell, for her PhD thesis. Having finished all of the coursework and examinations required for a PhD, Sarah stayed at LBNL to work on her thesis under the guidance of Dr. Bell. Sarah finished her PhD thesis in June of 2007. Writing a PhD thesis while working at one of the University of California (UC) managed DOE laboratories is long established tradition at UC and Professor Puckett has always encouraged his students to consider doing this. Another one of Professor Puckett's graduate students in the GGAM at UCD, Christopher Algieri, was partially supported with funds from DE-FG02-03ER25579 while he wrote his MS thesis in which he analyzed and extended work originally published by Dr

  2. Green and sustainable remediation (GSR) evaluation: framework, standards, and tool. A case study in Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Huang, Wen-Yen; Hung, Weiteng; Vu, Chi Thanh; Chen, Wei-Ting; Lai, Jhih-Wei; Lin, Chitsan

    2016-11-01

    Taiwan has a large number of poorly managed contaminated sites in need of remediation. This study proposes a framework, a set of standards, and a spreadsheet-based evaluation tool for implementing green and sustainable principles into remediation projects and evaluating the projects from this perspective. We performed a case study to understand how the framework would be applied. For the case study, we used a spreadsheet-based evaluation tool (SEFA) and performed field scale cultivation tests on a site contaminated with total petroleum hydrocarbons (TPHs). The site was divided into two lots: one treated by chemical oxidation and the other by bioremediation. We evaluated five core elements of green and sustainable remediation (GSR): energy, air, water resources, materials and wastes, and land and ecosystem. The proposed evaluation tool and field scale cultivation test were found to efficiently assess the effectiveness of the two remediation alternatives. The framework and related tools proposed herein can potentially be used to support decisions about the remediation of contaminated sites taking into account engineering management, cost effectiveness, and social reconciliation.

  3. Preparation of a Ytterbium-tagged Gunshot Residue Standard for Quality Control in the Forensic Analysis of GSR.

    PubMed

    Hearns, Nigel G R; Laflèche, Denis N; Sandercock, Mark L

    2015-05-01

    Preparation of a ytterbium-tagged gunshot residue (GSR) reference standard for scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopic (SEM-EDS) microanalysis is reported. Two different chemical markers, ytterbium and neodymium, were evaluated by spiking the primers of 38 Special ammunition cartridges (no propellant, no projectile) and discharging them onto 12.7 mm diameter aluminum SEM pin stubs. Following SEM-EDS microanalysis, the majority of tri-component particles containing lead, barium, and antimony (PbBaSb) were successfully tagged with the chemical marker. Results demonstrate a primer spiked with 0.75% weight percent of ytterbium nitrate affords PbBaSb particles characteristic of GSR with a ytterbium inclusion efficiency of between 77% and 100%. Reproducibility of the method was verified, and durability of the ytterbium-tagged tri-component particles under repeated SEM-EDS analysis was also tested. The ytterbium-tagged PbBaSb particles impart synthetic traceability to a GSR reference standard and are suitable for analysis alongside case work samples, as a positive control for quality assurance purposes.

  4. Environmental impact assessment using a GSR tool for a landfarming case in South Korea.

    PubMed

    Lim, Hyeongseok; Kwon, Ip-Sae; Lee, Hanuk; Park, Jae-Woo

    2016-04-01

    An environmental impact assessment of a landfarming process, which was performed at an actual petroleum-contaminated site, was conducted using a green and sustainable remediation (GSR) tool in this study. The landfarming process was divided into four stages: site preparation, installation, system operation, and system dismantling/waste disposal. The environmental footprints of greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions, water consumption, total energy usage, and air pollutants (SOx, NOx, and PM10) were analyzed. GHG emissions and water consumption were approximately 276 metric tons and 7.90E + 05 gal, respectively, in stage III, where they were the highest due to the consumables and equipment use in the system operation. Total energy usage had the highest value of 1.54E + 03 MMBTU in stage II due to material production. The SOx and NOx emissions primarily occurred in stages I and II due to energy usage. The PM10 was mostly emitted in stages I and III and was associated with heavy use of equipment. To reduce the environmental footprints, biodiesel and sunlight were suggested as alternatives in this study. The GHG and SOx emissions decreased to 1.7 and 4.4E-04 metric tons, respectively, on the basis of total emissions with a 1 % increase in biodiesel content, but the NOx emissions increased to 5.6E-03 metric tons. If sunlight was used instead of electricity, the GHG and NOx emissions could be reduced by as much as 79 and 84 %, respectively, and the SOx emissions could also be reduced.

  5. Thermostability of Sm2(FeGa)17Cy prepared by gas-solid reaction (GSR)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, L.; Handstein, A.; Gebel, B.; Schäfer, R.; Müller, K.-H.

    1997-04-01

    The gas-solid-reaction (GSR) was used to introduce interstitial carbon atoms into Sm2Fe17-xGax compounds with x=0, 0.5, 1, and 2. For this process, powders made from homogenized ingots were annealed at 500 °C under methane for different times. The thermostability increases for small amounts of Ga and the investigation shows that Sm2Fe16.5Ga0.5Cy is stable up to 750 °C. In the case of Sm2Fe15Ga2Cy carburized for 6 h (y=2.0) and 18 h (y=2.2), the x-ray diffraction patterns show the Th2Zn17-type structure only. After annealing at 800 °C for 20 min the 6 h carburized sample shows a small amount of α-Fe and other phases and there is a large Fe content after annealing at 850 °C. For an 18 h carburized sample, less Fe and no other phases have be seen after annealing at 800 °C, i.e., the material is nearly single phase. The result that longer carburization times stabilize the Th2Zn17-type structure could also be manifested by Kerr microscopy. A comparison with mechanically alloyed Sm2Fe15Ga2C2 powders prepared with Sm excess shows that those are very stable up to 900 °C. The density of fine-grained Sm2Fe17-xGaxCy could be increased by hot pressing, but the degree of compaction and the phase purity very sensitively depend on the Ga content.

  6. Evaluation of Consideration and Incorporation of Green and Sustainable Remediation (GSR) Practices in Army Environmental Remediation. Volume 1

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-08-27

    solar panels or wind turbines ) Methodologies with inherent GSR characteristics for different phases within the remedial process are...and/or for alternate use at or near the project site Examples: - Solar, wind , landfill gas (micro turbines ), combined heat and power, geothermal... turbines  directly to the grid.  This would be much more efficient than numerous, distributed  wind   generation at the various well control houses.    2

  7. Changes in brain activity during the observation of TV commercials by using EEG, GSR and HR measurements.

    PubMed

    Vecchiato, Giovanni; Astolfi, Laura; De Vico Fallani, Fabrizio; Cincotti, Febo; Mattia, Donatella; Salinari, Serenella; Soranzo, Ramon; Babiloni, Fabio

    2010-06-01

    In this study we were interested to analyse the brain activity occurring during the "naturalistic" observation of commercial ads intermingled in a random order within a documentary. In order to measure both the brain activity and the emotional engage of the 15 healthy subjects investigated, we used simultaneous EEG, Galvanic Skin Response (GSR), Heart Rate (HR) recordings during the whole experiment. We would like to link significant variation of EEG, GSR, HR and Heart Rate Variability (HRV) measurements with the memory and pleasantness of the stimuli presented, as resulted successively from the subject's verbal interview. In order to do that, different indexes were employed to summarize the cerebral and autonomic measurements performed. Such indexes were used in the statistical analysis, performed with the use of Analysis of Variance (ANOVA) and z-score transformation of the estimated cortical activity by solving the associated EEG inverse problem. The results are summarized as follows: (1) in the population analyzed, the cortical activity in the theta band elicited during the observation of the TV commercials that were remembered is higher and localized in the left frontal brain areas when compared to the activity elicited during the vision of the TV commercials that were forgotten (p < 0.048). Same increase in the theta activity occurred during the observation of commercials that were judgment pleasant when compared with the other (p < 0.042). Differences in cortical activity were also observed for the gamma activity, bilaterally in frontal and prefrontal areas. (2) the HR and HRV activity elicited during the observation of the TV commercials that were remembered or judged pleasant is higher than the same activity during the observation of commercials that will be forgotten (p < 0.001 and p < 0.048, respectively for HR and HRV) or were judged unpleasant (p < 0.042 and p < 0.04, respectively for HR and HRV). No statistical differences between the level of the GSR

  8. Certification Can Count: The Case of Aircraft Mechanics. Issues in Labor Statistics. Summary 02-03.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bureau of Labor Statistics, Washington, DC.

    This document is a summary of aerospace industry technician statistics gathered by the Occupational Employment Statistics Survey for the year 2000 by the Department of Labor, Bureau of Labor Statistics. The data includes the following: (1) a comparison of wages earned by Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) certified and non-FAA certified…

  9. Joint Service Chemical and Biological Defense Program. FY 02-03 Overview

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2003-01-01

    and track objectives or targets. The ----% pivotal characteristic of precision engagement is the linking of sensors, delivery systems, and effects ...efficacy of recombinant protein vaccines in animal models using intranasal/inhalation and transdermal delivery methods. JVAP-Advanced Development "* Acquire...JSCBIS) Skin Decontamination and Protection, Performance Effects of Protectant Drugs , and http://jscbis.rdaisaarmy.mil Chemical Casualty Management

  10. Grant No DE-FG02-03ER83720 Report for US Department of Engery

    SciTech Connect

    Chan, Winston; Wagner, Robert

    2004-04-22

    Effective and reliable nuclear monitoring requires discrimination between small magnitude explosions and earthquakes based on the use of limited regional data. Lg is generally the largest seismic phase from both explosion and earthquake sources recorded at regional distances. For small events, Lg may sometimes be the only well-recorded seismic phase so that discriminants based only on the use of Lg are especially desirable. Recent research has provided significantly better understanding of Lg by demonstrating that the explosion-generated Rg makes significant contribution to the low-frequency S or Lg from explosions. Near-source scattering of explosion-generated Rg appears to be a viable mechanism for generating low-frequency(< 2 Hz) Lg waves from explosions. Detailed knowledge of the complex scattering process is, however, still incomplete and is in fact the subject of several ongoing studies. Our analysis of regional data from nuclear explosions from both Nevada Test Site (NTS) and Kazakh Test Site (KTS) and nearby earthquakes in Phase I has suggested that there are several reliable source discrimination methods only based on the use of Lg at regional distances. These discriminants should be. especially useful for small magnitude seismic events for which Lg may be the only well-recorded seismic phase. Our results suggest four possible regional discriminants: (a) frequency-amplitude-time analysis of spectrograms, (b) Lg(low frequency)/Lg(high frequency), (c) Lg spectral slopes, and (d) skewness of Lg spectra. Remarkable similarity of discrimination results from both NTS and KTS nuclear explosions and nearby earthquakes, with entirely different geological settings, indicates that our results should be applicable to other regions of the world.

  11. Indeck-Niles, LLC PSD Appeal No. 02-03 EAB Decision

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This document may be of assistance in applying the New Source Review (NSR) air permitting regulations including the Prevention of Significant Deterioration (PSD) requirements. This document is part of the NSR Policy and Guidance Database. Some documents in the database are a scanned or retyped version of a paper photocopy of the original. Although we have taken considerable effort to quality assure the documents, some may contain typographical errors. Contact the office that issued the document if you need a copy of the original.

  12. Final Report for Award DE-FG02-03ER63640

    SciTech Connect

    James Ehleringer

    2007-07-19

    The carbon isotope ratios of carbon dioxide fluxes from terrestrial ecosystems are key measurements needed to constrain interpretations of carbon sinks in North American carbon cycle analyses. The completed research was a multi-faceted effort addressing photosynthetic and respiratory isotope exchanges across the biosphere-atmosphere boundary at five AmeriFlux sites (Harvard Forest, Howland Forest, Rannalls Ranch, Niwot Ridge Forest, and Wind River Crane Site), spanning the dominant ecosystem types of the United States. The sampling and analysis protocols developed in this project have become the fundamental analytical approach for all sites measuring ecosystem isotope studies across the United States and Canada. It is the first network of long-term observations to characterize the isotopic composition of the biosphere-atmosphere CO2 flux. We focused on understanding the magnitude of changes in the carbon isotope ratio of respiration and of photosynthetic discrimination on seasonal and interannual bases. Focusing at AmeriFlux sites provided a direct link to NEE measurements associated with studies of the North American carbon cycle and an opportunity to provide mechanistic insights relating observed isotope changes and the controls over carbon sequestration and loss on seasonal and interannual bases. An additional component of our research linked directly with eddy covariance monitoring to partition NEE into assimilation and respiratory components. The completed project promoted cross-site analyses and resulting publications applicable at AmeriFlux and other long-term carbon cycle research sites. Lastly, the online monitoring of carbon dioxide in the Salt Lake Valley and the intermittent monitoring of absolute carbon dioxide concentrations at different AmeriFlux sites contributed public awareness and data sets that can be used in public education and as a basis for public policies related to carbon dioxide

  13. Yearly Technical Report for DE-FG02-03ER46026

    SciTech Connect

    Duane D. Johnson

    2012-05-25

    We propose a unique, all-electron, thermodynamic density functional theory (DFT) code that directly predicts full or partial long-range order in crystalline (defected) solids and their effect on electronic properties via a first-principles mean-field theory, scales linear with number of atoms N per unit-cell [i.e. O(N), due to use of a mathematical-based screening in k-space], and addresses up to 1 million atoms using parallel architectures. Novel O(N) algorithms will be developed to permit this for an all-electron KKR Green's functional density-functional theory code.

  14. Final Technical Report For Closeout of Award No. DE-FG02-03ER41250

    SciTech Connect

    Richard C. York

    2005-07-20

    Michigan State University (MSU) activities in support of this grant were made as part of a larger collaboration including Los Alamos National Laboratory, Argonne National Laboratory, and Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. The main task of the collaboration was the development of an end-to-end multiparticle beam-dynamics simulation tool for computation of beam losses in the RIA driver linac. As the first part of this task, it was planned to modify PARMTEQ for multicharge-state beam-dynamics simulation in the LEBT and RFQ. The next part of this task was to develop a new multiparticle parallel code to model the superconducting driver linac. The output particle distributions from PARMTEQ could then be used as input for simulations through the superconducting linac, using the new parallel code with different random number seeds. The stripping of heavy ions is proposed for the RIA driver linac to increase acceleration efficiency. MSU developed a complete charge stripping foil model to evaluate the impact of the stripping foil on the beam transverse and longitudinal emittance. The stripping foil model was developed in LANA [1] and included the effects of elastic and inelastic scattering, ionization energy loss, and thickness variation in the stripping foil using the code SRIM [2]. This model was provided to the collaboration for inclusion in the new simulation tools. Benchmarking information in support of the new code development was provided by supplying the collaboration with the MSU driver linac model consisting of input information for LANA and DIMAD [3] The output of simulations using LANA and DIMAD were also provided. As an element of these activities, LANA was modified to provide simulation results with high statistics. The simulation results from the newly developed simulation tools and those of MSU gave statistically equivalent results.

  15. The high performance solar array GSR3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mamode, A.; Bartevian, J.; Bastard, J. L.; Auffray, P.; Plagne, A.

    A foldout solar array for communication satellites was developed. A wing composed of 4 panels of 1.6 x 1.5 m and a Y-shaped yoke, and a wing with 3 panels of 2.4 x 2.4 m were made. End of life performance goal is greater than 35 W/kg with BSR 180 micron solar cells, and 50 W/kg using 50 micron BSFR cells. Analysis shows that all identified requirements can be covered with current skin made of open weave very high modulus carbon fiber; reinforcements of unidirectional carbon fiber; honeycomb in current section; hold-down inserts made of wound carbon fibers; titanium hinge fitting; and Kapton foil (25 or 50 micron thickness). Tests confirm performance predictions.

  16. Effect of the X5.4 Class Solar Flare Event of Solar Cycle 24 ON the GPS Signal Reception in Peninsular Malaysia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ismail, S.; Musa, T. A.; Aris, W. A. W.; Gopir, G.

    2016-09-01

    In this paper, we examine the effect of solar flare event on the Global Positioning System (GPS) signal reception in Peninsular Malaysia during the X5.4 class solar flare on 7th March 2012, 00:24 UT at active region AR1429. GPS data from six MyRTKnet stations that cover the northern, southern, western and eastern regions of Peninsular Malaysia were used, namely Langkawi (Kedah), Bandar Baharu (Pulau Pinang), Pekan (Pahang), Mersing (Johor), Tanjung Pengelih (Johor) and Malacca (Malacca). The total electron content (TEC) was estimated based on the single layer ionospheric model. Next, the ionospheric delay for each GPS frequency of L1 (1575.42 MHz), L2 (1227.60 MHz) and L5 (1176.45 MHz) was then calculated. The results show that solar flare event can influence the GPS signal reception in Peninsular Malaysia where the X5.4 class solar flare shows significant effect of the ionospheric delay within the range of 9 m - 20 m. These research findings will significantly contribute to space weather study and its effects on space-based positioning system such as the GPS.

  17. Spallation Neutrons and Pressure SNAP DE-FG02-03ER46085 CLOSE-OUT MAY 2009

    SciTech Connect

    Parise, John B

    2009-05-22

    The purpose of the grant was to build a community of scientist and to draw upon their expertise to design and build the world's first dedicated high pressure beamline at a spallation source - the so called Spallation Neutron And Pressure (SNAP) beamline at the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) at OAk Ridge NAtional LAboratory. . Key to this endeavor was an annual meeting attended by the instrument design team and the executive committee. The discussions at those meeting set an ambitious agenda for beamline design and construction and highlighted key science areas of interest for the community. This report documents in 4 appendices the deliberations at the annual SNAP meetings and the evolution of the beamline optics from concept to construction. The appendices also contain key science opportunities for extreme conditions research.

  18. Final Report for DOE Grant DE-FG02-03ER54712, Experimental Studies of Collisionless Reconnection Processes in Plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Porkolab, Miklos; Egedal, Jan

    2007-11-30

    The Grant DE-FG-02-00ER54712, ?Experimental Studies of Collisionless Reconnection Processes in Plasmas?, financed within the DoE/NSF, spanned a period from September , 2003 to August, 2007. It partly supported an MIT Research scientist, two graduate students and material expenses. The grant enabled the operation of a basic plasma physics experiment (on magnetic reconnection) at the MIT Plasma Science and Fusion Center and the MIT Physics Department. A strong educational component characterized this work throughout, with the participation of a large number of graduate and undergraduate students and interns to the experimental activities. The study of the collisionless magnetic reconnection constituted the primary work carried out under this grant. The investigations utilized two magnetic configurations with distinct boundary conditions. Both configurations were based upon the Versatile Toroidal Facility (VTF). The first configuration is characterized by open boundary conditions where the magnetic field lines interface directly with the vacuum vessel walls. The reconnection dynamics for this configuration has been methodically characterized and it has been shown that kinetic effects related to trapped electron trajectories are responsible for the high rates of reconnection observed [7]. This type of reconnection has not been investigated before. Nevertheless, the results are directly relevant to observations by the Wind spacecraft of fast reconnection deep in the Earth magnetotail [9]. The second configuration was developed to be specifically relevant to numerical simulations of magnetic reconnection, allowing the magnetic field-lines to be contained inside the device. The configuration is compatible with the presence of large current sheets in the reconnection region and reconnection is observed in fast powerful bursts. These reconnection events facilitate the first experimental investigations of the physics governing the spontaneous onset of fast reconnection [12]. In this Report we review the general motivation of this work, the experimental set-up, and the main physics results. The details of the individual chapters are naturally contained in the relevant publications [1-12], indicated in the reference list and annexed to this Report.

  19. FINAL REPORT FOR DE-FG02-03ER46071 ENTITLED, "UNDERSTANDING FOAM RHEOLOGY FROM THE MICROSCOPIC TO THE MACROSCOPIC SCALE"

    SciTech Connect

    Dennin, Michael

    2012-01-10

    This research effort is focused on understanding the mechanical response of foams, and other complex fluids, from the microscopic to the macroscopic level. The research uses a model two-dimensional system: bubble rafts. Bubble rafts are a single layer of gas bubbles with liquid walls that float on a water surface. The work involves studies of the macroscopic response of foam under various conditions of external forcing, mesoscopic studies of bubble motion, and systematic variations of the microscopic details of the system. In addition to characterizing the specific properties of the bubble raft, a second aim of the research is to provide experimental tests of various general theories that have recently been developed to characterize complex fluids. Primarily, the focus is on testing the proposed jamming phase diagram paradigm. This paradigm suggests that a general jamme state of matter exists and is common to a wide range of systems, including foam, colloids, granular matter, glasses, and emulsions. Therefore,we have extended our research in two directions. First, we have included studies of plastic bead rafts. These are systems of plastic beads floating on the air-water interface. The advantage of plastic beads is that they do not pop, so they can be studied for the much longer periods of time required to measure the slow dynamics associated with the jammed state. Also, they allow us to explore a different density regime than the bubbles. Second, to better understand the role of defects in jamming behavior, we have done a few experiments on the impact of defects on domain growth.

  20. Final Scientific/Technical Report for DOE Award No. DE-FG02-03ER15426: Role of Arabidopsis PINHEAD gene in meristem function

    SciTech Connect

    Dr. M. Kathryn Barton

    2011-11-29

    The shoot apical meristems of land plants are small mounds of hundreds of cells located at the tips of branches. It is from these small clusters of cells that essentially all above ground plant biomass and therefore much of our energy supply originates. Several key genes have been discovered that are necessary for cells in the shoot apical meristem to take on stem cell properties. The goal of this project is to understand how the synthesis and accumulation of the mRNAs and proteins encoded by these genes is controlled. A thorough understanding of the molecules that control the growth of shoot apical meristems in plants will help us to manipulate food, fiber and biofuel crops to better feed, clothe and provide energy for humans.

  1. DOE FG02-03ER63557: Final Technical Report: Reactivity of Primary Soil Minerals and Secondary Precipitates Beneath Leaking Hanford Waste Tanks

    SciTech Connect

    Kathryn L. Nagy

    2009-05-04

    The purpose of the project was to investigate rates and mechanisms of reactions between primary sediment minerals and key components of waste tank solutions that leaked into the subsurface at the Hanford Site. Results were expected to enhance understanding of processes that cause (1) changes in porosity and permeability of the sediment and resultant changes in flow paths of the contaminant plumes, (2) formation of secondary precipitates that can take up contaminants in their structures, and (3) release of mineral components that can drive redox reactions affecting dissolved contaminant mobility. Measured rates can also be used directly in reactive transport models. Project tasks included (1) measurement of the dissolution rates of biotite mica from low to high pH and over a range of temperature relevant to the Hanford subsurface, (2) measurement of dissolution rates of quartz at high pH and in the presence of dissolved alumina, (3) measurement of the dissolution rates of plagioclase feldspar in high pH, high nitrate, high Al-bearing solutions characteristic of the BX tank farms, (4) incorporation of perrhenate in iron-oxide minerals as a function of pH, and (5) initiation of experiments to measure the formation of uranium(VI)-silicate phases under ambient conditions. Task 2 was started under a previous grant from the Environmental Management Science Program and Task 4 was partially supported by a grant to the PI from the Geosciences Program, Office of Basic Energy Sciences. Task 5 was continued under a subsequent grant from the Environmental Remediation Sciences Program, Office of Biological and Environmental Research.

  2. Final Technical Report for DOE Grant DE-FG02-03ER15473 “Molecular Level Design of Heterogeneous Chiral Catalysis”

    SciTech Connect

    David Sholl; Andrew Gellman

    2007-03-15

    The production of enantiomerically pure chiral compounds is of great importance in the pharmaceutical industry. Although processes involving chiral catalysis and separations involving solid surfaces are known, the molecular-scale details of these processes are not well understood. This lack of understanding strongly limits the development of new chiral processes. Our collaborative research effort examines several intertwined aspects of chirality and enantioselectivity at catalytically active metal surfaces. At Carnegie Mellon, our efforts focus on the development of chirally imprinted metal powders as materials for chiral columns and the experimental and theoretical study of small chiral molecules adsorbed on well-characterized metal surfaces, both achiral and chiral. These efforts are being performed in close collaboration with our team members at the University of California Riverside and the University of Wisconsin Milwaukee.

  3. Technical Report for DE-FG02-03ER46029 Sugar-Coated PPEs, Novel Nanomaterials and Sensing Modules for Disease and Bioterrorism Related Threats

    SciTech Connect

    Uwe Bunz

    2003-08-27

    The detection and sensing of biological warfare agents (Ricin, Anthrax toxin), of disease agents (cholera, botulinum and tetanus toxins, influenza virus etc) and of biologically active species is important for national security and disease control. A premiere goal would be the simple colorimetric or fluorimetric detection of such toxins by a dipstick test. It would be desirable to sense 5,000-10,000 toxin molecules, i.e. 10-100 fg of a toxin contained 1-5 mL of sample. Fluorescent conjugated polymers should be particularly interesting in this regard, because they can carry multiple identical and/or different recognition units. Such an approach is particularly valuable for the detection of lectin toxins, because these bind to oligomeric carbohydrate displays. Lectins bind multivalently to sugars, i.e. several covalently connected sugar moieties have to be exposed to the lectin at the same time to obtain binding. The requirement of multivalency of the lectin-sugar interactions should allow a very sensitive detection of lectins with sugar coated conjugated polymers in an agglutination type assay, where the fluorescence of the PPEs disappears upon binding to the lectins. High molecular weights of the used PPEs would mean high sensitivity. Herein we present our progress towards that goal up to date.

  4. 25 CFR 502.4 - Class III gaming.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... II gaming, including but not limited to: (a) Any house banking game, including but not limited to— (1) Card games such as baccarat, chemin de fer, blackjack (21), and pai gow (if played as house banking games); (2) Casino games such as roulette, craps, and keno; (b) Any slot machines as defined in 15...

  5. 25 CFR 502.4 - Class III gaming.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... II gaming, including but not limited to: (a) Any house banking game, including but not limited to— (1) Card games such as baccarat, chemin de fer, blackjack (21), and pai gow (if played as house banking games); (2) Casino games such as roulette, craps, and keno; (b) Any slot machines as defined in 15...

  6. 25 CFR 502.4 - Class III gaming.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... II gaming, including but not limited to: (a) Any house banking game, including but not limited to— (1) Card games such as baccarat, chemin de fer, blackjack (21), and pai gow (if played as house banking games); (2) Casino games such as roulette, craps, and keno; (b) Any slot machines as defined in 15...

  7. 25 CFR 502.4 - Class III gaming.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... II gaming, including but not limited to: (a) Any house banking game, including but not limited to— (1) Card games such as baccarat, chemin de fer, blackjack (21), and pai gow (if played as house banking games); (2) Casino games such as roulette, craps, and keno; (b) Any slot machines as defined in 15...

  8. 25 CFR 502.4 - Class III gaming.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... II gaming, including but not limited to: (a) Any house banking game, including but not limited to— (1) Card games such as baccarat, chemin de fer, blackjack (21), and pai gow (if played as house banking games); (2) Casino games such as roulette, craps, and keno; (b) Any slot machines as defined in 15...

  9. Category 4: Class II Division 2 malocclusion with deep overbite.

    PubMed

    Fooladi, Baharak; MacCarthy, Tarryn; Maloney, Tracy; Suri, Lokesh

    2007-08-01

    This case report was part of the resident display of cases sponsored by the College of Diplomates of the American Board of Orthodontics at the annual session of the American Association of Orthodontists, May 20-24, 2005, in San Francisco, Calif.

  10. Final Report DOE Grant No. DE-FG02-03ER83817 Integrated Reactor Design for Hydrogen Production from Biomass-Sourced Reactants Streams Using the Aqueous-Phase Carbohydrate Reforming (ACR) Process

    SciTech Connect

    Randy D. Cortright

    2005-05-04

    In this Phase I Small Business Innovation research project Virent Energy Systems (Virent) attempted to demonstrate the feasibility of generating high yields of hydrogen by developing the appropriate reactor system for the novel liquid-phase reforming of aqueous-phase carbohydrate streams derived from biomass. In this project platinum-based catalysts were initially utilized to establish the technical feasibility of reactor design for reforming carbohydrates found in biomass to hydrogen.

  11. ENVIRONMENTAL TECHNOLOGY VERIFICATION: JOINT (NSF-EPA) VERIFICATION STATEMENT AND REPORT FOR THE REDUCTION OF NITROGEN IN DOMESTIC WASTEWATER FROM INDIVIDUAL RESIDENTIAL HOMES, WATERLOO BIOFILTER® MODEL 4-BEDROOM (NSF 02/03/WQPC-SWP)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Verification testing of the Waterloo Biofilter Systems (WBS), Inc. Waterloo Biofilter® Model 4-Bedroom system was conducted over a thirteen month period at the Massachusetts Alternative Septic System Test Center (MASSTC) located at Otis Air National Guard Base in Bourne, Mas...

  12. Final Technical Report ARM DOE Grant #DE-FG02-03ER63520 Parameterizations of Shortwave Radiactive Properties of Broken Clouds from Satellite and Ground-Based Measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Albrecht, Bruce, A.

    2006-06-19

    This study used DOE ARM data and facilities to: 1) study macroscopic properties of continental stratus clouds at SGP and the factors controlling these properties, 2) develop a scientific basis for understanding the pocesses responsible for the formation of boundary layer clouds using ARM observations in conjunction with simple parametric models and LES, and 3) evaluate cumulus cloud characteristics retrieved retrieved from the MMCR operating at TWP-Nauru. In addition we have used high resolution 94 GHz observations of boundary layer clouds and precipitation to: 1)develop techniques for using high temporal resolution Doppler velocities to study large-eddy circulations and turbulence in boundary layer clouds and estimate the limitations of using current and past MMCR data for boundary layer cloud studies, 2) evaluate the capability and limitation of the current MMCR data for estimating reflectivity, vertical velocities, and spectral under low-signal-to-noise conditions associated with weak non-precipitating clouds, 3) develop possible sampling modes for the new MMCR processors to allow for adequate sampling of boundary layer clouds, and 4) retrieve updraft and downdraft structures under precipitating conditions.

  13. 17 CFR 50.4 - Classes of swaps required to be cleared.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... Entities Corporate. Region Europe. Indices iTraxx Europe. iTraxx Europe Crossover. iTraxx Europe HiVol. Tenor iTraxx Europe: 5Y, 10Y. iTraxx Europe Crossover: 5Y. iTraxx Europe HiVol: 5Y. Applicable Series iTraxx Europe 5Y: Series 10 and all subsequent Series, up to and including the current Series....

  14. 17 CFR 50.4 - Classes of swaps required to be cleared.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... Europe. Indices iTraxx Europe. iTraxx Europe Crossover. iTraxx Europe HiVol. Tenor iTraxx Europe: 5Y, 10Y. iTraxx Europe Crossover: 5Y. iTraxx Europe HiVol: 5Y. Applicable Series iTraxx Europe 5Y: Series 10 and all subsequent Series, up to and including the current Series. iTraxx Europe 10Y: Series 7 and...

  15. GEOCENTRIFUGE STUDIES OF FLOW AND TRANSPORT IN POROUS MEDIA, FINAL REPORT FOR GRANT NUMBER DE-FG02-03ER63567 TO THE UNIVERSITY OF IDAHO (RW SMITH), ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT SCIENCE PROGRAM PROJECT NUMBER 86598, COUPLED FLOW AND REACTIVITY IN VARIABLY SATURATED POROUS MEDIA

    SciTech Connect

    Robert W. Smith; Carl D. Palmer; Earl D. Mattson

    2007-06-15

    Improved models of contaminant migration in heterogeneous, variably saturated porous media are required to better define the long-term stewardship requirements for U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) lands and to assist in the design of effective vadose-zone barriers to contaminant migrations. The development of these improved models requires field and laboratory results to evaluate their efficacy. However, controlled laboratory experiments simulating vadose conditions can require extensive period of time, and often are conducted at condition near saturation rather than the much drier conditions common in many contaminated arid vadose zone sites. Collaborative research undertaken by the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) and the University of Idaho as part of this Environmental Management Science Program project focused on the development and evaluation of geocentrifuge techniques and equipment that allows vadose zone experiments to be conducted for relevant conditions in time frames not possible in conventional bench top experiments. A key and novel aspect of the research was the use of the 2-meter radius geocentrifuge capabilities at the Idaho National Laboratory to conduct unsaturated transport experiments. Specifically, the following activities were conducted ** Reviewing of the theory of unsaturated flow in the geocentrifuge to establish the range of centrifuge accelerations/experimental conditions and the translation of centrifuge results to 1 gravity applications. ** Designing, constructing, and testing of in-flight experimental apparatus allowing the replication of traditional bench top unsaturated transport experiments on the geocentrifuge. ** Performing unsaturated 1-dimenstional column geocentrifuge experiments using conservative tracers to evaluate the effects of increased centrifugal acceleration on derived transport properties and assessing the scaling relationships for these properties. Because the application of geocentrifuge techniques to vadose transport is in its infancy experimental apparatus such as pumps, flow meters, columns, fraction collectors, etc. that would reliably function under the increased self weight experienced on the centrifuge had to be developed and tested as part of this project. Although, we initially planed to conduct experiments using reactive tracer and 2-dimensional heterogeneities, the cost and time associated with designing, building, and testing of experimental apparatus limited our experimental program to conservative tracer experiments using 1-dimensional columns. The results we obtained in this study indicate that the geocentrifuge technique is a viable experimental method for the study of subsurface processes where gravitational acceleration is important. The geocentrifuge allows experiments to be completed more quickly than tests conducted at 1-g, can be used to experimentally address important scaling issues, and permits experiments under a range of conditions that would be difficult or impossible using conventional approaches. The application of the geocentrifuge approaches and associated models developed in this project allows more meaningful investigation of DOE relevant vadose-zone issues under scalable conditions in time frames previously not obtainable.

  16. Backbone resonance assignments of an artificially engineered TEM-1/PSE-4 Class A β-lactamase chimera.

    PubMed

    Morin, Sébastien; Clouthier, Christopher M; Gobeil, Sophie; Pelletier, Joelle N; Gagné, Stéphane M

    2010-10-01

    The rapid evolution of Class A β-lactamases, which procure resistance to an increasingly broad panel of β-lactam antibiotics, underscores the urgency to better understand the relation between their sequence variation and their structural and functional features. To date, more than 300 clinically-relevant β-lactamase variants have been reported, and this number continues to increase. With the aim of obtaining insights into the evolutionary potential of β-lactamases, an artificially engineered, catalytically active chimera of the Class A TEM-1 and PSE-4 β-lactamases is under study by kinetics and NMR. Here we report the (1)H, (13)C and (15)N backbone resonance assignments for the 30 kDa chimera cTEM-17m. Despite its high molecular weight, the data provide evidence that this artificially-evolved chimeric enzyme is well folded. The hydrolytic activity of cTEM-17m was determined using the chromogenic substrate CENTA, with K (M) = 160 ± 35 μM and k (cat) = 20 ± 4 s(-1), which is in the same range as the values for TEM-1 and PSE-4 β-lactamases.

  17. Two-gun suicide by simultaneous shots to the head: interdisciplinary reconstruction on the basis of scene investigation, autopsy findings, GSR analysis and examination of firearms, bullets and cartridge cases.

    PubMed

    Grosse Perdekamp, Markus; Nadjem, Hadi; Merkel, Joachim; Braunwarth, Roland; Pollak, Stefan; Thierauf, Annette

    2011-07-01

    Suicidal shots fired simultaneously to the head from two handguns are rare. The authors report about a recent case in which a Smith & Wesson cal. 9 mm pistol and a Smith & Wesson cal. .357 Magnum revolver were used. Sitting on a sofa, a 33-year-old man (member of a shooting club) fired two simultaneous shots to the head; the pistol held in the left hand was discharged into the left temple, and the revolver held in the right hand was fired into the mouth. Both weapons remained in the respective hands. An upside-down muzzle imprint in the left temporal region and recoil injuries of a mandibular incisor, and the lower lip indicated that both the pistol and the revolver had been held in an inverted manner at the time of discharge. Blood stains (backspatter) and gunshot residues were present on both firing hands, whereas forward spatter originating from the exit wounds was deposited on the wall behind the suicide's head.

  18. A Study of the Presence of Gunshot Residue in Pittsburgh Police Stations using SEM/EDS and LC-MS/MS.

    PubMed

    Ali, Leah; Brown, Kyle; Castellano, Holly; Wetzel, Stephanie J

    2016-07-01

    Due to possible secondary transfer of gunshot residue (GSR) onto a suspect in police custody prior to sampling, a baseline must be created for the amount of GSR present. With an increase of "lead free" ammunition, testing for both gunpowder and primer GSR is relevant. Seventy samples were collected using carbon-coated adhesive stubs from four Pittsburgh Police Stations and vehicles to investigate these locations as sources of secondary GSR contamination. These seventy samples were analyzed for primer GSR using scanning electron microscopy-energy-dispersive X-ray spectrometry. One primer GSR particle was detected; no sample was classified as positive for primer GSR. These same samples were then analyzed for gunpowder GSR using liquid chromatography coupled to tandem mass spectrometry to test for akardite II, ethylcentralite, diphenylamine, N-nitrosodiphenylamine, 2-nitrodiphenylamine, and 4-nitrodiphenylamine. Ethylcentralite was quantifiable in two test samples. These results suggest there is a negligible potential for secondary transfer of primer and gunpowder GSR.

  19. An immunodominant class I-restricted cytotoxic T lymphocyte determinant of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 induces CD4 class II-restricted help for itself

    PubMed Central

    1990-01-01

    We have observed that a peptide corresponding to an immunodominant epitope of the HIV-1 envelope protein recognized by class I MHC- restricted CD8+ CTL can also induce T cell help for itself. The help is necessary for restimulation of CTL precursors in vitro with peptide alone in the absence of exogenous lymphokines, can be removed by depletion of CD4+ T cells, and can be replaced by exogenous IL-2. Whereas the CTL in BALB/c or B10. D2 mice are restricted by the class I molecule Dd, the Th cells are restricted by the class II molecule Ad, and the help can be blocked by anti-Ad mAb. To examine the genetic regulation of the induction of help, we studied B10.A mice that share the class I Dd molecule, but have different class II molecules, Ak and Ek. Spleen cells of immune B10.A mice behave like CD4-depleted BALB/c spleen cells in that they cannot be restimulated in vitro by the peptide alone, but can with peptide plus IL-2. Therefore, in the absence of exogenous lymphokines, peptide-specific help is necessary for restimulation with this immunodominant CTL epitope peptide, and in H-2d mice, this peptide stimulates help for itself as well as CTL. We speculate on the implications of these findings for the immunodominance of this peptide in H-2d mice, and for the selective advantage of pairing certain class I and class II molecules in an MHC haplotype. PMID:1689366

  20. Brevitalea aridisoli, B. deliciosa and Arenimicrobium luteum, three novel species of Acidobacteria subdivision 4 (class Blastocatellia) isolated from savanna soil and description of the novel family Pyrinomonadaceae.

    PubMed

    Wüst, Pia K; Foesel, Bärbel U; Geppert, Alicia; Huber, Katharina J; Luckner, Manja; Wanner, Gerhard; Overmann, Jörg

    2016-09-01

    Three novel strains of the phylum Acidobacteria (Ac_11_E3T, Ac_12_G8T and Ac_16_C4T) were isolated from Namibian semiarid savanna soils by a high-throughput cultivation approach using low-nutrient growth media. 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis placed all three strains in the order Blastocatellales of the class Blastocatellia (Acidobacteria subdivision 4). However, 16S rRNA gene sequence similarities to their closest relative Pyrinomonas methylaliphatogenes K22T were ≤90 %. Cells of strains Ac_11_E3T, Ac_12_G8T and Ac_16_C4T were Gram-staining-negative and non-motile and divided by binary fission. Ac_11_E3T and Ac_16_C4T formed white colonies, while those of Ac_12_G8T were orange-yellowish. All three strains were aerobic chemoorganoheterotrophic mesophiles with a broad pH range for growth. All strains used a very limited spectrum of carbon and energy sources for growth, with a preference for complex proteinaceous substrates. The major respiratory quinone was MK-8. The major shared fatty acid was iso-C15 : 0. The DNA G+C contents of strains Ac_11_E3T, Ac_12_G8T and Ac_16_C4T were 55.9 mol%, 66.9 mol% and 54.7 mol%, respectively. Based on these characteristics, the two novel genera Brevitaleagen. nov. and Arenimicrobiumgen. nov. are proposed, harboring the novel species Brevitaleaaridisoli sp. nov. (Ac_11_E3T=DSM 27934T=LMG 28618T), Brevitalea deliciosa sp. nov. (Ac_16_C4T=DSM 29892T=LMG 28995T) and Arenimicrobium luteum sp. nov. (Ac_12_G8T=DSM 26556T=LMG 29166T), respectively. Since these novel genera are only distantly related to established families, we propose the novel family Pyrinomonadaceaefam. nov. that accommodates the proposed genera and the genus Pyrinomonas(Crowe et al., 2014).

  1. Gunshot residue in Chicago police vehicles and facilities: an empirical study.

    PubMed

    Berk, Robert E; Rochowicz, Scott A; Wong, Mary; Kopina, Michael A

    2007-07-01

    Suspects in shooting investigations in Chicago are routinely transported in department vehicles and detained in department facilities prior to gunshot residue (GSR) evidence collection. The GSR test results are used to associate the suspect with primary exposure to GSR. The potential for these vehicles and facilities being sources of secondary GSR contamination needed to be determined. A total of 201 samples were collected from randomly selected vehicles and detention facilities. The sampling collected trace materials from surfaces that suspects' hands may contact during the arrest process. These samples were examined for the presence of GSR particles using scanning electron microscopy. Upon completion of the automated analysis, those particles that met an initial GSR screening criterion were relocated and reanalyzed. The locations where GSR particles were recovered allowed us to make recommendations to the Chicago Police Department with regard to transporting and detaining these suspects. The low number of GSR particles recovered suggests that the potential for secondary contamination, although present, is relatively low.

  2. Media Research with a Galvanic Skin Response Biosensor: Some Kids Work Up a Sweat!

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clariana, Roy B.

    This study considers the galvanic skin response (GSR) of sixth-grade students (n=20) using print, video, and microcomputer segments. Subjects received all three media treatments, in randomized order. Data for analysis consisted of standardized test scores and GSR measures; a moderate positive relationship was shown between cumulative GSR and…

  3. Analysis of gunshot residue and associated materials--a review.

    PubMed

    Dalby, Oliver; Butler, David; Birkett, Jason W

    2010-07-01

    A comprehensive review of the scientific literature on gunshot residue (GSR) is presented. Aspects of both inorganic and organic GSR are discussed, from formation and distribution, to sample collection, preparation, and analysis using a variety of techniques. The interpretation of GSR results is also considered including issues surrounding the contamination, distribution, and transfer of GSR. Potential problems with ulterior sources of GSR like particles have been reported in the literature. For example, particles from environmental and occupational sources have been highlighted as exhibiting similar chemical and morphological characteristics to GSR. These findings are put into context with regard to interpreting samples. A move toward a "case by case" approach is argued to be more preferable to a "formal" classification system where possible. The analysis of both inorganic and organic compositions of residue samples as well as morphological considerations is considered to be a more ideal approach to GSR analysis, wherever practicable.

  4. Reconstruction of global solar radiation time series from 1933 to 2013 at the Izaña Atmospheric Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    García, R. D.; Cuevas, E.; García, O. E.; Cachorro, V. E.; Pallé, P.; Bustos, J. J.; Romero-Campos, P. M.; de Frutos, A. M.

    2014-09-01

    This paper presents the reconstruction of the 80-year time series of daily global solar radiation (GSR) at the subtropical high-mountain Izaña Atmospheric Observatory (IZO) located in Tenerife (The Canary Islands, Spain). For this purpose, we combine GSR estimates from sunshine duration (SD) data using the Ångström-Prescott method over the 1933/1991 period, and GSR observations directly performed by pyranometers between 1992 and 2013. Since GSR measurements have been used as a reference, a strict quality control has been applied based on principles of physical limits and comparison with LibRadtran model. By comparing with high quality GSR measurements, the precision and consistency over time of GSR estimations from SD data have been successfully documented. We obtain an overall root mean square error (RMSE) of 9.2% and an agreement between the variances of GSR estimations and GSR measurements within 92%. Nonetheless, this agreement significantly increases when the GSR estimation is done considering different daily fractions of clear sky (FCS). In that case, RMSE is reduced by half, to about 4.5%, when considering percentages of FCS > 40% (~ 90% of days in the testing period). Furthermore, we prove that the GSR estimations can monitor the GSR anomalies in consistency with GSR measurements and, then, can be suitable for reconstructing solar radiation time series. The reconstructed IZO GSR time series between 1933 and 2013 confirms change points and periods of increases/decreases of solar radiation at Earth's surface observed at a global scale, such as the early brightening, dimming and brightening. This fact supports the consistency of the IZO GSR time series presented in this work, which may be a reference for solar radiation studies in the subtropical North Atlantic region.

  5. Image analysis of gunshot residue on entry wounds. I--The technique and preliminary study.

    PubMed

    Brown, H; Cauchi, D M; Holden, J L; Wrobel, H; Cordner, S

    1999-03-29

    An automated image analysis (IA) technique has been developed to obtain a measure of the amount (i.e. number and area) of gunshot residue (GSR) particles within and around a gunshot wound. Sample preparation and IA procedures were standardised to improve the reproducibility of the IA measurements of GSR. Measurements of GSR from test firings into goat hide were enhanced by staining the barium and lead components present on the skin sections with Alizarin Red S. The amount of GSR detected on the stained skin sections was compared with backscatter electron micrographs of the same sections. The differences were deemed to be insignificant when the variability in the repeated test firings were taken into consideration. Preliminary results indicated that the decreasing relationship between firing range and the amount of GSR deposited was non-linear, and that for firing ranges of up to 20 cm the amount of GSR deposited from repeated shots fired from the same distance was highly variable.

  6. Machine washing or brushing of clothing and its influence on shooting distance estimation.

    PubMed

    Vinokurov, A; Zeichner, A; Glattstein, B; Koffman, A; Levin, N; Rosengarten, A

    2001-07-01

    Experiments were conducted to assess the effect of machine washing or brushing of clothing items on Gunshot Residue (GSR) patterns (gunpowder residues, lead, and copper, deposits) around bullet entrance holes. Results show that those treatments decrease considerably the amount and density of GSR. However, for close shooting distances not all of the GSR deposits are removed. Remaining patterns may be visualized by specific color reactions and used for shooting distance estimation.

  7. Gunshot residue preservation in seawater.

    PubMed

    Lindström, Anne-Christine; Hoogewerff, Jurian; Athens, Josie; Obertova, Zuzana; Duncan, Warwick; Waddell, Neil; Kieser, Jules

    2015-08-01

    Little is known about the persistence of gunshot residue (GSR) in soft tissue and bones during decomposition in marine environments. For a better understanding, qualitative and quantitative data were obtained on GSR retention on soft tissue and bony gunshot wounds (GSWs). A quantity of 36 fleshed and 36 defleshed bovine ribs were shot at contact range with 0.22 calibre hollow point ammunition using a Stirling 0.22 calibre long rifle. Bone specimens in triplicate were placed in three environments: submerged, intertidal and in supralittoral zone. Sets of triplicates were recovered on day 3, 10, 24 and 38, and analysed with scanning electron microscopy with energy dispersive X-ray spectrometry (SEM-EDX), and inductive coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). The SEM-EDX recorded GSR-indicative particles surrounding the bullet entrance on all bone types (fleshed and defleshed) in all environments throughout the study. GSR-unique particles were only detected on the supralittoral bones. The ICP-MS analysis showed faster GSR loss on submerged than intertidal and supralittoral defleshed specimens. Fleshed specimens showed a faster GSR loss on intertidal than submerged and supralittoral specimens. In conclusion, the GSR disappeared faster from submerged and intertidal than non-submerged specimens. The difference of detection of GSR between analysed specimens (defleshed versus fleshed) disappeared upon defleshing. This study highlights the potential of finding evidence of GSR in a submerged body and the potential of microscopic and analytical methods for examining suspected GSW in highly decomposed bodies in marine habitats.

  8. Raman microspectroscopic chemical mapping and chemometric classification for the identification of gunshot residue on adhesive tape.

    PubMed

    Bueno, Justin; Lednev, Igor K

    2014-07-01

    A novel approach utilizing automated Raman microspectroscopic mapping for gunshot residue (GSR) detection was investigated. A well-established technique for GSR recovery (tape lifting) was utilized for GSR particle collection. Uncontaminated samples of the substrate (tape), organic GSR (OGSR), and inorganic GSR (IGSR) particles were characterized to generate three respective Raman spectroscopic training sets. Automated Raman mapping was used to rapidly collect spectra over areas of the tape substrate populated with GSR particles. Raman spectra collected from the maps were classified against the training sets via partial least squares discriminant analysis (PLS-DA) to determine if GSR was present. We report the application of Raman chemical mapping as a proof of concept for the positive detection of GSR particles of varying morphologies. The estimated size of GSR particles, which could be readily detected by this method, is about 3.4 μm. The efficiency of the classification was quantitated with rates of true positives and negatives. Validation studies scrutinizing the practicality of this approach as a viable tool for potential forensics investigations are currently in progress.

  9. Analysis and Modeling of the Galvanic Skin Response Spontaneous Component in the context of Intelligent Biofeedback Systems Development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Unakafov, A.

    2009-01-01

    The paper presents an approach to galvanic skin response (GSR) spontaneous component analysis and modeling. In the study a classification of biofeedback training methods is given, importance of intelligent methods development is shown. The INTENS method, which is perspective for intellectualization, is presented. An important problem of biofeedback training method intellectualization - estimation of the GSR spontaneous component - is solved in the main part of the work. Its main characteristics are described; results of GSR spontaneous component modeling are shown. Results of small research of an optimum material for GSR probes are presented.

  10. Global signal regression has complex effects on regional homogeneity of resting state fMRI signal.

    PubMed

    Qing, Zhao; Dong, Zhangye; Li, Sufang; Zang, Yufeng; Liu, Dongqiang

    2015-12-01

    Regional homogeneity (ReHo) quantifies spatially local synchronization of resting state fMRI signal and has been applied to lots of clinic studies. Accumulating evidences demonstrated that the synchronization between spatially distinct brain regions, i.e. functional connectivity, can be remarkably influenced if the global mean time course is regressed out, namely global signal regression (GSR). Very recently, it was reported GSR reduces the test-retest reliability of ReHo, and reduces the positive correlation between ReHo and head motion. In this study, we were interested in two questions: 1) how GSR affects the raw ReHo values and its spatial distribution over the brain; 2) how GSR affects the differences of ReHo between two resting states, eyes open (EO) and eyes closed (EC), in healthy individuals. We found that the ReHo values were reduced by GSR but the spatial distribution of ReHo was not changed remarkably. In addition, split-half reproducibility analysis showed reproducible ReHo difference between EO and EC in some areas (e.g., thalamus and caudate) only with GSR, but showed reproducible ReHo difference in some other area (right temporal pole) only without GSR. The effects of GSR were almost independent of regression of other nuisance covariates. Our results suggest that the influences of GSR on ReHo are remarkable, reliable and complex. For the between-condition comparison, the GSR effects are region specific. We suggest that, for application studies using ReHo approach, it would be helpful to report results both with and without GSR.

  11. A study into the distribution of gunshot residue particles in the random population.

    PubMed

    Lucas, Nick; Brown, Hayley; Cook, Michael; Redman, Kahlee; Condon, Tanith; Wrobel, Harald; Kirkbride, K Paul; Kobus, Hilton

    2016-05-01

    When considering the impact and value of gunshot residues (GSR) as forensic trace evidence, the likelihood of a suspect producing a positive GSR analysis result without having direct exposure to a firearm is a major consideration. Therefore, the random prevalence of GSR and 'GSR-like' residues in the wider population is a highly pertinent question when considering the probative value of such evidence. The random prevalence of GSR in two Australian jurisdictions - Victoria and South Australia - was assessed through the collection and analysis of GSR samples obtained from randomly selected members of the public. Volunteers were asked to declare any firearms use, hobbies or potential firearms exposure before allowing their hands to be sampled using aluminium GSR sample stubs coated in adhesive tape. A total of 289 samples, 120 from Victoria and 169 from South Australia were collected and analysed using scanning electron microscopy coupled with energy dispersive X-ray microanalysis (SEM-EDS). Across all samples, three 'characteristic' three-component Pb/Ba/Sb particles were detected from a single subject in South Australia, corresponding to an overall prevalence of 0.3%. Two-component 'consistent' particles were more prevalent, with Pb/Sb particles being the most frequently occurring, in 8% of samples, and in South Australia only. A number of samples, approximately 7%, showed populations of single element particles of Pb, Ba and Sb, which has the potential to generate a false positive for GSR if using a bulk analysis technique such as NAA or AAS. The prevalence of GSR or 'GSR like' particles in this study matches closely with similar surveys conducted in other jurisdictions. Such surveys are a useful foundation for the creation of a probabilistic method for the assessment of GSR evidence.

  12. Gender and Ability Attentional Differences while Watching an Educational Television Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clariana, Roy B.

    This study investigated the attention or arousal of above and below average boys and girls while viewing a science television program on videotape. Skin resistance (GSR) was measured by a biosensor attached to a microcomputer and served as the dependent variable. Analysis of the data included a 2x2x8 ANOVA of gender v. ability v. GSR. The…

  13. A method for enhancing gunshot residue patterns on dark and multicolored fabrics compared with the modified Griess test.

    PubMed

    Bailey, James A; Casanova, Ruby S; Bufkin, Kim

    2006-07-01

    In using infrared or infrared-enhanced photography to examine gunshot residue (GSR) on dark-colored clothing, the GSR particles are microscopically examined directly on the fabric followed by the modified Griess test (MGT) for nitrites. In conducting the MGT, the GSR is transferred to treated photographic paper for visualization. A positive reaction yields an orange color on specially treated photographic paper. The examiner also evaluates the size of the powder pattern based on the distribution of nitrite reaction sites or density. A false-positive reaction can occur using the MGT due to contaminants or dyes that produce an orange cloud reaction as well. A method for enhancing visualization of the pattern produced by burned and partially unburned powder is by treatment of the fabric with a solution of sodium hypochlorite. In order to evaluate the results of sodium hypochlorite treatment for GSR visualization, the MGT was used as a reference pattern. Enhancing GSR patterns on dark or multicolored clothing was performed by treating the fabric with an application of 5.25% solution of sodium hypochlorite. Bleaching the dyes in the fabric enhances visualization of the GSR pattern by eliminating the background color. Some dyes are not affected by sodium hypochlorite; therefore, bleaching may not enhance the GSR patterns in some fabrics. Sodium hypochlorite provides the investigator with a method for enhancing GSR patterns directly on the fabric. However, this study is not intended to act as a substitute for the MGT or Sodium Rhodizonate test.

  14. A New Look at an Old Issue: Manifest Anxiety Scale Validity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Neva, Edward; Hicks, Robert A.

    1970-01-01

    The MAS was administered while drive level was systematically manipulated. Drive state was varied at four levels by the induced muscular tension technique while heart rate (HR) and galvanic skin response (GSR) activity were recorded. No meaningful relationship between MAS scores and HR and GSR activity was observed. The intercorrelation between HR…

  15. Gender Variations in the Effects of Number of Organizational Memberships, Number of Social Networking Sites, and Grade-Point Average on Global Social Responsibility in Filipino University Students

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Romeo B.; Baring, Rito V.; Sta. Maria, Madelene A.

    2016-01-01

    The study seeks to estimate gender variations in the direct effects of (a) number of organizational memberships, (b) number of social networking sites (SNS), and (c) grade-point average (GPA) on global social responsibility (GSR); and in the indirect effects of (a) and of (b) through (c) on GSR. Cross-sectional survey data were drawn from questionnaire interviews involving 3,173 Filipino university students. Based on a path model, the three factors were tested to determine their inter-relationships and their relationships with GSR. The direct and total effects of the exogenous factors on the dependent variable are statistically significantly robust. The indirect effects of organizational memberships on GSR through GPA are also statistically significant, but the indirect effects of SNS on GSR through GPA are marginal. Men and women significantly differ only in terms of the total effects of their organizational memberships on GSR. The lack of broad gender variations in the effects of SNS, organizational memberships and GPA on GSR may be linked to the relatively homogenous characteristics and experiences of the university students interviewed. There is a need for more path models to better understand the predictors of GSR in local students. PMID:27247700

  16. Gender Variations in the Effects of Number of Organizational Memberships, Number of Social Networking Sites, and Grade-Point Average on Global Social Responsibility in Filipino University Students.

    PubMed

    Lee, Romeo B; Baring, Rito V; Sta Maria, Madelene A

    2016-02-01

    The study seeks to estimate gender variations in the direct effects of (a) number of organizational memberships, (b) number of social networking sites (SNS), and (c) grade-point average (GPA) on global social responsibility (GSR); and in the indirect effects of (a) and of (b) through (c) on GSR. Cross-sectional survey data were drawn from questionnaire interviews involving 3,173 Filipino university students. Based on a path model, the three factors were tested to determine their inter-relationships and their relationships with GSR. The direct and total effects of the exogenous factors on the dependent variable are statistically significantly robust. The indirect effects of organizational memberships on GSR through GPA are also statistically significant, but the indirect effects of SNS on GSR through GPA are marginal. Men and women significantly differ only in terms of the total effects of their organizational memberships on GSR. The lack of broad gender variations in the effects of SNS, organizational memberships and GPA on GSR may be linked to the relatively homogenous characteristics and experiences of the university students interviewed. There is a need for more path models to better understand the predictors of GSR in local students.

  17. Identification of Genes Discriminating Multiple Sclerosis Patients from Controls by Adapting a Pathway Analysis Method

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Lei; Wang, Linlin; Tian, Pu

    2016-01-01

    The focus of analyzing data from microarray experiments has shifted from the identification of associated individual genes to that of associated biological pathways or gene sets. In bioinformatics, a feature selection algorithm is usually used to cope with the high dimensionality of microarray data. In addition to those algorithms that use the biological information contained within a gene set as a priori to facilitate the process of feature selection, various gene set analysis methods can be applied directly or modified readily for the purpose of feature selection. Significance analysis of microarray to gene-set reduction analysis (SAM-GSR) algorithm, a novel direction of gene set analysis, is one of such methods. Here, we explore the feature selection property of SAM-GSR and provide a modification to better achieve the goal of feature selection. In a multiple sclerosis (MS) microarray data application, both SAM-GSR and our modification of SAM-GSR perform well. Our results show that SAM-GSR can carry out feature selection indeed, and modified SAM-GSR outperforms SAM-GSR. Given pathway information is far from completeness, a statistical method capable of constructing biologically meaningful gene networks is of interest. Consequently, both SAM-GSR algorithms will be continuously revaluated in our future work, and thus better characterized. PMID:27846233

  18. The Efficiacy of Sternocleidomastoid Muscle Flap on Frey's Syndrome via a Novel Test: Galvanic Skin Response.

    PubMed

    Demirci, Ugur; Basut, Oguz; Noyan, Behzat; Demir, Uygar Levent; Afsin Ozmen, O; Kasapoglu, Fikret; Hakan Coskun, H; Onart, Selcuk

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of sternocleidomastoid (SCM) muscle flap on preventing Frey's syndrome by using, Galvanic skin responses (GSR). Fourty-three patients who underwent superficial parotidectomy were randomly divided into two groups and their GSR were recorded. SCM muscle flap was applied over the surgical area only in one group. Six months after the surgery, GSRs were remeasured. In addition, the patients completed a questionnaire regarding their complaints about clinical Frey's syndrome. Four patients had symptoms of clinical Frey's syndrome. Postoperative GSR measurements revealed no significant difference between two sides in flap group (p = 0.426) but higher in without flap group (p = 0.003). The patients with clinical Frey syndrome had significantly higher GSR values than the remaining patients. The SCM muscle flap was an effective method in preventing Frey's syndrome. Moreover, GSR test was highly sensitive and specific for diagnosis.

  19. Developing a quality assurance program for gunshot primer residue analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    White, Thomas R.

    2014-09-01

    The Texas DPS Crime Laboratory Service analyzes an average of 45 gunshot residue (GSR) kits a month using three different SEM/EDS systems and involving four different analysts. To maintain the volume of cases, we have developed a robust, cost-efficient method to ensure that all three systems are performing automated GSR analysis within laboratory specifications, and yielding consistent results across all three systems. This analysis commonly includes analysis of GSR kits collected from suspects' hands, but can also include kits from screening of suspects' clothing for GSR. Analysts have developed procedures for cleaning and monitoring areas where clothing and GSR stubs are processed and analyzed in order to ensure that casework stubs were not contaminated in the laboratory.

  20. Gunshot residue inserted under hair scales as a result of a muzzle blast

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burnett, Bryan R.

    2009-05-01

    The victim was alleged to have been shot in the head with a .40 caliber pistol from several feet. The defendant claimed that the shot was on the order of inches. Examination in the scanning electron microscope of the hair from around the victim's wound showed no adherent gunshot residue (GSR). However, when the hair was pulled apart by the adhesive of a standard GSR sampler, GSR was found associated with the exposed inner surfaces of the cuticle and cortex fragments. The pistol was discharged close enough to the victim's head that some of the cuticular scales were lifted in the muzzle blast which allowed GSR to be inserted under those scales. Gunshot residue associated with the surface of the victim's hair had somehow been removed. The defendant's account of the shooting was verified by the presence of under-scale GSR.

  1. Discharge of a Pistol Out a Car Window with the Breech Within the Interior of the Car: Analysis of Gunshot Residue on a Car's Interior Surfaces.

    PubMed

    Burnett, Bryan R; Lebiedzik, Jozef

    2016-12-19

    The defendant, the driver of the questioned car, allegedly extended his right arm over the passenger seat and fired a single shot from a 380 pistol out the passenger window with the pistol's breech within the car. A simulation of this shooting scenario using the same model car, but different year, was conducted to quantitate gunshot residue (GSR) contamination of interior surfaces within the car. The test car's dash and headliner/window frame above the pistol had the heaviest GSR contamination. The dash GSR from airborne deposition documents a firearm discharge within the vehicle. Transfer from GSR-contaminated hands or clothing to the dash is unlikely. The heavy GSR contamination of the headliner/window frame above the pistol likely documents the window from which the pistol was fired, but additional experiments are needed to verify.

  2. The potential of different artificial neural network (ANN) techniques in daily global solar radiation modeling based on meteorological data

    SciTech Connect

    Behrang, M.A.; Assareh, E.; Ghanbarzadeh, A.; Noghrehabadi, A.R.

    2010-08-15

    The main objective of present study is to predict daily global solar radiation (GSR) on a horizontal surface, based on meteorological variables, using different artificial neural network (ANN) techniques. Daily mean air temperature, relative humidity, sunshine hours, evaporation, and wind speed values between 2002 and 2006 for Dezful city in Iran (32 16'N, 48 25'E), are used in this study. In order to consider the effect of each meteorological variable on daily GSR prediction, six following combinations of input variables are considered: (I)Day of the year, daily mean air temperature and relative humidity as inputs and daily GSR as output. (II)Day of the year, daily mean air temperature and sunshine hours as inputs and daily GSR as output. (III)Day of the year, daily mean air temperature, relative humidity and sunshine hours as inputs and daily GSR as output. (IV)Day of the year, daily mean air temperature, relative humidity, sunshine hours and evaporation as inputs and daily GSR as output. (V)Day of the year, daily mean air temperature, relative humidity, sunshine hours and wind speed as inputs and daily GSR as output. (VI)Day of the year, daily mean air temperature, relative humidity, sunshine hours, evaporation and wind speed as inputs and daily GSR as output. Multi-layer perceptron (MLP) and radial basis function (RBF) neural networks are applied for daily GSR modeling based on six proposed combinations. The measured data between 2002 and 2005 are used to train the neural networks while the data for 214 days from 2006 are used as testing data. The comparison of obtained results from ANNs and different conventional GSR prediction (CGSRP) models shows very good improvements (i.e. the predicted values of best ANN model (MLP-V) has a mean absolute percentage error (MAPE) about 5.21% versus 10.02% for best CGSRP model (CGSRP 5)). (author)

  3. Estimation of global solar radiation using an artificial neural network based on an interpolation technique in southeast China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zou, Ling; Wang, Lunche; Lin, Aiwen; Zhu, Hongji; Peng, Yuling; Zhao, Zhenzhen

    2016-08-01

    Solar radiation plays important roles in energy application, vegetation growth and climate change. Empirical relations and machine-learning methods have been widely used to estimate global solar radiation (GSR) in recent years. An artificial neural network (ANN) based on spatial interpolation is developed to estimate GSR in southeast China. The improved Bristow-Campbell (IBC) model and the improved Ångström-Prescott (IA-P) model are compared with the ANN model to explore the best model in solar radiation modeling. Daily meteorological parameters, such as sunshine duration hours, mean temperature, maximum temperature, minimum temperature, relative humidity, precipitation, air pressure, water vapor pressure, and wind speed, along with station-measured GSR and a daily surface GSR dataset over China obtained from the Data Assimilation and Modeling Center for Tibetan Multi-spheres (DAM), are used to predict GSR and to validate the models in this work. The ANN model with the network of 9-17-1 provides better accuracy than the two improved empirical models in GSR estimation. The root-mean-square error (RMSE), mean bias error (MBE), and determination coefficient (R2) are 2.65 MJ m-2, -0.94 MJ m-2, and 0.68 in the IA-P model; 2.19 MJ m-2, 1.11 MJ m-2, and 0.83 in the IBC model; 1.34 MJ m-2, -0.11 MJ m-2, and 0.91 in the ANN model, respectively. The regional monthly mean GSR in the measured dataset, DAM dataset, and ANN model is analyzed. The RMSE (RMSE %) is 1.07 MJ m-2 (8.91%) and the MBE (MBE %) is -0.62 MJ m-2 (-5.21%) between the measured and ANN-estimated GSR. The statistical errors of RMSE (RMSE %) are 0.91 MJ m-2 (7.28%) and those of MBE (MBE %) are -0.15 MJ m-2 (-1.20%) between DAM and ANN-modeled GSR. The correlation coefficients and R2 are larger than 0.95. The regional mean GSR is 12.58 MJ m-2. The lowest GSR is observed in the northwest area, and it increases from northwest to southeast. The annual mean GSR decreases by 0.02 MJ m-2 decade-1 over the entire

  4. Attenuated total reflectance-FT-IR imaging for rapid and automated detection of gunshot residue.

    PubMed

    Bueno, Justin; Lednev, Igor K

    2014-04-01

    An alternative approach for the nondestructive, rapid and selective detection of gunshot residue (GSR) was investigated. A cloth substrate containing GSR particles expelled during a firearm discharge was used as an analog for the clothing of a shooting victim or a suspect discharging a firearm. An established and efficient procedure for GSR collection (tape lifting) was utilized to recover GSR particles from the cloth substrate. Microscopic-attenuated total reflectance (ATR) Fourier transform (FT) infrared (IR) spectroscopic imaging rapidly and automatically scanned large areas of the tape collection substrate and detected varying morphologies (microscopic and macroscopic) and chemical compositions (organic and inorganic) of GSR. The "spectroscopic fingerprint" of each GSR type provided unique virbrational modes, which were not characteristic of the tape collection substrate or the cloth debris which was also recovered. ATR images (maps) targeted the detection of these unique chemical markers over the mapped area. The hues of the ATR images were determined by the intensity of the signal for the chemical marker of each analyte. The spatial resolution of the technique was determined to be 4.7 μm. Therefore, all GSR particles sized 4.7 μm or larger will be resolved and detected on the tape substrate using micro-ATR imaging.

  5. A simple method for detection of gunshot residue particles from hands, hair, face, and clothing using scanning electron microscopy/wavelength dispersive X-ray (SEM/WDX).

    PubMed

    Kage, S; Kudo, K; Kaizoji, A; Ryumoto, J; Ikeda, H; Ikeda, N

    2001-07-01

    We devised a simple and rapid method for detection of gunshot residue (GSR) particles, using scanning electron microscopy/wavelength dispersive X-ray (SEM/WDX) analysis. Experiments were done on samples containing GSR particles obtained from hands, hair, face, and clothing, using double-sided adhesive coated aluminum stubs (tape-lift method). SEM/WDX analyses for GSR were carried out in three steps: the first step was map analysis for barium (Ba) to search for GSR particles from lead styphnate primed ammunition, or tin (Sn) to search for GSR particles from mercury fulminate primed ammunition. The second step was determination of the location of GSR particles by X-ray imaging of Ba or Sn at a magnification of x 1000-2000 in the SEM, using data of map analysis, and the third step was identification of GSR particles, using WDX spectrometers. Analysis of samples from each primer of a stub took about 3 h. Practical applications were shown for utility of this method.

  6. [Using of scanning electron microscopy for detection of gunshot residue].

    PubMed

    Havel, J; Vajtr, D; Starý, V; Vrána, J; Zelenka, K; Adámek, T

    2006-07-01

    Scanning electron microscope improves the possibility of investigation of surroundings near of gunshot wounds in forensic medicine, it is the next subsequent method for differentiating of area of entrance and exit wound, supplemental method for determination of firing distance, permit of detection (GSR) on the hand of shooter and ensured describing of samples and their stored. Detection of GSR provides many information about composition of bullet and primer. Authors are demonstrating the possibility of detection of GSR on experimental shooting to the krupon (pigs' skin) in different situation (such as in a room and in outside area) and using of different weapon (hand gun CZ No.75 and machine gun No.58).

  7. An electro-conductive organic coating for scanning electron microscopy (déjà vu)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burnett, Bryan R.

    2014-09-01

    An organic compound, originally marketed as an antistatic, can form an extremely thin electro-conductive coating upon drying. A scanning electron microscope (SEM) application for this compound was first explored in the late 1960s. A coating of this compound eliminates the need for carbon or gold coating in some applications. It is well suited for the viewing of fabric samples and associated gunshot residue (GSR) in the SEM and makes it possible to quickly analyze fabric bullet wipe and bore wipe GSR. Fabric samples can also be examined for GSR from intermediate-range shots to estimate muzzle-target distances. Scanning

  8. Some relationships between punishment, stuttering, and galvanic skin responses.

    PubMed

    Reed, C G; Lingwall, J B

    1976-06-01

    The simultaneous effects of response-contingent punishment on stuttering behaviors and the frequency of galvanic skin response (GSR) deflections for 10 subjects were investigated. GSR's and stuttering responses were recorded during base rate, treatment, and extinction conditions. The subjects demonstrated a 50% or greater decrease in stuttering frequency during the treatment condition. Combined data for all subjects indicated that the mean frequency of GSR deflections remained stable or declined across conditions of the study. Analysis of individual data revealed that GSR deflections during treatment as compared with base rate increased for four subjects, remained essentially the same in two subjects, and decreased for four subjects. These results suggest that experimental procedures which result in functional punishment effects on stuttering frequency may not be associated with any predictable pattern on concomitant autonomic arousal.

