Science.gov

Sample records for 03-42-01 conditional release

  1. 7 CFR 996.2 - Conditional release.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... STANDARDS FOR DOMESTIC AND IMPORTED PEANUTS MARKETED IN THE UNITED STATES Definitions § 996.2 Conditional... 7 Agriculture 8 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Conditional release. 996.2 Section 996.2 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Marketing...

  2. 7 CFR 996.2 - Conditional release.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... STANDARDS FOR DOMESTIC AND IMPORTED PEANUTS MARKETED IN THE UNITED STATES Definitions § 996.2 Conditional... 7 Agriculture 8 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Conditional release. 996.2 Section 996.2 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Marketing...

  3. Aroma release from wines under dynamic conditions.

    PubMed

    Tsachaki, Maroussa; Linforth, Robert S T; Taylor, Andrew J

    2009-08-12

    Aroma release from wines and model ethanolic solutions during dynamic headspace dilution was measured in real time using atmospheric pressure chemical ionization-mass spectrometry. Model ethanolic solutions maintained the headspace concentration of volatile compounds close to equilibrium values during gas phase dilution over 10 min. Wine samples (with the same ethanol content) did not maintain the headspace concentration of volatiles to the same extent. Wine components and acidity ((+)-catechin, glycerol; pH 3.6) in model ethanolic solutions (120 mL/L) had no effect on the volatile headspace concentration during dynamic headspace dilution. However, in the presence of certain proteins (beta-lactoglobulin, beta-casein, bovine serum albumin), the model ethanolic solutions failed to maintain their volatile headspace concentration upon headspace dilution, but other proteins (thaumatin, mucin, lysozyme) had no effect. Thermal imaging of the model ethanolic samples (with and without beta-casein) under dynamic headspace dilution conditions showed differences in surface temperatures. This observation suggested perturbation of the ethanol monolayer at the air-liquid interface and disruption of the Marangoni effect, which causes bulk convection within ethanolic solutions. Convection carries volatile compounds and warm liquid from the bulk phase to the air-liquid interface, thus replenishing the interfacial concentration and maintaining the gas phase concentration and interfacial surface temperature during headspace dilution. It is postulated that certain proteins may exert a similar effect in wine.

  4. 28 CFR 2.40 - Conditions of release.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Conditions of release. 2.40 Section 2.40 Judicial Administration DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE PAROLE, RELEASE, SUPERVISION AND RECOMMITMENT OF PRISONERS, YOUTH OFFENDERS, AND JUVENILE DELINQUENTS United States Code Prisoners and Parolees § 2.40 Conditions...

  5. Performance of Male Psychopaths Following Conditional Release from Prison.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hart, Stephen D.; And Others

    1988-01-01

    Administered Psychopathy Checklist (PCL) to criminals being released from prison on parole or mandatory supervision, then examined official parole supervision files for postrelease behavior. Violation of release conditions, suspensions, and presentation of supervisory problems were directly proportional, and the probability of subjects remaining…

  6. Optimal release conditions for the free throw in men's basketball.

    PubMed

    Tran, Chau M; Silverberg, Larry M

    2008-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the optimum release conditions for the free throw in men's basketball. The study used hundreds of thousands of three-dimensional simulations of basketball trajectories. Five release variables were studied: release height, release speed, launch angle, side angle, and back spin. The free throw shooter was assumed to shoot at 70% and to release the ball 2.134 m (7 ft) above the ground. We found that the shooter should place up to 3 Hz of back spin on the ball, should aim the ball towards the back of the ring, and should launch the ball at 52 degrees to the horizontal. We also found that it is desirable to release the ball as high above the ground as possible, as long as this does not adversely affect the player's launch consistency.

  7. Water conditioning and whooping crane survival after release in Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gee, G.F.; Nicolich, Jane M.; Nesbitt, S.A.; Hatfield, J.S.; Ellis, D.H.; Olsen, G.H.

    2001-01-01

    About 50% of the whooping cranes (Grus americana) released in Florida die within the first year of release. Most of these deaths and those in subsequent years result from bobcat (Lynx rufus) predation. Choosing release sites in open marshes away from bobcat habitat has improved survival. We hypothesized that exposure to ponds (water conditioning) at the rearing site would encourage birds to roost in deeper water marshes after release and such exposure would thereby reduce bobcat predation. In this study, we moved young birds (ca 50 days of age) to netted pens with large (15-m diameter), deep 30-60 cm) naturally vegetated ponds. We randomly assigned the costume-reared whooping cranes into 2 equal-sized groups at fledging. Some groups were placed in pens with a pond (experimental or ponded groups) and the others we reared without additional water exposure (control groups). All birds in the pens with ponds used the water. At night, they roosted at a depth of 36-46 cm. During the day, the birds used the ponds as well as other areas of the pen. We released 3 pairs of water-conditioned and control cohorts, 1 set in 1995 and 2 in 1996. No obvious behavioral differences were noted between the cohorts released in those years. Controls survived as expected (about 60% first year survival). The water-conditioned birds had much higher survival the first year (85%) and continued to survive better for the next 3 years.

  8. Statewide survey of living arrangements for conditionally released insanity acquittees.

    PubMed

    Novosad, David; Follansbee, Juliet; Banfe, Shelley; Bloom, Joseph D

    2014-09-01

    There is a large population (n =389) of insanity acquittees on monitored conditional release in Oregon. This article focuses on the living situation for these individuals, which can range from a secure residential treatment facility to independent living. This article will define all the different placement options available and then review the current living situation for all conditionally released insanity acquittees in the state of Oregon on a single day, February 1, 2014. This article shows that the majority of individuals on conditional release live in the most highly structured settings available. The article then ends with a discussion of these findings, including a comparison of current placement options, with previous descriptions in the literature demonstrating that current community options offer more structure and more individuals reside in structured settings than was previously the case. Current findings will be related to inpatient psychiatric bed reduction strategies and the question of possible transinstitutionalization.

  9. Microbial Release from Seeded Beach Sediments during Wave Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Phillips, Matthew C.; Feng, Zhixuan; Vogel, Laura J.; Reniers, Ad J. H. M.; Haus, Brian K.; Enns, Amber A; Zhang, Yifan; Hernandez, David B.; Solo-Gabriele, Helena M.

    2014-01-01

    Beach sands can sustain indigenous and introduced populations of enterococci. The objective of this study was to evaluate wave action in promoting the release of introduced bacteria. To accomplish this objective this study developed a method to assess attachment and identified conditions under which introduced bacteria are integrated into the sand. A new “shearing assay” showed that attachment of the introduced spike mimicked that of the natural sand when the spike was allowed to integrate into the sand for 24 hours at room temperature at a sand moisture content of 20%. Experiments in a wave flume showed that waves were capable of releasing about 60% of the total bacteria added. This suggests that for the range of wave conditions evaluated (height: 1.9-10.5 cm, period:1-2.7 s), waves were incapable of releasing all of the bacteria. Further study is needed to evaluate bacteria attachment mechanisms. PMID:24393380

  10. On the role of subsecond dopamine release in conditioned avoidance

    PubMed Central

    Oleson, Erik B.; Cheer, Joseph F.

    2013-01-01

    Using shock avoidance procedures to study conditioned behavioral responses has a rich history within the field of experimental psychology. Such experiments led to the formulation of the general concept of negative reinforcement and specific theories attempting to explain escape and avoidance behavior, or why animals choose to either terminate or prevent the presentation of an aversive event. For example, the two-factor theory of avoidance holds that cues preceding an aversive event begin to evoke conditioned fear responses, and these conditioned fear responses reinforce the instrumental avoidance response. Current neuroscientific advances are providing new perspectives into this historical literature. Due to its well-established role in reinforcement processes and behavioral control, the mesolimbic dopamine system presented itself as a logical starting point in the search for neural correlates of avoidance and escape behavior. We recently demonstrated that phasic dopamine release events are inhibited by stimuli associated with aversive events but increased by stimuli preceding the successful avoidance of the aversive event. The latter observation is inconsistent with the second component of the two-factor theory of avoidance and; therefore, led us propose a new theoretical explanation of conditioned avoidance: (1) fear is initially conditioned to the warning signal and dopamine computes this fear association as a decrease in release, (2) the warning signal, now capable of producing a negative emotional state, suppresses dopamine release and behavior, (3) over repeated trials the warning signal becomes associated with safety rather than fear; dopaminergic neurons already compute safety as an increase in release and begin to encode the warning signal as the earliest predictor of safety (4) the warning signal now promotes conditioned avoidance via dopaminergic modulation of the brain's incentive-motivational circuitry. PMID:23759871

  11. Modulation of precipitation by conditional symmetric instability release

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glinton, Michael R.; Gray, Suzanne L.; Chagnon, Jeffrey M.; Morcrette, Cyril J.

    2017-03-01

    Although many theoretical and observational studies have investigated the mechanism of conditional symmetric instability (CSI) release and associated it with mesoscale atmospheric phenomena such as frontal precipitation bands, cloud heads in rapidly developing extratropical cyclones and sting jets, its climatology and contribution to precipitation have not been extensively documented. The aim of this paper is to quantify the contribution of CSI release, yielding slantwise convection, to climatological precipitation accumulations for the North Atlantic and western Europe. Case studies reveal that CSI release could be common along cold fronts of mature extratropical cyclones and the North Atlantic storm track is found to be a region with large CSI according to two independent CSI metrics. Correlations of CSI with accumulated precipitation are also large in this region and CSI release is inferred to be occurring about 20% of the total time over depths of over 1 km. We conclude that the inability of current global weather forecast and climate prediction models to represent CSI release (due to insufficient resolution yet lack of subgrid parametrization schemes) may lead to errors in precipitation distributions, particularly in the region of the North Atlantic storm track.

  12. Volatile release from aqueous solutions under dynamic headspace dilution conditions.

    PubMed

    Marin, M; Baek, I; Taylor, A J

    1999-11-01

    Static equilibrium was established between the gas phase (headspace) and an unstirred aqueous phase in a sealed vessel. The headspace was then diluted with air to mimic the situation when a container of food is opened and the volatiles are diluted by the surrounding air. Because this first volatile signal can influence overall flavor perception, the parameters controlling volatile release under these conditions are of interest. A mechanistic model was developed and validated experimentally. Release of compounds depended on the air-water partition coefficient (K(aw)) and the mass transport in both phases. For compounds with K(aw) values <10(-)(3), K(aw) was the factor determining release rate. When K(aw) was >10(-)(3), mass transport in the gas phase became significant and the Reynolds number played a role. Because release from packaged foods occurs at low Reynolds numbers, whereas most experiments are conducted at medium to high Reynolds numbers, the experimentally defined profile may not reflect the real situation.

  13. The legal aspects of conditional release in the criminal and civil court system.

    PubMed

    Weinstein, Naomi M

    2014-09-01

    This article considers the legal implications of conditional release in both the civil and criminal parts of the law. In the criminal context, conditional release takes the form of probation and parole. It also involves persons who are found to be incompetent to stand trial or not guilty by reason of insanity. In the civil context, conditional release exists for persons with mental illness and sex offenders who face mandatory outpatient treatment. The public policy behind conditional release is to allow certain persons the least restrictive alternative with proper oversight that will prevent the person from recidivating or being re-hospitalized. Conditional release is also used as a cost-saving mechanism in response to the overwhelming costs of incarceration and hospitalization. This article explores the issues of professional liability, third party liability, and individual rights in relation to conditional release. This article also addresses public policy concerns with conditional release and examines conditional release from a therapeutic jurisprudence perspective.

  14. In vitro release of metoclopramide from hydrophobic matrix tablets. influence of hydrodynamic conditions on kinetic release parameters.

    PubMed

    Frutos, P; Pabón, C; Lastres, J L; Frutos, G

    2001-10-01

    There has been growing interest in the subject of drug delivery and the design and evaluation of controlled-release systems. The simplest way to control the release of an active agent is to disperse it in an inert polymeric matrix. Controlled-release systems are of interest because they are technologically simple, relatively cheap, and practically unaffected by physiological changes. In this study, a new matrix system was formed by an active principle, metoclopramide hydrochloride, scattered into a biocompatible hydrophobic polymerical mesh, polyamide 12, to achieve sustained and controlled delivery of metoclopramide hydrochloride. This research was conducted to investigate the in vitro drug release behavior from these new inert polymeric matrix tablets. The drug release process was investigated both experimentally and by means of mathematical models. Different models were applied for the evaluation of drug release data. On the basis of our results, a biexponential equation was proposed, Q=Qfast(1)(1 - e(-Kfast t)) + Qslow(2)(1 - e(-Kslow t)), in an attempt to explain the mechanism responsible for the release process. Additionally, the influence of the experimental conditions of the dissolution devices, such as rate of flow and pH of dissolution medium, on the parameters that characterize the release mechanism was studied, and it was found that the main factor was the hydrodynamic condition of rate of flow.

  15. Beyond Recidivism: Measuring Community Adjustments of Conditionally Released Insanity Acquitees.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wiederanders, Mark A.; Choate, Paul A.

    1994-01-01

    An instrument was developed to assess the community functioning of released insanity acquitees using items from previous scales and some original items. Preliminary results with samples from 254 to 1,187 subjects indicate that the developed questionnaire compares favorably in reliability with existing instruments. (SLD)

  16. Tritium release from SS316 under vacuum condition

    SciTech Connect

    Torikai, Y.; Penzhorn, R.D.

    2015-03-15

    The plasma facing surface of the ITER vacuum vessel, partly made of low carbon austenitic stainless steel type 316L, will incorporate tritium during machine operation. In this paper the kinetics of tritium release from stainless steel type 316 into vacuum and into a noble gas stream are compared and modelled. Type 316 stainless steel specimens loaded with tritium either by exposure to 1.2 kPa HT at 573 K or submersion into liquid HTO at 298 K showed characteristic thin surface layers trapping tritium in concentrations far higher than those determined in the bulk. The evolution of the tritium depth profile in the bulk during heating under vacuum was non-discernible from that of tritium liberated into a stream of argon. Only the relative amount of the two released tritium-species, i.e. HT or HTO, was different. Temperature-dependent depth profiles could be predicted with a one-dimensional diffusion model. Diffusion coefficients derived from fitting of the tritium release into an evacuated vessel or a stream of argon were found to be (1.4 ± 1.0)*10{sup -7} and (1.3 ± 0.9)*10{sup -9} cm{sup 2}/s at 573 and 423 K, respectively. Polished surfaces on type SS316 stainless steel inhibit considerably the thermal release rate of tritium.

  17. 28 CFR 2.204 - Conditions of supervised release.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... Section 2.204 Judicial Administration DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE PAROLE, RELEASE, SUPERVISION AND RECOMMITMENT... a person who has a criminal record without permission from the supervision officer. (vi) The... any applicable sex-offender reporting and registration law. (v) The releasee shall provide a...

  18. 28 CFR 2.204 - Conditions of supervised release.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Section 2.204 Judicial Administration DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE PAROLE, RELEASE, SUPERVISION AND RECOMMITMENT... a person who has a criminal record without permission from the supervision officer. (vi) The... any applicable sex-offender reporting and registration law. (v) The releasee shall provide a...

  19. 28 CFR 2.204 - Conditions of supervised release.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... Section 2.204 Judicial Administration DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE PAROLE, RELEASE, SUPERVISION AND RECOMMITMENT... a person who has a criminal record without permission from the supervision officer. (vi) The... any applicable sex-offender reporting and registration law. (v) The releasee shall provide a...

  20. 28 CFR 2.204 - Conditions of supervised release.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... Section 2.204 Judicial Administration DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE PAROLE, RELEASE, SUPERVISION AND RECOMMITMENT... a person who has a criminal record without permission from the supervision officer. (vi) The... any applicable sex-offender reporting and registration law. (v) The releasee shall provide a...

  1. 28 CFR 2.40 - Conditions of release.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... participation in a drug-treatment program, the releasee must submit to a drug test before release and to at least two other drug tests, as determined by the supervision officer. A decision not to impose this... releasee, shall constitute good cause for suspension of the drug testing requirements of 18 U.S.C....

  2. 28 CFR 2.40 - Conditions of release.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... participation in a drug-treatment program, the releasee must submit to a drug test before release and to at least two other drug tests, as determined by the supervision officer. A decision not to impose this... releasee, shall constitute good cause for suspension of the drug testing requirements of 18 U.S.C....

  3. 28 CFR 2.40 - Conditions of release.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... participation in a drug-treatment program, the releasee must submit to a drug test before release and to at least two other drug tests, as determined by the supervision officer. A decision not to impose this... releasee, shall constitute good cause for suspension of the drug testing requirements of 18 U.S.C....

  4. 28 CFR 2.40 - Conditions of release.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... participation in a drug-treatment program, the releasee must submit to a drug test before release and to at least two other drug tests, as determined by the supervision officer. A decision not to impose this... releasee, shall constitute good cause for suspension of the drug testing requirements of 18 U.S.C....

  5. Nitrogen release from rock and soil under simulated field conditions

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Holloway, J.M.; Dahlgren, R.A.; Casey, W.H.

    2001-01-01

    A laboratory study was performed to simulate field weathering and nitrogen release from bedrock in a setting where geologic nitrogen has been suspected to be a large local source of nitrate. Two rock types containing nitrogen, slate (1370 mg N kg-1) and greenstone (480 mg N kg-1), were used along with saprolite and BC horizon sand from soils derived from these rock types. The fresh rock and weathered material were used in batch reactors that were leached every 30 days over 6 months to simulate a single wet season. Nitrogen was released from rock and soil materials at rates between 10-20 and 10-19 mo1 N cm-2 s-1. Results from the laboratory dissolution experiments were compared to in situ soil solutions and available mineral nitrogen pools from the BC horizon of both soils. Concentrations of mineral nitrogen (NO3- + NH4+) in soil solutions reached the highest levels at the beginning of the rainy season and progressively decreased with increased leaching. This seasonal pattern was repeated for the available mineral nitrogen pool that was extracted using a KCl solution. Estimates based on these laboratory release rates bracket stream water NO3-N fluxes and changes in the available mineral nitrogen pool over the active leaching period. These results confirm that geologic nitrogen, when present, may be a large and reactive pool that may contribute as a non-point source of nitrate contamination to surface and ground waters. ?? 2001 Elsevier Science B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Chromium released from leather – I: exposure conditions that govern the release of chromium(III) and chromium(VI)

    PubMed Central

    Hedberg, Yolanda S; Lidén, Carola; Odnevall Wallinder, Inger

    2015-01-01

    Background Approximately 1–3% of the adult population in Europe is allergic to chromium (Cr). A new restriction in REACH (Registration, Evaluation, Authorization and Restriction of Chemicals) based on the ISO 17075 standard has recently been adopted in the EU to limit Cr(VI) in consumer and occupational leather products. Objectives The aim of this study was to critically assess key experimental parameters in this standard on the release of Cr(III) and Cr(VI) and their relevance for skin exposure. Material and methods Four differently tanned, unfinished, leather samples were systematically investigated for their release of Cr(III) and Cr(VI) in relation to surface area, key exposure parameters, temperature, ultraviolet irradiation, and time. Results Although the total release of Cr was largely unaffected by all investigated parameters, except exposure duration and temperature, the Cr oxidation state was highly dynamic, with reduced amounts of released Cr(VI) with time, owing to the simultaneous release of reducing agents from the leather. Significantly more Cr(III) than Cr(VI) was released from the Cr-tanned leather for all conditions tested, and it continued to be released in artificial sweat up to at least 1 week of exposure. Conclusions Several parameters were identified that influenced the outcome of the ISO 17075 test. PMID:25653094

  7. Conditional BDNF release under pathological conditions improves Huntington's disease pathology by delaying neuronal dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Brain-Derived Neurotrophic Factor (BDNF) is the main candidate for neuroprotective therapy for Huntington's disease (HD), but its conditional administration is one of its most challenging problems. Results Here we used transgenic mice that over-express BDNF under the control of the Glial Fibrillary Acidic Protein (GFAP) promoter (pGFAP-BDNF mice) to test whether up-regulation and release of BDNF, dependent on astrogliosis, could be protective in HD. Thus, we cross-mated pGFAP-BDNF mice with R6/2 mice to generate a double-mutant mouse with mutant huntingtin protein and with a conditional over-expression of BDNF, only under pathological conditions. In these R6/2:pGFAP-BDNF animals, the decrease in striatal BDNF levels induced by mutant huntingtin was prevented in comparison to R6/2 animals at 12 weeks of age. The recovery of the neurotrophin levels in R6/2:pGFAP-BDNF mice correlated with an improvement in several motor coordination tasks and with a significant delay in anxiety and clasping alterations. Therefore, we next examined a possible improvement in cortico-striatal connectivity in R62:pGFAP-BDNF mice. Interestingly, we found that the over-expression of BDNF prevented the decrease of cortico-striatal presynaptic (VGLUT1) and postsynaptic (PSD-95) markers in the R6/2:pGFAP-BDNF striatum. Electrophysiological studies also showed that basal synaptic transmission and synaptic fatigue both improved in R6/2:pGAP-BDNF mice. Conclusions These results indicate that the conditional administration of BDNF under the GFAP promoter could become a therapeutic strategy for HD due to its positive effects on synaptic plasticity. PMID:21985529

  8. Mechanistic analysis of triamcinolone acetonide release from PLGA microspheres as a function of varying in vitro release conditions.

    PubMed

    Doty, Amy C; Zhang, Ying; Weinstein, David G; Wang, Yan; Choi, Stephanie; Qu, Wen; Mittal, Sachin; Schwendeman, Steven P

    2017-04-01

    In vitro tests for controlled release PLGA microspheres in their current state often do not accurately predict in vivo performance of these products during formulation development. Here, we introduce a new mechanistic and multi-phase approach to more clearly understand in vitro-in vivo relationships, and describe the first "in vitro phase" with the model drug, triamcinolone acetonide (Tr-A). Two microsphere formulations encapsulating Tr-A were prepared from PLGAs of different molecular weights and end-capping (18kDa acid-capped and 54kDa ester-capped). In vitro release kinetics and the evidence for controlling mechanisms (i.e., erosion, diffusion, and water-mediated processes) were studied in four release media: PBST pH 7.4 (standard condition), PBST pH 6.5, PBS+1.0% triethyl citrate (TC), and HBST pH 7.4. The release mechanism in PBST was primarily polymer erosion-controlled as indicated by the similarity of release and mass loss kinetics. Release from the low MW PLGA was accelerated at low pH due to increased rate of hydrolysis and in the presence of the plasticizer TC due to slightly increased hydrolysis and much higher diffusion in the polymer matrix. TC also increased release from the high MW PLGA due to increased hydrolysis, erosion, and diffusion. This work demonstrates how in vitro conditions can be manipulated to change not only rates of drug release from PLGA microspheres but also the mechanism(s) by which release occurs. Follow-on studies in the next phases of this approach will utilize these results to compare the mechanistic data of the Tr-A/PLGA microsphere formulations developed here after recovery of microspheres in vivo. This new approach based on measuring mechanistic indicators of release in vitro and in vivo has the potential to design better, more predictive in vitro release tests for these formulations and potentially lead to mechanism-based in vitro-in vivo correlations.

  9. Equilibrium and kinetic models for colloid release under transient solution chemistry conditions

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We present continuum models to describe colloid release in the subsurface during transient physicochemical conditions. Our modeling approach relates the amount of colloid release to changes in the fraction of the solid surface area that contributes to retention. Equilibrium, kinetic, equilibrium and...

  10. 41 CFR 105-64.208 - What special conditions apply to release of medical records?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... apply to release of medical records? 105-64.208 Section 105-64.208 Public Contracts and Property....208 What special conditions apply to release of medical records? Medical records containing... writing by you, or by your guardian or conservator. Medical records in an Official Personnel Folder...

  11. Equilibrium and Kinetic Models for Colloid Release Under Transient Solution Chemistry Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bradford, S. A.; Torkzaban, S.; Leij, F. J.; Simunek, J.

    2014-12-01

    Colloid retention and release is well known to depend on a wide variety of physical, chemical, and microbiological factors that may vary temporally in the subsurface environment. We present equilibrium, kinetic, combined equilibrium and kinetic, and two-site kinetic models of colloid release during transient physicochemical conditions. Our mathematical modeling approach relates colloid release under transient conditions to changes in the fraction of the solid surface area that contributes to retention. The developed models were subsequently applied to experimental colloid release datasets to investigate the influence of variations in ionic strength (IS), pH, cation exchange, colloid size, and water velocity on release. Various combinations of equilibrium and/or kinetic release models were needed to describe the experimental data depending on the transient conditions and colloid type. Release of E. coli D21g was promoted by a decrease in solution IS and an increase in pH, similar to expected trends for a reduction in the secondary minimum and nanoscale chemical heterogeneity, respectively. The retention and release of 20 nm carboxyl modified latex nanoparticles (NPs) were demonstrated to be more sensitive to the presence of Ca2+ than D21g. Specifically, retention of NPs was greater than D21g in the presence of 2 mM CaCl2 solution, and release of NPs only occurred after exchange of Ca2+ by Na+ and then a reduction in the solution IS. These findings highlight the limitations of conventional interaction energy calculations to describe colloid retention and release, and point to the need to consider Born repulsion and nanoscale heterogeneity. Temporal changes in the water velocity did not have a large influence on the release of D21g. This insensitivity was likely due to factors that reduce the applied hydrodynamic torque and/or increase the resisting adhesive torque. Collectively, experimental and modeling results indicate that episodic colloid transport in the

  12. Environmental Influences on the Release of Ophiosphaerella agrostis Ascospores Under Controlled and Field Conditions.

    PubMed

    Kaminski, John E; Dernoeden, Peter H; O'Neill, Nichole R

    2005-11-01

    ABSTRACT Ophiosphaerella agrostis, the causal agent of dead spot of creeping bentgrass (Agrostis stolonifera), can produce prodigious numbers of pseudothecia and ascospores throughout the summer. The environmental conditions and seasonal timings associated with O. agrostis ascospore release are unknown. The objectives of this research were to (i) determine the influence of light and relative humidity on ascospore release in a controlled environment, (ii) document the seasonal and daily discharge patterns of ascospores in the field, and (iii) elucidate environmental conditions that promote ascospore release under field conditions. In a growth chamber, a sharp decrease (100 to approximately 50%; 25 degrees C) in relative humidity resulted in a rapid (1- to 3-h) discharge of ascospores, regardless of whether pseudothecia were incubated in constant light or dark. In the field, daily ascospore release increased between 1900 and 2300 h and again between 0700 and 1000 h local time. The release of ascospores occurred primarily during the early morning hours when relative humidity was decreasing and the canopy began to dry, or during evening hours when relative humidity was low and dew began to form. Few ascospores were released between 1100 and 1800 h when the bentgrass canopy was dry. The release of ascospores also was triggered by precipitation. Of the ascospores collected during precipitation events, 87% occurred within 10 h of the beginning of each event.

  13. Effect of yeast strain and fermentation conditions on the release of cell wall polysaccharides.

    PubMed

    Giovani, Giovanna; Canuti, Valentina; Rosi, Iolanda

    2010-02-28

    To improve our understanding of the factors involved in polysaccharide release during alcoholic fermentation, we investigated three Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains in fermentation trials conducted at two temperatures (25 degrees C and 32 degrees C) and three sugar concentrations (20%, 23.5%, and 27%), with or without supplementation of grape juice with diammonium phosphate (DAP) or microcrystalline cellulose. In two yeast strains, the release of cell wall polysaccharides increased significantly with an increase in fermentation temperature and sugar concentration of the grape juice; the polysaccharide release was greater in stressed conditions, in which the cells were less viable and less metabolically active. In the third strain, the average amount of polysaccharides released into the medium decreased significantly at 32 degrees C with 27% sugar, and increased in grape juice supplemented with DAP. Thus, this strain released more polysaccharides when conditions were nearer to optimal and the yeast cells were more viable and metabolically active. Our results suggest that the yeast strains released cell wall polysaccharides via different mechanisms, and that the cell wall integrity pathway may account for some of the differences in polysaccharide release among the strains.

  14. 75 FR 36773 - Notice of Intent To Release Certain Properties From All Terms, Conditions, Reservations and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-28

    ...The FAA hereby provides notice of intent to release certain airport properties 7.89 acres, more or less, at the Lakeland Linder Regional Airport, Lakeland, FL from the conditions, reservations, and restrictions as contained in a Quitclaim Deed agreement between the FAA and the City of Lakeland, dated September 26, 1947. The release of property will allow the City of Lakeland to dispose of the......

  15. Estimate of radionuclide release characteristics into containment under severe accident conditions. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Nourbakhsh, H.P.

    1993-11-01

    A detailed review of the available light water reactor source term information is presented as a technical basis for development of updated source terms into the containment under severe accident conditions. Simplified estimates of radionuclide release and transport characteristics are specified for each unique combination of the reactor coolant and containment system combinations. A quantitative uncertainty analysis in the release to the containment using NUREG-1150 methodology is also presented.

  16. Equilibrium and kinetic models for colloid release under transient solution chemistry conditions.

    PubMed

    Bradford, Scott A; Torkzaban, Saeed; Leij, Feike; Simunek, Jiri

    2015-10-01

    We present continuum models to describe colloid release in the subsurface during transient physicochemical conditions. Our modeling approach relates the amount of colloid release to changes in the fraction of the solid surface area that contributes to retention. Equilibrium, kinetic, equilibrium and kinetic, and two-site kinetic models were developed to describe various rates of colloid release. These models were subsequently applied to experimental colloid release datasets to investigate the influence of variations in ionic strength (IS), pH, cation exchange, colloid size, and water velocity on release. Various combinations of equilibrium and/or kinetic release models were needed to describe the experimental data depending on the transient conditions and colloid type. Release of Escherichia coli D21g was promoted by a decrease in solution IS and an increase in pH, similar to expected trends for a reduction in the secondary minimum and nanoscale chemical heterogeneity. The retention and release of 20nm carboxyl modified latex nanoparticles (NPs) were demonstrated to be more sensitive to the presence of Ca(2+) than D21g. Specifically, retention of NPs was greater than D21g in the presence of 2mM CaCl2 solution, and release of NPs only occurred after exchange of Ca(2+) by Na(+) and then a reduction in the solution IS. These findings highlight the limitations of conventional interaction energy calculations to describe colloid retention and release, and point to the need to consider other interactions (e.g., Born, steric, and/or hydration forces) and/or nanoscale heterogeneity. Temporal changes in the water velocity did not have a large influence on the release of D21g for the examined conditions. This insensitivity was likely due to factors that reduce the applied hydrodynamic torque and/or increase the resisting adhesive torque; e.g., macroscopic roughness and grain-grain contacts. Our analysis and models improve our understanding and ability to describe the amounts

  17. Release behavior of uranium in uranium mill tailings under environmental conditions.

    PubMed

    Liu, Bo; Peng, Tongjiang; Sun, Hongjuan; Yue, Huanjuan

    2017-02-28

    Uranium contamination is observed in sedimentary geochemical environments, but the geochemical and mineralogical processes that control uranium release from sediment are not fully appreciated. Identification of how sediments and water influence the release and migration of uranium is critical to improve the prevention of uranium contamination in soil and groundwater. To understand the process of uranium release and migration from uranium mill tailings under water chemistry conditions, uranium mill tailing samples from northwest China were investigated with batch leaching experiments. Results showed that water played an important role in uranium release from the tailing minerals. The uranium release was clearly influenced by contact time, liquid-solid ratio, particle size, and pH under water chemistry conditions. Longer contact time, higher liquid content, and extreme pH were all not conducive to the stabilization of uranium and accelerated the uranium release from the tailing mineral to the solution. The values of pH were found to significantly influence the extent and mechanisms of uranium release from minerals to water. Uranium release was monitored by a number of interactive processes, including dissolution of uranium-bearing minerals, uranium desorption from mineral surfaces, and formation of aqueous uranium complexes. Considering the impact of contact time, liquid-solid ratio, particle size, and pH on uranium release from uranium mill tailings, reducing the water content, decreasing the porosity of tailing dumps and controlling the pH of tailings were the key factors for prevention and management of environmental pollution in areas near uranium mines.

  18. The Effect of Spray Initial Conditions on Heat Release and Emissions in LDI CFD Calculations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Iannetti, Anthony C.; Liu, Nan-Suey; Davoudzadeh, Farhad

    2008-01-01

    The mass and velocity distribution of liquid spray has a primary effect on the combustion heat release process. This heat release process then affects emissions like nitrogen oxides (NOx) and carbon monoxide (CO). Computational Fluid Dynamics gives the engineer insight into these processes, but various setup options exist (number of droplet groups, and initial droplet temperature) for spray initial conditions. This paper studies these spray initial condition options using the National Combustion Code (NCC) on a single swirler lean direct injection (LDI) flame tube. Using laminar finite rate chemistry, comparisons are made against experimental data for velocity measurements, temperature, and emissions (NOx, CO).

  19. Differential acetylcholine release in the prefrontal cortex and hippocampus during pavlovian trace and delay conditioning.

    PubMed

    Flesher, M Melissa; Butt, Allen E; Kinney-Hurd, Brandee L

    2011-09-01

    Pavlovian trace conditioning critically depends on the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) and hippocampus (HPC), whereas delay conditioning does not depend on these brain structures. Given that the cholinergic basal forebrain system modulates activity in both the mPFC and HPC, it was reasoned that the level of acetylcholine (ACh) release in these regions would show distinct profiles during testing in trace and delay conditioning paradigms. To test this assumption, microdialysis probes were implanted unilaterally into the mPFC and HPC of rats that were pre-trained in appetitive trace and delay conditioning paradigms using different conditional stimuli in the two tasks. On the day of microdialysis testing, dialysate samples were collected during a quiet baseline interval before trials were initiated, and again during performance in separate blocks of trace and delay conditioning trials in each animal. ACh levels were quantified using high-performance liquid chromatography and electrochemical detection techniques. Consistent with our hypothesis, results showed that ACh release in the mPFC was greater during trace conditioning than during delay conditioning. The level of ACh released during trace conditioning in the HPC was also greater than the levels observed during delay conditioning. While ACh efflux in both the mPFC and HPC selectively increased during trace conditioning, ACh levels in the mPFC during trace conditioning testing showed the greatest increases observed. These results demonstrate a dissociation in cholinergic activation of the mPFC and HPC during performance in trace but not delay appetitive conditioning, where this cholinergic activity may contribute to attentional mechanisms, adaptive response timing, or memory consolidation necessary for successful trace conditioning.

  20. Conditional Release Placements of Insanity Acquittees in Oregon: 2012-2014.

    PubMed

    Novosad, David; Banfe, Shelley; Britton, Juliet; Bloom, Joseph D

    2016-03-01

    Between January 1, 2012 and December 31, 2014, there was a large population (N = 200) of insanity acquittees placed on conditional release (CR) in the state of Oregon. This article looks at the demographic and system characteristics of this large group of individuals. The authors then focus on the initial housing placement and what happens to individuals after their release in relation to their housing placement. In Oregon, insanity acquittees are either conditionally released directly by the court or placed in the hospital prior to potential CR by a supervising board. In general, once CR occurs, individuals tend to stay in their initial placement without moving to less structured levels of care, raising concerns about transinstitutionalization. This is especially true for individuals released to the most structured living arrangement (secure residential treatment facility). Those individuals who are conditionally released to less structured settings have a higher rate of revocation back to the hospital. Those individuals who do move to less structured levels of care usually have longer hospital stays and start off in more structured levels of care to start their CR. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  1. Myofascial Release as a Treatment for Orthopaedic Conditions: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    McKenney, Kristin; Elder, Amanda Sinclair; Elder, Craig; Hutchins, Andrea

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To critically analyze published literature to determine the effectiveness of myofascial release therapy as a treatment for orthopaedic conditions. Data Sources: We searched the following electronic databases: MEDLINE, CINAHL, Academic Search Premier, Cochrane Library, and Physiotherapy Evidence Database (PEDro), with key words myofascial release, myofascial release therapy, myofascial release treatment, musculoskeletal, and orthopedic. No date limitations were applied to the searches. Study Selection: Articles were selected based upon the use of the term myofascial release in the abstract or key words. Final selection was made by applying the inclusion and exclusion criteria to the full text. Studies were included if they were English-language, peer-reviewed studies on myofascial release for an orthopaedic condition in adult patients. Ten studies were eligible. Data Extraction: Data collected were number of participants, condition being treated, treatment used, control group, outcome measures and results. Studies were analyzed using the PEDro scale and the Center for Evidence-Based Medicine's Levels of Evidence Scale. Data Synthesis: Study scores on the PEDro scale ranged from 6 of 10 to 8 of 10. Based on the Levels of Evidence Scale, the case studies (n = 6) were of lower quality, with a rank of 4. Three of the 4 remaining studies were rated at 2b, and the final study was rated at 1b. Conclusions: The quality of studies was mixed, ranging from higher-quality experimental to lower-quality case studies. Overall, the studies had positive outcomes with myofascial release, but because of the low quality, few conclusions could be drawn. The studies in this review may serve as a good foundation for future randomized controlled trials. PMID:23725488

  2. 42 CFR 484.11 - Condition of participation: Release of patient identifiable OASIS information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... identifiable OASIS information. 484.11 Section 484.11 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES... Administration § 484.11 Condition of participation: Release of patient identifiable OASIS information. The HHA... confidentiality of all patient identifiable information contained in the clinical record, including OASIS...

  3. 42 CFR 484.11 - Condition of participation: Release of patient identifiable OASIS information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... identifiable OASIS information. 484.11 Section 484.11 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES... Administration § 484.11 Condition of participation: Release of patient identifiable OASIS information. The HHA... confidentiality of all patient identifiable information contained in the clinical record, including OASIS...

  4. 42 CFR 484.11 - Condition of participation: Release of patient identifiable OASIS information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... identifiable OASIS information. 484.11 Section 484.11 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES... Administration § 484.11 Condition of participation: Release of patient identifiable OASIS information. The HHA... confidentiality of all patient identifiable information contained in the clinical record, including OASIS...

  5. 42 CFR 484.11 - Condition of participation: Release of patient identifiable OASIS information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... identifiable OASIS information. 484.11 Section 484.11 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES... Administration § 484.11 Condition of participation: Release of patient identifiable OASIS information. The HHA... confidentiality of all patient identifiable information contained in the clinical record, including OASIS...

  6. 42 CFR 484.11 - Condition of participation: Release of patient identifiable OASIS information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... identifiable OASIS information. 484.11 Section 484.11 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES... Administration § 484.11 Condition of participation: Release of patient identifiable OASIS information. The HHA... confidentiality of all patient identifiable information contained in the clinical record, including OASIS...

  7. Diffusion modeling of fission product release during depressurized core conduction cooldown conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, R.C.

    1990-01-01

    A simple model for diffusion through the silicon carbide layer of TRISO particles is applied to the data for accident condition testing of fuel spheres for the High-Temperature Reactor program of the Federal Republic of Germany (FRG). Categorization of sphere release of {sup 137}Cs based on fast neutron fluence permits predictions of release with an accuracy comparable to that of the US/FRG accident condition fuel performance model. Calculations are also performed for {sup 85}Kr, {sup 90}Sr, and {sup 110m}Ag. Diffusion of cesium through SiC suggests that models of fuel failure should consider fuel performance during repeated accident condition thermal cycling. Microstructural considerations in models in fission product release are discussed. The neutron-induced segregation of silicon within the SiC structure is postulated as a mechanism for enhanced fission product release during accident conditions. An oxygen-enhanced SiC decomposition mechanism is also discussed. 12 refs., 11 figs., 2 tabs.

  8. Release of Pharmaceuticals under Reducing Conditions in a Wastewater-Irrigated Mexican Soil.

    PubMed

    Dalkmann, Philipp; Dresemann, Tim-Fabian; Siebe, Christina; Mansfeldt, Tim; Amelung, Wulf; Siemens, Jan

    2014-11-01

    Wastewater irrigation is often performed by flood irrigation, leading to changes in redox potential (Eh) of irrigated soils. In addition to soil organic matter, Fe-(hydr)oxides are important sorbents for pollutants, and biotransformation of pollutants can be accelerated under reducing conditions. Here, the influence of reducing conditions on the release of sorbed pharmaceuticals from soil and their potential accelerated dissipation was investigated in a microcosm study. Samples of a soil from the Mezquital Valley (Mexico) irrigated for 85 yr with untreated wastewater were incubated under oxidizing (Eh of 500 ± 20 mV), weakly reducing (Eh of 100 ± 20 mV), and moderately reducing (Eh of -100 ± 20 mV) soil conditions for 30 to 31 d. The concentrations of nine pharmaceuticals (bezafibrate, carbamazepine, ciprofloxacin, sulfamethoxazole, trimethoprim, enrofloxacin, clarithromycin, diclofenac, and naproxen) were extracted via solid-phase extraction from soil slurries and analyzed by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry. Low Eh did not lead to a release of formerly sorbed pharmaceuticals from the wastewater irrigated soil. High pH values (>8) of the examined soil resulting from denitrification under reducing conditions prevented the dissolution of Fe-(hydr)oxides and, hence, the potential release of pharmaceuticals. A trend of decreasing concentrations of sulfamethoxazole and bezafibrate with time under moderately reducing conditions supports previous findings of a transformation of these compounds under anaerobic conditions.

  9. Cisplatin-Conjugated Porous Gelatin Particles: Assessment of Optimal Conditions for Binding and Release

    SciTech Connect

    Ohta, Shinichi Nitta, Norihisa; Sonoda, Akinaga; Nitta-Seko, Ayumi; Tanaka, Toyohiko; Takahashi, Masashi; Murata, Kiyoshi

    2010-08-15

    This study was designed to evaluate the optimal conditions for binding cisplatin and porous gelatin particles (PGPs) and to establish in vivo drug release pharmacokinetics. PGPs were immersed in cisplatin solutions under different conditions: concentration, immersion time, and temperature. Thereafter, PGPs were washed in distilled water to remove uncombined cisplatin and were then freeze-dried. The platinum concentration (PC) in the PGPs was then measured. For the in vivo release test, 50 mg/kg of the cisplatin-conjugated PGPs was implanted subcutaneously in the abdominal region of two rabbits. PCs in the blood were measured at different time intervals. PCs significantly increased in direct proportion to the concentration and immersion time (p < 0.01). Although PC increased at higher solution temperature, it was not a linear progression. For the in vivo release test, platinum was released from cisplatin-conjugated PGPs after 1 day, and the peak PC was confirmed 2 days after implantation. Platinum in the blood was detected until 7 days after implantation in one rabbit and 15 days after administration in the other rabbit. Platinum binding with PGPs increased with a higher concentration of cisplatin solution at a higher temperature over a longer duration of time. Release of cisplatin from cisplatin-conjugated PGPs was confirmed in vivo.

  10. Citrate-enhanced release of arsenic during pyrite oxidation at circumneutral conditions.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Peng; Yao, Weiyu; Yuan, Songhu

    2017-02-01

    The release of arsenic (As) from the oxidation of As-rich pyrite is an important source of the high arsenic in groundwater. As a widespread low-molecular-weight organic acid, citrate plays an important role on the cycling of Fe(II)/Fe(III) through complexation in circumneutral subsurface environments, while the influence of citrate on the release of As from the oxidation of As-rich pyrite is poorly understood. In this study, As was loaded onto pyrite particles under anoxic conditions, and its release was investigated in the presence of 0-1 mM citrate at pH 7.4 under oxic conditions. As-loaded pyrite suspension was prepared by the equilibrium of 2.67 μM As(III) in 10 g/L pyrite under anoxic conditions with the decrease in dissolved As(III) concentration to 1 μM. The suspension was subsequently exposed to air for oxygenation. In the absence of citrate, the oxygenation decreased the partitioning of As in the solution because of the re-adsorption of aqueous As by the in situ generated Fe(III) oxyhydroxides. However, with the increase in citrate concentration from 0.1 to 1 mM, the As partitioned in the solution increased from 0.3 to 2.67 μM. In the presence of 1 mM citrate, the As(III) was almost completely oxidized to As(V) during the oxygenation. The mechanisms of citrate-enhanced release of As were mainly attributed to the ligand exchange of citrate with As for pyrite surface sites, the competitive adsorption of citrate with As on Fe(III) oxyhydroxides and pyrite, and the partitioning of As on the newly formed Fe(III) colloids. This finding presents an overlooked mechanism of the release of pyrite-associated As under oxic and circumneutral conditions.

  11. A model for nonvolatile fission product release during reactor accident conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Lewis, B.J.; Andre, B.; Ducros, G.; Maro, D.

    1996-10-01

    An analytical model has been developed to describe the release kinetics of nonvolatile fission products (e.g., molybdenum, cerium, ruthenium, and barium) from uranium dioxide fuel under severe reactor accident conditions. This treatment considers the rate-controlling process of release in accordance with diffusional transport in the fuel matrix and fission product vaporization from the fuel surface into the surrounding gas atmosphere. The effect of the oxygen potential in the gas atmosphere on the chemical form and volatility of the fission product is considered. A correlation is also developed to account for the trapping effects of antimony and tellurium in the Zircaloy cladding. This model interprets the release behavior of fission products observed in Commissariat a l`Energie Atomique experiments conducted in the HEVA/VERCORS facility at high temperature in a hydrogen and steam atmosphere.

  12. Evaluating conditional release in not guilty by reason of insanity acquittees: a prospective follow-up study in Virginia.

    PubMed

    Vitacco, Michael J; Vauter, Rebecca; Erickson, Steven K; Ragatz, Laurie

    2014-08-01

    Detailed research on treatment and risk management approaches with not guilty by reason of insanity acquittees (NGRI) during their conditional release is needed as states increasingly use community-based services for these individuals. Grounded in case law, and supported by follow-up studies demonstrating low recidivism rates, states have been encouraged in their efforts to conditionally release NGRI acquittees. The authors evaluated a state-wide sample of 127 NGRI acquittees released into the community after spending a mean of 61.63 months (SD = 76.54) in the hospital. One hundred individuals were committed to the hospital for lengthier treatment (M hospital time = 77.23 months, SD = 79.84), but 27 individuals were released to the community after a relatively short hospital stay (M hospital time = 5.60 months, SD = 3.01). Regarding release, 96 individuals (75.6%) maintained their conditional release. After evaluating a host of demographic and standardized risk data, the following variables predicted revocation on conditional release: previous failure on conditional release, nonadherence with hospital treatment, dangerousness to others, and previous violent charges. A multivariate survival analysis determined criminal behavior and previous failure on conditional release predicted time to revocation. The results of this study demonstrate the importance of considering standardized risk variables in the community-based management of forensic patients. In addition, the data are supportive of continued attempts at moving insanity acquittees from the hospital to the community via conditional release.

  13. Music and methamphetamine: conditioned cue-induced increases in locomotor activity and dopamine release in rats.

    PubMed

    Polston, J E; Rubbinaccio, H Y; Morra, J T; Sell, E M; Glick, S D

    2011-03-01

    Associations between drugs of abuse and cues facilitate the acquisition and maintenance of addictive behaviors. Although significant research has been done to elucidate the role that simple discriminative or discrete conditioned stimuli (e.g., a tone or a light) play in addiction, less is known about complex environmental cues. The purpose of the present study was to examine the role of a musical conditioned stimulus by assessing locomotor activity and in vivo microdialysis. Two groups of rats were given non-contingent injections of methamphetamine (1.0 mg/kg) or vehicle and placed in standard conditioning chambers. During these conditioning sessions both groups were exposed to a continuous conditioned stimulus, in the form of a musical selection ("Four" by Miles Davis) played repeatedly for 90 min. After seven consecutive conditioning days subjects were given one day of rest, and subsequently tested for locomotor activity or dopamine release in the absence of drugs while the musical conditioned stimulus was continually present. The brain regions examined included the basolateral amygdala, nucleus accumbens, and prefrontal cortex. The results show that music is an effective contextual conditioned stimulus, significantly increasing locomotor activity after repeated association with methamphetamine. Furthermore, this musical conditioned stimulus significantly increased extracellular dopamine levels in the basolateral amygdala and nucleus accumbens. These findings support other evidence showing the importance of these brain regions in conditioned learning paradigms, and demonstrate that music is an effective conditioned stimulus warranting further investigation.

  14. [Optimization of the indoor air conditioning in the places of excessive radon release].

    PubMed

    Malykhin, V M

    1994-01-01

    The experimental modelling covered ventilation and air purification as well as air pollution with radon and such derivatives as polonium-218b, lead-214 and bismuth-214. The modelling was designed for industrial conditions with higher radon release in technologic conversion at enterprises processing uranium. The investigators obtained some information to optimize air processing and to lower the workers exposure to radon and its derivatives.

  15. Air release measurements of V-oil 1404 downstream of a micro orifice at choked flow conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freudigmann, H.-A.; Iben, U.; Pelz, P. F.

    2015-12-01

    This study presents measurements on air release of V-oil 1404 in the back flow of a micro orifice at choked flow conditions using a shadowgraph imaging method. The released air was determined at three positions downstream of the orifice for different pressure conditions. It was found that more than 23% of the initially dissolved air is released and appears downstream of the orifice in the form of bubbles.

  16. 41 CFR 102-37.465 - May a SASP modify or release any of the terms and conditions of donation?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... release any of the terms and conditions of donation? 102-37.465 Section 102-37.465 Public Contracts and... REGULATION PERSONAL PROPERTY 37-DONATION OF SURPLUS PERSONAL PROPERTY Donations to Public Agencies, Service... SASP modify or release any of the terms and conditions of donation? You may alter or grant...

  17. Chromium Release from a COPR-Contaminated Soil at Varying Water Content and Redox Conditions.

    PubMed

    Matern, Katrin; Mansfeldt, Tim

    2016-07-01

    Many soils in the region of Kanpur, North India, are heavily affected by the leather industry and its upstream supplier sector, as indicated by elevated chromium (Cr) contents. Under reducing conditions-for instance, at water saturation after monsoon rain or flood irrigation-the dynamic and species distribution of Cr may be affected due to changes in redox potential (E). In this study, the influence of E on the speciation and release of Cr from a contaminated agricultural soil was investigated. A soil sample that was affected by hyperalkaline leachate from chromite ore processing residue, was taken and packed in soil columns, and subjected to a saturation-drainage-saturation cycle. After initial water saturation, the E dropped slowly to minimum values of around ‒100 mV (calculated to pH 7), while E was controlled by CrO/CrO(s), or CrO/(Fe,Cr)OOH redox couples. Soil drainage resulted in a quick return to oxidizing conditions; i.e., E > 300 mV. The Cr species distribution and release showed a clear trend with E. At the beginning of the experiment, under oxidizing and weakly reducing conditions (E range from >100 to 300 mV), Cr(VI) was released in particular. However, under moderately reducing conditions (E range from 100 to -100 mV), Cr was gradually immobilized and irreversible sequestered via reductive precipitation. The results presented in this study provide an improved understanding of the mobility of Cr(VI) in contaminated soils at varying water contents, which is essential for the evaluation of environmental risks in this region.

  18. IGF-1 Release Kinetics from Chitosan Microparticles Fabricated Using Environmentally Benign Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Mantripragada, Venkata P.; Jayasuriya, Ambalangodage C.

    2014-01-01

    The main objective of this study is to maximize growth factor encapsulation efficiency into microparticles. The novelty of this study is to maximize the encapsulated growth factors into microparticles by minimizing the use of organic solvents and using relatively low temperatures. The microparticles were fabricated using chitosan biopolymer as a base polymer and cross-linked with tripolyphosphate (TPP). Insulin like-growth factor-1 (IGF-1) was encapsulated into microparticles to study release kinetics and bioactivity. In order to authenticate the harms of using organic solvents like hexane and acetone during microparticle preparation, IGF-1 encapsulated microparticles prepared by the emulsification and coacervation methods were compared. The microparticles fabricated by emulsification method have shown a significant decrease (p<0.05) in IGF-1 encapsulation efficiency, and cumulative release during the two-week period. The biocompatibility of chitosan microparticles and the bioactivity of the released IGF-1 were determined in vitro by live/dead viability assay. The mineralization data observed with Von Kossa assay, was supported by mRNA expression levels of osterix and runx2, which are transcription factors necessary for osteoblasts differentiation. Real time RT-PCR data showed an increased expression of runx 2 and a decreased expression of osterix over time, indicating differentiating osteoblasts. Chitosan microparticles prepared in optimum environmental conditions are a promising controlled delivery system for cells to attach, proliferate, differentiate and mineralize, thereby acting as a suitable bone repairing material. PMID:25063148

  19. Decoupling of arsenic and iron release from ferrihydrite suspension under reducing conditions: a biogeochemical model

    PubMed Central

    Burnol, André; Garrido, Francis; Baranger, Philippe; Joulian, Catherine; Dictor, Marie-Christine; Bodénan, Françoise; Morin, Guillaume; Charlet, Laurent

    2007-01-01

    High levels of arsenic in groundwater and drinking water are a major health problem. Although the processes controlling the release of As are still not well known, the reductive dissolution of As-rich Fe oxyhydroxides has so far been a favorite hypothesis. Decoupling between arsenic and iron redox transformations has been experimentally demonstrated, but not quantitatively interpreted. Here, we report on incubation batch experiments run with As(V) sorbed on, or co-precipitated with, 2-line ferrihydrite. The biotic and abiotic processes of As release were investigated by using wet chemistry, X-ray diffraction, X-ray absorption and genomic techniques. The incubation experiments were carried out with a phosphate-rich growth medium and a community of Fe(III)-reducing bacteria under strict anoxic conditions for two months. During the first month, the release of Fe(II) in the aqueous phase amounted to only 3% to 10% of the total initial solid Fe concentration, whilst the total aqueous As remained almost constant after an initial exchange with phosphate ions. During the second month, the aqueous Fe(II) concentration remained constant, or even decreased, whereas the total quantity of As released to the solution accounted for 14% to 45% of the total initial solid As concentration. At the end of the incubation, the aqueous-phase arsenic was present predominately as As(III) whilst X-ray absorption spectroscopy indicated that more than 70% of the solid-phase arsenic was present as As(V). X-ray diffraction revealed vivianite Fe(II)3(PO4)2.8H2O in some of the experiments. A biogeochemical model was then developed to simulate these aqueous- and solid-phase results. The two main conclusions drawn from the model are that (1) As(V) is not reduced during the first incubation month with high Eh values, but rather re-adsorbed onto the ferrihydrite surface, and this state remains until arsenic reduction is energetically more favorable than iron reduction, and (2) the release of As

  20. Optimised process and formulation conditions for extended release dry polymer powder-coated pellets.

    PubMed

    Terebesi, Ildikó; Bodmeier, Roland

    2010-05-01

    The objective of this study was to improve the film formation and permeability characteristics of extended release ethylcellulose coatings prepared by dry polymer powder coating for the release of drugs of varying solubility. Ethylcellulose (7 and 10 cp viscosity grades) and Eudragit(R) RS were used for dry powder coating of pellets in a fluidised bed ball coater. Pre-plasticised ethylcellulose powder was prepared by spray-drying aqueous ethylcellulose dispersions (Surelease(R) and Aquacoat(R)) or by hot melt extrusion/cryogenic grinding of plasticised ethylcellulose. Chlorpheniramine maleate and theophylline were used as model drugs of different solubilities. The film formation process, polymeric films and coated pellets were characterised by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), dynamic mechanical analysis (DMA), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and dissolution testing. Film formation and extended drug release was achieved with ethylcellulose, a polymer with a high glass transition temperature (T(g)) without the use of water, which is usually required in dry powder coating. DMA-measurements revealed that plasticised ethylcellulose had a modulus of elasticity (E') similar to the low T(g) Eudragit(R) RS. With increasing plasticiser concentration, the T(g) of ethylcellulose was reduced and the mechanical properties improved, thus facilitating coalescence of the polymer particles. SEM-pictures revealed the formation of a dense, homogeneous film. The lower viscosity grade ethylcellulose (7 cp) resulted in better film formation than the higher viscosity grade (10 cp) and required less stringent curing conditions. Successful extended release ethylcellulose coatings were also obtained by coating with pre-plasticised spray-dried ethylcellulose powders as an alternative to the separate application of pure ethylcellulose powder and plasticiser. The permeability of the extended release coating could be controlled by using powder blends of ethylcellulose with the

  1. Measuring the release of organic contaminants from melting snow under controlled conditions.

    PubMed

    Meyer, Torsten; Lei, Ying Duan; Wania, Frank

    2006-05-15

    The release of organic contaminants from a melting snowpack may result in temporary concentration peaks in receiving water bodies and respective pulse exposure of aquatic organisms. It is thus of considerable interest to gain a mechanistic and quantitative understanding of the processes determining the dynamic behavior of organic chemicals during snowmelt. Uniformly structured and contaminated snow was produced with the help of a newly designed snow gun and exposed to predetermined temperature conditions in a temperature-controlled cold room. The dry density and liquid water content during four freeze-thaw cycles was recorded continuously at different layers within the snowpack using time domain reflectometry, providing information on meltwater production and propagation as well as snow metamorphism. Fractionated meltwater samples were filtered and the dissolved and particle phase analyzed for five polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) using gas chromatography/ mass spectrometry. The distribution of the PAHs between the dissolved and particulate fractions of the meltwater was strongly related to their hydrophobicity. Particle-bound PAHs were released late during the snowmelt, whereas PAHs in the dissolved phase were released uniformly during a two day melting period. Even though conductivity measurements indicated a preferential early elution of ions in the first meltwater fractions, no such "first flush" behavior was observed for soluble PAH. The developed laboratory-based approach opens up for the first time the possibility of reproducible experiments on organic contaminant behavior in snow. Future experiments will explore, in detail, how the properties of organic chemicals, the physical and chemical properties of the snowpack, and the temperature variations before and during the time of melting interact to determine the timing of chemical release from a snowpack.

  2. Transit losses and traveltimes for water-supply releases Marion Lake during drought conditions, Cottonwood River, east-central Kansas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jordan, P.R.; Hart, R.J.

    1985-01-01

    A streamflow routing model was used to calculate the transit losses and traveltimes. Channel and aquifer characteristics, and the model control parameters, were estimated from available data and then verified to the extent possible by comparing model simulated streamflow to observed streamflow at streamflow gaging stations. Transit losses and traveltimes for varying reservoir release rates and durations then were simulated for two different antecedent streamflow (drought) conditions. For the severe-drought antecedent-streamflow condition, it was assumed that only the downstream water use requirement would be released from the reservoir. For a less severe drought (LSD) antecedent streamflow condition, it was assumed than any releases from Marion Lake for water supply use downstream, would be in addition to a nominal dry weather release of 5 cu ft/sec. Water supply release rates of 10 and 25 cu ft/sec for the severe drought condition and 5, 10, and 25 cu ft/sec for the less severe drought condition were simulated for periods of 28 and 183 days commencing on July 1. Transit losses for the severe drought condition for all reservoir release rates and durations ranged from 12% to 78% of the maximum downstream flow rate and from 27% to 91% of the total volume of reservoir storage released. For the LSD condition, transit losses ranged from 7% to 29% of the maximum downstream flow rate and from 10% to 48% of the total volume of release. The 183-day releases had larger total transit losses, but losses on a percentage basis were less than the losses for the 28-day release period for both antecedent streamflow conditions. Traveltimes to full response (80% of the maximum downstream flow rate), however, showed considerable variation. For the release of 5 cu ft/sec during LSD conditions, base flow exceeded 80% of the maximum flow rate near the confluence; the traveltime to full response was undefined for those simulations. For the releases of 10 and 25 cu ft/sec during the same

  3. Conditional Release of Forensic Psychiatric Patients Consistent with or Contrary to Behavioral Experts' Recommendations in the Netherlands: Prevalence Rates, Patient Characteristics and Recidivism After Discharge from Conditional Release.

    PubMed

    Nagtegaal, Maria H; Boonmann, Cyril

    2016-03-01

    The present study examined a group of 447 Dutch forensic psychiatric patients on conditional release (CR). After a brief overview of the Dutch CR system for forensic psychiatric patients is presented, two sets of factors were studied: factors associated with behavioral experts' recommendations on CR readiness (prevalence rates of recommendations in contrast to or consistent with the judge's decision on CR, written vs. oral recommendations and consensus among parties); and characteristics of forensic psychiatric patients on CR imposed consistent with or contrary to behavioral experts' recommendations (i.e., demographic variables, psychopathology, judicial background and outcomes of violent behavior). Patients on CR consistent with or contrary to the behavioral experts' recommendations did not differ in demographic background variables and psychopathology. Patients on CR contrary to the behavioral experts' recommendations, however, had more prior convictions, and their index offense more often included a sex offense and a property offense (with or without violence) as compared to patients on CR consistent with the behavioral experts' recommendations. In addition, decisions contrary to the behavioral experts' recommendations were more often reached after a 3-month continuation adjournment and after an appeal. Also, patients on CR contrary to the behavioral experts' recommendations were less often found to have been on trial leave before their CR. Finally, recidivism rates were found to be much higher for those on CR contrary to, as compared with those on CR consistent with the behavioral experts' recommendations. However, when corrected for other well-known static predictors of recidivism, this significant difference was no longer prevalent. The implications for evaluators' CR readiness reports and lessons that may be learned from the Dutch forensic psychiatric CR system are discussed. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  4. [Ammonia volatilization of slow release compound fertilizer in different soils water conditions].

    PubMed

    Hu, Xiao-feng; Wang, Zheng-yin; You, Yuan; Li, Jing-chao

    2010-08-01

    By using venting method incubation experiment, we studied the ammonia volatilization and kinetics characteristics of uncoated slowed release compound fertilizer (SRF) under different soil water conditions and the growth and nitrogen utilization efficiency of rice in pot experiment. Results indicated that the ammonia volatilization of SRF under waterflooding reached the peak ahead of 3-4 days compared to the moist treatment. The peak and accumulation of ammonia volatilization in the waterflooding treatments were higher than those under the moist condition. SRF could significantly reduce total ammonia volatilization compared to the common compound fertilizer (CCF), reduced by 50.6% and 22.8% in the moist treatment and reduced by 24.2% and 10.4% in the waterflooding treatment,but the loss of ammonia volatilization of SRF was higher significantly than that of the coated fertilizer (CRF). Ammonia volatilization increased with the increasing of fertilizer application. The dynamics of ammonia volatilization of SRF could be quantitatively described with three equations: the first order kinetics equation, Elovich equation and parabola equation. Compared to moist condition, the biomass of rice plant in SRF, CCF and SRF treatments increased by 67.86%, 78.25% and 48.75%, and nitrogen utilization efficiency increased by 57.73%, 80.70% and 12.06% under waterflooding condition, respectively. Comparing with CCF, nitrogen utilization efficiency in SRF treatment improved by 59.10% and 10.40% under two soil moisture conditions. SRF could reduce ammonia volatilization and improve biomass and nitrogen utilization efficiency.

  5. Survival, recovery and microcystin release of Microcystis aeruginosa in cold or dark condition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, Yi; Gan, Nanqin; Liu, Jin; Zheng, Lingling; Li, Lin; Song, Lirong

    2017-03-01

    Microcystis often dominates phytoplankton in eutrophic lakes and must survive a long period of cold or dark conditions. However, the survival strategies of Microcystis to withstand cold or dark stress are less well known. In this study, we conducted experiments on the responses of two toxic Microcystis aeruginosa strains (FACHB-905 and FACHB-915) and their microcystin release in conditions of low temperature (15°C or 4°C, with illumination) or darkness, and subsequent recovery in standard conditions (25°C with illumination). On exposure to 15°C, a small decrease in cell viability was observed, but the cell number increased gradually, suggesting that M. aeruginosa FACHB-905 and FACHB-915 cells seem in general tolerant in 15°C. Interestingly, our results show that a higher carotenoid content and microcystin release potentially enhance the fitness of surviving cells at 15°C. M. aeruginosa cells exposed to lower temperature light stress (4°C) did not completely lose viability and retained the ability to reinitiate growth. In darkness, the maximum quantum yield ( F v/ F m) and the maximum electron transport rate (ETRmax) values and cell viability of M. aeruginosa cells gradually decreased with time. During the recovery period, the photosynthetic efficiency of M. aeruginosa reverted to the normal level. Additionally, M. aeruginosa FACHB-905 and FACHB-915 exposed to low temperature had increased caspase-3-like activity and DNA fragmentation, which suggests the occurrence of a type of cell death in M. aeruginosa cells under cold stress similar to programmed cell death. Overall, our findings could confer certain advantages on the Microcystis for surviving cold or dark conditions encountered in the annual cycle, and help explain its repeated occurrence in water blooms in large and shallow lakes.

