Science.gov

Sample records for 1 mpc scales

  1. The 6dF Galaxy Survey: bulk flows on 50-70 h-1 Mpc scales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scrimgeour, Morag I.; Davis, Tamara M.; Blake, Chris; Staveley-Smith, Lister; Magoulas, Christina; Springob, Christopher M.; Beutler, Florian; Colless, Matthew; Johnson, Andrew; Jones, D. Heath; Koda, Jun; Lucey, John R.; Ma, Yin-Zhe; Mould, Jeremy; Poole, Gregory B.

    2016-01-01

    We measure the bulk flow of the local Universe using the 6dF Galaxy Survey peculiar velocity sample (6dFGSv), the largest and most homogeneous peculiar velocity sample to date. 6dFGSv is a Fundamental Plane sample of ˜104 peculiar velocities covering the whole Southern hemisphere for galactic latitude |b| > 10°, out to redshift z = 0.0537. We apply the `minimum variance' bulk flow weighting method, which allows us to make a robust measurement of the bulk flow on scales of 50 and 70 h-1 Mpc. We investigate and correct for potential bias due to the lognormal velocity uncertainties, and verify our method by constructing Λ cold dark matter (ΛCDM) 6dFGSv mock catalogues incorporating the survey selection function. For a hemisphere of radius 50 h-1 Mpc we find a bulk flow amplitude of U = 248 ± 58 km s-1 in the direction (l, b) = (318° ± 20°, 40° ± 13°), and for 70 h-1 Mpc we find U = 243 ± 58 km s-1, in the same direction. Our measurement gives us a constraint on σ8 of 1.01^{+1.07}_{-0.58}. Our results are in agreement with other recent measurements of the direction of the bulk flow, and our measured amplitude is consistent with a ΛCDM prediction.

  2. Cosmic flows on 100 h-1 Mpc scales: standardized minimum variance bulk flow, shear and octupole moments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feldman, Hume A.; Watkins, Richard; Hudson, Michael J.

    2010-10-01

    The low-order moments, such as the bulk flow and shear, of the large-scale peculiar velocity field are sensitive probes of the matter density fluctuations on very large scales. In practice, however, peculiar velocity surveys are usually sparse and noisy, which can lead to the aliasing of small-scale power into what is meant to be a probe of the largest scales. Previously, we developed an optimal `minimum variance' (MV) weighting scheme, designed to overcome this problem by minimizing the difference between the measured bulk flow (BF) and that which would be measured by an ideal survey. Here we extend this MV analysis to include the shear and octupole moments, which are designed to have almost no correlations between them so that they are virtually orthogonal. We apply this MV analysis to a compilation of all major peculiar velocity surveys, consisting of 4536 measurements. Our estimate of the BF on scales of ~100h-1Mpc has a magnitude of |v| = 416 +/- 78 kms -1 towards Galactic l = 282° +/- 11° and b = 6° +/- 6°. This result is in disagreement with Λ cold dark matter with Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe 5 (WMAP5) cosmological parameters at a high confidence level, but is in good agreement with our previous MV result without an orthogonality constraint, showing that the shear and octupole moments did not contaminate the previous BF measurement. The shear and octupole moments are consistent with WMAP5 power spectrum, although the measurement noise is larger for these moments than for the BF. The relatively low shear moments suggest that the sources responsible for the BF are at large distances.

  3. Local dark matter and dark energy as estimated on a scale of ~1 Mpc in a self-consistent way

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chernin, A. D.; Teerikorpi, P.; Valtonen, M. J.; Dolgachev, V. P.; Domozhilova, L. M.; Byrd, G. G.

    2009-12-01

    Context: Dark energy was first detected from large distances on gigaparsec scales. If it is vacuum energy (or Einstein's Λ), it should also exist in very local space. Here we discuss its measurement on megaparsec scales of the Local Group. Aims: We combine the modified Kahn-Woltjer method for the Milky Way-M 31 binary and the HST observations of the expansion flow around the Local Group in order to study in a self-consistent way and simultaneously the local density of dark energy and the dark matter mass contained within the Local Group. Methods: A theoretical model is used that accounts for the dynamical effects of dark energy on a scale of ~1 Mpc. Results: The local dark energy density is put into the range 0.8-3.7ρv (ρv is the globally measured density), and the Local Group mass lies within 3.1-5.8×1012 M⊙. The lower limit of the local dark energy density, about 4/5× the global value, is determined by the natural binding condition for the group binary and the maximal zero-gravity radius. The near coincidence of two values measured with independent methods on scales differing by ~1000 times is remarkable. The mass ~4×1012 M⊙ and the local dark energy density ~ρv are also consistent with the expansion flow close to the Local Group, within the standard cosmological model. Conclusions: One should take into account the dark energy in dynamical mass estimation methods for galaxy groups, including the virial theorem. Our analysis gives new strong evidence in favor of Einstein's idea of the universal antigravity described by the cosmological constant.

  4. MPC1-like Is a Placental Mammal-specific Mitochondrial Pyruvate Carrier Subunit Expressed in Postmeiotic Male Germ Cells.

    PubMed

    Vanderperre, Benoît; Cermakova, Kristina; Escoffier, Jessica; Kaba, Mayis; Bender, Tom; Nef, Serge; Martinou, Jean-Claude

    2016-08-01

    Selective transport of pyruvate across the inner mitochondrial membrane by the mitochondrial pyruvate carrier (MPC) is a fundamental step that couples cytosolic and mitochondrial metabolism. The recent molecular identification of the MPC complex has revealed two interacting subunits, MPC1 and MPC2. Although in yeast, an additional subunit, MPC3, can functionally replace MPC2, no alternative MPC subunits have been described in higher eukaryotes. Here, we report for the first time the existence of a novel MPC subunit termed MPC1-like (MPC1L), which is present uniquely in placental mammals. MPC1L shares high sequence, structural, and topological homology with MPC1. In addition, we provide several lines of evidence to show that MPC1L is functionally equivalent to MPC1: 1) when co-expressed with MPC2, it rescues pyruvate import in a MPC-deleted yeast strain; 2) in mammalian cells, it can associate with MPC2 to form a functional carrier as assessed by bioluminescence resonance energy transfer; 3) in MPC1 depleted mouse embryonic fibroblasts, MPC1L rescues the loss of pyruvate-driven respiration and stabilizes MPC2 expression; and 4) MPC1- and MPC1L-mediated pyruvate imports show similar efficiency. However, we show that MPC1L has a highly specific expression pattern and is localized almost exclusively in testis and more specifically in postmeiotic spermatids and sperm cells. This is in marked contrast to MPC1/MPC2, which are ubiquitously expressed throughout the organism. To date, the biological importance of this alternative MPC complex during spermatogenesis in placental mammals remains unknown. Nevertheless, these findings open up new avenues for investigating the structure-function relationship within the MPC complex. PMID:27317664

  5. Forecasts for CMB μ and i-type spectral distortion constraints on the primordial power spectrum on scales 8∼Mpc{sup −1} with the future Pixie-like experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Khatri, Rishi; Sunyaev, Rashid A. E-mail: sunyaev@mpa-garching.mpg.de

    2013-06-01

    Silk damping at redshifts 1.5 × 10{sup 4}∼scales corresponding to the comoving wavenumbers 8∼Mpc{sup −1} (10{sup 5}∼scales and leads to much tighter constraints. We quantify the information contained in both the μ-type distortions and the i-type distortions taking into account the partial degeneracy with the y-type distortions and the temperature of the blackbody part of the CMB. We also calculate the constraints possible on the primordial power spectrum when the spectral distortion information is combined with the CMB anisotropies measured by the WMAP, SPT, ACT and Planck experiments.

  6. MPC1, a key gene in cancer metabolism, is regulated by COUPTFII in human prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Leiming; Xu, Mafei; Qin, Jun; Lin, Shih-Chieh; Lee, Hui-Ju; Tsai, Sophia Y.; Tsai, Ming-Jer

    2016-01-01

    Mitochondrial pyruvate carrier 1 (MPC1) and MPC 2 form a transporter complex in cells to control pyruvate transportation into mitochondria. Reduced expression of MPC1 disrupts the transporter function, induces metabolic shift to increase glycolysis, and thus plays important roles in several diseases, including cancer. However, the role of MPC1 in prostate cancer and the underlying mechanism causing the down-regulation of MPC1 in tumor cells remain to be defined. Here, we show that MPC1 serves as a critical regulator of glycolysis in prostate cancer cells, which in turn controls cancer cell growth, invasion, and the tumorigenic capability. More importantly, we identified that chicken ovalbumin upstream promoter-transcription factor II (COUP-TFII), a steroid receptor superfamily member, transcriptionally regulates the expression of MPC1. We further demonstrate that COUP-TFII, which is upregulated in the prostate cancer patient, regulates MPC1 and glycolysis to promote tumor growth and metastasis. Our findings reveal that COUP-TFII represses MPC1 expression in prostate cancer cells to facilitate a metabolism switch to increase glycolysis and promote cancer progression. This observation raises an intriguing possibility of targeting COUP-TFII to modulate cancer cell metabolism for prostate cancer intervention. PMID:26895100

  7. STS-35 Mission Specialist Parker operates ASTRO-1 MPC on OV-102's flight deck

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    STS-35 Mission Specialist (MS) Robert A.R. Parker operates Astronomy Laboratory 1 (ASTRO-1) manual pointing controller (MPC) on the aft flight deck of Columbia, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 102. Parker monitors a closed circuit television (CCTV) screen at the payload station as he uses the MPC to send data collection instructions to the ASTRO-1 instrument pointing system (IPS).

  8. STS-35 MS Hoffman operates ASTRO-1 MPC on OV-102's aft flight deck

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    STS-35 Mission Specialist (MS) Jeffrey A. Hoffman, wearing headset and monitoring closed circuit television (CCTV) display screen, operates the Astronomy Laboratory 1 (ASTRO-1) manual pointing controller (MPC) on the aft flight deck of Columbia, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 102. MPC is used to position the instrument pointing system (IPS) and its three ultraviolet telescopes in OV-102's payload bay (PLB). Hoffman and other crewmembers were able to command the IPS to record astronomical data using the MPC. At Hoffman's left are the onorbit station control panels and the two aft flight deck viewing windows W9 and W10.

  9. Evidence for large-scale structure on scales about 300/h MPC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plionis, Manolis; Valdarnini, Riccardo

    1991-03-01

    The combined Abell-ACO cluster catalog with m10 less than about 16.4 which is 80 percent redshift complete was analyzed. Taking into account different models of the extinction region the cluster dipole is found pointing within less than about 10 deg of the cosmic-microwave-background (CMB) dipole direction which indicates that clusters are tracers of mass. The dipole amplitude converges at about 150/h Mpc, within the completeness limit of the catalog. It is found that the anisotropy which is responsible for the Local Group (LG) motion with respect to the CMB rest frame extends in depth and has a scalelength of about 300/h Mpc. Most of the LG peculiar velocity is induced by matter fluctuations within about 50/h Mpc. Shapley's concentration (otherwise known as 'Giant Attractor' or 'alpha region') at a depth of about 140/h Mpc, is responsible for less than about 20 percent of the LG's peculiar velocity. Finally, using linear perturbation theory, it is found that Omega-0 is less than about 0.3.

  10. Inhomogeneities in the universe on scales of (125/h Mpc)3

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Picard, Alain

    1991-01-01

    Number counts of galaxies from a recently completed catalog of galaxies based on 16 plates obtained for the second-epoch Palomar Observatory Sky Survey are presented. A difference of 30 percent in the galaxy surface density is observed in magnitudes between the range of 16.5-19.0 in r. Because the entire survey has been brought to a common magnitude system using CCD photometry, variations in the magnitude zero point of the individual plates cannot account for this effect. Several tests have been conducted to verify the homogeneity of the catalog. The angular extent and depth of the survey suggests that structures of size 1/50 Mpc could be responsible for this effect.

  11. The Case for a Hubble Constant of 30 km s-1 Mpc-1.

    PubMed

    Bartlett, J G; Blanchard, A; Silk, J; Turner, M S

    1995-02-17

    Although recent determinations of the distance to the Virgo cluster based on Cepheid variable stars represent an important step in pinning down the Hubble constant, after 65 years a definitive determination of the Hubble constant still eludes cosmologists. At present, most of the observational determinations place the Hubble constant between 40 and 90 kilometers per second per megaparsec (km s(-1) Mpc(-1)). The case is made here for a Hubble constant that is even smaller than the lower bound of the accepted range on the basis of the great advantages, all theoretical in nature, of a Hubble constant of around 30 kilometers per second per megaparsec. Such a value for the Hubble cures all of the ills of the current theoretical orthodoxy, that is, a spatially flat universe composed predominantly of cold dark matter. PMID:17811436

  12. DISCOVERY OF A LARGE NUMBER OF CANDIDATE PROTOCLUSTERS TRACED BY ∼15 Mpc-SCALE GALAXY OVERDENSITIES IN COSMOS

    SciTech Connect

    Chiang, Yi-Kuan; Gebhardt, Karl; Overzier, Roderik

    2014-02-10

    To demonstrate the feasibility of studying the epoch of massive galaxy cluster formation in a more systematic manner using current and future galaxy surveys, we report the discovery of a large sample of protocluster candidates in the 1.62 deg{sup 2} COSMOS/UltraVISTA field traced by optical/infrared selected galaxies using photometric redshifts. By comparing properly smoothed three-dimensional galaxy density maps of the observations and a set of matched simulations incorporating the dominant observational effects (galaxy selection and photometric redshift uncertainties), we first confirm that the observed ∼15 comoving Mpc-scale galaxy clustering is consistent with ΛCDM models. Using further the relation between high-z overdensity and the present day cluster mass calibrated in these matched simulations, we found 36 candidate structures at 1.6 < z < 3.1, showing overdensities consistent with the progenitors of M{sub z} {sub =} {sub 0} ∼ 10{sup 15} M {sub ☉} clusters. Taking into account the significant upward scattering of lower mass structures, the probabilities for the candidates to have at least M{sub z=} {sub 0} ∼ 10{sup 14} M {sub ☉} are ∼70%. For each structure, about 15%-40% of photometric galaxy candidates are expected to be true protocluster members that will merge into a cluster-scale halo by z = 0. With solely photometric redshifts, we successfully rediscover two spectroscopically confirmed structures in this field, suggesting that our algorithm is robust. This work generates a large sample of uniformly selected protocluster candidates, providing rich targets for spectroscopic follow-up and subsequent studies of cluster formation. Meanwhile, it demonstrates the potential for probing early cluster formation with upcoming redshift surveys such as the Hobby-Eberly Telescope Dark Energy Experiment and the Subaru Prime Focus Spectrograph survey.

  13. Einstein SSS and MPC observations of AQL X-1 and 4U1820-30

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kelley, R. L.; Christian, D. J.; Schoelkopf, R. J.; Swank, J. H.

    1989-11-01

    The results of timing and spectral analyses of the X-ray sources Aql X-1 (X1908+005) and 4U1820-30 (NGC6624) are reported using data obtained with the Einstein SSS (Solid State Spectrometer) and MPC (Monitor Proportional Counter) instruments. A classic type I burst was observed from Aql X-1 in both detectors and a coherent modulation with a period of 131.66 + or - 0.02 ms and a pulsed fraction of 10 percent was detected in the SSS data. There is no evidence for a loss of coherance during the approximately 80 sec when the burst is observable. The 2 sigma upper limit on the rate of change of the pulse period is 0.00005s/s. It is argued that an asymmetrical burst occurring on a neutron star rotating at 7.6 Hz offers a plausible explanation for the oscillation. The data from 4U1820-30 show that the amplitude of the 685 sec modulation, identified as the orbital period, is independent of energy down to 0.6 keV. The SSS data show that the light curve in the 0.6 to 4.5 keV band is smoother than at higher energies.

  14. Einstein SSS and MPC observations of Aql X-1 and 4U1820-30

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kelley, R. L.; Christian, D. J.; Schoelkopf, R. J.; Swank, J. H.

    1989-01-01

    The results of timing and spectral analyses of the X-ray sources Aql X-1 (X1908+005) and 4U1820-30 (NGC6624) are reported using data obtained with the Einstein SSS (Solid State Spectrometer) and MPC (Monitor Proportional Counter) instruments. A classic type I burst was observed from Aql X-1 in both detectors and a coherent modulation with a period of 131.66 + or - 0.02 ms and a pulsed fraction of 10 percent was detected in the SSS data. There is no evidence for a loss of coherance during the approximately 80 sec when the burst is observable. The 2 sigma upper limit on the rate of change of the pulse period is 0.00005s/s. It is argued that an asymmetrical burst occurring on a neutron star rotating at 7.6 Hz offers a plausible explanation for the oscillation. The data from 4U1820-30 show that the amplitude of the 685 sec modulation, identified as the orbital period, is independent of energy down to 0.6 keV. The SSS data show that the light curve in the 0.6 to 4.5 keV band is smoother than at higher energies.

  15. Application of strainrange partitioning to the prediction of MPC creep-fatigue data for 2 1/4 Cr-1Mo steel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saltsman, J. F.; Halford, G. R.

    1976-01-01

    Strainrange partitioning is used to predict the long time cyclic lives of the metal properties council (MPC) creep-fatigue interspersion and cyclic creep-rupture tests conducted with annealed 2 1/4 Cr-1Mo steel. Observed lives agree with predicted lives within factors of two. The strainrange partitioning life relations used for the long time predictions were established from short time creep-fatigue data generated at NASA-Lewis on the same heat of material.

  16. A unique isolated dwarf spheroidal galaxy at D = 1.9 Mpc

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Makarov, Dmitry; Makarova, Lidia; Sharina, Margarita; Uklein, Roman; Tikhonov, Anton; Guhathakurta, Puragra; Kirby, Evan; Terekhova, Natalya

    2012-09-01

    We present a photometric and spectroscopic study of the unique isolated nearby dwarf spheroidal (dSph) galaxy KKR 25. The galaxy was resolved into stars with Hubble Space Telescope/Wide Field Planetary Camera 2 including old red giant branch and red clump. We have constructed a model of the resolved stellar populations and measured the star formation rate and metallicity as a function of time. The main star formation activity period occurred about 12.6-13.7 Gyr ago. These stars are mostly metal poor, with a mean metallicity [Fe/H] ˜ -1 to -1.6 dex. About 60 per cent of the total stellar mass was formed during this event. There are indications of intermediate-age star formation in KKR 25 between 1 and 4 Gyr with no significant signs of metal enrichment for these stars. Long-slit spectroscopy was carried out using the Russian 6-m telescope of the integrated starlight and bright individual objects in the galaxy. We have discovered a planetary nebula (PN) in KKR 25. This is the first known PN in a dSph galaxy outside the Local Group. We have measured its oxygen abundance 12 + log (O/H) = 7.60 ± 0.07 dex and a radial velocity Vh = -79 km s-1. We have analysed the stellar density distribution in the galaxy body. The galaxy has an exponential surface brightness profile with a central light depression. We discuss the evolutionary status of KKR 25, which belongs to a rare class of very isolated dwarf galaxies with spheroidal morphology.

  17. MpcAgent

    SciTech Connect

    Nutaro, James

    2013-11-29

    MpcAgent software is a module for the VolltronLite platform from PNNL that regulates the operation of rooftop air conditioning units in small to medium commercial buildings for the purpose of reducing peak power consumption. The MpcAgent accomplishes this by restricting the number of units that may operate simultaneously and using a model predictive control strategy to select which units to operate in each control period. The outcome of this control is effective control of the building air temperature at the user specified set point while avoiding expensive peak demand charges that result from running all HVAC units simultaneously.

  18. MpcAgent

    2013-11-29

    MpcAgent software is a module for the VolltronLite platform from PNNL that regulates the operation of rooftop air conditioning units in small to medium commercial buildings for the purpose of reducing peak power consumption. The MpcAgent accomplishes this by restricting the number of units that may operate simultaneously and using a model predictive control strategy to select which units to operate in each control period. The outcome of this control is effective control of themore » building air temperature at the user specified set point while avoiding expensive peak demand charges that result from running all HVAC units simultaneously.« less

  19. Synthesis of models of the BC ring systems of MPC1001 and MPC1001F.

    PubMed

    Dong, Shuai; Indukuri, Kiran; Clive, Derrick L J; Gao, Jin-Ming

    2016-07-01

    Piperazinedione 13, representing the BC rings of the anti-prostate cancer fungal metabolite MPC1001, was prepared by a route in which a sulfur-stabilized carbanion derived from 22 cyclizes onto the terminal ester of the pendant chain attached to N(1). Another model, 14, was synthesized by cyclization of an α-ketoamide nitrogen onto an ester; 14 represents the BC rings of MPC1001F. PMID:27284641

  20. The MPC&A Questionnaire

    SciTech Connect

    Powell, Danny H; Elwood Jr, Robert H

    2011-01-01

    The questionnaire is the instrument used for recording performance data on the nuclear material protection, control, and accountability (MPC&A) system at a nuclear facility. The performance information provides a basis for evaluating the effectiveness of the MPC&A system. The goal for the questionnaire is to provide an accurate representation of the performance of the MPC&A system as it currently exists in the facility. Performance grades for all basic MPC&A functions should realistically reflect the actual level of performance at the time the survey is conducted. The questionnaire was developed after testing and benchmarking the material control and accountability (MC&A) system effectiveness tool (MSET) in the United States. The benchmarking exercise at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) proved extremely valuable for improving the content and quality of the early versions of the questionnaire. Members of the INL benchmark team identified many areas of the questionnaire where questions should be clarified and areas where additional questions should be incorporated. The questionnaire addresses all elements of the MC&A system. Specific parts pertain to the foundation for the facility's overall MPC&A system, and other parts pertain to the specific functions of the operational MPC&A system. The questionnaire includes performance metrics for each of the basic functions or tasks performed in the operational MPC&A system. All of those basic functions or tasks are represented as basic events in the MPC&A fault tree. Performance metrics are to be used during completion of the questionnaire to report what is actually being done in relation to what should be done in the performance of MPC&A functions.

  1. Shielding analysis of the NAC-MPC storage system

    SciTech Connect

    Napolitano, D.G.; Romano, N.J.; Hertel, N.E.

    1997-12-01

    This paper presents the shielding analyses of the NAC-MPC dry cask storage system. The NAC-MPC dry cask storage system consists of a transportable storage canister, a transfer cask, and a vertical concrete storage cask. The NAC-MPC is designed to accommodate 36 {open_quotes}Yankee Class{close_quotes} fuel assemblies with a maximum burnup of 36,000 MWd/tonne U burnup and 8 yr cooling time. The shielding analysis is performed with the SCALE 4.3 code package which includes SAS2H for source term generation and SAS4A, a modification of SAS4, for shielding evaluations. SAS4 utilizes a one-dimensional XSDRNPM adjoint calculation of the cask to generate biasing parameters for a three-dimensional MORSE-SGC Monte Carlo model of the cask geometry.

  2. Application of strainrange partitioning to the prediction of MPC creep-fatigue data for 2 1/4 Cr-1 Mo steel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saltsman, J. F.; Halford, G. R.

    1976-01-01

    Creep-fatigue tests were conducted on annealed 2.25Cr-1Mo steel in air at 538 C involving interspersion of rapid strain cycles (0 to 22 cycles) between constant tensile stress-hold periods (23 or 47 hours). Life predictions were made on the basis of the strain range-life relations obtained from short-time material characterization tests on tubular specimens taken from the same heat as the specimens for the creep-fatigue tests. The creep-fatigue tests lasted from about 500 to 5000 hours, while the short-time tests used as the prediction basis lasted from 0.1 to 100 hours. By partitioning the creep and plastic strains within every cycle and summing the damage on a cycle-by-cycle basis, the predicted lives agreed with the observed ones within factors of two.

  3. An 80 Mpc Filament of Galaxies at Redshift z=2.38

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woodgate, B.; Palunas, P.; Francis, P.; Williger, G.; Teplitz, H.

    2004-01-01

    We present the detection of 34 Lyman-alpha emission-line galaxy candidates in a 80 x 80 x 60 co-moving Mpc region surrounding the known z=2.38 galaxy cluster J2143-4423. We have confirmed 15 of these candidates in followup spectroscopy with 2dF at the AAT. The peak space density is a factor of 4 greater than that found by field samples at similar redshifts. The distribution of these galaxy candidates contains several 5-10 Mpc scale voids. We compare our observations with mock catalogs derived from the VIRGO consortium Lambda-CDM N-body simulations. Fewer than 1\\% of the mock catalogues contains voids as large as we observe. Our observations thus tentatively suggest that the galaxy distribution at redshift 2.38 contains larger voids than predicted by current models. The distribution of galaxies suggests a filament or cross-section of a great wall at least 80 x 10 Mpc in transverse extent. Three of the candidate galaxies and one previously discovered galaxy have the large luminosities and extended morphologies of "Lyman-alpha blobs". X-ray properties and physical characteristics of those blobs will be discussed in an accompanying poster by Williger et al.

  4. Quasars Probing Quasars. VI. Excess H I Absorption within One Proper Mpc of z ~ 2 Quasars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prochaska, J. Xavier; Hennawi, Joseph F.; Lee, Khee-Gan; Cantalupo, Sebastiano; Bovy, Jo; Djorgovski, S. G.; Ellison, Sara L.; Lau, Marie Wingyee; Martin, Crystal L.; Myers, Adam; Rubin, Kate H. R.; Simcoe, Robert A.

    2013-10-01

    With close pairs of quasars at different redshifts, a background quasar sightline can be used to study a foreground quasar's environment in absorption. We use a sample of 650 projected quasar pairs to study the H I Lyα absorption transverse to luminous, z ~ 2 quasars at proper separations of 30 kpc < R < 1 Mpc. In contrast to measurements along the line-of-sight, regions transverse to quasars exhibit enhanced H I Lyα absorption and a larger variance than the ambient intergalactic medium, with increasing absorption and variance toward smaller scales. Analysis of composite spectra reveals excess absorption characterized by a Lyα equivalent width profile W = 2.3 Å (R /100 kpc)-0.46. We also observe a high (sime 60%) covering factor of strong, optically thick H I absorbers (H I column N_{H\\,\\scriptsize{I}}>10^{17.3}\\, cm^{-2}) at separations R < 200 kpc, which decreases to ~20% at R ~= 1 Mpc, but still represents a significant excess over the cosmic average. This excess of optically thick absorption can be described by a quasar-absorber cross-correlation function ξQA(r) = (r/r 0)γ with a large correlation length r_0=12.5^{+2.7}_{-1.4}\\, h^{-1}\\ Mpc (comoving) and \\gamma =1.68^{+0.14}_{-0.30}. The H I absorption measured around quasars exceeds that of any previously studied population, consistent with quasars being hosted by massive dark matter halos M halo ≈ 1012.5 M ⊙ at z ~ 2.5. The environments of these massive halos are highly biased toward producing optically thick gas, and may even dominate the cosmic abundance of Lyman limit systems and hence the intergalactic opacity to ionizing photons at z ~ 2.5. The anisotropic absorption around quasars implies the transverse direction is much less likely to be illuminated by ionizing radiation than the line-of-sight.

  5. ANALYSIS OF MPC WEIGHT, DIMENSIONAL ENVELOPE, AND CONFIGURATION REQUIREMENTS

    SciTech Connect

    W.E. Wallin

    1995-03-03

    This analysis is prepared by the Mined Geologic Disposal System (MGDS) Waste Package Development Department (WPDD) in response to a request received via a QAP-3-12 Design Input Data Request from WAST Design (formerly MRSMPC Design). The request is to provide: (1) Specific MPC weight, dimensional envelope, and configuration requirements to ensure compatibility with MGDS capabilities. The objective of this analysis is to provide a response to the foregoing request. The purpose of this analysis is to provide the basis for the response. The response is stated in Section 8 herein.

  6. Star formation in the cluster CLG0218.3-0510 at z = 1.62 and its large-scale environment: the infrared perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santos, J. S.; Altieri, B.; Tanaka, M.; Valtchanov, I.; Saintonge, A.; Dickinson, M.; Foucaud, S.; Kodama, T.; Rawle, T. D.; Tadaki, K.

    2014-03-01

    The galaxy cluster CLG0218.3-0510 at z = 1.62 is one of the most distant galaxy clusters known, with a rich multiwavelength data set that confirms a mature galaxy population already in place. Using very deep, wide-area (20 Mpc × 20 Mpc) imaging by Spitzer MIPS at 24 μm, in conjunction with Herschel five-band imaging from 100 to 500 μm, we investigate the dust-obscured, star formation properties in the cluster and its associated large-scale environment. Our galaxy sample of 693 galaxies at z ˜ 1.62 detected at 24 μm (10 spectroscopic and 683 photo-z) includes both cluster galaxies (i.e. within r < 1 Mpc projected cluster-centric radius) and field galaxies, defined as the region beyond a radius of 3 Mpc. The star formation rates (SFRs) derived from the measured infrared luminosity range from 18 to 2500 M⊙ yr-1, with a median of 55 M⊙ yr-1, over the entire radial range (10 Mpc). The cluster's brightest far-infrared galaxy, taken as the centre of the galaxy system, is vigorously forming stars at a rate of 256 ± 70 M⊙ yr-1, and the total cluster SFR enclosed in a circle of 1 Mpc is 1161 ± 96 M⊙ yr-1. We estimate a dust extinction of ˜3 mag by comparing the SFRs derived from [O II] luminosity with the ones computed from the 24 μm fluxes. We find that the in-falling region (1-3 Mpc) is special: there is a significant decrement (3.5×) of passive relative to star-forming galaxies in this region, and the total SFR of the galaxies located in this region is lower (˜130 M⊙ yr-1 Mpc-2) than anywhere in the cluster or field, regardless of their stellar mass. In a complementary approach, we compute the local galaxy density, Σ5, and find no trend between SFR and Σ5. However, we measure an excess of star-forming galaxies in the cluster relative to the field by a factor of 1.7, that lends support to a reversal of SF-density relation in CLG0218.

  7. ANALYSIS OF MPC ACCESS REQUIREMENTS FOR ADDITION OF FILLER MATERIALS

    SciTech Connect

    W. Wallin

    1996-09-03

    This analysis is prepared by the Mined Geologic Disposal System (MGDS) Waste Package Development Department (WPDD) in response to a request received via a QAP-3-12 Design Input Data Request (Ref. 5.1) from WAST Design (formerly MRSMPC Design). The request is to provide: Specific MPC access requirements for the addition of filler materials at the MGDS (i.e., location and size of access required). The objective of this analysis is to provide a response to the foregoing request. The purpose of this analysis is to provide a documented record of the basis for the response. The response is stated in Section 8 herein. The response is based upon requirements from an MGDS perspective.

  8. Cooperative MPC&A Enhancements at Russian Navy Sites

    SciTech Connect

    Nelson, N N; O'Shell, P; Hendrickson, S; Sukhoruchkin, V; Antipov, S; Melkhov, E; Ponomarev-Stepnoi, N; Yurasov, N

    2001-05-30

    U.S. MPC&A cooperation with the Russian Federation (RF) Navy is based on a Joint Statement signed in 1996 to protect Highly Enriched Uranium (HEU) fresh fuel used for nuclear propulsion. The Russian Federation Navy is the largest owner in Russia of highly enriched uranium, both in the form of fresh nuclear fuel, and in the form of slightly irradiated fuel with a long cooling time after irradiation. As a result of this agreement, projects began at the Northern Fleet Fresh Fuel Storage Facility (Site 49) and Refueling Ship PM-63. Initial projects provided upgrades for RF Navy HEU fresh fuel storage facilities, beginning with a land-based facility near Murmansk and later adding other land-based and ship-based fresh fuel storage facilities. Additional protocols (December 1997, January 1999, and March 2000) significantly expanded cooperation to include all HEU fuel under RF Navy control. To date, it is estimated that tens of metric tons of HEU have been secured - enough to construct hundreds of nuclear devices. It was determined that the cooperation would be coordinated by the Russian Research Center, Kurchatov Institute. This paper describes the history of the Program development, its stages, current status, scale of the work and prospects.

  9. Allan Sandage and the distance scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tammann, G. A.; Reindl, B.

    2013-02-01

    Allan Sandage returned to the distance scale and the calibration of the Hubble constant again and again during his active life, experimenting with different distance indicators. In 1952 his proof of the high luminosity of Cepheids confirmed Baade's revision of the distance scale (H0 ~ 250 km s-1 Mpc-1). During the next 25 years, he lowered the value to 75 and 55. Upon the arrival of the Hubble Space Telescope, he observed Cepheids to calibrate the mean luminosity of nearby Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) which, used as standard candles, led to the cosmic value of H0 = 62.3 +/- 1.3 +/- 5.0 km s-1 Mpc-1. Eventually he turned to the tip of the red giant branch (TRGB) as a very powerful distance indicator. A compilation of 176 TRGB distances yielded a mean, very local value of H0 = 62.9 +/- 1.6 km s-1 Mpc-1 and shed light on the streaming velocities in the Local Supercluster. Moreover, TRGB distances are now available for six SNe Ia; if their mean luminosity is applied to distant SNe Ia, one obtains H0 = 64.6 +/- 1.6 +/- 2.0 km s-1 Mpc-1. The weighted mean of the two independent large-scale calibrations yields H0 = 64.1 km s-1 Mpc-1 within 3.6%.

  10. ASASSN-14ae: a tidal disruption event at 200 Mpc

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holoien, T. W.-S.; Prieto, J. L.; Bersier, D.; Kochanek, C. S.; Stanek, K. Z.; Shappee, B. J.; Grupe, D.; Basu, U.; Beacom, J. F.; Brimacombe, J.; Brown, J. S.; Davis, A. B.; Jencson, J.; Pojmanski, G.; Szczygieł, D. M.

    2014-12-01

    ASASSN-14ae is a candidate tidal disruption event (TDE) found at the centre of SDSS J110840.11+340552.2 (d ≃ 200 Mpc) by the All-Sky Automated Survey for Supernovae (ASAS-SN). We present ground-based and Swift follow-up photometric and spectroscopic observations of the source, finding that the transient had a peak luminosity of L ≃ 8 × 1043 erg s-1 and a total integrated energy of E ≃ 1.7 × 1050 erg radiated over the ˜5 months of observations presented. The blackbody temperature of the transient remains roughly constant at T ˜ 20 000 K while the luminosity declines by nearly 1.5 orders of magnitude during this time, a drop that is most consistent with an exponential, L ∝ e-t/t 0 with t0 ≃ 39 d. The source has broad Balmer lines in emission at all epochs as well as a broad He II feature emerging in later epochs. We compare the colour and spectral evolution to both supernovae and normal AGN to show that ASASSN-14ae does not resemble either type of object and conclude that a TDE is the most likely explanation for our observations. At z = 0.0436, ASASSN-14ae is the lowest-redshift TDE candidate discovered at optical/UV wavelengths to date, and we estimate that ASAS-SN may discover 0.1-3 of these events every year in the future.

  11. New Directions for MPC&A at Chelyabinsk-70

    SciTech Connect

    Tsygankov, G.; Churikov, Y.; Bukin, D.; Karpov, A.; Zuev,V.; Blasy, J.; Labiak, B.; Hernandez, J.; Apt, K.; Schultz, F.; Neymotin, L.; Ystesund, K.; Griggs, J.; Cahalane, P.

    2000-06-27

    This paper describes the new directions for the Nuclear Materials Protection, Control, and Accounting (MPC&A) program at the All Russian Scientific Research Institute of Technical Physics (VNIITF), also called Chelyabinsk-70. Chelyabinsk-70 is located in the Ural Mountains, approximately 2000 km east of Moscow and 100 km south of Ekaterinburg. US sponsored MPC&A work has been underway at VNIITF since mid 1995. During the first three years of the VNIITF project, emphasis was on the Pulse Research Reactor Facility (PRR), which contains one metal and two liquid pulse reactors and associated nuclear material storage rooms and a control center. A commissioning of the PRR was held in May of 1998. With the completion of the MPC&A work in the PRR, new physical protection work has focused on building 726, which contains a pulse reactor and a criticality facility. Physical protection work is now complete at building 726. Several changes in the direction of MPC&A work at VNIITF have taken place and others are underway as a result of new DOE Guidelines for MPC&A at Russian Facilities, the National Research Council report issued in late 1999 and other recommendations. A major change is to do MPC&A work only at facilities for which the US can assure the proper categorization of nuclear materials, that upgrades are appropriate, properly installed and operational and that the equipment and funds used to implement and support those upgrades are being utilized in the manner intended. Other changes in direction which will be described include, an increased emphasis on completing inventories, the use of ''inherently sustainable'' upgrades wherever possible, and completing improved accounting systems and other MPC&A upgrades on a prioritized facility by facility basis rather than attempting to implement them site wide.

  12. Nano-scale surface modification of a segmented polyurethane with a phospholipid polymer.

    PubMed

    Morimoto, Nobuyuki; Watanabe, Akihiko; Iwasaki, Yasuhiko; Akiyoshi, Kazunari; Ishihara, Kazuhiko

    2004-10-01

    Nano-scale modification of a segmented polyurethane (SPU) with cross-linked 2-methacryloyloxyethyl phosphorylcholine (MPC) polymer was performed to obtain a biocompatible elastomer. To control the domain size and the depth of the modified layer, various compositions of monomers, including MPC, 2-ethylhexyl methacrylate (EHMA), and glycerol 1,3-diglycerolate diacrylate, were examined. SPU film was immersed in the monomer solution and visible light irradiation was applied to initiate polymerization to the SPU film that was held by mica to condense MPC units at the surface. The surfaces of the obtained film were analyzed by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and water contact angle measurement. The surface density of MPC units changed with the monomer concentration, and the density was the highest when the ratio between MPC and EHMA was 7:3. In modified SPU films, 6- to 25-nm MPC unit-enriched domains were observed and the density of these domains gradually decreased with depth. The sizes of the domains depended on the MPC composition in the monomer solution. The mechanical properties of the modified films as evaluated by tensile strength measurement under wet conditions were not significantly different from those of SPU. With increase in the existence of MPC unit-enriched domains on the MEG film surface, platelet adhesion and activation were remarkably reduced compared to the SPU film. This nano-scale surface modification may be a useful technique for applying elastic polymer biomaterials. PMID:15130720

  13. Indoor environmental quality (IEQ) and building energy optimization through model predictive control (MPC)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woldekidan, Korbaga

    include thermal comfort control based on ASHRAE comfort zone (based on temperature and relative humidity) and Predicted Mean Vote (PMV) and ventilation control based on ASHRAE 62.1 and Demand Control Ventilation (DCV). The building energy consumption was also evaluated with and without integrated lighting and window blind control. The simulation results revealed better performance of MPC both in terms of energy savings as well as maintaining acceptable indoor environmental quality. Energy saving as high as 48% was possible using MPC with integrated lighting and window blind control. A new critical contaminant - based demand control ventilation strategy was also developed to ensure acceptable or higher indoor air quality. Common indoor and outdoor contaminants were considered in the study and the method resulted in superior performance especially for buildings with strong indoor or outdoor contaminant sources compared to conventional CO2-based demand control ventilation which only monitors CO2 to vary the minimum outdoor air ventilation rate.

  14. Two-stage observer based offset-free MPC.

    PubMed

    Mohammadkhani, MohammadAli; Bayat, Farhad; Jalali, Ali Akbar

    2015-07-01

    This paper addresses design of model predictive control (MPC) for dynamic systems in the presence of disturbances. For the systems with disturbances, it is common to use observers to estimate states and disturbances, allowing control algorithm to reject disturbances. In this paper, we demonstrate how one can extend model predictive control for systems with disturbances by applying full state and disturbance observer. To this aim, a two-stage approach is proposed where the observer design procedure is completely decoupled from the MPC problem, known as the separation principle. We focus on the decoupling principal and it is shown that the observer can be designed independently via a norm minimization problem to reduce effects of disturbances and model mismatch. On the other hand, the MPC law is obtained using the multi-parametric quadratic programming approach where the parameters are the components of the state vector. PMID:25820088

  15. SU-E-T-434: Evaluation of the Machine Performance Check (MPC) Program for Truebeam 2.0

    SciTech Connect

    Chin, E; Yu, S; Hadsell, M; Bush, K; Mok, E

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Machine Performance Check (MPC) is a software application used to verify that the TrueBeam machine is operating within major specifications prior to treatment. Used in combination with a phantom named Isocal, it verifies beam output, beam uniformity, treatment isocenter size, coincidence of treatment and imaging isocenters, positioning accuracy of kV and MV imaging systems, accuracy of collimator and gantry rotation angle, positioning accuracy of jaws and MLC leafs, and couch positioning. The tests can be performed semi-automatically and requires approximately 10 minutes of machine time. It is the purpose of this study to report the performance of this program. Methods: A pre-release version of the MPC tool was installed on a Truebeam linac with 6D couch at our center. Baseline beam output measurements were taken for 5 photon beams (6–15 MV, 6 FFF, 10 FFF) and 5 electron beams (6–20 MeV). Deviations from the baseline output were subsequently recorded for several days and compared against independent measurements from a PTW farmer chamber and our daily QA device (Fluke Biomedical Tracker) as part of an ongoing evaluation. Results: The beam output deviations between the MPC and the PTW chamber measurements were within ±0.7% for photons beams and ±1.0% for electrons beams. This was similar to the tracker performance. There were some isolated incidents where the MPC measurements had unexplained spikes (>3%) that disappeared on a repeat measurement. MPC was also able to detect maximum positioning errors in the jaws (1.12 mm), MLCs (1.14 mm), and couch roll (0.11°). Conclusion: Overall, the ability of the MPC to monitor linac output stability was comparable to that of ionization chamber-based measurements. MPC also provided fast daily mechanical tests not currently available in the clinic. How best to utilize this previously unavailable data is still under investigation.

  16. 32 CFR 635.20 - Military Police Codes (MPC).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 4 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Military Police Codes (MPC). 635.20 Section 635... ENFORCEMENT AND CRIMINAL INVESTIGATIONS LAW ENFORCEMENT REPORTING Offense Reporting § 635.20 Military Police... attached military police units are notified for mobilization, relocation, activation, or inactivation....

  17. 32 CFR 635.20 - Military Police Codes (MPC).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 4 2014-07-01 2013-07-01 true Military Police Codes (MPC). 635.20 Section 635... ENFORCEMENT AND CRIMINAL INVESTIGATIONS LAW ENFORCEMENT REPORTING Offense Reporting § 635.20 Military Police... attached military police units are notified for mobilization, relocation, activation, or inactivation....

  18. 32 CFR 635.20 - Military Police Codes (MPC).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 4 2012-07-01 2011-07-01 true Military Police Codes (MPC). 635.20 Section 635... ENFORCEMENT AND CRIMINAL INVESTIGATIONS LAW ENFORCEMENT REPORTING Offense Reporting § 635.20 Military Police... attached military police units are notified for mobilization, relocation, activation, or inactivation....

  19. 32 CFR 635.20 - Military Police Codes (MPC).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 4 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Military Police Codes (MPC). 635.20 Section 635... ENFORCEMENT AND CRIMINAL INVESTIGATIONS LAW ENFORCEMENT REPORTING Offense Reporting § 635.20 Military Police... attached military police units are notified for mobilization, relocation, activation, or inactivation....

  20. 32 CFR 635.20 - Military Police Codes (MPC).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 4 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Military Police Codes (MPC). 635.20 Section 635... ENFORCEMENT AND CRIMINAL INVESTIGATIONS LAW ENFORCEMENT REPORTING Offense Reporting § 635.20 Military Police... attached military police units are notified for mobilization, relocation, activation, or inactivation....

  1. Testing a Constrained MPC Controller in a Process Control Laboratory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ricardez-Sandoval, Luis A.; Blankespoor, Wesley; Budman, Hector M.

    2010-01-01

    This paper describes an experiment performed by the fourth year chemical engineering students in the process control laboratory at the University of Waterloo. The objective of this experiment is to test the capabilities of a constrained Model Predictive Controller (MPC) to control the operation of a Double Pipe Heat Exchanger (DPHE) in real time.…

  2. QUASARS PROBING QUASARS. VI. EXCESS H I ABSORPTION WITHIN ONE PROPER Mpc OF z ∼ 2 QUASARS

    SciTech Connect

    Prochaska, J. Xavier; Cantalupo, Sebastiano; Lau, Marie Wingyee; Bovy, Jo; Djorgovski, S. G.; Ellison, Sara L.; Martin, Crystal L.; Simcoe, Robert A.

    2013-10-20

    With close pairs of quasars at different redshifts, a background quasar sightline can be used to study a foreground quasar's environment in absorption. We use a sample of 650 projected quasar pairs to study the H I Lyα absorption transverse to luminous, z ∼ 2 quasars at proper separations of 30 kpc < R < 1 Mpc. In contrast to measurements along the line-of-sight, regions transverse to quasars exhibit enhanced H I Lyα absorption and a larger variance than the ambient intergalactic medium, with increasing absorption and variance toward smaller scales. Analysis of composite spectra reveals excess absorption characterized by a Lyα equivalent width profile W = 2.3 Å (R /100 kpc){sup –0.46}. We also observe a high (≅ 60%) covering factor of strong, optically thick H I absorbers (H I column N{sub H{sub I}}>10{sup 17.3} cm{sup -2}) at separations R < 200 kpc, which decreases to ∼20% at R ≅ 1 Mpc, but still represents a significant excess over the cosmic average. This excess of optically thick absorption can be described by a quasar-absorber cross-correlation function ξ{sub QA}(r) = (r/r{sub 0}){sup γ} with a large correlation length r{sub 0} = 12.5{sup +2.7}{sub -1.4} h{sup -1} Mpc (comoving) and γ=1.68{sup +0.14}{sub -0.30}. The H I absorption measured around quasars exceeds that of any previously studied population, consistent with quasars being hosted by massive dark matter halos M{sub halo} ≈ 10{sup 12.5} M{sub ☉} at z ∼ 2.5. The environments of these massive halos are highly biased toward producing optically thick gas, and may even dominate the cosmic abundance of Lyman limit systems and hence the intergalactic opacity to ionizing photons at z ∼ 2.5. The anisotropic absorption around quasars implies the transverse direction is much less likely to be illuminated by ionizing radiation than the line-of-sight.

  3. Final Report: Efficient Databases for MPC Microdata

    SciTech Connect

    Michael A. Bender; Martin Farach-Colton; Bradley C. Kuszmaul

    2011-08-31

    The purpose of this grant was to develop the theory and practice of high-performance databases for massive streamed datasets. Over the last three years, we have developed fast indexing technology, that is, technology for rapidly ingesting data and storing that data so that it can be efficiently queried and analyzed. During this project we developed the technology so that high-bandwidth data streams can be indexed and queried efficiently. Our technology has been proven to work data sets composed of tens of billions of rows when the data streams arrives at over 40,000 rows per second. We achieved these numbers even on a single disk driven by two cores. Our work comprised (1) new write-optimized data structures with better asymptotic complexity than traditional structures, (2) implementation, and (3) benchmarking. We furthermore developed a prototype of TokuFS, a middleware layer that can handle microdata I/O packaged up in an MPI-IO abstraction.

  4. Discovery of an L-alanine ester prodrug of the Hsp90 inhibitor, MPC-3100.

    PubMed

    Kim, Se-Ho; Tangallapally, Rajendra; Kim, In Chul; Trovato, Richard; Parker, Daniel; Patton, J Scott; Reeves, Leslie; Bradford, Chad; Wettstein, Daniel; Baichwal, Vijay; Papac, Damon; Bajji, Ashok; Carlson, Robert; Yager, Kraig M

    2015-11-15

    Various types of Hsp90 inhibitors have been and continue to undergo clinical investigation. One development candidate is the purine-based, synthetic Hsp90 inhibitor 1 (MPC-3100), which successfully completed a phase I clinical study. However, further clinical development of 1 was hindered by poor solubility and consequent formulation issues and promoted development of a more water soluble prodrug. Towards this end, numerous pro-moieties were explored in vitro and in vivo. These studies resulted in identification of L-alanine ester mesylate, 2i (MPC-0767), which exhibited improved aqueous solubility, adequate chemical stability, and rapid bioconversion without the need for solubilizing excipients. Based on improved physical characteristics and favorable PK and PD profiles, 2i mesylate was selected for further development. A convergent, scalable, chromatography-free synthesis for 2i mesylate was developed to support further clinical evaluation. PMID:26483201

  5. Luminous Stars in Galaxies Beyond 3 Mpc

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whitmore, B. C.; Wfc3 Science Oversight Committee

    2011-06-01

    I am mainly interested in the formation and destruction of young star clusters in nearby star forming galaxies such as the Antennae, M83, and M51. One of the first analysis steps is to throw out all those pesky stars that keep contaminating my young cluster samples. Recently, spurred on by our new Wide Field Camera 3 (WFC3) Early Release Science data of galaxies including M83, NGC 4214, M82, NGC 2841, and Cen A, we began taking a closer look at the stellar component. Questions we are addressing are: 1) what are the most luminous stars, 2) how can we use them to help study the destruction of star clusters and the population of the field, 3) what fraction of stars, at least the bright stars, are formed in the field, in associations, and in compact clusters. In this contribution we describe some of the beginning steps in this process. More specifically, we describe how we separate stars from clusters in our galaxies, and describe how candidate Luminous Blue Variables (LBVs) and "Single Star" HII (SSHII) regions have been identified.

  6. MPC&A for plutonium disposition in the Russian federation

    SciTech Connect

    Sutcliffe, W.G.

    1995-08-08

    The issue of what to do with excess fissile materials from dismantled nuclear weapons has been discussed for a number of years. The options or alternatives commanding the most attention were identified by the American National Academy of Sciences. For plutonium these options are: (1) the fabrication and use of mixed-oxide (MOX) reactor fuel followed by the disposal of the spent fuel, or (2) vitrification (immobilization) of plutonium combined with highly radioactive material followed by direct disposal. The Academy report also identified the alternative of disposal in a deep borehole as requiring further study before being eliminated or accepted. The report emphasized security of nuclear materials as a principal factor in considering management and disposition decisions. Security of materials is particularly important in the near term-now-long before ultimate disposition can be accomplished. The MOX option was the subject of a NATO workshop held at Obninsk, Russia in October 1994. Hence this paper does not deal with the MOX alternative in detail. It deals with the following: materials protection, control, and accounting (MPC&A) for immobilization and disposal; the immobilization vs MOX alternatives; the security of disposed plutonium; the need to demonstrate MTC&A for plutonium disposition; and, finally, a recommended investment to quickly and inexpensively improve the protection of fissile materials in Russia. It is the author`s view that near-term management is of overriding importance. That is, with respect to the ultimate disposition of excess nuclear materials, how we get there is more important than where we are going.

  7. Dynamics of self-compressed argon and helium plasma streams in the MPC facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ladygina, M. S.; Marchenko, A. K.; Solyakov, D. G.; Petrov, Yu V.; Makhlaj, V. A.; Yeliseyev, D. V.; Garkusha, I. E.; Cherednichenko, T. N.

    2016-07-01

    The results of experimental investigations on self-compressed plasma streams and compression zone formation are presented for varied mass flow rate and initial concentrations of particles of working gas that depend on initial pressure. Experiments were carried out in the Magnetoplasma Compressor (MPC) facility. Space–time distributions of the electric current and electron density in the plasma stream compression region were measured under different experimental conditions. High-speed images of plasma stream dynamics in the MPC accelerating channel with a high temporal resolution were also obtained for different initial pressures. The experimental results show a strong dependence of plasma stream parameters and compression zone location on the initial gas concentration. The maximum electron density is obtained in the range of Ne = (1 ÷ 5) × 1018 cm‑3. Plasma streams have a good radial symmetry under all experimental conditions. The distributions of plasma parameters along the plasma stream flows are discussed.

  8. Surface grafting density analysis of high anti-clotting PU-Si-g-P(MPC) films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Chun-Yan; Zhou, Ning-Lin; Xiao, Ying-Hong; Tang, Yi-Da; Jin, Su-Xing; Wu, Yue; Zhang, Jun; Shen, Jian

    2012-02-01

    Well-defined zwitterionic polymer brushes with good blood compatibility were studied, grafted from polyurethane (PU) substrate (PU-Si-g-P(MPC)) by surface-initiated reverse atom transfer radical polymerization (SI-RATRP). We found that the structure of polymer brushes and hence their properties greatly depend on the grafting density. To solve the problems of the normal method for grafting density measurement, i.e., more requirements for qualified and proficient instrument operator, we established an effective and feasible way instead of the conventional method of spectroscopic ellipsometer combined with gel permeation chromatograph (ELM/GPC) to calculate the grafting density of PU-Si-g-P(MPC) films by using a software named ImageJ 1.44e in combination with scanning electronic microscope (SEM) or atomic microscope (AFM). X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), SEM and AFM were employed to analyze the surface topography and changes of elements before and after graft modification of the synthetic PU-Si-g-P(MPC) biofilms.