  9. Stubs versus swabs? A comparison of gunshot residue collection techniques.

    PubMed

    Reid, Lisa; Chana, Kal; Bond, John W; Almond, Matthew J; Black, Stuart

    2010-05-01

    The collection efficiency of two widely used gunshot residue (GSR) collection techniques-carbon-coated adhesive stubs and alcohol swabs-has been compared by counting the number of characteristic GSR particles collected from the firing hand of a shooter after firing one round. Samples were analyzed with both scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive X-rays by an experienced GSR analyst, and the number of particles on each sample containing Pb, Ba, and Sb counted. The adhesive stubs showed a greater collection efficiency as all 24 samples gave positive results for GSR particles whereas the swabs gave only positive results for half of the 24 samples. Results showed a statistically significant collection efficiency for the stub collection method and likely reasons for this are considered.

  10. Detection of gunshot residue on dark-colored clothing prior to chemical analysis.

    PubMed

    Kersh, Kyla L; Childers, James M; Justice, Dale; Karim, Greg

    2014-05-01

    Detection of gunshot residue (GSR) is an arduous task for investigators. It is often accomplished with chemical tests, which can reveal elements and ions indicating the presence of GSR, but are likely to cause physical alteration to the pattern. In this study, the Spex Forensics Mini-CrimeScope MCS 400, along with 16 accompanying wavelength filters, was applied to various GSR patterns and target types. Three dark shirt materials, four ammunition calibers, and eight ammunition manufacturers, along with the primer residue of the different manufacturer ammunitions were tested. Results indicate the alternate light source wavelength of 445 nm to be the optimal setting. In addition, target material plays a large role in the preservation of GSR patterns as particles burn. Furthermore, it can be extrapolated that residue, observed from a full round and firing distance of six inches, is mostly composed of unburnt gunpowder residue, not primer residue.

  11. The Effect of Skin Debris on Gunshot Residue Sampling and Detection.

    PubMed

    Burnett, Bryan R

    2016-11-01

    These experiments were designed to determine whether skin debris (desquamated epithelial cells and apparent skin oils) affects gunshot residue (GSR) particle detection on the sticky tape lift samples prepared for scanning electron microscopy (SEM). A dabbing experiment showed that GSR particles accumulate not only on the adhesive surface of the sampler, but also on the epithelial cell surfaces. Samplers were loaded with target GSR followed by dabbing 30 times on the back of a hand. Backscatter electron images were taken at 20 kV and for some at 30 kV of the same areas. The samplers were then treated with a sodium/calcium hypochlorite solution (bleach) to remove skin debris and again imaged in the SEM. Comparison of these images shows more GSR particles will likely be revealed at 30 kV than 20 kV and more particles revealed by the bleach treatment in an automated SEM system.

  12. Detection of gunshot primer residue on bone in an experimental setting-an unexpected finding.

    PubMed

    Berryman, Hugh E; Kutyla, Alicja K; Russell Davis, J

    2010-03-01

    Pork ribs with intact muscle tissue were used in an experimental attempt to identify bullet wipe on bone at distances from 1 to 6 feet with 0.45 caliber, full metal jacket ammunition. This resulted in the unexpected finding of primer-derived gunshot residue (GSR) deep within the wound tract. Of significance is the fact that the GSR was deposited on the bone, under the periosteum, after the bullet passed through a Ziploc bag and c. 1 inch of muscle tissue. It is also important to note that the GSR persisted on the bone after the periosteum was forcibly removed. The presence of primer-derived GSR on bone provides the potential to differentiate gunshot trauma from blunt trauma when the bone presents an atypical gunshot wound. In this study, the presence of gunshot primer residue at a distance of 6 feet demonstrates the potential for establishing maximum gun-to-target distance for remote shootings.

  13. Characterization of organic gunshot residues in lead-free ammunition using a new sample collection device for liquid chromatography-quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Benito, Sandra; Abrego, Zuriñe; Sánchez, Alicia; Unceta, Nora; Goicolea, M Aranzazu; Barrio, Ramón J

    2015-01-01

    The identification of characteristic organic gunshot residues (OGSR) provides conclusive evidence in the elucidation of elemental profiles when lead-free ammunition is fired. OGSR also prevents false negatives. Toward this aim, a quick and efficient method based on liquid chromatography-quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometry (LC-QTOF) was developed to detect and identify 18 gunpowder additives in gunshot residues (GSR). The unequivocal identification of target analytes was assured by using MS/MS mode. Swabs were compared with home-modified tape lift supports covered with a PTFE layer to determine the better sampling technique. The modified tape lift provided better extraction recoveries and enabled the analysis of inorganic and organic GSR simultaneously. The developed method was applied to the analysis of GSR from four different lead-free ammunitions. Diphenylamine and its nitrated degradation products and centralites were identified in all samples, providing strong evidence of GSR.

  14. [Energy dispersive x-ray fluorescence spectrometry--a forensic chemistry method for detection of bullet metal residue in gunshot wounds].

    PubMed

    Havel, J; Zelenka, K

    2003-04-01

    The article describes using of energo-dispersive X-ray fluorescence spectrometry (EDXRF) as the forensic method as the tool for detection of metals (gunshot residues--GSR) in connection with gunshot-wounds of persons.

  15. Statistical challenges in the quantification of gunshot residue evidence.

    PubMed

    Gauriot, Romain; Gunaratnam, Lawrence; Moroni, Rossana; Reinikainen, Tapani; Corander, Jukka

    2013-09-01

    The discharging of a gun results in the formation of extremely small particles known as gunshot residues (GSR). These may be deposited on the skin and clothing of the shooter, on other persons present, and on nearby items or surfaces. Several factors and their complex interactions affect the number of detectable GSR particles, which can deeply influence the conclusions drawn from likelihood ratios or posterior probabilities for prosecution hypotheses of interest. We present Bayesian network models for casework examples and demonstrate that probabilistic quantification of GSR evidence can be very sensitive to the assumptions concerning the model structure, prior probabilities, and the likelihood components. This finding has considerable implications for the use of statistical quantification of GSR evidence in the legal process.

  16. Gunshot residue testing in suicides: Part II: Analysis by inductive coupled plasma-atomic emission spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Molina, D Kimberley; Castorena, Joe L; Martinez, Michael; Garcia, James; DiMaio, Vincent J M

    2007-09-01

    Several different methods can be employed to test for gunshot residue (GSR) on a decedent's hands, including scanning electron microscopy with energy dispersive x-ray (SEM/EDX) and inductive coupled plasma-atomic emission spectrometry (ICP-AES). In part I of this 2-part series, GSR results performed by SEM/EDX in undisputed cases of suicidal handgun wounds were studied. In part II, the same population was studied, deceased persons with undisputed suicidal handgun wounds, but GSR testing was performed using ICP-AES. A total of 102 cases were studied and analyzed for caliber of weapon, proximity of wound, and the results of the GSR testing. This study found that 50% of cases where the deceased was known to have fired a handgun immediately prior to death had positive GSR results by ICP/AES, which did not differ from the results of GSR testing by SEM/EDX. Since only 50% of cases where the person is known to have fired a weapon were positive for GSR by either method, this test should not be relied upon to determine whether someone has discharged a firearm and is not useful as a determining factor of whether or not a wound is self-inflicted or non-self-inflicted. While a positive GSR result may be of use, a negative result is not helpful in the medical examiner setting as a negative result indicates that either a person fired a weapon prior to death or a person did not fire a weapon prior to death.

  17. Correcting for Blood Arrival Time in Global Mean Regression Enhances Functional Connectivity Analysis of Resting State fMRI-BOLD Signals.

    PubMed

    Erdoğan, Sinem B; Tong, Yunjie; Hocke, Lia M; Lindsey, Kimberly P; deB Frederick, Blaise

    2016-01-01

    Resting state functional connectivity analysis is a widely used method for mapping intrinsic functional organization of the brain. Global signal regression (GSR) is commonly employed for removing systemic global variance from resting state BOLD-fMRI data; however, recent studies have demonstrated that GSR may introduce spurious negative correlations within and between functional networks, calling into question the meaning of anticorrelations reported between some networks. In the present study, we propose that global signal from resting state fMRI is composed primarily of systemic low frequency oscillations (sLFOs) that propagate with cerebral blood circulation throughout the brain. We introduce a novel systemic noise removal strategy for resting state fMRI data, "dynamic global signal regression" (dGSR), which applies a voxel-specific optimal time delay to the global signal prior to regression from voxel-wise time series. We test our hypothesis on two functional systems that are suggested to be intrinsically organized into anticorrelated networks: the default mode network (DMN) and task positive network (TPN). We evaluate the efficacy of dGSR and compare its performance with the conventional "static" global regression (sGSR) method in terms of (i) explaining systemic variance in the data and (ii) enhancing specificity and sensitivity of functional connectivity measures. dGSR increases the amount of BOLD signal variance being modeled and removed relative to sGSR while reducing spurious negative correlations introduced in reference regions by sGSR, and attenuating inflated positive connectivity measures. We conclude that incorporating time delay information for sLFOs into global noise removal strategies is of crucial importance for optimal noise removal from resting state functional connectivity maps.

  18. Distribution and properties of gunshot residue originating from a Luger 9 mm ammunition in the vicinity of the shooting gun.

    PubMed

    Brozek-Mucha, Zuzanna

    2009-01-10

    Examinations of various features of gunshot residue (GSR) collected from targets in a function of the shooting distance as well as from hands and the forearm, front and back parts of the upper clothing of the shooting person were performed with SEM-EDX. GSR samples were obtained using Walther P-99 pistol and Luger 9 mm ammunition of Polish production. The experiments were designed in such a manner that the substrates for collecting GSR reminded the ones usually obtained for examinations within criminal cases. Results of the performed examinations in the form of parameters describing GSR particles: the number of GSR, proportions of their chemical classes as well as their sizes revealed a dependence on the shooting distance both, in the direction of shooting and backwards, i.e. on the shooting person. The analysis of the distribution of particles in the vicinity of the shooting gun may be utilised in description of the general rules of the dispersion of GSR as well as in the reconstruction of a real shooting case.

  19. An exploratory study of the potential of LIBS for visualizing gunshot residue patterns.

    PubMed

    López-López, María; Alvarez-Llamas, César; Pisonero, Jorge; García-Ruiz, Carmen; Bordel, Nerea

    2017-04-01

    The study of gunshot residue (GSR) patterns can assist in the reconstruction of shooting incidences. Currently, there is a real need of methods capable of furnishing simultaneous elemental analysis with higher specificity for the GSR pattern visualization. Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS) provides a multi-elemental analysis of the sample, requiring very small amounts of material and no sample preparation. Due to these advantages, this study aims at exploring the potential of LIBS imaging for the visualization of GSR patterns. After the spectral characterization of individual GSR particles, the distribution of Pb, Sb and Ba over clothing targets, shot from different distances, were measured in laser raster mode. In particular, an array of spots evenly spaced at 800μm, using a stage displacement velocity of 4mm/s and a laser frequency of 5Hz was employed (e.g. an area of 130×165mm(2) was measured in less than 3h). A LIBS set-up based on the simultaneous use of two spectrographs with iCCD cameras and a motorized stage was used. This set-up allows obtaining information from two different wavelength regions (258-289 and 446-463nm) from the same laser induced plasma, enabling the simultaneous detection of the three characteristic elements (Pb, Sb, and Ba) of GSR particles from conventional ammunitions. The ability to visualize the 2D distribution GSR pattern by LIBS may have an important application in the forensic field, especially for the ballistics area.

  20. MicroCT detection of gunshot residue in fresh and decomposed firearm wounds.

    PubMed

    Cecchetto, Giovanni; Amagliani, Alessandro; Giraudo, Chiara; Fais, Paolo; Cavarzeran, Fabiano; Montisci, Massimo; Feltrin, Giampietro; Viel, Guido; Ferrara, Santo Davide

    2012-05-01

    Gunshot residue (GSR) evidence may be altered or obscured by after-death events such as putrefaction, autolysis, and/or damage by animals. The present study aimed at evaluating and comparing the amount and differential distribution of GSR utilizing microcomputed tomography (microCT) analysis of fresh and decomposed gunshot wounds. A total of 60 experimental shootings at three different firing distances (5, 15, and 30 cm) were performed on human calves surgically amputated for medical reasons. Thirty specimens (10 for each tested distance) were immediately formalin-fixed, while the other 30 specimens were enclosed in a cowshed for 15 days, before formalin fixation (air temperature ranging from 11°C to 38°C). MicroCT analysis with three-dimensional image reconstruction detected GSR particles in all the investigated entrance wounds. In fresh specimens, GSR was concentrated on the skin surface around the entrance hole and in the epidermis and dermis layers around the cavity, while in decomposed specimens, the high density particles were detected only in the dermis layer. No GSR was detected in exit wounds of both fresh and decomposed specimens regardless of the tested firing distance. Statistical analysis demonstrated that also in decomposed wounds the amount of GSR roughly correlated with the distance from which the gun was fired, exhibiting, however, a higher variability than in fresh samples. The obtained results suggest that microCT analysis can be a valid screening tool for differentiating decomposed entrance and exit gunshot wounds.

  1. Surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy for the analysis of smokeless gunpowders and macroscopic gunshot residues.

    PubMed

    López-López, María; Merk, Virginia; García-Ruiz, Carmen; Kneipp, Janina

    2016-07-01

    Gunshot residues (GSR) result from the discharge of a firearm being a potential piece of evidence in criminal investigations. The macroscopic GSR particles are basically formed by burned and non-burned gunpowder. Motivated by the demand of trace analysis of these samples, in this paper, the use of surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) was evaluated for the analysis of gunpowders and macroscopic GSR particles. Twenty-one different smokeless gunpowders were extracted with ethanol. SERS spectra were obtained from the diluted extracts using gold nanoaggregates and an excitation wavelength of 633 nm. They show mainly bands that could be assigned to the stabilizers diphenylamine and ethylcentralite present in the gunpowders. Then, macroscopic GSR particles obtained after firing two different ammunition cartridges on clothing were also measured using the same procedure. SERS allowed the detection of the particles collected with an aluminum stub from cloth targets without interferences from the adhesive carbon. The results demonstrate the great potential of SERS for the analysis of macroscopic GSR particles. Furthermore, they indicate that the grain-to-grain inhomogeneity of the gunpowders needs to be considered. Graphical Abstract SERS allows the detection of GSR particles collected with adhesive stubs from cloth targets using gold nanoaggregates and an excitation wavelength of 633 nm.

  2. Firework displays as sources of particles similar to gunshot residue.

    PubMed

    Grima, Matthew; Butler, Mark; Hanson, Robert; Mohameden, Ahmed

    2012-03-01

    In light of past research being targeted to find specific particles which may be similar to gunshot residue (GSR), this project was formulated to detect any possible particulate by random particle fallout onto substrates at firework displays and to assess the impact this may have on GSR evidence. Firework residue was collected at a display site, from amongst spectators as well as from the author's hair 90min after the display. SEM-EDX analysis has detected such particulate in all three scenarios, with the firework particle population at large providing a solid ground for discrimination from GSR. Wind dispersal was found to decrease the particle population and subsequently, the latter's discriminatory power. Some particles, if treated individually were found to be indistinguishable from GSR. Findings also include residues which may mimic strontium based GSR as well as GSR which may be mixed with that from previous firings. The continuous changes made to primer and propellant compositions by manufacturers also call for greater consideration when classifying particles as originating from pyrotechnic devices. Furthermore, authorities such as police forces should be made more aware about the incidence of such particle transfer in firework related periods.

  3. Image analysis of gunshot residue on entry wounds. II--A statistical estimation of firing range.

    PubMed

    Brown, H; Cauchi, D M; Holden, J L; Allen, F C; Cordner, S; Thatcher, P

    1999-03-29

    A statistical investigation of the relationship between firing range and the amount and distribution of gunshot residue (GSR), used automated image analysis (IA) to quantify GSR deposit resulting from firings into pig skin, from distances ranging between contact and 45 cm. Overall, for a Ruger .22 semi-automatic rifle using CCI solid point, high velocity ammunition, the total area of GSR deposit on the skin sections decreased in a non-linear fashion with firing range. More specifically there were significant differences in the amount of GSR deposited from shots fired at contact compared with shots fired from distances between 2.5 and 45 cm; and between shots fired from a distance of 20 cm or less, with shots fired at a distance of 30 cm or more. In addition, GSR particles were heavily concentrated in the wound tract only for contact and close range shots at 2.5 cm, while the particle distribution was more uniform between the wound tract and the skin surfaces for shots fired from distances greater than 2.5 cm. Consequently, for future scientific investigations of gunshot fatalities, once standards have been established for the weapon and ammunition type in question, image analysis quantification of GSR deposited in and around the gunshot wound may be capable of providing a reliable, statistical basis for estimating firing range.

  4. Gunshot residue contamination of the hands of police officers following start-of-shift handling of their firearm.

    PubMed

    Cook, Michael

    2016-12-01

    If police officers are contaminated with gunshot residue (GSR) through the normal receiving, checking, loading, and securing of their issued firearm, there is the potential for secondary transfer of GSR to anyone those officers arrest during their shift. This 3-part study examined the level of GSR contamination of police officers following the start-of-shift handling of their standard issue firearm, the impact that hand-washing or the use of a self-drying hand-wash had on the level of GSR contamination, and the likelihood of officers re-contaminating their hands through contact with the exposed hand-grip of their holstered hand-gun. Almost 85% (28/33) of officers sampled had 3-component GSR particles on their hands immediately following the start-of-shift handling of their firearm. There was an average of 64 such particles over the 33 officers sampled. Of the 17 officers who washed their hands after securing their firearm, a single 3-component particle was recovered from the hands of one officer. GSR particles (maximum of 4) were recovered from 3 of the 14 officers who used self-drying hand gel following firearm handling. 3-component particles (maximum of 7) were recovered from the hand-grips of 12 of the 34 unissued handguns sampled.

  5. AirMSPI PODEX BigSur Terrain Images

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2013-12-13

    ... Browse Images from the PODEX 2013 Campaign   Big Sur target (Big Sur, California) 02/03/2013 Terrain-projected   Select ...   Version number   For more information, see the Data Product Specifications (DPS)   ...

  6. AirMSPI PODEX Big Sur Ellipsoid Images

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2013-12-11

    ... Browse Images from the PODEX 2013 Campaign   Big Sur target 02/03/2013 Ellipsoid-projected   Select link to ...   Version number   For more information, see the  Data Product Specifications (DPS) ...

  7. A resolution recognizing and honoring Ralph Wilson, Jr. and Bruce Smith on being selected to the 2009 Pro Football Hall of Fame class.

    THOMAS, 111th Congress

    Sen. Schumer, Charles E. [D-NY

    2009-02-03

    02/03/2009 Referred to the Committee on the Judiciary. (text of measure as introduced: CR S1438) (All Actions) Tracker: This bill has the status IntroducedHere are the steps for Status of Legislation:

  8. 76 FR 12728 - Agency Information Collection Activities OMB Responses

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-08

    ... 2395.01; Aerospace Manufacturing And Rework Industry Information Collection; was approved on 02/03/2011... change. EPA ICR Number 2398.02; Regulation of Fuels and Fuel Additives: 2011 Renewable Fuel...

  9. A resolution observing the 100th birthday of civil rights leader Daisy Bates and honoring her legacy as an American heroine.

    THOMAS, 113th Congress

    Sen. Pryor, Mark L. [D-AR

    2014-01-29

    02/03/2014 Resolution agreed to in Senate without amendment and with a preamble by Unanimous Consent. (All Actions) Tracker: This bill has the status Passed SenateHere are the steps for Status of Legislation:

  10. A resolution expressing the sense of the Senate that all necessary measures should be taken to protect children in the United States from human trafficking, especially during the upcoming Super Bowl, an event around which many children are trafficked for sex.

    THOMAS, 113th Congress

    Sen. Blumenthal, Richard [D-CT

    2014-01-28

    02/03/2014 Resolution agreed to in Senate without amendment and with a preamble by Unanimous Consent. (All Actions) Tracker: This bill has the status Passed SenateHere are the steps for Status of Legislation:

  11. Data Security Act of 2014

    THOMAS, 113th Congress

    Sen. Carper, Thomas R. [D-DE

    2014-01-15

    02/03/2014 Committee on Banking, Housing, and Urban Affairs Subcommittee on National Security and International Trade and Finance. Hearings held. (All Actions) Tracker: This bill has the status IntroducedHere are the steps for Status of Legislation:

  12. Honor Our Promise Act

    THOMAS, 113th Congress

    Sen. Ayotte, Kelly [R-NH

    2014-01-30

    02/03/2014 Read the second time. Placed on Senate Legislative Calendar under General Orders. Calendar No. 300. (All Actions) Tracker: This bill has the status IntroducedHere are the steps for Status of Legislation:

  13. A Closed-Cycle Optical Cryostat and Improved Optical Elements for Studies of Dissipation at the Molecular Scale

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-02-05

    MONITORING AGENCY NAME(S) AND ADDRESS (ES) U.S. Army Research Office P.O. Box 12211 Research Triangle Park, NC 27709-2211 plasmonics , optical cryostat...none) 02/03/2016 02/03/2016 Received Paper 1.00 2.00 Kenneth M. Evans, Pavlo Zolotavin, Douglas Natelson. Plasmon -Assisted Photoresponse in Ge-Coated...Zolotavin, Douglas Natelson. Plasmonic Heating in Au nanowires at Low Temperatures, ACS Nano (02 2016) TOTAL: 1 Books Number of Manuscripts: Patents

  14. Evaluating the Efficacy of a Sternocleidomastoid Flap via Galvanic Skin Responses in Superficial Parotidectomy.

    PubMed

    Basut, Oguz; Noyan, Behzat; Demirci, Ugur

    2014-01-01

    In the present study, we evaluated the efficacy of flaps via measurement of galvanic skin responses (GSR) in patients who had undergone superficial parotidectomy either with or without sternocleidomastoid (SCM) muscle flaps. Retrospective study design was used. The setting included University of Uludag School of Medicine Department of Otorhinolaryngology. Eleven patients who had undergone superficial parotidectomy for benign diseases in our clinic between June 2003 and August 2006 were included in the study. SCM muscle flaps were used in four patients. The GSR of the patients were measured using a MP 30 System. The Mann-Whitney U test was used for the analysis of data. There were complaints that resembled Frey's syndrome in three patients in whom flaps had not been performed. Patients with flaps had no complaints. In patients with flaps, no significant GSR changes were observed between the control and operated sides (P > 0.05). In patients without flaps, the GSR levels were significantly higher on the operated side compared to the control side (P < 0.05). GSR values on the control side did not show any differences between patients with and without a flap. However, there were significantly higher GSR values for the operated side in patients without flaps compared to patients with flaps (P < 0.05). Application of a SCM flap is an efficient method by which to prevent Frey's syndrome, and the GSR test is beneficial both in diagnosiing and determining the severity of the disease as well as evaluating the efficacy of surgical techniques used to prevent Frey's syndrome.

  15. Gunshot residue testing in suicides: Part I: Analysis by scanning electron microscopy with energy-dispersive X-ray.

    PubMed

    Molina, D Kimberley; Martinez, Michael; Garcia, James; DiMaio, Vincent J M

    2007-09-01

    Several different methods can be employed to test for gunshot residue (GSR) on a deceased person's hands, including scanning electron microscopy with energy-dispersive x-ray spectroscopy (SEM-EDX) and inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectrometry (ICP-AES). Each of these techniques has been extensively studied, especially on living individuals. The current studies (Part I and Part II) were designed to compare the use and utility of the different GSR testing techniques in a medical examiner setting. In Part I, the hands of deceased persons who died from undisputed suicidal handgun wounds were tested for GSR by SEM-EDX over a 4-year period. A total of 116 cases were studied and analyzed for caliber of weapon, proximity of wound, and results of GSR testing, including spatial deposition upon the hands. It was found that in only 50% of cases with a known self-inflicted gunshot wound was SEM-EDX positive for at least 1 specific particle for GSR. In 18% of the cases there was a discernible pattern (spatial distribution) of the particles on the hand such that the manner in which the weapon was held could be determined. Since only 50% of cases where the person is known to have fired a weapon immediately prior to death were positive for GSR by SEM-EDX, this test should not be relied upon to determine whether a deceased individual has discharged a firearm. Furthermore, in only 18% of cases was a discernible pattern present indicating how the firearm was held. The low sensitivity, along with the low percentage of cases with a discernible pattern, limits the usefulness of GSR test results by SEM-EDX in differentiating self-inflicted from non-self-inflicted wounds.

  16. CO2 and Tectonic Controls on the Opening of the Greenland-Scotland Seaway

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Staerz, M.; Jokat, W.; Lohmann, G.; Knorr, G.

    2014-12-01

    The subsidence history of the Greenland-Scotland Ridge (GSR) from subaerial to current ocean depths has been investigated by several studies, and the initial hydrographic opening of the North Polar Seas, "NPS" (Arctic Ocean, Nordic Seas) has been linked to major reorganizations of the global oceans and climate throughout the Neogene (23‒3 Myrs ago). However, the current understanding of the GSR subsidence affecting the hydrographic evolution of the Greenland Scotland Seaway and of the critical GSR depth providing effective water mass exchange between the oceans are largely based on conceptual models. Here, we emulate the GSR subsidence by means of a fully coupled ocean-atmosphere General Circulation Model (GCM) with integrated terrestrial vegetation dynamics (community of earth system models, COSMOS). The model setup comprise a global reconstruction of the mid-Miocene 20‒15 Myrs ago (continental geography, orography, bathymetry, ice-sheet geography and topography) and a change of CO2 levels in the atmosphere. Especially, we additionally integrated a high resolution bathymetric dataset for the area of interest (northern North Atlantic, GSR, Nordic Seas and the Eurasian Basin). In different experiments we deepen GSR depth levels by increments of 100 m, ranging from a quasi-enclosed North Polar basin to an open gateway configuration. We identify thresholds in hydrographic communication across the seaway and discuss consequences in climate change and ocean characteristics. Secondly, we use the model setup close to the allocated depth threshold and test the models sensitivity by changes of greenhouse gas concentrations within the spectrum of CO2 reconstructions. We find that a shift in the modeled climate by CO2 changes directly impact the exchange of water masses across the GSR. Based on our model results, we provide a mechanism on the hydrographic opening of the NPS by controls of tectonic activity and CO2.

  17. Orthogonal identification of gunshot residue with complementary detection principles of voltammetry, scanning electron microscopy, and energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy: sample, screen, and confirm.

    PubMed

    O'Mahony, Aoife M; Samek, Izabela A; Sattayasamitsathit, Sirilak; Wang, Joseph

    2014-08-19

    Field-deployable voltammetric screening coupled with complementary laboratory-based analysis to confirm the presence of gunshot residue (GSR) from the hands of a subject who has handled, loaded, or discharged a firearm is described. This protocol implements the orthogonal identification of the presence of GSR utilizing square-wave stripping voltammetry (SWSV) as a rapid screening tool along with scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX) to confirm the presence of the characteristic morphology and metal composition of GSR particles. This is achieved through the judicious modification of the working electrode of a carbon screen-printed electrode (CSPE) with carbon tape (used in SEM analysis) to fix and retain a sample. A comparison between a subject who has handled and loaded a firearm and a subject who has had no contact with GSR shows the significant variations in voltammetric signals and the presence or absence of GSR-consistent particles and constituent metals. This initial electrochemical screening has no effect on the integrity of the metallic particles, and SEM/EDX analysis conducted prior to and postvoltammetry show no differences in analytical output. The carbon tape is instrumental in retaining the GSR sample after electrochemical analysis, supported by comparison with orthogonal detection at a bare CSPE. This protocol shows great promise as a two-tier detection system for the presence of GSR from the hands of a subject, whereby initial screening can be conducted rapidly onsite by minimally trained operators; confirmation can follow at the same substrate to substantiate the voltammetric results.

  18. Distinct Roles for Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase Signaling and CALMODULIN-BINDING TRANSCRIPTIONAL ACTIVATOR3 in Regulating the Peak Time and Amplitude of the Plant General Stress Response1[W][OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Bjornson, Marta; Benn, Geoffrey; Song, Xingshun; Comai, Luca; Franz, Annaliese K.; Dandekar, Abhaya M.; Drakakaki, Georgia; Dehesh, Katayoon

    2014-01-01

    To survive environmental challenges, plants have evolved tightly regulated response networks, including a rapid and transient general stress response (GSR), followed by well-studied stress-specific responses. The mechanisms underpinning the GSR have remained elusive, but a functional cis-element, the rapid stress response element (RSRE), is known to confer transcription of GSR genes rapidly (5 min) and transiently (peaking 90–120 min after stress) in vivo. To investigate signal transduction events in the GSR, we used a 4xRSRE:LUCIFERASE reporter in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana), employing complementary approaches of forward and chemical genetic screens, and identified components regulating peak time versus amplitude of RSRE activity. Specifically, we identified a mutant in CALMODULIN-BINDING TRANSCRIPTIONAL ACTIVATOR3 (CAMTA3) with reduced RSRE activation, verifying this transcription factor’s role in activation of the RSRE-mediated GSR. Furthermore, we isolated a mutant in MITOGEN-ACTIVATED PROTEIN KINASE (MAPK) KINASE KINASE1 (mekk1-5), which displays increased basal and an approximately 60-min earlier peak of wound-induced RSRE activation. The double mekk1/camta3 mutant positioned CAMTA3 downstream of MEKK1 and verified their distinct roles in GSR regulation. mekk1-5 displays programmed cell death and overaccumulates reactive oxygen species and salicylic acid, hallmarks of the hypersensitive response, suggesting that the hypersensitive response may play a role in the RSRE phenotype in this mutant. In addition, chemical inhibition studies suggest that the MAPK network is required for the rapid peak of the RSRE response, distinguishing the impact of chronic (mekk1-5) from transient (chemical inhibition) loss of MAPK signaling. Collectively, these results reveal underlying regulatory components of the plant GSR and further define their distinct roles in the regulation of this key biological process. PMID:25157030

  19. Can galvanic skin conductance be used as an objective indicator of children’s anxiety in the dental setting?

    PubMed Central

    Najafpour, Ebrahim; Asl-Aminabadi, Naser; Nuroloyuni, Sara; Jamali, Zahra

    2017-01-01

    Background Assessment of procedural distress is essential at assisting children during invasive dental treatments. This study aimed to determine the validity and reliability of galvanic skin response as a measure for assessment of dental anxiety in children. Material and Methods 151 children, aged 5-7 years, participated in this study. Similar dental treatments were rendered to all subjects. At the beginning and end of the session, modified child dental anxiety scale (MCDAS), clinical anxiety rating scale (CARS) and galvanic skin response (GSR) were used to determine children’s anxiety. Results GSR was significantly correlated with both MCDAS (rs=0.62, p=0.02) and CARS (rs=0.44, p=0.032). The correlation between MCDAS and CARS was also significant (rs = 0.9, P<0.001). Anxiety decreased during the session in both GSR (rs=0.52, p=0.001) and MCDAS scales (rs=0.77, p=0.001). CARS also showed a reduction between the initial and second assessment, but it was not statistically significant (rs=0.12, P=0.36). Conclusions The findings suggest that GSR is a reliable and valid measure for assessment of children’s dental anxiety in the clinical context. GSR may help to identify clinically anxious children before dental treatment to provide appropriate interventions. Key words:Dental anxiety, reliability, validity, galvanic skin response. PMID:28298978

  20. Unambiguous characterization of gunshot residue particles using scanning laser ablation and inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Abrego, Zuriñe; Ugarte, Ana; Unceta, Nora; Fernández-Isla, Alberto; Goicolea, M Aranzazu; Barrio, Ramón J

    2012-03-06

    A new method based on scanning laser ablation and inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (LA-ICPMS) for the detection and identification of gunshot residue (GSR) particles from firearms discharges has been developed. Tape lifts were used to collect inorganic residues from skin surfaces. The laser ablation pattern and ICPMS conditions were optimized for the detection of metals present in GSR, such as (121)Sb, (137)Ba, and (208)Pb. Other isotopes ((27)Al, (29)Si, (31)P, (33)S, (35)Cl, (39)K, (44)Ca, (57)Fe, (60)Ni, (63)Cu, (66)Zn, and (118)Sn) were monitored during the ICPMS analyses to obtain additional information to possibly classify the GSR particles as either characteristic of GSR or consistent with GSR. In experiments with real samples, different firearms, calibers, and ammunitions were used. The performed method evaluation confirms that the developed methodology can be used as an alternative to the standard scanning electron microscopy-energy dispersive spectroscopy (SEM-EDS) technique, with the significant advantage of drastically reducing the analysis time to less than 66 min.

  1. Short wave infrared chemical imaging as future tool for analysing gunshot residues patterns in targets.

    PubMed

    Ortega-Ojeda, F E; Torre-Roldán, M; García-Ruiz, C

    2017-05-15

    This work used chemical imaging in the short-wave infrared region for analysing gunshot residues (GSR) patterns in cotton fabric targets shot with conventional and non-toxic ammunition. It presents a non-destructive, non-toxic, highly visual and hiperspectral-based approach. The method was based on classical least squares regression, and was tested with the ammunition propellants and their standard components' spectra. The propellants' spectra were satisfactorily used (R(2) >0.966, and CorrCoef >0.982) for identifying the GSR irrespective of the type of ammunition used for the shooting. In a more versatile approach, nitrocellulose, the main component in the ammunition propellants, resulted an excellent standard for identifying GSR patterns (R(2)>0.842, and CorrCoef >0.908). In this case, the propellants' stabilizers (diphenilamine and centralite), and its nitrated derivatives as well as dinitrotoluene, showed also high spectral activity. Therefore, they could be recommended as complementary standards for confirming the GSR identification. These findings establish the proof of concept for a science-based evidence useful to support expert reports and final court rulings. This approach for obtaining GSR patterns can be an excellent alternative to the current and traditional chemical methods, which are based in presumptive and invasive colour tests.

  2. The Brucella abortus virulence regulator, LovhK, is a sensor kinase in the general stress response signalling pathway.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hye-Sook; Willett, Jonathan W; Jain-Gupta, Neeta; Fiebig, Aretha; Crosson, Sean

    2014-11-01

    In the intracellular pathogen Brucella abortus, the general stress response (GSR) signalling system determines survival under acute stress conditions in vitro, and is required for long-term residence in a mammalian host. To date, the identity of the Brucella sensor kinase(s) that function to perceive stress and directly activate GSR signalling have remained undefined. We demonstrate that the flavin-binding sensor histidine kinase, LovhK (bab2_0652), functions as a primary B. abortus GSR sensor. LovhK rapidly and specifically phosphorylates the central GSR regulator, PhyR, and activates transcription of a set of genes that closely overlaps the known B. abortus GSR regulon. Deletion of lovhK severely compromises cell survival under defined oxidative and acid stress conditions. We further show that lovhK is required for cell survival during the early phase of mammalian cell infection and for establishment of long-term residence in a mouse infection model. Finally, we present evidence that particular regions of primary structure within the two N-terminal PAS domains of LovhK have distinct sensory roles under specific environmental conditions. This study elucidates new molecular components of a conserved signalling pathway that regulates B. abortus stress physiology and infection biology.

  3. Characterisation of gunshot residue from three ammunition types using suppressed anion exchange chromatography.

    PubMed

    Gilchrist, Elizabeth; Jongekrijg, Fleur; Harvey, Laura; Smith, Norman; Barron, Leon

    2012-09-10

    Gunshot residue (GSR) is commonly analysed in forensic casework using either scanning electron microscopy with energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (SEM-EDX) or gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). Relatively little work has been reported on the post-discharge GSR content of non-metallic inorganic or low molecular weight organic anions to distinguish between different ammunition types. The development of an analytical method using suppressed micro-bore anion exchange chromatography (IC) is presented for the analysis of GSR. A hydroxide gradient was optimised for the separation of 19 forensically relevant organic and inorganic anions in <23min and sensitivities of the order of 0.12-3.52ng of anion detected for all species were achieved. Along with an optimised extraction procedure, this method was applied to the analysis of post-ignition residues from three selected ammunition types. By profiling and comparing the anionic content in each ammunition residue, the possibility to distinguish between each type using their anionic profiles and absolute weight is presented. The potential for interference is also discussed with respect to sample types which are typically problematic in the analysis of GSR using SEM-EDX and GC-MS. To the best of our knowledge this represents the first study on the analysis of inorganic anions in GSR using suppressed ion chromatography.

  4. Attenuated total reflectance-FT-IR spectroscopy for gunshot residue analysis: potential for ammunition determination.

    PubMed

    Bueno, Justin; Sikirzhytski, Vitali; Lednev, Igor K

    2013-08-06

    The ability to link a suspect to a particular shooting incident is a principal task for many forensic investigators. Here, we attempt to achieve this goal by analysis of gunshot residue (GSR) through the use of attenuated total reflectance (ATR) Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR) combined with statistical analysis. The firearm discharge process is analogous to a complex chemical process. Therefore, the products of this process (GSR) will vary based upon numerous factors, including the specific combination of the firearm and ammunition which was discharged. Differentiation of FT-IR data, collected from GSR particles originating from three different firearm-ammunition combinations (0.38 in., 0.40 in., and 9 mm calibers), was achieved using projection to latent structures discriminant analysis (PLS-DA). The technique was cross (leave-one-out), both internally and externally, validated. External validation was achieved via assignment (caliber identification) of unknown FT-IR spectra from unknown GSR particles. The results demonstrate great potential for ATR-FT-IR spectroscopic analysis of GSR for forensic purposes.

  5. Raman spectroscopic analysis of gunshot residue offering great potential for caliber differentiation.

    PubMed

    Bueno, Justin; Sikirzhytski, Vitali; Lednev, Igor K

    2012-05-15

    Near-infrared (NIR) Raman microspectroscopy combined with advanced statistics was used to differentiate gunshot residue (GSR) particles originating from different caliber ammunition. The firearm discharge process is analogous to a complex chemical reaction. The reagents of this process are represented by the chemical composition of the ammunition, firearm, and cartridge case. The specific firearm parameters determine the conditions of the reaction and thus the subsequent product, GSR. We found that Raman spectra collected from these products are characteristic for different caliber ammunition. GSR particles from 9 mm and 0.38 caliber ammunition, collected under identical discharge conditions, were used to demonstrate the capability of confocal Raman microspectroscopy for the discrimination and identification of GSR particles. The caliber differentiation algorithm is based on support vector machines (SVM) and partial least squares (PLS) discriminant analyses, validated by a leave-one-out cross-validation method. This study demonstrates for the first time that NIR Raman microspectroscopy has the potential for the reagentless differentiation of GSR based upon forensically relevant parameters, such as caliber size. When fully developed, this method should have a significant impact on the efficiency of crime scene investigations.

  6. Quantifying gunshot residues in cases of suicide: Implications for evaluation of suicides and criminal shootings.

    PubMed

    Lucas, Nick; Cook, Michael; Wallace, James; Kirkbride, K Paul; Kobus, Hilton

    2016-09-01

    Gunshot residue (GSR) is a valuable form of forensic trace evidence in the investigation of firearms-related suicide and crime. In order to ensure that such evidence is given appropriate evidential weighting when it comes to case investigations, the dynamics of the deposition and distribution of GSR must be understood. As the activity of the subject after firing is a major factor in the retention of GSR, cases of suicide involving a firearm provide an opportunity to assess GSR distribution where post-shooting activity is not an issue, assuming the subject had not been moved. Seventy-one cases of suicide by gunshot in South Australia between 1998 and 2014 were examined to collect data on firearm type, calibre, and gunshot residue test results. Overall, 47% of cases were found to produce GSR results that were not of high probative value, even though it was known that the shooter had fired a firearm. Of particular interest were cases involving 0.22 rimfire ammunition, for which characteristic particles are not expected due to lack of antimony present in the primer. Despite this, 64% of these cases resulted in the detection of antimony-containing, three-component particles.

  7. A novel method for the identification of inorganic and organic gunshot residue particles of lead-free ammunitions from the hands of shooters using scanning laser ablation-ICPMS and Raman micro-spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Abrego, Zuriñe; Grijalba, Nagore; Unceta, Nora; Maguregui, Maite; Sanchez, Alicia; Fernández-Isla, Alberto; Goicolea, M Aranzazu; Barrio, Ramón J

    2014-12-07

    A method based on scanning laser ablation and inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (SLA-ICPMS) and Raman micro-spectroscopy for the detection and identification of compounds consistent with gunshot residue particles (GSR) has been developed. The method has been applied to the characterization of particles resulting from the discharge of firearms using lead-free ammunition. Modified tape lifts were used to collect the inorganic and organic residues from skin surfaces in a single sample. Using SLA-ICPMS, aggregates related to the composition of the ammunition, such as Cu-Zn-Sn, Zr-Sr, Cu-Zn, Al-Ti, or Al-Sr-Zr were detected, but this composition is only consistent with GSR from lead-free ammunitions. Additional evidence was provided by micro-Raman spectroscopy, which identified the characteristic organic groups of the particles as centralite, diphenylamine or their nitrated derivatives, which are indicative of GSR.

  8. Highly wearable galvanic skin response sensor using flexible and conductive polymer foam.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jeehoon; Kwon, Sungjun; Seo, Sangwon; Park, Kwangsuk

    2014-01-01

    Owing to advancements in daily physiological monitoring technology, diverse healthcare applications have emerged recently. The monitoring of skin conductance responses has extensive feasibility to support healthcare applications such as detecting emotion changes. In this study, we proposed a highly wearable and reliable galvanic skin response (GSR) sensor that measures the signals from the back of the user. To enhance its wearability and usability, we employed flexible conductive foam as the sensing material and designed it to be easily attachable to (and detachable from) a wide variety of clothes. We evaluated the sensing reliability of the proposed sensor by comparing its signal with a reference GSR. The average correlation between the two signals was 0.768; this is sufficiently high to validate the feasibility of the proposed sensor for reliable GSR sensing on the back.

  9. Implementation of Measuring Bio-signals Simultaneously using Time-Sharing Method.

    PubMed

    Kon Bae, Sang; Ho Kim, Kyung; Sig Kim, Hong; Kim, Youn-Ho; Hyeon Lee, Kwang; Chan Park, Jae

    2005-01-01

    In this paper, we propose a measuring device implementation to measure ECG, 50KHz BIA for getting BIA/Respiration, and 10~50Hz GSR for measuring electrical characteristics of skin. To this end, BIA signal is separated by line filter and high impedance element and the interference between signals could be minimized by switching in time domain to separate ECG and GSR signals having the similar frequency range. ECG, heart rate and respiration are measured by the simulator based on the implemented circuit and BIA and GSR impedance are verified using standard resistance. Also, we made an experiment this method to human body and found the possibility of detecting bio-signals.

  10. A comparison between digital radiography, computed tomography, and magnetic resonance in the detection of gunshot residues in burnt tissues and bone.

    PubMed

    Amadasi, Alberto; Borgonovo, Simone; Brandone, Alberto; Di Giancamillo, Mauro; Cattaneo, Cristina

    2014-05-01

    The radiological search for GSR is crucial in burnt material although it has been rarely tested. In this study, thirty-one bovine ribs were shot at near-contact range and burnt to calcination in an oven simulating a real combustion. Computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance (MR) were performed before and after carbonization and compared with former analyses with DR (digital radiography); thus comparing the assistance, the radiological methods can provide in the search for GSR in fresh and burnt bone. DR demonstrated the greatest ability in the detection of metallic residues, CT showed lower abilities, while MR showed a high sensitivity only in soft tissues. Thus, DR can be considered as the most sensitive method in the detection of GSR in charred bones, whereas CT and MR demonstrated much less reliability. Nonetheless, the MR ameliorates the analysis of gunshot wounds in other types of remains with large quantities of soft tissues.

  11. A new method for collection and identification of gunshot residues from the hands of shooters.

    PubMed

    Reis, Edson L T; Sarkis, Jorge E Souza; Neto, Osvaldo N; Rodrigues, Claudio; Kakazu, Maurício H; Viebig, Sônia

    2003-11-01

    This work presents a novel collection method for gunshot residues (GSR) using a sampling procedure based on ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA) solution as a complexing agent on moistened swabs. Detection was via a sector-field inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (HRICP-MS). The proposed collection and analytical method allowed detection of antimony (Sb), barium (Ba) and lead (Pb) after .38 shot tests. at detection limits of less than 1 microg L(-1) in four different areas of the hands of volunteers. This paper includes a discussion concerning hand areas near the thumb and forefinger as being more suitable for GSR collection as well as a comparison between differences observed using 2% diluted EDTA. 2% nitric acid solution, and simple deionized water as collecting solutions, proving the superior efficiency of EDTA in GSR recoveries.

  12. Variability of Solar Radiation under Cloud-Free Skies in China: The Role of Aerosols

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Qian, Yun; Wang, Weiguo; Leung, L. ruby; Kaiser, Dale P.

    2007-01-01

    In this study, we analyzed long-term surface global and diffuse solar radiation, aerosol single scattering albedo (SSA), and relative humidity (RH) from China. Our analysis reveals that much of China experienced significant decreases in global solar radiation (GSR) and increases in diffuse solar radiation under cloud-free skies between the 1960s and 1980s. With RH and aerosol SSA being rather constant during that time period, we suggest that the increasing aerosol loading from emission of pollutants is responsible for the observed reduced GSR and increased diffuse radiation in cloud-free skies. Although pollutant emissions continue to increase after the 1980s, the increment of aerosol SSA since 1980s can partly explain the transition of GSR from a decreasing trend to no apparent trend around that time. Preliminary analysis is also provided on the potential role of RH in affecting the global and diffuse solar radiation reaching the earth surface.

  13. A new quantitative method for gunshot residue analysis by ion beam analysis.

    PubMed

    Christopher, Matthew E; Warmenhoeven, John-William; Romolo, Francesco S; Donghi, Matteo; Webb, Roger P; Jeynes, Christopher; Ward, Neil I; Kirkby, Karen J; Bailey, Melanie J

    2013-08-21

    Imaging and analyzing gunshot residue (GSR) particles using the scanning electron microscope equipped with an energy dispersive X-ray spectrometer (SEM-EDS) is a standard technique that can provide important forensic evidence, but the discrimination power of this technique is limited due to low sensitivity to trace elements and difficulties in obtaining quantitative results from small particles. A new, faster method using a scanning proton microbeam and Particle Induced X-ray Emission (μ-PIXE), together with Elastic Backscattering Spectrometry (EBS) is presented for the non-destructive, quantitative analysis of the elemental composition of single GSR particles. In this study, the GSR particles were all Pb, Ba, Sb. The precision of the method is assessed. The grouping behaviour of different makes of ammunition is determined using multivariate analysis. The protocol correctly groups the cartridges studied here, with a confidence >99%, irrespective of the firearm or population of particles selected.

  14. The Relationship Between the Surface Morphology and Chemical Composition of Gunshot Residue Particles.

    PubMed

    Kara, Ilker; Lisesivdin, Sefer Bora; Kasap, Mehmet; Er, Elif; Uzek, Ugur

    2015-07-01

    In this study, chemical composition and morphology of gunshot residue (GSR) of 9 × 19 mm Parabellum-type MKE (Turkey)-brand ammunition were analyzed by scanning electron microscope and energy dispersive X-ray spectrometer. GSR samples were collected by "swab" technique from the shooter's right hand immediately after shooting. According to general principles of thermodynamics, it is likely that the structures will have a more regular (homogeneous) spherical form to minimize their surface area due to very high temperatures and pressures that occur during explosion. Studied samples were collected under the same conditions with the same original ammunition, from the same firearm and a single shooter. This is because many other variables may affect size, structure, and composition in addition to the concentrations of elements of the structure. Results indicated that the chemical compositions are effective in the formation of GSR morphological structures.

  15. Characterisation of 0.22 caliber rimfire gunshot residues by time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (TOF-SIMS): a preliminary study.

    PubMed

    Coumbaros, J; Kirkbride, K P; Klass, G; Skinner, W

    2001-06-01

    The application of time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (TOF-SIMS) for the characterisation of gunshot residue (GSR) from 0.22 caliber rimfire ammunition is reported. Results obtained by TOF-SIMS were compared with conventional scanning electron microscopy (SEM) studies. As could be expected, TOF-SIMS exhibited greater elemental sensitivity than SEM equipped with energy dispersive X-ray detection (SEM-EDX), and was also capable of detecting fragments characteristic of inorganic compounds. This preliminary study indicates that TOF-SIMS offers substantial potential for forensic GSR examinations as a complementary technique to SEM-EDX. In addition TOF-SIMS is applicable to the analysis of individual particles in the typical size range encountered in GSR casework.

  16. Determining the lifetime of detectable amounts of gunshot residue on the hands of a shooter using laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Rosenberg, Matthew B; Dockery, Christopher R

    2008-11-01

    Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) has been used to determine the period of time that a shooter will test positive for gunshot residue (GSR) after firing a revolver. Multiple rounds of primer were fired and samples collected at multiple hour intervals using an adhesive tape pressed against the skin. Samples were analyzed directly using a commercially available laser-induced breakdown spectrometer where barium emission (originating from barium nitrate in the primer) was observed. Population statistics were used to compare suspected GSR to a library of blank samples from which a threshold value was established. Statistically significant results, positive for GSR, are obtained 5.27 days after a firearm discharge using these techniques.

  17. Hymenobacter koreensis sp. nov. and Hymenobacter saemangeumensis sp. nov., isolated from estuarine water.

    PubMed

    Kang, Ji Young; Chun, Jeesun; Choi, Ahyoung; Moon, Sung Hyun; Cho, Jang-Cheon; Jahng, Kwang Yeop

    2013-12-01

    Two Gram-reaction-negative, rod-shaped, non-motile and red-pink-pigmented bacterial strains, designated GYR3077(T) and GSR0100(T), were isolated from a water sample of the Mangyung estuary enclosed by the Saemangeum Embankment in JEOLlabuk-do, South Korea, and were characterized using a polyphasic approach. 16S rRNA genes of strains GYR3077(T) and GSR0100(T) exhibited sequence similarities of 95.9 % to Hymenobacter deserti ZLB-3(T) and 96.6 % to Hymenobacter soli PB17(T), respectively, and indicated that these isolates belonged to the phylum Bacteroidetes. The major cellular fatty acids present in the two isolates were iso-C15 : 0, C16 : 1ω5c, summed feature 4 (iso-C17 : 1 I and/or anteiso-C17 : 1 B) and summed feature 3 (C16 : 1ω7c and/or C16 : 1ω6c). The major respiratory quinone and polyamine patterns were menaquinone-7 and sym-homospermidine, characteristic of the genus Hymenobacter. Flexirubin-type pigments were absent in both strains. The DNA G+C contents of strains GYR3077(T) and GSR0100(T) were 60.2 mol% and 61.9 mol%, respectively. The major polar lipid of strains GYR3077(T) and GSR0100(T) was phosphatidylethanolamine. Based on the morphological and physiological properties, strains GYR3077(T) and GSR0100(T) were considered to represent two novel species of the genus Hymenobacter, for which the names Hymenobacter koreensis sp. nov. (type strain GYR3077(T) = KACC 16451(T) = JCM 17924(T)) and Hymenobacter saemangeumensis sp. nov. (type strain GSR0100(T) = KACC 16452(T) = JCM 17923(T)) are proposed.

  18. Does research during general surgery residency correlate with academic pursuits after pediatric surgery residency?

    PubMed

    Lessin, M S; Klein, M D

    1995-09-01

    A study was designed to evaluate whether successful candidates in pediatric surgery have performed laboratory research with publication, and if such preparation leads to continued investigations. We requested a curriculum vitae from the 248 pediatric surgeons who began their pediatric surgery residencies (PSR) between 1979 and 1992. For nonresponders, data were collected from physician directories. Indicators of academic status, personal information, and publication data were obtained. Responders had more publications before, during, and after PSR. Those who published during general surgery residency (GSR) had more research years during their residency. Among responders, 59% had spent time in the laboratory, and the percentage with laboratory time increased over the study period. Those with laboratory experience had more laboratory and clinical papers before PSR. Ninety-four percent were from university-based GSRs and 6% were from community GSRs. University general surgery residents did not have more publications during GSR or PSR but had a greater number of publications after PSR. University general surgery residents had more laboratory publications during GSR and after PSR, but did not have more clinical publications. Publications during GSR and after PSR increased during the study period, but not during PSR. Time in the laboratory during GSR did not independently predict continued laboratory research. Those with laboratory papers during GSR did not publish more basic science papers after PSR. Several surgeons had basic science publications that were initiated only after their PSR. In a recent study that compared successful and unsuccessful PSR candidates, the successful candidates were found to have more publications.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  19. Identification of gunshot residue: a critical review.

    PubMed

    Saverio Romolo, F; Margot, P

    2001-06-15

    A review of the scientific papers published on inorganic gunshot residue (GSR) analysis permits to study how the particle analysis has shown its capability in detection and identification of gunshot residue. The scanning electron microscope can be the most powerful tool for forensic scientists to determine the proximity to a discharging firearm and/or the contact with a surface exposed to GSR. Particle analysis can identify individual gunshot residue particles through both morphological and elemental characteristics. When particles are detected on the collected sample, the analytical results can be interpreted following rules of a formal general interpretative system, to determine whether they come from the explosion of a primer or from other possible sources. The particles on the sample are compared with an abstract idea of "unique" GSR particle produced by the sole source of the explosion of a primer. "Uniqueness" is not the only problem related to GSR detection and identification for a forensic scientist. With "not-unique" particles interpretation of results is extremely important. The evidential strength of "not-unique" particles can increase with a more fruitful interpretative framework based on Bayes rule. For the assessment of the value of a GSR in linking a suspect and a crime, it is important to compare two hypothesis: the first can be that of the evidence if the suspect has been shooting in a specific situation, the second that of the evidence if the suspect was not involved in this shooting. This case specific or case-by-case approach is closer to what the court is interested in. The authors consider that a "case-by-case" approach should be followed whenever possible. Research of models and data such as those developed in other trace evidence material (fibres, glass, etc.) using a Bayesian approach is suggested in the interpretation of GSR.

  20. Combining Limited Multiple Environment Trials Data with Crop Modeling to Identify Widely Adaptable Rice Varieties

    PubMed Central

    Li, Tao; Ali, Jauhar; Franje, Neil Johann; Revilleza, Jastin Edrian; Redoña, Edilberto; Xu, Jianlong

    2016-01-01

    Multi-Environment Trials (MET) are conventionally used to evaluate varietal performance prior to national yield trials, but the accuracy of MET is constrained by the number of test environments. A modeling approach was innovated to evaluate varietal performance in a large number of environments using the rice model ORYZA (v3). Modeled yields representing genotype by environment interactions were used to classify the target population of environments (TPE) and analyze varietal yield and yield stability. Eight Green Super Rice (GSR) and three check varieties were evaluated across 3796 environments and 14 seasons in Southern Asia. Based on drought stress imposed on rainfed rice, environments were classified into nine TPEs. Relative to the check varieties, all GSR varieties performed well except GSR-IR1-5-S14-S2-Y2, with GSR-IR1-1-Y4-Y1, and GSR-IR1-8-S6-S3-Y2 consistently performing better in all TPEs. Varietal evaluation using ORYZA (v3) significantly corresponded to the evaluation based on actual MET data within specific sites, but not with considerably larger environments. ORYZA-based evaluation demonstrated the advantage of GSR varieties in diverse environments. This study substantiated that the modeling approach could be an effective, reliable, and advanced approach to complement MET in the assessment of varietal performance on spatial and temporal scales whenever quality soil and weather information are accessible. With available local weather and soil information, this approach can also be adopted to other rice producing domains or other crops using appropriate crop models. PMID:27723774

  1. Germostatin resistance locus 1 encodes a PHD finger protein involved in auxin-mediated seed dormancy and germination.

    PubMed

    Ye, Yajin; Gong, Ziying; Lu, Xiao; Miao, Deyan; Shi, Jianmin; Lu, Juan; Zhao, Yang

    2016-01-01

    Seed dormancy and germination are important physiological processes during the life cycle of a seed plant. Recently, auxin has been characterized as a positive regulator that functions during seed dormancy and as a negative regulator during germination. Through chemical genetic screenings, we have identified a small molecule, germostatin (GS), which effectively inhibits seed germination in Arabidopsis. GSR1 (germostatin resistance locus 1) encodes a tandem plant homeodomain (PHD) finger protein, identified by screening GS-resistant mutants. Certain PHD fingers of GSR1 are capable of binding unmethylated H3K4, which has been reported as an epigenetic mark of gene transcriptional repression. Biochemical studies show that GSR1 physically interacts with the transcriptional repressor ARF16 and attenuates the intensity of interaction of IAA17/ARF16 by directly interacting with IAA17 to release ARF16. Further results show that axr3-1, arf10 arf16 are hyposensitive to GS, and gsr1 not only resists auxin-mediated inhibition of seed germination but also displays decreased dormancy. We therefore propose that GSR1 may form a co-repressor with ARF16 to regulate seed germination. Besides promoting auxin biosynthesis via upregulating expression of YUCCA1, GS also enhances auxin responses by inducing degradation of DΙΙ-VENUS and upregulating expression of DR5-GFP. In summary, we identified GSR1 as a member of the auxin-mediated seed germination genetic network, and GS, a small non-auxin molecule that specifically acts on auxin-mediated seed germination.

  2. Combining Limited Multiple Environment Trials Data with Crop Modeling to Identify Widely Adaptable Rice Varieties.

    PubMed

    Li, Tao; Ali, Jauhar; Marcaida, Manuel; Angeles, Olivyn; Franje, Neil Johann; Revilleza, Jastin Edrian; Manalo, Emmali; Redoña, Edilberto; Xu, Jianlong; Li, Zhikang

    2016-01-01

    Multi-Environment Trials (MET) are conventionally used to evaluate varietal performance prior to national yield trials, but the accuracy of MET is constrained by the number of test environments. A modeling approach was innovated to evaluate varietal performance in a large number of environments using the rice model ORYZA (v3). Modeled yields representing genotype by environment interactions were used to classify the target population of environments (TPE) and analyze varietal yield and yield stability. Eight Green Super Rice (GSR) and three check varieties were evaluated across 3796 environments and 14 seasons in Southern Asia. Based on drought stress imposed on rainfed rice, environments were classified into nine TPEs. Relative to the check varieties, all GSR varieties performed well except GSR-IR1-5-S14-S2-Y2, with GSR-IR1-1-Y4-Y1, and GSR-IR1-8-S6-S3-Y2 consistently performing better in all TPEs. Varietal evaluation using ORYZA (v3) significantly corresponded to the evaluation based on actual MET data within specific sites, but not with considerably larger environments. ORYZA-based evaluation demonstrated the advantage of GSR varieties in diverse environments. This study substantiated that the modeling approach could be an effective, reliable, and advanced approach to complement MET in the assessment of varietal performance on spatial and temporal scales whenever quality soil and weather information are accessible. With available local weather and soil information, this approach can also be adopted to other rice producing domains or other crops using appropriate crop models.

  3. Building Sustainability into the Air Force Remediation Process

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-06-16

    Technology  GSR Through Optimization  In-depth Case Study : Travis AFB  Necessary  Optimization  GSR Treatment Train  In situ Bioreactor...y - S e r v i c e - E x c e l l e n c e Case Study : Travis AFB 12 Goals  Out of necessity  Reduce energy consumption, air emissions, material... Phytoremediation Biobarrier  Wrap-up  Future Direction 2 I n t e g r i t y - S e r v i c e - E x c e l l e n c e AF Environmental Restoration

  4. Structured and Dynamic Disordered Domains Regulate the Activity of a Multifunctional Anti-σ Factor

    PubMed Central

    Herrou, Julien; Willett, Jonathan W.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT The anti-σ factor NepR plays a central role in regulation of the general stress response (GSR) in alphaproteobacteria. This small protein has two known interaction partners: its cognate extracytoplasmic function (ECF) σ factor and the anti-anti-σ factor, PhyR. Stress-dependent phosphorylation of PhyR initiates a protein partner switch that promotes phospho-PhyR binding to NepR, which frees ECF σ to activate transcription of genes required for cell survival under adverse or fluctuating conditions. We have defined key functional roles for structured and intrinsically disordered domains of Caulobacter crescentus NepR in partner binding and activation of GSR transcription. We further demonstrate that NepR strongly stimulates the rate of PhyR phosphorylation in vitro and that this effect requires the structured and disordered domains of NepR. This result provides evidence for an additional layer of GSR regulation in which NepR directly influences activation of its binding partner, PhyR, as an anti-anti-σ factor. We conclude that structured and intrinsically disordered domains of NepR coordinately control multiple functions in the GSR signaling pathway, including core protein partner switch interactions and pathway activation by phosphorylation. PMID:26220965

  5. General Stress Signaling in the Alphaproteobacteria

    PubMed Central

    Fiebig, Aretha; Herrou, Julien; Willett, Jonathan

    2016-01-01

    The Alphaproteobacteria uniquely integrate features of two-component signal transduction and alternative σ factor regulation to control transcription of genes that ensure growth and survival across a range of stress conditions. Research over the past decade has led to the discovery of the key molecular players of this general stress response (GSR) system, including the sigma factor σEcfG, its anti-σ factor NepR, and the anti-anti-σ factor PhyR. The central molecular event of GSR activation entails aspartyl phosphorylation of PhyR, which promotes its binding to NepR and thereby releases σEcfG to associate with RNAP and direct transcription. Recent studies are providing a new understanding of complex, multilayered sensory networks that activate and repress this central protein partner switch. This review synthesizes our structural and functional understanding of the core GSR regulatory proteins and highlights emerging data that are defining the systems that regulate GSR transcription in a variety of species. PMID:26442844

  6. Flooding and Systematic Desensitization: Efficacy in Subclinical Phobics as a Function of Arousal

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Suarez, Yolanda; And Others

    1976-01-01

    Flooding and systematic desensitization procedures were investigated for possible interactions with subject arousal level on reduction in phobic reactions. No such interaction was found. Behaviorally and on GSR response, both flooding and systematic desensitization were effective, but only the latter was effective on subjective reports. (NG)

  7. Psychological and Associative Meaning in Auditory Recognition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tarte, Robert; And Others

    In 1964 Tarte, Gadlin, and Ehrlich found a correlation between Galvanic Skin Response (GSR) and associative meaning in an auditory recognition task. This study attempted to replicate the results and examine the critical variables involved. One hundred eighty female college students served as subjects. Each heard ten accelerated words followed by…

  8. Affective Realism of Animated Films in the Development of Simulation-Based Tutoring Systems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ekanayake, Hiran B.; Fors, Uno; Ramberg, Robert; Ziemke, Tom; Backlund, Per; Hewagamage, Kamalanath P.

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents a study focused on comparing real actors based scenarios and animated characters based scenarios with respect to their similarity in evoking psychophysiological activity for certain events by measuring galvanic skin response (GSR). In the experiment, one group (n = 11) watched the real actors' film whereas another group (n…

  9. Elemental analysis of gunshot residue to differentiate bullet type and firing distance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hay, Christine Ella

    Gunshot residue (GSR) was deposited on porcine tissue with hand loaded non-jacketed (NJ) and full-jacketed (FJ) ammunition at two different firing distances. Fresh tissue samples, as well as samples collected throughout decomposition were microwave digested in nitric acid and analyzed by inductively coupled plasma-optical emission spectroscopy (ICP-OES) and inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) to determine the elemental composition of the GSR. Element concentrations for lead (Pb), antimony (Sb), barium (Ba), copper (Cu), iron (Fe), and zinc (Zn) were statistically compared in order to investigate differentiation of bullet type and firing distance based on chemical concentrations in the GSR. Control (unshot) samples were collected in order to assess for environmental contaminants. Results of this study demonstrated that ICP-OES was adequate to detect the characteristic elements of GSR in fresh tissue, but was not sensitive enough to detect all elements throughout decomposition. Lead and Sb were significantly greater in NJ samples. Barium was useful in differentiating firing distance for both bullet types, while Cu was used to differentiate firing distance in FJ ammunition only. Analysis using ICP-MS, which has detection limits up to three orders of magnitude lower compared to ICP-OES, demonstrated the persistence of Pb, Sb, and Ba on porcine tissue throughout decomposition at a firing distance of 5 cm for both NJ and FJ ammunition.

  10. For Apple Owners: A Four-Channel, Computer-Managed Physiograph for $600.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jacobs, E. W.; Gaines, Marion T., IV

    1986-01-01

    Describes the hardware, priced at under $600 in 1984, required to adapt an Apple IIe microcomputer for use as a physiograph. Gavlanic skin response (GSR), electromyograph (EMG), skin temperature, and heart rate data can be recorded at user-specified intervals, displayed on a monitor, saved to a disk, and printed on paper. (Author/JDH)

  11. Measures of Autonomic Nervous System Regulation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-04-01

    Cortisol Galvanic Skin Response (GSR) Gastro- intestinal Pupillary Response Respiratory Salivary Amylase Vascular Manipulative Body-Based...Salivary Amylase Galvanic Skin Response Vascular Gastrointestinal The ANS Measures Table in Appendix A provides a summary of over fifty tools...Measures of Autonomic Nervous System Regulation Salivary Amylase Measurement

  12. Gunshot residues on dry bone after decomposition--a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Taborelli, Anna; Gibelli, Daniele; Rizzi, Agostino; Andreola, Salvatore; Brandone, Alberto; Cattaneo, Cristina

    2012-09-01

    Very little literature exists concerning radiochemical and microscopic analyses of gunshot wounds in decomposed material, and even less concerning skeletonized samples; the most advanced technologies may provide useful indications for the diagnosis of suspect lesions, especially if gunshot wounds are no longer recognizable. However, we know very little of the survival of gunshot residues (GSR) in skeletonized samples. This study examined nine gunshot wounds produced on pig heads which then underwent skeletonization for 4 years, and four gunshot entries on human heads from judicial cases which were then macerated to the bone in water; the samples underwent scanning electron microscopy coupled with energy dispersive X-ray (SEM-EDX) analysis. Positive results for GSR were observed only in four of the nine animal samples and in all four human samples. Among the human samples, two lesions showed Pb and Sb, one lesion only Pb, and one Pb, Sb, and Ba. This pilot study showed the survival of GSR in skeletal material and therefore the crucial importance of SEM-EDX analyses on skeletonized material. Further studies are needed in order to ascertain the role of environmental modifications of GSR.

  13. Influence of sympathetic autonomic arousal on cortical arousal: implications for a therapeutic behavioural intervention in epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Nagai, Yoko; Goldstein, Laura H; Critchley, Hugo D; Fenwick, Peter B C

    2004-02-01

    Negative amplitude shifts of cortical potential are related to seizure activity in epilepsy. Regulation of the cortical potential with biofeedback has been successfully used to reduce the frequency of some patients' seizures. Although such behavioural treatments are increasingly popular as an alternative to pharmacotherapy, there has been no investigation of the mechanisms that might bridge the behavioural index of peripheral autonomic activity and the central regulation of arousal. Galvanic Skin Response (GSR) is a sensitive measurement of autonomic arousal and physiological state which reflects one's behaviour. Thus we investigated the effect of peripheral autonomic modulation on cortical arousal with the future intention of using GSR biofeedback as a therapeutic treatment for epilepsy. The cortical negative potential was induced using the paradigm called Contingent Negative Variation (CNV) and measured in different physiological states. A high skin resistance state (reflecting a state of relaxation) and a low skin resistance state (reflecting a state of arousal), were engendered by two opposing procedures of GSR biofeedback. The CNV negative potential, acting as an index of cortical excitation, was significantly greater in amplitude at high levels of skin resistance (relaxed state) than at low levels of skin resistance (aroused state). Our results suggest an inverse relationship between a peripheral measure of autonomic arousal and an index of cortical arousal, the CNV. Moreover, we demonstrate modulation of this arousal-related potential by a behavioural intervention, indicating a potential therapeutic use of arousal biofeedback using GSR in the management of treatment-resistant epilepsy.

  14. Short range shooting distance estimation using variable pressure SEM images of the surroundings of bullet holes in textiles.

    PubMed

    Hinrichs, Ruth; Frank, Paulo Ricardo Ost; Vasconcellos, M A Z

    2017-03-01

    Modifications of cotton and polyester textiles due to shots fired at short range were analyzed with a variable pressure scanning electron microscope (VP-SEM). Different mechanisms of fiber rupture as a function of fiber type and shooting distance were detected, namely fusing, melting, scorching, and mechanical breakage. To estimate the firing distance, the approximately exponential decay of GSR coverage as a function of radial distance from the entrance hole was determined from image analysis, instead of relying on chemical analysis with EDX, which is problematic in the VP-SEM. A set of backscattered electron images, with sufficient magnification to discriminate micrometer wide GSR particles, was acquired at different radial distances from the entrance hole. The atomic number contrast between the GSR particles and the organic fibers allowed to find a robust procedure to segment the micrographs into binary images, in which the white pixel count was attributed to GSR coverage. The decrease of the white pixel count followed an exponential decay, and it was found that the reciprocal of the decay constant, obtained from the least-square fitting of the coverage data, showed a linear dependence on the shooting distance.

  15. General slip regime permeability model for gas flow through porous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Bo; Jiang, Peixue; Xu, Ruina; Ouyang, Xiaolong

    2016-07-01

    A theoretical effective gas permeability model was developed for rarefied gas flow in porous media, which holds over the entire slip regime with the permeability derived as a function of the Knudsen number. This general slip regime model (GSR model) is derived from the pore-scale Navier-Stokes equations subject to the first-order wall slip boundary condition using the volume-averaging method. The local closure problem for the volume-averaged equations is studied analytically and numerically using a periodic sphere array geometry. The GSR model includes a rational fraction function of the Knudsen number which leads to a limit effective permeability as the Knudsen number increases. The mechanism for this behavior is the viscous fluid inner friction caused by converging-diverging flow channels in porous media. A linearization of the GSR model leads to the Klinkenberg equation for slightly rarefied gas flows. Finite element simulations show that the Klinkenberg model overestimates the effective permeability by as much as 33% when a flow approaches the transition regime. The GSR model reduces to the unified permeability model [F. Civan, "Effective correlation of apparent gas permeability in tight porous media," Transp. Porous Media 82, 375 (2010)] for the flow in the slip regime and clarifies the physical significance of the empirical parameter b in the unified model.