  6. Survival, recovery and microcystin release of Microcystis aeruginosa in cold or dark condition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, Yi; Gan, Nanqin; Liu, Jin; Zheng, Lingling; Li, Lin; Song, Lirong

    2016-05-01

    Microcystis often dominates phytoplankton in eutrophic lakes and must survive a long period of cold or dark conditions. However, the survival strategies of Microcystis to withstand cold or dark stress are less well known. In this study, we conducted experiments on the responses of two toxic Microcystis aeruginosa strains (FACHB-905 and FACHB-915) and their microcystin release in conditions of low temperature (15°C or 4°C, with illumination) or darkness, and subsequent recovery in standard conditions (25°C with illumination). On exposure to 15°C, a small decrease in cell viability was observed, but the cell number increased gradually, suggesting that M. aeruginosa FACHB-905 and FACHB-915 cells seem in general tolerant in 15°C. Interestingly, our results show that a higher carotenoid content and microcystin release potentially enhance the fi tness of surviving cells at 15°C. M. aeruginosa cells exposed to lower temperature light stress (4°C) did not completely lose viability and retained the ability to reinitiate growth. In darkness, the maximum quantum yield (F v/F m) and the maximum electron transport rate (ETRmax) values and cell viability of M. aeruginosa cells gradually decreased with time. During the recovery period, the photosynthetic effi ciency of M. aeruginosa reverted to the normal level. Additionally, M. aeruginosa FACHB-905 and FACHB-915 exposed to low temperature had increased caspase-3-like activity and DNA fragmentation, which suggests the occurrence of a type of cell death in M. aeruginosa cells under cold stress similar to programmed cell death. Overall, our fi ndings could confer certain advantages on the Microcystis for surviving cold or dark conditions encountered in the annual cycle, and help explain its repeated occurrence in water blooms in large and shallow lakes.

  7. Carbon dioxide and ethanol release from champagne glasses, under standard tasting conditions.

    PubMed

    Liger-Belair, Gérard; Beaumont, Fabien; Bourget, Marielle; Pron, Hervé; Parvitte, Bertrand; Zéninari, Virginie; Polidori, Guillaume; Cilindre, Clara

    2012-01-01

    A simple glass of champagne or sparkling wine may seem like the acme of frivolity to most people, but in fact, it may rather be considered as a fantastic playground for any fluid physicist or physicochemist. In this chapter, results obtained concerning various steps where the CO₂ molecule plays a role (from its ingestion in the liquid phase during the fermentation process to its progressive release in the headspace above the tasting glass) are gathered and synthesized to propose a self-consistent and global overview of how gaseous and dissolved CO₂ impact champagne and sparkling wine science. Some recent investigations, conducted through laser tomography techniques, on ascending bubbles and ascending-bubble-driven flow patterns found in champagne glasses are reported, which illustrate the fine interplay between ascending bubbles and the fluid around under standard tasting conditions. The simultaneous monitoring of gaseous CO₂ and ethanol in the headspace of both a flute and a coupe filled with champagne was reported, depending on whether or not the glass shows effervescence. Both gaseous CO₂ and ethanol were found to be enhanced by the presence of ascending bubbles, thus confirming the close link between ascending bubbles, ascending-bubble-driven flow patterns, and the release of gaseous CO₂ and volatile organic compounds.

  8. Mobilization and Release of colloidal Carbon from a Soil Column Under Redox Oscillation Condition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Afsar, M. Z.; Jin, Y.

    2015-12-01

    Dissolved organic matter (DOM), the most mobile form of carbon (C), strongly influences the cycling, distribution and behavior of C in soil. In wetlands, the reductive dissolution of iron and manganese oxy-hydroxides releases large quantities of DOM into the soil solution. The objective of this study is to quantify the changes in aqueous organic carbon concentration in different sized fractions induced by reduction of iron and increase in pH. Twenty four cm long soil columns were prepared. Columns were run under oxic (as control) and anoxic conditions. Two platinum redox probes were inserted at 10 and 17 cm depths from the soil surface to monitor the redox status of the column. Anoxic and oxic conditions were maintained by flushing with either nitrogen or oxygen gas through the soil. No additional organic sources were added. After 35 days of anoxic environment, column leachate samples were separated by differential centrifugation into five colloidal sized fractions (<450 nm, <220 nm, <100 nm, <50 nm and <2.3 nm). Immediately after the 1st reduction half cycle, the leachate samples were collected inside the glove box and the soil columns were flushed with oxygen to prepare for 2nd reduction half cycle. After 1st reduction half cycle, the pH, ionic strength and aqueous (Fe2+) concentration of the column extracts were increased whereas the Eh value was decreased. The range of pH, Eh, ionic strength and concentration of Fe2+ was 6.38 to 6.91, -219 to -275 mV, 13.74 to 18.84 mM and 1.8 to 3.41 mg L-1, respectively. Following the anoxic incubation, the total desorbed C was increased up to 139 mg L-1. The distribution of C across the five particle size fractions was 3.68-11.73% (> 450 nm), 0.59-5.12% (450-220 nm), 0.45-4.91% (220-100 nm), 0.18-2.91% (100-50 nm), 15.48-35.23% (50 nm - 2.3 nm) and 49.15-63.94% (<2.3 nm). The preliminary results confirmed the release of more nanoparticulate (50-2.3 nm) and truly dissolved (<2.3 nm) organic matter from the anoxic soil column

  9. Radionuclide release from spent fuel under geologic disposal conditions: An overview of experimental and theoretical work through 1985

    SciTech Connect

    Reimus, P.W.; Simonson, S.A.

    1988-04-01

    This report presents an overview of experimental and theoretical work on radionuclide release from spent fuel and uranium dioxide (UO/sub 2/) under geologic disposal conditions. The purpose of the report is to provide a source book of information that can be used to develop models that describe radionuclide release from spent fuel waste packages. Modeling activities of this nature will be conducted within the Waste Package Program (WPP) of the Department of Energy's Salt Repository Project (SRP). The topics discussed include experimental methods for investigating radionuclide release, how results have been reported from radionuclide release experiments, theoretical studies of UO/sub 2/ and actinide solubility, results of experimental studies of radionuclide release from spent fuel and UO/sub 2/ (i.e., the effects of different variables on radionuclide release), characteristics of spent fuel pertinent to radionuclide release, and status of modeling of radionuclide release from spent fuel. Appendix A presents tables of data from spent fuel radionuclide release experiments. These data have been digitized from graphs that appear in the literature. An annotated bibliography of literature on spent fuel characterization is provided in Appendix B.

  10. Acetylcholine release in the hippocampus during the operant conditioned reflex and the footshock stimulus in rats.

    PubMed

    Dong, Yu; Mao, Jianjun; Shangguan, Dihua; Zhao, Rui; Liu, Guoquan

    2004-10-14

    The activity of the septo-hippocampal cholinergic pathway was investigated by measuring changes in the extracellular acetylcholine (ACh) levels in the hippocampus, by means of microdialysis, during the operant conditioned reflex and the repeated footshock stimulus. Microdialysis samplings were conducted in a Skinner box where lights were delivered as conditioned stimuli (CS) paired with footshocks as unconditioned stimuli (US). Two groups of rats were used. Extracellular ACh and choline (Ch) in samples collected at 6min intervals were assessed by high-performance liquid chromatography with electrochemical detection. The elevation of hippocampus ACh was observed in the two experimental groups. The increase in ACh during aversive stimulus (footshock) was significantly larger and was probably related to the number of footshocks. There might be moderate increase in the hippocampal ACh release during the retrieval of information. The concentration of choline showed no significant fluctuation in the two groups during the whole process. This experiment explored in more detail hippocampal cholinergic activity in relation to the two different procedures.

  11. Conditionally cleavable radioimmunoconjugates: a novel approach for the release of radioisotopes from radioimmunoconjugates.

    PubMed

    Beeson, Craig; Butrynski, James E; Hart, Michael J; Nourigat, Cynthia; Matthews, Dana C; Press, Oliver W; Senter, Peter D; Bernstein, Irwin D

    2003-01-01

    One of the limitations of therapy with radiolabeled monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) is that significant toxicities can arise from circulating non-tumor-bound radiolabeled conjugate. Here, we describe a new method to reduce systemic radiation exposure from radiolabeled mAbs involving the attachment of the radioisotope through a linker that can be cleaved by an administered enzyme. To demonstrate the feasibility of this approach, we prepared a conditionally cleavable radioimmunoconjugate (RIC) composed of (131)I-labeled cephalosporin conjugated to Tositumomab, a mAb against the CD20 antigen. The cleavable RIC bound antigen identically to directly iodinated antibody, and in the presence of beta-lactamase, about 80-85% of the radioisotope was released. In vivo studies in mice revealed that the cleavable RIC and the directly iodinated anti-CD20 antibody had similar biodistribution patterns. Systemically administered beta-lactamase induced a 2-3-fold decrease in the percent injected dose (ID) of the cleavable RIC/g of blood, marrow, spleen, lung, and liver 1 h after enzyme treatment, and a 4-6-fold decrease 20 h after enzyme treatment. This was accompanied by a 20-fold increase in % ID/g in urine 1 h after enzyme treatment, indicating that the released radiolabel was rapidly excreted through the kidneys. In mice with human tumor xenografts, there was no decrease in the %ID/g in tumor 1 h after enzyme treatment, but by 4 h after enzyme injection, decreases in tumor radioactive content began to diminish the targeting advantage. These studies demonstrate that the cleavable RIC substrate is able to bind to tumor antigens and localize within human tumor xenografts and that accelerated systemic clearance can be induced with beta-lactamase.

  12. Exposure to altered gravity conditions results in hypoxia-related enhancement of the presynaptic transporter-mediated release of glutamate.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borisova, Tatiana

    High-affinity Na+-dependent glutamate transporters locate in the plasma membrane and maintain the low concentration of glutamate in synaptic cleft by the uptake of glutamate into neurons. Under hypoxic conditions glutamate transporters contribute to the glutamate release due to functioning in reverse mode. The release of glutamate via reverse-operated Na+-dependent glutamate transporters was investigated in brain synaptosomes under conditions of centrifugeinduced hypergravity. Flow cytometric analisis revealed similarity in the size and cytoplasmic granularity of control and hypergravity synaptosomes. Protonophore FCCP dissipates the proton gradient across synaptic vesicle thus synaptic vesicles are not able to keep glutamate inside. 1 microM FCCP induced the release of 4. 8 ±1. 0 % and 8. 0 ±1. 0 % of total accumulated synaptosomal label in control and G-loaded animals, respectively. Ca 2+-independent high- KCl stimulated L-[14C]glutamate release from synaptosomes preliminary treated with FCCP increased considerably from 27. 0 ± 2. 2 % to 35. 0 ± 2. 3 % after centrifuge-induced hypergravity. No-transportable inhibitor of glutamate transporter DL-threo-beta-benzyloxyaspartate was found to inhibit high-KCl and FCCP-stimulated release of L-[14C]glutamate, thus the release was concluded to occur due to reversal of glutamate transporters. We have also found the inhibition of the activity of Na \\ K ATPase in the plasma membrane of synaptosomes after hypergravity that might also contribute to the enhancement of the transporter-mediated release of glutamate. These hypergravity-induced alterations in the transporter-mediated release of glutamate were suggested to correlate with the hypoxic injury of neurons. The changes we have revealed for the transporter-mediated release of glutamate may lead to mental disorders, upcoming seizures and neurotoxicity under hypergravity conditions.

  13. What Factors Are Related to Success on Conditional Release/Discharge? Findings from the New Orleans Forensic Aftercare Clinic: 2002–2013

    PubMed Central

    Manguno-Mire, Gina M.; Coffman, Kelly L.; DeLand, Sarah M.; Thompson, John W.; Myers, Leann

    2015-01-01

    The present study investigated the empirically based factors that predicted success on conditional release among a sample of individuals conditionally discharged in Louisiana. Not guilty by reason of insanity acquittees and individuals on conditional release/discharge for incompetency to stand trial were included in the study. Success on conditional release was defined as maintenance of conditional release during the study period. Recidivism (arrest on new charges) and incidents were empirically evaluated. Success on conditional release was maintained in over 70% of individuals. Recidivism was low, with only five arrests on new charges. Success on conditional release was predicted by financial resources, not having a personality disorder, and having fewer total incidents in the program. After controlling for the influence of other variables, having an incident on conditional release was predicted by a substance use diagnosis and being released from jail. Individuals conditionally released from jail showed fewer number of days to first incident (67 vs. 575 days) compared with individuals discharged from the hospital. These data provide support for the successful management of forensic patients in the community via conditional release, although they highlight specific factors that should be considered when developing community-based release programming. Conditional release programs should consider empirical factors in the development of risk assessment and risk management approaches to improve successful maintenance of community-based forensic treatment alternatives. PMID:25328070

  14. What factors are related to success on conditional release/discharge? Findings from the New Orleans forensic aftercare clinic: 2002-2013.

    PubMed

    Manguno-Mire, Gina M; Coffman, Kelly L; DeLand, Sarah M; Thompson, John W; Myers, Leann

    2014-09-01

    The present study investigated the empirically based factors that predicted success on conditional release among a sample of individuals conditionally discharged in Louisiana. Not guilty by reason of insanity acquittees and individuals on conditional release/discharge for incompetency to stand trial were included in the study. Success on conditional release was defined as maintenance of conditional release during the study period. Recidivism (arrest on new charges) and incidents were empirically evaluated. Success on conditional release was maintained in over 70% of individuals. Recidivism was low, with only five arrests on new charges. Success on conditional release was predicted by financial resources, not having a personality disorder, and having fewer total incidents in the program. After controlling for the influence of other variables, having an incident on conditional release was predicted by a substance use diagnosis and being released from jail. Individuals conditionally released from jail showed fewer number of days to first incident (67 vs. 575 days) compared with individuals discharged from the hospital. These data provide support for the successful management of forensic patients in the community via conditional release, although they highlight specific factors that should be considered when developing community-based release programming. Conditional release programs should consider empirical factors in the development of risk assessment and risk management approaches to improve successful maintenance of community-based forensic treatment alternatives.

  15. Presynaptic transporter-mediated release of glutamate evoked by the protonophore FCCP increases under altered gravity conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borisova, T. A.; Krisanova, N. V.

    2008-12-01

    High-affinity Na +-dependent glutamate transporters of the plasma membrane mediate the glutamate uptake into neurons, and thus maintain low levels of extracellular glutamate in the synaptic cleft. The study focused on the release of glutamate by reversal of Na +-dependent glutamate transporters from rat brain nerve terminals (synaptosomes) under conditions of centrifuge-induced hypergravity. Flow cytometric analysis revealed similarity in the size and cytoplasmic granularity between synaptosomal preparations obtained from control and G-loaded animals (10 G, 1 h). The release of cytosolic L-[ 14C]glutamate from synaptosomes was evaluated using the protonophore FCCP, which dissipated synaptic vesicle proton gradient, thus synaptic vesicles were not able to keep glutamate inside and the latter enriched cytosol. FCCP per se induced the greater release of L-[ 14C]glutamate in hypergravity as compared to control (4.8 ± 1.0% and 8.0 ± 1.0% of total label). Exocytotic release of L-[ 14C]glutamate evoked by depolarization was reduced down to zero after FCCP application under both conditions studied. Depolarization stimulated release of cytosolic L-[ 14C]glutamate from synaptosomes preliminary treated with FCCP was considerably increased from 27.0 ± 2.2% of total label in control to 35.0 ± 2.3% in hypergravity. Non-transportable inhibitor of glutamate transporter DL-threo-β-benzyloxyaspartate was found to significantly inhibit high-KCl and FCCP-stimulated release of L-[ 14C]glutamate, confirming the release by reversal of glutamate transporters. The enhancement of transporter-mediated release of glutamate in hypergravity was found to result at least partially from the inhibition of the activity of Na/K-ATPase in the plasma membrane of synaptosomes. We suggested that hypergravity-induced alteration in transporter-mediated release of glutamate indicated hypoxic injury of neurons.

  16. Pest persistence and eradication conditions in a deterministic model for sterile insect release.

    PubMed

    Gordillo, Luis F

    2015-01-01

    The release of sterile insects is an environment friendly pest control method used in integrated pest management programmes. Difference or differential equations based on Knipling's model often provide satisfactory qualitative descriptions of pest populations subject to sterile release at relatively high densities with large mating encounter rates, but fail otherwise. In this paper, I derive and explore numerically deterministic population models that include sterile release together with scarce mating encounters in the particular case of species with long lifespan and multiple matings. The differential equations account separately the effects of mating failure due to sterile male release and the frequency of mating encounters. When insects spatial spread is incorporated through diffusion terms, computations reveal the possibility of steady pest persistence in finite size patches. In the presence of density dependence regulation, it is observed that sterile release might contribute to induce sudden suppression of the pest population.

  17. Study of dissolution hydrodynamic conditions versus drug release from hypromellose matrices: the influence of agitation sequence.

    PubMed

    Asare-Addo, Kofi; Levina, Marina; Rajabi-Siahboomi, Ali R; Nokhodchi, Ali

    2010-12-01

    In this article, the influence of agitation in descending and ascending sequences as a systematic method development process for potentially discriminating fed and fasted states and evaluation of its effects on the drug release from swelling gel-forming hydrophilic matrix tablets were investigated. Theophylline extended release (ER) matrices containing hypromellose (hydroxypropyl methylcellulose (HPMC)) were evaluated in media with a pH range of 1.2-7.5, using an automated USP type III, Bio-Dis dissolution apparatus at 5, 10, 15, 20, 25 and 30 dips per minute (dpm). Agitation had a profound effect on the drug release from the HPMC K100LV matrices. Drug release in pH 1.2 changed from about 40% at 5 dpm to about 80% at 30 dpm over a 60 min period alone. The matrices containing HPMC K4M, K15M and K100M however were not significantly affected by the agitation rate. The similarity factor f2 was calculated using drug release at 10 dpm as a reference. The ascending agitations of 5-30 dpm and the descending order of agitation 30-5 dpm were also evaluated. Anomalous transport was the only kinetic of release for the K4M, K15M and K100M tablet matrices. The lower viscous polymer of K100LV had some matrices exhibiting Fickian diffusion as its kinetics of release. The use of systematic change of agitation method may indicate potential fed and fasted effects on drug release from hydrophilic matrices.

  18. Effect of boundary conditions on the kinetics of helium release from structural materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaluzhnyi, A. G.

    2015-11-01

    Gaseous products of nuclear reactions (specifically, helium) play a significant part in altering the material properties upon irradiation. It is known that atoms of inert gases promote the generation and growth of pores in irradiated materials and affect phenomena such as swelling, high-temperature irradiation embrittlement, etc. Therefore, a study of the behavior of helium (its production, accumulation, retention, and release) within structural materials is fairly topical. In order to validate the methods of express imitation of accumulation and retention of helium within structural materials under reactor irradiation, we perform a comparative analysis of the spectra of the rate of gas release from samples of austenitic steel 0Kh16N15M3B that were saturated with helium in different ways, i.e., through irradiation in a cyclotron, a magnetic massseparation setup, the IRT-2000 reactor, the BOR-60 reactor, and using the so-called tritium trick technique. The effect of the presence of dislocations and grain boundaries on the release of helium from materials is evaluated. The results of the research conducted show that the kinetics of helium release from samples saturated with helium through the bombardment with alpha particles of different energies, which ensures the simultaneous introduction of helium and radiation defects (in wide ranges of helium concentration and radiation damage) into the material lattice, is similar to the kinetics of helium release from samples irradiated in reactors.

  19. Fuel nitrogen release during black liquor pyrolysis; Part 1: Laboratory measurements at different conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Aho, K.; Vakkilainen, E. ); Hupa, M. . Chemical Engineering Dept.)

    1994-05-01

    Fuel nitrogen release during black liquor pyrolysis is high. There is only minor release during the drying stage. Ammonia is the main fixed nitrogen species formed. The rate of fixed nitrogen release increases with increasing temperature. The level of fixed nitrogen released by birch liquor is almost twice the level for pine liquor. Assuming complete conversion to NO, fixed nitrogen yields gave NO concentrations near typically measured values for flue gases in full scale recovery boilers. The purpose of this work was to gain more detailed information about the behavior of the fuel nitrogen in black liquor combustion. The work focused on the pyrolysis or devolatilization of the combustion process. Devolatilization is the stage at which the majority (typically 50--80%) of the liquor organics release from a fuel particle or droplet as gaseous species due to the rapid destruction of the organic macromolecules in the liquor. In this paper, the authors use the terms devolatilization and pyrolysis interchangeably with no difference in their meaning.

  20. Release of colloids from primary minimum contact under unfavorable conditions by perturbations in ionic strength and flow rate.

    PubMed

    Pazmino, Eddy; Trauscht, Jacob; Johnson, William P

    2014-08-19

    Colloid release from surfaces in response to ionic strength and flow perturbations has been mechanistically simulated. However, these models do not address the mechanism by which colloid attachment occurs, at least in the presence of bulk colloid-collector repulsion (unfavorable conditions), which is a prevalent environmental condition. We test whether a mechanistic model that predicts colloid attachment under unfavorable conditions also predicts colloid release in response to reduced ionic strength (IS) and increased fluid velocity (conditions thought prevalent for mobilization of environmental colloids). The model trades in mean-field colloid-collector interaction for discrete representation of surface heterogeneity, which accounts for a combination of attractive and repulsive interactions simultaneously, and results in an attached colloid population (in primary minimum contact with the surface) having a distribution of strengths of attraction. The model moderates equilibrium separation distance by inclusion of steric interactions. By using the same model parameters to quantitatively predict attachment under unfavorable conditions, simulated release of colloids (for all three sizes) from primary minimum attachment in response to perturbations qualitatively matched experimental results, demonstrating that both attachment and detachment were mechanistically simulated.

  1. Tension neuropathy of the superficial peroneal nerve: associated conditions and results of release.

    PubMed

    Johnston, E C; Howell, S J

    1999-09-01

    We reviewed eight patients who sustained superficial peroneal nerve neuralgia after an inversion ankle sprain. Surgical exploration found anatomic abnormalities that tethered the nerve from movement during plantarflexion and inversion of the ankle. Most patients' pain improved dramatically after release and anterior transposition of the nerve. Seven joints also underwent arthroscopy, which showed intra-articular disease that was consistent with the original trauma. Five patients had reflex sympathetic dystrophy, three of which resolved after nerve release. Nerve conduction studies were not helpful. Careful physical examination and local nerve blocks were most important in making the diagnosis and prescribing treatment. All conservative measures should be exhausted before surgery is considered.

  2. Investigation of the Dissolution Profile of Gliclazide Modified-Release Tablets Using Different Apparatuses and Dissolution Conditions.

    PubMed

    Skripnik, K K S; Riekes, M K; Pezzini, B R; Cardoso, S G; Stulzer, H K

    2016-10-31

    In the absence of an official dissolution method for modified-release tablets of gliclazide, dissolution parameters, such as apparatuses (1, 2, and 3), rotation speeds, pH, and composition of the dissolution medium were investigated. The results show that although the drug presents a pH-mediated solubility (pH 7.0 > 6.8 > 6.4 > 6.0 > 5.5 > 4.5), the in vitro release of the studied tablets was not dependent on this parameter, despite of the apparatus tested. On the other hand, the rotation speed demonstrated a greater influence (100 rpm >50 rpm). Using similar hydrodynamic conditions, the three different apparatuses were compared in pH 6.8 and provided the following trend: apparatus 1 at 100 rpm >2 at 50 rpm ≈3 at 10 dpm. As a complete, but slow release is expected from modified-release formulations, apparatus 2, in phosphate buffer pH 6.8 and 100 rpm, were selected as the optimized dissolution method. In comparison to apparatus 1 under the same conditions, the paddle avoids the stickiness of formulation excipients at the mesh of the basket, which could prejudice the release of gliclazide. Results obtained with biorelevant medium through the developed dissolution method were similar to the buffer solution pH 6.8. The application of the optimized method as a quality control test between two different brands of gliclazide modified-release tablets showed that both dissolution profiles were considered similar by the similarity factor (f2 = 51.8). The investigation of these dissolution profiles indicated a dissolution kinetic following first-order model.

  3. 78 FR 40545 - Notice of Intent to Release Certain Properties from All Terms, Conditions, Reservations and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-05

    ..., Reservations and Restrictions of a Quitclaim Deed Agreement Between the City of Orlando and the Federal Aviation Administration for the Orlando International Airport, Orlando, FL AGENCY: Federal Aviation... to release certain airport properties 0.422 acres at the Orlando International Airport, Orlando,...

  4. PRELIMINARY RESULTS: RELEASE OF METALS FROM ACID-MINE DRAINAGE CONTAMINATED STREAMBED SEDIMENTS UNDER ANOXIC CONDITIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Many miles of streams are contaminated with acid-mine drainage (AMD) from abandoned metal mines in the western U.S. Treatment of these streams may include dredging of the existing sediments, with subsequent burial. Burial of previously toxic sediments may result in release of met...

  5. Effect Of Imposed Anaerobic Conditions On Metals Release From Acid-Mine Drainage Contaminated Streambed Sediments

    EPA Science Inventory

    Remediation of streams influenced by mine-drainage may require removal and burial of metal-containing bed sediments. Burial of aerobic sediments into an anaerobic environment may release metals, such as through reductive dissolution of metal oxyhydroxides. Mining-impacted aerob...

  6. Effect of food characteristics, storage conditions, and electron beam irradiation on active agent release from polyamide-coated LDPE films.

    PubMed

    Han, J; Castell-Perez, M E; Moreira, R G

    2008-03-01

    We investigated the effect of electron beam irradiation, storage conditions, and model food pH on the release characteristics of trans-cinnamaldehyde incorporated into polyamide-coated low-density polyethylene (LDPE) films. Active agent release rate on irradiated films (up to 20.0 kGy) decreased by 69% compared with the nonirradiated controls, from 0.252 to 0.086 microg/mL/h. Storage temperature (4, 21, and 35 degrees C) and pH (4, 7, and 10) of the food simulant solutions (10% aqueous ethanol) affected the release rate of trans-cinnamaldehyde. As expected, antimicrobial release rate decreased to 0.013 microg/mL/h at the refrigerated temperature (4 degrees C) compared to the higher temperatures (0.029 and 0.035 microg/mL/h at 21 and 35 degrees C). The fastest release rate occurred when exposed to the acidic food simulant solution (pH 4). In aqueous solution, trans-cinnamaldehyde was highly unstable to ionizing radiation, with loss in concentration from 24.50 to 1.36 microg/mL after exposure to 2.0 kGy. Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) analysis revealed that exposure to ionizing radiation up to 10.0 kGy did not affect the structural conformation of LDPE/polyamide films and the trans-cinnamaldehyde in the films, though it induced changes in the functional group of trans-cinnamaldehyde when dose increased up to 20.0 kGy. Studies with a radiation-stable compound (naphthalene) showed that ionizing radiation induced the crosslinking in polymer networks of LDPE/polyamide film and caused slow and gradual release of the compound. This study demonstrated that irradiation serves as a controlling factor for release of active compounds, with potential applications in the development of antimicrobial packaging systems.

  7. Sublethal effects of catch-and-release fishing: measuring capture stress, fish impairment, and predation risk using a condition index

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Campbell, Matthew D.; Patino, Reynaldo; Tolan, J.M.; Strauss, R.E.; Diamond, S.

    2009-01-01

    The sublethal effects of simulated capture of red snapper (Lutjanus campechanus) were analysed using physiological responses, condition indexing, and performance variables. Simulated catch-and-release fishing included combinations of depth of capture and thermocline exposure reflective of environmental conditions experienced in the Gulf of Mexico. Frequency of occurrence of barotrauma and lack of reflex response exhibited considerable individual variation. When combined into a single condition or impairment index, individual variation was reduced, and impairment showed significant increases as depth increased and with the addition of thermocline exposure. Performance variables, such as burst swimming speed (BSS) and simulated predator approach distance (AD), were also significantly different by depth. BSSs and predator ADs decreased with increasing depth, were lowest immediately after release, and were affected for up to 15 min, with longer recovery times required as depth increased. The impairment score developed was positively correlated with cortisol concentration and negatively correlated with both BSS and simulated predator AD. The impairment index proved to be an efficient method to estimate the overall impairment of red snapper in the laboratory simulations of capture and shows promise for use in field conditions, to estimate release mortality and vulnerability to predation.

  8. Investigation of the Fission Product Release From Molten Pools Under Oxidizing Conditions With the Code RELOS

    SciTech Connect

    Kleinhietpass, Ingo D.; Unger, Hermann; Wagner, Hermann-Josef; Koch, Marco K.

    2006-07-01

    With the purpose of modeling and calculating the core behavior during severe accidents in nuclear power plants system codes are under development worldwide. Modeling of radionuclide release and transport in the case of beyond design basis accidents is an integrated feature of the deterministic safety analysis of nuclear power plants. Following a hypothetical, uncontrolled temperature escalation in the core of light water reactors, significant parts of the core structures may degrade and melt down under formation of molten pools, leading to an accumulation of large amounts of radioactive materials. The possible release of radionuclides from the molten pool provides a potential contribution to the aerosol source term in the late phase of core degradation accidents. The relevance of the amount of transferred oxygen from the gas atmosphere into the molten pool on the specification of a radionuclide and its release depends strongly on the initial oxygen inventory. Particularly for a low oxygen potential in the melt as it is the case for stratification when a metallic phase forms the upper layer and, respectively, when the oxidation has proceeded so far so that zirconium was completely oxidized, a significant influence of atmospheric oxygen on the specification and the release of some radionuclides has to be anticipated. The code RELOS (Release of Low Volatile Fission Products from Molten Surfaces) is under development at the Department of Energy Systems and Energy Economics (formerly Department of Nuclear and New Energy Systems) of the Ruhr-University Bochum. It is based on a mechanistic model to describe the diffusive and convective transport of fission products from the surface of a molten pool into a cooler gas atmosphere. This paper presents the code RELOS, i. e. the features and abilities of the latest code version V2.3 and the new model improvements of V2.4 and the calculated results evaluating the implemented models which deal with the oxygen transfer from the

  9. Release from ISOLDE molten metal targets under pulsed proton beam conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lettry, J.; Catherall, R.; Cyvoct, G.; Evensen, A. H. M.; Lindroos, M.; Jonsson, O. C.; Kugler, E.; Schindl, K.; Ravn, H.; Wildner, E.; Drumm, P.; Obert, J.; Putaux, J. C.; Sauvage, J.

    1996-04-01

    By moving the ISOLDE mass separators from the 600 MeV Synchrocyclotron (SC) to the 1 GeV Proton-Synchrotron-Booster (PS) the instantaneous energy density of the proton beam went up by 3 orders of magnitude. The developments of the molten metal target units and the optimization of the PS proton beam to cope with the effects of the thermal shocks induced by the proton beam are described. The energy density of the PS proton beam was reduced by spatial defocusing and time staggered extraction of the four PS-accelerators. The release from lanthanum, lead and tin targets is discussed for different settings of the proton beam and compared to the release observed at ISOLDE-SC. The yields of Hg isotopes are presented.

  10. Conditions inside Water Pooled in a Failed Nuclear Waste Container and its Effect on Radionuclide Release

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamdan, L. K.; Walton, J. C.; Woocay, A.

    2009-12-01

    Nuclear power use is expected to expand in the future, as part of the global clean energy initiative, to meet the world’s surging energy demand, and attenuate greenhouse gas emissions, which are mainly caused by fossil fuels. As a result, it is estimated that hundreds of thousands of metric tons of spent nuclear fuel (SNF) will accumulate. SNF disposal has major environmental (radiation exposure) and security (nuclear proliferation) concerns. Storage in unsaturated zone geological repositories is a reasonable solution for dealing with SNF. One of the key factors that determine the performance of the geological repository is the release of radionuclides from the engineered barrier system. Over time, the nuclear waste containers are expected to fail gradually due to general and localized corrosions and eventually infiltrating water will have access to the nuclear waste. Once radionuclides are released, they will be transported by water, and make their way to the accessible environment. Physical and chemical disturbances in the environment over the container will lead to different corrosion rates, causing different times and locations of penetration. One possible scenario for waste packages failure is the bathtub model, where penetrations occur on the top of the waste package and water pools inside it. In this paper the bathtub-type failed waste container is considered. We shed some light on chemical and physical processes that take place in the pooled water inside a partially failed waste container (bathtub category), and the effects of these processes on radionuclide release. Our study considers two possibilities: temperature stratification of the pooled water versus mixing process. Our calculations show that temperature stratification of the pooled water is expected when the waste package is half (or less) filled with water. On the other hand, when the waste package is fully filled (or above half) there will be mixing in the upper part of water. The effect of

  11. Understanding the role of saliva in aroma release from wine by using static and dynamic headspace conditions.

    PubMed

    Muñoz-González, Carolina; Feron, Gilles; Guichard, Elisabeth; Rodríguez-Bencomo, J José; Martín-Álvarez, Pedro J; Moreno-Arribas, M Victoria; Pozo-Bayón, M Ángeles

    2014-08-20

    The aim of this work was to determine the role of saliva in wine aroma release by using static and dynamic headspace conditions. In the latter conditions, two different sampling points (t = 0 and t = 10 min) corresponding with oral (25.5 °C) and postoral phases (36 °C) were monitored. Both methodologies were applied to reconstituted dearomatized white and red wines with different nonvolatile wine matrix compositions and a synthetic wine (without matrix effect). All of the wines had the same ethanol concentration and were spiked with a mixture of 45 aroma compounds covering a wide range of physicochemical characteristics at typical wine concentrations. Two types of saliva (human and artificial) or control samples (water) were added to the wines. The adequacy of the two headspace methodologies for the purposes of the study (repeatability, linear ranges, determination coefficients, etc.) was previously determined. After application of different chemometric analysis (ANOVA, LSD, PCA), results showed a significant effect of saliva on aroma release dependent on saliva type (differences between artificial and human) and on wine matrix using static headspace conditions. Red wines were more affected than white and synthetic wines by saliva, specifically human saliva, which provoked a reduction in aroma release for most of the assayed aroma compounds independent of their chemical structure. The application of dynamic headspace conditions using a saliva bioreactor at the two different sampling points (t = 0 and t = 10 min) showed a lesser but significant effect of saliva than matrix composition and a high influence of temperature (oral and postoral phases) on aroma release.

  12. A Novel Endo-β-N-Acetylglucosaminidase Releases Specific N-Glycans Depending on Different Reaction Conditions

    PubMed Central

    De Moura Bell, Juliana Maria Leite Nobrega; Frese, Steven A.; Liu, Yan; Mills, David A.; Block, David E.; Barile, Daniela

    2015-01-01

    Milk glycoproteins are involved in different functions and contribute to different cellular processes, including adhesion and signaling, and shape the development of the infant micro-biome. Methods have been developed to study the complexities of milk protein glycosylation and understand the role of N-glycans in protein functionality. Endo-β-N-acetylglucosaminidase (EndoBI-1) isolated from Bifidobacterium longum subsp. infantis ATCC 15697 is a recently isolated heat-stable enzyme that cleaves the N-N′-diacetyl chitobiose moiety found in the N-glycan core. The effects of different processing conditions (pH, temperature, reaction time, and enzyme/protein ratio) were evaluated for their ability to change EndoBI-1 activity on bovine colostrum whey glycoproteins using advanced mass spectrometry. This study shows that EndoBI-1 is able to cleave a high diversity of N-glycan structures. Nano-LC-Chip–Q-TOF MS data also revealed that different reaction conditions resulted in different N-glycan compositions released, thus modifying the relative abundance of N-glycan types. In general, more sialylated N-glycans were released at lower temperatures and pH values. These results demonstrated that EndoBI-1 is able to release a wide variety of N-glycans, whose compositions can be selectively manipulated using different processing conditions. PMID:26101185

  13. Diagnosing physical conditions near the flare energy-release sites from observations of solar microwave type III bursts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Bao-Lin; Karlický, Marian; Mészárosová, Hana; Huang, Guang-Li

    2016-05-01

    In the physics of solar flares, it is crucial to diagnose the physical conditions near the flare energy-release sites. However, so far it is unclear how to diagnose these physical conditions. A solar microwave type III burst is believed to be a sensitive signature of primary energy release and electron accelerations in solar flares. This work takes into account the effect of the magnetic field on the plasma density and develops a set of formulas which can be used to estimate the plasma density, temperature, magnetic field near the magnetic reconnection site and particle acceleration region, and the velocity and energy of electron beams. We apply these formulas to three groups of microwave type III pairs in an X-class flare, and obtained some reasonable and interesting results. This method can be applied to other microwave type III bursts to diagnose the physical conditions of source regions, and provide some basic information to understand the intrinsic nature and fundamental processes occurring near the flare energy-release sites.

  14. Angiotensin Type 1a Receptors on Corticotropin-Releasing Factor Neurons Contribute to the Expression of Conditioned Fear

    PubMed Central

    Hurt, Robert C.; Garrett, Jacob C.; Keifer, Orion P.; Linares, Andrea; Couling, Leena; Speth, Robert C.; Ressler, Kerry J.; Marvar, Paul J.

    2015-01-01

    Although generally associated with cardiovascular regulation, angiotensin II receptor type 1 (AT1aR) blockade in mouse models and humans has also been associated with enhanced fear extinction and decreased post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) symptom severity, respectively. The mechanisms mediating these effects remain unknown, but may involve alterations in the activities of corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF)-expressing cells, which are known to be involved in fear regulation. To test the hypothesis that AT1aR signaling in CRFergic neurons is involved in conditioned fear expression, we generated and characterized a conditional knockout mouse strain with a deletion of the AT1aR gene from its CRF-releasing cells (CRF-AT1aR(−/−)). These mice exhibit normal baseline heart rate, blood pressure, anxiety, and locomotion, and freeze at normal levels during acquisition of auditory fear conditioning. However, CRF-AT1aR(−/−) mice exhibit less freezing than wild type mice during tests of conditioned fear expression—an effect that may be caused by a decrease in the consolidation of fear memory. These results suggest that central AT1R activity in CRF-expressing cells plays a role in the expression of conditioned fear, and identify CRFergic cells as a population on which AT1R antagonists may act to modulate fear extinction. PMID:26257395

  15. Angiotensin type 1a receptors on corticotropin-releasing factor neurons contribute to the expression of conditioned fear.

    PubMed

    Hurt, R C; Garrett, J C; Keifer, O P; Linares, A; Couling, L; Speth, R C; Ressler, K J; Marvar, P J

    2015-09-01

    Although generally associated with cardiovascular regulation, angiotensin II receptor type 1a (AT1a R) blockade in mouse models and humans has also been associated with enhanced fear extinction and decreased post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) symptom severity, respectively. The mechanisms mediating these effects remain unknown, but may involve alterations in the activities of corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF)-expressing cells, which are known to be involved in fear regulation. To test the hypothesis that AT1a R signaling in CRFergic neurons is involved in conditioned fear expression, we generated and characterized a conditional knockout mouse strain with a deletion of the AT1a R gene from its CRF-releasing cells (CRF-AT1a R((-/-)) ). These mice exhibit normal baseline heart rate, blood pressure, anxiety and locomotion, and freeze at normal levels during acquisition of auditory fear conditioning. However, CRF-AT1a R((-/-)) mice exhibit less freezing than wild-type mice during tests of conditioned fear expression-an effect that may be caused by a decrease in the consolidation of fear memory. These results suggest that central AT1a R activity in CRF-expressing cells plays a role in the expression of conditioned fear, and identify CRFergic cells as a population on which AT1 R antagonists may act to modulate fear extinction.

  16. Release of synthetic microplastic plastic fibres from domestic washing machines: Effects of fabric type and washing conditions.

    PubMed

    Napper, Imogen E; Thompson, Richard C

    2016-11-15

    Washing clothes made from synthetic materials has been identified as a potentially important source of microscopic fibres to the environment. This study examined the release of fibres from polyester, polyester-cotton blend and acrylic fabrics. These fabrics were laundered under various conditions of temperature, detergent and conditioner. Fibres from waste effluent were examined and the mass, abundance and fibre size compared between treatments. Average fibre size ranged between 11.9 and 17.7μm in diameter, and 5.0 and 7.8mm in length. Polyester-cotton fabric consistently shed significantly fewer fibres than either polyester or acrylic. However, fibre release varied according to wash treatment with various complex interactions. We estimate over 700,000 fibres could be released from an average 6kg wash load of acrylic fabric. As fibres have been reported in effluent from sewage treatment plants, our data indicates fibres released by washing of clothing could be an important source of microplastics to aquatic habitats.

  17. Effect of preparation conditions on release of selected volatiles in tea headspace.

    PubMed

    Wright, Jonathan; Wulfert, Florian; Hort, Joanne; Taylor, Andrew J

    2007-02-21

    The release of volatile compounds from infused tea was monitored using on-line atmospheric pressure chemical ionization (APCI) mass spectrometry. Assignment of the APCI ions to particular compounds was achieved using gas chromatography of tea headspace with dual electron ionization and APCI-MS detectors. Six ions in the APCI spectrum could be assigned to individual compounds, five ions were associated with isobaric compounds (e.g., 2- and 3-methylbutanal and pentanal) or stereoisomers (e.g., heptenals or heptadienals), and a further four ions monitored were identified compounds but with some unknown impurities. Reproducibility of infusion preparation and the analytical system was good with percentage variation values generally below 5%. The analysis was used to study the effect of infusion and holding temperatures on the volatile profile of tea headspace samples, and this was found to be compound-dependent. Both the extraction of volatiles from leaf tea and the release of volatiles into the headspace play a role in creating the aroma profile that the consumer experiences.

  18. [Oxidation of mercury by CuBr2 decomposition under controlled-release membrane catalysis condition].

    PubMed

    Hu, Lin-Gang; Qu, Zan; Yan, Nai-Qiang; Guo, Yong-Fu; Xie, Jiang-Kun; Jia, Jin-Ping

    2014-02-01

    CuBr2 in the multi-porous ceramic membrane can release Br2 at high temperature, which was employed as the oxidant for Hg0 oxidation. Hg0 oxidation efficiency was studied by a membrane catalysis device. Meanwhile, a reaction and in situ monitoring device was designed to avoid the impact of Br2 on the downstream pipe. The result showed that the MnO(x)/alpha-Al2O3 catalysis membrane had a considerable "controlled-release" effect on Br2 produced by CuBr2 decomposition. The adsorption and reaction of Hg0 and Br2 on the surface of catalysis membrane obeyed the Langmuir-Hinshelwood mechanism. The removal efficiency of Hg0 increased with the rising of Br2 concentration. However, when Br2 reached a certain concentration, the removal efficiency was limited by adsorption rate and reaction rate of Hg0 and Br2 on the catalysis membrane. From 473 K to 573 K, the variation of Hg0 oxidation efficiency was relatively stable. SO2 in flue gas inhibited the oxidation of Hg0 while NO displayed no obvious effect.

  19. Degradation of poly(glycoamidoamine) DNA delivery vehicles: polyamide hydrolysis at physiological conditions promotes DNA release.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yemin; Reineke, Theresa M

    2010-02-08

    Poly(glycoamidoamine)s (PGAAs) are a group of efficient and degradable gene delivery vehicles that consist of three main functionalities: carbohydrate groups, secondary amines, and amide bonds. Herein, we have created nonhydroxylated models to these structures by polymerizing oxylate, succinate, or adipate groups with pentaethylenehexamine. The resulting polymers (named O4, S4, and A4, respectively) were created to understand how the absence of hydroxyl groups and changes in the amide bond spacing affect polymer degradation, plasmid DNA (pDNA) complexation, toxicity, and transfection efficiency in vitro. An additional model was also created that retains a galactaramide unit, but we have replaced the secondary amines with ethyleneoxide units (GO2) to understand the effects of the amine groups on polymer degradation. We have found that the secondary amines and hydroxyls are necessary to facilitate rapid degradation of these polymers, and analogues lacking hydroxyls or amines did not degrade over the time course of the study. Through electron-withdrawing and hydrogen bonding, the hydroxyls appear to activate the carbonyls of the amide bond to hydrolysis via an inductive electron withdrawing effect. Through titration experiments, PGAA degradation appears not to affect the polymer buffering capacity. Furthermore, we have found that PGAA degradation may enhance gene expression by releasing pDNA from polyplexes (polymer-pDNA complexes) and, thus, exposing it to undergo transcription and translation. The difference in the optimal pH that promotes degradation of the PGAAs and the hydroxyl-free analogues may prove to be a useful means to achieve pH-regulated DNA release from polyplexes by specifically modulating the chemical structures.

  20. The Effect of Spray Initial Conditions on Heat Release and Emissions in LDI CFD Calculations (Preprint)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-06-01

    equations, which are then advanced temporally by an explicit 4-stage Runge-Kutta scheme. For low Mach number compressible flow, a pre-conditioning is...currently valid OMB control number . PLEASE DO NOT RETURN YOUR FORM TO THE ABOVE ADDRESS. 1. REPORT DATE (DD-MM-YYYY) 05-06-2008 2. REPORT TYPE...Technical Memo 3. DATES COVERED (From - To) 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER The Effect of Spray Initial Conditions on Heat

  1. Antimony retention and release from drained and waterlogged shooting range soil under field conditions.

    PubMed

    Hockmann, Kerstin; Tandy, Susan; Lenz, Markus; Reiser, René; Conesa, Héctor M; Keller, Martin; Studer, Björn; Schulin, Rainer

    2015-09-01

    Many soils polluted by antimony (Sb) are subject to fluctuating waterlogging conditions; yet, little is known about how these affect the mobility of this toxic element under field conditions. Here, we compared Sb leaching from a calcareous shooting range soil under drained and waterlogged conditions using four large outdoor lysimeters. After monitoring the leachate samples taken at bi-weekly intervals for >1.5 years under drained conditions, two of the lysimeters were subjected to waterlogging with a water table fluctuating according to natural rainfall water infiltration. Antimony leachate concentrations under drained conditions showed a strong seasonal fluctuation between 110 μg L(-1) in summer and <40 μg L(-1) in winter, which closely correlated with fluctuations in dissolved organic carbon (DOC) concentrations. With the development of anaerobic conditions upon waterlogging, Sb in leachate decreased to 2-5 μg L(-1) Sb and remained stable at this level. Antimony speciation measurements in soil solution indicated that this decrease in Sb(V) concentrations was attributable to the reduction of Sb(V) to Sb(III) and the stronger sorption affinity of the latter to iron (Fe) (hydr)oxide phases. Our results demonstrate the importance of considering seasonal and waterlogging effects in the assessment of the risks from Sb-contaminated sites.

  2. Speciation and Release Kinetics of Cadmium in an Alkaline Paddy Soil Under Various Flooding Periods and Draining Conditions

    SciTech Connect

    S Khaokaew; R Chaney; G Landrot; M Ginder-Vogel; D Sparks

    2011-12-31

    This study determined Cd speciation and release kinetics in a Cd-Zn cocontaminated alkaline paddy soil, under various flooding periods and draining conditions, by employing synchrotron-based techniques, and a stirred-flow kinetic method. Results revealed that varying flooding periods and draining conditions affected Cd speciation and its release kinetics. Linear least-squares fitting (LLSF) of bulk X-ray absorption fine structure (XAFS) spectra of the air-dried, and the 1 day-flooded soil samples, showed that at least 50% of Cd was bound to humic acid. Cadmium carbonates were found as the major species at most flooding periods, while a small amount of cadmium sulfide was found after the soils were flooded for longer periods. Under all flooding and draining conditions, at least 14 mg/kg Cd was desorbed from the soil after a 2-hour desorption experiment. The results obtained by micro X-ray fluorescence ({mu}-XRF) spectroscopy showed that Cd was less associated with Zn than Ca, in most soil samples. Therefore, it is more likely that Cd and Ca will be present in the same mineral phases rather than Cd and Zn, although the source of these two latter elements may originate from the same surrounding Zn mines in the Mae Sot district.

  3. The Effects of Feeding Unpredictability and Classical Conditioning on Pre-Release Training of White-Lipped Peccary (Mammalia, Tayassuidae)

    PubMed Central

    Nogueira, Selene S. C.; Abreu, Shauana A.; Peregrino, Helderes; Nogueira-Filho, Sérgio L. G.

    2014-01-01

    Some authors have suggested that environmental unpredictability, accompanied by some sort of signal for behavioral conditioning, can boost activity or foster exploratory behavior, which may increase post-release success in re-introduction programs. Thus, using white-lipped peccary (Tayassu pecari), a vulnerable Neotropical species, as a model, we evaluated an unpredictable feeding schedule. Associating this with the effect of classical conditioning on behavioral activities, we assessed the inclusion of this approach in pre-release training protocols. The experimental design comprised predictable feeding phases (control phases: C1, C2 and C3) and unpredictable feeding phases (U1- signaled and U2- non-signaled). The animals explored more during the signaled and non-signaled unpredictable phases and during the second control phase (C2) than during the other two predictable phases (C1 and C3). The peccaries also spent less time feeding during the signaled unpredictable phase (U1) and the following control phase (C2) than during the other phases. Moreover, they spent more time in aggressive encounters during U1 than the other experimental phases. However, the animals did not show differences in the time they spent on affiliative interactions or in the body weight change during the different phases. The signaled unpredictability, besides improving foraging behavior, showing a prolonged effect on the next control phase (C2), also increased the competition for food. The signaled feeding unpredictability schedule, mimicking wild conditions by eliciting the expression of naturalistic behaviors in pre-release training, may be essential to fully prepare them for survival in the wild. PMID:24475072

  4. The effects of feeding unpredictability and classical conditioning on pre-release training of white-lipped peccary (Mammalia, Tayassuidae).

    PubMed

    Nogueira, Selene S C; Abreu, Shauana A; Peregrino, Helderes; Nogueira-Filho, Sérgio L G

    2014-01-01

    Some authors have suggested that environmental unpredictability, accompanied by some sort of signal for behavioral conditioning, can boost activity or foster exploratory behavior, which may increase post-release success in re-introduction programs. Thus, using white-lipped peccary (Tayassu pecari), a vulnerable Neotropical species, as a model, we evaluated an unpredictable feeding schedule. Associating this with the effect of classical conditioning on behavioral activities, we assessed the inclusion of this approach in pre-release training protocols. The experimental design comprised predictable feeding phases (control phases: C1, C2 and C3) and unpredictable feeding phases (U1- signaled and U2- non-signaled). The animals explored more during the signaled and non-signaled unpredictable phases and during the second control phase (C2) than during the other two predictable phases (C1 and C3). The peccaries also spent less time feeding during the signaled unpredictable phase (U1) and the following control phase (C2) than during the other phases. Moreover, they spent more time in aggressive encounters during U1 than the other experimental phases. However, the animals did not show differences in the time they spent on affiliative interactions or in the body weight change during the different phases. The signaled unpredictability, besides improving foraging behavior, showing a prolonged effect on the next control phase (C2), also increased the competition for food. The signaled feeding unpredictability schedule, mimicking wild conditions by eliciting the expression of naturalistic behaviors in pre-release training, may be essential to fully prepare them for survival in the wild.

  5. Effect of different flight conditions at the release of a small spacecraft from a high performance aircraft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ridolfi, L.; Pontani, M.; Teofilatto, P.

    2010-03-01

    In recent years, mainly due to miniaturization of electronics as well as to the improvement of computer performance, small spacecraft have increased their capabilities. More and more frequently specific mission objectives can be achieved with cheap satellites of reduced size. The growing use of small satellites stimulates the development of systems specifically dedicated to orbit injection of small payloads. In this context, one option is represented by air-launched rockets. The use of an air-launched rocket for delivering a small payload into the desired orbit has several advantages. First of all, payload release is much more flexible, because the delivery conditions are directly related to the dynamics of the aircraft and can be viewed as independent of ground facilities. In addition, reduced costs are associated with higher efficiency of an aircraft in the lower layers of the atmosphere with respect to traditional ground-launched rockets. To date, air-launched rockets separate from the aircraft in a horizontal flight condition. Then they maneuver in order to achieve the correct flight path angle for injecting into a gravity-turn arc of trajectory. Relevant losses are associated to this pitch maneuver; in addition, in this phase the rocket usually needs an aerodynamic control. Hence, the release of a rocket departing with a high flight path angle from the aircraft would avoid these losses and would simplify the control system, because in such a situation the pitch maneuver becomes unnecessary. This paper is aimed at investigating the dynamic behavior and performance of a payload delivered from a high performance aircraft, which flies with a high flight path angle. In particular, this work is concerned with showing the differences and tradeoffs among different starting conditions of a multistage air-launched rocket related to several flight path angles of the aircraft at release. An optimal system configuration, which allows placing a micro-satellite into a

  6. Calcitonin gene-related peptide released within the amygdala is involved in Pavlovian auditory fear conditioning.

    PubMed

    Kocorowski, L H; Helmstetter, F J

    2001-03-01

    The effects of CGRP and the CGRP receptor antagonist hCGRP(8-37) injected into the amygdala on both the acquisition and expression of fear behavior to a discrete auditory conditional stimulus (CS) and the training context were assessed. In Experiment 1, pretraining injections of CGRP but not hCGRP(8-37) produced fear-like behavior before any aversive stimuli were presented. While both compounds attenuated freezing to the contextual CS on the test day, neither affected learning about the auditory CS. In Experiment 2, pretesting injections of hCGRP(8-37) (0.63 mM) selectively attenuated freezing to the auditory CS but left freezing to the contextual CS intact. These data suggest that CGRP in the amygdala may selectively contribute to the expression of learning about auditory stimuli during fear conditioning.

  7. Behavior and Release of Nitrogen at Mines and Quarries in Nordic Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karlsson, Teemu; Neitola, Raisa; Jermakka, Johannes; Merta, Elina; Mroueh, Ulla-Maija

    2015-04-01

    The increased extraction of mineral resources and mining activities creates added pressure on the environmental issues and a proper water management in mining areas in Finland. Among others, nitrogen compounds released from explosives or from mining processes can have a detrimental effect on the environment. Thus, this project aimed at comprehensive understanding on the nitrogen issue in the extractive industry. The project collected essential data on nitrogen compounds present in the environments of mines and quarries, and generated better understanding of the discharge and behaviour of nitrogen compounds in mining areas. The sources and balances of explosives-originated nitrogen compounds at mines and quarries of different sizes were investigated and compared. Additionally, the focus was in 'nitrogen smudging' problem of waste rocks and the intensity, as well as evolution and chemical characteristics of their nitrogen contamination. According to the results, the total load of potential nitrogen to the environment depends on the scale and type of the activity as well as the type of explosives used. The main emission sources of nitrogen are process and dewatering waters. A lysimeter study showed that the explosives originated nitrogen content of left over stones from natural stone quarrying is relatively low and ca. half of the nitrogen is leached within the first weeks after detonation. The "nitrogen smudging" of natural stone quarrying left over stones is relatively low to begin with and enhanced by the rapid flushing by rainwater, thus the residues of explosives should not be considered to prevent the utilization of otherwise mineralogically inert waste rocks of good technical quality. The overall nitrogen management should take into account the background concentrations and sensitivity of the local ecosystem. The research project "Solution for Control of Nitrogen Discharges at Mines and Quarries, (MINIMAN)" was realized during years 2012-2014 as a cooperative

  8. Analysis of toxic effluents released from PVC carpet under different fire conditions.

    PubMed

    Stec, A A; Readman, J; Blomqvist, P; Gylestam, D; Karlsson, D; Wojtalewicz, D; Dlugogorski, B Z

    2013-01-01

    A large number of investigations have been reported on minimising the PAH and PCDD/F yields during controlled combustion, such as incineration. This study is an attempt to quantify acute and chronic toxicants including PAH and PCDD/F in conditions relating to unwanted fires. This paper investigates distribution patterns of fire effluents between gas and aerosol phase, and the different particle size-ranges produced under different fire conditions. PVC carpet was selected as the fuel as a precursor for both PAH and PCDD/F. In order to generate fire effluents under controlled fire conditions, the steady-state tube furnace, was chosen as the physical fire model. Fire scenarios included oxidative pyrolysis, well-ventilated and under-ventilated fires. Fire effluent measurements included: carbon monoxide, carbon dioxide, hydrogen chloride, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, chlorinated dibenzo-dioxins and furans and soot. The distribution patterns between gas and particle phase, and the size-ranges of the particles produced in these fires together with their chemical composition is also reported. Significant quantities of respirable submicron particles were detected, together with a range of PAHs. Lower levels of halogenated dioxins were detected in the fire residue compared with those found in other studies. Nevertheless, the findings do have implications for the health and safety of fire and rescue personnel, fire investigators, and other individuals exposed to the residue from unwanted fires.

  9. Microstructure, mechanical property and metal release of As-SLM CoCrW alloy under different solution treatment conditions.

    PubMed

    Lu, Yanjin; Wu, Songquan; Gan, Yiliang; Zhang, Shuyuan; Guo, Sai; Lin, Junjie; Lin, Jinxin

    2015-03-01

    In the study, the microstructure, mechanical property and metal release behavior of selective laser melted CoCrW alloys under different solution treatment conditions were systemically investigated to assess their potential use in orthopedic implants. The effects of the solution treatment on the microstructure, mechanical properties and metal release were systematically studied by OM, SEM, XRD, tensile test, and ICP-AES, respectively. The XRD indicated that during the solution treatment the alloy underwent the transformation of γ-fcc to ε-hcp phase; the ε-hcp phase nearly dominated in the alloy when treated at 1200°C following the water quenching; the results from OM, SEM showed that the microstructural change was occurred under different solution treatments; solution at 1150°C with furnace cooling contributed to the formation of larger precipitates at the grain boundary regions, while the size and number of the precipitates was decreased as heated above 1100°C with the water quenching; moreover, the diamond-like structure was invisible at higher solution temperature over 1150°C following water quenching; compared with the furnace cooling, the alloy quenched by water showed excellent mechanical properties and low amount of metal release; as the alloy heated at 1200°C, the mechanical properties of the alloy reached their optimum combination at UTS=1113.6MPa, 0.2%YS=639.5MPa, and E%=20.1%, whilst showed the lower total quantity of metal release. It is suggested that a proper solution treatment is an efficient strategy for improving the mechanical properties and corrosion resistance of As-SLM CoCrW alloy that show acceptable tensile ductility.

  10. Antibacterial Action of Nitric Oxide-Releasing Chitosan Oligosaccharides against Pseudomonas aeruginosa under Aerobic and Anaerobic Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Reighard, Katelyn P.

    2015-01-01

    Chitosan oligosaccharides were modified with N-diazeniumdiolates to yield biocompatible nitric oxide (NO) donor scaffolds. The minimum bactericidal concentrations and MICs of the NO donors against Pseudomonas aeruginosa were compared under aerobic and anaerobic conditions. Differential antibacterial activities were primarily the result of NO scavenging by oxygen under aerobic environments and not changes in bacterial physiology. Bacterial killing was also tested against nonmucoid and mucoid biofilms and compared to that of tobramycin. Smaller NO payloads were required to eradicate P. aeruginosa biofilms under anaerobic versus aerobic conditions. Under oxygen-free environments, the NO treatment was 10-fold more effective at killing biofilms than tobramycin. These results demonstrate the potential utility of NO-releasing chitosan oligosaccharides under both aerobic and anaerobic environments. PMID:26239983

  11. Amendment of biochar reduces the release of toxic elements under dynamic redox conditions in a contaminated floodplain soil.

    PubMed

    Rinklebe, Jörg; Shaheen, Sabry M; Frohne, Tina

    2016-01-01

    Biochar (BC) can be used to remediate soils contaminated with potential toxic elements (PTEs). However, the efficiency of BC to immobilize PTEs in highly contaminated floodplain soils under dynamic redox conditions has not been studied up to date. Thus, we have (i) quantified the impact of pre-definite redox conditions on the release dynamics of dissolved aluminum (Al), arsenic (As), cadmium (Cd), copper (Cu), nickel (Ni), and zinc (Zn) in a highly contaminated soil (CS) (non-treated) and in the same soil treated with 10 g kg(-1) biochar based material (CS+BC), and (ii) assessed the efficacy of the material to reduce the concentrations of PTEs in soil solution under dynamic redox conditions using an automated biogeochemical microcosm apparatus. The impact of redox potential (EH), pH, dissolved organic carbon (DOC), dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC), iron (Fe), manganese (Mn), and sulfate (SO4(2-)) on dynamics of PTEs was also determined. The EH was lowered to +68 mV and afterwards increased stepwise to +535 mV. Significant negative correlation between EH and pH in CS and CS+BC was detected. The systematic increase of EH along with decrease of pH favors the mobilization of PTEs in CS and CS+BC. The material addition seems to have little effect on redox processes because pattern of EH/pH and release dynamics of PTEs was basically similar in CS and CS+BC. However, concentrations of dissolved PTEs were considerably lower in CS+BC than in CS which demonstrates that BC is able to decrease concentrations of dissolved PTEs even under dynamic redox conditions.

  12. Gas release from an E125 zirconium alloy under hydrogenation and deformation conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tyurin, Yu. I.; Larionov, V. V.; Nikitenkov, N. N.

    2016-09-01

    The degassing from a hydrogen-saturated E125 zirconium alloy is studied as a function of its deformation. Zirconium alloy samples are subjected to tension at a relative elongation of 2.5, 5, and 10%. Undeformed and deformed samples were saturated with hydrogen by a galvanic method at a current density of 0.5 A/cm2; that is, they are hydrogen saturated and then deformed. As a result, the defects at which hydrogen is trapped in zirconium are identified. The quantity of hydrogen trapped by defects depends on the strain and the sequence of deformation and hydrogen saturation. This is a technical result of the investigations, which can be used to find optimum operation conditions for hydrogen-saturated zirconium articles.

  13. Increasing influence of the glutamate transporter inhibitor on glutamate release in low [Na +] media under extremal conditions.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borisova, T.; Krisanova, N.; Himmelreich, N.

    The effect of the competitive nontransportable inhibitor DL-threo-beta-benzyloxyaspartate DL-TBOA on the release of glutamate in Ca 2 -free Na - and NMDG-supplemented media was evaluated after exposure of rats to extremal conditions 6 min incubation of synaptosomes with 10 mu M DL-TBOA in low Na media resulted in the increase in extracellular L- 14 C glutamate level for control animals by 2 0 pm 0 5 of total accumulated label and 100 mu M DL-TBOA - 3 5 pm 0 5 respectively The experimental data for animals subjected to centrifuge-induced hypergravity showed 4 0 pm 1 0 and 9 0 pm 2 0 increase in L- 14 C glutamate level for 10 mu M and 100 mu M DL-TBOA respectively D le 0 05 The enhancement of the extracellular level of L- 14 C glutamate after application of DL-TBOA would be expected to connect with the inhibition of L- 14 C glutamate uptake process It appears that DL-TBOA inhibited uptake more potently after hypergravity The effect of DL-TBOA on depolarization-induced carrier-mediated L- 14 C glutamate release increased after hypergravity loading in Na - and low Na NMDG- supplemented media 10 mu M DL-TBOA-induced decrease in L- 14 C glutamate release in Na - supplemented medium was 15 2 pm 2 2 in the control experiments and 26 2 pm 3 9 after loading D le 0 05 and in low Na medium was 37 0 pm 2 5 and 45 0 pm 3 4 respectively DL-TBOA was demonstrated to better inhibit the transporter-mediated

  14. Release of arsenic from a Haplic Gleysol under controlled redox conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mansfeldt, T.; Overesch, M.

    2009-04-01

    The redox potential (EH) governs the solubility of trace elements in soils, mainly by the reductive dissolution of iron (hydr)oxides, which are important adsorbents. Similarly the species distribution of some trace elments in soils strongly depends on EH. Species distribution in turn affects the solubility and toxicity of trace elements. Hence, the EH is a master variable for the behaviour of trace elements in soil. Arsenic is such a redox-sensitive trace element. In the lowlands of southern Münsterland, North Rhine-Westphalia (Germany), various Gleysols under grassland recently have been found to be naturally enriched with arsenic. Field measurements at such a site revealed high variations in soil EH during the course of the time with a range of 900 mV. We initiated a laboratory study to determine the effects of different redox regimes (oxidizing, moderately reducing and reducing soil conditions) both on the solubility and speciation of As. The batch study was performed using the AhBg, Bg1 and Bg2 horizons from a Haplic Gleysol. Total arsenic contents increased with increasing soil depth from 121, 613 to 1.004 mg/kg As. Fixed redox potentials in stirred soil suspensions were achieved by flushing closed glass microcosms with either N2 or air during 40 days. Redox potential and pH of the suspension were continuously recorded. In intervals of 48 hours, subsamples of 40 ml were taken from a sampling port by a tube connected to a vacuum filtration device (0.45 µm). The filtrates were analyzed for DOC, TIC, nitrate, sulfate, phosphate, and total Mn, Fe and total As. Also, Fe2+ and As(III) were determined. First results indicate that lowering EH from 450 to -100 mV (pH 7) results in a significant increase of pH and concentrations of DOC, TIC, total Fe, Fe2+, Mn, and total As in solution. Significant concentrations of As(III) could be observed at EH values below 100 mV.

  15. Nitrogen release pattern in decomposing leaf litter of banj oak and chir pine seedlings leaf under glass house condition.