  9. Russian Navy Fresh Fuel MPC and A Training

    SciTech Connect

    Forehand, Harry M.; O'Shell, Parker; Opanassiouk, Yuri R.; Rexroth, Paul E.; Shmelev, Vladimir; Sukhoruchkin, Vladimir K.

    1999-07-06

    The goal of the Russian Navy Fuels Program is to incorporate nuclear fuel that is in the custody of the Russian Navy into a materials protection, control and accounting program. In addition to applying MPC and A upgrades to existing facilities, a program is underway to train site personnel in MPC and A activities. The goal is to assure that the upgraded facilities are managed, operated and maintained in an effective, sustainable manner. Training includes both the conceptual and necessary operational aspects of the systems and equipment. The project began with a Needs Assessment to identify priorities and objectives of required training. This led to the creation of a series of classes developed by Kurchatov Institute. One course was developed to allow attendees to get a general understanding of goals and objectives of nuclear MPC and A systems in the context of the Russian Navy. A follow-on course provided the detailed skills necessary for the performance of specialized duties. Parallel sessions with hands-on exercises provided the specific training needed for different personnel requirements. The courses were presented at KI facilities in Moscow. This paper reviews the work to date and future plans for this program.

  10. Huaiqihuang may protect from proteinuria by resisting MPC5 podocyte damage via targeting p-ERK/CHOP pathway

    PubMed Central

    Li, Tingxia; Mao, Jianhua; Huang, Lei; Fu, Haidong; Chen, Shuohui; Liu, Aimin; Liang, Yuqin

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the potential effects of Huaiqihuang (HQH) granule, a Chinese herbal medicine, in treating proteinuria and to reveal its possible mechanism. MPC5 podocytes were cultured in vitro at 37°C and induced with tunicamycin (TM). The TM-induced cells were treated with HQH at different concentrations. The cell proliferation was detected using the MTT assay. The optimal effective dose of HQH for MPC5 cells was determined by the MTT assay and LDH assay respectively. The influences of HQH on the proteinuria-related protein expression and the signaling pathway associated protein expression were also detected using quantitative reverse transcription PCR and Western blotting analysis. The results showed that the MPC5 cell model was successfully constructed in vitro. The HQH application could improve the harmful effects induced by TM on the MPC5 cells, including promoted cell proliferation and suppressed cell apoptosis. Furthermore, the protein expression, including podocin, nephrin, and synaptopodin was down-regulated by the TM treatment in the MPC5 cells. On contrary, the expression of these proteins was up-regulated after the HQH application. Also, the effect of TM on integrin α3 and integrin β1 expressions was also reversed by the HQH treatment. Moreover, the HQH application decreased the expression of p-ERK and DNA-damage-inducible transcript 3 (DDIT3 or CHOP) in the MPC5 cells, which was opposite to the effect observed in the cells treated with TM. Taken together, our study suggest that HQH application may protect podocytes from TM damage by suppressing the p-ERK/CHOP signaling pathway.

  11. Einstein SSS+MPC observations of Seyfert type galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holt, S. S.; Turner, T. J.; Mushotzky, R. F.; Weaver, K.

    1989-01-01

    The X-ray spectra of 27 Seyfert galaxies measured with the Solid State Spectrometer (SSS) onboard the Einstein Observatory is investigated. This new investigation features the utilization of simultaneous data from the Monitor Proportional Counter (MPC) and automatic correction for systematic effects in the SSS. The new results are that the best-fit single power law indices agree with those previously reported, but that soft excesses are inferred for at least 20 percent of the measured spectra. The soft excesses are consistent with either an approximately 0.25 keV black body or Fe-L line emission.

  12. Einstein SSS+MPC observations of Seyfert type galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holt, S. S.; Turner, T. J.; Mushotzky, R. F.; Weaver, K.

    1989-11-01

    The X-ray spectra of 27 Seyfert galaxies measured with the Solid State Spectrometer (SSS) onboard the Einstein Observatory is investigated. This new investigation features the utilization of simultaneous data from the Monitor Proportional Counter (MPC) and automatic correction for systematic effects in the SSS. The new results are that the best-fit single power law indices agree with those previously reported, but that soft excesses are inferred for at least 20 percent of the measured spectra. The soft excesses are consistent with either an approximately 0.25 keV black body or Fe-L line emission.

  13. MPC for LPV systems with bounded parameter variations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jungers, Marc; Oliveira, Ricardo C. L. F.; Peres, Pedro L. D.

    2011-01-01

    This article deals with the model predictive control (MPC) design problem for systems which are linearly dependent on a time-varying parameter. The main novelty is that, motivated by practical issues, the bounds on the rate of variation of the parameters are taken into account in the control design. Moreover, a Lyapunov function depending multiaffinely on the parameters computed at a set of instants of time and a parameter-dependent control gain are used to provide an upper bound to a quadratic performance index. The solution is obtained by means of a semidefinite programming algorithm. Examples illustrate the efficiency of the proposed approach.

  14. LYα FOREST TOMOGRAPHY FROM BACKGROUND GALAXIES: THE FIRST MEGAPARSEC-RESOLUTION LARGE-SCALE STRUCTURE MAP AT z > 2

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Khee-Gan; Hennawi, Joseph F.; Eilers, Anna-Christina; Stark, Casey; White, Martin; Prochaska, J. Xavier; Schlegel, David J.; Arinyo-i-Prats, Andreu; Suzuki, Nao; Croft, Rupert A. C.; Caputi, Karina I.; Cassata, Paolo; Ilbert, Olivier; Le Brun, Vincent; Le Fèvre, Olivier; Garilli, Bianca; Koekemoer, Anton M.; Maccagni, Dario; Nugent, Peter; and others

    2014-11-01

    We present the first observations of foreground Lyα forest absorption from high-redshift galaxies, targeting 24 star-forming galaxies (SFGs) with z ∼ 2.3-2.8 within a 5' × 14' region of the COSMOS field. The transverse sightline separation is ∼2 h {sup –1} Mpc comoving, allowing us to create a tomographic reconstruction of the three-dimensional (3D) Lyα forest absorption field over the redshift range 2.20 ≤ z ≤ 2.45. The resulting map covers 6 h {sup –1} Mpc × 14 h {sup –1} Mpc in the transverse plane and 230 h {sup –1} Mpc along the line of sight with a spatial resolution of ≈3.5 h {sup –1} Mpc, and is the first high-fidelity map of a large-scale structure on ∼Mpc scales at z > 2. Our map reveals significant structures with ≳ 10 h {sup –1} Mpc extent, including several spanning the entire transverse breadth, providing qualitative evidence for the filamentary structures predicted to exist in the high-redshift cosmic web. Simulated reconstructions with the same sightline sampling, spectral resolution, and signal-to-noise ratio recover the salient structures present in the underlying 3D absorption fields. Using data from other surveys, we identified 18 galaxies with known redshifts coeval with our map volume, enabling a direct comparison with our tomographic map. This shows that galaxies preferentially occupy high-density regions, in qualitative agreement with the same comparison applied to simulations. Our results establish the feasibility of the CLAMATO survey, which aims to obtain Lyα forest spectra for ∼1000 SFGs over ∼1 deg{sup 2} of the COSMOS field, in order to map out the intergalactic medium large-scale structure at (z) ∼ 2.3 over a large volume (100 h {sup –1} Mpc){sup 3}.

  15. Effective field theory of large scale structure at two loops: The apparent scale dependence of the speed of sound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baldauf, Tobias; Mercolli, Lorenzo; Zaldarriaga, Matias

    2015-12-01

    We study the effective field theory (EFT) of large-scale structure for cosmic density and momentum fields. We show that the finite part of the two-loop calculation and its counterterms introduces an apparent scale dependence for the leading-order parameter cs2 of the EFT starting at k =0.1 h Mpc-1 . These terms limit the range over which one can trust the one-loop EFT calculation at the 1% level to k <0.1 h Mpc-1 at redshift z =0 . We construct a well-motivated one-parameter ansatz to fix the relative size of the one- and two-loop counterterms using their high-k sensitivity. Although this one-parameter model is a very restrictive choice for the counterterms, it explains the apparent scale dependence of cs2 seen in simulations. It is also able to capture the scale dependence of the density power spectrum up to k ≈0.3 h Mpc-1 at the 1% level at redshift z =0 . Considering a simple scheme for the resummation of large-scale motions, we find that the two-loop calculation reduces the need for this IR resummation at k <0.2 h Mpc-1 . Finally, we extend our calculation to momentum statistics and show that the same one-parameter model can also describe density-momentum and momentum-momentum statistics.

  16. Superluminal Motions at 500 Mpc: New Results on Nearby AGN Jets with HST

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meyer, Eileen T.; Georganopoulos, Markos; Sparks, William B.; Biretta, John A.; Van Der Marel, Roeland P.; Anderson, Jay; Chiaberge, Marco; Perlman, Eric S.; Norman, Colin Arthur

    2015-01-01

    I will present results from recent HST observations of several nearby AGN Jets. Using over 20 years of archival data in combination with the most recent deep ACS/WFC imaging, we have found evidence for superluminal motions in optical kpc-scale jets, beyond the only previously reported case of M87. Our observations show that relativistic bulk motions extend to the outermost parts of these jets, and our continuous refinement of astrometric techniques suggests that the reach of Hubble observations, and the constraints on jet models implied by these measurements, may extend beyond 500 Mpc. The presentation will include movies of these jets in which the motions of the plasma can be seen by eye.

  17. LONG-TERM CRITICALITY CONTROL ISSUES FOR THE MPC (SCPB: N/A)

    SciTech Connect

    D.A. Thomas

    1996-03-19

    This analysis is prepared by the Mined Geologic Disposal System (MGDS) Waste Package Development Department (WPDD) in response to a request received via a QAP-3-12 Design Input Data Request (Reference 5.1) from Waste Acceptance, Storage, & Transportation (WAST) Design (formerly MRSMPC Design). This design analysis is an answer to the Design Input Data Request to provide: Specific requirements for long-term criticality control. The time period for long-term criticality control requirements encompass the time phases of operations (pre-closure), containment (first 1,000 years post-closure), and isolation (the time period beyond the containment phase, at least to 10,000 years post-closure). The purpose and objective of this analysis is to provide specific long-term disposal criticality control requirements for the Multi-Purpose Canister (MPC) Subsystem Design Procurement Specification (DPS), so as to not preclude MPC compatibility with disposal in the MGDS.(References 5.2, 5.3, and 5.4) The response is stated in Section 8 herein and will be available for transmittal as an attachment to a QAP-3-12 Design Input Data Transmittal.

  18. THE MEGAMASER COSMOLOGY PROJECT. V. AN ANGULAR-DIAMETER DISTANCE TO NGC 6264 AT 140 Mpc

    SciTech Connect

    Kuo, C. Y.; Braatz, J. A.; Lo, K. Y.; Condon, J. J.; Impellizzeri, C. M. V.; Reid, M. J.; Henkel, C.

    2013-04-20

    We present the direct measurement of the Hubble constant, yielding the direct measurement of the angular-diameter distance to NGC 6264 using the H{sub 2}O megamaser technique. Our measurement is based on sensitive observations of the circumnuclear megamaser disk from four observations with the Very Long Baseline Array, the Green Bank Telescope (GBT), and the Effelsberg telescope. We also monitored the maser spectral profile for 2.3 years using the GBT to measure accelerations of maser lines by tracking their line-of-sight velocities as they change with time. The measured accelerations suggest that the systemic maser spots have a significantly wider radial distribution than in the archetypal megamaser in NGC 4258. We model the maser emission as arising from a circumnuclear disk with orbits dominated by the central black hole. The best fit of the data gives a Hubble constant of H{sub 0} = 68 {+-} 9 km s{sup -1} Mpc{sup -1}, which corresponds to an angular-diameter distance of 144 {+-} 19 Mpc. In addition, the fit also gives a mass of the central black hole of (3.09 {+-} 0.42) Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 7} M{sub Sun }. The result demonstrates the feasibility of measuring distances to galaxies located well into the Hubble flow by using circumnuclear megamaser disks.

  19. DEMOGRAPHICS OF BULGE TYPES WITHIN 11 Mpc AND IMPLICATIONS FOR GALAXY EVOLUTION

    SciTech Connect

    Fisher, David B.; Drory, Niv

    2011-06-01

    We present an inventory of galaxy bulge types (elliptical galaxy, classical bulge, pseudobulge, and bulgeless galaxy) in a volume-limited sample within the local 11 Mpc sphere using Spitzer 3.6 {mu}m and Hubble Space Telescope data. We find that whether counting by number, star formation rate, or stellar mass, the dominant galaxy type in the local universe has pure disk characteristics (either hosting a pseudobulge or being bulgeless). Galaxies that contain either a pseudobulge or no bulge combine to account for over 80% of the number of galaxies above a stellar mass of 10{sup 9} M{sub sun}. Classical bulges and elliptical galaxies account for {approx}1/4, and disks for {approx}3/4 of the stellar mass in the local 11 Mpc. About 2/3 of all star formation in the local volume takes place in galaxies with pseudobulges. Looking at the fraction of galaxies with different bulge types as a function of stellar mass, we find that the frequency of classical bulges strongly increases with stellar mass, and comes to dominate above 10{sup 10.5} M{sub sun}. Galaxies with pseudobulges dominate at 10{sup 9.5}-10{sup 10.5} M{sub sun}. Yet lower-mass galaxies are most likely to be bulgeless. If pseudobulges are not a product of mergers, then the frequency of pseudobulges in the local universe poses a challenge for galaxy evolution models.

  20. Scale Dependence of Dark Energy Antigravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perivolaropoulos, L.

    2002-09-01

    We investigate the effects of negative pressure induced by dark energy (cosmological constant or quintessence) on the dynamics at various astrophysical scales. Negative pressure induces a repulsive term (antigravity) in Newton's law which dominates on large scales. Assuming a value of the cosmological constant consistent with the recent SnIa data we determine the critical scale $r_c$ beyond which antigravity dominates the dynamics ($r_c \\sim 1Mpc $) and discuss some of the dynamical effects implied. We show that dynamically induced mass estimates on the scale of the Local Group and beyond are significantly modified due to negative pressure. We also briefly discuss possible dynamical tests (eg effects on local Hubble flow) that can be applied on relatively small scales (a few $Mpc$) to determine the density and equation of state of dark energy.

  1. Large-scale simulations of reionization

    SciTech Connect

    Kohler, Katharina; Gnedin, Nickolay Y.; Hamilton, Andrew J.S.; /JILA, Boulder

    2005-11-01

    We use cosmological simulations to explore the large-scale effects of reionization. Since reionization is a process that involves a large dynamic range--from galaxies to rare bright quasars--we need to be able to cover a significant volume of the universe in our simulation without losing the important small scale effects from galaxies. Here we have taken an approach that uses clumping factors derived from small scale simulations to approximate the radiative transfer on the sub-cell scales. Using this technique, we can cover a simulation size up to 1280h{sup -1} Mpc with 10h{sup -1} Mpc cells. This allows us to construct synthetic spectra of quasars similar to observed spectra of SDSS quasars at high redshifts and compare them to the observational data. These spectra can then be analyzed for HII region sizes, the presence of the Gunn-Peterson trough, and the Lyman-{alpha} forest.

  2. Core-collapse supernova rate synthesis within 11 Mpc

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, Lin; Eldridge, J. J.

    2015-09-01

    The 11 Mpc Hα and Ultraviolet Galaxy Survey (11HUGS) traces the star formation activity of nearby galaxies. In addition, within this volume the detection completeness of core-collapse supernovae (CCSNe) is high therefore by comparing these observed stellar births and deaths we can make a sensitive test of our understanding of how stars live and die. In this paper, we use the results of the Binary Population and Spectral Synthesis (BPASS) code to simulate the 11HUGS galaxies' Hα and far-ultraviolet (FUV) star formation rate indicators (SFRIs) and simultaneously match the CCSN rate. We find that stellar population including interacting binary stars makes little difference to the total CCSN rate but increases the Hα and FUV fluxes for a constant number of stars being formed. In addition, they significantly increase the predicted rate of Type Ibc SNe relative to Type II SNe to the level observed in the 11HUGS galaxies. We also find that instead of assuming a constant star formation history for the galaxies our best-fitting models have an SFR that peaked more than 3 Myr ago.

  3. Self-optimizing MPC of melt temperature in injection moulding.

    PubMed

    Dubay, R

    2002-01-01

    The parameters in plastic injection moulding are highly nonlinear and interacting. Good control of plastic melt temperature for injection moulding is very important in reducing operator setup time, assuring consistent product quality, and preventing thermal degradation of the melt. Step response testing was performed on the barrel heating zones on an industrial injection moulding machine (IMM). The open loop responses indicated a high degree of process coupling between the heating zones. From these experimental step responses, a multiple-input-multiple-output model predictive control strategy was developed and practically implemented. The requirement of negligible overshoot is important to the plastics industry for preventing material overheating and wastage, and reducing machine operator setup time. A generic learning and self-optimizing MPC methodology was developed and implemented on the IMM to control melt temperature for any polymer to be moulded on any machine having different electrical heater capacities. The control performance was tested for varying setpoint trajectories typical of normal machine operations. The results showed that the predictive controller provided good control of melt temperature for all zones with negligible oscillations, and, therefore, eliminated material degradation and extended machine setup time. PMID:12014805

  4. Jet Studies on the MPC-EX pre shower detector upgrade to the PHENIX experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flores, Lucas; Seto, Richard; Phenix Collaboration

    2014-09-01

    As a part of the PHENIX experiment at RHIC, we are performing jet studies using the MPC-EX detector. The MPC-EX is pre shower extension to the MPC (the current lead tungstate calorimeter), made up of interleaved Silicon mini-pad detectors and Tungsten plates. This high resolution detector adds tracking and allows for the identification of π0s and direct photons in the rapidity range 3 < η < 4. By studying jet + photon events in simulations of protons on heavy nuclei, we aim to determine how well measurements of the Gluon Structure function can be made by the MPC-EX detector. One of the leading hypothesis to explain gluon distributions at low-x is the Color Glass Condensate. As a part of the PHENIX experiment at RHIC, we are performing jet studies using the MPC-EX detector. The MPC-EX is pre shower extension to the MPC (the current lead tungstate calorimeter), made up of interleaved Silicon mini-pad detectors and Tungsten plates. This high resolution detector adds tracking and allows for the identification of π0s and direct photons in the rapidity range 3 < η < 4. By studying jet + photon events in simulations of protons on heavy nuclei, we aim to determine how well measurements of the Gluon Structure function can be made by the MPC-EX detector. One of the leading hypothesis to explain gluon distributions at low-x is the Color Glass Condensate. MARC U Star Trainee Program.

  5. U.S./Russian cooperative efforts to enhance nuclear MPC&A at VNIITF, (Chelyabinsk-70)

    SciTech Connect

    Abramson, B; Apt, K; Blasy, J; Bukin, D; Churikov, Y; Curtis, D; Eras, A; Magda, E; Neymotin, L; Shultz, F; Slankas, T; Tittemore, G; Tsygankov, G; Zuev, V

    1999-04-20

    The work described here is part of an effort called the Nuclear Materials Protection, Control, and Accounting (MPC&A) Program, a cooperative program between the US Department of Eenrgy (DOE) and Russia's Ministry of Atomic Energy (MinAtom). The objective of the program is to reduce the risk of nuclear proliferation by strengthening MPC&A systems at Russian nuclear Facilities. This paper describes that portion of the MPC&A program that is directed specifically to the needs of the All Russian Scientific Research Institute of Technical Physics (VNIITF), also called Chelyabinsk-70. A major MPC&A milestone was met at VNIITF when the MPC&A improvements were commissioned at the Pulse Research Reactor Facility in May of this year.

  6. Silk damping at a redshift of a billion: new limit on small-scale adiabatic perturbations.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Donghui; Pradler, Josef; Chluba, Jens; Kamionkowski, Marc

    2014-08-01

    We study the dissipation of small-scale adiabatic perturbations at early times when the Universe is hotter than T≃0.5  keV. When the wavelength falls below the damping scale k(D)(-1), the acoustic modes diffuse and thermalize, causing entropy production. Before neutrino decoupling, k(D) is primarily set by the neutrino shear viscosity, and we study the effect of acoustic damping on the relic neutrino number, primordial nucleosynthesis, dark-matter freeze-out, and baryogenesis. This sets a new limit on the amplitude of primordial fluctuations of Δ(R)(2)<0.007 at 10(4)  Mpc(-1)≲k≲10(5)  Mpc(-1) and a model-dependent limit of Δ(R)(2)≲0.3 at k≲10(20-25)  Mpc(-1). PMID:25148313

  7. Using rule-based shot dose assignment in model-based MPC applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bork, Ingo; Buck, Peter; Wang, Lin; Müller, Uwe

    2014-10-01

    levels and requires a model which accurately predicts mask shapes at all dose levels used. The calibration of such a model is described in a separate paper [1]. In summary this paper presents an efficient method for combining rule-based VSB shot dose assignment with modelbased shape corrections in MPC. This method expands the printability of small features sizes without the need for increasing the base dose of the e-beam writer which reduces backscattering and increases the lifetime of the electron gun of the writer.

  8. GHOSTS I: A new faint very isolated dwarf galaxy at D = 12 ± 2 Mpc

    SciTech Connect

    Monachesi, Antonela; Bell, Eric F.; Radburn-Smith, David J.; Dalcanton, Julianne J.; De Jong, Roelof S.; Streich, David; Vlajić, Marija; Bailin, Jeremy; Holwerda, Benne W.; Alyson Ford, H.; Zucker, Daniel B.

    2014-01-10

    We report the discovery of a new faint dwarf galaxy, GHOSTS I, using HST/ACS data from one of our GHOSTS (Galaxy Halos, Outer disks, Substructure, Thick disk, and Star clusters) fields. Its detected individual stars populate an approximately 1 mag range of its luminosity function (LF). Using synthetic color-magnitude diagrams (CMDs) to compare with the galaxy's CMD, we find that the colors and magnitudes of GHOSTS I's individual stars are most consistent with being young helium-burning and asymptotic giant branch stars at a distance of ∼12 ± 2 Mpc. Morphologically, GHOSTS I appears to be actively forming stars, so we tentatively classify it as a dwarf irregular (dIrr) galaxy, although future Hubble Space Telescope (HST) observations deep enough to resolve a larger magnitude range in its LF are required to make a more secure classification. GHOSTS I's absolute magnitude is M{sub V}∼−9.85{sub −0.33}{sup +0.40}, making it one of the least luminous dIrr galaxies known, and its metallicity is lower than [Fe/H] = –1.5 dex. The half-light radius of GHOSTS I is 226 ± 38 pc and its ellipticity is 0.47 ± 0.07, similar to Milky Way and M31 dwarf satellites at comparable luminosity. There are no luminous massive galaxies or galaxy clusters within ∼4 Mpc from GHOSTS I that could be considered as its host, making it a very isolated dwarf galaxy in the local universe.

  9. Short communication: Effect of storage temperature on the solubility of milk protein concentrate 80 (MPC80) treated with NaCl or KCl.

    PubMed

    Sikand, V; Tong, P S; Walker, J; Wang, T; Rodriguez-Saona, L E

    2016-03-01

    A previous study in our laboratory showed that addition of 150 mM NaCl or KCl into diafiltration water improved the solubility of freshly made milk protein concentrate 80 (MPC80). In the present study, the objectives were (1) to evaluate the solubility of NaCl- or KCl-treated MPC80 samples kept at varying temperatures and then stored for extensive periods at room temperature (21°C ± 1°C); and (2) to determine if MPC80 samples stored at different temperatures and protein conformation can be grouped or categorized together. Freshly manufactured MPC80 samples were untreated (control), processed with NaCl, or processed with KCl. One set of sample bags was stored at 4°C; second and third sets of bags were kept at 25°C and 55°C for 1 mo (31d) and then transferred to room temperature (21°C ± 1°C) storage conditions for 1 yr (365d). Samples were tested for nitrogen solubility index (NSI) and for protein changes by Fourier-transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy. Analysis of variance results for NSI showed 2 significantly different groupings of MPC80 samples. The more soluble group contained samples treated with NaCl or KCl and stored at either 4°C or 25°C. These samples had mean NSI >97.5%. The less soluble groups contained all control samples, regardless of storage temperature, and NaCl- or KCl-treated samples stored at 55°C. These samples had mean NSI from 39.5 to 58%. Within each of these groups (more soluble and less soluble), no significant differences in solubility were detected. Pattern recognition analysis by soft independent modeling of class analogy (SIMCA) was used to assess protein changes during storage by monitoring the amide I and amide II (1,700(-1) to 1,300cm(-1)) regions. Dominant bands were observed at 1,385cm(-1) for control, 1,551cm(-1) for KCl-treated samples, and 1,694cm(-1) for NaCl-treated samples. Moreover, SIMCA clustered the MPC80 samples stored at 4°C separately from samples stored at 25°C and 55°C. This study demonstrates that (1

  10. Large-scale Structure around a z=2.1 Cluster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hung, Chao-Ling; Casey, Caitlin M.; Chiang, Yi-Kuan; Capak, Peter L.; Cowley, Michael J.; Darvish, Behnam; Kacprzak, Glenn G.; Kovač, K.; Lilly, Simon J.; Nanayakkara, Themiya; Spitler, Lee R.; Tran, Kim-Vy H.; Yuan, Tiantian

    2016-08-01

    The most prodigious starburst galaxies are absent in massive galaxy clusters today, but their connection with large-scale environments is less clear at z≳ 2. We present a search of large-scale structure around a galaxy cluster core at z = 2.095 using a set of spectroscopically confirmed galaxies. We find that both color-selected star-forming galaxies (SFGs) and dusty star-forming galaxies (DSFGs) show significant overdensities around the z = 2.095 cluster. A total of eight DSFGs (including three X-ray luminous active galactic nuclei, AGNs) and 34 SFGs are found within a 10‧ radius (corresponds to ˜15 cMpc at z˜ 2.1) from the cluster center and within a redshift range of {{Δ }}z=0.02, which leads to galaxy overdensities of {δ }{{DSFG}}˜ 12.3 and {δ }{{SFG}}˜ 2.8. The cluster core and the extended DSFG- and SFG-rich structures together demonstrate an active cluster formation phase, in which the cluster is accreting a significant amount of material from large-scale structure while the more mature core may begin to virialize. Our finding of this DSFG-rich structure, along with a number of other protoclusters with excess DSFGs and AGNs found to date, suggest that the overdensities of these rare sources indeed trace significant mass overdensities. However, it remains puzzling how these intense star formers are triggered concurrently. Although an increased probability of galaxy interactions and/or enhanced gas supply can trigger the excess of DSFGs, our stacking analysis based on 850 μm images and morphological analysis based on rest-frame optical imaging do not show such enhancements of merger fraction and gas content in this structure.

  11. The scale-dependence of halo assembly bias

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sunayama, Tomomi; Hearin, Andrew P.; Padmanabhan, Nikhil; Leauthaud, Alexie

    2016-05-01

    The two-point clustering of dark matter haloes is influenced by halo properties besides mass, a phenomenon referred to as halo assembly bias. Using the depth of the gravitational potential well, Vmax, as our secondary halo property, in this paper, we present the first study of the scale-dependence of assembly bias. In the large-scale linear regime, r ≥ 10 h-1 Mpc, our findings are in keeping with previous results. In particular, at the low-mass end (1), haloes with high Vmax show stronger large-scale clustering relative to haloes with low Vmax of the same mass; this trend weakens and reverses for Mvir ≳ Mcoll. In the non-linear regime, assembly bias in low-mass haloes exhibits a pronounced scale-dependent `bump' at 500 kpc h-1-5 Mpc h-1. This feature weakens and eventually vanishes for haloes of higher mass. We show that this scale-dependent signature can primarily be attributed to a special subpopulation of ejected haloes, defined as present-day host haloes that were previously members of a higher mass halo at some point in their past history. A corollary of our results is that galaxy clustering on scales of r ˜ 1-2 Mpc h-1 can be impacted by up to ˜15 per cent by the choice of the halo property used in the halo model, even for stellar mass-limited samples.

  12. Double inflation - A possible resolution of the large-scale structure problem

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Turner, Michael S.; Villumsen, Jens V.; Vittorio, Nicola; Silk, Joseph; Juszkiewicz, Roman

    1987-01-01

    A model is presented for the large-scale structure of the universe in which two successive inflationary phases resulted in large small-scale and small large-scale density fluctuations. This bimodal density fluctuation spectrum in an Omega = 1 universe dominated by hot dark matter leads to large-scale structure of the galaxy distribution that is consistent with recent observational results. In particular, large, nearly empty voids and significant large-scale peculiar velocity fields are produced over scales of about 100 Mpc, while the small-scale structure over less than about 10 Mpc resembles that in a low-density universe, as observed. Detailed analytical calculations and numerical simulations are given of the spatial and velocity correlations.

  13. Theoretical study on the stability of double-decker type metal phthalocyanines, M(Pc)2 and M(Pc)2(+) (M = Ti, Sn and Sc): a critical assessment on the performance of density functionals.

    PubMed

    Sumimoto, Michinori; Kawashima, Yukio; Hori, Kenji; Fujimoto, Hitoshi

    2015-03-01

    We report the results of theoretical calculations on the optimized structures and relative energies between the D4d and D2 symmetry structures for double-decker type phthalocyanine compounds, Ti(Pc)2, Ti(Pc)2(+), Sn(Pc)2, Sn(Pc)2(+), Sc(Pc)2 and Sc(Pc)2(+), using eighteen types of functionals: B3LYP, B3PW91, B3P86, PBE1PBE, BHandHLYP, BPW91, BP86, M06, M06-2x, M06-HF, M06L, LC-BPW91, LC-ωPBE, CAM-B3LYP, B97D, ωB97, ωB97X and ωB97XD. Two phthalocyanine moieties are stacked in a face-to-face configuration in the D4d structure, but they are stapled by two σ-bonds in the D2 one. We found that the molecular symmetry of M(Pc)2 and M(Pc)2(+) depends on the balance between stabilization due to electron delocalization and exchange repulsion of π-electrons in the phthalocyanine moieties. We assessed the performance of the well-established functionals to select the appropriate functional for calculations on M(Pc)2 and M(Pc)2(+), and several important aspects came out. Generally, the hybrid GGA and hybrid meta-GGA functionals with 20-27% of the HF exchange term would give the molecular structures consistent with the experimental expectations for the double-decker type phthalocyanine compounds. Pure GGA and pure meta-GGA functionals (BPW91, BP86, M06L and B97D) have the tendency to overestimate the stability of the D4d structure. On the other hand, functionals including HF exchange for 50% and over or including long-range corrections (BHandHLYP, M06, M06-2x, M06-HF, LC-BPW91, LC-ωPBE, CAM-B3LYP, ωB97, ωB97X and ωB97XD) tend to overestimate the stability of the D2 structure. It should be emphasized that the B3LYP functional, one of the most commonly used hybrid GGA functionals with 20% HF exchange, cannot estimate the relative stability between the two molecular structures of Ti(Pc)2 appropriately. The calculation for the systems considered in this article required well-balanced treatment of the HF exchange with the accompanied exchange-correlation functional. Thus, as

  14. Progress and future plans for MPC and A at Chelyabinsk-70

    SciTech Connect

    Apt, K; Blasy, J; Bukin, D; Cahalane, P; Churikov, Y; Curtis, D; Karpov, A; Labiak, B; Neymotin, L; Schultz, F; Tsygankov, G; Ystesund, K Slankas, T; Zuev, V

    1999-07-08

    This paper describes that portion of the Nuclear Materials Protection, Control, and Accounting (MPC and A) program that is directed specifically to the needs of the All Russian Scientific Research Institute of Technical Physics (VNIITF), also called Chelyabinsk-70. Chelyabinsk-70 is located in the Ural Mountains, approximately 2000 km east of Moscow and 100 km south of Ekaterinburg. The MPC and A work that has been completed, is underway and planned at the facility will be described. During the first two years of the VNIITF project, emphasis was on the Pulse Research Reactor Facility (PRR), which contains one metal and two liquid pulse reactors and associated nuclear material storage rooms and a control center. A commissioning of the PRR was held in May of 1998. With the completion of the MPC and A work in the PRR, new physical protection work is focusing on other areas. VNIITF-wide physical protection initiatives underway include access control and computerized badging systems, and a central MPC and A control system. Measured physical inventory taking is a high priority for the VNIITF Project Team. A VNIITF-wide computerized accounting system is also being developed for the large and diverse inventory of nuclear material subject to MPC and A.

  15. New parametrization for the scale dependent growth function in general relativity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dent, James B.; Dutta, Sourish; Perivolaropoulos, Leandros

    2009-07-01

    We study the scale-dependent evolution of the growth function δ(a,k) of cosmological perturbations in dark energy models based on general relativity. This scale dependence is more prominent on cosmological scales of 100h-1Mpc or larger. We derive a new scale-dependent parametrization which generalizes the well-known Newtonian approximation result f0(a)≡(dln⁡δ0)/(dln⁡a)=Ω(a)γ (γ=(6)/(11) for ΛCDM) which is a good approximation on scales less than 50h-1Mpc. Our generalized parametrization is of the form f(a)=(f0(a))/(1+ξ(a,k)), where ξ(a,k)=(3H02Ω0m)/(ak2). We demonstrate that this parametrization fits the exact result of a full general relativistic evaluation of the growth function up to horizon scales for both ΛCDM and dynamical dark energy. In contrast, the scale independent parametrization does not provide a good fit on scales beyond 5% of the horizon scale (k≃0.01h-1Mpc).

  16. Distributed MPC of polytopic uncertain systems: handling quantised communication and packet dropouts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Langwen; Wang, Jingcheng; Wang, Bohui

    2015-10-01

    In this paper, we study the distributed model predictive control (MPC) of polytopic uncertain systems with quantised communication and packet dropouts. The model of the whole plant is divided into a certain number of incomplete subsystems. Due to the nature of the distributed control structure, there is generally a lack of information about the state of the overall system. Each subsystem shares its information with neighbour subsystems via reliable connection. Distributed MPC controllers are designed for each subsystem by solving the linear matrix inequalities optimisation problem. The distributed state feedback laws are quantised and transmitted via communication network. An iterative algorithm is presented to make coordination among distributed state feedback laws. The communication is assumed to be affected by random packet dropouts in a representation of Bernoulli distributed white sequences with known conditional probabilities. A case study is carried out to demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed distributed MPC technique.

  17. US-Russian collaboration in MPC & A enhancements at the Elektrostal Uranium Fuel-Fabrication Plant

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, H.; Murray, W.; Whiteson, R.

    1997-11-01

    Enhancement of the nuclear materials protection, control, and accounting of (MPC&A) at the Elektrostal Machine-Building Plant (ELEMASH) has proceeded in two phases. Initially, Elektrostal served as the model facility at which to test US/Russian collaboration and to demonstrate MPC&A technologies available for safeguards enhancements at Russian facilities. This phase addressed material control and accounting (MC&A) in the low-enriched uranium (LEU) fuel-fabrication processes and the physical protection (PP) of part of the (higher-enrichment) breeder-fuel process. The second phase, identified later in the broader US/Russian agreement for expanded MPC&A cooperation. includes implementation of appropriate MC&A and PP systems in the breeder-fuel fabrication processes. Within the past year, an automated physical protection system has been installed and demonstrated in building 274, and an automated MC&A system has been designed and is being installed and will be tested in the LEU process. Attention has now turned to assuring longterm sustainability for the first phase and beginning MPC&A upgrades for the second phase. Sustainability measures establish the infrastructure for operation, maintenance, and repair of the installed systems-with US support for the lifetime of the US/Russian Agreement, but evolving toward full Russian operation of the system over the long term. For phase 2, which will address higher enrichments, projects have been identified to characterize the facilities, design MPC&A systems, procure appropriate equipment, and install and test final systems. One goal in phase 2 will be to build on initial work to create shared, plant-wide MPC&A assets for operation, maintenance, and evaluation of all safeguards systems.

  18. 1. Perspective View of Scales Shanty looking south with Scranton ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. Perspective View of Scales Shanty looking south with Scranton Yards in background. - Delaware, Lackawanna & Western Railroad, Scranton Yards, Track Scales, 500 feet Southeast of Bridge No. 60, Scranton, Lackawanna County, PA

  19. 1. VIEW OS SOUTH FRONT OF BOILER HOUSE, WITH SCALE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. VIEW OS SOUTH FRONT OF BOILER HOUSE, WITH SCALE STICK, SHOWING HEAVY SCALES OFFICE TO LEFT, LOOKING NORTH - Marvine Colliery, Boiler House No. 2, West side Boulevard Avenue, between East Parker Street & Route 380, Scranton, Lackawanna County, PA

  20. 1. VIEW OF EAST FRONT OF BREAKER, WITH SCALE STICK, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. VIEW OF EAST FRONT OF BREAKER, WITH SCALE STICK, SHOWING FOUNDATIONS OF RETAIL SCALES IN FOREGROUND, LOOKING WEST - Marvine Colliery, Breaker No. 2, West side Boulevard Avenue, between East Parker Street & Route 380, Scranton, Lackawanna County, PA

  1. Galaxy clustering on large scales.

    PubMed

    Efstathiou, G

    1993-06-01

    I describe some recent observations of large-scale structure in the galaxy distribution. The best constraints come from two-dimensional galaxy surveys and studies of angular correlation functions. Results from galaxy redshift surveys are much less precise but are consistent with the angular correlations, provided the distortions in mapping between real-space and redshift-space are relatively weak. The galaxy two-point correlation function, rich-cluster two-point correlation function, and galaxy-cluster cross-correlation function are all well described on large scales ( greater, similar 20h-1 Mpc, where the Hubble constant, H0 = 100h km.s-1.Mpc; 1 pc = 3.09 x 10(16) m) by the power spectrum of an initially scale-invariant, adiabatic, cold-dark-matter Universe with Gamma = Omegah approximately 0.2. I discuss how this fits in with the Cosmic Background Explorer (COBE) satellite detection of large-scale anisotropies in the microwave background radiation and other measures of large-scale structure in the Universe. PMID:11607400

  2. Scaling of the photon index vs. mass accretion rate correlation and estimate of black hole mass in M101 ULX-1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Titarchuk, Lev; Seifina, Elena

    2016-01-01

    We report the results of Swift and Chandra observations of an ultraluminous X-ray source, ULX-1 in M101. We show strong observational evidence that M101 ULX-1 undergoes spectral transitions from the low/hard state to the high/soft state during these observations. The spectra of M101 ULX-1 are well fitted by the so-called bulk motion Comptonization (BMC) model for all spectral states. We have established the photon index (Γ) saturation level, Γsat = 2.8 ± 0.1, in the Γ versus mass accretion rate (Ṁ) correlation. This Γ-Ṁ correlation allows us to evaluate black hole (BH) mass in M101 ULX-1 to be MBH ~ (3.2-4.3) × 104 M⊙, assuming the spread in distance to M101 (from 6.4 ± 0.5 Mpc to 7.4 ± 0.6 Mpc). For this BH mass estimate we apply the scaling method, using Galactic BHs XTE J1550-564, H 1743-322 and 4U 1630-472 as reference sources. The Γ vs. Ṁ correlation revealed in M101 ULX-1 is similar to that in a number of Galactic BHs and clearly exhibits the correlation along with the strong Γ saturation at ≈ 2.8. This is robust observational evidence for the presence of a BH in M101 ULX-1. We also find that the seed (disk) photon temperatures are low, on the order of 40-100 eV, which is consistent with high BH mass in M101 ULX-1. Thus, we suggest that the central object in M101 ULX-1 has intermediate BH mass on the order of 104 solar masses.

  3. Scale Up in Education. Volume 1: Ideas in Principle

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schneider, Barbara Ed.; McDonald, Sarah-Kathryn Ed.

    2006-01-01

    "Scale Up in Education, Volume 1: Ideas in Principle" examines the challenges of "scaling up" from a multidisciplinary perspective. It brings together contributions from disciplines that routinely take promising innovations to scale, including medicine, business, engineering, computing, and education. Together the contributors explore appropriate…

  4. US/Russian MPC{ampersand}A program at the VNIITF Institute, Chelyabinsk 70

    SciTech Connect

    Teryohin, V.; Tsygankov, G.; Churikov, Y,

    1997-09-22

    The All Russian Institute of Technical Physics (VNIITF) is one of the major sites in the nuclear weapons complex in Russia. The site contains a number of research facilities which use nuclear material as well as assembly, disassembly, and testing of prototypes (pilot samples) of nuclear weapons. Chelyabinsk-70 (C-70) also has ties to the major nuclear materials production facilities in the Urals region of Russia. Under the U.S./Russian Materials Protection Control and Accounting (MPC&A) cooperative program, enhanced safeguards systems are being implemented, initially at a reactor test area that contains two pulse reactors and a nuclear material storage facility. Current year projects include site-wide improvements and next year, expansion of work into other facilities at the site. C-70 has developed an extensive computerized system that integrates the physical security alarm station with elements of the nuclear material control system. Under the MPC&A program, the existing systems have been augmented with Russian and US technologies. Additional facilities were added in 1997 to broaden the impact of the MPC&A program at the site. The integrated MPC&A system will be demonstrated to US and Russian audiences when completed in the spring, 1998. This paper describes the on-going activities and describe the cooperative effort between the Lawrence Livermore, Los Alamos, Sandia, Oak Ridge, Pacific Northwest, and Brookhaven US Department of Energy National Laboratories in support of VNIITF.

  5. White Paper: Multi-purpose canister (MPC) for DOE-owned spent nuclear fuel (SNF)

    SciTech Connect

    Knecht, D.A.

    1994-04-01

    The paper examines the issue, What are the advantages, disadvantages, and other considerations for using the MPC concept as part of the strategy for interim storage and disposal of DOE-owned SNF? The paper is based in part on the results of an evaluation made for the DOE National Spent Fuel Program by the Waste Form Barrier/Canister Team, which is composed of knowledgeable DOE and DOE-contractor personnel. The paper reviews the MPC and DOE SNF status, provides criteria and other considerations applicable to the issue, and presents an evaluation, conclusions, and recommendations. The primary conclusion is that while most of DOE SNF is not currently sufficiently characterized to be sealed into an MPC, the advantages of standardized packages in handling, reduced radiation exposure, and improved human factors should be considered in DOE SNF program planning. While the design of MPCs for DOE SNF are likely premature at this time, the use of canisters should be considered which are consistent with interim storage options and the MPC design envelope.

  6. 75 FR 42292 - List of Approved Spent Fuel Storage Casks: NAC-MPC System, Revision 6

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-07-21

    ... on the State. Plain Language The Presidential Memorandum, ``Plain Language in Government Writing... for Storage of Spent Fuel at Power Reactor Sites'' (55 FR 29181; July 18, 1990). This rule also... subsequently issued a final rule on March 9, 2000 (65 FR 12444), that approved the NAC-MPC cask design...

  7. OPERATIONAL EXPERIENCE: UPGRADED MPC AND A SYSTEMS FOR THE RADIOCHEMICAL PLANT OF THE SIBERIAN CHEMICAL COMBINE

    SciTech Connect

    RODRIGUEZ,C.GOLOSKOKOV,I.FISHBONE,L.GOODEY,K.LOOMIS,M.CRAIN,B.JR.LARSEN,R.

    2003-07-18

    The success of reducing the risk of nuclear proliferation through physical protection and material control/accounting systems depends upon the development of an effective design that includes consideration of the objectives of the systems and the resources available to implement the design. Included among the objectives of the design are facility characterization, definition of threat, and identification of targets. When considering resources, the designer must consider funds available, rapid low-cost elements, technology elements, human resources, and the availability of resources to sustain operation of the end system. The Siberian Chemical Combine (SCC) is a multi-function nuclear facility located in the Tomsk region of Siberia, Russia. Beginning in 1996, SCC joined with the United States Department of Energy (US/DOE) Material Protection, Control, and Accounting (MPC&A) Program to develop and implement MPC&A upgrades for the Radiochemical, Chemical Metallurgical, Conversion, Uranium Enrichment, and Reactor Plants of the SCC. At the Radiochemical Plant the MPC&A design and implementation process has been largely completed for the Plutonium Storage Facility and related areas of the Radiochemical Plant. Design and implementation of upgrades for the Radiochemical Plant include rapid physical protection upgrades such as bricking up of doors and windows, and installation of security-hardened doors. Rapid material control and accounting upgrades include installation of modern balances and bar code equipment. Comprehensive MPC&A upgrades include the installation of access controls to sensitive areas of the Plant, alarm communication and display (AC&D) systems to detect and annunciate alarm conditions, closed circuit (CCTV) systems to assess alarm conditions, central and secondary alarm station upgrades that enable security forces to assess and respond to alarm conditions, material control and accounting upgrades that include upgraded physical inventory procedures, and

  8. Implementation of the MPC and A Operations Monitorying (MOM) System at JSC PO Sevmas

    SciTech Connect

    Monogarov, A.; Taranenko, V.; Serov,A; Duncan, C; Brownell, L; Pratt, W.T.; Carbonaro, J; White, R.M.; Coffing, J.A.

    2010-07-11

    The Material Protection, Control and Accounting (MPC&A) Program has been working since 1994 with nuclear sites in Russia to upgrade the physical protection (PP) and material control and accounting (MC&A) functions at facilities containing weapons usable nuclear material. In early 2001, the MPC&A program initiated the MPC&A Operations Monitoring (MOM) Project to monitor facilities where MPC&A upgrades have been installed to provide increased confidence that personnel are present and vigilant, provide confidence that security procedures are being properly performed and provide additional assurance that nuclear materials have not been stolen. The MOM project began as a pilot project at the Moscow State Engineering Physics Institute (MEPhI) and a MOM system was successfully installed in October 2001. Following the success of the MEPhI pilot project, the MPC&A Program expanded the installation of MOM systems to several other Russian facilities, including the JSC 'PO' Sevmash', Severodvinsk, Russia. The MOM system was made operational at Sevmash in September, 2008. This paper will discuss the objectives of the MOM system installed at Sevmash and indicate how the objectives influenced the development of the conceptual design. The paper will also describe activities related to installation of the infrastructure and the MOM system at Sevmash. Experience gained from operation of the system and how the objectives are being met will also be discussed. The paper will describe how the MOM system is used at Sevmash and, in particular, how the data is analyzed. Finally, future activities including potential expansion of the MOM system, operator training, data sharing and analysis, procedure development, repair and maintenance will be included in the paper.

  9. Galactic Conformity from z=0.2-1.0 with PRIMUS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berti, Angela; Coil, Alison L.

    2016-06-01

    We test for galactic conformity from z=0.2-1.0 to a projected distance of 5 Mpc using spectroscopic redshifts from the PRism MUlti-object Survey (PRIMUS). Our sample consists of ~60,000 galaxies in five separate fields covering a total of ~5.5 square degrees, which allows us to account for cosmic variance. Dividing our sample into star-forming and quiescent galaxies using a cut in specific star formation rate, we identify star-forming and quiescent “isolated primary” galaxies. We match the redshift and stellar mass distributions of these samples, to control for correlations between quiescent fraction and redshift and stellar mass. We detect a significant conformity signal (>3 sigma) of ~5% on scales of 0-1 Mpc and a 2.5-sigma signal of ~1% on scales of 1-3 Mpc. We also test for redshift and stellar mass dependence of the conformity signal within our sample.

  10. Synergistic effect on corrosion resistance of Phynox substrates grafted with surface-initiated ATRP (co)polymerization of 2-methacryloyloxyethyl phosphorylcholine (MPC) and 2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate (HEMA).

    PubMed

    Barthélémy, Bastien; Maheux, Simon; Devillers, Sébastien; Kanoufi, Frédéric; Combellas, Catherine; Delhalle, Joseph; Mekhalif, Zineb

    2014-07-01

    Phynox is of high interest for biomedical applications due to its biocompatibility and corrosion resistance. However, some Phynox applications require specific surface properties. These can be imparted with suitable surface functionalizations of its oxide layer. The present work investigates the surface-initiated atom transfer radical polymerization (ATRP) of 2-methacryloyoxyethyl phosphorylcholine (MPC), 2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate (HEMA), and ATRP copolymerization of (HEMA-co-MPC) (block and statistic copolymerization with different molar ratios) on grafted Phynox substrates modified with 11-(2-bromoisobutyrate)-undecyl-1-phosphonic acid (BUPA) as initiator. It is found that ATRP (co)polymerization of these monomers is feasible and forms hydrophilic layers, while improving the corrosion resistance of the system. PMID:24915233

  11. Evidence for shock acceleration and intergalactic magnetic fields in a large-scale filament of galaxies ZwCl 2341.1+0000

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bagchi, Joydeep; Enßlin, Torsten A.; Miniati, Francesco; Stalin, C. S.; Singh, M.; Raychaudhury, Somak; Humeshkar, N. B.

    2002-07-01

    We report the discovery of large-scale diffuse radio emission from what appears to be a large-scale filamentary network of galaxies in the region of cluster ZwCl 2341.1+0000, and stretching over an area of at least 6 h50-1 Mpc in diameter. Multicolour CCD observations yield photometric redshifts indicating that a significant fraction of the optical galaxies in this region is at a redshift of z=0.3. This is supported by spectroscopic measurements of 4 galaxies in the Sloan Digitized Sky Survey (SDSS) survey at a mean z=0.27. We present VLA images at λ=20 cm (NVSS) and 90 cm, showing the detailed radio structure of the filaments. Comparison with the high resolution FIRST radio survey shows that the diffuse emission is not due to known individual point sources. The diffuse radio-emission has a spectral index α≲-0.5, and is most likely synchrotron emission from relativistic charged particles in an inter-galactic magnetic field. Furthermore, this optical/radio structure is detected in X-rays by the ROSAT all-sky survey. It has a 0.1-2.4 keV luminosity of about 10 44 erg s -1 and shows an extended highly non-relaxed morphology. These observations suggest that ZwCl 2341.1+0000 is possibly a proto-cluster of galaxies in which we are witnessing the process of structure formation. We show that the energetics of accretion shocks generated in forming large-scale structures are sufficient to produce enough high energy cosmic-ray (CR) electrons required to explain the observed radio emission, provided a magnetic field of strength B≳0.3 μG is present there. The latter is only a lower limit and the actual magnetic field is likely to be higher depending on the morphology of the emitting region. Finally, we show results from a numerical simulation of large-scale structure formation including acceleration of CR electrons at cosmological shocks and magnetic field evolution. Our results are in accord with the observed radio synchrotron and X-ray thermal bremsstrahlung fluxes

  12. Catechol dioxygenases from Escherichia coli (MhpB) and Alcaligenes eutrophus (MpcI): sequence analysis and biochemical properties of a third family of extradiol dioxygenases.

    PubMed Central

    Spence, E L; Kawamukai, M; Sanvoisin, J; Braven, H; Bugg, T D

    1996-01-01

    The nucleotide sequence of the Escherichia coli mhpB gene, encoding 2,3-dihydroxyphenylpropionate 1,2-dioxygenase, was determined by sequencing of a 3.1-kb fragment of DNA from Kohara phage 139. The inferred amino acid sequence showed 58% sequence identity with the sequence of an extradiol dioxygenase, MpcI, from Alcaligenes eutrophus and 10 to 20% sequence identity with protocatechuate 4,5-dioxygenase from Pseudomonas paucimobilis, with 3,4-dihydroxyphenylacetate 2,3-dioxygenase from E. coli, and with human 3-hydroxyanthranilate dioxygenase. Sequence similarity between the N- and C-terminal halves of this new family of dioxygenases was detected, with conserved histidine residues in the N-terminal domain. A model is proposed to account for the relationship between this family of enzymes and other extradiol dioxygenases. The A. eutrophus MpcI enzyme was expressed in E. coli, purified, and characterized as a protein with a subunit size of 33.8 kDa. Purified MhpB and MpcI showed similar substrate specificities for a range of 3-substituted catechols, and evidence for essential histidine and cysteine residues in both enzymes was obtained. PMID:8752345

  13. ANALYSIS OF KEY MPC COMPONENTS MATERIAL REQUIREMENTS (SCPB: N/A)

    SciTech Connect

    D. Stahl

    1996-03-19

    This analysis is prepared by the Mined Geologic Disposal System (MGDS) Waste Package Development Department (WPDD) in response to a request received via a QAP-3-12 Design Input Data Request from Waste Acceptance, Storage & Transportation (WAST) Design (formerly MRS/MPC Design). The request is to provide: Specific material requirements for the various MPC components (shell, basket, closure lids, shield plug, neutron absorber, and flux traps, if used ). The objective of this analysis is to provide the requested requirements. The purpose of this analysis is to provide a documented record of the basis for the requested requirements. The response is stated in Section 8 herein. The analysis is based upon requirements from an MGDS perspective.