  16. The Utilization of Robotic Pets in Dementia Care

    PubMed Central

    Petersen, Sandra; Houston, Susan; Qin, Huanying; Tague, Corey; Studley, Jill

    2016-01-01

    Background: Behavioral problems may affect individuals with dementia, increasing the cost and burden of care. Pet therapy has been known to be emotionally beneficial for many years. Robotic pets have been shown to have similar positive effects without the negative aspects of traditional pets. Robotic pet therapy offers an alternative to traditional pet therapy. Objective: The study rigorously assesses the effectiveness of the PARO robotic pet, an FDA approved biofeedback device, in treating dementia-related symptoms. Methods: A randomized block design with repeated measurements guided the study. Before and after measures included reliable, valid tools such as: RAID, CSDD, GDS, pulse rate, pulse oximetry, and GSR. Participants interacted with the PARO robotic pet, and the control group received standard activity programs. Five urban secure dementia units comprised the setting. Results: 61 patients, with 77% females, average 83.4 years in age, were randomized into control and treatment groups. Compared to the control group, RAID, CSDD, GSR, and pulse oximetry were increased in the treatment group, while pulse rate, pain medication, and psychoactive medication use were decreased. The changes in GSR, pulse oximetry, and pulse rate over time were plotted for both groups. The difference between groups was consistent throughout the 12-week study for pulse oximetry and pulse rate, while GSR had several weeks when changes were similar between groups. Conclusions: Treatment with the PARO robot decreased stress and anxiety in the treatment group and resulted in reductions in the use of psychoactive medications and pain medications in elderly clients with dementia. PMID:27716673

  17. Optimizing and Interpreting Insular Functional Connectivity Maps Obtained During Acute Experimental Pain: The Effects of Global Signal and Task Paradigm Regression.

    PubMed

    Ibinson, James W; Vogt, Keith M; Taylor, Kevin B; Dua, Shiv B; Becker, Christopher J; Loggia, Marco; Wasan, Ajay D

    2015-12-01

    The insula is uniquely located between the temporal and parietal cortices, making it anatomically well-positioned to act as an integrating center between the sensory and affective domains for the processing of painful stimulation. This can be studied through resting-state functional connectivity (fcMRI) imaging; however, the lack of a clear methodology for the analysis of fcMRI complicates the interpretation of these data during acute pain. Detected connectivity changes may reflect actual alterations in low-frequency synchronous neuronal activity related to pain, may be due to changes in global cerebral blood flow or the superimposed task-induced neuronal activity. The primary goal of this study was to investigate the effects of global signal regression (GSR) and task paradigm regression (TPR) on the changes in functional connectivity of the left (contralateral) insula in healthy subjects at rest and during acute painful electric nerve stimulation of the right hand. The use of GSR reduced the size and statistical significance of connectivity clusters and created negative correlation coefficients for some connectivity clusters. TPR with cyclic stimulation gave task versus rest connectivity differences similar to those with a constant task, suggesting that analysis which includes TPR is more accurately reflective of low-frequency neuronal activity. Both GSR and TPR have been inconsistently applied to fcMRI analysis. Based on these results, investigators need to consider the impact GSR and TPR have on connectivity during task performance when attempting to synthesize the literature.

  18. Efficacy of repeated psychophysiological detection of deception testing.

    PubMed

    Dollins, A B; Cestaro, V L; Pettit, D J

    1998-09-01

    Physiological measures were recorded during repeated psychophysiological detection of deception (PDD) tests to determine if reaction levels change with test repetition. Two groups of 22 healthy male subjects completed six peak of tension PDD tests on each of two test days. A minimum between test day interval of six days was maintained. The treatment group was programmed to respond deceptively to one of seven test questions while the control group was programmed to respond truthfully to all questions. The respiration and galvanic skin resistance (GSR) line lengths, GSR peak response amplitude and latency, and cardiovascular inter-beat-interval (IBI) were calculated for each response. Analyses indicated that, except for GSR peak response latency, differential physiological reactivity during a PDD test did not change significantly over repeated tests or days; there was a decrease in average respiration line lengths at the initial test(s) of each day; and differential changes in average respiration line length, GSR peak latency, and cardiovascular IBI responses corresponded to deception. Power analyses were calculated to assist in result interpretation. It is suggested that PDD decision accuracy, concerning subject veracity, should not decrease during repeated testing.

  19. Predicting the In-Hospital Responsiveness to Treatment of Alcoholics. Social Factors as Predictors of Outcome. Brain Damage as a Factor in Treatment Outcome of Chronic Alcoholic Patients.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mascia, George V.; And Others

    The authors attempt to locate predictor variables associated with the outcome of alcoholic treatment programs. Muscia's study focuses on the predictive potential of: (1) response to a GSR conditioning procedure; (2) several personality variables; and (3) age and IQ measures. Nine variables, reflecting diverse perspectives, were selected as a basis…

  20. Galvanic Skin Response and Reported Anxiety During Systematic Desensitization

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hyman, Edward T.; Gale, Elliot N.

    1973-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to investigate the GSR during systematic desensitization. Three groups of females each were preselected for high snake fear. Outcome measures indicated that the desensitization group reduced phobic behavior most, followed by the relaxation group, and then the exposure groups. (Author)

  1. Analysis of gunshot residues as trace in nasal mucus by GFAAS.

    PubMed

    Aliste, Marina; Chávez, Luis Guillermo

    2016-04-01

    When a gun is fired, the majority of gunshot residues are deposited on the shooter's hands. But these residues disappear through contact with surfaces or washing. Therefore, the maximum time frame to find GSR on a suspect's hands is 8h. The mucus, inside of a nostril, forms a surface layer where they are trapped foreign particles. In this way, mucus inside of a gunshot suspect's nostrils could act like an adhesive medium to stick on it gaseous particles from a gunshot. In this study, the presence of GSR in nasal mucus and its residence time is examined. A new procedure for the sampling of possible gunshot residue accumulated in the nasal mucus is designed. Samples are taken with cotton swabs moistened with a solution of EDTA and, after an acid digestion, are analysed by graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry. In addition, samples of hands are taken for comparison purposes. GSR recovery has been successful. The concentration of GSR in nasal mucus is found to be lower than on the hands, but with a longer residence time. Thus, it is possible to expand the sampling time of a suspect also, as nasal mucus cannot be contaminated by handling weapons.

  2. Nano characterization of gunshot residues from Brazilian ammunition.

    PubMed

    Melo, Lis G A; Martiny, Andrea; Pinto, André L

    2014-07-01

    Gunshot residues (GSR) from a total of nine different caliber ammunitions produced in Brazil were analyzed and characterized by transmission (TEM) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). GSR particles are composed of spherical particles of several micrometers of diameter containing distinct amounts of lead, barium and antimony, along with other organic and inorganic elements arising from the primer, gunpowder, the gun and the bullet itself. This study was carried out to obtain additional information on the properties of GSR nanoparticles originated from different types of regular ammunition produced in Brazil by CBC. Besides the SEM, we have used a TEM, exploring its high magnification capability and ability to explore internal structure and chemical composition of submicron particles. We observed that CBC ammunition generated smaller particles than usually reported for other ammunitions and that the three component particles are not a majority. TEM analysis revealed that GSR are partially composed of sub-micron particles as well. The electron diffraction pattern from these particles confirmed them to be mainly composed of lead oxides crystalline nanoparticles that may be agglomerated into larger particles. Energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy revealed that most of them were composed of two elements, especially PbSb. Ba was not a common element found in the nanoparticles.

  3. Applications of focused ion beam systems in gunshot residue investigation.

    PubMed

    Niewöhner, L; Wenz, H W

    1999-01-01

    Scanning ion microscopy technology has opened a new door to forensic scientists, allowing the GSR investigator to see inside a particle's core. Using a focused ion beam, particles can be cross-sectioned, revealing interior morphology and character that can be utilized for identification of the ammunition manufacturer.

  4. Assets and pitfalls of chemical and microscopic analyses on gunshot residues in skeletonized bodies: a report of five cases.

    PubMed

    Amadasi, Alberto; Gibelli, Daniele; Mazzarelli, Debora; Porta, Davide; Gaudio, Daniel; Salsarola, Dominic; Brandone, Alberto; Rizzi, Agostino; Cattaneo, Cristina

    2015-07-01

    In case of gunshot wounds, forensic anthropologists and pathologists have many tools at hand, and the assistance that chemical and microscopic investigations can provide in such scenarios is often valuable and crucial. However, the results of such analyses in the search of gunshot residues (GSR) ought not to be acritically considered. We report five cases where chemical (sodium rhodizonate) and microscopic (scanning electron microscopy-energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (SEM-EDX)) analyses were performed for the search of GSR. Four cases concerned the forensic field and analyses on buried, charred, or submerged remains, whereas one case concerned the historical remains of a soldier of the First World War. In every case, the search for GSR with these techniques showed their persistence even after long periods and preservation in peculiar environments. However, chemical analyses provided their contribution, but in two cases, anthropological analyses provided crucial and solving results. The five cases show the indisputable usefulness of chemical and microscopic analyses in the search of GSR in gunshot wounds and especially how such residues may survive in time and in adverse environmental conditions. However, experts should always be dubious about some pitfalls (such as contamination) one can frequently find in these scenarios.

  5. Dimethyl Fumarate Induces Glutathione Recycling by Upregulation of Glutathione Reductase

    PubMed Central

    Hoffmann, Christina; Dietrich, Michael; Herrmann, Ann-Kathrin; Schacht, Teresa

    2017-01-01

    Neuronal degeneration in multiple sclerosis has been linked to oxidative stress. Dimethyl fumarate (DMF) is an effective oral therapeutic option shown to reduce disease activity and progression in patients with relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis. DMF activates the transcription factor nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 (NRF2) leading to increased synthesis of the major cellular antioxidant glutathione (GSH) and prominent neuroprotection in vitro. We previously demonstrated that DMF is capable of raising GSH levels even when glutathione synthesis is inhibited, suggesting enhanced GSH recycling. Here, we found that DMF indeed induces glutathione reductase (GSR), a homodimeric flavoprotein that catalyzes GSSG reduction to GSH by using NADPH as a reducing cofactor. Knockdown of GSR using a pool of E. coli RNase III-digested siRNAs or pharmacological inhibition of GSR, however, also induced the antioxidant response rendering it impossible to verify the suspected attenuation of DMF-mediated neuroprotection. However, in cystine-free medium, where GSH synthesis is abolished, pharmacological inhibition of GSR drastically reduced the effect of DMF on glutathione recycling. We conclude that DMF increases glutathione recycling through induction of glutathione reductase. PMID:28116039

  6. Eight-Year Trends in Federal Graduation Rates and Graduation Success Rates at NCAA Division I Institutions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Collegiate Athletic Association (NJ1), 2009

    2009-01-01

    Data is presented on: (1) Comparison of GSR and Federal Graduation Rate Cohorts (1999-2002 Entering Classes); (2) Average GSRs for Division I Student-Athletes in 1998-01 Cohorts Vs. 1999-2002 Cohorts; (3) Graduation Success Rate Trends for Division I Men's Sports: Four-Class Averages for 1998-01 Cohorts vs. 1999-02 Cohorts; (4) Graduation Success…

  7. Test and Evaluation of TRUST: Tools for Recognizing Useful Signals of Trustworthiness

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-04-01

    were given at the end of the experimental session. The goal of the study was to evaluate the extent to which particular behavioral, psychological ...Skin Response (GSR), oxytocin and cortisol concentrations, and psychological state (questionnaires). These dependent measures were investigated using...1.4.4 Psychological Measures ............................................................................................ 5 2. MATERIALS AND METHODS

  8. WrpA Is an Atypical Flavodoxin Family Protein under Regulatory Control of the Brucella abortus General Stress Response System

    PubMed Central

    Herrou, Julien; Czyż, Daniel M.; Willett, Jonathan W.; Kim, Hye-Sook; Chhor, Gekleng; Babnigg, Gyorgy; Kim, Youngchang

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The general stress response (GSR) system of the intracellular pathogen Brucella abortus controls the transcription of approximately 100 genes in response to a range of stress cues. The core genetic regulatory components of the GSR are required for B. abortus survival under nonoptimal growth conditions in vitro and for maintenance of chronic infection in an in vivo mouse model. The functions of the majority of the genes in the GSR transcriptional regulon remain undefined. bab1_1070 is among the most highly regulated genes in this regulon: its transcription is activated 20- to 30-fold by the GSR system under oxidative conditions in vitro. We have solved crystal structures of Bab1_1070 and demonstrate that it forms a homotetrameric complex that resembles those of WrbA-type NADH:quinone oxidoreductases, which are members of the flavodoxin protein family. However, B. abortus WrbA-related protein (WrpA) does not bind flavin cofactors with a high affinity and does not function as an NADH:quinone oxidoreductase in vitro. Soaking crystals with flavin mononucleotide (FMN) revealed a likely low-affinity binding site adjacent to the canonical WrbA flavin binding site. Deletion of wrpA (ΔwrpA) does not compromise cell survival under acute oxidative stress in vitro or attenuate infection in cell-based or mouse models. However, a ΔwrpA strain does elicit increased splenomegaly in a mouse model, suggesting that WrpA modulates B. abortus interaction with its mammalian host. Despite high structural homology with canonical WrbA proteins, we propose that B. abortus WrpA represents a functionally distinct member of the diverse flavodoxin family. IMPORTANCE Brucella abortus is an etiological agent of brucellosis, which is among the most common zoonotic diseases worldwide. The general stress response (GSR) regulatory system of B. abortus controls the transcription of approximately 100 genes and is required for maintenance of chronic infection in a murine model; the majority of

  9. Overview of Green and Sustainable Remediation for Soil and Groundwater Remediation - 12545

    SciTech Connect

    Simpkin, Thomas J.; Favara, Paul

    2012-07-01

    Making remediation efforts more 'sustainable' or 'green' is a topic of great interest in the remediation community. It has been spurred on by Executive Orders from the White House, as well as Department of Energy (DOE) sustainability plans. In private industry, it is motivated by corporate sustainability goals and corporate social responsibility. It has spawned new organizations, areas of discussion, tools and practices, and guidance documents around sustainable remediation or green remediation. Green remediation can be thought of as a subset of sustainable remediation and is mostly focused on reducing the environmental footprint of cleanup efforts. Sustainable remediation includes both social and economic considerations, in addition to environmental. Application of both green and sustainable remediation (GSR) may involve two primary activities. The first is to develop technologies and alternatives that are greener or more sustainable. This can also include making existing remediation approaches greener or more sustainable. The second is to include GSR criteria in the evaluation of remediation alternatives and strategies. In other words, to include these GSR criteria in the evaluation of alternatives in a feasibility study. In some cases, regulatory frameworks allow the flexibility to include GSR criteria into the evaluation process (e.g., state cleanup programs). In other cases, regulations allow less flexibility to include the evaluation of GSR criteria (e.g., Comprehensive Environmental Response Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA)). New regulatory guidance and tools will be required to include these criteria in typical feasibility studies. GSR provides a number of challenges for remediation professionals performing soil and groundwater remediation projects. Probably the most significant is just trying to stay on top of the ever changing landscape of products, tools, and guidance documents coming out of various groups, the US EPA, and states. However, this

  10. Gunshot residue and brakepads: Compositional and morphological considerations for forensic casework.

    PubMed

    Tucker, William; Lucas, Nick; Seyfang, Kelsey E; Kirkbride, K Paul; Popelka-Filcoff, Rachel S

    2017-01-01

    Previous research has raised the possibility that automotive brake pads can produce particles that are both compositionally and morphologically similar to gunshot residue (GSR). These studies, published in the early 2000s, coincided with the reduction or removal of unnecessary sources of lead from the automotive industry. The question therefore arises whether modern brake pads might still be a relevant source of 'GSR-like' particles. In the present study, a total of 75 brake pads taken from a range of cars currently on the road in Adelaide, South Australia, were collected from service centres. These pads were screened by XRF, and 12 were selected as representatives of the types of pads available on the market. Some pads generated XRF results for elements particularly relevant to GSR analysis. Signals for barium and antimony were commonly observed, with some pads showing results possibly attributable to lead. The surfaces of these 12 pads were directly sampled using aluminium stubs equipped with carbon-filled adhesive tape. Following this, they were screened using SEM-EDS and an automated GSR particle search in order to detect particles containing lead, barium or antimony. No particles containing all of these elements were found, although a large number of particles containing both barium and antimony were located. Other particulate samples were collected using stubs from persons or objects associated with brakes in order to examine whether particles similar to GSR might be present on them. No three-component particles were detected in samples collected from the wheel rims or the hands of those exposed to automobiles. From this study of common, contemporary cars, brake pads and brake pad technicians, it was determined that the possibility of obtaining three-component 'GSR-like' particles from brake pads appears to be much lower now than when this issue was first raised in the early 2000s. While some brake pads do produce particles containing barium and antimony

  11. Crime scene investigations using portable, non-destructive space exploration technology.

    PubMed

    Trombka, Jacob I; Schweitzer, Jeffrey; Selavka, Carl; Dale, Mark; Gahn, Norman; Floyd, Samuel; Marie, James; Hobson, Maritza; Zeosky, Jerry; Martin, Ken; McClannahan, Timothy; Solomon, Pamela; Gottschang, Elyse

    2002-09-10

    The National Institute of Justice (NIJ) and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration's (NASAs) Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) have teamed up to explore the use of NASA developed technologies to help criminal justice agencies and professionals solve crimes. The objective of the program is to produce instruments and communication networks that have application within both NASA's space program and NIJ programs with state and local forensic laboratories. A working group of NASA scientists and law enforcement professionals has been established to develop and implement a feasibility demonstration program. Specifically, the group has focused its efforts on identifying gunpowder and primer residue, blood, and semen at crime scenes. Non-destructive elemental composition identification methods are carried out using portable X-ray fluorescence (XRF) systems. These systems are similar to those being developed for planetary exploration programs. A breadboard model of a portable XRF system has been constructed for these tests using room temperature silicon and cadmium-zinc telluride (CZT) detectors. Preliminary tests have been completed with gunshot residue (GSR), blood-spatter and semen samples. Many of the element composition lines have been identified. Studies to determine the minimum detectable limits needed for the analyses of GSR, blood and semen in the crime scene environment have been initiated and preliminary results obtained. Furthermore, a database made up of the inorganic composition of GSR is being developed. Using data obtained from the open literature of the elemental composition of barium (Ba) and antimony (Sb) in handswipes of GSR, we believe that there may be a unique GSR signature based on the Sb to Ba ratio.

  12. TRAIL-Based High Throughput Screening Reveals a Link between TRAIL-Mediated Apoptosis and Glutathione Reductase, a Key Component of Oxidative Stress Response.

    PubMed

    Rozanov, Dmitri; Cheltsov, Anton; Sergienko, Eduard; Vasile, Stefan; Golubkov, Vladislav; Aleshin, Alexander E; Levin, Trevor; Traer, Elie; Hann, Byron; Freimuth, Julia; Alexeev, Nikita; Alekseyev, Max A; Budko, Sergey P; Bächinger, Hans Peter; Spellman, Paul

    2015-01-01

    A high throughput screen for compounds that induce TRAIL-mediated apoptosis identified ML100 as an active chemical probe, which potentiated TRAIL activity in prostate carcinoma PPC-1 and melanoma MDA-MB-435 cells. Follow-up in silico modeling and profiling in cell-based assays allowed us to identify NSC130362, pharmacophore analog of ML100 that induced 65-95% cytotoxicity in cancer cells and did not affect the viability of human primary hepatocytes. In agreement with the activation of the apoptotic pathway, both ML100 and NSC130362 synergistically with TRAIL induced caspase-3/7 activity in MDA-MB-435 cells. Subsequent affinity chromatography and inhibition studies convincingly demonstrated that glutathione reductase (GSR), a key component of the oxidative stress response, is a target of NSC130362. In accordance with the role of GSR in the TRAIL pathway, GSR gene silencing potentiated TRAIL activity in MDA-MB-435 cells but not in human hepatocytes. Inhibition of GSR activity resulted in the induction of oxidative stress, as was evidenced by an increase in intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) and peroxidation of mitochondrial membrane after NSC130362 treatment in MDA-MB-435 cells but not in human hepatocytes. The antioxidant reduced glutathione (GSH) fully protected MDA-MB-435 cells from cell lysis induced by NSC130362 and TRAIL, thereby further confirming the interplay between GSR and TRAIL. As a consequence of activation of oxidative stress, combined treatment of different oxidative stress inducers and NSC130362 promoted cell death in a variety of cancer cells but not in hepatocytes in cell-based assays and in in vivo, in a mouse tumor xenograft model.

  13. Crime scene investigations using portable, non-destructive space exploration technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trombka, Jacob I.; Schweitzer, Jeffrey; Selavka, Carl; Dale, Mark; Gahn, Norman; Floyd, Samuel; Marie, James; Hobson, Maritza; Zeosky, Jerry; Martin, Ken; McClannahan, Timothy; Solomon, Pamela; Gottschang, Elyse

    2002-01-01

    The National Institute of Justice (NIJ) and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration's (NASAs) Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) have teamed up to explore the use of NASA developed technologies to help criminal justice agencies and professionals solve crimes. The objective of the program is to produce instruments and communication networks that have application within both NASA's space program and NIJ programs with state and local forensic laboratories. A working group of NASA scientists and law enforcement professionals has been established to develop and implement a feasibility demonstration program. Specifically, the group has focused its efforts on identifying gunpowder and primer residue, blood, and semen at crime scenes. Non-destructive elemental composition identification methods are carried out using portable X-ray fluorescence (XRF) systems. These systems are similar to those being developed for planetary exploration programs. A breadboard model of a portable XRF system has been constructed for these tests using room temperature silicon and cadmium-zinc telluride (CZT) detectors. Preliminary tests have been completed with gunshot residue (GSR), blood-spatter and semen samples. Many of the element composition lines have been identified. Studies to determine the minimum detectable limits needed for the analyses of GSR, blood and semen in the crime scene environment have been initiated and preliminary results obtained. Furthermore, a database made up of the inorganic composition of GSR is being developed. Using data obtained from the open literature of the elemental composition of barium (Ba) and antimony (Sb) in handswipes of GSR, we believe that there may be a unique GSR signature based on the Sb to Ba ratio.

  14. Segregation of face sensitive areas within the fusiform gyrus using global signal regression? A study on amygdala resting-state functional connectivity.

    PubMed

    Kruschwitz, Johann D; Meyer-Lindenberg, Andreas; Veer, Ilya M; Wackerhagen, Carolin; Erk, Susanne; Mohnke, Sebastian; Pöhland, Lydia; Haddad, Leila; Grimm, Oliver; Tost, Heike; Romanczuk-Seiferth, Nina; Heinz, Andreas; Walter, Martin; Walter, Henrik

    2015-10-01

    The application of global signal regression (GSR) to resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging data and its usefulness is a widely discussed topic. In this article, we report an observation of segregated distribution of amygdala resting-state functional connectivity (rs-FC) within the fusiform gyrus (FFG) as an effect of GSR in a multi-center-sample of 276 healthy subjects. Specifically, we observed that amygdala rs-FC was distributed within the FFG as distinct anterior versus posterior clusters delineated by positive versus negative rs-FC polarity when GSR was performed. To characterize this effect in more detail, post hoc analyses revealed the following: first, direct overlays of task-functional magnetic resonance imaging derived face sensitive areas and clusters of positive versus negative amygdala rs-FC showed that the positive amygdala rs-FC cluster corresponded best with the fusiform face area, whereas the occipital face area corresponded to the negative amygdala rs-FC cluster. Second, as expected from a hierarchical face perception model, these amygdala rs-FC defined clusters showed differential rs-FC with other regions of the visual stream. Third, dynamic connectivity analyses revealed that these amygdala rs-FC defined clusters also differed in their rs-FC variance across time to the amygdala. Furthermore, subsample analyses of three independent research sites confirmed reliability of the effect of GSR, as revealed by similar patterns of distinct amygdala rs-FC polarity within the FFG. In this article, we discuss the potential of GSR to segregate face sensitive areas within the FFG and furthermore discuss how our results may relate to the functional organization of the face-perception circuit.

  15. Micro-CT features of intermediate gunshot wounds severely damaged by fire.

    PubMed

    Fais, Paolo; Giraudo, Chiara; Boscolo-Berto, Rafael; Amagliani, Alessandro; Miotto, Diego; Feltrin, Giampietro; Viel, Guido; Ferrara, S Davide; Cecchetto, Giovanni

    2013-03-01

    Incineration or extensive burning of the body, causing changes in the content and distribution of fluids, fixation and shrinking processes of tissues, can alter the typical macroscopic and microscopic characteristics of firearm wounds, hampering or at least complicating the reconstruction of gunshot fatalities. The present study aims at evaluating the potential role of micro-computed tomography (micro-CT) for detecting and quantifying gunshot residue (GSR) particles in experimentally produced intermediate-range gunshot wounds severely damaged by fire. Eighteen experimental shootings were performed on 18 sections of human calves surgically amputated for medical reasons at three different firing distances (5, 15 and 30 cm). Six stab wounds produced with an ice pick were used as controls. Each calf section underwent a charring cycle, being placed in a wood-burning stove for 4 min at a temperature of 400 °C. At visual inspection, the charred entrance wounds could not be differentiated from the exit lesions and the stab wounds. On the contrary, micro-CT analysis showed the presence of GSR particles in all burnt entrance gunshot wounds, while GSR was absent in the exit and stab wounds. The GSR deposits of the firearm lesions inflicted at very close distance (5 cm) were mainly constituted of huge particles (diameter >150 μm) with an irregular shape and well-delineated edges; at greater distances (15 and 30 cm), agglomerates of tiny radiopaque particles scattered in the epidermis and dermis layers were evident. Statistical analysis demonstrated that also in charred firearm wounds the amount of GSR roughly correlates with the distance from which the gun was fired. The obtained results suggest that micro-CT analysis can be a valid screening tool for identifying entrance gunshot wounds and for differentiating firearm wounds from sharp-force injuries in bodies severely damaged by fire.

  16. TRAIL-Based High Throughput Screening Reveals a Link between TRAIL-Mediated Apoptosis and Glutathione Reductase, a Key Component of Oxidative Stress Response

    PubMed Central

    Rozanov, Dmitri; Cheltsov, Anton; Sergienko, Eduard; Vasile, Stefan; Golubkov, Vladislav; Aleshin, Alexander E.; Levin, Trevor; Traer, Elie; Hann, Byron; Freimuth, Julia; Alexeev, Nikita; Alekseyev, Max A.; Budko, Sergey P; Bächinger, Hans Peter; Spellman, Paul

    2015-01-01

    A high throughput screen for compounds that induce TRAIL-mediated apoptosis identified ML100 as an active chemical probe, which potentiated TRAIL activity in prostate carcinoma PPC-1 and melanoma MDA-MB-435 cells. Follow-up in silico modeling and profiling in cell-based assays allowed us to identify NSC130362, pharmacophore analog of ML100 that induced 65-95% cytotoxicity in cancer cells and did not affect the viability of human primary hepatocytes. In agreement with the activation of the apoptotic pathway, both ML100 and NSC130362 synergistically with TRAIL induced caspase-3/7 activity in MDA-MB-435 cells. Subsequent affinity chromatography and inhibition studies convincingly demonstrated that glutathione reductase (GSR), a key component of the oxidative stress response, is a target of NSC130362. In accordance with the role of GSR in the TRAIL pathway, GSR gene silencing potentiated TRAIL activity in MDA-MB-435 cells but not in human hepatocytes. Inhibition of GSR activity resulted in the induction of oxidative stress, as was evidenced by an increase in intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) and peroxidation of mitochondrial membrane after NSC130362 treatment in MDA-MB-435 cells but not in human hepatocytes. The antioxidant reduced glutathione (GSH) fully protected MDA-MB-435 cells from cell lysis induced by NSC130362 and TRAIL, thereby further confirming the interplay between GSR and TRAIL. As a consequence of activation of oxidative stress, combined treatment of different oxidative stress inducers and NSC130362 promoted cell death in a variety of cancer cells but not in hepatocytes in cell-based assays and in in vivo, in a mouse tumor xenograft model. PMID:26075913

  17. 76 FR 1979 - Airworthiness Directives; The Boeing Company Model 757 Airplanes

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-01-12

    ... certification basis of the airplane, and the approval must specifically refer to this AD. Material Incorporated...-16576; AD 2011-02-03] RIN 2120-AA64 Airworthiness Directives; The Boeing Company Model 757 Airplanes... -300 series airplanes. This AD requires an inspection of the two spring arms in the spin...

  18. 76 FR 10401 - Investigations Regarding Certifications of Eligibility To Apply for Worker Adjustment Assistance...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-02-24

    .../ Maynard, MA 02/07/11 02/03/11 One-Stop). 75180 CPL (Company) Buffalo, NY 02/07/11 02/04/11 75181 Sony DADC... America, Salem, OH 02/11/11 02/09/11 Inc. (Union). 75223 Global Suspension Systems Bryan, OH 02/11/11...

  19. To provide for rollover treatment to traditional IRAs of amounts received in airline carrier bankruptcy.

    THOMAS, 112th Congress

    Rep. Lewis, John [D-GA-5

    2012-02-03

    02/03/2012 Referred to the House Committee on Ways and Means. (All Actions) Notes: For further action, see H.R.658, which became Public Law 112-95 on 2/14/2012. Tracker: This bill has the status IntroducedHere are the steps for Status of Legislation:

  20. The Afghan Tribe is a Critical Capability: Leveraging the Center of Gravity

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-05-03

    Corrupt, 5. 59. Nordland, With Raw Recruits, 1. 60. Oppel , Richard. "Corruption Undercuts Hopes for Afghan Police - NYTimes.com." The New York Times...www.nytimes.com/2010/02/03/world/asia/03afghan.html (accessed 22 April 2010). Oppel , Richard. "Corruption Undercuts Hopes for Afghan Police

  1. 75 FR 54078 - International Fisheries; Pacific Tuna Fisheries; Vessel Capacity Limit in the Purse Seine Fishery...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-09-03

    ... (Resolution C-02-03) to address the problem of excess capacity in the tuna purse-seine fleet operating in the... for tuna in the IATTC Convention Area. However, these vessels (class size 5 and under purse seine... satisfying its obligations under the Tuna Conventions Act and not exceeding its allotted capacity in...

  2. Assessing Binocular Advantage in Aided Vision

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-06-01

    SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES Report contains color. 88ABW Cleared 02/03/2014; 88ABW-2014-0320. 14. ABSTRACT Advances in microsensors, microprocessors and...HMD Abstract Advances in microsensors, microprocessors and microdisplays are creating new opportunities for improving vision in degraded...advantages of binocularity are lost. Discussion Recent advances in microsensors, microdisplays, and microprocessors are creating new technology

  3. FINAL INTERIM REPORT, CANDIDATE SITES, MACHINES IN USE, DATA STORAGE AND TRANSMISSION METHODS: TESTING FEASIBILITY OF 3D ULTRASOUND DATA ACQUISITION AND RELIABILITY OF DATA RETRIEVAL FROM STORED 3D IMAGES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The purpose of this Work Assignment, 02-03, is to examine the feasibility of collecting transmitting, and analyzing 3-D ultrasound data in the context of a multi-center study of pregnant women. The study will also examine the reliability of measurements obtained from 3-D images< ...

  4. A resolution to constitute the minority party's membership on certain committees for the One Hundred Twelfth Congress, or until their successors are chosen.

    THOMAS, 112th Congress

    Sen. McConnell, Mitch [R-KY

    2011-02-03

    02/03/2011 Submitted in the Senate, considered, and agreed to without amendment by Unanimous Consent. (consideration: CR S557; text as passed Senate: CR S557; text of measure as introduced: CR S551-552) (All Actions) Tracker: This bill has the status Passed SenateHere are the steps for Status of Legislation:

  5. A resolution to constitute the majority party's membership on certain committees for the One Hundred Twelfth Congress, or until their successors are chosen.

    THOMAS, 112th Congress

    Sen. Reid, Harry [D-NV

    2011-02-03

    02/03/2011 Submitted in the Senate, considered, and agreed to without amendment by Unanimous Consent. (consideration: CR S556-557; text as passed Senate: CR S556-557; text of measure as introduced: CR S551) (All Actions) Tracker: This bill has the status Passed SenateHere are the steps for Status of Legislation:

  6. A resolution supporting democracy, universal rights, and the peaceful transition to a representative government in Egypt.

    THOMAS, 112th Congress

    Sen. Kerry, John F. [D-MA

    2011-02-03

    02/03/2011 Submitted in the Senate, considered, and agreed to without amendment and with a preamble by Unanimous Consent. (consideration: CR S557-558; text as passed Senate: CR S558; text of measure as introduced: CR S552) (All Actions) Tracker: This bill has the status Passed SenateHere are the steps for Status of Legislation:

  7. View from the East: Arab Perceptions of United States Presence and Policy

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2003-02-01

    February 2002, n.p., on-line, Intenet , available from http://www.nytimes.com/2002/02/03/magazine...Friend,” Al-Ahram Weekly On-line, no. 561, 22-28 November 2001, n.p., on-line, Intenet , available from www.//ahram.org.eg/weekly/2001/561/ op10.htm

  8. Reasoning by Augmenting a Description Logic Reasoner (Phase 1)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-04-28

    terminology ontology, the meaning of the term Gastritis might be specified as an InflammatoryProcess whose outcome is InflammationOf- Stomach, where...http://www.hoise.com/primeur/03/ articles /monthly/AE-PR-02-03-7.html. 18. Tuecke, S., Czajkowski, K., Foster, I., Frey, J., Graham, S., Kesselman, C

  9. SURF: Taking Sustainable Remediation from Concept to Standard Operating Procedure (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, L. M.; Wice, R. B.; Torrens, J.

    2013-12-01

    Over the last decade, many sectors of industrialized society have been rethinking behavior and re-engineering practices to reduce consumption of energy and natural resources. During this time, green and sustainable remediation (GSR) has evolved from conceptual discussions to standard operating procedure for many environmental remediation practitioners. Government agencies and private sector entities have incorporated GSR metrics into their performance criteria and contracting documents. One of the early think tanks for the development of GSR was the Sustainable Remediation Forum (SURF). SURF brings together representatives of government, industry, consultancy, and academia to parse the means and ends of incorporating societal and economic considerations into environmental cleanup projects. Faced with decades-old treatment programs with high energy outputs and no endpoints in sight, a small group of individuals published the institutional knowledge gathered in two years of ad hoc meetings into a 2009 White Paper on sustainable remediation drivers, practices, objectives, and case studies. Since then, SURF has expanded on those introductory topics, publishing its Framework for Integrating Sustainability into Remediation Projects, Guidance for Performing Footprint Analyses and Life-Cycle Assessments for the Remediation Industry, a compendium of metrics, and a call to improve the integration of land remediation and reuse. SURF's research and members have also been instrumental in the development of additional guidance through ASTM International and the Interstate Technology and Regulatory Council. SURF's current efforts focus on water reuse, the international perspective on GSR (continuing the conversations that were the basis of SURF's December 2012 meeting at the National Academy of Sciences in Washington, DC), and ways to capture and evaluate the societal benefits of site remediation. SURF also promotes and supports student chapters at universities across the US

  10. Mitigating Physiological Responses to Layoff Threat: An Experimental Test of the Efficacy of Two Coping Interventions

    PubMed Central

    Probst, Tahira M.; Jiang, Lixin

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of the current study was to assess real-time physiological reactions to the threat of layoffs and to determine whether the use of an emotion-focused vs. problem-focused coping intervention would be more efficacious in attenuating these physiological reactions. A 2 (coping intervention) × 4 (within-subjects time points) mixed experimental design was used to test the hypotheses. Eighty-four undergraduates participated in this laboratory experiment during which their galvanic skin response (GSR) and heart rate (HR) were continuously monitored. Analyses indicate that individuals instructed to utilize an emotion-focused coping strategy experienced a significantly greater decline in their GSR compared to those utilizing the problem-focused coping method. Results suggest organizations conducting layoffs might focus first on dealing with the emotional aftermath of downsizing before focusing on problem-solving tasks, such as resume writing and other traditional outplacement activities. PMID:26999186

  11. Analysis of the sleep quality of elderly people using biomedical signals.

    PubMed

    Moreno-Alsasua, L; Garcia-Zapirain, B; Mendez-Zorrilla, A

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents a technical solution that analyses sleep signals captured by biomedical sensors to find possible disorders during rest. Specifically, the method evaluates electrooculogram (EOG) signals, skin conductance (GSR), air flow (AS), and body temperature. Next, a quantitative sleep quality analysis determines significant changes in the biological signals, and any similarities between them in a given time period. Filtering techniques such as the Fourier transform method and IIR filters process the signal and identify significant variations. Once these changes have been identified, all significant data is compared and a quantitative and statistical analysis is carried out to determine the level of a person's rest. To evaluate the correlation and significant differences, a statistical analysis has been calculated showing correlation between EOG and AS signals (p=0,005), EOG, and GSR signals (p=0,037) and, finally, the EOG and Body temperature (p=0,04). Doctors could use this information to monitor changes within a patient.

  12. Detection of gunshot residues using mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Taudte, Regina Verena; Beavis, Alison; Blanes, Lucas; Cole, Nerida; Doble, Philip; Roux, Claude

    2014-01-01

    In recent years, forensic scientists have become increasingly interested in the detection and interpretation of organic gunshot residues (OGSR) due to the increasing use of lead- and heavy metal-free ammunition. This has also been prompted by the identification of gunshot residue- (GSR-) like particles in environmental and occupational samples. Various techniques have been investigated for their ability to detect OGSR. Mass spectrometry (MS) coupled to a chromatographic system is a powerful tool due to its high selectivity and sensitivity. Further, modern MS instruments can detect and identify a number of explosives and additives which may require different ionization techniques. Finally, MS has been applied to the analysis of both OGSR and inorganic gunshot residue (IGSR), although the "gold standard" for analysis is scanning electron microscopy with energy dispersive X-ray microscopy (SEM-EDX). This review presents an overview of the technical attributes of currently available MS and ionization techniques and their reported applications to GSR analysis.

  13. The analysis of gun-cleaning oil as long-distance gunshot residue and its implications for chemical tags on bullets.

    PubMed

    Bendrihem, Stacey A; Pyle, Robyn; Allison, John

    2013-01-01

    Using a BB gun, it was shown that a gun-cleaning oil (GCO) can be wiped from the barrel by a projectile and carried much longer distances than those usually associated with solid gunshot residue (GSR). Analysis of GCO subsequently deposited on a target was performed using pentane extraction and gas chromatography. (Hoppe's GCO was used here as a model.) When a 0.45 caliber handgun was used, analysis reveals that most of the GCO wiped from the barrel does not survive, owing to the elevated temperatures encountered. However, two components of the GCO, a long-chain fatty acid and its ethyl ester, do survive and can be detected in the bullet wipe. This suggests that GCO may be considered as GSR, uniquely detectable at long distances, and that other chemical compounds could either be added to a GCO or directly to bullets, to serve as identifying chemical tags.

  14. Differentiation of bullet type based on the analysis of gunshot residue using inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Udey, Ruth N; Hunter, Brian C; Smith, Ruth Waddell

    2011-09-01

    Porcine tissue samples shot with two different types of bullets, jacketed and nonjacketed, were collected in the fresh state and throughout moderate decomposition. Wound samples were microwave-digested and analyzed using inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) to detect all elements present at measurable levels in gunshot residue (GSR). Elements detected included antimony (Sb), barium (Ba), and lead (Pb), which are considered characteristic of GSR, as well as iron (Fe) and copper (Cu). These five elements were used to differentiate shot tissue and unshot tissue, as well as tissue shot by the two different bullet types, both in the fresh state and throughout moderate decomposition. The concentrations of Cu, Sb, and Pb were able to distinguish the two bullet types in fresh tissue samples at the 95% confidence level. Cu and Pb were able to differentiate the bullet types throughout moderate decomposition at the 99% confidence level.

  15. Detection of gunshot residue in blowfly larvae and decomposing porcine tissue using inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS).

    PubMed

    Lagoo, Lisa; Schaeffer, Luther S; Szymanski, David W; Smith, Ruth Waddell

    2010-05-01

    Blowfly larvae and porcine tissue contaminated with gunshot residue (GSR) were collected during summer and winter months, over a 37-day and a 60-day sampling period, respectively. Wound samples were microwave-digested and analyzed by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) for the detection of antimony, barium, and lead. During summer, the 37-day sampling period encompassed all stages of decomposition, except skeletonization. The three elements were detected in larvae only on days 3 and 4 after death but were detected at significant levels in tissue samples throughout the entire sampling period. In winter, no significant decomposition was observed throughout the 60-day sampling. Although temperatures were too low for blowfly activity, the three elements were detected in the tissue samples at relatively constant, significant levels. Hence, GSR determination in tissue was more dependent on decomposition stage rather than time since death.

  16. Mitigating Physiological Responses to Layoff Threat: An Experimental Test of the Efficacy of Two Coping Interventions.

    PubMed

    Probst, Tahira M; Jiang, Lixin

    2016-03-18

    The purpose of the current study was to assess real-time physiological reactions to the threat of layoffs and to determine whether the use of an emotion-focused vs. problem-focused coping intervention would be more efficacious in attenuating these physiological reactions. A 2 (coping intervention) × 4 (within-subjects time points) mixed experimental design was used to test the hypotheses. Eighty-four undergraduates participated in this laboratory experiment during which their galvanic skin response (GSR) and heart rate (HR) were continuously monitored. Analyses indicate that individuals instructed to utilize an emotion-focused coping strategy experienced a significantly greater decline in their GSR compared to those utilizing the problem-focused coping method. Results suggest organizations conducting layoffs might focus first on dealing with the emotional aftermath of downsizing before focusing on problem-solving tasks, such as resume writing and other traditional outplacement activities.

  17. Sensei: A Multi-Modal Framework for Assessing Stress Resiliency

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-04-01

    During this reporting period, we collected pilot data verifying that our stressful and relaxing tasks were having the desired effects on subjects...shaded areas indicate the time during which the subject was engaged in the Stroop + peripheral detection task, with increasing task difficulty as time...differences between subjects also show some interesting patterns. For example, in the subject on the left, a strong GSR response at the start of the Stroop

  18. Multi-Sensor Based State Prediction for Personal Mobility Vehicles

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Pankaj; Umata, Ichiro; Watanabe, Atsushi; Even, Jani; Suyama, Takayuki; Ishii, Shin

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents a study on multi-modal human emotional state detection while riding a powered wheelchair (PMV; Personal Mobility Vehicle) in an indoor labyrinth-like environment. The study reports findings on the habituation of human stress response during self-driving. In addition, the effects of “loss of controllability”, change in the role of the driver to a passenger, are investigated via an autonomous driving modality. The multi-modal emotional state detector sensing framework consists of four sensing devices: electroencephalograph (EEG), heart inter-beat interval (IBI), galvanic skin response (GSR) and stressor level lever (in the case of autonomous riding). Physiological emotional state measurement characteristics are organized by time-scale, in terms of capturing slower changes (long-term) and quicker changes from moment-to-moment. Experimental results with fifteen participants regarding subjective emotional state reports and commercial software measurements validated the proposed emotional state detector. Short-term GSR and heart signal characterizations captured moment-to-moment emotional state during autonomous riding (Spearman correlation; ρ = 0.6, p < 0.001). Short-term GSR and EEG characterizations reliably captured moment-to-moment emotional state during self-driving (Classification accuracy; 69.7). Finally, long-term GSR and heart characterizations were confirmed to reliably capture slow changes during autonomous riding and also of emotional state during participant resting state. The purpose of this study and the exploration of various algorithms and sensors in a structured framework is to provide a comprehensive background for multi-modal emotional state prediction experiments and/or applications. Additional discussion regarding the feasibility and utility of the possibilities of these concepts are given. PMID:27732589

  19. DARPA Improving Warfighter Information Intake Under Stress -- Augmented Cognition. Volume 1. Phase 2: Concept Validation Experiment

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-09-01

    University, Human Bionics , Institute of Human and Machine Cognition, Oregon Health and Sciences University, and UFI. This team developed the Joint Human...included EEG from nine wireless EEG sensors as well as pupillometry data on pupil size for each eye , which served as the basis for a stand- alone Index of...and event-related 20 EEG/ERP, eye tracking and pupil dilation, mouse pressure, body posture, heart rate, and GSR. These technologies measured

  20. Progress and Planned Future Directions in Optical Processing and Communications (BRIEFING CHARTS)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-03-06

    Photonics Heterojunction Laser, Fiber Optics, Integrated Photonics , Optical Networks Cisco GSR Cisco CRS-1 (92 Tbps - 40 Racks Powerbook G5 e...Short Optical Filters CS-WDM DARPA MTO Symposium, March 4-6, 2007 11 Were Does Integrated Photonics Fit into the Picture? Today’s Technology 32/64 40G...Optical Wavelength Converter Monolithically Integrated with a Total Internal Reflection Corner Mirror Delay Line for 40Gbps RZ Operation," Integrated

  1. Robust Multimodal Cognitive Load Measurement II

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-06-24

    and GSR values. 15. SUBJECT TERMS Behavioural Science, Cognitive Psychology 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: 17. LIMITATION OF...Final 3. DATES COVERED (From - To) 26 June 2014 – 25 June 2015 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE (134144) Robust Multimodal Cognitive Load...research accomplishments out of the Robust Multimodal Cognitive Load Measurement II (RMCLM) project in the past one-year period. The objective of this

  2. Fast detection and characterization of organic and inorganic gunshot residues on the hands of suspects by CMV-GC-MS and LIBS.

    PubMed

    Tarifa, Anamary; Almirall, José R

    2015-05-01

    A rapid method for the characterization of both organic and inorganic components of gunshot residues (GSR) is proposed as an alternative tool to facilitate the identification of a suspected shooter. In this study, two fast screening methods were developed and optimized for the detection of organic compounds and inorganic components indicative of GSR presence on the hands of shooters and non-shooters. The proposed methods consist of headspace extraction of volatile organic compounds using a capillary microextraction of volatiles (CMV) device previously reported as a high-efficiency sampler followed by detection by GC-MS. This novel sampling technique has the potential to yield fast results (<2min sampling) and high sensitivity capable of detecting 3ng of diphenylamine (DPA) and 8ng of nitroglycerine (NG). Direct analysis of the headspace of over 50 swabs collected from the hands of suspected shooters (and non-shooters) provides information regarding VOCs present on their hands. In addition, a fast laser induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) screening method for the detection of the inorganic components indicative of the presence of GSR (Sb, Pb and Ba) is described. The sampling method for the inorganics consists of liquid extraction of the target elements from the same cotton swabs (previously analyzed for VOCs) and an additional 30 swab samples followed by spiking 1μL of the extract solution onto a Teflon disk and then analyzed by LIBS. Advantages of LIBS include fast analysis (~12s per sample) and high selectivity and sensitivity, with expected LODs 0.1-18ng for each of the target elements after sampling. The analytical performance of the LIBS method is also compared to previously reported methods (inductively coupled plasma-optical emission spectroscopy). The combination of fast CMV sampling, unambiguous organic compound identification with GC-MS and fast LIBS analysis provides the basis for a new comprehensive screening method for GSR.

  3. Army Green and Sustainable Remediation: Policy and Implementation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-06-15

    Headquarters GSR Overview  Headquarters Field Survey  Case Studies • Camp Crowder • Camp Edwards (MMR) • Camp Withycombe • Seneca Army Depot...Bioremediation (3 sites) June 2010Army Green and Sustainable Remediation Case Studies  Camp Crowder  Camp Edwards (MMR)  Camp Withycombe  Seneca Army...sacks. The treatment system processed around 300 tons of soil daily. June 2010Army Green and Sustainable Remediation 12 Seneca Army Depot

  4. A Multi-Attribute-Utility-Theory Model that Minimizes Interview-Data Requirements: A Consolidation of Space Launch Decisions.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1994-12-01

    Utility Theory . MAUT" will be the approach used in this research. It allows us to express a definitive multiattribute utility function that can be...Captain Raymond WY. •t,,ts•, UAP, rCLASS. GSr%-Q94D. THESIS TITLE: A Multi-Attribute- Utility - Theory Model That Minimizes Interview-Data Requirements: A...2.2.2 Interactive Approach ................................................................. 2-4 2.2.3 M ultiattribute Utility Theory

  5. Detectability and medico-legal value of the gunshot residues in the intracorporeal channel.

    PubMed

    Migliorini, Arnaldo Stanislao; Andreola, Salvatore; Battistini, Alessio; Gentile, Guendalina; Muccino, Enrico; Vancheri, Giulia; Zoja, Riccardo

    2015-11-01

    The application of the histochemical stain of sodium rhodizonate to the entrance wound for the detection of the lead (Pb) residues coming from the gunshot may be affected by false positive cases due to the contamination of the environmental Pb. The aim of the Authors is to histochemically search the Pb of GSR in a region which should be more protected by the contamination: the intracorporeal channel. Two hundreds and eighteen serial histological specimens of the intracorporeal channels coming from 25 subjects (dead due to gunshots and being autopsied at the Section of Legal Medicine of the Milan University, in the years 2013-2014) were stained with the sodium rhodizonate and sodium rhodizonate in acid environment (HCl 5%), and then observed by the microscope. The sodium rhodizonate showed a positivity for the Pb residues in the intracorporeal channel, with the detection of the particles within the first 2 cm beyond the entrance wound in 6 cases over the total number of 25 (24%). Victims were characterized by common features: short-barreled weapon; contact shots or short-distance shots; involvement of regions that were not covered by clothing; preservation of the microscopic structure of organs interested by the intracorporeal channel. The searching of GSR in the intracorporeal channel, even in conditions securing a high sensitivity, could represent an important test for the discrimination between an environmental contamination of Pb and the presence of Pb residues by GSR: once confirmed the presence of GSR in the intracorporeal channel by the histochemical analysis, the diagnostic process should require the application of the SEM-EDX for the confirmation of the results. Although not yet studied, this combination could be applied to cadavers exposed to the environment, with advanced post-mortal phenomena permitting at least the suspects of the existence of gunshot wounds at the macroscopic autopsy evaluation. Indeed, in some cases, the putrefaction is so advanced

  6. Exploratory Data Analytics for Information Discovery in a Network Structure

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-11-01

    probable origin, observer recognition ID, remote sensed facial imagery ID, remote sensed pulse rate, directly 4 measured pulse rate, directly sensed GSR...report are not to be construed as an official Department of the Army position unless so designated by other authorized documents. Citation of...discovery. The U.S. Army Research Laboratory (ARL) is addressing this complex topic by developing software that includes dimensionality reduction

  7. Department of the Army Policy Considerations for Green Sustainable Remediation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-03-08

    prior to the development of a formal policy, if determined necessary, beyond the DoD policy. 5 There are many intangible factors regarding GSR... Decision Framework The USACE has the following role in cleanup and restoration within the Army. The USACE is responsible for the program management...practices in Army Environmental Remediation. The objective of this initiative/contract is to follow the USACE Decision Framework/Interim Guidance as a

  8. A survey of gunshot residue analysis methods.

    PubMed

    Singer, R L; Davis, D; Houck, M M

    1996-03-01

    A survey was sent to 80 forensic laboratories in 44 States and two Canadian Provinces concerning methodology in analyzing gunshot residue (GSR) and interpreting the results. Of the 80 surveys, 50 (63%) were returned completed. Questions included standard procedures, collection methods, thresholding problems and specificity of data. These results are compared to a previous survey reported in 1990. Implications for the interpretation and future study of these methods are discussed.

  9. Solid-state Forensic Finger sensor for integrated sampling and detection of gunshot residue and explosives: towards 'Lab-on-a-finger'.

    PubMed

    Bandodkar, Amay J; O'Mahony, Aoife M; Ramírez, Julian; Samek, Izabela A; Anderson, Sean M; Windmiller, Joshua R; Wang, Joseph

    2013-09-21

    Increasing security needs require field-deployable, on-the-spot detection tools for the rapid and reliable identification of gunshot residue (GSR) and nitroaromatic explosive compounds. This manuscript presents a simple, all-solid-state, wearable fingertip sensor for the rapid on-site voltammetric screening of GSR and explosive surface residues. To fabricate the new Forensic Fingers, we screen-print a three-electrode setup onto a nitrile finger cot, and coat another finger cot with an ionogel electrolyte layer. The new integrated sampling/detection methodology relies on 'voltammetry of microparticles' (VMP) and involves an initial mechanical transfer of trace amounts of surface-confined analytes directly onto the fingertip-based electrode contingent. Voltammetric measurements of the sample residues are carried out upon bringing the working electrode (printed on the index finger cot) in direct contact with a second finger cot coated with an ionogel electrolyte (worn on the thumb), thus completing the solid-state electrochemical cell. Sampling and screening are performed in less than four minutes and generate distinct voltammetric fingerprints which are specific to both GSR and explosives. The use of the solid, flexible ionogel electrolyte eliminates any liquid handling which can resolve problems associated with leakage, portability and contamination. A detailed study reveals that the fingertip detection system can rapidly identify residues of GSR and nitroaromatic compounds with high specificity, without compromising its attractive behavior even after undergoing repeated mechanical stress. This new integrated sampling/detection fingertip strategy holds considerable promise as a rapid, effective and low-cost approach for on-site crime scene investigations in various forensic scenarios.

  10. A study of the potential risk of gunshot residue transfer from special units of the police to arrested suspects.

    PubMed

    Charles, Sébastien; Geusens, Nadia

    2012-03-10

    The presence of gunshot residues (GSRs) on arrested suspects can help the Court to form an opinion regarding the possibility of utilization of firearms by these suspects. Since the presence of a few particles can in some cases already have a strong indicative value, the GSR experts have to evaluate in their daily work the risk of a potential contamination of these suspects during their arrest. A few studies conducted on police officers and police facilities concluded that the risk of secondary transfer on arrested suspects is quite negligible. However, the case of special force units of the police should be taken into account, since these units can be assumed to be highly contaminated by GSR due to their intensive training. The aim of this study is to evaluate this possibility of particle transfer by performing simulations of arrests by special force police units, according to both low and high contamination scenarios. The results show that secondary transfers of GSR during these simulations are in most cases not negligible, even for the low contamination scenario. This is especially apparent on the vests of the target persons, with an average of 7 GSR particles (2 PbBaSb and 5 TiZn) found on the stubs used on these materials. Of course, the major contamination levels were observed in the case of the high contamination scenario, due to the use of highly contaminated gloves by the police officers during the arrests. Some recommendations are proposed to take into account this risk of contamination and to try to minimize it, or at least to better identify it.

  11. Functional shoulder radiography with use of a dynamic flat panel detector.

    PubMed

    Sakuda, Keita; Sanada, Shigeru; Tanaka, Rie; Kitaoka, Katsuhiko; Hayashi, Norio; Matsuura, Yukihiro

    2014-07-01

    Our purpose in this study was to develop a functional form of radiography and to perform a quantitative analysis for the shoulder joint using a dynamic flat panel detector (FPD) system. We obtained dynamic images at a rate of 3.75 frames per second (fps) using an FPD system. Three patients and 5 healthy controls were studied with a clinically established frontal projection, with abduction of the arms. The arm angle, glenohumeral angle (G-angle), and scapulothoracic angle (S-angle) were measured on dynamic images. The ratio of the G-angle to the S-angle (GSR) was also evaluated quantitatively. In normal subjects, the G-angle and S-angle changed gradually along with the arm angle. The G-angle was approximately twice as large as the S-angle, resulting in a GSR of 2 throughout the abduction of the shoulder. Changes in G-angle and S-angle tended to be irregular in patients with shoulder disorders. The GSR of the thoracic outlet syndrome, recurrent dislocation of the shoulder joint, and anterior serratus muscle paralysis were 3-7.5, 4-9.5, and 3.5-7.5, respectively. The GSR of the anterior serratus muscle paralysis improved to approximately 2 after orthopedic treatment. Our preliminary results indicated that functional radiography by FPD and computer-aided quantitative analysis is useful for diagnosis of some shoulder disorders, such as the thoracic outlet syndrome, recurrent dislocation of the shoulder joint, and anterior serratus muscle paralysis. The technique and procedures described comprise a simple, functional shoulder radiographic method for evaluation of the therapeutic effects of surgery and/or rehabilitation.

  12. Physiological Synchronization in Emergency Response Teams: Subjective Workload, Drivers and Empaths.

    PubMed

    Guastello, Stephen J; Marra, David E; Perna, Claire; Castro, Julian; Gomez, Maribeth; Peressini, Anthony F

    2016-04-01

    Behavioral and physiological synchronization have important implications for work teams with regard to workload management, coordinated behavior and overall functioning. This study extended previous work on the nonlinear statistical structure of GSR series in dyads to larger teams and included subjective ratings of workload and contributions to problem solving. Eleven teams of 3 or 4 people played a series of six emergency response (ER) games against a single opponent. Seven of the groups worked under a time pressure instruction at the beginning of the first game. The other four groups were not given that instruction until the beginning of the fourth game. The optimal lag length for the teams, which appeared to be phase-locked, was substantially shorter than that obtained previously for loosely-coupled dyads. There was a complex nonlinear effect from the time pressure manipulation on the autocorrelation over time that reflected workload and fatigue dynamics that were operating. The R2 values for linear and nonlinear statistical models differed by less than .01. The average amount of influence from one ER team member to another was 4.5-4.7% of the variance in GSR readings. ER team members were classified as drivers and empaths, based on the autocorrelations and transfer influences to and from other players in the GSR time series. Empaths were rated by their peers as making more types of positive contributions to the problem solving discussions than others, and drivers received the lowest ratings. Larger Lyapunov exponents that were calculated from the GSR time series were positively correlated with individuals' ratings of subjective workload and were negatively correlated with leadership indicators. Several directions for further research are outlined.

  13. Motivation and self-efficacy in the context of moderated drinking: global self-report and ecological momentary assessment.

    PubMed

    Kuerbis, Alexis; Armeli, Stephen; Muench, Frederick; Morgenstern, Jon

    2013-12-01

    Despite ample research demonstrating the role of motivation and self-efficacy in predicting drinking in the context of abstinence, little research explicitly explores their role in the context of moderation, and none have utilized daily diary methods. The purpose of this study was to (a) explore the concordance between global self-report and daily diary composite measures of motivation and self-efficacy and (b) compare the ability of each in predicting drinking outcomes in the context of a study of brief AUD treatments focused on controlled drinking. Problem drinkers (N = 89) were assessed, provided feedback about their drinking, and randomly assigned to one of three conditions: two brief AUD treatments or a third group asked to change on their own. Global self-report (GSR) measures were administered at baseline and Week 8 (end of treatment). Daily diary composites (DDC) were created from data collected via an Interactive Voice Recording system during the week prior to baseline and the week prior to Week 8. Findings revealed some concordance between GSR and DDC at both baseline and Week 8, indicating the two methods capture some of the same construct; however, their respective relationships to drinking differed. DDC for both baseline and Week 8 significantly predicted Week 8 drinking outcomes, whereas only change in GSR significantly predicted drinking outcomes. Findings suggest that motivation and self-efficacy are important to moderated drinking, and that both GSR and daily diary methods are useful in understanding mechanisms of change in the context of moderation. Daily diary methods may provide significant advantages. Limitations and arenas for future research are discussed.

  14. The use of unburned propellant powder for shooting-distance determination. Part I: Infrared luminescence.

    PubMed

    Hofer, Rolf; Graf, Stefan; Christen, Stephan

    2017-04-01

    Unburned propellant powder particles in gunshot residue (GSR) were detected at near infrared by optical excitation in the visible wavelength range. A series of ammunition (different brands and different manufacturers) was analyzed concerning the luminescence of their propellant. Shooting target samples with different shooting distances were produced on standard textile tissue and analyzed with this optical infrared inspection. The number of luminescent GSR particles per area was measured and curves with particle density vs. shooting distance were drawn. The method was applied on three ammunition types with different particle morphology shot with a pistol and one ammunition type shot with a revolver. The shooting series performed with the revolver showed a large particle density variation within the samples of identical shooting distances. In this case, the ratio of the amount of particles within the area around the bullet hole and within a ring with a defined distance from the bullet hole was calculated. These data resulted in measures with much lower standard deviations, which is a prove that the distribution pattern depends on the shooting distance and not on the amount of GSR particles. It has been shown, that imaging of target tissue with the aid of infrared luminescence is an easy, fast, reproducible and non-destructive method for shooting-distance determination.

  15. Gender empowerment and female-to-male smoking prevalence ratios

    PubMed Central

    Fong, Geoffrey T

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Objective To determine whether in countries with high gender empowerment the female-to-male smoking prevalence ratio is also higher. Methods Bivariate and multiple regression analyses were performed to explore the relation between the United Nations Development Programme’s gender empowerment measure (GEM) and the female-to-male smoking prevalence ratio (calculated from the 2008 WHO global tobacco control report). Because a country’s progression through the various stages of the tobacco epidemic and its gender smoking ratio (GSR) are thought to be influenced by its level of development, we explored this correlation as well, with economic development defined in terms of gross national income (GNI) per capita and income inequality (Gini coefficient). Findings The GSR was significantly and positively correlated with the GEM (r = 0.680; P < 0.001). In addition, the GEM was the strongest predictor of the GSR (β, adjusted: 0.47; P < 0.0001) after controlling for GNI per capita and for Gini coefficient. Conclusion Whether progress towards gender empowerment can take place without a corresponding increase in smoking among women remains to be seen. Strong tobacco control measures are needed in countries where women are being increasingly empowered. PMID:21379415

  16. Variation in the stress response between high- and low-neuroticism female undergraduates across the menstrual cycle.

    PubMed

    Liu, Qing; Zhou, Renlai; Oei, Tian P S; Wang, Qingguo; Zhao, Yan; Liu, Yanfeng

    2013-09-01

    This study was undertaken to elucidate possible relationships between menstrual cycle stage, neuroticism and behavioral and physiological responses to a cognitive challenge. The study investigated the differences between high neuroticism and low neuroticism groups across the menstrual cycle (luteal, menstrual and ovulatory stages). The Stroop color-naming task was used as a stressor. During the task, the galvanic skin response (GSR), heart rate (HR) and HR variability (HRV) were simultaneously recorded by a polygraph. The results showed a significant difference in reaction times (RT) on the Stroop task between the high- and low-neuroticism groups during menstruation. However, there were no significant RT differences between groups during the luteal or ovulatory cycle stages. The GSR of the high-neuroticism group during menstruation was significantly lower than it was in the luteal and ovulatory stages. Moreover, during menstruation, the cardiovascular responses (high-frequency HRV (HF) and low-frequency HRV (LF)) and accuracy on the Stroop task were positively correlated, while the correlations between HF, LF and the RT were negative. The results demonstrate that during menstruation, there were consistent variations in female behavior and physiology when facing a cognitive stressor. Specifically, the high-neuroticism group was more sensitive to the stressor than the low neuroticism group, with decreased reaction time on the Stroop task, and increased GSR and HRV.

  17. Enhancing emotional experiences to dance through music: the role of valence and arousal in the cross-modal bias

    PubMed Central

    Christensen, Julia F.; Gaigg, Sebastian B.; Gomila, Antoni; Oke, Peter; Calvo-Merino, Beatriz

    2014-01-01

    It is well established that emotional responses to stimuli presented to one perceptive modality (e.g., visual) are modulated by the concurrent presentation of affective information to another modality (e.g., auditory)—an effect known as the cross-modal bias. However, the affective mechanisms mediating this effect are still not fully understood. It remains unclear what role different dimensions of stimulus valence and arousal play in mediating the effect, and to what extent cross-modal influences impact not only our perception and conscious affective experiences, but also our psychophysiological emotional response. We addressed these issues by measuring participants’ subjective emotion ratings and their Galvanic Skin Responses (GSR) in a cross-modal affect perception paradigm employing videos of ballet dance movements and instrumental classical music as the stimuli. We chose these stimuli to explore the cross-modal bias in a context of stimuli (ballet dance movements) that most participants would have relatively little prior experience with. Results showed (i) that the cross-modal bias was more pronounced for sad than for happy movements, whereas it was equivalent when contrasting high vs. low arousal movements; and (ii) that movement valence did not modulate participants’ GSR, while movement arousal did, such that GSR was potentiated in the case of low arousal movements with sad music and when high arousal movements were paired with happy music. Results are discussed in the context of the affective dimension of neuroentrainment and with regards to implications for the art community. PMID:25339880

  18. Forensic analysis of a single particle of partially burnt gunpowder by solid phase micro-extraction-gas chromatography-nitrogen phosphorus detector.

    PubMed

    Burleson, Garrett Lee; Gonzalez, Brittney; Simons, Kelsie; Yu, Jorn C C

    2009-05-29

    Solid phase micro-extraction (SPME) was adopted to extract organic gun shot residues (OGSRs) from a single particle of partially burnt gunpowder. The partially burnt particle samples were collected from gun shot residue (GSR) deposited near the target areas. OGSRs, such as diphenylamine (DPA), methyl centralite (MC), ethyl centralite (EC), from only one single particle of partially burnt gunpowder were successfully extracted by SPME and analyzed by a gas chromatography coupled to a nitrogen phosphorus detector (GC-NPD). The results confirmed that the new extraction procedure is capable of extracting trace amount of MC and EC as signature molecules for the identification of GSR. The method represents a solvent-free extraction as a complementary analytical procedure for the forensic analysis of GSR-related evidences. The new extraction scheme with the capability of analyzing single particle of partially burnt gunpowder can also be applied to the identification of explosive residues, such as in post-blast investigations of improvised explosive devices.

  19. Grassmannian sparse representations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azary, Sherif; Savakis, Andreas

    2015-05-01

    We present Grassmannian sparse representations (GSR), a sparse representation Grassmann learning framework for efficient classification. Sparse representation classification offers a powerful approach for recognition in a variety of contexts. However, a major drawback of sparse representation methods is their computational performance and memory utilization for high-dimensional data. A Grassmann manifold is a space that promotes smooth surfaces where points represent subspaces and the relationship between points is defined by the mapping of an orthogonal matrix. Grassmann manifolds are well suited for computer vision problems because they promote high between-class discrimination and within-class clustering, while offering computational advantages by mapping each subspace onto a single point. The GSR framework combines Grassmannian kernels and sparse representations, including regularized least squares and least angle regression, to improve high accuracy recognition while overcoming the drawbacks of performance and dependencies on high dimensional data distributions. The effectiveness of GSR is demonstrated on computationally intensive multiview action sequences, three-dimensional action sequences, and face recognition datasets.

  20. An experimental investigation of the indirect transfer and deposition of gunshot residue: further studies carried out with SEM-EDX analysis.

    PubMed

    French, James; Morgan, Ruth

    2015-02-01

    Experiments were undertaken in order to explore the potential for gunshot residue (GSR) particles to undergo tertiary transfer, and to be deposited on individuals in the vicinity of a firearm discharge. Samples were taken from hands following a series of test-firings. SEM-EDX with automated detection and analysis software was used to determine the presence of GSR on these samples. As many as 22 particles were found to have undergone tertiary transfer via a series of handshakes following a firearm discharge. In one run, a particle measuring 49.19 μm was recovered from a tertiary transfer recipient. Significant numbers of particles were also recovered from bystanders, with as many as 36 being detected on a sample taken from an individual who was in the proximity of a firearm discharge. The implications of these observations for forensic investigations are considered. In particular, the need to prevent unwanted transfer during the collection phase is highlighted, and the importance of acknowledging the possibility of secondary and tertiary transfers when reconstructing firearms incidents is also stressed. Experimental studies offer a means of improving our understanding of the dynamics of GSR transfer and deposition, and assisting the forensic reconstruction of firearms incidents.

  1. Application of the Metal-Organic Framework [Eu(BTC)] as a Luminescent Marker for Gunshot Residues: A Synthesis, Characterization, and Toxicity Study.

    PubMed

    Lucena, Marcella A M; Oliveira, Marina F L; Arouca, Aline M; Talhavini, Márcio; Ferreira, Eduardo A; Alves, Severino; Veiga-Souza, Fabiane H; Weber, Ingrid T

    2017-02-08

    The 3D metal-organic framework (MOF) [Eu(BTC)] (where BTC = trimesic acid) was synthesized in 20 min by a microwave-assisted hydrothermal method with a yield of 89%. A structural and spectroscopic study, performed by X-ray diffraction, thermogravimetry, and photoluminescence spectroscopy, showed that this framework has high crystallinity, thermal stability, and luminescence. This MOF had a red-orange luminescence when excited with ultraviolet (UV) radiation (λ = 254 nm) and a high potential for use as a luminescent marker for gunshot residues (GSR). When added to 9 mm nontoxic ammunition, it greatly improved quality of the crime scene investigation, allowing for direct visualization of the luminescent GSR on the shooter's hand and firearm and at the firing range using only a portable UV lamp. The marked luminescent GSR was easily collected and characterized by nondestructive techniques, including with a Video Spectral Comparator and scanning electron microscopy/energy-dispersive spectroscopy, wherein the presence of Eu(3+) ions was confirmed. Furthermore, the oral acute toxicity of this MOF was assessed in adult female Wistar rats using the Organisation for Economic Cooperation and Development 423 guidelines. This study classified the MOF [Eu(BTC)] in a less toxic Globally Harmonized System category (category 5), with a LD50 (lethal dose) of 5000 mg/kg, ensuring a wide security range for its application.