    PubMed

    Usman, Samina

    2013-01-01

    Decomposition rate for leaf litter of banj oak (Quercus leucotrichophora) and chir pine (Pinus roxburghii), seedlings was studied over a period of one year, under glass house condition. The leaf litter of Quercus leucotrichophora decomposed faster as compared to Pinus roxburghii. Initially during 0-62 days of placement, the decomposition rate was slower for leaf litter of both species but after 123 days of placement it was 53% for Quercus leucotrichophora leaf litter and 33% for Pinus roxburghii leaf litter. The Quercus leucotrichophora leaf litter was completely decomposed after 11 months; however, 65% weight loss was recorded in Pinus roxburghii leaf litter after 12 months study. In Quercus leucotrichophora leaf litter the, initial (at the start of decomposition) nitrogen concentration was much higher (1.15%) than that of Pinus roxburghii leaf litter (1.41%), release of N was slower in chir pine leaf litter compared to banj oak leaf litter. Material with higher C/N ratio had longer duration of immobilization and in turn slower release phase. The concentration of N increased approximately linearly as a function of mass loss towards the end of annual cycle. Concentration of N was about 1.2 to 1.9 fold higher than the initial litter for seedlings of both the species.

  16. Changes of the corrosion potential of iron in stagnation and flow conditions and their relationship with metal release.

    PubMed

    Fabbricino, Massimiliano; Korshin, Gregory V

    2014-10-01

    This study examined the behavior of corrosion potential (Ecorr) of iron exposed to drinking water during episodes of stagnation and flow. These measurements showed that during stagnation episodes, Ecorr values decrease prominently and consistently. This decrease is initially rapid but it becomes slower as the stagnation time increases. During flow episodes, the Ecorr values increase and reach a quasi-steady state. Experiments with varying concentrations of dissolved oxygen showed that the decrease of Ecorr values characteristic for stagnation is likely to be associated with the consumption of dissolved oxygen by the exposed metal. The corrosion potential of iron and its changes during stagnation were sensitive to the concentrations of sulfate and chloride ions. Measurements of iron release showed that both the absolute values of Ecorr measured prior to or after stagnation episodes were well correlated with the logarithms of concentrations of total iron. The slope of this dependence showed that the observed correlations between Ecorr values and Fe concentrations corresponded to the coupling between the oxidant consumption and changes of Fe redox status. These results demonstrate that in situ Ecorr measurements can be a sensitive method with which to ascertain effects of hydrodynamic conditions and short-term variations of water chemistry on metal release and corrosion in drinking water. This approach is valuable practically because Ecorr measurements are precise, can be carried out in situ with any desired time resolution, do not affect the state of exposed surface in any extent and can be carried out with readily available equipment.

  17. Closure Report for Corrective Action Unit 481: Area 12 T-Tunnel Conditional Release Storage Yard, Nevada Test Site, Nevada

    SciTech Connect

    NSTec Environmental Restoration

    2008-11-01

    Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 481 is identified in the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO) as Area 12 T-Tunnel Conditional Release Storage Yard. CAU 481 is located in Area 12 of the Nevada Test Site, which is approximately 65 miles northwest of Las Vegas, Nevada. This CAU consists of one Corrective Action Site (CAS), CAS 12-42-05, Housekeeping Waste. CAU 481 closure activities were conducted by the Defense Threat Reduction Agency from August 2007 through July 2008 according to the FFACO and Revision 3 of the Sectored Clean-up Work Plan for Housekeeping Category Waste Sites. Closure activities included removal and disposal of construction debris and low-level waste. Drained fluids, steel, and lead was recycled as appropriate. Waste generated during closure activities was appropriately managed and disposed.

  18. Engine Operating Conditions and Fuel Properties on Pre-Spark Heat Release and SPI Promotion in SI Engines

    SciTech Connect

    Splitter, Derek A; Kaul, Brian C; Szybist, James P; Jatana, Gurneesh S

    2017-01-01

    This work explores the dependence of fuel ignition delay on stochastic pre-ignition (SPI). Findings are based on bulk gas thermodynamic state, where the effects of kinetically controlled bulk gas pre-spark heat release (PSHR) are correlated to SPI tendency and magnitude. Specifically, residual gas and low temperature PSHR chemistry effects and observations are explored, which are found to be indicative of bulk gas conditions required for strong SPI events. Analyzed events range from non-knocking SPI to knocking SPI and even detonation SPI events in excess of 325 bar peak cylinder pressure. The work illustrates that singular SPI event count and magnitude are found to be proportional to PSHR of the bulk gas mixture and residual gas fraction. Cycle-to-cycle variability in trapped residual mass and temperature are found to impose variability in singular SPI event count and magnitude. However, clusters and short lived bursts of multiple SPI events are found to better correlate with fuel-wall interaction. The results highlight the interplay of bulk gas thermodynamics and SPI ignition source, on SPI event magnitude and cluster tendency. Moreover, the results highlight fundamental fuel reactivity and associated hypersensitivity to operating conditions at SPI prone operating conditions.

  19. Encapsulation of R. planticola Rs-2 from alginate-starch-bentonite and its controlled release and swelling behavior under simulated soil conditions.

    PubMed

    Wu, Zhansheng; Guo, Lina; Qin, Shaohua; Li, Chun

    2012-02-01

    The plant growth-promoting bacteria (PGPR) Raoultella planticola Rs-2 was encapsulated with the various blends of alginate, starch, and bentonite for development of controlled-release formulations. The stability and release characteristics of these different capsule formulations were evaluated. The entrapment efficiency of Rs-2 in the beads (capsules) was more than 99%. The diameter of dry beads ranged from 0.98 to 1.41 mm. The bacteria release efficiency, swelling ratio, and biodegradability of the different bead formulations were enhanced by increasing the starch or alginate contents, but were impeded by higher bentonite content. The release kinetics of viable cells from capsules and the swelling ratio of capsules were studied in simulated soil media of varying temperature, moisture, pH, and salt content. The release of loaded Rs-2 cells and swelling of capsules are greatly affected by moisture, temperature, pH and salt content of the release medium. The release of viable Rs-2 cells from capsules was positively associated with the swelling properties of the capsules. The release of Rs-2 cells occurred through a Case II diffusion mechanism. In summary, this work indicates that alginate-starch-bentonite blends are a viable option for the development of efficient controlled-release formulations of Rs-2 biofertilizer, and which could have a promising application in natural field conditions.

  20. Metal release from contaminated coastal sediments under changing pH conditions: Implications for metal mobilization in acidified oceans.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zaosheng; Wang, Yushao; Zhao, Peihong; Chen, Liuqin; Yan, Changzhou; Yan, Yijun; Chi, Qiaoqiao

    2015-12-30

    To investigate the impacts and processes of CO2-induced acidification on metal mobilization, laboratory-scale experiments were performed, simulating the scenarios where carbon dioxide was injected into sediment-seawater layers inside non-pressurized chambers. Coastal sediments were sampled from two sites with different contamination levels and subjected to pre-determined pH conditions. Sediment samples and overlying water were collected for metal analysis after 10-days. The results indicated that CO2-induced ocean acidification would provoke increased metal mobilization causing adverse side-effects on water quality. The mobility of metals from sediment to the overlying seawater was correlated with the reduction in pH. Results of sequential extractions of sediments illustrated that exchangeable metal forms were the dominant source of mobile metals. Collectively, our data revealed that high metal concentrations in overlying seawater released from contaminated sediments under acidic conditions may strengthen the existing contamination gradients in Maluan Bay and represent a potential risk to ecosystem health in coastal environments.

  1. Release of DEFB126 from macaque sperm and completion of capacitation are triggered by conditions that simulate periovulatory oviductal fluid.

    PubMed

    Tollner, Theodore L; Vandevoort, Catherine A; Yudin, Ashley I; Treece, Cathy A; Overstreet, James W; Cherr, Gary N

    2009-05-01

    Capacitation of macaque sperm in vitro has been achieved efficiently only with the addition of both cyclic nucleotides and methylxanthines. The use of these exogenous sperm activators clouds an understanding of the normal mechanisms underlying capacitation and may slow early embryo development following in vitro fertilization (IVF). We demonstrate that culture medium which simulates periovulatory oviductal fluid with respect to bicarbonate (HCO(3)(-)) and glucose concentration induces capacitation in a high percentage of macaque sperm as determined by the ability of sperm to undergo both the release of coating protein DEFB126 and the zona pellucida-induced acrosome reaction (AR). Few sperm were able to undergo the AR following 6 hr incubation in medium containing either 35 mM HCO(3)(-) (approximately 7.2 pH) or 90 mM HCO(3)(-) (approximately pH 7.8) with 5 mM glucose. When glucose concentration was lowered to 0.5 mM to match levels reported for women at midcycle, the AR rate increased significantly in sperm incubated in both levels of HCO(3)(-), indicating that glucose interferes with sperm responsiveness to increasing HCO(3)(-) concentration observed in the primate oviduct during ovulation. Even greater synchronization of capacitation could be achieved with nonphysiologic extremes of alkalinity or energy substrate deprivation. In the latter case, sperm achieved high rates of IVF. A shift in pH from 7.2 to 7.8 in a HEPES-buffered medium was sufficient to remove DEFB126 from the surface of most sperm after only 3 hr. The loss of DEFB126 from sperm under periovulaory fluid conditions has implications for the timing of release of sperm from the oviductal reservoir.

  2. Measurement of copper release rates from antifouling paint under laboratory and in situ conditions: implications for loading estimation to marine water bodies.

    PubMed

    Valkirs, Aldis O; Seligman, Peter F; Haslbeck, Elizabeth; Caso, Joaquin S

    2003-06-01

    The release of biocides, such as copper (Cu), from antifouling (AF) coatings on vessel hulls represents a significant proportion of overall Cu loading in those harbors and estuaries where substantial numbers of small craft or large vessels are berthed. Copper release rates were measured on several self-polishing, tin-free coatings and an ablative Cu reference coating applied to steel panels using three measurement methods. The panels were exposed in natural seawater in San Diego Bay, and release rates were measured both in the laboratory and field over 2 years. Results with the static (20 cm x 30 cm) panels indicated that Cu release rates were initially high (25-65 microg Cu cm(-2)day(-1)), with a large range of values between paint types. Release rates declined to substantially lower rates (8-22 microg cm(-2)day(-1)) with reduced variability within 2 months. Release rates continued to decrease over time for approximately 6 months when relatively constant release rates were observed for most coatings. Over time, relative differences in Cu release rates measured by three exposure methods decreased, with all coatings exhibiting similar behavior toward the end of the study. Lowest overall Cu release rates were observed with the self-polishing experimental paint no. 7 in static-dynamic and in situ treatments. The highest periodic release rates were measured from panels that experienced periods of both static and dynamic exposure (8.7 ms(-1) rotation). The lowest release rates were measured from panels that experienced static, constant depth exposure, and where release rates were evaluated in situ, using a novel diver-deployed measurement system. Results from this in situ technique suggests that it more closely reflects actual Cu release rates on vessel hulls measured with intact natural biofilms under ambient conditions than measurements using standardized laboratory release rate methods. In situ measurements made directly on the AF surface of vessels demonstrated

  3. Design of magnetic molecularly imprinted polymer nanoparticles for controlled release of doxorubicin under an alternative magnetic field in athermal conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Griffete, N.; Fresnais, J.; Espinosa, A.; Wilhelm, C.; Bée, A.; Ménager, C.

    2015-11-01

    An innovative magnetic delivery nanomaterial for triggered cancer therapy showing active control over drug release by using an alternative magnetic field is proposed. In vitro and In vivo release of doxorubicin (DOX) were investigated and showed a massive DOX release under an alternative magnetic field without temperature elevation of the medium.An innovative magnetic delivery nanomaterial for triggered cancer therapy showing active control over drug release by using an alternative magnetic field is proposed. In vitro and In vivo release of doxorubicin (DOX) were investigated and showed a massive DOX release under an alternative magnetic field without temperature elevation of the medium. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c5nr06133d

  4. RESUSPENSION OF CONTAMINATED FIELD AND FORMULATED REFERENCE SEDIMENTS PART 1: EVALUATION OF METAL RELEASE UNDER CONTROLLED LABORATORY CONDITIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    In aquatic systems where metal-contaminated sediments are present, the potential exists for metals to be released to the water column when sediment resuspension occurs. The release and partitioning behavior of sediment-bound, toxic heavy metals is not well understood during res...

  5. Transforming growth factor-beta 1 release from oligo(poly(ethylene glycol) fumarate) hydrogels in conditions that model the cartilage wound healing environment.

    PubMed

    Holland, Theresa A; Tessmar, Joerg K V; Tabata, Yasuhiko; Mikos, Antonios G

    2004-01-08

    This research demonstrates that controlled material degradation and transforming growth factor-beta1 (TGF-beta1) release can be achieved by encapsulation of TGF-beta1-loaded gelatin microparticles within the biodegradable polymer oligo(poly(ethylene glycol) fumarate) (OPF), so that these microparticles function as both a digestible porogen and a delivery vehicle. Release studies performed with non-encapsulated microparticles confirmed that at normal physiological pH, TGF-beta1 complexes with acidic gelatin, resulting in slow release rates. At pH 4.0, this complexation no longer persists, and TGF-beta1 release is enhanced. However, by encapsulating TGF-beta1-loaded microparticles in a network of OPF, release at either pH can be diffusionally controlled. For instance, after 28 days of incubation at pH 4.0, final cumulative release from non-encapsulated microparticles crosslinked in 10 and 40 mM glutaraldehyde (GA) was 75.4+/-1.6% and 76.6+/-1.1%, respectively. However, when either microparticle formulation was encapsulated in an OPF hydrogel (noted as OPF-10 mM and OPF-40 mM, respectively), these values were reduced to 44.7+/-14.6% and 47.4+/-4.7%. More interestingly, release studies, in conditions that model the expected collagenase concentration of injured cartilage, demonstrated that by altering the microparticle crosslinking extent and loading within OPF hydrogels, TGF-beta1 release, composite swelling, and polymer loss could be systematically altered. Composites encapsulating less crosslinked microparticles (OPF-10 mM) exhibited 100% release after only 18 days and were completely degraded by day 24 in collagenase-containing phosphate-buffered saline (PBS). Hydrogels encapsulating 40 mM GA microparticles did not exhibit 100% release or polymer loss until day 28. Hydrogels with no microparticle component demonstrated only 79.3+/-9.2% release and 89.2+/-3.4% polymer loss after 28 days in enzyme-containing PBS. Accordingly, these studies confirm that the rate of TGF

  6. Simulation of the hydrodynamic conditions of the eye to better reproduce the drug release from hydrogel contact lenses: experiments and modeling.

    PubMed

    Pimenta, A F R; Valente, A; Pereira, J M C; Pereira, J C F; Filipe, H P; Mata, J L G; Colaço, R; Saramago, B; Serro, A P

    2016-12-01

    Currently, most in vitro drug release studies for ophthalmic applications are carried out in static sink conditions. Although this procedure is simple and useful to make comparative studies, it does not describe adequately the drug release kinetics in the eye, considering the small tear volume and flow rates found in vivo. In this work, a microfluidic cell was designed and used to mimic the continuous, volumetric flow rate of tear fluid and its low volume. The suitable operation of the cell, in terms of uniformity and symmetry of flux, was proved using a numerical model based in the Navier-Stokes and continuity equations. The release profile of a model system (a hydroxyethyl methacrylate-based hydrogel (HEMA/PVP) for soft contact lenses (SCLs) loaded with diclofenac) obtained with the microfluidic cell was compared with that obtained in static conditions, showing that the kinetics of release in dynamic conditions is slower. The application of the numerical model demonstrated that the designed cell can be used to simulate the drug release in the whole range of the human eye tear film volume and allowed to estimate the drug concentration in the volume of liquid in direct contact with the hydrogel. The knowledge of this concentration, which is significantly different from that measured in the experimental tests during the first hours of release, is critical to predict the toxicity of the drug release system and its in vivo efficacy. In conclusion, the use of the microfluidic cell in conjunction with the numerical model shall be a valuable tool to design and optimize new therapeutic drug-loaded SCLs.

  7. FASTGRASS: A mechanistic model for the prediction of Xe, I, Cs, Te, Ba, and Sr release from nuclear fuel under normal and severe-accident conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Rest, J.; Zawadzki, S.A. )

    1992-09-01

    The primary physical/chemical models that form the basis of the FASTGRASS mechanistic computer model for calculating fission-product release from nuclear fuel are described. Calculated results are compared with test data and the major mechanisms affecting the transport of fission products during steady-state and accident conditions are identified.

  8. Adsorption of bovine serum albumin on silver surfaces enhances the release of silver at pH neutral conditions.

    PubMed

    Wang, X; Herting, G; Wallinder, I Odnevall; Blomberg, E

    2015-07-28

    Metallic biomaterials are widely used to replace and/or restore the function of damaged bodily parts. The use of silver as antibacterial coatings onto implants has recently gained large interest in medical applications. The extent of silver that can be released into different biological fluids from such coatings is, except for the surface characteristics of the coating, governed by parameters such as protein characteristics, adsorbed layer properties, formation of silver-protein complexes as well as concentrations of proteins in the solution. This study aims to relate the structure of adsorbed net negatively charged bovine serum albumin (BSA), which is the most abundant protein in serum, to the release of silver from metallic silver surfaces in order to elucidate if the net charge of the protein has any effect of the silver release. Simultaneous adsorption measurements were performed in real time on the very same surface using combined ellipsometry and quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation monitoring (QCM-D) measurements to provide a more comprehensive understanding on adsorption kinetics and layer structures. The amount of released silver into solution was measured by means of graphite furnace atomic absorption spectroscopy (GF-AAS). The structure of the adsorbed BSA layer largely influenced the amount of released silver, an enhancement that increased with BSA concentration. These observations are in complete contrast to the effect of net positively charged lysozyme (LSZ) adsorbed on silver, previously studied by the authors, for which a complete surface coverage suppressed the possibility for silver release. The underlying mechanisms behind the enhanced release of silver in the presence of BSA were mainly attributed to surface complexation between BSA and silver followed by an enhanced exchange rate of these surface complexes with BSA molecules in the solution, which in turn increase the amount of released silver in solution.

  9. Determination of fission gas release of spent nuclear fuel in puncturing test and in leaching experiments under anoxic conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    González-Robles, E.; Metz, V.; Wegen, D. H.; Herm, M.; Papaioannou, D.; Bohnert, E.; Gretter, R.; Müller, N.; Nasyrow, R.; de Weerd, W.; Wiss, T.; Kienzler, B.

    2016-10-01

    During reactor operation the fission gases Kr and Xe are formed within the UO2 matrix of nuclear fuel. Their quantification is important to evaluate their impact on critical parameters regarding the fuel behaviour during irradiation and (long-term) interim storage, such as internal pressure of the fuel rod and fuel swelling. Moreover the content of Kr and Xe in the plenum of a fuel rod and their content in the UO2 fuel itself are widely used as indicators for the release properties of 129I, 137Cs, and other safety relevant radionuclides with respect to final disposal of spent nuclear fuel. The present study deals with the fission gas release from spent nuclear fuel exposed to simulated groundwater in comparison with the fission gas previously released to the fuel rod plenum during irradiation in reactor. In a unique approach we determined both the Kr and Xe inventories in the plenum by means of a puncturing test and in leaching experiments with a cladded fuel pellet and fuel fragments in bicarbonate water under 3.2 bar H2 overpressure. The fractional inventory of the fission gases released during irradiation into the plenum was (8.3 ± 0.9) %. The fraction of inventory of fission gases released during the leaching experiments was (17 ± 2) % after 333 days of leaching of the cladded pellet and (25 ± 2) % after 447 days of leaching of the fuel fragments, respectively. The relatively high release of fission gases in the experiment with fuel fragments was caused by the increased accessibility of water to the Kr and Xe occluded in the fuel.

  10. Examination of fabrication conditions of acrylate-based hydrogel formulations for doxorubicin release and efficacy test for hepatocellular carcinoma cell.

    PubMed

    Bayramoglu, Gulay; Gozen, Damla; Ersoy, Gozde; Ozalp, V Cengiz; Akcali, K Can; Arica, M Yakup

    2014-01-01

    The objective of the present study was to develop 2-hydroxypropyl methacrylate-co-polyethylene methacrylate [p(HPMA-co-PEG-MEMA)] hydrogels that are able to efficiently entrap doxorubicin for the application of loco-regional control of the cancer disease. Systemic chemotherapy provides low clinical benefit while localized chemotherapy might provide a therapeutic advantage. In this study, effects of hydrogel properties such as PEG chains length, cross-linking density, biocompatibility, drug loading efficiency, and drug release kinetics were evaluated in vitro for targeted and controlled drug delivery. In addition, the characterization of the hydrogel formulations was conducted with swelling experiments, permeability tests, Fourier transform infrared, SEM, and contact angle studies. In these drug-hydrogel systems, doxorubicin contains amine group that can be expected a strong Lewis acid-base interaction between drug and polar groups of PEG chains, thus the drug was released in a timely fashion with an electrostatic interaction mechanism. It was observed that doxorubicin release from the hydrogel formulations decreased when the density of cross-linking, and drug/polymer ratio were increased while an increase in the PEG chains length of the macro-monomer (i.e. PEG-MEMA) in the hydrogel system was associated with an increase in water content and doxorubicin release. The biocompatibility of the hydrogel formulations has been investigated using two measures: cytotoxicity test (using lactate dehydrogenase assay) and major serum proteins adsorption studies. Antitumor activity of the released doxorubicin was assessed using a human SNU398 human hepatocellular carcinoma cell line. It was observed that doxorubicin released from all of our hydrogel formulations which remained biologically active and had the capability to kill the tested cancer cells.

  11. Licensing topical report: the measurement and modelling of time-dependent fission product release from failed HTGR fuel particles under accident conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Myers, B.F.; Morrissey, R.E.

    1980-04-01

    The release of fission products from failed fuel particles was measured under simulated accident (core heatup) conditions. A generic model and specific model parameters that describe delayed fission product release from the kernels of failed HTGR fuel particles were developed from the experimental results. The release of fission products was measured from laser-failed BISO ThO/sub 2/ and highly enriched (HEU) TRISO UC/sub 2/ particles that had been irradiated to a range of kernel burnups. The burnups were 0.25, 1.4, and 15.7% FIMA for ThO/sub 2/ particles and 23.5 and 74% FIMA for UC/sub 2/ particles. The fission products measured were nuclides of xenon, iodine, krypton, tellurium, and cesium.

  12. U.S. EPA Releases Monitoring Plan to Evaluate Conditions in the Animas and San Juan Rivers

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    WASHINGTON - The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency today released its final monitoring plan for the Animas and San Juan rivers following the Aug. 5, 2015, Gold King Mine incident. The agency also posted on its Gold King Mine website the results o

  13. Some Operational Characteristics of Glycine Release in Rat Retina: The Role of Reverse Mode Operation of Glycine Transporter Type-1 (GlyT-1) in Ischemic Conditions.

    PubMed

    Hanuska, Adrienn; Szénási, Gábor; Albert, Mihaly; Koles, Laszlo; Varga, Agoston; Szabo, Andras; Matyus, Peter; Harsing, Laszlo G

    2016-02-01

    Rat posterior eyecups containing the retina were prepared, loaded with [(3)H]glycine and superfused in order to determine its release originated from glycinergic amacrine cells and/or glial cells. Deprivation of oxygen and glucose from the Krebs-bicarbonate buffer used for superfusion evoked a marked increase of [(3)H]glycine release, an effect that was found to be external Ca(2+)-independent. Whereas oxygen and glucose deprivation increased [(3)H]glycine release, its uptake was reduced suggesting that energy deficiency shifts glycine transporter type-1 operation from normal to reverse mode. The increased release of [(3)H]glycine evoked by oxygen and glucose deprivation was suspended by addition of the non-competitive glycine transporter type-1 inhibitor NFPS and the competitive inhibitor ACPPB further suggesting the involvement of this transporter in the mediation of [(3)H]glycine release. Oxygen and glucose deprivation also evoked [(3)H]glutamate release from rat retina and the concomitantly occurring release of the NMDA receptor agonist glutamate and the coagonist glycine makes NMDA receptor pathological overstimulation possible in hypoxic conditions. [(3)H]Glutamate release was suspended by addition of the excitatory amino acid transporter inhibitor TBOA. Sarcosine, a substrate inhibitor of glycine transporter type-1, also increased [(3)H]glycine release probably by heteroexchange shifting transporter operation into reverse mode. This effect of sarcosine was also external Ca(2+)-independent and could be suspended by NFPS. Energy deficiency in retina induced by ouabain, an inhibitor of the Na(+)-K(+)-dependent ATPase, and by rotenone, a mitochondrial complex I inhibitor added with the glycolytic inhibitor 2-deoxy-D-glucose, led to increase of retinal [(3)H]glycine efflux. These effects of ouabain and rotenone/2-deoxy-D-glucose could also be blocked by NFPS pointed to the preferential reverse mode operation of glycine transporter type-1 as a consequence of

  14. Corticotropin-releasing factor type II (CRF-sub-2) receptors in the bed nucleus of the stria terminalis modulate conditioned defeat in Syrian hamsters (Mesocricetus auratus).

    PubMed

    Cooper, Matthew A; Huhman, Kim L

    2005-08-01

    In Syrian hamsters (Mesocricetus auratus), social defeat produces a subsequent increase in submissive and defensive behavior and a loss of normal territorial aggression, which the authors have called conditioned defeat. In this study, the authors investigated the effect of blocking corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF) Type I and Type II receptors on conditioned defeat. Intracerebroventricular infusion of the CRF-sub-2 receptor antagonist antisauvagine-30 prior to testing significantly reduced conditioned defeat compared with vehicle controls, whereas the CRF-sub-1 receptor antagonist CP-154,526 had no effect. Also, infusion of antisauvagine-30 into the bed nucleus of the stria terminalis (BNST) 15 min, but not immediately, prior to testing reduced conditioned defeat in a dose-dependent manner. The authors' results provide evidence that CRF-sub-2 receptors in the BNST, but not CRF-sub-1 receptors, are an important component in the neural circuitry regulating conditioned defeat.

  15. P2Y receptor mediated inhibitory modulation of noradrenaline release in response to electrical field stimulation and ischemic conditions in superfused rat hippocampus slices.

    PubMed

    Csölle, Cecília; Heinrich, Attila; Kittel, Agnes; Sperlágh, Beáta

    2008-07-01

    In this study, the inhibitory regulation of the release of noradrenaline (NA) by P2 receptors was investigated in hippocampus slices pre-incubated with [(3)H]NA. Electrical field stimulation (EFS; 2 Hz, 240 shocks, and 1 ms) released NA in an outside [Ca(2+)]-dependent manner, and agonists of P2Y receptors inhibited the EFS-evoked [(3)H]NA release with pharmacological profile similar to that of the P2Y(1) and P2Y(13) receptor subtypes. This inhibitory modulation was counteracted by bicuculline and 6-cyano-2,3-dihydroxy-7-nitro-quinoxaline + 2-amino-5-phosphonovalerate and 2-amino-4-phosphonobutyrate. In contrast, the excess release in response to 30 min combined oxygen and glucose deprivation was outside [Ca(2+)] independent, but still sensitive to the inhibition of both facilitatory P2X(1) and inhibitory P2Y(1) receptors. Whereas mRNA encoding P2Y(12) and P2Y(13) receptor subunits were expressed in the brainstem, P2Y(1) receptor immunoreactivity was localized to neuronal somata and dendrites innervated by the mossy fiber terminals in the CA3 region of the hippocampus, as well as somata of granule cells and interneurons in the dentate gyrus. In summary, in addition to the known facilitatory modulation via P2X receptors, EFS-evoked [(3)H]NA outflow in the hippocampus is subject to inhibitory modulation by P2Y(1)/P2Y(13) receptors. Furthermore, endogenous activation of both facilitatory and inhibitory P2 receptors may participate in the modulation of pathological NA release under ischemic-like conditions.

  16. Effect of ethanol, temperature, and gas flow rate on volatile release from aqueous solutions under dynamic headspace dilution conditions.

    PubMed

    Tsachaki, Maroussa; Gady, Anne-Laure; Kalopesas, Michalis; Linforth, Robert S T; Athès, Violaine; Marin, Michele; Taylor, Andrew J

    2008-07-09

    On the basis of a mechanistic model, the overall and liquid mass transfer coefficients of aroma compounds were estimated during aroma release when an inert gas diluted the static headspace over simple ethanol/water solutions (ethanol concentration = 120 mL x L(-1)). Studied for a range of 17 compounds, they were both increased in the ethanol/water solution compared to the water solution, showing a better mass transfer due to the presence of ethanol, additively to partition coefficient variation. Thermal imaging results showed differences in convection of the two systems (water and ethanol/water) arguing for ethanol convection enhancement inside the liquid. The effect of ethanol in the solution on mass transfer coefficients at different temperatures was minor. On the contrary, at different headspace dilution rates, the effect of ethanol in the solution helped to maintain the volatile headspace concentration close to equilibrium concentration, when the headspace was replenished 1-3 times per minute.

  17. A ketone/alcohol polymer for cycle of electrolytic hydrogen-fixing with water and releasing under mild conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kato, Ryo; Yoshimasa, Keisuke; Egashira, Tatsuya; Oya, Takahiro; Oyaizu, Kenichi; Nishide, Hiroyuki

    2016-09-01

    Finding a safe and efficient carrier of hydrogen is a major challenge. Recently, hydrogenated organic compounds have been studied as hydrogen storage materials because of their ability to stably and reversibly store hydrogen by forming chemical bonds; however, these compounds often suffer from safety issues and are usually hydrogenated with hydrogen at high pressure and/or temperature. Here we present a ketone (fluorenone) polymer that can be moulded as a plastic sheet and fixes hydrogen via a simple electrolytic hydrogenation at -1.5 V (versus Ag/AgCl) in water at room temperature. The hydrogenated alcohol derivative (the fluorenol polymer) reversibly releases hydrogen by heating (80 °C) in the presence of an aqueous iridium catalyst. Both the use of a ketone polymer and the efficient hydrogen fixing with water as a proton source are completely different from other (de)hydrogenated compounds and hydrogenation processes. The easy handling and mouldable polymers could suggest a pocketable hydrogen carrier.

  18. mTOR ensures increased release and reduced uptake of the organic osmolyte taurine under hypoosmotic conditions in mouse fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Lambert, Ian Henry; Jensen, Jane Vendelbo; Pedersen, Per Amstrup

    2014-06-01

    Mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) is a serine/threonine kinase that modulates translation in response to growth factors and alterations in nutrient availability following hypoxia and DNA damage. Here we demonstrate that mTOR activity in Ehrlich Lettré ascites (ELA) cells is transiently increased within minutes following osmotic cell swelling and that inhibition of phosphatidylinositol-3-phosphatase (PTEN) counteracts the upstream phosphatidylinositol kinase and potentiates mTOR activity. PTEN inhibition concomitantly potentiates swelling-induced taurine release via the volume-sensitive transporter for organic osmolytes and anion channels (VSOAC) and enhances swelling-induced inhibition of taurine uptake via the taurine-specific transporter (TauT). Chronic osmotic stress, i.e., exposure to hypotonic or hypertonic media for 24 h, reduces and increases mTOR activity in ELA cells, respectively. Using rapamycin, we demonstrate that mTOR inhibition is accompanied by reduction in TauT activity and increase in VSOAC activity in cells expressing high (NIH3T3 fibroblasts) or low (ELA) amounts of mTOR protein. The effect of mTOR inhibition on TauT activity reflects reduced TauT mRNA, TauT protein abundance, and an overall reduction in protein synthesis, whereas the effect on VSOAC is mimicked by catalase inhibition and correlates with reduced catalase mRNA abundance. Hence, mTOR activity favors loss of taurine following hypoosmotic cell swelling, i.e., release via VSOAC and uptake via TauT during acute hypotonic exposure is potentiated and reduced, respectively, by phosphorylation involving mTOR and/or the kinases upstream to mTOR. Decrease in TauT activity during chronic hypotonic exposure, on the other hand, involves reduction in expression/activity of TauT and enzymes in antioxidative defense.

  19. Modelling the impact of climatic conditions and plant species on the nitrogen release from mulch of legumes at the soil surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaudinat, Germain; Lorin, Mathieu; Valantin-morison, Muriel; Garnier, Patricia

    2015-04-01

    Cover crops provide multiple services to the agro ecosystem. Among them, the use of legumes as cover crop is one of the solutions for limiting the use of herbicides, mineral fertilizers, and insecticides. However, the dynamic of mineralization is difficult to understand because of the difficulty of measuring nitrogen release from mulch in field. Indeed, residues are degraded at the soil surface as mulch, while the nitrogen uptake by the main crop occurred simultaneously in the soil. This work aims to study the dynamics of nitrogen mineralization from legume residues through i) the use of a model able to describe the physical and biological dynamic of mulch and ii) a data set from a field experiment of intercropping systems "oilseed rape-legumes" from different species (grass pea, lentil, Berseem clover, field pea, vetch). The objective of the simulations is to identify the variations of expected quantities of nitrogen from different legumes. The soil-plant model of mulch decomposition PASTIS-Mulch was used to determine the nitrogen supply from mulch available for rapeseed. These simulation results were compared to the data collected in the experimental field of Grignon (France). We performed analyzes of biochemical and physical characteristics of legume residues and monitored the evolution of mulches (moisture, density, cover surface, biomass) in fields. PASTIS simulations of soil temperature, soil moisture, mulch humidity and mulch decomposition were close to the experimental results. The PASTIS model was suitable to simulate the dynamic of legume mulches in the case of "rape - legume" associations. The model simulated nitrogen restitution of aerial and root parts. We found a more rapid nitrogen release by grass pea than other species. Vetch released less nitrogen than the other species. The scenarios for climate conditions were : i) a freezing in December that causes the destruction of plants, or a destruction by herbicide in March, ii) a strong or a weak rainy

  20. Impact of Leaching Conditions on Constituents Release from Flue Gas Desulfurization Gypsum (FGDG) and FGDG-Soil Mixture

    EPA Science Inventory

    The interest in using Flue Gas Desulfurization Gypsum(FGDG) has increased recently. This study evaluates the leaching characteristics of trace elements in "modern" FGDG (produced after fly ash removal) and FGDG-mixed soil (SF) under different environmental conditions using rece...

  1. Enhancing the stability and ecological safety of mass-reared transgenic strains for field release by redundant conditional lethality systems

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Advances in the genetic manipulation of agriculturally important insects now allows the development of genetic sexing and male sterility systems for more highly efficient biologically-based population control programs, most notably SIT, in fruit pests throughout the world. Potentially, these condit...

  2. Valproic acid inhibits excess dopamine release in response to a fear-conditioned stimulus in the basolateral complex of the amygdala of methamphetamine-sensitized rats.

    PubMed

    Miyagi, Junko; Oshibuchi, Hidehiro; Kasai, Akiko; Inada, Ken; Ishigooka, Jun

    2014-05-05

    Valproic acid, an established antiepileptic and antimanic drug, has recently emerged as a promising emotion-stabilizing agent for patients with psychosis. Although dopamine transmission in the amygdala plays a key role in emotional processing, there has been no direct evidence about how valproic acid acts on the dopaminergic system in the brain during emotional processing. In the present study, we tested the effect of valproic acid on a trait marker of vulnerability to emotional stress in psychosis, which is excess dopamine release in response to a fear-conditioned stimulus (CS) in the basolateral complex of the amygdala of methamphetamine-sensitized rats. Extracellular dopamine was collected from the amygdala of freely moving methamphetamine-sensitized rats by in vivo microdialysis and was measured using high-performance liquid chromatography. During microdialysis, valproic acid was intraperitoneally injected followed by CS exposure. Valproic acid treatment decreased baseline levels of dopamine and also attenuated the excess dopamine release in response to the CS in the amygdala of methamphetamine-sensitized rats. The results prove that valproic acid inhibits spontaneous dopamine release and also attenuates excess dopaminergic signaling in response to emotional stress in the amygdala. These findings suggest that the mechanisms of the emotion-stabilizing effect of valproic acid in psychosis involve modulation of dopaminergic transmission in emotional processing.

  3. Bench-scale gasification of cedar wood--part II: effect of operational conditions on contaminant release.

    PubMed

    Aljbour, Salah H; Kawamoto, Katsuya

    2013-01-01

    Here, we present the evolution profile of tar in the product gas during cedar biomass gasification. We also discuss the evolution of other contaminants (H(2)S, COS, NH(3), HCN, and HCl). The cedar wood was gasified under various operating conditions in a bench-scale externally heated updraft gasifier; this was followed by thermal reforming. Tar levels in the product gas were significantly affected by the operating conditions used. At a gasification temperature of 923 K, there was no clear relation between the evolution of phenolic tar in the product gas as a function of residence time. The evolution of PAH tar at a low gasification temperature was lower than the evolution of phenolic tar. With increasing temperature, the proportion of PAH tar content became significant. At a gasification temperature of 1223 K, increasing the residence time reduced the content of PAH tar owing to a catalytic effect associated with ash generation at high temperatures. Increasing the steam-to-carbon (S/C) ratio under thermal conditions had a slight effect on PAH conversion. However, increasing the equivalence ratio (ER) effectively reduced the tar levels. The conversion of fuel-sulfur and fuel-nitrogen to volatile-sulfur and volatile-nitrogen, respectively, increased with increasing S/C ratio and ER. The evolutions of COS and HCN gases were much smaller than the evolution of H(2)S and NH(3). The evolution of HCl in the product gas decreased slightly with increasing ER. Increasing the S/C ratio decreased the HCl levels in the product gas. The effect of temperature on contaminant levels could not be fully understood due to limited availability of experimental data at various temperatures. We also compare our findings with data in the literature.

  4. [Recommendations for Releasing the Pelvic Binder After a Non-Invasive Pelvic Stabilisation Procedure Under Emergency Room Conditions].

    PubMed

    Schweigkofler, U; Wohlrath, B; Paffrath, T; Flohé, S; Wincheringer, D; Hoffmann, R; Trentzsch, H

    2016-10-01

    kinematics. 2) Assessment of the haemodynamic status. 3) Check of the need to open the pelvic binder for diagnostic/therapeutic measures before completing all diagnostic tests. 4) Assessment of the radiology diagnostic testing and release of the pelvic region. The result is a so-called "clear the pelvis algorithm" which describes a structured approach according to specific criteria and which specifies the circumstances under which the pelvic binder can be opened. Additional studies are necessary to analyse the applicability and safety of this algorithm in a clinical context. Our advice is not to "clear" the pelvis if no X-rays or CT scans of the pelvis have been carried out without (or with an opened) pelvic binder.

  5. Persistent efficacy and production benefits following use of extended-release injectable eprinomectin in grazing beef cattle under field conditions.

    PubMed

    Kunkle, B N; Williams, J C; Johnson, E G; Stromberg, B E; Yazwinski, T A; Smith, L L; Yoon, S; Cramer, L G

    2013-03-01

    Seven studies were conducted in commercial grazing operations to confirm anthelmintic efficacy, assess acceptability, and measure the productivity response of cattle to treatment with eprinomectin in an extended-release injectable formulation (ERI) when exposed to nematode infected pastures for 120 days. The studies were conducted under one protocol in the USA in seven locations (Arkansas, Idaho, Louisiana, Minnesota, Missouri, Oregon, and Wisconsin). Each study had 67-68 naturally infected animals for a total of 475 (226 female, 249 male castrate) Angus or beef-cross cattle. The animals weighed 133-335 kg prior to treatment and were approximately 3-12 months of age. The studies were conducted under a randomized block design based on pre-treatment body weights to sequentially form 17 replicates of four animals each within sex in each study. Animals within a replicate were randomly assigned to treatments, one to Eprinomectin ERI vehicle (control) and three to Eprinomectin ERI (5%, w/v eprinomectin). Treatments were administered at 1 mL/50 kg body weight once subcutaneously anterior to the shoulder. All animals in each study grazed one pasture throughout the observation period of 120 days. Cattle were weighed and fecal samples collected pre-treatment and on 28, 56, 84, and 120 days after treatment for fecal egg and lungworm larval counts. Positive fecal samples generally were cultured en masse to determine the nematode genera attributable to the gastrointestinal helminth infection. Bunostomum, Cooperia, Haemonchus, Nematodirus, Oesophagostomum, Ostertagia, and Trichostrongylus, when present, were referred to as strongylids. At all post-treatment sampling intervals, Eprinomectin ERI-treated cattle had significantly (P<0.05) lower strongylid egg counts than vehicle-treated controls, with ≥95% reduction after 120 days of grazing. Over this same period, Eprinomectin ERI-treated cattle gained more weight (43.9 lb/head) than vehicle-treated controls in all studies. This

  6. Proteome analysis of dormancy-released seeds of Fraxinus mandshurica Rupr. in response to re-dehydration under different conditions.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Peng; Liu, Di; Shen, Hailong; Li, Yuhua; Nie, Yuzhe

    2015-03-02

    Desiccation tolerance is the ability of orthodox seeds to achieve equilibrium with atmospheric relative humidity and to survive in this state. Understanding how orthodox seeds respond to dehydration is important for improving quality and long-term storage of seeds under low temperature and drought stress conditions. Long-term storage of seeds is an artificial situation, because in most natural situations a seed that has been shed may not remain in a desiccated state for very long, and if dormant it may undergo repeated cycles of hydration. Different types of seeds are differentially sensitive to desiccation and this directly affects long-term storage. For these reasons, many researchers are investigating loss of desiccation tolerance during orthodox seed development to understand how it is acquired. In this study, the orthodox seed proteome response of Fraxinus mandshurica Rupr. to dehydration (to a relative water content of 10%, which mimics seed dehydration) was investigated under four different conditions viz. 20 °C; 20 °C with silica gel; 1 °C; and 1 °C after pretreatment with Ca2+. Proteins from seeds dehydrated under different conditions were extracted and separated by two-dimensional difference gel electrophoresis (2D-DIGE). A total of 2919 protein spots were detected, and high-resolution 2D-DIGE indicated there were 27 differentially expressed. Seven of these were identified using MALDI TOF/TOF mass spectrometry. Inferences from bioinformatics annotations of these proteins established the possible involvement of detoxifying enzymes, transport proteins, and nucleotide metabolism enzymes in response to dehydration. Of the seven differentially abundant proteins, the amounts of six were down-regulated and one was up-regulated. Also, a putative acyl-coenzyme A oxidase of the glyoxylate cycle increased in abundance. In particular, the presence of kinesin-1, a protein important for regulation and cargo interaction, was up-regulated in seeds exposed to low

  7. The response of abyssal organisms to low pH conditions during a series of CO2-release experiments simulating deep-sea carbon sequestration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barry, J. P.; Buck, K. R.; Lovera, C.; Brewer, P. G.; Seibel, B. A.; Drazen, J. C.; Tamburri, M. N.; Whaling, P. J.; Kuhnz, L.; Pane, E. F.

    2013-08-01

    The effects of low-pH, high-pCO2 conditions on deep-sea organisms were examined during four deep-sea CO2 release experiments simulating deep-ocean C sequestration by the direct injection of CO2 into the deep sea. We examined the survival of common deep-sea, benthic organisms (microbes; macrofauna, dominated by Polychaeta, Nematoda, Crustacea, Mollusca; megafauna, Echinodermata, Mollusca, Pisces) exposed to low-pH waters emanating as a dissolution plume from pools of liquid carbon dioxide released on the seabed during four abyssal CO2-release experiments. Microbial abundance in deep-sea sediments was unchanged in one experiment, but increased under environmental hypercapnia during another, where the microbial assemblage may have benefited indirectly from the negative impact of low-pH conditions on other taxa. Lower abyssal metazoans exhibited low survival rates near CO2 pools. No urchins or holothurians survived during 30-42 days of exposure to episodic, but severe environmental hypercapnia during one experiment (E1; pH reduced by as much as ca. 1.4 units). These large pH reductions also caused 75% mortality for the deep-sea amphipod, Haploops lodo, near CO2 pools. Survival under smaller pH reductions (ΔpH<0.4 units) in other experiments (E2, E3, E5) was higher for all taxa, including echinoderms. Gastropods, cephalopods, and fish were more tolerant than most other taxa. The gastropod Retimohnia sp. and octopus Benthoctopus sp. survived exposure to pH reductions that episodically reached -0.3 pH units. Ninety percent of abyssal zoarcids (Pachycara bulbiceps) survived exposure to pH changes reaching ca. -0.3 pH units during 30-42 day-long experiments.

  8. Application of TOUGH2/EOS7R to modeling of radionuclide release from a low/intermediate level repository under two-phase conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Oldenburg, C.M.; Pruess, K.

    1996-06-01

    The generation of gas due to corrosion of repository waste packages under water-saturated conditions will give rise to pressure increases and two-phase flow conditions. We have developed a numerical simulator TOUGH2/EOS7R for modeling the two-phase flow and transport of a parent-daughter pair of radionuclides including the processes of adsorption, first-order decay, binary diffusion, and volatilization. TOUGH2/EOS7R is a descendant of EOS7, the water, brine and air module of TOUGH2. We apply TOUGH2/EOS7R to an example problem relevant to the disposal of low- and intermediate-level nuclear wastes in crystalline rock. The conceptual model and spatial discretization were provided to us by NAGRA. We demonstrate in preliminary simulations that to good approximation, the generation of hydrogen can be modeled using air as a proxy for hydrogen. Simulations of gas generation and subsequent flow and transport away from the repository demonstrate the use and flexibility of TOUGH2/EOS7R. By small modification in the code, users can printout data for calculating the fractional release curve (FR curve), which shows the instantaneous release rate from the repository.

  9. Acetylcholine release in the mesocorticolimbic dopamine system during cocaine seeking: conditioned and unconditioned contributions to reward and motivation.

    PubMed

    You, Zhi-Bing; Wang, Bin; Zitzman, Dawnya; Wise, Roy A

    2008-09-03

    Microdialysis was used to assess the contribution to cocaine seeking of cholinergic input to the mesocorticolimbic dopamine system in ventral tegmental area (VTA). VTA acetylcholine (ACh) was elevated in animals lever pressing for intravenous cocaine and in cocaine-experienced and cocaine-naive animals passively receiving similar "yoked" injections. In cocaine-trained animals, the elevations comprised an initial (first hour) peak to approximately 160% of baseline and a subsequent plateau of 140% of baseline for the rest of the cocaine intake period. In cocaine-naive animals, yoked cocaine injections raised ACh levels to the 140% plateau but did not cause the initial 160% peak. In cocaine-trained animals that received unexpected saline (extinction conditions) rather than the expected cocaine, the initial peak was seen but the subsequent plateau was absent. VTA ACh levels played a causal role and were not just a correlate of cocaine seeking. Blocking muscarinic input to the VTA increased cocaine intake; the increase in intake offset the decrease in cholinergic input, resulting in the same VTA dopamine levels as were seen in the absence of the ACh antagonists. Increased VTA ACh levels (resulting from 10 microM VTA neostigmine infusion) increased VTA dopamine levels and reinstated cocaine seeking in cocaine-trained animals that had undergone extinction; these effects were strongly attenuated by local infusion of a muscarinic antagonist and weakly attenuated by a nicotinic antagonist. These findings identify two cholinergic responses to cocaine self-administration, an unconditioned response to cocaine itself and a conditioned response triggered by cocaine-predictive cues, and confirm that these cholinergic responses contribute to the control of cocaine seeking.

  10. Basalt Weathering, Nutrient Uptake, And Carbon Release By An Exotic And A Native Arizona Grass Species Under Different Temperature Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gallas, G.; Dontsova, K.; Chorover, J.; Hunt, E.; Ravi, S.

    2010-12-01

    During this past summer, the National Science Foundation funded a 10-week Research Experience for Undergraduates (REU) program “Environmental and Earth Systems Research at Biosphere 2”. This program provides undergraduates with an opportunity to conduct guided research in environmental and Earth systems science and has resulted in this work. Biosphere 2 allows for the exploration of complex questions in Earth sciences because of its large scale and the precise control allowed over many experimental elements. The goal of this study was to observe plant-mediated weathering of granular basalt under two temperature conditions. Two grass species were studied, one native to Arizona: Tanglehead, Heteropogan contortus, and one exotic to Arizona: Buffelgrass, Pennisetum ciliar. The grasses were grown in pots located in the Desert and the Savannah Biomes in the Biosphere 2 to take advantage of a 4° C temperature difference. Understanding differences in how native and invasive grasses weather soil and take up nutrients may explain the mechanism behind current invasion of Sonoran Desert by exotic species and help predict response of native and invasive vegetation to expected increase in temperatures. Each biome also contained three replicate “control” pots without vegetation, and mixtures of the two grass species to observe possible competition between the species. Three factors were compared in this study: 1. Temperature: the same species of grass under two different temperature conditions 2. Species: Native Arizonan species vs. a species exotic to Arizona 3. Temporal: How the grasses use resources differently as they grow Leachate samples were collected and analyzed for pH, electrical conductivity, total organic carbon, total nitrogen, inorganic carbon by high temperature combustion coupled with infrared gas analysis; F-, Cl-, Br-, NO3-, NO2-, SO42-, and PO43- by ion chromatography; and cations and metals by ICP-MS. The data trends indicate that plants enhanced

  11. Short and long term release mechanisms of arsenic, selenium and boron from a tunnel-excavated sedimentary rock under in situ conditions.

    PubMed

    Tamoto, Shuichi; Tabelin, Carlito Baltazar; Igarashi, Toshifumi; Ito, Mayumi; Hiroyoshi, Naoki

    2015-01-01

    Sedimentary rocks of marine origin excavated from tunnel construction projects usually contain background levels of hazardous trace elements, but when exposed to the environment, they generate leachates with concentrations of arsenic (As), selenium (Se) and boron (B) exceeding the WHO guideline for drinking water. In this study, the leaching of As, Se and B was evaluated under in situ conditions at various flow patterns, particle size distributions and column thicknesses. The results showed that these trace elements were leached out of the rock via short and long term mechanisms. In the short term, all three elements were rapidly and simultaneously released due to the dissolution of soluble evaporite salts formed from entrapped sea water of the Cretaceous. After their rapid release, however, these trace elements behaved differently as a result of their contrasting adsorption affinities onto minerals like clays and Fe-oxyhydroxides, which were further influenced by the pH, presence of coexisting ions and speciation of the trace elements. Selenium was quickly and easily transported out of the columns because it was mostly present as the very mobile selenate ion (Se[VI]). In comparison, the migration of As and B was hindered by adsorption reactions onto mineral phases of the rock. Boron was initially the least mobile among the three because of its preferential adsorption onto clay minerals that was further enhanced by the slightly alkaline pH and high concentrations of Ca(2+) and Na(+). However, it was gradually re-mobilized in the latter part of the experiments because it was only weakly adsorbed via outer sphere complexation reactions. In the long term, the rock continued to release substantial amounts of As, Se and B via pyrite oxidation and adsorption/desorption reactions, which were regulated by the temperature and rainfall intensity/frequency on site.

  12. Delayed simultaneous release mechanism

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moyer, X. W.; Webb, J. B. (Inventor)

    1973-01-01

    The disclosed appendage release mechanism is particularly adapted for use with spacecraft operating with despin mechanisms and releasable appendages. It includes a flexible loop and a number of appendage releasing devices which are attached to the flexible loop. The appendage releasing devices are made up of piston-cams and ball latches which hold the appendages as long as the flexible loop is maintained in a taut condition, but which release the appendages upon relaxation of the flexible loop. The flexible loop remains taut as long as the despin weights remain attached, but relaxes when the despin weights are released.

  13. Increased belowground C release during initial plant development of Populus deltoides x nigra grown under light and C reserve limited conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Studer, Mirjam S.; Siegwolf, Rolf T. W.; Schmidt, Michael W. I.; Abiven, Samuel

    2014-05-01

    Plants might be a key factor for the long-term stabilisation of carbon (C) in the soil, e.g. through enhanced physical protection of root-derived C against microbial decomposition in soil aggregates. On the other hand C released by the plants into the soil might promote the decomposition of native soil organic matter (SOM) through the stimulation of microbial activity. We measured the C budget of developing plant-soil systems (Populus deltoides x nigra, Cambisol soil) in the laboratory under controlled environmental conditions. In order to distinguish plant-derived from native C in the SOM and the soil CO2 efflux, we labelled the poplar shoots continuously with 13C-CO2 from first emergence of leaves (sprouting from stem cuttings). Throughout the experiment the CO2 fluxes (photosynthetic assimilation, dark respiratory loss, soil CO2 efflux) were measured frequently (every 30 min) and the 13C was traced in the soil CO2 efflux (1-2 times a week). After 10 weeks the plant-soil systems were destructively harvested and the distribution of the 13C distribution was analysed. The plants developed slowly (compared to previous experiments), most likely due to limitation in C reserves (long term cutting storage) and C supply (low light intensities). The amount of 13C recovered in the roots, microbial biomass and soil CO2 efflux was directly correlated with the leaf area of the different plant individuals. After 3-4 weeks of plant development we observed a high peak in the total soil CO2 efflux. During this time the relative belowground C release was increased massively over the basal rate of 17 % of net C assimilated, whereby the variability between the plant individuals was large. The smallest plants, i.e. the plants that were most resource limited, obtained the highest belowground C release accounting at the peak time for up to 57 % of net assimilated C. We hypothesize that the plants released specific compounds, which either directly (enzymatically) or indirectly (priming

  14. Spontaneous release of angiotensin converting enzyme and interleukin 1 beta from peripheral blood monocytes from patients with rheumatoid arthritis under a serum free condition.

    PubMed Central

    Goto, M; Fujisawa, M; Yamada, A; Okabe, T; Takaku, F; Sasano, M; Nishioka, K

    1990-01-01

    Angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) and interleukin 1 activities were assayed simultaneously in the serum free medium from the unstimulated peripheral blood monocytes from 32 patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA), 11 patients with osteoarthritis, and 25 normal controls matched for age and sex. Angiotensin converting enzyme activity was raised in most (29/32) patients with RA and interleukin 1 activity (most of which was interleukin 1 beta) was enhanced in 11/32 patients with RA, while monocytes from only two patients with osteoarthritis, but from none of the controls, secreted a small amount of ACE alone in the culture condition. Monocytes from patients with early RA (disease duration less than 3 years) released significantly more ACE and interleukin 1 than those from late stage RA (disease duration greater than or equal to 3 years). PMID:2157375

  15. The Effect of Ethanol Addition to Gasoline on Low- and Intermediate-Temperature Heat Release under Boosted Conditions in Kinetically Controlled Engines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vuilleumier, David Malcolm

    The detailed study of chemical kinetics in engines has become required to further advance engine efficiency while simultaneously lowering engine emissions. This push for higher efficiency engines is not caused by a lack of oil, but by efforts to reduce anthropogenic carbon dioxide emissions, that cause global warming. To operate in more efficient manners while reducing traditional pollutant emissions, modern internal combustion piston engines are forced to operate in regimes in which combustion is no longer fully transport limited, and instead is at least partially governed by chemical kinetics of combusting mixtures. Kinetically-controlled combustion allows the operation of piston engines at high compression ratios, with partially-premixed dilute charges; these operating conditions simultaneously provide high thermodynamic efficiency and low pollutant formation. The investigations presented in this dissertation study the effect of ethanol addition on the low-temperature chemistry of gasoline type fuels in engines. These investigations are carried out both in a simplified, fundamental engine experiment, named Homogeneous Charge Compression Ignition, as well as in more applied engine systems, named Gasoline Compression Ignition engines and Partial Fuel Stratification engines. These experimental investigations, and the accompanying modeling work, show that ethanol is an effective scavenger of radicals at low temperatures, and this inhibits the low temperature pathways of gasoline oxidation. Further, the investigations measure the sensitivity of gasoline auto-ignition to system pressure at conditions that are relevant to modern engines. It is shown that at pressures above 40 bar and temperatures below 850 Kelvin, gasoline begins to exhibit Low-Temperature Heat Release. However, the addition of 20% ethanol raises the pressure requirement to 60 bar, while the temperature requirement remains unchanged. These findings have major implications for a range of modern engines

  16. Effect of ceramic conversion treatments on the surface damage and nickel ion release of NiTi alloys under fretting corrosion conditions.

    PubMed

    Dong, H; Ju, X; Yang, H; Qian, L; Zhou, Z

    2008-02-01

    Recent researches have demonstrated that surface modification can improve the fretting wear resistance of NiTi alloys in air or enhance their aqueous corrosion resistance without fretting. However, little is known about the behaviour of surface engineered NiTi under fretting corrosion conditions. This is important for such body implants as orthodontic arch wires and orthopedic bone fixation devices because they need to withstand the combined attack of corrosion from body fluid and mechanical fretting. In this study, a NiTi alloy was ceramic conversion (CC) treated at 400 and 650 degrees C. The effect of the surface treatment on the fretting corrosion behaviour of NiTi alloy was investigated using fretting corrosion tests in the Ringer's solution. The experimental results have shown that the CC treatment can convert the surface of NiTi into a TiO2 layer, which can effectively improve the fretting corrosion resistance of NiTi alloy and significantly reduce Ni ion release into the Ringer's solution. Detailed SEM observations revealed that the untreated samples were severely damaged by adhesion and delamination; the high temperature (HT) (650 degrees C/1 h) treated samples were damaged mainly by spallation and adhesion; and the low temperature (LT) (400 degrees C/50 h) treated samples were characterised by mild abrasion. Mild oxidation and corrosion were also observed for all three types of samples tested under fretting corrosion conditions.

  17. In vitro conditions for the study of the in vivo performance of sustained-release theophylline matrix tablets administered in fasted conditions and with a high-fat diet.

    PubMed

    Andonaegui, M T; Barría, J L; Thielemann, A M; Seitz, C; Gai, M N

    1999-11-01

    Dissolution profiles of theophylline (TP) from three types of sustained-release (SR) matrix tablets (plastic [PL], lipid [LP], and hydrophilic [HP]) in different dissolution media, with and without enzymes, were established. Also investigated was the influence of a treatment of the tablets with peanut oil prior to the dissolution test. The in vivo behavior of the tablets under the fasted state and with the concomitant administration with a high-fat diet was previously evaluated; the diet produced changes in the absorption profiles for the three matrix tablets in comparison with fasted administration. Level A correlations were obtained between cumulative percentage dissolved (CPD) and cumulative percentage absorbed (CPA). For the fasted condition, better correlations were obtained with water as the dissolution medium for the HP and LP matrix; for PL matrix, the best correlation was obtained with a medium with gradual change of pH. The pretreatment with peanut oil showed better correlations for the fed state.

  18. The Anorexigenic Peptide Neuromedin U (NMU) Attenuates Amphetamine-Induced Locomotor Stimulation, Accumbal Dopamine Release and Expression of Conditioned Place Preference in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Vallöf, Daniel; Vestlund, Jesper; Engel, Jörgen A.; Jerlhag, Elisabet

    2016-01-01

    Amphetamine dependence, besides its substantial economical consequence, is a serious cause of mortality and morbidity. By investigations of the neurochemical correlates through which addictive drugs, such as amphetamine, activate the mesoaccumbal dopamine system unique targets for treatment of drug addiction can be identified. This reward link consists of a dopamine projection from the ventral tegmental area to the nucleus accumbens (NAc) suggesting that these brain areas are important for reward. The physiological function of gut-brain peptides has expanded beyond food intake modulation and involves regulation of drug reinforcement. A novel candidate for reward regulation is the anorexigenic peptide neuromedin U (NMU). We therefore investigated the effects of intracerebroventricular (icv) administration of NMU on amphetamine’s well-documented effects on the mesoaccumbal dopamine system, i.e. locomotor stimulation and accumbal dopamine release in mice. In addition, the effect of accumbal NMU administration on locomotor activity was examined. The effect of NMU, icv or intra-NAc, on the expression of conditioned place preference (CPP) was elucidated. Firstly, we showed that icv administration of NMU attenuate the amphetamine-induced locomotor stimulation, accumbal dopamine release and expression of CPP in mice. Secondly, we found that a lower dose of NMU (icv) reduce the amphetamine-induced locomotor stimulation in mice. Thirdly, we demonstrated that NMU administration into the NAc block the ability of amphetamine to cause a locomotor stimulation in mice. However, accumbal NMU administration did not attenuate the amphetamine-induced expression of CPP in mice. Our novel data suggest that central NMU signalling is involved in development of amphetamine dependence. PMID:27139195

  19. Development of Novel Delivery System for Cardiovascular Drug Molsidomine: Influence of Synthesis Method and Conditions on Molsidomine Release From Its Composites With Hydrophilic Silica In Vitro.

    PubMed

    Dolinina, Ekaterina S; Parfenyuk, Elena V

    2016-06-01

    Composites of cardiovascular drug molsidomine with silica materials (unmodified and mercaptopropyl modified) were prepared by 2 methods, adsorption and sol-gel technology. The effects of sol pH and release medium pH (1.6 and 7.4) as well as molsidomine loading on the drug release kinetics were also investigated. Mechanisms of molsidomine release from all the synthesized composites were elucidated. The obtained results showed that different principles of the composites formation (adsorption or sol-gel) lead to their different release behavior because the composites obtained by the indicated methods differ by distribution of the drug over the silica matrixes and their capability to degradation. The drug release from the composites prepared by adsorption is characterized by a high burst effect, sustained release up to 36 h irrespective of release medium pH. The release behavior of sol-gel composites depends on the amount of the loaded drug and release medium pH. These effects were explained by different stability of the sol-gel composites with high and low loading in acidic and neutral media. In general case, the ascertained effects are independent on chemistry of the silica surface organic groups.

  20. Passageway: A Novel Approach to Success of Conditional Release - Principles and Constructs of the Model Residential Program for the Forensic Mentally III Patient.

    PubMed

    Melnick, Ilan

    2016-03-01

    With the advent of psychotropic medications and with the deinstitutionalization of psychiatry starting in 1968, patients were prematurely discharged from forensic state hospitals. Due to lack of resources, psychiatric forensic patients ended up in the correctional system or homeless with the reduction of psychiatric beds in forensic and civil state hospitals. Lacking proper training and medication management, the recidivism rate of this population was close to 10% for rearrest and about 35% for revocation of conditional release (CR; Manguno-Mire et al., ). A new treatment modality was created to successfully transition patients from the forensic state hospital system to the community. This article describes and analyzes the principles and constructs of Passageway, a model residential program for patients found not guilty by reason of insanity or those incompetent to proceed to CR. The CR allows for a program like Passageway to be successful in transitioning patients back into the community. This is accomplished with minimal government funding, and since 1982 has resulted in a 0% recidivism rate, for any known arrests or convictions and for recommittal of a felony, defined in the state of Florida as, "any criminal offense that is punishable under the laws of this state, or that would be punishable, if committed in this state, by death or imprisonment in a state penitentiary. " (Fla. Stat. § 775.08). Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  1. A study of the effects of curing and storage conditions on controlled release diphenhydramine HCl pellets coated with Eudragit NE30D.

    PubMed

    Lin, Angela Y; Muhammad, Nouman A; Pope, David; Augsburger, Larry L

    2003-08-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the possible impacts of curing and storage conditions on dissolution of controlled release diphenhydramine HCl pellets coated with EUDRAGIT NE30D. The accumulative percentage of dissolved active drug was used as the response in three statistical experimental design studies: 32 full factorial, Box-Behnken and 2(3) designs. By only considering curing temperature and curing time, both factors were found to significantly affect the dissolution rate, but curing temperature had greater impact than curing time. When considering polymer coating level, curing temperature and curing time together, polymer coating level and curing temperature had important effects on dissolution rate, but curing time became insignificant among these three factors. The addition of the water-soluble additives hydroxypropyl methyl cellulose and mannitol made coating films less sensitive to curing, and there was little or no difference in their effect in the model studied. Lower levels of a water-insoluble additive (kaolin) had little impact on dissolution; however, when the level of water-insoluble additive increased, the coating film became more sensitive to curing, especially at the lower curing temperature of 30 degrees C.

  2. Effectiveness and safety of a long-acting, once-daily, two-phase release formulation of methylphenidate (Ritalin ® LA) in school children under daily practice conditions.

    PubMed

    Haertling, Fabian; Mueller, Beate; Bilke-Hentsch, Oliver

    2015-06-01

    Long-acting (LA) preparations of methylphenidate allow for once-daily dosing; however, pharmacokinetics may vary and depend on food intake. The objective was to evaluate effectiveness of a two-phase release formulation (Ritalin(®) LA) under daily practice conditions. This was a prospective, multicenter, observational study in Germany. Eligibility and dosing were determined by the physician based on the drug label. Outcomes included changes over 3 months of treatment in assessments of effect duration, clinical global impression (CGI), and quality of life (ILK). In 101 sites, 262 patients (197 boys, 63 girls, and two unknown) with a mean age of 10.9 years were enrolled; 50 were treated for the first time; 212 switched medication to Ritalin(®) LA. After 3 months, CGI improved in 59.4 % of patients, and well-being overall was rated as good by 61.0 % of parents and 63.7 % of children. Based on parents' assessment, the proportion of children suffering from strong disease burden decreased from 40.7 to 15.1 %. In 123 insufficient responders to previous ADHD medications, benefit from Ritalin(®) LA was above average and effect duration was significantly prolonged as compared to pretreatment. Overall, 28 patients (10.7 %) had treatment-related adverse events with one case being serious; 23 patients (8.8 %) discontinued therapy, 7 (2.7 %) due to poor treatment response; and 212 patients (81 %) continued treatment beyond the study. In line with clinical trial data, Ritalin(®) LA provides significant benefit also under routine practice conditions.