  14. Numerical analysis of plasma flows in an MPC duct with diverter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Badin, V. V.

    1983-01-01

    The two-dimensional MHD-flow of the ideal plasma in a channel of the magnetoplasma compressor (MPC) with an axial hole in the central electrode (divertor) is numerically simulated. The steady-state regime of the flow is obtained. The influence of finite and periodical density perturbation at the entry of the channel on the compressional flow properties is investigated. It is shown that the flow is stable under such perturbations.

  15. A Decoupled MPC for Motion Control in Robotino Using a Geometric Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Straßberger, Daniel; Mercorelli, Paolo; Sergiyenko, Oleg

    2015-11-01

    This paper proposes a controller for motion control of the Robotino. The proposed controller considers a functional decoupling control strategy realized using a geometric approach and the invertibility property of the DC-drives with which the Robotino is equipped. Horizontal, Vertical and Angular motions are considered and once the decoupling between these motions is obtained, a Model Predictive Control (MPC) strategy is used in combination with the inverse DC-drive model. Simulation results using real data of Robotino are shown.

  16. Scaling and Dimensioning. Pre-Apprenticeship Phase 1 Training.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lane Community Coll., Eugene, OR.

    This self-paced student training module on scaling and dimensioning is one of a number of modules developed for Pre-apprenticeship Phase 1 Training. Purpose of the module is to teach students the concepts of scales and dimensions, their symbols, and how they are applied in reading and drawing blueprints. The module may contain some or all of the…

  17. Large-Scale 1:1 Computing Initiatives: An Open Access Database

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Richardson, Jayson W.; McLeod, Scott; Flora, Kevin; Sauers, Nick J.; Kannan, Sathiamoorthy; Sincar, Mehmet

    2013-01-01

    This article details the spread and scope of large-scale 1:1 computing initiatives around the world. What follows is a review of the existing literature around 1:1 programs followed by a description of the large-scale 1:1 database. Main findings include: 1) the XO and the Classmate PC dominate large-scale 1:1 initiatives; 2) if professional…

  18. Practical application of drainage system control by using MPC in Noorderzijlvest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Heeringen, Klaas-Jan; Gooijer, Jan; Schwanenberg, Dirk

    2013-04-01

    We discuss the implementation of a Model Predictive Control (MPC) approach for the control of the pump stations and tidal spilling sluices in the district of the regional water authority Noorderzijlvest in the north of the Netherlands. The RTC component is integrated in a Delft-FEWS application that connects to the SCADA system of the waterboard and also 17 aggregated structures including 127 individual pumps and gates The approach consists of a Nonlinear MPC in combination with a low-pass filter for state updating. The MPC runs hourly for a 5-day forecast horizon. One main objective of the control is flood mitigation during extreme taken into account by anticipating approaching rainfall events by flow forecasting. Another objective has is the reduction of pumping costs by taking advantage of gravity flow through gates during low tide conditions and the exploitation of cheaper electricity at night, both in combination with tactical usage of the available storage in the water system. Firstly the approach is tested in a closed-loop setting in combination with a detailed one-dimensional hydraulic model as the real-world replacement. A performance comparison of the approach against the existing feedback control shows pumping cost reductions in the range of 7-35% for different sub-systems or total annual cost savings in the order of 150-200 thousand Euros as well as significantly reduced peak water levels during flood events.

  19. Effect of sodium chloride on hydration structures of PMEA and P(MPC-r-BMA).

    PubMed

    Morita, Shigeaki; Tanaka, Masaru

    2014-09-01

    The hydration structures of two different types of biomaterials, i.e., poly(2-methoxyethyl acrylate) (PMEA) and a random copolymer of 2-methacryloyloxyethyl phosphorylcholine and n-butyl methacrylate (P(MPC-r-BMA)), were investigated by means of attenuated total reflection infrared (ATR-IR) spectroscopy. The effects of the addition of sodium chloride to liquid water in contact with the surfaces of the polymer films were examined. The neutral polymer of PMEA was easily dehydrated by NaCl addition, whereas the zwitterionic polymer of P(MPC-r-BMA) was hardly dehydrated. More specifically, nonfreezing water having a strong interaction with the PMEA chain and freezing bound water having an intermediate interaction were hardly dehydrated by contacting with normal saline solution, whereas freezing water having a weak interaction with the PMEA chain was readily dehydrated. In contrast, freezing water in P(MPC-r-BMA) is exchanged for the saline solution contacting with the material surface without dehydration. PMID:25133748

  20. Acoustic characteristics of 1/20-scale model helicopter rotors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shenoy, Rajarama K.; Kohlhepp, Fred W.; Leighton, Kenneth P.

    1986-01-01

    A wind tunnel test to study the effects of geometric scale on acoustics and to investigate the applicability of very small scale models for the study of acoustic characteristics of helicopter rotors was conducted in the United Technologies Research Center Acoustic Research Tunnel. The results show that the Reynolds number effects significantly alter the Blade-Vortex-Interaction (BVI) Noise characteristics by enhancing the lower frequency content and suppressing the higher frequency content. In the time domain this is observed as an inverted thickness noise impulse rather than the typical positive-negative impulse of BVI noise. At higher advance ratio conditions, in the absence of BVI, the 1/20 scale model acoustic trends with Mach number follow those of larger scale models. However, the 1/20 scale model acoustic trends appear to indicate stall at higher thrust and advance ratio conditions.

  1. FEATURE 1, SMALL GUN POSITION, VIEW FACING NORTH, (with scale ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    FEATURE 1, SMALL GUN POSITION, VIEW FACING NORTH, (with scale stick). - Naval Air Station Barbers Point, Anti-Aircraft Battery Complex-Small Gun Position, East of Coral Sea Road, northwest of Hamilton Road, Ewa, Honolulu County, HI

  2. Fiscal year 1993 1/25-scale sludge mobilization testing

    SciTech Connect

    Powell, M.R.; Golcar, G.R.; Hymas, C.R.; McKay, R.L.

    1995-04-01

    Sixteen 1/25-scale sludge mobilization experiments were conducted in fiscal year (FY) 1993. The results of this testing are presented in this document. The ability of a single, centrally-located, scale model mixer pump to resuspend a layer of simulated tank sludge was evaluated for five different simulant types. The resistance of these simulants to the mobilizing action of the mixer pump jets was not found to adequately correlate with simulant vane shear strength. The data indicate that the simulant cohesion, as quantified by tensile strength, may provide a good measure of mobilization resistance. A single test was done to evaluate whether indexed mixer pump rotation is significantly more effective than the planned continuous oscillation. No significant difference was found in the sludge mobilization caused by these two modes of operation. Two tests were conducted using a clay-based sludge simulant that contained approximately 5 wt% soluble solids. The distance to which the mixer pump jets were effective for this simulant was approximately 50% greater than on similar simulants that did not contain soluble solids. The implication is that sludge dissolution effects may significantly enhance the performance of mixer pumps in some tanks. The development of a means to correlate the magnitude of this effect with waste properties is a direction for future work. Two tests were performed with the goal of determining whether the 1/25-scale sludge mobilization data can be scaled linearly to 1/12-scale. The two 1/25-scale tests were conducted using the same simulant recipe as had been used in previous 1/12-scale tests. The difficulty of matching the 1/25-scale simulants, with those used previously is thought to have adversely affected the results. Further tests are needed to determine whether the data from sludge mobilization tests can be linearly scaled.

  3. 1/f scaling in heart rate requires antagonistic autonomic control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Struzik, Zbigniew R.; Hayano, Junichiro; Sakata, Seiichiro; Kwak, Shin; Yamamoto, Yoshiharu

    2004-11-01

    We present systematic evidence for the origins of 1/f -type temporal scaling in human heart rate. The heart rate is regulated by the activity of two branches of the autonomic nervous system: the parasympathetic (PNS) and the sympathetic (SNS) nervous systems. We examine alterations in the scaling property when the balance between PNS and SNS activity is modified, and find that the relative PNS suppression by congestive heart failure results in a substantial increase in the Hurst exponent H towards random-walk scaling 1/f2 and a similar breakdown is observed with relative SNS suppression by primary autonomic failure. These results suggest that 1/f scaling in heart rate requires the intricate balance between the antagonistic activity of PNS and SNS.

  4. U.S./Russian cooperative efforts to enhance nuclear MPC&A at VNIITF, (Chelyabinsk-70)

    SciTech Connect

    Abramson, B; Apt, K; Blasy, J; Bukin, D; Churikov, Y; Eras, A; Magda, E; Neymotin, L; Schultz, F; Slankas, T; Tsygankov, G; Zuev, V

    1998-09-01

    The All Russian Scientific Research Institute of Technical Physics (VNIITF) is one of the major sites in the nuclear weapons complex in Russia. The site contains a number of research facilities which use nuclear material as well as assembly, disassembly, and testing of prototypes (pilot samples) of nuclear weapons. VNIITF also has ties to the major nuclear materials production facilities in the Urals region of Russia. The objective of the U.S./Russian Materials Protection Control and Accounting (MPC&A) cooperative program between the US Department of Energy and Russia's Ministry of Atomic Eneryy, at VNIITF is to improve the protection and accountability of nuclear material at VNIITF. Enhanced safeguards systems have been implemented at a reactor test area called the Pulse Research Reactor Facility (PRR) in Area 20. The area contains three pulse reactors with associated storage areas. The integrated MPC&A system at the PRR was demonstrated to US and Russian audiences in May, 1998. Expansion of work into several new facilities is underway both in Area 20 and at other locations. These include processing and production facilities some of which are considered sensitive facilities, by the Russian side. Methods have been developed to assure that work is done as agreed without actually having access to the buildings. C-70 has developed an extensive computerized system which integrates the physical security alarm station with elements of the nuclear material control system. Under the MPC&A program, the existing systems have been augmented with Russian and US technologies. This paper will describe the work completed at the PRR, and the on-going activities and cooperative effort between the Lawrence Livermore, Los Alamos, Sandia, Oak Ridge, Pacific Northwest, and Brookhaven US Department of Energy National Laboratories in support of VNIITF.

  5. First-Session Competency: The Brief Strategic Therapy Scale-1

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Amini, Rachelle L.; Woolley, Scott R.

    2011-01-01

    The first session in brief strategic therapy is the most critical phase of treatment. More than a mere "assessment phase," the first session in a true intervention sets the stage for all subsequent therapeutic maneuvers. This article presents a supervisory observation tool, the Brief Strategic Therapy Scale-1 (BSTS-1), a fidelity measure proposed…

  6. A hybrid multiresolution scheme to efficiently model the structure of reionization on the largest scales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Han-Seek; Wyithe, J. Stuart B.; Park, Jaehong; Poole, Gregory B.; Lacey, C. G.; Baugh, C. M.

    2016-02-01

    Redshifted 21-cm measurements of the structure of ionized regions that grow during reionization promise to provide a new probe of early galaxy and structure formation. One of the challenges of modelling reionization is to account both for the subhalo scale physics of galaxy formation and the regions of ionization on scales that are many orders of magnitude larger. To bridge this gap we first calculate the statistical relationship between ionizing luminosity and Mpc-scale overdensity using detailed models of galaxy formation computed using relatively small volume - (˜100 Mpc h-1)3, high-resolution dark matter simulations. We then use a Monte Carlo technique to apply this relationship to reionization of the intergalactic medium within large volume dark matter simulations - (>1 Gpc h-1)3. The resulting simulations can be used to address the contribution of very large scale clustering of galaxies to the structure of reionization, and show that volumes larger than 500 Mpc h-1 are required to probe the largest reionization features mid-way through reionization. As an example application of our technique, we demonstrate that the predicted 21-cm power spectrum amplitude and gradient could be used to determine the importance of supernovae feedback for early galaxy formation.

  7. U.S.-Russia MPC and A upgrades at the Beloyarsk Nuclear Power Plant

    SciTech Connect

    Saraev, O.; Haase, M.; Smarto, C.; Mikkelsen, K.; Heinberg, C.; Showalter, R.; Soo Hoo, M.; Hatcher, C.; Forehand, M.

    1998-08-01

    During the January 1996 meeting of the Gore-Chernomyrdin Commission, the Beloyarsk Nuclear Power Plant (BNPP) was identified as one of the additional sites for cooperative projects on upgrading Materials Protection, Control and Accounting (MPC and A). Since June 1996, Sandia National Laboratories (SNL), Pacific Northwest National Laboratories (PNNL), and Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) have worked with BNPP to upgrade MPC and A at the facility. Some unique challenges were encountered because BNPP has an operating BN-600 600-Megawatt breeder reactor. SNL has been responsible for working with BNPP to implement physical protection upgrades to the Central Alarm Station, Fresh Fuel Storage building, Spent Fuel Storage Area, and Vehicle/Personnel Portal. In addition, improved communication equipment for the Ministry of the Interior (MVD) guards and training of personnel were provided. PNNL has been responsible for coordinating Material Control and Accounting (MC and A) upgrades at BNPP. PNNL, in conjunction with LANL, has implemented such MC and A upgrades as a computerized nuclear materials accounting system, training in MC and A elements, nondestructive assay instrumentation for fresh fuel, installation of a fork detector for measuring spent fuel, and installation of an underwater video camera for verification of spent fuel serial numbers.

  8. KrasMAS: Implementation of a nuclear material computerized accounting system at the Mining and Chemical Combine through the Russian/US cooperative MPC and A program

    SciTech Connect

    Dorofeev, K.V.; Zhidkov, V.V.; Martinez, B.J.; Perry, R.T.; Scott, S.C.

    1998-12-31

    The Russian/US Mining and Chemical Combine (Gorno-Kimichesky Kombinat, GKhK, also referred to as Krasnoyarsk-26) Material Protection, Control and Accounting (MPC and A) project was initiated in June 1996. A critical component of the ongoing cooperative MPC and A enhancements at the GKhK is the implementation of a computerized nuclear material control and accountability (MC and A) system. This system must meet the MC and A requirements of the GKhK by integrating the information generated by numerous existing and new MC and A components in place at the GKhK (e.g., scales, bar-code equipment, NDA measurement systems). During the first phase of this effort, the GKhK adapted CoreMAS (developed at Los Alamos National Laboratory) for use in the PuO{sub 2} storage facility. This included formulation of Web-based user interfaces for plant personnel, Russification of the existing user interface, and at the functional level, modification of the CoreMAS stored procedures. The modified system is referred to as KrasMAS and builds upon completed work on CoreMAS. Ongoing efforts include adding GKhK specific report forms and expanding the functionality of the system for implementation at the radiochemical processing and reactor plants of the GKhK. Collaborations with other Russian facilities for appropriate parts of these efforts will be pursued.

  9. Heisenberg-scaled magnetometer with dipolar spin-1 condensates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xing, Haijun; Wang, Anbang; Tan, Qing-Shou; Zhang, Wenxian; Yi, Su

    2016-04-01

    We propose a scheme to realize a Heisenberg-scaled magnetometer using dipolar spin-1 condensates. The input state of magnetometer is prepared by slowly sweeping a transverse magnetic field to zero, which yields a highly entangled spin state of N atoms. We show that this process is protected by a parity symmetry such that the state preparation time is within the reach of the current experiment. We also propose a parity measurement with a Stern-Gerlach apparatus which is shown to approach the optimal measurement in the large atom number limit. Finally, we show that the phase estimation sensitivity of the proposed scheme roughly follows the Heisenberg scaling.

  10. Heteroepitaxial metallo-phthalocyanine (MPc, M = cobalt, nickel, copper) thin films on gold: Atomic and interfacial electronic structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ellis, Trinity S.

    2005-12-01

    Organic semiconductors have become a hot topic for research within the past few years. This work describes research into a family of organic semiconductors known as metallo-phthalocyanine (MPc) in which the electronic and optical properties can be easily tuned by the systematic modification of the metal cations and ligands. More specifically, thin films of CoPc, NiPc, and CuPc have been evaporated onto a "5 x 20" reconstructed Au(001) substrate and have been investigated by employing low energy electron diffraction and ultraviolet photoelectron spectroscopy. Low energy electron diffraction reveals that thin films of CuPc and NiPc are highly ordered with a square unit cell aligned along the substrate <110> and <11¯0> axes. In addition, deposition of CuPc onto the Au(001) substrate when at room temperature and elevated temperatures reveal that the square unit cell is larger when the substrate is heated. On the other hand, CoPc thin films are not well ordered as evidenced by multiple rotationally equivalent square domains, which are separated by 16°. Even more interesting is that the contrast between NiPc and CoPc on Au(001) is further found in the interfacial electronic structure. Ultraviolet photoelectron spectroscopy studies of the interfacial layers of NiPc deposited on the reconstructed gold substrate indicate that NiPc physisorbs on the gold surface as verified by a uniform molecular orbital (MO) shift. However, similar studies of the interfacial layers of CoPc depict an interaction between the CoPc 13a1g MO and the Au surface suggesting a charge transfer between the two. In addition to the research into MPc thin films, this work also describes the development of a Low Energy Electron Diffraction Intensity versus Voltage (LEED-IV) system for the Laboratory for Surface Analysis and Modification. This development involved the merging of various hardware and software systems by means of LabVIEW environment. Characterization of the system performance was carried

  11. Biocontrol of Late Blight (Phytophthora capsici) Disease and Growth Promotion of Pepper by Burkholderia cepacia MPC-7

    PubMed Central

    Sopheareth, Mao; Chan, Sarun; Naing, Kyaw Wai; Lee, Yong Seong; Hyun, Hae Nam; Kim, Young Cheol; Kim, Kil Yong

    2013-01-01

    A chitinolytic bacterial strain having strong antifungal activity was isolated and identified as Burkholderia cepacia MPC-7 based on 16S rRNA gene analysis. MPC-7 solubilized insoluble phosphorous in hydroxyapatite agar media. It produced gluconic acid and 2-ketogluconic acid related to the decrease in pH of broth culture. The antagonist produced benzoic acid (BA) and phenylacetic acid (PA). The authentic compounds, BA and PA, showed a broad spectrum of antimicrobial activity against yeast, several bacterial and fungal pathogens in vitro. To demonstrate the biocontrol efficiency of MPC-7 on late blight disease caused by Phytophthora capsici, pepper plants in pot trials were treated with modified medium only (M), M plus zoospore inoculation (MP), MPC-7 cultured broth (B) and B plus zoospore inoculation (BP). With the sudden increase in root mortality, plants in MP wilted as early as five days after pathogen inoculation. However, plant in BP did not show any symptom of wilting until five days. Root mortality in BP was markedly reduced for as much as 50%. Plants in B had higher dry weight, P concentration in root, and larger leaf area compared to those in M and MP. These results suggested that B. cepacia MPC-7 should be considered as a candidate for the biological fertilizer as well as antimicrobial agent for pepper plants. PMID:25288930

  12. Biocontrol of Late Blight (Phytophthora capsici) Disease and Growth Promotion of Pepper by Burkholderia cepacia MPC-7.

    PubMed

    Sopheareth, Mao; Chan, Sarun; Naing, Kyaw Wai; Lee, Yong Seong; Hyun, Hae Nam; Kim, Young Cheol; Kim, Kil Yong

    2013-03-01

    A chitinolytic bacterial strain having strong antifungal activity was isolated and identified as Burkholderia cepacia MPC-7 based on 16S rRNA gene analysis. MPC-7 solubilized insoluble phosphorous in hydroxyapatite agar media. It produced gluconic acid and 2-ketogluconic acid related to the decrease in pH of broth culture. The antagonist produced benzoic acid (BA) and phenylacetic acid (PA). The authentic compounds, BA and PA, showed a broad spectrum of antimicrobial activity against yeast, several bacterial and fungal pathogens in vitro. To demonstrate the biocontrol efficiency of MPC-7 on late blight disease caused by Phytophthora capsici, pepper plants in pot trials were treated with modified medium only (M), M plus zoospore inoculation (MP), MPC-7 cultured broth (B) and B plus zoospore inoculation (BP). With the sudden increase in root mortality, plants in MP wilted as early as five days after pathogen inoculation. However, plant in BP did not show any symptom of wilting until five days. Root mortality in BP was markedly reduced for as much as 50%. Plants in B had higher dry weight, P concentration in root, and larger leaf area compared to those in M and MP. These results suggested that B. cepacia MPC-7 should be considered as a candidate for the biological fertilizer as well as antimicrobial agent for pepper plants. PMID:25288930

  13. Implementation of the MPC and A Operations Monitoring (MOM) System at IRT-T FSRE Nuclear Power Institute (NPI)

    SciTech Connect

    Sitdikov,I.; Zenkov, A.; Tsibulnikov, Y.; Duncan, C.; Brownell, L.; Pratt, W.T.; Carbonaro, J.; White, R.M.; Coffing, J.A.

    2008-07-13

    The Material Protection, Control and Accounting (MPC&A) Program has been working since 1994 with nuclear sites in Russia to upgrade the physical protection (PP) and material control and accounting (MC&A) functions at facilities containing weapons usable nuclear material. In early 2001, the MPC&A program initiated the MPC&A Operations Monitoring (MOM) Project to monitor facilities where MPC&A upgrades have been installed to provide increased confidence that personnel are present and vigilant, provide confidence that security procedures are being properly performed and provide additional assurance that nuclear materials have not been stolen. The MOM project began as a pilot project at the Moscow State Engineering Physics Institute (MEPhI) and a MOM system was successfully installed in October 2001. Following the success of the MEPhI pilot project, the MPC&A Program expanded the installation of MOM systems to several other Russian facilities, including the Nuclear Physics Institute (NPI) in Tomsk. The MOM system was made operational at NPI in October 2004. This paper is focused on the experience gained from operation of this system and the objectives of the MOM system. The paper also describes how the MOM system is used at NPI and, in particular, how the data is analyzed. Finally, potential expansion of the MOM system at NPI is described.

  14. MPC&A training needs of the NIS/Baltics States.

    SciTech Connect

    Beck, David Franklin; Stoy-McLeod, Carol L.

    2006-07-01

    This report serves to document contract deliverables considered to be of continuing interest associated with two workshops conducted as part of an initial assessment of Material Protection, Control, and Accounting (MPC&A) training needs of the Newly Independent and Baltic States (NIS/Baltics). These workshops were held in Kiev, Ukraine, ca. 2003-2004, with the assistance of personnel from the George Kuzmycz Training Center (GKTC) of the Kiev Institute of Nuclear Research (KINR). Because of the dominant role Ukraine plays in the region in terms of the nuclear industry, one workshop focused exclusively on Ukrainian training needs, with participants attending from twelve Ukrainian organizations (plus U.S. DOE/NNSA representatives). The second workshop included participation by a further ten countries from the NIS/Baltics region. In addition, the training needs data developed during the workshop were supplemented by the outcomes of surveys and studies conducted by the GKTC.

  15. Observational requirements for Lyα forest tomographic mapping of large-scale structure at z ∼ 2

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Khee-Gan; Hennawi, Joseph F.; White, Martin; Croft, Rupert A. C.; Ozbek, Melih

    2014-06-10

    The z ≳ 2 Lyα forest traces the underlying dark matter distribution on large scales and, given sufficient sightlines, can be used to create three-dimensional (3D) maps of large-scale structures. We examine the observational requirements to construct such maps and estimate the signal-to-noise as a function of exposure time and sightline density. Sightline densities at z = 2.25 are n {sub los} ≈ [360, 1200, 3300] deg{sup –2} at limiting magnitudes of g = [24.0, 24.5, 25.0], resulting in transverse sightline separations of (d ) ≈ [3.6, 1.9, 1.2] h {sup –1} Mpc, which roughly sets the reconstruction scale. We simulate these reconstructions using mock spectra with realistic noise properties and find that spectra with S/N ≈ 4 per angstrom can be used to generate maps that clearly trace the underlying dark matter at overdensities of ρ/(ρ) ∼ 1. For the VLT/VIMOS spectrograph, exposure times t {sub exp} = [4, 6, 10] hr are sufficient for maps with spatial resolution ε{sub 3D} = [5.0, 3.2, 2.3] h {sup –1} Mpc. Assuming ∼250 h {sup –1} Mpc is probed along the line of sight, 1 deg{sup 2} of survey area would cover a comoving volume of ≈10{sup 6} h {sup –3} Mpc{sup 3} at (z) ∼ 2.3, enabling the efficient mapping of large volumes with 8-10 m telescopes. These maps could be used to study galaxy environments, the topology of large-scale structures at high z, and to detect proto-clusters.

  16. PRIMUS: The Effect of Physical Scale on the Luminosity Dependence of Galaxy Clustering via Cross-correlations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bray, Aaron D.; Eisenstein, Daniel J.; Skibba, Ramin A.; Blanton, Michael R.; Coil, Alison L.; Cool, Richard J.; Mendez, Alexander J.; Moustakas, John; Zhu, Guangtun

    2015-10-01

    We report small-scale clustering measurements from the PRIsm MUlti-object Survey (PRIMUS) spectroscopic redshift survey as a function of color and luminosity. We measure the real-space cross-correlations between 62,106 primary galaxies with PRIMUS redshifts and a tracer population of ∼545,000 photometric galaxies over redshifts from z = 0.2 to z = 1. We separately fit a power-law model in redshift and luminosity to each of three independent color-selected samples of galaxies. We report clustering amplitudes at fiducial values of z = 0.5 and L=1.5{L}*. The clustering of the red galaxies is ∼ 3 times as strong as that of the blue galaxies and ∼ 1.5 as strong as that of the green galaxies. We also find that the luminosity dependence of the clustering is strongly dependent on physical scale, with greater luminosity dependence being found between r=0.0625 {h}-1 {Mpc} and r=0.25 {h}-1 {Mpc}, compared to the r=0.5 {h}-1 {Mpc} to r=2 {h}-1 {Mpc} range. Moreover, over a range of two orders of magnitude in luminosity, a single power-law fit to the luminosity dependence is not sufficient to explain the increase in clustering at both the bright and faint ends at the smaller scales. We argue that luminosity-dependent clustering at small scales is a necessary component of galaxy-halo occupation models for blue, star-forming galaxies as well as for red, quenched galaxies.

  17. AN ACCURATE FLUX DENSITY SCALE FROM 1 TO 50 GHz

    SciTech Connect

    Perley, R. A.; Butler, B. J. E-mail: BButler@nrao.edu

    2013-02-15

    We develop an absolute flux density scale for centimeter-wavelength astronomy by combining accurate flux density ratios determined by the Very Large Array between the planet Mars and a set of potential calibrators with the Rudy thermophysical emission model of Mars, adjusted to the absolute scale established by the Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe. The radio sources 3C123, 3C196, 3C286, and 3C295 are found to be varying at a level of less than {approx}5% per century at all frequencies between 1 and 50 GHz, and hence are suitable as flux density standards. We present polynomial expressions for their spectral flux densities, valid from 1 to 50 GHz, with absolute accuracy estimated at 1%-3% depending on frequency. Of the four sources, 3C286 is the most compact and has the flattest spectral index, making it the most suitable object on which to establish the spectral flux density scale. The sources 3C48, 3C138, 3C147, NGC 7027, NGC 6542, and MWC 349 show significant variability on various timescales. Polynomial coefficients for the spectral flux density are developed for 3C48, 3C138, and 3C147 for each of the 17 observation dates, spanning 1983-2012. The planets Venus, Uranus, and Neptune are included in our observations, and we derive their brightness temperatures over the same frequency range.

  18. The scale of cosmic isotropy

    SciTech Connect

    Marinoni, C.; Bel, J.; Buzzi, A. E-mail: Julien.Bel@cpt.univ-mrs.fr

    2012-10-01

    The most fundamental premise to the standard model of the universe states that the large-scale properties of the universe are the same in all directions and at all comoving positions. Demonstrating this hypothesis has proven to be a formidable challenge. The cross-over scale R{sub iso} above which the galaxy distribution becomes statistically isotropic is vaguely defined and poorly (if not at all) quantified. Here we report on a formalism that allows us to provide an unambiguous operational definition and an estimate of R{sub iso}. We apply the method to galaxies in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) Data Release 7, finding that R{sub iso} ∼ 150h{sup −1}Mpc. Besides providing a consistency test of the Copernican principle, this result is in agreement with predictions based on numerical simulations of the spatial distribution of galaxies in cold dark matter dominated cosmological models.

  19. The EFT of Large Scale Structures at all redshifts: analytical predictions for lensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foreman, Simon; Senatore, Leonardo

    2016-04-01

    We study the prediction of the Effective Field Theory of Large Scale Structures (EFTofLSS) for the matter power spectrum at different redshifts. In previous work, we found that the two-loop prediction can match the nonlinear power spectrum measured from N-body simulations at redshift zero within approximately 2% up to k~ 0.6 h Mpc-1 after fixing a single free parameter, the so-called "speed of sound". We determine the time evolution of this parameter by matching the EFTofLSS prediction to simulation output at different redshifts, and find that it is well-described by a fitting function that only includes one additional parameter. After the two free parameters are fixed, the prediction agrees with nonlinear data within approximately 2% up to at least k~ 1 h Mpc-1 at z>= 1, and also within approximately 5% up to k~ 1.2 h Mpc-1 at z=1 and k~ 2.3 h Mpc-1 at z=3, a major improvement with respect to other perturbative techniques. We also develop an accurate way to estimate where the EFTofLSS predictions at different loop orders should fail, based on the sizes of the next-order terms that are neglected, and find agreement with the actual comparisons to data. Finally, we use our matter power spectrum results to perform analytical calculations of lensing potential power spectra corresponding to both CMB and galaxy lensing. This opens the door to future direct applications of the EFTofLSS to observations of gravitational clustering on cosmic scales.

  20. Scales

    MedlinePlus

    Scales are a visible peeling or flaking of outer skin layers. These layers are called the stratum ... Scales may be caused by dry skin, certain inflammatory skin conditions, or infections. Eczema , ringworm , and psoriasis ...

  1. Investigation of Homogeneity and Matter Distribution on Large Scales Using Large Quasar Groups

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Ming-Hua

    2015-12-01

    We use 20 large quasar group (LQG) samples in Park et al. (2015) to investigate the homogeneity of the 0.3 ≲ z ≲ 1.6 Universe (z denotes the redshift). For comparison, we also employ the 12 LQGs samples at 0.5 ≲ z ≲ 2 in Komberg et al. (1996) to do the analysis. We calculate the bias factor b and the two-point correlation function ξLQG for such groups for three different density profiles of the LQG dark matter halos, i.e. the isothermal profile, the Navarro-Frenk-White (NFW) profile, and the (gravitational) lensing profile. We consider the ΛCDM (cold dark matter plus a cosmological constant Λ) underlying matter power spectrum with Ωm = 0.28, ΩΛ = 0.72, the Hubble constant H0 = 100 h·km·s-1· Mpc-1 with h = 0.72. Dividing the samples into three redshift bins, we find that the LQGs with higher redshift are more biased and correlated than those with lower redshift. The homogeneity scale RH of the LQG distribution is also deduced from theory. It is defined as the comoving radius of the sphere inside which the number of LQGs N(< r) is proportional to r3 within 1%, or equivalently above which the correlation dimension of the sample D2 is within 1% of D2 = 3. For Park et al.'s samples and the NFW dark matter halo profile, the homogeneity scales of the LQG distribution are RH ⋍ 247 h-1· Mpc for 0.2 < z ≤ 0.6, RH ⋍ 360 h-1· Mpc for 0.6 < z ≤ 1.2, and RH ⋍ 480 h-1· Mpc for 1.2 < z ≲ 1.6. The maximum extent of the LQG samples are beyond RH in each bin, showing that the LQG samples are not homogeneously distributed on such a scale, i.e. a length range of ˜ 500 h-1. Mpc and a mass scale of ˜1014M⊙. The possibilities of a top-down structure formation process as was predicted by the hot/warm dark matter (WDM) scenarios and the redshift evolution of bias factor b and correlation amplitude ξLQG of the LQGs as a consequence of the cosmic expansion are both discussed. Different results were obtained based on the LQG sample in Komberg et al. (1996

  2. Scalar field dark energy perturbations and their scale dependence

    SciTech Connect

    Unnikrishnan, Sanil; Seshadri, T. R.; Jassal, H. K.

    2008-12-15

    We estimate the amplitude of perturbation in dark energy at different length scales for a quintessence model with an exponential potential. It is shown that on length scales much smaller than Hubble radius, perturbation in dark energy is negligible in comparison to that in dark matter. However, on scales comparable to the Hubble radius ({lambda}{sub p}>1000 Mpc) the perturbation in dark energy in general cannot be neglected. As compared to the {lambda}CDM model, the large-scale matter power spectrum is suppressed in a generic quintessence dark energy model. We show that on scales {lambda}{sub p}<1000 Mpc, this suppression is primarily due to different background evolution compared to the {lambda}CDM model. However, on much larger scales perturbation in dark energy can affect the matter power spectrum significantly. Hence this analysis can act as a discriminator between the {lambda}CDM model and other generic dark energy models with w{sub de}{ne}-1.

  3. Light domain walls, massive neutrinos and the large scale structure of the Universe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Massarotti, Alessandro

    1991-01-01

    Domain walls generated through a cosmological phase transition are considered, which interact nongravitationally with light neutrinos. At a redshift z greater than or equal to 10(exp 4), the network grows rapidly and is virtually decoupled from the matter. As the friction with the matter becomes dominant, a comoving network scale close to that of the comoving horizon scale at z of approximately 10(exp 4) gets frozen. During the later phases, the walls produce matter wakes of a thickness d of approximately 10h(exp -1)Mpc, that may become seeds for the formation of the large scale structure observed in the Universe.

  4. BINARY QUASARS IN THE SLOAN DIGITAL SKY SURVEY: EVIDENCE FOR EXCESS CLUSTERING ON SMALL SCALES

    SciTech Connect

    Hennawi, J F; Strauss, M A; Oguri, M; Inada, N; Richards, G T; Pindor, B; Schneider, D P; Becker, R H; Gregg, M D; Hall, P B; Johnston, D E; Fan, X; Burles, S; Schlegel, D J; Gunn, J E; Lupton, R; Bahcall, N A; Brunner, R J; Brinkman, J

    2005-11-10

    We present a sample of 218 new quasar pairs with proper transverse separations R{sub prop} < 1 h{sup -1} Mpc over the redshift range 0.5 < z < 3.0, discovered from an extensive follow up campaign to find companions around the Sloan Digital Sky Survey and 2dF Quasar Redshift Survey quasars. This sample includes 26 new binary quasars with separations R{sub prop} < 50 h{sup -1} kpc ({theta} < 10''), more than doubling the number of such systems known. We define a statistical sample of binaries selected with homogeneous criteria and compute its selection function, taking into account sources of incompleteness. The first measurement of the quasar correlation function on scales 10 h{sup -1} kpc < R{sub prop} < 400 h{sup -1} kpc is presented. For R{sub prop} {approx}< 40 h{sup -1} kpc, we detect an order of magnitude excess clustering over the expectation from the large scale (R{sub prop} {approx}> 3 h{sup -1} Mpc) quasar correlation function, extrapolated down as a power law to the separations probed by our binaries. The excess grows to {approx}30 at R{sub prop} {approx} 10 h{sup -1} kpc, and provides compelling evidence that the quasar autocorrelation function gets progressively steeper on sub-Mpc scales. This small scale excess can likely be attributed to dissipative interaction events which trigger quasar activity in rich environments. Recent small scale measurements of galaxy clustering and quasar-galaxy clustering are reviewed and discussed in relation to our measurement of small scale quasar clustering.

  5. Subgrid-scale Modeling in the Atmospheric Surface Layer^1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khanna, S.; Wyngaard, J. C.; Brasseur, J. G.

    1996-11-01

    Subgrid-scale (SGS) modeling is crucial in the surface layer of wall-bounded flows where the vertical velocity fluctuations cannot be well resolved. We focus on the distinct characteristics of the surface layer of the atmospheric boundary layer (ABL), and analyze, from a highly resolved surface-layer field of a moderately convective ABL, the extent to which Smagorinsky-based SGS models predict these characteristics. The fields were generated using a nested-mesh large-eddy simulation (LES) with the finest mesh having an effective grid resolution of 512^3 covering 1/16^th of the boundary-layer depth. At a height where the fine mesh resolves 90 % of the total fluxes and variances, the resolved fields were treated as surrogate fully resolved fields that were filtered onto a coarser mesh to get ``resolvable'' and ``subgrid'' fields. Preliminary results show that Smagorinsky-based models fail to capture many of the distinctive characteristics of the ABL surface layer. For example, they do not capture the anisotropic distribution of subgrid-scale energy among the horizontal and the vertical components, and they grossly underestimate the SGS horizontal temperature flux. Currently we are focusing on more suitable closures for the atmospheric surface layer. A DNS-based study is also underway and will be used to supplement this analysis. ^1 supported by ARO (# DAAL03-92-G-0117) and ONR (# N00014-92-J-1688)

  6. Stress response of adherent cells on a polymer blend surface composed of a segmented polyurethane and MPC copolymers.

    PubMed

    Sawada, Shin-Ichi; Iwasaki, Yasuhiko; Nakabayashi, Nobuo; Ishihara, Kazuhiko

    2006-12-01

    To better understand the effect of 2-methacryloyloxyethyl phosphorylcholine (MPC) copolymer in improving the biocompatibility of segmented polyurethane (SPU), the expression of heat shock protein (HSP) mRNA in HeLa S3 cells adhered on SPU blended with MPC copolymers was measured. Conventionally, MPC copolymers (PMEH) were synthesized by changing the feed ratios of MPC and 2-ethylhexyl methacrylate. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopic analysis of the SPU/PMEH film indicated that the surface concentration of MPC units on the SPU/PMEH film increased with an increase in PMEH composition. HeLa S3 cells were cultured on SPU/PMEH films. The number of adherent cells on the SPU/PMEH films decreased with an increase in the concentration of PMEH. When the PMEH composition was greater than 0.5 wt %, cell adhesion and proliferation decreased markedly. Expressions of HSP27 and HSP47 mRNA were detected using the reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). After incubation for 24 h, both the HSP mRNA expressions in the HeLa S3 cells showed no significant differences among all samples. In HeLa S3 cells that adhered to the SPU film for 48 h, the expressions of HSP27 and HSP47 mRNA increased significantly when compared with those incubated for 24 h. In contrast, the two kinds of mRNA expressions decreased in the HeLa S3 cells that adhered to the SPU/PMEH films for 48 h. From these results, we concluded that PMEH was quite important in suppressing the stress response of adherent HeLa S3 cells. Therefore, SPU/PMEH blend polymers are useful as implantable biomedical materials. PMID:16758458

  7. Operational systems integration methodology for effective and sustainable MPC&A systems in the former Soviet Union

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, H. A.; Toth, W. J.; Key, L. S.; Nations, J. O.; Mikkelsen, K. R.; De Castro, K. L.; Fink, M. T.

    2001-01-01

    Ensuring all aspects of the continued operation of installed Material Protection, Control, and Accounting (MPC&A) systems is a critical measure of the successful establishment of improved safeguards and security for nuclear materials at Russian sites. The installed systems must eventually be operable solely by the Russian sites, or the desired control over the nuclear materials will not be permanently realized. Effective introduction and implementation of new technologies and procedures for the enhanced protection of nuclear material at Russian sites requires a focus on the operational work processes supported at those sites. A number of US/Russian joint teams are following an upgrades methodology that seeks first to understand these processes and then integrate effective technologies that will result in a sustainable system. Process identification leads to effective procedures that in turn drive resource usage analysis and training programs. Performance tests of the system result in data that are used for appropriate system modification. Following this methodology allows for effective MPC&A systems that continuously improve and allow for a US role in the Russian site to evolve from implementation of upgrades to problem solution and assurance of the protection and accounting operations. In educating the sites to assess and understand their MPC&A procedures, the associated operational costs, and the methods to improve operations, the US is preparing eventually to phase out of this support role as the site's ability to assume that burden materializes. This paper will define and describe the sustainability concept, outline the methodology for ensuring MPC&A sustainability at upgraded sites, describe some success stories from implementation at pilot Russian sites, and offer suggestions for embedding sustainability and operational infrastructure in MPC&A systems as they are upgraded.

  8. Hadron supercolliders: The 1-TeV scale and beyond

    SciTech Connect

    Quigg, C.

    1990-08-10

    Greater understanding of the connection between the weak and electromagnetic interactions is central to progress in elementary-particle physics. A definitive exploration of the mechanism for electroweak symmetry breaking will require collisions between fundamental constituents at energies on the order of 1 TeV. This goal drives the design of high-energy, high-luminosity hadron colliders that will be commissioned during the next decade, but by no means completely defines their scientific potential. These three lectures are devoted to a review of the standard-model issues that motivated an experimental assault on the 1-TeV scale, an introduction to the machines and the experimental environment they will present, and a survey of possibilities for measurement and discovery with a multi-TeV hadron collider. 72 refs., 29 figs.

  9. Control of the tokamak safety factor profile with time-varying constraints using MPC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maljaars, E.; Felici, F.; de Baar, M. R.; van Dongen, J.; Hogeweij, G. M. D.; Geelen, P. J. M.; Steinbuch, M.

    2015-02-01

    A controller is designed for the tokamak safety factor profile that takes real-time-varying operational and physics limits into account. This so-called model predictive controller (MPC) employs a prediction model in order to compute optimal control inputs that satisfy the given limits. The use of linearized models around a reference trajectory results in a quadratic programming problem that can easily be solved online. The performance of the controller is analysed in a set of ITER L-mode scenarios simulated with the non-linear plasma transport code RAPTOR. It is shown that the controller can reduce the tracking error due to an overestimation or underestimation of the modelled transport, while making a trade-off between residual error and amount of controller action. It is also shown that the controller can account for a sudden decrease in the available actuator power, while providing warnings ahead of time about expected violations of operational and physics limits. This controller can be extended and implemented in existing tokamaks in the near future.

  10. The U.S. DOE MPC and A assistance program to Ukraine

    SciTech Connect

    Kuzmycz, G.; Bingham, C.; Chen, R.

    1997-09-01

    The nuclear industry of Ukraine is a vital part of the national economy. In 1995 nuclear power accounted for approximately 37% of the total electricity production. Ukraine has five nuclear power stations with fourteen reactors in commercial operation. Ukraine also has research facilities whose work involves nuclear materials. Improving the security of the nuclear material under its control is an important goal for the Ukrainian nuclear community. Ukraine has requested and is receiving the assistance of several IAEA member states in material protection, control and accounting (MPC and A). The US DOE is providing assistance in nuclear material safeguards in both material control and accountability (MC and A) and physical protection (PP) to the national regulatory authority and to four facilities in Ukraine. The program is well under way. At the Kiev Institute of Nuclear Research (KINR) a significant upgrade of the PP system has been completed. Similar upgrades are in progress at the Kharkov Institute of Physics and Technology (KIPT), South Ukraine Nuclear Power Plant (SUNPP) and Sevastopol Institute of Nuclear Energy and Industry (SINEI). MC and A equipment and software, including computers and NDA instrumentation, have been delivered to the facilities. This paper summarizes accomplishments of the program to date, and future plans.

  11. Mapping 3D Large-Scale Structure at z ˜2 with Lyman-α Forest Tomographic Mapping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Khee-Gan; Hennawi, J. F.; White, M.; Croft, R. A.; Prochaska, J. X.; Schlegel, D. J.; Suzuki, N.; Kneib, J.; Bailey, S. J.; Spergel, D. N.; Rix, H.; Strauss, M. A.

    2014-01-01

    The Lyman-α (Lyα) forest absorption at z>2 traces the underlying dark-matter distribution, and with a sufficient density of background sightlines can be used to create 3D tomographic maps of large-scale structure. Since the useful Lyα forest in each sightline spans ˜400-500 h-1Mpc, Lyα forest tomography can efficiently map out large-scale structure at z˜2. The Cosmic Lyman-Alpha Program for the Tomographic Reconstruction of Absorption Probes (CLAPTRAP) will be the first survey to attempt this technique. We aim to obtain spectra for a background grid of faint quasars and bright LBGs at 21Mpc, allowing a 3D map with similar 3 h-1Mpc resolution to be reconstructed from the data. In a recent paper, we have found that spectra with S/N ˜ 4 per Å are sufficient to make excellent-quality tomographic maps that clearly trace the underlying dark-matter distribution at overdensities of order unity. This requires integrations of several hours on moderate-resolution spectrographs mounted on existing 8-10m telescopes, such as LRIS on the Keck-I telescope and VIMOS on the Very Large Telescopes. We aim to observe ˜1500-2000 background sources over 1 sq deg of the COSMOS field with Lyα forest coverage over 2.0Mpc3, equivalent to the zCOSMOS and DEEP2 galaxy redshift maps out to z˜1. The total time requirement is 16 nights on either VLT-VIMOS or Keck-LRIS. The resulting tomographic maps will be the first 3D maps of large-scale structure at z>1. In conjunction with the rich multi-wavelength data from the COSMOS survey, these maps will facilitate the study of galaxies in the context of the large-scale environment, reveal the topology of large-scale structure at high-redshifts, and allow the direct detection of galaxy protoclusters at the intersections of the cosmic web. The

  12. SN 2008jb: A 'LOST' CORE-COLLAPSE SUPERNOVA IN A STAR-FORMING DWARF GALAXY AT {approx}10 Mpc

    SciTech Connect

    Prieto, J. L.; Lee, J. C.; Drake, A. J.; Djorgovski, S. G.; McNaught, R.; Garradd, G.; Beacom, J. F.; Beshore, E.; Catelan, M.; Pojmanski, G.; Stanek, K. Z.; Szczygiel, D. M.

    2012-01-20

    We present the discovery and follow-up observations of SN 2008jb, a core-collapse supernova in the southern dwarf irregular galaxy ESO 302-14 (M{sub B} = -15.3 mag) at 9.6 Mpc. This nearby transient was missed by galaxy-targeted surveys and was only found in archival optical images obtained by the Catalina Real-time Transient Survey and the All-Sky Automated Survey. The well-sampled archival photometry shows that SN 2008jb was detected shortly after explosion and reached a bright optical maximum, V{sub max} {approx_equal} 13.6 mag (M{sub V,max} {approx_equal} -16.5). The shape of the light curve shows a plateau of {approx}100 days, followed by a drop of {approx}1.4 mag in the V band to a slow decline with an approximate {sup 56}Co decay slope. The late-time light curve is consistent with 0.04 {+-} 0.01 M{sub Sun} of {sup 56}Ni synthesized in the explosion. A spectrum of the supernova obtained two years after explosion shows a broad, boxy H{alpha} emission line, which is unusual for normal Type II-Plateau supernovae at late times. We detect the supernova in archival Spitzer and WISE images obtained 8-14 months after explosion, which show clear signs of warm (600-700 K) dust emission. The dwarf irregular host galaxy, ESO 302-14, has a low gas-phase oxygen abundance, 12 + log(O/H) = 8.2 ({approx}1/5 Z{sub Sun }), similar to those of the Small Magellanic Cloud and the hosts of long gamma-ray bursts and luminous core-collapse supernovae. This metallicity is one of the lowest among local ({approx}< 10 Mpc) supernova hosts. We study the host environment using GALEX far-UV, R-band, and H{alpha} images and find that the supernova occurred in a large star formation complex. The morphology of the H{alpha} emission appears as a large shell (R {approx_equal} 350 pc) surrounding the FUV and optical emission. Using the H{alpha}-to-FUV ratio and FUV and R-band luminosities, we estimate an age of {approx}9 Myr and a total mass of {approx}2 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 5} M{sub Sun

  13. Scaling of X pinches from 1 MA to 6 MA.

    SciTech Connect

    Bland, Simon Nicholas; McBride, Ryan D.; Wenger, David Franklin; Sinars, Daniel Brian; Chittenden, Jeremy Paul; Pikuz, Sergei A.; Harding, Eric; Jennings, Christopher A.; Ampleford, David J.; Yu, Edmund P.; Cuneo, Michael Edward; Shelkovenko, Tatiana A.; Hansen, Stephanie B.

    2010-09-01

    This final report for Project 117863 summarizes progress made toward understanding how X-pinch load designs scale to high currents. The X-pinch load geometry was conceived in 1982 as a method to study the formation and properties of bright x-ray spots in z-pinch plasmas. X-pinch plasmas driven by 0.2 MA currents were found to have source sizes of 1 micron, temperatures >1 keV, lifetimes of 10-100 ps, and densities >0.1 times solid density. These conditions are believed to result from the direct magnetic compression of matter. Physical models that capture the behavior of 0.2 MA X pinches predict more extreme parameters at currents >1 MA. This project developed load designs for up to 6 MA on the SATURN facility and attempted to measure the resulting plasma parameters. Source sizes of 5-8 microns were observed in some cases along with evidence for high temperatures (several keV) and short time durations (<500 ps).

  14. The small scale power asymmetry in the cosmic microwave background

    SciTech Connect

    Flender, Samuel; Hotchkiss, Shaun E-mail: shaun.hotchkiss@helsinki.fi

    2013-09-01

    We investigate the hemispherical power asymmetry in the cosmic microwave background on small angular scales. We find an anomalously high asymmetry in the multipole range l = 601−2048, with a naive statistical significance of 6.5σ. However, we show that this extreme anomaly is simply a coincidence of three other effects, relativistic power modulation, edge effects from the mask applied, and inter-scale correlations. After correcting for all of these effects, the significance level drops to ∼ 1σ, i.e., there is no anomalous intrinsic asymmetry in the small angular scales. Using this null result, we derive a constraint on a potential dipolar modulation amplitude, A(k) < 0.0045 on the ∼ 10 Mpc-scale, at 95% C.L. This new constraint must be satisfied by any theoretical model attempting to explain the hemispherical asymmetry at large angular scales.