  2. Estimation of the firing distance through micro-CT analysis of gunshot wounds.

    PubMed

    Cecchetto, Giovanni; Giraudo, Chiara; Amagliani, Alessandro; Viel, Guido; Fais, Paolo; Cavarzeran, Fabiano; Feltrin, Giampietro; Ferrara, Santo Davide; Montisci, Massimo

    2011-03-01

    Estimation of the firing range is often critical for reconstructing gunshot fatalities, where the main measurable evidence is the gunshot residue (GSR). In the present study intermediate-range gunshot wounds have been analysed by means of a micro-computed tomography (micro-CT) coupled to an image analysis software in order to quantify the powder particles and to determine the firing distance. A total of 50 shootings were performed on skin sections obtained from human legs surgically amputated for medical reasons. For each tested distance (5, 15, 23, 30 and 40 cm), firing was carried out perpendicularly at the samples using a 7.65-mm pistol loaded with jacketed bullets. Uninjured skin sections were used as controls. By increasing the firing distance, micro-CT analysis demonstrated a clear decreasing trend in the mean GSR percentage, particularly for shots fired from more than 15 cm. For distances under 23 cm, the powder particles were concentrated on the epidermis and dermis around the hole, and inside the cavity; while, at greater distances, they were deposited only on the skin surface. Statistical analysis showed a nonlinear relationship between the amount of GSR deposits and the firing range, well explained by a Gaussian-like function. The proposed method allowed a good discrimination for all the tested distances, proving to be an objective, rapid and inexpensive tool for estimating the firing range in intermediate-range gunshot wounds.

  3. Skin permeation of organic gunshot residue: implications for sampling and analysis.

    PubMed

    Moran, Jordan Wade; Bell, Suzanne

    2014-06-17

    Traditional gunshot residue (GSR) analysis is based on detection of particulates formed from metals found in the primer. Recent concerns regarding the interpretation of GSR evidence has led to interest in alternatives such as the organic constituents (organic gunshot residue, OGSR) found in propellants. Previous work has shown OGSR to be detectable on hands for several hours after a firing event, and given the lipophilic nature of these compounds, it was expected that losses due to secondary transfer (an issue with GSR particulates) would be negligible. However, other loss mechanisms have been identified, specifically skin permeation and evaporation. This paper describes experimental and modeling studies used to elucidate characteristics of skin permeation of 5 compounds present in OGSR. Pharmaceutical methods were adapted to characterize skin permeation using a skin surrogate and Franz diffusion cells. The amount of compounds deposited on skin after an authentic firing event (1 and 2 shots) was experimentally determined and applied for the permeation experiments. A fully validated selected ion monitoring GC/MS method was developed for quantitative analysis, and easily accessible online tools were employed for modeling. Results showed that OGSR residues should be detectable on skin for many hours after a firing event of as few as one or two shots, with detection capability being a function of the efficacy of sampling and sample preparation and the instrumental method employed. The permeation rates of the OGSR compounds were sufficiently different to suggest the potential to develop methods to approximate time-since-deposition.

  4. Probabilistic evidential assessment of gunshot residue particle evidence (Part II): Bayesian parameter estimation for experimental count data.

    PubMed

    Biedermann, A; Bozza, S; Taroni, F

    2011-03-20

    Part I of this series of articles focused on the construction of graphical probabilistic inference procedures, at various levels of detail, for assessing the evidential value of gunshot residue (GSR) particle evidence. The proposed models--in the form of Bayesian networks--address the issues of background presence of GSR particles, analytical performance (i.e., the efficiency of evidence searching and analysis procedures) and contamination. The use and practical implementation of Bayesian networks for case pre-assessment is also discussed. This paper, Part II, concentrates on Bayesian parameter estimation. This topic complements Part I in that it offers means for producing estimates usable for the numerical specification of the proposed probabilistic graphical models. Bayesian estimation procedures are given a primary focus of attention because they allow the scientist to combine (his/her) prior knowledge about the problem of interest with newly acquired experimental data. The present paper also considers further topics such as the sensitivity of the likelihood ratio due to uncertainty in parameters and the study of likelihood ratio values obtained for members of particular populations (e.g., individuals with or without exposure to GSR).

  5. HALO VELOCITY GROUPS IN THE PISCES OVERDENSITY

    SciTech Connect

    Sesar, Branimir; Ivezic, Zeljko; Vivas, A. Katherina; Duffau, Sonia E-mail: zi@u.washington.ed E-mail: sonia.duffau@gmail.co

    2010-07-01

    We report spectroscopic observations of five faint (V {approx} 20) RR Lyrae stars associated with the Pisces overdensity conducted with the Gemini South Telescope. At a heliocentric and galactocentric distance of {approx}80 kpc, this is the most distant substructure in the Galactic halo known to date. We combined our observations with literature data and confirmed that the substructure is composed of two different kinematic groups. The main group contains eight stars and has (V{sub gsr}) = 50 km s{sup -1}, while the second group contains four stars at a velocity of (V{sub gsr}) = -52 km s{sup -1}, where V{sub gsr} is the radial velocity in the galactocentric standard of rest. The metallicity distribution of RR Lyrae stars in the Pisces overdensity is centered on [Fe/H] = -1.5 dex and has a width of 0.3 dex. The new data allowed us to establish that both groups are spatially extended making it very unlikely that they are bound systems, and are more likely to be debris of a tidally disrupted galaxy or galaxies. Due to small sky coverage, it is still unclear whether these groups have the same or different progenitors.

  6. The pleiotropic effects of the seed germination inhibitor germostatin.

    PubMed

    Ye, Yajin; Zhao, Yang

    2016-01-01

    Seed dormancy and germination are the most important adaptive traits of seed plants, which control the germination in a proper space and time. Internal genetic factors together with environmental cues govern seed dormancy and germination. Abscisic acid (ABA), a key phytohormone induces seed dormancy and inhibits seed germination through its molecular genetic signaling network responding the seed inherent physiological and environmental factors. Recently, auxin has been shown to be another phytohormone that induces seed dormancy. We have recently shown that germonstatin (GS), a small synthetic molecule identified by high through-put chemical genetic screenings, inhibits seed germination through up-regulating auxin signaling and inducing auxin biosynthesis. GERMOSTATIN RESISTANCE LOCUS 1 (GSR1) encodes a plant homeodomain (PHD) finger protein and is responsible for GS seed germination inhibition. Its knockdown mutant gsr1 displays decreased dormancy. In this report, we show that GS is not an ABA analog and provided 2 other GS-resistant mutants related to the chemical's function in seed germination inhibition other than gsr1, suggesting that GS may have pleiotropic effects through targeting different pathway governing seed germination.

  7. Holocene Depositional History of the Southern New Jersey Barrier and Backbarrier Regions

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-02-01

    earlier identified and described by Klein (1977) and 23 Reinleck and Singh (1980). Macrofauna are usually present and include Crassostrea virginica ...substrate. 2110 BP ’, 15 Crassostrea virginica zone of mostly fragmented shells. 5 Cressostrea virginica zone with whole and fragmented shells. Fluvial 1-3...clean sand zone . Scattered organics from 5.2-5.4 a. _ -10 ; Unit becomes cleaner with depth. 95:02:03 00:02:98 6 -120 Crassostrea virginica in

  8. 40 CFR 52.170 - Identification of plan.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 110 of the Clean Air Act, 42 U.S.C. 7410, and 40 CFR part 51 to meet national ambient air quality... Director of the Federal Register in accordance with 5 U.S.C. 552(a) and 1 CFR part 51. Material is... (72 FR 18394) Reg. 19.410 Permit Revocation and Cancellation 02/03/05 04/12/07 (72 FR 18394) Reg....

  9. 40 CFR 52.170 - Identification of plan.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 110 of the Clean Air Act, 42 U.S.C. 7410, and 40 CFR part 51 to meet national ambient air quality... Director of the Federal Register in accordance with 5 U.S.C. 552(a) and 1 CFR part 51. Material is... (72 FR 18394) Reg. 19.410 Permit Revocation and Cancellation 02/03/05 04/12/07 (72 FR 18394) Reg....

  10. 40 CFR 52.170 - Identification of plan.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 110 of the Clean Air Act, 42 U.S.C. 7410, and 40 CFR part 51 to meet national ambient air quality... Director of the Federal Register in accordance with 5 U.S.C. 552(a) and 1 CFR part 51. Material is... (72 FR 18394) Reg. 19.410 Permit Revocation and Cancellation 02/03/05 04/12/07 (72 FR 18394) Reg....

  11. 40 CFR 52.170 - Identification of plan.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 110 of the Clean Air Act, 42 U.S.C. 7410, and 40 CFR part 51 to meet national ambient air quality... Director of the Federal Register in accordance with 5 U.S.C. 552(a) and 1 CFR part 51. Material is... (72 FR 18394) Reg. 19.410 Permit Revocation and Cancellation 02/03/05 04/12/07 (72 FR 18394) Reg....

  12. 40 CFR 52.170 - Identification of plan.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 110 of the Clean Air Act, 42 U.S.C. 7410, and 40 CFR part 51 to meet national ambient air quality... Director of the Federal Register in accordance with 5 U.S.C. 552(a) and 1 CFR part 51. Material is... (72 FR 18394) Reg. 19.410 Permit Revocation and Cancellation 02/03/05 04/12/07 (72 FR 18394) Reg....

  13. A resolution congratulating the Eastern Washington University football team for winning the 2010 National Collegiate Athletic Association Division 1 Football Championship Subdivision title.

    THOMAS, 112th Congress

    Sen. Murray, Patty [D-WA

    2011-02-03

    02/03/2011 Submitted in the Senate, considered, and agreed to without amendment and with a preamble by Unanimous Consent. (consideration: CR S558-559; text as passed Senate: CR S558-559; text of measure as introduced: CR S552-553) (All Actions) Tracker: This bill has the status Passed SenateHere are the steps for Status of Legislation:

  14. Analysis of Separation Pay Options

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2004-06-01

    approach to reduce the ranks also has affected senior enlisted sailors, who are finding themselves pushed into early retirement if they don’t advance...historical experience with Voluntary Separation Incentive (VSI), Special Separation Bonus (SSB), Temporary Early Retirement Authority (TERA), and...HYT Years by PaygradeFiscal Year Table 1. High Year Tenure Adjustments by Paygrade (FY 93-43 and 02-03) c. Selective Early Retirement Selective

  15. Calendar of Selected Aeronautical and Space Meetings January 1988 (Calendrier des Manifestations Aeronautiques et Spatiales (Selection) Janvier 1988).

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-12-01

    aerospatiales2 02 - Electronique, Optique et Metrologie 03 - Mccaniquec du Vol 28 04 - Dynamnique des Fluides et Acoustique 30 05 - Navigation, Guidagce t...Ferromagnetism 07-42, 07-43, 07-65. 07-71 Fibre Optics 02-03, 02-12. 02-13. 02-22. (2-39. 02-44. 02-53. 02-54. 02-56). 02-78, 02-83. 02-84. 12-18 Fibre

  16. Extending Human Effectiveness during Sustained Operations through Sleep Management

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-08-01

    HASE MONDAY TUESDAY WEDNESDAY THURSDAY FRiDAY _’, ,•_PFTL PWA -SE Training Baseline CW11 CW2 Recovery LTIME WA WB WA W WA We WA WB WA WB 01-02 02-03 03-04...recovery sleep. IP Table 2. Summary of Results Task/Measure Sleep/hours Mean CWii Mean CW2 % Change÷ Direction of Change SRT*(l0?i slow: msec) 8** 509 524

  17. Theoretical Aspect of Low Pressure Discharges in Simple Gasses

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1994-03-28

    0+, 0- ,02-, 03, 03+, 03-, electronically excited oxygen, electrons, and possibly clusters . The number possible of reaction channels is huge, and one...which are not simple chemically to begin with, and then which decay into many species of ions and free radicals, this information is not always easy to...radiative decays . Another reaction path is for the atom to recombine into a highly excited atomic state and then radiatively decay to the ground state

  18. America’s Credibility at Stake: Arab Perceptions of US Foreign Policy

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2002-03-19

    n.p., on-line, Intenet , available from http://www.nytimes.com/2002/02/03/magazine/03PALESTINE.html. 27 Chapter 4 Adding Fuel to the Fire – The...on-line, Intenet , available from www.//ahram.org.eg/weekly/2001/561/op10.htm. 33 Notes 6 “US Vetoes UN Terror Resolution,” USA Today.com, World

  19. 48 CFR 915.404-4-71-4 - Considerations affecting fee amounts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... and transformer stations; water treatment plants; sewage disposal plants; hospitals; and ordinary..., railroads, grading, sewers, storm drains, and water and power distribution systems. (4) Class...

  20. 48 CFR 915.404-4-71-4 - Considerations affecting fee amounts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... and transformer stations; water treatment plants; sewage disposal plants; hospitals; and ordinary..., railroads, grading, sewers, storm drains, and water and power distribution systems. (4) Class...

  1. 48 CFR 915.404-4-71-4 - Considerations affecting fee amounts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... and transformer stations; water treatment plants; sewage disposal plants; hospitals; and ordinary..., railroads, grading, sewers, storm drains, and water and power distribution systems. (4) Class...

  2. 48 CFR 915.404-4-71-4 - Considerations affecting fee amounts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... and transformer stations; water treatment plants; sewage disposal plants; hospitals; and ordinary..., railroads, grading, sewers, storm drains, and water and power distribution systems. (4) Class...

  3. 48 CFR 915.404-4-71-4 - Considerations affecting fee amounts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... and transformer stations; water treatment plants; sewage disposal plants; hospitals; and ordinary..., railroads, grading, sewers, storm drains, and water and power distribution systems. (4) Class...

  4. 14 CFR 145.59 - Ratings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... and gyrosyn compasses. (4) Class 4: Electronic. An instrument whose operation depends on electron... depends on the use of an electron tube transistor, or similar device, including supercharger,...

  5. 14 CFR 145.59 - Ratings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... and gyrosyn compasses. (4) Class 4: Electronic. An instrument whose operation depends on electron... depends on the use of an electron tube transistor, or similar device, including supercharger,...

  6. 14 CFR 145.59 - Ratings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... and gyrosyn compasses. (4) Class 4: Electronic. An instrument whose operation depends on electron... depends on the use of an electron tube transistor, or similar device, including supercharger,...

  7. An alternative method to characterize the surface urban heat island.

    PubMed

    Martin, Philippe; Baudouin, Yves; Gachon, Philippe

    2015-07-01

    An urban heat island (UHI) is a relative measure defined as a metropolitan area that is warmer than the surrounding suburban or rural areas. The UHI nomenclature includes a surface urban heat island (SUHI) definition that describes the land surface temperature (LST) differences between urban and suburban areas. The complexity involved in selecting an urban core and external thermal reference for estimating the magnitude of a UHI led us to develop a new definition of SUHIs that excludes any rural comparison. The thermal reference of these newly defined surface intra-urban heat islands (SIUHIs) is based on various temperature thresholds above the spatial average of LSTs within the city's administrative limits. A time series of images from Landsat Thematic Mapper (TM) and Enhanced Thematic Mapper Plus (ETM+) from 1984 to 2011 was used to estimate the LST over the warm season in Montreal, Québec, Canada. Different SIUHI categories were analyzed in consideration of the global solar radiation (GSR) conditions that prevailed before each acquisition date of the Landsat images. The results show that the cumulative GSR observed 24 to 48 h prior to the satellite overpass is significantly linked with the occurrence of the highest SIUHI categories (thresholds of +3 to +7 °C above the mean spatial LST within Montreal city). The highest correlation (≈0.8) is obtained between a pixel-based temperature that is 6 °C hotter than the city's mean LST (SIUHI + 6) after only 24 h of cumulative GSR. SIUHI + 6 can then be used as a thermal threshold that characterizes hotspots within the city. This identification approach can be viewed as a useful criterion or as an initial step toward the development of heat health watch and warning system (HHWWS), especially during the occurrence of severe heat spells across urban areas.

  8. Three physiological responses in fathers and non-fathers’ to vocalizations of typically developing infants and infants with Autism Spectrum Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Esposito, Gianluca; Valenzi, Stefano; Islam, Tanvir; Bornstein, Marc H.

    2015-01-01

    Children with ASD, even before receiving a formal diagnosis, express atypical patterns of distress vocalizations (namely, episodes of crying). Their cries have higher fundamental frequencies, shorter inter-bout pauses, and fewer utterances. Cries of children with ASD are also perceived differently from other cries, and these perceptual differences may alter parent-infant interaction. This study assessed multiple physiological responses in fathers and non-fathers to atypical distress vocalizations (cries of children with ASD), acoustically matched typical distress vocalizations (cries of typically developing children), and positive vocalizations (laughter of typically developing children). The experimental procedures were designed to measure how components of the autonomic nervous system respond to typical and atypical infant vocalizations. Three convergent methodologies (Galvanic Skin Response – GSR; cardiac dynamics via Inter-Beat Interval – IBI; right hand temperature change – RHTC) were performed on two groups with contrasting caregiving experience: fathers of typically developing children (n=10) and non-fathers (n=10). Inferential statistical analysis compared the two groups (fathers, non-fathers) and three stimulus types (ASD cry, typical cry, laughter) for the three measures (GSR, IBI, RHTC). Both fathers and non-fathers showed greater negative responses (increased GSR) to ASD cries compared to typical cries and laughter. Fathers showed higher IBI and greater temperature increases (RHTC) than non-fathers while listening to typical and atypical cries. Fathers and non-fathers showed more emotional arousal mediated by sympathetic activation while listening to cries of children with ASD. Fathers were calmer and acted more promptly than non-fathers while listening to typical cries, perhaps because the fathers had more experience in caring for crying infants. These findings point to similarities and differences in fathers’ and non-fathers’ physiological

  9. Optical and scintillation properties of Ce:(Gd8AE2)(SiO4)6O2 (AE = Mg, Ca, Sr and Ba) crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Igashira, Takuya; Mori, Masaki; Okada, Go; Kawaguchi, Noriaki; Yanagida, Takayuki

    2017-02-01

    1% Ce-doped and non-doped (Gd8AE2)(SiO4)6O2 (AE = Mg, Ca, Sr and Ba) (denoted as GMS, GCS, GSrS and GBS, respectively) single crystals were grown by the Floating Zone (FZ) method to evaluate their optical and scintillation properties. The Ce:GCS and Ce:GSrS samples exhibited scintillation and photoluminescence (PL) around 400 nm due to the 5d-4f transitions of Ce3+. On the other hand, Ce:GMS and Ce:GBS showed much weaker emissions in the wavelength range of 500-650 nm, in which the origin was associated with the host matrices. The PL decay curves were approximated by a double exponential decay function for all the Ce-doped samples. The decay times ranged around 10-30 and 40-90 ns, and faster components coincided with those of the non-doped samples. The scintillation decay curves of Ce-doped samples, on the other hand, were approximated by single exponential functions with slower decay constants than those of PL decay. These constants were very similar to those of non-doped samples. In the X-ray induced afterglow measurements, Ce:GCS exhibited the lowest afterglow level. The pulse height spectrum of these samples showed a full-energy peak under 241Am 5.5 MeV α-ray irradiation. Among these samples, Ce:GSrS exhibited the highest light yield which was around 600 ph/5.5 MeV-α.

  10. An alternative method to characterize the surface urban heat island

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, Philippe; Baudouin, Yves; Gachon, Philippe

    2015-07-01

    An urban heat island (UHI) is a relative measure defined as a metropolitan area that is warmer than the surrounding suburban or rural areas. The UHI nomenclature includes a surface urban heat island (SUHI) definition that describes the land surface temperature (LST) differences between urban and suburban areas. The complexity involved in selecting an urban core and external thermal reference for estimating the magnitude of a UHI led us to develop a new definition of SUHIs that excludes any rural comparison. The thermal reference of these newly defined surface intra-urban heat islands (SIUHIs) is based on various temperature thresholds above the spatial average of LSTs within the city's administrative limits. A time series of images from Landsat Thematic Mapper (TM) and Enhanced Thematic Mapper Plus (ETM+) from 1984 to 2011 was used to estimate the LST over the warm season in Montreal, Québec, Canada. Different SIUHI categories were analyzed in consideration of the global solar radiation (GSR) conditions that prevailed before each acquisition date of the Landsat images. The results show that the cumulative GSR observed 24 to 48 h prior to the satellite overpass is significantly linked with the occurrence of the highest SIUHI categories (thresholds of +3 to +7 °C above the mean spatial LST within Montreal city). The highest correlation (≈0.8) is obtained between a pixel-based temperature that is 6 °C hotter than the city's mean LST (SIUHI + 6) after only 24 h of cumulative GSR. SIUHI + 6 can then be used as a thermal threshold that characterizes hotspots within the city. This identification approach can be viewed as a useful criterion or as an initial step toward the development of heat health watch and warning system (HHWWS), especially during the occurrence of severe heat spells across urban areas.

  11. Complexities of emotional responses to social and non-social affective stimuli in schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Peterman, Joel S.; Bekele, Esubalew; Bian, Dayi; Sarkar, Nilanjan; Park, Sohee

    2015-01-01

    Background: Adaptive emotional responses are important in interpersonal relationships. We investigated self-reported emotional experience, physiological reactivity, and micro-facial expressivity in relation to the social nature of stimuli in individuals with schizophrenia (SZ). Method: Galvanic skin response (GSR) and facial electromyography (fEMG) were recorded in medicated outpatients with SZ and demographically matched healthy controls (CO) while they viewed social and non-social images from the International Affective Pictures System. Participants rated the valence and arousal, and selected a label for experienced emotions. Symptom severity in the SZ and psychometric schizotypy in CO were assessed. Results: The two groups did not differ in their labeling of the emotions evoked by the stimuli, but individuals with SZ were more positive in their valence ratings. Although self-reported arousal was similar in both groups, mean GSR was greater in SZ, suggesting differential awareness, or calibration of internal states. Both groups reported social images to be more arousing than non-social images but their physiological responses to non-social vs. social images were different. Self-reported arousal to neutral social images was correlated with positive symptoms in SZ. Negative symptoms in SZ and disorganized schizotypy in CO were associated with reduced mean fEMG. Greater corrugator mean fEMG activity for positive images in SZ indicates valence-incongruent facial expressions. Conclusion: The patterns of emotional responses differed between the two groups. While both groups were in broad agreement in self-reported arousal and emotion labels, their mean GSR, and fEMG correlates of emotion diverged in relation to the social nature of the stimuli and clinical measures. Importantly, these results suggest disrupted self awareness of internal states in SZ and underscore the complexities of emotion processing in health and disease. PMID:25859230

  12. Expression of Multiple Stress Response Genes by Escherichia Coli Under Modeled Reduced Gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vukanti, Raja; Leff, Laura G.

    2012-09-01

    Bacteria, in response to changes in their environment, quickly regulate gene expression; hence, transcriptional profiling has been widely used to characterize bacterial responses to various environmental conditions. In this study, we used clinorotation to grow bacteria under low-sedimentation, -shear, and -turbulence conditions (referred to as modeled reduced gravity, MRG, below) which profoundly impacts bacteria including causing elevated resistance to multiple environmental stresses. To explore potential mechanisms behind the multiple stress resistance response to MRG, we assessed expression levels of E. coli genes, using reverse transcription followed by real-time-PCR, involved in specific stress and general stress responses under MRG and normal gravity (NG) in nutritionally rich and minimal media, and during exponential and stationary phases of growth. In addition, growth rates as well as physico-chemical parameters of culture media were examined. Over-expression of stress response genes (csiD, cstA, katE, otsA, treA) occurred under MRG compared to NG controls, but only during the later stages of growth in rich medium demonstrating that bacterial response to MRG varies with growth-medium and -phase. At stationary phase in rich medium under MRG and NG, E. coli had similar growth rates (based on rRNA-leader abundance) and yields (cell mass and numbers); this coupled, with observations of simultaneous induction of starvation response genes (csiD and cstA) suggests the multiple stress resistance phenotype under MRG could be attributable to microzones of nutrient unavailability around cells. Overall, in rich medium, the response resembled the general stress response (GSR) that E. coli develops during stationary phase of growth. Along these same lines, induction of genes coding for GSR was reversed by improving nutritional conditions under MRG. The reversal of GSR under MRG suggests that the multiple stress response exhibited is not specific to MRG but may result

  13. Micro-CT features of intermediate gunshot wounds covered by textiles.

    PubMed

    Giraudo, Chiara; Fais, Paolo; Pelletti, Guido; Viero, Alessia; Miotto, Diego; Boscolo-Berto, Rafael; Viel, Guido; Montisci, Massimo; Cecchetto, Giovanni; Ferrara, Santo Davide

    2016-09-01

    The analysis of gunshot residue (GSR) on the clothing and the underlying skin of the victim may play an important role in the reconstruction of the shooting incident. The aim of the present study was to test micro-computed tomography (micro-CT) for the analysis of firearm wounds experimentally produced on human skin covered by textiles. Firing trials were performed on 60 sections of human calves enveloped by a single layer of fabric (cotton or jeans or leather or nylon) and 15 controls consisting of bare calves. Experimental firings were conducted in a ballistic laboratory at three different muzzle-to-target distances (5, 15, and 30 cm), using a .32 ACP pistol (Beretta Mod. 81) loaded with full-jacketed bullets coming from the same production lot (7.65 × 17 mm, Browning SR). The visual inspection revealed the classic pattern of GSR distribution on the fabrics and the skin of control samples, while only a dark ring around the entrance lesion was identified on the skin beneath the fabrics. Micro-CT analysis showed the presence of radiopaque material on all entrance wounds, with a statistically significant difference between cases and controls. No differences were found among specimens covered by fabrics, with regard to the firing distance and the type of clothing. No GSR-like deposits were detected in exit wounds. Our results suggest that micro-CT analysis may be a useful screening tool for differentiating entry from exit gunshot wounds when the covering textiles are contaminated, damaged, or missing.

  14. Does sediment resuspension by storms affect the fate of polychlorobiphenyls (PCBs) in the benthic food chain? Interactions between changes in POM characteristics, adsorption and absorption by the mussel Mytilus galloprovincialis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Charles, François; Lopez-Legentil, Susanna; Grémare, Antoine; Michel Amouroux, Jean; Desmalades, Martin; Vétion, Gilles; Escoubeyrou, Karine

    2005-12-01

    Environmental parameters and gross sedimentation rates (GSR) were monitored at a fixed site located in the Bay of Banyuls-sur-Mer (NW Mediterranean), between March 1997 and April 1998, together with the main biochemical characteristics of both sedimenting and sedimented particulate organic matter (POM). Three storms which occurred during this time period resulted in natural sediment resuspension. This is indicated by the corresponding increase in GSR and a decrease in the enzymatically hydrolysable amino acids/totally hydrolysable amino acids ratio (EHAA/THAA), within the sedimenting POM. Only the strongest storm resulted in (1) a transitory increase in fine-grained particles, (2) concomitant increases in organic carbon, carbohydrates, lipids and THAA, and (3) a decrease in the EHAA/THAA ratio in surficial sediments. For most of the assayed parameters, the values recorded after the December 1997 storm corresponded to extremes for the whole period under study. This emphasises the role of storms in controlling the characteristics of sedimented and sedimenting POM. Ten sediment types, with contrasting biochemical characteristics, were selected for experiments; these were based on the results of the monitoring survey and were used during adsorption and absorption experiments involving 14C tetrachlorobiphenyl (TCB). Adsorption rates differed significantly between the sediment types, but did not correlate with any of the assayed biochemical parameters. Absorption efficiency by the mussel Mytilus galloprovincialis also differed between the sediment types; it correlated positively with all the assayed biochemical parameters, except lipids. Comparison between the magnitudes of the increase in GSR, together with the decrease in absorption efficiency during resuspension events, suggests that resuspension tends to enhance the transfer of organic pollutants in the benthic food chain.

  15. Investigation of gunshot residue patterns using milli-XRF-techniques: first experiences in casework

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schumacher, Rüdiger; Barth, Martin; Neimke, Dieter; Niewöhner, Ludwig

    2010-06-01

    The investigation of gunshot residue (GSR) patterns for shooting range estimation is usually based on visualizing the lead, copper, or nitrocellulose distributions on targets like fabric or adhesive tape by chemographic color tests. The method usually provides good results but has its drawbacks when it comes to the examination of ammunition containing lead-free primers or bloody clothing. A milli-X-ray fluorescence (m-XRF) spectrometer with a large motorized stage can help to circumvent these problems allowing the acquisition of XRF mappings of relatively large areas (up to 20 x 20 cm) in millimeter resolution within reasonable time (2-10 hours) for almost all elements. First experiences in GSR casework at the Forensic Science Institute of the Bundeskriminalamt (BKA) have shown, that m-XRF is a useful supplementation for conventional methods in shooting ranges estimation, which helps if there are problems in transferring a GSR pattern to secondary targets (e.g. bloody or stained garments) or if there is no suitable color test available for the element of interest. The resulting elemental distributions are a good estimate for the shooting range and can be evaluated by calculating radial distributions or integrated count rates of irregular shaped regions like pieces of human skin which are too small to be investigated with a conventional WD-XRF spectrometer. Beside a mapping mode the milli-XRF offers also point and line scan modes which can also be utilized in gunshot crime investigations as a quick survey tool to identify bullet holes based on the elements present in the wipe ring.

  16. Glucose-Sensing Receptor T1R3: A New Signaling Receptor Activated by Glucose in Pancreatic β-Cells.

    PubMed

    Kojima, Itaru; Nakagawa, Yuko; Hamano, Kunihisa; Medina, Johan; Li, Longfei; Nagasawa, Masahiro

    2015-01-01

    Subunits of the sweet taste receptors T1R2 and T1R3 are expressed in pancreatic β-cells. Compared with T1R3, mRNA expression of T1R2 is considerably lower. At the protein level, expression of T1R2 is undetectable in β-cells. Accordingly, a major component of the sweet taste-sensing receptor in β-cells may be a homodimer of T1R3 rather than a heterodimer of T1R2/T1R3. Inhibition of this receptor by gurmarin or deletion of the T1R3 gene attenuates glucose-induced insulin secretion from β-cells. Hence the T1R3 homodimer functions as a glucose-sensing receptor (GSR) in pancreatic β-cells. When GSR is activated by the T1R3 agonist sucralose, elevation of intracellular ATP concentration ([ATP]i) is observed. Sucralose increases [ATP]i even in the absence of ambient glucose, indicating that sucralose increases [ATP]i not simply by activating glucokinase, a rate-limiting enzyme in the glycolytic pathway. In addition, sucralose augments elevation of [ATP]i induced by methylsuccinate, suggesting that sucralose activates mitochondrial metabolism. Nonmetabolizable 3-O-methylglucose also increases [ATP]i and knockdown of T1R3 attenuates elevation of [ATP]i induced by high concentration of glucose. Collectively, these results indicate that the T1R3 homodimer functions as a GSR; this receptor is involved in glucose-induced insulin secretion by activating glucose metabolism probably in mitochondria.

  17. Enhancement of Glycerol Steam Reforming Activity and Thermal Stability by Incorporating CeO2 and TiO2 in Ni- and Co-MCM-41 Catalysts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dade, William N.

    Hydrogen (H2) has many applications in industry with current focus shifted to production of hydrocarbon fuels and valuable oxygenates using the Fischer-Tropsch technology and direct use in proton exchange membrane fuel cell (PEMFC). Hydrogen is generally produced via steam reforming of natural gas or alcohols like methanol and ethanol. Glycerol, a by-product of biodiesel production process, is currently considered to be one of the most attractive sources of sustainable H2 due to its high H/C ratio and bio-based origin. Ni and Co based catalysts have been reported to be active in glycerol steam reforming (GSR); however, deactivation of the catalysts by carbon deposition and sintering under GSR operating conditions is a major challenge. In this study, a series of catalysts containing Ni and Co nanoparticles incorporated in CeO2 and TiO2 modified high surface area MCM-41 have been synthesized using one-pot method. The catalysts are tested for GSR (at H2O/Glycerol mole ratio of 12 and GHSV of 2200 h-1) to study the effect of support modification and reaction temperature (450 - 700 °C) on the product selectivity and long term stability. GSR results revealed that all the catalysts performed significantly well exhibiting over 85% glycerol conversion at 650 °C except Ni catalysts that showed better low temperature activities. Deactivation studies of the catalysts conducted at 650 °C indicated that the Ni-TiO2-MCM-41 and Ni-CeO 2-MCM-41 were resistant to deactivation with ˜100% glycerol conversion for 40 h. In contrast, Co-TiO2-MCM-41 perform poorly as the catalyst rapidly deactivated after 12 h to yield ˜20% glycerol conversion after 40 h. The WAXRD and TGA-DSC analyses of spent catalysts showed a significant amount of coke deposition that might explain catalysts deactivation. The flattening shape of the original BET type IV isotherm with drastic reduction of catalyst surface area can also be responsible for observed drop in catalysts activities.

  18. EXPLORING THE SAGITTARIUS STREAM WITH SEKBO SURVEY RR LYRAE STARS

    SciTech Connect

    Prior, Sayuri L.; Da Costa, G. S.; Keller, Stefan C.

    2009-10-20

    A sample of RR Lyrae (RRL) variables from the Southern Edgeworth-Kuiper Belt Object survey in regions overlapping the expected position of debris from the interaction of the Sagittarius (Sgr) dwarf galaxy with the Milky Way (R.A. approx 20 and 21.5 hr; distance = 16-21 kpc) has been followed up spectroscopically and photometrically. The 21 photometrically confirmed type ab RRLs in this region have ([Fe/H]) = -1.79 +- 0.08 on our system, consistent with the abundances found for RRLs in a different portion of the Sgr tidal debris stream. The distribution of velocities in the Galactic standard of rest frame (V {sub GSR}) of the 26 RRLs in the region is not consistent with a smooth halo population. Upon comparison with the Sgr disruption models of Law et al., a prominent group of five stars having highly negative radial velocities (V {sub GSR} approx-175 km s{sup -1}) is consistent with predictions for old trailing debris when the Galactic halo potential is modeled as oblate. In contrast, the prolate model does not predict any significant number of Sgr stars at the locations of the observed sample. The observations also require that the recent trailing debris stream has a broader spread perpendicular to the Sgr plane than predicted by the models. We have also investigated the possible association of the Virgo Stellar Stream (VSS) with Sgr debris by comparing radial velocities for RRLs in the region with the same models, finding similarities in the velocity-position trends. As suggested by our earlier work, the stars in the VSS region with large negative V {sub GSR} values are likely to be old leading Sgr debris, but we find that while old trailing Sgr debris may well make a contribution at positive V {sub GSR} values, it is unlikely to fully account for the VSS feature. Overall we find that further modeling is needed, as trailing arm data generally favor oblate models while leading arm data favor prolate models, with no single potential fitting all the observed data.

  19. Identification of Tumor Suppressor Genes by Genetic and Epigenetic Genome-Scanning

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-04-01

    genes that were found down-regulated in all 5 breast and 3 prostate cancer cell lines and the ESCO2 (set 20), GSHR (GSR) (set 26), NP_115712 (GINS4...the CH012, CH013, DEF1, EGR3, ESCO2, FBX25, GON1, GSHR , MYOM2, NP_065895, NP_115712, NP_859074, NP_001034551, NPM2, NRG1, PHYIP, PIWL2, Q6P464...cases), ESCO2, NP_115712 (8 cases), GSHR (7 cases). For the remaining genes, down-regulation was observed in 4 (NP_065895), 5 (TPA), or 6 cases (CH013

  20. Near-bottom temperature and salinity evolution around Iceland, 1975-2007

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jochumsen, Kerstin; Schnurr, Sarah; Quadfasel, Detlef

    2015-04-01

    The near-bottom water masses in the deep basins of the northern North Atlantic and the Nordic Seas hold major temperature differences due to the barrier formed by the Greenland-Scotland-Ridge (GSR). Deep water exchanges across the ridge are prohibited, and only limited water mass exchange in intermediate layers is possible through deep channels, where the flow is southwestward (the Nordic Overflows). The shallow surface layers exhibit warm and saline water flowing north-eastwards across most of the ridge, only at the western GSR (along the east Greenland coast) cold and fresh water is transported southwestward. Several studies have indicated that the GSR or the environmental conditions connected to the influence of the ridge system shape the species distribution and composition of particular benthic groups in this region. Species distribution models (SDMs), which use spatial environmental variables, can lead to a better understanding of species distributions within the marine environment. Additionally, these models provide an estimate of the response of the marine ecosystem and species distributions to climate change. Hence, spatial environmental variables, known to have an influence on the distribution of species (e.g. temperature, salinity, sediment type), are needed to create realistic SDMs. Here we use near-bottom measurements of about 88,000 CTD (conductivity-temperature-depth) and bottle profiles, collected in the period 1975-2007. The data is gridded into regular boxes of about 11 km size and interpolated following isobaths. We derive average spatial temperature and salinity distributions in the region around Iceland, showing the influence of the GSR on the near-bottom properties. The spatial distribution of standard deviation is used to compare local variability, which is enhanced near water mass fronts. These spatial property distributions can provide the basis for SDM modelling. Finally, property changes within the last 30 years are presented using time

  1. Towards a smart non-invasive fluid loss measurement system.

    PubMed

    Suryadevara, N K; Mukhopadhyay, S C; Barrack, L

    2015-04-01

    In this article, a smart wireless sensing non-invasive system for estimating the amount of fluid loss, a person experiences while physical activity is presented. The system measures three external body parameters, Heart Rate, Galvanic Skin Response (GSR, or skin conductance), and Skin Temperature. These three parameters are entered into an empirically derived formula along with the user's body mass index, and estimation for the amount of fluid lost is determined. The core benefit of the developed system is the affluence usage in combining with smart home monitoring systems to care elderly people in ambient assisted living environments as well in automobiles to monitor the body parameters of a motorist.

  2. Composition and distribution of selected munnopsid genera (Crustacea, Isopoda, Asellota) in Icelandic waters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schnurr, Sarah; Brandt, Angelika; Brix, Saskia; Fiorentino, Dario; Malyutina, Marina; Svavarsson, Jörundur

    2014-02-01

    The Greenland-Scotland Ridge (GSR) is a major topographic feature, extending from Greenland to Scotland. It constrains the water exchange between the northernmost North Atlantic Ocean and the Greenland, Iceland and Norwegian Seas (GIN Seas) and thus forms a potential barrier for faunal exchange from the Arctic to the North Atlantic (and vice versa). Recently an increase in Atlantic water inflow has been observed, leading to changes in physical parameters (i.e. temperature and salinity), which may have an impact on the resident fauna. In this study, we analyzed the composition and distribution of six selected genera of the isopod family Munnopsidae (Crustacea) occurring north and south of the GSR. We examined 82 epibenthic sledge samples and 26 additional sub-samples taken in the course of the Benthic Invertebrates of Icelandic Waters (BIOICE) and Icelandic Marine Animals: Genetics and Ecology (IceAGE) projects, respectively, covering a total depth range from 103 to 2752 m depth. Overall, 58 of the evaluated stations originated in the area north of the GSR, while the remaining 50 samples were collected south of the ridge. In total, 10517 individuals could be assigned to 15 species, most belonging to the genus EurycopeSars, 1864. Due to the presence of the GSR as well as differences in the environment, we expected significant dissimilarities in faunal composition between the two study areas. However, most species (8) occurred on both sides of the ridge, while four species were restricted to the region north of Iceland, and three to the region south of the ridge. Depth (or factors related to depth) appeared to be the most important factor in driving distributional patterns of the studied species. Temperature was also an important driver, but not to the same extent as depth. On the contrary, salinity and sediment type did not have much influence on munnopsid distribution patterns. Hence, the presence of the ridge does not restrict faunal exchange between the northern

  3. Study/Services Installation/Implementation Schedule Analysis

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-11-16

    Scheduled Morbach AB, GE 078 8 08-19-91 08-28-91 Scheduled RheinMain (MAC) 170 8 09-03-91 09-12-91 Scheduled Templehof (MAC) 171 8 09-17-91 09-26-91...94 Scheduled Sembach AB, GE 378 3 01-20-94 01-24-94 Scheduled RheinMain (MAC) 388 3 01-27-94 01-31-94 Scheduled Templehof (MAC) 389 3 02-03-94 02-07

  4. Field Studies of the Air Force Procedures (NOISECHECK) for Measuring Community Noise Exposure from Aircraft Operations.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-03-01

    cutters to cut the lock off. If made of a heavy gauge steel, the boxes will also prevent most vandalism from destroying the units. The biggest problem with...Landings 24 190 240 53 43 Feb 21 Takeoffs 234 232 300 est 69 40 Feb 22 Takeoffs 244 1420 260 150 est 57 Feb 23 Landings 282 892 678 I50 135 Feb 24...1 4)0 43$L OqHC Hd 0-4 WII 125 TABLE D-1 THE RELATIONSHIP OF PARAMETERS p AND z. .--. 0 .01 .02 .03 .04 .05 . . 607 .0J .09 .0 .5000 .5040 .5080

  5. Utility Building Plan, elevations and sections. March Air Force Base, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Utility Building Plan, elevations and sections. March Air Force Base, Riverside, California, COmbat Operations Center, Utility Building. By Moffatt and Nichol, Engineers, 122 West Fifth Street, Long Beach, California; for the Corps of Engineers, U.S. Army, Office of the District Engineer, Los Angeles, California. Drawing no. AW-60-02-03, sheet no. 57, approved March, 1962; specifications no. ENG-04-353-62-66; D.O. series AW 1596/57, Rev. "B"; file drawer 1290. Last revised 3 October 1966 "drawings updated." Various scales. 29 x 41 inches. pencil on paper - March Air Force Base, Strategic Air Command, Utility Building, 5220 Riverside Drive, Moreno Valley, Riverside County, CA

  6. 7 CFR 43.106 - Choosing AQL's and sampling plans.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 23 C n1=4 01 12 D n1=5 01 12 E n1=6 12 23 EE n1=7 23 F n1=9 01 12 23 34 G n1=11 12 23 34 H n1=13 01... 67 78 nt=65 12 67 9 10 L n1=48 01 02 12 23 34 45 56 67 78 89 10 11 11 12 nt=72 12 M n1=84 01 02 03 23... Hundred Units) Comparable sampling plans Identification letter of OC curve Q nc Ac Re R nc Ac Re S, T...

  7. 30 CFR 934.15 - Approval of North Dakota regulatory program amendments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... February 18, 1986 NDCC 38-14.1-04.2, .3, -7, -10, -14, -21, -30,-33; NDAC 69-05.2-04-01, -06-02, -08-03, -09-02,-08, -09, -10-03, -16-09. May 30, 1986 October 21, 1986 NDAC 69-05.2-01-02 (11), (12...-13, -15-01, -02, -03(2), -04, -16-04(1)(b), -09(22), -15-01, -21-03. September 8, 1986 December...

  8. Temporal Reliability and Lateralization of the Resting-State Language Network

    PubMed Central

    Zou, Qihong; Wang, Jue; Gao, Jia-Hong; Niu, Zhendong

    2014-01-01

    The neural processing loop of language is complex but highly associated with Broca's and Wernicke's areas. The left dominance of these two areas was the earliest observation of brain asymmetry. It was demonstrated that the language network and its functional asymmetry during resting state were reproducible across institutions. However, the temporal reliability of resting-state language network and its functional asymmetry are still short of knowledge. In this study, we established a seed-based resting-state functional connectivity analysis of language network with seed regions located at Broca's and Wernicke's areas, and investigated temporal reliability of language network and its functional asymmetry. The language network was found to be temporally reliable in both short- and long-term. In the aspect of functional asymmetry, the Broca's area was found to be left lateralized, while the Wernicke's area is mainly right lateralized. Functional asymmetry of these two areas revealed high short- and long-term reliability as well. In addition, the impact of global signal regression (GSR) on reliability of the resting-state language network was investigated, and our results demonstrated that GSR had negligible effect on the temporal reliability of the resting-state language network. Our study provided methodology basis for future cross-culture and clinical researches of resting-state language network and suggested priority of adopting seed-based functional connectivity for its high reliability. PMID:24475058

  9. Temporal reliability and lateralization of the resting-state language network.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Linlin; Fan, Yang; Zou, Qihong; Wang, Jue; Gao, Jia-Hong; Niu, Zhendong

    2014-01-01

    The neural processing loop of language is complex but highly associated with Broca's and Wernicke's areas. The left dominance of these two areas was the earliest observation of brain asymmetry. It was demonstrated that the language network and its functional asymmetry during resting state were reproducible across institutions. However, the temporal reliability of resting-state language network and its functional asymmetry are still short of knowledge. In this study, we established a seed-based resting-state functional connectivity analysis of language network with seed regions located at Broca's and Wernicke's areas, and investigated temporal reliability of language network and its functional asymmetry. The language network was found to be temporally reliable in both short- and long-term. In the aspect of functional asymmetry, the Broca's area was found to be left lateralized, while the Wernicke's area is mainly right lateralized. Functional asymmetry of these two areas revealed high short- and long-term reliability as well. In addition, the impact of global signal regression (GSR) on reliability of the resting-state language network was investigated, and our results demonstrated that GSR had negligible effect on the temporal reliability of the resting-state language network. Our study provided methodology basis for future cross-culture and clinical researches of resting-state language network and suggested priority of adopting seed-based functional connectivity for its high reliability.

  10. LOV Histidine Kinase Modulates the General Stress Response System and Affects the virB Operon Expression in Brucella abortus.

    PubMed

    Sycz, Gabriela; Carrica, Mariela Carmen; Tseng, Tong-Seung; Bogomolni, Roberto A; Briggs, Winslow R; Goldbaum, Fernando A; Paris, Gastón

    2015-01-01

    Brucella is the causative agent of the zoonotic disease brucellosis, and its success as an intracellular pathogen relies on its ability to adapt to the harsh environmental conditions that it encounters inside the host. The Brucella genome encodes a sensor histidine kinase containing a LOV domain upstream from the kinase, LOVHK, which plays an important role in light-regulated Brucella virulence. In this report we study the intracellular signaling pathway initiated by the light sensor LOVHK using an integrated biochemical and genetic approach. From results of bacterial two-hybrid assays and phosphotransfer experiments we demonstrate that LOVHK functionally interacts with two response regulators: PhyR and LovR, constituting a functional two-component signal-transduction system. LOVHK contributes to the activation of the General Stress Response (GSR) system in Brucella via PhyR, while LovR is proposed to be a phosphate-sink for LOVHK, decreasing its phosphorylation state. We also show that in the absence of LOVHK the expression of the virB operon is down-regulated. In conclusion, our results suggest that LOVHK positively regulates the GSR system in vivo, and has an effect on the expression of the virB operon. The proposed regulatory network suggests a similar role for LOVHK in other microorganisms.

  11. Game design to measure reflexes and attention based on biofeedback multi-sensor interaction.

    PubMed

    Ortiz-Vigon Uriarte, Inigo de Loyola; Garcia-Zapirain, Begonya; Garcia-Chimeno, Yolanda

    2015-03-17

    This paper presents a multi-sensor system for implementing biofeedback as a human-computer interaction technique in a game involving driving cars in risky situations. The sensors used are: Eye Tracker, Kinect, pulsometer, respirometer, electromiography (EMG) and galvanic skin resistance (GSR). An algorithm has been designed which gives rise to an interaction logic with the game according to the set of physiological constants obtained from the sensors. The results reflect a 72.333 response to the System Usability Scale (SUS), a significant difference of p = 0.026 in GSR values in terms of the difference between the start and end of the game, and an r = 0.659 and p = 0.008 correlation while playing with the Kinect between the breathing level and the energy and joy factor. All the sensors used had an impact on the end results, whereby none of them should be disregarded in future lines of research, even though it would be interesting to obtain separate breathing values from that of the cardio.

  12. The characterization of nanoparticles using analytical electron microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hill, Whitney B.

    2011-06-01

    Nanoparticles are often overlooked during routine trace evidence analyses because of their small size and the degree of difficulty needed to efficiently characterize them. However, analytical electron microscopy (AEM) enables the characterization and/or identification of nanoparticles because of its high magnification capability, the ability to gather elemental data and also the ability to determine the internal structure of a single nanoparticles(1). There is a wide variety of natural and manufactured nanoparticles that are prominent within the environment and their presence becomes very valuable in the absence of larger particles. The combustion of materials produces by-products such as nano-sized carbon soot, fumes, fly ash and gun-shot residue (GSR). Using AEM, nano-sized carbon soot, fumes, fly ash and GSR can not only be distinguished from other nanoparticles within the environment but can also be distinguished from each other because of differences in morphology, elemental composition, and internal structure. The elemental information gathered from combustion by-products during AEM analysis can also give an indication of the original source material. Other nanoparticles such as paint pigments and fillers can also be characterized by AEM using morphology, electron diffraction and elemental composition.

  13. User stress detection in human-computer interactions.

    PubMed

    Zhai, Jing; Barreto, Armando B; Chin, Craig; Li, Chao

    2005-01-01

    The emerging research area of Affective Computing seeks to advance the field of Human-Computer Interaction (HCI) by enabling computers to interact with users in ways appropriate to their affective states. Affect recognition, including the use of psychophysiologcal measures (e.g. heart rate), facial expressions, speech recognition etc. to derive an assessment of user affective state based on factors from the current task context, is an important foundation required for the development of Affective Computing. Our research focuses on the use of three physiological signals: Blood Volume Pulse (BVP), Galvanic Skin Response (GSR) and Pupil Diameter (PD), to automatically monitor the level of stress in computer users. This paper reports on the hardware and software instrumentation development and signal processing approach used to detect the stress level of a subject interacting with a computer, within the framework of a specific experimental task, which is called the 'Stroop Test'. For this experiment, a computer game was implemented and adapted to make the subject experience the Stroop Effect, evoked by the mismatch between the font color and the meaning of a certain word (name of a color) displayed, while his/her BVP, GSR and PD signals were continuously recorded. Several data processing techniques were applied to extract effective attributes of the stress level of the subjects throughout the experiment. Current results indicate that there exists interesting similarity among changes in those three signals and the shift in the emotional states when stress stimuli are applied to the interaction environment.

  14. Elemental quantification of large gunshot residues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duarte, A.; Silva, L. M.; de Souza, C. T.; Stori, E. M.; Boufleur, L. A.; Amaral, L.; Dias, J. F.

    2015-04-01

    In the present work we embarked on the evaluation of the Sb/Pb, Ba/Pb and Sb/Ba elemental ratios found in relatively large particles (of the order of 50-150 μm across) ejected in the forward direction when a gun is fired. These particles are commonly referred to as gunshot residues (GSR). The aim of this work is to compare the elemental ratios of the GSR with those found in the primer of pristine cartridges in order to check for possible correlations. To that end, the elemental concentration of gunshot residues and the respective ammunition were investigated through PIXE (Particle-Induced X-ray Emission) and micro-PIXE techniques. The ammunition consisted of a .38 SPL caliber (ogival lead type) charged in a Taurus revolver. Pristine cartridges were taken apart for the PIXE measurements. The shooting sessions were carried out in a restricted area at the Forensic Institute at Porto Alegre. Residues ejected at forward directions were collected on a microporous tape. The PIXE experiments were carried out employing 2.0 MeV proton beams with a beam spot size of 1 mm2. For the micro-PIXE experiments, the samples were irradiated with 2.2 MeV proton beams of 2 × 2 μm2. The results found for the ratios of Sb/Pb, Ba/Pb and Sb/Ba do not correlate with those stemming from the analysis of the primer.

  15. A Comparison of Physiological Signal Analysis Techniques and Classifiers for Automatic Emotional Evaluation of Audiovisual Contents

    PubMed Central

    Colomer Granero, Adrián; Fuentes-Hurtado, Félix; Naranjo Ornedo, Valery; Guixeres Provinciale, Jaime; Ausín, Jose M.; Alcañiz Raya, Mariano

    2016-01-01

    This work focuses on finding the most discriminatory or representative features that allow to classify commercials according to negative, neutral and positive effectiveness based on the Ace Score index. For this purpose, an experiment involving forty-seven participants was carried out. In this experiment electroencephalography (EEG), electrocardiography (ECG), Galvanic Skin Response (GSR) and respiration data were acquired while subjects were watching a 30-min audiovisual content. This content was composed by a submarine documentary and nine commercials (one of them the ad under evaluation). After the signal pre-processing, four sets of features were extracted from the physiological signals using different state-of-the-art metrics. These features computed in time and frequency domains are the inputs to several basic and advanced classifiers. An average of 89.76% of the instances was correctly classified according to the Ace Score index. The best results were obtained by a classifier consisting of a combination between AdaBoost and Random Forest with automatic selection of features. The selected features were those extracted from GSR and HRV signals. These results are promising in the audiovisual content evaluation field by means of physiological signal processing. PMID:27471462

  16. Evaluating Autonomic Parameters: The Role of Sleep ‎Duration in Emotional Responses to Music ‎

    PubMed Central

    Goshvarpour‎, Atefeh; Abbasi, Ataollah; Goshvarpour‎, Ateke

    2016-01-01

    Objective: It has been recognized that sleep has an important effect on emotion processing. The aim ‎of this study was to investigate the effect of previous night sleep duration on autonomic ‎responses to musical stimuli in different emotional contexts.‎ Method: A frequency based measure of GSR, PR and ECG signals were examined in 35 healthy ‎students in three groups of oversleeping, lack of sleep and normal sleep. ‎ Results: The results of this study revealed that regardless of the emotional context of the musical ‎stimuli (happy, relax, fear, and sadness), there was an increase in the maximum power of ‎GSR, ECG and PR during the music time compared to the rest time in all the three ‎groups. In addition, the higher value of these measures was achieved while the ‎participants listened to relaxing music. Statistical analysis of the extracted features ‎between each pair of emotional states revealed that the most significant differences ‎were attained for ECG signals. These differences were more obvious in the participants ‎with normal sleeping (p<10-18). The higher value of the indices has been shown, ‎comparing long sleep duration with the normal one.‎ Conclusion: There was a strong relation between emotion and sleep duration, and this association can ‎be observed by means of the ECG signals.‎ PMID:27252770

  17. Changes in DNA Methylation in Mouse Lungs after a Single Intra-Tracheal Administration of Nanomaterials

    PubMed Central

    Tabish, Ali M.; Poels, Katrien; Byun, Hyang-Min; luyts, Katrien; Baccarelli, Andrea A.; Martens, Johan; Kerkhofs, Stef; Seys, Sven; Hoet, Peter; Godderis, Lode

    2017-01-01

    Aims This study aimed to investigate the effects of nanomaterial (NM) exposure on DNA methylation. Methods and Results Intra-tracheal administration of NM: gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) of 5-, 60- and 250-nm diameter; single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) and multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) at high dose of 2.5 mg/kg and low dose of 0.25 mg/kg for 48 h to BALB/c mice. Study showed deregulations in immune pathways in NM-induced toxicity in vivo. NM administration had the following DNA methylation effects: AuNP 60 nm induced CpG hypermethylation in Atm, Cdk and Gsr genes and hypomethylation in Gpx; Gsr and Trp53 showed changes in methylation between low- and high-dose AuNP, 60 and 250 nm respectively, and AuNP had size effects on methylation for Trp53. Conclusion Epigenetics may be implicated in NM-induced disease pathways. PMID:28081255

  18. Does the prior application of the field kit bullet hole testing kit 3 on a suspected bullet hole bias the analysis of atomic absorption spectrophotometry?

    PubMed

    Seltenhammer, Monika H; Fitzl, Christine; Wieser, Ingo; Binder, Reinhard; Paula, Pia; Risser, Daniele U

    2014-09-01

    Forensic ballistics is the study of bullet trajectory and consists of determining gunshot residue (GSR) to identify bullet holes. Among several highly sensitive methods, atomic absorption spectrophotometry (AAS) is employed to analyze GSR in the laboratory. However, it is sometimes necessary to identify bullet holes immediately at a crime scene. The purpose of this examination was to determine whether the use of the field test Bullet Hole Testing Kit 3 (BTK3) on a suspected bullet hole would influence the outcome of AAS-analysis: Three commonly encountered firearms (Glock17, Tokarev, and Colt) were fired at skin, wood, and cloth. AAS-analysis was performed with and without previous BTK3 application. The results clearly indicate that there is no significant interaction on the grounds of BTK3 use (BTK3 vs. no-BTK3 [kit_nokit] [Pb: p = 0.1309; Sb: p = 0.9111], material*kit_nokit [Pb: p = 0.5960; Sb: p = 0.9930], distance*kit_nokit [Pb: p = 0.4014; Sb: p = 0.9184], and firearm type*kit_nokit [Pb: p = 0.9662; Sb: p = 0.9885]); hence, applying this field kit does not falsify later AAS outcomes.

  19. Grad-Shafranov Reconstruction: Overview and Improvement of the Numerical Solution Used in Space Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    González, A. Ojeda; Domingues, M. O.; Mendes, O.; Kaibara, M. K.; Prestes, A.

    2015-10-01

    The Grad-Shafranov equation is a Poisson's equation, i.e., a partial differential equation of elliptic type. The problem is depending on the initial condition and can be treated as a Cauchy problem. Although it is ill-posed or ill-conditioned, it can be integrated numerically. In the integration of the GS equation, singularities with large values of the potential arise after a certain number of integration steps away from the original data line, and a filter should be used. The Grad-Shafranov reconstruction (GSR) technique was developed from 1996 to 2000 for recovering two-dimensional structures in the magnetopause in an ideal MHD formulation. Other works have used the GSR techniques to study magnetic flux ropes in the solar wind and in the magnetotail from a single spacecraft dataset; posteriorly, it was extended to treat measurements from multiple satellites. From Vlasov equation, it is possible to arrive at the GS-equation in function of the normalized vector potential. A general solution is obtained using complex variable theory. A specific solution was chosen as benchmark case to solve numerically the GS equation. We propose some changes in the resolution scheme of the GS equation to improve the solution. The result of each method is compared with the solution proposed by Hau and Sonnerup (J. Geophys. Res. 104(A4), 6899-6917 (1999)). The main improvement found in the GS resolution was the need to filter B x values at each y value.

  20. Aberrant Effective Connectivity in Schizophrenia Patients during Appetitive Conditioning

    PubMed Central

    Diaconescu, Andreea Oliviana; Jensen, Jimmy; Wang, Hongye; Willeit, Matthäus; Menon, Mahesh; Kapur, Shitij; McIntosh, Anthony R.

    2010-01-01

    It has recently been suggested that schizophrenia involves dysfunction in brain connectivity at a neural level, and a dysfunction in reward processing at a behavioral level. The purpose of the present study was to link these two levels of analyses by examining effective connectivity patterns between brain regions mediating reward learning in patients with schizophrenia and healthy, age-matched controls. To this aim, we used functional magnetic resonance imaging and galvanic skin recordings (GSR) while patients and controls performed an appetitive conditioning experiment with visual cues as the conditioned (CS) stimuli, and monetary reward as the appetitive unconditioned stimulus (US). Based on explicit stimulus contingency ratings, conditioning occurred in both groups; however, based on implicit, physiological GSR measures, patients failed to show differences between CS+ and CS− conditions. Healthy controls exhibited increased blood-oxygen-level dependent (BOLD) activity across striatal, hippocampal, and prefrontal regions and increased effective connectivity from the ventral striatum to the orbitofrontal cortex (OFC BA 11) in the CS+ compared to the CS− condition. Compared to controls, patients showed increased BOLD activity across a similar network of brain regions, and increased effective connectivity from the striatum to hippocampus and prefrontal regions in the CS− compared to the CS+ condition. The findings of increased BOLD activity and effective connectivity in response to the CS− in patients with schizophrenia offer insight into the aberrant assignment of motivational salience to non-reinforced stimuli during conditioning that is thought to accompany schizophrenia. PMID:21267430

  1. Affective Visual Stimuli: Characterization of the Picture Sequences Impacts by Means of Nonlinear Approaches

    PubMed Central

    Goshvarpour, Ateke; Abbasi, Ataollah; Goshvarpour, Atefeh

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: The main objective of the present study was to investigate the effect of preceding pictorial stimulus on the emotional autonomic responses of the subsequent one. Methods: To this effect, physiological signals, including Electrocardiogram (ECG), Pulse Rate (PR), and Galvanic Skin Response (GSR) were collected. As these signals have random and chaotic nature, nonlinear dynamics of these physiological signals were evaluated with the methods of nonlinear system theory. Considering the hypothesis that emotional responses are usually associated with previous experiences of a subject, the subjective ratings of 4 emotional states were also evaluated. Four nonlinear characteristics (including Detrended Fluctuation Analysis (DFA), based parameters, Lyapunov exponent, and approximate entropy) were implemented. Nine standard features (including mean, standard deviation, minimum, maximum, median, mode, the second, third, and fourth moment) were also extracted. Results: To evaluate the ability of features in discriminating different types of emotions, some classification approaches were appraised, of them, Probabilistic Neural Network (PNN) led to the best classification rate of 100%. The results show that considering the emotional sequences, GSR is the best candidate for the representation of the physiological changes. Discussion: Lower discrimination was attained when the sequence occurred in the diagonal line of valence-arousal coordinates (for instance, positive valence and positive arousal versus negative valence and negative arousal). By employing self-assessment ranks, no obvious improvement was achieved. PMID:26649159

  2. Game Design to Measure Reflexes and Attention Based on Biofeedback Multi-Sensor Interaction

    PubMed Central

    Ortiz-Vigon Uriarte, Inigo de Loyola; Garcia-Zapirain, Begonya; Garcia-Chimeno, Yolanda

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents a multi-sensor system for implementing biofeedback as a human-computer interaction technique in a game involving driving cars in risky situations. The sensors used are: Eye Tracker, Kinect, pulsometer, respirometer, electromiography (EMG) and galvanic skin resistance (GSR). An algorithm has been designed which gives rise to an interaction logic with the game according to the set of physiological constants obtained from the sensors. The results reflect a 72.333 response to the System Usability Scale (SUS), a significant difference of p = 0.026 in GSR values in terms of the difference between the start and end of the game, and an r = 0.659 and p = 0.008 correlation while playing with the Kinect between the breathing level and the energy and joy factor. All the sensors used had an impact on the end results, whereby none of them should be disregarded in future lines of research, even though it would be interesting to obtain separate breathing values from that of the cardio. PMID:25789493

  3. Linkage disequilibrium and haplotype studies of chromosome 8p 11. 1-21. 1 markers and Werner syndrome

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, Chang-En; Schellenberg, G.D.; Oshima, Junko; Martin, G.M.; Goddard, K.A.B.; Wijsman, E.M. ); Miki, Tetsuro; Nakura, Jun; Ogihara, Toshio ); Poot, M.; Hoehn, H. )

    1994-08-01

    Werner syndrome (WS) is an autosomal recessive disorder, characterized as a progeroid syndrome, previously mapped to the 8p 11.2-21.1 region. Because WS is so rare, and because many patients are from consanguineous marriages, fine localization of the gene by traditional meiotic mapping methods is unlikely to succeed. Here the authors present the results of a search for a region that exhibits linkage disequilibrium with the disorder, under the assumption that identification of such a region may provide an alternative method of narrowing down the location of WRN, the gene responsible for WS. They present allele frequencies in Japanese and Caucasian cases and controls for D8S137, D8S131, D8S87, D8S278, D8S259, D8S283, fibroblast growth factor receptor 1, ankyrin 1, D8S339, and two polymorphisms in glutathione reductase (GSR), covering [approximately] 16.5 cM in total. They show that three of the markers examined - D8S339 and both polymorphisms in the GSR locus - show strong statistically significant evidence of disequilibrium with WRN in the Japanese population but not in the Caucasian population. In addition, they show that a limited number of haplotypes are associated with the disease in both populations and that these haplotypes define clusters of apparently related haplotypes that may identify as many as eight or nine independent WRN mutations in these two populations. 36 refs., 1 fig., 4 tabs.

  4. Wearable Systems for Service based on Physiological Signals.

    PubMed

    Ryoo, Dong-Wan; Kim, Young-Sung; Lee, Jeun-Woo

    2005-01-01

    Many researches for useful status information on humans have been done using the bio-signals. The bio-signal acquisition systems can be used to connect a user and a ubiquitous computing environment. The ubiquitous computing environment has to give various services anywhere, anytime. Consequently, ubiquitous computing requires new technology, such as a new user interface, dynamic service mechanism based on context and mobility support, which is different from technology used in desktop environment. To do this, we developed a wearable system, which can sense physiological data, determine emotional status and execute service based on the emotion. In this paper, we described wearable systems for personalized service based on physiological signals. The wearable system is composed of three subsystems, the physiological data sensing subsystem, the human status awareness subsystem and the service management subsystem. The physiological data sensing subsystem senses PPG, GSR and SKT signals from the data glove and sends the data to a wearable system using Bluetooth. The human status awareness subsystem in the wearable system receives the data from bio-sensors and determines emotional status using nonlinear mapping and rule-base. After determining emotion, the service management subsystem activates proper service automatically, and the service management subsystem can provide personalized service for users based on acquired bio-signals. Also, we presented various feature extraction using bio-signals such as PPG, GSR, SKT considering mobility, and emotion recognition of human status for the ubiquitous computing service.

  5. Comparative physiological and transcriptional analysis of weak organic acid stress in Bacillus subtilis.

    PubMed

    Ter Beek, Alexander; Wijman, Janneke G E; Zakrzewska, Anna; Orij, Rick; Smits, Gertien J; Brul, Stanley

    2015-02-01

    The advent of 'omics' techniques bears significant potential for the assessment of the microbiological stability of foods. This requires the integration of molecular data with their implication for cellular physiology. Here we performed a comparative physiological and transcriptional analysis of Bacillus subtilis stressed with three different weak organic acids: the commonly used food preservatives sorbic- and acetic-acid, plus the well-known uncoupler carbonyl cyanide-m-chlorophenyl hydrazone (CCCP). The concentration of each compound needed to cause a similar reduction of the growth rate negatively correlated with their membrane solubility, and positively with the concentration of undissociated acid. Intracellular acidification was demonstrated by expressing a pH-sensitive GFP derivative. The largest drop in intracellular pH was observed in CCCP-stressed cells and was accompanied by the transcriptional induction of the general stress response (GSR) and SigM regulon, responses known to be induced by acidification. The GSR was induced by acetate, but not by sorbate in mildly-stressed cells. Microarray analysis further revealed that all three acids activate transcriptional programs normally seen upon nutrient limitation and cause diverse responses indicative of an adaptation of the cell envelope. Based on the responses observed and the utilized pH measurements, the inhibitory effect of sorbic acid seems to be more focused on the cell membrane than that of acetic acid or CCCP.

  6. Detection of Gunshot Residues Using Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Blanes, Lucas; Cole, Nerida; Doble, Philip; Roux, Claude

    2014-01-01

    In recent years, forensic scientists have become increasingly interested in the detection and interpretation of organic gunshot residues (OGSR) due to the increasing use of lead- and heavy metal-free ammunition. This has also been prompted by the identification of gunshot residue- (GSR-) like particles in environmental and occupational samples. Various techniques have been investigated for their ability to detect OGSR. Mass spectrometry (MS) coupled to a chromatographic system is a powerful tool due to its high selectivity and sensitivity. Further, modern MS instruments can detect and identify a number of explosives and additives which may require different ionization techniques. Finally, MS has been applied to the analysis of both OGSR and inorganic gunshot residue (IGSR), although the “gold standard” for analysis is scanning electron microscopy with energy dispersive X-ray microscopy (SEM-EDX). This review presents an overview of the technical attributes of currently available MS and ionization techniques and their reported applications to GSR analysis. PMID:24977168

  7. Chemical and morphological study of gunshot residue persisting on the shooter by means of scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive X-ray spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Brożek-Mucha, Zuzanna

    2011-12-01

    Persistence of gunshot residue (GSR) simultaneously collected from hands, face and hair, and clothing of the shooting person was examined. Samples were collected from five shooters in nine time intervals after a single shoot with a Luger 9 mm pistol, in the range of 0-4 h and examined with scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive X-ray spectrometry. Numbers of particles, frequencies of occurrence of certain compositions of particles, and their sizes in function of the time intervals were inspected. The greatest numbers of particles were observed in samples collected from hands right after shooting, but they decrease quickly with time. In samples collected from the face smaller initial numbers of particles were found, but they lasted at a similar level longer. The estimated half-life times of particles were less than 1 h for samples taken from the hands, over 1 h for clothing and about 2-3 h for the face. In samples collected at longer intervals after shooting, there were particles present of small sizes and irregular shapes. The results demonstrate that including evidence collected from the suspect's face and hair may increase the probability of detection of GSR in cases when the suspect has not been apprehended immediately after the investigated incident.

  8. The determination of firing distance applying a microscopic quantitative method and confocal laser scanning microscopy for detection of gunshot residue particles.

    PubMed

    Neri, Margherita; Turillazzi, Emanuela; Riezzo, Irene; Fineschi, Vittorio

    2007-07-01

    In this study, we applied a microscopic quantitative method based on the use of sodium rhodizonate to verify the presence of residues and their distribution on the cutis of gunshot wounds. A total of 250 skin samples were selected from cases in which the manner of death (accidental, suicide, and homicide) and the shooting distance could be reliably determined. The samples were examined under a light microscope, in transmitted bright field illumination and phase contrast mode, and with confocal laser scanning microscopy. In all skin specimens the area of each histological section was directly measured by an image analysis system. Both the number and the size of powder particles were measured. The distribution of gunshot residues (GSR) in the epidermal and subepidermal layers was also analyzed. The evaluation of the microscopic entrance wounds demonstrated different findings related to the range of fire. The data derived from the evaluation of both macroscopic and microscopic features demonstrated that the amount and the spatial distribution of GSR deposits in the skin surrounding entrance wounds strictly correlate with shooting distance.

  9. Simultaneous measurement of time-domain fNIRS and physiological signals during a cognitive task

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jelzow, A.; Tachtsidis, I.; Kirilina, E.; Niessing, M.; Brühl, R.; Wabnitz, H.; Heine, A.; Ittermann, B.; Macdonald, R.

    2011-07-01

    Functional near-infrared spectroscopy (fNIRS) is a commonly used technique to measure the cerebral vascular response related to brain activation. It is known that systemic physiological processes, either independent or correlated with the stimulation task, can influence the optical signal making its interpretation challenging. The aim of the present work is to investigate the impact of task-evoked changes in the systemic physiology on fNIRS measurements for a cognitive paradigm. For this purpose we carried out simultaneous measurements of time-domain fNIRS on the forehead and systemic physiological signals, i.e. mean blood pressure, heart rate, respiration, galvanic skin response, scalp blood flow (flux) and red blood cell (RBC) concentration changes. We performed measurements on 15 healthy volunteers during a semantic continuous performance task (CPT). The optical data was analyzed in terms of depth-selective moments of distributions of times of flight of photons through the tissue. In addition, cerebral activation was localized by a subsequent fMRI experiment on the same subject population using the same task. We observed strong non-cerebral task-evoked changes in concentration changes of oxygenated hemoglobin in the forehead. We investigated the temporal behavior and mutual correlations between hemoglobin changes and the systemic processes. Mean blood pressure (BP), galvanic skin response (GSR) and heart rate exhibited significant changes during the activation period, whereby BP and GSR showed the highest correlation with optical measurements.