  3. Release of copper from sintered tungsten-bronze shot under different pH conditions and its potential toxicity to aquatic organisms.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Vernon G; Santore, Robert C; McGill, Ian

    2007-03-01

    Sintered tungsten-bronze is a new substitute for lead shot, and is about to be deposited in and around the wetlands of North America. This material contains copper in the alloyed form of bronze. This in vitro study was performed according to U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service criteria to determine the dissolution rate of copper from the shot, and to assess the toxic risk that it may present to aquatic organisms. The dissolution of copper from tungsten-bronze shot, pure copper shot, and glass beads was measured in a buffered, moderately hard, synthetic water of pH 5.5, 6.6, and 7.8 over a 28-day period. The dissolution of copper from both the control copper shot and the tungsten-bronze shot was affected significantly by the pH of the water and the duration of dissolution (all p values<0.000). The rate of copper release from tungsten bronze shot was 30 to 50 times lower than that from the copper shot, depending on pH (p<0.0000). The observed expected environmental concentration of copper released from tungsten-bronze shot after 28 days was 0.02 microg/L at pH 7.8, and 0.4 microg/L at pH 5.6, using a loading and exposure scenario specific in a U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service protocol. Ratio Quotient values derived from the highest EEC observed in this study (0.4 microg/L), and the copper toxic effect levels for all aquatic species listed in the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency ambient water quality criteria database, were all far less than the 0.1 criterion value. Given the conditions stipulated by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, heavy loading from discharged tungsten-bronze shot would not pose a toxic risk to potable water, or to soil. Consequently, it would appear that no toxic risks to aquatic organisms will attend the use of tungsten-bronze shot of the approved composition. Given the likelihood that sintered tungsten-bronze of the same formula will be used for fishing weights, bullets, and wheel balance weights, it

  4. Omnigen-AF reduces basal plasma cortisol, AWA cortisol release to adrencocorticotropic hormone or corticotrophin releasing hormone & vasopressin in lactating dairy cows under thermoneutral or acute heat stress conditions.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Differences in the adrenal cortisol response of OmniGen-AF (OG) supplemented dairy cows to a corticotrophin releasing hormone (CRH) and vasopressin (VP) or an adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) challenge when housed at different temperature-humidity indices (THI) were studied. Holstein cows (n=12; 1...

  5. Metabolically active extracellular vesicles released from hepatocytes under drug-induced liver-damaging conditions modify serum metabolome and might affect different pathophysiological processes.

    PubMed

    Royo, Felix; Palomo, Laura; Mleczko, Justyna; Gonzalez, Esperanza; Alonso, Cristina; Martínez, Ibon; Pérez-Cormenzana, Miriam; Castro, Azucena; Falcon-Perez, Juan M

    2017-02-15

    Hepatocytes are involved in the endogenous and drug metabolism; many of the enzymes involved in those processes are incorporated into extracellular vesicles and secreted into the bloodstream. Liver-damaging conditions modify the molecular cargo of those vesicles significantly. However, no information about the effect of these hepatic vesicles on the extracellular environment is available. Drug-induced liver damage increases the number of circulating extracellular vesicles and affects the release and content of hepatocyte-derived vesicles. In this work, we evaluated the metabolic effect of these vesicles on the composition of the serum. We performed a targeted ultra-high performance liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (UHPLC-MS) metabolomics analysis of serum samples. The samples had been first incubated with hepatic extracellular vesicles from hepatocytes challenged with acetaminophen or diclofenac. The incubation affected the serum levels of 67 metabolites, such as amino acids and different species of lipids. The metabolites included various species of phosphatidylcholines and phosphatidylethanolamines. These compounds are the components of biological membranes; our observations suggest that the vesicles might take part in remodelling and maintenance of the membranes. Alterations in the levels of some other serum metabolites might have deleterious consequences, for example, the tetracosanoic acid with its cardiovascular effects. However, some of the metabolites whose levels were increased, including alpha-linoleic and tauroursodeoxycholic acids, have been reported to have a protective effect. Our targeted metabolomics analysis indicated that the hepatic extracellular vesicles act as nano-metabolic machines supplying the extracellular environment with the means to integrate diverse tissue responses. In conclusion, we show that the hepatic extracellular vesicles are metabolically active and might play a role in the physiopathological response to hepatic insults

  6. Effectiveness of melatonin and controlled internal drug release device treatment on reproductive performance of buffalo heifers during out-of-breeding season under tropical conditions.

    PubMed

    Ramadan, T A; Sharma, R K; Phulia, S K; Balhara, A K; Ghuman, S S; Singh, I

    2014-12-01

    Sixteen Murrah buffalo heifers, divided into control and treatment groups of eight animals each, were used to study the effect of melatonin and controlled internal drug release (CIDR) device treatment on the resumption of ovarian activity during out-of-breeding season (summer solstice). Treated group was implanted with melatonin (18 mg of melatonin per 50 kg of body weight) for 45 days and then heifers of both groups received CIDR for 9 days. All heifers received intramuscular 500 IU eCG on the day before CIDR removal and 10 μg GnRH on the day after CIDR withdrawal. All animals were subjected to estrus detection daily. Blood sampling in conjunction with transrectal ultrasonography were performed twice weekly to determine serum concentrations of melatonin, progesterone, LH, and antioxidant enzyme activities, as well as to monitor the ovarian follicular activity. Melatonin treatment resulted in an increase (P < 0.01) in serum melatonin and a decrease (P < 0.01) in serum progesterone and LH. In addition, melatonin had no significant effect on the frequency of LH pulses. Furthermore, melatonin treatment increased (P < 0.01) the diameter of the largest follicle and the number of large follicles between Days 0 and 35 of melatonin treatment. However, melatonin exhibited superior ability to maintain CL at 21 days after artificial insemenation (AI) and increased the percentage of conception to threefold higher than control. In conclusion, melatonin implantation successfully improved the diameter of largest follicles and the ability to maintain CL at 21 days after AI in buffalo heifers during out-of-breeding season under tropical conditions.

  7. Release of Reactive Halogen Species from Sea-Salt Aerosols under Tropospheric Conditions with/without the Influence of Organic Matter in Smog-Chamber Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balzer, N.; Behnke, W.; Bleicher, S.; Krueger, H.; Ofner, J.; Siekmann, F.; Zetzsch, C.

    2008-12-01

    Experiments to investigate the release of reactive halogen species from sea-salt aerosol and the influence of organic matter were performed in an aerosol smog-chamber (3500 l), made of Teflon film (FEP 200A, Dupont). Smog chamber facilities at lowered temperature (coolable down to -25°C) enable us to simulate these reactions under polar, tropospheric conditions. First experiments were performed to investigate the production of atomic Br and Cl without the impact of organic aerosol. Br and Cl play an important role in atmospheric ozone depletion, particularly regarding ozone depletion events (bromine explosion) during polar spring. In these studies, the aerosol was generated by atomizing salt solutions containing the typical Br/Cl ratio of 1/660 in seawater by an ultrasonic nebulizer and increasing the Br content up to sixfold. To ensure the aqueous surface of the aerosol, the experiments were performed at relative humidities above 76%. We determined the atomic Cl and OH-radical concentrations from the simultaneous consumption of four reference hydrocarbons. The Br-radical concentration was calculated on the basis of ozone depletion. Organic aerosol may take part in these reaction cycles by halogenation and production of volatile organic halogens. Further experiments are planned to add organic aerosol for mechanistic and kinetic studies on the influence of secondary organic aerosols (SOA) and humic-like substances (HULIS) on bromine explosion. The formation of the secondary organic aerosol and the determination of possible halogenated gaseous and solid organic products will be studied using longpath-FTIR, DRIFTS, ATR-FTIR, GC-FID, GC-ECD, GC-MS, TPD-MS and DMA-CNC.

  8. A qualitative study of the retention and release of volatile gases in JSC-1A lunar soil simulant at room temperature under ultrahigh vacuum (UHV) conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patrick, Edward L.; Mandt, K. E.; Escobedo, S. M.; Winters, G. S.; Mitchell, J. N.; Teolis, B. D.

    2015-07-01

    We conducted a qualitative study to simulate the flux of volatile gases expected to occur at the lunar surface due to cometary impact or lunar outgassing events. A small sample cell containing 8.8 g of JSC-1A lunar soil simulant in a vacuum system with a base pressure of 1.5 × 10-8 Torr was exposed to various gases using dynamic pressure dosing at room temperature to observe any retention of those gases as a function of the exposure times, temperatures and pressures used. Gases included pure argon, a five-component gas mixture (H2, He, Ne, N2, Ar), a simulated Mars atmospheric mixture (CO2, N2, Ar, CO, O2), and a simulated Titan mixture (N2, CH4). Results at exposure pressures of approximately 1.5 × 10-8 Torr above background showed no observable retention of rare gases, slight retention of molecular gases, but surface retention of the triatomic gas CO2 occurred at room temperature with a time to reach equilibrium of greater than 10 min, which was an unanticipated result. Despite several bakeouts and months under ultrahigh vacuum (UHV) conditions, trace levels of atmospheric gases continued to evolve from the simulant. Mechanical and optical probing of the simulant surface increased this latent gas evolution, particularly for CO2 and CO, with some evidence also for the release of CH4. We assert our results are, by analogy, applicable to protocols and instrumentation needed for conducting analytical chemistry aboard future landed lunar missions.

  9. Exocytosis sensitivity to growth hormone-releasing hormone in subsets of GH cells in rats under different corticosterone conditions. Ultrastructural study using microwave irradiation for fixation and immunocytochemistry.

    PubMed

    Ozawa, Hitoshi; Han, Fang; Kawata, Mitsuhiro

    2004-12-01

    Growth hormone (GH) cells in the rat anterior pituitary have been morphologically classified into three subtypes: type I (mature) containing large secretory granules about 350 nm in diameter, type II (intermediate) containing a mixture of large and small granules, and type III (immature) containing small granules about 150 nm in diameter. However, the functional implications of morphological heterogeneity, especially the different sensitivities to growth hormone-releasing hormone (GRH) under different corticosteroid conditions have not been elucidated to date. In the present study, by application of microwave irradiation (MWI) for fixation and immunocytochemistry, new findings of the exocytotic response have been revealed among the subsets of GH cells following adrenalectomy (ADX), corticosterone treatment and/or GRH treatment. The MWI gave effective results for fixation, especially for the permeability of the fixative, and showed good results for immunoelectron microscopy using the protein-A gold method. Moreover, the use of MWI greatly shortened the fixation, processing and immunolabeling times without compromising the quality of ultrastructural preservation and the specificity of labeling. The number of exocytotic figures was low in all subtypes of GH cells in the sham-operated control rats. GRH treatment induced a significant increase in exocytosis in each subtype of GH cells, particularly in type I (mature) and type II (intermediate) GH cells in the control rats. GRH injection to rats for 4 days after ADX also showed an increase in exocytosis, but the degree was significantly less in comparison with the GRH injection in the control group. Corticosterone replacement given to ADX rats induced a clear recovery of the exocytotic response to GRH to the control level. Serum GH content measured by radioimmunoassay correlated with these morphological results. These results suggest that the secretion of GH stimulated by GRH is closely related to corticosteroids, and

  10. Comparative growth performance of pigs immunised with a gonadotrophin releasing factor vaccine with surgically castrated pigs and entire boars raised under conventionally managed conditions.

    PubMed

    Fuchs, Thilo; Nathues, Heiko; Koehrmann, Annika; Andrews, Stuart; Brock, Fiona; Klein, Günter; grosse Beilage, Elisabeth

    2011-01-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the effect of using a gonadotrophin releasing factor (GnRF) vaccine on growth performance of male pigs. Vaccinated pigs were compared with surgically castrated pigs and entire males under conventionally managed farm conditions. Male pigs were randomly assigned to three treatment groups: pigs surgically castrated during the first week of life (group "C", n=274), pigs immunised twice during the fattening period with a GnRF vaccine, the first when 13-14 weeks of age and the second when 20-21 weeks of age (group "V" n=280) and entire males (group "E", n=56). Average daily weight gain (ADG) was measured during the study. Additionally, feed conversion ratio (FCR) as defined by feed intake/weight gain and feed consumption was assessed during the fattening period. No difference in the ADG during the fattening period could be determined between "C" and "V". From the start of the study until slaughter at study day 160/173 the ADG in group "E" was lower (625 g/day; P) than in group "C" (681 g/day; P < 0.001) and group "V" (675 g/day; P < 0.01). The FCR during the fattening period until study day 160, three days before the first batch of pigs were slaughtered at 24-25 weeks of age, was higher in group"C" (2.72 kg feed intake/kg weight gain) compared with group "V" (2.44 kg feed intake/kg weight gain; P < 0.001) and group "E" (2.44 kg feed intake/kg weight gain; P <0.01). Pigs in group "V" performed similarly to those in group "E" until the second vaccination (day 135) after which time they showed a substantial increase in feed intake and ADG, while retaining an FCR advantage over group C.

  11. Effect of the protonophore carbonyl cyanide-p-trifluoromethoxyphenyl-hydrazon on the glutamate release from rat brain nerve terminals under altered gravity conditions.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borisova, T.; Krisanova, N.

    L-glutamate acts within the mammalian central nervous system as the predominant excitatory neurotransmitter and as a potent neurotoxin The balance between these physiological and pathological actions of glutamate is thought to be kept in check by the rapid removal of the neurotransmitter from the synaptic cleft The majority of uptake is mediated by the high-affinity Na -dependent glutamate transporters Depolarization leads to stimulation of glutamate efflux mediated by reversal of the high-affinity glutamate transporters The effects of the protonophore carbonyl cyanide-p-trifluoromethoxyphenyl-hydrazon FCCP on the glutamate release from isolated nerve terminals rat brain synaptosomes were investigated in control and after centrifuge-induced hypergravity rats were rotated in a long-arm centrifuge at ten-G during one-hour period The treatment of synaptosomes with 1 mu M FCCP during 11 min resulted in the increase in L- 14 C glutamate release by 23 0 pm 2 3 of total accumulated synaptosomal label in control animals and 24 0 pm 2 3 animals subjected to hypergravity FCCP evoked release of L- 14 C glutamate from synaptosomes was not altered in animals exposed to hypergravity as compared to control Glutamate transport is of electrogenic nature and thus depends on the membrane potential The high-KCl stimulated L- 14 C glutamate release in Ca 2 -free media occurred due to reversal of the glutamate transporters Carrier --mediated release of L- 14 C glutamate 6 min slightly increased as a result of

  12. Multicomponent Implant Releasing Dexamethasone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nikkola, L.; Vapalahti, K.; Ashammakhi, N.

    2008-02-01

    Several inflammatory conditions are usually treated with corticosteroids. There are various problems like side effects with traditional applications of steroids, e.g. topical, or systemic routes. Local drug delivery systems have been studied and developed to gain more efficient administration with fewer side effects. Earlier, we reported on developing Dexamethasone (DX) releasing biodegradable fibers. However, their drug release properties were not satisfactory in terms of onset of drug release. Thus, we assessed the development of multicomponent (MC) implant to enhance earlier drug release from such biodegradable fibers. Poly (lactide-co-glycolide) (PLGA) and 2 wt-% and 8 wt-% DX were compounded and extruded with twin-screw extruder to form of fibers. Some of the fibers were sterilized to obtain a change in drug release properties. Four different fiber classes were studied: 2 wt-%, 8 wt-%, sterilized 2 wt-%, and sterilized 8 wt-%. 3×4 different DX-releasing fibers were then heat-pressed to form one multicomponent rod. Half of the rods where sterilized. Drug release was measured from initial fibers and multicomponent rods using a UV/VIS spectrometer. Shear strength and changes in viscosity were also measured. Drug release studies showed that drug release commenced earlier from multicomponent rods than from component fibers. Drug release from multicomponent rods lasted from day 30 to day 70. The release period of sterilized rods extended from day 23 to day 57. When compared to the original component fibers, the drug release from MC rods commenced earlier. The initial shear strength of MC rods was 135 MPa and decreased to 105 MPa during four weeks of immersion in phosphate buffer solution. Accordingly, heat pressing has a positive effect on drug release. After four weeks in hydrolysis, no disintegration was observed.

  13. Pre-release assessment of impact on Arundo donax by the candidate biological control agents, Tetramesa romana (Hymenoptera: Eurytomidae) and Rhizaspidiotus donacis (Homoptera: Diaspididae) under quarantine conditions

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Impact by two potential biological control agents, Tetramesa romana Walker and Rhizaspidiotus donacis (Leonardi), on the invasive weed, giant reed, Arundo donax L., was assessed in a quarantine greenhouse before release. Tetramesa romana alone and T. romana plus R. donacis significantly damaged A. ...

  14. Migratory-stage sea lamprey Petromyzon marinus stop responding to conspecific damage-released alarm cues after 4 h of continuous exposure in laboratory conditions

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Imre, Istvan; Di Rocco, Richard T.; McClure, Haley; Johnson, Nicholas; Brown, Grant E.

    2016-01-01

    This study investigated the length of avoidance response of migratory-stage sea lamprey Petromyzon marinus exposed continuously to conspecific damage-released alarm cues for varying lengths of time in laboratory stream channels. Ten replicate groups of P. marinus, separated by sex, were exposed to either deionized water control or to P. marinus extract for 0, 2 or 4 h continuously. Petromyzon marinus maintained their avoidance response to the conspecific damage-released alarm cue after continuous exposure to the alarm cue for 0 and 2 h but not 4 h. Beyond being one of the first studies in regards to sensory–olfactory adaptation–acclimation of fishes to alarm cues of any kind, these results have important implications for use of conspecific alarm cues in P. marinus control. For example, continuous application of conspecific alarm cue during the day, when P. marinus are inactive and hiding, may result in sensory adaptation to the odour by nightfall when they migrate upstream.

  15. Syndactyly Release.

    PubMed

    Braun, Tara L; Trost, Jeffrey G; Pederson, William C

    2016-11-01

    Syndactyly is one of the most common congenital hand anomalies treated by pediatric plastic surgeons. Established principles of syndactyly separation dictate the timing and order of syndactyly release, with the goals of surgery being the creation of an anatomically normal webspace, tension-free closure of soft tissue, and return of function to the fingers. Numerous surgical methods have been described, many of which involve the use of local flaps to reconstruct the commissure and full-thickness skin grafts for coverage of raw areas. Recently, reconstructive techniques without the use of skin grafts have been devised, which work well for certain indications. Special considerations are described for complete, complex, and syndromic syndactylies. Outcomes for simple syndactyly release are typically good when surgical principles are followed, whereas complex syndactyly release tends to have less-favorable outcomes and more complications.

  16. Toggle release

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Graves, Thomas J. (Inventor); Yang, Robert A. (Inventor); Brown, Christopher W. (Inventor)

    1989-01-01

    A pyrotechnic actuated structural release device 10 which is mechanically two fault tolerant for release. The device 10 comprises a fastener plate 11 and fastener body 12, each attachable to a different one of a pair of structures to be joined. The fastener plate 11 and body 12 are fastenable by a toggle 13 supported at one end on the fastener plate and mounted for universal pivotal movement thereon. At its other end which is received in a central opening in the fastener body 12 and adapted for limited pivotal movement therein the toggle 13 is restrained by three retractable latching pins 61 symmetrically disposed in equiangular spacing about the axis of the toggle 13 and positionable in latching engagement with an end fitting on the toggle. Each pin 61 is individually retractable by combustion of a pyrotechnic charge 77, the expanding gases of which are applied to a pressure receiving face 67 on the latch pin 61 to effect its retraction from the toggle. While retraction of all three pins 62 releases the toggle, the fastener is mechanically two fault tolerant since the failure of any single one or pair of the latch pins to retract results in an asymmetrical loading on the toggle and its pivotal movement to effect a release. An annular bolt 18 is mounted on the fastener plate 11 as a support for the socket mounting 30, 37 of the toggle whereby its selective axial movement provides a means for preloading the toggle.

  17. 28 CFR 2.83 - Release planning.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Release planning. 2.83 Section 2.83... Release planning. (a) All grants of parole shall be conditioned on the development of a suitable release... parole date for purposes of release planning for up to 120 days without a hearing. If efforts...

  18. Dissolution experiments of commercial PWR (52 MWd/kgU) and BWR (53 MWd/kgU) spent nuclear fuel cladded segments in bicarbonate water under oxidizing conditions. Experimental determination of matrix and instant release fraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    González-Robles, E.; Serrano-Purroy, D.; Sureda, R.; Casas, I.; de Pablo, J.

    2015-10-01

    The denominated instant release fraction (IRF) is considered in performance assessment (PA) exercises to govern the dose that could arise from the repository. A conservative definition of IRF comprises the total inventory of radionuclides located in the gap, fractures, and the grain boundaries and, if present, in the high burn-up structure (HBS). The values calculated from this theoretical approach correspond to an upper limit that likely does not correspond to what it will be expected to be instantaneously released in the real system. Trying to ascertain this IRF from an experimental point of view, static leaching experiments have been carried out with two commercial UO2 spent nuclear fuels (SNF): one from a pressurized water reactor (PWR), labelled PWR, with an average burn-up (BU) of 52 MWd/kgU and fission gas release (FGR) of 23.1%, and one from a boiling water reactor (BWR), labelled BWR, with an average BU of and 53 MWd/kgU and FGR of 3.9%. One sample of each SNF, consisting of fuel and cladding, has been leached in bicarbonate water during one year under oxidizing conditions at room temperature (25 ± 5)°C. The behaviour of the concentration measured in solution can be divided in two according to the release rate. All radionuclides presented an initial release rate that after some days levels down to a slower second one, which remains constant until the end of the experiment. Cumulative fraction of inventory in aqueous phase (FIAPc) values has been calculated. Results show faster release in the case of the PWR SNF. In both cases Np, Pu, Am, Cm, Y, Tc, La and Nd dissolve congruently with U, while dissolution of Zr, Ru and Rh is slower. Rb, Sr, Cs and Mo, dissolve faster than U. The IRF of Cs at 10 and 200 days has been calculated, being (3.10 ± 0.62) and (3.66 ± 0.73) for PWR fuel, and (0.35 ± 0.07) and (0.51 ± 0.10) for BWR fuel.

  19. Release of nitrous oxide and dinitrogen from a transition bog under drained and rewetted conditions due to denitrification: results from a [15N]nitrate-bromide double-tracer study.

    PubMed

    Tauchnitz, Nadine; Spott, Oliver; Russow, Rolf; Bernsdorf, Sabine; Glaser, Bruno; Meissner, Ralph

    2015-01-01

    Denitrification is well known being the most important nitrate-consuming process in water-logged peat soils, whereby the intermediate compound nitrous oxide (N(2)O) and the end product dinitrogen (N(2)) are ultimately released. The present study was aimed at evaluating the release of these gases (due to denitrification) from a nutrient-poor transition bog ecosystem under drained and three differently rewetted conditions at the field scale using a (15)N-tracer approach ([(15)N]nitrate application, 30 kg N ha(-1)) and a common closed-chamber technique. The drained site is characterized by a constant water table (WT) of -30 cm (here referred to as D30), while rewetted sites represent a constant WT of -15 cm, a constant WT of 0 cm (i.e. waterlogged), and an initial WT of 0 cm (which decreased slightly during the experiment), respectively, (here referred to as R15, R0, and R0(d), respectively). The highest N(2)O emissions were observed at D30 (291 µg N(2)O-N m(-2) h(-1)) as well as at R0d (665 µg N(2)O-N m(-2) h(-1)). At the rewetted peat sites with a constant WT (i.e. R15 and R0), considerably lower N2O emissions were observed (maximal 37 µg N(2)O-N m(-2) h(-1)). Concerning N(2) only at the initially water-logged peat site R0d considerable release rates (up to 3110 µg N(2)-N m(-2) h(-1)) were observed, while under drained conditions (D30) no N(2) emission and under rewetted conditions with a constant WT (R15 and R0) significantly lower N(2) release rates (maximal 668 µg N(2)-N m(-2) h(-1)) could be detected. In addition, it has been found that natural WT fluctuations at rewetted peat sites, in particular a rapid drop down of the WT, can induce high emission rates for both N(2)O and N(2).

  20. Mapping Planetary Volcanic Deposits: Identifying Vents and Distingushing between Effects of Eruption Conditions and Local Lava Storage and Release on Flow Field Morphology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bleacher, J. E.; Eppler, D. B.; Skinner, J. A.; Evans, C. A.; Feng, W.; Gruener, J. E.; Hurwitz, D. M.; Whitson, P.; Janoiko, B.

    2014-01-01

    Terrestrial geologic mapping techniques are regularly used for "photogeologic" mapping of other planets, but these approaches are complicated by the diverse type, areal coverage, and spatial resolution of available data sets. When available, spatially-limited in-situ human and/or robotic surface observations can sometimes introduce a level of detail that is difficult to integrate with regional or global interpretations. To assess best practices for utilizing observations acquired from orbit and on the surface, our team conducted a comparative study of geologic mapping and interpretation techniques. We compared maps generated for the same area in the San Francisco Volcanic Field (SFVF) in northern Arizona using 1) data collected for reconnaissance before and during the 2010 Desert Research And Technology Studies campaign, and 2) during a traditional, terrestrial field geology study. The operations, related results, and direct mapping comparisons are discussed in companion LPSC abstracts [1-3]. Here we present new geologic interpretations for a volcanic cone and related lava flows as derived from all approaches involved in this study. Mapping results indicate a need for caution when interpreting past eruption conditions on other planetary surfaces from orbital data alone.

  1. Mapping Planetary Volcanic Deposits: Identifying Vents and Distinguishing between Effects of Eruption Conditions and Local Storage and Release on Flow Field Morphology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bleacher, J. E.; Eppler, D. B.; Skinner, J. A.; Evans, C. A.; Feng, W.; Gruener, J. E.; Hurwitz, D. M.; Whitson, P.; Janoiko, B.

    2014-01-01

    Terrestrial geologic mapping techniques are regularly used for "photogeologic" mapping of other planets, but these approaches are complicated by the diverse type, areal coverage, and spatial resolution of available data sets. When available, spatially-limited in-situ human and/or robotic surface observations can sometimes introduce a level of detail that is difficult to integrate with regional or global interpretations. To assess best practices for utilizing observations acquired from orbit and on the surface, our team conducted a comparative study of geologic mapping and interpretation techniques. We compared maps generated for the same area in the San Francisco Volcanic Field (SFVF) in northern Arizona using 1) data collected for reconnaissance before and during the 2010 Desert Research And Technology Studies campaign, and 2) during a traditional, terrestrial field geology study. The operations, related results, and direct mapping comparisons are discussed in companion LPSC abstracts. Here we present new geologic interpretations for a volcanic cone and related lava flows as derived from all approaches involved in this study. Mapping results indicate a need for caution when interpreting past eruption conditions on other planetary surfaces from orbital data alone.

  2. 28 CFR 2.33 - Release plans.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Release plans. 2.33 Section 2.33 Judicial..., AND JUVENILE DELINQUENTS United States Code Prisoners and Parolees § 2.33 Release plans. (a) A grant of parole is conditioned upon the approval of release plans by the Regional Commissioner. In...

  3. 28 CFR 2.33 - Release plans.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... Administration DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE PAROLE, RELEASE, SUPERVISION AND RECOMMITMENT OF PRISONERS, YOUTH OFFENDERS... of parole is conditioned upon the approval of release plans by the Regional Commissioner. In general... reasonable plan for payment shall, where feasible, be included in the parole release plan....

  4. 28 CFR 2.33 - Release plans.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... Administration DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE PAROLE, RELEASE, SUPERVISION AND RECOMMITMENT OF PRISONERS, YOUTH OFFENDERS... of parole is conditioned upon the approval of release plans by the Regional Commissioner. In general... reasonable plan for payment shall, where feasible, be included in the parole release plan....

  5. 28 CFR 2.33 - Release plans.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Release plans. 2.33 Section 2.33 Judicial..., AND JUVENILE DELINQUENTS United States Code Prisoners and Parolees § 2.33 Release plans. (a) A grant of parole is conditioned upon the approval of release plans by the Regional Commissioner. In...

  6. Contact: Releasing the news

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pinotti, Roberto

    The problem of mass behavior after man's future contacts with other intelligences in the universe is not only a challenge for social scientists and political leaders all over the world, but also a cultural time bomb as well. In fact, since the impact of CETI (Contact with Extraterrestrial Intelligence) on human civilization, with its different cultures, might cause a serious socio-anthropological shock, a common and predetermined worldwide strategy is necessary in releasing the news after the contact, in order to keep possible manifestations of fear, panic and hysteria under control. An analysis of past studies in this field and of parallel historical situations as analogs suggests a definite "authority crisis" in the public as a direct consequence of an unexpected release of the news, involving a devastating "chain reaction" process (from both the psychological and sociological viewpoints) of anomie and maybe the collapse of today's society. The only way to prevent all this is to prepare the world's public opinion concerning contact before releasing the news, and to develop a long-term strategy through the combined efforts of scientists, political leaders, intelligence agencies and the mass media, in order to create the cultural conditions in which a confrontation with ETI won't affect mankind in a traumatic way. Definite roles and tasks in this multi-level model are suggested.

  7. The Effect of Ethanol on the Release of Opioids from Oral Prolonged-Release Preparations

    PubMed Central

    Walden, Malcolm; Nicholls, Fiona A.; Smith, Kevin J.; Tucker, Geoffrey T.

    2007-01-01

    Recent experience has prompted the US FDA to consider whether ethanol ingestion may modify the release characteristics of prolonged-release formulations, where dose dumping may be an issue for patient safety. The influence of ethanol on the in vitro release of opioid drugs from some prolonged-release formulations utilizing different release technologies was examined. Results indicated that the prolonged-release mechanisms remained intact under the testing conditions, although one product showed initial sensitivity to ethanol in its release characteristics. Nevertheless, in this case, extrapolation of the findings to likely outcome in vivo indicated no risk of dose-dumping. It is proposed that prolonged-release medicinal products should be tested during development to ensure robustness to the effects of ethanol on drug release. PMID:17882730

  8. Pituitary Tumors: Condition Information

    MedlinePlus

    ... FOIA Jobs at NICHD Meetings, Conferences & Events Partnering & Donating to the NICHD Staff Directory Overview Condition Information ... gland causes the release of hormones in the body that control growth, metabolism, response to stress, and ...

  9. Helium release during shale deformation: Experimental validation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bauer, Stephen J.; Gardner, W. Payton; Heath, Jason E.

    2016-07-01

    This work describes initial experimental results of helium tracer release monitoring during deformation of shale. Naturally occurring radiogenic 4He is present in high concentration in most shales. During rock deformation, accumulated helium could be released as fractures are created and new transport pathways are created. We present the results of an experimental study in which confined reservoir shale samples, cored parallel and perpendicular to bedding, which were initially saturated with helium to simulate reservoir conditions, are subjected to triaxial compressive deformation. During the deformation experiment, differential stress, axial, and radial strains are systematically tracked. Release of helium is dynamically measured using a helium mass spectrometer leak detector. Helium released during deformation is observable at the laboratory scale and the release is tightly coupled to the shale deformation. These first measurements of dynamic helium release from rocks undergoing deformation show that helium provides information on the evolution of microstructure as a function of changes in stress and strain.

  10. [Lateral retinacular release].

    PubMed

    Verdonk, P; Bonte, F; Verdonk, R

    2008-09-01

    This overview of numerous studies discusses, based on short-term and long-term results, which diagnoses are indications for lateral retinacular release. No significant differences in outcome between arthroscopic and open lateral release could be documented. Isolated lateral release offers a good success rate for treating a stable patella with excessive lateral pressure. In patellar instability, the results are less favorable in long-term follow-up evaluation. Hyperlaxity with hypermobility of the patella is an absolute contraindication. Lateral release provides only temporary benefit for patellofemoral osteoarthritis. Proximal and/or distal realignment of the extensor mechanism gives better results than isolated lateral release.

  11. ELECTROMAGNETIC RELEASE MECHANISM

    DOEpatents

    Michelson, C.

    1960-09-13

    An electromagnetic release mechanism is offered that may be used, for example, for supporting a safety rod for a nuclear reactor. The release mechanism is designed to have a large excess holding force and a rapid, uniform, and dependable release. The fast release is accomplished by providing the electromagnet with slotttd polts separated by an insulating potting resin, and by constructing the poles with a ferro-nickel alloy. The combination of these two features materially reduces the eddy current power density whenever the magnetic field changes during a release operation. In addition to these features, the design of the armature is such as to provide ready entrance of fluid into any void that might tend to form during release of the armature. This also improves the release time for the mechanism. The large holding force for the mechanism is accomplished by providing a small, selected, uniform air gap between the inner pole piece and the armature.

  12. Dendritic Release of Neurotransmitters.

    PubMed

    Ludwig, Mike; Apps, David; Menzies, John; Patel, Jyoti C; Rice, Margaret E

    2016-12-06

    Release of neuroactive substances by exocytosis from dendrites is surprisingly widespread and is not confined to a particular class of transmitters: it occurs in multiple brain regions, and includes a range of neuropeptides, classical neurotransmitters, and signaling molecules, such as nitric oxide, carbon monoxide, ATP, and arachidonic acid. This review is focused on hypothalamic neuroendocrine cells that release vasopressin and oxytocin and midbrain neurons that release dopamine. For these two model systems, the stimuli, mechanisms, and physiological functions of dendritic release have been explored in greater detail than is yet available for other neurons and neuroactive substances. © 2017 American Physiological Society. Compr Physiol 7:235-252, 2017.

  13. Release the Body, Release the Mind.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stoner, Martha Goff

    1998-01-01

    A college English teacher describes the anxiety and resentment of students during in-class writing assignments and the successful classroom use of meditation and body movement. Movement seemed to relax the students, change their attitudes, and release their creative impulses to write. Implications related to the body-mind connection are pondered.…

  14. Factors controlling gastric-glucagon release.

    PubMed Central

    Lefèbvre, P J; Luyckx, A S

    1977-01-01

    A system consisting of an isolated dog stomach perfused with whole blood has been designed to study gastric glucagon secretion. Under basal conditions, gastric glucagon release was 0.0-3.1 ng glucagon/100g of stomach per min. Arginine, at an arterial plasma concentration averaging 10 mM, elicited a rapid glucagon release. This gastric glucagon release was almost completely abolished by somatostatin (100 ng/ml). The release of gastric glucagon was not affected by hyperglycemia alone but was reduced by about 40% when hyperglycemia was concomitant with an hyperinsulinemia within the physiological range. These observations support the concept that adequate concentrations of insulin are necessary in order for hyperglycemia to inhibit gastric glucagon secretion. Furthermore, it is suggested that the isolated perfused dog stomach might provide a unique tool permitting investigation of alpha-cell function in the absence of endogenously released insulin. PMID:845258

  15. Quantification of Energy Release in Composite Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Minnetyan, Levon; Chamis, Christos C. (Technical Monitor)

    2003-01-01

    Energy release rate is usually suggested as a quantifier for assessing structural damage tolerance. Computational prediction of energy release rate is based on composite mechanics with micro-stress level damage assessment, finite element structural analysis and damage progression tracking modules. This report examines several issues associated with energy release rates in composite structures as follows: Chapter I demonstrates computational simulation of an adhesively bonded composite joint and validates the computed energy release rates by comparison with acoustic emission signals in the overall sense. Chapter II investigates the effect of crack plane orientation with respect to fiber direction on the energy release rates. Chapter III quantifies the effects of contiguous constraint plies on the residual stiffness of a 90 deg ply subjected to transverse tensile fractures. Chapter IV compares ICAN and ICAN/JAVA solutions of composites. Chapter V examines the effects of composite structural geometry and boundary conditions on damage progression characteristics.

  16. Quantification of Energy Release in Composite Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Minnetyan, Levon

    2003-01-01

    Energy release rate is usually suggested as a quantifier for assessing structural damage tolerance. Computational prediction of energy release rate is based on composite mechanics with micro-stress level damage assessment, finite element structural analysis and damage progression tracking modules. This report examines several issues associated with energy release rates in composite structures as follows: Chapter I demonstrates computational simulation of an adhesively bonded composite joint and validates the computed energy release rates by comparison with acoustic emission signals in the overall sense. Chapter II investigates the effect of crack plane orientation with respect to fiber direction on the energy release rates. Chapter III quantifies the effects of contiguous constraint plies on the residual stiffness of a 90 ply subjected to transverse tensile fractures. Chapter IV compares ICAN and ICAN/JAVA solutions of composites. Chapter V examines the effects of composite structural geometry and boundary conditions on damage progression characteristics.

  17. First update of the International Xenotransplantation Association consensus statement on conditions for undertaking clinical trials of porcine islet products in type 1 diabetes--Chapter 3: Porcine islet product manufacturing and release testing criteria.

    PubMed

    Rayat, Gina R; Gazda, Lawrence S; Hawthorne, Wayne J; Hering, Bernhard J; Hosking, Peter; Matsumoto, Shinichi; Rajotte, Ray V

    2016-01-01

    In the 2009 IXA consensus, the requirements for the quality and control of manufacturing of porcine islet products were based on the U.S. regulatory framework where the porcine islet products fall within the definition of somatic cell therapy under the statutory authority of the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA). In addition, porcine islet products require pre-market approval as a biologic product under the Public Health Services Act and they meet the definition of a drug under the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act (FD&C Act). Thus, they are subject to applicable provisions of the law and as such, control of manufacturing as well as reproducibility and consistency of porcine islet products, safety of porcine islet products, and characterization of porcine islet products must be met before proceeding to clinical trials. In terms of control of manufacturing as well as reproducibility and consistency of porcine islet products, the manufacturing facility must be in compliance with current Good Manufacturing Practices (cGMP) guidelines appropriate for the initiation of Phase 1/2 clinical trials. Sponsors intending to conduct a Phase 1/2 trial of islet xenotransplantation products must be able to demonstrate the safety of the product through the establishment of particular quality assurance and quality control procedures. All materials (including animal source and pancreas) used in the manufacturing process of the porcine islet products must be free of adventitious agents. The final porcine islet product must undergo tests for the presence of these adventitious agents including sterility, mycoplasma (if they are cultured), and endotoxin. Assessments of the final product must include the safety specifications mentioned above even if the results are not available until after release as these data would be useful for patient diagnosis and treatment if necessary. In addition, a plan of action must be in place for patient notification and treatment in case the

  18. Conditional Belief Types

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-04-19

    hypothetical knowledge , conditional probability, counterfactuals REPORT DOCUMENTATION PAGE 11. SPONSOR/MONITOR’S REPORT NUMBER(S) 10. SPONSOR/MONITOR’S...spaces are closely related to the sphere models of counterfactual conditionals and to models of hypothetical knowledge . 3 Approved for public release...hypothetical knowledge . Keywords: Conditional probability; Type spaces; Hypothetical knowledge ; Counterfactuals JEL Classification: C70; C72; D80; D82

  19. Rad-Release

    SciTech Connect

    2011-01-01

    The R&D 100 Award winning Rad-Release Chemical Decontamination Technology is a highly effective (up to 99% removal rate), affordable, patented chemical-foam-clay decontamination process tailored to specific radiological and metal contaminants, which is applicable to a wide variety of substrates. For more information about this project, visit http://www.inl.gov/rd100/2011/rad-release/

  20. Rad-Release

    ScienceCinema

    None

    2016-07-12

    The R&D 100 Award winning Rad-Release Chemical Decontamination Technology is a highly effective (up to 99% removal rate), affordable, patented chemical-foam-clay decontamination process tailored to specific radiological and metal contaminants, which is applicable to a wide variety of substrates. For more information about this project, visit http://www.inl.gov/rd100/2011/rad-release/

  1. Bioequivalence of two lansoprazole delayed release capsules 30 mg in healthy male volunteers under fasting, fed and fasting-applesauce conditions: a partial replicate crossover study design to estimate the pharmacokinetics of highly variable drugs.

    PubMed

    Thota, S; Khan, S M; Tippabhotla, S K; Battula, R; Gadiko, C; Vobalaboina, V

    2013-11-01

    An open-label, 2-treatment, 3-sequence, 3-period, single-dose, partial replicate crossover studies under fasting (n=48), fed (n=60) and fasting-applesauce (n=48) (sprinkled on one table spoonful of applesauce) modalities were conducted in healthy adult male volunteers to evaluate bioequivalence between 2 formulations of lansoprazole delayed release capsules 30 mg. In all the 3 studies, as per randomization, either test or reference formulations were administered in a crossover manner with a required washout period of at least 7 days. Blood samples were collected adequately (0-24 h) to determine lansoprazole plasma concentrations using a validated LC-MS/MS analytical method. To characterize the pharmacokinetic parameters (Cmax, AUC0-t, AUC0-∞, Tmax, Kel and T1/2) of lansoprazole, non-compartmental analysis and ANOVA was applied on ln-transformed values. The bioequivalence was tested based on within-subject variability of the reference formulation. In fasting and fed studies (within-subject variability>30%) bioequivalence was evaluated with scaled average bioequivalence, hence for the pharmacokinetic parameters Cmax, AUC0-t and AUC0-∞, the 95% upper confidence bound for (μT-μR)2-θσ2 WR was ≤0, and the point estimates (test-to-reference ratio) were within the regulatory acceptance limit 80.00-125.00%. In fasting-applesauce study (within-subject variability<30%) bioequivalence was evaluated with average bioequivalence, the 90% CI of ln-transformed data of Cmax, AUC0-t and AUC0-∞ were within the regulatory acceptance limit 80.00-125.00%. Based on these aforesaid statistical inferences, it was concluded that the test formulation is bioequivalent to reference formulation.

  2. Post-release survival and feeding in reared turbot

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sparrevohn, Claus R.; Støttrup, Josianne G.

    2007-02-01

    As part of the Danish restocking program, an experiment was carried out with four groups of turbot Psetta maxima released on two different occasions at the same location in Århus Bay, Denmark. One objective was to analyse the duration of post-release mortality and the magnitude of this mortality. In 2003 a group called Large turbot (17.1 cm total length (L T)) and a group called Intermediate (L T = 11.8 cm) were released, and in 2004 two similar-sized groups called Naive and Conditioned (L T = 9.8 cm) were released. The Conditioned differed from the Naive turbot by being transferred to enclosures at the release location six days prior to the actual release. This experiment was performed to investigate whether such a conditioning period had a positive effect on the survival and hence the success of the stocking. All the groups released were monitored daily until day 8, using a juvenile flatfish-trawl to recapture the fish. The catches were analyzed on the basis of a normal distribution approximation method, founded in diffusion theory, from which daily abundance of the released fish and hence post-release mortality could be estimated. The group of Large turbot suffered negligible post-release mortality, but for the Conditioned, Naive and Intermediate groups the loss varied between 34 and 66% d - 1 . The mortality for the Conditioned group was found to be half that of the Naive turbot released simultaneously. The period of high post-release mortality was estimated to be restricted to three days after release. The only active predators observed in the area were birds. Besides estimating mortality the diffusion model provides an estimate on the catchability of the released turbot when fished with a juvenile flatfish-trawl. Catchabilities varied between 38 and 52% for all releases except for the 17 cm sized turbot released, where catchability was only 12%. The feeding performance of the released fish was also analysed and compared with that of wild fish caught at the

  3. The low synaptic release probability in vivo.

    PubMed

    Borst, J Gerard G

    2010-06-01

    The release probability, the average probability that an active zone of a presynaptic terminal releases one or more vesicles following an action potential, is tightly regulated. Measurements in cultured neurons or in slices indicate that this probability can vary greatly between synapses, but on average it is estimated to be as high as 0.5. In vivo, however, the size of synaptic potentials is relatively independent of recent history, suggesting that release probability is much lower. Possible causes for this discrepancy include maturational differences, a higher spontaneous activity, a lower extracellular calcium concentration and more prominent tonic inhibition by ambient neurotransmitters during in vivo recordings. Existing evidence thus suggests that under physiological conditions in vivo, presynaptic action potentials trigger the release of neurotransmitter much less frequently than what is observed in in vitro preparations.

  4. Controlled-release microchips.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Sadhana; Nijdam, A Jasper; Sinha, Piyush M; Walczak, Robbie J; Liu, Xuewu; Cheng, Mark M-C; Ferrari, Mauro

    2006-05-01

    Efficient drug delivery remains an important challenge in medicine: continuous release of therapeutic agents over extended time periods in accordance with a predetermined temporal profile; local delivery at a constant rate to the tumour microenvironment to overcome much of the systemic toxicity and to improve antitumour efficacy; improved ease of administration, and increasing patient compliance required are some of the unmet needs of the present drug delivery technology. Microfabrication technology has enabled the development of novel controlled-release microchips with capabilities not present in the current treatment modalities. In this review, the current status and future prospects of different types of controlled-release microchips are summarised and analysed with reference to microneedle-based microchips, as well as providing an in-depth focus on microreservoir-based and nanoporous microchips.

  5. RAVEN Beta Release

    SciTech Connect

    Rabiti, Cristian; Alfonsi, Andrea; Cogliati, Joshua Joseph; Mandelli, Diego; Kinoshita, Robert Arthur; Wang, Congjian; Maljovec, Daniel Patrick; Talbot, Paul William

    2016-02-01

    This documents the release of the Risk Analysis Virtual Environment (RAVEN) code. A description of the RAVEN code is provided, and discussion of the release process for the M2LW-16IN0704045 milestone. The RAVEN code is a generic software framework to perform parametric and probabilistic analysis based on the response of complex system codes. RAVEN is capable of investigating the system response as well as the input space using Monte Carlo, Grid, or Latin Hyper Cube sampling schemes, but its strength is focused toward system feature discovery, such as limit surfaces, separating regions of the input space leading to system failure, using dynamic supervised learning techniques. RAVEN has now increased in maturity enough for the Beta 1.0 release.

  6. Altitude release mechanism

    DOEpatents

    Kulhanek, Frank C.

    1977-01-01

    An altitude release mechanism for releasing a radiosonde or other measuring instrument from a balloon carrying it up into the atmosphere includes a bottle partially filled with water, a tube sealed into the bottle having one end submerged in the water in the bottle and the free end extending above the top of the bottle and a strip of water-disintegrable paper held within the free end of the tube linking the balloon to the remainder of the package. As the balloon ascends, the lowered atmospheric air pressure causes the air in the bottle to expand, forcing the water in the bottle up the tubing to wet and disintegrate the paper, releasing the package from the balloon.

  7. Diffuse-interface theory for structure formation and release behavior in controlled drug release systems.

    PubMed

    Saylor, David M; Kim, Chang-Soo; Patwardhan, Dinesh V; Warren, James A

    2007-11-01

    A common method of controlling drug release has been to incorporate the drug into a polymer matrix, thereby creating a diffusion barrier that slows the rate of drug release. It has been demonstrated that the internal microstructure of these drug-polymer composites can significantly impact the drug release rate. However, the effect of processing conditions during manufacture on the composite structure and the subsequent effects on release behavior are not well understood. We have developed a diffuse-interface theory for microstructure evolution that is based on interactions between drug, polymer and solvent species, all of which may be present in either crystalline or amorphous states. Because the theory can be applied to almost any specific combination of material species and over a wide range of environmental conditions, it can be used to elucidate and quantify the relationships between processing, microstructure and release response in controlled drug release systems. Calculations based on the theory have now demonstrated that, for a characteristic delivery system, variations in microstructure arising due to changes in either drug loading or processing time, i.e. evaporation rate, could have a significant impact on both the bulk release kinetics and the uniformity of release across the system. In fact, we observed that changes in process time alone can induce differences in bulk release of almost a factor of two and typical non-uniformities of +/-30% during the initial periods of release. Because these substantial variations may have deleterious clinical ramifications, it is critical that both the system microstructure and the control of that microstructure are considered to ensure the device will be both safe and effective in clinical use.

  8. Releasable Asbestos Field Sampler

    EPA Science Inventory

    Asbestos aerosolization (or releasability) is the potential for fibrous asbestos structures that are present in a material or on a solid surface to become airborne when the source is disturbed by human activities or natural forces. In turn, the magnitude of the airborne concentra...

  9. Release of OLe peanut

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    OLe is a high oleic Spanish-type peanut that has excellent yield and enhanced Sclerotinia blight and pod rot resistance when compared to other high oleic Spanish cultivars. The purpose for releasing OLe is to provide peanut producers with a true Spanish peanut that is high oleic and has enhanced yi...

  10. Hydraulic release oil tool

    SciTech Connect

    Mims, M.G.; Mueller, M.D.; Ehlinger, J.C.

    1992-03-11

    This patent describes a hydraulic release tool. It comprises a setting assembly; a coupling member for coupling to drill string or petroleum production components, the coupling member being a plurality of sockets for receiving the dogs in the extended position and attaching the coupling member the setting assembly; whereby the setting assembly couples to the coupling member by engagement of the dogs in the sockets of releases from and disengages the coupling member in movement of the piston from its setting to its reposition in response to a pressure in the body in exceeding the predetermined pressure; and a relief port from outside the body into its bore and means to prevent communication between the relief port and the bore of the body axially of the piston when the piston is in the setting position and to establish such communication upon movement of the piston from the setting position to the release position and reduce the pressure in the body bore axially of the piston, whereby the reduction of the pressure signals that the tool has released the coupling member.

  11. Data Release Summary Statement

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2016-11-14

    ... 3 CALIOP Level 1 data are released with a product maturity classification of Validated Stage1 , indicating that initial validation of ... users for evaluation and to provide feedback to the CALIOP algorithm development team. Users should carefully read the section of the Data ...

  12. 18 CFR 284.8 - Release of firm capacity on interstate pipelines.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... term of the release. (ii) If the capacity release is for a period of more than one year, the asset...) Firm shippers must be permitted to release their capacity, in whole or in part, on a permanent or short-term basis, without restriction on the terms or conditions of the release. A firm shipper may...

  13. Kinetic studies of rat liver hexokinase D ('glucokinase') in non-co-operative conditions show an ordered mechanism with MgADP as the last product to be released.

    PubMed Central

    Monasterio, Octavio; Cárdenas, María Luz

    2003-01-01

    The kinetic mechanism of rat liver hexokinase D ('glucokinase') was studied under non-co-operative conditions with 2-deoxyglucose as substrate, chosen to avoid uncertainties derived from the co-operativity observed with the physiological substrate, glucose. The enzyme shows hyperbolic kinetics with respect to both 2-deoxyglucose and MgATP(2-), and the reaction follows a ternary-complex mechanism with K (m)=19.2+/-2.3 mM for 2-deoxyglucose and 0.56+/-0.05 mM for MgATP(2-). Product inhibition by MgADP(-) was mixed with respect to MgATP(2-) and was largely competitive with respect to 2-deoxyglucose, suggesting an ordered mechanism with 2-deoxyglucose as first substrate and MgADP(-) as last product. Dead-end inhibition by N -acetylglucosamine, AMP and the inert complex CrATP [the complex of ATP with chromium in the 3+ oxidation state, i.e. Cr(III)-ATP], studied with respect to both substrates, also supports an ordered mechanism with 2-deoxyglucose as first substrate. AMP appears to bind both to the free enzyme and to the E*dGlc complex. Experiments involving protection against inactivation by 5,5'-dithiobis-(2-nitrobenzoic acid) support the existence of the E*MgADP(-) and E*AMP complexes suggested by the kinetic studies. MgADP(-), AMP, 2-deoxyglucose, glucose and mannose were strong protectors, supporting the existence of binary complexes with the enzyme. Glucose 6-phosphate failed to protect, even at concentrations as high as 100 mM, and MgATP(2-) protected only slightly (12%). The inactivation results support the postulated ordered mechanism with 2-deoxyglucose as first substrate and MgADP(-) as last product. In addition, the straight-line dependence observed when the reciprocal value of the inactivation constant was plotted against the sugar-ligand concentration supports the view that there is just one sugar-binding site in hexokinase D. PMID:12513690

  14. Stereoselectivity of presynaptic autoreceptors modulating dopamine release.

    PubMed

    Arbilla, S; Langer, S Z

    1981-12-17

    The effects of the (R)- and (S)-enantiomers of sulpiride and butaclamol were studied on the spontaneous and field stimulation-evoked release of total radioactivity from slices of rabbit caudate nucleus prelabelled with [3H]dopamine. (S)-Sulpiride in concentrations ranging from 0.01--1 microM enhanced the electrically evoked release of [3H]dopamine while (R)-sulpiride was 10 times less potent than (S)-sulpiride. Exposure to (S)-butaclamol (0.01--1 microM) but not to (R)-butaclamol (0.1--10 microM) enhanced the field-stimulated release of [3H]dopamine. The facilitatory effects of (S)- and (R)-sulpiride and (S)-butaclamol on the stimulated release of the labelled neurotransmitter were observed under conditions in which these drugs did not modify the spontaneous outflow of radioactivity. Only the active enantiomers of sulpiride and butaclamol antagonized the inhibition by apomorphine (1 microM) of the stimulated release of [3H]dopamine. Our results indicate that the presynaptic inhibitory dopamine autoreceptors modulating the stimulation-evoked release of [3H]dopamine in the caudate nucleus are, like the classical postsynaptic dopamine receptors, chemically stereoselective.

  15. Terminology challenges: defining modified release dosage forms in veterinary medicine.

    PubMed

    Martinez, Marilyn N; Lindquist, Danielle; Modric, Sanja

    2010-08-01

    Terminologies for describing dosage form release characteristics for human pharmaceuticals have been addressed by bodies such as the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA), the International Conference on Harmonization (ICH), and the US Pharmacopeia (USP). While the definition for terms such as "immediate release," "modified release," "extended release," and "delayed release" are now well accepted for human pharmaceuticals, confusion still exists within the veterinary community. In part, this confusion is attributable to differences between human and veterinary dosage forms (such as the preponderance of parenteral vs. oral extended release products for use in animals vs. the focus on oral extended release formulations for human use) which reflect interspecies differences in physiology and conditions of use. It also simply reflects a lack of attention to existing definitions. In an effort to remedy this problem, this manuscript reflects an initial effort to suggest definitions that may be appropriate for describing formulation effects in veterinary medicine.

  16. Release Fraction Evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    Bamberger, Judith A.; Glissmeyer, John A.

    2004-01-01

    This document presents results of experiments conducted to measure release fractions during certain tank retrieval processes. The tests were performed in a 1/4 scale model of a waste storage tank. The retrieval processes simulated were: (1) Discharging liquid or slurry from the mouth of a vertically oriented two-in. Schedule 40 pipe. The discharging material was in free-fall from the mouth of the pipe near the top of the tank into a liquid or slurry pool at the bottom of the tank. (2) The jet from a 9/16-in.-diameter nozzle transferring liquid or slurry waste from one side of the tank to the other. The discharging liquid was aimed at the opposite side of the tank from the nozzle and either impacted the tank wall or fell into a liquid or slurry pool in the bottom of the tank. (3) A high pressure fan jet of liquid striking a steel plate or simulated waste from a stand-off distance of a few inches. For each process, a water-soluble fluorescent dye was added to the liquid fraction as a tracer. Kaolin clay was used to represent the solids. The tank was covered and there was no forced ventilation in the tank during the tests. Six air samples were collected during each test. The air samples were collected at fixed positions in the tank. The air sample filters were dried and weighed to determine the solids collection. The fluorescent dye was then leached from each filter and quantified with a fluorometer to determine the collection of liquid. Samples of the slurry and liquid simulants were also collected to determine the quantities of simulant used in each test. To calculate the release fraction, the quantity collected on each air sample was adjusted for the fraction of the tank volume sampled and divided by the quantity of material exposed in the simulation. The method was not as sensitive for the solids content as it was for the liquid content, but in those instances where a solids release fraction was determined, it was in relatively good agreement with that of the

  17. Releasable locking mechanisms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ahmed, Rafiq (Inventor); Wingate, Robert J. (Inventor)

    2005-01-01

    In the aerospace field spacecraft components are held together by separation systems until a specific time when they must be separated or deployed. Customarily a threaded joining bolt engages one of the components to be joined, and a threaded nut is placed on that bolt against the other component so they can be drawn together by a releasable locking assembly. The releasable locking assembly herein includes a plunger having one end coupled to one end of a plunger bolt. The other end is flanged to abut and compress a coil spring when the plunger is advanced toward the interface plane between the two components. When the plunger is so advanced toward the interface plane, the end of the plunger bolt can be connected to the joining bolt. Thus during retraction the joining bolt is drawn to one side of the interface plane by the force of the expanding spring.

  18. Cryogenic hydrogen release research.

    SciTech Connect

    LaFleur, Angela Christine

    2015-12-01

    The objective of this project was to devolop a plan for modifying the Turbulent Combustion Laboratory (TCL) with the necessary infrastructure to produce a cold (near liquid temperature) hydrogen jet. The necessary infrastructure has been specified and laboratory modifications are currently underway. Once complete, experiments from this platform will be used to develop and validate models that inform codes and standards which specify protection criteria for unintended releases from liquid hydrogen storage, transport, and delivery infrastructure.

  19. Sudden releases of gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chaloupecká, Hana; Jaňour, Zbyněk; Jurčáková, Klára; Kukačka, Libor; Nosek, Štěpán

    2014-03-01

    Conurbations all over the world have enlarged for numberless years. The accidental or intentional releases of gases become more frequent. Therefore, these crises situations have to be studied. The aim of this paper is to describe experiments examining these processes that were carried out in the laboratory of Environmental Aerodynamics of the Institute of Thermomechanics AS CR in Nový Knín. Results show huge puff variability from replica to replica.

  20. Slow-release fertilizer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ming, Douglas W. (Inventor); Golden, D. C. (Inventor)

    1992-01-01

    A synthetic apatite containing agronutrients and a method for making the apatite are disclosed. The apatite comprises crystalline calcium phosphate having agronutrients dispersed in the crystalline structure. The agronutrients can comprise potassium, magnesium, sulfur, iron, manganese, molybdenum, chlorine, boron, copper and zinc in amounts suited for plant growth. The apatite can optionally comprise a carbonate and/or silicon solubility control agent. The agronutrients are released slowly as the apatite dissolves.

  1. Slow-release fertilizer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ming, Douglas W. (Inventor); Golden, Dadigamuwage C. (Inventor)

    1995-01-01

    A synthetic apatite containing agronutrients and a method for making the apatite are disclosed. The apatite comprises crystalline calcium phosphate having agronutrients dispersed in the crystalline structure. The agronutrients can comprise potassium, magnesium, sulfur, iron, manganese, molybdenum, chlorine, boron, copper and zinc in amounts suited for plant growth. The apatite can optionally comprise a carbonate and/or silicon solubility control agent. The agronutrients are released slowly as the apatite dissolves.

  2. EIA new releases

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-12-01

    This report was prepared by the Energy Information Administration. It contains news releases on items of interest to the petroleum, coal, nuclear, electric and alternate fuels industries ranging from economic outlooks to environmental concerns. There is also a listing of reports by industry and an energy education resource listing containing sources for free or low-cost energy-related educational materials for educators and primary and secondary students.

  3. Slow-release fertilizer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ming, Douglas W.; Golden, D. C.

    1992-10-01

    A synthetic apatite containing agronutrients and a method for making the apatite are disclosed. The apatite comprises crystalline calcium phosphate having agronutrients dispersed in the crystalline structure. The agronutrients can comprise potassium, magnesium, sulfur, iron, manganese, molybdenum, chlorine, boron, copper and zinc in amounts suited for plant growth. The apatite can optionally comprise a carbonate and/or silicon solubility control agent. The agronutrients are released slowly as the apatite dissolves.

  4. Clinton releases oceans report

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Showstack, Randy

    U.S. President Bill Clinton is trying to beat the clock on the January 20 close of his administration by maintaining a flurry of activity on resource and conservation issues.During a December 4 speech in Washington, D.C., he released a broad-ranging report by the Presidents Panel on Ocean Exploration, entitled “Discovering Earth's Final Frontier: A U.S. Strategy for Ocean Exploration.”

  5. Triggered Release from Polymer Capsules

    SciTech Connect

    Esser-Kahn, Aaron P.; Odom, Susan A.; Sottos, Nancy R.; White, Scott R.; Moore, Jeffrey S.

    2011-07-06

    Stimuli-responsive capsules are of interest in drug delivery, fragrance release, food preservation, and self-healing materials. Many methods are used to trigger the release of encapsulated contents. Here we highlight mechanisms for the controlled release of encapsulated cargo that utilize chemical reactions occurring in solid polymeric shell walls. Triggering mechanisms responsible for covalent bond cleavage that result in the release of capsule contents include chemical, biological, light, thermal, magnetic, and electrical stimuli. We present methods for encapsulation and release, triggering methods, and mechanisms and conclude with our opinions on interesting obstacles for chemically induced activation with relevance for controlled release.

  6. Recommended for release on recognizance: factors affecting pretrial release recommendations.

    PubMed

    Petee, T A

    1994-06-01

    Researchers have acknowledged the influence of pretrial release agencies in judicial decision making regarding bail; however, few researchers have focused on the process used by the pretrial release agencies to make bail-bond recommendations. In this study I sought to establish which factors were most salient in making the decision to recommend a defendant for release on recognizance. I found that both officially sanctioned release criteria and "extralegal" variables were predictive of this decision.

  7. Modeling of Fission Gas Release in UO2

    SciTech Connect

    MH Krohn

    2006-01-23

    A two-stage gas release model was examined to determine if it could provide a physically realistic and accurate model for fission gas release under Prometheus conditions. The single-stage Booth model [1], which is often used to calculate fission gas release, is considered to be oversimplified and not representative of the mechanisms that occur during fission gas release. Two-stage gas release models require saturation at the grain boundaries before gas is release, leading to a time delay in release of gases generated in the fuel. Two versions of a two-stage model developed by Forsberg and Massih [2] were implemented using Mathcad [3]. The original Forsbers and Massih model [2] and a modified version of the Forsberg and Massih model that is used in a commercially available fuel performance code (FRAPCON-3) [4] were examined. After an examination of these models, it is apparent that without further development and validation neither of these models should be used to calculate fission gas release under Prometheus-type conditions. There is too much uncertainty in the input parameters used in the models. In addition. the data used to tune the modified Forsberg and Massih model (FRAPCON-3) was collected under commercial reactor conditions, which will have higher fission rates relative to Prometheus conditions [4].

  8. Printing Tablets with Fully Customizable Release Profiles for Personalized Medicine.

    PubMed

    Sun, Yajuan; Soh, Siowling

    2015-12-16

    Personalizing the release profiles of drugs is important for different people with different medical and biological conditions. A technically simple and low-cost method to fabricate fully customizable tablets that can deliver drugs with any type of release profile is described. The customization is intuitively straightforward: the desired profile can simply be "drawn" and printed by a 3D printer.

  9. Circadian regulation of cortisol release in behaviorally split golden hamsters.

    PubMed

    Lilley, Travis R; Wotus, Cheryl; Taylor, Daniel; Lee, Jennifer M; de la Iglesia, Horacio O

    2012-02-01

    The master circadian clock located within the hypothalamic suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) is necessary for the circadian rhythm of glucocorticoid (GC) release. The pathways by which the SCN sustains rhythmic GC release remain unclear. We studied the circadian regulation of cortisol release in the behaviorally split golden hamster, in which the single bout of circadian locomotor activity splits into two bouts approximately 12 h apart after exposing the animals to constant light conditions. We show that unsplit control hamsters present a single peak of cortisol release that is concomitant with a single peak of ACTH release. In contrast, split hamsters show two peaks of cortisol release that are approximately 12 h appart and are appropriately phased to each locomotor activity bout but surprisingly do not rely on rhythmic release of ACTH. Our results are consistent with a model in which the circadian pacemaker within the SCN regulates the circadian release of GC via input to the hypothalamo-pituitary-adrenal axis and via a second regulatory pathway, which likely involves sympathetic innervation of the adrenal and can operate even in the absence of ACTH circadian rhythmic release. Furthermore, we show that although the overall 24-h cortisol output in split hamsters is lower than in unsplit controls, split hamsters release constant low levels of ACTH. This result suggests that the timing, rather than the absolute amount, of cortisol release is more critical for the induction of negative feedback effects that regulate the hypothalamo-pituitary-adrenal axis.