  15. Large-Scale Functional Purification of Recombinant HIV-1 Capsid

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Debi; Wong, Melanie; Leavitt, Stephanie; Brendza, Katherine M.; Liu, Xiaohong; Sakowicz, Roman

    2013-01-01

    During human immunodeficiency virus type-1 (HIV-1) virion maturation, capsid proteins undergo a major rearrangement to form a conical core that protects the viral nucleoprotein complexes. Mutations in the capsid sequence that alter the stability of the capsid core are deleterious to viral infectivity and replication. Recently, capsid assembly has become an attractive target for the development of a new generation of anti-retroviral agents. Drug screening efforts and subsequent structural and mechanistic studies require gram quantities of active, homogeneous and pure protein. Conventional means of laboratory purification of Escherichia coli expressed recombinant capsid protein rely on column chromatography steps that are not amenable to large-scale production. Here we present a function-based purification of wild-type and quadruple mutant capsid proteins, which relies on the inherent propensity of capsid protein to polymerize and depolymerize. This method does not require the packing of sizable chromatography columns and can generate double-digit gram quantities of functionally and biochemically well-behaved proteins with greater than 98% purity. We have used the purified capsid protein to characterize two known assembly inhibitors in our in-house developed polymerization assay and to measure their binding affinities. Our capsid purification procedure provides a robust method for purifying large quantities of a key protein in the HIV-1 life cycle, facilitating identification of the next generation anti-HIV agents. PMID:23472130

  16. Large-scale functional purification of recombinant HIV-1 capsid.

    PubMed

    Hung, Magdeleine; Niedziela-Majka, Anita; Jin, Debi; Wong, Melanie; Leavitt, Stephanie; Brendza, Katherine M; Liu, Xiaohong; Sakowicz, Roman

    2013-01-01

    During human immunodeficiency virus type-1 (HIV-1) virion maturation, capsid proteins undergo a major rearrangement to form a conical core that protects the viral nucleoprotein complexes. Mutations in the capsid sequence that alter the stability of the capsid core are deleterious to viral infectivity and replication. Recently, capsid assembly has become an attractive target for the development of a new generation of anti-retroviral agents. Drug screening efforts and subsequent structural and mechanistic studies require gram quantities of active, homogeneous and pure protein. Conventional means of laboratory purification of Escherichia coli expressed recombinant capsid protein rely on column chromatography steps that are not amenable to large-scale production. Here we present a function-based purification of wild-type and quadruple mutant capsid proteins, which relies on the inherent propensity of capsid protein to polymerize and depolymerize. This method does not require the packing of sizable chromatography columns and can generate double-digit gram quantities of functionally and biochemically well-behaved proteins with greater than 98% purity. We have used the purified capsid protein to characterize two known assembly inhibitors in our in-house developed polymerization assay and to measure their binding affinities. Our capsid purification procedure provides a robust method for purifying large quantities of a key protein in the HIV-1 life cycle, facilitating identification of the next generation anti-HIV agents. PMID:23472130

  17. LUMINOUS RED GALAXY HALO DENSITY FIELD RECONSTRUCTION AND APPLICATION TO LARGE-SCALE STRUCTURE MEASUREMENTS

    SciTech Connect

    Reid, Beth A.; Spergel, David N.; Bode, Paul E-mail: dns@astro.princeton.edu

    2009-09-01

    The nontrivial relationship between observations of galaxy positions in redshift space and the underlying matter field complicates our ability to determine the linear theory power spectrum and extract cosmological information from galaxy surveys. The Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) luminous red galaxy (LRG) catalog has the potential to place powerful constraints on cosmological parameters. LRGs are bright, highly biased tracers of large-scale structure. However, because they are highly biased, the nonlinear contribution of satellite galaxies to the galaxy power spectrum is large and fingers-of-God (FOGs) are significant. The combination of these effects leads to a {approx}10% correction in the underlying power spectrum at k = 0.1 h Mpc{sup -1} and {approx}40% correction at k = 0.2 h Mpc{sup -1} in the LRG P(k) analysis of Tegmark et al., thereby compromising the cosmological constraints when this potentially large correction is left as a free parameter. We propose an alternative approach to recovering the matter field from galaxy observations. Our approach is to use halos rather than galaxies to trace the underlying mass distribution. We identify FOGs and replace each FOG with a single halo object. This removes the nonlinear contribution of satellite galaxies, the one-halo term. We test our method on a large set of high-fidelity mock SDSS LRG catalogs and find that the power spectrum of the reconstructed halo density field deviates from the underlying matter power spectrum at the {<=}1% level for k {<=} 0.1 h Mpc{sup -1} and {<=}4% at k = 0.2 h Mpc{sup -1}. The reconstructed halo density field also removes the bias in the measurement of the redshift space distortion parameter {beta} induced by the FOG smearing of the linear redshift space distortions.

  18. Handling Difficult Towers in the Calibration of the PHENIX Muon Piston Calorimeter (MPC) for Analysis of RHIC Au+Au Collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lallow, Emran; Phenix Collaboration

    2015-10-01

    The PHENIX Muon Piston Calorimeter (MPC) is an electromagnetic detector with a kinematic coverage of (3 . 1 < | η | < 3 . 9). This allows for measurements at high forward and backward pseudorapidity and will be used to measure transverse energy in √{SNN} = 200, 62.4, 39, and 7.7 GeV RHIC Au+Au collisions in this kinematic region. The towers will be calibrated by using an iterative procedure in which neutral pions are reconstructed from their decay photons. To augment the iterative process, rough calibrations of individual towers can be obtained by direct examination of ADC distributions. These rough calibrations serve as input to the more rigorous neutral pion reconstruction method and will be described in this poster. This material is based upon work supported by the National Science Foundation under Grant No. 1507841.

  19. Is fractal 1/f scaling in stream chemistry universal?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hrachowitz, Markus

    2016-04-01

    Stream water chemistry data from catchments worldwide suggest that catchments act as filters that transform white noise, i.e. random, input signals such as in precipitation, into 1/f^α noise whose slope in a power spectrum typically ranges between -0.5>α>-1.5. This previously lead to the hypothesis that catchments act as fractal filters. In other words, it was posed that considering uncertainty, a slope of α=-1 may be a universal and intrinsic property of catchments. Such fractal scaling characteristics would have considerable implications on the predictability of stream water chemistry, as both, temporal short- and long-range interdependence and memory control the system response. While short memories and thus flatter slopes with α closer to 0 indicate poor short term but good long-term predictability, steeper slopes with values of α <<-1 indicate the opposite. In fractal systems, i.e. where α=-1, this therefore leads to inherent problems of robustly predicting both, short and long-term response patterns. The hypothesis of catchments acting as fractal filters (α=-1), however, remains to be tested more profoundly. It is, for example, not yet clear, if the observed inter-catchment variations in α indeed need to be interpreted as uncertainty and noise in the signal or if the variations underlie a systematic pattern and can be explained by some characteristic of catchment function, as was recently suggested in a modelling study based two experimental catchments (Hrachowitz et al., 2015). Here we will therefore further test the hypothesis that the spectral slope of stream water chemistry is not necessarily α=-1 and that catchments therefore do not inherently act as fractal filters. Further, it will be tested if closer links between the variations in spectral slope and hydrological function of catchments can be identified. The combined data-analysis and modelling study uses hydrochemical data (i.e. Cl- and O-18) from a wide range of catchments worldwide to

  20. Scale

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schaffhauser, Dian

    2009-01-01

    The common approach to scaling, according to Christopher Dede, a professor of learning technologies at the Harvard Graduate School of Education, is to jump in and say, "Let's go out and find more money, recruit more participants, hire more people. Let's just keep doing the same thing, bigger and bigger." That, he observes, "tends to fail, and fail…

  1. Stellar mass to halo mass scaling relation for X-ray-selected low-mass galaxy clusters and groups out to redshift z ≈ 1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiu, I.; Saro, A.; Mohr, J.; Desai, S.; Bocquet, S.; Capasso, R.; Gangkofner, C.; Gupta, N.; Liu, J.

    2016-05-01

    We present the stellar mass-halo mass scaling relation for 46 X-ray-selected low-mass clusters or groups detected in the XMM-Newton-Blanco Cosmology Survey (XMM-BCS) survey with masses 2 × 1013 M⊙ ≲ M500 ≲ 2.5 × 1014 M⊙ (median mass 8 × 1013 M⊙) at redshift 0.1 ≤ z ≤ 1.02 (median redshift 0.47). The cluster binding masses M500 are inferred from the measured X-ray luminosities LX, while the stellar masses M⋆ of the galaxy populations are estimated using near-infrared (NIR) imaging from the South Pole Telescope Deep Field survey and optical imaging from the BCS survey. With the measured LX and stellar mass M⋆, we determine the best-fitting stellar mass-halo mass relation, accounting for selection effects, measurement uncertainties and the intrinsic scatter in the scaling relation. The resulting mass trend is M_{star }∝ M_{500}^{0.69± 0.15}, the intrinsic (lognormal) scatter is σ _{ln M_{star }|M_{500}}=0.36^{+0.07}_{-0.06}, and there is no significant redshift trend M⋆ ∝ (1 + z)-0.04 ± 0.47, although the uncertainties are still large. We also examine M⋆ within a fixed projected radius of 0.5 Mpc, showing that it provides a cluster binding mass proxy with intrinsic scatter of ≈93 per cent (1σ in M500). We compare our M⋆ = M⋆(M500, z) scaling relation from the XMM-BCS clusters with samples of massive, Sunyaev-Zel'dovich Effect selected clusters (M500 ≈ 6 × 1014 M⊙) and low-mass NIR-selected clusters (M500 ≈ 1014 M⊙) at redshift 0.6 ≲ z ≲ 1.3. After correcting for the known mass measurement systematics in the compared samples, we find that the scaling relation is in good agreement with the high-redshift samples, suggesting that for both groups and clusters the stellar content of the galaxy populations within R500 depends strongly on mass but only weakly on redshift out to z ≈ 1.

  2. Drift scale test status report (Chapters 1-9)

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, W., LLNL

    1998-07-01

    The Drift-Scale Test (DST) is one of the thermal tests being conducted in the Exploratory Studies Facility (ESF) at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, site of the potential repository for high-level nuclear waste. One of the DST`s major objectives is to study the coupled thermal-hydrologic-chemical-mechanical (THCM) processes at the potential repository`s horizon. The objectives, test design, and test layouts of the DST are included in a previous test design report. this report present results and analysis of several difference measurements made in the DST by researchers at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory through the second quarter of the heating phase. Sections 1.1 and 1.2 describe the layout of the DST and the boreholes and instrumentation used to monitor the THCM processes in the rock of associated drifts. Section 2 presents an analysis of temperature data for the test through the end of May 1998. Sections 3 and 4 present results of electrical resistance tomography and neutron logging measurements, respectively. These two sets of measurements are designed to determine the movement of moisture in the test. Results of a series of geochemical measurements made on gas and water samples are presented in Section 5. The purpose of these measurements is to monitor the chemical processes occurring in the DST. Section 6 presents results of thermohydrologic modeling analysis of the test, and Section 7 presents data collected via the laboratory testing for characterization of the hydrologic properties of the rock forming the DST. A brief analysis of barometric pressure and humidity data collected through the end of May 1998 is discussed in Section 8, along with temperature data for the bulkhead. Finally, Section 9 presented an evaluation of sensors used in the DST.

  3. Scaling, cumulant ratios, and height distribution of ballistic deposition in 3 +1 and 4 +1 dimensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alves, Sidiney G.; Ferreira, Silvio C.

    2016-05-01

    We investigate the origin of the scaling corrections in ballistic deposition models in high dimensions using the method proposed by Alves et al. [Phys. Rev. E 90, 052405 (2014), 10.1103/PhysRevE.90.052405] in d =2 +1 dimensions, where the intrinsic width associated with the fluctuations of the height increments during the deposition processes is explicitly taken into account. In the present work, we show that this concept holds for d =3 +1 and 4 +1 dimensions. We have found that growth and roughness exponents and dimensionless cumulant ratios are in agreement with other models, presenting small finite-time corrections to the scaling, that in principle belong to the Kardar-Parisi-Zhang (KPZ) universality class in both d =3 +1 and 4 +1 . Our results constitute further evidence that the upper critical dimension of the KPZ class, if it exists, is larger than 4.

  4. Operant conditioning of a small-scale muscle response1

    PubMed Central

    Sasmor, Robert M.

    1966-01-01

    Six naive male subjects were reinforced for responses in the 20-30 microvolt range, and two each for those in 10-20 and 30-40 microvolt ranges. Records were taken of 15 min of “settling down,” 15 min of initial operant level responding, 30 min of conditioning, and 45 min of extinction, 30 min with light present and 15 min without. The results were: (1) small-scale muscle potentials from the thenar eminence, in the 10-20, 20-30, and 30-40 microvolt ranges, were conditioned, using pointer movement as the reinforcement; (2) the response rate in adjacent ranges of greater and lesser amplitude also increased during such conditioning and decreased during the subsequent extinction; (3) during conditioning the frequency of response distribution shifted toward the reinforced range; (4) subjects were unaware of the reinforced response; (5) observing a noncontingent moving pointer increased the response rate in the 20-30 microvolt range, but did not lead to conditioning. PMID:5903967

  5. Generation of large-scale magnetic fields from inflation in teleparallelism

    SciTech Connect

    Bamba, Kazuharu; Geng, Chao-Qiang; Luo, Ling-Wei E-mail: geng@phys.nthu.edu.tw

    2012-10-01

    We explore the generation of large-scale magnetic fields from inflation in teleparallelism, in which the gravitational theory is described by the torsion scalar instead of the scalar curvature in general relativity. In particular, we examine the case that the conformal invariance of the electromagnetic field during inflation is broken by a non-minimal gravitational coupling between the torsion scalar and the electromagnetic field. It is shown that for a power-law type coupling, the magnetic field on 1 Mpc scale with its strength of ∼ 10{sup −9} G at the present time can be generated.

  6. A practical approach to Model Predictive Control (MPC) for solar communities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quintana, Humberto

    Solar district heating (SDH) systems are part of the solution to reduce energy consumption and GHG emissions required for space heating. This kind of installation takes advantage of the convenience of a centralized system and of solar energy to reduce dependency on fossil-fuels. An SDH system is a proven concept that can be enhanced with the addition of long-term thermal energy storage to compensate the seasonal disparity between solar energy supply and heating load demand. These systems are especially deployed in Europe. In Canada, the only SDH installation is the Drake Landing Solar Community (DLSC). This project, which includes seasonal storage (Borehole Thermal Energy Storage-BTES), has been a remarkable success, reaching a solar fraction of 97% by the fifth year of operation. An SDH system cannot be complete without an appropriate supervisory control that coordinates the operation and interaction of system components. The control is based on a set of rules that must consider the system's internal status and external conditions to guarantee occupant comfort with minimal fossil-fuels consumption. This research project is mainly focused on conceiving and assessing new control mechanisms aiming towards an increase of SDH systems' overall energy efficiency. The case study is the DLSC plant, and the proposed control strategies are based on the practical application of Model Predictive Control (MPC) theory. A calibrated model of DLSC including the supervisory control strategies was developed in TRNSYS, building upon the model used for design studies. The model was improved and new components were created when needed. The calibration process delivered a very good agreement for the most important yearly energy performance indices (2 % for solar heat input to the district and for gas consumption, and 5 % for electricity use). Proposed control strategies were conceived for modifying four aspects of the current control: the parameters that define the interaction between

  7. Behavior of oxide scales on 2. 25Cr-1Mo steel during thermal cycling. II. Scales grown in water vapor

    SciTech Connect

    Christl, W.; Rahmel, A.; Schuetze, M.

    1989-02-01

    The acoustic emission (AE) technique has been applied to identify scale cracking during thermal cycling of tubes of 2.25Cr-1Mo steel. The scale morphology and failure mode were investigated by light and electron optical method. The scale formed at 600/degree/C in water vapor consists of an outer magnetite and an inner, chromium-containing spinel layer. Cooling leads to tensile stresses in the scale that cause macro- and microcrack formation in the scale. At constant-cycle parameters, a characteristic set of crack length and crack density is established. Changes in the cycle parameters also change the crack length and crack density. The experimental results can be described by a model developed by Hasselmann assuming a large number of noninteracting microcracks in a ceramic plate.

  8. MODELING THE VERY SMALL SCALE CLUSTERING OF LUMINOUS RED GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Watson, Douglas F.; Berlind, Andreas A.; McBride, Cameron K.; Masjedi, Morad

    2010-01-20

    We model the small-scale clustering of luminous red galaxies (LRGs) in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. Specifically, we use the halo occupation distribution formalism to model the projected two-point correlation function of LRGs on scales well within the sizes of their host halos (0.016 h {sup -1} Mpc <= r <= 0.42 h {sup -1} Mpc). We start by varying P(N|M), the probability distribution that a dark matter halo of mass M contains N LRGs, and assuming that the radial distribution of satellite LRGs within halos traces the Navarro-Frenk-White (NFW) dark matter density profile. We find that varying P(N|M) alone is not sufficient to match the small-scale data. We next allow the concentration of satellite LRG galaxies to differ from that of dark matter and find that this is also not sufficient. Finally, we relax the assumption of an NFW profile and allow the inner slope of the density profile to vary. We find that this model provides a good fit to the data and the resulting value of the slope is -2.17 +- 0.12. The radial density profile of satellite LRGs within halos is thus not compatible with that of the underlying dark matter, but rather is closer to an isothermal distribution.

  9. Probing large scale homogeneity and periodicity in the LRG distribution using Shannon entropy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pandey, Biswajit; Sarkar, Suman

    2016-08-01

    We quantify the degree of inhomogeneity in the Luminous Red Galaxy (LRG) distribution from the SDSS DR7 as a function of length scales by measuring the Shannon entropy in independent and regular cubic voxels of increasing grid sizes. We also analyse the data by carrying out measurements in overlapping spheres and find that it suppresses inhomogeneities by a factor of 5-10 on different length scales. Despite the differences observed in the degree of inhomogeneity both the methods show a decrease in inhomogeneity with increasing length scales which eventually settle down to a plateau at ˜150 h-1 Mpc. Considering the minuscule values of inhomogeneity at the plateaus and their expected variations we conclude that the LRG distribution becomes homogeneous at 150 h-1 Mpc and beyond. We also use the Kullback-Leibler divergence as an alternative measure of inhomogeneity which reaffirms our findings. We show that the method presented here can effectively capture the inhomogeneity in a truly inhomogeneous distribution at all length scales. We analyse a set of Monte Carlo simulations with certain periodicity in their spatial distributions and find periodic variations in their inhomogeneity which helps us to identify the underlying regularities present in such distributions and quantify the scale of their periodicity. We do not find any underlying regularities in the LRG distribution within the length scales probed.

  10. Probing large scale homogeneity and periodicity in the LRG distribution using Shannon entropy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pandey, Biswajit; Sarkar, Suman

    2016-05-01

    We quantify the degree of inhomogeneity in the Luminous Red Galaxy (LRG) distribution from the SDSS DR7 as a function of length scales by measuring the Shannon entropy in independent and regular cubic voxels of increasing grid sizes. We also analyze the data by carrying out measurements in overlapping spheres and find that it suppresses inhomogeneities by a factor of 5 to 10 on different length scales. Despite the differences observed in the degree of inhomogeneity both the methods show a decrease in inhomogeneity with increasing length scales which eventually settle down to a plateau at ˜ 150 h^{-1} {Mpc}. Considering the minuscule values of inhomogeneity at the plateaus and their expected variations we conclude that the LRG distribution becomes homogeneous at 150 h^{-1} {Mpc} and beyond. We also use the Kullback-Leibler divergence as an alternative measure of inhomogeneity which reaffirms our findings. We show that the method presented here can effectively capture the inhomogeneity in a truly inhomogeneous distribution at all length scales. We analyze a set of Monte Carlo simulations with certain periodicity in their spatial distributions and find periodic variations in their inhomogeneity which helps us to identify the underlying regularities present in such distributions and quantify the scale of their periodicity. We do not find any underlying regularities in the LRG distribution within the length scales probed.

  11. Scales

    ScienceCinema

    Murray Gibson

    2010-01-08

    Musical scales involve notes that, sounded simultaneously (chords), sound good together. The result is the left brain meeting the right brain ? a Pythagorean interval of overlapping notes. This synergy would suggest less difference between the working of the right brain and the left brain than common wisdom would dictate. The pleasing sound of harmony comes when two notes share a common harmonic, meaning that their frequencies are in simple integer ratios, such as 3/2 (G/C) or 5/4 (E/C).

  12. Scales

    SciTech Connect

    Murray Gibson

    2007-04-27

    Musical scales involve notes that, sounded simultaneously (chords), sound good together. The result is the left brain meeting the right brain — a Pythagorean interval of overlapping notes. This synergy would suggest less difference between the working of the right brain and the left brain than common wisdom would dictate. The pleasing sound of harmony comes when two notes share a common harmonic, meaning that their frequencies are in simple integer ratios, such as 3/2 (G/C) or 5/4 (E/C).

  13. Small-Scale High Temperature Melter-1 (SSHTM-1) Data Package. Appendix A

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, G.L.

    1996-03-01

    This appendix provides the data for Alternate HTM Flowsheet 1 (No Reductant Addition, Nitric Acid) melter feed preparation activities in both the laboratory and small-scale testing. The first section provides an outline of this appendix. The melter feed preparation data are presented in the next two main sections, laboratory welter feed preparation data and small-scale melter feed preparation data. Section 3.0 provides the laboratory data which is discussed in the main body of the Small-Scale High Temperature-1 (SSHTM-1) Data Package, milestone C95-02.02Y. Section 3.1 gives the flowsheet in outline form as used in the laboratory-scale tests. This section also includes the ``Laboratory Melter Feed Preparation Activity Log`` which gives a chronological account of the test in terms of time, temperature, slurry pH, and specific observations about slurry appearance, acid addition rates, and samples taken. The ``Laboratory Melter Feed Preparation Activity Log`` provides a road map to the reader by which all the activity and data from the laboratory can be easily accessed. A summary of analytical data is presented next, section 3.2, which covers starting materials and progresses to the analysis of the melter feed. The next section, 3.3, characterizes the off-gas generation that occurs during the slurry processing. The following section, 3.4, provides the rheology data gathered including gram waste oxide loading information for the various slurries tested. The final section, 3.5. includes data from standard crucible redox testing. Section 4.0 provides the small-scale data tn parallel form to section 3.0. Section 5.0 concludes with the references for this appendix.

  14. Single parameter scaling for 1d systems with scale-free long-range correlated disordered potentials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sandler, Nancy; Petersen, Greg

    2013-03-01

    Disordered optical lattices have renewed the interest in localization physics under power-law long-range correlated disorder potentials. For these systems, insight can be gained by combining numerical data and analytic expressions based on scaling laws. Thus, the absence of a transition in short-range correlated disordered systems can been proved by verifying the validity of the single parameter scaling (SPS) hypothesis for the distribution function of the dimensionless conductance. In this talk we discuss this hypothesis for a system with scale-free long-range correlated disorder potentials of the form ~ 1 /rα as a function of the correlation exponent α. We present results for the 1st (the β-function) and 2nd (variance) cumulants of the distribution function, and show a violation of SPS at an energy scale ESPS, that scales with an α-renormalized disorder strength. Calculations for the localization length reveals the existence of a crossover scale Ecross between two regions as correlations increase. An increased number of more extended-like states appear near the band-center while states near the band edges experience reduced localization lengths. We confirm previously predicted scaling behavior near the band edge and center. Supported by NSF-MWN/CIAM and NSF-PIRE.

  15. Criticality Safety Validation of Scale 6.1

    SciTech Connect

    Marshall, William BJ J; Rearden, Bradley T

    2011-11-01

    The computational bias of criticality safety computer codes must be established through the validation of the codes to critical experiments. A large collection of suitable experiments has been vetted by the International Criticality Safety Benchmark Experiment Program (ICSBEP) and made available in the International Handbook of Evaluated Criticality Safety Benchmark Experiments (IHECSBE). A total of more than 350 cases from this reference have been prepared and reviewed within the Verified, Archived Library of Inputs and Data (VALID) maintained by the Reactor and Nuclear Systems Division at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The performance of the KENO V.a and KENO-VI Monte Carlo codes within the Scale 6.1 code system with ENDF/B-VII.0 cross-section data in 238-group and continuous energy is assessed using the VALID models of benchmark experiments. The TSUNAMI tools for sensitivity and uncertainty analysis are utilized to examine some systems further in an attempt to identify potential causes of unexpected results. The critical experiments available for validation of the KENO V.a code cover eight different broad categories of systems. These systems use a range of fissile materials including a range of uranium enrichments, various plutonium isotopic vectors, and mixed uranium-plutonium oxides. The physical form of the fissile material also varies and is represented as metal, solutions, or arrays of rods or plates in a water moderator. The neutron energy spectra of the systems also vary and cover both fast and thermal spectra. Over 300 of the total cases used utilize the KENO V.a code. The critical experiments available for the validation of the KENO-VI code cover three broad categories of systems. The fissile materials in the systems vary and include high and intermediate-enrichment uranium and mixed uranium/plutonium oxides. The physical form of the fissile material is either metal or rod arrays in water. As with KENO V.a, both fast and thermal neutron energy spectra

  16. Small-Scale High Temperature Melter-1 (SSHTM-1) Data Package. Appendix B

    SciTech Connect

    1996-03-01

    This appendix provides the data for Alternate HTM Flowsheet 2 (Glycolic Acid) melter feed preparation activities in both the laboratory- and small-scale testing. The first section provides an outline of this appendix. The melter feed preparation data are presented in the next two main sections, laboratory melter feed preparation data and small-scale melter feed preparation data. Section 3.0 provides the laboratory data which is discussed in the main body of the Small-Scale High Temperature-1 (SSHTM-1) Data Package, milestone C95-02.02Y. Section 3.1 gives the flowsheet in outline form as used in the laboratory-scale tests. This section also includes the ``Laboratory Melter Feed Preparation Activity Log`` which gives A chronological account of the test in terms of time, temperature, slurry pH, and specific observations about slurry appearance, acid addition rates, and samples taken. The ``Laboratory Melter Feed Preparation Activity Log`` provides a road map to the reader by which all the activity and data from the laboratory can be easily accessed. A summary of analytical data is presented next, section 3.2, which covers starting materials and progresses to the analysis of the melter feed. The next section, 3.3, characterizes the off-gas generation that occurs during the slurry processing. The following section, 3.4, provides the rheology data gathered including gram waste oxide loading information for the various slurries tested. The final section, 3.5, includes data from standard crucible redox testing. Section 4.0 provides the small-scale data in parallel form to section 3.0. Section 5.0 concludes with the references for this appendix.

  17. Ionocovalency and Applications 1. Ionocovalency Model and Orbital Hybrid Scales

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yonghe

    2010-01-01

    Ionocovalency (IC), a quantitative dual nature of the atom, is defined and correlated with quantum-mechanical potential to describe quantitatively the dual properties of the bond. Orbiotal hybrid IC model scale, IC, and IC electronegativity scale, XIC, are proposed, wherein the ionicity and the covalent radius are determined by spectroscopy. Being composed of the ionic function I and the covalent function C, the model describes quantitatively the dual properties of bond strengths, charge density and ionic potential. Based on the atomic electron configuration and the various quantum-mechanical built-up dual parameters, the model formed a Dual Method of the multiple-functional prediction, which has much more versatile and exceptional applications than traditional electronegativity scales and molecular properties. Hydrogen has unconventional values of IC and XIC, lower than that of boron. The IC model can agree fairly well with the data of bond properties and satisfactorily explain chemical observations of elements throughout the Periodic Table. PMID:21151444

  18. Large-scale structure in the Southern Sky Redshift Survey

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Park, Changbom; Gott, J. R., III; Da Costa, L. N.

    1992-01-01

    The power spectrum from the Southern Sky Redshift Survey and the CfA samples are measured in order to explore the amplitude of fluctuation in the galaxy density. At lambda of less than or equal to 30/h Mpc the observed power spectrum is quite consistent with the standard CDM model. At larger scales the data indicate an excess of power over the standard CDM model. The observed power spectrum from these optical galaxy samples is in good agreement with that drawn from the sparsely sampled IRAS galaxies. The shape of the power spectrum is also studied by examining the relation between the genus per unit volume and the smoothing length. It is found that, over Gaussian smoothing scales from 6 to 14/h Mpc, the power spectrum has a slope of about -1. The topology of the galaxy density field is studied by measuring the shift of the genus curve from the Gaussian case. Over all smoothing scales studied, the observed genus curves are consistent with a random phase distribution of the galaxy density field, as predicted by the inflationary scenarios.

  19. Series Overview. Sustaining School Turnaround at Scale. Brief 1

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Education Resource Strategies, 2012

    2012-01-01

    Members of the non-profit organization Education Resource Strategies (ERS) have worked for over a decade with leaders of urban school systems to help them organize talent, time and technology to support great schools at scale. One year into the Federal program they are noticing significant differences in district turnaround approaches, engagement…

  20. Large-scale motions in the universe: Using clusters of galaxies as tracers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gramann, Mirt; Bahcall, Neta A.; Cen, Renyue; Gott, J. Richard

    1995-01-01

    Can clusters of galaxies be used to trace the large-scale peculiar velocity field of the universe? We answer this question by using large-scale cosmological simulations to compare the motions of rich clusters of galaxies with the motion of the underlying matter distribution. Three models are investigated: Omega = 1 and Omega = 0.3 cold dark matter (CDM), and Omega = 0.3 primeval baryonic isocurvature (PBI) models, all normalized to the Cosmic Background Explorer (COBE) background fluctuations. We compare the cluster and mass distribution of peculiar velocities, bulk motions, velocity dispersions, and Mach numbers as a function of scale for R greater than or = 50/h Mpc. We also present the large-scale velocity and potential maps of clusters and of the matter. We find that clusters of galaxies trace well the large-scale velocity field and can serve as an efficient tool to constrain cosmological models. The recently reported bulk motion of clusters 689 +/- 178 km/s on approximately 150/h Mpc scale (Lauer & Postman 1994) is larger than expected in any of the models studied (less than or = 190 +/- 78 km/s).

  1. Asymptotic dynamic scaling behavior of the (1+1)-dimensional Wolf-Villain model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xun, Zhipeng; Tang, Gang; Han, Kui; Xia, Hui; Hao, Dapeng; Li, Yan

    2012-04-01

    Extensive kinetic Monte Carlo simulations are presented for the Wolf-Villain model in (1+1) dimensions. Asymptotic dynamic scaling is found for lattice sizes L⩾2048. The exponents obtained from our simulations, α=0.50±0.02 and β=0.25±0.02, are in excellent agreement with the exact values α=1/2 and β=1/4 for the one-dimensional Edwards-Wilkinson equation. Our findings explain the widespread discrepancies of previous reports for exponents of the Wolf-Villain model in (1+1) dimensions, and the results are also consistent with the theoretical predictions of López [J. M. López, M. Castro, and R. Gallego, Phys. Rev. Lett.PRLTAO0031-900710.1103/PhysRevLett.94.166103 94, 166103 (2005)].

  2. Large- and small-scale constraints on power spectra in Omega = 1 universes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gelb, James M.; Gradwohl, Ben-Ami; Frieman, Joshua A.

    1993-01-01

    The CDM model of structure formation, normalized on large scales, leads to excessive pairwise velocity dispersions on small scales. In an attempt to circumvent this problem, we study three scenarios (all with Omega = 1) with more large-scale and less small-scale power than the standard CDM model: (1) cold dark matter with significantly reduced small-scale power (inspired by models with an admixture of cold and hot dark matter); (2) cold dark matter with a non-scale-invariant power spectrum; and (3) cold dark matter with coupling of dark matter to a long-range vector field. When normalized to COBE on large scales, such models do lead to reduced velocities on small scales and they produce fewer halos compared with CDM. However, models with sufficiently low small-scale velocities apparently fail to produce an adequate number of halos.

  3. Development of Physical Protection Regulations for Rosatom State Corporation Sites under the U.S.-Russian MPC&A Program

    SciTech Connect

    Izmaylov, Alexander; Babkin, Vladimir; Shemigon, Nikolai N.; O'Brien, Patricia; Wright, Troy L.; Hazel, Michael J.; Tuttle, John D.; Cunningham, Mitchel E.; Lane, Melinda; Kovchegin, Dmitry

    2012-07-14

    This paper describes issues related to upgrading the physical protection regulatory basis for Rosatom State Corporation sites. It is underlined that most of the regulatory and methodological documents for this subject area have been developed under the U.S.-Russian MPC&A Program. According to the joint management plan developed and agreed upon by the parties in 2005, nearly 50 physical protection documents were identified to be developed, approved and implemented at Rosatom sites by 2012. It is also noted that, on the whole, the plans have been fulfilled.

  4. Reheating the Universe Once More: The Dissipation of Acoustic Waves as a Novel Probe of Primordial Inhomogeneities on Even Smaller Scales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakama, Tomohiro; Suyama, Teruaki; Yokoyama, Jun'ichi

    2014-08-01

    We provide a simple but robust bound on the primordial curvature perturbation in the range 104 Mpc-1Mpc-1, which has not been constrained so far unlike low-wave-number modes. Perturbations on these scales dissipate the energy of their acoustic oscillations by the Silk damping after primordial nucleosynthesis but before the redshift z˜2×106 and reheat the photon bath without invoking cosmic microwave background distortions. This acoustic reheating results in the decrease of the baryon-photon ratio. By combining independent measurements probing the nucleosynthesis era and around the recombination epoch, we find an upper bound on the amplitude of the curvature perturbation over the above wave number range as Pζ<0.06. Implications for supermassive black holes are also discussed.

  5. Reheating the universe once more: the dissipation of acoustic waves as a novel probe of primordial inhomogeneities on even smaller scales.

    PubMed

    Nakama, Tomohiro; Suyama, Teruaki; Yokoyama, Jun'ichi

    2014-08-01

    We provide a simple but robust bound on the primordial curvature perturbation in the range 10(4)  Mpc(-1)Mpc(-1), which has not been constrained so far unlike low-wave-number modes. Perturbations on these scales dissipate the energy of their acoustic oscillations by the Silk damping after primordial nucleosynthesis but before the redshift z∼2×10(6) and reheat the photon bath without invoking cosmic microwave background distortions. This acoustic reheating results in the decrease of the baryon-photon ratio. By combining independent measurements probing the nucleosynthesis era and around the recombination epoch, we find an upper bound on the amplitude of the curvature perturbation over the above wave number range as P(ζ)<0.06. Implications for supermassive black holes are also discussed. PMID:25148314

  6. Water Prediction and Control Technologies for Large-scale Water Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Xin; van de Giesen, Nick; van Overloop, Peter-Jules

    2014-05-01

    A number of control techniques have been used in the field of operational water management over recent decades. Among these techniques, the ones that utilize prediction to anticipate near-future problems, such as Model Predictive Control (MPC), have shown the most promising results. Constraints handling and multi-objective management can be explicitly taken into account in MPC. To control large-scale systems, several extensions to standard MPC have been proposed. Firstly, Proper Orthogonal Decomposition (POD-MPC) has been applied to reduce the order the states and computational time. Secondly, a tree-based scheme (TB-MPC) has been proposed to cope with uncertainties of the prediction that are inherently parts of large scale systems. Thirdly, a distributed scheme (DMPC) has been proposed to deal with multiple regions and multiple goals in a computationally tractable way. Simulation experiments on the Dutch water system illustrate that tree-based distributed MPC outperforms feedback control, feedforward control and conventional MPC. Keywords: Model Predictive Control; Proper Orthogonal Decomposition; tree-based control; distributed control; Large Scale Systems;

  7. Hydromining a full-scale class 1.1 solid rocket motor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Young, M. F.; Chleborad, O. W.; Cova, P. J.; Eccli, D. B.; Glad, T. J.; Kunkle, D. M.

    1993-11-01

    A class 1.1 full-scale Stage 2 Small Intercontinental Ballistic Missile (SICBM) was successfully deloaded using high pressure water jets at approximately 689 N (10,000 psia). The SICBM Stage 2 rocket motor contains approximately 2948 kg (6500 lb) of Class 1.1 propellant (nitrato ester polyester based propellant). A vertical hydromining facility was constructed to simulate a production operational mode in which the system water was continuously recycled to the high pressure water jet nozzles. A series of four in-line carbon absorption filter pairs were used to reduce nitrato ester concentrations to acceptable safety levels (e.g., less than 1 ppm of nitroglycerin). This paper will summarize the operating conditions used and the results of the successful study.

  8. Are galaxy distributions scale invariant? A perspective from dynamical systems theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCauley, J. L.

    2002-06-01

    Unless there is an evidence for fractal scaling with a single exponent over distances 0.1<=r<=100h-1Mpc, then the widely accepted notion of scale invariance of the correlation integral for 0.1<=r<=10h-1Mpc must be questioned. The attempt to extract a scaling exponent /ν from the correlation integral /n(r) by plotting /log(n(r)) vs. /log(r) is unreliable unless the underlying point set is approximately monofractal. The extraction of a spectrum of generalized dimensions νq from a plot of the correlation integral generating function Gn(q) by a similar procedure is probably an indication that Gn(q) does not scale at all. We explain these assertions after defining the term multifractal, mutually inconsistent definitions having been confused together in the cosmology literature. Part of this confusion is traced to the confusion in interpreting a measure-theoretic formula written down by Hentschel and Procaccia in the dynamical systems theory literature, while other errors follow from confusing together entirely different definitions of multifractal from two different schools of thought. Most important are serious errors in data analysis that follow from taking for granted a largest term approximation that is inevitably advertised in the literature on both fractals and dynamical systems theory.

  9. The landslide susceptibility map of Italy at 1:1 Million scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trigila, A.; Catani, F.; Casagli, N.; Crosta, G.; Esposito, C.; Frattini, P.; Iadanza, C.; Lagomarsino, D.; Lari, S.; Scarascia Mugnozza, G.; Segoni, S.; Spizzichino, D.; Tofani, V.

    2012-04-01

    Landslides are among the most problematic natural hazards in Italy, in terms of both casualties and economic losses. Landslide susceptibility maps are key tools for land use planning, management and risk mitigation. The aim of the work is to present the methodology adopted by ISPRA (Italian National Institute for Environmental Protection and Research), University of Florence, University of Milano-Bicocca and University of Rome "La Sapienza" for the development of a Landslide susceptibility map of Italy at 1:1,000,000 scale. The Landslide susceptibility map of Italy has been realized by using the Italian Landslide Inventory - Progetto IFFI which contains more than 486,000 landslides, and a set of contributing factors such as surface parameters derived from 20x20 m DEM, lithological map obtained from the Geological map of Italy 1:500,000, and land use map (Corine Land Cover). These databases have been subjected to a quality analysis with the aim of assessing the completeness, homogeneity and reliability of data, and identifying representative areas which may be used as training and test areas for the implementation of landslide susceptibility models. Physiographic domains of homogeneous geology and geomorphology have been identified, and landslides have been divided into three main classes in order to take into account specific sets of conditioning factors: a) rockfalls and rock-avalanches; b) slow mass movements, c) debris flows. Bivariate statistical analyses have been performed to assess the frequency distribution of contributing factors on the landslide area. The tests of different techniques (Discriminant Analysis, Logistic Regression, Bayesian Tree Random Forest) have been performed in selected areas of Italy in order to assess advantages, disadvantages and applicability of the models at the scale of analysis. The modelling tests provided good performance with all techniques, once applied with the appropriate selection of training and validations sets and with

  10. Level 1 Radiance Scaling and Conditioning Algorithm Theoretical Basis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bruegge, C.; Diner, D.; Korechoff, R.; Lee, M.

    2000-01-01

    The Algorithm Theoretical Basis (ATB) document describes the algorithms used to produce the Multi-angle Imaging SpectroRadiometer (MISR) Level 1B1 Radiometric Product, and certain parameters of the Level 1A Reformatted Annotated Product.

  11. MREG V1.1 : a multi-scale image registration algorithm for SAR applications.

    SciTech Connect

    Eichel, Paul H.

    2013-08-01

    MREG V1.1 is the sixth generation SAR image registration algorithm developed by the Signal Processing&Technology Department for Synthetic Aperture Radar applications. Like its predecessor algorithm REGI, it employs a powerful iterative multi-scale paradigm to achieve the competing goals of sub-pixel registration accuracy and the ability to handle large initial offsets. Since it is not model based, it allows for high fidelity tracking of spatially varying terrain-induced misregistration. Since it does not rely on image domain phase, it is equally adept at coherent and noncoherent image registration. This document provides a brief history of the registration processors developed by Dept. 5962 leading up to MREG V1.1, a full description of the signal processing steps involved in the algorithm, and a user's manual with application specific recommendations for CCD, TwoColor MultiView, and SAR stereoscopy.

  12. THE OPACITY OF THE INTERGALACTIC MEDIUM DURING REIONIZATION: RESOLVING SMALL-SCALE STRUCTURE

    SciTech Connect

    Emberson, J. D.; Thomas, Rajat M.; Alvarez, Marcelo A.

    2013-02-15

    Early in the reionization process, the intergalactic medium (IGM) would have been quite inhomogeneous on small scales, due to the low Jeans mass in the neutral IGM and the hierarchical growth of structure in a cold dark matter universe. This small-scale structure acted as an important sink during the epoch of reionization, impeding the progress of the ionization fronts that swept out from the first sources of ionizing radiation. Here we present results of high-resolution cosmological hydrodynamics simulations that resolve the cosmological Jeans mass of the neutral IGM in representative volumes several Mpc across. The adiabatic hydrodynamics we follow are appropriate in an unheated IGM, before the gas has had a chance to respond to the photoionization heating. Our focus is determination of the resolution required in cosmological simulations in order to sufficiently sample and resolve small-scale structure regulating the opacity of an unheated IGM. We find that a dark matter particle mass of m {sub dm} {approx}< 50 M {sub Sun} and box size of L {approx}> 1 Mpc are required. With our converged results we show how the mean free path of ionizing radiation and clumping factor of ionized hydrogen depend on the ultraviolet background flux and redshift. We find, for example at z = 10, clumping factors typically of 10-20 for an ionization rate of {Gamma} {approx} (0.3-3) Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -12} s{sup -1}, with corresponding mean free paths of {approx}3-15 Mpc, extending previous work on the evolving mean free path to considerably smaller scales and earlier times.

  13. Soil map of the Russian Arctic on a 1 : 1 M scale: Contents and compilation methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mikhailov, I. S.

    2016-04-01

    A new soil map of the Russian Arctic on a scale of 1 : 1 M shows the soil cover in the north of Eurasia and on the islands of the Arctic Ocean to the north of 68° N. This map has been developed in a geoinformation system in the vector format with the wide use of remote sensing data. The delineated soil polygons show dominant and accompanying soils and the structure of soil cover patterns with indication of soil associations and soil complexes, the character of parent materials, and the topographic conditions. The map of the soil-geographic zoning of the Russian Arctic developed on the basis of the soil map differs from its earlier analogues in a greater degree of detail. The soil map of the Russian Arctic on a scale of 1 : 1 M displays the most detailed information on the soil cover patterns and can be used for solving various problems related to the exploration and development of this territory. Soil names from the new classification system of Russian soils [10] have been introduced into the legend of the map. New soil information and the use of remote sensing data have made it possible to enlarge the number of soil polygons shown on the map and to correct their boundaries in comparison with previous soil maps of the Russian Arctic.

  14. Modelling utility-scale wind power plants. Part 1: Economics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milligan, Michael R.

    1999-10-01

    As the worldwide use of wind turbine generators continues to increase in utility-scale applications, it will become increasingly important to assess the economic and reliability impact of these intermittent resources. Although the utility industry in the United States appears to be moving towards a restructured environment, basic economic and reliability issues will continue to be relevant to companies involved with electricity generation. This article is the first of two which address modelling approaches and results obtained in several case studies and research projects at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL). This first article addresses the basic economic issues associated with electricity production from several generators that include large-scale wind power plants. An important part of this discussion is the role of unit commitment and economic dispatch in production cost models. This paper includes overviews and comparisons of the prevalent production cost modelling methods, including several case studies applied to a variety of electric utilities. The second article discusses various methods of assessing capacity credit and results from several reliability-based studies performed at NREL.

  15. Reverse atom transfer radical polymerization (RATRP) for anti-clotting PU-LaCl3-g-P(MPC) films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Chunyan; Zhou, Ninglin; Xiao, Yinghong; Tang, Yida; Jin, Suxing; Wu, Yue; Shen, Jian

    2013-01-01

    Low grafting density is a disadvantage both in reverse atom transfer radical polymerization (RATRP) and ATRP. In this work, the surfaces of polyurethane (PU) were treated by LaCl3·6H2O to obtain modified surfaces with hydrated layers. The reaction of surface-initiated RATRP was carried out easily, which may be attributed to the enriched hydroxyl groups on the hydrated layers. An innovation found in this work is that some free lanthanum ions (La3+) reacted with the silane coupling agent (CPTM) and the product served as mixed ligand complex. The mixed ligand complex instead of conventional 2,2‧-bipyridine was adopted to serve as a ligand in the process of RATRP. As a result, PU surfaces grafted with well-defined polymer brushes (MPC) were obtained. PU substrates before and after modification were characterized by FTIR, XPS, AFM, SEM, SCA, respectively. The results showed that zwitterionic brushes were successfully fabricated on the PU surfaces (P(MPC)), and the content of the grafted layer increased gradually with polymerization time with the grafting density as high as 97.9%. The blood compatibility of the PU substrates was evaluated by plasma recalcification profiles test and platelet adhesion tests in vitro. It was found that all PU functionalized with zwitterionic brush showed improved resistance to nonspecific protein adsorption and platelet adhesion.

  16. Hepatic Mitochondrial Pyruvate Carrier 1 Is Required for Efficient Regulation of Gluconeogenesis and Whole-Body Glucose Homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Gray, Lawrence R; Sultana, Mst Rasheda; Rauckhorst, Adam J; Oonthonpan, Lalita; Tompkins, Sean C; Sharma, Arpit; Fu, Xiaorong; Miao, Ren; Pewa, Alvin D; Brown, Kathryn S; Lane, Erin E; Dohlman, Ashley; Zepeda-Orozco, Diana; Xie, Jianxin; Rutter, Jared; Norris, Andrew W; Cox, James E; Burgess, Shawn C; Potthoff, Matthew J; Taylor, Eric B

    2015-10-01

    Gluconeogenesis is critical for maintenance of euglycemia during fasting. Elevated gluconeogenesis during type 2 diabetes (T2D) contributes to chronic hyperglycemia. Pyruvate is a major gluconeogenic substrate and requires import into the mitochondrial matrix for channeling into gluconeogenesis. Here, we demonstrate that the mitochondrial pyruvate carrier (MPC) comprising the Mpc1 and Mpc2 proteins is required for efficient regulation of hepatic gluconeogenesis. Liver-specific deletion of Mpc1 abolished hepatic MPC activity and markedly decreased pyruvate-driven gluconeogenesis and TCA cycle flux. Loss of MPC activity induced adaptive utilization of glutamine and increased urea cycle activity. Diet-induced obesity increased hepatic MPC expression and activity. Constitutive Mpc1 deletion attenuated the development of hyperglycemia induced by a high-fat diet. Acute, virally mediated Mpc1 deletion after diet-induced obesity decreased hyperglycemia and improved glucose tolerance. We conclude that the MPC is required for efficient regulation of gluconeogenesis and that the MPC contributes to the elevated gluconeogenesis and hyperglycemia in T2D. PMID:26344103

  17. The Pervasiveness of 1/f Scaling in Speech Reflects the Metastable Basis of Cognition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kello, Christopher T.; Anderson, Gregory G.; Holden, John G.; Van Orden, Guy C.

    2008-01-01

    Human neural and behavioral activities have been reported to exhibit fractal dynamics known as "1/f noise," which is more aptly named "1/f scaling." Some argue that 1/f scaling is a general and pervasive property of the dynamical substrate from which cognitive functions are formed. Others argue that it is an idiosyncratic property of…

  18. The MASSIVE survey. I. A volume-limited integral-field spectroscopic study of the most massive early-type galaxies within 108 Mpc

    SciTech Connect

    Ma, Chung-Pei; Greene, Jenny E.; Murphy, Jeremy D.; McConnell, Nicholas; Janish, Ryan; Blakeslee, John P.; Thomas, Jens

    2014-11-10

    Massive early-type galaxies represent the modern day remnants of the earliest major star formation episodes in the history of the universe. These galaxies are central to our understanding of the evolution of cosmic structure, stellar populations, and supermassive black holes, but the details of their complex formation histories remain uncertain. To address this situation, we have initiated the MASSIVE Survey, a volume-limited, multi-wavelength, integral-field spectroscopic (IFS) and photometric survey of the structure and dynamics of the ∼100 most massive early-type galaxies within a distance of 108 Mpc. This survey probes a stellar mass range M* ≳ 10{sup 11.5} M {sub ☉} and diverse galaxy environments that have not been systematically studied to date. Our wide-field IFS data cover about two effective radii of individual galaxies, and for a subset of them, we are acquiring additional IFS observations on sub-arcsecond scales with adaptive optics. We are also acquiring deep K-band imaging to trace the extended halos of the galaxies and measure accurate total magnitudes. Dynamical orbit modeling of the combined data will allow us to simultaneously determine the stellar, black hole, and dark matter halo masses. The primary goals of the project are to constrain the black hole scaling relations at high masses, investigate systematically the stellar initial mass function and dark matter distribution in massive galaxies, and probe the late-time assembly of ellipticals through stellar population and kinematical gradients. In this paper, we describe the MASSIVE sample selection, discuss the distinct demographics and structural and environmental properties of the selected galaxies, and provide an overview of our basic observational program, science goals and early survey results.

  19. On the '-1' scaling of air temperature spectra in atmospheric surface layer flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, D.; Katul, G. G.; Gentine, P.

    2015-12-01

    The spectral properties of scalar turbulence at high wavenumbers have been extensively studied in turbulent flows, and existing theories explaining the k-5/3 scaling within the inertial subrange appear satisfactory at high Reynolds numbers. Equivalent theories for the low wavenumber range have been comparatively lacking because boundary conditions prohibit attainment of such universal behavior. A number of atmospheric surface layer (ASL) experiments reported a k-1 scaling in air temperature spectra ETT(k) at low wavenumbers but other experiments did not. Here, the occurrence of a k-1 scaling in ETT(k) in an idealized ASL flow across a wide range of atmospheric stability regimes is investigated theoretically and experimentally. Experiments reveal a k-1 scaling persisted across different atmospheric stability parameter values (ζ) ranging from mildly unstable to mildly stable conditions (-0.1< ζ < 0.2). As instability increases, the k-1 scaling vanishes. Based on a combined spectral and co-spectral budget models and upon using a Heisenberg eddy viscosity as a closure to the spectral flux transfer term, conditions promoting a k-1 scaling are identified. Existence of a k-1 scaling is shown to be primarily linked to an imbalance between the production and dissipation rates of half the temperature variance. The role of the imbalance between the production and dissipation rates of half the temperature variance in controlling the existence of a '-1' scaling suggests that the '-1' scaling in ETT(k) does not necessarily concur with the '-1' scaling in the spectra of longitudinal velocity Euu(k). This finding explains why some ASL experiments reported k-1 in Euu(k) but not ETT(k). It also differs from prior arguments derived from directional-dimensional analysis that lead to simultaneous k-1 scaling in Euu(k) and ETT(k) at low wavenumbers in a neutral ASL.

  20. Constraining gravity at the largest scales through CMB lensing and galaxy velocities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pullen, Anthony R.; Alam, Shadab; He, Siyu; Ho, Shirley

    2016-08-01

    We demonstrate a new method to constrain gravity on the largest cosmological scales by combining measurements of cosmic microwave background (CMB) lensing and the galaxy velocity field. EG is a statistic, constructed from a gravitational lensing tracer and a measure of velocities such as redshift-space distortions (RSD), that can discriminate between gravity models while being independent of clustering bias and σ8. While traditionally, the lensing field for EG has been probed through galaxy lensing, CMB lensing has been proposed as a more robust tracer of the lensing field for EG at higher redshifts while avoiding intrinsic alignments. We perform the largest-scale measurement of EG ever, up to 150 Mpc h-1, by cross-correlating the Planck CMB lensing map with the Sloan Digital Sky Survey III (SDSS-III) CMASS galaxy sample and combining this with our measurement of the CMASS auto-power spectrum and the RSD parameter β. We report EG(z = 0.57) = 0.243 ± 0.060 (stat) ± 0.013 (sys), a measurement in tension with the general relativity (GR) prediction at a level of 2.6σ. Note that our EG measurement deviates from GR only at scales greater than 80 Mpc h-1, scales which have not been probed by previous EG tests. Upcoming surveys, which will provide an order-of-magnitude reduction in statistical errors, can significantly constrain alternative gravity models when combined with better control of systematics.

  1. Synthesis, characterisation, and in vitro cellular uptake kinetics of nanoprecipitated poly(2-methacryloyloxyethyl phosphorylcholine)-b-poly(2-(diisopropylamino)ethyl methacrylate) (MPC-DPA) polymeric nanoparticle micelles for nanomedicine applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salvage, Jonathan P.; Smith, Tia; Lu, Tao; Sanghera, Amendeep; Standen, Guy; Tang, Yiqing; Lewis, Andrew L.