  10. Prediction of ozone concentration in tropospheric levels using artificial neural networks and support vector machine at Rio de Janeiro, Brazil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luna, A. S.; Paredes, M. L. L.; de Oliveira, G. C. G.; Corrêa, S. M.

    2014-12-01

    It is well known that air quality is a complex function of emissions, meteorology and topography, and statistical tools provide a sound framework for relating these variables. The observed data were contents of nitrogen dioxide (NO2), nitrogen monoxide (NO), nitrogen oxides (NOx), carbon monoxide (CO), ozone (O3), scalar wind speed (SWS), global solar radiation (GSR), temperature (TEM), moisture content in the air (HUM), collected by a mobile automatic monitoring station at Rio de Janeiro City in two places of the metropolitan area during 2011 and 2012. The aims of this study were: (1) to analyze the behavior of the variables, using the method of PCA for exploratory data analysis; (2) to propose forecasts of O3 levels from primary pollutants and meteorological factors, using nonlinear regression methods like ANN and SVM, from primary pollutants and meteorological factors. The PCA technique showed that for first dataset, variables NO, NOx and SWS have a greater impact on the concentration of O3 and the other data set had the TEM and GSR as the most influential variables. The obtained results from the nonlinear regression techniques ANN and SVM were remarkably closely and acceptable to one dataset presenting coefficient of determination for validation respectively 0.9122 and 0.9152, and root mean square error of 7.66 and 7.85, respectively. For these datasets, the PCA, SVM and ANN had demonstrated their robustness as useful tools for evaluation, and forecast scenarios for air quality.

  11. Gemini telescope structure design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raybould, Keith; Gillett, Paul E.; Hatton, Peter; Pentland, Gordon; Sheehan, Mike; Warner, Mark

    1994-06-01

    The Gemini project is an international collaboration to design, fabricate, and assemble two 8 M telescopes, one on Mauna Kea in Hawaii, the other on Cerro Pachon in Chile. The telescopes will be national facilities designed to meet the Gemini Science Requirements (GSR), a document developed by the Gemini Science Committee (GSC) and the national project scientists. The Gemini telescope group, based on Tucson, has developed a telescope structure to meet the GSR. This paper describes the science requirements that have technically driven the design, and the features that have been incorporated to meet these requirements. This is followed by a brief description of the telescope design. Finally, analyses that have been performed and development programs that have been undertaken are described briefly. Only the designs that have been performed by the Gemini Telescope Structure, Building and Enclosure Group are presented here; control, optical systems, acquisition and guiding, active and adaptive optics, Cassegrain rotator and instrumentation issues are designed and managed by others and will not be discussed here, except for a brief description of the telescope configurations to aid subsequent discussions.

  12. Life Cycle Sustainability Assessment of Sediment Remediation at the London Olympic Park

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hou, D.; Al-Tabbaa, A.

    2013-12-01

    In recent years, there is an emerging 'green and sustainable remediation' (GSR) movement. It is drawing increasing attention from both the government and the industry, because this GSR movement is promising in accelerating process in addressing the contaminated land issue, by overcoming regulatory barriers, encouraging technological innovation, and balancing life cycle environmental stewardship with economic vitality and social well-being. Life cycle assessment (LCA) has been increasingly used by both researchers and industrial practitioners in an initiative to make environmental remediation greener and more sustainable. Life cycle sustainability assessment (LCSA), aiming at expanding the traditional LCA model in both breadth and depth (e.g. to incorporate both environmental and social-economic sustainability), is an important research direction in the existing LCA research field. The present study intends to develop a LCSA method based on a hybrid LCA model and economic input-output (EIO) data. The LCSA method is applied to a contaminated sediment remediation project conducted at the London Olympic Park site.

  13. Total Glutamine Synthetase Activity during Soybean Nodule Development Is Controlled at the Level of Transcription and Holoprotein Turnover.

    PubMed Central

    Temple, S. J.; Kunjibettu, S.; Roche, D.; Sengupta-Gopalan, C.

    1996-01-01

    Gln synthetase (GS) catalyzes the ATP-dependent condensation of ammonia with glutamate to yield Gln. In higher plants GS is an octameric enzyme and the subunits are encoded by members of a small multigene family. In soybeans (Glycine max), following the onset of N2 fixation there is a dramatic increase in GS activity in the root nodules. GS activity staining of native polyacrylamide gels containing nodule and root extracts showed a common band of activity (GSrs). The nodules also contained a slower-migrating, broad band of enzyme activity (GSns). The GSns activity band is a complex of many isozymes made up of different proportions of two kinds of GS subunits: GSr and GSn. Root nodules formed following inoculation with an Nif- strain of Bradyrhizobium japonicum showed the presence of GS isoenzymes (GSns1) with low enzyme activity, which migrated more slowly than GSns. Gsns1 is most likely made up predominantly of GSn subunits. Our data suggest that, whereas the class I GS genes encoding the GSr subunits are regulated by the availability of NH3, the class II GS genes coding for the GSn subunits are developmentally regulated. Furthermore, we have demonstrated that the GSns1 isozymes in the Nif- nodules are relatively more labile. Our overall conclusion is that GSns activity in soybean nodules is regulated by N2 fixation both at the level of transcription and at the level of holoprotein stability. PMID:12226474

  14. Synchronization Analysis of Language and Physiology in Human Dyads.

    PubMed

    Orsucci, Franco F; Musmeci, Nicolò; Aas, Benjamin; Schiepek, Günter; Reda, Mario A; Canestri, Luca; Giuliani, Alessandro; de Felice, Giulio

    2016-04-01

    We studied the synchronization dynamics of a therapist and patient during a psychotherapy session. This investigation was developed in order to explore a new possible perspective and methodology for studying the expression of emotions. More specifically, literature concerning synchronization of in-session non-verbal variables emphasises its positive correlation with empathy and therapeutic outcomes. We compared the dynamics of galvanic skin response (GSR) and linguistic prosody, chosen as indicators of emotional expression in different domains. We studied their synchronization through complementary methodologies: Recurrence Quantification Analysis (RQA) and Principal Component Analysis (PCA), Markov Transition Matrix (MTM) and Cross-Recurrence Quantification Analysis (CRQA). We investigated the nonlinearity of GSR in terms of self-similarity and power-law, as emerged in autocorrelation functions and signal variations. We considered time-lagged correlations as a measure of dynamical systems' memory. This article concludes by highlighting the importance of a deeper study of all variables related to the psychotherapeutic process and their synchronization in order to extend our knowledge of general human dynamics.

  15. Linkage Disequilibrium and Haplotype Studies of Chromosome 8p 11.1-21.1 Markers and Werner Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Chang-En; Oshima, Junko; Goddard, Katrina A. B.; Miki, Tetsuro; Nakura, Jun; Ogihara, Toshio; Poot, Martin; Hoehn, Holger; Fraccaro, Marco; Piussan, Charles; Martin, George M.; Schellenberg, Gerard D.; Wijsman, Ellen M.

    1994-01-01

    Werner syndrome (WS) is an autosomal recessive disorder, characterized as a progeroid syndrome, previously mapped to the 8p 11.1-21.1 region. Because WS is so rare, and because many patients are from consanguineous marriages, fine localization of the gene by traditional meiotic mapping methods is unlikely to succeed. Here we present the results of a search for a region that exhibits linkage disequilibrium with the disorder, under the assumption that identification of such a region may provide an alternative method of narrowing down the location of WRN, the gene responsible for WS. We present allele frequencies in Japanese and Caucasian cases and controls for D8S137, D8S131, D8S87, D8S278, D8S259, D8S283, fibroblast growth factor receptor 1, ankyrin 1, D8S339, and two polymorphisms in glutathione reductase (GSR), covering ∼16.5 cM in total. We show that three of the markers examined—D8S339 and both polymorphisms in the GSR locus—show strong statistically significant evidence of disequilibrium with WRN in the Japanese population but not in the Caucasian population. In addition, we show that a limited number of haplotypes are associated with the disease in both populations and that these haplotypes define clusters of apparently related haplotypes that may identify as many as eight or nine independent WRN mutations in these two populations. PMID:8037212

  16. Hydrogen desorption from MgH2(110) surface with transition-metal catalyst: a DFT study of energetics and barriers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Lin-Lin; Johnson, Duane D.

    2011-03-01

    Transition-metal (TM) catalysts are widely used in hydrogen-storage materials to increase hydrogen absorption and desorption kinetics. Using density functional theory calculations, we elucidate the catalytic effect of Ti on H-desorption from Mg H2 (110) surface. Kinetic energy barriers of different reaction pathways of hydrogen desorption are calculated via nudged-elastic-band method. We find that Ti dopant is effective in reducing kinetic barriers, in agreement with experimental observations. We also find that magnetic degrees of freedom must be carefully included to describe the change of magnetic states during catalytic-enhanced desorption. As vacancy migration barriers are lower than desorption barrier, bulk diffusion of H inherently feeds into the favorable surface desorption mechanism. Supported by the DOE/BES under DE-FG02-03ER15476 (Catalysis), DEFC36-05GO15064 (Sandia Metal-Hydride Center of Excellence), DE-FG02-03ER46026 (Materials), and DE-AC02-07CH11358 at the Ames Laboratory operated by Iowa State University.

  17. MitoNEET Protects HL-1 Cardiomyocytes from Oxidative Stress Mediated Apoptosis in an In Vitro Model of Hypoxia and Reoxygenation

    PubMed Central

    Habener, Anika; Chowdhury, Arpita; Echtermeyer, Frank; Lichtinghagen, Ralf

    2016-01-01

    The iron-sulfur cluster containing protein mitoNEET is known to modulate the oxidative capacity of cardiac mitochondria but its function during myocardial reperfusion injury after transient ischemia is unknown. The purpose of this study was to analyze the impact of mitoNEET on oxidative stress induced cell death and its relation to the glutathione-redox system in cardiomyocytes in an in vitro model of hypoxia and reoxygenation (H/R). Our results show that siRNA knockdown (KD) of mitoNEET caused an 1.9-fold increase in H/R induced apoptosis compared to H/R control while overexpression of mitoNEET caused a 53% decrease in apoptosis. Necrosis was not affected. Apoptosis of both, mitoNEET-KD and control cells was diminished to comparable levels by using the antioxidants Tiron and glutathione compound glutathione reduced ethyl ester (GSH-MEE), indicating that mitoNEET-dependent apoptosis is mediated by oxidative stress. The interplay between mitoNEET and glutathione redox system was assessed by treating cardiomyocytes with 2-acetylamino-3-[4-(2-acetylamino-2-carboxyethylsulfanylthio-carbonylamino) phenylthiocarbamoylsulfanyl] propionic acid (2-AAPA), known to effectively inhibit glutathione reductase (GSR) and to decrease the GSH/GSSG ratio. Surprisingly, inhibition of GSR-activity to 20% by 2-AAPA decreased apoptosis of control and mitoNEET-KD cells to 23% and 25% respectively, while at the same time mitoNEET-protein was increased 4-fold. This effect on mitoNEET-protein was not accessible by mitoNEET-KD but was reversed by GSH-MEE. In conclusion we show that mitoNEET protects cardiomyocytes from oxidative stress-induced apoptosis during H/R. Inhibition of GSH-recycling, GSR-activity by 2-AAPA increased mitoNEET-protein, accompanied by reduced apoptosis. Addition of GSH reversed these effects suggesting that mitoNEET can in part compensate for imbalances in the antioxidative glutathione-system and therefore could serve as a potential therapeutic approach for the

  18. Microwave and Millimeter-Wave Radiometric Studies of Temperature, Water Vapor and Clouds

    SciTech Connect

    Westwater, Edgeworth

    2011-05-06

    The importance of accurate measurements of column amounts of water vapor and cloud liquid has been well documented by scientists within the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program. At the North Slope of Alaska (NSA), both microwave radiometers (MWR) and the MWRProfiler (MWRP), been used operationally by ARM for passive retrievals of the quantities: Precipitable Water Vapor (PWV) and Liquid Water Path (LWP). However, it has been convincingly shown that these instruments are inadequate to measure low amounts of PWV and LWP. In the case of water vapor, this is especially important during the Arctic winter, when PWV is frequently less than 2 mm. For low amounts of LWP (< 50 g/m{sup 2}), the MWR and MWRP retrievals have an accuracy that is also not acceptable. To address some of these needs, in March-April 2004, NOAA and ARM conducted the NSA Arctic Winter Radiometric Experiment - Water Vapor Intensive Operational Period at the ARM NSA/Adjacent Arctic Ocean (NSA/AAO) site. After this experiment, the radiometer group at NOAA moved to the Center for Environmental Technology (CET) of the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering of the University of Colorado at Boulder. During this 2004 experiment, a total of 220 radiosondes were launched, and radiometric data from 22.235 to 380 GHz were obtained. Primary instruments included the ARM MWR and MWRP, a Global Positioning System (GPS), as well as the CET Ground-based Scanning Radiometer (GSR). We have analyzed data from these instruments to answer several questions of importance to ARM, including: (a) techniques for improved water vapor measurements; (b) improved calibration techniques during cloudy conditions; (c) the spectral response of radiometers to a variety of conditions: clear, liquid, ice, and mixed phase clouds; and (d) forward modeling of microwave and millimeter wave brightness temperatures from 22 to 380 GHz. Many of these results have been published in the open literature. During the third year of

  19. Physiological Mechanisms Underlying the High-Grain Yield and High-Nitrogen Use Efficiency of Elite Rice Varieties under a Low Rate of Nitrogen Application in China

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Lilian; Yuan, Shen; Huang, Liying; Sun, Fan; Zhu, Guanglong; Li, Guohui; Fahad, Shah; Peng, Shaobing; Wang, Fei

    2016-01-01

    Selecting rice varieties with a high nitrogen (N) use efficiency (NUE) is the best approach to reduce N fertilizer application in rice production and is one of the objectives of the Green Super Rice (GSR) Project in China. However, the performance of elite candidate GSR varieties under low N supply remains unclear. In the present study, differences in the grain yield and NUE of 13 and 14 candidate varieties with two controls were determined at a N rate of 100 kg ha−1 in field experiments in 2014 and 2015, respectively. The grain yield for all of the rice varieties ranged from 8.67 to 11.09 t ha−1, except for a japonica rice variety YG29, which had a grain yield of 6.42 t ha−1. HY549 and YY4949 produced the highest grain yield, reflecting a higher biomass production and harvest index in 2014 and 2015, respectively. Total N uptake at maturity (TNPM) ranged from 144 to 210 kg ha−1, while the nitrogen use efficiency for grain production (NUEg) ranged from 35.2 to 62.0 kg kg−1. Both TNPM and NUEg showed a significant quadratic correlation with grain yield, indicating that it is possible to obtain high grain yield and NUEg with the reduction of TNPM. The correlation between N-related parameters and yield-related traits suggests that promoting pre-heading growth could increase TNPM, while high biomass accumulation during the grain filling period and large panicles are important for a higher NUEg. In addition, there were significant and negative correlations between the NUEg and N concentrations in leaf, stem, and grain tissues at maturity. Further improvements in NUEg require a reduction in the stem N concentration but not the leaf N concentration. The daily grain yield was the only parameter that significantly and positively correlated with both TNPMand NUEg. This study determined variations in the grain yield and NUE of elite candidate GSR rice varieties and provided plant traits that could be used as selection criteria in breeding N-efficient rice varieties

  20. Multiple Views of X1.4 Solar Flare on July 12, 2012

    NASA Video Gallery

    This video shows the July 12, 2012 X1.4 class solar flare in a variety of wavelength; 131- Teal colored, 335 - blue colored, 171 - yellow colored and finally a combined wavelength view. All video w...

  1. A survey on the geographic scope of textual documents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monteiro, Bruno R.; Davis, Clodoveu A.; Fonseca, Fred

    2016-11-01

    Recognizing references to places in texts is needed in many applications, such as search engines, location-based social media and document classification. In this paper we present a survey of methods and techniques for the recognition and identification of places referenced in texts. We discuss concepts and terminology, and propose a classification of the solutions given in the literature. We introduce a definition of the Geographic Scope Resolution (GSR) problem, dividing it in three steps: geoparsing, reference resolution, and grounding references. Solutions to the first two steps are organized according to the method used, and solutions to the third step are organized according to the type of output produced. We found that it is difficult to compare existing solutions directly to one another, because they often create their own benchmarking data, targeted to their own problem.

  2. The survival of metallic residues from gunshot wounds in cremated bone: a radiological study.

    PubMed

    Amadasi, Alberto; Borgonovo, Simone; Brandone, Alberto; Di Giancamillo, Mauro; Cattaneo, Cristina

    2012-05-01

    In literature, many studies have been performed in order to investigate the presence of GSR ("gunshot residue") and metallic residues in general with radiological techniques on several types of material, but the survival of metallic residues on charred samples has never been systematically performed. In this study, 31 adult bovine ribs underwent a shooting test. Every rib was shot with a single bullet, at a near-contact shooting distance, using two kinds of projectile: 17 samples were shot with a full metal-jacketed bullet and the remaining 14 with an unjacketed bullet. After the shooting test, every rib underwent a "charring cycle" in an electric oven up to 800°C. Every sample underwent radiological investigation with conventional radiography, before and after the burning process, to evaluate any changes in number and distribution of metallic residues. Radiographs showed survival of radiopaque residues in every sample, even after the charring process, especially when the bullet used was of the unjacketed type.

  3. Nickel and Copper Toxicity and Plant Response Mechanisms in White Birch (Betula papyrifera).

    PubMed

    Theriault, Gabriel; Nkongolo, Kabwe

    2016-08-01

    Nickel (Ni) and copper (Cu) are the most prevalent metals found in the soils in the Greater Sudbury Region (Canada) because of smelting emissions. The main objectives of the present study were to (1) determine the toxicity of nickel (Ni) and copper (Cu) at different doses in Betula papyrifera (white birch), (2) Characterize nickel resistance mechanism, and (3) assess segregating patterns for Ni and Cu resistance in B. papyrifera populations. This study revealed that B. papyrifera is resistant to Ni and Cu concentrations equivalent to the levels reported in metal-contaminated stands in the GSR. Resistant genotypes (RG) accumulate Ni in roots but not in leaves. Moderately susceptible (MSG) and susceptible genotypes (SG) show a high level of Ni translocation to leaves. Gene expression analysis showed differential regulation of genes in RG compared to MSG and SG. Analysis of segregation patterns suggests that resistance to Ni and Cu is controlled by single recessive genes.

  4. The role of stress on the language-independence and code-switching phenomena.

    PubMed

    Javier, R A; Marcos, L R

    1989-09-01

    This investigation studies the extent to which stress affects the assumed functional separation of coordinate bilingual's linguistic organization. Spanish/English bilinguals were subjects in a GSR linguistic conditioning experiment using two intensities of buzzer sounds (stressful conditions) and two lists of words. One word for each list functioned as the conditioned stimulus. Generalization to semantically, phonemically, and unrelated words occurred in both languages and buzzer conditions. We found a differential impact of the buzzer on the functional separation of the languages, although not in the direction predicted. We concluded that stress produced code-switching, and hence, a primitivization of the subject's cognitive and linguistic functioning is assumed to have occurred. These findings are important in understanding the way stress affects the bilingual's languages at the linguistic and cognitive levels. They are also important in understanding the role of stress in language development and in the transfer of linguistic information.

  5. Effects of menstrual cycle and neuroticism on females' emotion regulation.

    PubMed

    Wu, Mengying; Zhou, Renlai; Huang, Yamei

    2014-12-01

    Fifteen highly neurotic women and 21 women who were low in neuroticism participated in this study. The women were surveyed three times over a single menstrual cycle during the mid-late luteal, menstrual, and late follicular phases. Each time, the participants were asked to use reappraisal to regulate their emotions, which were evoked by a sad film clip, and their subjective emotional experiences and physiological responses were recorded. The results showed that neuroticism had no impact on emotion regulation, and the females experienced fluctuations in their emotion regulation success over their menstrual cycle. During the menstrual phase, women reported significantly higher levels of reappraisal, but subjective sadness did not differ throughout the three phases. Additionally, the regulation effects on galvanic skin response (GSR) were smaller during the menstrual phase than in the mid-late luteal phase. These results suggested that women in the menstrual phase expended more effort but gained less success at regulating their emotions.

  6. The use of biofeedback in clinical virtual reality: the intrepid project.

    PubMed

    Repetto, Claudia; Gorini, Alessandra; Algeri, Davide; Vigna, Cinzia; Gaggioli, Andrea; Riva, Giuseppe

    2009-01-01

    In our protocol for the treatment of Generalized Anxiety Disorders we use Virtual reality (VR) to facilitate emotional regulation and the relaxation process. Using a biofeedback biomonitoring system (GSR, HR, Thermal) the patient is made aware of his or her reactions through the modification of some features of the VR environment in real time. Using mental exercises the patient learns to control these physiological parameters and using the feedback provided by the virtual environment is able to gauge his or her success. To test this concept, we planned a randomized controlled trial (NCT00602212), including three groups of 15 patients each (for a total of 45 patients): (1) the VR group, (2) the non-VR group, and (3) the waiting list (WL) group.

  7. [Psychophysiological aspects of piloted flights to space].

    PubMed

    Kozarenko, O P; Ponomareva, I P

    2008-01-01

    The paper illuminates some issues of the psychophysiological support (PPS) of piloted flights to space discussed with academician O.G. Gazenko. Already in initial space flights monitoring and assessment of the psychic state and mental performance of crew members were the key PPS component that needed all-round investigations and development of associated methods. The poly-effect method of registering the physiological functions (ECG, EEG, GSR) was recognized as a potent tool for gathering information to be used in actual state assessment. Starting from the 96-d flight of Yu. Romanenko and G. Grechko, the enhanced PPS system has been an indispensable component of long-term missions to orbital complexes Salyut, Mir, and the International space station. The practical experience with the PPS system showed its major contribution to maintenance of space crew mental health and performance.

  8. Preliminary analysis of the use of smartwatches for longitudinal health monitoring.

    PubMed

    Jovanov, Emil

    2015-08-01

    New generations of smartwatches feature continuous measurement of physiological parameters, such as heart rate, galvanic skin resistance (GSR), and temperature. In this paper we present the results of preliminary analysis of the use of Basis Peak smartwatch for longitudinal health monitoring during a 4 month period. Physiological measurements during sleep are validated using Zephyr Bioharness 3 monitor and SOMNOscreen+ polysomnographic monitoring system from SOMNOmedics. Average duration of sequences with no missed data was 49.9 minutes, with maximum length of 17 hours, and they represent 88.88% of recording time. Average duration of the charging event was 221.9 min, and average time between charges was 54 hours, with maximum duration of the charging event of 16.3 hours. Preliminary results indicate that the physiological monitoring performance of existing smartwatches provides sufficient performance for longitudinal monitoring of health status and analysis of health and wellness trends.

  9. Hereditary spherocytic anemia with deletion of the short arm of chromosome 8

    SciTech Connect

    Okamoto, Nobuhiko; Wada, Yoshinao; Nakamura, Yoich

    1995-09-11

    We describe a 30-month-old boy with multiple anomalies and mental retardation with hereditary spherocytic anemia. His karyotype was 46,XYdel(8)(p11.23p21.1). Genes for ankyrin and glutathione reductase (GSR) were localized to chromosome areas 8p11.2 and 8p21.1, respectively. Six patients with spherocytic anemia and interstitial deletion of 8p- have been reported. In these patients, severe mental retardation and multiple anomalies are common findings. This is a new contiguous gene syndrome. Lux established that ankyrin deficiency and associated deficiencies of spectrin and protein 4.2 were responsible for spherocytosis in this syndrome. We reviewed the manifestations of this syndrome. Patients with spherocytic anemia and multiple congenital anomalies should be investigated by high-resolution chromosomal means to differentiate this syndrome. 14 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  10. Glutathione synthesis is compromised in erythrocytes from individuals with HIV

    PubMed Central

    Morris, Devin; Ly, Judy; Chi, Po-Ting; Daliva, John; Nguyen, Truongson; Soofer, Charleen; Chen, Yung C.; Lagman, Minette; Venketaraman, Vishwanath

    2014-01-01

    We demonstrated that the levels of enzymes responsible for the synthesis of glutathione (GSH) such as glutathione synthase (GSS), glutamate-cysteine ligase-catalytic subunit (GCLC), and glutathione reductase (GSR) were significantly reduced in the red blood cells (RBCs) isolated from individuals with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection and this reduction correlated with decreased levels of intracellular GSH. GSH content in RBCs can be used as a marker for increased overall oxidative stress and immune dysfunctions caused by HIV infection. Our data supports our hypothesis that compromised levels of GSH in HIV infected individuals’ is due to decreased levels of GSH-synthetic enzymes. The role of GSH in combating oxidative stress and improving the functions of immune cells in HIV patients’ indicates the benefit of an antioxidant supplement which can reduce the cellular damage and promote the functions of immune cells. PMID:24782776

  11. Glutathione synthesis is compromised in erythrocytes from individuals with HIV.

    PubMed

    Morris, Devin; Ly, Judy; Chi, Po-Ting; Daliva, John; Nguyen, Truongson; Soofer, Charleen; Chen, Yung C; Lagman, Minette; Venketaraman, Vishwanath

    2014-01-01

    We demonstrated that the levels of enzymes responsible for the synthesis of glutathione (GSH) such as glutathione synthase (GSS), glutamate-cysteine ligase-catalytic subunit (GCLC), and glutathione reductase (GSR) were significantly reduced in the red blood cells (RBCs) isolated from individuals with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection and this reduction correlated with decreased levels of intracellular GSH. GSH content in RBCs can be used as a marker for increased overall oxidative stress and immune dysfunctions caused by HIV infection. Our data supports our hypothesis that compromised levels of GSH in HIV infected individuals' is due to decreased levels of GSH-synthetic enzymes. The role of GSH in combating oxidative stress and improving the functions of immune cells in HIV patients' indicates the benefit of an antioxidant supplement which can reduce the cellular damage and promote the functions of immune cells.

  12. Preliminary classification of characteristic organic gunshot residue compounds.

    PubMed

    Goudsmits, Ellen; Sharples, George P; Birkett, Jason W

    2016-12-01

    For the first time, a classification system for organic gunshot residue (OGSR) compounds with respect to the confirmation of OGSR materials is presented. There are 136 compounds considered to be associated with OGSR that have been highlighted in the literature. Many of these compounds could be classified as being ubiquitous in the environment and thus their detection as characteristic components of OGSR could cause issues with the interpretation of chemical ballistic evidence. The proposed system aims to address this problem by classifying OGSR compounds based on their forensic relevance with respect to the confirmation of GSR materials. To increase the forensic relevance of such a system, the large number of OGSR compounds reported in the literature has been decreased to 20 OGSR compounds based on the organic chemical composition of over 200 propellant powders. Occupational and environmental materials also associated with OGSR compounds have been considered.

  13. First experiences with 2D-mXRF analysis of gunshot residue on garment, tissue, and cartridge cases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knijnenberg, Alwin; Stamouli, Amalia; Janssen, Martin

    2014-09-01

    The investigation of garment and human tissue originating from a victim of a shooting incident can provide crucial information for the reconstruction of such an incident. The use of 2D-mXRF for such investigations has several advantages over current methods as this new technique can be used to scan large areas, provides simultaneous information on multiple elements, can be applied under ambient conditions and is non-destructive. In this paper we report our experiences and challenges with the implementation of 2D-mXRF in GSR analysis. Currently we mainly focus on the use of 2D-mXRF as a tool for visualizing elemental distributions on various samples.

  14. Field Test Kit for Gun Residue Detection

    SciTech Connect

    WALKER, PAMELA K.; RODACY, PHILIP J.

    2002-01-01

    One of the major needs of the law enforcement field is a product that quickly, accurately, and inexpensively identifies whether a person has recently fired a gun--even if the suspect has attempted to wash the traces of gunpowder off. The Field Test Kit for Gunshot Residue Identification based on Sandia National Laboratories technology works with a wide variety of handguns and other weaponry using gunpowder. There are several organic chemicals in small arms propellants such as nitrocellulose, nitroglycerine, dinitrotoluene, and nitrites left behind after the firing of a gun that result from the incomplete combustion of the gunpowder. Sandia has developed a colorimetric shooter identification kit for in situ detection of gunshot residue (GSR) from a suspect. The test kit is the first of its kind and is small, inexpensive, and easily transported by individual law enforcement personnel requiring minimal training for effective use. It will provide immediate information identifying gunshot residue.

  15. Classification of Gunshot Residue Using Laser Electrospray Mass Spectrometry and Offline Multivariate Statistical Analysis.

    PubMed

    Perez, Johnny J; Watson, David A; Levis, Robert J

    2016-12-06

    Nonresonant laser vaporization combined with high-resolution electrospray time-of-flight mass spectrometry enables analysis of a casing after discharge of a firearm revealing organic signature molecules including methyl centralite (MC), diphenylamine (DPA), N-nitrosodiphenylamine (N-NO-DPA), 4-nitrodiphenylamine (4-NDPA), a DPA adduct, and multiple unidentified features not observed in previous mass spectral measurements. Collision-induced dissociation measurements of unknown GSR signature ions reveals inorganic barium and derivatives BaOH, BaOHCH3, BaCH3COO remaining from the primer. Both hydrophilic and hydrophobic signatures are detected using water-methanol electrospray solution. Offline principal component analysis and discrimination of the laser electrospray mass spectral (LEMS) measurements resulted in perfect classification of the gun shot residue with respect to the manufacturer. Principal component analysis of recycled and reloaded casings resulted in classification of the penultimate manufacturer with an accuracy of 89%.

  16. Determination of diagnostic reference levels in general radiography in Latin America.

    PubMed

    Blanco, Susana; Mora, Patricia; Almonte, Narkiss; Benavente, Tony; Benson, Nadja; Blanco, Daniel; Cárdenas, Juan; Defaz Gómez, Yolanda; Edding, Oscar; Escobar, Carolina; Fonseca, María; Gamarra, Mirtha; García Aguilar, Juan; Khoury, Helen Jamil; Quintero, Ana Rosa; Roas Zuniga, Norma; Zaire, Edgar; Nader, Alejandro

    2013-09-01

    The International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) through the International Action Plan on Radiation Protection of Patients and the International Commission on Radiological Protection have for some time carried out important efforts to assure that in the medical applications of the ionising radiations, the optimisation of radiological protection of patients is fundamental, to such a point that the IAEA includes it directly as a requirement for these practices (in its International Basic Safety Standards for Protection against Ionising Radiation and for the Safety of Radiation Sources (BSS)-GSR Part 1, 2011). For this reason, among the objectives of Regional Project RLA/9/057 and Regional Project RLA/9/067, the intention was to establish the dose references in conventional radiology for Latin America, for the purposes of determining whether these doses comply with the requirements of the BSS and to tend to improve practices, in order to minimise the dose received by the patients.

  17. Forensic Evidence in Homicide Investigations and Prosecutions.

    PubMed

    McEwen, Tom; Regoeczi, Wendy

    2015-09-01

    Even though forensic evidence is collected at virtually every homicide scene, only a few studies have examined its role in investigation and prosecution. This article adds to the literature by providing the results of a study of 294 homicide cases (315 victims) occurring in Cleveland, Ohio, between 2008 and 2011. Through a logistic regression on open versus closed cases, the collection of knives, administration of gunshot residue (GSR) kits, and clothing at the scene were positively and significantly related to case closures, while collection of ballistics evidence and DNA evidence were statistically significant in the opposite direction. With regard to analysis, the clearance rate for cases with probative results (i.e., matches or exclusions) was 63.1% compared to a closure rate of 56.3% for cases without probative results. However, only 23 cases had probative results prior to arrest compared to 128 cases with probative results after arrest.

  18. [Mental load of robot operation upon workers].

    PubMed

    Okada, Y

    1986-03-20

    In recent years industrial robots have been widely used in factories. In various stages of their introduction mental stress on workers is predicted and factory workers and managers are being forced to deal with the problem seriously. This study centers upon the operation of taking and giving parts between men and robots to estimate the physical and mental load on workers through the analysis of behaviors by means of such physiological indices as RMR, GSR, EOG, etc. and Video Tapes. At the same time I examined the relation of the level of consciousness with the change of the time of selection responses and psychological quantity such as working senses. I also referred to observations and researches in the field of mental medicine. As compared with conveyer system work, robot operation gives a greater mental influence for better or worse, so a more careful operation control is needed from the viewpoint of labor hygiene.

  19. Effect of static magnetic fields and phloretin on antioxidant defense system of human fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Pawłowska-Góral, Katarzyna; Kimsa-Dudek, Magdalena; Synowiec-Wojtarowicz, Agnieszka; Orchel, Joanna; Glinka, Marek; Gawron, Stanisław

    2016-08-01

    The available evidence from in vitro and in vivo studies is deemed not sufficient to draw conclusions about the potential health effects of static magnetic field (SMF) exposure. Therefore, the aim of the present study was to determine the influence of static magnetic fields and phloretin on the redox homeostasis of human dermal fibroblasts. Control fibroblasts and fibroblasts treated with phloretin were subjected to the influence of static magnetic fields. Three chambers with static magnetic fields of different intensities (0.4, 0.55, and 0.7 T) were used in the study. Quantification of superoxide dismutase 1 (SOD1), superoxide dismutase 2 (SOD2), glutathione peroxidase 1 (GPX1), microsomal glutathione S-transferase 1 (MGST1), glutathione reductase (GSR), and catalase (CAT) messenger RNAs (mRNAs) was performed by means of real-time reverse transcription PCR (QRT-PCR) technique. Superoxide dismutase (SOD), glutathione peroxidase (GPx), and catalase (CAT) activities were measured using a commercially available kit. No significant differences were found in SOD1, SOD2, GPX1, MGST1, GSR, and CAT mRNA levels among the studied groups in comparison to the control culture without phloretin and without the magnet. There were also no changes in SOD, GPx, and CAT activities. In conclusion, our study indicated that static magnetic fields generated by permanent magnets do not exert a negative influence on the oxidative status of human dermal fibroblasts. Based on these studies, it may also be concluded that phloretin does not increase its antioxidant properties under the influence of static magnetic fields. However, SMF-induced modifications at the cellular and molecular level require further clarification.

  20. Use of Wearable Sensors and Biometric Variables in an Artificial Pancreas System

    PubMed Central

    Turksoy, Kamuran; Monforti, Colleen; Park, Minsun; Griffith, Garett; Quinn, Laurie; Cinar, Ali

    2017-01-01

    An artificial pancreas (AP) computes the optimal insulin dose to be infused through an insulin pump in people with Type 1 Diabetes (T1D) based on information received from a continuous glucose monitoring (CGM) sensor. It has been recognized that exercise is a major challenge in the development of an AP system. The use of biometric physiological variables in an AP system may be beneficial for prevention of exercise-induced challenges and better glucose regulation. The goal of the present study is to find a correlation between biometric variables such as heart rate (HR), heat flux (HF), skin temperature (ST), near-body temperature (NBT), galvanic skin response (GSR), and energy expenditure (EE), 2D acceleration-mean of absolute difference (MAD) and changes in glucose concentrations during exercise via partial least squares (PLS) regression and variable importance in projection (VIP) in order to determine which variables would be most useful to include in a future artificial pancreas. PLS and VIP analyses were performed on data sets that included seven different types of exercises. Data were collected from 26 clinical experiments. Clinical results indicate ST to be the most consistently important (important for six out of seven tested exercises) variable over all different exercises tested. EE and HR are also found to be important variables over several types of exercise. We also found that the importance of GSR and NBT observed in our experiments might be related to stress and the effect of changes in environmental temperature on glucose concentrations. The use of the biometric measurements in an AP system may provide better control of glucose concentration. PMID:28272368

  1. Genetic Biomarkers for ALS Disease in Transgenic SOD1G93A Mice

    PubMed Central

    Calvo, Ana C.; Manzano, Raquel; Atencia-Cibreiro, Gabriela; Oliván, Sara; Muñoz, María J.; Zaragoza, Pilar; Cordero-Vázquez, Pilar; Esteban-Pérez, Jesús; García-Redondo, Alberto; Osta, Rosario

    2012-01-01

    The pathophysiological mechanisms of both familial and sporadic Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS) are unknown, although growing evidence suggests that skeletal muscle tissue is a primary target of ALS toxicity. Skeletal muscle biopsies were performed on transgenic SOD1G93A mice, a mouse model of ALS, to determine genetic biomarkers of disease longevity. Mice were anesthetized with isoflurane, and three biopsy samples were obtained per animal at the three main stages of the disease. Transcriptional expression levels of seventeen genes, Ankrd1, Calm1, Col19a1, Fbxo32, Gsr, Impa1, Mef2c, Mt2, Myf5, Myod1, Myog, Nnt, Nogo A, Pax7, Rrad, Sln and Snx10, were tested in each muscle biopsy sample. Total RNA was extracted using TRIzol Reagent according to the manufacturer's protocol, and variations in gene expression were assayed by real-time PCR for all of the samples. The Pearson correlation coefficient was used to determine the linear correlation between transcriptional expression levels throughout disease progression and longevity. Consistent with the results obtained from total skeletal muscle of transgenic SOD1G93A mice and 74-day-old denervated mice, five genes (Mef2c, Gsr, Col19a1, Calm1 and Snx10) could be considered potential genetic biomarkers of longevity in transgenic SOD1G93A mice. These results are important because they may lead to the exploration of previously unexamined tissues in the search for new disease biomarkers and even to the application of these findings in human studies. PMID:22412900

  2. Depression, anxiety-like behavior and memory impairment are associated with increased oxidative stress and inflammation in a rat model of social stress.

    PubMed

    Patki, Gaurav; Solanki, Naimesh; Atrooz, Fatin; Allam, Farida; Salim, Samina

    2013-11-20

    In the present study, we have examined the behavioral and biochemical effect of induction of psychological stress using a modified version of the resident-intruder model for social stress (social defeat). At the end of the social defeat protocol, body weights, food and water intake were recorded, depression and anxiety-like behaviors as well as memory function was examined. Biochemical analysis including oxidative stress measurement, inflammatory markers and other molecular parameters, critical to behavioral effects were examined. We observed a significant decrease in the body weight in the socially defeated rats as compared to the controls. Furthermore, social defeat increased anxiety-like behavior and caused memory impairment in rats (P<0.05). Socially defeated rats made significantly more errors in long term memory tests (P<0.05) as compared to control rats. Furthermore, brain extracellular signal-regulated kinase-1/2 (ERK1/2), and an inflammatory marker, interleukin (IL)-6 were activated (P<0.05), while the protein levels of glyoxalase (GLO)-1, glutathione reductase (GSR)-1, calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase type (CAMK)-IV, cAMP-response-element-binding protein (CREB) and brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) were significantly less (P<0.05) in the hippocampus, but not in the prefrontal cortex and amygdala of socially defeated rats, when compared to control rats. We suggest that social defeat stress alters ERK1/2, IL-6, GLO1, GSR1, CAMKIV, CREB, and BDNF levels in specific brain areas, leading to oxidative stress-induced anxiety-depression-like behaviors and as well as memory impairment in rats.

  3. Use of luminescent gunshot residues markers in forensic context.

    PubMed

    Weber, I T; Melo, A J G; Lucena, M A M; Consoli, E F; Rodrigues, M O; de Sá, G F; Maldaner, A O; Talhavini, M; Alves, S

    2014-11-01

    Chemical evaluation of gunshot residues (GSR) produced by non-toxic lead-free ammunition (NTA) has been a challenge to forensic analyses. Our group developed some luminescent markers specific to the detection of GSR. Here, we evaluated the performance of selected markers in experiments that mimic forensic context and/or routines in which luminescent characteristics would be very useful. We evaluated the influence of markers' addition on the bullet's speed, the rate of shot failure (i.e., when the cartridge case is not fully ejected and/or a new ammunition is not automatically replaced in the gun chamber) as a function of marker percentage, the possibility of collecting luminescent gunshot residue (LGSR) in unconventional locations (e.g. the shooters' nostrils), the LGSR lifetime after hand washing, the transfer of LGSR to objects handled by the shooter, and the dispersion of LGSR at the crime scene and on simulated victims. It was observed that high amounts of marker (10 wt%) cause high rates of failure on pistols, as well as a substantial decrease in bullet speed. However, the use of 2 wt% of marker minimizes these effects and allows LGSR detection, collection and analysis. Moreover, in all conditions tested, markers showed high performance and provided important information for forensic analyses. For instance, the LGSR particles were found on the floor, ranging from 0 to 9.4 m away from the shooter, on the door panel and seats after a car shooting experiment, and were found easily on a pig leg used to simulate a victim. When a selective tagging was done, it was possible to obtain positive or negative correlation between the victim and shooter. Additionally LGSR possesses a fairly long lifetime (9 h) and good resistance to hand washing (up to 16 washes).

  4. Use of Wearable Sensors and Biometric Variables in an Artificial Pancreas System.

    PubMed

    Turksoy, Kamuran; Monforti, Colleen; Park, Minsun; Griffith, Garett; Quinn, Laurie; Cinar, Ali

    2017-03-07

    An artificial pancreas (AP) computes the optimal insulin dose to be infused through an insulin pump in people with Type 1 Diabetes (T1D) based on information received from a continuous glucose monitoring (CGM) sensor. It has been recognized that exercise is a major challenge in the development of an AP system. The use of biometric physiological variables in an AP system may be beneficial for prevention of exercise-induced challenges and better glucose regulation. The goal of the present study is to find a correlation between biometric variables such as heart rate (HR), heat flux (HF), skin temperature (ST), near-body temperature (NBT), galvanic skin response (GSR), and energy expenditure (EE), 2D acceleration-mean of absolute difference (MAD) and changes in glucose concentrations during exercise via partial least squares (PLS) regression and variable importance in projection (VIP) in order to determine which variables would be most useful to include in a future artificial pancreas. PLS and VIP analyses were performed on data sets that included seven different types of exercises. Data were collected from 26 clinical experiments. Clinical results indicate ST to be the most consistently important (important for six out of seven tested exercises) variable over all different exercises tested. EE and HR are also found to be important variables over several types of exercise. We also found that the importance of GSR and NBT observed in our experiments might be related to stress and the effect of changes in environmental temperature on glucose concentrations. The use of the biometric measurements in an AP system may provide better control of glucose concentration.

  5. Canonical and non-canonical EcfG sigma factors control the general stress response in Rhizobium etli.

    PubMed

    Jans, Ann; Vercruysse, Maarten; Gao, Shanjun; Engelen, Kristof; Lambrichts, Ivo; Fauvart, Maarten; Michiels, Jan

    2013-12-01

    A core component of the α-proteobacterial general stress response (GSR) is the extracytoplasmic function (ECF) sigma factor EcfG, exclusively present in this taxonomic class. Half of the completed α-proteobacterial genome sequences contain two or more copies of genes encoding σ(EcfG) -like sigma factors, with the primary copy typically located adjacent to genes coding for a cognate anti-sigma factor (NepR) and two-component response regulator (PhyR). So far, the widespread occurrence of additional, non-canonical σ(EcfG) copies has not satisfactorily been explained. This study explores the hierarchical relation between Rhizobium etli σ(EcfG1) and σ(EcfG2) , canonical and non-canonical σ(EcfG) proteins, respectively. Contrary to reports in other species, we find that σ(EcfG1) and σ(EcfG2) act in parallel, as nodes of a complex regulatory network, rather than in series, as elements of a linear regulatory cascade. We demonstrate that both sigma factors control unique yet also shared target genes, corroborating phenotypic evidence. σ(EcfG1) drives expression of rpoH2, explaining the increased heat sensitivity of an ecfG1 mutant, while katG is under control of σ(EcfG2) , accounting for reduced oxidative stress resistance of an ecfG2 mutant. We also identify non-coding RNA genes as novel σ(EcfG) targets. We propose a modified model for GSR regulation in R. etli, in which σ(EcfG1) and σ(EcfG2) function largely independently. Based on a phylogenetic analysis and considering the prevalence of α-proteobacterial genomes with multiple σ(EcfG) copies, this model may also be applicable to numerous other species.

  6. Genetic biomarkers for ALS disease in transgenic SOD1(G93A) mice.

    PubMed

    Calvo, Ana C; Manzano, Raquel; Atencia-Cibreiro, Gabriela; Oliván, Sara; Muñoz, María J; Zaragoza, Pilar; Cordero-Vázquez, Pilar; Esteban-Pérez, Jesús; García-Redondo, Alberto; Osta, Rosario

    2012-01-01

    The pathophysiological mechanisms of both familial and sporadic Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS) are unknown, although growing evidence suggests that skeletal muscle tissue is a primary target of ALS toxicity. Skeletal muscle biopsies were performed on transgenic SOD1(G93A) mice, a mouse model of ALS, to determine genetic biomarkers of disease longevity. Mice were anesthetized with isoflurane, and three biopsy samples were obtained per animal at the three main stages of the disease. Transcriptional expression levels of seventeen genes, Ankrd1, Calm1, Col19a1, Fbxo32, Gsr, Impa1, Mef2c, Mt2, Myf5, Myod1, Myog, Nnt, Nogo A, Pax7, Rrad, Sln and Snx10, were tested in each muscle biopsy sample. Total RNA was extracted using TRIzol Reagent according to the manufacturer's protocol, and variations in gene expression were assayed by real-time PCR for all of the samples. The Pearson correlation coefficient was used to determine the linear correlation between transcriptional expression levels throughout disease progression and longevity. Consistent with the results obtained from total skeletal muscle of transgenic SOD1(G93A) mice and 74-day-old denervated mice, five genes (Mef2c, Gsr, Col19a1, Calm1 and Snx10) could be considered potential genetic biomarkers of longevity in transgenic SOD1(G93A) mice. These results are important because they may lead to the exploration of previously unexamined tissues in the search for new disease biomarkers and even to the application of these findings in human studies.

  7. New isoforms and assembly of glutamine synthetase in the leaf of wheat (Triticum aestivum L.)

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Xiaochun; Wei, Yihao; Shi, Lanxin; Ma, Xinming; Theg, Steven M.

    2015-08-24

    Glutamine synthetase (GS; EC 6.3.1.2) plays a crucial role in the assimilation and re-assimilation of ammonia derived from a wide variety of metabolic processes during plant growth and development. Here, three developmentally regulated isoforms of GS holoenzyme in the leaf of wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) seedlings are described using native-PAGE with a transferase activity assay. The isoforms showed different mobilities in gels, with GSII>GSIII>GSI. The cytosolic GSI was composed of three subunits, GS1, GSr1, and GSr2, with the same molecular weight (39.2kDa), but different pI values. GSI appeared at leaf emergence and was active throughout the leaf lifespan. GSII and GSIII, both located in the chloroplast, were each composed of a single 42.1kDa subunit with different pI values. GSII was active mainly in green leaves, while GSIII showed brief but higher activity in green leaves grown under field conditions. LC-MS/MS experiments revealed that GSII and GSIII have the same amino acid sequence, but GSII has more modification sites. With a modified blue native electrophoresis (BNE) technique and in-gel catalytic activity analysis, only two GS isoforms were observed: one cytosolic and one chloroplastic. Mass calibrations on BNE gels showed that the cytosolic GS1 holoenzyme was ~490kDa and likely a dodecamer, and the chloroplastic GS2 holoenzyme was ~240kDa and likely a hexamer. Lastly, our experimental data suggest that the activity of GS isoforms in wheat is regulated by subcellular localization, assembly, and modification to achieve their roles during plant development.

  8. New isoforms and assembly of glutamine synthetase in the leaf of wheat (Triticum aestivum L.)

    DOE PAGES

    Wang, Xiaochun; Wei, Yihao; Shi, Lanxin; ...

    2015-08-24

    Glutamine synthetase (GS; EC 6.3.1.2) plays a crucial role in the assimilation and re-assimilation of ammonia derived from a wide variety of metabolic processes during plant growth and development. Here, three developmentally regulated isoforms of GS holoenzyme in the leaf of wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) seedlings are described using native-PAGE with a transferase activity assay. The isoforms showed different mobilities in gels, with GSII>GSIII>GSI. The cytosolic GSI was composed of three subunits, GS1, GSr1, and GSr2, with the same molecular weight (39.2kDa), but different pI values. GSI appeared at leaf emergence and was active throughout the leaf lifespan. GSII andmore » GSIII, both located in the chloroplast, were each composed of a single 42.1kDa subunit with different pI values. GSII was active mainly in green leaves, while GSIII showed brief but higher activity in green leaves grown under field conditions. LC-MS/MS experiments revealed that GSII and GSIII have the same amino acid sequence, but GSII has more modification sites. With a modified blue native electrophoresis (BNE) technique and in-gel catalytic activity analysis, only two GS isoforms were observed: one cytosolic and one chloroplastic. Mass calibrations on BNE gels showed that the cytosolic GS1 holoenzyme was ~490kDa and likely a dodecamer, and the chloroplastic GS2 holoenzyme was ~240kDa and likely a hexamer. Lastly, our experimental data suggest that the activity of GS isoforms in wheat is regulated by subcellular localization, assembly, and modification to achieve their roles during plant development.« less

  9. Application of talcum powder, trichloroacetic acid and silver nitrate in female rats for non-surgical sterilization: evaluation of the apoptotic pathway mRNA and miRNA genes

    PubMed Central

    Yumrutas, Onder; Kara, Murat; Atilgan, Remzi; Kavak, Salih Burcin; Bozgeyik, Ibrahim; Sapmaz, Ekrem

    2015-01-01

    There are several methods used for non-surgical sterilization in birth control including quinacrine, trichloroacetic acid (TCA), erythromycin, tetracycline, silver nitrate and talcum powder. Among these, talcum powder, TCA and silver nitrate are the most commonly used. However, the toxic and carcinogenic activities of these chemicals in ovarian tissue have been poorly elucidated. This study demonstrates the expression levels of antioxidant, apoptotic and anti-apoptotic genes after administration of talc powder, TCA and silver nitrate for non-surgical sterilization in female rat models. The expression changes of some microRNAs (miR-15b, miR-21, miR-34a and miR-98) that play key roles in the apoptosis pathway were also included. All expression analyses were evaluated with real-time PCR. The expression levels of all genes appeared to be upregulated in the talcum powder group, but the results were not statistically significant. Increased expression of Gsr and Sod1 genes was statistically significant in the talcum powder group. In TCA and silver nitrate group, expression of all genes was appeared to be elevated but only the Gsr expression was statistically significant in the TCA-administrated group; there were no statistically significant changes in the silver nitrate group. miRNA expression levels were increased in talcum powder and TCA-administrated groups, but these results were not significant. Expression levels of miR-15b, miR-21 and miR-98 in the silver nitrate group were significantly increased. Consequently, these chemicals appear to be non-carcinogenic agents for rat ovarian tissue which do not induce apoptosis. However, talcum powder and TCA can be considered as agents that are toxic to ovarian tissue. PMID:25885949

  10. Variation in IL10 and Other Genes Involved in the Immune Response and in Oxidation and Prostate Cancer Recurrence

    PubMed Central

    Dluzniewski, Paul J.; Wang, Ming-Hsi; Zheng, Siqun Lilly; De Marzo, Angelo M.; Drake, Charles G.; Fedor, Helen L.; Partin, Alan W.; Han, Misop; Fallin, M. Daniele; Xu, Jianfeng; Isaacs, William B.; Platz, Elizabeth A.

    2012-01-01

    Background To evaluate the association of variation in genes involved in immune response, including IL10, production and detoxification of reactive oxygen species, and repair of oxidative DNA damage with risk of recurrence after surgery for localized prostate cancer. Methods We conducted a nested case-control study of men who had a radical prostatectomy in 1993–2001. 484 recurrence cases and 484 controls were matched on age, race, and pathologic stage and grade. Germline DNA was extracted from paraffin-embedded unaffected lymph nodes. We genotyped candidate single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in IL10, CRP, GPX1, GSR, GSTP1, hOGG1, IL1B, IL1RN, IL6, IL8, MPO, NOS2, NOS3, SOD1, SOD2, SOD3, TLR4, and TNF and tagging SNPs in IL10, CRP, GSR, IL1RN, IL6, NOS2, and NOS3. We used conditional logistic regression to estimate odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI). Results The minor allele (A) in IL10 rs1800872, known to produce less interleukin-10, was associated with a higher risk of recurrence (OR=1.76, 95% CI: 1.00–3.10), and the minor allele (G) in rs1800896, known to produce more interleukin-10, was associated with a lower risk of recurrence (OR=0.66, 95% CI: 0.48–0.91). We also observed associations for candidate SNPs in CRP, GSTP1, and IL1B. A common IL10 haplotype and two common NOS2 haplotypes were associated with recurrence. Conclusion Variation in IL10, CRP, GSTP1, IL1B, and NOS2 was associated with recurrence independent of pathologic prognostic factors. Impact This study supports that genetic variation in immune response and oxidation influence recurrence risk and suggests genetic variation in these pathways may inform prognosis. PMID:22859398

  11. New isoforms and assembly of glutamine synthetase in the leaf of wheat (Triticum aestivum L.).

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiaochun; Wei, Yihao; Shi, Lanxin; Ma, Xinming; Theg, Steven M

    2015-11-01

    Glutamine synthetase (GS; EC 6.3.1.2) plays a crucial role in the assimilation and re-assimilation of ammonia derived from a wide variety of metabolic processes during plant growth and development. Here, three developmentally regulated isoforms of GS holoenzyme in the leaf of wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) seedlings are described using native-PAGE with a transferase activity assay. The isoforms showed different mobilities in gels, with GSII>GSIII>GSI. The cytosolic GSI was composed of three subunits, GS1, GSr1, and GSr2, with the same molecular weight (39.2kDa), but different pI values. GSI appeared at leaf emergence and was active throughout the leaf lifespan. GSII and GSIII, both located in the chloroplast, were each composed of a single 42.1kDa subunit with different pI values. GSII was active mainly in green leaves, while GSIII showed brief but higher activity in green leaves grown under field conditions. LC-MS/MS experiments revealed that GSII and GSIII have the same amino acid sequence, but GSII has more modification sites. With a modified blue native electrophoresis (BNE) technique and in-gel catalytic activity analysis, only two GS isoforms were observed: one cytosolic and one chloroplastic. Mass calibrations on BNE gels showed that the cytosolic GS1 holoenzyme was ~490kDa and likely a dodecamer, and the chloroplastic GS2 holoenzyme was ~240kDa and likely a hexamer. Our experimental data suggest that the activity of GS isoforms in wheat is regulated by subcellular localization, assembly, and modification to achieve their roles during plant development.

  12. Using molecular biomarkers and traditional morphometric measurements to assess the health of slimy sculpin (Cottus cognatus) from streams with elevated selenium in North-Eastern British Columbia.

    PubMed

    Miller, Lana L; Isaacs, Meghan A; Martyniuk, Christopher J; Munkittrick, Kelly R

    2015-10-01

    Canadian fish-based environmental effects monitoring programs use individual and population-level endpoints to assess aquatic health. Impacts of coal mining and selenium (Se) exposure were assessed in slimy sculpin (Cottus cognatus) from reference streams located both inside and outside of a coal zone, and from 1 stream with a history of coal mining, using traditional environmental effects monitoring endpoints. In addition, physical characteristics of the streams and benthic macro-invertebrate communities were assessed. To determine whether the assessment of effects could be improved by including molecular markers, real-time polymerase chain reaction assays were optimized for genes associated with reproduction (vtg, esr1, star, cyp19a1, and gys2), and oxidative and cellular stress (sod1, gpx, gsr, cat, and hsp 90). Water Se levels exceeded guidelines in the stream with historical mining (4 μg/L), but benthic macroinvertebrates did not exceed dietary thresholds (2-3 μg/g dry wt). Whole-body Se levels were above British Columbia's tissue guideline in fish from all streams, but only above the draft US Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) criterion (7.91 μg/g dry wt) at the reference stream inside the coal zone. Some markers of cellular and oxidative stress were elevated in fish liver at the exposed site (sod1, gpx), but some were lower (cat, sod1, gpx, gsr, hsp90) in the gonads of fish inside the coal zone. Some of the differences in gene expression levels between the reference and impacted sites were sex dependent. Based on benthic macroinvertebrate assessments, the authors hypothesize that traditional and molecular differences in slimy sculpin at impacted sites may be driven by food availability rather than Se exposure. The present study is the first to adapt molecular endpoints in the slimy sculpin for aquatic health assessments.

  13. Brucella abortus ΔrpoE1 confers protective immunity against wild type challenge in a mouse model of brucellosis.

    PubMed

    Willett, Jonathan W; Herrou, Julien; Czyż, Daniel M; Cheng, Jason X; Crosson, Sean

    2016-09-30

    The Brucella abortus general stress response (GSR) system regulates activity of the alternative sigma factor, σ(E1), which controls transcription of approximately 100 genes and is required for persistence in a BALB/c mouse chronic infection model. We evaluated the host response to infection by a B. abortus strain lacking σ(E1) (ΔrpoE1), and identified pathological and immunological features that distinguish ΔrpoE1-infected mice from wild-type (WT), and that correspond with clearance of ΔrpoE1 from the host. ΔrpoE1 infection was indistinguishable from WT in terms of splenic bacterial burden, inflammation and histopathology up to 6weeks post-infection. However, Brucella-specific serum IgG levels in ΔrpoE1-infected mice were 5 times higher than WT by 4weeks post-infection, and remained significantly higher throughout the course of a 12-week infection. Total IgG and Brucella-specific IgG levels peaked strongly in ΔrpoE1-infected mice at 6weeks, which correlated with reduced splenomegaly and bacterial burden relative to WT-infected mice. Given the difference in immune response to infection with wild-type and ΔrpoE1, we tested whether ΔrpoE1 confers protective immunity to wild-type challenge. Mice immunized with ΔrpoE1 completely resisted WT infection and had significantly higher serum titers of Brucella-specific IgG, IgG2a and IFN-γ after WT challenge relative to age-matched naïve mice. We conclude that immunization of BALB/c mice with the B. abortus GSR pathway mutant, ΔrpoE1, elicits an adaptive immune response that confers significant protective immunity against WT infection.

  14. Application of talcum powder, trichloroacetic acid and silver nitrate in female rats for non-surgical sterilization: evaluation of the apoptotic pathway mRNA and miRNA genes.

    PubMed

    Yumrutas, Onder; Kara, Murat; Atilgan, Remzi; Kavak, Salih Burcin; Bozgeyik, Ibrahim; Sapmaz, Ekrem

    2015-04-01

    There are several methods used for non-surgical sterilization in birth control including quinacrine, trichloroacetic acid (TCA), erythromycin, tetracycline, silver nitrate and talcum powder. Among these, talcum powder, TCA and silver nitrate are the most commonly used. However, the toxic and carcinogenic activities of these chemicals in ovarian tissue have been poorly elucidated. This study demonstrates the expression levels of antioxidant, apoptotic and anti-apoptotic genes after administration of talc powder, TCA and silver nitrate for non-surgical sterilization in female rat models. The expression changes of some microRNAs (miR-15b, miR-21, miR-34a and miR-98) that play key roles in the apoptosis pathway were also included. All expression analyses were evaluated with real-time PCR. The expression levels of all genes appeared to be upregulated in the talcum powder group, but the results were not statistically significant. Increased expression of Gsr and Sod1 genes was statistically significant in the talcum powder group. In TCA and silver nitrate group, expression of all genes was appeared to be elevated but only the Gsr expression was statistically significant in the TCA-administrated group; there were no statistically significant changes in the silver nitrate group. miRNA expression levels were increased in talcum powder and TCA-administrated groups, but these results were not significant. Expression levels of miR-15b, miR-21 and miR-98 in the silver nitrate group were significantly increased. Consequently, these chemicals appear to be non-carcinogenic agents for rat ovarian tissue which do not induce apoptosis. However, talcum powder and TCA can be considered as agents that are toxic to ovarian tissue.

  15. Bottom temperature and salinity distribution and its variability around Iceland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jochumsen, Kerstin; Schnurr, Sarah M.; Quadfasel, Detlef

    2016-05-01

    The barrier formed by the Greenland-Scotland-Ridge (GSR) shapes the oceanic conditions in the region around Iceland. Deep water cannot be exchanged across the ridge, and only limited water mass exchange in intermediate layers is possible through deep channels, where the flow is directed southwestward (the Nordic Overflows). As a result, the near-bottom water masses in the deep basins of the northern North Atlantic and the Nordic Seas hold major temperature differences. Here, we use near-bottom measurements of about 88,000 CTD (conductivity-temperature-depth) and bottle profiles, collected in the period 1900-2008, to investigate the distribution of near-bottom properties. Data are gridded into regular boxes of about 11 km size and interpolated following isobaths. We derive average spatial temperature and salinity distributions in the region around Iceland, showing the influence of the GSR on the near-bottom hydrography. The spatial distribution of standard deviation is used to identify local variability, which is enhanced near water mass fronts. Finally, property changes within the period 1975-2008 are presented using time series analysis techniques for a collection of grid boxes with sufficient data resolution. Seasonal variability, as well as long term trends are discussed for different bottom depth classes, representing varying water masses. The seasonal cycle is most pronounced in temperature and decreases with depth (mean amplitudes of 2.2 °C in the near surface layers vs. 0.2 °C at depths > 500 m), while linear trends are evident in both temperature and salinity (maxima in shallow waters of +0.33 °C/decade for temperature and +0.03/decade for salinity).

  16. The nucleon-nucleon interaction up to sixth order in the chiral expansion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Machleidt, Ruprecht; Nosyk, Yevgen

    2016-09-01

    We have calculated the nucleon-nucleon potential up to sixth order (N5LO) of chiral perturbation theory. Previous calculations extended only up to N3LO (fourth order) and typically showed a surplus of attraction, particularly, when the π- N LECs from π- N analysis were applied consistently. Furthermore, the contributions at N2LO and N3LO are both fairly sizeable, thus, raising concerns about the convergence of the chiral expansion. We show that the N4LO contribution is repulsive and, essentially, cancels the excessive attraction of N3LO. The N5LO contribution turns out to be considerably smaller than the N4LO one, hence establishing the desired trend of convergence. The predictions at N5LO are in excellent agreement with the empirical phase shifts of peripheral partial waves. Supported by the US Department of Energy under Grant No. DE-FG02-03ER41270.

  17. Second floor plan. (Also includes a roof plan and finish ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Second floor plan. (Also includes a roof plan and finish schedule.) March Air Force Base, Riverside, California, Combat Operations Center, Combat Operations Building. By Moffatt and Nichol, Engineers, 122 West Fifth Street, Long Beach, California; for the Corps of Engineers, U.S. Army, Office of the District Engineer, Los Angeles, California. Drawing no. AW-60-02-03, sheet no. 13, approved March, 1962; specifications no. OCI-62-66; D.O. series AW 1596/13, Rev. "C"; file drawer 1290. Last revised 7 February 1984. Roof plan scale one-sixteenth inch to one foot; second floor plan scale one-eighth inch to one foot. 28.75x41 inches. pencil on paper - March Air Force Base, Strategic Air Command, Combat Operations Center, 5220 Riverside Drive, Moreno Valley, Riverside County, CA

  18. A comparison of quasi-symmetries in stellarators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Alex; Ware, Andrew

    2016-10-01

    This work explores the differences between the equilibrium, stability and transport properties of quasi-helically (QH) symmetric, quasi-axisymmetric (QA) and quasi-poloidally (QP) symmetric stellarator configurations with the same major radius, aspect ratio, average magnetic field strength, plasma β and pressure profiles. Previous work on quasi-symmetry in stellarators has typically focused on one type of quasi-symmetry. Optimized stellarators have been developed for QH, QA and QP configurations but at very different plasma parameters. In this work computational studies of optimized cases of all three cases have been undertaken. Results of the studies will be presented. Work supported by U.S. Department of Energy under Grant DE-FG02-03ER54699 at the University of Montana.

  19. Airport Activity Statistics of Certificated Route Air Carriers.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-12-31

    4. 77 I4 3404A 1,1973 1.9. 3.44A t AA 3* 34433 0.61 Is.. 4. 2 4.06 .4.6 7 W.34 87 4ILL 3𔃾IL! 1375.24 .44 C6 .06 344 34 I 0.444 ’.---3 2 .6[0 533.64I...2d 4; /03 SY4- I(. it -5t 3 1 1 3 0 2 " IL 34433 3351 02/-03 135 IS A$-L 1-1115 24l l 1.45" 6 43 3-1-3 2 2 l’-1, -jIs PA-/I 2AL 10/3 58,4 to, 11k,..a

  20. Final Report: X-ray Studies of Materials Dynamics at MHATT-CAT Sector 7 , Advanced Photon Source

    SciTech Connect

    Roy Clarke

    2006-04-25

    This Final Report describes the scientific accomplishments that have been achieved with support from grant DE-FG02-03ER46023 during the period 12/01/02 ? 11/30/05. The funding supported a vigorous scientific program allowing the PI to achieve leadership in a number of important areas. In particular, research carried out during this period has opened way to ultrafast dynamics studies of materials by combining the capabilities of synchrotron radiation with those of ultrafast lasers. This enables the initiation of laser-induced excitations and studies of their subsequent dynamics using laser-pump/x-ray probe techniques. Examples of such excitations include phonons, shock waves, excitons, spin-waves, and polaritons. The breadth of phenomena that can now be studied in the time-domain is very broad, revealing new phenomena and mechanisms that are critical to many applications of materials.

  1. Historical perspective and future prospects for nuclear interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Machleidt, Ruprecht

    2017-01-01

    The nuclear force is the heart of nuclear physics and, thus, the significance of this force for all of nuclear physics can hardly be overstated. Research on this crucial force has by now spanned eight decades and we are still not done. I will review the rich history of hope and desperation, which had spin-off far beyond just nuclear physics. After a summary of the current status in the field, I will also take a look at the future: Where will we stand 50 years from now? Will there ever be closure? Supported by the U.S. Department of Energy under Grant No. DE-FG02-03ER41270.

  2. [Microbiological quality of indoor air at the School of Building and Environmental Engineering at Białystok University of Technology].

    PubMed

    Butarewicz, Andrzej

    2005-01-01

    The investigation of microbiological rate of indoor air pollution on Faculty of Building and Environmental Engineering at Białystok University of Technology were made by sedimentation method in accordance with Polish standards (PN-89/Z-04111/01,02,03). Six series of measurements were carried out from autumn 2002 to spring 2003. The results show bad microbiological quality of indoor air on Faculty of Building and Environmental Engineering at Białystok University of Technology. It was found that the number of Staphylococcus, Actinomycetales as well as the total count of bacteria were too high and broke the Polish regulations of the clear air. Because of the students' and other workers' safety, monitoring of microbiological pollution of the indoor air must be done and existing emergency to improve the quality of the air must be lead.

  3. Streamlined Approach for Environmental Restoration (SAFER) Plan for Corrective Action Unit 124: Storage Tanks, Nevada Test Site, Nevada (Draft), Revision 0

    SciTech Connect

    Alfred Wickline

    2007-04-01

    This Streamlined Approach for Environmental Restoration (SAFER) Plan addresses closure for Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 124, Areas 8, 15, and 16 Storage Tanks, identified in the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order. Corrective Action Unit 124 consists of five Corrective Action Sites (CASs) located in Areas 8, 15, and 16 of the Nevada Test Site as follows: • 08-02-01, Underground Storage Tank • 15-02-01, Irrigation Piping • 16-02-03, Underground Storage Tank • 16-02-04, Fuel Oil Piping • 16-99-04, Fuel Line (Buried) and UST This plan provides the methodology of field activities necessary to gather information to close each CAS. There is sufficient information and process knowledge from historical documentation and investigations of similar sites regarding the expected nature and extent of potential contaminants to recommend closure of CAU 124 using the SAFER process.