  10. Delayed release of neurotransmitter from cerebellar granule cells.

    PubMed

    Atluri, P P; Regehr, W G

    1998-10-15

    At fast chemical synapses the rapid release of neurotransmitter that occurs within a few milliseconds of an action potential is followed by a more sustained elevation of release probability, known as delayed release. Here we characterize the role of calcium in delayed release and test the hypothesis that facilitation and delayed release share a common mechanism. Synapses between cerebellar granule cells and their postsynaptic targets, stellate cells and Purkinje cells, were studied in rat brain slices. Presynaptic calcium transients were measured with calcium-sensitive fluorophores, and delayed release was detected with whole-cell recordings. Calcium influx, presynaptic calcium dynamics, and the number of stimulus pulses were altered to assess their effect on delayed release and facilitation. Following single stimuli, delayed release can be separated into two components: one lasting for tens of milliseconds that is steeply calcium-dependent, the other lasting for hundreds of milliseconds that is driven by low levels of calcium with a nearly linear calcium dependence. The amplitude, calcium dependence, and magnitude of delayed release do not correspond to those of facilitation, indicating that these processes are not simple reflections of a shared mechanism. The steep calcium dependence of delayed release, combined with the large calcium transients observed in these presynaptic terminals, suggests that for physiological conditions delayed release provides a way for cells to influence their postsynaptic targets long after their own action potential activity has subsided.

  11. Sustained-release, extended-release, and other time-release formulations in neuropsychiatry.

    PubMed

    Andrade, Chittaranjan

    2015-08-01

    Pills and capsules may release their contents within minutes of ingestion; these are immediate-release formulations. Pills and capsules may also release their contents after a time lag, or a little at a time, or in some other predetermined way; these are time-release formulations. Many drugs in psychiatry have been time-release formulated to reduce their local adverse effects in the gastrointestinal tract, to reduce adverse effects associated with peak blood levels, or to artificially extend their half-life. Time-release formulations are associated with the added advantages of convenience of dosing, improved compliance, and less fluctuation in blood levels across the course of the day. A disadvantage of time-release formulations is that they may be incompletely absorbed; this is a serious issue in patients with acute or chronic intestinal hurry disorders, such as gastroenteritis or irritable bowel syndrome. Time-release formulations may also be more expensive than immediate-release formulations.

  12. Multiplexed programmable release of captured DNA.

    PubMed

    Kennedy-Darling, Julia; Holden, Matthew T; Shortreed, Michael R; Smith, Lloyd M

    2014-11-03

    Nucleic-acid hybridization is widely used for the specific capture of complementary sequences from complex samples. It is useful for both analytical methodologies, such as array hybridization (e.g. transcriptome analysis, genetic-variation analysis), and preparative strategies such as exome sequencing and sequence-specific proteome capture and analysis (PICh, HyCCAPP). It has not generally been possible to selectively elute particular captured subsequences, however, as the conditions employed for disruption of a duplex can lack the specificity needed to discriminate between different sequences. We show here that it is possible to bind and selectively release multiple sets of sequences by using toehold-mediated DNA branch migration. The strategy is illustrated for simple mixtures of oligonucleotides, for the sequence-specific capture and specific release of crosslinked yeast chromatin, and for the specific release of oligonucleotides hybridized to DNA microarrays.

  13. CONDITIONS LEADING TO SUDDEN RELEASE OF MAGMA PRESSURE

    SciTech Connect

    B. Damjanac; E.S. Gaffney

    2005-08-26

    Buildup of magmatic pressures in a volcanic system can arise from a variety of mechanisms. Numerical models of the response of volcanic structures to buildup of pressures in magma in dikes and conduits provide estimates of the pressures needed to reopen blocked volcanic vents. They also can bound the magnitude of sudden pressure drops in a dike or conduit due to such reopening. Three scenarios are considered: a dike that is sheared off by covolcanic normal faulting, a scoria cone over a conduit that is blocked by in-falling scoria and some length of solidified magma, and a lava flow whose feed has partially solidified due to an interruption of magma supply from below. For faulting, it is found that magma would be able to follow the fault to a new surface eruption. A small increase in magma pressure over that needed to maintain flow prior to faulting is required to open the new path, and the magma pressure needed to maintain flow is lower but still greater than for the original dike. The magma pressure needed to overcome the other types of blockages depends on the details of the blockage. For example, for a scoria cone, it depends on the depth of the slumped scoria and on the depth to which the magma has solidified in the conduit. In general, failure of the blockage is expected to occur by radial hydrofracture just below the blocked length of conduit at magma pressures of 10 MPa or less, resulting in radial dikes. However, this conclusion is based on the assumption that the fluid magma has direct access to the rock surrounding the conduit. If, on the other hand, there is a zone of solidified basalt, still hot enough to deform plastically, surrounding the molten magma in the conduit, this could prevent breakout of a hydrofracture and allow higher pressures to build up. In such cases, pressures could build high enough to deform the overlying strata (scoria cone or lava flow). Models of such deformations suggest the possibility of more violent eruptions resulting from sudden shear failure of a scoria cone with material accelerations near 100 m/s{sup 2}.

  14. 28 CFR 2.204 - Conditions of supervised release.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... any applicable sex-offender reporting and registration law. (v) The releasee shall provide a DNA sample, as directed by the supervision officer, if collection of such sample is authorized by the...

  15. Gas releases from salt

    SciTech Connect

    Ehgartner, B.; Neal, J.; Hinkebein, T.

    1998-06-01

    The occurrence of gas in salt mines and caverns has presented some serious problems to facility operators. Salt mines have long experienced sudden, usually unexpected expulsions of gas and salt from a production face, commonly known as outbursts. Outbursts can release over one million cubic feet of methane and fractured salt, and are responsible for the lives of numerous miners and explosions. Equipment, production time, and even entire mines have been lost due to outbursts. An outburst creates a cornucopian shaped hole that can reach heights of several hundred feet. The potential occurrence of outbursts must be factored into mine design and mining methods. In caverns, the occurrence of outbursts and steady infiltration of gas into stored product can effect the quality of the product, particularly over the long-term, and in some cases renders the product unusable as is or difficult to transport. Gas has also been known to collect in the roof traps of caverns resulting in safety and operational concerns. The intent of this paper is to summarize the existing knowledge on gas releases from salt. The compiled information can provide a better understanding of the phenomena and gain insight into the causative mechanisms that, once established, can help mitigate the variety of problems associated with gas releases from salt. Outbursts, as documented in mines, are discussed first. This is followed by a discussion of the relatively slow gas infiltration into stored crude oil, as observed and modeled in the caverns of the US Strategic Petroleum Reserve. A model that predicts outburst pressure kicks in caverns is also discussed.

  16. Hydrogen release behavior.

    SciTech Connect

    LaChance, Jeffrey L.; Dedrick, Daniel E.; Keller, Jay O.; Evans, Gregory Herbert; Houf, William G.; Winters, William Stanley, Jr.; Ruggles, A.; Zhang, J.

    2010-04-01

    The summary of this presentation is: (1) Barrier walls are used to reduce setbacks by factor of 2; (2) We found no ignition-timing vs. over-pressure sensitivities for jet flow obstructed by barrier walls; (3) Cryogenic vapor cloud model indicates hazard length scales exceed the room-temperature release; validation experiments are required to confirm; (4) Light-up maps developed for lean limit ignition; flammability factor model provides good indication of ignition probability; and (5) Auto-ignition is enhanced by blunt-body obstructions - increases gas temperature and promotes fuel/air mixing.

  17. 40 CFR 68.28 - Alternative release scenario analysis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... applicable as part of current practices. Proprietary models that account for the modeling conditions may be... alternative release scenarios: (1) The five-year accident history provided in § 68.42; and (2)...

  18. SkyMapper Early Data Release

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolf, Christian; Onken, Christopher; Schmidt, Brian; Bessell, Michael; Da Costa, Gary; Luvaul, Lance; Mackey, Dougal; Murphy, Simon; White, Marc; SkyMapper Team

    2016-05-01

    The SkyMapper Early Data Release (EDR) is the initial data release from the SkyMapper Southern Survey, which aims to create a deep, multi-epoch, multi-band photometric data set for the entire southern sky. EDR covers approximately 6700 sq. deg. (one-third) of the southern sky as obtained by the Short Survey component of the project. All included fields have at least two visits in good conditions in all six SkyMapper filters (uvgriz). Object catalogues are complete to magnitude 17-18, depending on filter. IVOA-complaint table access protocol (TAP), cone search and simple image access protocol (SIAP) services are available from the SkyMapper website (http://skymapper.anu.edu.au/), as well as through tools such as TOPCAT. Data are restricted to Australian astronomers and their collaborators for twelve months from the release date. Further details on the reduction of SkyMapper data, along with data quality improvements, will be released in late 2016 as part of SkyMapper Data Release 1 (DR1).

  19. Modeling downwind hazards after an accidental release of chlorine trifluoride

    SciTech Connect

    Lombardi, D.A.; Cheng, Meng-Dawn

    1996-05-01

    A module simulating ClF{sub 3} chemical reactions with water vapor and thermodynamic processes in the atmosphere after an accidental release has been developed. This module was liked to the HGSYSTEM. Initial model runs simulate the rapid formation of HF and ClO{sub 2} after an atmospheric release of ClF{sub 3}. At distances beyond the first several meters from the release point, HF and ClO{sub 2} concentrations pose a greater threat to human health than do ClF{sub 3} concentrations. For most of the simulations, ClF{sub 3} concentrations rapidly fall below the IDLH. Fro releases occurring in ambient conditions with low relative humidity and/or ambient temperature, ClF{sub 3} concentrations exceed the IDLH up to almost 500 m. The performance of this model needs to be determined for potential release scenarios that will be considered. These release scenarios are currently being developed.

  20. Request for approval, vented container annual release fraction

    SciTech Connect

    HILL, J.S.

    1999-10-12

    In accordance with the approval conditions for Modification to the Central Waste Complex (CWC) Radioactive Air Emissions Notice of Construction (NOC). dated August 24,1998, a new release fraction has been developed for submittal to the Washington State Department of Health (WDOH). The proposed annual release fraction of 2.50 E-14 is proposed for use in future NOCs involving the storage and handling operations associated with vented containers on the Hanford Site. The proposed annual release fraction was the largest release fraction calculated from alpha measurements of the NucFil filters from 10 vented containers consisting of nine 55-gallon drums and one burial box with dimensions of 9.3 x 5.7 x 6.4 feet. An annual release fraction of 2.0 E-09 was used in the modification to the CWC radioactive air emissions NOC. This study confirmed that the release fraction used in the CWC radioactive air emissions NOC was conservative.

  1. Shock loading and release behavior of silicon nitride

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawai, N.; Tsuru, T.; Hidaka, N.; Liu, X.; Mashimo, T.

    2017-01-01

    Shock-reshock and shock-release experiments were performed on silicon nitride ceramics above and below its phase transition pressure. Experimental results clearly show the occurrence of elastic-plastic transition and phase transition during initial shock loading. The HEL and phase transition stress are determined as 11.6 and 34.5 GPa, respectively. Below the phase transition stress, the reshock profile consists of the single shock with short rise time, while the release profile shows the gradual release followed by rapid one. Above phase transition stress, reshock and release behavior varies with the initial shock stress. In the case of reshock and release from about 40 GPa, the reshock structure is considerably dispersed, while the release structure shows rapid release. In the reshock profile from about 50 GPa, the formation of the shock wave with the small ramped precursor is observed. And, the release response from same shocked condition shows initial gradual release and subsequent quite rapid one. These results would provide the information about how phase transformation kinetics effects on the reshock and release behavior.

  2. [Compound erythromycin sustained release preparation and its in vitro release].

    PubMed

    Chen, Hai-xia; Chen, Zhi-peng; Wang, Qi-rong; Liu, Ze-kun; Ma, Quan-long

    2011-11-01

    Using the weight-average molecular weight 50 000 polylactic acid (PLA) as a carrier, and a certain proportion of erythromycin (EM) and prednisone acetate (PNA) to mixed prepare the compound erythromycin sustained release preparation (sustained-release tablets). Using ultraviolet spectrophotometry and high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) to detect separately the release amount of EM and PNA in vitro medium. The sustained-release tablets release for about 21 days, the average content of EM is 99.7 mg/table, RSD = 0.82%; and the average content of PNA is 10.03 mg/table, RSD = 0.93%. Within 21 days, the cumulative releases of EM and PNA are 86.1% and 78.3%, respectively. The drug release is steady and slow after 5 days, the burst release phenomenon in early stage is more significant. The results showed that the sustained-release tablet preparation method is feasible, the release performance is good and the clinical efficacy is significant.

  3. MERCURY RELEASE FROM DISTURBED ANOXIC SOILS

    SciTech Connect

    Jaroslav Solc; Bethany A. Bolles

    2001-07-16

    The primary objectives of experiments conducted at the Energy & Environmental Research Center (EERC) were to provide information on the secondary release of mercury from contaminated anoxic sediments to an aqueous environment after disturbance/change of in situ physical conditions and to evaluate its migration and partitioning under controlled conditions, including implications of these processes for treatment of contaminated soils. Experimental work included (1) characterization of the mercury-contaminated sediment; (2) field bench-scale dredging simulation; (3) laboratory column study to evaluate a longer-term response to sediment disturbance; (4) mercury volatilization from sediment during controlled drying; (5) resaturation experiments to evaluate the potential for secondary release of residual mercury after disturbance, transport, drying, and resaturation, which simulate a typical scenario during soil excavation and transport to waste disposal facilities; and (6) mercury speciation and potential for methylation during column incubation experiments.

  4. Chromosomal Conditions

    MedlinePlus

    ... 150 babies is born with a chromosomal condition. Down syndrome is an example of a chromosomal condition. Because ... all pregnant women be offered prenatal tests for Down syndrome and other chromosomal conditions. A screening test is ...

  5. QUICK RELEASABLE DRIVE

    DOEpatents

    Dickson, J.J.

    1958-07-01

    A quick releasable mechanical drive system suitable for use in a nuclear reactor is described. A small reversible motor positions a control rod by means of a worm and gear speed reducer, a magnetic torque clutch, and a bell crank. As the control rod is raised to the operating position, a heavy coil spring is compressed. In the event of an emergency indicated by either a''scram'' signal or a power failure, the current to the magnetic clutch is cut off, thereby freeing the coil spring and the bell crank positioner from the motor and speed reduction gearing. The coil spring will immediately act upon the bell crank to cause the insertion of the control rod. This arrangement will allow the slow, accurate positioning of the control rod during reactor operation, while providing an independent force to rapidly insert the rod in the event of an emergency.

  6. Quick release engine cylinder

    DOEpatents

    Sunnarborg, Duane A.

    2000-01-01

    A quick release engine cylinder allows optical access to an essentially unaltered combustion chamber, is suitable for use with actual combustion processes, and is amenable to rapid and repeated disassembly and cleaning. A cylinder member, adapted to constrain a piston to a defined path through the cylinder member, sealingly engages a cylinder head to provide a production-like combustion chamber. A support member mounts with the cylinder member. The support-to-cylinder mounting allows two relationships therebetween. In the first mounting relationship, the support engages the cylinder member and restrains the cylinder against the head. In the second mounting relationship, the cylinder member can pass through the support member, moving away from the head and providing access to the piston-top and head.

  7. SITELLE's Data Release 1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, T. B.; Drissen, L.

    2016-12-01

    Installed at the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope (CFHT) since August 2015, SITELLE is an Imaging Fourier Transform Spectrometer (IFTS) with an 11×11 field of view. After its prototype SpIOMM, installed at Mont Mégantic (Québec, Canada), it is the second IFTS in the world operating in the visible band (350-1000 nm). It delivers hyperspectral data cubes of 4 million spectra at R˜1500-5000 with a spatial sampling of 0.32" and a filling factor of 100 %. A suite of softwares has been designed to reduce (ORBS) and analyze (ORCS) the data. Based on commissioning data obtained in August 2015, a first stable version has been released in March 2016 which is capable of reducing all the data. In this paper the quality of the calibration is discussed.

  8. Representative Atmospheric Plume Development for Elevated Releases

    SciTech Connect

    Eslinger, Paul W.; Lowrey, Justin D.; McIntyre, Justin I.; Miley, Harry S.; Prichard, Andrew W.

    2014-02-01

    An atmospheric explosion of a low-yield nuclear device will produce a large number of radioactive isotopes, some of which can be measured with airborne detection systems. However, properly equipped aircraft may not arrive in the region where an explosion occurred for a number of hours after the event. Atmospheric conditions will have caused the radioactive plume to move and diffuse before the aircraft arrives. The science behind predicting atmospheric plume movement has advanced enough that the location of the maximum concentrations in the plume can be determined reasonably accurately in real time, or near real time. Given the assumption that an aircraft can follow a plume, this study addresses the amount of atmospheric dilution expected to occur in a representative plume as a function of time past the release event. The approach models atmospheric transport of hypothetical releases from a single location for every day in a year using the publically available HYSPLIT code. The effective dilution factors for the point of maximum concentration in an elevated plume based on a release of a non-decaying, non-depositing tracer can vary by orders of magnitude depending on the day of the release, even for the same number of hours after the release event. However, the median of the dilution factors based on releases for 365 consecutive days at one site follows a power law relationship in time, as shown in Figure S-1. The relationship is good enough to provide a general rule of thumb for estimating typical future dilution factors in a plume starting at the same point. However, the coefficients of the power law function may vary for different release point locations. Radioactive decay causes the effective dilution factors to decrease more quickly with the time past the release event than the dilution factors based on a non-decaying tracer. An analytical expression for the dilution factors of isotopes with different half-lives can be developed given the power law expression

  9. Engineered therapeutic-releasing nanoporous anodic alumina-aluminum wires with extended release of therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Law, Cheryl Suwen; Santos, Abel; Kumeria, Tushar; Losic, Dusan

    2015-02-18

    In this study, we present a nanoengineered therapeutic-releasing system based on aluminum wires featuring nanoporous anodic alumina layers and chitosan coatings. Nanoporous anodic alumina layers are produced on the surface of aluminum wires by electrochemical anodization. These nanoporous layers with precisely engineered nanopore geometry are used as nanocontainers for bovine serum albumin molecules labeled with fluorescein isothiocyanate (BSA-FITC), which is selected as a model drug. The surface of these therapeutic-releasing implants is coated with a biocompatible and biodegradable polymer, chitosan, in order to achieve a sustained release of protein over extended periods of time. The performance of this therapeutic-releasing device is systematically assessed through a series of experiments under static and dynamic flow conditions. In these experiments, the effect of such parameters as the number of layers of chitosan coating and the temperature and pH of the eluting medium is established. The obtained results reveal that the proposed therapeutic-releasing system based on nanoporous aluminum wires can be engineered with sustained release performance for up to 6.5 weeks, which is a critical factor for medical treatments using sensitive therapeutics such as proteins and genes when a localized delivery is desired.

  10. Hot Melt Extrusion for Sustained Protein Release: Matrix Erosion and In Vitro Release of PLGA-Based Implants.

    PubMed

    Cossé, Anne; König, Corinna; Lamprecht, Alf; Wagner, Karl G

    2017-01-01

    The design of biodegradable implants for sustained release of proteins is a complex challenge optimizing protein polymer interaction in combination with a mini-scale process which is predictive for production. The process of hot melt extrusion (HME) was therefore conducted on 5- and 9-mm mini-scale twin screw extruders. Poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) implants were characterized for their erosion properties and the in vitro release of the embedded protein (bovine serum albumin, BSA). The release of acidic monomers as well as other parameters (pH value, mass loss) during 16 weeks indicated a delayed onset of matrix erosion in week 3. BSA-loaded implants released 17.0% glycolic and 5.9% lactic acid after a 2-week lag time. Following a low burst release (3.7% BSA), sustained protein release started in week 4. Storage under stress conditions (30°C, 75% rH) revealed a shift of erosion onset of 1 week (BSA-loaded implants: 26.9% glycolic and 9.3% lactic acid). Coherent with the changed erosion profiles, an influence on the protein release was observed. Confocal laser scanning and Raman microscopy showed a homogenous protein distribution throughout the matrix after extrusion and during release studies. Raman spectra indicated a conformational change of the protein structure which could be one reason for incomplete protein release. The study underlined the suitability of the HME process to obtain a solid dispersion of protein inside a polymeric matrix providing sustained protein release. However, the incomplete protein release and the impact by storage conditions require thorough characterization and understanding of erosion and release mechanisms.

  11. Arsenic release during managed aquifer recharge (MAR)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pichler, T.; Lazareva, O.; Druschel, G.

    2013-12-01

    The mobilization and addition of geogenic trace metals to groundwater is typically caused by anthropogenic perturbations of the physicochemical conditions in the aquifer. This can add dangerously high levels of toxins to groundwater, thus compromising its use as a source of drinking water. In several regions world-wide, aquifer storage and recovery (ASR), a form of managed aquifer recharge (MAR), faces the problem of arsenic release due to the injection of oxygenated storage water. To better understand this process we coupled geochemical reactive transport modeling to bench-scale leaching experiments to investigate and verify the mobilization of geogenic arsenic (As) under a range of redox conditions from an arsenic-rich pyrite bearing limestone aquifer in Central Florida. Modeling and experimental observations showed similar results and confirmed the following: (1) native groundwater and aquifer matrix, including pyrite, were in chemical equilibrium, thus preventing the release of As due to pyrite dissolution under ambient conditions; (2) mixing of oxygen-rich surface water with oxygen-depleted native groundwater changed the redox conditions and promoted the dissolution of pyrite, and (3) the behavior of As along a flow path was controlled by a complex series of interconnected reactions. This included the oxidative dissolution of pyrite and simultaneous sorption of As onto neo-formed hydrous ferric oxides (HFO), followed by the reductive dissolution of HFO and secondary release of adsorbed As under reducing conditions. Arsenic contamination of drinking water in these systems is thus controlled by the re-equilibration of the system to more reducing conditions rather than a purely oxidative process.

  12. Release of bisphenol A from polycarbonate: a review.

    PubMed

    Hoekstra, Eddo J; Simoneau, Catherine

    2013-01-01

    The release of Bisphenol A (BPA) from polycarbonate baby bottles into food and food simulants is reviewed in the perspective of the current intensive discussions on the risks of this substance. Potential factors that have been reported to influence the release of BPA are reviewed. Unlike most polymers polycarbonate is hydrolyzed under alkaline conditions by scale formation, residual alkaline detergents and boiled water. Data suggest that brushing of the bottle did not raise the release of BPA. Claims that used bottles release more BPA than new bottles and that mineral composition of the aqueous food simulant affect release could not be substantiated. There are indications that aminolysis of polycarbonate by milk and ethanolysis of polycarbonate by 50% ethanol might take place under relevant test conditions. The relatively few migration data following the test conditions of European food contact material legislation, comply with the specific migration limit. Two test conditions were identified that reflect real use and exposure, and might cause higher release of BPA compared to the test conditions of European food contact material legislation. Further detailed studies are necessary to verify whether these two exposure scenarios are more severe.

  13. Optogenetic control of ATP release

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lewis, Matthew A.; Joshi, Bipin; Gu, Ling; Feranchak, Andrew; Mohanty, Samarendra K.

    2013-03-01

    Controlled release of ATP can be used for understanding extracellular purinergic signaling. While coarse mechanical forces and hypotonic stimulation have been utilized in the past to initiate ATP release from cells, these methods are neither spatially accurate nor temporally precise. Further, these methods cannot be utilized in a highly effective cell-specific manner. To mitigate the uncertainties regarding cellular-specificity and spatio-temporal release of ATP, we herein demonstrate use of optogenetics for ATP release. ATP release in response to optogenetic stimulation was monitored by Luciferin-Luciferase assay (North American firefly, photinus pyralis) using luminometer as well as mesoscopic bioluminescence imaging. Our result demonstrates repetitive release of ATP subsequent to optogenetic stimulation. It is thus feasible that purinergic signaling can be directly detected via imaging if the stimulus can be confined to single cell or in a spatially-defined group of cells. This study opens up new avenue to interrogate the mechanisms of purinergic signaling.

  14. Detection of contaminant plumes released from landfills

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yenigül, N. B.; Hendsbergen, A. T.; Elfeki, A. M. M.; Dekking, F. M.

    2006-06-01

    Contaminant leaks released from landfills are a significant threat to groundwater quality. The groundwater detection monitoring systems installed in the vicinity of such facilities are vital. In this study the detection probability of a contaminant plume released from a landfill has been investigated by means of both a simulation and an analytical model for both homogeneous and heterogeneous aquifer conditions. The results of the two models are compared for homogeneous aquifer conditions to illustrate the errors that might be encountered with the simulation model. For heterogeneous aquifer conditions contaminant transport is modelled by an analytical model using effective (macro) dispersivities. The results of the analysis show that the simulation model gives the concentration values correctly over most of the plume length for homogeneous aquifer conditions, and that the detection probability of a contaminant plume at given monitoring well locations match quite well. For heterogeneous aquifer conditions the approximating analytical model based on effective (macro) dispersivities yields the average concentration distribution satisfactorily. However, it is insufficient in monitoring system design since the discrepancy between the detection probabilities of contaminant plumes at given monitoring well locations computed by the two models is significant, particularly with high dispersivity and heterogeneity.

  15. Floodplain Hyporheic Response under Dam Release Hydrographs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, T.; Ward, A. S.; O'Connor, B. L.; Endreny, T. A.

    2012-12-01

    Hydropower operations cause altered hydrograph patterns downstream of dams, which regulates the direction and magnitude of floodplain and riverbed hyporheic flux. Periodic adjustments in river stage changes temporal and spatial patterns in hydraulic pressure, initiates propagation of lateral and vertical hyporheic flux, and affects the riparian ecological system by changing the hyporheic penetration distance, hyporheic flux rate, and thermal conditions in river banks. While this issue has been largely neglected by watershed scientists and managers, there is the potential to use hyporheic metrics in setting dam release rules and restoring downstream river reaches. In order to evaluate the hyporheic feedbacks of various dam release patterns, this study applied a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) model to simulate the interaction of open water hydrographs on porous media lateral hyporheic exchange for the Green River, Utah, downstream of Flaming Gorge Dam. The CFD initially represented the river as a straight channel with a thick porous media extending from the channel banks and bottom. The dam release hydrographs changed the patterns of hyporheic flux at the river banks, the penetration distance of the hyporheic flux, the subsurface thermal patterns, and the residence time of water in the subsurface. The results suggest the undulating river stage downstream of dam releases can initiate patterns of hyporheic exchange similar to those induced by restoration of river bed morphology.

  16. Predicting red wolf release success in the southeastern United States

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    van Manen, Frank T.; Crawford, Barron A.; Clark, Joseph D.

    2000-01-01

    Although the red wolf (Canis rufus) was once found throughout the southeastern United States, indiscriminate killing and habitat destruction reduced its range to a small section of coastal Texas and Louisiana. Wolves trapped from 1973 to 1980 were taken to establish a captive breeding program that was used to repatriate 2 mainland and 3 island red wolf populations. We collected data from 320 red wolf releases in these areas and classified each as a success or failure based on survival and reproductive criteria, and whether recaptures were necessary to resolve conflicts with humans. We evaluated the relations between release success and conditions at the release sites, characteristics of released wolves, and release procedures. Although <44% of the variation in release success was explained, model performance based on jackknife tests indicated a 72-80% correct prediction rate for the 4 operational models we developed. The models indicated that success was associated with human influences on the landscape and the level of wolf habituation to humans prior to release. We applied the models to 31 prospective areas for wolf repatriation and calculated an index of release success for each area. Decision-makers can use these models to objectively rank prospective release areas and compare strengths and weaknesses of each.

  17. Proretinal nanoparticles: stability, release, efficacy, and irritation

    PubMed Central

    Pisetpackdeekul, Pimolphan; Supmuang, Piyapan; Pan-In, Porntip; Banlunara, Wijit; Limcharoen, Benchaphorn; Kokpol, Chayada; Wanichwecharungruang, Supason

    2016-01-01

    Despite many potent biological activities, retinoids such as retinoic acid (RA) and retinal possess dose-related broad side effects. In this study, we show that this problem, which has been unsolvable for a long time, can be tackled through a controlled release strategy in which retinal is continuously delivered to the skin via sustained release from proretinal nanoparticles. The water dispersible proretinal nanoparticles are stable when kept in water at neutral pH and at room temperature for 8 months under light-proof conditions, and show sustained release of retinal into human synthetic sebum at a pH of 5. In the daily topical application tests performed for 4 weeks on rats’ skin, the nanoparticles showed superior ability to increase epidermal thickness compared to RA and retinal, with no skin irritation observed for the proretinal particles, but severe skin irritation observed for RA and free retinal. When tested under occlusion conditions in human volunteers, insignificant skin irritation was observed for the proretinal nanoparticles. The 12-week, double-blind, split-face study on human volunteers indicates better antiaging efficacy of the particles as compared to the free RA. PMID:27499622

  18. Controlled Release Applications of Organometals.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thayer, John S.

    1981-01-01

    Reviews two classes of controlled release organometals: (1) distributional, to distribute bioactive materials to control a certain target organism; and (2) protective, to protect surface or interior of some structure from attach by organisms. Specific examples are given including a discussion of controlled release for schistosomiasis. (SK)

  19. Partial site release at a power reactor facility.

    PubMed

    Darman, Joseph; Whitney, Michael; Dubiel, Richard

    2004-01-01

    U.S. NRC licensed facilities undergoing decommissioning may wish to remove portions of their site from the jurisdiction of their license, prior to final license termination. The method of partial site release, relevant to radiological conditions, described herein employs NUREG-1505 methodology for demonstrating indistinguishability from background. The partial site release process was also informed by NRC Regulatory Issue Summary 2000-19 "Partial Release of Reactor Site for Unrestricted Use Before NRC Approval of the License Termination Plan." However, the focus of this discussion is the radiological aspects of partial site release, relevant to the implementation of NUREG-1505 methodology for demonstrating indistinguishability from background, based on the 137Cs concentrations at the site and a suitable background reference area. This type of approach was found acceptable by the NRC, and the partial site release was granted.

  20. Evaluation of radiological releases from the Tomsk-7 accident

    SciTech Connect

    Lussie, W.G.

    1995-10-01

    On April 6, 1993, there was an uncontrolled release of radioactive material from the fuel reprocessing plant at the Siberian Chemical Combine in Tomsk. The release resulted from the rupture of an over-pressurized feed adjustment tank and subsequent explosion that destroyed the walls and roof of the operating gallery. Radioactive material was released through a 150 meter stack, as well as through the destroyed walls and roof. Relatively stable atmospheric conditions prevailed and a light snow was falling. The radiation release was not excessive, but the spread of radioactive material was compounded by the explosion. Radiation was detected about 26 km from the source. This paper summarizes the information available in the US regarding the release and, using reasonable assumptions, compares the calculated ground activity and radiation levels with the reported measured values.

  1. Kepler Data Release 4 Notes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Van Cleve, Jeffrey (Editor); Jenkins, Jon; Caldwell, Doug; Allen, Christopher L.; Batalha, Natalie; Bryson, Stephen T.; Chandrasekaran, Hema; Clarke, Bruce D.; Cote, Miles T.; Dotson, Jessie L.; Gilliland, Ron; Girouard, Forrest; Haas, Michael R.; Hall, Jennifer; Ibrahim, Khadeejah; Klaus, Todd; Kolodziejczak, Jeff; Li, Jie; McCauliff, Sean D.; Middour, Christopher K.; Pletcher, David L.; Quintana, Elisa V.; Tenenbaum, Peter G.; Twicken, Joe; Uddin, Akm Kamal

    2010-01-01

    The Data Analysis Working Group have released long and short cadence materials, including FFIs and Dropped Targets for the Public. The Kepler Science Office considers Data Release 4 to provide "browse quality" data. These notes have been prepared to give Kepler users of the Multimission Archive at STScl (MAST) a summary of how the data were collected and prepared, and how well the data processing pipeline is functioning on flight data. They will be updated for each release of data to the public archive and placed on MAST along with other Kepler documentation, at http://archive.stsci.edu/kepler/documents.html. Data release 3 is meant to give users the opportunity to examine the data for possibly interesting science and to involve the users in improving the pipeline for future data releases. To perform the latter service, users are encouraged to notice and document artifacts, either in the raw or processed data, and report them to the Science Office.

  2. ORNL fission product release tests VI-6

    SciTech Connect

    Osborne, M.F.; Lorenz, R.A.; Collins, J.L.; Lee, C.S.

    1991-01-01

    The ORNL fission product release tests investigate release and transport of the major fission products from high-burnup fuel under LWR accident conditions. The two most recent tests (VI-4 and VI-5) were conducted in hydrogen. In three previous tests in this series (VI-1, VI-2, and VI-3), which had been conducted in steam, the oxidized Zircaloy cladding remained largely intact and acted as a barrier to steam reaction with the UO{sub 2}. Test VI-6 was designed to insure significant oxidation of the UO{sub 2} fuel, which has been shown to enhance release of certain fission products, especially molybdenum and ruthenium. The BR3 fuel specimen used in test VI-6 will be heated in hydrogen to 2300 K; the Zircaloy cladding is expected to melt and runoff at {approximately}2150 K. Upon reaching the 2300 K test temperature, the test atmosphere will be changed to steam, and that temperature will be maintained for 60 min, with the three collection trains being operated for 2-, 18-, and 40-min periods. The releases of {sup 85}Kr and {sup 137}Cs will be monitored continuously throughout the test. Posttest analyses of the material collected on the three trains will provide results on the release and transport of Mo, Ru, Sb, Te, Ba, Ce, and Eu as a function of time at 2300 K. Continuous monitoring of the hydrogen produced during the steam atmosphere period at high temperature will provide a measure of the oxidation rate of the cladding and fuel. Following delays in approval of the safety documentation and in decontamination of the hot cell and test apparatus, test VI-6 will be conducted in late May.

  3. Dissolved organic carbon release by marine macrophytes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barrón, C.; Apostolaki, E. T.; Duarte, C. M.

    2012-02-01

    Estimates of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) release by marine macrophyte communities (seagrass meadows and macroalgal beds) were obtained experimentally using in situ benthic chambers. The effect of light availability on DOC release by macrophyte communities was examined in two communities both by comparing net DOC release under light and dark, and by examining the response of net DOC release to longer-term (days) experimental shading of the communities. All most 85% of the seagrass communities and almost all of macroalgal communities examined acted as net sources of DOC. There was a weak tendency for higher DOC fluxes under light than under dark conditions in seagrass meadow. There is no relationship between net DOC fluxes and gross primary production (GPP) and net community production (NCP), however, this relationship is positive between net DOC fluxes and community respiration. Net DOC fluxes were not affected by shading of a T. testudinum community in Florida for 5 days, however, shading of a mixed seagrass meadow in the Philippines led to a significant reduction on the net DOC release when shading was maintained for 6 days compared to only 2 days of shading. Based on published and unpublished results we also estimate the global net DOC production by marine macrophytes. The estimated global net DOC flux, and hence export, from marine macrophyte is about 0.197 ± 0.015 Pg C yr-1 or 0.212 ± 0.016 Pg C yr-1 depending if net DOC flux by seagrass meadows was estimated by taking into account the low or high global seagrass area, respectively.

  4. [Attempted suicide with sustained release diltiazem].

    PubMed

    Quispel, R; Baur, H J

    2001-05-12

    A 15-year-old woman was admitted to the intensive care unit after intentional auto-intoxication with 10 tablets of 200 mg diltiazem sustained release. She developed hypotension and became oliguric. This was followed by metabolic acidosis. Maximum plasma lactate concentration was 10 mmol/l and the highest measured plasma diltiazem level was 500 micrograms/l. The occurrence of pulmonary oedema due to adult respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) was striking and the patient required mechanical ventilation for a period of three days as a result of this. After five days in the intensive care unit, she was transferred to a psychiatric hospital in a good physical condition. Sustained release diltiazem intoxications have previously been described on five occasions.

  5. Post-release monitoring of Antillean manatees: an assessment of the Brazilian rehabilitation and release programme

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Normande, Iran C.; Malhado, Ana C. M.; Reid, James P.; Viana Junior, P.C.; Savaget, P. V. S.; Correia, R. A.; Luna, F. O.; R. J. Ladle,

    2016-01-01

    Mammalian reintroduction programmes frequently aim to reconnect isolated sub-populations and restore population viability. However, these long-term objectives are rarely evaluated due to the inadequacy of post-release monitoring. Here, we report the results of a unique long term telemetry-based monitoring programme for rehabilitated Antillean manatees (Trichechus manatus manatus) reintroduced into selected sites in northeast Brazil with the aim of reconnecting isolated relict populations. Twenty-one satellite-tagged rehabilitated manatees, 13 males and 8 females, were released into the wild from two sites between November 2008 and June 2013. Individual accumulation curves were plotted and home ranges were calculated through the fixed kernel method using 95% of the utilization distribution. The number and size of the Centres of Activity (COAs) were calculated using 50% of the utilization distribution. Manatees displayed a dichotomous pattern of movement, with individuals either characterized by sedentary habits or by much more extensive movements. Moreover, home range size was not significantly influenced by gender, age at release or release site. COAs were strongly associated with sheltered conditions within reefs and estuaries, and also by the presence of freshwater and feeding sites. Our data confirm that manatee reintroductions in Brazil have the potential to reconnect distant sub-populations. However, pre-release identification of potential long-distance migrants is currently unfeasible, and further analysis would be required to confirm genetic mixing of distant sub-populations.

  6. Nitrogen release during coal combustion

    SciTech Connect

    Baxter, L.L.; Mitchell, R.E.; Fletcher, T.H.; Hurt, R.H.

    1995-02-01

    Experiments in entrained flow reactors at combustion temperatures are performed to resolve the rank dependence of nitrogen release on an elemental basis for a suite of 15 U.S. coals ranging from lignite to low-volatile bituminous. Data were obtained as a function of particle conversion, with overall mass loss up to 99% on a dry, ash-free basis. Nitrogen release rates are presented relative to both carbon loss and overall mass loss. During devolatilization, fractional nitrogen release from low-rank coals is much slower than fractional mass release and noticeably slower than fractional carbon release. As coal rank increases, fractional nitrogen release rate relative to that of carbon and mass increases, with fractional nitrogen release rates exceeding fractional mass and fractional carbon release rates during devolatilization for high-rank (low-volatile bituminous) coals. At the onset of combustion, nitrogen release rates increase significantly. For all coals investigated, cumulative fractional nitrogen loss rates relative to those of mass and carbon passes through a maximum during the earliest stages of oxidation. The mechanism for generating this maximum is postulated to involve nascent thermal rupture of nitrogen-containing compounds and possible preferential oxidation of nitrogen sites. During later stages of oxidation, the cumulative fractional loss of nitrogen approaches that of carbon for all coals. Changes in the relative release rates of nitrogen compared to those of both overall mass and carbon during all stages of combustion are attributed to a combination of the chemical structure of coals, temperature histories during combustion, and char chemistry.

  7. Hexamethylenetetramine carboxyborane: synthesis, structural characterization and CO releasing properties.

    PubMed

    Ayudhya, T I; Raymond, C C; Dingra, N N

    2017-01-17

    Carbon monoxide, although widely known as a toxic gas, has received great attention in the past few decades due to its promising role as a medical gas. Several classes of carbon monoxide releasing molecules (CORMs) have been synthesised with many of them having pharmacological activities under physiological conditions. Herein, we report the synthesis and structural characterization of the first example of amine carboxyborane that releases CO under physiological conditions without the aid of inducers. A representative compound hexamethylenetetramine carboxyborane (HMTA-CB) described here has a half-life of 2.7 days and gradually releases CO with the rate constant of 3.0 × 10(-6) s(-1). Its ability to promote cell growth shows the beneficial effect of slow CO release to supplement CO in small amounts over time.

  8. Corrective Action Decision Document for Corrective Action Unit 166: Storage Yards and Contaminated Materials, Nevada Test Site, Nevada with Errata Sheet

    SciTech Connect

    Grant Evenson

    2007-03-01

    This Corrective Action Decision Document (CADD) has been prepared for Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 166, Storage Yards and Contaminated Materials, in accordance with the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (1996). The corrective action sites (CASs) are located in Areas 2, 3, 5, and 18 of the Nevada Test Site, Nevada. Corrective Action Unit 166 is comprised of the following CASs: • 02-42-01, Cond. Release Storage Yd - North • 02-42-02, Cond. Release Storage Yd - South • 02-99-10, D-38 Storage Area • 03-42-01, Conditional Release Storage Yard • 05-19-02, Contaminated Soil and Drum • 18-01-01, Aboveground Storage Tank • 18-99-03, Wax Piles/Oil Stain The purpose of this CADD is to identify and provide the rationale for the recommendation of a corrective action alternative (CAA) for the seven CASs within CAU 166. Corrective action investigation (CAI) activities were performed from July 31, 2006, through February 28, 2007, as set forth in the CAU 166 Corrective Action Investigation Plan (NNSA/NSO, 2006).

  9. Corrective Action Plan for Corrective Action Unit 166: Storage Yards and Contaminated Materials, Nevada Test Site, Nevada

    SciTech Connect

    NSTec Environmental Restoration

    2007-10-01

    Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 166, Storage Yards and Contaminated Materials, is listed in the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO) of 1996 (FFACO, 1996). CAU 166 consists of seven Corrective Action Sites (CASs) located in Areas 2, 3, 5, and 18 of the Nevada Test Site (NTS), which is located approximately 65 miles northwest of Las Vegas, Nevada (Figure 1). CAU 166 consists of the following CASs: (1) CAS 02-42-01, Cond. Release Storage Yd - North; (2) CAS 02-42-02, Cond. Release Storage Yd - South; (3) CAS 02-99-10, D-38 Storage Area; (4) CAS 03-42-01, Conditional Release Storage Yard; (5) CAS 05-19-02, Contaminated Soil and Drum; (6) CAS 18-01-01, Aboveground Storage Tank; and (7) CAS 18-99-03, Wax Piles/Oil Stain. Details of the site history and site characterization results for CAU 166 are provided in the approved Corrective Action Investigation Plan (CAIP) (U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office [NNSA/NSO], 2006) and in the approved Corrective Action Decision Document (CADD) (NNSA/NSO, 2007).

  10. Thermal Release of Gases in Achondrites: 1. Gas Release During Melting of Eucrites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Assonov, S. S.; Ivanova, M. A.; Shukolyukov, Yu. A.

    1995-09-01

    We previously studied Ar, Kr and Xe during stepwise heating of a sample of the eucrite Pomozdino [1], with temperature steps 400, 600, 800, 900, 1100, 1300 and 1600 C. Most (96%) of the cosmogenic and fissiogenic Xe was released in the 1100 - 1600 C fractions, with maximum release (70%) in the 1300 C fraction. The relative release of these components in the fractions was nearly identical. The fissiongenic Xe release curve is shown in Fig. 1 lower part (construction technique is discussed in part 2). The release curves of all isotopes formed in situ have a peak release in the 1300 C fraction too. The existence of this common peak for different isotopes suggests either the same release process or that the different isotopes were present in the same mineral phase. The rock-forming minerals of eucrites are plagioclase and pyroxenes. Investigation of the Sm-Nd system in the eucrite Pomozdino [2] demonstrated the nearness of the concentrations of Nd in both plagioclase and pyroxene fractions (3.34 and 2.89 nmol/g respectively). Thus the concentrations of both cosmogenic and fissiogenic Xe should be approximately equal in these minerals, and the presence of a single release peak might indicate the destruction of the crystal structure of both minerals, possibly during melting of eucrite under laboratory conditions. In order to evaluate the interval of the Pomozdino eucrite's melting temperatures we used a thermodynamic model of equilibrium crystallization of lunar magmas embodied in the LUNAMAG computer program [3] (and references in this work). The similar compositions of eucrites and lunar rocks, and also the vacuum conditions of the experiment (low fO2) make the model applicable. Fig. 1 (upper part) shows a LUNAMAG graph of equilibrium crystallization using the Pomozdino eucrite [4] chemical composition. The melting temperature of minerals during stepwise heating may be higher than the calculated values due to incomplete solid-melt equilibrium during the temperature

  11. Peptide secreted by human alveolar macrophages releases neutrophil granule contents

    SciTech Connect

    MacArthur, C.K.; Miller, E.J.; Cohen, A.B.

    1987-11-15

    A monoclonal antibody was developed against an 8000-kDa enzyme-releasing peptide (ERP) released from human alveolar macrophages. ERP was isolated on an immunoaffinity column containing the antibody bound to staphylococcal protein A-Sepharose, and by autoradiography. Release of ERP from the macrophages is not changed by plastic adherence, phagocytosis, calcium ionophore, or phorbol esters. The peptide was not antigenically similar to interferon-..gamma.., tumor necrosis factor, or interleukin l..cap alpha.. or 1..beta... The release of constituents from azurophilic and specific granules was the main identified biologic function of ERP. ERP was a more effective secretagogue in the untreated neutrophils and f-met-leu-phe was more effective in the cytochalasin B-treated neutrophils. Absorption of ERP from macrophage-conditioned medium removed a small amount of the chemotactic activity; however, the immunopurified peptide was not chemotactic or chemokinetic for neutrophils, and at high concentrations, it suppressed base line chemokinesis. Treatment of washed macrophages with trypsin released active ERP of approximately the same m.w. of spontaneously secreted ERP. These studies showed that human alveolar macrophages release a peptide which is a secretagogue for human neutrophils under conditions which may be encountered in the lungs during certain disease states. Proteolytic enzymes which are free in the lungs may release the peptide and lead to the secretion of neutrophil enzymes.

  12. Iron release analyses from ferritin by visible light irradiation.

    PubMed

    Ohishi, Kentaro; Zhang, Xiao Mei; Moriwaki, Shinichi; Hiramitsu, Tadahisa; Matsugo, Seiichi

    2005-08-01

    We investigated the iron release from ferritin by irradiation from a white fluorescent light in the absence or presence of ADP. Irradiation of a ferritin solution at 17,000 lx in the absence of ADP slightly induces iron release from ferritin but only at acidic pH conditions (pH 5.0 or pH 6.0). Irradiation in the presence of ADP markedly enhances iron release from ferritin under the same conditions. In the absence of irradiation, the iron release from ferritin was low even in the presence of ADP. The induction of the iron release by irradiation in the presence of ADP was also affected by various factors such as irradiation dose and acidity, but not temperature (4-47 degrees C), oxygen concentration, or free radical generations during the irradiation. The iron release during the irradiation ceased to increase by turning off the light and was found to increase again after additional irradiation. These results suggest that visible light directly induces iron release from ferritin via the photoreduction of iron stored inside ferritin.

  13. Toxics Release Inventory indicates big increases in releases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Showstack, Randy

    2012-01-01

    Nearly 4 billion pounds of tracked toxic chemicals were released into the environment throughout the United States during 2010, according to an analysis by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) of the Toxics Release Inventory (TRI), the agency announced on 5 January. This is a 16% increase above 2009. The agency said the increase is mainly due to changes in the metal-mining sector, where differences in the chemical composition of ore being mined can result in significant changes in the amount of toxic chemicals. The chemical and primary metals industries were other sectors with increases in toxic releases in 2010, the latest year for which data collection is complete. EPA also noted that although releases in 2010 were higher than during the previous 2 years, they were lower than in 2007 and in prior years.

  14. Evaluation of pheromone release from commercial mating disruption dispensers.

    PubMed

    Tomaszewska, Elizabeth; Hebert, Vincent R; Brunner, Jay F; Jones, Vincent P; Doerr, Mike; Hilton, Richard

    2005-04-06

    Pome fruit growers and crop consultants have expressed concerns about the seasonal release performance of commercial codling moth mating disruption dispenser products. Because of these concerns, we developed a laboratory flow-through volatile collection system (VCS) for measuring the volatile release of the codling moth sex pheromone, codlemone, from commercially available hand-applied dispensers. Under controlled air-flow and temperature conditions, the released vapor was trapped onto a polyurethane foam adsorbent followed by solvent extraction, solvent reduction, and GC/MS determination. Method recovery and breakthrough validations were performed to demonstrate system reliability before determining codlemone release from commercial dispensers field-aged over 140 days. The volatile collection was carried out in a consistent manner among five dispenser types most commonly used by growers, so that direct comparison of performance could be made. The comparison showed differences in the amount of pheromone released and in the patterns of release throughout the season between dispenser types. The variation in release performance demonstrates the need for routine evaluation of commercially marketed mating disruption dispensers. We believe that the simple and cost-effective volatile collection system can assist pheromone dispenser manufacturers in determining seasonal dispenser performance before new products are introduced into the commercial market and in rapidly verifying dispenser release when field-aged dispenser efficacy is in question.

  15. Controlled Release of Imidacloprid from Poly Styrene-Diacetone - Nanoformulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qian, Kun; Guo, Yanzhen; He, Lin

    2012-01-01

    Imidacloprid is a neonicotinoids insecticide, which is important for the cash crops such as tomato, rape and so on. The conventional formulation does not only increase the loss of pesticide but also leads to environmental pollution. Controlled-release formulations of pesticide are highly desirable not only for attaining the most effective utilization of the pesticide, but also for reducing environmental pollution. Pesticide imidacloprid was incorporated in poly (styrene-diacetone crylamide)-based formulation to obtain controlled release properties, and the imidacloprid nanocontrolled release formulation was characterized by infrared (IR) and field emission scanning electron microscope (FESEM). Factors related to loading efficiency, swelling and release behaviors of the formulation were investigated. It showed that the loading efficiency could reach about 40% (w/w). The values for the diffusion exponent "n" were in the range of 0.31-0.58, which indicated that the release of imidacloprid was diffusion-controlled. The time taken for 50% of the active ingredient to be released into water, T50, was also calculated for the comparison of formulations in different conditions. The results showed that the formulation with higher temperature and more diacetone crylamide had lower value of T50, which means a quicker release of the active ingredient. This study highlighted some pieces of evidence that improved pesticide incorporation and slower release were linked to potential interactions between the pesticide and the polymer.

  16. Mast cell release of superoxide

    SciTech Connect

    Dileepan, K.N.; Simpson, K.M.; Stechschulte, D.J.

    1987-05-01

    The ability of rat serosal mast cells (MC) to release superoxide (O/sub 2//sup -/) upon activation by immunologic and nonimmunologic stimuli was investigated. Purified MC (90-95%) were either sensitized with monoclonal IgE reactive against dinitrophenyl bovine serum albumin (DNP-BSA) and challenged with DNP-BSA, or naive MC were treated with compound 48/80 or ionophore A23187. O/sub 2//sup -/ release was measured by O/sub 2//sup -/ dismutase (SOD)-sensitive reduction of cytochrome C and MC activation was assessed by the release of histamine or (/sup 14/C)5-hydroxytryptamine (5HT). The results reveal that activation of MC by 48/80 or immunologic challenge does not release O/sub 2//sup -/, although these stimuli induce substantial release of histamine and 5HT (40-70%). In contrast, A23187 released O/sub 2//sup -/ (3-6 nMols/10/sup 6/ MC) and histamine (40-80%). In mixed cell preparations containing MC and macrophages (M0), activation of MC with 48/80 resulted in inhibition of M0 O/sub 2//sup -/ release. The MC-mediated inhibition of O/sub 2//sup -/ production was not due to histamine or 5HT, but was due to MC-granule SOD. MC contain abundant quantities of SOD and, therefore, release O/sub 2//sup -/ only when its production exceeds the intracellular SOD threshold following activation with selective stimuli. In addition, the apparent differences in the mode and site of action of various stimuli on MC may contribute to the discriminative release of O/sub 2//sup -/.

  17. Controlled release liquid dosage formulation

    DOEpatents

    Benton, Ben F.; Gardner, David L.

    1989-01-01

    A liquid dual coated dosage formulation sustained release pharmaceutic having substantial shelf life prior to ingestion is disclosed. A dual coating is applied over controlled release cores to form dosage forms and the coatings comprise fats melting at less than approximately 101.degree. F. overcoated with cellulose acetate phthalate or zein. The dual coated dosage forms are dispersed in a sugar based acidic liquid carrier such as high fructose corn syrup and display a shelf life of up to approximately at least 45 days while still retaining their release profiles following ingestion. Cellulose acetate phthalate coated dosage form cores can in addition be dispersed in aqueous liquids of pH <5.

  18. EFFECTS OF FRESHWATER RELEASES AND SEASON ON OYSTERS (CRASSOSTREA VIRGINICA) IN CALOOSAHATCHEE ESTUARY, FLORIDA

    EPA Science Inventory

    The influence of freshwater releases and season on disease prevalence and intensity of Perkinsus marinus, condition index, gonadal condition, recruitment potential, and growth of oysters was examined monthly at five locations along the Caloosahatchee estuary, Florida. Temperature...

  19. Salt release from potato crisps.

    PubMed

    Tian, Xing; Fisk, Ian D

    2012-04-01

    The rate of salt release in-mouth from salted potato crisps was evaluated. It was hypothesised that a slow steady release of sodium would occur on chewing and hydration; to test this a crisp was chewed and held in the oral cavity without swallowing for 60 s. Sodium release was measured over the entire holding period, after 20-30 s a peak in salivary sodium levels was recorded. A similar trend was observed with sensory perceived saltiness by trained panellists. The results suggest that a significant proportion of the crisp's salt flavouring is released in a pulse-type mechanism which would not be encountered when the crisp is exposed to normal eating patterns and would result in the consumption of a large proportion of unperceived sodium.

  20. Tyrosine - Effects on catecholamine release

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Acworth, Ian N.; During, Matthew J.; Wurtman, Richard J.

    1988-01-01

    Tyrosine administration elevates striatal levels of dopamine metabolites in animals given treatments that accelerate nigrostriatal firing, but not in untreated rats. We examined the possibility that the amino acid might actually enhance dopamine release in untreated animals, but that the technique of measuring striatal dopamine metabolism was too insensitive to demonstrate such an effect. Dopamine release was assessed directly, using brain microdialysis of striatal extracellular fluid. Tyrosine administration (50-200 mg/kg IP) did indeed cause a dose related increase in extracellular fluid dopamine levels with minor elevations in levels of DOPAC and HVA, its major metabolites, which were not dose-related. The rise in dopamine was short-lived, suggesting that receptor-mediated feedback mechanisms responded to the increased dopamine release by diminishing neuronal firing or sensitivity to tyrosine. These observations indicate that measurement of changes in striatal DOPAC and HVA, if negative, need not rule out increases in nigrostriatal dopamine release.

  1. Birth control - slow release methods

    MedlinePlus

    Contraception - slow-release hormonal methods; Progestin implants; Progestin injections; Skin patch; Vaginal ring ... implants while breastfeeding. Progestin implants work better than birth control pills to prevent pregnancy. Very few women who ...

  2. SELF-RELEASING GRAPPLING DEVICE

    DOEpatents

    Hoover, D.A. Sr.

    1963-11-01

    >A self-releasing grappling device that lifts by virtue of engagement between clamping jaws and the undercut lower side of a conical head of a lifting lug attached to the object to be lifted and employs a releasing sleeve on the lug to free the jaws from the lug is presented. When the jaws are to be released, they are dropped over the releasing sleeve, which is located well below lug head. When the jaws are lifted, they engage a conical surface on the sleeve and lift it up to the head of the lifting lug. In this position of the sleeve, the lower side of the lug head is covered by the sleeve and so cannot be engaged by the jaws, which move past before clearing the sleeve. (AEC)

  3. Energy release in solar flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, John C.; Correia, Emilia; Farnik, Frantisek; Garcia, Howard; Henoux, Jean-Claude; La Rosa, Ted N.; Machado, Marcos E. (Compiler); Nakajima, Hiroshi; Priest, Eric R.

    1994-01-01

    Team 2 of the Ottawa Flares 22 Workshop dealt with observational and theoretical aspects of the characteristics and processes of energy release in flares. Main results summarized in this article stress the global character of the flaring phenomenon in active regions, the importance of discontinuities in magnetic connectivity, the role of field-aligned currents in free energy storage, and the fragmentation of energy release in time and space.

  4. Oxidative calcium release from catechol.

    PubMed

    Riley, Patrick A; Stratford, Michael R L

    2015-04-01

    Oxidation of 4-methylcatechol previously exposed to aqueous calcium chloride was shown by ion chromatography to be associated with release of calcium ions. The catechol was oxidised to the corresponding orthoquinone by the use of tyrosinase from Agaricus bisporus. The oxidative release of calcium from the catechol is ascribed to the diminution of the available hydroxyl functions able to act as chelating groups. Our results suggest that the redox status of melanin may regulate calcium binding and influence calcium levels in pigmented cells.

  5. Development of the releasable asbestos field sampler.

    PubMed

    Kominsky, John R; Thornburg, Jonathan W; Shaul, Glenn M; Barrett, William M; Hall, Fred D; Konz, James J

    2010-03-01

    The releasable asbestos field sampler (RAFS) was developed as an alternative to activity-based sampling (ABS; personal breathing zone sampling during a simulated activity). The RAFS utilizes a raking motion to provide the energy that releases particulate material from the soil and aerosolizes the asbestos fibers. A gentle airflow laterally transports the generated aerosol inside of a tunnel to one end where filter sampling cassettes or real-time instruments are used to measure asbestos and particulate release. The RAFS was tested in a series of laboratory experiments to validate its performance and then was deployed for field trials in asbestos-contaminated soil at multiple geographical locations. Laboratory data showed the RAFS generated repeatable and representative aerosol particulate concentrations. Field tests showed the RAFS aerosolized asbestos concentrations were statistically correlated with total particle concentrations. Field tests also showed the RAFS aerosolized asbestos concentrations were statistically correlated with asbestos concentrations measured by multiple ABS tests with different activities, different soil/environmental conditions, and at different geographical locations. RAFS provides a direct measurement of asbestos emission from soil in situ without consideration of meteorology and personal activity on the asbestos transport to the breathing zone.

  6. Bisphosphonate release profiles from magnetite microspheres.

    PubMed

    Miyazaki, Toshiki; Inoue, Tatsuya; Shirosaki, Yuki; Kawashita, Masakazu; Matsubara, Takao; Matsumine, Akihiko

    2014-10-01

    Hyperthermia has been suggested as a novel, minimally invasive cancer treatment method. After implantation of magnetic nano- or microparticles around a tumour through blood vessels, irradiation with alternating magnetic fields facilitates the efficient in situ hyperthermia even for deep-seated tumours. On the basis of this idea, if the microspheres are capable of delivering drugs, they could be promising multifunctional biomaterials effective for chemotherapy as well as hyperthermia. In the present study, magnetite microspheres were prepared by aggregation of the iron oxide colloid in water-in-oil (W/O) emulsion. The release behaviour of alendronate, a typical bisphosphonate, from the microspheres was examined in vitro as a model of the bone tumour prevention and treatment system. The alendronate was successfully incorporated onto the porous magnetite microspheres in vacuum conditions. The drug-loaded microspheres maintained their original spherical shapes even after shaking in ultrapure water for 3 days, suggesting that they have sufficient mechanical integrity for clinical use. It was attributed to high aggregation capability of the magnetite nanoparticles through van der Waals and weak magnetic attractions. The microspheres showed slow release of the alendronate in vitro, resulting from tight covalent or ionic interaction between the magnetite and the alendronate. The release rate was diffusion-controlled type and well controlled by the alendronate concentration in drug incorporation to the microspheres.

  7. Characteristics of nitrogen release from synthetic zeolite Na-P1 occluding NH4NO3.

    PubMed

    Park, Man; Kim, Jong Su; Choi, Choong Lyeal; Kim, Jang-Eok; Heo, Nam Ho; Komarneni, Sridhar; Choi, Jyung

    2005-08-18

    Zeolites can accommodate a considerable amount of occluded salt such as NH4NO3, which can serve as a good source of slow-release plant nutrient. This study evaluates the kinetics of ion release from NH4NO3-occluded Na-P1 (N-NaP) using a simulated soil solution and deionized water as leaching solutions. The patterns of ion releases were examined as a function of leaching time under both static and continuous-flow conditions for more than one month. Releases of both NH4+ and NO3- from N-NaP were found to be slow and steady under both the above conditions. The soil solution affected the release of NH4+ and NO3- differently, while deionized water released nearly the same equivalents of these ions. This clearly indicates that ion release from salt-occluded zeolite involves two different reactions, cation exchange and dissolution. The kinetics of ion release from occluded NH4NO3 under static condition was best described by the standard Elovich model while the power function model best expressed these under continuous-flow condition. The initial ion release patterns under both conditions exhibited considerable deviation from the simulated models, probably as a result of the presence of hydrated occluded NH4NO3. Flow condition and the presence of electrolytes in leaching solution affected the release kinetics significantly. Release of occluded NH4NO3 was delayed by the presence of the NH4NO3 coated on zeolite crystals. These results indicate that the ion release property of occluded salt could be predicted and controlled. This study clearly shows that NH4NO3-occluded zeolites could be developed as slow release fertilizers.

  8. Release of ATP induced by hypertonic solutions in Xenopus oocytes

    PubMed Central

    Aleu, Jordi; Martín-Satué, Mireia; Navarro, Piedad; de Lara, Ivanna Pérez; Bahima, Laia; Marsal, Jordi; Solsona, Carles

    2003-01-01

    ATP mediates intercellular communication. Mechanical stress and changes in cell volume induce ATP release from various cell types, both secretory and non-secretory. In the present study, we stressed Xenopus oocytes with a hypertonic solution enriched in mannitol (300 mm). We measured simultaneously ATP release and ionic currents from a single oocyte. A decrease in cell volume, the activation of an inward current and ATP release were coincident. We found two components of ATP release: the first was associated with granule or vesicle exocytosis, because it was inhibited by tetanus neurotoxin, and the second was related to the inward current. A single exponential described the correlation between ATP release and the hypertonic-activated current. Gadolinium ions, which block mechanically activated ionic channels, inhibited the ATP release and the inward current but did not affect the decrease in volume. Oocytes expressing CFTR (cystic fibrosis transmembrane regulator) released ATP under hypertonic shock, but ATP release was significantly inhibited in the first component: that related to granule exocytosis. Since the ATP measured is the balance between ATP release and ATP degradation by ecto-enzymes, we measured the nucleoside triphosphate diphosphohydrolase (NTPDase) activity of the oocyte surface during osmotic stress, as the calcium-dependent hydrolysis of ATP, which was inhibited by more than 50 % in hypertonic conditions. The best-characterized membrane protein showing NTPDase activity is CD39. Oocytes injected with an antisense oligonucleotide complementary to CD39 mRNA released less ATP and showed a lower amplitude in the inward current than those oocytes injected with water. PMID:12562935

  9. Added release time in diffusion/dissolution coupled release.

    PubMed

    Nuxoll, Eric

    2015-10-15

    While increasingly sophisticated models have been developed to more accurately predict dispersed solute release from complex systems, distillation of their results into quantitative trends has been difficult. Here, the numerically calculated release profiles of coupled diffusion/dissolution systems are quantified by their cumulative release time (CRT) and compared against corresponding diffusion-controlled limits. The increase in CRT due to a finite dissolution rate was found to vary inversely with the second Damköhler number across several orders of magnitude, and also vary linearly with the amount of solid drug loaded in the system. The analytical nature of the relationship provides new physical insights into the system and appears to be indifferent to the form of the secondary rate-limiting step. This work provides a simple analytical expression with which one can not only predict the mean release time for a given set of parameter values, but understand precisely how each parameter value will affect it. The simplicity of the correlation and the lack of apparent limits to its validity also suggest the existence of an analytical pathway for its derivation, which may yield additional insights into the effect of secondary rate processes on controlled release.

  10. Cholecystokinin facilitates glutamate release by increasing the number of readily releasable vesicles and releasing probability.

    PubMed

    Deng, Pan-Yue; Xiao, Zhaoyang; Jha, Archana; Ramonet, David; Matsui, Toshimitsu; Leitges, Michael; Shin, Hee-Sup; Porter, James E; Geiger, Jonathan D; Lei, Saobo

    2010-04-14

    Cholecystokinin (CCK), a neuropeptide originally discovered in the gastrointestinal tract, is abundantly distributed in the mammalian brains including the hippocampus. Whereas CCK has been shown to increase glutamate concentration in the perfusate of hippocampal slices and in purified rat hippocampal synaptosomes, the cellular and molecular mechanisms whereby CCK modulates glutamatergic function remain unexplored. Here, we examined the effects of CCK on glutamatergic transmission in the hippocampus using whole-cell recordings from hippocampal slices. Application of CCK increased AMPA receptor-mediated EPSCs at perforant path-dentate gyrus granule cell, CA3-CA3 and Schaffer collateral-CA1 synapses without effects at mossy fiber-CA3 synapses. CCK-induced increases in AMPA EPSCs were mediated by CCK-2 receptors and were not modulated developmentally and transcriptionally. CCK reduced the coefficient of variation and paired-pulse ratio of AMPA EPSCs suggesting that CCK facilitates presynaptic glutamate release. CCK increased the release probability and the number of readily releasable vesicles with no effects on the rate of recovery from vesicle depletion. CCK-mediated increases in glutamate release required the functions of phospholipase C, intracellular Ca(2+) release and protein kinase Cgamma. CCK released endogenously from hippocampal interneurons facilitated glutamatergic transmission. Our results provide a cellular and molecular mechanism to explain the roles of CCK in the brain.