    2016-01-01

    Nanoscience offers the potential for great advances in medical technology and therapies in the form of nanomedicine. As such, developing controllable, predictable, and effective, nanoparticle-based therapeutic systems remains a significant challenge. Many polymer-based nanoparticle systems have been reported to date, but few harness materials with accepted biocompatibility. Phosphorylcholine (PC) based biomimetic materials have a long history of successful translation into effective commercial medical technologies. This study investigated the synthesis, characterisation, nanoprecipitation, and in vitro cellular uptake kinetics of PC-based polymeric nanoparticle micelles (PNM) formed by the biocompatible and pH responsive block copolymer poly(2-methacryloyloxyethyl phosphorylcholine)-b-poly(2-(diisopropylamino)ethyl methacrylate) (MPC-DPA). Atom transfer radical polymerisation (ATRP), and gel permeation chromatography (GPC) were used to synthesise and characterise the well-defined MPC100-DPA100 polymer, revealing organic GPC, using evaporative light scatter detection, to be more accurate than aqueous GPC for this application. Subsequent nanoprecipitation investigations utilising photon correlation spectroscopy (PCS) revealed PNM size increased with polymer concentration, and conferred Cryo-stability. PNM diameters ranged from circa 64-69 nm, and increased upon hydrophobic compound loading, circa 65-71 nm, with loading efficiencies of circa 60 % achieved, whilst remaining monodisperse. In vitro studies demonstrated that the PNM were of low cellular toxicity, with colony formation and MTT assays, utilising V79 and 3T3 cells, yielding comparable results. Investigation of the in vitro cellular uptake kinetics revealed rapid, 1 h, cellular uptake of MPC100-DPA100 PNM delivered fluorescent probes, with fluorescence persistence for 48 h. This paper presents the first report of these novel findings, which highlight the potential of the system for nanomedicine application

  2. Physical origin of the large-scale conformity in the specific star formation rates of galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kauffmann, Guinevere

    2015-12-01

    Two explanations have been put forward to explain the observed conformity between the colours and specific star formation rates (SFR/M*) of galaxies on large scales: (1) the formation times of their surrounding dark matter haloes are correlated (commonly referred to as `assembly bias'), (2) gas is heated over large scales at early times, leading to coherent modulation of cooling and star formation between well-separated galaxies (commonly referred to as `pre-heating'). To distinguish between the pre-heating and assembly bias scenarios, we search for relics of energetic feedback events in the neighbourhood of central galaxies with different specific SFRs. We find a significant excess of very high mass (log M* > 11.3) galaxies out to a distance of 2.5 Mpc around low SFR/M* central galaxies compared to control samples of higher SFR/M* central galaxies with the same stellar mass and redshift. We also find that very massive galaxies in the neighbourhood of low-SFR/M* galaxies have much higher probability of hosting radio-loud active galactic nuclei (AGN). The radio-loud AGN fraction in neighbours with log M* > 11.3 is four times higher around passive, non star-forming centrals at projected distances of 1 Mpc and two times higher at projected distances of 4 Mpc. Finally, we carry out an investigation of conformity effects in the recently publicly released Illustris cosmological hydrodynamical simulation, which includes energetic input both from quasars and from radio mode accretion on to black holes. We do not find conformity effects of comparable amplitude on large scales in the simulations and we propose that gas needs to be pushed out of dark matter haloes more efficiently at high redshifts.

  3. The large-scale quasar-Lyman α forest cross-correlation from BOSS

    SciTech Connect

    Font-Ribera, Andreu; Arnau, Eduard; Miralda-Escudé, Jordi E-mail: edu.arnau.lazaro@gmail.com; and others

    2013-05-01

    We measure the large-scale cross-correlation of quasars with the Lyα forest absorption in redshift space, using ∼ 60000 quasar spectra from Data Release 9 (DR9) of the Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey (BOSS). The cross-correlation is detected over a wide range of scales, up to comoving separations r of 80 h{sup −1}Mpc. For r > 15 h{sup −1}Mpc, we show that the cross-correlation is well fitted by the linear theory prediction for the mean overdensity around a quasar host halo in the standard ΛCDM model, with the redshift distortions indicative of gravitational evolution detected at high confidence. Using previous determinations of the Lyα forest bias factor obtained from the Lyα autocorrelation, we infer the quasar bias factor to be b{sub q} = 3.64{sup +0.13}{sub −0.15} at a mean redshift z = 2.38, in agreement with previous measurements from the quasar auto-correlation. We also obtain a new estimate of the Lyα forest redshift distortion factor, β{sub F} = 1.1±0.15, slightly larger than but consistent with the previous measurement from the Lyα forest autocorrelation. The simple linear model we use fails at separations r < 15h{sup −1}Mpc, and we show that this may reasonably be due to the enhanced ionization due to radiation from the quasars. We also provide the expected correction that the mass overdensity around the quasar implies for measurements of the ionizing radiation background from the line-of-sight proximity effect.

  4. JOINT DEVELOPMENT OF A NATIONAL 1:100,000-SCALE DIGITAL CARTOGRAPHIC DATA BASE.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Callahan, George M.; Broome, Frederick R.

    1984-01-01

    The U. S. Geological Survey is beginning a major new program to create a nationwide digital cartographic data base from 1:100,000-scale maps by the end of the decade. This data base will supplement the currently available 1:2,000,000-scale national data base and the selected coverage at 1:24,000-scale. It is anticipated that the data will be useful for both the production of custom graphics and as basic input to geographic information systems. The 1:100,000-scale USGS map series was designed to facilitate automated data capture. The methodologies and procedures used in the data capture process have developed enough so that the two agencies can take advantage of the design features of the 1:100,000-scale maps and work together on complementary tasks to build a digital cartographic data base.

  5. The Infrastructure Necessary to Support a Sustainable Material Protection, Control and Accounting (MPC&A) Program in Russia

    SciTech Connect

    Bachner, Katherine M.; Mladineo, Stephen V.

    2011-07-20

    The NNSA Material Protection, Control, and Accounting (MPC&A) program has been engaged for fifteen years in upgrading the security of nuclear materials in Russia. Part of the effort has been to establish the conditions necessary to ensure the long-term sustainability of nuclear security. A sustainable program of nuclear security requires the creation of an indigenous infrastructure, starting with sustained high level government commitment. This includes organizational development, training, maintenance, regulations, inspections, and a strong nuclear security culture. The provision of modern physical protection, control, and accounting equipment to the Russian Federation alone is not sufficient. Comprehensive infrastructure projects support the Russian Federation's ability to maintain the risk reduction achieved through upgrades to the equipment. To illustrate the contributions to security, and challenges of implementation, this paper discusses the history and next steps for an indigenous Tamper Indication Device (TID) program, and a Radiation Portal Monitoring (RPM) program.

  6. Two-particle correlations in 200 GeV p+p with the MPC-EX at RHIC-PHENIX

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    White, John; Phenix Collaboration

    2015-10-01

    The Extension to the Muon Piston Calorimeter (MPC-EX) is a newly installed tungsten-silicon preshower added to enhance the forward (3<| η|<4) photon identification in p + p and p +A collisions in the PHENIX detector at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC). At these pseudorapidities new and extended measurements using the correlation of two particles can be made. For example, one can look for a flow-like correlation with low momentum pairs in high multiplicity collisions. At higher momentum jet-like correlations probe high-Q2 and low- x partons in the target proton or nucleus and can potentially test models of gluon saturation. In this poster, we outline some details of the MPC-EX detector and its performance in the p + p and p +Au runs during 2015 as well as give a current status of two-particle correlation analysis using the MPC-EX.

  7. Extended general relativity: Large-scale antigravity and short-scale gravity with ω=-1 from five-dimensional vacuum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Madriz Aguilar, José Edgar; Bellini, Mauricio

    2009-08-01

    Considering a five-dimensional (5D) Riemannian spacetime with a particular stationary Ricci-flat metric, we obtain in the framework of the induced matter theory an effective 4D static and spherically symmetric metric which give us ordinary gravitational solutions on small (planetary and astrophysical) scales, but repulsive (anti gravitational) forces on very large (cosmological) scales with ω=-1. Our approach is an unified manner to describe dark energy, dark matter and ordinary matter. We illustrate the theory with two examples, the solar system and the great attractor. From the geometrical point of view, these results follow from the assumption that exists a confining force that make possible that test particles move on a given 4D hypersurface.

  8. Unsteady Aero Computation of a 1 1/2 Stage Large Scale Rotating Turbine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    To, Wai-Ming

    2012-01-01

    This report is the documentation of the work performed for the Subsonic Rotary Wing Project under the NASA s Fundamental Aeronautics Program. It was funded through Task Number NNC10E420T under GESS-2 Contract NNC06BA07B in the period of 10/1/2010 to 8/31/2011. The objective of the task is to provide support for the development of variable speed power turbine technology through application of computational fluid dynamics analyses. This includes work elements in mesh generation, multistage URANS simulations, and post-processing of the simulation results for comparison with the experimental data. The unsteady CFD calculations were performed with the TURBO code running in multistage single passage (phase lag) mode. Meshes for the blade rows were generated with the NASA developed TCGRID code. The CFD performance is assessed and improvements are recommended for future research in this area. For that, the United Technologies Research Center's 1 1/2 stage Large Scale Rotating Turbine was selected to be the candidate engine configuration for this computational effort because of the completeness and availability of the data.

  9. The one-loop matter bispectrum in the Effective Field Theory of Large Scale Structures

    SciTech Connect

    Angulo, Raul E.; Foreman, Simon; Schmittfull, Marcel; Senatore, Leonardo

    2015-10-14

    With this study, given the importance of future large scale structure surveys for delivering new cosmological information, it is crucial to reliably predict their observables. The Effective Field Theory of Large Scale Structures (EFTofLSS) provides a manifestly convergent perturbative scheme to compute the clustering of dark matter in the weakly nonlinear regime in an expansion in k/kNL, where k is the wavenumber of interest and kNL is the wavenumber associated to the nonlinear scale. It has been recently shown that the EFTofLSS matches to 1% level the dark matter power spectrum at redshift zero up to k ≃ 0.3 h Mpc1 and k ≃ 0.6 h Mpc1 at one and two loops respectively, using only one counterterm that is fit to data. Similar results have been obtained for the momentum power spectrum at one loop. This is a remarkable improvement with respect to former analytical techniques. Here we study the prediction for the equal-time dark matter bispectrum at one loop. We find that at this order it is sufficient to consider the same counterterm that was measured in the power spectrum. Without any remaining free parameter, and in a cosmology for which kNL is smaller than in the previously considered cases (σ8=0.9), we find that the prediction from the EFTofLSS agrees very well with N-body simulations up to k ≃ 0.25 h Mpc1, given the accuracy of the measurements, which is of order a few percent at the highest k's of interest. While the fit is very good on average up to k ≃ 0.25 h Mpc1, the fit performs slightly worse on equilateral configurations, in agreement with expectations that for a given maximum k, equilateral triangles are the most nonlinear.

  10. JVLA Observations of Cosmic Rays in the Galaxy Cluster ZwCl2341.1+0000

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van Weeren, Reinout J.; Ogrean, Georgiana; Jones, Christine; Forman, William R.; Bonafede, Annalisa; Brüggen, Marcus; Kraft, Ralph P.

    2016-06-01

    We present new Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array (JVLA) observations of the merging galaxy cluster ZwCl2341.1+0000 located at z=0.27. This cluster is known to contain two diffuse radio sources, the largest being about 1 Mpc in size, located on opposite sides of the cluster center. The sources are separated by about 2 Mpc. In addition, the presence of fainter emission located between the two diffuse sources has been suggested. Diffuse Mpc-size radio sources in clusters are classified as radio halos and relics. Their existence implies the presence of cosmic rays and magnetic fields in the intracluster medium. The question is by which mechanism these cosmic rays are accelerated. For relics, there is increasing evidence that they trace particles (re)accelerated at large-scale shocks. However, the physics of the acceleration mechanism is not yet fully understood. Radio halos are centrally located in clusters. For halos, it has been suggested that the cosmic rays are re-accelerated by magneto-hydrodynamical turbulence. We use our JVLA observations of ZwCl2341.1+0000 to (1) search for the presence of additional large-scale emission in the cluster and (2) measure the spectral and polarization properties of the diffuse emission to determine its origin.

  11. The 2dF Galaxy Redshift Survey: voids and hierarchical scaling models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Croton, Darren J.; Colless, Matthew; Gaztañaga, Enrique; Baugh, Carlton M.; Norberg, Peder; Baldry, I. K.; Bland-Hawthorn, J.; Bridges, T.; Cannon, R.; Cole, S.; Collins, C.; Couch, W.; Dalton, G.; de Propris, R.; Driver, S. P.; Efstathiou, G.; Ellis, R. S.; Frenk, C. S.; Glazebrook, K.; Jackson, C.; Lahav, O.; Lewis, I.; Lumsden, S.; Maddox, S.; Madgwick, D.; Peacock, J. A.; Peterson, B. A.; Sutherland, W.; Taylor, K.

    2004-08-01

    We measure the redshift-space reduced void probability function (VPF) for 2dFGRS volume-limited galaxy samples covering the absolute magnitude range MbJ-5log10h=-18 to -22. Theoretically, the VPF connects the distribution of voids to the moments of galaxy clustering of all orders, and can be used to discriminate clustering models in the weakly non-linear regime. The reduced VPF measured from the 2dFGRS is in excellent agreement with the paradigm of hierarchical scaling of the galaxy clustering moments. The accuracy of our measurement is such that we can rule out, at a very high significance, popular models for galaxy clustering, including the lognormal distribution. We demonstrate that the negative binomial model gives a very good approximation to the 2dFGRS data over a wide range of scales, out to at least 20 h-1 Mpc. Conversely, the reduced VPF for dark matter in a Λ cold dark matter (ΛCDM) universe does appear to be lognormal on small scales but deviates significantly beyond ~4 h-1 Mpc. We find little dependence of the 2dFGRS reduced VPF on galaxy luminosity. Our results hold independently in both the North and South Galactic Pole survey regions.

  12. Imaging neutral hydrogen on large scales during the Epoch of Reionization with LOFAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaroubi, S.; de Bruyn, A. G.; Harker, G.; Thomas, R. M.; Labropolous, P.; Jelić, V.; Koopmans, L. V. E.; Brentjens, M. A.; Bernardi, G.; Ciardi, B.; Daiboo, S.; Kazemi, S.; Martinez-Rubi, O.; Mellema, G.; Offringa, A. R.; Pandey, V. N.; Schaye, J.; Veligatla, V.; Vedantham, H.; Yatawatta, S.

    2012-10-01

    The first generation of redshifted 21 cm detection experiments, carried out with arrays like Low Frequency Array (LOFAR), Murchison Widefield Array (MWA) and Giant Metrewave Telescope (GMRT), will have a very low signal-to-noise ratio (S/N) per resolution element (≲0.2). In addition, whereas the variance of the cosmological signal decreases on scales larger than the typical size of ionization bubbles, the variance of the formidable galactic foregrounds increases, making it hard to disentangle the two on such large scales. The poor sensitivity on small scales, on the one hand, and the foregrounds effect on large scales, on the other hand, make direct imaging of the Epoch of Reionization of the Universe very difficult, and detection of the signal therefore is expected to be statistical. Despite these hurdles, in this paper we argue that for many reionization scenarios low-resolution images could be obtained from the expected data. This is because at the later stages of the process one still finds very large pockets of neutral regions in the intergalactic medium, reflecting the clustering of the large-scale structure, which stays strong up to scales of ≈120 h-1 comoving Mpc (≈1°). The coherence of the emission on those scales allows us to reach sufficient S/N (≳3) so as to obtain reionization 21 cm images. Such images will be extremely valuable for answering many cosmological questions but above all they will be a very powerful tool to test our control of the systematics in the data. The existence of this typical scale (≈120 h-1 comoving Mpc) also argues for designing future EoR experiments, e.g. with Square Kilometre Array, with a field of view of at least 4°.

  13. Determination of the large scale volume weighted halo velocity bias in simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Yi; Zhang, Pengjie; Jing, Yipeng

    2015-06-01

    A profound assumption in peculiar velocity cosmology is bv=1 at sufficiently large scales, where bv is the volume-weighted halo(galaxy) velocity bias with respect to the matter velocity field. However, this fundamental assumption has not been robustly verified in numerical simulations. Furthermore, it is challenged by structure formation theory (Bardeen, Bond, Kaiser and Szalay, Astrophys. J. 304, 15 (1986); Desjacques and Sheth, Phys. Rev D 81, 023526 (2010), which predicts the existence of velocity bias (at least for proto-halos) due to the fact that halos reside in special regions (local density peaks). The major obstacle to measuring the volume-weighted velocity from N-body simulations is an unphysical sampling artifact. It is entangled in the measured velocity statistics and becomes significant for sparse populations. With recently improved understanding of the sampling artifact (Zhang, Zheng and Jing, 2015, PRD; Zheng, Zhang and Jing, 2015, PRD), for the first time we are able to appropriately correct this sampling artifact and then robustly measure the volume-weighted halo velocity bias. (1) We verify bv=1 within 2% model uncertainty at k ≲0.1 h /Mpc and z =0 - 2 for halos of mass ˜1012- 1013h-1M⊙ and, therefore, consolidate a foundation for the peculiar velocity cosmology. (2) We also find statistically significant signs of bv≠1 at k ≳0.1 h /Mpc . Unfortunately, whether this is real or caused by a residual sampling artifact requires further investigation. Nevertheless, cosmology based on the k ≳0.1 h /Mpc velocity data should be careful with this potential velocity bias.

  14. Non-Fermi liquid scaling in UPd(x)Cu(5-x)(x = 1,1.5)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aronson, M. C.; Osborn, R.; Robinson, R. A.; Lynn, J. W.

    1994-06-01

    We have determined the inelastic magnetic response S((omega)) of UPd(x)Cu(5-x) (X=1,1.5) for temperatures from 0.3 to 300 K and energies between 05 and 400 meV using the neutron time of flight technique. S((omega)) is virtually identical in the two compound, displaying marginal Fermi Liquid scaling over the entire range of temperatures, as well as scale invariant energetics.

  15. A topological analysis of large-scale structure, studied using the CMASS sample of SDSS-III

    SciTech Connect

    Parihar, Prachi; Gott, J. Richard III; Vogeley, Michael S.; Choi, Yun-Young; Kim, Juhan; Kim, Sungsoo S.; Speare, Robert; Brownstein, Joel R.; Brinkmann, J. E-mail: yy.choi@khu.ac.kr

    2014-12-01

    We study the three-dimensional genus topology of large-scale structure using the northern region of the CMASS Data Release 10 (DR10) sample of the SDSS-III Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey. We select galaxies with redshift 0.452 < z < 0.625 and with a stellar mass M {sub stellar} > 10{sup 11.56} M {sub ☉}. We study the topology at two smoothing lengths: R {sub G} = 21 h {sup –1} Mpc and R {sub G} = 34 h {sup –1} Mpc. The genus topology studied at the R {sub G} = 21 h {sup –1} Mpc scale results in the highest genus amplitude observed to date. The CMASS sample yields a genus curve that is characteristic of one produced by Gaussian random phase initial conditions. The data thus support the standard model of inflation where random quantum fluctuations in the early universe produced Gaussian random phase initial conditions. Modest deviations in the observed genus from random phase are as expected from shot noise effects and the nonlinear evolution of structure. We suggest the use of a fitting formula motivated by perturbation theory to characterize the shift and asymmetries in the observed genus curve with a single parameter. We construct 54 mock SDSS CMASS surveys along the past light cone from the Horizon Run 3 (HR3) N-body simulations, where gravitationally bound dark matter subhalos are identified as the sites of galaxy formation. We study the genus topology of the HR3 mock surveys with the same geometry and sampling density as the observational sample and find the observed genus topology to be consistent with ΛCDM as simulated by the HR3 mock samples. We conclude that the topology of the large-scale structure in the SDSS CMASS sample is consistent with cosmological models having primordial Gaussian density fluctuations growing in accordance with general relativity to form galaxies in massive dark matter halos.

  16. 45. STEEL FRAMING FOR LOFT, Y&D No. 107723 Scales 1/2' ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    45. STEEL FRAMING FOR LOFT, Y&D No. 107723 Scales 1/2' and 1-1/2' = 1'; July 2, 1929 - U.S. Naval Submarine Base, New London Submarine Escape Training Tank, Albacore & Darter Roads, Groton, New London County, CT

  17. 25. FOLSOM, CALIFORNIA, 15 MINUTE QUADRANGLE. 1941. Scale 1:62,500. United ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    25. FOLSOM, CALIFORNIA, 15 MINUTE QUADRANGLE. 1941. Scale 1:62,500. United States Geological Survey. - Natomas Ditch System, Rhodes Ditch, West of Bidwell Street, north of U.S. Highway 50, Folsom, Sacramento County, CA

  18. 1:2,000,000-scale Counties of the United States

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lanfear, K.J.

    1994-01-01

    This coverage is of the county boundaries of the conterminous United States. It was derived from the Digital Line Graph (DLG) files representing the 1:2,000,000-scale map in the National Atlas of the United States.

  19. Origin of the Scaling Constant "d" = 1.7 in Item Response Theory.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Camilli, Gregory

    1994-01-01

    Describes the scaling constant "d" = 1.702, used in Item Response Theory, which minimizes the maximum difference between the normal and logistic distribution functions. Recapitulates the theoretical and numerical derivation of "d" given by D. Haley (1952). (SLD)

  20. LyMAS: Predicting Large-scale Lyα Forest Statistics from the Dark Matter Density Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peirani, Sébastien; Weinberg, David H.; Colombi, Stéphane; Blaizot, Jérémy; Dubois, Yohan; Pichon, Christophe

    2014-03-01

    We describe Lyα Mass Association Scheme (LyMAS), a method of predicting clustering statistics in the Lyα forest on large scales from moderate-resolution simulations of the dark matter (DM) distribution, with calibration from high-resolution hydrodynamic simulations of smaller volumes. We use the "Horizon-MareNostrum" simulation, a 50 h -1 Mpc comoving volume evolved with the adaptive mesh hydrodynamic code RAMSES, to compute the conditional probability distribution P(Fs |δ s ) of the transmitted flux Fs , smoothed (one-dimensionally, 1D) over the spectral resolution scale, on the DM density contrast δ s , smoothed (three-dimensionally, 3D) over a similar scale. In this study we adopt the spectral resolution of the SDSS-III Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey (BOSS) at z = 2.5, and we find optimal results for a DM smoothing length σ = 0.3 h -1 Mpc (comoving). In its simplest form, LyMAS draws randomly from the hydro-calibrated P(Fs |δ s ) to convert DM skewers into Lyα forest pseudo-spectra, which are then used to compute cross-sightline flux statistics. In extended form, LyMAS exactly reproduces both the 1D power spectrum and one-point flux distribution of the hydro simulation spectra. Applied to the MareNostrum DM field, LyMAS accurately predicts the two-point conditional flux distribution and flux correlation function of the full hydro simulation for transverse sightline separations as small as 1 h -1 Mpc, including redshift-space distortion effects. It is substantially more accurate than a deterministic density-flux mapping ("Fluctuating Gunn-Peterson Approximation"), often used for large-volume simulations of the forest. With the MareNostrum calibration, we apply LyMAS to 10243 N-body simulations of a 300 h -1 Mpc and 1.0 h -1 Gpc cube to produce large, publicly available catalogs of mock BOSS spectra that probe a large comoving volume. LyMAS will be a powerful tool for interpreting 3D Lyα forest data, thereby transforming measurements from BOSS and

  1. LyMAS: Predicting large-scale Lyα forest statistics from the dark matter density field

    SciTech Connect

    Peirani, Sébastien; Colombi, Stéphane; Dubois, Yohan; Pichon, Christophe; Weinberg, David H.; Blaizot, Jérémy

    2014-03-20

    We describe Lyα Mass Association Scheme (LyMAS), a method of predicting clustering statistics in the Lyα forest on large scales from moderate-resolution simulations of the dark matter (DM) distribution, with calibration from high-resolution hydrodynamic simulations of smaller volumes. We use the 'Horizon-MareNostrum' simulation, a 50 h {sup –1} Mpc comoving volume evolved with the adaptive mesh hydrodynamic code RAMSES, to compute the conditional probability distribution P(F{sub s} |δ {sub s}) of the transmitted flux F{sub s} , smoothed (one-dimensionally, 1D) over the spectral resolution scale, on the DM density contrast δ {sub s}, smoothed (three-dimensionally, 3D) over a similar scale. In this study we adopt the spectral resolution of the SDSS-III Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey (BOSS) at z = 2.5, and we find optimal results for a DM smoothing length σ = 0.3 h {sup –1} Mpc (comoving). In its simplest form, LyMAS draws randomly from the hydro-calibrated P(F{sub s} |δ {sub s}) to convert DM skewers into Lyα forest pseudo-spectra, which are then used to compute cross-sightline flux statistics. In extended form, LyMAS exactly reproduces both the 1D power spectrum and one-point flux distribution of the hydro simulation spectra. Applied to the MareNostrum DM field, LyMAS accurately predicts the two-point conditional flux distribution and flux correlation function of the full hydro simulation for transverse sightline separations as small as 1 h {sup –1} Mpc, including redshift-space distortion effects. It is substantially more accurate than a deterministic density-flux mapping ({sup F}luctuating Gunn-Peterson Approximation{sup )}, often used for large-volume simulations of the forest. With the MareNostrum calibration, we apply LyMAS to 1024{sup 3} N-body simulations of a 300 h {sup –1} Mpc and 1.0 h {sup –1} Gpc cube to produce large, publicly available catalogs of mock BOSS spectra that probe a large comoving volume. LyMAS will be a powerful

  2. Comparisons of the Impact Responses of a 1/5-Scale Model and a Full-Scale Crashworthy Composite Fuselage Section

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jackson, Karen E.; Fasanella, Edwin L.; Lyle, Karen H.

    2003-01-01

    A 25-fps vertical drop test of a 1/5-scale model composite fuselage section was conducted to replicate a previous test of a full-scale fuselage section. The purpose of the test was to obtain experimental data characterizing the impact response of the 1/5-scale model fuselage section for comparison with the corresponding full-scale data. This comparison is performed to assess the scaling procedures and to determine if scaling effects are present. For the drop test, the 1/5-scale model fuselage section was configured in a similar manner as the full-scale section, with lead masses attached to the floor through simulated seat rails. Scaled acceleration and velocity responses are compared and a general assessment of structural damage is made. To further quantify the data correlation, comparisons of the average acceleration data are made as a function of floor location and longitudinal position. Also, the percentage differences in the velocity change (area under the acceleration curve) and the velocity change squared (proportional to kinetic energy) are compared as a function of floor location. Finally, correlation coefficients are calculated for corresponding 1/5- and full-scale data channels and these values are plotted versus floor location. From a scaling perspective, the differences between the 1/5- and full-scale tests are relatively small, indicating that appropriate scaling procedures were used in fabricating the test specimens and in conducting the experiments. The small differences in the scaled test data are attributed to minor scaling anomalies in mass, potential energy, and impact attitude.

  3. Measures of large-scale structure in the CfA redshift survey slices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    De Lapparent, Valerie; Geller, Margaret J.; Huchra, John P.

    1991-01-01

    Variations of the counts-in-cells with cell size are used here to define two statistical measures of large-scale clustering in three 6 deg slices of the CfA redshift survey. A percolation criterion is used to estimate the filling factor which measures the fraction of the total volume in the survey occupied by the large-scale structures. For the full 18 deg slice of the CfA redshift survey, f is about 0.25 + or - 0.05. After removing groups with more than five members from two of the slices, variations of the counts in occupied cells with cell size have a power-law behavior with a slope beta about 2.2 on scales from 1-10/h Mpc. Application of both this statistic and the percolation analysis to simulations suggests that a network of two-dimensional structures is a better description of the geometry of the clustering in the CfA slices than a network of one-dimensional structures. Counts-in-cells are also used to estimate at 0.3 galaxy h-squared/Mpc the average galaxy surface density in sheets like the Great Wall.

  4. Measures of large-scale structure in the CfA redshift survey slices

    SciTech Connect

    De Lapparent, V.; Geller, M.J.; Huchra, J.P. Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, Cambridge, MA )

    1991-03-01

    Variations of the counts-in-cells with cell size are used here to define two statistical measures of large-scale clustering in three 6 deg slices of the CfA redshift survey. A percolation criterion is used to estimate the filling factor which measures the fraction of the total volume in the survey occupied by the large-scale structures. For the full 18 deg slice of the CfA redshift survey, f is about 0.25 + or - 0.05. After removing groups with more than five members from two of the slices, variations of the counts in occupied cells with cell size have a power-law behavior with a slope beta about 2.2 on scales from 1-10/h Mpc. Application of both this statistic and the percolation analysis to simulations suggests that a network of two-dimensional structures is a better description of the geometry of the clustering in the CfA slices than a network of one-dimensional structures. Counts-in-cells are also used to estimate at 0.3 galaxy h-squared/Mpc the average galaxy surface density in sheets like the Great Wall. 46 refs.

  5. Bayesian inference of cosmic density fields from non-linear, scale-dependent, and stochastic biased tracers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ata, Metin; Kitaura, Francisco-Shu; Müller, Volker

    2015-02-01

    We present a Bayesian reconstruction algorithm to generate unbiased samples of the underlying dark matter field from halo catalogues. Our new contribution consists of implementing a non-Poisson likelihood including a deterministic non-linear and scale-dependent bias. In particular we present the Hamiltonian equations of motions for the negative binomial (NB) probability distribution function. This permits us to efficiently sample the posterior distribution function of density fields given a sample of galaxies using the Hamiltonian Monte Carlo technique implemented in the ARGO code. We have tested our algorithm with the Bolshoi N-body simulation at redshift z = 0, inferring the underlying dark matter density field from subsamples of the halo catalogue with biases smaller and larger than one. Our method shows that we can draw closely unbiased samples (compatible within 1-σ) from the posterior distribution up to scales of about k ˜ 1 h Mpc-1 in terms of power-spectra and cell-to-cell correlations. We find that a Poisson likelihood including a scale-dependent non-linear deterministic bias can yield reconstructions with power spectra deviating more than 10 per cent at k = 0.2 h Mpc-1. Our reconstruction algorithm is especially suited for emission line galaxy data for which a complex non-linear stochastic biasing treatment beyond Poissonity becomes indispensable.

  6. Large-scale power spectrum and structures from the ENEAR galaxy peculiar velocity catalogue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaroubi, S.; Bernardi, M.; da Costa, L. N.; Hoffman, Y.; Alonso, M. V.; Wegner, G.; Willmer, C. N. A.; Pellegrini, P. S.

    2001-09-01

    We estimate the mass density fluctuations power spectrum (PS) on large scales by applying a maximum likelihood technique to the peculiar velocity data of the recently completed redshift-distance survey of early-type galaxies (hereafter ENEAR). Parametric cold dark matter (CDM)-like models for the PS are assumed, and the best-fitting parameters are determined by maximizing the probability of the model given the measured peculiar velocities of the galaxies, their distances and estimated errors. The method has been applied to CDM models with and without COBE normalization. The general results are in agreement with the high-amplitude power spectra found from similar analyses of other independent all-sky catalogue of peculiar velocity data such as MARK III and SFI, in spite of the differences in the way these samples were selected, the fact that they probe different regions of space and galaxy distances are computed using different distance relations. For example, at k=0.1hMpc-1 the power spectrum value is P(k)Ω1.2=(6.5+/-3)×103(h- 1Mpc)3 and η8≡σ8Ω0.6=1.1- 0.35+0.2 the quoted uncertainties refer to 3σ error level. We also find that, for ΛCDM and OCDM COBE-normalized models, the best-fitting parameters are confined by a contour approximately defined by Ωh1.3=0.377+/-0.08 and Ωh0.88=0.517+/-0.083 respectively. Γ-shape models, free of COBE normalization, result in the weak constraint of Γ>=0.17 and in the rather stringent constraint of η8=1.0+/-0.25. All quoted uncertainties refer to 3σ confidence level (c.l.). The calculated PS has been used as a prior for Wiener reconstruction of the density field at different resolutions and the three-dimensional velocity field within a volume of radius ~80h-1Mpc. All major structures in the nearby Universe are recovered and are well matched to those predicted from all-sky redshift surveys. The robustness of these features has been tested with constrained realizations (CR). Analysis of the reconstructed three

  7. Quantifying the colour-dependent stochasticity of large-scale structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patej, Anna; Eisenstein, Daniel

    2016-08-01

    We address the question of whether massive red and blue galaxies trace the same large-scale structure at z ˜ 0.6 using the CMASS sample of galaxies from Data Release 12 of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey III. After splitting the catalogue into subsamples of red and blue galaxies using a simple colour cut, we measure the clustering of both subsamples and construct the correlation coefficient, r, using two statistics. The correlation coefficient quantifies the stochasticity between the two subsamples, which we examine over intermediate scales (20 ≲ R ≲ 100 h-1 Mpc). We find that on these intermediate scales, the correlation coefficient is consistent with 1; in particular, we find r > 0.95 taking into account both statistics and r > 0.974 using the favoured statistic.

  8. Quantifying the Colour-Dependent Stochasticity of Large-Scale Structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patej, Anna; Eisenstein, Daniel

    2016-03-01

    We address the question of whether massive red and blue galaxies trace the same large-scale structure at z ˜ 0.6 using the CMASS sample of galaxies from Data Release 12 of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey III. After splitting the catalog into subsamples of red and blue galaxies using a simple colour cut, we measure the clustering of both subsamples and construct the correlation coefficient, r, using two statistics. The correlation coefficient quantifies the stochasticity between the two subsamples, which we examine over intermediate scales (20 ≲ R ≲ 100 h-1Mpc). We find that on these intermediate scales, the correlation coefficient is consistent with 1; in particular, we find r > 0.95 taking into account both statistics and r > 0.974 using the favored statistic.

  9. Scaling of dynamic thermoelectric harvesting devices in the 1-100 cm3 range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiziroglou, M. E.; Elefsiniotis, A.; Kokorakis, N.; Wright, S. W.; Toh, T. T.; Mitcheson, P. D.; Schmid, U.; Becker, Th.; Yeatman, E. M.

    2015-05-01

    Aircraft sensors are typically cable powered, imposing a significant weight overhead. The exploitation of temperature variations during flight by a phase change material (PCM) based heat storage thermoelectric energy harvester, as an alternative power source in aeronautical applications, has recently been flight tested. In this work, a scaled-down and a scaled-up prototype are presented. Output energy of 4.1 J per gram of PCM from a typical flight cycle is demonstrated for the scaled-down device, and 3.2 J per gram of PCM for the scaled-up device. The observed performance improvement with scaling down is attributed to the reduction in temperature inhomogeneity inside the PCM. As an application demonstrator for dynamic thermoelectric harvesting devices, the output of a thermoelectric module is used to directly power a microcontroller for the generation of a pulse width modulation signal.

  10. GeeWiz Integrated Visualization Interface for SCALE 5.1

    SciTech Connect

    Bowman, Stephen M; Rearden, Bradley T; Horwedel, James E

    2007-01-01

    The KENO V.a and KENO-VI three-dimensional Monte Carlo criticality computer codes in the SCALE (Standardized Computer Analyses for Licensing Evaluation) computer software system developed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) are widely used and accepted around the world for criticality safety analyses. As part of current development efforts to improve SCALE's ease of use, the SCALE project team at ORNL has developed a new integrated graphical visualization package for KENO V.a and KENO-VI in SCALE 5.1. This package uses the SCALE Graphically Enhanced Editing Wizard (GeeWiz) as the visualization control center that provides users the capability to set up, execute, plot, and view results from KENO in a friendly, colorful, and interactive computing environment without ever using a text editor or a command prompt.

  11. CONSTRAINING PRIMORDIAL MAGNETIC FIELDS THROUGH LARGE-SCALE STRUCTURE

    SciTech Connect

    Kahniashvili, Tina; Natarajan, Aravind; Battaglia, Nicholas; Maravin, Yurii; Tevzadze, Alexander G.

    2013-06-10

    We study primordial magnetic field effects on the matter perturbations in the universe. We assume magnetic field generation prior to the big bang nucleosynthesis (BBN), i.e., during the radiation-dominated epoch of the universe expansion, but do not limit analysis by considering a particular magnetogenesis scenario. Contrary to previous studies, we limit the total magnetic field energy density and not the smoothed amplitude of the magnetic field at large (of the order of 1 Mpc) scales. We review several cosmological signatures, such as halo abundance, thermal Sunyaev-Zel'dovich effect, and Ly{alpha} data. For a cross-check, we compare our limits with that obtained through the cosmic microwave background faraday rotation effect and BBN. The limits range between 1.5 nG and 4.5 nG for n{sub B} in (- 3; -1.5).

  12. US/Russian laboratory-to-laboratory MPC&A Program at the VNIITF Institute, Chelyabinsk-70 May 1996

    SciTech Connect

    Tsygankov, G.; Churikov, Y.; Teryokhin, V.

    1996-05-01

    The AR Russian Institute of Technical Physics (VNIITF), also called Chelyabinsk-70, is one of two Russian federal nuclear centers established to design, test and support nuclear weapons throughout their life cycle. The site contains research facilities which use nuclear materials, two experimental plants which manufacture prototype samples for nuclear weapons, and a site for various ground tests. Chelyabinsk-70 also has cooperative relationships with the major nuclear materials production facilities in the Urals region of Russia. Chelyabinsk-70 has been participating in the US/Russian Laboratory-to-laboratory cooperative program for approximately one year. Six US Department of Energy Laboratories are carrying out a program of cooperation with VNIITF to improve the capabilities and facilities for nuclear materials protection, control, and accounting (MPC&A) at VNIITF. A Safeguards Effectiveness Evaluation Workshop was conducted at VNIITF in July, 1995. Enhanced safeguards systems are being implemented, initially at a reactor test area that contains three pulse reactors. Significant improvements to physical security and access control systems are under way. C-70 is developing an extensive computerized system that integrates the physical security alarm station with elements of the nuclear material control system. The existing systems will be augmented with Russian and US technologies. This paper will describe the on-going activities and describe the cooperative effort between the Lawrence Livermore, Los Alamos, Sandia, Oak Ridge, Pacific Northwest, and Brookhaven US Department of Energy National Laboratories and VNIITF.

  13. U.S./Russian Laboratory-to-Laboratory MPC&A Program at the VNIITF Institute, Chelyabinsk-70

    SciTech Connect

    Teryohin, V.; Tzygankov, G.; Blasy, J.

    1995-07-01

    The All Russian Institute of Technical Physics (VNIITF) is one of the major sites in the nuclear weapons complex in Russia. The site contains a number of research facilities which use nuclear material as well as facilities active in disassembly and disposition of nuclear weapons. Chelyabinsk-70 (C-70) also has ties to the major nuclear materials production facilities in the Urals region of Russia. Under the U.S./Russian Laboratory -to- Laboratory cooperative program, enhanced safeguards systems are being implemented, initially at a reactor test area that contains two pulse reactors and a nuclear material storage facility. C-70 is developing an extensive computerized system that integrates the physical security alarm station with elements of the nuclear material control system. Under the Lab-to-Lab program, the existing systems will bi augmented with Russian and US technologies. The integrated MPC&A system for the test facilities will be demonstrated to US and Russian audiences when completed and follow-on work at additional C-70 facilities will be identified. This paper will describe the on-going activities and describe the cooperative effort between the Lawrence Livermore, Los Alamos, Sandia, Oak Ridge, Pacific Northwest, and Brookhaven US Department of Energy National Laboratories in support of VNIITF.

  14. U.S./Russian laboratory-to-laboratory MPC and A program at the VNIITF Institute, Chelyabinsk-70

    SciTech Connect

    Teryohin, V.; Tzygankov, G.; Blasy, J.

    1996-12-31

    The All Russian Institute of Technical Physics (VNIITF) is one of the major sites in the nuclear weapons complex in Russia. The site contains a number of research facilities which use nuclear material as well as facilities active in disassembly and disposition of nuclear weapons. Chelyabinsk-70 (C-70) also has ties to the major nuclear materials production facilities in the Urals region of Russia. Under the US/Russian Laboratory-to-Laboratory cooperative program, enhanced safeguards systems are being implemented, initially at a reactor test area that contains two pulse reactors and a nuclear material storage facility. C-70 is developing an extensive computerized system that integrates the physical security alarm station with elements of the nuclear material control system. Under the Lab-to-Lab program, the existing systems will be augmented with Russian and US technologies. The integrated MPC and A system for the test facilities will be demonstrated to US and Russian audiences when completed and follow-on work at additional C-70 facilities will be identified. This paper will describe the on-going activities and describe the cooperative effort between the Lawrence Livermore, Los Alamos, Sandia, Oak Ridge, Pacific Northwest, and Brookhaven US Department of Energy National Laboratories in support of VNIITF.

  15. Physiographic map of the Sicilian region (1:250,000 scale)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Priori, Simone; Fantappiè, Maria; Costantini, Edoardo A. C.

    2015-04-01

    Physiographic maps summarize and group the landforms of a territory into homogeneous areas in terms of kind and intensity of main geomorphological process. Most of the physiographic maps have large scale, which is national or continental scale. Other maps have been produced at the semi-detailed scales, while examples at the regional scale are much less common. However, being the Region the main administrative level in Europe, they can be very useful for land planning in many fields, such as ecological studies, risk maps, and soil mapping. This work presents a methodological example of regional physiographic map, compiled at 1:250,000 scale, representing the whole Sicilian region, the largest and most characteristic of Mediterranean island. The physiographic units were classed matching thematich layers (NDVI, geology, DEM, land cover) with the main geomorphological processes that were identified by stereo-interpretation of aerial photographs (1:70,000 scale). In addition, information from other published maps, representing geomorphological forms, aeolian deposits, anthropic terraced slopes, and landslide were used to improve the accuracy and reliability of the map. The classification of the physiographic units, and then the map legend, was built up on the basis of literature and taking into account Italian geomorphological legend. The legend proposed in this map, which can be applied also in other Mediterranean countries, is suitable for different scales. The landform units were grouped on the base of a geomorphological classification of the forms into: anthropogenic, eolian, coastal, valley floor, intermountain fluvial, slope erosional, structural, karstic, and volcanic.

  16. Precision Measurement of Large Scale Structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hamilton, A. J. S.

    2001-01-01

    The purpose of this grant was to develop and to start to apply new precision methods for measuring the power spectrum and redshift distortions from the anticipated new generation of large redshift surveys. A highlight of work completed during the award period was the application of the new methods developed by the PI to measure the real space power spectrum and redshift distortions of the IRAS PSCz survey, published in January 2000. New features of the measurement include: (1) measurement of power over an unprecedentedly broad range of scales, 4.5 decades in wavenumber, from 0.01 to 300 h/Mpc; (2) at linear scales, not one but three power spectra are measured, the galaxy-galaxy, galaxy-velocity, and velocity-velocity power spectra; (3) at linear scales each of the three power spectra is decorrelated within itself, and disentangled from the other two power spectra (the situation is analogous to disentangling scalar and tensor modes in the Cosmic Microwave Background); and (4) at nonlinear scales the measurement extracts not only the real space power spectrum, but also the full line-of-sight pairwise velocity distribution in redshift space.

  17. Room temperature stretch forming of scale space shuttle external tank dome gores. Volume 1: Technical

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blunck, R. D.; Krantz, D. E.

    1974-01-01

    An account of activities and data gathered in the Room Temperature Stretch Forming of One-third Scale External Tank Bulkhead Gores for space shuttle study, and a tooling design and production cost study are reported. The following study phases are described: (1) the stretch forming of three approximately one-third scale external tank dome gores from single sheets of 2219-T37 aluminum alloy; (2) the designing of a full scale production die, including a determination of tooling requirements; and (3) the determination of cost per gore at the required production rates, including manufacturing, packaging, and shipping.

  18. The value of ERTS-1 imagery in resource inventorization on a national scale in South Africa

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Malan, O. G.; Macvicar, C. N.; Edwards, D.; Temperley, B. N.; Claassen, L.

    1974-01-01

    It has been shown that ERTS imagery, particularly in the form of 1:500,000 scale false color photolithographic prints, can contribute very significantly towards facilitating and accelerating (dramatically, in some cases) resource surveys and geologic mapping. Fire mapping on a national scale becomes a feasability; numerous new geologic features, particularly lineaments, have been discovered, land use can be mapped efficiently on a regional scale and degraded areas identified. The first detailed tectonic and geomorphological maps of the Republic of South Africa will be published mainly owing to the availability of ERTS images.

  19. Scaling behavior of spin gap of the bond alternating anisotropic spin-1/2 Heisenberg chain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paul, Susobhan; Ghosh, Asim Kumar

    2016-05-01

    Scaling behavior of spin gap of a bond alternating spin-1/2 anisotropic Heisenberg chain has been studied both in ferromagnetic (FM) and antiferromagnetic (AFM) cases. Spin gap has been estimated by using exact diagonalization technique. All those quantities have been obtained for a region of anisotropic parameter Δ defined by 0≤Δ≤1. Spin gap is found to develop as soon as the non-uniformity in the alternating bond strength is introduced in the AFM regime which furthermore sustains in the FM regime as well. Scaling behavior of the spin gap has been studied by introducing scaling exponent. The variation of scaling exponents with Δ is fitted with a regular function.

  20. A geometric frequency-magnitude scaling transition: Measuring b = 1.5 for large earthquakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoder, Mark R.; Holliday, James R.; Turcotte, Donald L.; Rundle, John B.

    2012-04-01

    We identify two distinct scaling regimes in the frequency-magnitude distribution of global earthquakes. Specifically, we measure the scaling exponent b = 1.0 for "small" earthquakes with 5.5 < m < 7.6 and b = 1.5 for "large" earthquakes with 7.6 < m < 9.0. This transition at mt = 7.6, can be explained by geometric constraints on the rupture. In conjunction with supporting literature, this corroborates theories in favor of fully self-similar and magnitude independent earthquake physics. We also show that the scaling behavior and abrupt transition between the scaling regimes imply that earthquake ruptures have compact shapes and smooth rupture-fronts.

  1. Spectral scaling laws of solar wind fluctuations at 1 AU: Part 2

    SciTech Connect

    Podesta, John J.

    2013-06-13

    In-situ measurements of solar wind fluctuations at 1 AU show that the reduced energy spectrum, equal to the sum of the reduced kinetic plus magnetic energy spectra, is characterized by a power-law scaling k{sup -{alpha}} in the inertial range with an average spectral exponent {alpha} Asymptotically-Equal-To 3/2, a result confirmed by independent analyses using data from different spacecraft. Magnetic field and electron density spectra at kinetic scales {rho}{sup -1}{sub i} < k < {rho}{sup -1}{sub e} both have a spectral index of approximately 2.7. These and other recent observations of spectral scaling laws in the solar wind using single spacecraft measurements are briefly reviewed. The first part of this review, Part 1, is contained in a separate paper in these proceedings.

  2. The VIMOS Public Extragalactic Redshift Survey (VIPERS). An unprecedented view of galaxies and large-scale structure at 0.5 < z < 1.2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guzzo, L.; Scodeggio, M.; Garilli, B.; Granett, B. R.; Fritz, A.; Abbas, U.; Adami, C.; Arnouts, S.; Bel, J.; Bolzonella, M.; Bottini, D.; Branchini, E.; Cappi, A.; Coupon, J.; Cucciati, O.; Davidzon, I.; De Lucia, G.; de la Torre, S.; Franzetti, P.; Fumana, M.; Hudelot, P.; Ilbert, O.; Iovino, A.; Krywult, J.; Le Brun, V.; Le Fèvre, O.; Maccagni, D.; Małek, K.; Marulli, F.; McCracken, H. J.; Paioro, L.; Peacock, J. A.; Polletta, M.; Pollo, A.; Schlagenhaufer, H.; Tasca, L. A. M.; Tojeiro, R.; Vergani, D.; Zamorani, G.; Zanichelli, A.; Burden, A.; Di Porto, C.; Marchetti, A.; Marinoni, C.; Mellier, Y.; Moscardini, L.; Nichol, R. C.; Percival, W. J.; Phleps, S.; Wolk, M.

    2014-06-01

    We describe the construction and general features of VIPERS, the VIMOS Public Extragalactic Redshift Survey. This ESO Large Programme is using the Very Large Telescope with the aim of building a spectroscopic sample of ~ 100 000 galaxies with iAB< 22.5 and 0.5 1.5. The survey covers a total area of ~ 24 deg2 within the CFHTLS-Wide W1 and W4 fields. VIPERS is designed to address a broad range of problems in large-scale structure and galaxy evolution, thanks to a unique combination of volume (~ 5 × 107h-3 Mpc3) and sampling rate (~ 40%), comparable to state-of-the-art surveys of the local Universe, together with extensive multi-band optical and near-infrared photometry. Here we present the survey design, the selection of the source catalogue and the development of the spectroscopic observations. We discuss in detail the overall selection function that results from the combination of the different constituents of the project. This includes the masks arising from the parent photometric sample and the spectroscopic instrumental footprint, together with the weights needed to account for the sampling and the success rates of the observations. Using the catalogue of 53 608 galaxy redshifts composing the forthcoming VIPERS Public Data Release 1 (PDR-1), we provide a first assessment of the quality of the spectroscopic data. The stellar contamination is found to be only 3.2%, endorsing the quality of the star-galaxy separation process and fully confirming the original estimates based on the VVDS data, which also indicate a galaxy incompleteness from this process of only 1.4%. Using a set of 1215 repeated observations, we estimate an rms redshift error σz/ (1 + z) = 4.7 × 10-4 and calibrate the internal spectral quality grading. Benefiting from the combination of size and detailed sampling of this dataset, we conclude by presenting a map showing in unprecedented detail the large-scale distribution of galaxies between 5 and 8 billion years ago. Based on observations

  3. SCALE 5.1 Predictions of PWR Spent Nuclear Fuel Isotopic Compositions

    SciTech Connect

    Radulescu, Georgeta; Gauld, Ian C; Ilas, Germina

    2010-03-01

    The purpose of this calculation report is to document the comparison to measurement of the isotopic concentrations for pressurized water reactor (PWR) spent nuclear fuel determined with the Standardized Computer Analysis for Licensing Evaluation (SCALE) 5.1 (Ref. ) epletion calculation method. Specifically, the depletion computer code and the cross-section library being evaluated are the twodimensional (2-D) transport and depletion module, TRITON/NEWT,2, 3 and the 44GROUPNDF5 (Ref. 4) cross-section library, respectively, in the SCALE .1 code system.

  4. The MATS-1 Risk Assessment Scale: Summary of Methodological Concerns and an Empirical Validation.

    PubMed

    Helmus, Leslie; Thornton, David

    2016-04-01

    Recently, Wollert and colleagues proposed that sex offender recidivism estimates should be stratified by age and they developed an age-stratified scale called the MATS-1 (Multisample Age-Stratified Table of Sexual Recidivism). The purpose of this article is to highlight concerns with the development of the MATS-1 and to validate the scale using 3,510 sex offenders from 14 unique samples. Concerns with the scale's development fall into three categories: approximations leading to considerable loss of precision, absence of appropriate statistical tests, and the use of inappropriate statistical techniques. The predictive accuracy of the MATS-1 (Area Under the Curve [AUC] = .663) was significantly lower than Static-99R (AUC = .708). The MATS-1 also significantly underestimated recidivism for some offenders. Both the relative and absolute predictive properties of the MATS-1 were not stable across samples. We conclude that the MATS-1 is not appropriate to use for applied risk assessment. Proposals are made for alternate ways to develop risk scales using the age-stratification method. PMID:24743657

  5. An Overview of the Cooperative Effort between the United States Department of Energy and the China Atomic Energy Authority to Enhance MPC&A Inspections for Civil Nuclear Facilities in China

    SciTech Connect

    Ahern, Keith; Daming, Liu; Hanley, Tim; Livingston, Linwood; McAninch, Connie; McGinnis, Brent R; Ning, Shen; Qun, Yang; Roback, Jason William; Tuttle, Glenn; Xuemei, Gao; Galer, Regina; Peterson, Nancy; Jia, Jinlie

    2011-01-01

    The United States Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration (DOE/NNSA) and the China Atomic Energy Authority (CAEA) are cooperating to enhance the domestic regulatory inspections capacity for special nuclear material protection, control and accounting (MPC&A) requirements for civil nuclear facilities in China. This cooperation is conducted under the auspices of the Agreement between the Department of Energy of the United States of America and the State Development and Planning Commission of the People s Republic of China on Cooperation Concerning Peaceful Uses of Nuclear Technology. This initial successful effort was conducted in three phases. Phase I focused on introducing CAEA personnel to DOE and U. S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission inspection methods for U. S. facilities. This phase was completed in January 2008 during meetings in Beijing. Phase II focused on developing physical protection and material control and accounting inspection exercises that enforced U. S. inspection methods identified during Phase 1. Hands on inspection activities were conducted in the United States over a two week period in July 2009. Simulated deficiencies were integrated into the inspection exercises. The U. S. and Chinese participants actively identified and discussed deficiencies noted during the two week training course. The material control and accounting inspection exercises were conducted at the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PGDP) in Paducah, KY. The physical protection inspection exercises were conducted at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) in Oak Ridge, TN. Phase III leveraged information provided under Phase I and experience gained under Phase II to develop a formal inspection guide that incorporates a systematic approach to training for Chinese MPC&A field inspectors. Additional hands on exercises that are applicable to Chinese regulations were incorporated into the Phase III training material. Phase III was completed in May 2010 at the China

  6. Variability in Soil Properties at Different Spatial Scales (1 m to 1 km) in a Deciduous Forest Ecosystem

    SciTech Connect

    Garten Jr, Charles T; Kang, S.; Brice, Deanne Jane; Schadt, Christopher Warren; Zhou, Jizhong

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this research was to test the hypothesis that variability in 11 soil properties, related to soil texture and soil C and N, would increase from small (1 m) to large (1 km) spatial scales in a temperate, mixed-hardwood forest ecosystem in east Tennessee, USA. The results were somewhat surprising and indicated that a fundamental assumption in geospatial analysis, namely that variability increases with increasing spatial scale, did not apply for at least five of the 11 soil properties measured over a 0.5-km2 area. Composite mineral soil samples (15 cm deep) were collected at 1, 5, 10, 50, 250, and 500 m distances from a center point along transects in a north, south, east, and westerly direction. A null hypothesis of equal variance at different spatial scales was rejected (P{le}0.05) for mineral soil C concentration, silt content, and the C-to-N ratios in particulate organic matter (POM), mineral-associated organic matter (MOM), and whole surface soil. Results from different tests of spatial variation, based on coefficients of variation or a Mantel test, led to similar conclusions about measurement variability and geographic distance for eight of the 11 variables examined. Measurements of mineral soil C and N concentrations, C concentrations in MOM, extractable soil NH{sub 4}-N, and clay contents were just as variable at smaller scales (1-10 m) as they were at larger scales (50-500 m). On the other hand, measurement variation in mineral soil C-to-N ratios, MOM C-to-N ratios, and the fraction of soil C in POM clearly increased from smaller to larger spatial scales. With the exception of extractable soil NH4-N, measured soil properties in the forest ecosystem could be estimated (with 95% confidence) to within 15% of their true mean with a relatively modest number of sampling points (n{le}25). For some variables, scaling up variation from smaller to larger spatial domains within the ecosystem could be relatively easy because small-scale variation may be

  7. Subtask 12A1: Fabrication of production-scale heat of V-4Cr-4Ti

    SciTech Connect

    Chung, H.M.; Tsai, H.C.; Smith, D.L.