  4. Elevations. March Air Force Base, Riverside, California, Combat Operations Center, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Elevations. March Air Force Base, Riverside, California, Combat Operations Center, Combat Operations Building. By Moffatt and Nichol, Engineers, 122 West Fifth Street, Long Beach, California; for the Corps of Engineers, U.S. Army, Office of the District Engineer, Los Angeles, California. Drawing no. AW-60-02-03, sheet no. 14, approved March, 1962; specifications no. ENG-04-353-62-66; D.O. series AW 1596/14, Rev. "B"; file drawer 77-1/102. Last revised 3 October 1966. Scale one-eighth inch to one foot. 30x36 inches. photocopy on paper - March Air Force Base, Strategic Air Command, Combat Operations Center, 5220 Riverside Drive, Moreno Valley, Riverside County, CA

  5. First floor plan. (Also includes a door schedule and door ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    First floor plan. (Also includes a door schedule and door elevations). March Air Force Base, Riverside, California, Combat Operations Center, Combat Operations Building. By Moffatt and Nichol, Engineers, 122 West Fifth Street, Long Beach, California; for the Corps of Engineers, U.S. Army, Office of the District Engineer, Los Angeles, California. Drawing no. AW-60-02-03, sheet no. 12, approved March 1962; specifications no. OCI-62-66; D.O. series AW 1596/12, Rev. "C"; file drawer 1290. Last revised 25 August 1975. Scale one-eighth inch to one foot. 28.5x 41 inches. pencil on paper - March Air Force Base, Strategic Air Command, Combat Operations Center, 5220 Riverside Drive, Moreno Valley, Riverside County, CA

  6. Sections. March Air Force Base, Riverside, California, Combat Operations Center, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Sections. March Air Force Base, Riverside, California, Combat Operations Center, Combat Operations Building. By Moffatt and Nichol, Engineers, 122 West Fifth Street, Long Beach, California; for the Corps of Engineers, U.S. Army, Office of the District Engineer, Los Angeles, California. Drawing no. AW-60-02-03, sheet no. 14, approved March, 1962; specifications no. ENG-04-353-62-66; D.O. series AW 1596/15, Rev. "A"; file drawer 1290. Last revised 3 October 1966. Scale one-eighth inch to one foot. 30x36 inches. pencil on paper - March Air Force Base, Strategic Air Command, Combat Operations Center, 5220 Riverside Drive, Moreno Valley, Riverside County, CA

  7. VIEW OF THE #67 HOLDING FURNACE POURING AT #04 COPPER ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    VIEW OF THE #67 HOLDING FURNACE POURING AT #04 COPPER STATION IN THE CASTING SHOP. (OTHER UNITS MELT BRASS ALLOYS.) THIS IS THE SOUTHERNMOST FURNACE OF THE FOUR PRESENTLY IN SITU. THE CURRENT CASTING SHOP WAS CONSTRUCTED DURING THE EARLY 1970'S, REPLACING THE ORIGINAL PRE-WWI FACILITY. STATIONS #02,03, AND 04 EACH CONSIST OF A HOLDER FLANKED BY A PAIR OF 800 KW ELECTRIC MELTERS. THE HOLDER IS RATED AT 85,000 LBS. SHAKER BOXES, LOCATED AT THE REAR OF EACH MELTER SUPPLY THE MIXTURE OF INGREDIENTS REQUIRED FOR EACH PARTICULAR ALLOY. ONE MEMBER OF THE THREE-MAN CASTING TEAMS IS RESPONSIBLE FOR SHAKING METAL INTO THE MELTERS. IN THE LOWER RIGHT ARE SHOWN THE MOLD STORAGE AREA AND THE FURNACE BUILDERS' AREA FOR CHIPPING AND REBRICKING OFF-LINE UNITS. - American Brass Foundry, 70 Sayre Street, Buffalo, Erie County, NY

  8. VIEW OF THE #67 HOLDING FURNACE POURING AT #04 COPPER ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    VIEW OF THE #67 HOLDING FURNACE POURING AT #04 COPPER STATION IN THE CASTING SHOP. (OTHER UNITS MELT BRASS ALLOYS.) THIS IS THE SOUTHERNMOST FURNACE OF THE FOUR PRESENTLY IN SITU. THE CURRENT CASTING SHOP WAS CONSTRUCTED DURING THE EARLY 1970'S, REPLACING THE ORIGINAL PRE-WWI FACILITY. STATIONS #02, 03, AND 04 EACH CONSIST OF A HOLDER FLANKED BY A PAIR OF 800 KW ELECTRIC MELTERS. THE HOLDER IS REHEATED AT 85,000 LBS. SHAKER BOX, LOCATED AT THE REAR OF EACH MELTER SUPPLY THE MIXTURE OF INGREDIENTS REQUIRED FOR EACH PARTICULAR ALLOY. ONE MEMBER OF THE THREE-MAN CASTING TEAMS IS RESPONSIBLE FOR SHAKING METAL INTO THE MELTERS. IN THE LOWER RIGHT ARE SHOWN THE MOLD STORAGE AREA AND THE FURNACE BUILDERS' AREA FOR CHIPPING AND REBRICKING OFF-LINE UNITS. - American Brass Foundry, 70 Sayre Street, Buffalo, Erie County, NY

  9. V3FIT: Three-Dimensional MHD Equilibrium Reconstruction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanson, James D.; Shields, John; Hirshman, S. P.; Lazarus, E. A.; Lao, L.; Knowlton, S. F.

    2007-11-01

    V3FIT is a three-dimensional MHD equilibrium reconstruction code, based on the VMEC equilibrium code. V3FIT is a general and easily extensible reconstruction code, designed so that information from many types of diagnostics can be used to determine the equilibrium. The first diagnostics included in V3FIT were magnetic diagnostics. We will present results on reconstruction using microwave interferometers and polarimeters as diagnostics. We will also show comparisons between V3FIT and EFIT reconstructions using experimental data from the DIII-D tokamak. This work is supported in part by US DOE Grant DE-FG02-03ER54692B and a US DOE Postdoctoral Research Fellowship.

  10. Equipment Location Plan, partial basement plan. (Includes identification of each ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Equipment Location Plan, partial basement plan. (Includes identification of each separate CPU, tape drive, hard drive, printer, keyboard, etc., within the data processing center in the southeast part of the basement.) March Air Force Base, Riverside, California, Combat Operations Center, 465-L DPC. By International Electric Corporation, Paramus, New Jersey (3/5/62); for Moffatt and Nichol, Engineers, 122 West Fifth Street, Long Beach, California; for the Corps of Engineers, U.S. Army, Office of the District Engineer, Los Angeles, California. Drawing no. AW-60-02-03, sheet no. 100, approved March, 1962; specifications no. OCI-62-66; D.O. series AW 1596/100, Rev. "A"; file drawer 1290. Last revised 3 October 1966. Scale one-quarter inch to one foot. 28.75x40.5 inches. ink on linen - March Air Force Base, Strategic Air Command, Combat Operations Center, 5220 Riverside Drive, Moreno Valley, Riverside County, CA

  11. Equipment Location Plan, partial first floor plan. (Includes identification of ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Equipment Location Plan, partial first floor plan. (Includes identification of each separate CPU, tape drive, hard drive, printer, keyboard, etc., within the data processing center in the southwest part of the first floor.) March Air Force Base, Riverside, California, Combat Operations Center, 465-L EDTCC/EDLCC. By International Electric Corporation, Paramus, New Jersey (3/5/62); for Moffatt and Nichol, Engineers, 122 West Fifth Street, Long Beach, California; for the Corps of Engineers, U.S. Army, Office of the District Engineer, Los Angeles, California. Drawing no. AW-60-02-03, sheet no. 85, approved March, 1962; specifications no. OCI-62-66; D.O. series AW 1596/85, Rev. "A"; file drawer 1290. Last revised 3 October 1966. Scale one-quarter inch to one foot. 28.75x40.5 inches. ink on linen - March Air Force Base, Strategic Air Command, Combat Operations Center, 5220 Riverside Drive, Moreno Valley, Riverside County, CA

  12. ASYMPTOTICALLY OPTIMAL HIGH-ORDER ACCURATE ALGORITHMS FOR THE SOLUTION OF CERTAIN ELLIPTIC PDEs

    SciTech Connect

    Leonid Kunyansky, PhD

    2008-11-26

    The main goal of the project, "Asymptotically Optimal, High-Order Accurate Algorithms for the Solution of Certain Elliptic PDE's" (DE-FG02-03ER25577) was to develop fast, high-order algorithms for the solution of scattering problems and spectral problems of photonic crystals theory. The results we obtained lie in three areas: (1) asymptotically fast, high-order algorithms for the solution of eigenvalue problems of photonics, (2) fast, high-order algorithms for the solution of acoustic and electromagnetic scattering problems in the inhomogeneous media, and (3) inversion formulas and fast algorithms for the inverse source problem for the acoustic wave equation, with applications to thermo- and opto- acoustic tomography.

  13. Evaluating the Impact of Alternative Forms of the Military Health Care Benefit: The Application of a Health Service Behavioral Framework.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-06-01

    in this apDroach are: cultural definition of illness, cultural definition of illness behavior, life styles, familia : composition. Suchman examined...write in ranK.) El E2 E3 E E5 E6 E7 EB Z9 Wl W2 W3 W4 01 02 03 04 05 06 07 08 09 OlD RANK !N ALL OF THE ’OLL)WI*;G QUESTIONS ANSWER -O YOURSELF WHETHER...W a) I ID ~ In (D oD ID- I ,( Zn In eb Z cn ’A It 0 I 147 TITLE OF OFFICER RANKS Army, Air Force Grade Marines Navy 0-10 General Admiral 0-9

  14. Correction of walk-off-induced wavefront distortion for continuous-wave laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zou, Hongxin; Chen, Guozhu; Wu, Yue; Shen, Yong; Liu, Qu

    2016-09-01

    We theoretically and experimentally investigate the wave front distortion in critically phase-matched continuous-wave (CW) second harmonic generation (SHG). Due to the walk-off effect in the nonlinear crystal, the generated second harmonic is extremely elliptical and quite non-Gaussian, which causes a very low matching and coupling efficiency in experiment. Cylindrical lenses and walk-off compensating crystals are adopted to correct distorted wave fronts, and obtain a good TEM00 mode efficiently. Theoretically, we simulate the correction effect of 266-nm laser generated with SHG. The experiment results accord well with the theoretical simulation and an above 80% TEM00 component is obtained for 266-nm continuous-wave laser with a 4.8°-walk-off angle in beta barium borate (BBO) crystal. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 91436103) and Research Programme of National University of Defense Technology, China (Grant No. JC15-02-03).

  15. Sequencing and analysis of the gene-rich space of cowpea

    PubMed Central

    Timko, Michael P; Rushton, Paul J; Laudeman, Thomas W; Bokowiec, Marta T; Chipumuro, Edmond; Cheung, Foo; Town, Christopher D; Chen, Xianfeng

    2008-01-01

    Background Cowpea, Vigna unguiculata (L.) Walp., is one of the most important food and forage legumes in the semi-arid tropics because of its drought tolerance and ability to grow on poor quality soils. Approximately 80% of cowpea production takes place in the dry savannahs of tropical West and Central Africa, mostly by poor subsistence farmers. Despite its economic and social importance in the developing world, cowpea remains to a large extent an underexploited crop. Among the major goals of cowpea breeding and improvement programs is the stacking of desirable agronomic traits, such as disease and pest resistance and response to abiotic stresses. Implementation of marker-assisted selection and breeding programs is severely limited by a paucity of trait-linked markers and a general lack of information on gene structure and organization. With a nuclear genome size estimated at ~620 Mb, the cowpea genome is an ideal target for reduced representation sequencing. Results We report here the sequencing and analysis of the gene-rich, hypomethylated portion of the cowpea genome selectively cloned by methylation filtration (MF) technology. Over 250,000 gene-space sequence reads (GSRs) with an average length of 610 bp were generated, yielding ~160 Mb of sequence information. The GSRs were assembled, annotated by BLAST homology searches of four public protein annotation databases and four plant proteomes (A. thaliana, M. truncatula, O. sativa, and P. trichocarpa), and analyzed using various domain and gene modeling tools. A total of 41,260 GSR assemblies and singletons were annotated, of which 19,786 have unique GenBank accession numbers. Within the GSR dataset, 29% of the sequences were annotated using the Arabidopsis Gene Ontology (GO) with the largest categories of assigned function being catalytic activity and metabolic processes, groups that include the majority of cellular enzymes and components of amino acid, carbohydrate and lipid metabolism. A total of 5,888 GSRs had

  16. Hepatoprotection with a chloroform extract of Launaea procumbens against CCl4-induced injuries in rats

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Launaea procumbens (Asteraceae) is used as a folk medicine to treat hepatic disorders in Pakistan. The effect of a chloroform extract of Launaea procumbens (LPCE) was evaluated against carbon-tetrachloride (CCl4)-induced liver damage in rats. Methods To evaluate the hepatoprotective effects of LPCE, 36 male Sprague–Dawley rats were equally divided into six groups. Animals of group 1 (control) had free access to food and water. Group II received 3 ml/kg of CCl4 (30% in olive oil v/v) via the intraperitoneal route twice a week for 4 weeks. Group III received 1 ml of silymarin via gavage (100 mg/kg b.w.) after 48 h of CCl4 treatment whereas groups IV and V were given 1 ml of LPCE (100 and 200 mg/kg b.w., respectively) after 48 h of CCl4 treatment. Group VI received 1 ml of LPCE (200 mg/kg b.w.) twice a week for 4 weeks. The activities of the antioxidant enzymes catalase, peroxidase (POD), superoxide dismutase (SOD), glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px), glutathione S-transferase (GST), glutathione reductase (GSR), glutathione (GSH) and lipid peroxidation (thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS)) were measured in liver homogenates. DNA damage, argyrophilic nucleolar organizer regions (AgNORs) counts and histopathology were studied in liver samples. Serum was analyzed for various biochemical parameters. Phytochemical composition in LPCE was determined through high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). Results LPCE inhibited lipid peroxidation, and reduced the activities of aspartate transaminase, alanine transaminase, alkaline phosphatase, and lactate dehydrogenase in serum induced by CCl4. GSH contents were increased as were the activities of antioxidant enzymes (catalase, SOD, GST, GSR, GSH-Px) when altered due to CCl4 hepatotoxicity. Similarly, absolute liver weight, relative liver weight and the number of hepatic lesions were reduced with co-administration of LPCE. Phyochemical analyses of LPCE indicated that it contained catechin, kaempferol

  17. TWO DISTANT HALO VELOCITY GROUPS DISCOVERED BY THE PALOMAR TRANSIENT FACTORY

    SciTech Connect

    Sesar, Branimir; Cohen, Judith G.; Levitan, David; Kirby, Evan N.; Kulkarni, Shrinivas R.; Prince, Thomas A.; Grillmair, Carl J.; Laher, Russ R.; Surace, Jason A.; Juric, Mario; Ofek, Eran O.

    2012-08-20

    We report the discovery of two new halo velocity groups (Cancer groups A and B) traced by eight distant RR Lyrae stars and observed by the Palomar Transient Factory survey at R.A. {approx} 129 Degree-Sign , decl. {approx} 20 Degree-Sign (l {approx} 205 Degree-Sign , b {approx} 32 Degree-Sign ). Located at 92 kpc from the Galactic center (86 kpc from the Sun), these are some of the most distant substructures in the Galactic halo known to date. Follow-up spectroscopic observations with the Palomar Observatory 5.1 m Hale telescope and W. M. Keck Observatory 10 m Keck I telescope indicate that the two groups are moving away from the Galaxy at v-bar{sub gsr}{sup A} = 78.0{+-}5.6 km s{sup -1} (Cancer group A) and v-bar{sub gsr}{sup B} = 16.3{+-}7.1 km s{sup -1} (Cancer group B). The groups have velocity dispersions of {sigma}{sub v{sub g{sub s{sub r}{sup A}}}} = 12.4{+-}5.0 km s{sup -1} and {sigma}B{sub v{sub g{sub s{sub r}{sup B}}}} =14.9{+-}6.2 km s{sup -1} and are spatially extended (about several kpc), making it very unlikely that they are bound systems, and more likely to be debris of tidally disrupted dwarf galaxies or globular clusters. Both groups are metal-poor (median metallicities of [Fe/H]{sup A} = -1.6 dex and [Fe/H]{sup B} = -2.1 dex) and have a somewhat uncertain (due to small sample size) metallicity dispersion of {approx}0.4 dex, suggesting dwarf galaxies as progenitors. Two additional RR Lyrae stars with velocities consistent with those of the Cancer groups have been observed {approx}25 Degree-Sign east, suggesting possible extension of the groups in that direction.

  18. Linkage disequilibrium, haplotype analysis and Werner`s syndrome

    SciTech Connect

    Wijsman, E.M.; Goddard, K.A.B.; Martin, G.M.

    1994-09-01

    Werner`s syndrome (WS) is a rare, autosomal, recessive disorder of premature aging. Although the underlying defect is unknown, the gene for the disorder, WRN, has been mapped to the 8p11.1-21.1 region. We have assembled a sample of 30 Japanese and 24 non-Japanese (primary Caucasian) WS patients, as well as a control sample from each population. 25 of the Japanese patients and 10 of the Caucasian patients are from consanguineous marriages. We recently presented evidence from these families which places WRN in the 10.2 cM interval between D8S87 and D8S137. However, because WS is so rare and because many patients are from consanguineous marriages, fine localization of the gene by traditional meiotic mapping methods is unlikely to succeed. The existence of linkage disequilibrium is now recognized as a key piece of evidence in defining a small region (typically under 1-2 cM) containing a gene of interest. Thus an alternative approach for refining the location of WRN may be to identify linked markers which are in linkage disequilibrium with the disease. We recently suggested that WRN may be close to D8S339 and GSR in the above interval because of the presence of statistically significant evidence of linkage disequilibrium in the Japanese sample. In addition, there was evidence in both populations that a limited number of haplotypes was associated with the disease. Here we report an extension of this study to include a number of additional markers. We present additional evidence that there is linkage disequilibrium between many of these markers and WRN in both the Japanese and Caucasian samples. In addition, the additional markers do not markedly subdivide the disease haplotypes defined by D8S339 and GSR, while at the same time they introduce substantial numbers of new haplotypes into the control populations. These results suggest that the haplotypes associated with WS may be used to further define the limits of WRN.

  19. Investigation on flavonoid composition and anti free radical potential of Sida cordata

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Sida cordata, a member of Family Malvaceae is used in folk medicine for various ailments including liver diseases. In this study we investigated, its flavonoid constituents, in vitro antioxidant potential against different free radicals and hepatoprotection against carbon tetrachloride (CCl4)-induced liver damage in rat. Methods Dried powder of S. cordata whole plant was extracted with methanol and the resultant (SCME) obtained was fractionated with escalating polarity to obtain n-hexane fraction (SCHE), ethyl acetate fraction (SCEE), n-butanol fraction (SCBE) and the remaining soluble portion as aqueous fraction (SCAE). Diverse in vitro antioxidants assays such as DPPH, H2O2, •OH, ABTS, β-carotene bleaching assay, superoxide radical, lipid peroxidation, reducing power, and total antioxidant capacity were studied to assess scavenging potential of methanol extract and its derived fractions. On account of marked scavenging activity SCEE was selected to investigate the hepatoprotective potential against CCl4 induced toxicity in Sprague–Dawley male rats by assessing the level of serum markers (alkaline phosphatase, alanine transaminase, aspartate transaminase, lactate dehydrogenase, bilirubin, and γ-glutamyltransferase) and of liver antioxidant enzymes such as catalase (CAT), superoxide dismutase (SOD), peroxidase (POD), glutathione-S-transfers (GST), glutathione reductase (GSR), glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px), and reduced glutathione (GSH) and lipid peroxidation (TBARS). Histology of the liver was performed to study alteration in histoarchitecture. Existence of active flavonoids was established by thin layer chromatographic studies. Results Considerable amount of flavonoid and phenolic contents were recorded in the methanol extract and its derived fractions. Although the extract and all its derived fractions exhibited good antioxidant activities however, the most distinguished scavenging potential was observed for SCEE. Treatment of SCEE decreased

  20. Cadmium-Induced Disruption in 24-h Expression of Clock and Redox Enzyme Genes in Rat Medial Basal Hypothalamus: Prevention by Melatonin

    PubMed Central

    Jiménez-Ortega, Vanesa; Cano-Barquilla, Pilar; Scacchi, Pablo A.; Cardinali, Daniel P.; Esquifino, Ana I.

    2011-01-01

    In a previous study we reported that a low daily p.o. dose of cadmium (Cd) disrupted the circadian expression of clock and redox enzyme genes in rat medial basal hypothalamus (MBH). To assess whether melatonin could counteract Cd activity, male Wistar rats (45 days of age) received CdCl2 (5 ppm) and melatonin (3 μg/mL) or vehicle (0.015% ethanol) in drinking water. Groups of animals receiving melatonin or vehicle alone were also included. After 1 month, MBH mRNA levels were measured by real-time PCR analysis at six time intervals in a 24-h cycle. In control MBH Bmal1 expression peaked at early scotophase, Per1 expression at late afternoon, and Per2 and Cry2 expression at mid-scotophase, whereas neither Clock nor Cry1 expression showed significant 24-h variations. This pattern was significantly disrupted (Clock, Bmal1) or changed in phase (Per1, Per2, Cry2) by CdCl2 while melatonin counteracted the changes brought about by Cd on Per1 expression only. In animals receiving melatonin alone the 24-h pattern of MBH Per2 and Cry2 expression was disrupted. CdCl2 disrupted the 24-h rhythmicity of Cu/Zn- and Mn-superoxide dismutase (SOD), nitric oxide synthase (NOS)-1, NOS-2, heme oxygenase (HO)-1, and HO-2 gene expression, most of the effects being counteracted by melatonin. In particular, the co-administration of melatonin and CdCl2 increased Cu/Zn-SOD gene expression and decreased that of glutathione peroxidase (GPx), glutathione reductase (GSR), and HO-2. In animals receiving melatonin alone, significant increases in mean Cu/Zn and Mn-SOD gene expression, and decreases in that of GPx, GSR, NOS-1, NOS-2, HO-1, and HO-2, were found. The results indicate that the interfering effect of melatonin on the activity of a low dose of CdCl2 on MBH clock and redox enzyme genes is mainly exerted at the level of redox enzyme gene expression. PMID:21442002

  1. Mapping the Nuclear Outflow of the Milky Way: Studying the Kinematics and Spatial Extent of the Northern Fermi Bubble

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bordoloi, Rongmon; Fox, Andrew J.; Lockman, Felix J.; Wakker, Bart P.; Jenkins, Edward B.; Savage, Blair D.; Hernandez, Svea; Tumlinson, Jason; Bland-Hawthorn, Joss; Kim, Tae-Sun

    2017-01-01

    We report new observations from a systematic, spectroscopic, ultraviolet absorption-line survey that maps the spatial and kinematic properties of the high velocity gas in the Galactic Center (GC) region. We examine the hypothesis that this gas traces the biconical nuclear outflow. We use an ultraviolet spectra of 47 background QSOs and halo stars projected inside and outside the northern Fermi Bubble from the Hubble Space Telescope to study the incidence of high velocity absorption around it. We use five lines of sight inside the northern Fermi Bubble to constrain the velocity and column densities of outflowing gas traced by O i, Al ii, C ii, C iv, Si ii, Si iii, Si iv, and other species. We find that all five lines of sight inside the northern Fermi Bubble exhibit blueshifted high velocity absorption components, whereas only 9 out of the 42 lines of sight outside the northern Fermi Bubble exhibit blueshifted high velocity absorption components. The observed outflow velocity profile decreases with Galactic latitude and radial distance (R) from the GC. The observed blueshifted velocities change from {v}{GSR}=-265 {km} {{{s}}}-1 at R ≈ 2.3 kpc to {v}{GSR}=-91 {km} {{{s}}}-1 at R ≈ 6.5 kpc. We derive the metallicity of the entrained gas along the 1H1613-097 sightline, one that passes through the center of the northern Fermi Bubble, finding [O/H] ≳ ‑0.54 ± 0.15. A simple kinematic model, tuned to match the observed absorption component velocities along the five lines of sight inside the Bubble, constrains the outflow velocities to ≈1000–1300 {km} {{{s}}}-1, and the age of the outflow to be ∼6–9 Myr. We estimate a minimum mass outflow rate for the nuclear outflow to be ≳ 0.2{M}ȯ {{yr}}-1. Combining the age and mass outflow rates, we determine a minimum mass of total UV-absorbing cool gas entrained in the Fermi Bubbles to be ≳ 2× {10}6 {M}ȯ .

  2. A stable Faroe Bank Channel overflow 1995-2015

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hansen, Bogi; Húsgarð, Margretha; Larsen, Karin; Hátún, Hjálmar; Østerhus, Svein

    2016-11-01

    The Faroe Bank Channel (FBC) is the deepest passage across the Greenland-Scotland Ridge (GSR) and there is a continuous deep flow of cold and dense water passing through it from the Arctic Mediterranean into the North Atlantic and further to the rest of the world ocean. This FBC overflow is part of the Atlantic Meridional Overturning Circulation (AMOC), which has recently been suggested to have weakened. From November 1995 to May 2015, the FBC overflow has been monitored by a continuous ADCP (acoustic Doppler current profiler) mooring, which has been deployed in the middle of this narrow channel. Combined with regular hydrography cruises and several short-term mooring experiments, this allowed us to construct time series of volume transport and to follow changes in the hydrographic properties and density of the FBC overflow. The mean kinematic overflow, derived solely from the velocity field, was found to be (2.2 ± 0.2) Sv (1 Sv = 106 m3 s-1) with a slight, but not statistically significant, positive trend. The coldest part, and probably the bulk, of the FBC overflow warmed by a bit more than 0.1 °C, especially after 2002, increasing the transport of heat into the deep ocean. This warming was, however, accompanied by increasing salinities, which seem to have compensated for the temperature-induced density decrease. Thus, the FBC overflow has remained stable in volume transport as well as density during the 2 decades from 1995 to 2015. After crossing the GSR, the overflow is modified by mixing and entrainment, but the associated change in volume (and heat) transport is still not well known. Whatever effect this has on the AMOC and the global energy balance, our observed stability of the FBC overflow is consistent with reported observations from the other main overflow branch, the Denmark Strait overflow, and the three Atlantic inflow branches to the Arctic Mediterranean that feed the overflows. If the AMOC has weakened during the last 2 decades, it is not likely

  3. RADIAL VELOCITIES OF GALACTIC HALO STARS IN VIRGO

    SciTech Connect

    Brink, Thomas G.; Mateo, Mario; Martinez-Delgado, David E-mail: mmateo@umich.ed

    2010-11-15

    We present multi-slit radial velocity measurements for 111 stars in the direction of the Virgo Stellar Stream (VSS). The stars were photometrically selected to be probable main-sequence stars in the Galactic halo. When compared with the radial velocity distribution expected for the halo of the Milky Way, as well as the distribution seen in a control field, we observe a significant excess of negative velocity stars in the field, which can likely be attributed to the presence of a stellar stream. This kinematic excess peaks at a Galactic standard of rest radial velocity of -75 km s{sup -1}. A rough distance estimate suggests that this feature extends from {approx}15 kpc out to, and possibly beyond, the {approx}30 kpc limit of the study. The mean velocity of these stars is incompatible with those of the VSS itself (V{sub gsr} {approx} 130 km s{sup -1}), which we weakly detect, but it is consistent with radial velocity measurements of nearby 2MASS M-giants and SDSS+SEGUE K/M-giants and blue horizontal branch stars that constitute the leading tidal tail of the Sagittarius dwarf spheroidal galaxy. Some oblate models for the shape of the Milky Way's dark matter halo predict that the leading arm of the Sagittarius Stream should pass through this volume, and have highly negative (V{sub gsr} {approx}< -200 km s{sup -1}) radial velocities, as it descends down from the northern Galactic hemisphere toward the Galactic plane. The kinematic feature observed in this study, if it is in fact Sagittarius debris, is not consistent with these predictions, and instead, like other leading stream radial velocity measurements, is consistent with a recently published triaxial halo model, or, if axisymmetry is imposed, favors a prolate shape for the Galactic halo potential. However, a rough distance estimate to the observed kinematic feature places it somewhat closer (D {approx} 15-30 kpc) than the Sagittarius models predict (D {approx} 35-45 kpc).

  4. Corrective Action Decision Document for Corrective Action Unit 135: Area 25 Underground Storage Tanks, Nevada Test Site, Nevada

    SciTech Connect

    U.S. Department of Energy, Nevada Operations Office

    1999-12-23

    This corrective action decision document identifies and rationalizes the US Department of Energy, Nevada Operations Office's selection of a recommended corrective action alternative (CAA) appropriate to facilitate the closure of Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 135, Area 25 Underground Storage Tanks, under the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order. Located on the Nevada Test Site (NTS), CAU 135 consists of three Corrective Action Sites (CASs): 25-02-01, Underground Storage Tanks, referred to as the Engine, Maintenance, Assembly, and Disassembly Waste Holdup Tanks and Vault; 25-02-03, Underground Electrical Vault, referred to as the Deluge Valve Pit at the Test Cell A Facility; and 25-02-10, Underground Storage Tank, referred to as the former location of an aboveground storage tank for demineralized water at the Test Cell A Facility. Two of these CASs (25-02-03 and 25-02-10) were originally considered as underground storage tanks, but were found to be misidentified. Further, radio logical surveys conducted by Bechtel Nevada in January 1999 found no radiological contamination detected above background levels for these two sites; therefore, the closure report for CAU 135 will recommend no further action at these two sites. A corrective action investigation for the one remaining CAS (25-02-01) was conducted in June 1999, and analytes detected during this investigation were evaluated against preliminary action levels. It was determined that contaminants of potential concern included polychlorinated biphenyls, Resource Conservation and Recovery Act metals, total petroleum hydrocarbons as diesel-range organics, and radionuclides. Two corrective action objectives were identified for this CAS (i.e., prevention and mitigation of human exposure to sediments and surrounding areas), and subsequently two CAAs developed for consideration based on a review of existing data, future use, and current operations at the NTS. These CAAs were: Alternative 1 - No Further Action, and

  5. Corrective Action Decision Document for Corrective Action Unit 145: Wells and Storage Holes, Nevada Test Site, Nevada, Rev. No.: 0, with ROTC No. 1 and Addendum

    SciTech Connect

    David Strand

    2006-04-01

    This Corrective Action Decision Document has been prepared for Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 145, Wells and Storage Holes in Area 3 of the Nevada Test Site, Nevada, in accordance with the ''Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order'' (1996). Corrective Action Unit 145 is comprised of the following corrective action sites (CASs): (1) 03-20-01, Core Storage Holes; (2) 03-20-02, Decon Pad and Sump; (3) 03-20-04, Injection Wells; (4) 03-20-08, Injection Well; (5) 03-25-01, Oil Spills; and (6) 03-99-13, Drain and Injection Well. The purpose of this Corrective Action Decision Document is to identify and provide the rationale for the recommendation of a corrective action alternative for the six CASs within CAU 145. Corrective action investigation activities were performed from August 1, 2005, through November 8, 2005, as set forth in the CAU 145 Corrective Action Investigation Plan and Record of Technical Change No. 1. Analytes detected during the Corrective Action Investigation (CAI) were evaluated against appropriate final action levels to identify the contaminants of concern for each CAS. The results of the CAI identified contaminants of concern at one of the six CASs in CAU 145 and required the evaluation of corrective action alternatives. Assessment of the data generated from investigation activities conducted at CAU 145 revealed the following: CASs 03-20-01, 03-20-02, 03-20-04, 03-20-08, and 03-99-13 do not contain contamination; and CAS 03-25-01 has pentachlorophenol and arsenic contamination in the subsurface soils. Based on the evaluation of analytical data from the CAI, review of future and current operations at the six CASs, and the detailed and comparative analysis of the potential corrective action alternatives, the following corrective actions are recommended for CAU 145. No further action is the preferred corrective action for CASs 03-20-01, 03-20-02, 03-20-04, 03-20-08, and 03-99-13. Close in place is the preferred corrective action for CAS 03-25-01. The

  6. Attendance Feedback in An Academic Setting: Preliminary Results

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Broucek, Willard G.; Bass, William

    2008-01-01

    In the fall of 2005, the attendance behavior of 118 business students at Northern State University (NSU) was monitored in 4 classes. After 10 weeks of classes Absenteeism Feedback was given to these students. Examination of the data indicated a strong correlation between attendance and subsequent course grade. (Contains 1 table.)

  7. Prevalence of Multidrug-Resistant Organisms Recovered at a Military Burn Center

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-01-01

    4 classes as well as colistin. Susceptibility testing of colistin during the study period was performed by disk diffusion and Etest . To determine the...isolates being recovered. A closer examination of A. baumannii susceptibility data during hospitalization days 1–5 and 15–30 revealed a higher percent- age

  8. Family Decision Making: Benefits to Persons with Developmental Disabilities and Their Family Members

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Neely-Barnes, Susan; Graff, J. Carolyn; Marcenko, Maureen; Weber, Lisa

    2008-01-01

    Family involvement in planning and choosing services has become a key intervention concept in developmental disability services. This study (N = 547) modeled patterns of family decision making and assessed benefits to persons with developmental disabilities (DDs) and their family members. A latent profile analysis identified 4 classes that were…

  9. Compartiendo Culturas/Sharing Cultures: A Title VII Two-Way Bilingual Program at Herod Elementary School 1995-96. Research Report on Educational Grants.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Houston Independent School District, TX. Dept. of Research and Evaluation.

    This report describes a program that was designed to end the isolation typically experienced by language minority students in traditional bilingual education and to provide language majority students the opportunity to acquire proficiency in a second Language. The program served 4 classes of approximately 22 students each (85 students) in…

  10. Sunspot 1520 Releases Strong (X1.4) Solar Flare

    NASA Video Gallery

    This movie shows the sun July 10-12, ending with the X1.4 class flare on July 12, 2012. It was captured by NASA’s Solar Dynamics Observatory in the 131 Angstrom wavelength - a wavelength that is...

  11. SDO Captures X1.4 Solar Flare on July 12, 2012

    NASA Video Gallery

    This movie shows the sun July 11-12, ending with the X1.4 class flare on July 12, 2012. It was captured by NASA’s Solar Dynamics Observatory in the 304 Angstrom wavelength - a wavelength coloriz...

  12. Understanding the Heterogeneity of BPD Symptoms through Latent Class Analysis: Initial Results and Clinical Correlates among Inner-City Substance Users

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bornovalova, Marina A.; Levy, Roy; Gratz, Kim L.; Lejuez, C. W.

    2010-01-01

    The current study investigated the heterogeneity of borderline personality disorder (BPD) symptoms in a sample of 382 inner-city, predominantly African American male substance users through the use of latent class analysis. A 4-class model was statistically preferred, with 1 class interpreted to be a baseline class, 1 class interpreted to be a…

  13. Media Presentations on the Reading Attention and Comprehension of Taiwanese Elementary School Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ku, David Tawei; Cheng, Yu-Mei

    2016-01-01

    We adopted an experimental design to investigate the effects of various media presentation modes on the reading attention and comprehension of Taiwanese elementary school students. The participants comprised 138 students from 4 classes of third grade elementary school students from New Taipei City, Taiwan. The participants attended 5 short stories…

  14. The Reconceptualisation of Outdoor Education in the Primary School Classroom in Aotearoa New Zealand: How Might "We" Do It?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cosgriff, Marg

    2016-01-01

    The powerful learning that occurs outdoors has been well documented in this journal, as has an array of barriers teachers typically face in providing outdoor learning experiences. This paper draws on findings from a collaborative, practice-based research project examining the reconceptualisation of outdoor education in two Year 4 classes in a…

  15. A Pilot Study to Explore the Challenges of Changing Children's Food and Health Concepts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bullen, Kathryn; Benton, David

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the effect of a nutrition education intervention and four hours of related teaching on the nutrition concepts of a sample of 9 year-old children. Design: Prepost test design. Children's food classification concepts were assessed before and after the intervention and nutrition teaching. Setting: Year 4 class of a suburban…

  16. Ciencias en Espanol, 1995-96 (Sciences in Spanish, 1995-96). Research Report on Educational Grants.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Houston Independent School District, TX. Dept. of Research and Evaluation.

    An elementary science program was taught in Spanish for English-speaking children to give them the opportunity to acquire second language skills through hands-on science instruction. The program included 4 classes of approximately 22 students at kindergarten and first-grade levels in the gifted and talented program at the Gary Herod Elementary…

  17. Effectiveness of Conceptual Change Text Oriented Instruction on Students' Understanding of Cellular Respiration Concepts.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cakir, Ozlem S.; Yuruk, Nejla; Geban, Omer

    The purpose of the study is to compare the effectiveness of conceptual change text oriented instruction and traditional instruction on students' understanding of cellular respiration concepts and their attitudes toward biology as a school subject. The sample of this study consisted of 84 eleventh-grade students from the 4 classes of a high school.…

  18. AR 1121 Unleases X-ray Flare

    NASA Video Gallery

    Increasingly active sunspot 1121 has unleashed one of the brightest x-ray solar flares in years, an M5.4-class eruption at 15:36 UT on Nov. 6th. This close-up video shows the detail of the flare an...

  19. Enhancing Cognitive and Social-Emotional Development through a Simple-to-Administer Mindfulness-Based School Program for Elementary School Children: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schonert-Reichl, Kimberly A.; Oberle, Eva; Lawlor, Molly Stewart; Abbott, David; Thomson, Kimberly; Oberlander, Tim F.; Diamond, Adele

    2015-01-01

    The authors hypothesized that a social and emotional learning (SEL) program involving mindfulness and caring for others, designed for elementary school students, would enhance cognitive control, reduce stress, promote well-being and prosociality, and produce positive school outcomes. To test this hypothesis, 4 classes of combined 4th and 5th…

  20. A Festschrift for Jacob Ornstein: Studies in General Linguistics and Sociolinguistics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blansitt, Edward L., Jr., Ed.; Teschner, Richard V., Ed.

    Among the 29 articles collected here are the following: (1) "On Markedness and Sociolinguistic Variation" (Amastae); (2) "On the Form of Bilingual Grammars: The Phonological Component" (Elerick); (3) "On Negation in Comparative Constructions" (Fries); (4) "Class by Value System: Implications for Bilingual…

  1. What Do We Teachers Need to Know to Enhance Our Creativity? A Report on a Pilot Project into Primary School Pupils' Perceptions of Their Identities as Learners

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hood, Philip

    2008-01-01

    This article reports on the findings from the first part of a pilot project which gathered data from a mixed-ability Year-4 class on their perceptions of their identities as learners. A questionnaire was used which addressed both academic and affective issues, for example, why pupils do or do not enjoy certain subjects, whether they prefer to work…

  2. A pilot study on the neurometric evaluation of "effective" and "ineffective" antismoking public service announcements.

    PubMed

    Cartocci, Giulia; Modica, Enrica; Rossi, Dario; Maglione, Anton Giulio; Venuti, Isotta; Rossi, Giulia; Corsi, Elena; Babiloni, Fabio

    2016-08-01

    Tobacco use is the leading cause of preventable death and smoking-related illness worldwide. Research has shown that antismoking advertising may help reduce this habit. Nowadays, public service announcements (PSAs) are considered "Effective" or "Ineffective" on the base of official reports concerning behavioral/attitudinal changes toward healthier patterns and health-related savings following the exposure to the PSA. In this pilot study, we described the results of the use of three neurometric indexes for the evaluation of the efficacy of a couple of antismoking PSAs in a reduced sample of voluntary participants. The study applied the gathering of the electroencephalographic (EEG) rhythms variations, as well as the heart rate (HR) and galvanic skin response (GSR). The neurometric indicators here employed were the Approach-Withdrawal (AW), the Effort (EfI) and the Emotional (EI) indexes. Results suggest a significant higher values for AW, Effort and Emotional indexes (p=0,02; p= 0,03 and p= 0,01 respectively) related to the perception of the "Effective" antismoking PSAs against the perception of the "Ineffective" one. Since this is a pilot study, the results obtained need further investigation, in terms of enlarged stimuli sample and number of participants to provide indications concerning the relevant features to be included in the realization of effective anti-smoking PSAs.

  3. Neurophysiological Tools to Investigate Consumer's Gender Differences during the Observation of TV Commercials

    PubMed Central

    Maglione, Anton Giulio; Wasikowska, Barbara; Wawrzyniak, Agata; Graziani, Ilenia; Trettel, Arianna

    2014-01-01

    Neuromarketing is a multidisciplinary field of research whose aim is to investigate the consumers' reaction to advertisements from a neuroscientific perspective. In particular, the neuroscience field is thought to be able to reveal information about consumer preferences which are unobtainable through conventional methods, including submitting questionnaires to large samples of consumers or performing psychological personal or group interviews. In this scenario, we performed an experiment in order to investigate cognitive and emotional changes of cerebral activity evaluated by neurophysiologic indices during the observation of TV commercials. In particular, we recorded the electroencephalographic (EEG), galvanic skin response (GSR), and heart rate (HR) in a group of 28 healthy subjects during the observation of a series of TV advertisements that have been grouped by commercial categories. Comparisons of cerebral indices have been performed to highlight gender differences between commercial categories and scenes of interest of two specific commercials. Findings show how EEG methodologies, along with the measurements of autonomic variables, could be used to obtain hidden information to marketers not obtainable otherwise. Most importantly, it was suggested how these tools could help to analyse the perception of TV advertisements and differentiate their production according to the consumer's gender. PMID:25147579

  4. Valproate-induced teratogenesis in Japanese rice fish (Oryzias latipes) embryogenesis.

    PubMed

    Wu, Mengmeng; Khan, Ikhlas A; Dasmahapatra, Asok K

    2012-04-01

    Fertilized eggs of Japanese rice fish (medaka) at three developmental stages (Iwamatsu stages 4-30) were exposed to waterborne valproic acid (VPA) (0-80 mM) in hatching solution for 48 h. The amount of valproate to cause 50% mortality (IC(50)) is found to be developmental stage-specific. The embryos were more sensitive to valproate at early stages of development (Iwamatsu stages 4-10) than in the embryos in late stages (Iwamatsu stages 17-30). Valproate exposed embryos have microcephaly and disrupted cardiovasculature with delayed vessel circulation, thrombus formation, and slow heart rate. The hatching efficiency is also reduced by valproate exposure due to developmental delay. The mRNA analysis of nine genes belong to oxidative stress (catalase, gsr, gst), neurogenesis (iro3, wnt1, shh, otx2, nlgn3b) and cell cycle regulation (ccna2) have been done. It was observed that the genes belong to oxidative stress remained unaltered after valproate exposure. However, some of the genes belong to neurogenesis (wnt1,shh, otx2 and nlgn3b) and cell cycle (ccna2) showed developmental stage-specific alteration after valproate exposure. This study indicates that valproate is able to induce some of the phenotypic features which are analogous to human fetal valproate syndrome (FVS). Modulation of genes expressed in neural tissues indicates that this fish can be used to analyze the mechanisms of many neurobehavioral disorders like Autism spectrum disorder (ASD) in human.

  5. Historical GIS Data and Changes in Urban Morphological Parameters for the Analysis of Urban Heat Islands in Hong Kong

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, F.; Wong, M. S.; Nichol, J. E.; Chan, P. W.

    2016-06-01

    Rapid urban development between the 1960 and 2010 decades have changed the urban landscape and pattern in the Kowloon Peninsula of Hong Kong. This paper aims to study the changes of urban morphological parameters between the 1985 and 2010 and explore their influences on the urban heat island (UHI) effect. This study applied a mono-window algorithm to retrieve the land surface temperature (LST) using Landsat Thematic Mapper (TM) images from 1987 to 2009. In order to estimate the effects of local urban morphological parameters to LST, the global surface temperature anomaly was analysed. Historical 3D building model was developed based on aerial photogrammetry technique using aerial photographs from 1964 to 2010, in which the urban digital surface models (DSMs) including elevations of infrastructures and buildings have been generated. Then, urban morphological parameters (i.e. frontal area index (FAI), sky view factor (SVF)), vegetation fractional cover (VFC), global solar radiation (GSR), Normalized Difference Built-Up Index (NDBI), wind speed were derived. Finally, a linear regression method in Waikato Environment for Knowledge Analysis (WEKA) was used to build prediction model for revealing LST spatial patterns. Results show that the final apparent surface temperature have uncertainties less than 1 degree Celsius. The comparison between the simulated and actual spatial pattern of LST in 2009 showed that the correlation coefficient is 0.65, mean absolute error (MAE) is 1.24 degree Celsius, and root mean square error (RMSE) is 1.51 degree Celsius of 22,429 pixels.

  6. The survival of gunshot residues in cremated bone: an inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry study.

    PubMed

    Amadasi, Alberto; Merli, Daniele; Brandone, Alberto; Poppa, Pasquale; Gibelli, Daniele; Cattaneo, Cristina

    2013-07-01

    Gunshot residue (GSR) has been sought and demonstrated on many types of material and with many techniques. Inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry (ICP-OES) could be a useful method on difficult substrates, but a systematic study on burnt material has never been performed. Hence, this study aims at evaluating the usefulness and reliability of this method on burnt samples. Sixteen adult bovine ribs (eight with soft tissues, eight totally skeletonized) were shot using two kinds of projectile (both 9 mm full metal-jacketed or unjacketed). Then, every sample was led to complete calcination in an electric oven. The area of the gunshot entrance wound was swabbed and analyzed by ICP-OES; the results were also correlated with a previously published parallel study by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) equipped with an SEM-energy dispersive X-ray analyzer. ICP-OES proved to be very sensitive and reliable even on degraded material and can be an appropriate nondestructive method for detecting residues on difficult and delicate substrates such as burnt bone.

  7. The Essential Role of H19 Contributing to Cisplatin Resistance by Regulating Glutathione Metabolism in High-Grade Serous Ovarian Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Zhi-Guo; Xu, Hong; Suo, Sha-Sha; Xu, Xiao-Li; Ni, Mao-Wei; Gu, Lin-Hui; Chen, Wei; Wang, Liang-Yan; Zhao, Ye; Tian, Bing; Hua, Yue-Jin

    2016-01-01

    Primary and acquired drug resistance is one of the main obstacles encountered in high-grade serous ovarian cancer (HGSC) chemotherapy. Cisplatin induces DNA damage through cross-linking and long integrated non-coding RNAs (lincRNAs) play an important role in chemical induced DNA-damage response, which suggests that lincRNAs may be also associated with cisplatin resistance. However, the mechanism of long integrated non-coding RNAs (lincRNAs) acting on cisplatin resistance is not well understood. Here, we showed that expression of lin-RECK-3, H19, LUCAT1, LINC00961, and linc-CARS2-2 was enhanced in cisplatin-resistant A2780-DR cells, while transcriptome sequencing showed decreased Linc-TNFRSF19-1 and LINC00515 expression. Additionally, we verified that different H19 expression levels in HGSC tissues showed strong correlation with cancer recurrence. H19 knockdown in A2780-DR cells resulted in recovery of cisplatin sensitivity in vitro and in vivo. Quantitative proteomics analysis indicated that six NRF2-targeted proteins, including NQO1, GSR, G6PD, GCLC, GCLM and GSTP1 involved in the glutathione metabolism pathway, were reduced in H19-knockdown cells. Furthermore, H19-knockdown cells were markedly more sensitive to hydrogen-peroxide treatment and exhibited lower glutathione levels. Our results reveal a previously unknown link between H19 and glutathione metabolism in the regulation of cancer-drug resistance. PMID:27193186

  8. HUNTING THE PARENT OF THE ORPHAN STREAM: IDENTIFYING STREAM MEMBERS FROM LOW-RESOLUTION SPECTROSCOPY

    SciTech Connect

    Casey, Andrew R.; Da Costa, Gary; Keller, Stefan C.; Maunder, Elizabeth

    2013-02-10

    We present candidate K-giant members in the Orphan Stream that have been identified from low-resolution data taken with the AAOmega spectrograph on the Anglo-Australian Telescope. From modest signal-to-noise spectra and independent cuts in photometry, kinematics, gravity, and metallicity we yield self-consistent, highly probable stream members. We find a revised stream distance of 22.5 {+-} 2.0 kpc near the celestial equator and our kinematic signature peaks at V {sub GSR} = 82.1 {+-} 1.4 km s{sup -1}. The observed velocity dispersion of our most probable members is consistent with arising from the velocity uncertainties alone. This indicates that at least along this line of sight, the Orphan Stream is kinematically cold. Our data indicate an overall stream metallicity of [Fe/H] = -1.63 {+-} 0.19 dex which is more metal-rich than previously found and unbiased by spectral type. Furthermore, the significant metallicity dispersion displayed by our most probable members, {sigma}([Fe/H]) = 0.56 dex, suggests that the unidentified Orphan Stream parent is a dSph satellite. We highlight likely members for high-resolution spectroscopic follow-up.

  9. Antioxidant Defense Enzyme Genes and Asthma Susceptibility: Gender-Specific Effects and Heterogeneity in Gene-Gene Interactions between Pathogenetic Variants of the Disease

    PubMed Central

    Polonikov, Alexey V.; Ivanov, Vladimir P.; Bogomazov, Alexey D.; Freidin, Maxim B.; Illig, Thomas; Solodilova, Maria A.

    2014-01-01

    Oxidative stress resulting from an increased amount of reactive oxygen species and an imbalance between oxidants and antioxidants plays an important role in the pathogenesis of asthma. The present study tested the hypothesis that genetic susceptibility to allergic and nonallergic variants of asthma is determined by complex interactions between genes encoding antioxidant defense enzymes (ADE). We carried out a comprehensive analysis of the associations between adult asthma and 46 single nucleotide polymorphisms of 34 ADE genes and 12 other candidate genes of asthma in Russian population using set association analysis and multifactor dimensionality reduction approaches. We found for the first time epistatic interactions between ADE genes underlying asthma susceptibility and the genetic heterogeneity between allergic and nonallergic variants of the disease. We identified GSR (glutathione reductase) and PON2 (paraoxonase 2) as novel candidate genes for asthma susceptibility. We observed gender-specific effects of ADE genes on the risk of asthma. The results of the study demonstrate complexity and diversity of interactions between genes involved in oxidative stress underlying susceptibility to allergic and nonallergic asthma. PMID:24895604

  10. Smart Vest: wearable multi-parameter remote physiological monitoring system.

    PubMed

    Pandian, P S; Mohanavelu, K; Safeer, K P; Kotresh, T M; Shakunthala, D T; Gopal, Parvati; Padaki, V C

    2008-05-01

    The wearable physiological monitoring system is a washable shirt, which uses an array of sensors connected to a central processing unit with firmware for continuously monitoring physiological signals. The data collected can be correlated to produce an overall picture of the wearer's health. In this paper, we discuss the wearable physiological monitoring system called 'Smart Vest'. The Smart Vest consists of a comfortable to wear vest with sensors integrated for monitoring physiological parameters, wearable data acquisition and processing hardware and remote monitoring station. The wearable data acquisition system is designed using microcontroller and interfaced with wireless communication and global positioning system (GPS) modules. The physiological signals monitored are electrocardiogram (ECG), photoplethysmogram (PPG), body temperature, blood pressure, galvanic skin response (GSR) and heart rate. The acquired physiological signals are sampled at 250samples/s, digitized at 12-bit resolution and transmitted wireless to a remote physiological monitoring station along with the geo-location of the wearer. The paper describes a prototype Smart Vest system used for remote monitoring of physiological parameters and the clinical validation of the data are also presented.

  11. Measurement of airborne gunshot particles in a ballistics laboratory by sector field inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Diaz, Ernesto; Sarkis, Jorge E Souza; Viebig, Sônia; Saldiva, Paulo

    2012-01-10

    The present study aimed determines lead (Pb), antimony (Sb) and barium (Ba) as the major elements present in GSR in the environmental air of the Ballistics Laboratory of the São Paulo Criminalistics Institute (I.C.-S.P.), São Paulo, SP, Brazil. Micro environmental monitors (mini samplers) were located at selected places. The PM(2.5) fraction of this airborne was collected in, previously weighted filters, and analyzed by sector field inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometer (SF-HR-ICP-MS). The higher values of the airborne lead, antimony and barium, were found at the firing range (lead (Pb): 58.9 μg/m(3); barium (Ba): 6.9 μg/m(3); antimony (Sb): 7.3 μg/m(3)). The mean value of the airborne in this room during 6 monitored days was Pb: 23.1 μg/m(3); Ba: 2.2 μg/m(3); Sb: 1.5 μg/m(3). In the water tank room, the air did not show levels above the limits of concern. In general the airborne lead changed from day to day, but the barium and antimony remained constant. Despite of that, the obtained values suggest that the workers may be exposed to airborne lead concentration that can result in an unhealthy environment and could increase the risk of chronic intoxication.

  12. Embodiments, visualizations, and immersion with enactive affective systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Domingues, Diana; Miosso, Cristiano J.; Rodrigues, Suélia F.; Silva Rocha Aguiar, Carla; Lucena, Tiago F.; Miranda, Mateus; Rocha, Adson F.; Raskar, Ramesh

    2014-02-01

    Our proposal in Bioart and Biomedical Engineering for a ective esthetics focuses on the expanded sensorium and investigates problems regarding enactive systems. These systems enhance the sensorial experiences and amplify kinesthesia by adding the sensations that are formed in response to the physical world, which aesthetically constitutes the principle of synaesthesia. In this paper, we also present enactive systems inside the CAVE, con guring compelling experiences in data landscapes and human a ective narratives. The interaction occurs through the acquisition, data visualization and analysis of several synchronized physiological signals, to which the landscapes respond and provide immediate feedback, according to the detected participants' actions and the intertwined responses of the environment. The signals we use to analyze the human states include the electrocardiography (ECG) signal, the respiratory ow, the galvanic skin response (GSR) signal, plantar pressures, the pulse signal and others. Each signal is collected by using a speci cally designed dedicated electronic board, with reduced dimensions, so it does not interfere with normal movements, according to the principles of transparent technologies. Also, the electronic boards are implemented in a modular approach, so they are independent, and can be used in many di erent desired combinations, and at the same time provide synchronization between the collected data.

  13. Neurophysiological tools to investigate consumer's gender differences during the observation of TV commercials.

    PubMed

    Vecchiato, Giovanni; Maglione, Anton Giulio; Cherubino, Patrizia; Wasikowska, Barbara; Wawrzyniak, Agata; Latuszynska, Anna; Latuszynska, Malgorzata; Nermend, Kesra; Graziani, Ilenia; Leucci, Maria Rita; Trettel, Arianna; Babiloni, Fabio

    2014-01-01

    Neuromarketing is a multidisciplinary field of research whose aim is to investigate the consumers' reaction to advertisements from a neuroscientific perspective. In particular, the neuroscience field is thought to be able to reveal information about consumer preferences which are unobtainable through conventional methods, including submitting questionnaires to large samples of consumers or performing psychological personal or group interviews. In this scenario, we performed an experiment in order to investigate cognitive and emotional changes of cerebral activity evaluated by neurophysiologic indices during the observation of TV commercials. In particular, we recorded the electroencephalographic (EEG), galvanic skin response (GSR), and heart rate (HR) in a group of 28 healthy subjects during the observation of a series of TV advertisements that have been grouped by commercial categories. Comparisons of cerebral indices have been performed to highlight gender differences between commercial categories and scenes of interest of two specific commercials. Findings show how EEG methodologies, along with the measurements of autonomic variables, could be used to obtain hidden information to marketers not obtainable otherwise. Most importantly, it was suggested how these tools could help to analyse the perception of TV advertisements and differentiate their production according to the consumer's gender.

  14. Neuroelectrical Correlates of Trustworthiness and Dominance Judgments Related to the Observation of Political Candidates

    PubMed Central

    Vecchiato, Giovanni; Toppi, Jlenia; Maglione, Anton Giulio; Olejarczyk, Elzbieta; Astolfi, Laura; Mattia, Donatella; Colosimo, Alfredo; Babiloni, Fabio

    2014-01-01

    The present research investigates the neurophysiological activity elicited by fast observations of faces of real candidates during simulated political elections. We used simultaneous recording of electroencephalographic (EEG) signals as well as galvanic skin response (GSR) and heart rate (HR) as measurements of central and autonomic nervous systems. Twenty healthy subjects were asked to give judgments on dominance, trustworthiness, and a preference of vote related to the politicians' faces. We used high-resolution EEG techniques to map statistical differences of power spectral density (PSD) cortical activity onto a realistic head model as well as partial directed coherence (PDC) and graph theory metrics to estimate the functional connectivity networks and investigate the role of cortical regions of interest (ROIs). Behavioral results revealed that judgment of dominance trait is the most predictive of the outcome of the simulated elections. Statistical comparisons related to PSD and PDC values highlighted an asymmetry in the activation of frontal cortical areas associated with the valence of the judged trait as well as to the probability to cast the vote. Overall, our results highlight the existence of cortical EEG features which are correlated with the prediction of vote and with the judgment of trustworthy and dominant faces. PMID:25214884

  15. Historical perspective on the DNA damage response.

    PubMed

    Hanawalt, Philip C

    2015-12-01

    The DNA damage response (DDR) has been broadly defined as a complex network of cellular pathways that cooperate to sense and repair lesions in DNA. Multiple types of DNA damage, some natural DNA sequences, nucleotide pool deficiencies and collisions with transcription complexes can cause replication arrest to elicit the DDR. However, in practice, the term DDR as applied to eukaryotic/mammalian cells often refers more specifically to pathways involving the activation of the ATM (ataxia-telangiectasia mutated) and ATR (ATM-Rad3-related) kinases in response to double-strand breaks or arrested replication forks, respectively. Nevertheless, there are distinct responses to particular types of DNA damage that do not involve ATM or ATR. In addition, some of the aberrations that cause replication arrest and elicit the DDR cannot be categorized as direct DNA damage. These include nucleotide pool deficiencies, nucleotide sequences that can adopt non-canonical DNA structures, and collisions between replication forks and transcription complexes. The response to these aberrations can be called the genomic stress response (GSR), a term that is meant to encompass the sensing of all types of DNA aberrations together with the mechanisms involved in coping with them. In addition to fully functional cells, the consequences of processing genomic aberrations may include mutagenesis, genomic rearrangements and lethality.

  16. Acute Exposure to Tris(1,3-dichloro-2-propyl) Phosphate (TDCIPP) Causes Hepatic Inflammation and Leads to Hepatotoxicity in Zebrafish

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Chunsheng; Su, Guanyong; Giesy, John P.; Letcher, Robert J.; Li, Guangyu; Agrawal, Ira; Li, Jing; Yu, Liqin; Wang, Jianghua; Gong, Zhiyuan

    2016-01-01

    Tris(1,3-dichloro-2-propyl) phosphate (TDCIPP) has been frequently detected in environmental media and has adverse health effect on wildlife and humans. It has been implicated to have hepatotoxicity, but its molecular mechanisms remain unclear. In the present study, adult male zebrafish were exposed to TDCIPP and global hepatic gene expression was examined by RNA-Seq and RT-qPCR in order to understand the molecular mechanisms of TDCIPP-induced hepatotoxicity. Our results indicated that TDCIPP exposure significantly up-regulated the expression of genes involved in endoplasmic reticulum stress and Toll-like receptor (TLR) pathway, implying an inflammatory response, which was supported by up-regulation of inflammation-related biomaker genes. Hepatic inflammation was further confirmed by histological observation of increase of infiltrated neutrophils and direct observation of liver recruitment of neutrophils labeled with Ds-Red fluorescent protein of Tg(lysC:DsRed) zebrafish upon TDCIPP exposure. To further characterize the hepatotoxicity of TDCIPP, the expression of hepatotoxicity biomarker genes, liver histopathology and morphology were examined. The exposure to TDCIPP significantly up-regulated the expression of several biomarker genes for hepatotoxicity (gck, gsr and nqo1) and caused hepatic vacuolization and apoptosis as well as increase of the liver size. Collectively, our results suggest that exposure to TDCIPP induces hepatic inflammation and leads to hepatotoxicity in zebrafish.

  17. Arguments for and proposed tests of a revised S-R contiguity-reinforcement theory of human Pavlovian autonomic conditioning: some contra-cognitive claims.

    PubMed

    Furedy, J J

    1988-10-01

    One of the consequences of the cognitive paradigm shift is that human Pavlovian autonomic conditioning of responses like the GSR has been considered to be a mere epiphenomenon or index of an underlying cognitive process. The paper begins by reviewing evidence against three such reductionist, cognitive accounts, and then proposes a revision of an S-R theory of classical conditioning that was first put forward in the early sixties. The revision is designed to increase the S-R theory's testability, and this increase is demonstrated by indicating four sets of experimental arrangements where the revised S-R theory forbids certain outcomes, and does so in a way that differentiates it from other competing theories. In this way we can proceed to begin the task of determining the boundary conditions of both cognitive and non-cognitive accounts of human Pavlovian autonomic conditioning, instead of engaging in territorial struggles between those accounts, struggles whose outcome is determined by changing Zeitgeist considerations rather than evidential ones.

  18. Statistical Properties of Blue Horizontal Branch Stars in the Spheroid: Detection of a Moving Group approximately 50 kpc from the Sun

    SciTech Connect

    Harrigan, Matthew J.; Newberg, Heidi Jo; Newberg, Lee A.; Yanny, Brian; Beers, Timothy C.; Lee, Young Sun; Fiorentin, Paola Re; /Ljubljana U. /Heidelberg, Max Planck Inst. Astron.

    2010-02-01

    A new moving group comprising at least four Blue Horizontal Branch (BHB) stars is identified at (l; b) = (65{sup o}; 48{sup o}). The horizontal branch at g{sub 0} = 18.9 magnitude implies a distance of 50 kpc from the Sun. The heliocentric radial velocity is = -157 {+-} 4 km s{sup -1}, corresponding to V{sub gsr} = -10 km s{sup -1}; the dispersion in line-of-sight velocity is consistent with the instrumental errors for these stars. The mean metallicity of the moving group is [Fe/H] {approx} -2.4, which is significantly more metal poor than the stellar spheroid. We estimate that the BHB stars in the outer halo have a mean metallicity of [Fe/H]=-2.0, with a wide scatter and a distribution that does not change much as a function of distance from the Sun. We explore the systematics of SDSS DR7 surface gravity metallicity determinations for faint BHB stars, and present a technique for estimating the significance of clumps discovered in multidimensional data. This moving group cannot be distinguished in density, and highlights the need to collect many more spectra of Galactic stars to unravel the merger history of the Galaxy.

  19. Measurements of gunshot residues by sector field inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry--further studies with pistols.

    PubMed

    Sarkis, Jorge E Souza; Neto, Osvaldo N; Viebig, Sônia; Durrant, Steven F

    2007-10-02

    The most popular handgun in Brazil is the single round-barrel caliber 0.38 revolver. In recent years, however, owing to the modernization of police arms and their availability on the legal and illicit markets, pistols have become increasingly popular and currently represent about 20% of police seizures. In a previous paper we presented a novel collection method for gunshot residues (GSR) using a sampling procedure based on ethylenediamine-tetraacetic acid (EDTA) solution as a complexing agent on moistened swabs with subsequent detection using sector field-high resolution-inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (SF-HR-ICP-MS). In the present paper, we discuss the capability of this methodology to identify antimony (Sb), barium (Ba) and lead (Pb) on the hands of volunteers after shot tests with 9 mm and 0.40 in. caliber pistols. Two types of munitions were tested: 9 mm Taurus and clean range. The use of a technique with high sensitivity, such as SF-HR-ICP-MS, permits the identification of low concentrations (less than 1 microg/L) of metals in firearm residue and constitutes a powerful tool in forensic science. We also discuss the importance of the sampling procedure, including collection from a different body part than the gun hand of the suspect. Comparison of the analytical data obtained allows clear discrimination between samples from the hands of shooters and non-shooters.

  20. Cognitive Workload and Fatigue in a Vigilance Dual Task: Miss Errors, False Alarms, and the Effect of Wearing Biometric Sensors While Working.

    PubMed

    Guastello, Stephen J; Reiter, Katherine E; Malon, Matthew

    2016-10-01

    The effects of workload, fatigue, and practice on the performance of cognitive tasks are often intertwined. Previous research has shown that these influences can be separated with the two cusp catastrophe models. This study expanded an earlier investigation of the two models for workload and fatigue in a vigilance task to include a wider range of bifurcation variables that could affect the elasticity versus rigidity of the operator in response to workload and added performance variability resulting from fatigue. The study also responded to a concern in the literature that performance on cognitive tasks can be complicated by adaptive responses to artificial task situations and thus distort underlying cognitive events. Therefore, we also explored whether wearing biometric sensors, frequently used in workload studies, can affect performance dynamics. Participants were 279 undergraduates who responded to target stimuli that appeared on a simulated security camera display at three rates of speed while completing a secondary task. Participants worked alone, in pairs, or in pairs wearing GSR sensors. Results supported the efficacy of the two models and isolated the impact of wearing sensors on the fatigue process. The strongest control variables across both the workload and fatigue models were field independence, anxiety, indecisiveness, inflexibility, secondary task completion, working in pairs, and wearing the sensors. The contributing effect of wearing sensors could possibly extend to other types of wearable technologies.

  1. Effects of Head-Down Bed Rest on the Executive Functions and Emotional Response

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Qing; Zhou, Renlai; Chen, Shanguang; Tan, Cheng

    2012-01-01

    Prolonged bed rest may cause changes in the autonomic nervous system that are related to cognition and emotion. This study adopted an emotional flanker task to evaluate the effect of 45 days -6° head-down bed rest (HDBR) on executive functioning in 16 healthy young men at each of six time points: the second-to-last day before the bed rest period, the eleventh, twentieth, thirty-second and fortieth day during the bed rest period, and the eighth day after the bed rest period. In addition, self-report inventories (Beck Anxiety Inventory, BAI; Beck Depression Inventory, BDI; Positive Affect and Negative Affect Scale, PANAS) were conducted to record emotional changes, and the participants’ galvanic skin response (GSR), heart rate (HR) and heart rate variability (HRV) were assessed as measures of physiological activity. The results showed that the participants’ reaction time on the flanker task increased significantly relative to their responses on the second-to-last day before the period of bed rest, their galvanic skin response weakened and their degrees of positive affect declined during the bed rest period. Our results provide some evidence for a detrimental effect of prolonged bed rest on executive functioning and positive affect. Whether this stems from a lack of aerobic physical activity and/or the effect of HDBR itself remains to be determined. PMID:23284916

  2. Naturalistic Enactment to Elicit and Recognize Caregiver State Anxiety.

    PubMed

    Miranda, Darien; Favela, Jesus; Ibarra, Catalina; Cruz, Netzahualcoyotl

    2016-09-01

    Caring for people with dementia imposes significant stress on family members and caregivers. Often, these informal caregivers have no coping strategy to deal with these behaviors. Anxiety and stress episodes are often triggered by problematic behaviors exhibited by the person who suffers from dementia. Detecting these behaviors could help them in dealing with them and reduce caregiver burden. However, work on anxiety detection using physiological signals has mostly been done under controlled conditions. In this paper we describe an experiment aimed at inducing anxiety among caregivers of people with dementia under naturalistic conditions. We report an experiment, using the naturalistic enactment technique, in which 10 subjects were asked to care for an older adult who acts as if she experiences dementia. We record physiological signals from the participants (GSR, HR, EEG) during the sessions that lasted for approximately 30 min. We explain how we obtained ground truth from self-report and observation data. We conducted two different tests using the Support Vector Machine technique. We obtained an average precision of 77.8 % and 38.1 % recall when classifying two different possible states: "Anxious" and "Not anxious". Analysis of the data provides evidence that the experiment elicits state anxiety and that it can be detected using wearable sensors. Furthermore, if episodes of problematic behaviors can also be detected, the recognition of anxiety in the caregiver can be improved, leading to the enactment of appropriate interventions to help caregivers cope with anxiety episodes.

  3. Sub-toxic Ethanol Exposure Modulates Gene Expression and Enzyme Activity of Antioxidant Systems to Provide Neuroprotection in Hippocampal HT22 Cells.

    PubMed

    Casañas-Sánchez, Verónica; Pérez, José A; Quinto-Alemany, David; Díaz, Mario

    2016-01-01

    Ethanol is known to cause severe systemic damage often explained as secondary to oxidative stress. Brain is particularly vulnerable to ethanol-induced reactive oxygen species (ROS) because the high amounts of lipids, and because nerve cell membranes contain high amounts of peroxidable fatty acids. Usually these effects of ethanol are associated to high and/or chronic exposure to ethanol. However, as we show in this manuscript, a low and acute dose of ethanol trigger a completely different response in hippocampal cells. Thus, we have observed that 0.1% ethanol exposure to HT22 cells, a murine hippocampal-derived cell line, increases the transcriptional expression of different genes belonging to the classical, glutathione/glutaredoxin and thioredoxin/peroxiredoxin antioxidant systems, these including Sod1, Sod2, Gpx1, Gclc, and Txnrd1. Paralleling these changes, enzyme activities of total superoxide dismutase (tSOD), catalase, total glutathione peroxidase (tGPx), glutathione-S-reductase (GSR), and total thioredoxin reductase (tTXNRD), were all increased, while the generation of thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS), as indicators of lipid peroxidation, and glutathione levels remained unaltered. Ethanol exposure did not affect cell viability or cell growing as assessed by real-time cell culture monitoring, indicating that low ethanol doses are not deleterious for hippocampal cells, but rather prevented glutamate-induced excitotoxicity. In summary, we conclude that sub-toxic exposure to ethanol may well be neuroprotective against oxidative insults in hippocampal cells.

  4. Sub-toxic Ethanol Exposure Modulates Gene Expression and Enzyme Activity of Antioxidant Systems to Provide Neuroprotection in Hippocampal HT22 Cells

    PubMed Central

    Casañas-Sánchez, Verónica; Pérez, José A.; Quinto-Alemany, David; Díaz, Mario

    2016-01-01

    Ethanol is known to cause severe systemic damage often explained as secondary to oxidative stress. Brain is particularly vulnerable to ethanol-induced reactive oxygen species (ROS) because the high amounts of lipids, and because nerve cell membranes contain high amounts of peroxidable fatty acids. Usually these effects of ethanol are associated to high and/or chronic exposure to ethanol. However, as we show in this manuscript, a low and acute dose of ethanol trigger a completely different response in hippocampal cells. Thus, we have observed that 0.1% ethanol exposure to HT22 cells, a murine hippocampal-derived cell line, increases the transcriptional expression of different genes belonging to the classical, glutathione/glutaredoxin and thioredoxin/peroxiredoxin antioxidant systems, these including Sod1, Sod2, Gpx1, Gclc, and Txnrd1. Paralleling these changes, enzyme activities of total superoxide dismutase (tSOD), catalase, total glutathione peroxidase (tGPx), glutathione-S-reductase (GSR), and total thioredoxin reductase (tTXNRD), were all increased, while the generation of thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS), as indicators of lipid peroxidation, and glutathione levels remained unaltered. Ethanol exposure did not affect cell viability or cell growing as assessed by real-time cell culture monitoring, indicating that low ethanol doses are not deleterious for hippocampal cells, but rather prevented glutamate-induced excitotoxicity. In summary, we conclude that sub-toxic exposure to ethanol may well be neuroprotective against oxidative insults in hippocampal cells. PMID:27512374

  5. [Determination of Sb and Bi in 24 international geological reference materials by using pressurized acid digestion-ICP-MS].

    PubMed

    Hu, Zhao-chu; Gao, Shan; Liu, Xiao-ming; Yuan, Hong-lin; Liu, Ye; Diwu, Chun-rong

    2007-12-01

    The authors studied in detail the memory effect of Bi, Sb, As and Te in ICP-MS. The produced memory effects of these element were in the order of Bi>Sb>Te>As. Bi was seriously adsorbed by the polypropylene sample storing bottle and the sample introduction system in the low nitric acid medium (0.01%-1% HNO3). The washout effect of 0.1% HF was found to be better than those of 6% HNO3 and 0.1% HClO4. Under the given experiment conditions, the instrumental limit of detection was 0.001 and 0.0001 ng x mL(-1) for Sb and Bi, respectively. The authors report the determination of Sb and Bi in 24 international geological reference materials by using pressurized acid digestion-ICP-MS (including AGV-2, BHVO-2, BCR-2, etc.). Most of the results were found to be in reasonable agreement with the reported values in the literature. The authors' determined values of Sb for GSR-1 (granite; 0.30 microg x g(-1)) and JP-1 (peridotite; 0.045 microg x g(-1)) are obviously higher than those reported values. This is attributed to the efficient pressurized acid digestion, which is generally much more efficient than conventional wet digestions for insoluble minerals.