  11. Pheromonal stimulation of spawning release of gametes by gonadotropin releasing hormone in the chiton, Mopalia sp.

    PubMed

    Gorbman, Aubrey; Whiteley, Arthur; Kavanaugh, Scott

    2003-03-01

    The chiton Mopalia sp., a mollusc, was exposed to various dilutions of gonadotropin releasing hormone (GnRH) in sea water to determine whether this peptide is capable of acting as a pheromone that could stimulate release of ripe gametes (spawning). Two of the peptides, lamprey GnRH-1 and tunicate GnRH-2, had this action at a higher concentration (1.0 mg/L) but dilutions to 50 microg/L no longer were effective. Three other GnRHs: lamprey GnRH-3, tunicate GnRH-1, and a modified chicken GnRH-2, had no such action under the same test conditions. Since the spawning response could be produced by some GnRHs and not by others, it would appear that some kind of molecular recognition is involved, possibly by specific binding to a receptor. In earlier preliminary experiments tunicate GnRH-2 rapidly stimulated gamete release in a hemichordate, Saccoglossus. Thus it is suggested that GnRHs, in at least some invertebrates, may function as pheromones, serving to stimulate simultaneous spawning of individuals in a population of animals, and in this way assure more successful fertilization in species that must release their gametes into the water in which they live.

  12. Preparation, characterization and optimization of glipizide controlled release nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Emami, J.; Boushehri, M.S. Shetab; Varshosaz, J.

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to develop glipizide controlled release nanoparticles using alginate and chitosan thorough ionotropic controlled gelation method. Glipizide is a frequently prescribed second generation sulfonylurea which lowers the blood glucose in type-two diabetics. Quick absorption of the drug from the gastrointestinal tract along with short half- life of elimination makes it a good candidate for controlled release formulations. Alginate-chitosan nanoparticles (ACNP) are convenient controlled delivery systems for glipizide, due to both the release limiting properties of the system, and the bioadhesive nature of the polymers. In the present study, glipizide loaded alginate-chitosan nanoparticles (GlACNP) were prepared, and the particle characteristics including particle size (PS), zeta potential (ZP), entrapment efficiency (EE%), loading percent (LP), and mean release time (MRT), as well as the morphology of the nanoparticles, the drug-excipient compatibility, and the release kinetics along with the drug diffusion mechanism were evaluated. The results suggested that ionotropic controlled gelation method offers the possibility of preparing the nanoparticles in mild conditions in an aqueous environment, and can lead to the preparation of particles with favorable size, controlled release characteristics, and high entrapment efficiency, serving as a convenient delivery system for glipizide. The particle and release characteristics can be efficiently optimized using the Box-Behnken design. Based on the findings of the present study, it is expected that this novel formulation be a superior therapeutic alternative to the currently available glipizide delivery systems. PMID:25657802

  13. Radar investigation of barium releases over Arecibo Observatory, Puerto Rico

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Djuth, Frank T.

    1995-01-01

    The NASA Combined Release and Radiation Effects Satellite (CRRES) El Coqui rocket campaign was successfully carried out in Puerto Rico during the period 18 May through 12 July 1992. This report describes five chemical release experiments in the upper ionosphere supported by Geospace Research, Inc. during the El Coqui campaign. Additional spin-off science is also discussed. The El Coqui releases are designated AA-1 (rocket 36-082), AA-2 (rocket 36-081), AA-3b (rocket 36-064), AA-4 (rocket 36-065), and AA-7 (rocket 36-083). Particular attention is paid to releases AA-2 and AA-4. These two experiments involved the illumination of ionospheric release regions with powerful high-frequency (HF) radio waves transmitted from the Arecibo HF facility. In the AA-2 experiment, microinstabilities excited by the HF wave in a Ba(+) plasma were examined. This release yielded a smooth plasma cloud that helped clarify several fundamental issues regarding the physics of wave plasma instabilities. During AA-2 extremely strong HF-induced Langmuir turbulence was detected with the Arecibo 430 MHz radar. CF3Br was released in the AA-4 study to create an ionospheric hole that focused the HF beam. This experiment successfully explored wave-plasma coupling in an O(+) ionosphere under conditions of very high HF electric field strengths.

  14. Wetting mechanisms of gel-based controlled-release fertilizers.

    PubMed

    Shavit, U; Reiss, M; Shaviv, A

    2003-02-14

    The release mechanism of gel-based controlled release fertilizers (CRFs) involves water penetration into dry mixtures of fertilizers and gel forming polymers. Water penetration provides an upper limit to the whole release process. Where wetting prediction is often based on models that describe the flow of the liquid phase, vapor motion may become significant when a sharp wetting front exists. In this study we examine the role of vapor and fluid flows in the wetting process of CRFs consisting of urea or KNO(3) mixed with polyacrylamide (PAM). Vapor adsorption isotherms were obtained for typical fertilizer-PAM mixtures. Wetting and release experiments were conducted by dividing the CRFs into regions alternately filled with a pure fertilizer and mixtures of PAM and fertilizer. The experiments were designed in such a way that when the wetting front reaches a mixtures interface, its motion depends on the gradient imposed by the difference in osmotic potential (OP). The coupled equations of vapor and liquid flow in initially dry conditions were solved numerically to demonstrate the conceptual understanding gained by the experiments. The results show that wetting front motion is affected by transport and adsorption of vapor. It was also shown that the release rate is different when wetting is governed by vapor flow or by liquid flow. The release pattern from a multi-regions device was consistent with the wetting pattern, demonstrating the possibility to tailor the release according to periods of peak demand.

  15. Impact of variable reservoir releases on management of downstream water temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carron, John C.; Rajaram, Harihar

    2001-06-01

    A coupled unsteady flow and heat transport model is used to determine the impacts of fluctuating reservoir releases on downstream water temperatures. Maintenance of stream temperatures is one of the most common reasons cited for imposition of minimum flow requirements in regulated (reservoir controlled) rivers. Minimum flow constraints for temperature control are typically developed using worst-case scenarios (i.e., maximum air temperature, clear sky, etc.) of atmospheric conditions. We show that short- term modifications to reservoir releases based on local meteorological conditions can reduce the volume of water released, while still meeting temperature objectives. A case study of the Green River below Flaming Gorge Dam shows that for certain sets of temperature objectives and atmospheric conditions, a diurnally varying release may be the only way to meet multiple temperature objectives at different downstream locations. In the examples discussed, savings of nearly 20% in total release volume could be realized by using variable releases.

  16. Preparation and evaluation of sustained release loxoprofen loaded microspheres

    PubMed Central

    Venkatesan, P.; Manavalan, R.; Valliappan, K.

    2011-01-01

    The aim of present study was to formulate and evaluate the loxoprofen loaded Sustained release microspheres by emulsion solvent evaporation technique. Ethylcellulose, a biocompatible polymer is used as the retardant material. The effects of process conditions such as drug loading, polymer type and solvent type on the characteristics of microspheres were investigated. The prepared microspheres were characterized for their particle size and drug loading and drug release. The in-vitro release studies were carried out in phosphate buffer at pH 7.4. The prepared microspheres were white, free flowing and spherical in shape. The drug-loaded microspheres showed 71.2% of entrapment and the in-vitro release studies showed that Loxoprofen microspheres of 1:3 ratios showed better sustained effect over a period of 8 hours PMID:24826017

  17. Investigating the feasibility of temperature-controlled accelerated drug release testing for an intravaginal ring.

    PubMed

    Externbrink, Anna; Clark, Meredith R; Friend, David R; Klein, Sandra

    2013-11-01

    The objective of the present study was to investigate if temperature can be utilized to accelerate drug release from Nuvaring®, a reservoir type intravaginal ring based on polyethylene vinyl acetate copolymer that releases a constant dose of contraceptive steroids over a duration of 3 weeks. The reciprocating holder apparatus (USP 7) was utilized to determine real-time and accelerated etonogestrel release from ring segments. It was demonstrated that drug release increased with increasing temperature which can be attributed to enhanced drug diffusion. An Arrhenius relationship of the zero-order release constants was established, indicating that temperature is a valid parameter to accelerate drug release from this dosage form and that the release mechanism is maintained under these accelerated test conditions. Accelerated release tests are particularly useful for routine quality control to assist during batch release of extended release formulations that typically release the active over several weeks, months or even years, since they can increase the product shelf life. The accelerated method should therefore be able to discriminate between formulations with different release characteristics that can result from normal manufacturing variance. In the case of Nuvaring®, it is well known that the process parameters during the extrusion process strongly influence the polymeric structure. These changes in the polymeric structure can affect the permeability which, in turn, is reflected in the release properties. Results from this study indicate that changes in the polymeric structure can lead to a different temperature dependence of the release rate, and as a consequence, the accelerated method can become less sensitive to detect changes in the release properties. When the accelerated method is utilized during batch release, it is therefore important to take this possible restriction into account and to evaluate the accelerated method with samples from non

  18. Controlled Release from Recombinant Polymers

    PubMed Central

    Price, Robert; Poursaid, Azadeh; Ghandehari, Hamidreza

    2014-01-01

    Recombinant polymers provide a high degree of molecular definition for correlating structure with function in controlled release. The wide array of amino acids available as building blocks for these materials lend many advantages including biorecognition, biodegradability, potential biocompatibility, and control over mechanical properties among other attributes. Genetic engineering and DNA manipulation techniques enable the optimization of structure for precise control over spatial and temporal release. Unlike the majority of chemical synthetic strategies used, recombinant DNA technology has allowed for the production of monodisperse polymers with specifically defined sequences. Several classes of recombinant polymers have been used for controlled drug delivery. These include, but are not limited to, elastin-like, silk-like, and silk-elastinlike proteins, as well as emerging cationic polymers for gene delivery. In this article, progress and prospects of recombinant polymers used in controlled release will be reviewed. PMID:24956486

  19. Payload holddown and release mechanism

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chaput, Dale; Visconti, Mark; Edwards, Michael; Moran, Tom

    1994-01-01

    A payload holddown and release mechanism, designated the Model 1172, was designed and built at G&H Technology during the winter of 1992/1993. The mechanism is able to restrain and release a 45-pound payload with minimal tipoff. The payload is held in place by a stainless steel band and released using electrically triggered non-explosive actuators. These actuators provide reliable operation with negligible shock and no special handling requirements. The performance of the mechanism was demonstrated in two flight tests. Data showed pitch and yaw tipoff rates of less than 0.07 radian (4 degree) per second. The Model 1172 design is an efficient replacement for conventional payload deployment devices, especially where low transmitted shock is required.

  20. Controlled release from recombinant polymers.

    PubMed

    Price, Robert; Poursaid, Azadeh; Ghandehari, Hamidreza

    2014-09-28

    Recombinant polymers provide a high degree of molecular definition for correlating structure with function in controlled release. The wide array of amino acids available as building blocks for these materials lend many advantages including biorecognition, biodegradability, potential biocompatibility, and control over mechanical properties among other attributes. Genetic engineering and DNA manipulation techniques enable the optimization of structure for precise control over spatial and temporal release. Unlike the majority of chemical synthetic strategies used, recombinant DNA technology has allowed for the production of monodisperse polymers with specifically defined sequences. Several classes of recombinant polymers have been used for controlled drug delivery. These include, but are not limited to, elastin-like, silk-like, and silk-elastinlike proteins, as well as emerging cationic polymers for gene delivery. In this article, progress and prospects of recombinant polymers used in controlled release will be reviewed.

  1. Nanostructured Diclofenac Sodium Releasing Material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nikkola, L.; Vapalahti, K.; Harlin, A.; Seppälä, J.; Ashammakhi, N.

    2008-02-01

    Various techniques have been developed to produce second generation biomaterials for tissue repair. These include extrusion, molding, salt leaching, spinning etc, but success in regenerating tissues has been limited. It is important to develop porous material, yet with a fibrous structure for it to be biomimetic. To mimic biological tissues, the extra-cellular matrix usually contains fibers in nano scale. To produce nanostructures, self-assembly or electrospinning can be used. Adding a drug release function to such a material may advance applications further for use in controlled tissue repair. This turns the resulting device into a multifunctional porous, fibrous structure to support cells and drug releasing properties in order to control tissue reactions. A bioabsorbable poly(ɛ-caprolactone-co-D,L lactide) 95/5 (PCL) was made into diluted solution using a solvent, to which was added 2w-% of diclofenac sodium (DS). Nano-fibers were made by electrospinning onto substrate. Microstructure of the resulting nanomat was studied using SEM and drug release profiles with UV/VIS spectroscopy. Thickness of the electrospun nanomat was about 2 mm. SEM analysis showed that polymeric nano-fibers containing drug particles form a highly interconnected porous nano structure. Average diameter of the nano-fibers was 130 nm. There was a high burst peak in drug release, which decreased to low levels after one day. The used polymer has slow a degradation rate and though the nanomat was highly porous with a large surface area, drug release rate is slow. It is feasible to develop a nano-fibrous porous structure of bioabsorbable polymer, which is loaded with test drug. Drug release is targeted at improving the properties of biomaterial for use in controlled tissue repair and regeneration.

  2. Stabilization and release of enzymes from silk films.

    PubMed

    Lu, Qiang; Wang, Xiaoqin; Hu, Xiao; Cebe, Peggy; Omenetto, Fiorenzo; Kaplan, David L

    2010-04-08

    A significant challenge remains to protect protein drugs from inactivation during production, storage, and use. In the present study, the stabilization and release of horseradish peroxidase (HRP) in silk films was investigated. Water-insoluble silk films were prepared under mild aqueous conditions, maintaining the activity of the entrapped enzyme. Depending on film processing and post-processing conditions, HRP retained more than 90% of the initial activity at 4 degrees C, room temperature and 37 degrees C over two months. The stability of protein drugs in silk films is attributed to intermolecular interactions between the silk and the enzymes, based on Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). The unique structural feature of silk molecules, periodic hydrophobic-hydrophilic domains, enabled strong interactions with proteins. The entrapped protein was present in two states, untrapped active and trapped inactive forms. The ratio between the two forms varied according to processing conditions. Proteolytic degradation and dissolution of the silk films resulted in the release of the bound enzyme which was otherwise not released by diffusion; enzyme recovered full activity upon release. There was a linear relationship between silk degradation/dissolution and the release of entrapped enzyme. Modifying the secondary structure of the silk matrix and the interactions with the non-crystalline domains resulted in control of the film degradation or dissolution rate, and therefore the release rate of the entrapped enzyme. Based on the above results, silk materials are an intriguing carrier for proteins in terms of both retention of activity and controllable release kinetics from the films.

  3. Hydrocarbon release investigations in Missouri

    SciTech Connect

    Fels, J.B.

    1996-09-01

    Hydrocarbon releases are among the most common environmental problems in Missouri, as well as across the country. Old, unprotected underground storage tanks and buried piping from the tanks to pumps are notorious sources of petroleum contamination at LUST (leaking underground storage tank) sites. Missouri has an estimated 5000 LUST sites across the state with the majority being simple spills into clay-rich soils or into a shallow perched water system. However, in the southern half of the state, where residual soils and karst bedrock are not conducive to trapping such releases, significant groundwater supplies are at risk. This article discusses the process used to identify the source of contamination.

  4. Counterion release and electrostatic adsorption

    PubMed

    Sens; Joanny

    2000-05-22

    The effective charge of a rigid polyelectrolyte (PE) approaching an oppositely charged surface is studied. The cases of a weak (annealed) and strongly charged PE with condensed counterions (such as DNA) are discussed. In the most interesting case of the adsorption onto a substrate of low dielectric constant (such as a lipid membrane or a mica sheet) the condensed counterions are not always released as the PE approaches the substrate, because of the major importance of the image-charge effect. For the adsorption onto a surface with freely moving charges, the image-charge effect becomes less important and full release is often expected.

  5. Prediction of modified release pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics from in vitro, immediate release, and intravenous data.

    PubMed

    Lukacova, Viera; Woltosz, Walter S; Bolger, Michael B

    2009-06-01

    The aim of this study was to demonstrate the value of mechanistic simulations in gaining insight into the behaviors of modified release (MR) formulations in vivo and to use the properly calibrated models for prediction of pharmacokinetics (PK) and pharmacodynamics (PD). GastroPlus (Simulations Plus, Inc.) was used to fit mechanistic models for adinazolam and metoprolol that describe the absorption, PK, and PD after intravenous (i.v.) and immediate release (IR) oral (p.o.) administration. The fitted model for adinazolam was then used to predict the PD profile for a MR formulation and to design a new formulation with desired onset and duration of action. The fitted metoprolol model was used to gain insight and to explain the in vivo behaviors of MR formulations. For each drug, a single absorption/PK model was fitted that provided simulated plasma concentration-time profiles closely matching observed in vivo profiles across several different i.v. and p.o doses. Sedation score profiles of adinazolam were fitted with an indirect PD model. For metoprolol, the fitted absorption/PK model for IR p.o. doses was used to select in vitro dissolution conditions that best matched the in vivo release of MR doses. This model also explained differences in exposure after administration of MR formulations with different release rates. Mechanistic absorption/PK models allow for detailed descriptions of all processes affecting the two drugs' bioavailability, including release/dissolution, absorption, and intestinal and hepatic first pass extraction. The insights gained can be used to design formulations that more effectively overcome identified problems.

  6. Release of Adenosine and ATP During Ischemia and Epilepsy

    PubMed Central

    Dale, Nicholas; Frenguelli, Bruno G

    2009-01-01

    Eighty years ago Drury & Szent-Györgyi described the actions of adenosine, AMP (adenylic acid) and ATP (pyrophosphoric or diphosphoric ester of adenylic acid) on the mammalian cardiovascular system, skeletal muscle, intestinal and urinary systems. Since then considerable insight has been gleaned on the means by which these compounds act, not least of which in the distinction between the two broad classes of their respective receptors, with their many subtypes, and the ensuing diversity in cellular consequences their activation invokes. These myriad actions are of course predicated on the release of the purines into the extracellular milieu, but, surprisingly, there is still considerable ambiguity as to how this occurs in various physiological and pathophysiological conditions. In this review we summarise the release of ATP and adenosine during seizures and cerebral ischemia and discuss mechanisms by which the purines adenosine and ATP may be released from cells in the CNS under these conditions. PMID:20190959

  7. Kinetics of drug release from ointments: Role of transient-boundary layer.

    PubMed

    Xu, Xiaoming; Al-Ghabeish, Manar; Krishnaiah, Yellela S R; Rahman, Ziyaur; Khan, Mansoor A

    2015-10-15

    In the current work, an in vitro release testing method suitable for ointment formulations was developed using acyclovir as a model drug. Release studies were carried out using enhancer cells on acyclovir ointments prepared with oleaginous, absorption, and water-soluble bases. Kinetics and mechanism of drug release was found to be highly dependent on the type of ointment bases. In oleaginous bases, drug release followed a unique logarithmic-time dependent profile; in both absorption and water-soluble bases, drug release exhibited linearity with respect to square root of time (Higuchi model) albeit differences in the overall release profile. To help understand the underlying cause of logarithmic-time dependency of drug release, a novel transient-boundary hypothesis was proposed, verified, and compared to Higuchi theory. Furthermore, impact of drug solubility (under various pH conditions) and temperature on drug release were assessed. Additionally, conditions under which deviations from logarithmic-time drug release kinetics occur were determined using in situ UV fiber-optics. Overall, the results suggest that for oleaginous ointments containing dispersed drug particles, kinetics and mechanism of drug release is controlled by expansion of transient boundary layer, and drug release increases linearly with respect to logarithmic time.

  8. Spatial release from informational masking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rakerd, Brad; Aaronson, Neil L.

    2001-05-01

    A new method for investigating spatial release from informational masking was developed and employed in two experiments. The new method is computer controlled and efficient. It employs the versatile coordinate response measure speech stimulus set [Bolia et al., J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 107, 1065 (2000)]. The experiments were conducted in an anechoic room, with a primary loudspeaker in front of the listener and a secondary loudspeaker at 60 deg to the right. Target messages were presented from the primary speaker only. For a standard, distractor messages, simultaneous with the target, were also presented from the primary speaker only. Spatial release was measured by presenting the distractors from both primary and secondary speakers with a temporal offset. Experiment 1 fixed the offset (secondary leading, +4 ms) and varied the number of distractors (1 to 3) and the target-to-distractor ratio (-12 to +4 dB). Masking release, sometimes as large as 10 dB, was found for all combinations of these variables. Experiment 2 varied the offset over a wide range of values. Substantial release from masking was found for both positive and negative offsets, but only in the range in which speech echoes are suppressed (<50 ms). [Work supported by NIDCD grant DC 00181.

  9. Very low shock release pyromechanisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soulier, Grégory; Gaechter, J. Pierre

    2003-09-01

    Pyromechanisms have long been used in space for launchers and satellites applications, particularly for release or separation purposes, such as bolt cutters, release nuts, pyrovalves, etc. They offer a great variety of uses, a high potential between the power supplied and the weight on board with, at the same time, a high reliability. However, they also feature a drawback due to the high dynamics generated by their functioning. Pyroshocks levels may damage adjacent sensible equipments (eg electronic boxes, reaction wheels,...) and require to design damping systems or to remove those equipments from the shock source. In a mechanism using standard pyrodevices, shock generation comes from three sources: 1. Pyrotechnic reaction. 2. Energy from internal parts in motion. 3. The release of structural constraints. Devices developed by E. LACROIX have the objectives to avoid the two last ones by: Using heat and gas generated by pyrotechnic effects. Reducing speed of parts in motion. Reducing release speed of mechanical constraints. In this paper, LACROIX presents two products named "PYROSOFT" and "VIROSOFT " designed by LACROIX and supported by CNES Toulouse (French Space Agency). R&T contracts.

  10. 2014 Pee Dee germplasm releases

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    PD 05035, PD 05041, PD 05064, PD 05069, PD 05070, PD 05071, PD 06001, and PD 06078 are noncommercial breeding lines of cotton jointly released by the Agricultural Research Service, United States Department of Agriculture, Clemson University Experiment Station, and Cotton Incorporated in 2014. These ...

  11. 7 CFR 550.29 - Press releases.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 6 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Press releases. 550.29 Section 550.29 Agriculture... Program Management § 550.29 Press releases. Press releases or other forms of public notification will be... opportunity to review, in advance, all written press releases and any other written information to be...

  12. Index to NASA News Releases 1995

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    This issue of the index to NASA News Releases contains a listing of news releases distributed by the Office of Public Affairs, NASA Headquarters, during 1995. The index is arranged in six sections: Subject index, Personal name index, News release number index, Accession number index, Speeches, and News releases.

  13. 18 CFR 801.3 - Allocations, diversions, withdrawals and release.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    .... One of the responsibilities of the Commission is to act upon requests for allocations, withdrawals, or... projected long term local and regional uses are protected. (3) Impose conditions, obligations and release requirements for dams and/or diversion structures to protect prior local interests, downstream interests,...

  14. 18 CFR 801.3 - Allocations, diversions, withdrawals and release.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    .... One of the responsibilities of the Commission is to act upon requests for allocations, withdrawals, or... projected long term local and regional uses are protected. (3) Impose conditions, obligations and release requirements for dams and/or diversion structures to protect prior local interests, downstream interests,...

  15. 18 CFR 801.3 - Allocations, diversions, withdrawals and release.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    .... One of the responsibilities of the Commission is to act upon requests for allocations, withdrawals, or... projected long term local and regional uses are protected. (3) Impose conditions, obligations and release requirements for dams and/or diversion structures to protect prior local interests, downstream interests,...

  16. 42 CFR 431.306 - Release of information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL ASSISTANCE PROGRAMS STATE ORGANIZATION AND GENERAL ADMINISTRATION Safeguarding... specifying the conditions for release and use of information about applicants and recipients. (b) Access to... source, unless the information is to be used to verify income, eligibility and the amount of...

  17. Gastrin: an acid-releasing, proliferative and immunomodulatory peptide?

    PubMed

    Calatayud, Sara; Alvarez, Angeles; Víctor, Víctor M

    2010-01-01

    Gastrin release is affected by gastric inflammatory conditions. Antral G cells respond to inflammatory mediators by increasing gastrin secretion. Accumulating experimental evidence suggests that gastrin exerts immunomodulatory and proinflammatory effects. Gastrin could be a contributing factor to these pathologies, which may constitute a new justification for pharmacological blockade of gastrin action.

  18. Modelling and simulations of controlled release fertilizer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Irfan, Sayed Ameenuddin; Razali, Radzuan; Shaari, Ku Zilati Ku; Mansor, Nurlidia

    2016-11-01

    The recent advancement in controlled release fertilizer has provided an alternative solution to the conventional urea, controlled release fertilizer has a good plant nutrient uptake they are environment friendly. To have an optimum plant intake of nutrients from controlled release fertilizer it is very essential to understand the release characteristics. A mathematical model is developed to predict the release characteristics from polymer coated granule. Numerical simulations are performed by varying the parameters radius of granule, soil water content and soil porosity to study their effect on fertilizer release. Understanding these parameters helps in the better design and improve the efficiency of controlled release fertilizer.

  19. Redox regulation of the ryanodine receptor/calcium release channel.

    PubMed

    Zissimopoulos, S; Lai, F A

    2006-11-01

    The RyR (ryanodine receptor)/calcium release channel contains a number of highly reactive thiol groups that endow it with redox sensitivity. In general, oxidizing conditions favour channel opening, while reducing conditions have the opposite effect. Thiol modification affects the channel sensitivity to its principal effectors, Ca2+, Mg2+ and ATP, and alters RyR protein interactions. Here, we give a brief account of the major findings and prevailing views in the field.

  20. Kepler Data Release 3 Notes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cleve, Jeffrey E.

    2010-01-01

    This describes the collection of data and the processing done on it so when researchers around the world get the Kepler data sets (which are a set of pixels from the telescope of a particular target (star, galaxy or whatever) over a 3 month period) they can adjust their algorithms fro things that were done (like subtracting all of one particular wavelength for example). This is used to calibrate their own algorithms so that they know what it is they are starting with. It is posted so that whoever is accessing the publicly available data (not all of it is made public) can understand it .. (most of the Kepler data is under restriction for 1 - 4 years and is not available, but the handbook is for everyone (public and restricted) The Data Analysis Working Group have released long and short cadence materials, including FFls and Dropped Targets for the Public. The Kepler Science Office considers Data Release 3 to provide "browse quality" data. These notes have been prepared to give Kepler users of the Multimission Archive at STScl (MAST) a summary of how the data were collected and prepared, and how well the data processing pipeline is functioning on flight data. They will be updated for each release of data to the public archive and placed on MAST along with other Kepler documentation, at http:// archive.stsci.edu/kepler/documents.html .Data release 3 is meant to give users the opportunity to examine the data for possibly interesting science and to involve the users in improving the pipeline for future data releases. To perform the latter service, users are encouraged to notice and document artifacts, either in the raw or processed data, and report them to the Science Office.

  1. Thiophenic Sulfur Compounds Released During Coal Pyrolysis.

    PubMed

    Xing, Mengwen; Kong, Jiao; Dong, Jie; Jiao, Haili; Li, Fan

    2013-06-01

    Thiophenic sulfur compounds are released during coal gasification, carbonization, and combustion. Previous studies indicate that thiophenic sulfur compounds degrade very slowly in the environment, and are more carcinogenic than polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and nitrogenous compounds. Therefore, it is very important to study the principle of thiophenic sulfur compounds during coal conversion, in order to control their emission and promote clean coal utilization. To realize this goal and understand the formation mechanism of thiophenic sulfur compounds, this study focused on the release behavior of thiophenic sulfur compounds during coal pyrolysis, which is an important phase for all coal thermal conversion processes. The pyrolyzer (CDS-5250) and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (Focus GC-DSQII) were used to analyze thiophenic sulfur compounds in situ. Several coals with different coal ranks and sulfur contents were chosen as experimental samples, and thiophenic sulfur compounds of the gas produced during pyrolysis under different temperatures and heating rates were investigated. Levels of benzothiophene and dibenzothiophene were obtained during pyrolysis at temperatures ranging from 200°C to 1300°C, and heating rates ranging from 6°C/ms to 14°C/ms and 6°C/s to 14°C/s. Moreover, the relationship between the total amount of benzothiophene and dibenzothiophene released during coal pyrolysis and the organic sulfur content in coal was also discussed. This study is beneficial for understanding the formation and control of thiophenic sulfur compounds, since it provides a series of significant results that show the impact that operation conditions and organic sulfur content in coal have on the amount and species of thiophenic sulfur compounds produced during coal pyrolysis.

  2. Thiophenic Sulfur Compounds Released During Coal Pyrolysis

    PubMed Central

    Xing, Mengwen; Kong, Jiao; Dong, Jie; Jiao, Haili; Li, Fan

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Thiophenic sulfur compounds are released during coal gasification, carbonization, and combustion. Previous studies indicate that thiophenic sulfur compounds degrade very slowly in the environment, and are more carcinogenic than polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and nitrogenous compounds. Therefore, it is very important to study the principle of thiophenic sulfur compounds during coal conversion, in order to control their emission and promote clean coal utilization. To realize this goal and understand the formation mechanism of thiophenic sulfur compounds, this study focused on the release behavior of thiophenic sulfur compounds during coal pyrolysis, which is an important phase for all coal thermal conversion processes. The pyrolyzer (CDS-5250) and gas chromatography–mass spectrometry (Focus GC-DSQII) were used to analyze thiophenic sulfur compounds in situ. Several coals with different coal ranks and sulfur contents were chosen as experimental samples, and thiophenic sulfur compounds of the gas produced during pyrolysis under different temperatures and heating rates were investigated. Levels of benzothiophene and dibenzothiophene were obtained during pyrolysis at temperatures ranging from 200°C to 1300°C, and heating rates ranging from 6°C/ms to 14°C/ms and 6°C/s to 14°C/s. Moreover, the relationship between the total amount of benzothiophene and dibenzothiophene released during coal pyrolysis and the organic sulfur content in coal was also discussed. This study is beneficial for understanding the formation and control of thiophenic sulfur compounds, since it provides a series of significant results that show the impact that operation conditions and organic sulfur content in coal have on the amount and species of thiophenic sulfur compounds produced during coal pyrolysis. PMID:23781126

  3. Controlled release of alendronate from nitrogen-doped mesoporous carbon

    SciTech Connect

    Saha, Dipendu; Spurri, Amanda; Chen, Jihua; Hensley, Dale K.

    2016-04-13

    With this study, we have synthesized a nitrogen doped mesoporous carbon with the BET surface area of 1066 m2/g, total pore volume 0.6 cm3/g and nitrogen content of 0.5%. Total alendronate adsorption in this carbon was ~5%. The release experiments were designed in four different media with sequential pH values of 1.2, 4.5, 6.8 and 7.4 for 3, 1, 3 and 5 h, respectively and at 37 °C to imitate the physiological conditions of stomach, duodenum, small intestine and colon, respectively. Release of the drug demonstrated a controlled fashion; only 20% of the drug was released in the media with pH = 1.2, whereas 64% of the drug was released in pH = 7.4. This is in contrary to pure alendronate that was completely dissolved within 30 min in the first release media (pH = 1.2) only. The relatively larger uptake of alendronate in this carbon and its sustained fashion of release can be attributed to the hydrogen bonding between the drug and the nitrogen functionalities on carbon surface. Based on this result, it can be inferred that this formulation may lower the side effects of oral delivery of alendronate.

  4. Controlled release of alendronate from nitrogen-doped mesoporous carbon

    DOE PAGES

    Saha, Dipendu; Spurri, Amanda; Chen, Jihua; ...

    2016-04-13

    With this study, we have synthesized a nitrogen doped mesoporous carbon with the BET surface area of 1066 m2/g, total pore volume 0.6 cm3/g and nitrogen content of 0.5%. Total alendronate adsorption in this carbon was ~5%. The release experiments were designed in four different media with sequential pH values of 1.2, 4.5, 6.8 and 7.4 for 3, 1, 3 and 5 h, respectively and at 37 °C to imitate the physiological conditions of stomach, duodenum, small intestine and colon, respectively. Release of the drug demonstrated a controlled fashion; only 20% of the drug was released in the media withmore » pH = 1.2, whereas 64% of the drug was released in pH = 7.4. This is in contrary to pure alendronate that was completely dissolved within 30 min in the first release media (pH = 1.2) only. The relatively larger uptake of alendronate in this carbon and its sustained fashion of release can be attributed to the hydrogen bonding between the drug and the nitrogen functionalities on carbon surface. Based on this result, it can be inferred that this formulation may lower the side effects of oral delivery of alendronate.« less

  5. Formulation of controlled release gellan gum macro beads of amoxicillin.

    PubMed

    Babu, R Jayachandra; Sathigari, Sateesh; Kumar, M Thilek; Pandit, J K

    2010-01-01

    Gellan gum has been reported to have wide pharmaceutical applications such as tablet binder, disintegrant, gelling agent and as a controlled release polymer. Multiparticulate delivery systems spread out more uniformly in the gastrointestinal tract and reduce the local irritation. The purpose of this study is to explore possible applicability of gellan macro beads as an oral controlled release system of a sparingly soluble drug, amoxicillin. Gellan gum beads were prepared by ionotropic gelation with calcium ions. The effect of drug loading, stirring time, polymer concentration, electrolyte (CaCl2) concentration, curing time etc. influencing the preparation of the gellan gum macro beads and the drug release from gellan gum beads were investigated in this study. Optimal preparation conditions allowed very high incorporation efficiency for amoxicillin (91%) The release kinetics of amoxicillin from gellan beads followed the diffusion model for an inert porous matrix in the order: 0.1 N HCl > phosphate buffer > distilled water. Change in curing time did not significantly affect the release rate constant, but drug concentration, polymer concentration and electrolyte concentration significantly affect the release rate of amoxicillin from the beads. The gellan macro beads may be suitable for gastro retentive controlled delivery of amoxicillin.

  6. The release of iron during coal combustion. Milestone report

    SciTech Connect

    Baxter, L.L.

    1995-06-01

    Iron plays an important role in the formation of both fly ash and deposits in many pulverized-coal-fired boilers. Several authors indicate that iron content is a significant indicator of the slagging propensity of a majority of US bituminous coals, in particular eastern bituminous coals. The pyritic iron content of these coals is shown to be a particularly relevant consideration. A series of investigations of iron release during combustion is reported for a suite of coals ranging in rank from lignite to low-volatile bituminous coal under combustion conditions ranging from oxidizing to inert. Experimental measurements are described in which, under selected conditions, major fractions of the iron in the coal are released within a 25 ms period immediately following coal devolatilization. Mechanistic interpretation of the data suggest that the iron is released as a consequence of oxygen attack on porous pyrrhotite particles. Experimental testing of the proposed mechanism reveals that the release is dependent on the presence of both pyrite in the raw coal and oxygen in the gas phase, that slow preoxidation (weathering) of the pyrite significantly inhibits the iron release, and that iron loss increases as oxygen penetration of the particle increases. Each observation is consistent with the postulated mechanism.

  7. 49 CFR 581.6 - Conditions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... the vehicle if they are optional equipment. (b) Pendulum test conditions. The following conditions apply to the pendulum test procedures of § 581.7 (a) and (b). (1) The test device consists of a block... 1963. From the point of release of the device until the onset of rebound, the pendulum...

  8. 49 CFR 581.6 - Conditions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... the vehicle if they are optional equipment. (b) Pendulum test conditions. The following conditions apply to the pendulum test procedures of § 581.7 (a) and (b). (1) The test device consists of a block... 1963. From the point of release of the device until the onset of rebound, the pendulum...

  9. 49 CFR 581.6 - Conditions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... the vehicle if they are optional equipment. (b) Pendulum test conditions. The following conditions apply to the pendulum test procedures of § 581.7 (a) and (b). (1) The test device consists of a block... 1963. From the point of release of the device until the onset of rebound, the pendulum...

  10. 49 CFR 581.6 - Conditions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... the vehicle if they are optional equipment. (b) Pendulum test conditions. The following conditions apply to the pendulum test procedures of § 581.7 (a) and (b). (1) The test device consists of a block... 1963. From the point of release of the device until the onset of rebound, the pendulum...

  11. p-Coumaric Acid Attenuates UVB-Induced Release of Stratifin from Keratinocytes and Indirectly Regulates Matrix Metalloproteinase 1 Release from Fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Seok, Jin Kyung; Boo, Yong Chool

    2015-05-01

    Ultraviolet (UV) radiation-induced loss of dermal extracellular matrix is associated with skin photoaging. Recent studies demonstrated that keratinocyte-releasable stratifin (SFN) plays a critical role in skin collagen metabolism by inducing matrix metalloproteinase 1 (MMP1) expression in target fibroblasts. In the present study, we examined whether SFN released from UVB-irradiated epidermal keratinocytes increases MMP1 release from dermal fibroblasts, and whether these events are affected by p-coumaric acid (p-CA), a natural phenolic compound with UVB-shielding and antioxidant properties. HaCaT cells were exposed to UVB in the absence and presence of p-CA, and the conditioned medium was used to stimulate fibroblasts in medium transfer experiments. The cells and media were analyzed to determine the expressions/releases of SFN and MMP1. UVB exposure increased SFN release from keratinocytes into the medium. The conditioned medium of UVB-irradiated keratinocytes increased MMP1 release from fibroblasts. The depletion of SFN using a siRNA rendered the conditioned medium of UVB-irradiated keratinocytes ineffective at stimulating fibroblasts to release MMP1. p-CA mitigated UVB-induced SFN expression in keratinocytes, and attenuated the MMP1 release by fibroblasts in medium transfer experiments. In conclusion, the present study demonstrated that the use of UV absorbers such as p-CA would reduce UV-induced SFN-centered signaling events involved in skin photoaging.

  12. A comparative study on cell disruption methods for release of aspartase from E. coli K-12.

    PubMed

    Singh, R S

    2013-11-01

    Applicability of different mechanical cell disruption techniques namely sonication, bead milling and French press for the release of aspartase from E. coli K-12 was compared. Various operating parameters of each technique were optimized to obtain maximum aspartase release. The efficiency of aspartase release and cell disruption by all the methods was also compared under optimal conditions. The maximum release of aspartase (98.22%) and maximum cell breakage (84.25%) was observed using French press, while 92% of aspartase release was obtained by both sonication and bead milling. The order of cell disruption constant (k) for aspartase release by these methods was French press > bead milling > sonication. Disruption of cells using French press also demonstrated maximum protein release (14.12 mg/mL). The crude enzyme preparations can be further used for purification and its applications.

  13. Nickel release from stainless steels.

    PubMed

    Haudrechy, P; Mantout, B; Frappaz, A; Rousseau, D; Chabeau, G; Faure, M; Claudy, A

    1997-09-01

    In 1994, a study of nickel release and allergic contact dermatitis from nickel-plated metals and stainless steels was published in this journal. It was shown that low-sulfur stainless steel grades like AISI 304, 316L or 430 (S < or = 0.007%) release less than 0.03 microgram/cm2/week of nickel in acid artificial sweat and elicit no reactions in patients already sensitized to nickel. In contrast, nickel-plated samples release around 100 micrograms/cm2/week of Ni and high-sulfur stainless steel (AISI 303-S approximately 0.3%) releases about 1.5 micrograms/cm2/week in this acid artificial sweat. Applied on patients sensitized to nickel, these metals elicit positive reactions in 96% and 14%, respectively, of the patients. The main conclusion was that low-sulfur stainless steels like AISI 304, 316L or 430, even when containing Ni, should not elicit nickel contact dermatitis, while metals having a mean corrosion resistance like a high-sulfur stainless steel (AISI 303) or nickel-plated steel should be avoided. The determining characteristic was in fact the corrosion resistance in chloride media, which, for stainless steels, is connected, among other factors, to the sulfur content. Thus, a question remained concerning the grades with an intermediate sulfur content, around 0.03%, which were not studied. They are the object of the study presented in this paper. 3 tests were performed: leaching experiments, dimethylglyoxime and HNO3 spot tests, and clinical patch tests; however, only stainless steels were tested: a low-sulfur AISI 304 and AISI 303 as references and 3 grades with a sulfur content around 0.03%: AISI 304L, AISI 304L added with Ca, AISI 304L+Cu. Leaching experiments showed that the 4 non-resulfurised grades released less than 0.5 microgram/cm2/week in acid sweat while the reulfurized AISI 303 released around or more than 0.5 microgram/cm2/week. This is explained by the poorer corrosion resistance of the resulfurized grade. Yet all these grades had the same

  14. Data summary report for fission product release test VI-4

    SciTech Connect

    Obsorne, M.F.; Lorenz, R.A.; Collins, J.L.; Travis, J.R.; Webster, C.S.; Nakamura, T. )

    1991-01-01

    This was the fourth in a series of high-temperature fission product release tests in a vertical test apparatus. The test specimen, a 15.2-cm-long section of a fuel rod from the BR3 reactor in Belgium, had been irradiated to a burnup of 47 MWd/kg. In simulation of a severe accident in a light-water reactor, it was heated in hydrogen in a hot cell-mounted test apparatus to a maximum test temperature of 2400 K for a period of 20 min. The released fission products were collected on components designed to facilitate sampling and analysis. On-line radioactivity measurements and posttest inspection revealed that the fuel had partially collapsed at about the time the cladding melted. Based on fission product inventories measured in the fuel or calculated by ORIGEN2, analyses of test components showed total releases from the fuel of 85% for {sup 85}Kr, <1% for {sup 106}Ru, 3.9% for {sup 125}Sb, 96% for both {sup 134}Cs and {sup 137}Cs, and 13% for {sup 154}Eu. Large fractions of the released fission products (up to 96% of the {sup 154}Eu) were retained in the furnace. Small release fractions for several other fission products -- Rb, Br, Sr, Te, I, and Ba -- were detected also. In addition, very small amounts of fuel material -- uranium and plutonium -- were released. Total mass release from the furnace to the collection system, which included fission products, fuel material, and structural materials, was 0.40g, with 40% of this material being deposited as vapor and 60% of it being collected as aerosols. The results from this test were compared with previous tests in this series and with an in-pile test at similar conditions at Sandia National Laboratories. There was no indication that the mode of heating (fission heat vs radiant heat) significantly affected fission product release. 24 refs., 25 figs., 14 tabs.

  15. Data summary report for fission product release test VI-3

    SciTech Connect

    Osborne, M.F.; Lorenz, R.A.; Collins, J.L.; Travis, J.R.; Webster, C.S.; Lee, H.K.; Nakamura, T.; Tong, Y.-C. )

    1990-06-01

    Test VI-3, the third in a series of high-temperature fission product release tests in the vertical test apparatus, was conducted in flowing steam. The test specimen was a 15.2-cm-long section of a fuel rod from the BR3 reactor in Belgium, which had been irradiated to a burnup of 42 MWd/kg. Using an induction furnace, it was heated under simulated light-water reactor (LWR) accident conditions to two test temperatures, 20 min at 2000 K and then 20 min at 2700 K, in a hot cell-mounted test apparatus. The released fission products were collected on components designed to facilitate sampling and analysis. Posttest inspection confirmed that the cladding had been completely oxidized during the test. Only minimal fragmentation of the fuel specimen was found, however, and very little melting or fuel-cladding interaction had occurred. Based on fission product inventories measured in the fuel or calculated by ORIGEN2, analyses of test components showed total releases from the fuel of 100% for {sup 85}Kr, 5% for {sup 106}Ru, 99% for {sup 125}Sb, and 99% for both {sup 134}Cs and {sup 137}Cs. A large fraction (27%) of the released {sup 125}Sb was retained in the furnace, but most of the released cesium (89%) escaped to the collection system. In addition, very small amounts of fuel material --- uranium and plutonium --- were released. Including fission products and fuel and structural materials, the total mass released from the furnace to the collection system was 3.17 g, 78% of which was collected on the filters. The results from this test were compared with previous tests in this series and with a commonly used model for fission product release. 25 refs., 22 figs., 14 tabs.

  16. Modeling and measurement of vesicle pools at the cone ribbon synapse: changes in release probability are solely responsible for voltage-dependent changes in release

    PubMed Central

    Thoreson, Wallace B.; Van Hook, Matthew J.; Parmelee, Caitlyn; Curto, Carina

    2015-01-01

    Post-synaptic responses are a product of quantal amplitude (Q), size of the releasable vesicle pool (N), and release probability (P). Voltage-dependent changes in presynaptic Ca2+ entry alter post-synaptic responses primarily by changing P but have also been shown to influence N. With simultaneous whole cell recordings from cone photoreceptors and horizontal cells in tiger salamander retinal slices, we measured N and P at cone ribbon synapses by using a train of depolarizing pulses to stimulate release and deplete the pool. We developed an analytical model that calculates the total pool size contributing to release under different stimulus conditions by taking into account the prior history of release and empirically-determined properties of replenishment. The model provided a formula that calculates vesicle pool size from measurements of the initial post-synaptic response and limiting rate of release evoked by a train of pulses, the fraction of release sites available for replenishment, and the time constant for replenishment. Results of the model showed that weak and strong depolarizing stimuli evoked release with differing probabilities but the same size vesicle pool. Enhancing intraterminal Ca2+ spread by lowering Ca2+ buffering or applying BayK8644 did not increase PSCs evoked with strong test steps showing there is a fixed upper limit to pool size. Together, these results suggest that light-evoked changes in cone membrane potential alter synaptic release solely by changing release probability. PMID:26541100

  17. Modeling and measurement of vesicle pools at the cone ribbon synapse: Changes in release probability are solely responsible for voltage-dependent changes in release.

    PubMed

    Thoreson, Wallace B; Van Hook, Matthew J; Parmelee, Caitlyn; Curto, Carina

    2016-01-01

    Postsynaptic responses are a product of quantal amplitude (Q), size of the releasable vesicle pool (N), and release probability (P). Voltage-dependent changes in presynaptic Ca(2+) entry alter postsynaptic responses primarily by changing P but have also been shown to influence N. With simultaneous whole cell recordings from cone photoreceptors and horizontal cells in tiger salamander retinal slices, we measured N and P at cone ribbon synapses by using a train of depolarizing pulses to stimulate release and deplete the pool. We developed an analytical model that calculates the total pool size contributing to release under different stimulus conditions by taking into account the prior history of release and empirically determined properties of replenishment. The model provided a formula that calculates vesicle pool size from measurements of the initial postsynaptic response and limiting rate of release evoked by a train of pulses, the fraction of release sites available for replenishment, and the time constant for replenishment. Results of the model showed that weak and strong depolarizing stimuli evoked release with differing probabilities but the same size vesicle pool. Enhancing intraterminal Ca(2+) spread by lowering Ca(2+) buffering or applying BayK8644 did not increase PSCs evoked with strong test steps, showing there is a fixed upper limit to pool size. Together, these results suggest that light-evoked changes in cone membrane potential alter synaptic release solely by changing release probability.

  18. Limited incision carpal tunnel release

    PubMed Central

    Gaba, Sunil; Bhogesha, Sandeep; Singh, Onkar

    2017-01-01

    Background: Carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) is the most common peripheral entrapment neuropathy. Limited incision techniques for carpal tunnel release are gaining popularity. The main advantages of these techniques are less scar load, less pillar pain, shorter recovery, and return-to-work time. However, the completeness of release, and risk of neurovascular injury are always a concern. We devised a method of limited incision release with two mini-incisions and use of nasal speculum and a probe. We aimed to evaluate the clinical and neurological outcome of this technique. Materials and Methods: Twenty seven cases (9 male and 18 female, age 28–56 years) of isolated CTS cases were enrolled in the study. A total of 33 hands (six bilateral) underwent limited incision carpal tunnel release. In this study, two mini-incisions were used and release was done with the help of nasal speculum. Evaluation preoperatively and in 6 months and at 1-year postoperatively was done, namely, (a) clinical status examination, (b) motor testing using grip and pinch dynamometer, and (c) neurological outcome measure using nerve conduction study. Results: All the patients had good clinical and neurological outcome with no recurrence during followup. The first symptom to get relieved was night pains, with a mean of 4.5 days (range 2–14 days). Compared to pain, improvement of sensory symptoms was delayed; the mean duration was 42.8 days (range 30–90 days). Scar tenderness was present only for a mean duration of 9 days (range 7–21 days). The mean duration for patients to resume their daily activities was12 days (range 7–28 days) and to work was 32 days (range 21–90 days). The hand grip showed mean values of 45.12 ± 16.16 g/mm2 preoperatively, 62.45 ± 18.86 g/mm2 at 6 months postoperatively, and 74.87 ± 20.35 g/mm2 at 1-year postoperatively. The key pinch showed mean values of 11.27 ± 3.51 g/mm2 preoperatively, 20.181 ± 3.94 g/mm2 at 6 months postoperatively, and 27.96 ± 94.42 g/mm2

  19. Zegerid--immediate-release omeprazole.

    PubMed

    2005-04-11

    The FDA has approved marketing of Zegerid powder for oral suspension (Santarus), an immediate-release formulation of the proton-pump inhibitor (PPI) omeprazole (Prilosec, and others). All other oral PPIs are delayed-release, enteric-coated formulations designed to prevent degradation of the drug by gastric acid. Each 20- or 40-mg packet of Zegerid contains 1680 mg sodium bicarbonate, which protects the drug from gastric acid degradation. A dose of Zegerid contains 460 mg of sodium, which may be excessive for some patients. Zegerid is the first oral PPI to be approved by the FDA for reduction of risk of upper GI bleeding in critically ill patients. The drug may be useful for patients who are unable to swallow and have nasogastric (NG) tubes in place. Zegerid cost $70.00 for 14 days' treatment, compared to less than $10 for 14 tablets of Prilosec OTC.

  20. Neutron-absorber release device

    DOEpatents

    VAN Erp, Jan B.; Kimont, Edward L.

    1976-01-01

    A resettable device is provided for supporting an object, sensing when an environment reaches a critical temperature and releasing the object when the critical temperature is reached. It includes a flexible container having a material inside with a melting point at the critical temperature. The object's weight is supported by the solid material which gives rigidity to the container until the critical temperature is reached at which point the material in the container melts. The flexible container with the now fluid material inside has insufficient strength to support the object which is thereby released. Biasing means forces the container back to its original shape so that when the temperature falls below the melting temperature the material again solidifies, and the object may again be supported by the device.

  1. Release and transportation of Hedgehog molecules.

    PubMed

    Thérond, Pascal P

    2012-04-01

    Secretion of the Hedgehog morphogen induces different cell fates over the short and long ranges during developmental patterning. Mature Hedgehog carries hydrophobic palmitic acid and cholesterol modifications essential for its correct spread. The long-range activity of Hedgehog raises questions about how a dually lipidated protein can spread in the hydrophilic environment of the extracellular space. There is compelling experimental evidence in favour of the existence of several different carriers for Hedgehog transportation, via very different routes. This suggests that different accessory proteins and cellular machineries may be involved in the specific release of Hedgehog. I suggest that Hh carriers may work in parallel within a given cell and that developmental context may condition the choice of Hh carrier in secreting cells.

  2. Copper release in low and high alkaline water.

    PubMed

    D'Antonio, L; Fabbricino, M; Nasso, M; Trifuoggi, M

    2008-04-01

    Copper release in drinking water, caused by electrochemical corrosion of household distribution systems, was investigated. Experiments were developed testing both low and high alkaline water in stagnant conditions. The effect of varying stagnation time was investigated also. Both soluble and insoluble copper compounds, produced by corrosion processes are quantified, using appropriate experimental procedures. On the basis of obtained results, copper concentration in stagnant water is defined as a function of water alkalinity, while total metal release is defined as a function of stagnation length, and is not dependent on water alkalinity.

  3. Dopamine release in rat striatum - Physiological coupling to tyrosine supply

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    During, Matthew J.; Acworth, Ian N.; Wurtman, Richard J.

    1989-01-01

    Intracerebral microdialysis was used to monitor dopamine release in rat striatal extracellular fluid following the intraperitoneal administration of dopamine's precursor amino acid, L-tyrosine. Dopamine concentrations in dialysates increased transiently after tyrosine (50-100 mg/kg) administration. Pretreatment with haloperidol or the partial lesioning of nigrostriatal neurons enhanced the effect of tyrosine on dopamine release, and haloperidol also prolonged this effect. These data suggest that nigrostriatal dopaminergic neurons are responsive to changes in precursor availability under basal conditions, but that receptor-mediated feedback mechanisms limit the magnitude and duration of this effect.

  4. Fluoride release from restorative materials.

    PubMed

    Basso, Gabriela Romanini; Della Bona, Alvaro; Gobbi, Delton Luiz; Cecchetti, Dileta

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate in vitro fluoride (F) release from 4 restorative materials (3M ESPE): Ketak Molar Easymix [KME - conventional glass ionomer cement (GIC)]; Rely-X luting 2 [RL2 - resin-modified GIC (RMGIC)]; Vitremer (VIT- RMGIC); and Filtek Z250 [Z250 - negative control]. Disc-shaped specimens were fabricated according to the manufacturer's instructions and placed into 10 mL of reverse osmosis water at 37°C until the analyses were done using a liquid membrane for selective F ion electrode (Orion 710). F release was evaluated every 6 h in the first day and thereafter daily during 28 days (d). The results were analyzed statistically by two-way ANOVA and Tukey's test (α=0.05). Mean F release and standard deviation values (in ppm) were: KME: 6 h- 0.34 ± 0.04; 24 h- 1.22 ± 0.30; 7 d- 0.29 ± 0.09; 14 d- 0.20 ± 0.04; 28 d- 0.16 ± 0.01; RL2: 6 h- 2.46 ± 0.48; 24 h-12.33 ± 2.93; 7 d- 1.37 ± 0.38; 14 d- 0.80 ± 0.13; 28 d- 0.80 ± 0.21; VIT: 6 h- 0.98 ± 0.35; 24 h- 4.35 ± 1.22; 7 d- 0.66 ± 0.23; 14 d- 0.40 ± 0.07; 28 d- 0.39 ± 0.08; Z250: 6 h- 0.029 ± 0.001; 24 h- 0.024 ± 0.009; 7 d- 0.023 ± 0.004; 14 d- 0.025 ± 0.001; 28 d- 0.028 ± 0.001. RL2 RMGIC released more F than the other materials in all periods. The greatest release of F occurred in the first 24 h.

  5. Controlled Release Formulations of Auxinic Herbicides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kowalski, Witold J.; Siłowiecki, Andrzej.; Romanowska, Iwona; Glazek, Mariola; Bajor, Justyna; Cieciwa, Katarzyna; Rychter, Piotr

    2013-04-01

    ingredient in the HBA oligomers was chemically bound to the oligomer matrix and a controlled release followed in concert with the hydrolysis of ester bonds in the oligomer systems. Due to the high volatility and high water solubility of the DMA salts, significant amounts of active ingredients were predisposed to be dispersed in the environment. On the other hand, the HBA oligomers exhibit low volatility and low solubility in water, so they tend to exhibit lover migrating rates from the target site. The obtained plots suggested that in the case of the HBA oligomers the effectiveness were delayed in time when compared with the DMA salts. The integral effectiveness of the studied HBA oligomers was practically equivalent to the conventional DMA salts, but the release of the HBA herbicides was delayed in time vs. DMA salts. The mixtures of oligo (R,S)-3-hydroxybutyric acid containing chemically bonded 2,4-D, Dicamba and MCPA (HBA) were proposed as carriers of active ingredients that could be released to control the sensitive weeds. The synthesized HBA oligomers could be particularly useful in a number of practical applications, because they release the herbicide to plants at a controlled rate and in amounts required over a specified period of time, their degradation products are identical to metabolites formed in plant cells, the physicochemical and operational parameters of the carrier oligomers might be optimized by fine-tuning of synthesis conditions. The decreased vapor pressure and increased lipophilicity of the studied materials could reduce the risk exposure of the operational personnel, as well as, a decrease the environmental pollution. Acknowledgments The authors would like to thank the Polish Ministry of Science and Higher Education for supporting this work through the grant No. NN 310 303039. References [1] S. Dubey, V. Jhelum, P.K. Patanjali, Controlled release agrochemical formulations: A review, J. Scientific &Industrial Research (India) 70 (2011) 105-112. [2] W. J

  6. 77 FR 3031 - Release of Airport Property: Tampa International Airport, Tampa, FL

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-01-20

    ... Federal Aviation Administration Release of Airport Property: Tampa International Airport, Tampa, FL AGENCY... FAA hereby provides notice of intent to release certain airport properties, approximately 3.407 acres, at the Tampa International Airport, Tampa, FL from the conditions, reservations, and restrictions...

  7. Kinetics of piroxicam release from low-methylated pectin/zein hydrogel microspheres

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The kinetics of a model drug (piroxicam) release from pectin/zein hydrogel microspheres was studied under conditions simulating the gastrointestinal tract. It is established that the rate-limiting step in the release mechanism is drug diffusion out of the microspheres rather than its dissolution. ...

  8. 21 CFR 520.2260c - Sulfamethazine sustained-release tablets.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... chapter for use of an 8-gram sulfamethazine sustained-release tablet. (b) Conditions of use—(1) Amount. 8 grams (1 tablet) per 45 pounds of body weight as a single dose. (2) Indications for use. In calves for... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Sulfamethazine sustained-release tablets....

  9. 21 CFR 520.2260c - Sulfamethazine sustained-release tablets.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... chapter for use of an 8-gram sulfamethazine sustained-release tablet. (b) Conditions of use—(1) Amount. 8 grams (1 tablet) per 45 pounds of body weight as a single dose. (2) Indications for use. In calves for... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Sulfamethazine sustained-release tablets....

  10. 21 CFR 520.2260c - Sulfamethazine sustained-release tablets.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... chapter for use of an 8-gram sulfamethazine sustained-release tablet. (b) Conditions of use—(1) Amount. 8 grams (1 tablet) per 45 pounds of body weight as a single dose. (2) Indications for use. In calves for... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Sulfamethazine sustained-release tablets....

  11. On the maximum energy release in flux-rope models of eruptive flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Forbes, T. G.; Priest, E. R.; Isenberg, P. A.

    1994-01-01

    We determine the photospheric boundary conditions which maximize the magnetic energy released by a loss of ideal-magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) equilibrium in two-dimensional flux-rope models. In these models a loss of equilibrium causes a transition of the flux rope to a lower magnetic energy state at a higher altitude. During the transition a vertical current sheet forms below the flux rope, and reconnection in this current sheet releases additional energy. Here we compute how much energy is released by the loss of equilibrium relative to the total energy release. When the flux-rope radius is small compared to its height, it is possible to obtain general solutions of the Grad-Shafranov equation for a wide range of boundary conditions. Variational principles can then be used to find the particular boundary condition which maximizes the magnetic energy released for a given class of conditions. We apply this procedure to a class of models known as cusp-type catastrophes, and we find that the maximum energy released by the loss of equilibrium is 20.8% of the total energy release for any model in this class. If the additional restriction is imposed that the photospheric magnetic field forms a simple arcade in the absence of coronal currents, then the maximum energy release reduces to 8.6%

  12. Controlled Release of Salicylic Acid from Biodegradable Cross-Linked Polyesters.

    PubMed

    Dasgupta, Queeny; Chatterjee, Kaushik; Madras, Giridhar

    2015-09-08

    The purpose of this work was to develop a family of cross-linked poly(xylitol adipate salicylate)s with a wide range of tunable release properties for delivering pharmacologically active salicylic acid. The synthesis parameters and release conditions were varied to modulate polyester properties and to understand the mechanism of release. Varying release rates were obtained upon longer curing (35% in the noncured polymer to 10% in the cured polymer in 7 days). Differential salicylic acid loading led to the synthesis of polymers with variable cross-linking and the release could be tuned (100% release for the lowest loading to 30% in the highest loading). Controlled release was monitored by changing various factors, and the release profiles were dependent on the stoichiometric composition, pH, curing time, and presence of enzyme. The polymer released a combination of salicylic acid and disalicylic acid, and the released products were found to be nontoxic. Minimal hemolysis and platelet activation indicated good blood compatibility. These polymers qualify as "bioactive" and "resorbable" and can, therefore, find applications as immunomodulatory resorbable biomaterials with tunable release properties.

  13. Synapsins Differentially Control Dopamine and Serotonin Release

    PubMed Central

    Kile, Brian M.; Guillot, Thomas S.; Venton, B. Jill; Wetsel, William C.; Augustine, George J.; Wightman, R. Mark

    2010-01-01

    Synapsins are a family of synaptic vesicle proteins that are important for neurotransmitter release. Here we have used triple knockout (TKO) mice lacking all three synapsin genes to determine the roles of synapsins in the release of two monoamine neurotransmitters, dopamine and serotonin. Serotonin release evoked by electrical stimulation was identical in substantia nigra pars reticulata slices prepared from TKO and wild-type mice. In contrast, release of dopamine in response to electrical stimulation was approximately doubled in striatum of TKO mice, both in vivo and in striatal slices, in comparison to wild-type controls. This was due to loss of synapsin III, because deletion of synapsin III alone was sufficient to increase dopamine release. Deletion of synapsins also increased the sensitivity of dopamine release to extracellular calcium ions. Although cocaine did not affect the release of serotonin from nigral tissue, this drug did enhance dopamine release. Cocaine-induced facilitation of dopamine release was a function of external calcium, an effect that was reduced in TKO mice. We conclude that synapsins play different roles in the control of release of dopamine and serotonin, with release of dopamine being negatively regulated by synapsins, specifically synapsin III, while serotonin release appears to be relatively independent of synapsins. These results provide further support for the concept that synapsin function in presynaptic terminals varies according to the neurotransmitter being released. PMID:20660258

  14. Time Scales for Energy Release in Hall Magnetic Reconnection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huba, J. D.; Rudakov, L. I.

    2004-05-01

    We present a study of the time scales for energy release in 2D Hall magnetic reconnection. We use the NRL Hall MHD code VooDoo for this study. We consider a 2D reversed field current layer with a magnetic perturbation that initiates the reconnection process. We use boundary conditions that allow inflow and outflow (i.e., not periodic) and let the system reach a steady state. We find that the system goes through three stages: a relatively long current layer thinning process, a fast reconnection phase, and a final steady state phase. We define the time scale for energy release as the fast reconnection period: from onset to steady state. Preliminary results indicate that the time for energy release scales as the initial thickness of the current layer. We apply these results to the magnetotail and magnetopause. Research supported by NASA and ONR.

  15. Gastrin-releasing peptide stimulates glycoconjugate release from feline trachea

    SciTech Connect

    Lundgren, J.D.; Baraniuk, J.N.; Ostrowski, N.L.; Kaliner, M.A.; Shelhamer, J.H. )

    1990-02-01

    The effect of gastrin-releasing peptide (GRP) on respiratory glycoconjugate (RGC) secretion was investigated in a feline tracheal organ culture model. RGC secretion was stimulated by GRP in a dose-dependent fashion at concentrations from 10(-8) to 10(-5) M (range 15-38% increase above control) with a peak effect within 0.5-1 h of incubation. GRP-(14-27), the receptor binding portion of GRP, and the related molecule, bombesin, also stimulated RGC secretion by approximately 20% above control. Acetyl-GRP-(20-27) stimulated RGC release by 10%, whereas GRP-(1-16) was inactive. Autoradiographic studies with 125I-GRP revealed that specific binding was restricted to the submucosal glands and the surface epithelium. A specific radioimmunoassay showed the content of GRP in feline trachea after extraction with ethanol-acetic acid to be 156 +/- 91 fmol/g wet wt. Indirect immunohistochemistry indicated that ganglion cells located just outside the cartilage contained GRP-immunoreactive materials. GRP is a novel mucus secretagogue that may participate in regulating airway mucosal gland secretion.

  16. Modified pipe extension safely releases chain binders

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haw, D. W.

    1978-01-01

    Pipe, cut partly in half lengthwise, and cupped and notched at one end, safely releases tension in chain binders that cinch tiedown chains around truck loads. Device prevents binder-handle from being thrown violently during release.

  17. Safety Precautions for Total Release Foggers

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Total release foggers, also known as bug bombs, are pesticide products containing aerosol propellants that release their contents at once to fumigate an area. They can pose a hazard if used incorrectly. Find safety information and videos on this page.

  18. Section 9: Ground Water - Likelihood of Release

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    HRS training. the ground water pathway likelihood of release factor category reflects the likelihood that there has been, or will be, a release of hazardous substances in any of the aquifers underlying the site.

  19. Controlled antibody release from gelatin for on-chip sample preparation.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xichen; Wasserberg, Dorothee; Breukers, Christian; Terstappen, Leon W M M; Beck, Markus

    2016-05-10

    A practical way to realize on-chip sample preparation for point-of-care diagnostics is to store the required reagents on a microfluidic device and release them in a controlled manner upon contact with the sample. For the development of such diagnostic devices, a fundamental understanding of the release kinetics of reagents from suitable materials in microfluidic chips is therefore essential. Here, we study the release kinetics of fluorophore-conjugated antibodies from (sub-) μm thick gelatin layers and several ways to control the release time. The observed antibody release is well-described by a diffusion model. Release times ranging from ∼20 s to ∼650 s were determined for layers with thicknesses (in the dry state) between 0.25 μm and 1.5 μm, corresponding to a diffusivity of 0.65 μm(2) s(-1) (in the swollen state) for our standard layer preparation conditions. By modifying the preparation conditions, we can influence the properties of gelatin to realize faster or slower release. Faster drying at increased temperatures leads to shorter release times, whereas slower drying at increased humidity yields slower release. As expected in a diffusive process, the release time increases with the size of the antibody. Moreover, the ionic strength of the release medium has a significant impact on the release kinetics. Applying these findings to cell counting chambers with on-chip sample preparation, we can tune the release to control the antibody distribution after inflow of blood in order to achieve homogeneous cell staining.