    1995-03-01

    On the basis of excellent properties that were determined for a laboratory-scale heat, V-4Cr-4Ti has been identified previously as the most promising vanadium-based candidate alloy for application in fusion reactor structural components. The objective of this work is to produce a large-scale (500-kg) ingot of the alloy and fabricate various plates and sheets from the ingot, thereby demonstrating a reliable method of fabricating an industrial-scale heat of V-4Cr-4Ti that exhibits excellent properties. A 500-kg heat of V-4Cr-4Ti, an alloy identified previously as the most promising vanadium-based candidate alloy for application in fusion reactor structural components, has been produced. The ingot was produced by multiple vacuum-arc melting using screened high-quality raw materials of vanadium, chrome, and titanium. Several long bars {approx}64 mm in thickness and {approx}200 mm in width were extruded from the ingot, and plates and sheets of various thicknesses ranging from 1.0 to 29.2 mm were fabricated successfully from the extruded bars. The chemical composition of the ingot and the secondary fabrication procedures, specified on the basis of the experience and knowledge gained from fabrication, testing, and microstructural characterization of a laboratory-scale heat, were found to be satisfactory. Charpy-impact tests showed that mechanical properties of the production-scale heat are as good as those of the laboratory-scale heat. This demonstrates a method of reliable fabrication of industrial-scale heats of V-4Cr-4Ti that exhibit excellent properties. 14 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab.

  8. Bench-scale development of mild gasification char desulfurization. Technical report, 1 March--31 May 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Knight, R.A.

    1994-09-01

    The goal of this project is to scale up a process, developed under a previous ICCI grant, for desulfurization of mild gasification char by treatment with hydrogen-rich process-derived fuel gas at 650--760 C and 7--15 atm. The char can be converted into a low-sulfur metallurgical form coke. In the prior study, IBC-105 coal with 4.0 wt% sulfur was converted to chars with less than 1.0 wt% sulfur in a laboratory-scale batch reactor. The susceptibility of the char to desulfurization was correlated with physicochemical char properties and mild gasification conditions. Acid pretreatment of the coal prior to mild gasification was also shown to significantly enhance subsequent sulfur removal. In this study, IGT is conducting continuous bench-scale tests in a 1-lb/h fluidized-bed reactor to determine the preferred process conditions and obtain steady-state data necessary for process design and scale-up. The desulfurized chars are to be used to produce low-sulfur form coke, which will be evaluated for density, reactivity, and strength properties relevant to utilization in blast furnaces. This quarter, 2,500 g of mild gasification char was produced from untreated IBC-105 coal in the bench-scale reactor. Half of this char will be subjected to sulfuric acid treatment to enhance subsequent desulfurization. Char-producing runs were also initiated with acid-pretreated coal, which will produce about 1,250 g of char.

  9. KILOPARSEC-SCALE RADIO STRUCTURES IN NARROW-LINE SEYFERT 1 GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Doi, Akihiro; Kino, Motoki; Nagira, Hiroshi; Kawakatu, Nozomu; Nagai, Hiroshi; Asada, Keiichi

    2012-11-20

    We report the finding of kiloparsec (kpc)-scale radio structures in three radio-loud narrow-line Seyfert 1 (NLS1) galaxies from the Faint Images of the Radio Sky at Twenty-centimeters of the Very Large Array, which increases the number of known radio-loud NLS1s with kpc-scale structures to six, including two {gamma}-ray-emitting NLS1s (PMN J0948+0022 and 1H 0323+342) detected by the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope. The detection rate of extended radio emissions in NLS1s is lower than that in broad-line active galactic nuclei (AGNs) with a statistical significance. We found both core-dominated (blazar-like) and lobe-dominated (radio-galaxy-like) radio structures in these six NLS1s, which can be understood in the framework of the unified scheme of radio-loud AGNs that considers radio galaxies as non-beamed parent populations of blazars. Five of the six NLS1s have (1) extended radio luminosities suggesting jet kinetic powers of {approx}> 10{sup 44} erg s{sup -1}, which is sufficient to make jets escape from hosts' dense environments; (2) black holes of {approx}> 10{sup 7} M {sub Sun }, which can generate the necessary jet powers from near-Eddington mass accretion; and (3) two-sided radio structures at kpc scales, requiring expansion rates of {approx}0.01c-0.3c and kinematic ages of {approx}> 10{sup 7} years. On the other hand, most typical NLS1s would be driven by black holes of {approx}< 10{sup 7} M {sub Sun} in a limited lifetime of {approx}10{sup 7} years. Hence, the kpc-scale radio structures may originate in a small window of opportunity during the final stage of the NLS1 phase just before growing into broad-line AGNs.

  10. DEVELOPMENT, INSTALLATION AND OPERATION OF THE MPC&A OPERATIONS MONITORING (MOM) SYSTEM AT THE JOINT INSTITUTE FOR NUCLEAR RESEARCH (JINR) DUBNA, RUSSIA

    SciTech Connect

    Kartashov,V.V.; Pratt,W.; Romanov, Y.A.; Samoilov, V.N.; Shestakov, B.A.; Duncan, C.; Brownell, L.; Carbonaro, J.; White, R.M.; Coffing, J.A.

    2009-07-12

    The Material Protection, Control and Accounting (MPC&A) Operations Monitoring (MOM) systems handling at the International Intergovernmental Organization - Joint Institute for Nuclear Research (JINR) is described in this paper. Category I nuclear material (plutonium and uranium) is used in JINR research reactors, facilities and for scientific and research activities. A monitoring system (MOM) was installed at JINR in April 2003. The system design was based on a vulnerability analysis, which took into account the specifics of the Institute. The design and installation of the MOM system was a collaborative effort between JINR, Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) and the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). Financial support was provided by DOE through BNL. The installed MOM system provides facility management with additional assurance that operations involving nuclear material (NM) are correctly followed by the facility personnel. The MOM system also provides additional confidence that the MPC&A systems continue to perform effectively.

  11. DOE Lab-to-Lab MPC&A workshop for cooperative tasks with Russian institutes: Focus on critical assemblies and item facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Bieber, A.M. Jr.; Fishbone, L.G.; Kato, W.Y.; Lazareth, O.W.; Suda, S.C.; Garcia, D.; Haga, R.

    1995-12-01

    Seventeen Russian scientists and engineers representing five different institutes participated in a Workshop on material control and accounting as part of the US-Russian Lab-to-Lab Cooperative Program in Nuclear Materials Protection, Control, and Accounting (MPC&A). In addition to presentations and discussions, the Workshop included an exercise at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) and demonstrations at the Zero Power Physics Reactor (critical-assembly facility) of Argonne National Laboratory-West (ANL-W). The Workshop particularly emphasized procedures for physical inventory-taking at critical assemblies and item facilities, with associated supporting techniques and methods. By learning these topics and applying the methods and experience at their own institutes, the Russian scientists and engineers will be able to determine and verify nuclear material inventories based on sound procedures, including measurements. This will constitute a significant enhancement to MPC&A at the Russian institutes.

  12. Scale dependence of halo and galaxy bias: Effects in real space

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, Robert E.; Scoccimarro, Roman; Sheth, Ravi K.

    2007-03-15

    We examine the scale dependence of dark matter halo and galaxy clustering on very large scales (0.01Mpc{sup -1}]<0.15), due to nonlinear effects from dynamics and halo bias. We pursue a two line offensive: high-resolution numerical simulations are used to establish some old and some new results, and an analytic model is developed to understand their origins. Our simulations show: (i) that the z=0 dark matter power spectrum is suppressed relative to linear theory by {approx}5% on scales 0.05Mpc{sup -1}]<0.075; (ii) that, indeed, halo bias is nonlinear over the scales we probe and that the scale dependence is a strong function of halo mass. High mass haloes show no suppression of power on scales k<0.07[h Mpc{sup -1}], and only show amplification on smaller scales, whereas low mass haloes show strong, {approx}5%-10%, suppression over the range 0.05Mpc{sup -1}]<0.15. These results were primarily established through the use of the cross-power spectrum of dark matter and haloes, which circumvents the thorny issue of shot-noise correction. The halo-halo power spectrum, however, is highly sensitive to the shot-noise correction; we show that halo exclusion effects make this sub-Poissonian and a new correction is presented. Our results have special relevance for studies of the baryon acoustic oscillation features in the halo power spectra. Nonlinear mode-mode coupling: (i) damps these features on progressively larger scales as halo mass increases; (ii) produces small shifts in the positions of the peaks and troughs which depend on halo mass. We show that these effects on halo clustering are important over the redshift range relevant to such studies (01-loop' perturbation theory and a nonlinear

  13. Reconstructing the Rasch-Built Myotonic Dystrophy Type 1 Activity and Participation Scale

    PubMed Central

    Hermans, Mieke C. E.; Hoeijmakers, Janneke G. J.; Faber, Catharina G.; Merkies, Ingemar S. J.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction A previously published Rasch-built activity and participation scale specifically designed for patients with myotonic dystrophy type 1 (DM1) was criticized for having been constructed in a relatively small cohort of patients and containing items too broadly phrased for DM1 patients, thus hampering its clinical use. Methods We report the results of the reconstructed Rasch-built DM1 activity and participation scale for clinical use (DM1-ActivC) through Rasch analyses using an expanded questionnaire containing 146 more simply phrased activity and participation inquiries completed by 340 patients with DM1. Results Through stepwise investigation including data quality control, model fit, response category ordering, local dependency and item bias, we succeeded in reconstructing the DM1-ActivC consisting of 25 items that showed good Rasch model fit, including construct convergent validity, items’ weights and persons’ locations reliability, and unidimensionality. Conclusion The DM1-ActivC scale has been reconstructed and fulfills all modern clinimetric requirements. Its use is recommended in future longitudinal trials in patients with DM1 to determine its responsiveness. PMID:26484877

  14. HOWARD EISEN, JPL'S LEAD MECHANICAL TECHNICIAN, HOLDS MARS PATHFINDER 'SOJOURNER' ROVER 1:1 SCALE DU

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    The Mars Pathfinder 'Sojourner' rover l:l scale duplicate test vehicle is held by Howard Eisen, its lead mechanical technician from the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, with Kennedy Space Center's Vehicle Assembly Building looming in the background. The launch of NASA's Mars Pathfinder spacecraft aboard a McDonnell Douglas Delta II rocket is scheduled for Monday, Dec. 2, at 2:09:11 a.m. EST. This is a single instantaneous target launch time without a second opportunity on that day. Liftoff will occur from Pad B at Launch Complex 17 on Cape Canaveral Air Station, Fla. There is a 24-day launch opportunity which extends through Dec. 31.

  15. Large-scale 3D mapping of the intergalactic medium using the Lyman α forest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ozbek, Melih; Croft, Rupert A. C.; Khandai, Nishikanta

    2016-03-01

    Maps of the large-scale structure of the Universe at redshifts 2-4 can be made with the Lyman α forest which are complementary to low-redshift galaxy surveys. We apply the Wiener interpolation method of Caucci et al. to construct three-dimensional maps from sets of Lyman α forest spectra taken from cosmological hydrodynamic simulations. We mimic some current and future quasar redshift surveys [Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey (BOSS), extended BOSS (eBOSS) and Mid-Scale Dark Energy Spectroscopic Instrument (MS-DESI)] by choosing similar sightline densities. We use these appropriate subsets of the Lyman α absorption sightlines to reconstruct the full three-dimensional Lyman α flux field and perform comparisons between the true and the reconstructed fields. We study global statistical properties of the intergalactic medium (IGM) maps with autocorrelation and cross-correlation analysis, slice plots, local peaks and point-by-point scatter. We find that both the density field and the statistical properties of the IGM are recovered well enough that the resulting IGM maps can be meaningfully considered to represent large-scale maps of the Universe in agreement with Caucci et al., on larger scales and for sparser sightlines than had been tested previously. Quantitatively, for sightline parameters comparable to current and near future surveys the correlation coefficient between true and reconstructed fields is r > 0.9 on scales >30 h-1 Mpc. The properties of the maps are relatively insensitive to the precise form of the covariance matrix used. The final BOSS quasar Lyman α forest sample will allow maps to be made with a resolution of ˜30 h-1 Mpc over a volume of ˜15 h-3 Gpc3 between redshifts 1.9 and 2.3.

  16. INTEGRATED SACHS-WOLFE IMPRINT OF SUPERSTRUCTURES ON LINEAR SCALES

    SciTech Connect

    Papai, Peter; Szapudi, Istvan; Granett, Benjamin R.

    2011-05-01

    We build a model for the density and integrated Sachs-Wolfe (ISW) profile of supervoid and supercluster structures. Our model assumes that fluctuations evolve linearly from an initial Gaussian random field. We find these assumptions capable of describing N-body simulations and simulated ISW maps remarkably well on large scales. We construct an ISW map based on locations of superstructures identified previously in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Luminous Red Galaxy sample. A matched filter analysis of the cosmic microwave background confirms a signal at the 3.2{sigma} confidence level and estimates the radius of the underlying structures to be 55 {+-} 28 h{sup -1} Mpc. The amplitude of the signal, however, is 2{sigma} higher than {Lambda}CDM predictions.

  17. Implementation of an advanced hybrid MPC-PID control system using PAT tools into a direct compaction continuous pharmaceutical tablet manufacturing pilot plant.

    PubMed

    Singh, Ravendra; Sahay, Abhishek; Karry, Krizia M; Muzzio, Fernando; Ierapetritou, Marianthi; Ramachandran, Rohit

    2014-10-01

    It is desirable for a pharmaceutical final dosage form to be manufactured through a quality by design (QbD)-based approach rather than a quality by testing (QbT) approach. An automatic feedback control system coupled with PAT tools that is part of the QbD paradigm shift, has the potential to ensure that the pre-defined end product quality attributes are met in a time and cost efficient manner. In this work, an advanced hybrid MPC-PID control architecture coupled with real time inline/online monitoring tools and principal components analysis (PCA) based additional supervisory control layer has been proposed for a continuous direct compaction tablet manufacturing process. The advantages of both MPC and PID have been utilized in a hybrid scheme. The control hardware and software integration and implementation of the control system has been demonstrated using feeders and blending unit operation of a continuous tablet manufacturing pilot plant and an NIR based PAT tool. The advanced hybrid MPC-PID control scheme leads to enhanced control loop performance of the critical quality attributes in comparison to a regulatory (e.g. PID) control scheme indicating its potential to improve pharmaceutical product quality. PMID:24974987

  18. Force Measurements on a 1/40-scale Model of the U. S. Airship "Akron."

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Freeman, Hugh B

    1933-01-01

    This report describes a series of tests made on a 1/40-scale model of the U. S. Airship "Akron" (ZRS-4) for the purpose of determining the drag, lift, and pitching moments of the bare hull and of the hull equipped with two different sets of fins. Measurements were also made of the elevator forces and hinge moments.

  19. Child Proportional Scaling: Is 1/3 = 2/6 = 3/9 = 4/12?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boyer, Ty W.; Levine, Susan C.

    2012-01-01

    The current experiments examined the role of scale factor in children's proportional reasoning. Experiment 1 used a choice task and Experiment 2 used a production task to examine the abilities of kindergartners through fourth-graders to match equivalent, visually depicted proportional relations. The findings of both experiments show that accuracy…

  20. Neighborhood-Scale Spatial Models of Diesel Exhaust Concentration Profile Using 1-Nitropyrene and Other Nitroarenes.

    PubMed

    Schulte, Jill K; Fox, Julie R; Oron, Assaf P; Larson, Timothy V; Simpson, Christopher D; Paulsen, Michael; Beaudet, Nancy; Kaufman, Joel D; Magzamen, Sheryl

    2015-11-17

    With emerging evidence that diesel exhaust exposure poses distinct risks to human health, the need for fine-scale models of diesel exhaust pollutants is growing. We modeled the spatial distribution of several nitrated polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (NPAHs) to identify fine-scale gradients in diesel exhaust pollution in two Seattle, WA neighborhoods. Our modeling approach fused land-use regression, meteorological dispersion modeling, and pollutant monitoring from both fixed and mobile platforms. We applied these modeling techniques to concentrations of 1-nitropyrene (1-NP), a highly specific diesel exhaust marker, at the neighborhood scale. We developed models of two additional nitroarenes present in secondary organic aerosol: 2-nitropyrene and 2-nitrofluoranthene. Summer predictors of 1-NP, including distance to railroad, truck emissions, and mobile black carbon measurements, showed a greater specificity to diesel sources than predictors of other NPAHs. Winter sampling results did not yield stable models, likely due to regional mixing of pollutants in turbulent weather conditions. The model of summer 1-NP had an R(2) of 0.87 and cross-validated R(2) of 0.73. The synthesis of high-density sampling and hybrid modeling was successful in predicting diesel exhaust pollution at a very fine scale and identifying clear gradients in NPAH concentrations within urban neighborhoods. PMID:26501773

  1. Psychometric Properties of the MMPI-2-RF Somatic Complaints (RC1) Scale

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thomas, Michael L.; Locke, Dona E. C.

    2010-01-01

    The MMPI-2 Restructured Form (MMPI-2-RF; Tellegen & Ben-Porath, 2008) was designed to be psychometrically superior to its MMPI-2 counterpart. However, the test has yet to be extensively evaluated in diverse clinical settings. The purpose of this study was to examine the psychometric properties of the MMPI-2-RF Somatic Complaints (RC1) scale in a…

  2. Surface microstructural features of scales in relation to toxic stress of Basic Violet-1.

    PubMed

    Kaur, Kirandeep; Kaur, Ramandeep; Kaur, Arvinder

    2016-01-01

    The present work deals with scanning electron microscopic (SEM) studies of the scales of Labeo rohita on exposure to lethal and sublethal doses of Basic Violet-1 (an important textile and hair colorant). The dye induced loosening of the scales and caused breakage and disorganization of lepidonts. Erosion of lepidonts occurred mostly in the fish exposed to 0.20 and 0.40 mg/L dye, during acute exposure and to 0.0225 and 0.045 mg/L dye, during the subchronic exposure. However, lepidonts were sloughed off from their sockets in 0.60 and 0.80 mg/L dye during acute exposure and in 0.09 mg/L dye during the subchronic exposure. Circuli, the base that provides anchorage to the lepidonts, got damaged, and tubercles responsible for coloration of a fish became atrophied with an increase in the duration of exposure. The results of the present investigation clearly indicated that exposure to Basic Violet-1 (BV-1) even at a concentration as low as 0.0225 mg was responsible for deleterious changes in the scale morphology of the test fish after 150 days of exposure. Similar changes were observed in the scales of the dead fish also. It can thus be suggested that this noninvasive technique is very helpful for evaluating the health status of an aquatic body. At the same time, the changes in ultramorphology of scales can act as an early indicator of the stress of very minute doses of dyes and even the scales of a dead fish can act as indicators of the untoward changes that would have occurred in the environment of the fish before death. PMID:26432273

  3. The three-point function as a probe of models for large-scale structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frieman, Joshua A.; Gaztanaga, Enrique

    1993-01-01

    The consequences of models of structure formation for higher-order (n-point) galaxy correlation functions in the mildly non-linear regime are analyzed. Several variations of the standard Omega = 1 cold dark matter model with scale-invariant primordial perturbations were recently introduced to obtain more power on large scales, R(sub p) is approximately 20 h(sup -1) Mpc, e.g., low-matter-density (non-zero cosmological constant) models, 'tilted' primordial spectra, and scenarios with a mixture of cold and hot dark matter. They also include models with an effective scale-dependent bias, such as the cooperative galaxy formation scenario of Bower, etal. It is shown that higher-order (n-point) galaxy correlation functions can provide a useful test of such models and can discriminate between models with true large-scale power in the density field and those where the galaxy power arises from scale-dependent bias: a bias with rapid scale-dependence leads to a dramatic decrease of the hierarchical amplitudes Q(sub J) at large scales, r is approximately greater than R(sub p). Current observational constraints on the three-point amplitudes Q(sub 3) and S(sub 3) can place limits on the bias parameter(s) and appear to disfavor, but not yet rule out, the hypothesis that scale-dependent bias is responsible for the extra power observed on large scales.

  4. The three-point function as a probe of models for large-scale structure

    SciTech Connect

    Frieman, J.A.; Gaztanaga, E.

    1993-06-19

    The authors analyze the consequences of models of structure formation for higher-order (n-point) galaxy correlation functions in the mildly non-linear regime. Several variations of the standard {Omega} = 1 cold dark matter model with scale-invariant primordial perturbations have recently been introduced to obtain more power on large scales, R{sub p} {approximately}20 h{sup {minus}1} Mpc, e.g., low-matter-density (non-zero cosmological constant) models, {open_quote}tilted{close_quote} primordial spectra, and scenarios with a mixture of cold and hot dark matter. They also include models with an effective scale-dependent bias, such as the cooperative galaxy formation scenario of Bower, et al. The authors show that higher-order (n-point) galaxy correlation functions can provide a useful test of such models and can discriminate between models with true large-scale power in the density field and those where the galaxy power arises from scale-dependent bias: a bias with rapid scale-dependence leads to a dramatic decrease of the hierarchical amplitudes Q{sub J} at large scales, r {approx_gt} R{sub p}. Current observational constraints on the three-point amplitudes Q{sub 3} and S{sub 3} can place limits on the bias parameter(s) and appear to disfavor, but not yet rule out, the hypothesis that scale-dependent bias is responsible for the extra power observed on large scales.

  5. The three-point function as a probe of models for large-scale structure

    SciTech Connect

    Frieman, J.A. ); Gaztanaga, E. )

    1993-06-19

    The authors analyze the consequences of models of structure formation for higher-order (n-point) galaxy correlation functions in the mildly non-linear regime. Several variations of the standard [Omega] = 1 cold dark matter model with scale-invariant primordial perturbations have recently been introduced to obtain more power on large scales, R[sub p] [approximately]20 h[sup [minus]1] Mpc, e.g., low-matter-density (non-zero cosmological constant) models, [open quote]tilted[close quote] primordial spectra, and scenarios with a mixture of cold and hot dark matter. They also include models with an effective scale-dependent bias, such as the cooperative galaxy formation scenario of Bower, et al. The authors show that higher-order (n-point) galaxy correlation functions can provide a useful test of such models and can discriminate between models with true large-scale power in the density field and those where the galaxy power arises from scale-dependent bias: a bias with rapid scale-dependence leads to a dramatic decrease of the hierarchical amplitudes Q[sub J] at large scales, r [approx gt] R[sub p]. Current observational constraints on the three-point amplitudes Q[sub 3] and S[sub 3] can place limits on the bias parameter(s) and appear to disfavor, but not yet rule out, the hypothesis that scale-dependent bias is responsible for the extra power observed on large scales.

  6. Scale-4 Analysis of Pressurized Water Reactor Critical Configurations: Volume 3-Surry Unit 1 Cycle 2

    SciTech Connect

    Bowman, S.M.

    1995-01-01

    The requirements of ANSI/ANS 8.1 specify that calculational methods for away-from-reactor criticality safety analyses be validated against experimental measurements. If credit for the negative reactivity of the depleted (or spent) fuel isotopics is desired, it is necessary to benchmark computational methods against spent fuel critical configurations. This report summarizes a portion of the ongoing effort to benchmark away-from-reactor criticality analysis methods using selected critical configurations from commercial pressurized-water reactors. The analysis methodology selected for all the calculations in this report is based on the codes and data provided in the SCALE-4 code system. The isotopic densities for the spent fuel assemblies in the critical configurations were calculated using the SAS2H analytical sequence of the SCALE-4 system. The sources of data and the procedures for deriving SAS2H input parameters are described in detail. The SNIKR code module was used to extract the necessary isotopic densities from the SAS2H results and to provide the data in the format required by the SCALE criticality analysis modules. The CSASN analytical sequence in SCALE-4 was used to perform resonance processing of the cross sections. The KENO V.a module of SCALE-4 was used to calculate the effective multiplication factor (k{sub eff}) of each case. The SCALE-4 27-group burnup library containing ENDF/B-IV (actinides) and ENDF/B-V (fission products) data was used for all the calculations. This volume of the report documents the SCALE system analysis of two reactor critical configurations for Surry Unit 1 Cycle 2. This unit and cycle were chosen for a previous analysis using a different methodology because detailed isotopics from multidimensional reactor calculations were available from the Virginia Power Company. These data permitted a direct comparison of criticality calculations using the utility-calculated isotopics with those using the isotopics generated by the SCALE-4

  7. Scaling theory of magnetoresistance and carrier localization in Ga1-xMnxAs.

    PubMed

    Moca, C P; Sheu, B L; Samarth, N; Schiffer, P; Janko, B; Zarand, G

    2009-04-01

    We compare experimental resistivity data on Ga1-xMnxAs films with theoretical calculations using a scaling theory for strongly disordered ferromagnets. The characteristic features of the temperature dependent resistivity can be quantitatively understood through this approach as originating from the close vicinity of the metal-insulator transition. However, accounting for thermal fluctuations is crucial for a quantitative description of the magnetic field induced changes in resistance. While the noninteracting scaling theory is in reasonable agreement with the data, we find clear evidence for interaction effects at low temperatures. PMID:19392399

  8. Testing gravity using large-scale redshift-space distortions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raccanelli, Alvise; Bertacca, Daniele; Pietrobon, Davide; Schmidt, Fabian; Samushia, Lado; Bartolo, Nicola; Doré, Olivier; Matarrese, Sabino; Percival, Will J.

    2013-11-01

    We use luminous red galaxies from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) II to test the cosmological structure growth in two alternatives to the standard Λ cold dark matter (ΛCDM)+general relativity (GR) cosmological model. We compare observed three-dimensional clustering in SDSS Data Release 7 (DR7) with theoretical predictions for the standard vanilla ΛCDM+GR model, unified dark matter (UDM) cosmologies and the normal branch Dvali-Gabadadze-Porrati (nDGP). In computing the expected correlations in UDM cosmologies, we derive a parametrized formula for the growth factor in these models. For our analysis we apply the methodology tested in Raccanelli et al. and use the measurements of Samushia et al. that account for survey geometry, non-linear and wide-angle effects and the distribution of pair orientation. We show that the estimate of the growth rate is potentially degenerate with wide-angle effects, meaning that extremely accurate measurements of the growth rate on large scales will need to take such effects into account. We use measurements of the zeroth and second-order moments of the correlation function from SDSS DR7 data and the Large Suite of Dark Matter Simulations (LasDamas), and perform a likelihood analysis to constrain the parameters of the models. Using information on the clustering up to rmax = 120 h-1 Mpc, and after marginalizing over the bias, we find, for UDM models, a speed of sound c∞ ≤ 6.1e-4, and, for the nDGP model, a cross-over scale rc ≥ 340 Mpc, at 95 per cent confidence level.

  9. Short Time-Scale Sensory Coding in S1 during Discrimination of Whisker Vibrotactile Sequences.

    PubMed

    McGuire, Leah M; Telian, Gregory; Laboy-Juárez, Keven J; Miyashita, Toshio; Lee, Daniel J; Smith, Katherine A; Feldman, Daniel E

    2016-08-01

    Rodent whisker input consists of dense microvibration sequences that are often temporally integrated for perceptual discrimination. Whether primary somatosensory cortex (S1) participates in temporal integration is unknown. We trained rats to discriminate whisker impulse sequences that varied in single-impulse kinematics (5-20-ms time scale) and mean speed (150-ms time scale). Rats appeared to use the integrated feature, mean speed, to guide discrimination in this task, consistent with similar prior studies. Despite this, 52% of S1 units, including 73% of units in L4 and L2/3, encoded sequences at fast time scales (≤20 ms, mostly 5-10 ms), accurately reflecting single impulse kinematics. 17% of units, mostly in L5, showed weaker impulse responses and a slow firing rate increase during sequences. However, these units did not effectively integrate whisker impulses, but instead combined weak impulse responses with a distinct, slow signal correlated to behavioral choice. A neural decoder could identify sequences from fast unit spike trains and behavioral choice from slow units. Thus, S1 encoded fast time scale whisker input without substantial temporal integration across whisker impulses. PMID:27574970

  10. Short Time-Scale Sensory Coding in S1 during Discrimination of Whisker Vibrotactile Sequences

    PubMed Central

    Miyashita, Toshio; Lee, Daniel J.; Smith, Katherine A.; Feldman, Daniel E.

    2016-01-01

    Rodent whisker input consists of dense microvibration sequences that are often temporally integrated for perceptual discrimination. Whether primary somatosensory cortex (S1) participates in temporal integration is unknown. We trained rats to discriminate whisker impulse sequences that varied in single-impulse kinematics (5–20-ms time scale) and mean speed (150-ms time scale). Rats appeared to use the integrated feature, mean speed, to guide discrimination in this task, consistent with similar prior studies. Despite this, 52% of S1 units, including 73% of units in L4 and L2/3, encoded sequences at fast time scales (≤20 ms, mostly 5–10 ms), accurately reflecting single impulse kinematics. 17% of units, mostly in L5, showed weaker impulse responses and a slow firing rate increase during sequences. However, these units did not effectively integrate whisker impulses, but instead combined weak impulse responses with a distinct, slow signal correlated to behavioral choice. A neural decoder could identify sequences from fast unit spike trains and behavioral choice from slow units. Thus, S1 encoded fast time scale whisker input without substantial temporal integration across whisker impulses. PMID:27574970

  11. Langley Full-Scale Tunnel Investigation of a 1/3-Scale Model of the Chance Vought XF5U-1 Airplane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lange, Roy H.; Cocke, Bennie W., Jr.; Proterra, Anthony J.

    1946-01-01

    The results of an investigation of a 1/3-scale model of the Chance Vought XF5U-1 airplane in the Langley full-scale tunnel are presented in this report. The maximum lift and stalling characteristics of several model configurations, the longitudinal stability characteristics of the model, and the effectiveness of the control surfaces were determined with the propellers removed. The propulsive characteristics, the effect of propeller operation on the lift, and the static thrust of the model propellers were determined at several propeller-blade angles. The results with the propellers removed showed that the maximum lift coefficient of the complete model configuration was only 0.97 was compared with the value of 1.31 for the model configuration in which the engine-air ducts and canopy are removed. The model with the propellers removed (normal center-of-gravity position) has a positive static margin, stick fixed, varying from 5 to 13 percent of the mean aerodynamic chord throughout the unstalled range of lift coefficients. The unit horizontal tail is sufficiently powerful to trim the airplane with the propellers removed throughout the unstalled range of lift coefficients. The peak propulsive efficiencies for beta = 20 degrees and beta = 30 degrees were increased 7 percent at C(sub L) congruent to 0.67 and 20 percent at C(sub L) congruent to 0.74, respectively, with the propellers rotating upward in the center than with the propellers rotating downward in the center. Indications are that the minimum forward-flight speed of the airplane for full-power operation at sea level will be about 90 miles per hour. Decreasing the weight and increasing the power reduced this value of minimum speed and there were no indications from the results of a lower limit to the minimum speed.

  12. Analyses of 1/15 scale Creare bypass transient experiments. [PWR

    SciTech Connect

    Kmetyk, L.N.; Buxton, L.D.; Cole, R.K. Jr.

    1982-09-01

    RELAP4 analyses of several 1/15 scale Creare H-series bypass transient experiments have been done to investigate the effect of using different downcomer nodalizations, physical scales, slip models, and vapor fraction donoring methods. Most of the analyses were thermal equilibrium calculations performed with RELAP4/MOD5, but a few such calculations were done with RELAP4/MOD6 and RELAP4/MOD7, which contain improved slip models. In order to estimate the importance of nonequilibrium effects, additional analyses were performed with TRAC-PD2, RELAP5 and the nonequilibrium option of RELAP4/MOD7. The purpose of these studies was to determine whether results from Westinghouse's calculation of the Creare experiments, which were done with a UHI-modified version of SATAN, were sufficient to guarantee SATAN would be conservative with respect to ECC bypass in full-scale plant analyses.

  13. The finite scaling for S = 1 XXZ chains with uniaxial single-ion-type anisotropy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Honglei; Xiong, Xingliang

    2014-03-01

    The scaling behavior of criticality for spin-1 XXZ chains with uniaxial single-ion-type anisotropy is investigated by employing the infinite matrix product state representation with the infinite time evolving block decimation method. At criticality, the accuracy of the ground state of a system is limited by the truncation dimension χ of the local Hilbert space. We present four evidences for the scaling of the entanglement entropy, the largest eigenvalue of the Schmidt decomposition, the correlation length, and the connection between the actual correlation length ξ and the energy. The result shows that the finite scalings are governed by the central charge of the critical system. Also, it demonstrates that the infinite time evolving block decimation algorithm by the infinite matrix product state representation can be a quite accurate method to simulate the critical properties at criticality.

  14. Intensity mapping cross-correlations: connecting the largest scales to galaxy evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolz, L.; Tonini, C.; Blake, C.; Wyithe, J. S. B.

    2016-05-01

    Intensity mapping of the neutral hydrogen (H I) is a new observational tool to efficiently map the large-scale structure over wide redshift ranges. The cross-correlation of intensity maps with galaxy surveys is a robust measure of the cosmological power spectrum and the H I content of galaxies which diminishes systematics caused by instrumental effects and foreground removal. We examine the cross-correlation signature at redshift 0.9 using a semi-analytical galaxy formation model in order to model the H I gas of galaxies as well as their optical magnitudes. We determine the scale-dependent clustering of the cross-correlation power for different types of galaxies determined by their colours, which act as a proxy for their star formation activity. We find that the cross-correlation coefficient with H I density for red quiescent galaxies falls off more quickly on smaller scales k > 0.2 h Mpc-1 than for blue star-forming galaxies. Additionally, we create a mock catalogue of highly star-forming galaxies to mimic the WiggleZ Dark Energy Survey, and use this to predict existing and future measurements using data from the Green Bank telescope and Parkes telescope. We find that the cross-power of highly star-forming galaxies shows a higher clustering on small scales than any other galaxy type and that this significantly alters the power spectrum shape on scales k > 0.2 h Mpc-1. We show that the cross-correlation coefficient is not negligible when interpreting the cosmological cross-power spectrum and additionally contains information about the H I content of the optically selected galaxies.

  15. Development of thermal stratification and destratification scaling concepts. Volume 1: Definition of thermal stratification scaling parameters and experimental investigations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lovrich, T. N.; Schwartz, S. H.

    1975-01-01

    The dimensionless parameters associated with the thermal stratification and pressure history of a heated container of liquid and its vapor were examined. The Modified Grashof number, the Fourier number, and an Interface number were parameterized using a single test liquid, Freon 113. Cylindrical test tanks with spherical dome end caps were built. Blanket heaters covered the tanks and thermocouples monitored the temperatures of the liquid, the ullage, the tank walls, and the foam insulation encapsulating the tank. A centrifuge was used for the 6 inch tank to preserve the same scaling parameter values between it and the larger tanks. Tests were conducted over a range of Gr* values and the degree of scaling was checked by comparing the dimensionless pressures and temperatures for each scaled pair of tests. Results indicate that the bulk liquid temperature, the surface temperature of the liquid, and the tank pressure can be scaled with the three dimensionless parameters. Some deviation was, however, found in the detailed temperature profiles between the scaled pairs of tests.

  16. Acoustic Treatment Design Scaling Methods. Volume 1; Overview, Results, and Recommendations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kraft, R. E.; Yu, J.

    1999-01-01

    Scale model fan rigs that simulate new generation ultra-high-bypass engines at about 1/5-scale are achieving increased importance as development vehicles for the design of low-noise aircraft engines. Testing at small scale allows the tests to be performed in existing anechoic wind tunnels, which provides an accurate simulation of the important effects of aircraft forward motion on the noise generation. The ability to design, build, and test miniaturized acoustic treatment panels on scale model fan rigs representative of the fullscale engine provides not only a cost-savings, but an opportunity to optimize the treatment by allowing tests of different designs. The primary objective of this study was to develop methods that will allow scale model fan rigs to be successfully used as acoustic treatment design tools. The study focuses on finding methods to extend the upper limit of the frequency range of impedance prediction models and acoustic impedance measurement methods for subscale treatment liner designs, and confirm the predictions by correlation with measured data. This phase of the program had as a goal doubling the upper limit of impedance measurement from 6 kHz to 12 kHz. The program utilizes combined analytical and experimental methods to achieve the objectives.

  17. NASTRAN analysis of the 1/8-scale space shuttle dynamic model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bernstein, M.; Mason, P. W.; Zalesak, J.; Gregory, D. J.; Levy, A.

    1973-01-01

    The space shuttle configuration has more complex structural dynamic characteristics than previous launch vehicles primarily because of the high model density at low frequencies and the high degree of coupling between the lateral and longitudinal motions. An accurate analytical representation of these characteristics is a primary means for treating structural dynamics problems during the design phase of the shuttle program. The 1/8-scale model program was developed to explore the adequacy of available analytical modeling technology and to provide the means for investigating problems which are more readily treated experimentally. The basic objectives of the 1/8-scale model program are: (1) to provide early verification of analytical modeling procedures on a shuttle-like structure, (2) to demonstrate important vehicle dynamic characteristics of a typical shuttle design, (3) to disclose any previously unanticipated structural dynamic characteristics, and (4) to provide for development and demonstration of cost effective prototype testing procedures.

  18. Performance Comparison at Mach Numbers 1.8 and 2.0 of Full Scale and Quarter Scale Translating-Spike Inlets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, B. H.; Dryer, M.; Hearth, D. P.

    1957-01-01

    The performance of a full-scale translating-spike inlet was obtained at Mach numbers of 1.8 and 2.0 and at angles of attach from 0 deg to 6 deg. Comparisons were made between the full-scale production inlet configuration and a geometrically similar quarter-scale model. The inlet pressure-recovery, cowl pressure-distribution, and compressor-face distortion characteristics of the full-scale inlet agreed fairly well with the quarter-scale results. In addition, the results indicated that bleeding around the periphery ahead of the compressor-face station improved pressure recovery and compressor-face distortion, especially at angle of attack.

  19. The environments of Ly α blobs - I. Wide-field Ly α imaging of TN J1338-1942, a powerful radio galaxy at z ≃ 4.1 associated with a giant Ly α nebula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saito, Tomoki; Matsuda, Yuichi; Lacey, Cedric G.; Smail, Ian; Orsi, Alvaro; Baugh, Carlton M.; Inoue, Akio K.; Tanaka, Ichi; Yamada, Toru; Ohta, Kouji; De Breuck, Carlos; Kodama, Tadayuki; Taniguchi, Yoshiaki

    2015-03-01

    We exploit wide-field Ly α imaging with Subaru to probe the environment around TN J1338-1942, a powerful radio galaxy with a > 100 kpc Ly α halo at z = 4.11. We used a sample of Ly α emitters (LAEs) down to log (LLyα[ erg s-1]) ˜ 42.8 to measure the galaxy density around TN J1338-1942, compared to a control sample from a blank field taken with the same instrument. We found that TN J1338-1942 resides in a region with a peak overdensity of δLAE = 2.8 ± 0.5 on scales of 8 h- 1 Mpc (on the sky) and 112 h- 1 Mpc (line of sight) in comoving coordinates. Adjacent to this overdensity, we found a strong underdensity where virtually no LAEs are detected. We used a semi-analytical model of LAEs derived from the Millennium Simulation to compare our results with theoretical predictions. While the theoretical density distribution is consistent with the blank field, overdense regions such as that around TN J1338-1942 are very rare, with a number density of 6.4 × 10- 8 Mpc- 3 (comoving), corresponding to the densest <0.4 percentile at z ≃ 4.1. We also found that the Ly α luminosity function in the TN J1338-1942 field differs from that in the blank field: the number of bright LAEs (log (LLyα[ erg s- 1]) ≳ 43.3) is enhanced, while the number of fainter LAEs is relatively suppressed. These results suggest that some powerful radio galaxies associated with Ly α nebulae reside in extreme overdensities on ˜3-6 Mpc scales, where star formation and AGN activity may be enhanced via frequent galaxy mergers or high rates of gas accretion from the surroundings.

  20. KILOPARSEC-SCALE JETS IN THREE RADIO-LOUD NARROW-LINE SEYFERT 1 GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Richards, Joseph L.; Lister, Matthew L.

    2015-02-10

    We have discovered kiloparsec-scale extended radio emission in three narrow-line Seyfert 1 galaxies (NLS1s) in sub-arcsecond resolution 9 GHz images from the Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array. We find all sources show two-sided, mildly core-dominated jet structures with diffuse lobes dominated by termination hotspots. These span 20–70 kpc with morphologies reminiscent of FR II radio galaxies, while the extended radio luminosities are intermediate between FR I and FR II sources. In two cases the structure is linear, while a 45° bend is apparent in the third. Very Long Baseline Array images at 7.6 GHz reveal parsec-scale jet structures, in two cases with extended structure aligned with the inner regions of the kiloparsec-scale jets. Based on this alignment, the ratio of the radio core–luminosity to the optical luminosity, the jet/counter-jet intensity and extension length ratios, and moderate core brightness temperatures (≲10{sup 10} K), we conclude these jets are mildly relativistic (β≲0.3, δ∼11.5) and aligned at moderately small angles to the line of sight (10–15°). The derived kinematic ages of ∼10{sup 6}–10{sup 7} yr are much younger than radio galaxies but comparable to other NLS1s. Our results increase the number of radio-loud NLS1s with known kiloparsec-scale extensions from 7 to 10 and suggest that such extended emission may be common, at least among the brightest of these sources.

  1. Bench-scale development of mild gasification char desulfurization; [Quarterly] report, September 1--November 30, 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Knight, R.A.

    1994-03-01

    This goal of this project is to scale up a process, developed under a previous ICCI grant, for desulfurization of mild gasification char by treatment with hydrogen-rich process-derived fuel gas at 650{degree}--760{degree}C and 7-15 atm. The char can be converted into a low-sulfur metallurgical form coke. In the prior study, IBC-105 coal with 4.0 wt % sulfur was converted to chars with less than 1.0 wt % sulfur in a laboratory-scale batch reactor. The susceptibility of the char to desulfurization was correlated with physicochemical char properties and mild gasification conditions. Acid pretreatment of the coal prior to mild gasification was also shown to significantly enhance subsequent sulfur removal. In this study, IGT is conducting continuous bench-scale tests in a 1-lb/h fluidized-bed reactor to determine the preferred process conditions and obtain steady-state data necessary for process design and scale-up. The desulfurized chars are to be used to produce low-sulfur form coke, which will be evaluated for density, reactivity, and strength properties relevant to utilization in blast furnaces. During the first quarter, 180 lb (82 kg) of IBC-105 coal was obtained and subjected to crushing, and sizing to prepare 49 lb (22 kg) of material for test operation.

  2. The Effective Field Theory of Large Scale Structures at two loops

    SciTech Connect

    Carrasco, John Joseph M.; Foreman, Simon; Green, Daniel; Senatore, Leonardo E-mail: sfore@stanford.edu E-mail: senatore@stanford.edu

    2014-07-01

    Large scale structure surveys promise to be the next leading probe of cosmological information. It is therefore crucial to reliably predict their observables. The Effective Field Theory of Large Scale Structures (EFTofLSS) provides a manifestly convergent perturbation theory for the weakly non-linear regime of dark matter, where correlation functions are computed in an expansion of the wavenumber k of a mode over the wavenumber associated with the non-linear scale k{sub NL}. Since most of the information is contained at high wavenumbers, it is necessary to compute higher order corrections to correlation functions. After the one-loop correction to the matter power spectrum, we estimate that the next leading one is the two-loop contribution, which we compute here. At this order in k/k{sub NL}, there is only one counterterm in the EFTofLSS that must be included, though this term contributes both at tree-level and in several one-loop diagrams. We also discuss correlation functions involving the velocity and momentum fields. We find that the EFTofLSS prediction at two loops matches to percent accuracy the non-linear matter power spectrum at redshift zero up to k∼ 0.6 h Mpc{sup −1}, requiring just one unknown coefficient that needs to be fit to observations. Given that Standard Perturbation Theory stops converging at redshift zero at k∼ 0.1 h Mpc{sup −1}, our results demonstrate the possibility of accessing a factor of order 200 more dark matter quasi-linear modes than naively expected. If the remaining observational challenges to accessing these modes can be addressed with similar success, our results show that there is tremendous potential for large scale structure surveys to explore the primordial universe.

  3. Wind tunnel test on a 1/4.622 Froude scale, hingeless rotor, tilt rotor model, volume 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Magee, J. P.; Alexander, H. R.

    1976-01-01

    Wing tunnel test data on a 1/4.622 Froude scale, hingeless rotor, tilt rotor mode are reported for all potential flight conditions through hover and a wide envelope of transitions. A mathematical model was used to describe the rotor system in real time simulation by means of regression analyses. Details of the model, test program and data system are provided together with four data files for hover and transition.

  4. Does lower Omega allow a resolution of the large-scale structure problem?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Silk, Joseph; Vittorio, Nicola

    1987-01-01

    The intermediate angular scale anisotropy of the cosmic microwave background, peculiar velocities, density correlations, and mass fluctuations for both neutrino and baryon-dominated universes with Omega less than one are evaluated. The large coherence length associated with a low-Omega, hot dark matter-dominated universe provides substantial density fluctuations on scales up to 100 Mpc: there is a range of acceptable models that are capable of producing large voids and superclusters of galaxies and the clustering of galaxy clusters, with Omega roughly 0.3, without violating any observational constraint. Low-Omega, cold dark matter-dominated cosmologies are also examined. All of these models may be reconciled with the inflationary requirement of a flat universe by introducing a cosmological constant 1-Omega.

  5. The effective field theory of cosmological large scale structures

    SciTech Connect

    Carrasco, John Joseph M.; Hertzberg, Mark P.; Senatore, Leonardo

    2012-09-20

    Large scale structure surveys will likely become the next leading cosmological probe. In our universe, matter perturbations are large on short distances and small at long scales, i.e. strongly coupled in the UV and weakly coupled in the IR. To make precise analytical predictions on large scales, we develop an effective field theory formulated in terms of an IR effective fluid characterized by several parameters, such as speed of sound and viscosity. These parameters, determined by the UV physics described by the Boltzmann equation, are measured from N-body simulations. We find that the speed of sound of the effective fluid is c2s ≈ 10–6c2 and that the viscosity contributions are of the same order. The fluid describes all the relevant physics at long scales k and permits a manifestly convergent perturbative expansion in the size of the matter perturbations δ(k) for all the observables. As an example, we calculate the correction to the power spectrum at order δ(k)4. As a result, the predictions of the effective field theory are found to be in much better agreement with observation than standard cosmological perturbation theory, already reaching percent precision at this order up to a relatively short scale k ≃ 0.24h Mpc1.

  6. Fabrication of 1/3 scale boron/epoxy booster thrust structure, phase 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1974-01-01

    The design, materials, tooling, various manufacturing processes, quality control, test procedures, and results associated with the fabrication and testing of a 1/3 scale boron/epoxy, booster thrust structure are described. A complete two-dimensional truss type thrust structure, comprised of nine boron/epoxy tubular members and six apex fittings, was fabricated. This resulted in structurally representative flight hardware, and verified the manufacturing feasibility and projected weight savings (30%) for this type of structure.

  7. Uncertainties in modelling and scaling of critical flows and pump model in TRAC-PF1/MOD1

    SciTech Connect

    Rohatgi, U.S.; Yu, Wen-Shi

    1987-01-01

    The USNRC has established a Code Scalability, Applicability and Uncertainty (CSAU) evaluation methodology to quantify the uncertainty in the prediction of safety parameters by the best estimate codes. These codes can then be applied to evaluate the Emergency Core Cooling System (ECCS). The TRAC-PF1/MOD1 version was selected as the first code to undergo the CSAU analysis for LBLOCA applications. It was established through this methodology that break flow and pump models are among the top ranked models in the code affecting the peak clad temperature (PCT) prediction for LBLOCA. The break flow model bias or discrepancy and the uncertainty were determined by modelling the test section near the break for 12 Marviken tests. It was observed that the TRAC-PF1/MOD1 code consistently underpredicts the break flow rate and that the prediction improved with increasing pipe length (larger L/D). This is true for both subcooled and two-phase critical flows. A pump model was developed from Westinghouse (1/3 scale) data. The data represent the largest available test pump relevant to Westinghouse PWRs. It was then shown through the analysis of CE and CREARE pump data that larger pumps degrade less and also that pumps degrade less at higher pressures. Since the model developed here is based on the 1/3 scale pump and on low pressure data, it is conservative and will overpredict the degradation when applied to PWRs.

  8. Lotung large-scale seismic test strong motion records. Volume 1, General description: Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-03-01

    The Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI), in cooperation with the Taiwan Power Company (TPC), constructed two models (1/4 scale and 1/12 scale) of a nuclear plant concrete containment structure at a seismically active site in Lotung, Taiwan. Extensive instrumentation was deployed to record both structural and ground responses during earthquakes. The experiment, generally referred to as the Lotung Large-Scale Seismic Test (LSST), was used to gather data for soil-structure interaction (SSI) analysis method evaluation and validation as well as for site ground response investigation. A number of earthquakes having local magnitudes ranging from 4.5 to 7.0 have been recorded at the LSST site since the completion of the test facility in September 1985. This report documents the earthquake data, both raw and processed, collected from the LSST experiment. Volume 1 of the report provides general information on site location, instrument types and layout, data acquisition and processing, and data file organization. The recorded data are described chronologically in subsequent volumes of the report.

  9. Crashworthy Evaluation of a 1/5-Scale Model Composite Fuselage Concept

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jackson, Karen E.; Fasanella, Edwin L.

    1999-01-01

    A 1/5-scale model composite fuselage concept for light aircraft and rotorcraft has been developed to satisfy structural and flight loads requirements and to satisfy design goals for improved crashworthiness. The 1/5-scale model fuselage consists of a relatively rigid upper section which forms the passenger cabin, a stiff structural floor, and an energy absorbing subfloor which is designed to limit impact forces during a crash event. The focus of the present paper is to describe the crashworthy evaluation of the fuselage concept through impact testing and finite element simulation using the nonlinear, explicit transient dynamic code, MSC/DYTRAN. The energy absorption behavior of two different subfloor configurations was determined through quasi-static crushing tests. For the dynamic evaluation, each subfloor configuration was incorporated into a 1/5-scale model fuselage section, which was impacted at 31 ft/s vertical velocity onto a rigid surface. The experimental data demonstrate that the fuselage section with a foam-filled subfloor configuration satisfied the impact design requirement. In addition, the fuselage section maintained excellent energy absorption behavior for a 31 ft/s vertical drop test with a 15 deg-roll impact attitude. Good correlation was obtained between the experimental data and analytical results for both impact conditions.