  6. Endocrine and psychophysiological aspects of human adaptation to the extreme.

    PubMed

    Farrace, S; Cenni, P; Tuozzi, G; Casagrande, M; Barbarito, B; Peri, A

    1999-06-01

    Human beings need to adapt to any extreme, unknown, or isolated environment. This adaptation requires changes in the normal regulation of psychophysiological homeostasis, as described in terms of stress reaction. The aim of the present study was to monitor the processes of human adaptation to cold and isolated areas in Antarctica during the 12th expedition of the Italian National Research Program. Nine healthy subjects (experimental subjects), members of the expedition, and nine controls in Italy, were studied over a period of 2 months. Anterior pituitary hormone secretion, insulin, and melatonin, plus routine blood test, blood pressure, and ECG were performed. In addition, psychophysiological correlates were also recorded before and after the expedition period. In experimental subjects results of metabolic data suggested the presence of an increased peripheral insulin sensitivity at the end of the permanence in the station and a significant increased of total cholesterol. Hematocrit also significantly increased due to the conditions of hypobaric hypoxia. Results of endocrine data showed a significant decrease (p < 0.05) of hormone levels, which was associated with a significant decrement of the Galvanic Skin Response (GSR) activity to a standardized cognitive stress. No significant differences were reported in the controls. The data suggest that the exposure to the extreme environment develops a possible psychophysiological mechanism(s) that decreases the individual arousal.

  7. VehiHealth: An Emergency Routing Protocol for Vehicular Ad Hoc Network to Support Healthcare System.

    PubMed

    Bhoi, S K; Khilar, P M

    2016-03-01

    Survival of a patient depends on effective data communication in healthcare system. In this paper, an emergency routing protocol for Vehicular Ad hoc Network (VANET) is proposed to quickly forward the current patient status information from the ambulance to the hospital to provide pre-medical treatment. As the ambulance takes time to reach the hospital, ambulance doctor can provide sudden treatment to the patient in emergency by sending patient status information to the hospital through the vehicles using vehicular communication. Secondly, the experienced doctors respond to the information by quickly sending a treatment information to the ambulance. In this protocol, data is forwarded through that path which has less link breakage problem between the vehicles. This is done by calculating an intersection value I v a l u e for the neighboring intersections by using the current traffic information. Then the data is forwarded through that intersection which has minimum I v a l u e . Simulation results show VehiHealth performs better than P-GEDIR, GyTAR, A-STAR and GSR routing protocols in terms of average end-to-end delay, number of link breakage, path length, and average response time.

  8. IJS: An Intelligent Junction Selection Based Routing Protocol for VANET to Support ITS Services.

    PubMed

    Bhoi, Sourav Kumar; Khilar, Pabitra Mohan

    2014-01-01

    Selecting junctions intelligently for data transmission provides better intelligent transportation system (ITS) services. The main problem in vehicular communication is high disturbances of link connectivity due to mobility and less density of vehicles. If link conditions are predicted earlier, then there is a less chance of performance degradation. In this paper, an intelligent junction selection based routing protocol (IJS) is proposed to transmit the data in a quickest path, in which the vehicles are mostly connected and have less link connectivity problem. In this protocol, a helping vehicle is set at every junction to control the communication by predicting link failures or network gaps in a route. Helping vehicle at the junction produces a score for every neighboring junction to forward the data to the destination by considering the current traffic information and selects that junction which has minimum score. IJS protocol is implemented and compared with GyTAR, A-STAR, and GSR routing protocols. Simulation results show that IJS performs better in terms of average end-to-end delay, network gap encounter, and number of hops.

  9. IJS: An Intelligent Junction Selection Based Routing Protocol for VANET to Support ITS Services

    PubMed Central

    Khilar, Pabitra Mohan

    2014-01-01

    Selecting junctions intelligently for data transmission provides better intelligent transportation system (ITS) services. The main problem in vehicular communication is high disturbances of link connectivity due to mobility and less density of vehicles. If link conditions are predicted earlier, then there is a less chance of performance degradation. In this paper, an intelligent junction selection based routing protocol (IJS) is proposed to transmit the data in a quickest path, in which the vehicles are mostly connected and have less link connectivity problem. In this protocol, a helping vehicle is set at every junction to control the communication by predicting link failures or network gaps in a route. Helping vehicle at the junction produces a score for every neighboring junction to forward the data to the destination by considering the current traffic information and selects that junction which has minimum score. IJS protocol is implemented and compared with GyTAR, A-STAR, and GSR routing protocols. Simulation results show that IJS performs better in terms of average end-to-end delay, network gap encounter, and number of hops. PMID:27433485

  10. Reprogramming human A375 amelanotic melanoma cells by catalase overexpression: Upregulation of antioxidant genes correlates with regression of melanoma malignancy and with malignant progression when downregulated

    PubMed Central

    Berenstein, Ariel; Notcovich, Cintia; Cerda, María B.; Klamt, Fabio; Chernomoretz, Ariel; Durán, Hebe

    2016-01-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are implicated in tumor transformation. The antioxidant system (AOS) protects cells from ROS damage. However, it is also hijacked by cancers cells to proliferate within the tumor. Thus, identifying proteins altered by redox imbalance in cancer cells is an attractive prognostic and therapeutic tool. Gene expression microarrays in A375 melanoma cells with different ROS levels after overexpressing catalase were performed. Dissimilar phenotypes by differential compensation to hydrogen peroxide scavenging were generated. The melanotic A375-A7 (A7) upregulated TYRP1, CNTN1 and UCHL1 promoting melanogenesis. The metastatic A375-G10 (G10) downregulated MTSS1 and TIAM1, proteins absent in metastasis. Moreover, differential coexpression of AOS genes (EPHX2, GSTM3, MGST1, MSRA, TXNRD3, MGST3 and GSR) was found in A7 and G10. Their increase in A7 improved its AOS ability and therefore, oxidative stress response, resembling less aggressive tumor cells. Meanwhile, their decrease in G10 revealed a disruption in the AOS and therefore, enhanced its metastatic capacity. These gene signatures, not only bring new insights into the physiopathology of melanoma, but also could be relevant in clinical prognostic to classify between non aggressive and metastatic melanomas. PMID:27206673

  11. Analysis of particles produced during airbag deployment by scanning electron microscopy with energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy and their deposition on surrounding surfaces: a mid-research summary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wyatt, J. Matney

    2011-06-01

    Airbags can be encountered in forensic work when investigating a car crash and are typically constructed with primerlike material to begin the deployment apparatus. The mechanisms of airbag deployment can produce particles ideal for scanning electron microscopy with energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (SEM/EDS) analysis. A recent study published by Berk studied airbags with vents and showed that it is possible for particles generated from the deployment of these airbags to deposit on surfaces in the vehicle as the airbags deflate.1 Another paper published by Berk reported particles similar in morphology and composition to primer gunshot residue (GSR) are produced by side impact airbags.2 This paper's aim will be to show mid-point results of a study still in progress in which non-vented airbags were analyzed to determine if they exhibited the same particle depositing features as their vented airbag counterparts. Further investigation in this study is being performed to find more airbags which produce primer gunshot residue-like particles containing lead, barium, and antimony from airbag deployment. To date, the study has resulted in (1) non-vented airbags exhibiting deposition of particles suitable for SEM/EDS analysis and (2) no gunshot residue-like particles being detected from the airbag residues studied thus far.

  12. Development of a quantitative LC-MS/MS method for the analysis of common propellant powder stabilizers in gunshot residue.

    PubMed

    Laza, Désiré; Nys, Bart; Kinder, Jan De; Kirsch-De Mesmaeker, Andrée; Moucheron, Cécile

    2007-07-01

    In traditional scanning electron microscopy/energy dispersive X-ray analysis of gunshot residue (GSR), one has to cope more and more frequently with limitations of this technique due to the use of lead-free ammunition or ammunition lacking heavy metals. New methods for the analysis of the organic components of common propellant powder stabilizers were developed based on liquid chromatography coupled to tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). A multiple reactions monitoring scanning method was created for the screening of akardite II, ethylcentralite, diphenylamine, methylcentralite, N-nitrosodiphenylamine, 2-nitrodiphenylamine, and 4-nitrodiphenylamine, present in standards mixtures. Five out of seven of these target compounds can be selectively identified and distinguished from the two others with a high accuracy. Samples from the hands of a shooter were collected by swabbing and underwent solid phase extraction prior to analysis. Detection limits ranging from 5 to 115 mug injected were achieved. Results from several firing trials show that the LC-MS/MS method is suitable for the detection of stabilizers in samples collected following the firing of 9 mm Para ammunitions.

  13. Probabilistic evidential assessment of gunshot residue particle evidence (Part I): likelihood ratio calculation and case pre-assessment using Bayesian networks.

    PubMed

    Biedermann, A; Bozza, S; Taroni, F

    2009-10-30

    Well developed experimental procedures currently exist for retrieving and analyzing particle evidence from hands of individuals suspected of being associated with the discharge of a firearm. Although analytical approaches (e.g. automated Scanning Electron Microscopy with Energy Dispersive X-ray (SEM-EDS) microanalysis) allow the determination of the presence of elements typically found in gunshot residue (GSR) particles, such analyses provide no information about a given particle's actual source. Possible origins for which scientists may need to account for are a primary exposure to the discharge of a firearm or a secondary transfer due to a contaminated environment. In order to approach such sources of uncertainty in the context of evidential assessment, this paper studies the construction and practical implementation of graphical probability models (i.e. Bayesian networks). These can assist forensic scientists in making the issue tractable within a probabilistic perspective. The proposed models focus on likelihood ratio calculations at various levels of detail as well as case pre-assessment.

  14. THE APACHE POINT OBSERVATORY GALACTIC EVOLUTION EXPERIMENT: FIRST DETECTION OF HIGH-VELOCITY MILKY WAY BAR STARS

    SciTech Connect

    Nidever, David L.; Zasowski, Gail; Majewski, Steven R.; Beaton, Rachael L.; Wilson, John C.; Skrutskie, Michael F.; O'Connell, Robert W.; Bird, Jonathan; Schoenrich, Ralph; Johnson, Jennifer A.; Sellgren, Kris; Robin, Annie C.; Schultheis, Mathias; Martinez-Valpuesta, Inma; Gerhard, Ortwin; Shetrone, Matthew; Schiavon, Ricardo P.; Weiner, Benjamin; Schneider, Donald P.; Allende Prieto, Carlos; and others

    2012-08-20

    Commissioning observations with the Apache Point Observatory Galactic Evolution Experiment (APOGEE), part of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey III, have produced radial velocities (RVs) for {approx}4700 K/M-giant stars in the Milky Way (MW) bulge. These high-resolution (R {approx} 22, 500), high-S/N (>100 per resolution element), near-infrared (NIR; 1.51-1.70 {mu}m) spectra provide accurate RVs ({epsilon}{sub V} {approx} 0.2 km s{sup -1}) for the sample of stars in 18 Galactic bulge fields spanning -1 Degree-Sign -32 Degree-Sign . This represents the largest NIR high-resolution spectroscopic sample of giant stars ever assembled in this region of the Galaxy. A cold ({sigma}{sub V} {approx} 30 km s{sup -1}), high-velocity peak (V{sub GSR} Almost-Equal-To +200 km s{sup -1}) is found to comprise a significant fraction ({approx}10%) of stars in many of these fields. These high RVs have not been detected in previous MW surveys and are not expected for a simple, circularly rotating disk. Preliminary distance estimates rule out an origin from the background Sagittarius tidal stream or a new stream in the MW disk. Comparison to various Galactic models suggests that these high RVs are best explained by stars in orbits of the Galactic bar potential, although some observational features remain unexplained.

  15. Feature selection for multimodal emotion recognition in the arousal-valence space.

    PubMed

    Torres, Cristian A; Orozco, Álvaro A; Álvarez, Mauricio A

    2013-01-01

    Emotion recognition is a challenging research problem with a significant scientific interest. Most of the emotion assessment studies have focused on the analysis of facial expressions. Recently, it has been shown that the simultaneous use of several biosignals taken from the patient may improve the classification accuracy. An open problem in this area is to identify which biosignals are more relevant for emotion recognition. In this paper, we perform Recursive Feature Elimination (RFE) to select a subset of features that allows emotion classification. Experiments are carried out over a multimodal database with arousal and valence annotations, and a diverse range of features extracted from physiological, neurophysiological, and video signals. Results show that several features can be eliminated while still preserving classification accuracy in setups of 2 and 3 classes. Using a small subset of the features, it is possible to reach 70% accuracy for arousal and 60% accuracy for valence in some experiments. Experimentally, it is shown that the Galvanic Skin Response (GSR) is relevant for arousal classification, while the electroencephalogram (EEG) is relevant for valence.

  16. Historical Perspective on the DNA Damage Response

    PubMed Central

    Hanawalt, Philip C.

    2015-01-01

    The DNA damage response (DDR) has been broadly defined as a complex network of cellular pathways that cooperate to sense and repair lesions in DNA. Multiple types of DNA damage, some natural DNA sequences, nucleotide pool deficiencies and collisions with transcription complexes can cause replication arrest to elicit the DDR. However, in practice, the term DDR as applied to eukaryotic/mammalian cells often refers more specifically to pathways involving the activation of the ATM (ataxia-telangiectasia mutated) and ATR (ATM-Rad3-related) kinases in response to double-strand breaks or arrested replication forks, respectively. Nevertheless, there are distinct responses to particular types of DNA damage that do not involve ATM or ATR. In addition, some of the aberrations that cause replication arrest and elicit the DDR cannot be categorized as direct DNA damage. These include nucleotide pool deficiencies, nucleotide sequences that can adopt non-canonical DNA structures, and collisions between replication forks and transcription complexes. The response to these aberrations can be called the genomic stress response (GSR), a term that is meant to encompass the sensing of all types of DNA aberrations together with the mechanisms involved in coping with them. In addition to fully functional cells, the consequences of processing genomic aberrations may include mutagenesis, genomic rearrangements and lethality. PMID:26507443

  17. The great beauty: a neuroaesthetic study by neuroelectric imaging during the observation of the real Michelangelo's Moses sculpture.

    PubMed

    Babiloni, F; Cherubino, P; Graziani, I; Trettel, A; Bagordo, G M; Cundari, C; Borghini, G; Arico, P; Maglione, A G; Vecchiato, G

    2014-01-01

    Recent studies have been showed as the perception of real or displayed masterpieces by ancient or modern painters generate stable neuroelectrical correlates in humans. In this study, we collected the neuroelectrical brain activity correlated with the observation of the real sculpture of Michelangelo's Moses within the church where it is actually installed in a group of healthy subjects. In addition to the cerebral activity also the heart rate (HR) and the galvanic skin response (GSR) were collected simultaneously, to assess the emotional engage of the investigated population. The Moses sculpture was observed by the group from three different point of views, each one revealing different details of the sculpture. In addition, in each location the light conditions related to the specific observation of the sculpture were explicitly changed. Results showed that cerebral activity of the subjects varied significantly across the three different views and for light condition against no light condition (p<;0.04). Furthermore, the emotional engage estimated on the whole population is higher for a point of observation in which the Mose's face is directed toward the eyes of the observers (p<;0.02). Finally, the cerebral appreciation of the investigated group was found maximum from a perspective in which all the details of the sculpture could be easily grab by the eyes. Results suggested how the perception of the sculpture depends critically by the point of view of the observers and how such point of view can produce separate emotional and cerebral responses.

  18. [Biofeedback and drug-resistant epilepsy: back to an earlier treatment?].

    PubMed

    Micoulaud-Franchi, J A; Lanteaume, L; Pallanca, O; Vion-Dury, J; Bartolomei, F

    2014-03-01

    Biofeedback is a complementary non-pharmacological and non-surgical therapeutic developed over the last thirty years in the management of drug-resistant epilepsy. Biofeedback allows learning cognitive and behavioral strategies via a psychophysiological feedback loop. Firstly, this paper describes the different types of biofeedback protocols used for the treatment of drug-refractory epilepsy and their physiological justifications. Secondly, this paper analyzes the evidence of effectiveness, from a medical point of view, on reducing the numbers of seizures, and from a neurophysiological point of view, on the changing brain activity. Electroencephalography (EEG) biofeedback (neurofeedback) protocol on sensorimotor rhythms (SMR) has been investigated in many studies, the main limitation being small sample sizes and lack of control groups. The newer neurofeedback protocol on slow cortical potential (SCP) and galvanic skin response (GSR) biofeedback protocols have been used in a smaller number of studies. But, these studies are more rigorous with larger sized samples, matched control groups, and attempts to control the placebo effect. These protocols also open the way for innovative neurophysiological researches and may predict a renewal of biofeedback techniques. Biofeedback would have legitimacy in the field of clinical drug-resistant epilepsy at the interface between therapeutic and clinical neurophysiology.

  19. Neuroelectrical correlates of trustworthiness and dominance judgments related to the observation of political candidates.

    PubMed

    Vecchiato, Giovanni; Toppi, Jlenia; Maglione, Anton Giulio; Olejarczyk, Elzbieta; Astolfi, Laura; Mattia, Donatella; Colosimo, Alfredo; Babiloni, Fabio

    2014-01-01

    The present research investigates the neurophysiological activity elicited by fast observations of faces of real candidates during simulated political elections. We used simultaneous recording of electroencephalographic (EEG) signals as well as galvanic skin response (GSR) and heart rate (HR) as measurements of central and autonomic nervous systems. Twenty healthy subjects were asked to give judgments on dominance, trustworthiness, and a preference of vote related to the politicians' faces. We used high-resolution EEG techniques to map statistical differences of power spectral density (PSD) cortical activity onto a realistic head model as well as partial directed coherence (PDC) and graph theory metrics to estimate the functional connectivity networks and investigate the role of cortical regions of interest (ROIs). Behavioral results revealed that judgment of dominance trait is the most predictive of the outcome of the simulated elections. Statistical comparisons related to PSD and PDC values highlighted an asymmetry in the activation of frontal cortical areas associated with the valence of the judged trait as well as to the probability to cast the vote. Overall, our results highlight the existence of cortical EEG features which are correlated with the prediction of vote and with the judgment of trustworthy and dominant faces.

  20. Magnetic Reconnection: studies of collisionless momentum balance near an X-line with a guide magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fox, William; Egedal, J.; Porkolab, M.; Plasma Science, Mit; Center, Fusion

    2004-11-01

    A long-standing problem in reconnection research is what provides balance for the reconnecting electric field along an X-line. Two different types of theories can account for momentum balance: turbulence theories invoke unstable waves which provide a non-linear force on the particle species, and laminar models invoke terms in the momentum equation which are typically subdominant, such as electron inertia. For a laminar theory with a strong guide field, we present a study of all these tems, and a kinetic study where we have relaxed the condition that the X-line must be a stagnation point of the reconnection plasma flow, i.e. we construct solutions with plasma flow across, not just into and out of, the X-line. We present experimental evidence from the VTF open cusp configuration that the X-line is indeed not a stagnation point, and discuss consequences for momentum balance. Second, we present the first measurements of plasma turbulence in the new VTF closed configuration and discuss their relevance for momentum balance. This work was funded by an Oak Ridge Fusion Energy Sciences Fellowship, and by NSF/DoE Award DE-FG02-03ER54712

  1. A New 3He-Target Design for Compton Scattering Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahalchick, S.; Gao, H.; Laskaris, G.; Weir, W.; Ye, Q.; Ye, Q. J.

    2011-10-01

    The neutron spin polarizabilities describe the stiffness of the neutron spin to external electric and magnetic fields. A double-polarized elastic Compton Scattering experiment will try to determine the neutron spin polarizabilities using a new polarized 3He target and the circularly polarized γ-beam of HI γS facility at the Duke Free Electron Laser Laboratory (DFELL). To polarize the 3He target, a newly constructed solenoid is being used which can provide a very uniform magnetic field around the target area and allows to place High Intensity Gamma Source NaI Detector Arrays (HINDA) closer to the target. The ideal target polarization is 40-60% and will be measured using the nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) techniques. A prototype of the polarized 3He target is being constructed in the Medium Energy Physics Group laboratories at Duke and is currently being tested. The experiment is expected to take place in 2013 after the DFELL upgrade. I will be presenting details of the construction process, including design specifications and data from the magnetic field mapping, as well as preliminary target polarization results. This work is supported by the US Department of Energy, under contract number DE-FG02-03ER41231, and by the National Science Foundation, grant number NSF-PHY-08-51813.

  2. Thermal oxidation of Si/SiGe heterostructures for use in quantum dot qubits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neyens, Samuel F.; Foote, Ryan H.; Knapp, T. J.; McJunkin, Thomas; Savage, D. E.; Lagally, M. G.; Coppersmith, S. N.; Eriksson, M. A.

    Here we demonstrate dry thermal oxidation of a Si/SiGe heterostructure at 700°C and use a Hall bar device to measure the mobility after oxidation to be 43,000 cm2V-1s-1 at a carrier density of 4.1 ×1011 cm-2. Surprisingly, we find no significant reduction in mobility compared with an Al2O3 device made with atomic layer deposition on the same heterostructure, indicating thermal oxidation can be used to process Si/SiGe quantum dot devices. This result provides a path for investigating improvements to the gate oxide in Si/SiGe qubit devices, whose performance is believed to be limited by charge noise in the oxide layer. This work was supported in part by ARO (W911NF-12-0607) and NSF (DMR-1206915 and PHY-1104660). Development and maintenance of the growth facilities used for fabricating samples is supported by DOE (DE-FG02-03ER46028). This research utilized NSF-supported shared facilities at the University of Wisconsin-Madison.

  3. GEM Detectors of Proton Charge Radius (PRad) Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bai, Xinzhan; PRad Collaboration

    2017-01-01

    The PRad experiment (E12-11-106) was recently performed at Jefferson Lab in Hall B. It was designed to measure the proton charge radius with high precision, through the elastic electron proton scattering process, using a non-magnetic-spectrometer method. PRad experiment reached very small ep scattering angles and thus it can see an unprecedented small four-momentum transfer squared region, Q2 from 2 ×10-4 to 0 . 1(GeV / c) 2 . This experiment measures the proton charge radius by extracting the electric form factor of proton with a sub-percent precision. A pair of world's largest GEM detectors, and a high resolution calorimeter(HyCal) were utilized in the experiment. In this talk, we will present the performance of GEM detectors achieved in the experiment, such as efficiency and other characteristics, and preliminary analysis results of the experimental data. This work is supported in part by NSF MRI award PHY-1229153, the U.S. Department of Energy under Contract No. DE-FG02-07ER41528, University of Virginia under Contract No. DE-FG02-03ER41240 and Thomas Jefferson National Laboratory.

  4. The Data Quality and Analysis Status of the Proton Charge Radius (PRad) Experiment at JLab

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiong, Weizhi; PRad Collaboration

    2017-01-01

    In order to investigate the proton radius puzzle, the PRad experiment (E12-11-106) was performed in 2016 in Hall B at Jefferson Lab. The experiment aims to extract the electric form factor of proton in an unprecedented low Q2 region (2 ×10-4 - 0 . 1(GeV / c) 2), with a sub-percent precision. The PRad experiment utilizes a non-magnetic calorimetric method with a high efficiency and high resolution calorimeter (HyCal), and two Gas Electron Multiplier (GEM) detectors. The systematic uncertainties are well controlled by two main advantages of the experiment: (1) The electron-proton (e - p) elastic scattering cross section is normalized to the well-known M øller scattering process, which is measured simultaneously during the experiment; (2) The H2 gas flow target has no cell windows at both ends, which created primary backgrounds in the previous e - p elastic scattering experiments. Thus the PRad experiment largely suppresses the two major systematic uncertainties in the previous magnetic spectrometric e - p elastic scattering experiments. In this talk, we will discuss the data quality and analysis status, and present the first preliminary results from the current analysis process. This work is supported in part by the U.S. Department of Energy under Contract No. DE-FG02-03ER41231, NSF MRI award PHY-1229153, Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility and Duke University.

  5. Enhancement of Pure Spin Currents in Spin Pumping Y3Fe5O12/Cu/metal Trilayers Through Spin Impedance Matching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hammel, P. Chris; Du, Chunhui; Wang, Hailong; Yang, Fengyuan

    2014-03-01

    Spin pumping, driven thermally as well as by Ferromagnetic Resonance (FMR), is being widely used to generate pure spin currents from ferromagnets (FM) into normal metals (NM). Typically, the NM is chosen to be a spin-sink-Pt, W or Ta, while lighter metals such as Cu are rarely used, except to decouple the FM and spin sink. The efficiency of spin pumping is largely determined by the spin mixing conductance of the FM/NM interface. Here, we report a comparative study of spin pumping in Y3Fe5O12 /Cu/Pt and Y3Fe5O12 /Cu/W trilayers with varying Cu thicknesses. Remarkably, we find that insertion of a Cu interlayer between YIG and W substantially improves (over a factor of 4) the spin current injection into W while similar insertion between YIG and Pt degrades the spin current. This is a consequence of a much improved YIG/Cu spin mixing conductance relative to that for YIG/W. This result shows that high quality multilayer FM/NM heterostructures can enable spin mixing conductances to be engineered to enable optimal spin pumping efficiency. We acknowledge the Center for Emergent Materials at OSU, a NSF MRSEC (DMR-0820414), the DOE through grant DE-FG02-03ER46054, LakeShore Cryotronics and NSL at OSU.

  6. Nuclear structure of 124Xe in dynamic PPQ model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, J. B.

    2014-07-01

    The Xe isotopes in the A = 130 region, with low quadrupole deformation β, are good examples of the γ-soft nuclei. Recent data of 124Xe exhibit well developed K-bands of ground, Kπ = 21+, 02+, 03+ and 41+. Its spectrum is studied in relation to the underlying dynamic symmetries. The absolute intra- and inter-band B (E2) values and the B (E2) ratios are compared with the theoretical predictions of the dynamic pairing plus quadrupole model in the microscopic approach, and the interacting boson model IBM-1. The potential energy surface illustrates the γ-soft character. The variation of inertia tensor over the (β , γ) space is studied, and the spread of the wave functions of three Iπ =0+ and two 2+ states over the (β , γ) space illustrate their varied character. Comparison is done with the dynamic symmetries of IBM for different bands. The O(6) symmetry breaking and preservation of the O(5) and O(6) symmetry are reviewed.

  7. Rosetta-Orbiter Check Giada 2 CR2 CRUISE2 V1.0

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colangeli, L.; International Giada Consortium

    2012-01-01

    This volume contains Experiment Data acquired by GIADA during 'Cruise 2' phase. More in detail it refers to the data provided during the following in-flight tests: 'Passive Payload Checkout n. 1' (PC1) held on 02/03-10-2005; 'Passive Payload Checkout n. 2' (PC2) held on 05/06-03-2006. It also contains documentation which describes the GIADA experiment. The data reported in this data set have been converted from ADC counts to engineering values. The quality of the Housekeeping and Calibration data is good. Scientific data are due to noise, as no grain event is expected during this mission phase. These data must be only considered to evaluate GIADA behaviour and not as real scientific data. Data reported by GDS and IS are due to noise as no dust event is expected during this mission phase. MBS frequency changes, once normalised for frequency vs. temperature dependence, if present, are due to deposition of contaminants existing in the S/C environment. Housekeeping and Calibration data from all GIADA sub-systems are useful to evaluate instrument health and behaviour when compared with similar data acquired during other mission phases.

  8. Nonlinear dynamics of a strongly driven single spin solid state qubit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coppersmith, S. N.; Jullien, Thibaut; Scarlino, P.; Kawakami, E.; Ward, D. R.; Savage, D. E.; Lagally, M. G.; Friesen, Mark; Eriksson, M. A.; Vandersypen, L. M. K.

    This talk will discuss how dynamical systems theory can yield new insight into some exotic behavior found in experiments on strongly driven quantum spins in silicon/silicon-germanium heterostructures. Spin resonance experiments were performed by using ac voltages to drive an electron wavefunction in a strong magnetic field gradient. Nontrivial dependence of the resonance frequency on applied power, including the observation of multiple resonant frequencies at one power, are shown to be consistent with frequency-dependent attenuation in the high-frequency lines. The method of analysis is very similar to that presented in the course on nonlinear dynamics that Leo Kadanoff developed at the University of Chicago in the early 1990's. This work was supported in part by ARO (W911NF-12-0607). Development and maintenance of the growth facilities used for fabricating samples is supported by DOE (DE-FG02-03ER46028). This research utilized NSF-supported shared facilities at UW-Madison.

  9. Genetic distances and variations of three clupeid species determined by PCR technique.

    PubMed

    Choi, Sang-Hoon; Yoon, Jong-Man

    2014-12-01

    In this study, seven oligonucleotides primers were shown to generate the shared loci, specific loci, unique shared loci to each species and shared loci by the three species which could be obviously calculated. Euclidean genetic distances within- and between-species were also calculated by complete linkage method with the sustenance of the hierarchical dendevrepogram program Systat version 13. The genomic DNA isolated from herring (Clupea pallasii), Korean anchovy (Coilia nasus) and large-eyed herring (Harengula zunashi), respectively, in the Yellow Sea, were amplified several times by PCR reaction. The hierarchical dendevrepogram shows three chief branches: cluster 1 (PALLASII 01, 02, 03, 04, 06 and 07), cluster 2 (NASUS 08, 09, 10, 11, 12, 13 and 14), and cluster 3 (ZUNASHI 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21 and PALLASII 05). In three clupeid species, the shortest genetic distance displaying significant molecular difference was between individual PALLASII no. 03 and PALLASII no. 02 (0.018). Individual no. 06 of PALLASII was most distantly related to NASUS no. 11 (genetic distance = 0.318). Individuals from herring (C. pallasii) species (0.920) exhibited higher bandsharing values than did individuals from Korean anchovy (C. nasus) species (0.872) (P<0.05). As a result, this PCR analysis generated on the genetic data displayed that the herring (C. pallasii) species was widely separated from Korean anchovy (C. nasus) species. Reversely, individuals of Korean anchovy (C. nasus) species were a little closely related to those of large-eyed herring (H. zunashi) species.

  10. The New Proton Radius Experiment (PRad) at Jefferson Lab

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gasparian, Ashot; PRad collaboration at JLab Collaboration

    2017-01-01

    The proton charge radius (Rp) is one of the most fundamental quantities in physics. Precise knowledge of its value is critically important for both nuclear and atomic physics - especially for the spectroscopy of atomic hydrogen. Recent high precision measurements of Rp using the muonic hydrogen atom demonstrated up to eight standard deviations smaller value than the accepted average from all previous experiments performed with different methods. This fact triggered the well known ``proton charge radius puzzle'' in hadronic physics. The PRad collaboration at Jefferson Lab for the last four years developed a novel magnetic-spectrometer-free electron-proton scattering experiment to address this puzzle. The PRad experiment successfully performed in May and June of this year at Jefferson Lab collecting a large statistical and high quality experimental data set. The specifics of the method, the experimental characteristics of the setup together with the first preliminary results from the current data analysis process will be presented in this talk. This project is supported in part by the US NSF MRI award PHY-1229153, and US DOE awards: DE-FG02-03ER41240, DE-FG0203ER41231.

  11. Overview and Status of the SeaQuest Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Isenhower, Larry Donald; SeaQuest Collaboration

    2016-09-01

    SeaQuest (E906) is a Fermilab fixed target experiment and has been running since December 2013. It has made significant progress towards its goal of extending measurements made by earlier Fermilab Drell-Yan (D-Y) experiments, E866 and E772. A description will be given of the effort that went into building this new high-mass, high-rate capability di-muon spectrometer with entirely new target, trigger, and DAQ systems. These were integrated into detector systems which are new or recycled from other experiments. A completely new beam operation mode had to be developed by Fermilab that would allow a slow extraction of the beam for SeaQuest over four seconds while not disturbing the fast extraction mode for neutrino running. A beam Cherenkov detector was built that could run at the necessary 53 MHz rate to monitor each beam pulse and produce a beam veto for large proton bunches. After commissioning, SeaQuest has made steady progress on the amount of data recorded. The current status will be shown, along with expectations for the next year. Many challenges have been overcome by this collaboration in order to produce data for analysis. A broad range of physics results will be the result of this effort as well as a number of possible future experiments. Work supported by U.S. DOE MENP Grant DE-FG02-03ER41243.

  12. Parallel calculations of vibrational properties in complex materials: negative thermal expansion and elastic inhomogeneity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vila, F. D.; Rehr, J. J.

    Effects of thermal vibrations are essential to obtain a more complete understanding of the properties of complex materials. For example, they are important in the analysis and simulation of x-ray absorption spectra (XAS). In previous work we introduced an ab initio approach for a variety of vibrational effects, such as crystallographic and XAS Debye-Waller factors, Debye and Einstein temperatures, and thermal expansion coefficients. This approach uses theoretical dynamical matrices from which the locally-projected vibrational densities of states are obtained using a Lanczos recursion algorithm. In this talk I present recent improvements to our implementation, which permit simulations of more complex materials with up to two orders of magnitude larger simulation cells. The method takes advantage of parallelization in calculations of the dynamical matrix with VASP. To illustrate these capabilities we discuss two problems of considerable interest: negative thermal expansion in ZrW2O8; and local inhomogeneities in the elastic properties of supported metal nanoparticles. Both cases highlight the importance of a local treatment of vibrational properties. Supported by DOE Grant DE-FG02-03ER15476, with computer support from DOE-NERSC.

  13. Mass Gap Equation in 1+1 Dimensional QCD Interpolating between the Instant and Front Forms of Relativistic Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Bailing; Ji, Chueng-Ryong

    2017-01-01

    Due to the simplicity and the inherent characteristics of confinement, the 1+1 dimensional QCD known as 't Hooft model has attracted a lot of interest for many yers. In the large Nc limit, the contribution from non-planar diagrams are negligible, hence an iterative equation can be simplified and solved numerically for the quark propagator dressed by gluons. While 't Hooft model was originally solved using the Light Front Dynamics (LFD), people have also done similar work afterwards in the Instant Form Dynamics (IFD). We attempt to interpolate the 1+1 dimensional QCD between IFD and LFD by introducing an angle called the interpolation angle. Using this interpolation method, we analyze the formulation of the single quark mass gap equation in dynamical forms between IFD and LFD. Examining that our interpolating results reproduce the IFD and LFD results previously obtained by others, we discuss the fate of the vacuum condensation, the chiral angle, and the effective mass in the limit to the IFD and the LFD. This work was supported by the U.S. Department of Energy (Grant No. DE-FG02-03ER41260).

  14. Does the Bohm Criterion have meaning for collisional plasmas?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Severn, Greg; Yip, Chi-Shung; Nourgostar, Sirous; Hershkowitz, Noah

    2014-10-01

    Theorists view the Bohm criterion as approximately true, holding only for collisionless plasmas. The question of whether there exists a collisionally modified Bohm Criterion (CMBC) is often answered in the negative, and it is only a question of how the Bohm Criterion fails for the case of finite collisionality. The question is of importance considering that nearly all practical plasma processing applications involve plasmas of finite collisionality. There is, however, very little experimental work to help choose between competing models of how Bohm's Criterion fails. The question of critical importance is this: in plasmas of finite collisionality, do ions reach the Bohm speed at the location where the quasineutral plasma ends and where space charge appears? We have begun to examine the question experimentally in single ion species plasmas, and our goal is to vary the ion-neutral mean free path λ within the interval 1 < λ /λD <103 , where λD is the Debye length, and to present both plasma potential data and ion velocity distribution function profiles, measured by emissive probes and by LIF, respectively, to help us understand and assess the validity of theoretical claims. Work supported by NSF Grant No. PHY-1206421, CBET-0903783, and CBET-0903832, and U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Grant Nos. DE-FG02- 97ER54437 and DE FG02- 03ER54728.

  15. Nonlinear, Local Kinetic Damping of Finite-Size Plasma Waves Relevant to Stimulated Raman Scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mori, Warren; Fahlen, Jay; Winjum, Benjamin; Grismayer, Thomas; Decyk, Viktor

    2009-11-01

    Computer simulations of stimulated Raman scattering (SRS) indicate that the instability is bursty in time and space, leading to finite-size plasma waves in both the longitudinal and transverse directions. Using particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations with an external, ponderomotive impulse driver, we present the results of detailed study of the nonlinear behavior of finite-sized plasma waves in order to better understand the long-time behavior of SRS reflectivities. In one dimension, we present recently published results (Fahlen et al., PRL 102, 245002 (2009)) showing that finite-length plasma waves erode from the rear edge as new resonant particles enter and locally damp the packet. In multiple dimensions, recent results show that finite-width plasma waves localize about their axis due primarily to local, kinetic damping at the edges. The simulations are performed using a 1D and 2D electrostatic PIC code, and also using a 2D Darwin PIC code. This work was supported by DOE under Grant Nos. DE-FG52-03-NA00065, DE-FG52-06NA26195, and DE-FG02-03ER54721.

  16. Cosmic Test Stand for Dark Photon Triggers at E906/SeaQuest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martinez, Joshua; SeaQuest Collaboration

    2016-09-01

    The E906/SeaQuest experiment uses the 120 GeV proton beam from Fermilab's Main Injector aimed at a fixed target to produce Drell-Yan events in order to study the quark and antiquark structure of the nucleon. Through interactions with the beam and the 5m long Fe Magnet, which also serves as a beam dump, this experiment has the potential to produce dark photons which would decay into a dimuon pair. To detect these dark photons, we need to install a new detector system that can trigger on these events that will come from areas the present SeaQuest trigger is designed to exclude as background. The detector system will be made of extruded scintillator with waveshifting optical fiber at its center, which will be matched to a 3mm multi-pixel photon counter (MPPC) Silicon Photomultiplier (SiPM). Then we will need to use programs to map the track back to the vertex inside the Fe magnet. This work describes the construction and operation of a test apparatus that was used to study the efficiency along the entire length of these scintillators to be used in the new dark photon trigger. This research was supported by US DOE MENP Grant DE-FG02-03ER41243.

  17. Initial coil sets for a high- β stellarator-tokamak hybrid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schlomann, B.; Ware, A. S.; Spong, D. A.

    2013-10-01

    Magnetic coil configurations have been developed for a drift-optimized, tokamak-stellarator hybrid that is stable to both pressure- and current-driven modes for high values of β. Previous work on this configuration [A. S. Ware, et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 89, 125003 (2002)] was carried out using a fixed-boundary equilibrium (i.e., with no set of external coils). Here, we present initial work to produce a realizable coil set for such a configuration. This work is done using the COILOPT code to develop an initial coil set and the STELLOPT code to enhance the quality of the resulting free-boundary equilibria. Since this is a hybrid device, the initial modular coil sets have the advantage of being simpler than modular coils from recent stellarator design efforts (such as QPS and NCSX). Ballooning stability is analyzed using the COBRAVMEC code and transport properties are analyzed using the DKES code. Work supported by U.S. Department of Energy under Grant DE-FG02-03ER54699 at the University of Montana.

  18. Study of the trigger efficiency for SeaQuest Drell-Yan Dimuons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xi, Zhaojia; E906/SeaQuest Collaboration

    2017-01-01

    The SeaQuest (E906) experiment, using the 120 GeV proton beam from the Main Injector at the Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (FNAL), is studying the quark and antiquark structure of the nucleon using the Drell-Yan process. SeaQuest uses a two magnet focusing spectrometer with four detector stations that include fast plastic scintillator hodoscope planes. The hodoscope arrays along with Field Programmable Gate Arrays(FPGAs) are used to make the SeaQuest trigger system. It is designed to measure events with dimuon pairs from the Drell-Yan process. The signals from each hodoscope, which have adequate timing resolution to determine which 18.9 ns beam pulse the event occurred, are sent to the FPGA trigger modules. In order to get a correct hit pattern, each channel is aligned to the beam RF clock. The trigger is formed when the hits fulfill a dimuon pattern. A program has been developed to analyze and calculate trigger efficiency by using data from hodoscopes. It is important to study trigger efficiency to be used in physics results, such as the cross section of the Drell-Yan process. The method, programming, measurements, and results of this study will be presented. This research was supported by US DOE MENP Grant DE-FG02-03ER41243.

  19. Runaway electrons and ITER

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boozer, Allen

    2016-10-01

    ITER planning for avoiding runaway damage depends on magnetic surface breakup in fast relaxations. These arise in thermal quenches and in the spreading of impurities from massive gas injection or shattered pellets. Surface breakup would prevent a runaway to relativistic energies were it not for non-intercepting flux tubes, which contain magnetic field lines that do not intercept the walls. Such tubes persist near the magnetic axis and in the cores of islands but must dissipate before any confining surfaces re-form. Otherwise, a highly dangerous situation arises. Electrons that were trapped and accelerated in these flux tubes can fill a large volume of stochastic field lines and serve as a seed for the transfer of the full plasma current to runaways. If the outer confining surfaces are punctured, as by a drift into the wall, then the full runaway inventory will be lost in a short pulse along a narrow flux tube. Although not part of ITER planning, currents induced in the walls by the fast magnetic relaxation could be used to passively prevent outer surfaces re-forming. If magnetic surface breakup can be avoided during impurity injection, the plasma current could be terminated in tens of milliseconds by plasma cooling with no danger of runaway. Support by DoE Office of Fusion Energy Science Grant De-FG02-03ER54696.

  20. Simulations of Stimulated Raman Scattering in One and Two Dimensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winjum, B. J.; Langdon, A. B.

    2005-10-01

    Using the full-PIC code OSIRIS, we have studied stimulated Raman scattering (SRS) over a wide range of parameters relevant to NIF. In previous one-dimensional simulation studies using reduced PIC, Vlasov, or full PIC models, the modification of the electron distribution function and electron trapping effects are believed to play the dominant role in explaining the recurring behavior of SRS reflectivity. Vu et al., have proposed that a nonlinear frequency shift due to the trapped particles detunes the instability, Brunner and Valeo argue that the trapped-particle instability is the dominant saturation mechanism, while L. Yin et al., claim that electron beam acoustic modes are important. We will discuss the role played by each of these effects in OSIRIS simulations, as well as the importance of plasma wave convection on the recurrence of SRS reflectivity. In extending the simulations to two dimensions, we will discuss side-scattering and electron trapping by both forward and backward SRS. When the laser intensity is near-threshold for SRS and the laser is focused to a finite width, we find that the physics remains rather one-dimensional. On the other hand, for plane-wave lasers, as well as for higher-intensity lasers, the physics becomes multi-dimensional. Simulations performed on the Dawson Cluster under support of NSF grant NSF Phy-0321345. Work also supported by DE-FG02-03-NA00065.

  1. Observation of heterodyne and homodyne mixing in X-ray photon correlation spectroscopy during thin film deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Headrick, Randall; Ulbrandt, Jeffrey; Rainville, Meliha; Wagenbach, Christa; Narayanan, Suresh; Sandy, Alec; Zhou, Hua; Ludwig, Karl

    The properties of artificially grown thin films are often strongly affected by the dynamic relationship between surface growth processes and subsurface structure. Coherent mixing of X-ray signals promises to provide an approach to better understand such processes. Continuously variable mixing of surface and bulk scattering signals during real-time studies of sputter deposition of a-Si and a-WiSi2 films has been observed by controlling the X-ray penetration and escape depths in coherent grazing incidence small angle X-ray scattering (Co-GISAXS). Under conditions where the X-ray signal comes from both the growth surface and the thin film bulk, oscillations in temporal correlations arise from coherent interference between scattering from stationary bulk features and from the advancing surface. The absence of oscillations at larger in-plane wavevector transfer is interpreted as evidence that elongated bulk features propagate upward at the same velocity as the surface. Additionally, a highly surface sensitive mode is demonstrated that can access the surface dynamics independently of the subsurface structure. Acknowledgements: USDOE Office of Basic Energy Sciences under DE-FG02-07ER46380 (RH and JU), and DE-FG02-03ER46037 (MR, CW, and KL).

  2. Track Reconstruction at SeaQuest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Byrd, Reuben; SeaQuest Collaboration

    2016-09-01

    The SeaQuest experiment, at Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory, is a fixed target experiment that uses the Drell-Yan process to measure the quark and antiquark structure in the nucleon sea. A naïve assumption is that the number of anti-up and anti-down quarks within a nucleon sea would be the same. However, evidence shows that this is not true. The goal of SeaQuest is to more accurately measure this asymmetry in the nucleon sea. In this process event tracking is an integral step in analyzing the data collected. This is difficult due to the size of the experiment, the number of detectors and the beam dump. The beam dump is a 5m block of iron that lies just beyond the target to protect the detectors from the beam. This poses a problem for accurately tracking muons back to the target. Therefore, it is important to crosscheck two independent event trackers. Sqerp, the SeaQuest Event Reconstruction Program, is one of these trackers used at SeaQuest. This tracks events through two magnets, 4 detector stations, and 18 planes of wires. Sqerp deals with difficult problems such as matching hits in each detector station and how detector alignment affects this. This poster will focus on the methods used by Sqerp and the work done in optimizing these processes. This research was supported by US DOE MENP Grant DE-FG02-03ER41243.

  3. Nucleon Structure Studies with Electromagnetic Probes

    SciTech Connect

    Vineyard, Michael F.

    2011-03-31

    Summarized in this report is the progress achieved during the period from March 1, 2008 to June 14, 2009 under contract number DE-FG02-03ER41252. This is the final technical report under this contract. The experimental work described here is part of the electromagnetic nuclear physics program of the CEBAF Large Acceptance Spectrometer (CLAS) Collaboration at the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (Jefferson Lab) that published 17 journal articles during the period of this report. One of these journal articles reported on the results of precise measurements of the neutron magnetic form factor. I was a spokesperson on this experiment and the publication of these results is the culmination of years of effort by a small subset of the CLAS Collaboration. As usual, undergraduate students were involved in all aspects of this work. Three Union College students participated in this program during the window of this report and one presented a paper on his work at the 2009 National Conference on Undergraduate Research (NCUR22). In this report, I discuss recent progress on the measurements of the neutron magnetic form factor and describe my service work for the CLAS Collaboration.

  4. NIMROD Simulations of Low-q Disruptions in the Compact Toroidal Hybrid Device (CTH)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Howell, E. C.; Pandya, M. D.; Hanson, J. D.; Mauer, D. A.; Ennis, D. A.; Hartwell, G. J.

    2016-10-01

    Nonlinear MHD simulations of low-q disruptions in the CTH are presented. CTH is a current carrying stellarator that is used to study the effects of 3D shaping. The application of 3D shaping stabilizes low-q disruptions in CTH. The amount of 3D shaping is controlled by adjusting the external rotational transform, and it is characterized by the ratio of the external rotational transform to the total transform: f =ιvac / ι . Disruptions are routinely observed during operation with weak shaping (f < 0.05). The frequency of disruptions decreases with increasing amounts of 3D shaping, and the disruptions are completely suppressed for f > 0.1 . Nonlinear simulations are performed using the NIMROD code to better understand how the shaping suppresses the disruptions. Comparisons of runs with weak (f = 0.04) and strong (f = 0.10) shaping are shown. This material is based upon work supported by Auburn University and the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, Office of Fusion Energy Sciences under Award Numbers DE-FG02-03ER54692 and DE-FG02-00ER54610.

  5. Transport through an impurity tunnel coupled to a Si/SiGe quantum dot

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foote, Ryan H.; Ward, Daniel R.; Prance, J. R.; Gamble, John King; Nielsen, Erik; Thorgrimsson, Brandur; Savage, D. E.; Saraiva, A. L.; Friesen, Mark; Coppersmith, S. N.; Eriksson, M. A.

    Here we present measurements of transport through a gate-defined quantum dot formed in a Si/SiGe heterostructure, demonstrating controllable tunnel coupling between the quantum dot and a localized electronic state.1 Combining experimental stability diagram measurements with 3D capacitive modeling based on the expected electron density profiles, we determine the most likely location of the localized state in the quantum well. This work is supported in part by NSF (DMR-1206915, IIA-1132804), ARO (W911NF-12-1-0607) and the William F. Vilas Estate Trust. Development and maintenance of the growth facilities used for fabricating samples supported by DOE (DE-FG02-03ER46028). This research utilized facilities supported by the NSF (DMR-0832760, DMR-1121288). The work of J.K.G. and E.N. was supported in part by the Laboratory Directed Research and Development program at Sandia National Laboratories. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under Contract DE-AC04-94AL85000. 1Ryan H. Foote et al., Appl. Phys. Lett. 107, 103112 (2015)

  6. Drift-reducing nozzles and their biological efficacy.

    PubMed

    Nuyttens, D; Dhoop, M; De Blauwer, V; Hermann, O; Hubrechts, W; Mestdagh, I; Dekeyser, D

    2009-01-01

    In 2007 and 2008, field trials were carried out with different standard and drift-reducing nozzles in sugar beet, maize, chicory, Belgian endive (all herbicide applications), wheat (fungicide application) and potatoes (Haulm killing herbicide application). The effect of nozzle type (standard flat fan, low-drift flat fan, air injection), nozzle size (ISO 02, 03 and 04) and application volume on the biological efficacy was investigated. All applications were done using a plot sprayer with volume rates ranging from 160 to 320 l.ha(-1) at recommended dose rates with commonly used (mix of) plant protection products. For each crop, the experiments included four replicates in a randomized block design. Depending on the type of application, the efficacy was measured in terms of weed control, disease and yield level, percentage dead leaf and stem, etc. In a previous research, drift and droplet characteristics of the different techniques were measured. In general no important effect of application technique on biological efficacy was observed for the tested herbicide and fungicide applications within the interval of volume rates and droplet size tested. Drift-reducing nozzles performed similar as conventional nozzles under good spraying conditions and using a correct spray application technique.

  7. Using Neural Networks to Detect Di-muon Tracks for Fermilab E906/SeaQuest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carstens, Paul; SeaQuest Collaboration

    2015-10-01

    The experiment E906/SeaQuest aims to gain further insight into the nucleon quark sea by gathering information about the anti-down/anti-up ratio produced by Drell-Yan events. SeaQuest collides a 120 GeV proton beam with one of several targets, liquid hydrogen, liquid deuterium, carbon, tungsten, iron, and two calibration targets, empty target and no target. The di-muon pairs created by the Drell-Yan events are monitored by four detector stations. Each has a set of hodoscopes, stations one, two, and three have wire chambers, and station four, which has a lower resolution, has a set of prop tubes. In order to separate the useful Drell-Yan events from dump events and background noise we employ the use of the hodoscopes to trigger potentially useful events to keep. This neural network would learn to properly discern Drell-Yan events by associating hodoscope readings from real data with results from existing trigger systems. By doing this, we could efficiently replicate existing results while alleviating the processing needed. This work is supported by U.S. DOE MENP Grant DE-FG02-03ER41243.

  8. Simulations of Sawtooth Oscillations In CTH

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roberds, Nicholas; Guazzotto, Luca; Hanson, James; Maurer, David

    2015-11-01

    Sawteeth are driven relaxation oscillations seen in tokamaks. Experimentally, they can be reproduced reliably. They affect the confinement of the plasma core, and in some circumstances can trigger disruptions. Sawtoothing has been observed in the Compact Toroidal Hybrid (CTH), a tokamak-stellarator hybrid having a non-axisymmetric equilibrium field. We present novel numerical simulations of sawtooth oscillations in this tokamak-stellarator hybrid. Results are contrasted and compared with simulations of a small ohmic tokamak that resembles CTH without the helical stellarator field. We have used NIMROD to conduct these extended-MHD simulations in toroidal geometry. Sawtooth simulations are obtained by starting with a stable ideal MHD equilibrium from VMEC, and driving the central safety factor below unity with an applied loop voltage. The challenges of sawtooth simulations with 3D equilibrium fields are discussed. This material is based upon work supported by Auburn University and the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, Office of Fusion Energy Sciences under Award Number DE-FG02-03ER54692.

  9. Comparing Novel Multi-Gap Resistive Plate Chamber Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stien, Haley; EIC PID Consortium Collaboration

    2016-09-01

    Investigating nuclear structure has led to the fundamental theory of Quantum Chromodynamics. An Electron Ion Collider (EIC) is a proposed accelerator that would further these investigations. In order to prepare for the EIC, there is an active detector research and development effort. One specific goal is to achieve better particle identification via improved Time of Flight (TOF) detectors. A promising option is the Multi-Gap Resistive Plate Chamber (mRPC). These detectors are similar to the more traditional RPCs, but their active gas gaps have dividers to form several thinner gas gaps. These very thin and accurately defined gas gaps improve the timing resolution of the chamber, so the goal is to build an mRPC with the thinnest gaps to achieve the best possible timing resolution. Two different construction techniques have been employed to make two mRPCs. The first technique is to physically separate the gas gaps with sheets of glass that are .2mm thick. The second technique is to 3D print the layered gas gaps. A comparison of these mRPCs and their performances will be discussed and the latest data presented. This research was supported by US DOE MENP Grant DE-FG02-03ER41243.

  10. Cellulose synthesizing Complexes in Vascular Plants andProcaryotes

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, Richard M, Jr; Saxena, Inder Mohan

    2009-07-07

    Continuing the work initiated under DE-FG03-94ER20145, the following major accomplishments were achieved under DE-FG02-03ER15396 from 2003-2007: (a) we purified the acsD gene product of the Acetobacter cellulose synthase operon as well as transferred the CesA cellulose gene from Gossypium into E. coli in an attempt to crystallize this protein for x-ray diffraction structural analysis; however, crystallization attempts proved unsuccessful; (b) the Acetobacter cellulose synthase operon was successfully incorporated into Synechococcus, a cyanobacterium2; (c) this operon in Synechococcus was functionally expressed; (d) we successfully immunolabeled Vigna cellulose and callose synthase components and mapped their distribution before and after wounding; (e) we developed a novel method to produce replicas of cellulose synthases in tobacco BY-2 cells, and we demonstrated the cytoplasmic domain of the rosette TC; (f) from the moss Physcomitrella, we isolated two full-length cDNA sequences of cellulose synthase (PpCesA1 and PpCesA2) and attempted to obtain full genomic DNA sequences; (g) we examined the detailed molecular structure of a new form of non-crystalline cellulose known as nematic ordered cellulose (=NOC)3.

  11. Studies of elasticity, sound propagation and attenuation of acoustic modes in granular media: final report

    SciTech Connect

    Makse, Hernan A.; Johnson, David L.

    2014-09-03

    This is the final report describing the results of DOE Grant # DE-FG02-03ER15458 with original termination date of April 31, 2013, which has been extended to April 31, 2014. The goal of this project is to develop a theoretical and experimental understanding of sound propagation, elasticity and dissipation in granular materials. The topic is relevant for the efficient production of hydrocarbon and for identifying and characterizing the underground formation for storage of either CO2 or nuclear waste material. Furthermore, understanding the basic properties of acoustic propagation in granular media is of importance not only to the energy industry, but also to the pharmaceutical, chemical and agricultural industries. We employ a set of experimental, theoretical and computational tools to develop a study of acoustics and dissipation in granular media. These include the concept effective mass of granular media, normal modes analysis, statistical mechanics frameworks and numerical simulations based on Discrete Element Methods. Effective mass measurements allow us to study the mechanisms of the elastic response and attenuation of acoustic modes in granular media. We perform experiments and simulations under varying conditions, including humidity and vacuum, and different interparticle force-laws to develop a fundamental understanding of the mechanisms of damping and acoustic propagation in granular media. A theoretical statistical approach studies the necessary phase space of configurations in pressure, volume fraction to classify granular materials.

  12. Volatile Composition of Comet C/2012 K1 (PanSTARRS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roth, Nathan; Gibb, Erika; Bonev, Boncho P.; DiSanti, Michael A.; Villanueva, Geronimo L.; Paganini, Lucas; Mumma, Michael J.

    2015-11-01

    On 2014 May 22 and 24 we characterized the volatile composition of the dynamically new Oort Cloud comet C/2012 K1 (PanSTARRS) using the long-slit, high resolution (λ/Δλ ≈ 25,000) infared echelle spectrograph (NIRSPEC) at the 10m Keck 2 telescope on Maunakea, HI. We detected fluorescent emission from six primary species (H2O, HCN, CH4, C2H6, CH3OH, and CO) and prompt emission from one product species (OH* - a directory proxy for H­2O). Upper limits were derived for C2H2 and H2CO. We report rotational temperatures, production rates, and mixing ratios (relative to water). Based on the inventory of comets characterized to date, mixing ratios of trace gases in C/2012 K1 (PanSTARRS) are about normal - CH3OH and C2H6 are slightly enriched, CO, CH4, HCN, and H2CO are average, and C­2H2 is depleted. I will discuss C/2012 K1 (PanSTARRS) in the context of an emerging taxonomy for comets based on volatile composition.This work is supported through the NASA Missouri Space Grant Consortium and the National Science Foundation (NSF 1211362), the NASA Astrobiology Institute through a grant to the Goddard Center for Astrobiology (811073.02.12.03.91), and the NASA Planetary Astronomy Program (811073.02.03.03.43).

  13. Applications of modern chiral interactions in nuclear matter and nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sammarruca, Francesca

    2016-09-01

    Experimental investigations are in progress, and more are planned for the near future, to set reliable constraints on the isospin asymmetric part of the nuclear equation of state. The latter plays a fundamental role in a broad spectrum of systems and phenomena, including the skins of neutron-rich nuclei and the location of the neutron drip lines. From the theoretical standpoint, microscopic calculations with statistically meaningful uncertainties are essential to guide experiments. We will discuss recent calculations of the nuclear and neutron matter equations of state at different orders of the chiral expansion. We will present applications and discuss the significance of those predictions as a foundation for future studies of convergence of the chiral perturbation series. Anticipating future experiments which may provide reliable information on the weak charge density in nuclei, we discuss the possibility of constraining the size of three-neutron forces in neutron matter. Supported by the U.S. Department of Energy under Grant No. DE-FG02-03ER41270.

  14. Dark Photon Monte Carlo at SeaQuest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hicks, Caleb; SeaQuest/E906 Collaboration

    2016-09-01

    Fermi National Laboratory's E906/SeaQuest is an experiment primarily designed to study the ratio of anti-down to anti-up quarks in the nucleon quark sea as a function of Bjorken x. SeaQuest's measurement is obtained by measuring the muon pairs produced by the Drell-Yan process. The experiment can also search for muon pair vertices past the target and beam dump, which would be a signature of Dark Photon decay. It is therefore necessary to run Monte Carlo simulations to determine how a changed Z vertex affects the detection and distribution of muon pairs using SeaQuest's detectors. SeaQuest has an existing Monte Carlo program that has been used for simulations of the Drell-Yan process as well as J/psi decay and other processes. The Monte Carlo program was modified to use a fixed Z vertex when generating muon pairs. Events were then generated with varying Z vertices and the resulting simulations were then analyzed. This work is focuses on the results of the Monte Carlo simulations and the effects on Dark Photon detection. This research was supported by US DOE MENP Grant DE-FG02-03ER41243.

  15. Optimization of Magnet Strength for Event Reconstruction and Analysis at FNAL SeaQuest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carstens, Paul; SeaQuest Collaboration

    2016-09-01

    The Fermilab E906/SeaQuest experiment primarily means to study the nucleon sea and its antiquark distribution. This experiment collides a 120 GeV proton beam with one of several fixed targets. E906/SeaQuest probes the quark sea with the Drell-Yan process in which a quark from the beam annihilates an antiquark from the target producing a virtual photon that decays into a pair of muons. Two magnets focus the muons through four detector stations in the spectrometer. The first is a solid iron magnet, which also serves as the beam dump and absorber. The second, an open aperture magnet, is the momentum analyzing magnet and is positioned between the first two detector stations. A tracking program reconstructs the trajectories of the particles in the detector to discern their kinematics. In order to correctly analyze data, the magnetic field strength must be accurately known since it affects the momentum of particles passing through the field. This poster focuses on how the magnet's effect on the transverse momentum of the muons affects kinematic reconstruction of both simulated and real events. This research was supported by US DOE MENP Grant DE-FG02-03ER41243 be added to my submission.

  16. Guinea pig lung resistance shows circadian rhythmicity not influenced by ozone.

    PubMed

    Sommer, B; Montaño, L M; Chávez, J; Gustin, P; Vargas, M H

    1998-09-01

    Increased circadian variability of airway caliber is a key feature of asthmatic patients, but it has not been addressed in animal models of asthma. Furthermore, animal studies on circadian rhythmicity of airway resistance are very scanty. We used a plethysmographic method for unrestrained guinea pigs to monitor a lung resistance index (iRL) during 24 h. We found circadian variability of iRL values, which were fitted by a sinusoidal curve. Acrophase and bathyphase, characterizing the timing of narrowest and widest airway caliber, respectively, were found at 02:03, and 15:34 h. iRL values at these time-points were statistically different (P < 10(-5)). Moreover, average resistance during the dark period was significantly higher (P < 0.0001) than during the light period. Immediately after an acute ozone exposure (3 ppm for 1 h) an increase in iRL was demonstrated (P < 0.01), which lasted for 2 h, and tended to remain high for the next hour. After guinea pigs recovered from this obstruction, the circadian rhythm and variability of airway caliber were unaffected. Our results show that a circadian rhythm of iRL takes place in guinea pigs, greatly resembling what occurs in humans, and that ozone exposure causes a transient airway obstruction, but fails to reproduce the increased variability of airway caliber observed in asthmatic patients.

  17. Data Assimilation of InSAR Surface Deformation Measurements for the Estimation of Reservoir Geomechanical Parameters in the Upper Adriatic Sedimentary Basin, Italy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bau, D. A.; Alzraiee, A.; Ferronato, M.; Gambolati, G.; Teatini, P.

    2012-12-01

    In the last decades, extensive work has been conducted to estimate land subsidence due the development of deep gas reservoirs situated in the Upper Adriatic sedimentary basin, Italy. These modeling efforts have stemmed from the development finite-element (FE) coupled reservoir-geomechanical models that can simulate the deformation due to the change in pore pressure induced by hydrocarbon production from the geological formations. However, the application of these numerical models has often been limited by the uncertainty in the hydrogeological and poro-mechanical input parameters that are necessary to simulate the impact on ground surface levels of past and/or future gas-field development scenarios. Resolving these uncertainties is of paramount importance, particularly the Northern Adriatic region, given the low elevation above the mean sea level observed along most of the coastline and in the areas surrounding the Venice Lagoon. In this work, we present a state-of-the-art data assimilation (DA) framework to incorporate measurements of displacement of the land surface obtained using Satellite Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar (InSAR) techniques into the response of geomechanical simulation models. In Northern Italy, InSAR measurement campaigns have been carried out over a depleted gas reservoir, referred to as "Lombardia", located at a depth of about 1200 m in the sedimentary basin of the Po River plain. In the last years, this reservoir has been used for underground gas storage and recovery (GSR). Because of the pore pressure periodical alternation produced by GSR, reservoir formations have undergone loading/unloading cycles, experiencing effective stress changes that have induced periodical variation of ground surface levels. Over the Lombardia reservoir, the pattern, magnitude and timing of time-laps land displacements both in the vertical and in the East-West directions have been acquired from 2003 until 2008. The availability of these data opens new

  18. An Overview of Public Domain Tools for Measuring the Sustainability of Environmental Remediation - 12060

    SciTech Connect

    Claypool, John E.; Rogers, Scott

    2012-07-01

    The application of sustainability principles to the investigation and remediation of contaminated sites is an area of rapid development within the environmental profession, with new business practices, tools, and performance standards for identifying, evaluating, and managing the 'collateral' impacts of cleanup projects to the environment, economy and society coming from many organizations. Guidelines, frameworks, and standards of practice for 'green and sustainable remediation' (GSR) have been released and are under development by the Sustainable Remediation Forum (SURF), the American Society for Testing Materials (ASTM), the Interstate Technology Roundtable Commission (ITRC) and other organizations in the U.S. and internationally. In response to Executive Orders from the President, Federal government agencies have developed policies, procedures and guidelines for evaluating and reporting the sustainability of their environmental restoration projects. Private sector companies in the petroleum, utility, manufacturing, defense, and other sectors are developing their own corporate GSR programs to improve day-to-day management of contaminated sites and to support external reporting as part of their corporate social responsibility (CSR) efforts. The explosion of mandates, policy, procedures and guidance raises the question of how to determine whether a remediation technology or cleanup approach is green and/or sustainable. The environmental profession has responded to this question by designing, developing and deploying a wide array of tools, calculators, and databases that enable regulatory agencies, site managers and environmental professionals to calculate the collateral impacts of their remediation projects in the environmental, social, and economic domains. Many of these tools are proprietary ones developed by environmental engineering/consulting firms for use in their consulting engagements and/or tailored specifically to meet the needs of their clients. When it

  19. Maternal supplementation with rumen-protected methionine increases prepartal plasma methionine concentration and alters hepatic mRNA abundance of 1-carbon, methionine, and transsulfuration pathways in neonatal Holstein calves.

    PubMed

    Jacometo, C B; Zhou, Z; Luchini, D; Corrêa, M N; Loor, J J

    2017-02-01

    An important mechanism of nutritional "programming" induced by supplementation with methyl donors during pregnancy is the alteration of mRNA abundance in the offspring. We investigated the effects of rumen-protected Met (RPM) on abundance of 17 genes in the 1-carbon, Met, and transsulfuration pathways in calf liver from cows fed the same basal diet without (control, CON) or with RPM at 0.08% of diet dry matter/d (MET) from -21 through +30 d around calving. Biopsies (n = 8 calves per diet) were harvested on d 4, 14, 28, and 50 of age. Cows fed RPM had greater plasma concentration of Met (17.8 vs. 28.2 μM) at -10 d from calving. However, no difference was present in colostrum yield and free AA concentrations. Greater abundance on d 4 and 14 of betaine-homocysteine S-methyltransferase 2 (BHMT2), adenosylhomocysteinase (AHCY; also known as SAHH), and cystathionine-β-synthase (CBS) in MET calves indicated alterations in Met, choline, and homocysteine metabolism. Those data agree with the greater abundance of methionine adenosyltransferase 1A (MAT1A) in MET calves. Along with CBS, the greater abundance of glutamate-cysteine ligase (GCLC) and glutathione reductase (GSR) on d 4 in MET calves indicated a short-term postnatal alteration in the use of homocysteine for taurine and glutathione synthesis (both are potent intracellular antioxidants). The striking 7-fold upregulation at d 50 versus 4 of cysteine sulfinic acid decarboxylase (CSAD), catalyzing the last step of taurine synthesis, in MET and CON calves underscores an important role of taurine during postnatal calf growth. The unique role of taurine in the young calf is further supported by the upregulation of CBS, GCLC, and GSR at d 50 versus 14 and 28 in MET and CON. Although betaine-homocysteine S-methyltransferase (BHMT) activity did not differ in MET and CON, it increased ∼50% at d 14 and 28 versus 4. A significant positive correlation (r = 0.79) was present between BHMT abundance and BHMT activity regardless

  20. Sources of variation in assessing left atrial functions by 2D speckle-tracking echocardiography.

    PubMed

    Rimbaş, Roxana Cristina; Mihăilă, Sorina; Vinereanu, Dragoş

    2016-03-01

    Left atrial (LA) strain and strain rate, determined by speckle-tracking echocardiography (STE), are reproducible indices to assess LA function. Different normal ranges for LA phasic functions have been reported. We investigated the role of the reference point (P- and R-wave), gain, and region of interest (ROI), as the major sources of variation when assessing LA function. 52 subjects were evaluated for LA conventional and STE analysis. 45 of them (46 ± 14 years, 26 men) were feasible for concomitant LA deformation, and LA phasic volumes and ejection fractions (LAEF) evaluation. First, we compared the P- and R-wave methods, for the evaluation of the LA functions. We used diastolic mitral profile to clearly delineate the time intervals for each LA function. For the P-wave method, active function was assessed from negative global strain as a difference between the strain at pre-atrial contraction and strain just before mitral valve closure (GSA-), and late diastolic strain rate (GSRL); passive function from positive strain at MVO (GSA+), and from early negative diastolic strain rate (GSRE); reservoir function from the sum of GSA- and GSA+ (TGSA), and positive strain rate at the beginning of LV systole (GSR+). For the R-wave method we used the same SR parameters. The active function was evaluated by late positive global strain (GSAC), the reservoir by positive peak before the opening of the mitral valve (TGSA), and conduit function by the difference between TGSA and GSAC (GSA+). Then, by using P-wave method, we measured all previously described parameters for different gains-minimum (G0), medium (G12), and maximum (G24), and for different ROIs-minimum (ROI0), step 1 (ROI1), and 2 (ROI2). Feasibility of the LA strain measurements was 87 %. Active LA function was similar in the absolute value (GSAC and GSA-), whereas passive and reservoir functions were significantly higher (GSA+, TGSA) with the R-wave method. Active LAEF correlated with GSA- measured by the P-wave (r

  1. Oxidative Stress and Heat-Shock Responses in Desulfovibrio vulgaris by Genome-Wide Transcriptomic Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Weiwen; Culley, David E.; Hogan, Mike; Vitiritti, Luigi; Brockman, Fred J.

    2006-05-30

    Abstract Sulfate-reducing bacteria, like Desulfovibrio vulgaris have developed a set of reactions allowing them to survive in environments. To obtain further knowledge of the protecting mechanisms employed in D. vulgaris against the oxidative stress and heat shock, we performed a genome-wide transcriptomic analysis to determine the cellular responses to both stimuli. The results showed that 130 genes were responsive to oxidative stress, while 427 genes responsive to heat-shock, respectively. Functional analyses suggested that the genes regulated were involved in a variety of cellular functions. Metabolic analysis showed that amino acid biosynthetic pathways were induced by both oxidative stress and heat shock treatments, while fatty acid metabolism, purine and cofactor biosynthesis were induced by heat shock only. Rubrerythrin gene (rbR) were upregulated by the oxidative stress, suggesting its important role in the oxidative resistance, whereas the expression of rubredoxin oxidoreductase (rbO), superoxide ismutase (sodB) and catalase (katA) genes were not subjected to regulation by oxidative stress in D. vulgaris. In addition, the results showed that thioredoxin reductase (trxB) was responsive to oxidative stress, suggesting the thiol-specific redox system might be involved in oxidative protection in D. vulgaris. Comparison of cellular responses to oxidative stress and heat-shock allowed the identification of 66 genes that showed a similar drastic response to both environmental stimuli, implying that they might be part of the general stress response (GSR) network in D. vulgaris, which was further supported by the finding of a conserved motif upstream these common-responsive genes.