  20. Mars Express releases Beagle 2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2003-12-01

    At 9:31 CET, the crucial sequence started to separate the Beagle 2 lander from Mars Express. As data from Mars Express confirm, the pyrotechnic device was fired to slowly release a loaded spring, which gently pushed Beagle 2 away from the mother spacecraft. An image from the onboard visual monitoring camera (VMC) showing the lander drifting away is expected to be available later today. Since the Beagle 2 lander has no propulsion system of its own, it had to be put on the correct course for its descent before it was released. For this reason, on 16 December the trajectory of the whole Mars Express spacecraft had to be adjusted to ensure that Beagle 2 would be on course to enter the atmosphere of Mars. This manoeuvre, called "retargeting'' was critical: if the entry angle is too steep, the lander could overheat and burn up in the atmosphere; if the angle is too shallow, the lander might skim like a pebble on the surface of a lake and miss its target. This fine targeting and today's release were crucial manoeuvres for which ESA's Ground Control Team at ESOC (European Space Operations Centre) had trained over the past several months. The next major milestone for Mars Express will be the manoeuvre to enter into orbit around Mars. This will happen at 3:52 CET on Christmas morning, when Beagle 2 is expected to land on the surface of Mars. "Good teamwork by everybody - ESA, industry and the Beagle 2 team - has got one more critical step accomplished. Mars, here comes Europe!" said David Southwood, ESA Director of Science.

  1. CRRES: The combined release and radiation effects satellite program directory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Layman, Laura D.; Miller, George P.

    1992-01-01

    As a result of natural processes, plasma clouds are often injected into the magnetosphere. These chemical releases can be used to study many aspects of such injections. When a dense plasma is injected into the inner magnetosphere, it is expected to take up the motion of the ambient plasma. However, it has been observed in previous releases at moderate altitudes that the cloud preserved its momentum for some time following the release and that parts of the cloud peeled off from the main cloud presumable due to the action of an instability. As one moves outward into the magnetosphere, the mirror force becomes less dominant and the initial conditions following a release are dominated by the formation of a diamagnetic cavity since the initial plasma pressure from the injected Ba ions is greater than the magnetic field energy density. A previous high-altitude release (31,300 km) showed this to be the case initially, but at later times there was evidence for acceleration of the Ba plasma to velocities corresponding to 60,000 K. This effect is not explained. This series of experiments is therefore designed to inject plasma clouds into the magnetosphere under widely varying conditions of magnetic field strength and ambient plasma density. In this way the coupling of injected clouds to the ambient plasma and magnetic field, the formation of striations due to instabilities, and possible heating and acceleration of the injected Ba plasma can be studied over a wide range of magnetosphere parameters. Adding to the scientific yield will be the availability of measurements for the DOD/SPACERAD instruments which can monitor plasma parameters, electric and magnetic fields, and waves before, during and after the releases.

  2. Dependence of maximum concentration from chemical accidents on release duration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanna, Steven; Chang, Joseph

    2017-01-01

    Chemical accidents often involve releases of a total mass, Q, of stored material in a tank over a time duration, td, of less than a few minutes. The value of td is usually uncertain because of lack of knowledge of key information, such as the size and location of the hole and the pressure and temperature of the chemical. In addition, it is rare that eyewitnesses or video cameras are present at the time of the accident. For inhalation hazards, serious health effects (such as damage to the respiratory system) are determined by short term averages (<1 min) of concentrations, C. It is intuitively obvious that, for a ground level source and with all conditions the same (e.g., the same mass Q released), the maximum C near the source will be larger for a shorter than a longer release duration, td. This paper investigates the variation with downwind distance, x, of the ratio of maximum C for two time durations of release. Some simplified formulas for dispersion from finite duration releases are presented based on dimensional analysis. A primary dimensionless number of importance is the ratio of the release duration, td, to the travel time tt = x/u, at distance, x, where u is wind speed. Examples of applications to pressurized liquefied chlorine releases from tanks are given, focusing on scenarios from the Jack Rabbit I (JR I) field experiment. The analytical calculations and the predictions of the SLAB dense gas dispersion model agree that the ratio of maximum C for two different td's is greatest (as much as a factor of ten) near the source. At large distances (beyond a few km for the JR I scenarios), where tt exceeds both td's, the ratio of maximum C approaches unity.

  3. Confirmatory Survey for the Partial Site Release at the ABB Inc. CE Winsor Site, Windsor, CT

    SciTech Connect

    W.C. Adams

    2008-06-27

    The objectives of the confirmatory surveys were to confirm that remedial actions had been effective in meeting established release criteria and that documentation accurately and adequately describes the final radiological conditions of the PSR Impacted Areas.

  4. EPA Releases Updated Environmental and Public Health Indicators in Online Database

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    WASHINGTON - Today, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) released updated environmental and public health indicators in an online database, making information about the current and historical condition of the nation's environment and human

  5. Hysteresis of Colloid Retention and Release in Saturated Porous Media During Transients in Solution Chemistry

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Saturated packed column and micromodel transport studies wereconducted to gain insightonmechanismsof colloid retention and release under unfavorable attachment conditions. The initial deposition of colloids in porous media was found to be a strongly coupled process that depended on solution chemistr...

  6. A comparative study on the potential of oxygen release by roots of selected wetland plants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Fang; Shen, Gen-xiang; Li, Xue-lian; Li, Huai-zheng; Hu, Hong; Ni, Wu-zhong

    The capacity of root oxygen release by selected wetland plants pre-grown under both nutrient solution and artificial wastewater conditions were determined. The results indicated that the significant differences of root oxygen release by the tested wetland plants existed, and the biochemical process was the main source of root oxygen release as oxygen released by Vetiveria zizanioides L. Nash roots through biochemical process was contributed to 77% and 74% of total root oxygen release under nutrient solution conditions and artificial wastewater conditions, respectively, and that was 72% and 71% of total root oxygen release for Cyperus alternifolius L. It was found that the formation of root plaque with iron oxide was a function of root oxygen release as iron oxide concentration in root plaque was positively correlated to the potential of oxygen released by wetland plant roots with the regression coefficients as 0.874 *( p < 0.05) under nutrient solution conditions and 0.944 **( p < 0.01) under artificial wastewater conditions, which could be regarded as an important mechanism of wetland plants being tolerant to anoxia during wastewater treatment. It was suggested that the potential of root oxygen release could be used as a parameter for selecting wetland plants that can increase oxygen supply to soil or substrate of constructed wetlands and enhance nutrient transformation and removal, and V. zizanioides L. Nash with the highest potential of root oxygen release and higher tolerance to wastewater could be recommended to establish vegetated wetlands for treating nutrient-rich wastewater such as domestic wastewater.

  7. Releasing captive-reared masked bobwhite for population recovery: A review

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gall, S.A.; Kuvlesky, W.P.; Gee, G.; Brennan, L.A.; Palmer, W.E.; Burger, L.W.; Pruden, T.L.

    2000-01-01

    Efforts to re-establish the endangered masked bobwhite (Colinus virginianus ridgwayi) to it's former southern Arizona range have been ongoing since establishment of the Buenos Aires National Wildlife Refuge in 1986. Pre-release conditioning techniques developed prior to Refuge establishment continued to be utilized in an effort to improve post-release survival of captive-reared masked bobwhite chicks. Foremost among these techniques was the use of wild Texas bobwhite (C. v. texanus) males as foster parents which were paired with all broods released on the Refuge. The efficacy of this technique was evaluated using radio telemetry in 1994, and the results indicated that the use of foster Texas males was not as effective as had been presumed because post-release chick survival was poor. Therefore, in 1995 pre-release conditioning protocol were modified in an effort to improve post-release survival. The primary intent of these modifications was to emphasize wild behavior among chicks prior to release. Modifications to established protocol included imprinting chicks to adult bobwhites immediately after eggs hatched and exposing 1-to-2 day old chicks to natural foods (insects and seeds) while they were in brooder units. Foster parents and their respective broods were then placed in flight pens that mimicked the natural conditions that would confront broods upon release. Family groups were held in flight pens for several weeks for acclimatization purposes and then transported to temporary enclosures erected at release sites where they were held for a week and then released. Finally all releases were conducted during fall after covey formation was apparent to ensure that foster parents and released chicks remained with a group of birds. Preliminary results indicated that post-release chick survival was higher than what was observed in 1994. Pre-conditioning research will continue in an effort to further quantify post-release survival of masked bobwhite chicks. Although the

  8. Multifunctional conducting fibres with electrically controlled release of ciprofloxacin.

    PubMed

    Esrafilzadeh, Dorna; Razal, Joselito M; Moulton, Simon E; Stewart, Elise M; Wallace, Gordon G

    2013-08-10

    We hereby present a new method of producing coaxial conducting polymer fibres loaded with an antibiotic drug that can then be subsequently released (or sustained) in response to electrical stimulation. The method involves wet-spinning of poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene) poly(styrenesulfonate) (PEDOT:PSS) fibre, which served as the inner core to the electropolymerised outer shell layer of polypyrrole (Ppy). Ciprofloxacin hydrochloride (Cipro) was selected as the model drug and as the dopant in the Ppy synthesis. The release of Cipro in phosphate buffered saline (PBS) from the fibres was controlled by switching the redox state of Ppy.Cipro layer. Released Cipro under passive and stimulated conditions were tested against Gram positive (Streptococcus pyogenes) and Gram negative (Escherichia coli) bacteria. Significant inhibition of bacterial growth was observed against both strains tested. These results confirm that Cipro retains antibacterial properties during fibre fabrication and electrochemically controlled release. In vitro cytotoxicity testing utilising the neural B35 cell line confirmed the cytocompatibility of the drug loaded conducting fibres. Electrical conductivity, cytocompatibility and tuning release profile from this flexible fibre can lead to promising bionic applications such as neuroprosthetics and localised drug delivery.

  9. Solid lipid extrusion of sustained release dosage forms.

    PubMed

    Reitz, Claudia; Kleinebudde, Peter

    2007-09-01

    The applicability of the solid lipid extrusion process as preparations method for sustained release dosage forms was investigated in this study. Two lipids with similar melting ranges but of different composition, glyceryl palmitostearate (Precirol ATO 5) and glyceryl trimyristate (Dynasan 114), and mixtures of each lipid with 50% or 75% theophylline were extruded at temperatures below their melting ranges. Extrudates were analyzed using differential scanning calorimetry, scanning electron microscopy, porosity measurements and in vitro drug dissolution studies. The possibility of processing lipids by softening instead of complete melting and without subsequent formation of low-melting, metastable polymorphs could be demonstrated. Extrudates based on formulations of glyceryl palmitostearate/theophylline (50:50) and glyceryl trimyristate/theophylline (50:50) showed sustained release properties. An influence of extrusion conditions on the matrix structure was shown for extrudates based on a mixture of glyceryl trimyristate and theophylline (50:50). Glyceryl trimyristate tended to solidify in porous structures after melting. Exceeding a material temperature of 50.5 degrees C led to porous extrudate matrices with a faster drug release. The production of novel, non porous sustained release matrices was possible at a material temperature of 49.5 degrees C. Extrudates based on glyceryl trimyristate/theophylline (50:50) only slight changes in melting enthalpy and stable drug release profiles.

  10. Controlled release of ethylene via polymeric films for food packaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pisano, Roberto; Bazzano, Marco; Capozzi, Luigi Carlo; Ferri, Ada; Sangermano, Marco

    2015-12-01

    In modern fruit supply chain a common method to trigger ripening is to keep fruits inside special chambers and initiate the ripening process through administration of ethylene. Ethylene is usually administered through cylinders with inadequate control of its final concentration in the chamber. The aim of this study is the development of a new technology to accurately regulate ethylene concentration in the atmosphere where fruits are preserved: a polymeric film, containing an inclusion complex of α-cyclodextrin with ethylene, was developed. The complex was prepared by molecular encapsulation which allows the entrapment of ethylene into the cavity of α-cyclodextrin. After encapsulation, ethylene can be gradually released from the inclusion complex and its release rate can be regulated by temperature and humidity. The inclusion complex was dispersed into a thin polymeric film produced by UV-curing. This method was used because is solvent-free and involves low operating temperature; both conditions are necessary to prevent rapid release of ethylene from the film. The polymeric films were characterized with respect to thermal behaviour, crystalline structure and kinetics of ethylene release, showing that can effectively control the release of ethylene within confined volume.

  11. Highly Efficient Thermoresponsive Nanocomposite for Controlled Release Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yassine, Omar; Zaher, Amir; Li, Er Qiang; Alfadhel, Ahmed; Perez, Jose E.; Kavaldzhiev, Mincho; Contreras, Maria F.; Thoroddsen, Sigurdur T.; Khashab, Niveen M.; Kosel, Jurgen

    2016-06-01

    Highly efficient magnetic release from nanocomposite microparticles is shown, which are made of Poly (N-isopropylacrylamide) hydrogel with embedded iron nanowires. A simple microfluidic technique was adopted to fabricate the microparticles with a high control of the nanowire concentration and in a relatively short time compared to chemical synthesis methods. The thermoresponsive microparticles were used for the remotely triggered release of Rhodamine (B). With a magnetic field of only 1 mT and 20 kHz a drug release of 6.5% and 70% was achieved in the continuous and pulsatile modes, respectively. Those release values are similar to the ones commonly obtained using superparamagnetic beads but accomplished with a magnetic field of five orders of magnitude lower power. The high efficiency is a result of the high remanent magnetization of the nanowires, which produce a large torque when exposed to a magnetic field. This causes the nanowires to vibrate, resulting in friction losses and heating. For comparison, microparticles with superparamagnetic beads were also fabricated and tested; while those worked at 73 mT and 600 kHz, no release was observed at the low field conditions. Cytotoxicity assays showed similar and high cell viability for microparticles with nanowires and beads.

  12. Microbial Mineral Weathering for Nutrient Acquisition Releases Arsenic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mailloux, B. J.; Alexandrova, E.; Keimowitz, A.; Wovkulich, K.; Freyer, G.; Stolz, J.; Kenna, T.; Pichler, T.; Polizzotto, M.; Dong, H.; Radloff, K. A.; van Geen, A.

    2008-12-01

    Tens of millions of people in Southeast Asia drink groundwater contaminated with naturally occurring arsenic. The process of arsenic release from the sediment to the groundwater remains poorly understood. Experiments were performed to determine if microbial mineral weathering for nutrient acquisition can serve as a potential mechanism for arsenic mobilization. We performed microcosm experiments with Burkholderia fungorum, phosphate free artificial groundwater, and natural apatite. Controls included incubations with no cells and with killed cells. Additionally, samples were treated with two spikes - an arsenic spike, to show that arsenic release is independent of the initial arsenic concentration, and a phosphate spike to determine whether release occurs at field relevant phosphate conditions. We show in laboratory experiments that phosphate-limited cells of Burkholderia fungorum mobilize ancillary arsenic from apatite as a by-product of mineral weathering for nutrient acquisition. The released arsenic does not undergo a redox transformation but appears to be solubilized from the apatite mineral lattice as arsenate during weathering. Apatite has been shown to be commonly present in sediment samples from Bangladesh aquifers. Analysis of apatite purified from the Ganges, Brahamputra, Meghna drainage basin shows 210 mg/kg of arsenic, which is higher than the average crustal level. Finally, we demonstrate the presence of the microbial phenotype that releases arsenic from apatite in Bangladesh sediments. These results suggest that microbial weathering for nutrient acquisition could be an important mechanism for arsenic mobilization.

  13. Highly Efficient Thermoresponsive Nanocomposite for Controlled Release Applications

    PubMed Central

    Yassine, Omar; Zaher, Amir; Li, Er Qiang; Alfadhel, Ahmed; Perez, Jose E.; Kavaldzhiev, Mincho; Contreras, Maria F.; Thoroddsen, Sigurdur T.; Khashab, Niveen M.; Kosel, Jurgen

    2016-01-01

    Highly efficient magnetic release from nanocomposite microparticles is shown, which are made of Poly (N-isopropylacrylamide) hydrogel with embedded iron nanowires. A simple microfluidic technique was adopted to fabricate the microparticles with a high control of the nanowire concentration and in a relatively short time compared to chemical synthesis methods. The thermoresponsive microparticles were used for the remotely triggered release of Rhodamine (B). With a magnetic field of only 1 mT and 20 kHz a drug release of 6.5% and 70% was achieved in the continuous and pulsatile modes, respectively. Those release values are similar to the ones commonly obtained using superparamagnetic beads but accomplished with a magnetic field of five orders of magnitude lower power. The high efficiency is a result of the high remanent magnetization of the nanowires, which produce a large torque when exposed to a magnetic field. This causes the nanowires to vibrate, resulting in friction losses and heating. For comparison, microparticles with superparamagnetic beads were also fabricated and tested; while those worked at 73 mT and 600 kHz, no release was observed at the low field conditions. Cytotoxicity assays showed similar and high cell viability for microparticles with nanowires and beads. PMID:27335342

  14. Infuence of Microstructure in Drug Release Behavior of Silica Nanocapsules

    PubMed Central

    Zoltan, Tamara

    2013-01-01

    Meso- and nanoporous structures are adequate matrices for controlled drug delivery systems, due to their large surface areas and to their bioactive and biocompatibility properties. Mesoporous materials of type SBA-15, synthesized under different pH conditions, and zeolite beta were studied in order to compare the different intrinsic morphological characteristics as pore size, pore connectivity, and pore geometry on the drug loading and release process. These materials were characterized by X-ray diffraction, nitrogen adsorption, scanning and transmission electron microscopy, and calorimetric measurements. Ibuprofen (IBU) was chosen as a model drug for the formulation of controlled-release dosage forms; it was impregnated into these two types of materials by a soaking procedure during different periods. Drug loading and release studies were followed by UV-Vis spectrophotometry. All nano- and mesostructured materials showed a similar loading behavior. It was found that the pore size and Al content strongly influenced the release process. These results suggest that the framework structure and architecture affect the drug adsorption and release properties of these materials. Both materials offer a good potential for a controlled delivery system of ibuprofen. PMID:23986870

  15. Microparticle dispensers for the controlled release of insect pheromones.

    PubMed

    Stipanovic, Arthur J; Hennessy, Patrick J; Webster, Francis X; Takahashi, Yae

    2004-04-21

    The potential utility of micrometer-sized particles as controlled-release devices for the volatilization of insect pheromones for mating disruption applications is evaluated in this study for two pheromone/model compound systems (codlemone/1-dodecanol and disparlure/1,2-epoxyoctadecane). To expedite the measurement of release rates from these particle devices, two techniques based on thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) have been exploited: isothermal TGA (I-TGA) at elevated temperatures (40-80 degrees C) with N(2) convection and volatilization temperature (VT) by dynamic TGA. A correlation between these two methods has been established. Samples that exhibit a higher VT provide a lower release rate from a particle substrate. Using these techniques, it has been demonstrated that chemical interactions between adsorbed liquids and particle surfaces may play a small role in defining release characteristics under conditions of low surface area, whereas parameters associated with total surface area and micropore structure appear to be much more significant in retarding evaporation for uncoated particles containing an adsorbed liquid. Additional regulation of release rates was achieved by coating the particle systems with water-soluble or water-dispersible polymers. By careful selection of particle porosity and coating composition, it is envisioned that the evaporation rate of pheromones can be tailored to specific insect control applications.

  16. Radio-synthesized polyacrylamide hydrogels for proteins release

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferraz, Caroline C.; Varca, Gustavo H. C.; Lopes, Patricia S.; Mathor, Monica B.; Lugão, Ademar B.

    2014-01-01

    The use of hydrogels for biomedical purposes has been extensively investigated. Pharmaceutical proteins correspond to highly active substances which may be applied for distinct purposes. This work concerns the development of radio-synthesized hydrogel for protein release, using papain and bovine serum albumin as model proteins. The polymer was solubilized (1% w/v) in water and lyophilized. The proteins were incorporated into the lyophilized polymer and the hydrogels were produced by simultaneous crosslinking and sterilization using γ-radiation under frozen conditions. The produced systems were characterized in terms of swelling degree, gel fraction, crosslinking density and evaluated according to protein release, bioactivity and cytotoxicity. The hydrogels developed presented different properties as a function of polymer concentration and the optimized results were found for the samples containing 4-5% (w/v) polyacrylamide. Protein release was controlled by the electrostatic affinity of acrylic moieties and proteins. This selection was based on the release of the proteins during the experiment period (up to 50 h), maintenance of enzyme activity and the nanostructure developed. The system was suitable for protein loading and release and according to the cytotoxic assay it was also adequate for biomedical purposes, however this method was not able to generate a matrix with controlled pore sizes.

  17. Changes in parasite transmission stage excretion after pheasant release.

    PubMed

    Villanúa, D; Acevedo, P; Höfle, U; Rodríguez, O; Gortázar, C

    2006-09-01

    The production of parasite transmission stages was investigated in the faeces of 77 farm-bred ring-necked pheasants (Phasianus colchicus). Coccidian oocysts (Eimeria sp.), and nematode eggs (Heterakis sp., and Capillaria-like eggs) were recovered before and after release but all birds were treated prior to release. Treatment with fenbendazole significantly reduced the abundance of transmission-stage excretion for all parasites, and reduced the prevalence in the case of Eimeria sp. and Heterakis sp. Nonetheless, a significant increase in the excretion abundance for all parasites and in the prevalence of Eimeria sp. and Heterakis sp. was found after release. Eggs of Ascaridia sp. were found only after releasing, suggesting infection ocurred in the wild. A negative relationship was found between the pheasant body condition and Heterakis excretion abundance and a higher abundance of Capillaria sp. eggs in female birds. No significant relationship was found between parasite excretion abundance and pheasant survival. Despite this, results suggest that an increase in the excretion of parasite transmission stages follows the release of captive pheasants into the wild. This can in part explain restocking failures, but also means that autochtonous free-living birds may become exposed to new and potentially harmful pathogens. To avoid these risks it is proposed that improved prophylactic measures should be taken.

  18. Release of allyl isothiocyanate from mustard seed meal powder.

    PubMed

    Dai, Ruyan; Lim, Loong-Tak

    2014-01-01

    Allyl isothiocyanate (AITC) is a wide-spectrum antimicrobial compound found in mustard seeds, produced when their tissues are disrupted. The formation of AITC in mustard seed is mediated by the myrosinase enzyme which catalyzes the release of volatile AITC from a glucosinolate-sinigrin. Since water is a substrate in the reaction, humidity from the air can be used to activate the release of AITC from mustard seed. In this study, defatted and partially defatted mustard seed meals were ground into powders with particle size ranging from 5 to 300 μm. The mustard seed meal powder (MSMP) samples were enclosed within hermetically sealed glass jars wherein the headspace air was adjusted to 85% or 100% relative humidity at 5, 20, or 35 °C. Data from gas chromatography analysis showed that AITC release rate and amount increased with increasing relative humidity and temperature. Moreover, the release rate can be manipulated by particle size and lipid content of the MSMP samples. The amount of AITC released ranged from 2 to 17 mg/g MSMP within 24 h under the experimental conditions tested. In view of the antimicrobial properties of AITC, the mustard meal powder may be used as a natural antimicrobial material for extending the shelf life of food products.

  19. Evaluation of tritium release properties of advanced tritium breeders

    SciTech Connect

    Hoshino, T.; Ochiai, K.; Edao, Y.; Kawamura, Y.

    2015-03-15

    Demonstration power plant (DEMO) fusion reactors require advanced tritium breeders with high thermal stability. Lithium titanate (Li{sub 2}TiO{sub 3}) advanced tritium breeders with excess Li (Li{sub 2+x}TiO{sub 3+y}) are stable in a reducing atmosphere at high temperatures. Although the tritium release properties of tritium breeders are documented in databases for DEMO blanket design, no in situ examination under fusion neutron (DT neutron) irradiation has been performed. In this study, a preliminary examination of the tritium release properties of advanced tritium breeders was performed, and DT neutron irradiation experiments were performed at the fusion neutronics source (FNS) facility in JAEA. Considering the tritium release characteristics, the optimum grain size after sintering is <5 μm. From the results of the optimization of granulation conditions, prototype Li{sub 2+x}TiO{sub 3+y} pebbles with optimum grain size (<5 μm) were successfully fabricated. The Li{sub 2+x}TiO{sub 3+y} pebbles exhibited good tritium release properties similar to the Li{sub 2}TiO{sub 3} pebbles. In particular, the released amount of HT gas for easier tritium handling was higher than that of HTO water. (authors)

  20. Binaural release from informational masking in a speech identification task

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gallun, Frederick J.; Mason, Christine R.; Kidd, Gerald

    2005-09-01

    Binaural release from informational masking (IM) was examined in a speech identification task. Target and masker sentences were processed into mutually exclusive frequency bands, thus limiting energetic masking (EM), and presented over headphones. In a baseline condition, both were presented monotically to the same ear (TmMm). Despite minimal frequency overlap between target and masker, the presence of the masker resulted in reduced performance, or IM. Presenting the target monotically and the masker diotically (TmM0) resulted in a release from IM. Release was also obtained by imposing interaural differences in level (ILDs) and in time (ITDs) on the maskers (TmMILD,TmMITD). Any masker with a perceived lateral position that differed from that of a truly monaural stimulus resulted in a similar amount of release from IM relative to TmMm. For binaural targets and maskers (T0MILD,T0MITD), release was seen whenever ITDs or ILDs differed between target and masker. These results suggest that binaural cues can be very effective in reducing IM. Because mechanisms based on differences in perceived location make predictions that are similar to those of nonlocation-based binaural mechanisms, a variant of the equalization-cancellation model is also considered.

  1. [Controlled release hydromorphone for visceral, somatic and neuropathic pain].

    PubMed

    Alon, E; Cachin, C

    2010-03-03

    The aim of this multicentre, longitudinal investigation was to document the efficacy and tolerability profiles of controlled release hydromorphone in patients with heavy visceral, somatic or neuropathic pain under practical conditions. To this end, a prospective observational study was conducted in 57 centres in Switzerland, on a total of 196 patients. After an average of 43 days of treatment with controlled release hydromorphone, the intensity of momentary pain dropped by 46.5% and that of maximum pain dropped by 41.3%, with the efficacy of the treatment being most pronounced with visceral and somatic pain. At the same time, the prevalence of sleep disorders as a result of pain decreased from initially 86.7% to 21.0%. Controlled release hydromorphone was excellently tolerated in this group of elderly (average age 70.6 years), multimorbid pain patients receiving various medical treatments (average of 2.4 drugs in addition to pain medication), even in the voluntary long-term extension study of up to 96 days. No medical interactions were reported. Six and thirteen weeks after introducing the treatment, 89.8% and 85.2%, respectively, were still taking controlled release hydromorphone. Controlled release hydromorphone is a recommendable option for practical treatment of heavy and extremely heavy pain of various genesis.

  2. Individualized optimal release angles in discus throwing.

    PubMed

    Leigh, Steve; Liu, Hui; Hubbard, Mont; Yu, Bing

    2010-02-10

    The purpose of this study was to determine individualized optimal release angles for elite discus throwers. Three-dimensional coordinate data were obtained for at least 10 competitive trials for each subject. Regression relationships between release speed and release angle, and between aerodynamic distance and release angle were determined for each subject. These relationships were linear with subject-specific characteristics. The subject-specific relationships between release speed and release angle may be due to subjects' technical and physical characteristics. The subject-specific relationships between aerodynamic distance and release angle may be due to interactions between the release angle, the angle of attack, and the aerodynamic distance. Optimal release angles were estimated for each subject using the regression relationships and equations of projectile motion. The estimated optimal release angle was different for different subjects, and ranged from 35 degrees to 44 degrees . The results of this study demonstrate that the optimal release angle for discus throwing is thrower-specific. The release angles used by elite discus throwers in competition are not necessarily optimal for all discus throwers, or even themselves. The results of this study provide significant information for understanding the biomechanics of discus throwing techniques.

  3. 19 CFR 142.48 - Release procedure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 2 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Release procedure. 142.48 Section 142.48 Customs Duties U.S. CUSTOMS AND BORDER PROTECTION, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY; DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) ENTRY PROCESS Line Release § 142.48 Release procedure. (a) General. When the Customs officer...

  4. 34 CFR 21.61 - Release.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 34 Education 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Release. 21.61 Section 21.61 Education Office of the Secretary, Department of Education EQUAL ACCESS TO JUSTICE How Are Awards Paid? § 21.61 Release. If an...; and (b) Constitutes a complete release of any further claim against the United States with respect...

  5. 34 CFR 21.61 - Release.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 34 Education 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Release. 21.61 Section 21.61 Education Office of the Secretary, Department of Education EQUAL ACCESS TO JUSTICE How Are Awards Paid? § 21.61 Release. If an...; and (b) Constitutes a complete release of any further claim against the United States with respect...

  6. 34 CFR 21.61 - Release.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 34 Education 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Release. 21.61 Section 21.61 Education Office of the Secretary, Department of Education EQUAL ACCESS TO JUSTICE How Are Awards Paid? § 21.61 Release. If an...; and (b) Constitutes a complete release of any further claim against the United States with respect...

  7. 34 CFR 21.61 - Release.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 34 Education 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Release. 21.61 Section 21.61 Education Office of the Secretary, Department of Education EQUAL ACCESS TO JUSTICE How Are Awards Paid? § 21.61 Release. If an...; and (b) Constitutes a complete release of any further claim against the United States with respect...

  8. 34 CFR 21.61 - Release.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 34 Education 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Release. 21.61 Section 21.61 Education Office of the Secretary, Department of Education EQUAL ACCESS TO JUSTICE How Are Awards Paid? § 21.61 Release. If an...; and (b) Constitutes a complete release of any further claim against the United States with respect...

  9. 46 CFR 108.457 - Pressure release.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Pressure release. 108.457 Section 108.457 Shipping COAST... Fire Extinguishing Systems Fixed Carbon Dioxide Fire Extinguishing Systems § 108.457 Pressure release... have a means for releasing pressure that accumulates within the space if CO2 is discharged into...

  10. 46 CFR 108.457 - Pressure release.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Pressure release. 108.457 Section 108.457 Shipping COAST... Fire Extinguishing Systems Fixed Carbon Dioxide Fire Extinguishing Systems § 108.457 Pressure release... have a means for releasing pressure that accumulates within the space if CO2 is discharged into...

  11. 46 CFR 108.457 - Pressure release.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Pressure release. 108.457 Section 108.457 Shipping COAST... Fire Extinguishing Systems Fixed Carbon Dioxide Fire Extinguishing Systems § 108.457 Pressure release... have a means for releasing pressure that accumulates within the space if CO2 is discharged into...

  12. 46 CFR 108.457 - Pressure release.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Pressure release. 108.457 Section 108.457 Shipping COAST... Fire Extinguishing Systems Fixed Carbon Dioxide Fire Extinguishing Systems § 108.457 Pressure release... have a means for releasing pressure that accumulates within the space if CO2 is discharged into...

  13. 46 CFR 108.457 - Pressure release.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Pressure release. 108.457 Section 108.457 Shipping COAST... Fire Extinguishing Systems Fixed Carbon Dioxide Fire Extinguishing Systems § 108.457 Pressure release... have a means for releasing pressure that accumulates within the space if CO2 is discharged into...

  14. How Newspapers Choose the Releases They Use.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morton, Linda P.

    1986-01-01

    Examines how four newspaper characteristics and seven types of news releases related to publications. Concludes that weekly and twice-weekly newspapers print more releases than daily papers and that past events, features, and institutional news releases are almost never printed. (SRT)

  15. 28 CFR 2.33 - Release plans.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Release plans. 2.33 Section 2.33 Judicial Administration DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE PAROLE, RELEASE, SUPERVISION AND RECOMMITMENT OF PRISONERS, YOUTH OFFENDERS, AND JUVENILE DELINQUENTS United States Code Prisoners and Parolees § 2.33 Release plans. (a) A...

  16. ATP release through pannexon channels

    PubMed Central

    Dahl, Gerhard

    2015-01-01

    Extracellular adenosine triphosphate (ATP) serves as a signal for diverse physiological functions, including spread of calcium waves between astrocytes, control of vascular oxygen supply and control of ciliary beat in the airways. ATP can be released from cells by various mechanisms. This review focuses on channel-mediated ATP release and its main enabler, Pannexin1 (Panx1). Six subunits of Panx1 form a plasma membrane channel termed ‘pannexon’. Depending on the mode of stimulation, the pannexon has large conductance (500 pS) and unselective permeability to molecules less than 1.5 kD or is a small (50 pS), chloride-selective channel. Most physiological and pathological stimuli induce the large channel conformation, whereas the small conformation so far has only been observed with exclusive voltage activation of the channel. The interaction between pannexons and ATP is intimate. The pannexon is not only the conduit for ATP, permitting ATP efflux from cells down its concentration gradient, but the pannexon is also modulated by ATP. The channel can be activated by ATP through both ionotropic P2X as well as metabotropic P2Y purinergic receptors. In the absence of a control mechanism, this positive feedback loop would lead to cell death owing to the linkage of purinergic receptors with apoptotic processes. A control mechanism preventing excessive activation of the purinergic receptors is provided by ATP binding (with low affinity) to the Panx1 protein and gating the channel shut. PMID:26009770

  17. Foamy Virus Budding and Release

    PubMed Central

    Hütter, Sylvia; Zurnic, Irena; Lindemann, Dirk

    2013-01-01

    Like all other viruses, a successful egress of functional particles from infected cells is a prerequisite for foamy virus (FV) spread within the host. The budding process of FVs involves steps, which are shared by other retroviruses, such as interaction of the capsid protein with components of cellular vacuolar protein sorting (Vps) machinery via late domains identified in some FV capsid proteins. Additionally, there are features of the FV budding strategy quite unique to the spumaretroviruses. This includes secretion of non-infectious subviral particles and a strict dependence on capsid-glycoprotein interaction for release of infectious virions from the cells. Virus-like particle release is not possible since FV capsid proteins lack a membrane-targeting signal. It is noteworthy that in experimental systems, the important capsid-glycoprotein interaction could be bypassed by fusing heterologous membrane-targeting signals to the capsid protein, thus enabling glycoprotein-independent egress. Aside from that, other systems have been developed to enable envelopment of FV capsids by heterologous Env proteins. In this review article, we will summarize the current knowledge on FV budding, the viral components and their domains involved as well as alternative and artificial ways to promote budding of FV particle structures, a feature important for alteration of target tissue tropism of FV-based gene transfer systems. PMID:23575110

  18. Nuclear energy release from fragmentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Cheng; Souza, S. R.; Tsang, M. B.; Zhang, Feng-Shou

    2016-08-01

    It is well known that binary fission occurs with positive energy gain. In this article we examine the energetics of splitting uranium and thorium isotopes into various numbers of fragments (from two to eight) with nearly equal size. We find that the energy released by splitting 230,232Th and 235,238U into three equal size fragments is largest. The statistical multifragmentation model (SMM) is applied to calculate the probability of different breakup channels for excited nuclei. By weighing the probability distributions of fragment multiplicity at different excitation energies, we find the peaks of energy release for 230,232Th and 235,238U are around 0.7-0.75 MeV/u at excitation energy between 1.2 and 2 MeV/u in the primary breakup process. Taking into account the secondary de-excitation processes of primary fragments with the GEMINI code, these energy peaks fall to about 0.45 MeV/u.

  19. Fully redundant mechanical release actuator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lucy, Melvin H. (Inventor)

    1987-01-01

    A system is described for performing a mechanical release function exhibiting low shock. This system includes two pyrotechnic detents fixed mounted in opposing axial alignment within a cylindrical housing having two mechanical bellows. Two mechanical bellow assemblies, each having one end hermetically bonded to the housing and the other to the respective actuator pin extending from either end of the housing, ensure that all outgassing and contamination from the operation of the pyrotechnic devices will be contained within the housing and bellows. The pin on one end of the assembly is fixed mounted and supported, via a bolt or ball-and-socket joint so that when the charge corresponding to that pin ignites, the entire assembly will exhibit rectilinear movement, including the opposing pin providing the unlatching motion. The release detent pin is supported by a linear bearing and when its corresponding pyrotechnic charge ignites the pin is retracted within the housing producing the same unlatching motion without movement of the entire assembly, thus providing complete mechanical, electrical and pyrotechnic redundancy for the unlatching pin.

  20. Ririe Dam Release Test Assessment

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-06-01

    the water temperature, stage, and discharge along the Willow Creek channel; and personnel observed the dynamic ice conditions. The test included an...3 2.2 Willow Creek...27 4.5 Willow Creek hydraulic conditions .................................................................................. 28 4.5.1

  1. A Comparison of Three Algorithms for Orion Drogue Parachute Release

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Matz, Daniel A.; Braun, Robert D.

    2015-01-01

    The Orion Multi-Purpose Crew Vehicle is susceptible to ipping apex forward between drogue parachute release and main parachute in ation. A smart drogue release algorithm is required to select a drogue release condition that will not result in an apex forward main parachute deployment. The baseline algorithm is simple and elegant, but does not perform as well as desired in drogue failure cases. A simple modi cation to the baseline algorithm can improve performance, but can also sometimes fail to identify a good release condition. A new algorithm employing simpli ed rotational dynamics and a numeric predictor to minimize a rotational energy metric is proposed. A Monte Carlo analysis of a drogue failure scenario is used to compare the performance of the algorithms. The numeric predictor prevents more of the cases from ipping apex forward, and also results in an improvement in the capsule attitude at main bag extraction. The sensitivity of the numeric predictor to aerodynamic dispersions, errors in the navigated state, and execution rate is investigated, showing little degradation in performance.

  2. Lithium stimulates the release of human parathyroid hormone in vitro.

    PubMed

    Birnbaum, J; Klandorf, H; Giuliano, A; Van Herle, A

    1988-06-01

    The effect of lithium on PTH release from human parathyroid tissue was studied using a perifusion system and an immunoradiometric assay for intact human PTH. Tissue was obtained from three patients undergoing surgery for thyroid disease, three patients with secondary hyperparathyroidism due to chronic renal insufficiency, and four patients with primary hyperparathyroidism due to a parathyroid adenoma. Addition of lithium in concentrations equivalent to the therapeutic serum levels normally attained in man (1.3 mmol/L) resulted in a significant (P less than 0.05) increase in PTH release under normocalcemic (1.15 mmol/L) conditions from normal and hyperplastic tissues. The magnitude of the lithium-induced response of PTH release ranged from a 1.4- to 5.3-fold increase above basal levels (perifusion with 1.15 mmol/L calcium alone) and was comparable to the response during a low calcium (0.42 mmol/L) perifusion. Although the response to lithium was delayed compared to that of hypocalcemia, PTH returned to basal levels immediately after removal of either stimulator. In contrast, parathyroid adenomas did not respond to either lithium or hypocalcemia in a characteristic manner, but, rather, functioned in an autonomous fashion with repeated pulsatile bursts of PTH release that were not suppressible even under hypercalcemic (1.70 mmol/L) conditions. These in vitro studies suggest that lithium therapy may elevate serum PTH levels in some patients and could, thus, be responsible for hypercalcemia in them.

  3. Membrane perturbations of erythrocyte ghosts by spectrin release.

    PubMed

    Yamaguchi, Takeo; Ozaki, Shinnosuke; Shimomura, Taiji; Terada, Shigeyuki

    2007-05-01

    The cytoskeleton plays an important role in the stability and function of the membrane. Spectrin release from erythrocyte ghosts makes the membrane more fragile. However, the detail of membrane fragility has remained unclear. In the present study, the effects of incubation temperatures and polyamines on the membrane structure of ghosts under hypotonic conditions have been examined. Upon exposure of ghosts to a hypotonic buffer at 0-37 degrees C, reduction of ghost volume, spectrin release and decrease of band 3-cytoskeleton interactions were clearly observed above 30 degrees C. However, such changes were completely inhibited by spermine and spermidine. Interestingly, conformational changes of spectrin induced at 37 degrees C or 49 degrees C were not suppressed by both polyamines. Flow cytometry of fluorescein isothiocyanate-labelled ghosts exposed to 37 degrees C demonstrated the two peaks corresponding to ghosts with normal spectrin content and decreased one. Taken together, these results indicate that the degree of spectrin release from the membrane under hypotonic conditions is not same in all ghosts, and that polyamines inhibit the spectrin release followed by changes in the membrane structure, but not conformational changes of spectrin.

  4. Release of trace organic compounds during the decomposition of municipal solid waste components.

    PubMed

    Staley, Bryan F; Xu, Fangxiang; Cowie, Steven J; Barlaz, Morton A; Hater, Gary R

    2006-10-01

    Landfill gas contains numerous speciated organic compounds (SOCs) including alkanes, aromatics, chlorinated aliphatic hydrocarbons, alcohols, ketones, terpenes, chlorofluoro compounds, and siloxanes. The source, rate and extent of release of these compounds are poorly understood. The objective of this study was to characterize the release of SOCs and the regulated parameter, non-methane organic compounds (NMOCs) during the decomposition of residential refuse and its major biodegradable components [paper (P), yard waste (YW), food waste (FW)]. Work was conducted under anaerobic conditions in 8-L reactors operated to maximize decomposition. Refuse and YW were also tested under aerobic conditions. NMOC release during anaerobic decomposition of refuse, P, YW, and FW was 0.151, 0.016, 0.038, and 0.221 mg-C dry g(-1), respectively, while release during aerobic decomposition of refuse and YW was 0.282 and 0.236 mg-C dry g(-1), respectively. The highest NMOC release was measured under abiotic conditions (3.01 mg-C dry g(-1)), suggesting the importance of gas stripping. NMOC release was faster than CH4 production in all treatments. Terpenes and ketones accounted for 32-96% of SOC release in each treatment, while volatile fatty acids were not a significant contributor. Release in aerobic systems points to the potential importance of composting plants as an emissions source.

  5. Preparation and characterization of controlled release matrices based on novel seaweed interpolyelectrolyte complexes.

    PubMed

    Prado, Héctor J; Matulewicz, María C; Bonelli, Pablo R; Cukierman, Ana L

    2012-06-15

    Novel interpolyelectrolyte complexes (IPECs) between naturally sulfated polysaccharides of the seaweed Polysiphonia nigrescens (PN) and cationized agaroses (CAG) and Eudragit E (EE) were prepared using an organic solvent free process, characterized, and explored for controlled drug release. Tablets containing model drug ibuprofen and IPECs were prepared by direct compression. Drug release in acid medium was low owing to the low solubility of ibuprofen in that condition and to the matrix action. Zero order drug release was determined in the buffer stage (pH=6.8), with Fickian diffusion predominating over relaxation during the initial phases. Relaxation appears to increase along the release process and even overcomes diffusion for some systems. Drug release profiles could be controlled by varying the content of IPECs in the tablets. Also, the change in molecular weight and the degree of substitution of the components allowed altering the release profiles.

  6. Controlled release of an anti-cancer drug from DNA structured nano-films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, Younghyun; Lee, Jong Bum; Hong, Jinkee

    2014-02-01

    We demonstrate the generation of systemically releasable anti-cancer drugs from multilayer nanofilms. Nanofilms designed to drug release profiles in programmable fashion are promising new and alternative way for drug delivery. For the nanofilm structure, we synthesized various unique 3-dimensional anti cancer drug incorporated DNA origami structures (hairpin, Y, and X shaped) and assembled with peptide via layer-by-layer (LbL) deposition method. The key to the successful application of these nanofilms requires a novel approach of the influence of DNA architecture for the drug release from functional nano-sized surface. Herein, we have taken first steps in building and controlling the drug incorporated DNA origami based multilayered nanostructure. Our finding highlights the novel and unique drug release character of LbL systems in serum condition taken full advantages of DNA origami structure. This multilayer thin film dramatically affects not only the release profiles but also the structure stability in protein rich serum condition.

  7. A rapid technique for prediction of nutrient release from controlled release fertilizers

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Nutrient release from soluble granular fertilizers can be modified by polymer coating to extend the total duration nutrient release up to 3 to 9 months and rate of release to match the nutrient requirement of the plant during the growing period. Hence these products are termed as “Controlled Release...

  8. Study of the mechanisms of laser-induced release of liposome-encapsulated dye

    SciTech Connect

    Khoobehi, B.; Char, C.A.; Peyman, G.A.; Schuele, K.M. )

    1990-01-01

    To differentiate the contributing factors (blood or encapsulated dye) leading to the release of encapsulated dyes from liposomes after laser exposure, we initiated an in vitro experimental study. The release of encapsulated calcein was quantified under various experimental conditions in whole blood and in buffered solution containing high-density lipoprotein. Generally, the amount of dye release improved with an increase in laser power, with a maximum release of approximately 80% of encapsulated dye. Because the laser exposure was not continuous, only 80% of each sample was actually exposed. Therefore, 80% release may be thought of as total release. In a lipoprotein/buffer mixture, the 488 nm wavelength caused greater dye release than the 577 nm wavelength, because the maximum absorption of calcein is near 488 nm. The laser wavelength at 577 nm, however, caused greater release in the blood mixture, reflecting the peak absorption of hemoglobin at near 577 nm. At a 3 x higher liposome concentration, the differences in the effects of wavelengths on the release of dye from liposomes were insignificant. Although the 577 nm wavelength is an optimum wavelength for dye and drug delivery in the presence of blood, the 488 nm wavelength might also be suitable for the release of dye from the liposomes.

  9. Temporal 3D refined simulation of SF6 release in the ionosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Zheng-Wen; Zhao, Hai-Sheng; Wu, Jian; Feng, Jie; Xu, Bin; Zhang, Ya-Bin; Xue, Kun; Ma, Zheng-Zheng

    2017-04-01

    A number of significant studies have been dedicated to SF6 releases. However, given the complicated nature, the simulations provided at the design phases are still not consistent with those diagnosed in experiments. It is mainly because the actual conditions of experiments have not been fully introduced in the state-of-art models. A temporal 3D refined simulation model of SF6 release by a rocket payload is proposed in this paper. It first considers the release status (rocket attitude, velocity, etc.), release process (duration, injection velocity, the flux of the chemical release, etc.) and ambient neutral wind. This model is better than existing ones; the latter can only deal with release from a point source. The time-dependent drift of the released cloud, driven by the velocities of the rocket inertia and neutral wind, are calculated accurately. The non-uniform spherical structure of the electron density hole driven by the lasting release along the trajectory and the injection velocity are also described. The release flow field is calculated by using a new microcell method. The temporal 3D refined model proposed could be useful for improving the diagnosis and also helpful for the theory on chemical releases.

  10. Controlled Drug Release from Pharmaceutical Nanocarriers

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jinhyun Hannah; Yeo, Yoon

    2014-01-01

    Nanocarriers providing spatiotemporal control of drug release contribute to reducing toxicity and improving therapeutic efficacy of a drug. On the other hand, nanocarriers face unique challenges in controlling drug release kinetics, due to the large surface area per volume ratio and the short diffusion distance. To develop nanocarriers with desirable release kinetics for target applications, it is important to understand the mechanisms by which a carrier retains and releases a drug, the effects of composition and morphology of the carrier on the drug release kinetics, and current techniques for preparation and modification of nanocarriers. This review provides an overview of drug release mechanisms and various nanocarriers with a specific emphasis on approaches to control the drug release kinetics. PMID:25684779

  11. In-situ generation of oxygen-releasing metal peroxides

    DOEpatents

    Looney, Brian B.; Denham, Miles E.

    2007-01-09

    A method for remediation of contaminants in soil and groundwater is disclosed. The method generates oxygen releasing solids in groundwater or soil by injecting an aqueous energetic oxidant solution containing free radicals, oxidative conditions can be created within or ahead of a contaminant plume. Some contaminants may be remediated directly by reaction with the free radicals. Additionally and more importantly, the free radicals create an oxidative condition whereby native or injected materials, especially metals, are converted to peroxides. These peroxides provide a long-term oxygen reservoir, releasing oxygen relatively slowly over time. The oxygen can enhance microbial metabolism to remediate contaminants, can react with contaminant metals either to form immobile precipitants or to mobilize other metals to permit remediation through leaching techniques. Various injection strategies for injecting the energetic oxidant solution are also disclosed.

  12. The acoustic field scattered from some approximate pressure release materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caille, Gary W.

    1988-03-01

    The objective was to determine if a pressure release boundary condition can be achieved by coating an elastic shell with a visco-elastic material. One necessary condition is that the coating must acoustically decouple the shell from the scattering problem. Two closed cell rubbers and two cork-rubber composites (nitrile and neoprene based) were investigated. The dynamic viscoelastic constants of the materials were determined by wave propagation techniques. The far field scattering form functions for an infinite cylindrical shell coated with the viscoelastic material were calculated using the complete elastic equations of motion. The form functions were experimentally measured for the different materials at different thicknesses as verification of the theory. A thick finite right cylindrical shell was coated with .25 inches of closed cell neoprene and the normalized scattered pressure measured. The pressure release normalized scattered pressure was determined for the end on incident plane wave case using the acoustic radiation Simplified Helmholtz Integral Program (SHIP).

  13. Aspartate release from rat hippocampal synaptosomes.

    PubMed

    Bradford, S E; Nadler, J V

    2004-01-01

    Certain excitatory pathways in the rat hippocampus can release aspartate along with glutamate. This study utilized rat hippocampal synaptosomes to characterize the mechanism of aspartate release and to compare it with glutamate release. Releases of aspartate and glutamate from the same tissue samples were quantitated simultaneously. Both amino acids were released by 25 mM K(+), 300 microM 4-aminopyridine (4-AP) and 0.5 and 1 microM ionomycin in a predominantly Ca(2+)-dependent manner. For a roughly equivalent quantity of glutamate released, aspartate release was significantly greater during exposure to elevated [K(+)] than to 4-AP and during exposure to 0.5 than to 1 microM ionomycin. Aspartate release was inefficiently coupled to P/Q-type voltage-dependent Ca(2+) channels and was reduced by KB-R7943, an inhibitor of reversed Na(+)/Ca(2+) exchange. In contrast, glutamate release depended primarily on Ca(2+) influx through P/Q-type channels and was not significantly affected by KB-R7943. Pretreatment of the synaptosomes with tetanus toxin and botulinum neurotoxins C and F reduced glutamate release, but not aspartate release. Aspartate release was also resistant to bafilomycin A(1), an inhibitor of vacuolar H(+)-ATPase, whereas glutamate release was markedly reduced. (+/-) -Threo-3-methylglutamate, a non-transportable competitive inhibitor of excitatory amino acid transport, did not reduce aspartate release. Niflumic acid, a blocker of Ca(2+)-dependent anion channels, did not alter the release of either amino acid. Exogenous aspartate and aspartate recently synthesized from glutamate accessed the releasable pool of aspartate as readily as exogenous glutamate and glutamate recently synthesized from aspartate accessed the releasable glutamate pool. These results are compatible with release of aspartate from either a vesicular pool by a "non-classical" form of exocytosis or directly from the cytoplasm by an as-yet-undescribed Ca(2+)-dependent mechanism. In either case

  14. Study on novel galantaminehydrobromide sustained-release capsules and itsin vitro releasing property.

    PubMed

    Li, Kun; Yang, Shuoye

    2014-09-01

    In present study, we prepared a novel galantamine hydro bromide sustained-release capsules with the new manufacturing technology, extrusion-spheronization method, and the optimized preparative formulation. A simple, rapid and accurate high performance liquid chromatography method (HPLC) was developed and validated for the quantification and release evaluation of galantamine hydro bromide. Experimental results showed that the method was specific, sensitive and reliable, could be effectively applied to the in vitro release study of galantamine hydro bromide sustained-release capsules. Our resulting samples had superior properties, worked better as sustained-release carriers and lasted longer hours to release drugs compared with the marketed control, Razadyne ER. The in vitro releasing characteristics of different batches of preparations are quite similar with each other, the total release proportions of galantamine hydro bromide from sustained-release capsules reached higher than 90 % within 12 h. The testing sustained-release preparation may be a promising new product for curing the related diseases.

  15. Screw-released roller brake

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vranish, John M. (Inventor)

    1999-01-01

    A screw-released roller brake including an input drive assembly, an output drive assembly, a plurality of locking sprags, a mechanical tripper nut for unlocking the sprags, and a casing therefor. The sprags consist of three dimensional (3-D) sprag members having pairs of contact surface regions which engage respective pairs of contact surface regions included in angular grooves or slots formed in the casing and the output drive assembly. The sprags operate to lock the output drive assembly to the casing to prevent rotation thereof in an idle mode of operation. In a drive mode of operation, the tripper is either self actuated or motor driven and is translated linearly up and down against a spline and at the limit of its travel rotates the sprags which unlock while coupling the input drive assembly to the output drive assembly so as to impart a turning motion thereto in either a clockwise or counterclockwise direction.

  16. Chemical releases in the ionosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, T. N.

    1979-01-01

    The study of the interaction between the atmosphere, ionosphere and magnetosphere is identified as a major task worthy of pursuit. The present review demonstrates the major contributions to this complex problem already made by active experiments involving the injection of chemicals and energetic electron beams into the atmosphere, ionosphere and magnetosphere. Through the use of chemical releases, it has been possible to investigate a number of quantities including high-altitude winds and electric fields, the detailed configurations of the geomagnetic field within the ionosphere and the magnetosphere, as well as the propagation of energetic particle beams and their interaction with natural neutral and ionized constituents of the high atmosphere. So far, virtually all of this effort has been accomplished using rockets. In the future, it is obvious that satellite platforms will play a greater role, both in making injections and in observing their effects.

  17. Biomediated continuous release phosphate fertilizer

    DOEpatents

    Goldstein, Alan H.; Rogers, Robert D.

    1999-01-01

    A composition is disclosed for providing phosphate fertilizer to the root zone of plants. The composition comprises a microorganism capable of producing and secreting a solubilization agent, a carbon source for providing raw material for the microorganism to convert into the solubilization agent, and rock phosphate ore for providing a source of insoluble phosphate that is solubilized by the solubilization agent and released as soluble phosphate. The composition is provided in a physical form, such as a granule, that retains the microorganism, carbon source, and rock phosphate ore, but permits water and soluble phosphate to diffuse into the soil. A method of using the composition for providing phosphate fertilizer to plants is also disclosed.

  18. Biomediated continuous release phosphate fertilizer

    DOEpatents

    Goldstein, A.H.; Rogers, R.D.

    1999-06-15

    A composition is disclosed for providing phosphate fertilizer to the root zone of plants. The composition comprises a microorganism capable of producing and secreting a solubilization agent, a carbon source for providing raw material for the microorganism to convert into the solubilization agent, and rock phosphate ore for providing a source of insoluble phosphate that is solubilized by the solubilization agent and released as soluble phosphate. The composition is provided in a physical form, such as a granule, that retains the microorganism, carbon source, and rock phosphate ore, but permits water and soluble phosphate to diffuse into the soil. A method of using the composition for providing phosphate fertilizer to plants is also disclosed. 13 figs.

  19. 10 CFR 50.54 - Conditions of licenses.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... decay heat removal; (C) Maintenance of sub-criticality; (D) Control of radioactive releases; and (E... stable condition and that radioactive contamination is removed or controlled such that personnel... release of radioactive material from its intended place of confinement within the reactor or on...

  20. A critical review of engineered nanomaterial release data: Are current data useful for material flow modeling?

    PubMed

    Caballero-Guzman, Alejandro; Nowack, Bernd

    2016-06-01

    Material flow analysis (MFA) is a useful tool to predict the flows of engineered nanomaterials (ENM) to the environment. The quantification of release factors is a crucial part of MFA modeling. In the last years an increasing amount of literature on release of ENM from materials and products has been published. The purpose of this review is to analyze the strategies implemented by MFA models to include these release data, in particular to derive transfer coefficients (TC). Our scope was focused on those articles that analyzed the release from applications readily available in the market in settings that resemble average use conditions. Current MFA studies rely to a large extent on extrapolations, authors' assumptions, expert opinions and other informal sources of data to parameterize the models. We were able to qualitatively assess the following aspects of the release literature: (i) the initial characterization of ENM provided, (ii) quantitative information on the mass of ENM released and its characterization, (iii) description of transformation reactions and (iv) assessment of the factors determining release. Although the literature on ENM release is growing, coverage of exposure scenarios is still limited; only 20% of the ENMs used industrially and 36% of the product categories involved have been investigated in release studies and only few relevant release scenarios have been described. Furthermore, the information provided is rather incomplete concerning descriptions and characterizations of ENMs and the released materials. Our results show that both the development of methods to define the TCs and of protocols to enhance assessment of ENM release from nano-applications will contribute to increase the exploitability of the data provided for MFA models. The suggestions we provide in this article will likely contribute to an improved exposure modeling by providing ENM release estimates closer to reality.

  1. Release Data Package for Hanford Site Assessments

    SciTech Connect

    Riley, Robert G.; Lopresti, Charles A.; Engel, David W.

    2006-07-01

    Beginning in fiscal year (FY) 2003, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Richland Operations Office initiated activities, including the development of data packages, to support a Hanford assessment. This report describes the data compiled in FY 2003 through 2005 to support the Release Module of the System Assessment Capability (SAC) for the updated composite analysis. This work was completed as part of the Characterization of Systems Project, part of the Remediation and Closure Science Project, the Hanford Assessments Project, and the Characterization of Systems Project managed by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. Related characterization activities and data packages for the vadose zone and groundwater are being developed under the remediation Decision Support Task of the Groundwater Remediation Project managed by Fluor Hanford, Inc. The Release Module applies release models to waste inventory data from the Inventory Module and accounts for site remediation activities as a function of time. The resulting releases to the vadose zone, expressed as time profiles of annual rates, become source terms for the Vadose Zone Module. Radioactive decay is accounted for in all inputs and outputs of the Release Module. The Release Module is implemented as the VADER (Vadose zone Environmental Release) computer code. Key components of the Release Module are numerical models (i.e., liquid, soil-debris, cement, saltcake, and reactor block) that simulate contaminant release from the different waste source types found at the Hanford Site. The Release Module also handles remediation transfers to onsite and offsite repositories.

  2. Controlled exosome release from the retinal pigment epithelium in situ.

    PubMed

    Locke, Christina J; Congrove, Nicole R; Dismuke, W Michael; Bowen, Trent J; Stamer, W Daniel; McKay, Brian S

    2014-12-01

    Retinal Pigment Epithelial cells (RPE) express both GPR143 and myocilin, which interact in a signal transduction-dependent manner. In heterologous systems, activation of GPR143 with ligand causes transient recruitment of myocilin to internalized receptors, which appears to be the entry point of myocilin to the endocytic pathway. In some but not all cells, myocilin also traffics through the multivesicular body (MVB) and is released on the surface of exosomes in a signal transduction-dependent fashion. Little is known regarding the role of exosomes in RPE, but they likely serve as a mode of communication between the RPE and the outer retina. In this study, we used posterior poles with retina removed from fresh human donor eyes as a model to test the relationship between GPR143, myocilin, and exosomes in an endogenous system. We isolated exosomes released by RPE using differential centrifugation of media conditioned by the RPE for 25 min, and then characterized the exosomes using nanoparticle tracking to determine the number and size of the exosomes. Next, we tested whether ligand stimulation of GPR143 using l-DOPA altered RPE exosome release. Finally, we investigated whether myocilin was present on the exosomes released by RPE and whether l-DOPA stimulation of GPR143 caused recruitment of myocilin to the endocytic pathway, as we have previously observed using cultured cells. Activation of GPR143 halted RPE exosome release, while simultaneously recruiting myocilin to the endocytic compartment. Together, our results indicate that GPR143 and myocilin function in a signal transduction system that can control exosome release from RPE.

  3. Energy released at Teide Volcano,Tenerife, Canary Islands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lopez, D. L.; Perez, N. M.; Marrero, R.

    2003-12-01

    Teide volcano (3715 m high) is located at the northern scarp of the Las Ca¤adas caldera, a large depression at the center of Tenerife Island. Las Ca¤adas has been produced by multiple episodes of caldera collapse and giant landslides. The basanite-phonolite magmatic system associated with Teide volcano is emitting gases that reach the summit producing weak fumaroles. The chemical composition of these fumaroles and the flux of diffuse soil CO2 degassing at the summit cone (0.5 km2) has been used to determine the energy released as passive degassing in this volcano. Previous investigations show that Teide's summit is emitting 400 tons m2 day-1 of CO2 to the atmosphere. The composition of CH4, CO2, CO, and H2O indicate a chemical equilibrium temperature of 234° C and 75% condensation of water vapor within the volcanic edifice (Chiodini and Marini, 1998). The composition of the gases before condensation was restored and assumed to represent the composition at the equilibrium zone. The energy stored by the gases at the equilibration zone is assumed to be released as the gases move towards the discharge zone. The following processes are considered: change in pressure and temperature for water from the equilibration zone to the zone of condensation, latent heat released during the water condensation process, cooling of the condensed water from the condensation temperature to ambient temperature, and change of pressure and temperature for CO2 from the equilibrium to the discharge zone. Thermodynamic calculations of the energy released in each one of these processes indicate that 144 MW are released at Teide. Energy flux is 288 MW m-2. Most of this energy is released during the condensation process. This energy output compares with other hydrothermal systems of the world. These results show that during periods of passive degassing, fumarolic activity is limited by the geometry and elevation of the volcanic structure and the internal thermodynamic conditions.

  4. Injectable silica-permanganate gel as a slow-release MnO4(-) source for groundwater remediation: rheological properties and release dynamics.

    PubMed

    Yang, S; Oostrom, M; Truex, M J; Li, G; Zhong, L

    2016-02-01

    Injectable slow-release permanganate gels (ISRPGs), formed by mixing aqueous KMnO4 solution with fumed silica powders, may have potential applications in remediating chlorinated solvent plumes in groundwater. A series of batch, column, and two-dimensional (2-D) flow cell experiments has been completed to characterize the ISRPG and study the release of permanganate (MnO4(-)) under a variety of conditions. The experiments have provided information on ISRPG rheology, MnO4(-) release dynamics and distribution in porous media, and trichloroethene (TCE) destruction by the ISRPG-released oxidant. The gel possesses shear thinning characteristics, resulting in a relatively low viscosity during mixing, and facilitating subsurface injection and distribution. Batch tests clearly showed that MnO4(-) diffused out from the ISRPG into water. During this process, the gel did not dissolve or disperse into water, but rather maintained its initial shape. Column experiments demonstrated that MnO4(-) release from the ISRPG lasted considerably longer than that from an aqueous solution. In addition, due to the longer release duration, TCE destruction by ISRPG-released MnO4(-) was considerably more effective than that when MnO4(-) was delivered using aqueous solution injection. In the 2-D flow cell experiments, it was demonstrated that ISRPGs released a long-lasting, low-concentration MnO4(-) plume potentially sufficient for sustainable remediation in aquifers.

  5. Synthesis of Depo-Medrol-chitosan hydrogel as new drug slow-release appliance and investigation of release kinetics by high-performance liquid chromatography.

    PubMed

    Alizadeh, Reza; Jabbari, Sara Majd; Zarnani, Amir H; Barghi, Hamidreza

    2016-09-01

    The present study deals with preparation and optimization of a novel chitosan hydrogel-based matrix by suspension cross-linking method for controlled release of Depo-Medrol. The controlled release of Depo-Medrol for effective Rheumatoid arthritis disease has become an imperative field in the drug delivery system. In this context, it was intended to optimize loading circumstances by experimental design and also study the release kinetics of Depo-Medrol entrapped in the chitosan matrix in order to obtain maximal efficiency for drug loading. The optimum concentrations of chitosan (2.5 g), glutaraldehyde (3.05 μL) and Depo-Medrol (0.1 mg) were set up to achieve the highest value of drug loaded and the most sustained release from the chitosan matrix. In vitro monitoring of drug release kinetic using high-performance liquid chromatography showed that 73% of the Depo-Medrol was released within 120 min, whereas remained drug was released during the next 67 h. High correlation between first-order and Higuchi's kinetic models indicates a controlled diffusion of Depo-Medrol through the surrounding media. Moreover, recovery capacity >82% and entrapment efficiency of 58-88% were achieved under optimal conditions. Therefore, the new synthesized Depo Medrol-chitosan is an applicable appliance for arthritis therapy by slow release mechanism. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  6. The fate of released histamine: reception, response and termination.

    PubMed Central

    Rangachari, P. K.