  10. Evolution of light domain walls interacting with dark matter, part 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Massarotti, Alessandro

    1990-01-01

    The evolution of domain walls generated in the early Universe is discussed considering an interaction between the walls and a major gaseous component of the dark matter. The walls are supposed able to reflect the particles elastically and with a reflection coefficient of unity. A toy Lagrangian that could give rise to such a phenomenon is discussed. In the simple model studied, highly non-relativistic and slowly varying speeds are obtained for the domain walls (approximately 10 (exp -2)(1+z)(exp -1)) and negligible distortions of the microwave background. In addition, these topological defects may provide a mechanism of forming the large scale structure of the Universe, by creating fluctuations in the dark matter (delta rho/rho approximately O(1)) on a scale comparable with the distance the walls move from the formation (in the model d less than 20 h(exp -1) Mpc). The characteristic scale of the wall separation can be easily chosen to be of the order of 100 Mpc instead of being restricted to the horizon scale, as usually obtained.

  11. Large-scale interplanetary magnetic fields: Voyager 1 and 2 observations between 1 AU and 9.5 AU

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burlaga, L. F.; Klein, L. W.; Lepping, R. P.; Behannon, K. W.

    1984-01-01

    The large-scale radial and temporal variations of the interplanetary magnetic field strength B observed by Voyagers 1 and 2 are discussed. Two components of the magnetic field strength were considered: (1) an average component, B sub zero, based on solar rotation averages, and (2) a fluctuation component, delta B, expressed by 10- or 24-hour averages of B normalized by the best-fit average field for the corresponding time and distance. Observations of the sector structure, interfaces, and shocks are presented to further describe magnetic field strength.

  12. Resolved Spectroscopy of a Gravitationally Lensed L^{*} Lyman Break Galaxy at z˜5: Evidence for a Starburst-Driven, Galactic-Scale Bi-Polar Outflow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swinbank, M.

    2007-12-01

    We exploit the gravitational potential of a massive, rich cluster as a natural magnifying glass to study the internal properties of the highly magnified galaxy at z=4.88. Using high resolution HST imaging we construct a detailed mass model and, together with optical (VIMOS) and near-infrared (SINFONI) Integral Field Spectroscopy, we have mapped the source-frame morphology of the lensed galaxy behind galaxy cluster RCS0224-002 on 200pc scales to find an ˜L^{*} Lyman-break galaxy with a dynamical mass of 1.0×10^{10} M_{⊙} within 2 kpc and infer an integrated star-formation rate of just 12±2 M_{⊙} yr^{-1}. By combing the spatially resolved velocities from the [O II] and Lyα emission and UV ISM absorption lines we suggest that this galaxy is surrounded by a galactic-scale bi-polar outflow which has recently burst out of the system and is escaping at a speed of ˜500 km s^{-1}. The geometry and velocity of the outflow suggests that the ejected material is travelling far faster than escape velocity and we estimate that it will travel at least 1 Mpc (comoving) before eventually stalling. The enriched, outflowing material is therefore efficient at expelling baryons which are likely to subsequently play no further part in the star-formation history of this galaxy, but rather will pollute the IGM in a volume of at least 3Mpc^{3}.

  13. EOIL power scaling in a 1-5 kW supersonic discharge-flow reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davis, Steven J.; Lee, Seonkyung; Oakes, David B.; Haney, Julie; Magill, John C.; Paulsen, Dwane A.; Cataldi, Paul; Galbally-Kinney, Kristin L.; Vu, Danthu; Polex, Jan; Kessler, William J.; Rawlins, Wilson T.

    2008-02-01

    Scaling of EOIL systems to higher powers requires extension of electric discharge powers into the kW range and beyond with high efficiency and singlet oxygen yield. We have previously demonstrated a high-power microwave discharge approach capable of generating singlet oxygen yields of ~25% at ~50 torr pressure and 1 kW power. This paper describes the implementation of this method in a supersonic flow reactor designed for systematic investigations of the scaling of gain and lasing with power and flow conditions. The 2450 MHz microwave discharge, 1 to 5 kW, is confined near the flow axis by a swirl flow. The discharge effluent, containing active species including O II(a1Δ g, b1Σ g +), O( 3P), and O 3, passes through a 2-D flow duct equipped with a supersonic nozzle and cavity. I2 is injected upstream of the supersonic nozzle. The apparatus is water-cooled, and is modular to permit a variety of inlet, nozzle, and optical configurations. A comprehensive suite of optical emission and absorption diagnostics is used to monitor the absolute concentrations of O II(a), O II(b), O( 3P), O 3, I II, I(2P 3/2), I(2P 1/2), small-signal gain, and temperature in both the subsonic and supersonic flow streams. We discuss initial measurements of singlet oxygen and I* excitation kinetics at 1 kW power.

  14. Aeroelastic Tests of an Eight Percent Scale Saturn C-1 Block II

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1963-01-01

    Aeroelastic Tests of an Eight Percent Scale Saturn C-1 Block II. Buffet and flutter characteristics of Saturn Apollo mission were studied using a dynamically scaled model. The model was built around a central aluminum tube for scaled stiffness distribution and strength to resist loads imposed during testing. Styrofoam sections attached to the core provided the correct external contours. Lead weights were added for correct mass distribution. An electromagnetic shaker was used to excite the model in its flexible modes of vibration during portions of the test. The model was supported on a sting, mounted by leaf springs, cables and torsion bars. The support system provided for simulating the full scale rigid body pitch frequency with minimum restraint imposed on elastic deflections. Bending moments recorded by sensors on the aluminum tube. Several modified nose configurations were tested: The basic configuration was tested with and without a flow separator disk on the escape rocket motor, tests also were made with the escape tower and rocket motor removed completely. For the final test, the Apollo capsule was replaced with a Jupiter nose cone. The test program consisted of determining model response throughout the transonic speed range at angles of attack up to 6 degrees and measuring the aerodynamic damping over the same range for the basic model and the modified configurations. Signals from the model pickup were recorded on tape for later analysis. The data obtained were used to estimate bending moments that would be produced on the full-scale vehicle by aerodynamic forces due to buffeting. [Entire movie available on DVD from CASI as Doc ID 20070030987. Contact help@sti.nasa.gov

  15. Development of dynamic kinetic resolution on large scale for (±)-1-phenylethylamine.

    PubMed

    Thalén, Lisa K; Bäckvall, Jan-E

    2010-01-01

    Candida antarctica lipase B (CALB) and racemization catalyst 4 were combined in the dynamic kinetic resolution (DKR) of (±)-1-phenylethylamine (1). Several reaction parameters have been investigated to modify the method for application on multigram scale. A comparison of isopropyl acetate and alkyl methoxyacetates as acyl donors was carried out. It was found that lower catalyst loadings could be used to obtain (R)-2-methoxy-N-(1-phenylethyl)acetamide (3) in good yield and high ee when alkyl methoxyacetates were used as acyl donors compared to when isopropyl acetate was used as the acyl donor. The catalyst loading could be decreased to 1.25 mol % Ru-catalyst 4 and 10 mg CALB per mmol 1 when alkyl methoxyacetates were used as the acyl donor. PMID:20978623

  16. SCALE-4 Analysis of LaSalle Unit 1 BWR Commercial Reactor Critical Configurations

    SciTech Connect

    Gauld, I.C.

    2000-03-01

    Five commercial reactor criticals (CRCs) for the LaSalle Unit 1 boiling-water reactor have been analyzed using KENO V.a, the Monte Carlo criticality code of the SCALE 4 code system. The irradiated fuel assembly isotopics for the criticality analyses were provided by the Waste Package Design team at the Yucca Mountain Project in the US, who performed the depletion calculations using the SAS2H sequence of SCALE 4. The reactor critical measurements involved two beginning-of-cycle and three middle-of-cycle configurations. The CRCs involved relatively low-cycle burnups, and therefore contained a relatively high gadolinium poison content in the reactor assemblies. This report summarizes the data and methods used in analyzing the critical configurations and assesses the sensitivity of the results to some of the modeling approximations used to represent the gadolinium poison distribution within the assemblies. The KENO V.a calculations, performed using the SCALE 44GROUPNDF5 ENDF/B-V cross-section library, yield predicted k{sub eff} values within about 1% {Delta}k/k relative to reactor measurements for the five CRCs using general 8-pin and 9-pin heterogeneous gadolinium poison pin assembly models.

  17. SCALE-4 Analysis of LaSalle Unit 1 BWR Commercial Reactor Critical Configuration

    SciTech Connect

    Gauld, I.C.

    2000-03-16

    Five commercial reactor criticals (CRCs) for the LaSalle Unit 1 boiling-water reactor have been analyzed using KENO V.a, the Monte Carlo criticality code of the SCALE 4 code system. The irradiated fuel assembly isotopics for the criticality analyses were provided by the Waste Package Design team at the Yucca Mountain Project in the United States, who performed the depletion calculations using the SAS2H sequence of SCALE 4. The reactor critical measurements involved two beginning-of-cycle and three middle-of-cycle configurations. The CRCs involved relatively low-cycle burnups, and therefore contained a relatively high gadolinium poison content in the reactor assemblies. This report summarizes the data and methods used in analyzing the critical configurations and assesses the sensitivity of the results to some of the modeling approximations used to represent the gadolinium poison distribution within the assemblies. The KENO V.a calculations, performed using the SCALE 44GROUPNDF5 ENDF/B-V cross-section library, yield predicted k{sub eff} values within about 1% {Delta}k/k relative to reactor measurements for the five CRCs using general 8-pin and 9-pin heterogeneous gadolinium poison pin assembly models.

  18. Validation to Portuguese of the Scale of Student Satisfaction and Self-Confidence in Learning1

    PubMed Central

    Almeida, Rodrigo Guimarães dos Santos; Mazzo, Alessandra; Martins, José Carlos Amado; Baptista, Rui Carlos Negrão; Girão, Fernanda Berchelli; Mendes, Isabel Amélia Costa

    2015-01-01

    Objective: translate and validate to Portuguese the Scale of Student Satisfaction and Self-Confidence in Learning. Material and Methods: methodological translation and validation study of a research tool. After following all steps of the translation process, for the validation process, the event III Workshop Brazil - Portugal: Care Delivery to Critical Patients was created, promoted by one Brazilian and another Portuguese teaching institution. Results: 103 nurses participated. As to the validity and reliability of the scale, the correlation pattern between the variables, the sampling adequacy test (Kaiser-Meyer-Olkin) and the sphericity test (Bartlett) showed good results. In the exploratory factorial analysis (Varimax), item 9 behaved better in factor 1 (Satisfaction) than in factor 2 (Self-confidence in learning). The internal consistency (Cronbach's alpha) showed coefficients of 0.86 in factor 1 with six items and 0.77 for factor 2 with 07 items. Conclusion: in Portuguese this tool was called: Escala de Satisfação de Estudantes e Autoconfiança na Aprendizagem. The results found good psychometric properties and a good potential use. The sampling size and specificity are limitations of this study, but future studies will contribute to consolidate the validity of the scale and strengthen its potential use. PMID:26625990

  19. An analysis of more than 1,400 articles, 900 scales, and 17 years of research: the state of scales in cyberpsychology, behavior, and social networking.

    PubMed

    Howard, Matt C; Jayne, Bradley S

    2015-03-01

    Cyberpsychology is a recently emergent field that examines the impact of technology upon human cognition and behavior. Given its infancy, authors have rapidly created new measures to gauge their constructs of interest. Unfortunately, few of these authors have had the opportunity to test their scales' psychometric properties and validity. This is concerning, as many theoretical assumptions may be founded upon scales with inadequate attributes. If this were found to be true, then previous findings in cyberpsychology studies would need to be retested, and future research would need to shift its focus to creating psychometrically sound and valid measures. To provide inferences on this concern, the current study examines the article reporting, scale creation, and scale reliabilities of every article published in Cyberpsychology, Behavior, and Social Networking from its inception to July 2014. The final data set encompassed the coding of 1,478 individual articles, including 921 scales, and spanning 17 years. The results demonstrate that the simple survey methodology has become more popular over time. Authors are gradually applying empirically tested scales. However, self-created measures are still the most popular, leading to concerns about the measures' validity. Also, the use of multi-item measures has increased over time, but many articles still fail to report adequate information to assess the reliability of the applied scales. Lastly, the average scale reliability is 0.81, which barely meets standard cutoffs. Overall, these results are not overly concerning, but suggestions are given on methods to improve the reporting of measures, the creation of scales, and the state of cyberpsychology. PMID:25751050

  20. The CUORE Cryostat: A 1-Ton Scale Setup for Bolometric Detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ligi, C.; Alduino, C.; Alessandria, F.; Biassoni, M.; Bucci, C.; Caminata, A.; Canonica, L.; Cappelli, L.; Chott, N. I.; Copello, S.; D'Addabbo, A.; Dell'Oro, S.; Drobizhev, A.; Franceschi, M. A.; Gladstone, L.; Gorla, P.; Napolitano, T.; Nucciotti, A.; Orlandi, D.; Ouellet, J.; Pagliarone, C.; Pattavina, L.; Rusconi, C.; Santone, D.; Singh, V.; Taffarello, L.; Terranova, F.; Uttaro, S.

    2015-12-01

    The cryogenic underground observatory for rare events (CUORE) is a 1-ton scale bolometric experiment whose detector consists of an array of 988 TeO_2 crystals arranged in a cylindrical compact structure of 19 towers. This will be the largest bolometric mass ever operated. The experiment will work at a temperature around or below 10 mK. CUORE cryostat consists of a cryogen-free system based on pulse tubes and a custom high power dilution refrigerator, designed to match these specifications. The cryostat has been commissioned in 2014 at the Gran Sasso National Laboratories and reached a record temperature of 6 mK on a cubic meter scale. In this paper, we present results of CUORE commissioning runs. Details on the thermal characteristics and cryogenic performances of the system will be also given.

  1. The CUORE Cryostat: A 1-Ton Scale Setup for Bolometric Detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ligi, C.; Alduino, C.; Alessandria, F.; Biassoni, M.; Bucci, C.; Caminata, A.; Canonica, L.; Cappelli, L.; Chott, N. I.; Copello, S.; D'Addabbo, A.; Dell'Oro, S.; Drobizhev, A.; Franceschi, M. A.; Gladstone, L.; Gorla, P.; Napolitano, T.; Nucciotti, A.; Orlandi, D.; Ouellet, J.; Pagliarone, C.; Pattavina, L.; Rusconi, C.; Santone, D.; Singh, V.; Taffarello, L.; Terranova, F.; Uttaro, S.

    2016-08-01

    The cryogenic underground observatory for rare events (CUORE) is a 1-ton scale bolometric experiment whose detector consists of an array of 988 TeO_2 crystals arranged in a cylindrical compact structure of 19 towers. This will be the largest bolometric mass ever operated. The experiment will work at a temperature around or below 10 mK. CUORE cryostat consists of a cryogen-free system based on pulse tubes and a custom high power dilution refrigerator, designed to match these specifications. The cryostat has been commissioned in 2014 at the Gran Sasso National Laboratories and reached a record temperature of 6 mK on a cubic meter scale. In this paper, we present results of CUORE commissioning runs. Details on the thermal characteristics and cryogenic performances of the system will be also given.

  2. Diagnostics and performance of a 1/4-scale MPD thruster

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    York, T. M.; Zakrzwski, C.; Soulas, G.

    1990-01-01

    The primary purpose of this study is to evaluate the performance and scaling characteristics of a 1/4-scale magnetoplasmadynamic (MPD) thruster operating with and without applied magnetic nozzle fields. The experiment was carried out with separate pulse forming networks for the thruster and the applied field solenoidal coil. A strong correlation of impact pressure signal with thruster current was noted. Also striking was the larger impact signal when the magnetic nozzle field was applied. Measurements of N(e) and T(e) from Langmuir probes have been made. Compatible interpretation of pressure with N(e), T(e), allow local velocity to be mapped, thus enhancing understanding of the acceleration process.

  3. Quantum Diffusion on Molecular Tubes: Universal Scaling of the 1D to 2D Transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chuang, Chern; Lee, Chee Kong; Moix, Jeremy M.; Knoester, Jasper; Cao, Jianshu

    2016-05-01

    The transport properties of disordered systems are known to depend critically on dimensionality. We study the diffusion coefficient of a quantum particle confined to a lattice on the surface of a tube, where it scales between the 1D and 2D limits. It is found that the scaling relation is universal and independent of the temperature, disorder, and noise parameters, and the essential order parameter is the ratio between the localization length in 2D and the circumference of the tube. Phenomenological and quantitative expressions for transport properties as functions of disorder and noise are obtained and applied to real systems: In the natural chlorosomes found in light-harvesting bacteria the exciton transfer dynamics is predicted to be in the 2D limit, whereas a family of synthetic molecular aggregates is found to be in the homogeneous limit and is independent of dimensionality.

  4. Quantum Diffusion on Molecular Tubes: Universal Scaling of the 1D to 2D Transition.

    PubMed

    Chuang, Chern; Lee, Chee Kong; Moix, Jeremy M; Knoester, Jasper; Cao, Jianshu

    2016-05-13

    The transport properties of disordered systems are known to depend critically on dimensionality. We study the diffusion coefficient of a quantum particle confined to a lattice on the surface of a tube, where it scales between the 1D and 2D limits. It is found that the scaling relation is universal and independent of the temperature, disorder, and noise parameters, and the essential order parameter is the ratio between the localization length in 2D and the circumference of the tube. Phenomenological and quantitative expressions for transport properties as functions of disorder and noise are obtained and applied to real systems: In the natural chlorosomes found in light-harvesting bacteria the exciton transfer dynamics is predicted to be in the 2D limit, whereas a family of synthetic molecular aggregates is found to be in the homogeneous limit and is independent of dimensionality. PMID:27232033

  5. Towards the 1 mm/y Stability of the Radial Orbit Error at Regional Scales

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Couhert, Alexandre; Cerri, Luca; Legeais, Jean-Francois; Ablain, Michael; Zelensky, Nikita P.; Haines, Bruce J.; Lemoine, Frank G.; Bertiger, William I.; Desai, Shailen D.; Otten, Michiel

    2015-01-01

    An estimated orbit error budget for the Jason-1 and Jason-2 GDR-D solutions is constructed, using several measures of orbit error. The focus is on the long-term stability of the orbit time series for mean sea level applications on a regional scale. We discuss various issues related to the assessment of radial orbit error trends; in particular this study reviews orbit errors dependent on the tracking technique, with an aim to monitoring the long-term stability of all available tracking systems operating on Jason-1 and Jason-2 (GPS, DORIS, SLR). The reference frame accuracy and its effect on Jason orbit is assessed. We also examine the impact of analysis method on the inference of Geographically Correlated Errors as well as the significance of estimated radial orbit error trends versus the time span of the analysis. Thus a long-term error budget of the 10-year Jason-1 and Envisat GDR-D orbit time series is provided for two time scales: interannual and decadal. As the temporal variations of the geopotential remain one of the primary limitations in the Precision Orbit Determination modeling, the overall accuracy of the Jason-1 and Jason-2 GDR-D solutions is evaluated through comparison with external orbits based on different time-variable gravity models. This contribution is limited to an East-West "order-1" pattern at the 2 mm/y level (secular) and 4 mm level (seasonal), over the Jason-2 lifetime. The possibility of achieving sub-mm/y radial orbit stability over interannual and decadal periods at regional scales and the challenge of evaluating such an improvement using in situ independent data is discussed.

  6. Pilot-scale treatability test plan for the 200-UP-1 groundwater Operable Unit

    SciTech Connect

    Wittreich, C.D.

    1994-05-01

    This document presents the treatability test plan for pilot-scale pump and treat testing at the 200-UP-1 Operable Unit. This treatability test plan has been prepared in response to an agreement between the US Department of Energy, the US Environmental Protection Agency, and the Washington State Department of Ecology, as documented in Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (Ecology et al. 1989a) Change Control Form M-13-93-03 (Ecology et al. 1994). The agreement also requires that, following completion of the activities described in this test plan, a 200-UP-1 Operable Unit interim remedial measure (IRM) proposed plan be developed for use in preparing an interim action record of decision (ROD). The IRM Proposed Plan will be supported by the results of the testing described in this treatability test plan, as well as by other 200-UP-1 Operable Unit activities (e.g., limited field investigation, development of a qualitative risk assessment). Once issued, the interim action ROD will specify the interim action for groundwater contamination at the 200-UP-1 Operable Unit. The approach discussed in this treatability test plan is to conduct a pilot-scale pump and treat test for the contaminant plume associated with the 200-UP-1 Operable Unit. Primary contaminants of concern are uranium and technetium-99; the secondary contaminant of concern is nitrate. The pilot-scale treatability testing presented in this test plan has as its primary purpose to assess the performance of aboveground treatment systems with respect to the ability to remove the primary contaminants in groundwater withdrawn from the contaminant plume.

  7. Towards the 1 mm/y stability of the radial orbit error at regional scales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Couhert, Alexandre; Cerri, Luca; Legeais, Jean-François; Ablain, Michael; Zelensky, Nikita P.; Haines, Bruce J.; Lemoine, Frank G.; Bertiger, William I.; Desai, Shailen D.; Otten, Michiel

    2015-01-01

    An estimated orbit error budget for the Jason-1 and Jason-2 GDR-D solutions is constructed, using several measures of orbit error. The focus is on the long-term stability of the orbit time series for mean sea level applications on a regional scale. We discuss various issues related to the assessment of radial orbit error trends; in particular this study reviews orbit errors dependent on the tracking technique, with an aim to monitoring the long-term stability of all available tracking systems operating on Jason-1 and Jason-2 (GPS, DORIS, SLR). The reference frame accuracy and its effect on Jason orbit is assessed. We also examine the impact of analysis method on the inference of Geographically Correlated Errors as well as the significance of estimated radial orbit error trends versus the time span of the analysis. Thus a long-term error budget of the 10-year Jason-1 and Envisat GDR-D orbit time series is provided for two time scales: interannual and decadal. As the temporal variations of the geopotential remain one of the primary limitations in the Precision Orbit Determination modeling, the overall accuracy of the Jason-1 and Jason-2 GDR-D solutions is evaluated through comparison with external orbits based on different time-variable gravity models. This contribution is limited to an East-West “order-1” pattern at the 2 mm/y level (secular) and 4 mm level (seasonal), over the Jason-2 lifetime. The possibility of achieving sub-mm/y radial orbit stability over interannual and decadal periods at regional scales and the challenge of evaluating such an improvement using in situ independent data is discussed.

  8. Collection Efficiency and Ice Accretion Characteristics of Two Full Scale and One 1/4 Scale Business Jet Horizontal Tails

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bidwell, Colin S.; Papadakis, Michael

    2005-01-01

    Collection efficiency and ice accretion calculations have been made for a series of business jet horizontal tail configurations using a three-dimensional panel code, an adaptive grid code, and the NASA Glenn LEWICE3D grid based ice accretion code. The horizontal tail models included two full scale wing tips and a 25 percent scale model. Flow solutions for the horizontal tails were generated using the PMARC panel code. Grids used in the ice accretion calculations were generated using the adaptive grid code ICEGRID. The LEWICE3D grid based ice accretion program was used to calculate impingement efficiency and ice shapes. Ice shapes typifying rime and mixed icing conditions were generated for a 30 minute hold condition. All calculations were performed on an SGI Octane computer. The results have been compared to experimental flow and impingement data. In general, the calculated flow and collection efficiencies compared well with experiment, and the ice shapes appeared representative of the rime and mixed icing conditions for which they were calculated.

  9. Scale-4 Analysis of Pressurized Water Reactor Critical Configurations: Volume 1-Summary

    SciTech Connect

    DeHart, M.D.

    1995-01-01

    The requirements of ANSI/ANS 8.1 specify that calculational methods for away-from-reactor criticality safety analyses be validated against experimental measurements. If credit is to be taken for the reduced reactivity of burned or spent fuel relative to its original ''fresh'' composition, it is necessary to benchmark computational methods used in determining such reactivity worth against spent fuel reactivity measurements. This report summarizes a portion of the ongoing effort to benchmark away-from-reactor criticality analysis methods using critical configurations from commercial pressurized- water reactors (PWR). The analysis methodology utilized for all calculations in this report is based on the modules and data associated with the SCALE-4 code system. Isotopic densities for spent fuel assemblies in the core were calculated using the SAS2H analytical sequence in SCALE-4. The sources of data and the procedures for deriving SAS2H input parameters are described in detail. The SNIKR code sequence was used to extract the necessary isotopic densities from SAS2H results and to provide the data in the format required for SCALE-4 criticality analysis modules. The CSASN analytical sequence in SCALE-4 was used to perform resonance processing of cross sections. The KENO V.a module of SCALE-4 was used to calculate the effective multiplication factor (k{sub eff}) for the critical configuration. The SCALE-4 27-group burnup library containing ENDF/B-IV (actinides) and ENDF/B-V (fission products) data was used for analysis of each critical configuration. Each of the five volumes comprising this report provides an overview of the methodology applied. Subsequent volumes also describe in detail the approach taken in performing criticality calculations for these PWR configurations: Volume 2 describes criticality calculations for the Tennessee Valley Authority's Sequoyah Unit 2 reactor for Cycle 3; Volume 3 documents the analysis of Virginia Power's Surry Unit 1 reactor for the

  10. Shadow Higgs boson from a scale-invariant hidden U(1){sub s} model

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, W.-F.; Ng, John N.; Wu, Jackson M. S.

    2007-06-01

    We study a scale-invariant SU(2)xU(1){sub Y}xU(1){sub s} model which has only dimensionless couplings. The shadow U(1){sub s} is hidden, and it interacts with the standard model (SM) solely through mixing in the scalar sector and kinetic mixing of the U(1) gauge bosons. The gauge symmetries are broken radiatively by the Coleman-Weinberg mechanism. Lifting of the flat direction in the scalar potential gives rise to a light scalar, the scalon, or the shadow Higgs, and a heavier scalar which we identify as the SM Higgs boson. The phenomenology of this model is discussed. In particular, the constraints on the shadow Higgs in different mass ranges, and the possibility of discovering a shadow Higgs with a mass a few tens of GeV in precision t-quark studies at the LHC, are investigated.

  11. 1/6TH SCALE STRIP EFFLUENT FEED TANK-MIXING RESULTS USING MCU SOLVENT

    SciTech Connect

    Hansen, E

    2006-02-01

    The purpose of this task was to determine if mixing was an issue for the entrainment and dispersion of the Modular Caustic Side Solvent Extraction (CSSX) Unit (MCU) solvent in the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) Strip Effluent Feed Tank (SEFT). The MCU strip effluent stream containing the Cs removed during salt processing will be transferred to the DWPF for immobilization in HLW glass. In lab-scale DWPF chemical process cell testing, mixing of the solvent in the dilute nitric acid solution proved problematic, and the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) was requested to perform scaled SEFT mixing tests to evaluate whether the problem was symptomatic of the lab-scale set-up or of the solvent. The solvent levels tested were 228 and 235 ppm, which represented levels near the estimated DWPF solvent limit of 239 ppm in 0.001M HNO{sub 3} solution. The 239 ppm limit was calculated by Norato in X-CLC-S-00141. The general approach for the mixing investigation was to: (1) Investigate the use of fluorescent dyes to aid in observing the mixing behavior. Evaluate and compare the physical properties of the fluorescent dyed MCU solvents to the baseline Oak Ridge CSSX solvent. Based on the data, use the dyed MCU solvent that best approximates the physical properties. (2) Use approximately a 1/6th linear scale of the SEFT to replicate the internal configuration for DWPF mixing. (3) Determine agitator speed(s) for scaled testing based on the DWPF SEFT mixing speed. (4) Perform mixing tests using the 1/6th SEFT and determine any mixing issues (entrainment/dispersion, accumulation, adhesion) through visual observations and by pulling samples to assess uniformity. The mixing tests used MCU solvent fabricated at SRNL blended with Risk Reactor DFSB-K43 fluorescent dye. This dyed SRNL MCU solvent had equivalent physical properties important to mixing as compared to the Oak Ridge baseline solvent, blended easily with the MCU solvent, and provided an excellent visual aid.

  12. Posttest analysis of a 1:6-scale reinforced concrete reactor containment building

    SciTech Connect

    Weatherby, J.R. )

    1990-02-01

    In an experiment conducted at Sandia National Laboratories, 1:6-scale model of a reinforced concrete light water reactor containment building was pressurized with nitrogen gas to more than three times its design pressure. The pressurization produced one large tear and several smaller tears in the steel liner plate that functioned as the primary pneumatic seal for the structure. The data collected from the overpressurization test have been used to evaluate and further refine methods of structural analysis that can be used to predict the performance of containment buildings under conditions produced by a severe accident. This report describes posttest finite element analyses of the 1:6-scale model tests and compares pretest predictions of the structural response to the experimental results. Strain and displacements calculated in axisymmetric finite element analyses of the 1:6-scale model are compared to strains and displacement measured in the experiment. Detailed analyses of the liner plate are also described in the report. The region of the liner surrounding the large tear was analyzed using two different two-dimensional finite elements model. The results from these analyzed indicate that the primary mechanisms that initiated the tear can be captured in a two- dimensional finite element model. Furthermore, the analyses show that studs used to anchor the liner to the concrete wall, played an important role in initiating the liner tear. Three-dimensional finite element analyses of liner plates loaded by studs are also presented. Results from the three-dimensional analyses are compared to results from two-dimensional analyses of the same problems. 12 refs., 56 figs., 1 tab.

  13. Modelling a full scale membrane bioreactor using Activated Sludge Model No.1: challenges and solutions.

    PubMed

    Delrue, F; Choubert, J M; Stricker, A E; Spérandio, M; Mietton-Peuchot, M; Racault, Y

    2010-01-01

    A full-scale membrane bioreactor (1,600 m(3) d(-1)) was monitored for modelling purposes during the summer of 2006. A complete calibration of the ASM1 model is presented, in which the key points were the wastewater characterisation, the oxygen transfer and the biomass kinetics. Total BOD tests were not able to correctly estimate the biodegradable fraction of the wastewater. Therefore the wastewater fractionation was identified by adjusting the simulated sludge production rate to the measured value. MLVSS and MLSS were accurately predicted during both calibration and validation periods (20 and 30 days). Because the membranes were immerged in the aeration tank, the coarse bubble and fine bubble diffusion systems coexisted in the same tank. This allowed five different aeration combinations, depending whether the 2 systems were operating separately or simultaneously, and at low speed or high speed. The aeration control maintained low DO concentrations, allowing simultaneous nitrification and denitrification. This made it difficult to calibrate the oxygen transfer. The nitrogen removal kinetics were determined using maximum nitrification rate tests and an 8-hour intensive sampling campaign. Despite the challenges encountered, a calibrated set of parameters was identified for ASM1 that gave very satisfactory results for the calibration period. Matching simulated and measured data became more difficult during the validation period, mainly because the dominant aeration configuration had changed. However, the merit of this study is to be the first effort to simulate a full-scale MBR plant. PMID:21076205

  14. The multifrequency parsec-scale structure of PKS 2254-367 (IC 1459): a luminosity-dependent break in morphology for the precursors of radio galaxies?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tingay, S. J.; Edwards, P. G.

    2015-03-01

    We present the first multifrequency very long baseline interferometry (VLBI) images of PKS 2254-367, a gigahertz-peaked spectrum (GPS) radio source hosted by the nearby galaxy IC 1459 (D = 20.5 Mpc). PKS 2254-367 and the radio source in NGC 1052 (PKS 0238-084; D = 17.2 Mpc) are the two closest GPS radio sources to us, far closer than the next closest example, PKS 1718-649 (D = 59 Mpc). As such, IC 1459 and NGC 1052 offer opportunities to study the details of the parsec-scale radio sources as well as the environments that the radio sources inhabit, across the electromagnetic spectrum. Given that some models for the origin and evolution of GPS radio sources require a strong connection between the radio source morphology and the gaseous nuclear environment, such opportunities for detailed study are important. Our VLBI images of PKS 2254-367 show that the previously identified similarities between IC 1459 and NGC 1052 continue on to the parsec-scale. Both compact radio sources appear to have symmetric jets of approximately the same luminosity, much lower than typically noted in compact double GPS sources. Similarities between PKS 2254-367 and NGC 1052, and differences with respect to other GPS galaxies, lead us to speculate that a sub-class of GPS radio sources, with low luminosity and with jet-dominated morphologies, exists and would be largely absent from radio source surveys with ˜1 Jy flux density cut-offs. We suggest that this possible low-luminosity, jet-dominated population of GPS sources could be an analogue of the Fanaroff-Riley type I (FR I) radio galaxies, with the higher luminosity lobe-dominated GPS sources being the analogue of the FR II radio galaxies.

  15. Analytical and experimental investigation of a 1/8-scale dynamic model of the shuttle orbiter. Volume 1: Summary report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mason, P. W.; Harris, H. G.; Zalesak, J.; Bernstein, M.

    1974-01-01

    A 1/8-scale structural dynamics model of the space shuttle orbiter was analyzed using the NASA Structural Analysis System (NASTRAN). Comparison of the calculated eigenvalues with preliminary test data for the unrestrained condition indicate that the analytical model was consistently stiffer, being about 20% higher in the first mode. The eigenvectors show reasonably good agreement with test data. A series of analytical and experimental investigations undertaken to resolve the discrepancy are described. Modifications in the NASTRAN model based upon these investigations resulted in close agreement for both eigenvalues and eigenvectors.

  16. Analysis and test for space shuttle propellant dynamics (1/10th scale model test results). Volume 1: Technical discussion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berry, R. L.; Tegart, J. R.; Demchak, L. J.

    1979-01-01

    Space shuttle propellant dynamics during ET/Orbiter separation in the RTLS (return to launch site) mission abort sequence were investigated in a test program conducted in the NASA KC-135 "Zero G" aircraft using a 1/10th-scale model of the ET LOX Tank. Low-g parabolas were flown from which thirty tests were selected for evaluation. Data on the nature of low-g propellant reorientation in the ET LOX tank, and measurements of the forces exerted on the tank by the moving propellent will provide a basis for correlation with an analytical model of the slosh phenomenon.

  17. Results of Overpressurization Test of a 1:4-Scale Prestressed Concrete Containment Vessel Model

    SciTech Connect

    Hessheimer, Michael F.; Shibata, Satoru; Costello, James F.

    2002-07-01

    The Nuclear Power Engineering Corporation (NUPEC) of Japan and the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) have been co-sponsoring and jointly funding a Cooperative Containment Research Program at Sandia National Laboratories. The purpose of the program is to investigate the response of representative models of nuclear containment structures to pressure loading beyond the design basis accident and to compare analytical predictions with measured behavior. This is accomplished by conducting static, pneumatic overpressurization tests of scale models at ambient temperature. The first project in this program was a test of a mixed scale steel containment vessel (SCV). Next, a 1:4-scale model of a prestressed concrete containment vessel (PCCV), representative of a pressurized water reactor (PWR) plant in Japan, was constructed by NUPEC at Sandia National Laboratories from January 1997 through June, 2000. Concurrently, Sandia instrumented the model with over 1500 transducers to measure strain, displacement and forces in the model from prestressing through the pressure testing. The limit state test of the PCCV model was conducted in September, 2000 at Sandia National Laboratories. This paper describes the conduct and some of the results of this test. (authors)

  18. Operation of a 1/10 scale mixed water incinerator air pollution control system

    SciTech Connect

    Burns, D.B.; Wong, A.; Walker, W.

    1996-08-01

    The Consolidated Incineration Facility (CIF) at the Savannah River Site is designed to treat solid and liquid RCRA hazardous and mixed wastes generated by site operations and clean-up activities. The technologies selected for use in the CIF air pollution control system (APCS) were based on reviews of existing commercial and DOE incinerators, on-site air pollution control experience, and recommendations from contracted consultants. In order to study the CIF APCS prior to operation, a 1/10 scale pilot facility, known as the Offgas Components Test Facility (OCTF) was constructed and has been in operation since late 1994. Its current mission is to demonstrate the design integrity of the CIF APCS and optimize equipment/instrument performance of the full scale production facility. Due to the nature of the wastes to be incinerated at the CIF, High Efficiency Particulate Air (HEPA) filters are used to remove hazardous and radioactive particulates from the exhaust gas stream before being released into the atmosphere. The HEPA filter change-out frequency has been a potential issue and was the first technical issue to be studied at the OCTF. Tests were conducted to evaluate the performance of HEPA filters under different operating conditions. These tests included evaluating the impact on HEPA life of scrubber operating parameters and the type of HEPA prefilter used. This pilot-scale testing demonstrated satisfactory HEPA filter life when using cleanable metal prefilters and high flows of steam and water in the offgas scrubber.

  19. 1/12-Scale scoping experiments to characterize double-shell tank slurry uniformity: Test plan

    SciTech Connect

    Bamberger, J.A.; Liljegren, L.M.

    1994-10-01

    Million gallon double-shell tanks (DSTs) at Hanford are used to store transuranic, high-level, and low-level wastes. These wastes generally consist of a large volume of salt-laden solution covering a smaller volume of settled sludge primarily containing metal hydroxides. These wastes will be retrieved and processed into immobile waste forms suitable for permanent disposal. The current retrieval concept is to use submerged dual-nozzle pumps to mobilize the settled solids by creating jets of fluid that are directed at the tank solids. The pumps oscillate, creating arcs of high-velocity fluid jets that sweep the floor of the tank. After the solids are mobilized, the pumps will continue to operate at a reduced flow rate sufficient to maintain the particles in a uniform suspension. The objectives of these 1/12-scale scoping experiments are to determine how Reynolds number, Froude number, and gravitational settling parameter affect the degree of uniformity achieved during jet mixer pump operation in the full-scale double-shell tanks; develop linear models to predict the degree of uniformity achieved by jet mixer pumps operating in the full-scale double-shell tanks; apply linear models to predict the degree of uniformity that will be achieved in tank 241-AZ-101 and determine whether contents of that tank will be uniform to within {+-} 10% of the mean concentration; and obtain experimental concentration and jet velocity data to compared with the TEMPEST computational and modeling predictions to guide further code development.

  20. A Sensitive VLA Search for Small-Scale Glycine Emission Toward OMC-1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hollis, J. M.; Pedelty, J. A.; Snyder, L. E.; Jewell, P. R.; Lovas, F. J.; Palmer, Patrick; Liu, S.-Y.

    2002-01-01

    We have conducted a deep Q-band (lambda-7 mm) search with the Very Large Array (VLA) toward OMC-1 for the lowest energy conformation (conformer I) of glycine (NH2CH2COOH) in four rotational transitions: the 6(sub 15)- 5(sub 14), 6(sub 24)-5(sub 23), 7(sub 17- 6(sub 16), and 7(sub 07)-6(sub 06). Our VLA observations sample the smallest-scale structures to date in the search for glycine toward OMC-1. No glycine emission features were detected. Thus if glycine exists in OMC-1, either it is below our detection limit, or it is more spatially extended than other large molecules in this source, or it is primarily in its high energy form (conformer II). Our VLA glycine fractional abundance limits in OMC-1 are comparable to those determined from previous IRAM 30m measurements -- somewhat better or worse depending on the specific source model -- and the entire approximately 1 foot primary beam of the VLA was searched while sensitive to an areal spatial scale approximately 150 times smaller than the 24 inch beam of the IRAM single-element telescope. In the course of this work, we detected and imaged the 4(sub 14)-3(sub 13) A and E transitions of methyl formate (HCOOCH3) and also the 2(sub 02) - 1(sub 01) transition of formic acid (HCOOH). Since formic acid is a possible precursor to glycine, our glycine limits and formic acid results provide a constraint on this potential formation chemistry route for glycine in OMC-1.

  1. Advances in Sensitivity Analysis Capabilities with SCALE 6.0 and 6.1

    SciTech Connect

    Rearden, Bradley T; Petrie Jr, Lester M; Williams, Mark L

    2010-01-01

    The sensitivity and uncertainty analysis sequences of SCALE compute the sensitivity of k{sub eff} to each constituent multigroup cross section using perturbation theory based on forward and adjoint transport computations with several available codes. Versions 6.0 and 6.1 of SCALE, released in 2009 and 2010, respectively, include important additions to the TSUNAMI-3D sequence, which computes forward and adjoint solutions in multigroup with the KENO Monte Carlo codes. Previously, sensitivity calculations were performed with the simple and efficient geometry capabilities of KENO V.a, but now calculations can also be performed with the generalized geometry code KENO-VI. TSUNAMI-3D requires spatial refinement of the angular flux moment solutions for the forward and adjoint calculations. These refinements are most efficiently achieved with the use of a mesh accumulator. For SCALE 6.0, a more flexible mesh accumulator capability has been added to the KENO codes, enabling varying granularity of the spatial refinement to optimize the calculation for different regions of the system model. The new mesh capabilities allow the efficient calculation of larger models than were previously possible. Additional improvements in the TSUNAMI calculations were realized in the computation of implicit effects of resonance self-shielding on the final sensitivity coefficients. Multigroup resonance self-shielded cross sections are accurately computed with SCALE's robust deterministic continuous-energy treatment for the resolved and thermal energy range and with Bondarenko shielding factors elsewhere, including the unresolved resonance range. However, the sensitivities of the self-shielded cross sections to the parameters input to the calculation are quantified using only full-range Bondarenko factors.

  2. 1/f and the Earthquake Problem: Scaling constraints that facilitate operational earthquake forecasting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    yoder, M. R.; Rundle, J. B.; Turcotte, D. L.

    2012-12-01

    The difficulty of forecasting earthquakes can fundamentally be attributed to the self-similar, or "1/f", nature of seismic sequences. Specifically, the rate of occurrence of earthquakes is inversely proportional to their magnitude m, or more accurately to their scalar moment M. With respect to this "1/f problem," it can be argued that catalog selection (or equivalently, determining catalog constraints) constitutes the most significant challenge to seismicity based earthquake forecasting. Here, we address and introduce a potential solution to this most daunting problem. Specifically, we introduce a framework to constrain, or partition, an earthquake catalog (a study region) in order to resolve local seismicity. In particular, we combine Gutenberg-Richter (GR), rupture length, and Omori scaling with various empirical measurements to relate the size (spatial and temporal extents) of a study area (or bins within a study area) to the local earthquake magnitude potential - the magnitude of earthquake the region is expected to experience. From this, we introduce a new type of time dependent hazard map for which the tuning parameter space is nearly fully constrained. In a similar fashion, by combining various scaling relations and also by incorporating finite extents (rupture length, area, and duration) as constraints, we develop a method to estimate the Omori (temporal) and spatial aftershock decay parameters as a function of the parent earthquake's magnitude m. From this formulation, we develop an ETAS type model that overcomes many point-source limitations of contemporary ETAS. These models demonstrate promise with respect to earthquake forecasting applications. Moreover, the methods employed suggest a general framework whereby earthquake and other complex-system, 1/f type, problems can be constrained from scaling relations and finite extents.; Record-breaking hazard map of southern California, 2012-08-06. "Warm" colors indicate local acceleration (elevated hazard

  3. 1/f and the Earthquake Problem: Scaling constraints to facilitate operational earthquake forecasting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoder, M. R.; Rundle, J. B.; Glasscoe, M. T.

    2013-12-01

    The difficulty of forecasting earthquakes can fundamentally be attributed to the self-similar, or '1/f', nature of seismic sequences. Specifically, the rate of occurrence of earthquakes is inversely proportional to their magnitude m, or more accurately to their scalar moment M. With respect to this '1/f problem,' it can be argued that catalog selection (or equivalently, determining catalog constraints) constitutes the most significant challenge to seismicity based earthquake forecasting. Here, we address and introduce a potential solution to this most daunting problem. Specifically, we introduce a framework to constrain, or partition, an earthquake catalog (a study region) in order to resolve local seismicity. In particular, we combine Gutenberg-Richter (GR), rupture length, and Omori scaling with various empirical measurements to relate the size (spatial and temporal extents) of a study area (or bins within a study area), in combination with a metric to quantify rate trends in local seismicity, to the local earthquake magnitude potential - the magnitudes of earthquakes the region is expected to experience. From this, we introduce a new type of time dependent hazard map for which the tuning parameter space is nearly fully constrained. In a similar fashion, by combining various scaling relations and also by incorporating finite extents (rupture length, area, and duration) as constraints, we develop a method to estimate the Omori (temporal) and spatial aftershock decay parameters as a function of the parent earthquake's magnitude m. From this formulation, we develop an ETAS type model that overcomes many point-source limitations of contemporary ETAS. These models demonstrate promise with respect to earthquake forecasting applications. Moreover, the methods employed suggest a general framework whereby earthquake and other complex-system, 1/f type, problems can be constrained from scaling relations and finite extents.

  4. APPLICATION OF THE 1:2,000,000-SCALE DATA BASE: A NATIONAL ATLAS SECTIONAL PROTOTYPE.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dixon, Donna M.

    1985-01-01

    A study of the potential to produce a National Atlas sectional prototype from the 1:2,000,000-scale data base was concluded recently by the National Mapping Division, U. S. Geological Survey. This paper discusses the specific digital cartographic production procedures involved in the preparation of the prototype map, as well as the theoretical and practical cartographic framework for the study. Such items as data organization, data classification, digital techniques, data conversions, and modification of traditional design specifications for an automated environment are discussed. The bulk of the cartographic work for the production of the prototype was carried out in raster format on the Scitex Response-250 mapping system.

  5. Quantification of InxGa1-xP composition modulation by nanometric scale HAADF simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pastore, C. E.; Gutiérrez, M.; Araújo, D.; Rodríguez-Messmer, E.

    2013-03-01

    Multijunction solar cell efficiency is highly sensitive to structural and chemical variations. These variations can be quantified at nm scale in InGaP/InGaAs/Ge multijunctions using transmission electron microscopy modes, e.g. diffraction contrast (DC-CTEM) and high angle annular dark field (STEM-HAADF). These studies determined the structure and the composition modulation of InGaP layers with sensitivity below 1% of In composition. To quantify the In-related variation, STEM-HAADF profiles are compared to numerically simulated ones. The fit with the experimental contrast shows local variations of 4.25%In for distances below 30 nm.

  6. iAK692: A genome-scale metabolic model of Spirulina platensis C1

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Spirulina (Arthrospira) platensis is a well-known filamentous cyanobacterium used in the production of many industrial products, including high value compounds, healthy food supplements, animal feeds, pharmaceuticals and cosmetics, for example. It has been increasingly studied around the world for scientific purposes, especially for its genome, biology, physiology, and also for the analysis of its small-scale metabolic network. However, the overall description of the metabolic and biotechnological capabilities of S. platensis requires the development of a whole cellular metabolism model. Recently, the S. platensis C1 (Arthrospira sp. PCC9438) genome sequence has become available, allowing systems-level studies of this commercial cyanobacterium. Results In this work, we present the genome-scale metabolic network analysis of S. platensis C1, iAK692, its topological properties, and its metabolic capabilities and functions. The network was reconstructed from the S. platensis C1 annotated genomic sequence using Pathway Tools software to generate a preliminary network. Then, manual curation was performed based on a collective knowledge base and a combination of genomic, biochemical, and physiological information. The genome-scale metabolic model consists of 692 genes, 837 metabolites, and 875 reactions. We validated iAK692 by conducting fermentation experiments and simulating the model under autotrophic, heterotrophic, and mixotrophic growth conditions using COBRA toolbox. The model predictions under these growth conditions were consistent with the experimental results. The iAK692 model was further used to predict the unique active reactions and essential genes for each growth condition. Additionally, the metabolic states of iAK692 during autotrophic and mixotrophic growths were described by phenotypic phase plane (PhPP) analysis. Conclusions This study proposes the first genome-scale model of S. platensis C1, iAK692, which is a predictive metabolic platform

  7. 1:500 Scale Aerial Triangulation Test with Unmanned Airship in Hubei Province

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feifei, Xie; Zongjian, Lin; Dezhu, Gui

    2014-03-01

    A new UAVS (Unmanned Aerial Vehicle System) for low altitude aerial photogrammetry is introduced for fine surveying and mapping, including the platform airship, sensor system four-combined wide-angle camera and photogrammetry software MAP-AT. It is demonstrated that this low-altitude aerial photogrammetric system meets the precision requirements of 1:500 scale aerial triangulation based on the test of this system in Hubei province, including the working condition of the airship, the quality of image data and the data processing report. This work provides a possibility for fine surveying and mapping.

  8. Plant-Scale Concentration Column Designs for SHINE Target Solution Utilizing AG 1 Anion Exchange Resin

    SciTech Connect

    Stepinski, Dominique C.; Vandegrift, G. F.

    2015-09-30

    Argonne is assisting SHINE Medical Technologies (SHINE) in their efforts to develop SHINE, an accelerator-driven process that will utilize a uranyl-sulfate solution for the production of fission product Mo-99. An integral part of the process is the development of a column for the separation and recovery of Mo-99, followed by a concentration column to reduce the product volume from 15-25 L to <1 L. Argonne has collected data from batch studies and breakthrough column experiments to utilize the VERSE (Versatile Reaction Separation) simulation program (Purdue University) to design plant-scale product recovery and concentration processes.

  9. Hidden extra U(1) at the electroweak/TeV scale

    SciTech Connect

    Grossmann, B. N.; Rai, Santosh Kumar; McElrath, B.; Nandi, S.

    2010-09-01

    We propose a simple extension of the standard model (SM) by adding an extra U(1) symmetry which is hidden from the SM sector. Such a hidden U(1) has not been considered before, and its existence at the TeV scale can be explored at the LHC. This hidden U(1) does not couple directly to the SM particles, and couples only to new SU(2){sub L} singlet exotic quarks and singlet Higgs bosons, and is broken at the TeV scale. The dominant signals at the high-energy hadron colliders are multilepton and multi-b-jet final states with or without missing energy. We calculate the signal rates as well as the corresponding standard model background for these final states. A very distinctive signal is 6 high p{sub T} b-jets in the final state with no missing energy. For a wide range of the exotic quarks masses the signals are observable above the background at the LHC.

  10. 1/12-scale physical modeling experiments in support of tank 241-SY- 101 hydrogen mitigation

    SciTech Connect

    Fort, J.A.; Bamberger, J.A.; Bates, J.M.; Enderlin, C.W.; Elmore, M.R.

    1993-01-01

    Hanford tank 241-SY-101 is a 75-ft-dia double-shell tank that contains approximately 1.1 M gal of radioactive fuel reprocessing waste. Core samples have shown that the tank contents are separated into two main layers, a article laden supernatant liquid at the top of the tank and a more dense slurry on the bottom. Two additional layers may be present, one being a potentially thick sludge lying beneath the slurry at the bottom of the tank and the other being the crust that has formed on the surface of the supernatant liquid. The supernatant is more commonly referred to as the convective layer and the slurry as the non-convective layer. Accumulation of gas (partly hydrogen) in the non-convective layer is suspected to be the key mechanism behind the gas burp phenomena, and several mitigation schemes are being developed to encourage a more uniform gas release rate (Benegas 1992). To support the full-scale hydraulic mitigation test, scaled experiments were performed to satisfy two objectives: 1. provide an experimental database for numerical- model validation; 2. establish operating parameter values required to mobilize the settled solids and maintain the solids in suspension.

  11. Posttest analysis of the 1:6-scale reinforced concrete containment

    SciTech Connect

    Pfeiffer, P.A.; Kennedy, J.M.; Marchertas, A.H.

    1989-01-01

    A prediction of the response of the Sandia National Laboratories 1:6- scale reinforced concrete containment model test was made by Argonne National Laboratory. ANL along with nine other organizations performed a detailed nonlinear response analysis of the 1:6-scale model containment subjected to overpressurization in the fall of 1986. The two-dimensional code TEMP-STRESS and the three-dimensional NEPTUNE code were utilized (1) to predict the global response of the structure, (2) to identify global failure sites and the corresponding failure pressures and (3) to identify some local failure sites and pressure levels. A series of axisymmetric models was studied with the two-dimensional computer program TEMP-STRESS. The comparison of these pretest computations with test data from the containment model has provided a test for the capability of the respective finite element codes to predict global failure modes, and hence serves as a validation of these codes. Only the two-dimensional analyses will be discussed in this paper. 3 refs., 10 figs.