  2. Vascular relaxation induced by Eucommiae Ulmoides Oliv. and its compounds Oroxylin A and wogonin: implications on their cytoprotection action

    PubMed Central

    Akinyi, Mary; Gao, Xiu Mei; Li, Yu Hong; Wang, Bing Yao; Liu, Er Wei; Chai, Li Juan; JawoBah, Abdulai; Fan, Guan Wei

    2014-01-01

    The vascular relaxation action of Eucommiae Ulmoides Oliv. also known as Duzhong has been seen on arteries of the heart such as the aorta and the coronary artery which are elastic in nature. Duzhong is historically an active ingredient commonly used in hypertensive herbal prescriptions in China. This work investigated the vasodilating effect of Duzhong and its compounds (wogonin 10 μM and oroxylin-A) in the isolated intact rat heart, perfused retrograde according the method of Langendorff and the cytoprotective effect in EA.hy926 cell lines Coronary perfusion pressure was monitored with a pressure transducer connected to a side-arm of the aortic perfusion cannula. Duzhong induced vasorelaxation in a dose dependent manner, on precontracting the vessels with endothelin-1, Duzhong 10 mg/ml, wogonin 10 μM and oroxylin-A 10 μM could significantly lower the perfusion pressure in reference to positive control SNP, Duzhong induced vasodilation was not inhibited by L-NAME (nitric oxide inhibitor), but was significantly inhibited by Tetraethyl ammonium (TEA, a K+ channel blocker and almost abolished by potassium chloride. The underlying mechanism was carried out in EA.hy926 cell lines. When these cells were treated with H2O2, there was higher expression of NOX-4, TNF-α and COX-2 mRNA. However, wogonin treatment attenuated the mRNA of NOX-4, TNF-α and COX-2. Wogonin also upregulated the mRNA expression of CAT, SOD-1 and GSR in oxidative stress induced by H2O2 EA.hy926 cells. Duzhong and compounds can exert an in vitro relaxation effect of the coronary artery and improve the heart function in Langendorff apparatus. This action appears to be endothelium dependent but not NO mediated. Cell culture findings indicated that wogonin can exert vascular and cellular protection by scavenging Reactive Oxygen Species. PMID:25419347

  3. Arctigenin enhances swimming endurance of sedentary rats partially by regulation of antioxidant pathways

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Ruo-ming; Sun, Yan-yan; Zhou, Ting-ting; Zhu, Zhi-yuan; Zhuang, Jing-jing; Tang, Xuan; Chen, Jing; Hu, Li-hong; Shen, Xu

    2014-01-01

    Aim: Arctigenin, a phenylpropanoid dibenzylbutyrolactone lignan found in traditional Chinese herbs, has been determined to exhibit a variety of pharmacological activities, including anti-tumor, anti-inflammation, neuroprotection, and endurance enhancement. In the present study, we investigated the antioxidation and anti-fatigue effects of arctigenin in rats. Methods: Rat L6 skeletal muscle cell line was exposed to H2O2 (700 μmol/L), and ROS level was assayed using DCFH-DA as a probe. Male SD rats were injected with arctigenin (15 mg·kg−1·d−1, ip) for 6 weeks, and then the weight-loaded forced swimming test (WFST) was performed to evaluate their endurance. The levels of antioxidant-related genes in L6 cells and the skeletal muscles of rats were analyzed using real-time RT-PCR and Western blotting. Results: Incubation of L6 cells with arctigenin (1, 5, 20 μmol/L) dose-dependently decreased the H2O2-induced ROS production. WFST results demonstrated that chronic administration of arctigenin significantly enhanced the endurance of rats. Furthermore, molecular biology studies on L6 cells and skeletal muscles of the rats showed that arctigenin effectively increased the expression of the antioxidant-related genes, including superoxide dismutase (SOD), glutathione reductase (Gsr), glutathione peroxidase (GPX1), thioredoxin (Txn) and uncoupling protein 2 (UCP2), through regulation of two potential antioxidant pathways: AMPK/PGC-1α/PPARα in mitochondria and AMPK/p53/Nrf2 in the cell nucleus. Conclusion: Arctigenin efficiently enhances rat swimming endurance by elevation of the antioxidant capacity of the skeletal muscles, which has thereby highlighted the potential of this natural product as an antioxidant in the treatment of fatigue and related diseases. PMID:25152028

  4. The Role of Stress and Stress Adaptations in Determining the Fate of the Bacterial Pathogen Listeria monocytogenes in the Food Chain.

    PubMed

    NicAogáin, Kerrie; O'Byrne, Conor P

    2016-01-01

    The foodborne pathogen Listeria monocytogenes is a highly adaptable organism that can persist in a wide range of environmental and food-related niches. The consumption of contaminated ready-to-eat foods can cause infections, termed listeriosis, in vulnerable humans, particularly those with weakened immune systems. Although these infections are comparatively rare they are associated with high mortality rates and therefore this pathogen has a significant impact on food safety. L. monocytogenes can adapt to and survive a wide range of stress conditions including low pH, low water activity, and low temperature, which makes it problematic for food producers who rely on these stresses for preservation. Stress tolerance in L. monocytogenes can be explained partially by the presence of the general stress response (GSR), a transcriptional response under the control of the alternative sigma factor sigma B (σ(B)) that reconfigures gene transcription to provide homeostatic and protective functions to cope with the stress. Within the host σ(B) also plays a key role in surviving the harsh conditions found in the gastrointestinal tract. As the infection progresses beyond the GI tract L. monocytogenes uses an intracellular infectious cycle to propagate, spread and remain protected from the host's humoral immunity. Many of the virulence genes that facilitate this infectious cycle are under the control of a master transcriptional regulator called PrfA. In this review we consider the environmental reservoirs that enable L. monocytogenes to gain access to the food chain and discuss the stresses that the pathogen must overcome to survive and grow in these environments. The overlap that exists between stress tolerance and virulence is described. We review the principal measures that are used to control the pathogen and point to exciting new approaches that might provide improved means of control in the future.

  5. The Role of Stress and Stress Adaptations in Determining the Fate of the Bacterial Pathogen Listeria monocytogenes in the Food Chain

    PubMed Central

    NicAogáin, Kerrie; O’Byrne, Conor P.

    2016-01-01

    The foodborne pathogen Listeria monocytogenes is a highly adaptable organism that can persist in a wide range of environmental and food-related niches. The consumption of contaminated ready-to-eat foods can cause infections, termed listeriosis, in vulnerable humans, particularly those with weakened immune systems. Although these infections are comparatively rare they are associated with high mortality rates and therefore this pathogen has a significant impact on food safety. L. monocytogenes can adapt to and survive a wide range of stress conditions including low pH, low water activity, and low temperature, which makes it problematic for food producers who rely on these stresses for preservation. Stress tolerance in L. monocytogenes can be explained partially by the presence of the general stress response (GSR), a transcriptional response under the control of the alternative sigma factor sigma B (σB) that reconfigures gene transcription to provide homeostatic and protective functions to cope with the stress. Within the host σB also plays a key role in surviving the harsh conditions found in the gastrointestinal tract. As the infection progresses beyond the GI tract L. monocytogenes uses an intracellular infectious cycle to propagate, spread and remain protected from the host’s humoral immunity. Many of the virulence genes that facilitate this infectious cycle are under the control of a master transcriptional regulator called PrfA. In this review we consider the environmental reservoirs that enable L. monocytogenes to gain access to the food chain and discuss the stresses that the pathogen must overcome to survive and grow in these environments. The overlap that exists between stress tolerance and virulence is described. We review the principal measures that are used to control the pathogen and point to exciting new approaches that might provide improved means of control in the future. PMID:27933042

  6. The presence of carbon nanostructures in bakery products induces metabolic stress in human mesenchymal stem cells through CYP1A and p53 gene expression.

    PubMed

    Al-Hadi, Ahmed M; Periasamy, Vaiyapuri Subbarayan; Athinarayanan, Jegan; Alshatwi, Ali A

    2016-01-01

    Ingredients commonly present in processed foods are excellent substrates for chemical reactions during modern thermal cooking or processing, which could possibly result in deteriorative carbonization changes mediated by a variety of thermal reactions. Spontaneous self-assembling complexation or polymerization of partially combusted lipids, proteins, and other food macromolecules with synthetic food additives during high temperature food processing or baking (200-250 °C) would result in the formation of carbon nanostructures (CNs). These unknown nanostructures may produce adverse physiological effects or potential health risks. The present work aimed to identify and characterize the nanostructures from the crusts of bread. Furthermore, a toxicological risk assessment of these nanostructures was conducted using human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) as a model for cellular uptake and metabolic oxidative stress, with special reference to induced adipogenesis. CNs isolated from bread crusts were characterized using transmission electron microscopy. The in vitro risk assessment of the CNs was carried out in hMSCs using an MTT assay, cell morphological assessment, a reactive oxygen species assay, a mitochondrial trans-membrane potential assay, cell cycle progression assessment and gene expression analysis. Our results revealed that bread crusts contain CNs, which may form during the bread-making process. The in vitro results indicate that carbon nanostructures have moderately toxic effects in the hMSCs at a high dose (400 μg/mL). The mitochondrial trans-membrane potentials and intracellular ROS levels of the hMSCs were altered at this dose. The levels of the mRNA transcripts of metabolic stress-responsive genes such as CAT, GSR, GSTA4, CYP1A and p53 were significantly altered in response to CNs.

  7. Cold Lake Blend diluted bitumen toxicity to the early development of Japanese medaka.

    PubMed

    Madison, Barry N; Hodson, Peter V; Langlois, Valerie S

    2017-03-20

    Diluted bitumen (dilbit) from Alberta oil sands (Canada) is transported across major continental watersheds, yet little is known about its toxicity to fish if spilled into aquatic environments. The toxicity of Cold Lake (CLB) dilbit was assessed for medaka embryos (Oryzias latipes) exposed to water accommodated fractions (WAF) and chemically-enhanced WAF (CEWAF) using Corexit(®)EC9500A as dispersant. The effects of CLB toxicity were similar to conventional crude oils and Access Western Blend (AWB) dilbit. The prevalence of malformations and cyp1a mRNA synthesis in hatched fish increased monotonically with concentration during WAF and CEWAF treatments and provided a novel indicator of dilbit PAH toxicity. Apart from nfe2 (an antioxidant transcription factor), there were no statistically significant monotonic exposure-responses of ahr, arnt2, cat, sod, gpx, gst, gsr, g6pdh, p53, and hsp70 transcripts at total polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (TPAH) concentrations bracketing EC50s for embryotoxicity (WAF ≅ 3 μg/L; CEWAF ≅ 0.1 μg/L TPAH). Based on measured TPAH concentrations in exposure test solutions, CLB dilbit was 6-10 fold more toxic to medaka than AWB during chronic exposures. Lack of direct monotonic gene transcription responses to increasing oil concentrations during exposures that were embryotoxic suggests that the capacity of the oxidative stress response is limited in earlier lifestages or that differences exist among species in mechanisms of toxicity. This study provides a comparative framework for identifying suitable biomarkers and toxicity methods for those fish species in sensitive lifestages at highest risk of Canadian oil sands dilbit exposure following a spill in the freshwater environment.

  8. Antioxidant properties of repaglinide and its protections against cyclosporine A-induced renal tubular injury

    PubMed Central

    Li, Dao; Li, Jin; Li, Hui; Wu, Qiong; Li, Qi-Xiong

    2016-01-01

    Objective(s): Repaglinide (RG) is an antihyperglycemic agent used for the treatment of non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus. It has a good safety and efficacy profile in diabetic patients with complications in renal impairment and is an appropriate treatment choice, even for individuals with more severe degrees of renal malfunctions. The aim of the present study was to examine the protective effect of RG on cyclosporine A (CsA)-induced rat renal impairment and to evaluate the antioxidant mechanisms by which RG exerts its protective actions. Materials and Methods: Fifty male Sprague-Dawley rats weighing 250–300 g were randomly divided into five groups: administrations of olive oil (control, PO), RG (0.4 mg/kg, PO), CsA (30 mg/kg in olive oil, SC), RG (0.2 or 0.4 mg/kg, PO) plus CsA (30 mg/kg in olive oil SC) every day for 15 days. Results: SC administration of CsA (30 mg/kg) to rats produced marked elevations in the levels of renal impairment parameters such as urinary protein, N-acetyl-beta-D-glucosaminidase (NAG), serum creatinine (SCr), and blood urea nitrogen (BUN). It also caused histologic injury to the kidneys. Oral administration of RG (0.2 and 0.4 mg/kg) markedly decreased all the aforementioned changes. In addition, CsA caused increases in the levels of malondialdehyde (MDA) and decreases in superoxide dismutase (SOD), glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px), glutathione reductase (GSR), glutathione-S-transferase (GST), and glutathione in kidney homogenate, which were reversed significantly by both doses of RG. Conclusion: The findings of our study indicate that RG may play an important role in protecting the kidney from oxidative insult. PMID:27635199

  9. Green tea diet decreases PCB 126-induced oxidative stress in mice by up-regulating antioxidant enzymes.

    PubMed

    Newsome, Bradley J; Petriello, Michael C; Han, Sung Gu; Murphy, Margaret O; Eske, Katryn E; Sunkara, Manjula; Morris, Andrew J; Hennig, Bernhard

    2014-02-01

    Superfund chemicals such as polychlorinated biphenyls pose a serious human health risk due to their environmental persistence and link to multiple diseases. Selective bioactive food components such as flavonoids have been shown to ameliorate PCB toxicity, but primarily in an in vitro setting. Here, we show that mice fed a green tea-enriched diet and subsequently exposed to environmentally relevant doses of coplanar PCB exhibit decreased overall oxidative stress primarily due to the up-regulation of a battery of antioxidant enzymes. C57BL/6 mice were fed a low-fat diet supplemented with green tea extract (GTE) for 12 weeks and exposed to 5 μmol PCB 126/kg mouse weight (1.63 mg/kg-day) on weeks 10, 11 and 12 (total body burden: 4.9 mg/kg). F2-isoprostane and its metabolites, established markers of in vivo oxidative stress, measured in plasma via HPLC-MS/MS exhibited fivefold decreased levels in mice supplemented with GTE and subsequently exposed to PCB compared to animals on a control diet exposed to PCB. Livers were collected and harvested for both messenger RNA and protein analyses, and it was determined that many genes transcriptionally controlled by aryl hydrocarbon receptor and nuclear factor (erythroid-derived 2)-like 2 proteins were up-regulated in PCB-exposed mice fed the green tea-supplemented diet. An increased induction of genes such as SOD1, GSR, NQO1 and GST, key antioxidant enzymes, in these mice (green tea plus PCB) may explain the observed decrease in overall oxidative stress. A diet supplemented with green tea allows for an efficient antioxidant response in the presence of PCB 126, which supports the emerging paradigm that healthful nutrition may be able to bolster and buffer a physiological system against the toxicities of environmental pollutants.

  10. Schisandrol B protects against acetaminophen-induced acute hepatotoxicity in mice via activation of the NRF2/ARE signaling pathway

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Yi-ming; Wang, Ying; Tan, Hua-sen; Yu, Tao; Fan, Xiao-mei; Chen, Pan; Zeng, Hang; Huang, Min; Bi, Hui-chang

    2016-01-01

    Aim: The nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 (NRF2) acts through the antioxidant response element (ARE) to regulate the expression of many detoxifying and antioxidant genes responsible for cytoprotective processes. We previously reported that Schisandrol B (SolB) isolated from Schisandra sphenanthera produced a protective effect against acetaminophen (APAP)-induced liver injury. In this study we investigated whether the NRF2/ARE signaling pathway was involved in this hepato-protective effect. Methods: Male C57BL/6 mice were treated with SolB (200 mg·kg−1·d−1, ig) for 3 d before injection of APAP (400 mg/kg, ip). Serum and liver tissue samples were collected 6 h later. The mRNA and protein expression were measured using qRT-PCR and Western blot assay, respectively. The activation of NRF2 was examined in HepG2 cells using luciferase reporter gene assay. Results: SolB pretreatment significantly alleviated the hepatic injury (large patchy necrosis and hyperemia of the hepatic sinus), the increase of serum AST, ALT levels and hepatic MDA contents, and the decrease of liver and mitochondrial glutathione levels in APAP-treated mice. Furthermore, SolB pretreatment significantly increased nuclear accumulation of NRF2 and increased hepatic expression of NRF2 downstream proteins, including GCLC, GSR, NQO1, GSTs, MRP2, MRP3 and MRP4 in APAP-treated mice. Moreover, treatment with SolB (2.5–20 μmol/L) dose-dependently increased the activity of NRF2 reporter gene in HepG2 cells. Conclusion: SolB exhibits a remarkable protective effect against APAP-induced hepatotoxicity, partially via activation of the NRF2/ARE pathway and regulation of NRF2 target genes, which induce detoxification and increase antioxidant capacity. PMID:26806302

  11. Comprehensive Pb-Sr-Nd-Hf isotopic, trace element, and mineralogical characterization of mafic to ultramafic rock reference materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fourny, Anaïs.; Weis, Dominique; Scoates, James S.

    2016-03-01

    Controlling the accuracy and precision of geochemical analyses requires the use of characterized reference materials with matrices similar to those of the unknown samples being analyzed. We report a comprehensive Pb-Sr-Nd-Hf isotopic and trace element concentration data set, combined with quantitative phase analysis by XRD Rietveld refinement, for a wide range of mafic to ultramafic rock reference materials analyzed at the Pacific Centre for Isotopic and Geochemical Research, University of British Columbia. The samples include a pyroxenite (NIM-P), five basalts (BHVO-2, BIR-1a, JB-3, BE-N, GSR-3), a diabase (W-2), a dolerite (DNC-1), a norite (NIM-N), and an anorthosite (AN-G); results from a leucogabbro (Stillwater) are also reported. Individual isotopic ratios determined by MC-ICP-MS and TIMS, and multielement analyses by HR-ICP-MS are reported with 4-12 complete analytical duplicates for each sample. The basaltic reference materials have coherent Sr and Nd isotopic ratios with external precision below 50 ppm (2SD) and below 100 ppm for Hf isotopes (except BIR-1a). For Pb isotopic reproducibility, several of the basalts (JB-3, BHVO-2) require acid leaching prior to dissolution. The plutonic reference materials also have coherent Sr and Nd isotopic ratios (<50 ppm), however, obtaining good reproducibility for Pb and Hf isotopic ratios is more challenging for NIM-P, NIM-N, and AN-G due to a variety of factors, including postcrystallization Pb mobility and the presence of accessory zircon. Collectively, these results form a comprehensive new database that can be used by the geochemical community for evaluating the radiogenic isotope and trace element compositions of volcanic and plutonic mafic-ultramafic rocks.

  12. Triangulum II: A Very Metal-poor and Dynamically Hot Stellar System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, Nicolas F.; Ibata, Rodrigo A.; Collins, Michelle L. M.; Rich, R. Michael; Bell, Eric F.; Ferguson, Annette M. N.; Laevens, Benjamin P. M.; Rix, Hans-Walter; Chapman, Scott C.; Koch, Andreas

    2016-02-01

    We present a study of the recently discovered compact stellar system Triangulum II. From observations conducted with the DEIMOS spectrograph on Keck II, we obtained spectra for 13 member stars that follow the CMD features of this very faint stellar system and include two bright red giant branch stars. Tri II has a very negative radial velocity (< {v}{{r}}> =-{383.7}-3.3+3.0 {km} {{{s}}}-1) that translates to < {v}{{r},{gsr}}> ≃ -264 {km} {{{s}}}-1 and confirms it is a Milky Way satellite. We show that, despite the small data set, there is evidence that Tri II has complex internal kinematics. Its radial velocity dispersion increases from {4.4}-2.0+2.8 {km} {{{s}}}-1 in the central 2\\prime to {14.1}-4.2+5.8 {km} {{{s}}}-1 outwards. The velocity dispersion of the full sample is inferred to be {σ }{vr}={9.9}-2.2+3.2 {km} {{{s}}}-1. From the two bright RGB member stars we measure an average metallicity < {{[Fe/H]}}> =-2.6+/- 0.2, placing Tri II among the most metal-poor Milky Way dwarf galaxies. In addition, the spectra of the fainter member stars exhibit differences in their line widths that could be the indication of a metallicity dispersion in the system. All these properties paint a complex picture for Tri II, whose nature and current state are largely speculative. The inferred metallicity properties of the system however lead us to favor a scenario in which Tri II is a dwarf galaxy that is either disrupting or embedded in a stellar stream.

  13. Prevention of CCl(4)-induced oxidative damage in adrenal gland by Digera muricata extract in rat.

    PubMed

    Khan, Muhammad Rashid; Younus, Tahira

    2011-10-01

    Digera muricata (L.) Mart. is a weed and commonly found in waste places, road sides and in maize fields during the summer season. It possesses antioxidant capacity and is locally used for various disorders such as inflammation, urination, as refrigerant, aperient and in sexual anomalies. In this study antioxidant potential of Digera muricata methanol extract (DMME) and n-hexane extract (DMHE) was evaluated against CCl(4)-induced oxidative stress in adrenal gland of Sprague-Dawley male rats. 42 rats were equally divided into 7 groups of 6 rats in each. Group I remained untreated, while Group II treated with vehicles. Group III received only CCl(4) (1 ml/kg b.w., 10% in olive oil) once a week for 16 weeks. Group IV and VI received DMME and DMHE at a dose of 200 mg/kg b.w. along with CCl(4). Animals of Group V and VII administered with DMME and DMHE alone at a dose of 200 mg/kg b.w. once a week for 16 weeks. Lipid peroxidation significantly increased while activities of antioxidant enzymes (CAT, SOD, GST, GSR and GSH-Px) were reduced in adrenal gland samples by the administration of CCl(4). Glutathione (GSH) concentration was significantly decreased whereas DNA fragmentation% and AgNORs count was increased in adrenal gland by CCl(4) administration. Treatment of rat by both the extracts (DMME, DMHE) and CCl(4) increased the glutathione level and activities of antioxidant enzymes while reduced the lipid peroxidation, DNA fragmentation percent and AgNORs count in adrenal gland. These results indicate that Digera muricata extract is able to ameliorate oxidative stress in adrenal gland induced by CCl(4) in rat.

  14. HW 03-1 RENAL SYMPATHETIC DENERVATION FOR RESISTANT HYPERTENSION UNDER OPTIMAL DRUG THERAPY.

    PubMed

    Kim, Byeong-Keuk

    2016-09-01

    Catheter-based renal sympathetic denervation (RDN) has opened the new world in the treatment of resistant or refractory hypertension. However, SYMPLICITY HTN-3, 2:1 randomization, blinded and sham-controlled study did not show a significant reduction of systolic blood pressure (BP) in patients with resistant hypertension 6 months after RDN as compared with a sham control. After that, substudy investigating the predictors of BP responses in SYMPLICITY HTN-3 trial was reported; racial difference and optimal medical treatment were issued for the optimal denervation therapy. Recent data (GSR Korea data) showed RDN provided a significant reduction in 6- and 12-month office SBP among Asian patients, with a favorable safety profile. The 12-month systolic BP reduction was larger than that observed in Caucasian patients, suggesting there could be ethnic difference in the effects of RDN for resistant hypertension. The optimal medical therapy is still mainstay in the treatment of resistant hypertension. OSLO RDN trial suggest that adjusted drug treatment has superior BP lowering effects compared with RDN in patients with true resistant hypertension. In DENERHTN (Renal Denervation for Hypertension) trial demonstrated that RDN plus standardized stepped-care antihypertensive treatment decreased ambulatory BP more than the same medication alone at 6 months. For the successful RDN therapy causing BP decrease, the effective perfect denervation by complete catheter contact would be still most important. Related with this, we should pay attention to the upcoming new-generation multi-electrode system, one shot system. In conclusion, RDN therapy is not the end. However, we need a more concrete data and should await future studies.

  15. Muzzle-loading weapons discharging spherical lead bullets: two case studies and experimental simulation using a skin-soap composite model.

    PubMed

    Große Perdekamp, Markus; Braunwarth, Roland; Kromeier, Jan; Nadjem, Hadi; Pollak, Stefan; Thierauf, Annette

    2013-07-01

    In current forensic practice, fatal injuries from black powder guns are rare events. In contact and close-range shots, the intensity of GSR deposition (soot, powder particles) is much greater than that in shots with smokeless powder ammunition. The same applies to any burning effects from the combustion gases. Besides, a wad of felt interposed between the propellant and the lead bullet may enter the wound channel. Apart from these findings seen in close-range shots, another characteristic feature results from the mostly spherical shape of the missiles causing maximum tissue damage at the entrance site. Two fatal injuries inflicted with muzzle-loading weapons are reported. In the first case, suicide was committed with a cal. 11.6 mm miniature cannon by firing a contact shot to the back of the neck. In test shots using black powder (1 and 2 g) as propellant, the mean bullet velocity measured 1 m away from the weapon was 87.11 and 146.85 m/s, respectively, corresponding to a kinetic energy of 32.49 and 92.95 J, respectively. Contact test shots to composite models consisting of ballistic soap covered by pig skin at the entrance site were evaluated by CT and revealed cone-like cavitations along the bullet path as known from spherical missiles and penetration depths up to 25 cm. The second case presented deals with a homicidal close-range shot discharged from a muzzle-loading percussion pistol cal. .44. The skin around the entrance site (root of the nose) was densely covered with blackish soot and powder particles, whereas the eyebrows and eyelashes showed singeing of the hairs. The flattened bullet and the wad had got stuck under the scalp of the occipital region. In both cases, there was a disproportionally large zone of tissue destruction in the initial parts of the wound tracks.

  16. Transcriptional and morphological effects of tamoxifen on the early development of zebrafish (Danio rerio).

    PubMed

    Xia, Liang; Zheng, Liang; Zhou, Jun Liang

    2016-06-01

    Tamoxifen is a widely used anticancer drug with both an estrogen agonist and antagonist effect. This study focused on its endocrine disrupting effect, and overall environmental significance. Zebrafish embryos were exposed to different concentrations (0.5, 5, 50 and 500 µg l(-1) ) of tamoxifen for 96 h. The results showed a complex effect of tamoxifen on zebrafish embryo development. For the 500 µg l(-1) exposure group, the heart rate was decreased by 20% and mild defects in caudal fin and skin were observed. Expressions of a series of genes related to endocrine and morphological changes were subsequently tested through quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction. Bisphenol A as a known estrogen was also tested as an endocrine-related comparison. Among the expression of endocrine-related genes, esr1, ar, cyp19a1b, hsd3b1 and ugt1a1 were all increased by tamoxifen exposure, similar to bisphenol A. The cyp19a1b is a key gene that controls estrogen synthesis. Exposure to 0.5, 5, 50 and 500 µg l(-1) of tamoxifen caused upregulation of cyp19a1b expression to 152%, 568%, 953% and 2024% compared to controls, higher than the effects from the same concentrations of bisphenol A treatment, yet vtg1 was suppressed by 24% from exposure to 500 µg l(-1) tamoxifen. The expression of metabolic-related genes such as cyp1a, cyp1c2, cyp3a65, gpx1a, gstp1, gsr and genes related to observed morphological changes such as krt17 were also found to be upregulated by high concentrations of tamoxifen. These findings indicated the potential environmental effect of tamoxifen on teleost early development. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  17. Microcystin-LR induced DNA damage in human peripheral blood lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Zegura, B; Gajski, G; Straser, A; Garaj-Vrhovac, V; Filipič, M

    2011-12-24

    Human exposure to microcystins, which are produced by freshwater cyanobacterial species, is of growing concern due to increasing appearance of cyanobacterial blooms as a consequence of global warming and increasing water eutrophication. Although microcystins are considered to be liver-specific, there is evidence that they may also affect other tissues. These substances have been shown to induce DNA damage in vitro and in vivo, but the mechanisms of their genotoxic activity remain unclear. In human peripheral blood lymphocytes (HPBLs) exposure to non-cytotoxic concentrations (0, 0.1, 1 and 10μg/ml) of microcystin-LR (MCLR) induced a dose- and time-dependent increase in DNA damage, as measured with the comet assay. Digestion of DNA from MCLR-treated HPBLs with purified formamidopyrimidine-DNA glycosylase (Fpg) displayed a greater number of DNA strand-breaks than non-digested DNA, confirming the evidence that MCLR induces oxidative DNA damage. With the cytokinesis-block micronucleus assay no statistically significant induction of micronuclei, nucleoplasmic bridges and nuclear buds was observed after a 24-h exposure to MCLR. At the molecular level, no changes in the expression of selected genes involved in the cellular response to DNA damage and oxidative stress were observed after a 4-h exposure to MCLR (1μg/ml). After 24h, DNA damage-responsive genes (p53, mdm2, gadd45a, cdkn1a), a gene involved in apoptosis (bax) and oxidative stress-responsive genes (cat, gpx1, sod1, gsr, gclc) were up-regulated. These results provide strong support that MCLR is an indirectly genotoxic agent, acting via induction of oxidative stress, and that lymphocytes are also the target of microcystin-induced toxicity.

  18. Galvanic skin response of oral cancer patients during speech.

    PubMed

    Nishigawa, G; Natsuaki, N; Maruo, Y; Okamoto, M; Minagi, S

    2003-05-01

    Severe speech difficulty is often caused after surgery of an oral cancer. Prosthetic treatment with a removable obturator prosthesis is generally provided for such patients. Although some speech ability is recovered with prosthetic treatment, patients sometimes complain of continued dissatisfaction with their speech. However, it is difficult to evaluate the dissatisfaction. Therefore, a new method for evaluation is desirable. In this study, such a new method using the galvanic skin response as the index for the dissatisfaction of the patient was developed, and its objectivity was investigated. Eleven patients with maxillary bone defects were selected. Prior to the evaluation, improvement of speech with the removable prosthesis was confirmed using the speech intelligibility test and the visual analogue scale. The electrical resistant value at pronunciation was measured with the measuring system composed with the apparatus (galvanic skin response (GSR) measuring apparatus), the personal computer program. The changes for the electrical resistant value after pronunciation were evaluated by calculating the decrease ratio at pronunciation [(the mean electrical resistance before pronunciation - the mean electrical resistance after pronunciation)/the mean electrical resistance before pronunciation]. This decrease ratio at pronunciation was defined as the index of the speech dissatisfaction of the subject. The mean values for the decrease ratio with prosthesis were significantly smaller than the values without prosthesis (P < 0.05). From the results of this study, it is suggested that the measurement of the electrical resistance change of the skin during speech could be a new method for evaluating the speech dissatisfaction of the post-oral-cancer patient.

  19. Photometric and spectroscopic study of the ultra-faint Milky Way satellite Pegasus III

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Dongwon; Jerjen, Helmut; Geha, Marla C.; Chiti, Anirudh; Milone, Antonino; Da Costa, Gary S.; Mackey, Dougal; Frebel, Anna; Conn, Blair

    2017-01-01

    Pegasus III (Peg III) is one of the few known ultra-faint dwarf (UFD) satellite galaxies in the outer halo (R >150 kpc) of the Milky Way (MW). We present results from a recent study of Peg III using Magellan/IMACS and Keck/DEIMOS. Our newly-measured structural parameters confirm that Peg III is large (rh = 53±14pc), elongated (∈ = 0.38+0.22-0.38 ), and faint (MV=-3.4±0.4 mag) — indicative of its nature as a dwarf rather than a globular cluster. In the color-magnitude diagram, Peg III is well described by an old (>12Gyr) and metal-poor ([Fe/H]<-2.0 dex) stellar population at a heliocentric distance of 215±12 kpc. Using spectroscopic measurements of individual stars, we identify seven kinematic members of Peg III. The Ca II triplet lines of the brightest members verify that Peg III indeed contains stars with metallicity as low as [Fe/H]=-2.55±0.15 dex. The systemic velocity and velocity dispersion of Peg III are -222.9±2.6 km/s and 5.4+3.0-2.5 km/s, respectively. The inferred dynamical mass within the half-light radius of 1.4+3.0-1.1×106M⊙, and the mass-to-light ratio of M/LV = 1470+5660-1240M⊙/L⊙ provide further evidence that Peg III is a bona fide UFD. Peg III and another distant UFD Pisces II lie relatively close to each other (△dspatial=43±19 kpc) and share similar systemic radial velocities (△vGSR=12.3±3.7 km/s), which suggests that they may share a common origin.

  20. Green tea diet decreases PCB 126-induced oxidative stress in mice by upregulating antioxidant enzymes

    PubMed Central

    Newsome, Bradley J; Petriello, Michael C; Han, Sung Gu; Murphy, Margaret O; Eske, Katryn E; Sunkara, Manjula; Morris, Andrew J; Hennig, Bernhard

    2013-01-01

    Superfund chemicals such as polychlorinated biphenyls pose a serious human health risk due to their environmental persistence and link to multiple diseases. Selective bioactive food components such as flavonoids have been shown to ameliorate PCB toxicity, but primarily in an in vitro setting. Here, we show that mice fed a green tea-enriched diet and subsequently exposed to environmentally relevant doses of coplanar PCB exhibit decreased overall oxidative stress primarily due to the upregulation of a battery of antioxidant enzymes. C57BL/6 mice were fed a low fat diet supplemented with green tea extract (GTE) for 12 weeks and exposed to 5 μmol PCB 126/kg mouse weight (1.63 mg/kg-day) on weeks 10, 11 and 12 (total body burden: 4.9 mg/kg). F2-Isoprostane and its metabolites, established markers of in vivo oxidative stress, measured in plasma via HPLC-MS/MS exhibited five-fold decreased levels in mice supplemented with GTE and subsequently exposed to PCB compared to animals on a control diet exposed to PCB. Livers were collected and harvested for both mRNA and protein analyses, and it was determined that many genes transcriptionally controlled by AhR and Nrf2 proteins were upregulated in PCB-exposed mice fed the green tea supplemented diet. An increased induction of genes such as SOD1, GSR, NQO1 and GST, key antioxidant enzymes, in these mice (green tea plus PCB) may explain the observed decrease in overall oxidative stress. A diet supplemented with green tea allows for an efficient antioxidant response in the presence of PCB 126 which supports the emerging paradigm that healthful nutrition may be able to bolster and buffer a physiological system against the toxicities of environmental pollutants. PMID:24378064

  1. Psychophysiological Sensing and State Classification for Attention Management in Commercial Aviation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harrivel, Angela R.; Liles, Charles; Stephens, Chad L.; Ellis, Kyle K.; Prinzel, Lawrence J.; Pope, Alan T.

    2016-01-01

    Attention-related human performance limiting states (AHPLS) can cause pilots to lose airplane state awareness (ASA), and their detection is important to improving commercial aviation safety. The Commercial Aviation Safety Team found that the majority of recent international commercial aviation accidents attributable to loss of control inflight involved flight crew loss of airplane state awareness, and that distraction of various forms was involved in all of them. Research on AHPLS, including channelized attention, diverted attention, startle / surprise, and confirmation bias, has been recommended in a Safety Enhancement (SE) entitled "Training for Attention Management." To accomplish the detection of such cognitive and psychophysiological states, a broad suite of sensors has been implemented to simultaneously measure their physiological markers during high fidelity flight simulation human subject studies. Pilot participants were asked to perform benchmark tasks and experimental flight scenarios designed to induce AHPLS. Pattern classification was employed to distinguish the AHPLS induced by the benchmark tasks. Unimodal classification using pre-processed electroencephalography (EEG) signals as input features to extreme gradient boosting, random forest and deep neural network multiclass classifiers was implemented. Multi-modal classification using galvanic skin response (GSR) in addition to the same EEG signals and using the same types of classifiers produced increased accuracy with respect to the unimodal case (90 percent vs. 86 percent), although only via the deep neural network classifier. These initial results are a first step toward the goal of demonstrating simultaneous real time classification of multiple states using multiple sensing modalities in high-fidelity flight simulators. This detection is intended to support and inform training methods under development to mitigate the loss of ASA and thus reduce accidents and incidents.

  2. Gene expression profile of oxidative stress and antioxidant defense in lung tissue of patients exposed to sulfur mustard.

    PubMed

    Tahmasbpour, Eisa; Ghanei, Mostafa; Qazvini, Ali; Vahedi, Ensieh; Panahi, Yunes

    2016-04-01

    Sulfur mustard (SM) is a potent alkylating agent that targets several organs, especially lung tissue. Although pathological effects of SM on mustard lung have been widely considered, molecular and cellular mechanisms for these pathologies are poorly understood. We investigated changes in expression of genes related to oxidative stress (OS) and antioxidant defense caused by SM in lung tissue of patients. We performed gene expression profiling of OS and antioxidant defense in lung tissue samples from healthy controls (n=5) and SM-exposed patients (n=6). Changes in gene expression were measured using a 96-well RT(2) Profiler ™PCR Array: Human Oxidative Stress and Antioxidant Defense, which arrayed 84 genes functionally involved in cellular OS response. 47 (55.95%) genes were found to be significantly upregulated in patients with mustard lung compared with controls (p<0.05), whereas 7 (8.33%) genes were significantly downregulated (p<0.05). Among the most upregulated genes were OS responsive-1 (OXSR1), forkhead box M1 (FOXM1), and glutathione peroxidase-2 (GPX2), while metallothionein-3 (MT3) and glutathione reductase (GSR) were the most downregulated genes. Expression of hypoxia-induced genes (CYGB and MB), antioxidants and reactive oxygen species (ROS)-producing genes were significantly altered, suggesting an increased oxidative damage in mustard lungs. Mustard lungs were characterized by hypoxia, massive production of ROS, OS, disruption of epithelial cells, surfactant dysfunction, as well as increased risk of lung cancer and pulmonary fibrosis. Oxidative stress induced by ROS is the major mechanism for direct effect of SM exposure on respiratory system. Antioxidant treatment may improve the main features of mustard lungs.

  3. FIRRE Remote Sensor Station (RSS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cruickshanks, J. R.; Wickstrand, E. L.; Kramer, T. A.; Laird, R. T.; Barngrover, C. M.; Gardner, C. W.

    2006-05-01

    The Family of Integrated Rapid Response Equipment (FIRRE) is an advanced technology demonstration program intended to develop a family of affordable, scalable, modular, and logistically supportable unmanned systems to meet urgent operational force protection needs and requirements worldwide. The near-term goal is to provide the best available unmanned ground systems to the warfighter in Iraq and Afghanistan. The overarching long-term goal is to develop a fully-integrated, layered force protection system of systems for our forward deployed forces that is networked with the future force C4ISR systems architecture. The intent of the FIRRE program is to reduce manpower requirements, enhance force protection capabilities, and reduce casualties through the use of unmanned systems. FIRRE is sponsored by the Office of the Under Secretary of Defense, Acquisitions, Technology and Logistics (OUSD AT&L), and is managed by the Product Manager, Force Protection Systems (PM-FPS). The Remote Sensor Station (RSS) provides FIRRE with the ability to remote (or extend the range of) manned/unmanned sensors. The RSS consists of three primary components: (1) an actively cooled and hermetically sealed (NEMA-4X) electronics enclosure, (2) a 22' telescoping tower, (3) and the PM-MEP 531A 2KW GENSET. The current configuration supports a Digital Imaging Infrared (DII) DI-5000 thermal imaging system/visual imaging system (TIS/VIS), a Syracuse Research Corporation (SRC) PPS-5D ground surveillance radar (GSR), an AN/PRS-9 (BAIS) unmanned ground sensor (UGS) receiver, an Intuicom Military Navigator II (MILNAVII) data link radio, and a DTC Communications Palladium 12000 audio/video (A/V) radio. The electronics box is insulated with a radiant barrier and fitted with a EIC Solutions 1500 BTU solid state thermoelectric cooler (TEC) capable of maintaining a safe operating temperature in extreme conditions (<120° Fahrenheit).

  4. CCl4-induced hepatotoxicity: protective effect of rutin on p53, CYP2E1 and the antioxidative status in rat

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Rutin is a polyphenolic natural flavonoid which possesses antioxidant and anticancer activity. In the present study the hepatoprotective effect of rutin was evaluated against carbon tetrachloride (CCl4)-induced liver injuries in rats. Methods and materials 24 Sprague–Dawley male rats were equally divided into 4 groups for the assessment of hepatoprotective potential of rutin. Rats of group I (control) received only vehicles; 1 ml/kg bw of saline (0.85%) and olive oil (3 ml/kg) and had free access to food and water. Rats of group II, III and IV were treated with CCl4 (30% in olive oil, 3 ml/kg bw) via the intraperitoneal route twice a week for four weeks. The rutin at the doses of 50 and 70 mg/kg were administered intragastrically after 48 h of CCl4 treatment to group III and IV, respectively. Protective effect of rutin on serum enzyme level, lipid profile, activities of antioxidant enzymes and molecular markers were calculated in CCl4-induced hepatotoxicity in rat. Results Rutin showed significant protection with the depletion of alanine aminotransferase (ALT), aspartate aminotransferase (AST), alkaline phosphatase (ALP), gamma glutamyl transpeptidase (γ-GT) in serum as was raised by the induction of CCl4. Concentration of serum triglycerides, total cholesterol and low density lipoproteins was increased while high-density lipoprotein was decreased with rutin in a dose dependent manner. Activity level of endogenous liver antioxidant enzymes; catalase (CAT), superoxide dismutase (SOD), glutathione peroxidase (GSHpx), glutathione-S-transferase (GST) and glutathione reductase (GSR) and glutathione (GSH) contents were increased while lipid peroxidation (TBARS) was decreased dose dependently with rutin. Moreover, increase in DNA fragmentation and oxo8dG damages while decrease in p53 and CYP 2E1 expression induced with CCl4 was restored with the treatment of rutin. Conclusion From these results, it is suggested that rutin possesses hepatoprotective

  5. Development of simulation interfaces for evaluation task with the use of physiological data and virtual reality applied to a vehicle simulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miranda, Mateus R.; Costa, Henrik; Oliveira, Luiz; Bernardes, Thiago; Aguiar, Carla; Miosso, Cristiano; Oliveira, Alessandro B. S.; Diniz, Alberto C. G. C.; Domingues, Diana Maria G.

    2015-03-01

    This paper aims at describing an experimental platform used to evaluate the performance of individuals at training immersive physiological games. The platform proposed is embedded in an immersive environment in a CAVE of Virtual Reality and consists on a base frame with actuators with three degrees of freedom, sensor array interface and physiological sensors. Physiological data of breathing, galvanic skin resistance (GSR) and pressure on the hand of the user and a subjective questionnaire were collected during the experiments. The theoretical background used in a project focused on Software Engineering, Biomedical Engineering in the field of Ergonomics and Creative Technologies in order to presents this case study, related of an evaluation of a vehicular simulator located inside the CAVE. The analysis of the simulator uses physiological data of the drivers obtained in a period of rest and after the experience, with and without movements at the simulator. Also images from the screen are captured through time at the embedded experience and data collected through physiological data visualization (average frequency and RMS graphics). They are empowered by the subjective questionnaire as strong lived experience provided by the technological apparatus. The performed immersion experience inside the CAVE allows to replicate behaviors from physical spaces inside data space enhanced by physiological properties. In this context, the biocybrid condition is expanded beyond art and entertainment, as it is applied to automotive engineering and biomedical engineering. In fact, the kinesthetic sensations amplified by synesthesia replicates the sensation of displacement in the interior of an automobile, as well as the sensations of vibration and vertical movements typical of a vehicle, different speeds, collisions, etc. The contribution of this work is the possibility to tracing a stress analysis protocol for drivers while operating a vehicle getting affective behaviors coming from

  6. Examination of Attention Level in Nurses Working Night Shifts in terms of the Relationship between Electrodermal Activity and Sex Hormones

    PubMed Central

    DOLU, Nazan; ELALMIŞ, Derya Deniz; KELOĞLAN, Seval

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Electrodermal activity (EDA) is an electrical activity of eccrine sweat gland stimulated by the sympathetic nervous system. Skin conductance level (SCL) is measured with EDA. SCL and sweat gland activity increase in emotional situations, such as high activation, attention or stress. In this study, we investigated whether working in shifts affects attention level of nurses with EDA and explored the relationship between EDA and sex hormones. Method The study was carried out on nurses working night shifts (16.00–08.00 h) (n=22) and nurses working without a shift (08.00–16.00 h) (n=20). Firstly, The Epworth Sleepiness Scale which evaluates a person’s daytime sleepiness was applied to the subjects. For EDA measurement, Ag/AgCl electrodes were put on two fingers of their dominant hand. SCL was measured via MP30 system and GSR connection. The blood samples were analyzed for cortisol and ACTH hormone levels to investigate the changes in sleep and circadian rhythm. Result It was found that there was no statistically significant difference in skin conductance levels between the groups. Moreover, in the comparison of hormone values between the groups, the cortisol levels in night shift nurses were higher than in those working without a shift. Conclusion Night shift had no significant effect on the attention levels in the nurses. This situation is thought to be related to the fact that the nurses responsible for the night service raise their attention level to the highest point. The reason for higher level of cortisol in nurses working shifts may reflect that cortisol has no effect on the breadth of attention but reflects a high level of stress.

  7. Stomatal conductance at Duke FACE: Leveraging the lessons from 11 years of scaled sap flux measurements for region-wide analyses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ward, E. J.; Bell, D.; Clark, J. S.; McCarthy, H. R.; Kim, H.; domec, J.; Noormets, A.; McNulty, D.; Sun, G.; Oren, R.

    2013-12-01

    A network of thermal dissipation probes (TDPs) monitoring sap flux density was used to estimate leaf-specific transpiration (EL) and canopy-averaged stomatal conductance (GS) in Pinus taeda (L.) exposed to +200 ppm atmospheric CO2 levels (eCO2) and nitrogen fertilization as part of the Duke FACE study. Data from scaling half-hourly measurements from hundreds of sensors over 11 years indicated that P. taeda in eCO2 intermittently (49% of monthly values) decreased stomatal conductance relative to the control, with a mean reduction of 13% in both total EL and mean daytime GS. This intermittent response was related to changes in a hydraulic allometry index (AH), defined as sapwood area per unit leaf area per unit canopy height, which was linearly related to GS at reference conditions (GSR) during the growing season across years (R2=0.67). Overall, AH decreased a mean of 15% with eCO2 over the course of the study, due mostly to a mean 19% increase in leaf area. Throughout the southeastern U.S., other P. taeda stands have been monitored with TDPs, such as the US-NC2 Ameriflux site and four fertilizer × throughfall displacement studies recently begun as part of the PINEMAP research network in VA, GA, FL and OK. We will also discuss the challenges and benefits of using a common modeling platform to combine FACE TDP data with that from a diversity of sites and treatments to draw inferences about EL and GS responses to environmental drivers and climate change, as well as their relation to AH, across the range of P. taeda.

  8. Analysis of glutathione levels in the brain tissue samples from HIV-1-positive individuals and subject with Alzheimer's disease and its implication in the pathophysiology of the disease process.

    PubMed

    Saing, Tommy; Lagman, Minette; Castrillon, Jeffery; Gutierrez, Eutiquio; Guilford, Frederick T; Venketaraman, Vishwanath

    2016-12-01

    HIV-1 positive individuals are at high risk for susceptibility to both pulmonary tuberculosis (TB) and extra-pulmonary TB, including TB meningitis (TBM) which is an extreme form of TB. The goals of this study are to determine the mechanisms responsible for compromised levels of glutathione (GSH) in the brain tissue samples derived from HIV-1-infected individuals and individuals with Alzheimer's disease (AD), investigate the possible underlying mechanisms responsible for GSH deficiency in these pathological conditions, and establish a link between GSH levels and pathophysiology of the disease processes. We demonstrated in the autopsied human brain tissues that the levels of total and reduced forms of GSH were significantly compromised in HIV-1 infected individuals compared to in healthy subjects and individuals with AD. Brain tissue samples derived from HIV-1-positive individuals had substantially higher levels of free radicals than that derived from healthy and AD individuals. Enzymes that are responsible for the de novo synthesis of GSH such as γ-glutamate cysteine-ligase catalytic subunit (GCLC-rate limiting step enzyme) and glutathione synthetase (GSS-enzyme involved in the second step reaction) were significantly decreased in the brain tissue samples derived from HIV-1-positive individuals with low CD4 + T-cells (< 200 cells/mm(3)) compared to healthy and AD individuals. Levels of glutathione reductase (GSR) were also decreased in the brain tissue samples derived from HIV-1 infected individuals. Overall, our findings demonstrate causes for GSH deficiency in the brain tissue from HIV-1 infected individuals explaining the possible reasons for increased susceptibility to the most severe form of extra-pulmonary TB, TBM.

  9. Presence of nanosilica (E551) in commercial food products: TNF-mediated oxidative stress and altered cell cycle progression in human lung fibroblast cells.

    PubMed

    Athinarayanan, Jegan; Periasamy, Vaiyapuri Subbarayan; Alsaif, Mohammed A; Al-Warthan, Abdulrahman A; Alshatwi, Ali A

    2014-04-01

    Silica (E551) is commonly used as an anti-caking agent in food products. The morphology and the dimension of the added silica particles are not, however, usually stated on the food product label. The food industry has adapted nanotechnology using engineered nanoparticles to improve the quality of their products. However, there has been increased debate regarding the health and safety concerns related to the use of engineered nanoparticles in consumer products. In this study, we investigated the morphology and dimensions of silica (E551) particles in food. The silica content of commercial food products was determined using inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry. The result indicates that 2.74-14. 45 μg/g silica was found in commercial food products; however, the daily dietary intake in increase causes adverse effects on human health. E551 was isolated from food products and the morphology, particle size, crystalline nature, and purity of the silica particles were analyzed using XRD, FTIR, TEM, EDX and DLS. The results of these analyses confirmed the presence of spherical silica nanoparticles (of amorphous nature) in food, approximately 10-50 nm in size. The effects of E551 on human lung fibroblast cell viability, intracellular ROS levels, cell cycle phase, and the expression levels of metabolic stress-responsive genes (CAT, GSTA4, TNF, CYP1A, POR, SOD1, GSTM3, GPX1, and GSR1) were studied. The results suggest that E551 induces a dose-dependent cytotoxicity and changes in ROS levels and alters the gene expression and cell cycle. Treatment with a high concentration of E551 caused significant cytotoxic effects on WI-38 cells. These findings have implications for the use of these nanoparticles in the food industry.

  10. Evaluation of halofenozide against prey mosquito larvae Culex pipiens and the predator fish Gambusia affinis: impact on growth and enzymatic activities.

    PubMed

    Soltani, N; Chouahda, S; Smagghe, G

    2008-01-01

    Culex pipiens (Diptera: Culicidae) is the most widely distributed mosquito species in Algeria and many other countries in the world. Mosquitoes are generally controlled by conventional insecticides but these may pose strong secondary effects on the environment. In this context, the insect growth regulators (IGRs) have shown promise in controlling pest insects. Halofenozide (23% EC) is a novel IGRs belonging to the class of non-steroidal ecdysone agonists, and it was found toxic for larvae of C. pipiens. In addition biological methods constitute an alternative to chemical control. Several fish species have been tested against mosquitoes, and Gambusia affinis was found very efficient. In the present study we evaluated the impact of this new potent insecticide (halofenozide) on growth and metric indexes in the larvivorous fish G. affinis under laboratory conditions. In addition, the effects were evaluated on the enzymatic activities of acetyl cholinesterase (AChE) and glutathione S-transferase (GST). The insecticide was added in water at two concentrations (12.6 and 28.6 microg/L) corresponding to the LC50 and LC90 obtained against fourth instar larvae of C. pipiens, and adult females of G. affinis were exposed to halofenozide for 30 days. At different exposure times we measured the length and weight of fishes, the index of condition (K), the gonado-somatic ratio (GSR) and the hepato-somatic ratio (HSR). The results showed that halofenozide had no significant (p>0.05) effects on growth, metric indexes and AChE activities. However, treatment caused a significant induction (p<0.05) in GST activities at days 15 and 30 with the highest dose. Our results indicate that this ecdysteroid agonist presented only minor secondary effects on the non-target fish species, and so it has potential for controlling of mosquitoes in an integrated manner.

  11. Adaptation and transcriptome analysis of Aureobasidium pullulans in corncob hydrolysate for increased inhibitor tolerance to malic acid production.

    PubMed

    Zou, Xiang; Wang, Yongkang; Tu, Guangwei; Zan, Zhanquan; Wu, Xiaoyan

    2015-01-01

    Malic acid is a dicarboxylic acid widely used in the food industry, and is also a potential C4 platform chemical. Corncob is a low-cost renewable feedstock from agricultural industry. However, side-reaction products (furfural, 5-hydroxymethylfurfural (HMF), formic acid, and acetic acid) that severely hinder fermentation are formed during corncob pretreatment. The process for producing malic acid from a hydrolysate of corncob was investigated with a polymalic acid (PMA)-producing Aureobasidium pullulans strain. Under the optimal hydrolysate sugar concentration 110 g/L, A. pullulans was further adapted in an aerobic fibrous bed bioreactor (AFBB) by gradually increasing the sugar concentration of hydrolysate. After nine batches of fermentation, the production and productivity of malic acid reached 38.6 g/L and 0.4 g/L h, respectively, which was higher than that in the first batch (27.6 g/L and 0.29 g/L h, respectively). The adapted strain could grow under the stress of 0.5 g/L furfural, 3 g/L HMF, 2g/L acetic acid, and 0.5 g/L formic acid, whereas the wild type did not. Transcriptome analysis revealed that the differentially expressed genes were related to carbohydrate transport and metabolism, lipid transport and metabolism, signal transduction mechanism, redox metabolism, and energy production and conversion under 0.5 g/L furfural and 3 g/L HMF stress conditions. In total, 42 genes in the adapted strain were upregulated by 15-fold or more, and qRT-PCR also confirmed that the expression levels of key genes (i.e. SIR, GSS, CYS, and GSR) involved in sulfur assimilation pathway were upregulated by over 10-fold in adapted strain for cellular protection against oxidative stress.

  12. THE SMITH CLOUD: HIGH-VELOCITY ACCRETION AND DARK MATTER CONFINEMENT

    SciTech Connect

    Nichols, M.; Bland-Hawthorn, J.

    2009-12-20

    The Smith Cloud is a massive system of metal-poor neutral and ionized gas (M{sub gas} approx> 2 x 10{sup 6} M{sub sun}) that is presently moving at high velocity (V{sub GSR}approx 300 km s{sup -1}) with respect to the Galaxy at a distance of 12 kpc from the Sun. The kinematics of the cloud's cometary tail indicates that the gas is in the process of accretion onto the Galaxy, as first discussed by Lockman et al. Here, we re-investigate the cloud's orbit by considering the possibility that the cloud is confined by a dark matter halo. This is required for the cloud to survive its passage through the Galactic corona. We consider three possible models for the dark matter halo (Navarro-Frenk-White (NFW), Einasto, and Burkert) including the effects of tidal disruption and ram pressure stripping during the cloud's infall onto and passage through the Galactic disk. For the NFW and Einasto dark matter models, we are able to determine reasonable initial conditions for the Smith Cloud, although this is only marginally possible with the Burkert model. For all three models, the progenitor had an initial (gas+dark matter) mass that was an order-of-magnitude higher than inferred today. In agreement with Lockman et al., the cloud appears to have punched through the disk approx70 Myr ago. For our most successful models, the baryon-to-dark matter ratio is fairly constant during an orbital period but drops by a factor of 2-5 after transiting the disk. The cloud appears to have only marginally survived its transit and is unlikely to retain its integrity during the next transit approx 30 Myr from now.

  13. Adaptation and Transcriptome Analysis of Aureobasidium pullulans in Corncob Hydrolysate for Increased Inhibitor Tolerance to Malic Acid Production

    PubMed Central

    Zou, Xiang; Wang, Yongkang; Tu, Guangwei; Zan, Zhanquan; Wu, Xiaoyan

    2015-01-01

    Malic acid is a dicarboxylic acid widely used in the food industry, and is also a potential C4 platform chemical. Corncob is a low-cost renewable feedstock from agricultural industry. However, side-reaction products (furfural, 5-hydroxymethylfurfural (HMF), formic acid, and acetic acid) that severely hinder fermentation are formed during corncob pretreatment. The process for producing malic acid from a hydrolysate of corncob was investigated with a polymalic acid (PMA)-producing Aureobasidium pullulans strain. Under the optimal hydrolysate sugar concentration 110 g/L, A. pullulans was further adapted in an aerobic fibrous bed bioreactor (AFBB) by gradually increasing the sugar concentration of hydrolysate. After nine batches of fermentation, the production and productivity of malic acid reached 38.6 g/L and 0.4 g/L h, respectively, which was higher than that in the first batch (27.6 g/L and 0.29 g/L h, respectively). The adapted strain could grow under the stress of 0.5 g/L furfural, 3 g/L HMF, 2g/L acetic acid, and 0.5 g/L formic acid, whereas the wild type did not. Transcriptome analysis revealed that the differentially expressed genes were related to carbohydrate transport and metabolism, lipid transport and metabolism, signal transduction mechanism, redox metabolism, and energy production and conversion under 0.5 g/L furfural and 3 g/L HMF stress conditions. In total, 42 genes in the adapted strain were upregulated by 15-fold or more, and qRT-PCR also confirmed that the expression levels of key genes (i.e. SIR, GSS, CYS, and GSR) involved in sulfur assimilation pathway were upregulated by over 10-fold in adapted strain for cellular protection against oxidative stress. PMID:25793624

  14. Thiostrepton is an Inducer of Oxidative and Proteotoxic Stress that Impairs Viability of Human Melanoma Cells but not Primary Melanocytes

    PubMed Central

    Qiao, Shuxi; Lamore, Sarah D.; Cabello, Christopher M.; Lesson, Jessica L.; Muñoz-Rodriguez, José L.; Wondrak, Georg T.

    2012-01-01

    Pharmacological induction of oxidative and proteotoxic stress has recently emerged as a promising strategy for chemotherapeutic intervention targeting cancer cells. Guided by a differential phenotypic drug screen for novel lead compounds that selectively induce melanoma cell apoptosis without compromising viability of primary human melanocytes, we have focused on the cyclic pyridinyl-polythiazolyl peptide-antimicrobial thiostrepton. Using comparative gene expression-array analysis, the early cellular stress response induced by thiostrepton was examined in human A375 metastatic melanoma cells and primary melanocytes. Thiostrepton displayed selective antimelanoma activity causing early induction of proteotoxic stress with massive upregulation of heat shock (HSPA6, HSPA1A, DNAJB4, HSPB1, HSPH1, HSPA1L, CRYAB, HSPA5, DNAJA1), oxidative stress (HMOX1, GSR, SOD1), and ER stress response (DDIT3) gene expression, confirmed by immunodetection (Hsp70, Hsp70B′, HO-1, phospho-eIF2α). Moreover, upregulation of p53, proapoptotic modulation of Bcl-2 family members (Bax, Noxa, Mcl-1, Bcl-2), and induction of apoptotic cell death were observed. Thiostrepton rapidly induced cellular oxidative stress followed by inactivation of chymotrypsin-like proteasomal activity and melanoma cell-directed accumulation of ubiquitinated proteins, not observed in melanocytes that were resistant to thiostrepton-induced apoptosis. Proteotoxic and apoptogenic effects were fully antagonized by antioxidant intervention. In RPMI 8226 multiple myeloma cells, known to be exquisitely sensitive to proteasome inhibition, early proteotoxic and apoptogenic effects of thiostrepton were confirmed by array analysis indicating pronounced upregulation of heat shock response gene expression. Our findings demonstrate that thiostrepton displays dual activity as a selective prooxidant and proteotoxic chemotherapeutic, suggesting feasibility of experimental intervention targeting metastatic melanoma and other

  15. Secondary Data Analytics of Aquaporin Expression Levels in Glioblastoma Stem-Like Cells

    PubMed Central

    Isokpehi, Raphael D; Wollenberg Valero, Katharina C; Graham, Barbara E; Pacurari, Maricica; Sims, Jennifer N; Udensi, Udensi K; Ndebele, Kenneth

    2015-01-01

    Glioblastoma is the most common brain tumor in adults in which recurrence has been attributed to the presence of cancer stem cells in a hypoxic microenvironment. On the basis of tumor formation in vivo and growth type in vitro, two published microarray gene expression profiling studies grouped nine glioblastoma stem-like (GS) cell lines into one of two groups: full (GSf) or restricted (GSr) stem-like phenotypes. Aquaporin-1 (AQP1) and aquaporin-4 (AQP4) are water transport proteins that are highly expressed in primary glial-derived tumors. However, the expression levels of AQP1 and AQP4 have not been previously described in a panel of 92 glioma samples. Therefore, we designed secondary data analytics methods to determine the expression levels of AQP1 and AQP4 in GS cell lines and glioblastoma neurospheres. Our investigation also included a total of 2,566 expression levels from 28 Affymetrix microarray probe sets encoding 13 human aquaporins (AQP0–AQP12); CXCR4 (the receptor for stromal cell derived factor-1 [SDF-1], a potential glioma stem cell therapeutic target]); and PROM1 (gene encoding CD133, the widely used glioma stem cell marker). Interactive visual representation designs for integrating phenotypic features and expression levels revealed that inverse expression levels of AQP1 and AQP4 correlate with distinct phenotypes in a set of cell lines grouped into full and restricted stem-like phenotypes. Discriminant function analysis further revealed that AQP1 and AQP4 expression are better predictors for tumor formation and growth types in glioblastoma stem-like cells than are CXCR4 and PROM1. Future investigations are needed to characterize the molecular mechanisms for inverse expression levels of AQP1 and AQP4 in the glioblastoma stem-like neurospheres. PMID:26279619

  16. HLA Class I and Class II Alleles and Haplotypes Confirm the Berber Origin of the Present Day Tunisian Population

    PubMed Central

    Hajjej, Abdelhafidh; Almawi, Wassim Y.; Hattab, Lasmar; El-Gaaied, Amel; Hmida, Slama

    2015-01-01

    In view of its distinct geographical location and relatively small area, Tunisia witnessed the presence of many civilizations and ethnic groups throughout history, thereby questioning the origin of present-day Tunisian population. We investigated HLA class I and class II gene profiles in Tunisians, and compared this profile with those of Mediterranean and Sub-Sahara African populations. A total of 376 unrelated Tunisian individuals of both genders were genotyped for HLA class I (A, B) and class II (DRB1, DQB1), using reverse dot-blot hybridization (PCR-SSO) method. Statistical analysis was performed using Arlequin software. Phylogenetic trees were constructed by DISPAN software, and correspondence analysis was carried out by VISTA software. One hundred fifty-three HLA alleles were identified in the studied sample, which comprised 41, 50, 40 and 22 alleles at HLA-A,-B,-DRB1 and -DQB1 loci, respectively. The most frequent alleles were HLA-A*02:01 (16.76%), HLA-B*44:02/03 (17.82%), HLA-DRB1*07:01 (19.02%), and HLA-DQB1*03:01 (17.95%). Four-locus haplotype analysis identified HLA-A*02:01-B*50:01-DRB1*07:01-DQB1*02:02 (2.2%) as the common haplotype in Tunisians. Compared to other nearby populations, Tunisians appear to be genetically related to Western Mediterranean population, in particular North Africans and Berbers. In conclusion, HLA genotype results indicate that Tunisians are related to present-day North Africans, Berbers and to Iberians, but not to Eastern Arabs (Palestinians, Jordanians and Lebanese). This suggests that the genetic contribution of Arab invasion of 7th-11th century A.D. had little impact of the North African gene pool. PMID:26317228

  17. Proton Charge Radius (PRad) Experiment at Jefferson Lab

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiong, Weizhi; Peng, Chao; Prad Collaboration

    2016-09-01

    The PRad experiment (E12-11-106) was recently performed with 1.1 and 2.2 GeV unpolarized electron beam on a windowless H2 gas flow target in Hall B at Jefferson Lab. The experiment aims to investigate the proton radius puzzle by extracting the electric form factor of proton in an unprecedented low four-momentum transfer squared region, Q2 = 2 ×10-4 - 0 . 1(GeV / c) 2 , with a sub-percent precision. The PRad experiment utilizes a non-magnetic and calorimetric method with a high efficiency and high resolution calorimeter (HyCal) and two Gas Electron Multiplier (GEM) chambers. Its systematics are well controlled by two main advantages of this experiment: (1) The scattered electrons from M øller and e - p elastic scattering are measured simultaneously, and the e - p cross section will be normalized to the well-known M øller process; (2) The windowless gas flow target has no cell windows at both up- and downstream, which was one of the primary background sources in the previous e - p elastic scattering experiments. Thus the PRad experiment has systematic uncertainties totally different from the previous magnetic spectrometric e - p elastic scattering experiments. In this talk, we will present the details of the experimental method and preliminary analysis of the data. This work is supported in part by the U.S. Department of Energy under Contract No. DE-FG02-03ER41231, NSF MRI Award PHY-1229153, Thomas Jefferson National Laboratory and Duke University.

  18. Investigating the impact of surface wave breaking on modeling the trajectories of drifters in the northern Adriatic Sea during a wind-storm event

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Carniel, S.; Warner, J.C.; Chiggiato, J.; Sclavo, M.

    2009-01-01

    An accurate numerical prediction of the oceanic upper layer velocity is a demanding requirement for many applications at sea and is a function of several near-surface processes that need to be incorporated in a numerical model. Among them, we assess the effects of vertical resolution, different vertical mixing parameterization (the so-called Generic Length Scale -GLS- set of k-??, k-??, gen, and the Mellor-Yamada), and surface roughness values on turbulent kinetic energy (k) injection from breaking waves. First, we modified the GLS turbulence closure formulation in the Regional Ocean Modeling System (ROMS) to incorporate the surface flux of turbulent kinetic energy due to wave breaking. Then, we applied the model to idealized test cases, exploring the sensitivity to the above mentioned factors. Last, the model was applied to a realistic situation in the Adriatic Sea driven by numerical meteorological forcings and river discharges. In this case, numerical drifters were released during an intense episode of Bora winds that occurred in mid-February 2003, and their trajectories compared to the displacement of satellite-tracked drifters deployed during the ADRIA02-03 sea-truth campaign. Results indicted that the inclusion of the wave breaking process helps improve the accuracy of the numerical simulations, subject to an increase in the typical value of the surface roughness z0. Specifically, the best performance was obtained using ??CH = 56,000 in the Charnok formula, the wave breaking parameterization activated, k-?? as the turbulence closure model. With these options, the relative error with respect to the average distance of the drifter was about 25% (5.5 km/day). The most sensitive factors in the model were found to be the value of ??CH enhanced with respect to a standard value, followed by the adoption of wave breaking parameterization and the particular turbulence closure model selected. ?? 2009 Elsevier Ltd.

  19. OGS improvements in 2012 in running the Northeastern Italy Seismic Network: the Ferrara VBB borehole seismic station

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pesaresi, Damiano; Romanelli, Marco; Barnaba, Carla; Bragato, Pier Luigi; Durì, Giorgio

    2013-04-01

    The Centro di Ricerche Sismologiche (CRS, Seismological Research Center) of the Istituto Nazionale di Oceanografia e di Geofisica Sperimentale (OGS, Italian National Institute for Oceanography and Experimental Geophysics) in Udine (Italy) after the strong earthquake of magnitude M=6.4 occurred in 1976 in the Italian Friuli-Venezia Giulia region, started to operate the Northeastern Italy Seismic Network: it currently consists of 17 very sensitive broad band and 18 simpler short period seismic stations, all telemetered to and acquired in real time at the OGS-CRS data center in Udine. Real time data exchange agreements in place with other Italian, Slovenian, Austrian and Swiss seismological institutes lead to a total number of about 100 seismic stations acquired in real time, which makes the OGS the reference institute for seismic monitoring of Northeastern Italy. The southwestern edge of the OGS seismic network stands on the Po alluvial basin: earthquake localization and characterization in this area is affected by the presence of soft alluvial deposits. OGS ha already experience in running a local seismic network in high noise conditions making use of borehole installations in the case of the micro-seismicity monitoring of a local gas storage site for a private company. Following the ML=5.9 earthquake that struck the Emilia region around Ferrara in Northern Italy on May 20, 2012 at 02:03:53 UTC, a cooperation of Istituto Nazionale di Geofisica e Vulcanologia, OGS, the Comune di Ferrara and the University of Ferrara lead to the reinstallation of a previously existing very broad band (VBB) borehole seismic station in Ferrara. The aim of the OGS intervention was on one hand to extend its real time seismic monitoring capabilities toward South-West, including Ferrara and its surroundings, and on the other hand to evaluate the seismic response at the site. We will describe improvements in running the Northeastern Italy Seismic Network, including details of the Ferrara VBB

  20. Corrective Action Decision Document for Corrective Action Unit 563: Septic Systems, Nevada Test Site, Nevada, Revision 0

    SciTech Connect

    Grant Evenson

    2008-02-01

    This Corrective Action Decision Document has been prepared for Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 563, Septic Systems, in accordance with the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO, 1996; as amended January 2007). The corrective action sites (CASs) for CAU 563 are located in Areas 3 and 12 of the Nevada Test Site, Nevada, and are comprised of the following four sites: •03-04-02, Area 3 Subdock Septic Tank •03-59-05, Area 3 Subdock Cesspool •12-59-01, Drilling/Welding Shop Septic Tanks •12-60-01, Drilling/Welding Shop Outfalls The purpose of this Corrective Action Decision Document is to identify and provide the rationale for the recommendation of a corrective action alternative (CAA) for the four CASs within CAU 563. Corrective action investigation (CAI) activities were performed from July 17 through November 19, 2007, as set forth in the CAU 563 Corrective Action Investigation Plan (NNSA/NSO, 2007). Analytes detected during the CAI were evaluated against appropriate final action levels (FALs) to identify the contaminants of concern (COCs) for each CAS. The results of the CAI identified COCs at one of the four CASs in CAU 563 and required the evaluation of CAAs. Assessment of the data generated from investigation activities conducted at CAU 563 revealed the following: •CASs 03-04-02, 03-59-05, and 12-60-01 do not contain contamination at concentrations exceeding the FALs. •CAS 12-59-01 contains arsenic and chromium contamination above FALs in surface and near-surface soils surrounding a stained location within the site. Based on the evaluation of analytical data from the CAI, review of future and current operations at CAS 12-59-01, and the detailed and comparative analysis of the potential CAAs, the following corrective actions are recommended for CAU 563.