    1998-01-01

    Histamine released from ECL cells elicits responses from a variety of cellular targets in the vicinity. Three sets of receptors are involved (H1, H2 and H3). Receptor occupation is promptly transduced into cellular responses. The responses, in turn, are terminated by diverse mechanisms: enzymatic inactivation, cellular uptake and desensitization at the receptor level. Under specific pathological conditions, histamine effects could be exaggerated by the presence of derivatives that may be of marginal relevance under physiological conditions. Images Figure 2 PMID:10461350

  7. Quantifying the effect size of changing environmental controls on carbon release from permafrost-affected soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schaedel, C.; Bader, M. K. F.; Schuur, E. A. G.; Bracho, R. G.; Capek, P.; De Baets, S. L.; Diakova, K.; Ernakovich, J. G.; Hartley, I. P.; Iversen, C. M.; Kane, E. S.; Knoblauch, C.; Lupascu, M.; Natali, S.; Norby, R. J.; O'Donnell, J. A.; Roy Chowdhury, T.; Santruckova, H.; Shaver, G. R.; Sloan, V. L.; Treat, C. C.; Waldrop, M. P.

    2014-12-01

    High-latitude surface air temperatures are rising twice as fast as the global mean, causing permafrost to thaw and thereby exposing large quantities of previously frozen organic carbon (C) to microbial decomposition. Increasing temperatures in high latitude ecosystems not only increase C emissions from previously frozen C in permafrost but also indirectly affect the C cycle through changes in regional and local hydrology. Warmer temperatures increase thawing of ice-rich permafrost, causing land surface subsidence where soils become waterlogged, anoxic conditions prevail and C is released in form of anaerobic CO2 and CH4. Although substrate quality, physical protection, and nutrient availability affect C decomposition, increasing temperatures and changes in surface and sub-surface hydrology are likely the dominant factors affecting the rate and form of C release from permafrost; however, their effect size on C release is poorly quantified. We have compiled a database of 24 incubation studies with soils from active layer and permafrost from across the entire permafrost zone to quantify a) the effect size of increasing temperatures and b) the changes from aerobic to anaerobic environmental soil conditions on C release. Results from two different meta-analyses show that a 10°C increase in temperature increased C release by a factor of two in boreal forest, peatland and tundra ecosystems. Under aerobic incubation conditions, soils released on average three times more C than under anaerobic conditions with large variation among the different ecosystems. While peatlands showed similar amounts of C release under aerobic and anaerobic soil conditions, tundra and boreal forest ecosystems released up to 8 times more C under anoxic conditions. This pan-arctic synthesis shows that boreal forest and tundra soils will have a larger impact on climate change when newly thawed permafrost C decomposes in an aerobic environment compared to an anaerobic environment even when

  8. Engineered collagen hydrogels for the sustained release of biomolecules and imaging agents: promoting the growth of human gingival cells.

    PubMed

    Choi, Jonghoon; Park, Hoyoung; Kim, Taeho; Jeong, Yoon; Oh, Myoung Hwan; Hyeon, Taeghwan; Gilad, Assaf A; Lee, Kwan Hyi

    2014-01-01

    We present here the in vitro release profiles of either fluorescently labeled biomolecules or computed tomography contrast nanoagents from engineered collagen hydrogels under physiological conditions. The collagen constructs were designed as potential biocompatible inserts into wounded human gingiva. The collagen hydrogels were fabricated under a variety of conditions in order to optimize the release profile of biomolecules and nanoparticles for the desired duration and amount. The collagen constructs containing biomolecules/nanoconstructs were incubated under physiological conditions (ie, 37°C and 5% CO2) for 24 hours, and the release profile was tuned from 20% to 70% of initially loaded materials by varying the gelation conditions of the collagen constructs. The amounts of released biomolecules and nanoparticles were quantified respectively by measuring the intensity of fluorescence and X-ray scattering. The collagen hydrogel we fabricated may serve as an efficient platform for the controlled release of biomolecules and imaging agents in human gingiva to facilitate the regeneration of oral tissues.

  9. Model for TCLP Releases from Waste Glasses

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Dong-Sang; Vienna, John D.

    2003-05-01

    A first-order property model for normalized Toxicity Characteristic Leaching Procedure (TCLP) release as a function of glass composition was developed using data collected from various studies. The normalized boron release is used to estimate the release of toxic elements based on the observation that the boron release represents the conservative release for those constituents of interest. The current TCLP model has two targeted application areas: (1) delisting of waste-glass product as radioactive (not mixed) waste and (2) designating the glass wastes generated from waste-glass research activities as hazardous or non-hazardous. This report describes the data collection and model development for TCLP releases and discusses the issues related to the application of the model.

  10. Effects of artemisinin sustained-release granules on mixed alga growth and microcystins production and release.

    PubMed

    Ni, Lixiao; Li, Danye; Hu, Shuzhen; Wang, Peifang; Li, Shiyin; Li, Yiping; Li, Yong; Acharya, Kumud

    2015-12-01

    To safely and effectively apply artemisinin sustained-release granules to control and prevent algal water-blooms, the effects of artemisinin and its sustained-release granules on freshwater alga (Scenedesmus obliquus (S. obliquus) and Microcystis aeruginosa (M. aeruginosa)), as well as the production and release of microcystins (MCs) were studied. The results showed that artemisinin sustained-release granules inhibited the growth of M. aeruginosa (above 95% IR) and S. obliquus (about 90% IR), with M. aeruginosa more sensitive. The artemisinin sustained-release granules had a longer inhibition effect on growth of pure algae and algal coexistence than direct artemisinin dosing. The artemisinin sustained-release granules could decrease the production and release of algal toxins due to the continued stress of artemisinin released from artemisinin sustained-release granules. There was no increase in the total amount of MC-LR in the algal cell culture medium.

  11. Characteristics of pollutant gas releases from swine, dairy, beef, and layer manure, and municipal wastewater.

    PubMed

    Dai, Xiao-Rong; Saha, Chayan Kumer; Ni, Ji-Qin; Heber, Albert J; Blanes-Vidal, Victoria; Dunn, James L

    2015-06-01

    Knowledge about characteristics of gas releases from various types of organic wastes can assist in developing gas pollution reduction technologies and establishing environmental regulations. Five different organic wastes, i.e., four types of animal manure (swine, beef, dairy, and layer hen) and municipal wastewater, were studied for their characteristics of ammonia (NH3), carbon dioxide (CO2), hydrogen sulfide (H2S), and sulfur dioxide (SO2) releases for 38 or 43 days in reactors under laboratory conditions. Weekly waste additions and continuous reactor headspace ventilation were supplied to simulate waste storage conditions. Results demonstrated that among the five waste types, layer hen manure and municipal wastewater had the highest and lowest NH3 release potentials, respectively. Layer manure had the highest and dairy manure had the lowest CO2 release potentials. Dairy manure and layer manure had the highest and lowest H2S release potentials, respectively. Beef manure and layer manure had the highest and lowest SO2 releases, respectively. The physicochemical characteristics of the different types of wastes, especially the total nitrogen, total ammoniacal nitrogen, dry matter, and pH, had strong influence on the releases of the four gases. Even for the same type of waste, the variation in physicochemical characteristics affected the gas releases remarkably.

  12. Environmental releases for calendar year 1996

    SciTech Connect

    Greager, E.M.

    1997-07-31

    This report presents data on radioactive and nonradioactive materials released into the environment during calendar year 1996 from facilities and activities managed by the Fluor Daniel Hanford, Incorporated (formerly the Westinghouse Hanford Company) and Bechtel Hanford, Incorporated. Fluor Daniel Hanford, Incorporated provides effluent monitoring services for Bechtel Hanford, Incorporated, which includes release reporting. Both summary and detailed presentations of the environmental releases are provided. When appropriate, comparisons to data from previous years are made.

  13. Environmental releases for calendar year 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Diediker, L.P., Westinghouse Hanford

    1996-07-30

    This report presents data on radioactive and nonradioactive materials released into the environment during calendar year 1995 from facilities managed by the Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC) and monitored by Bechtel Hanford, Incorporated (BHI). WHC provides effluent monitoring services for BHI, which includes release reporting. Both summary and detailed presentations of the environmental releases are provided. When appropriate,comparisons to data from previous years are made.

  14. Double-Swivel Mechanism For Reliable Release

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    King, Guy L.; Schneider, William C.

    1990-01-01

    Double-swivel toggle mechanism releases large, heavy objects reliably. Double-swiveling action of mechanism ensures it clears restraining pins upon release. Pins retain toggle and its load. If pin fails to withdraw at designated time for releasing payload, toggle swivels about its upper ball, and ring swivels about lower ball so ring flange clears failed pin. Double-swivel action ensures disengagement even it two pins fail to withdraw.

  15. Creation of hydrophilic nitric oxide releasing polymers via plasma surface modification.

    PubMed

    Pegalajar-Jurado, A; Joslin, J M; Hawker, M J; Reynolds, M M; Fisher, E R

    2014-08-13

    Herein, we describe the surface modification of an S-nitrosated polymer derivative via H2O plasma treatment, resulting in polymer coatings that maintained their nitric oxide (NO) releasing capabilities, but exhibited dramatic changes in surface wettability. The poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid)-based hydrophobic polymer was nitrosated to achieve a material capable of releasing the therapeutic agent NO. The NO-loaded films were subjected to low-temperature H2O plasma treatments, where the treatment power (20-50 W) and time (1-5 min) were varied. The plasma treated polymer films were superhydrophilic (water droplet spread completely in <100 ms), yet retained 90% of their initial S-nitrosothiol content. Under thermal conditions, NO release profiles were identical to controls. Under buffer soak conditions, the NO release profile was slightly lowered for the plasma-treated materials; however, they still result in physiologically relevant NO fluxes. XPS, SEM-EDS, and ATR-IR characterization suggests the plasma treatment resulted in polymer rearrangement and implantation of hydroxyl and carbonyl functional groups. Plasma treated samples maintained both hydrophilic surface properties and NO release profiles after storage at -18 °C for at least 10 days, demonstrating the surface modification and NO release capabilities are stable over time. The ability to tune polymer surface properties while maintaining bulk properties and NO release properties, and the stability of those properties under refrigerated conditions, represents a unique approach toward creating enhanced therapeutic biopolymers.

  16. Effects of tetracaine on insulin release and calcium handling by rat pancreatic islets

    SciTech Connect

    Abdel El Motal, S.M.A.; Pian-Smith, M.C.M.; Sharp, G.W.G.

    1987-06-01

    The effects of tetracaine on insulin release and /sup 45/Ca/sup 2 +/ handling by rat pancreatic islets have been studied under basal, glucose-stimulated, and 3-isobutyl-1-methylxanthine (IBMX)-stimulated conditions. Islets were isolated by the use of collagenase and used either directly (freshly isolated islets) or after a period under tissue culture conditions. Tetracaine was found to stimulate insulin release under basal conditions, to inhibit glucose-stimulated insulin release, and to potentiate insulin release stimulated by IBMX. In studies on the mechanisms underlying these effects, tetracaine was found to decrease glucose-stimulated net retention of /sup 45/Ca/sup 2 +/ (by an action to block the voltage-dependent Ca channels) and to mobilize Ca/sup 2 +/ from intracellular stores. These two actions form the basis for the inhibition of glucose-stimulated insulin release, which depends heavily on Ca/sup 2 +/ entry via the voltage-dependent channels and the synergism with IBMX to potentiate release. No inhibition of IBMX-stimulated release occurs because IBMX does not use the voltage-dependent channels to raise intracellular Ca/sup 2 +/.

  17. Differential contribution of L- and N-type calcium channels on rat hippocampal acetylcholine release.

    PubMed

    Clos, M V; Garcia Sanz, A; Sabriá, J; Pastor, C; Badia, A

    1994-12-05

    Bay K 8644, nimodipine and omega-conotoxin GVIA (omega-CgTx) were used to study the different contribution of voltage-sensitive calcium channels (VSCC) to [3H]acetylcholine ([[3H]ACh) release in rat hippocampal synaptosomes. In our experimental conditions, the percentage of calcium-dependent ACh release was approximately 80%. Nimodipine (0.01-10 microM) and Bay 8644 (0.01-10 microM) were not able to modify the [3H]ACh release under stimulating conditions (15 mM K+). Nevertheless, when K+ concentration was reduced to 8 mM, a significant increase in [3H]ACh release was observed at 1 and 10 microM of Bay K 8644. Nimodipine (0.01-10 microM) failed to reverse the effect of Bay K 8644 on [3H]ACh release. Finally, omega-CgTx (0.001-1 microM) caused a concentration-dependent reduction of [3H]ACh release in K+ (15 mM)-stimulating conditions. These results suggest that the N-type VSCC probably play a predominant role in regulating the [3H]ACh release in synaptosomes from rat hippocampus.

  18. Quick-release connector module

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sedig, Albert R. (Inventor)

    1995-01-01

    A multi-bay electrical connector is described, of the type that has a frame (12, FIG. 2 ) with cavities (14) that each holds a separate module 20, which enables quick withdrawal of a single module from the frame and its quick replacement. A lock arm (42) is slidable along a first side (50) of a first cavity, and has at least one lock lug (80). A first module has a barrier part (70) that lies inward of the lock lug, which prevents outward movement of the first module out of the frame cavity. The lock arm can be moved to an unlocked position wherein the barrier part on the module lies inward of a gap (84) in the lock arm to permit the module to be pulled out of the frame cavity and later inserted therein. A latch (54) is slidable on the frame in directions (A, B) perpendicular to the sliding movement of the lock arm, and has an abutment (112, FIG. 5 ) that abuts a shoulder (114) on the lock arm to keep the lock arm in its unlocked position until the latch is released.

  19. Thyroid hormone biosynthesis and release.

    PubMed

    Carvalho, Denise P; Dupuy, Corinne

    2017-01-31

    Thyroid hormones (TH) 3,5,3',5'- tetraiodothyronine or thyroxine (T4) and 3,5,3'- triiodothyronine (T3) contain iodine atoms as part of their structure, and their synthesis occur in the unique structures called thyroid follicles. Iodide reaches thyroid cells through the bloodstream that supplies the basolateral plasma membrane of thyrocytes, where it is avidly taken up through the sodium/iodide symporter (NIS). Thyrocytes are also specialized in the secretion of the high molecular weight protein thyroglobulin (TG) in the follicular lumen. The iodination of the tyrosyl residues of TG preceeds TH biosynthesis, which depends on the interaction of iodide, TG, hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) and thyroid peroxidase (TPO) at the apical plasma membrane of thyrocytes. Thyroid hormone biosynthesis is under the tonic control of thyrotropin (TSH), while the iodide recycling ability is very important for normal thyroid function. We discuss herein the biochemical aspects of TH biosynthesis and release, highlighting the novel molecules involved in the process.

  20. Quick-release medical tape.

    PubMed

    Laulicht, Bryan; Langer, Robert; Karp, Jeffrey M

    2012-11-13

    Medical tape that provides secure fixation of life-sustaining and -monitoring devices with quick, easy, damage-free removal represents a longstanding unmet medical need in neonatal care. During removal of current medical tapes, crack propagation occurs at the adhesive-skin interface, which is also the interface responsible for device fixation. By designing quick-release medical tape to undergo crack propagation between the backing and adhesive layers, we decouple removal and device fixation, enabling dual functionality. We created an ordered adhesive/antiadhesive composite intermediary layer between the medical tape backing and adhesive for which we achieve tunable peel removal force, while maintaining high shear adhesion to secure medical devices. We elucidate the relationship between the spatial ordering of adhesive and antiadhesive regions to create a fully tunable system that achieves strong device fixation and quick, easy, damage-free device removal. We also described ways of neutralizing the residual adhesive on the skin and have observed that thick continuous films of adhesive are easier to remove than the thin islands associated with residual adhesive left by current medical tapes.

  1. 14 CFR 121.599 - Familiarity with weather conditions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Familiarity with weather conditions. 121... § 121.599 Familiarity with weather conditions. (a) Domestic and flag operations. No aircraft dispatcher may release a flight unless he is thoroughly familiar with reported and forecast weather conditions...

  2. 14 CFR 121.599 - Familiarity with weather conditions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Familiarity with weather conditions. 121... § 121.599 Familiarity with weather conditions. (a) Domestic and flag operations. No aircraft dispatcher may release a flight unless he is thoroughly familiar with reported and forecast weather conditions...

  3. 14 CFR 121.599 - Familiarity with weather conditions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Familiarity with weather conditions. 121... § 121.599 Familiarity with weather conditions. (a) Domestic and flag operations. No aircraft dispatcher may release a flight unless he is thoroughly familiar with reported and forecast weather conditions...

  4. 14 CFR 121.599 - Familiarity with weather conditions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Familiarity with weather conditions. 121... § 121.599 Familiarity with weather conditions. (a) Domestic and flag operations. No aircraft dispatcher may release a flight unless he is thoroughly familiar with reported and forecast weather conditions...

  5. 14 CFR 121.599 - Familiarity with weather conditions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Familiarity with weather conditions. 121... § 121.599 Familiarity with weather conditions. (a) Domestic and flag operations. No aircraft dispatcher may release a flight unless he is thoroughly familiar with reported and forecast weather conditions...

  6. 19 CFR 145.42 - Proof for conditionally free merchandise.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 2 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Proof for conditionally free merchandise. 145.42... conditionally free merchandise. The port director may, at his discretion, require appropriate proof of duty-free status before releasing conditionally free merchandise. This proof may be obtained by either of...

  7. 19 CFR 145.42 - Proof for conditionally free merchandise.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 2 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Proof for conditionally free merchandise. 145.42... conditionally free merchandise. The port director may, at his discretion, require appropriate proof of duty-free status before releasing conditionally free merchandise. This proof may be obtained by either of...

  8. 19 CFR 145.42 - Proof for conditionally free merchandise.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 2 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Proof for conditionally free merchandise. 145.42... conditionally free merchandise. The port director may, at his discretion, require appropriate proof of duty-free status before releasing conditionally free merchandise. This proof may be obtained by either of...

  9. 19 CFR 145.42 - Proof for conditionally free merchandise.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 2 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Proof for conditionally free merchandise. 145.42... conditionally free merchandise. The port director may, at his discretion, require appropriate proof of duty-free status before releasing conditionally free merchandise. This proof may be obtained by either of...

  10. Individual dose due to radioactivity accidental release from fusion reactor.

    PubMed

    Nie, Baojie; Ni, Muyi; Wei, Shiping

    2017-04-05

    As an important index shaping the design of fusion safety system, evaluation of public radiation consequences have risen as a hot topic on the way to develop fusion energy. In this work, the comprehensive public early dose was evaluated due to unit gram tritium (HT/HTO), activated dust, activated corrosion products (ACPs) and activated gases accidental release from ITER like fusion reactor. Meanwhile, considering that we cannot completely eliminate the occurrence likelihood of multi-failure of vacuum vessel and tokamak building, we conservatively evaluated the public radiation consequences and environment restoration after the worst hypothetical accident preliminarily. The comparison results show early dose of different unit radioactivity release under different conditions. After further performing the radiation consequences, we find it possible that the hypothetical accident for ITER like fusion reactor would result in a level 6 accident according to INES, not appear level 7 like Chernobyl or Fukushima accidents. And from the point of environment restoration, we need at least 69 years for case 1 (1kg HTO and 1000kg dust release) and 34-52years for case 2 (1kg HTO and 10kg-100kg dust release) to wait the contaminated zone drop below the general public safety limit (1mSv per year) before it is suitable for human habitation.

  11. Isotopic signature of atmospheric xenon released from light water reactors.

    PubMed

    Kalinowski, Martin B; Pistner, Christoph

    2006-01-01

    A global monitoring system for atmospheric xenon radioactivity is being established as part of the International Monitoring System to verify compliance with the Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty (CTBT). The isotopic activity ratios of (135)Xe, (133m)Xe, (133)Xe and (131m)Xe are of interest for distinguishing nuclear explosion sources from civilian releases. Simulations of light water reactor (LWR) fuel burn-up through three operational reactor power cycles are conducted to explore the possible xenon isotopic signature of nuclear reactor releases under different operational conditions. It is studied how ratio changes are related to various parameters including the neutron flux, uranium enrichment and fuel burn-up. Further, the impact of diffusion and mixing on the isotopic activity ratio variability are explored. The simulations are validated with reported reactor emissions. In addition, activity ratios are calculated for xenon isotopes released from nuclear explosions and these are compared to the reactor ratios in order to determine whether the discrimination of explosion releases from reactor effluents is possible based on isotopic activity ratios.

  12. Distribution and release of epidermal growth factor in man.

    PubMed Central

    Konturek, J W; Bielanski, W; Konturek, S J; Bogdal, J; Oleksy, J

    1989-01-01

    Epidermal growth factor (EGF) is localised in man to salivary and Brunner's glands. It is present in large concentrations in saliva and duodenal contents but the mechanisms of its release have been little studied. This study carried out on four groups of healthy subjects was designed to determine the distribution and the release of immunoreactive EGF (IR-EGF) in salivary, gastric, duodenal, and pancreatic secretions. Under basal conditions, the concentrations of IR-EGF in salivary, gastric, duodenal and pancreatic secretions were; 2.7 (0.4), 0.42 (0.12), 21 (5) and 8.5 (1.2) ng/ml, respectively. Chewing of Parafilm* significantly increased salivary but not gastric or duodenal EGF output while atropinisation led to the reduction in basal salivary and duodenal EGF output without affecting the increment in EGF release induced by chewing. Cigarette smoking caused a marked reduction in basal salivary and duodenal EGF output. Infusion of pentagastrin increased salivary and duodenal EGF output and this was blocked by the addition of somatostatin. Injection of secretin lead to an increase in pancreatic output of EGF. We conclude that in man the major sources of EGF are salivary glands, duodenum, and pancreas and that the release of EGF remains under neurohormonal control. PMID:2806986

  13. Modeling MIC copper release from drinking water pipes.

    PubMed

    Pizarro, Gonzalo E; Vargas, Ignacio T; Pastén, Pablo A; Calle, Gustavo R

    2014-06-01

    Copper is used for household drinking water distribution systems given its physical and chemical properties that make it resistant to corrosion. However, there is evidence that, under certain conditions, it can corrode and release unsafe concentrations of copper to the water. Research on drinking water copper pipes has developed conceptual models that include several physical-chemical mechanisms. Nevertheless, there is still a necessity for the development of mathematical models of this phenomenon, which consider the interaction among physical-chemical processes at different spatial scales. We developed a conceptual and a mathematical model that reproduces the main processes in copper release from copper pipes subject to stagnation and flow cycles, and corrosion is associated with biofilm growth on the surface of the pipes. We discuss the influence of the reactive surface and the copper release curves observed. The modeling and experimental observations indicated that after 10h stagnation, the main concentration of copper is located close to the surface of the pipe. This copper is associated with the reactive surface, which acts as a reservoir of labile copper. Thus, for pipes with the presence of biofilm the complexation of copper with the biomass and the hydrodynamics are the main mechanisms for copper release.

  14. Packing of Fruit Fly Parasitoids for Augmentative Releases.

    PubMed

    Montoya, Pablo; Cancino, Jorge; Ruiz, Lía

    2012-09-20

    The successful application of Augmentative Biological Control (ABC) to control pest fruit flies (Diptera: Tephritidae) confronts two fundamental requirements: (1) the establishment of efficient mass rearing procedures for the species to be released, and (2) the development of methodologies for the packing and release of parasitoids that permit a uniform distribution and their optimal field performance under an area-wide approach. Parasitoid distributions have been performed by ground and by air with moderate results; both options face challenges that remain to be addressed. Different devices and strategies have been used for these purposes, including paper bags and the chilled adult technique, both of which are commonly used when releasing sterile flies. However, insect parasitoids have morphological and behavioral characteristics that render the application of such methodologies suboptimal. In this paper, we discuss an alternate strategy for the augmentative release of parasitoids and describe packing conditions that favor the rearing and emergence of adult parasitoids for increased field performance. We conclude that the use of ABC, including the packaging of parasitoids, requires ongoing development to ensure that this technology remains a viable and effective control technique for pest fruit flies.

  15. Formulation and Evaluation of Controlled Release Floating Microballoons of Stavudine.

    PubMed

    Vidyadhara, Suryadevara; Sasidhar, Reddyvalam Lankapalli; Balakrishna, Talamanchi; Balaji, Boyapati; Amrutha, Ravi

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to formulate and evaluate stavudine floating microballoons for controlled drug release. Initially, the drug-loaded low-density granular pellets were prepared with hydroxypropyl methylcellulose E5 grade and by using isopropyl alcohol as a granulating fluid. Further, the low-density granular pellets were subjected to microencapsulation by an emulsion evaporation technique using ethyl cellulose 7 cps and Eudragit S 100 as coating polymers and 1% w/v polyethylene glycol 400 as aqueous phase. The prepared microballoons were characterized for their particle size analysis, angle of repose, and compressibility index. The in vitro release studies were performed in 0.1 N HCl as medium. The prepared microballoons were free-flowing and spherical in shape. From all the formulations, F5E and F5F can be considered as promising controlled release floating microballoons of stavudine providing first-order release over a period of 12 hours, with a minimum floating lag time of 1 minute. It was found that the ratio of the drug & polymer, stirring speed, and concentration of surfactant were the most significant variables which influenced the size of the stavudine microballoons under the applied experimental conditions.

  16. Formulation and Evaluation of Controlled Release Floating Microballoons of Stavudine

    PubMed Central

    Vidyadhara, Suryadevara; Sasidhar, Reddyvalam Lankapalli; Balakrishna, Talamanchi; Balaji, Boyapati; Amrutha, Ravi

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to formulate and evaluate stavudine floating microballoons for controlled drug release. Initially, the drug-loaded low-density granular pellets were prepared with hydroxypropyl methylcellulose E5 grade and by using isopropyl alcohol as a granulating fluid. Further, the low-density granular pellets were subjected to microencapsulation by an emulsion evaporation technique using ethyl cellulose 7 cps and Eudragit S 100 as coating polymers and 1% w/v polyethylene glycol 400 as aqueous phase. The prepared microballoons were characterized for their particle size analysis, angle of repose, and compressibility index. The in vitro release studies were performed in 0.1 N HCl as medium. The prepared microballoons were free-flowing and spherical in shape. From all the formulations, F5E and F5F can be considered as promising controlled release floating microballoons of stavudine providing first-order release over a period of 12 hours, with a minimum floating lag time of 1 minute. It was found that the ratio of the drug & polymer, stirring speed, and concentration of surfactant were the most significant variables which influenced the size of the stavudine microballoons under the applied experimental conditions. PMID:26839847

  17. Data summary report for fission product release test VI-5

    SciTech Connect

    Osborne, M.F.; Lorenz, R.A.; Travis, J.R.; Webster, C.S.; Collins, J.L. )

    1991-10-01

    Test VI-5, the fifth in a series of high-temperature fission product release tests in a vertical test apparatus, was conducted in a flowing mixture of hydrogen and helium. The test specimen was a 15.2-cm-long section of a fuel rod from the BR3 reactor in Belgium which had been irradiated to a burnup of {approximately}42 MWd/kg. Using a hot cell-mounted test apparatus, the fuel rod was heated in an induction furnace under simulated LWR accident conditions to two test temperatures, 2000 K for 20 min and then 2700 K for an additional 20 min. The released fission products were collected in three sequentially operated collection trains on components designed to measure fission product transport characteristics and facilitate sampling and analysis. The results from this test were compared with those obtained in previous tests in this series and with the CORSOR-M and ORNL diffusion release models for fission product release. 21 refs., 19 figs., 12 tabs.

  18. Triggered release of therapeutic antibodies from nanodiamond complexes.

    PubMed

    Smith, Adrienne H; Robinson, Erik M; Zhang, Xue-Qing; Chow, Edward K; Lin, Yang; Osawa, Eiji; Xi, Jianzhong; Ho, Dean

    2011-07-01

    Recent reports have revealed that detonation nanodiamonds (NDs) can serve as efficient, biocompatible, and versatile drug delivery platforms. Consequently, further investigations exploring additional therapeutic applications are warranted. Current limitations associated with the non-specific nature of intravenous drugs limit the potential of certain pharmacological agents. One such treatment that could benefit from a stable delivery platform is antibody (Ab) therapy. Determination of Ab adsorption and desorption to a ND surface was subsequently examined using the transforming growth factor β (TGF-β) antibody as a model therapeutic. ND-Ab complexes were found to be stable in water through enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISAs), UV-vis spectroscopy and TEM, with no Ab released after ten days. Released Abs were detected in extreme pH solutions (3.5), DMEM (+) serum with pH levels ranging from 4 to 10.5, and inorganic saline solutions. Preserved activity of Abs released in DMEM (+) serum was confirmed using an ELISA. These results suggest ND-Ab complexes are synthesized and stabilized in water and are triggered to release active Abs upon exposure to physiological conditions.

  19. Packing of Fruit Fly Parasitoids for Augmentative Releases

    PubMed Central

    Montoya, Pablo; Cancino, Jorge; Ruiz, Lía

    2012-01-01

    The successful application of Augmentative Biological Control (ABC) to control pest fruit flies (Diptera: Tephritidae) confronts two fundamental requirements: (1) the establishment of efficient mass rearing procedures for the species to be released, and (2) the development of methodologies for the packing and release of parasitoids that permit a uniform distribution and their optimal field performance under an area-wide approach. Parasitoid distributions have been performed by ground and by air with moderate results; both options face challenges that remain to be addressed. Different devices and strategies have been used for these purposes, including paper bags and the chilled adult technique, both of which are commonly used when releasing sterile flies. However, insect parasitoids have morphological and behavioral characteristics that render the application of such methodologies suboptimal. In this paper, we discuss an alternate strategy for the augmentative release of parasitoids and describe packing conditions that favor the rearing and emergence of adult parasitoids for increased field performance. We conclude that the use of ABC, including the packaging of parasitoids, requires ongoing development to ensure that this technology remains a viable and effective control technique for pest fruit flies. PMID:26466634

  20. Polyelectrolyte complexes stabilize and controllably release vascular endothelial growth factor.

    PubMed

    Huang, Min; Vitharana, Samadhi N; Peek, Laura J; Coop, Tina; Berkland, Cory

    2007-05-01

    Angiogenesis has long been a desired therapeutic approach to improve clinical outcomes of conditions typified by ischemia. Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) has demonstrated the ability to generate new blood vessels in vivo, but trials using intravenous delivery have not yet produced clinical success. Localized, sustained delivery of VEGF has been proven necessary to generate blood vessels as demonstrated by implantable, controlled release devices. Ultimately, nanoparticles delivered by intravenous injection may be designed to accumulate in target tissues and sustain the local VEGF concentration; however, injectable nanosuspensions that control the release of stabilized VEGF must first be developed. In this study, we utilize the heparin binding domain of VEGF to bind the polyanion dextran sulfate, resulting in an enhanced thermal stability of VEGF. Coacervation of the VEGF-bound dextran sulfate with selected polycations (chitosan, polyethylenimine, or poly-L-lysine) produced nanoparticles approximately 250 nm in diameter with high VEGF encapsulation efficiency (50-85%). Release of VEGF from these formulations persisted for >10 days and maintained high VEGF activity as determined by ELISA and a mitogenic bioassay. Chitosan-dextran sulfate complexes were preferred because of their biodegradability, desirable particle size ( approximately 250 nm), entrapment efficiency ( approximately 85%), controlled release (near linear for 10 days), and mitogenic activity.

  1. Permeability changes in layered sediments: impact of particle release.

    PubMed

    Blume, Theresa; Weisbrod, Noam; Selker, John S

    2002-01-01

    One of the mechanisms of sudden particle release from grain surfaces in natural porous media is a decrease in salt concentration of the permeating fluid to below the critical salt concentration. Particle release can cause a change in hydraulic conductivity of the matrix, either by washing out the fines and thus increasing the pore sizes or by the plugging of pore constrictions. The phenomenon of permeability changes as a result of particle detachment was investigated in a series of column experiments. Coarse and fine sediments from the Hanford Formation in southeast Washington were tested. Columns were subject to a pulse of highly saline solution (NaNO3) followed by a fresh water shock causing particle release. Outflow rates and changes in hydraulic head as well as electric conductivity and pH were monitored over time. No permeability decrease occurred within the coarse matrix alone. However, when a thin layer of fine sediment was embedded within the coarse material (mimicking field conditions at the Hanford site), permeability irreversibly decreased to 10% to 20% of the initial value. Evidence suggests that most of this permeability decrease was a result of particles detached within the fine layer and its subsequent clogging. An additional observation was a sudden increase in pH in the outflow solution, generated in situ during the fresh water shock. Because layered systems are common in natural settings, our results suggest that alteration between sodium solution and fresh water can lead to particle release and subsequently reduce the overall permeability of the matrix.

  2. Preparation and investigation of controlled-release glipizide novel oral device with three-dimensional printing.

    PubMed

    Li, Qijun; Wen, Haoyang; Jia, Danyang; Guan, Xiaoying; Pan, Hao; Yang, Yue; Yu, Shihui; Zhu, Zhihong; Xiang, Rongwu; Pan, Weisan

    2017-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore the feasibility of combining fused deposition modeling (FDM) 3D printing technology with hot melt extrusion (HME) to fabricate a novel controlled-release drug delivery device. Glipizide used in the treatment of diabetes was selected as model drug, and was successfully loaded into commercial polyvinyl alcohol(PVA) filaments by HME method. The drug-loaded filaments were printed through a dual-nozzle 3D printer, and finally formed a double-chamber device composed by a tablet embedded within a larger tablet (DuoTablet), each chamber contains different contents of glipizide. The drug-loaded 3D printed device was evaluated for drug release under in-vitro dissolution condition, and we found the release profile fit Korsmeyer-Peppas release kinetics. With the double-chamber design, it is feasible to design either controlled drug release or delayed drug release behavior by reasonably arranging the concentration distribution of the drug in the device. The characteristics of the external layer performed main influence on the release profile of the internal compartment such as lag-time or rate of release. The results of this study suggest the potential of 3D printing to fabricate controlled-release drug delivery system containing multiple drug concentration distributions via hot melt extrusion method and specialized design configurations.

  3. Nonopioid effect of morphine on electrically evoked acetylcholine release from Torpedo electromotor neurons.

    PubMed

    Oron, L; Sarne, Y; Michaelson, D M

    1992-02-01

    The release of acetylcholine from Torpedo electric organ slices following their electrical stimulation was modulated by morphine, by the muscarinic antagonist atropine, and by the nicotinic antagonist tubocurarine. Addition of either atropine or tubocurarine in the presence of the acetylcholinesterase inhibitor phospholine iodide enhanced acetylcholine release. The effects of the two antagonists were additive, a result suggesting that the secreted acetylcholine regulates its own release by activating both muscarinic and nicotinic cholinergic receptors and that these receptors inhibit acetylcholine release by different mechanisms. The effects of opiates on acetylcholine release were examined under conditions in which the cholinergic modulation of release is blocked, i.e., in the presence of atropine and tubocurarine. These experiments revealed that electrically evoked release of acetylcholine is blocked by the opiate agonists morphine and levorphanol. However, the inhibitory effect of morphine on acetylcholine release was not reversed by the opioid antagonist naloxone. Furthermore, dextrorphan, the nonopioid stereoisomer of levorphanol, had the same inhibitory effect as its opioid counterpart. These findings suggest that the effects of opiates on electrically evoked release of acetylcholine are not mediated by opioid receptors. The possible mechanisms underlying these nonopioid effects of morphine and levorphanol are discussed.

  4. Taurine and the control of basal hormone release from rat neurohypophysis.

    PubMed

    Song, Zhilin; Hatton, Glenn I

    2003-10-01

    Pituicytes of pituitary neural lobe are rich in the amino acid taurine, which they release upon hypoosmotic stimulation. As a generally inhibitory amino acid, taurine is thought to activate receptors on neural lobe nerve terminals and exert some control over hormone release. Previous work has shown the presence of glycine and GABA(A) receptors in neural lobe, both of which have affinity for taurine. Using a perifused explant system, we studied the effects of taurine activation of glycine and GABA(A) receptors on basal hormone release. Somewhat surprisingly, taurine induced increases in basal release of both vasopressin and oxytocin. Taurine-induced increases in oxytocin release were blocked by bicuculline, suggesting involvement of GABA(A) receptors. Increases in vasopressin release were not blocked by bicuculline, indicating involvement of receptors other than GABA(A). Although combined bicuculline and strychnine, an antagonist at most glycine receptors, also did not block increased vasopressin release, picrotoxin (a Cl(-) channel blocker) was effective in blocking increases in both vasopressin and oxytocin release. The other receptor(s) involved in taurine actions is postulated to be strychnine-insensitive glycine receptors. Thus, taurine in neural lobe may act via both a GABA(A) receptor and one or more types of glycine receptors to depolarize nerve terminal membranes under basal conditions. Taurine-induced partial depolarization resulting in Na(+) channel inactivation is probably responsible for its previously observed inhibition of stimulated hormone release from neural lobe.

  5. Validation of USP apparatus 4 method for microsphere in vitro release testing using Risperdal Consta.

    PubMed

    Rawat, Archana; Stippler, Erika; Shah, Vinod P; Burgess, Diane J

    2011-11-28

    The current manuscript addresses the need for a validated in vitro release testing method for controlled release parenteral microspheres. A USP apparatus 4 method was validated with the objective of possible compendial adaptation for microsphere in vitro release testing. Commercial microspheres (Risperdal Consta) were used for method validation. Accelerated and real-time release tests were conducted. The accelerated method had significantly reduced test duration and showed a good correlation with the real-time release profile (with limited number of sample analysis). Accelerated conditions were used for method validation (robustness and reproducibility). The robustness testing results revealed that release from the microspheres was not flow rate dependent and was not affected by minor variations in the method (such as cell preparation technique, amount of microspheres, flow-through cell size and size of glass beads). The significant difference in the release profile with small variations (± 0.5°C) in temperature was shown to be due to a change in risperidone catalyzed PLGA degradation in response to temperature. The accelerated method was reproducible as changing the system/equipment or the analyst did not affect the release profile. This work establishes the suitability of the modified USP apparatus 4 for possible compendial adaptation for drug release testing of microspheres.

  6. Controls on Fe(II)-Activated Trace Element Release from Goethite and Hematite

    SciTech Connect

    Frierdich, Andrew J.; Catalano, Jeffrey G.

    2012-03-26

    Electron transfer and atom exchange (ETAE) between aqueous Fe(II) and Fe(III) oxides induces surface growth and dissolution that affects trace element fate and transport. We have recently demonstrated Ni(II) cycling through goethite and hematite (adsorbed Ni incorporates into the mineral structure and preincorporated Ni releases to solution) during Fe(II)-Fe(III) ETAE. However, the chemical parameters affecting net trace element release remain unknown. Here, we examine the chemical controls on Ni(II) and Zn(II) release from Ni- and Zn-substituted goethite and hematite during reaction with Fe(II). Release follows a rate law consistent with surface reaction limited mineral dissolution and suggests that release occurs near sites of Fe(III) reductive dissolution during Fe(II)-Fe(III) ETAE. Metal substituent type affects reactivity; Zn release is more pronounced from hematite than goethite, whereas the opposite trend occurs for Ni. Buildup of Ni or Zn in solution inhibits further release but this resumes upon fluid exchange, suggesting that sustained release is possible under flow conditions. Mineral and aqueous Fe(II) concentrations as well as pH strongly affect sorbed Fe(II) concentrations, which directly control the reaction rates and final metal concentrations. Our results demonstrate that structurally incorporated trace elements are mobilized from iron oxides into fluids without abiotic or microbial net iron reduction. Such release may affect micronutrient availability, contaminant transport, and the distribution of redox-inactive trace elements in natural and engineered systems.

  7. Morphology of Gas Release in Physical Simulants

    SciTech Connect

    Daniel, Richard C.; Burns, Carolyn A.; Crawford, Amanda D.; Hylden, Laura R.; Bryan, Samuel A.; MacFarlan, Paul J.; Gauglitz, Phillip A.

    2014-07-03

    This report documents testing activities conducted as part of the Deep Sludge Gas Release Event Project (DSGREP). The testing described in this report focused on evaluating the potential retention and release mechanisms of hydrogen bubbles in underground radioactive waste storage tanks at Hanford. The goal of the testing was to evaluate the rate, extent, and morphology of gas release events in simulant materials. Previous, undocumented scoping tests have evidenced dramatically different gas release behavior from simulants with similar physical properties. Specifically, previous gas release tests have evaluated the extent of release of 30 Pa kaolin and 30 Pa bentonite clay slurries. While both materials are clays and both have equivalent material shear strength using a shear vane, it was found that upon stirring, gas was released immediately and completely from bentonite clay slurry while little if any gas was released from the kaolin slurry. The motivation for the current work is to replicate these tests in a controlled quality test environment and to evaluate the release behavior for another simulant used in DSGREP testing. Three simulant materials were evaluated: 1) a 30 Pa kaolin clay slurry, 2) a 30 Pa bentonite clay slurry, and 3) Rayleigh-Taylor (RT) Simulant (a simulant designed to support DSGREP RT instability testing. Entrained gas was generated in these simulant materials using two methods: 1) application of vacuum over about a 1-minute period to nucleate dissolved gas within the simulant and 2) addition of hydrogen peroxide to generate gas by peroxide decomposition in the simulants over about a 16-hour period. Bubble release was effected by vibrating the test material using an external vibrating table. When testing with hydrogen peroxide, gas release was also accomplished by stirring of the simulant.

  8. 28 CFR 571.13 - Institution release preparation program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Institution release preparation program... PROGRAMS AND RELEASE RELEASE FROM CUSTODY Release Preparation Program § 571.13 Institution release preparation program. (a) The institution release preparation program shall be administered by the...

  9. 28 CFR 571.13 - Institution release preparation program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Institution release preparation program... PROGRAMS AND RELEASE RELEASE FROM CUSTODY Release Preparation Program § 571.13 Institution release preparation program. (a) The institution release preparation program shall be administered by the...

  10. 28 CFR 571.13 - Institution release preparation program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Institution release preparation program... PROGRAMS AND RELEASE RELEASE FROM CUSTODY Release Preparation Program § 571.13 Institution release preparation program. (a) The institution release preparation program shall be administered by the...

  11. 28 CFR 571.13 - Institution release preparation program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Institution release preparation program... PROGRAMS AND RELEASE RELEASE FROM CUSTODY Release Preparation Program § 571.13 Institution release preparation program. (a) The institution release preparation program shall be administered by the...

  12. 28 CFR 571.22 - Release clothing and transportation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Release clothing and transportation. 571... AND RELEASE RELEASE FROM CUSTODY Release Gratuities, Transportation, and Clothing § 571.22 Release clothing and transportation. (a) Staff shall provide release clothing appropriate for the time of year...

  13. Ten Ways to Get Attention with Your Press Releases.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Van Kooten, Valerie

    1994-01-01

    Recommends 10 steps that can increase chances of having press release published. Advises readers to use required format; determine what constitutes news; keep release short; include contact person in release; incorporate good quotes; send releases to right person; understand that release will be edited; time arrival of release; follow up with…

  14. Transient early neurotrophin release and delayed inflammatory cytokine release by microglia in response to PAR-2 stimulation.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chen-Wen; Chen, Qian-Bo; Ouyang, Qing; Sun, Ji-Hu; Liu, Fang-Ting; Song, Dian-Wen; Yuan, Hong-Bin

    2012-06-25

    Activated microglia exerts both beneficial and deleterious effects on neurons, but the signaling mechanism controlling these distinct responses remain unclear. We demonstrated that treatment of microglial cultures with the PAR-2 agonist, 2-Furoyl-LIGRLO-NH2, evoked early transient release of BDNF, while sustained PAR-2 stimulation evoked the delayed release of inflammatory cytokines (IL-1 β and TNF-α) and nitric oxide. Culture medium harvested during the early phase (at 1 h) of microglial activation induced by 2-Furoyl-LIGRLO-NH2 (microglial conditioned medium, MCM) had no deleterious effects on cultured neurons, while MCM harvested during the late phase (at 72 h) promoted DNA fragmentation and apoptosis as indicated by TUNEL and annexin/PI staining. Blockade of PAR-1 during the early phase of PAR-2 stimulation enhanced BDNF release (by 11%, small but significant) while a PAR-1 agonist added during the late phase (24 h after 2-Furoyl-LIGRLO-NH2 addition) suppressed the release of cytokines and NO. The neuroprotective and neurotoxic effects of activated microglial exhibit distinct temporal profiles that are regulated by PAR-1 and PAR-2 stimulation. It may be possible to facilitate neuronal recovery and repair by appropriately timed stimulation and inhibition of microglial PAR-1 and PAR-2 receptors.

  15. Niacin extended-release/simvastatin.

    PubMed

    Sanford, Mark; Curran, Monique P

    2008-01-01

    Niacin extended-release (ER)/simvastatin is a once-daily, fixed-dose combination of the HMG-CoA reductase inhibitor simvastatin and an ER formulation of niacin (a B-complex vitamin). In healthy volunteers who were given niacin ER/simvastatin 2000 mg/40 mg, niacin exposure was similar to that with niacin ER 2000 mg, while simvastatin exposure was increased compared to that with simvastatin 40 mg. In patients with elevated non-high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (non-HDL-C) but with low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) at or below the National Cholesterol Education Program (NCEP) goal after a > or = 2-week simvastatin 20 mg/day run-in period (SEACOAST I), 24 weeks of niacin ER/simvastatin 1000 mg/20 mg or 2000 mg/20 mg per day reduced median plasma non-HDL-C levels to a significantly greater extent than simvastatin 20 mg/day. In patients with elevated non-HDL-C and LDL-C at any level after a > or = 2-week simvastatin 40 mg/day run-in period (SEACOAST II), 24 weeks of niacin ER/simvastatin 1000 mg/40 mg or 2000 mg/40 mg per day was noninferior to simvastatin 80 mg/day in reducing median plasma non-HDL-C levels. Compared with simvastatin monotherapy, there was no significant difference in reduction in plasma LDL-C levels with niacin ER/simvastatin in SEACOAST I, and the noninferiority criterion for LDL-C was not met in SEACOAST II. However, plasma HDL-C levels increased more and triglyceride levels were lowered more than with simvastatin monotherapy (SEACOAST I and II). Niacin ER/simvastatin was generally well tolerated, with flushing being the most common adverse reaction.

  16. Prospects for isomeric energy release

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karamian, S. A.

    2008-07-01

    The state of experimental studies and promising proposals for the application of nuclear isomers presented as controlled energy or γ-ray sources are reviewed. The properties of isomeric states, methods of their production, and approaches to their efficient stimulation using various types of radiation are analyzed. The long-lived isomers, which can be accumulated in reactor irradiations or in other nuclear interactions with abundant yield, are listed. The isomers are estimated according to their specific energy accumulated per nucleus and the level of the cross section for their formation in reactions with neutrons. The nuclei are classified as promising either for obtaining controlled γ-ray pulses, for the enhanced release of the radioactive decay energy, or for experimental studies on detecting forbidden electromagnetic transitions from the ground to isomeric state. In all cases, the possibility of external-stimulus action on nuclear transitions has key significance, which should become the subject of investigations. The results of successful observation of stimulation of isomers are described at excitation energy E* > 1 MeV in the reactions with bremsstrahlung photons and Coulomb excitation in the ion beam. The essential increase in the K-hindered transitions with increasing energy and also the K-mixing at high rotational frequency for high-spin levels are discussed. The attention is focused on attempts to detect the triggering induced by the radiation in the x-ray range, in particular, that of the 178 m2Hf isomer with the help of x-ray sources and the synchrotron radiation. Proposals for experiments with other isomers are considered. The possibility of affecting the nuclear states by means of ionization of electron shells of a corresponding atom is discussed as promising, and various schemes of similar experiments are proposed. The atomic cross sections are eight orders of magnitude higher than the nuclear ones; therefore, the stimulation of an isomer can

  17. [Laboratory simulation study on the influence of resuspension on the release of mercury from Yangtze estuarine tidal flat].

    PubMed

    Li, Meng; Bi, Chun-Juan; Zhang, Jing-Jing; Lü, Jin-Gang; Chen, Zhen-Lou

    2011-11-01

    Using a Particle Environment Simulator, laboratory simulation experiment on the influence of resuspension on the release of mercury from sediments collected from medium tidal flat and low tidal flat in Chongming Dongtan was conducted. Results indicated that the conditions of overlying water changed significantly during resuspension. The concentrations of HgD and HgP were mainly in the rang of 0.152-2.657 microg x L(-1), 0.080-2.722 microg x L(-1) separately. In the resuspension processes, mercury was released from the medium intertidal sediments under the salinity condition of 4.1 per thousand, 8.0 per thousand, 10.0 per thousand, 13.0 per thousand, and from the low intertidal sediments under the salinity condition of 13.0 per thousand. However, the release of mercury from the medium intertidal sediments is not significant under the salinity condition of 4.1 per thousand, 8.0 per thousand, 10.0 per thousand. The salinity of overlying water had an important effect on resuspension. In different salinity condition, the release of mercury was different. And the release of mercury from medium tidal flat and low tidal flat was different during the resuspension periods, the release of mercury from the medium intertidal sediment was significantly higher than the release from the low intertidal sediment. When the rotate speed was (210 +/- 5) r x min(-1), the desorption of mercury significantly increased, thereby the rotate speed had an effect on the release of mercury.

  18. Nanostructured biocompatible thermal/electrical stimuli-responsive biopolymer-doped polypyrrole for controlled release of chlorpromazine: kinetics studies.

    PubMed

    Shamaeli, Ehsan; Alizadeh, Naader

    2014-09-10

    Biocompatible nanostructured conductive heparin-doped polypyrrole film was fabricated and employed as a high-capacity cation exchanger for programmable release of neuroleptic drug, chlorpromazine (CPZ) with thermally and electrical dual-stimulation. Releasing behavior were studied at different applied potentials and temperatures by in-situ monitoring of UV absorbance measurements. Three mathematical models (Higuchi, Power, and Avrami equation) were employed to investigate kinetics of the release. Based on the obtained results, the Avrami model found to be more comprehensive than two other ones for mathematical description of electro-stimulated release of CPZ. A quantitative relationship between activation energy parameters (Ea, ΔG(≠), ΔH(≠), and ΔS(≠)) and release conditions (applied potential and temperature) has been developed and established to predict release rate constants at various applied conditions.

  19. Self-Replenishing Vascularized Fouling-Release Surfaces

    DOE PAGES

    Howell, Caitlin; Vu, Thy L.; Lin, Jennifer J.; ...

    2014-08-13

    Inspired by the long-term effectiveness of living antifouling materials, we have developed a method for the selfreplenishment of synthetic biofouling-release surfaces. These surfaces are created by either molding or directly embedding 3D vascular systems into polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) and filling them with a silicone oil to generate a nontoxic oil-infused material. When replenished with silicone oil from an outside source, these materials are capable of self-lubrication and continuous renewal of the interfacial fouling-release layer. Under accelerated lubricant loss conditions, fully infused vascularized samples retained significantly more lubricant than equivalent nonvascularized controls. Tests of lubricant-infused PDMS in static cultures of the infectiousmore » bacteria Staphylococcus aureus and Escherichia coli as well as the green microalgae Botryococcus braunii, Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, Dunaliella salina, and Nannochloropsis oculata showed a significant reduction in biofilm adhesion compared to PDMS and glass controls containing no lubricant. Further experiments on vascularized versus nonvascularized samples that had been subjected to accelerated lubricant evaporation conditions for up to 48 h showed significantly less biofilm adherence on the vascularized surfaces. These results demonstrate the ability of an embedded lubricant-filled vascular network to improve the longevity of fouling-release surfaces.« less

  20. Self-Replenishing Vascularized Fouling-Release Surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Howell, Caitlin; Vu, Thy L.; Lin, Jennifer J.; Kolle, Stefan; Juthani, Nidhi; Watson, Emily; Weaver, James C.; Alvarenga, Jack; Aizenberg, Joanna

    2014-08-13

    Inspired by the long-term effectiveness of living antifouling materials, we have developed a method for the selfreplenishment of synthetic biofouling-release surfaces. These surfaces are created by either molding or directly embedding 3D vascular systems into polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) and filling them with a silicone oil to generate a nontoxic oil-infused material. When replenished with silicone oil from an outside source, these materials are capable of self-lubrication and continuous renewal of the interfacial fouling-release layer. Under accelerated lubricant loss conditions, fully infused vascularized samples retained significantly more lubricant than equivalent nonvascularized controls. Tests of lubricant-infused PDMS in static cultures of the infectious bacteria Staphylococcus aureus and Escherichia coli as well as the green microalgae Botryococcus braunii, Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, Dunaliella salina, and Nannochloropsis oculata showed a significant reduction in biofilm adhesion compared to PDMS and glass controls containing no lubricant. Further experiments on vascularized versus nonvascularized samples that had been subjected to accelerated lubricant evaporation conditions for up to 48 h showed significantly less biofilm adherence on the vascularized surfaces. These results demonstrate the ability of an embedded lubricant-filled vascular network to improve the longevity of fouling-release surfaces.

  1. Self-Replenishing Vascularized Fouling-Release Surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Howell, C; Vu, TL; Lin, JJ; Kolle, S; Juthani, N; Watson, E; Weaver, JC; Alvarenga, J; Aizenberg, J

    2014-08-13

    Inspired by the long-term effectiveness of living antifouling materials, we have developed a method for the self-replenishment of synthetic biofouling-release surfaces. These surfaces are created by either molding or directly embedding 3D vascular systems into polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) and filling them with a silicone oil to generate a nontoxic oil-infused material. When replenished with silicone oil from an outside source, these materials are capable of self-lubrication and continuous renewal of the interfacial fouling-release layer. Under accelerated lubricant loss conditions, fully infused vascularized samples retained significantly more lubricant than equivalent nonvascularized controls. Tests of lubricant-infused PDMS in static cultures of the infectious bacteria Staphylococcus aureus and Escherichia coli as well as the green microalgae Botryococcus braunii, Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, Dunaliella sauna, and Nannochloropsis oculata showed a significant reduction in biofilm adhesion compared to PDMS and glass controls containing no lubricant. Further experiments on vascularized versus nonvascularized samples that had been subjected to accelerated lubricant evaporation conditions for up to 48 h showed significantly less biofilm adherence on the vascularized surfaces. These results demonstrate the ability of an embedded lubricant-filled vascular network to improve the longevity of fouling-release surfaces.

  2. Role of Corticotropin-releasing Factor in Gastrointestinal Permeability

    PubMed Central

    Rodiño-Janeiro, Bruno K; Alonso-Cotoner, Carmen; Pigrau, Marc; Lobo, Beatriz; Vicario, María; Santos, Javier

    2015-01-01

    The interface between the intestinal lumen and the mucosa is the location where the majority of ingested immunogenic particles face the scrutiny of the vast gastrointestinal immune system. Upon regular physiological conditions, the intestinal micro-flora and the epithelial barrier are well prepared to process daily a huge amount of food-derived antigens and non-immunogenic particles. Similarly, they are ready to prevent environmental toxins and microbial antigens to penetrate further and interact with the mucosal-associated immune system. These functions promote the development of proper immune responses and oral tolerance and prevent disease and inflammation. Brain-gut axis structures participate in the processing and execution of response signals to external and internal stimuli. The brain-gut axis integrates local and distant regulatory networks and super-systems that serve key housekeeping physiological functions including the balanced functioning of the intestinal barrier. Disturbance of the brain-gut axis may induce intestinal barrier dysfunction, increasing the risk of uncontrolled immunological reactions, which may indeed trigger transient mucosal inflammation and gut disease. There is a large body of evidence indicating that stress, through the brain-gut axis, may cause intestinal barrier dysfunction, mainly via the systemic and peripheral release of corticotropin-releasing factor. In this review, we describe the role of stress and corticotropin-releasing factor in the regulation of gastrointestinal permeability, and discuss the link to both health and pathological conditions. PMID:25537677

  3. Self-replenishing vascularized fouling-release surfaces.

    PubMed

    Howell, Caitlin; Vu, Thy L; Lin, Jennifer J; Kolle, Stefan; Juthani, Nidhi; Watson, Emily; Weaver, James C; Alvarenga, Jack; Aizenberg, Joanna

    2014-08-13

    Inspired by the long-term effectiveness of living antifouling materials, we have developed a method for the self-replenishment of synthetic biofouling-release surfaces. These surfaces are created by either molding or directly embedding 3D vascular systems into polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) and filling them with a silicone oil to generate a nontoxic oil-infused material. When replenished with silicone oil from an outside source, these materials are capable of self-lubrication and continuous renewal of the interfacial fouling-release layer. Under accelerated lubricant loss conditions, fully infused vascularized samples retained significantly more lubricant than equivalent nonvascularized controls. Tests of lubricant-infused PDMS in static cultures of the infectious bacteria Staphylococcus aureus and Escherichia coli as well as the green microalgae Botryococcus braunii, Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, Dunaliella salina, and Nannochloropsis oculata showed a significant reduction in biofilm adhesion compared to PDMS and glass controls containing no lubricant. Further experiments on vascularized versus nonvascularized samples that had been subjected to accelerated lubricant evaporation conditions for up to 48 h showed significantly less biofilm adherence on the vascularized surfaces. These results demonstrate the ability of an embedded lubricant-filled vascular network to improve the longevity of fouling-release surfaces.

  4. Releasable Asbestos Field Sampler (RAFS) Operation Manual

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Releasable Asbestos Field Sampler (RAFS) is a field instrument that provides an in-situ measurement of asbestos releasability from consistent and reproducible mechanical agitation of the source material such as soil. The RAFS was designed to measure concentration (asbestos st...

  5. 7 CFR 356.5 - Bonded release.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 5 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Bonded release. 356.5 Section 356.5 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE FORFEITURE PROCEDURES § 356.5 Bonded release. (a) The Deputy Administrator...

  6. 77 FR 1976 - Release of Waybill Data

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-01-12

    ... Surface Transportation Board Release of Waybill Data AGENCY: Surface Transportation Board, DOT. ACTION: Release of Waybill Data; Correction. SUMMARY: This document corrects a notice appearing in the Federal... of Trinity Industries, Inc. (WB605-8-12/20/11) for permission to use certain data from the...

  7. Serotonin release varies with brain tryptophan levels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schaechter, Judith D.; Wurtman, Richard J.

    1990-01-01

    This study examines directly the effects on serotonin release of varying brain tryptophan levels within the physiologic range. It also addresses possible interactions between tryptophan availability and the frequency of membrane depolarization in controlling serotonin release. We demonstrate that reducing tryptophan levels in rat hypothalamic slices (by superfusing them with medium supplemented with 100 microM leucine) decreases tissue serotonin levels as well as both the spontaneous and the electrically-evoked serotonin release. Conversely, elevating tissue tryptophan levels (by superfusing slices with medium supplemented with 2 microM tryptophan) increases both the tissue serotonin levels and the serotonin release. Serotonin release was found to be affected independently by the tryptophan availability and the frequency of electrical field-stimulation (1-5 Hz), since increasing both variables produced nearly additive increases in release. These observations demonstrate for the first time that both precursor-dependent elevations and reductions in brain serotonin levels produce proportionate changes in serotonin release, and that the magnitude of the tryptophan effect is unrelated to neuronal firing frequency. The data support the hypothesis that serotonin release is proportionate to intracellular serotonin levels.

  8. 49 CFR 236.790 - Release, time.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Release, time. 236.790 Section 236.790... Release, time. A device used to prevent the operation of an operative unit until after the expiration of a predetermined time interval after the device has been actuated....

  9. 49 CFR 236.790 - Release, time.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Release, time. 236.790 Section 236.790... Release, time. A device used to prevent the operation of an operative unit until after the expiration of a predetermined time interval after the device has been actuated....

  10. 49 CFR 236.790 - Release, time.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Release, time. 236.790 Section 236.790... Release, time. A device used to prevent the operation of an operative unit until after the expiration of a predetermined time interval after the device has been actuated....

  11. Extracellular proton release by stimulated neutrophils

    SciTech Connect

    van Zwieten, R.; Wever, R.; Hamers, M.N.; Weening, R.S.; Roos, D.

    1981-07-01

    We have tried to elucidate the mechanism of phagosome acidification in human neutrophils. Assuming that phenomena occurring at the plasma membrane reflect reactions in the phagocytic vacuoles, we have stimulated human neutrophils with agents that induce a ''respiratory burst,'' and we have measured the release of protons into the extracellular medium. Phorbol myristate acetate, N-formyl-methionyl-leucyl-phenylalanine and serum-opsonized zymosan particles each caused a rapid release of protons, concomitant with the increase in oxygen consumption. The stimulated release of protons was strictly coupled to the increase respiration of the cells, because inhibition of the respiration of either anaerobiosis, chlorpromazine, or glycolytic inhibitors also inhibited the release of protons. Also, in the presence of the above-mentioned stimulating agents, neutrophils from three patients with chronic granulomatous disease enhanced neither respiration not proton release. In normal cells, the ratio of deltaH+/-deltaO2 was 1.04 +/- 0.19 (mean +/ SD, n . 13). The mechanism of this proton release is not clear. The amount of lactic and carbonic acid produced by stimulated neutrophils was inadequate to explain the amount of protons released. Perhydroxyl radicals were also ruled out as the source of the protons. Because the cells did not release measurable amounts of phosphate ions, a phosphate-hydroxyl-ion antiport was also excluded. Finally, the lack of any effect of uncouplers renders it unlikely that a respiration-driven proton gradient is built up across the plasma membrane.

  12. Release of Unreviewed Studies Sparks Debate

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Viadero, Debra

    2005-01-01

    Studies generally undergo an evaluation process before they are accepted for publication in an academic journal, presented at a conference, or released by a think tank. This article discusses the release of unreviewed research that sparks debate over the need for tighter peer-review mechanisms. Researchers from two of the nation's most eminent…

  13. Extended-release trazodone (Oleptro) for depression.

    PubMed

    2010-11-15

    The FDA has approved the marketing of an extended-release formulation of trazodone (Oleptro--Angelini Labopharm) for treatment of major depressive disorder in adults. Immediate-release trazodone has been available for treatment of depression for many years, but is used mostly in low doses for its sedating effects.

  14. Teach with Databases: Toxics Release Inventory. [Multimedia].

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barracato, Jay; Spooner, Barbara

    This curriculum unit provides students with real world applications of science as it pertains to toxic releases into the environment. This boxed package contains the Toxics Release Inventory (TRI) Teacher's Guide, TRI Database Basics guide, comprehensive TRI compact disk with user's guide, "Getting Started: A Guide to Bringing Environmental…

  15. 49 CFR 236.790 - Release, time.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Release, time. 236.790 Section 236.790... Release, time. A device used to prevent the operation of an operative unit until after the expiration of a predetermined time interval after the device has been actuated....

  16. 27 CFR 27.185 - Customs release.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Customs release. 27.185... Distilled Spirits From Customs Custody Free of Tax for Use of the United States § 27.185 Customs release. (a) Upon receipt of appropriate customs entry and a photocopy of a permit, Form 5150.33 or...

  17. Extended-release methylphenidate (Ritalin LA).

    PubMed

    Lyseng-Williamson, Katherine A; Keating, Gillian M

    2002-01-01

    An extended-release formulation of methylphenidate (Ritalin LA), a CNS stimulant that inhibits dopamine and noradrenaline (norepinephrine) reuptake into presynaptic neurons, has been developed for use in patients with attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). In children with ADHD and healthy male adults, extended-release methylphenidate 20mg was rapidly absorbed and demonstrated two distinct peak plasma concentrations approximately 4 hours apart. The absorption pharmacokinetics of extended-release methylphenidate 20mg, which closely mimics those of immediate-release methylphenidate 10mg given in two doses 4 hours apart, permits once-daily administration. In a 2-week randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial in 134 evaluable children aged 6 to 12 years with ADHD, symptoms improved to a significantly greater extent with extended-release methylphenidate 10 to 40mg once daily than with placebo. Extended-release methylphenidate improved both inattention and hyperactivity symptoms and was effective in children with combined- (inattentive and hyperactive/impulsive) type or predominantly inattentive-type ADHD. In clinical trials, the safety and tolerability profiles of extended-release methylphenidate were consistent with that of the immediate-release formulation.

  18. 40 CFR 302.8 - Continuous releases.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... stack, the stack height (in feet or meters). (D) The frequency of the release and the fraction of the... use; (3) If a lake, the surface area (in acres) and average depth (in feet or meters); (4) If on or... stack, the stack height (in feet or meters). (iv) The frequency of the release and the fraction of...

  19. Method for releasing hydrogen from ammonia borane

    SciTech Connect

    Varma, Arvind; Diwan, Moiz; Shafirovich, Evgeny; Hwang, Hyun-Tae; Al-Kukhun, Ahmad

    2013-02-19

    A method of releasing hydrogen from ammonia borane is disclosed. The method comprises heating an aqueous ammonia borane solution to between about 80-135.degree. C. at between about 14.7 and 200 pounds per square inch absolute (psia) to release hydrogen by hydrothermolysis.

  20. Shape-Memory-Alloy Release Mechanism

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mckinnis, Darin

    1993-01-01

    Release-nut mechanism activated by electric current applied to shape-memory alloy. Separates attached objects quickly by remote control. Does not create hazard or cause damage. Shape-memory release-nut mechanism unaffected by moisture or vacuum. Requires sustained current lasting 5 seconds or longer, and insensitive to electromagnetic interference. Mechanism can be reused.