  12. 1D Scaling with Ablation for K-Shell Radiation from Stainless Steel Wire Arrays

    SciTech Connect

    Giuliani, J. L.; Thornhill, J. W.; Dasgupta, A.; Davis, J.; Clark, R. W.; Jones, B.; Cuneo, M.; Coverdale, C. A.; Deeney, C.

    2009-01-21

    A 1D Lagrangian magnetohydrodynamic z-pinch simulation code is extended to include wire ablation. The plasma transport coefficients are calibrated to reproduce the K-shell yields measured on the Z generator for three stainless steel arrays of diameter 55 mm and masses ranging from 1.8 to 2.7 mg. The resulting 1D scaling model is applied to a larger SS array (65 mm and 2.5 mg) on the refurbished Z machine. Simulation results predict a maximum K-shell yield of 77 kJ for an 82 kV charging voltage. This maximum drops to 42 kJ at 75 kV charging. Neglecting the ablation precursor leads to a {approx}10% change in the calculated yield.

  13. Scaling law characterizing the dynamics of the transition of HIV-1 to error catastrophe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, Vipul; Dixit, Narendra M.

    2015-10-01

    Increasing the mutation rate, μ , of viruses above a threshold, {μ }c, has been predicted to trigger a catastrophic loss of viral genetic information and is being explored as a novel intervention strategy. Here, we examine the dynamics of this transition using stochastic simulations mimicking within-host HIV-1 evolution. We find a scaling law governing the characteristic time of the transition: τ ≈ 0.6/≤ft(μ -{μ }c\\right). The law is robust to variations in underlying evolutionary forces and presents guidelines for treatment of HIV-1 infection with mutagens. We estimate that many years of treatment would be required before HIV-1 can suffer an error catastrophe.

  14. An Essential Role for Inhibitor-2 Regulation of Protein Phosphatase-1 in Synaptic Scaling

    PubMed Central

    Siddoway, Benjamin A.; Altimimi, Haider F.; Hou, Hailong; Petralia, Ronald S.; Xu, Bo; Stellwagen, David

    2013-01-01

    Protein phosphatase-1 (PP1) activity is important for many calcium-dependent neuronal functions including Hebbian synaptic plasticity and learning and memory. PP1 activity is necessary for the induction of long-term depression, whereas downregulation of PP1 activity is required for the normal induction of long-term potentiation. However, how PP1 is activated is not clear. Moreover, it is not known whether PP1 plays a role in homeostatic synaptic scaling, another form of synaptic plasticity which functions to reset the neuronal firing rate in response to chronic neuronal activity perturbations. In this study, we found that PP1 inhibitor-2 (I-2) is phosphorylated at serine 43 (S43) in rat and mouse cortical neurons in response to bicuculine application. Expression of I-2 phosphorylation-blocking mutant I-2 (S43A) blocked the dephosphorylation of GluA2 at serine 880, AMPA receptor trafficking, and synaptic downscaling induced by bicuculline application. Our data suggest that the phosphorylation of I-2 at S43 appears to be mediated by L-type calcium channels and calcium/calmodulin-dependent myosin light-chain kinase. Our work thus reveals a novel calcium-induced PP1 activation pathway critical for homeostatic synaptic plasticity. PMID:23825423

  15. The large-scale environment of low surface brightness galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosenbaum, S. D.; Krusch, E.; Bomans, D. J.; Dettmar, R.-J.

    2009-09-01

    Context: The exact formation scenarios and evolutionary processes that led to the existence of the class of low surface brightness galaxies (LSBs) have not yet been understood completely. There is evidence that the lack of star formation expected to be typical of LSBs can only occur if the LSBs were formed in low-density regions. Aims: Since the environment of LSBs has been studied before only on small scales (below 2 Mpc), a study of the galaxy content in the vicinity of LSB galaxies on larger scales could add a lot to our understanding of the origin of this galaxy class. Methods: We used the spectroscopic main galaxy sample of the SDSS DR4 to investigate the environmental galaxy density of LSB galaxies compared to the galaxy density in the vicinity of high surface brightness galaxies (HSBs). To avoid the influence of evolutionary effects depending of redshift and to minimize completeness issues within the SDSS, we limited the environment studies to the local universe with a redshift of z≤0.1. At first we studied the luminosity distribution of the LSB sample obtained from the SDSS within two symmetric redshift intervals (0.01 < z ≤ 0.055 and 0.055 < z ≤0.1). Results: It was found that the lower redshift interval is dominated by small, low-luminosity LSBs, whereas the LSB sample in the higher redshift range mainly consists of larger, more luminous LSBs. This comes from selection effects of the SDSS spectroscopic sample. The environment studies, also divided into these two redshift bins, show that both the low mass, and the more massive LSBs possess an environment with a lower galaxy density than HSBs. The differences in the galaxy density between LSBs and HSBs are significant on scales between 2 and 5 Mpc, the scales of groups and filaments. To quantify this, we have introduced for the first time the LSB-HSB Antibias. The obtained LSB-HSB Antibias parameter has a value of 10%-15%. Conclusions: From these results we conclude that LSBs formed in low

  16. Activity-dependent synaptic GRIP1 accumulation drives synaptic scaling up in response to action potential blockade

    PubMed Central

    Gainey, Melanie A.; Tatavarty, Vedakumar; Nahmani, Marc; Lin, Heather; Turrigiano, Gina G.

    2015-01-01

    Synaptic scaling is a form of homeostatic plasticity that stabilizes neuronal firing in response to changes in synapse number and strength. Scaling up in response to action-potential blockade is accomplished through increased synaptic accumulation of GluA2-containing AMPA receptors (AMPAR), but the receptor trafficking steps that drive this process remain largely obscure. Here, we show that the AMPAR-binding protein glutamate receptor-interacting protein-1 (GRIP1) is essential for regulated synaptic AMPAR accumulation during scaling up. Synaptic abundance of GRIP1 was enhanced by activity deprivation, directly increasing synaptic GRIP1 abundance through overexpression increased the amplitude of AMPA miniature excitatory postsynaptic currents (mEPSCs), and shRNA-mediated GRIP1 knockdown prevented scaling up of AMPA mEPSCs. Furthermore, knockdown and replace experiments targeting either GRIP1 or GluA2 revealed that scaling up requires the interaction between GRIP1 and GluA2. Finally, GRIP1 synaptic accumulation during scaling up did not require GluA2 binding. Taken together, our data support a model in which activity-dependent trafficking of GRIP1 to synaptic sites drives the forward trafficking and enhanced synaptic accumulation of GluA2-containing AMPAR during synaptic scaling up. PMID:26109571

  17. Embryonic Lethality of Mitochondrial Pyruvate Carrier 1 Deficient Mouse Can Be Rescued by a Ketogenic Diet.

    PubMed

    Vanderperre, Benoît; Herzig, Sébastien; Krznar, Petra; Hörl, Manuel; Ammar, Zeinab; Montessuit, Sylvie; Pierredon, Sandra; Zamboni, Nicola; Martinou, Jean-Claude

    2016-05-01

    Mitochondrial import of pyruvate by the mitochondrial pyruvate carrier (MPC) is a central step which links cytosolic and mitochondrial intermediary metabolism. To investigate the role of the MPC in mammalian physiology and development, we generated a mouse strain with complete loss of MPC1 expression. This resulted in embryonic lethality at around E13.5. Mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) derived from mutant mice displayed defective pyruvate-driven respiration as well as perturbed metabolic profiles, and both defects could be restored by reexpression of MPC1. Labeling experiments using 13C-labeled glucose and glutamine demonstrated that MPC deficiency causes increased glutaminolysis and reduced contribution of glucose-derived pyruvate to the TCA cycle. Morphological defects were observed in mutant embryonic brains, together with major alterations of their metabolome including lactic acidosis, diminished TCA cycle intermediates, energy deficit and a perturbed balance of neurotransmitters. Strikingly, these changes were reversed when the pregnant dams were fed a ketogenic diet, which provides acetyl-CoA directly to the TCA cycle and bypasses the need for a functional MPC. This allowed the normal gestation and development of MPC deficient pups, even though they all died within a few minutes post-delivery. This study establishes the MPC as a key player in regulating the metabolic state necessary for embryonic development, neurotransmitter balance and post-natal survival. PMID:27176894

  18. Embryonic Lethality of Mitochondrial Pyruvate Carrier 1 Deficient Mouse Can Be Rescued by a Ketogenic Diet

    PubMed Central

    Krznar, Petra; Hörl, Manuel; Ammar, Zeinab; Montessuit, Sylvie; Pierredon, Sandra; Zamboni, Nicola; Martinou, Jean-Claude

    2016-01-01

    Mitochondrial import of pyruvate by the mitochondrial pyruvate carrier (MPC) is a central step which links cytosolic and mitochondrial intermediary metabolism. To investigate the role of the MPC in mammalian physiology and development, we generated a mouse strain with complete loss of MPC1 expression. This resulted in embryonic lethality at around E13.5. Mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) derived from mutant mice displayed defective pyruvate-driven respiration as well as perturbed metabolic profiles, and both defects could be restored by reexpression of MPC1. Labeling experiments using 13C-labeled glucose and glutamine demonstrated that MPC deficiency causes increased glutaminolysis and reduced contribution of glucose-derived pyruvate to the TCA cycle. Morphological defects were observed in mutant embryonic brains, together with major alterations of their metabolome including lactic acidosis, diminished TCA cycle intermediates, energy deficit and a perturbed balance of neurotransmitters. Strikingly, these changes were reversed when the pregnant dams were fed a ketogenic diet, which provides acetyl-CoA directly to the TCA cycle and bypasses the need for a functional MPC. This allowed the normal gestation and development of MPC deficient pups, even though they all died within a few minutes post-delivery. This study establishes the MPC as a key player in regulating the metabolic state necessary for embryonic development, neurotransmitter balance and post-natal survival. PMID:27176894

  19. Highly Scaled InP/InGaAs DHBTs Beyond 1 THz Bandwidth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rode, Johann Christian

    This work examines the efforts pursued to extend the bandwidth of InP-based DHBTs above 1 THz. Aggressive lithographic and epitaxial scaling of key device dimensions and simultaneous reduction of contact resistivities have enabled increased RF bandwidths by reduction of device RC and transit delays. A fabrication process for forming base electrodes and base/collector mesas of highly scaled transistors has been developed that exploits superior resolution (10nm) and alignment (<30nm) of electron beam lithography. Ultra-low resistance, thermally stable base contacts are critical for extended fmax bandwidth: a novel dual-deposition base metalization technique is presented that removes contaminating lithographic processes from the formation of the base contact, thereby enabling low resistivity contacts (4 Ω-microm2) to ultra-thin base layers (20 nm). The composite base metal stack exploits an ultra-thin layer of platinum that controllably reacts with base, yielding low contact resistivity, as well as a thick refractory diffusion barrier which permits stable operation at high current densities and elevated temperatures. Reduction in emitter-base surface leakage and subsequent increase of current gain was achieved by passivating emitter-base semiconductor surfaces with conformally grown ALD Al2O3. RF bandwidth limiting parasitics associated to the perimeter of highly scaled transistors have been identified and significantly reduced, among which are high sheet resistance of base electrodes, excess undercut of emitter stripes and improperly scaled base posts. At 100nm collector thickness, the breakdown voltage of the transistor BVCEO has been increased to more than 4.1V by passivating base/collector surfaces. With the technology improvements discussed, transistors with ftau of 480 GHz and fmax in excess of 1 THz have been demonstrated at 200nm emitter width and 80nm single-sided base contact width. Transistors at the same emitter width, but 30nm base contact width exhibit

  20. Production and Isolation of Azaspiracid-1 and -2 from Azadinium spinosum Culture in Pilot Scale Photobioreactors

    PubMed Central

    Jauffrais, Thierry; Kilcoyne, Jane; Séchet, Véronique; Herrenknecht, Christine; Truquet, Philippe; Hervé, Fabienne; Bérard, Jean Baptiste; Nulty, Cíara; Taylor, Sarah; Tillmann, Urban; Miles, Christopher O.; Hess, Philipp

    2012-01-01

    Azaspiracid (AZA) poisoning has been reported following consumption of contaminated shellfish, and is of human health concern. Hence, it is important to have sustainable amounts of the causative toxins available for toxicological studies and for instrument calibration in monitoring programs, without having to rely on natural toxin events. Continuous pilot scale culturing was carried out to evaluate the feasibility of AZA production using Azadinium spinosum cultures. Algae were harvested using tangential flow filtration or continuous centrifugation. AZAs were extracted using solid phase extraction (SPE) procedures, and subsequently purified. When coupling two stirred photobioreactors in series, cell concentrations reached 190,000 and 210,000 cell·mL−1 at steady state in bioreactors 1 and 2, respectively. The AZA cell quota decreased as the dilution rate increased from 0.15 to 0.3 day−1, with optimum toxin production at 0.25 day−1. After optimization, SPE procedures allowed for the recovery of 79 ± 9% of AZAs. The preparative isolation procedure previously developed for shellfish was optimized for algal extracts, such that only four steps were necessary to obtain purified AZA1 and -2. A purification efficiency of more than 70% was achieved, and isolation from 1200 L of culture yielded 9.3 mg of AZA1 and 2.2 mg of AZA2 of >95% purity. This work demonstrated the feasibility of sustainably producing AZA1 and -2 from A. spinosum cultures. PMID:22822378

  1. Antiferromagnetic Heisenberg spin-1 chain: Magnetic susceptibility of the Haldane chain described using scaling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Souletie, Jean; Drillon, Marc; Rabu, Pierre; Pati, Swapan K.

    2004-08-01

    The phenomenological expression χT/(Ng2μB2/k)=C1nexp(-W1n/T)+C2nexp(-W2n/T) describes very accurately the temperature dependence of the magnetic susceptibility computed for antiferromagnetic rings of Heisenberg spins S=1 , whose size n is even and ranges from 6 to 20. This expression has been obtained through a strategy justified by scaling considerations together with finite size numerical calculations. For n large, the coefficients of the expression converge towards C1=0.125 , W1=0.451J , C2=0.564 , W2=1.793J ( J is the exchange constant), which are appropriate for describing the susceptibility of the spin-1 Haldane chain. The Curie constant, the paramagnetic Curie-Weiss temperature, the correlation length at T=0 and the Haldane gap are found to be closely related to these coefficients. With this expression, a very good description of the magnetic behavior of Y2BaNiO5 and of Ni(C2H8N2)2NO2ClO4 (NENP), the archetype of the Haldane gap systems, is achieved over the whole temperature range.

  2. Scale-up of anaerobic 1,3-propanediol production by Clostridium butyricum DSP1 from crude glycerol

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background As the production of biofuels from raw materials continuously increases, optimization of production processes is necessary. A very important issue is the development of wasteless methods of biodiesel production. One way of utilization of glycerol generated in biodiesel production is its microbial conversion to 1,3-PD (1,3-propanediol). Results The study investigated the scale-up of 1,3-PD synthesis from crude glycerol by Clostridium butyricum. Batch fermentations were carried out in 6.6 L, 42 L and 150 L bioreactors. It was observed that cultivation of C. butyricum on a pilot scale did not decrease the efficiency of 1,3-PD production. The highest concentrations of 1,3-PD, 37 g/L for batch fermentation and 71 g/L for fed-batch fermentation, were obtained in the 6.6 L bioreactor. The kinetic parameters of 1,3-PD synthesis from crude glycerol established for batch fermentation were similar regarding all three bioreactor capacities. During fed-batch fermentation, the concentration of 1,3-PD in the 150 L bioreactor was lower and the substrate was not completely utilized. That suggested the presence of multifunctional environmental stresses in the 150 L bioreactor, which was confirmed by protein analysis. Conclusion The values of effectivity parameters for 1,3-PD synthesis in batch fermentations carried out in 6.6 L, 42 L and 150 L bioreactors were similar. The parameters obtained during fed-batch fermentations in the 150 L bioreactor differed in the rate and percentage of substrate utilization. The analysis of cell proteins demonstrated that a number of multifunctional stresses occurred during fed-batch fermentations in the 150 L bioreactor, which suggests the possibility of identifying the key stages in the biochemical process where inhibition of 1,3-PD synthesis pathways can be observed. PMID:24555775

  3. Acoustic testing of a 1.5 pressure ratio, low tip speed fan (QEP fan B scale model)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kazin, S. B.; Minzner, W. R.; Paas, J. E.

    1972-01-01

    A scale model (0.484 scale factor) of a single stage fan designed for a 1.5 pressure ratio and 1160 ft/sec tip speed was tested to determine its noise characteristics. The fan had 26 blades and 60 outlet guide vanes, with vanes spaced two rotor blade aerodynamic chords from the blades. The effects of speed, exhaust nozzle area and fan frame acoustic treatment on the scale model's noise characteristics were investigated.

  4. The discriminative capacity of CBCL/1½-5-DSM5 scales to identify disruptive and internalizing disorders in preschool children.

    PubMed

    de la Osa, Nuria; Granero, Roser; Trepat, Esther; Domenech, Josep Maria; Ezpeleta, Lourdes

    2016-01-01

    This paper studies the discriminative capacity of CBCL/1½-5 (Manual for the ASEBA Preschool-Age Forms & Profiles, University of Vermont, Research Center for Children, Youth, & Families, Burlington, 2000) DSM5 scales attention deficit and hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), oppositional defiant disorder (ODD), anxiety and depressive problems for detecting the presence of DSM5 (DSM5 diagnostic and statistical manual of mental disorders, APA, Arlington, 2013) disorders, ADHD, ODD, Anxiety and Mood disorders, assessed through diagnostic interview, in children aged 3-5. Additionally, we compare the clinical utility of the CBCL/1½-5-DSM5 scales with respect to analogous CBCL/1½-5 syndrome scales. A large community sample of 616 preschool children was longitudinally assessed for the stated age group. Statistical analysis was based on ROC procedures and binary logistic regressions. ADHD and ODD CBCL/1½-5-DSM5 scales achieved good discriminative ability to identify ADHD and ODD interview's diagnoses, at any age. CBCL/1½-5-DSM5 Anxiety scale discriminative capacity was fair for unspecific anxiety disorders in all age groups. CBCL/1½-5-DSM5 depressive problems' scale showed the poorest discriminative capacity for mood disorders (including depressive episode with insufficient symptoms), oscillating into the poor-to-fair range. As a whole, DSM5-oriented scales generally did not provide evidence better for discriminative capacity than syndrome scales in identifying DSM5 diagnoses. CBCL/1½-5-DSM5 scales discriminate externalizing disorders better than internalizing disorders for ages 3-5. Scores on the ADHD and ODD CBCL/1½-5-DSM5 scales can be used to screen for DSM5 ADHD and ODD disorders in general populations of preschool children. PMID:25715996

  5. Criticality Safety Validation of SCALE 6.1 with ENDF/B-VII.0 Libraries

    SciTech Connect

    Marshall, William BJ J; Rearden, Bradley T

    2012-01-01

    ANSI/ANS-8.1-1998;2007, Nuclear Criticality Safety in Operations with Fissionable Material Outside Reactors, and ANSI/ANS-8.24-2007, Validation of Neutron Transport Methods for Nuclear Criticality Safety Calculations, require validation of a computer code and the associated data through benchmark evaluations based on physical experiments. The performance of the code and data are validated by comparing the calculated and the benchmark results. A SCALE procedure has been established to generate a Verified, Archived Library of Inputs and Data (VALID). This procedure provides a framework for preparing, peer reviewing, and controlling models and data sets derived from benchmark definitions so that the models and data can be used with confidence. The procedure ensures that the models and data were correctly generated using appropriate references with documented checks and reviews. Configuration management is implemented to prevent inadvertent modification of the models and data or inclusion of models that have not been subjected to the rigorous review process. VALID entries for criticality safety are based on critical experiments documented in the International Handbook of Evaluated Criticality Safety Benchmark Experiments (IHECSBE). The findings of a criticality safety validation of SCALE 6.1 utilizing the benchmark models vetted in the VALID library at Oak Ridge National Laboratory are summarized here.

  6. Local Scale Radiobrightness Modelling during Intensive Observing Period-4 of the Cold Land Processes Experiment-1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, Edward J.; Tedesco, Marco; deRoo, Roger; England, Anthony W.; Gu, Haoyu; Pham, Hanh; Boprie, David; Graf, Tobias; Koike, Toshio; Armstrong, Richard

    2004-01-01

    The NASA Cold Land Processes Field Experiment (CLPX-1) was designed to provide microwave remote sensing observations and ground truth for studies of snow and frozen ground remote sensing, particularly issues related to scaling. CLPX-1 was conducted in the spring of 2003 in Colorado, USA. Initial forward model validation work is concentrating on the Local-Scale Observation Site (LSOS), a 0.8 ha study site consisting of open meadows separated by trees where the most detailed measurements were made of snow depth and temperature, density, and grain size profiles. This paper will focus on the ability of forward Dense Medium Radiative Transfer (DMRT) modelling, combined with snowpack measurements to reproduce the radiobrightness signatures observed by the University of Michigan s Truck-Mounted Radiometer System at 19 and 37 GHz during the 4th Intensive Observing Period (IOP4) in March, 2003. Unlike the earlier IOP3, conditions during IOP4 include both wet and dry periods, providing a valuable test of DMRT model performance. Observations of upwelling and downwelling tree radiobrightness will be used to formulate a simple model for the effect of trees within the field of view. In addition, a comparison will be made for the one day of coincident observations by the University of Tokyo s Ground- Based Microwave Radiometer-7 (GBMR-7). These analyses will help guide the choice of future snow retrieval algorithms and the design of future Cold Lands observing systems.

  7. Late time cosmological phase transitions 1: Particle physics models and cosmic evolution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frieman, Joshua A.; Hill, Christopher T.; Watkins, Richard

    1991-01-01

    We described a natural particle physics basis for late-time phase transitions in the universe. Such a transition can seed the formation of large-scale structure while leaving a minimal imprint upon the microwave background anisotropy. The key ingredient is an ultra-light pseudo-Nambu-Goldstone boson with an astronomically large (O(kpc-Mpc)) Compton wavelength. We analyze the cosmological signatures of and constraints upon a wide class of scenarios which do not involve domain walls. In addition to seeding structure, coherent ultra-light bosons may also provide unclustered dark matter in a spatially flat universe, omega sub phi approx. = 1.

  8. SCALE: A modular code system for performing Standardized Computer Analyses for Licensing Evaluation. Volume 1, Part 2: Control modules S1--H1; Revision 5

    SciTech Connect

    1997-03-01

    SCALE--a modular code system for Standardized Computer Analyses Licensing Evaluation--has been developed by Oak Ridge National Laboratory at the request of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission. The SCALE system utilizes well-established computer codes and methods within standard analysis sequences that (1) allow an input format designed for the occasional user and/or novice, (2) automated the data processing and coupling between modules, and (3) provide accurate and reliable results. System development has been directed at problem-dependent cross-section processing and analysis of criticality safety, shielding, heat transfer, and depletion/decay problems. Since the initial release of SCALE in 1980, the code system has been heavily used for evaluation of nuclear fuel facility and package designs. This revision documents Version 4.3 of the system.

  9. Transit Time Distributions, Legacy Contamination and Variability in Biogeochemical 1/f^α Scaling: How are Hydrological Response Dynamics Linked to Water Quality at the Catchment Scale?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hrachowitz, M.; Fovet, O.; Ruiz, L.; Savenije, H.

    2015-12-01

    In spite of recent progress, hydrological processes underlying observed water quality response patterns, such as the emergence of near-chemostatic conditions and fractal 1/fα scaling of stream chemistry, are not completely understood. Analysing hydrological and Cl- tracer data for two intensely managed, hydrologically contrasting yet biogeochemically similar catchments we tested if (1) a semi-distributed, conceptual model can simultaneously reproduce catchment scale hydrological and biogeochemical responses, (2) legacy stores, allowing for long-term storage of nutrient inputs can be identified and (3) a model can reproduce 1/fα scaling. Further we analysed (4) transit (TTD) and residence time distributions (RTD) and the associated response dynamics of legacy stores, to explore (5) what controls fluctuations in the scaling exponent α, thereby establishing a process based link between 1/fα scaling, legacy stores, and age distributions. We found that the model could reproduce the variable hydrological and the stable Cl- responses. This was possible through Cl- accumulation in hydrologically passive legacy stores that are mainly associated with the groundwater store, where Cl- age is well above 2000 days, one magnitude above the Cl- age in other components, such as the root zone (~200d). The results indicate that legacy stores can cause stable nutrient concentrations in streams for several decades after the end of nutrient input. It was further found that the model could reproduce fractal scaling of stream Cl- in both catchments, with higher values of α for the catchment with the smaller legacy store and faster response (α=-0.88 vs. -1.29). Further analysing the spectral properties of model components, it was found that the parts of the system with less storage are characterized by higher values of α. This suggests a plausible processes-based link between the fluctuations of α, legacy stores and RTDs: the smaller the legacy store and the higher the flow

  10. Large-Scale Structures around Quasar Pairs at z ˜ 1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sodré, L., Jr.; Boris, N. V.; Lima Neto, G. B.; Cypriano, E. S.; Santos, W. A.; Mendes de Oliveira, C.; West, M.

    2009-05-01

    We have used Gemini telescopes to study the photometric properties of four fields around the high-redshift quasar pairs QP1310+0007, QP1355-0032, QP0110-0219, and QP0114-3140z ˜ 1 with the aim of identifying large-scale structures -galaxy clusters or groups- around them. Our analysis reveals that QP0110-0219very strong and QP1310+0007 - QP1355-0032some evidence for the presence of rich galaxy clusters in direct vicinity of the pairs. On the other hand, QP0114-3140be an isolated pair in a poor environment. This work suggest that z ˜ 1 quasar pairs are excellent tracers of high density environments.

  11. Transonic wind tunnel tests of A.015 scale space shuttle orbiter model, volume 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Struzynski, N. A.

    1975-01-01

    Transonic wind tunnel tests were run on a 0.015 scale model of the Space Shuttle Orbiter Vehicle in an eight-foot tunnel during August 1975. The purpose of the program was to obtain basic shuttle aerodynamic data through a full range of elevon and aileron deflections, verification of data obtained at other facilities, and effects of Reynolds numbers. The first part of a discussion of test procedures and results in both tabular and graphical form were presented. Tests were performed at Mach numbers from 0.35 to 1.20, and at Reynolds numbers for 3.5 million to 8.2 million per foot. The angle of attack was varied from -1 to +20 degrees at sideslip angles of -2, 0, +2 degrees. Sideslip was varied from -6 to +8 degrees at constant angles of attack from 0 to +20 degrees. Various aileron and ailevon settings were tested for various angles of attack.

  12. A large-scale purification of recombinant histone H1.5 from Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Pyo, S H; Lee, J H; Park, H B; Hong, S S; Kim, J H

    2001-10-01

    An Escherichia coli expression system has been constructed for production of biologically active recombinant histone H1.5. A process of fermentation and purification method at a large scale has been developed. Recombinant histone H1.5 was released from the high density cultured cells by high-pressure homogenization. For an efficient removal of cell debris and partial purification of basic histone H1.5 in a single step, the whole cell lysates were directly loaded onto an expanded bed column packed with the strong cation exchanger (Streamline SP). Complete removal of various impurities was achieved by a combination of hydroxyapatite chromatography and the following cation exchange chromatography with high grade strong cation exchanger (POROS 20 HS), and finally endotoxins were removed by ultrafiltration using a 100-kDa cut-off membrane, which gave the level of endotoxin below 0.5 EU/mg. The molecular mass of the recombinant histone H1.5 analyzed by MALDI-TOF-MS, and the N-terminal amino acid sequences were in good agreement with the authentic histone H1.5. The whole process gave highly purified recombinant histone H1.5 at a high yield, compared to the conventional process. PMID:11570844

  13. Improving the modelling of redshift-space distortions - II. A pairwise velocity model covering large and small scales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bianchi, Davide; Percival, Will J.; Bel, Julien

    2016-09-01

    We develop a model for the redshift-space correlation function, valid for both dark matter particles and halos on scales >5 h-1Mpc. In its simplest formulation, the model requires the knowledge of the first three moments of the line-of-sight pairwise velocity distribution plus two well-defined dimensionless parameters. The model is obtained by extending the Gaussian-Gaussianity prescription for the velocity distribution, developed in a previous paper, to a more general concept allowing for local skewness, which is required to match simulations. We compare the model with the well known Gaussian streaming model and the more recent Edgeworth streaming model. Using N-body simulations as a reference, we show that our model gives a precise description of the redshift-space clustering over a wider range of scales. We do not discuss the theoretical prescription for the evaluation of the velocity moments, leaving this topic to further investigation.

  14. Dark matter and formation of large scale structure in the universe - The test by distribution of quasars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, L.; Chu, Y.; Zhu, X.

    1985-05-01

    According to the scenario, developed in the previous paper, on the formation of large scale structure in the universe, it would be expected that: (1) the distribution of quasars should differ from that of galaxies because it has no strong inhomogeneity on the scale of 10-100 Mpc; (2) the distributions of quasars with Z greater than 2 and Z less than 2 should differ from each other because of the absence of large structure in the former but its presence in the latter. Various analyses on quasar distribution are consistent with these predictions. Particularly, the nearest neighbor test for the complete quasar sample given by Savage and Bolton (1979) clearly shows that the distribution of Z greater than 2 quasars is rather homogeneous while the Z less than 2 quasars have a tendency to clustering.

  15. Detecting multi-scale filaments in galaxy distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tempel, Elmo

    2014-05-01

    The main feature of the spatial large-scale galaxy distribution is its intricate network of galaxy filaments. This network is spanned by the galaxy locations that can be interpreted as a three-dimensional point distribution. The global properties of the point process can be measured by different statistical methods, which, however, do not describe directly the structure elements. The morphology of the large-scale structure, on the other hand, is an important property of the galaxy distribution. Here, we apply an object point process with interactions (the Bisous model) to trace and extract the filamentary network in the presently largest galaxy redshift survey, the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS data release 10). We search for multi-scale filaments in the galaxy distribution that have a radius of about 0.5, 1.0, 2.0, and 4.0 h -1 Mpc. We extract the spines of the filamentary network and divide the detected network into single filaments.

  16. Discovery of Faint Radio Structures over 50 Square Degrees Down to 3 arcmin Scales near the NGP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kronberg, Philipp P.; Kothes, R.; Salter, C. J.; Perillat, P.

    2006-12-01

    We present a deep, 8o diameter, 0.4 GHz radio image near the North Galactic Pole using a first time combination of the Arecibo 305-m telescope and the wide-angle interferometer at the DRAO. The uniquely complementary nature of these two instruments permits a distortion-free image sensitive to radiation on all scales from 8o down to that of an individual galaxy halo at the 100 Mpc distance of the Great Wall, all in a single pointing. Faint, previously unseen diffuse patches of distributed radio ``glow'' are detected, well above our detection limit, and on a range of angular scales. The emission could compete with CMB fluctuations as a CMB foreground at high multipole scales around 30GHz if its radio spectrum continues up to these GHz bands. This new faint radio emission appears to be a mix of foreground Galactic, and extragalactic ``glow’. The latter implies i.g. magnetic field strengths at or above 0.1 microgauss on Mpc scales in certain areas. A striking anticorrelation is also found between the diffuse radio glow and some regions of high optical galaxy surface density. This suggests that cosmological Large Scale Structure (LSS), normally defined by the baryonic (and/or dark) matter density, is not uniquely traced by the faint continuum radio glow. More likely, the radio glow is a proxy for IGM energy density, at least in the low redshift universe. Its detailed relation to the WHIM, and diffuse X-ray glow is unclear, and must await future, more sensitive detectors for these latter two IGM components. Support for this project is acknowledged from the DOE's LDRD program at LANL, the Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada (NSERC), and the National Science Foundation.

  17. U.S. Photovoltaic Prices and Cost Breakdowns. Q1 2015 Benchmarks for Residential, Commercial, and Utility-Scale Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Chung, Donald; Davidson, Carolyn; Fu, Ran; Ardani, Kristen; Margolis, Robert

    2015-09-01

    The price of photovoltaic (PV) systems in the United States (i.e., the cost to the system owner) has continued to decline across all major market sectors. This report provides a Q1 2015 update regarding the prices of residential, commercial, and utility scale PV systems, based on an objective methodology that closely approximates the book value of a PV system. Several cases are benchmarked to represent common variations in business models, labor rates, and system architecture choice. We estimate a weighted-average cash purchase price of $3.09/W for residential scale rooftop systems, $2.15/W for commercial scale rooftop systems, $1.77/W for utility scale systems with fixed mounting structures, and $1.91/W for utility scale systems using single-axis trackers. All systems are modeled assuming standard-efficiency, polycrystalline-silicon PV modules, and further assume installation within the United States.

  18. The IR-resummed Effective Field Theory of Large Scale Structures

    SciTech Connect

    Senatore, Leonardo; Zaldarriaga, Matias E-mail: matiasz@ias.edu

    2015-02-01

    We present a new method to resum the effect of large scale motions in the Effective Field Theory of Large Scale Structures. Because the linear power spectrum in ΛCDM is not scale free the effects of the large scale flows are enhanced. Although previous EFT calculations of the equal-time density power spectrum at one and two loops showed a remarkable agreement with numerical results, they also showed a 2% residual which appeared related to the BAO oscillations. We show that this was indeed the case, explain the physical origin and show how a Lagrangian based calculation removes this differences. We propose a simple method to upgrade existing Eulerian calculations to effectively make them Lagrangian and compare the new results with existing fits to numerical simulations. Our new two-loop results agrees with numerical results up to k∼ 0.6 h Mpc{sup −1} to within 1% with no oscillatory residuals. We also compute power spectra involving momentum which is significantly more affected by the large scale flows. We show how keeping track of these velocities significantly enhances the UV reach of the momentum power spectrum in addition to removing the BAO related residuals. We compute predictions for the real space correlation function around the BAO scale and investigate its sensitivity to the EFT parameters and the details of the resummation technique.

  19. Experimental results from pressure testing a 1:6-scale nuclear power plant containment

    SciTech Connect

    Horschel, D.S.

    1992-01-01

    This report discusses the testing of a 1:6-scale, reinforced-concrete containment building at Sandia National Laboratories, in Albuquerque, New Mexico. The scale-model, Light Water Reactor (LWR) containment building was designed and built to the American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME) code by United Engineers and Constructors, Inc., and was instrumented with over 1200 transducers to prepare for the test. The containment model was tested to failure to determine its response to static internal overpressurization. As part of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission`s program on containment integrity, the test results will be used to assess the capability of analytical methods to predict the performance of containments under severe-accident loads. The scaled dimensions of the cylindrical wall and hemispherical dome were typical of a full-size containment. Other typical features included in the heavily reinforced model were equipment hatches, personnel air locks, several small piping penetrations, and a ihin steel liner that was attached to the concrete by headed studs. In addition to the transducers attached to the model, an acoustic detection system and several video and still cameras were used during testing to gather data and to aid in the conduct of the test. The model and its instrumentation are briefly discussed, and is followed by the testing procedures and measured response of the containment model. A summary discussion is included to aid in understanding the significance of the test as it applies to real world reinforced concrete containment structures. The data gathered during SIT and overpressure testing are included as an appendix.

  20. On the Reversal of Star formation Rate-Density Relation at z = 1: Insights from Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tonnesen, Stephanie; Cen, Renyue

    2014-06-01

    Recent surveys have found a reversal of the star formation rate (SFR)-density relation at z = 1 from that at z = 0, while the sign of the slope of the color-density relation remains unchanged. We use adaptive mesh refinement cosmological hydrodynamic simulations of a 21 × 24 × 20 h -3 Mpc3 region to examine the SFR-density and color-density relations of galaxies at z = 0 and z = 1. The local environmental density is defined by the dark matter mass in spheres of radius 1 h -1 Mpc, and we probe two decades of environmental densities. Our simulations produce a large increase of SFR with density at z = 1, as in the Elbaz et al. observations. We also find a significant evolution to z = 0, where the SFR-density relation is much flatter. The simulated color-density relation is consistent from z = 1 to z = 0, in agreement with observations. We find that the increase in SFR with local density at z = 1 is due to a growing population of star-forming galaxies in higher-density environments. At z = 0 and z = 1 both the SFR and cold gas mass are correlated with the galaxy halo mass, and therefore the correlation between median halo mass and local density is an important cause of the SFR-density relation at both redshifts. However, at z = 0 the local density on 1 h -1 Mpc scales affects galaxy SFRs as much as halo mass. Finally, we find indications that while at z = 0 high-density environments depress galaxy SFRs, at z = 1 high-density environments tend to increase SFRs.

  1. On the reversal of star formation rate-density relation at z = 1: Insights from simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Tonnesen, Stephanie; Cen, Renyue E-mail: cen@astro.princeton.edu

    2014-06-20

    Recent surveys have found a reversal of the star formation rate (SFR)-density relation at z = 1 from that at z = 0, while the sign of the slope of the color-density relation remains unchanged. We use adaptive mesh refinement cosmological hydrodynamic simulations of a 21 × 24 × 20 h {sup –3} Mpc{sup 3} region to examine the SFR-density and color-density relations of galaxies at z = 0 and z = 1. The local environmental density is defined by the dark matter mass in spheres of radius 1 h {sup –1} Mpc, and we probe two decades of environmental densities. Our simulations produce a large increase of SFR with density at z = 1, as in the Elbaz et al. observations. We also find a significant evolution to z = 0, where the SFR-density relation is much flatter. The simulated color-density relation is consistent from z = 1 to z = 0, in agreement with observations. We find that the increase in SFR with local density at z = 1 is due to a growing population of star-forming galaxies in higher-density environments. At z = 0 and z = 1 both the SFR and cold gas mass are correlated with the galaxy halo mass, and therefore the correlation between median halo mass and local density is an important cause of the SFR-density relation at both redshifts. However, at z = 0 the local density on 1 h {sup –1} Mpc scales affects galaxy SFRs as much as halo mass. Finally, we find indications that while at z = 0 high-density environments depress galaxy SFRs, at z = 1 high-density environments tend to increase SFRs.

  2. A large-scale replication study identifies TNIP1, PRDM1, JAZF1, UHRF1BP1 and IL10 as risk loci for systemic lupus erythematosus

    PubMed Central

    Gateva, Vesela; Sandling, Johanna K; Hom, Geoff; Taylor, Kimberly E; Chung, Sharon A; Sun, Xin; Ortmann, Ward; Kosoy, Roman; Ferreira, Ricardo C; Nordmark, Gunnel; Gunnarsson, Iva; Svenungsson, Elisabet; Padyukov, Leonid; Sturfelt, Gunnar; Jönsen, Andreas; Bengtsson, Anders A; Rantapää-Dahlqvist, Solbritt; Baechler, Emily C; Brown, Elizabeth E; Alarcón, Graciela S; Edberg, Jeffrey C; Ramsey-Goldman, Rosalind; McGwin, Gerald; Reveille, John D; Vilá, Luis M; Kimberly, Robert P; Manzi, Susan; Petri, Michelle A; Lee, Annette; Gregersen, Peter K; Seldin, Michael F; Rönnblom, Lars; Criswell, Lindsey A; Syvänen, Ann-Christine; Behrens, Timothy W; Graham, Robert R

    2010-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies have recently identified at least 15 susceptibility loci for systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). To confirm additional risk loci, we selected SNPs from 2,466 regions that showed nominal evidence of association to SLE (P < 0.05) in a genome-wide study and genotyped them in an independent sample of 1,963 cases and 4,329 controls. This replication effort identified five new SLE susceptibility loci (P < 5 × 10−8): TNIP1 (odds ratio (OR) = 1.27), PRDM1 (OR = 1.20), JAZF1 (OR = 1.20), UHRF1BP1 (OR = 1.17) and IL10 (OR = 1.19). We identified 21 additional candidate loci with P ≤ 1 × 10−5. A candidate screen of alleles previously associated with other autoimmune diseases suggested five loci (P < 1 × 10−3) that may contribute to SLE: IFIH1, CFB, CLEC16A, IL12B and SH2B3. These results expand the number of confirmed and candidate SLE susceptibility loci and implicate several key immunologic pathways in SLE pathogenesis. PMID:19838195

  3. Thermal Testing and Integration: Magnetospheric MultiScale (MMS) Observatories with Digital 1-Wire Sensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Solimani, Jason A.; Rosanova, Santino

    2015-01-01

    Thermocouples require two thin wires to be routed out of the spacecraft to connect to the ground support equipment used to monitor and record the temperature data. This large number of wires that exit the observatory complicates integration and creates an undesirable heat path during testing. These wires exiting the spacecraft need to be characterized as a thermal short that will not exist during flight. To minimize complexity and reduce thermal variables from these ground support equipment (GSE) wires, MMS pursued a hybrid path for temperature monitoring, utilizing thermocouples and digital 1-wire temperature sensors. Digital 1-wire sensors can greatly reduce harness mass, length and complexity as they can be spliced together. For MMS, 350 digital 1-wire sensors were installed on the spacecraft with only 18 wires exiting as opposed to a potential 700 thermocouple wires. Digital 1-wire sensors had not been used in such a large scale at NASAGSFC prior to the MMS mission. During the MMS thermal vacuum testing a lessons learned matrix was formulated that will assist future integration of 1-wires into thermal testing and one day into flight.

  4. Large-Scale Pumping Test Recommendations for the 200-ZP-1 Operable Unit

    SciTech Connect

    Spane, Frank A.

    2010-09-08

    CH2M Hill Plateau Remediation Company (CHPRC) is currently assessing aquifer characterization needs to optimize pump-and-treat remedial strategies (e.g., extraction well pumping rates, pumping schedule/design) in the 200-ZP-1 operable unit (OU), and in particular for the immediate area of the 241 TX-TY Tank Farm. Specifically, CHPRC is focusing on hydrologic characterization opportunities that may be available for newly constructed and planned ZP-1 extraction wells. These new extraction wells will be used to further refine the 3-dimensional subsurface contaminant distribution within this area and will be used in concert with other existing pump-and-treat wells to remediate the existing carbon tetrachloride contaminant plume. Currently, 14 extraction wells are actively used in the Interim Record of Decision ZP-1 pump-and-treat system for the purpose of remediating the existing carbon tetrachloride contamination in groundwater within this general area. As many as 20 new extraction wells and 17 injection wells may be installed to support final pump-and-treat operations within the OU area. It should be noted that although the report specifically refers to the 200-ZP-1 OU, the large-scale test recommendations are also applicable to the adjacent 200-UP-1 OU area. This is because of the similar hydrogeologic conditions exhibited within these two adjoining OU locations.

  5. Large-scale evolutionary surveillance of the 2009 H1N1 influenza A virus using resequencing arrays

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Charlie Wah Heng; Koh, Chee Wee; Chan, Yang Sun; Aw, Pauline Poh Kim; Loh, Kuan Hon; Han, Bing Ling; Thien, Pei Ling; Nai, Geraldine Yi Wen; Hibberd, Martin L.; Wong, Christopher W.; Sung, Wing-Kin

    2010-01-01

    In April 2009, a new influenza A (H1N1 2009) virus emerged that rapidly spread around the world. While current variants of this virus have caused widespread disease, particularly in vulnerable groups, there remains the possibility that future variants may cause increased virulence, drug resistance or vaccine escape. Early detection of these virus variants may offer the chance for increased containment and potentially prevention of the virus spread. We have developed and field-tested a resequencing kit that is capable of interrogating all eight segments of the 2009 influenza A(H1N1) virus genome and its variants, with added focus on critical regions such as drug-binding sites, structural components and mutation hotspots. The accompanying base-calling software (EvolSTAR) introduces novel methods that utilize neighbourhood hybridization intensity profiles and substitution bias of probes on the microarray for mutation confirmation and recovery of ambiguous base queries. Our results demonstrate that EvolSTAR is highly accurate and has a much improved call rate. The high throughput and short turn-around time from sample to sequence and analysis results (30 h for 24 samples) makes this kit an efficient large-scale evolutionary biosurveillance tool. PMID:20185568

  6. Kinetic and morphological development of oxide-sulfide scales on iron at 1,073 K

    SciTech Connect

    McAdam, G.; Young, D.J. )

    1992-04-01

    The corrosion behavior of pure iron has been investigated at 1,073 K in controlled gas atmospheres of SO{sub 2}-CO{sub 2}-CO-N{sub 2}. The equilibrium gas compositions were such that: (1) FeS was stable with respect to FeO, (2) FeO was stable with respect to FeS, and (3) only one of the solids was stable with respect to the gas sulfur and oxygen activities. The resultant scale morphologies are discussed along with the observed parabolic corrosion kinetics. It was shown that duplex (oxide plus sulfide) scales could be produced under all three reaction conditions. Careful adjustment of gas compositions permitted comparisons to be made among sets of experiments having (1) the same p{sub s{sub 2}} value but different p{sub so{sub 2}} and p{sub o{sub 2}}values, (2) the same p{sub o{sub 2}} value but different p{sub so{sub 2}} and p{sub s{sub 2}} values, and (3) the same p{sub so{sub 2}}value but different p{sub s{sub 2}} and p{sub o{sub 2}}values. In this way it was confirmed that the reactant species was SO{sub 2} over a wide range of gas compositions, and under conditions in which solid-state diffusion was rate-controlling. The exception was found at very high p{sub s{sub 2}} values, where elemental sulfur was the reactant. Catalysis of the reactant gas demonstrated that the results could be affected by the slow approach to equilibrium of the gas phase.

  7. F/A-18 1/9th scale model tail buffet measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martin, C. A.; Glaister, M. K.; Maclaren, L. D.; Meyn, L. A.; Ross, J.

    1991-01-01

    Wind tunnel tests were carried out on a 1/9th scale model of the F/A-18 at high angles of attack to investigate the characteristics of tail buffet due to bursting of the wing leading edge extension (LEX) vortices. The tests were carried out at the Aeronautical Research Laboratory low-speed wind tunnel facility and form part of a collaborative activity with NASA Ames Research Center, organized by The Technical Cooperative Program (TTCP). Information from the program will be used in the planning of similar collaborative tests, to be carried out at NASA Ames, on a full-scale aircraft. The program covered the measurement of unsteady pressures and fin vibration for cases with and without the wing LEX fences fitted. Fourier transform methods were used to analyze the unsteady data, and information on the spatial and temporal content of the vortex burst pressure field was obtained. Flow visualization of the vortex behavior was carried out using smoke and a laser light sheet technique.

  8. A multi-scale Q1/P0 approach to langrangian shock hydrodynamics.

    SciTech Connect

    Shashkov, Mikhail (Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM.); Love, Edward; Scovazzi, Guglielmo

    2006-03-01

    A new multi-scale, stabilized method for Q1/P0 finite element computations of Lagrangian shock hydrodynamics is presented. Instabilities (of hourglass type) are controlled by a stabilizing operator derived using the variational multi-scale analysis paradigm. The resulting stabilizing term takes the form of a pressure correction. With respect to currently implemented hourglass control approaches, the novelty of the method resides in its residual-based character. The stabilizing residual has a definite physical meaning, since it embeds a discrete form of the Clausius-Duhem inequality. Effectively, the proposed stabilization samples and acts to counter the production of entropy due to numerical instabilities. The proposed technique is applicable to materials with no shear strength, for which there exists a caloric equation of state. The stabilization operator is incorporated into a mid-point, predictor/multi-corrector time integration algorithm, which conserves mass, momentum and total energy. Encouraging numerical results in the context of compressible gas dynamics confirm the potential of the method.

  9. Ditching Investigation of a 1/18-Scale Model of the North American B-45 Airplane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fisher, Lloyd J.; Thompson, William C.

    1949-01-01

    An investigation of a 1/18-scale dynamically similar model of the North American B-45 airplane was made to observe the ditching behavior and determine the proper landing technique to be used in an emergency water landing. Various conditions of damage were simulated to determine the behavior which probably would occur in a full-scale ditching. The behavior of the model was determined from high-speed motion-picture records, time-history acceleration records, and visual observations. It was concluded that the airplane should be ditched at the maximum nose-high attitude with the landing flaps full down for minimum landing speed. During the ditching, the nose-wheel and bomb-bay doors probably will be torn away and the rear of the fuselage flooded. A violent dive will very likely occur. Longitudinal decelerations of approximately 5g and vertical accelerations of approximately -6g (including gravity) will be experienced near the pilots' compartment. Ditching braces installed in the bomb bay will tend to improve the behavior slightly but will be torn away along with the bomb-bay doors. A hydroflap installed ahead of the nose-wheel doors will eliminate the dive and failure of the nose-wheel doors, and substantially reduce the motions and accelerations.

  10. Deviation of 1/ f voltage fluctuations from scale-similar Gaussian behavior

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nelkin, Mark; Tremblay, A.-M. S.

    1981-06-01

    Recent measurements on thin metal films suggest a pulse model of resistance fluctuations in which scale similarity and power law spectra are only approximate. We show that such a pulse model is consistent with stationary Gaussian resistance fluctuations. This is to be contrasted with the phenomenological behavior, of fluctuations near phase transitions and in turbulent fluids where the fluctuations are non-Gaussian, but exhibit scale similarity of deep physical origin. We then critically examine other tests of the Gaussian behavior of the fluctuating voltage V(t) across a resistor. These include the relaxation of the conditional mean < V(t)¦V(0)= V 0>, and the spectrum of V 2( t). We consider also the question of time reversal invariance. We further ask under what conditions 1/f noise can be measured through fluctuations of the Johnson noise power with no applied voltage. We emphasize that this possibility, suggested and observed by Voss and Clarke, requires that V(t) contain a non-Gaussian component.

  11. A Brief Hydrodynamic Investigation of a 1/24-Scale Model of the DR-77 Seaplane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fisher, Lloyd J.; Hoffman, Edward L.

    1953-01-01

    A limited investigation of a 1/24-scale dynamically similar model of the Navy Bureau of Aeronautics DR-77 design was conducted in Langley tank no. 2 to determine the calm-water take-off and the rough-water landing characteristics of the design with particular regard to the take-off resistance and the landing accelerations. During the take-off tests, resistance, trim, and rise were measured and photographs were taken to study spray. During the landing tests, motion-picture records and normal-acceleration records were obtained. A ratio of gross load to maximum resistance of 3.2 was obtained with a 30 deg. dead-rise hydro-ski installation. The maximum normal accelerations obtained with a 30 deg. dead-rise hydro-ski installation were of the order of 8g to log in waves 8 feet high (full scale). A yawing instability that occurred just prior to hydro-ski emergence was improved by adding an afterbody extension, but adding the extension reduced the ratio of gross load to maximum resistance to 2.9.

  12. MECHANISMS UNDERLYING THE MICRON-SCALE SEGREGATION OF STEROLS AND GM1 IN LIVE MAMMALIAN SPERM

    PubMed Central

    Selvaraj, Vimal; Asano, Atsushi; Buttke, Danielle E.; Sengupta, Prabuddha; Weiss, Robert S.; Travis, Alexander J.

    2009-01-01

    We demonstrate for the first time that a stable, micron-scale segregation of focal enrichments of sterols exists at physiological temperature in the plasma membrane of live murine and human sperm. These enrichments of sterols represent microheterogeneities within this membrane domain overlying the acrosome. Previously, we showed that cholera toxin subunit B (CTB), which binds the glycosphingolipid, GM1, localizes to this same domain in live sperm. Interestingly, the GM1 undergoes an unexplained redistribution upon cell death. We now demonstrate that GM1 is also enriched in the acrosome, an exocytotic vesicle. Transfer of lipids between this and the plasma membrane occurs at cell death, increasing GM1 in the plasma membrane without apparent release of acrosomal contents. This finding provides corroborative support for an emerging model of regulated exocytosis in which membrane communications might occur without triggering the “acrosome reaction.” Comparison of the dynamics of CTB-bound endogenous GM1 and exogenous BODIPY-GM1 in live murine sperm demonstrate that the sub-acrosomal ring functions as a specialized diffusion barrier segregating specific lipids within the sperm head plasma membrane. Our data show significant differences between endogenous lipids and exogenous lipid probes in terms of lateral diffusion. Based on these studies, we propose a hierarchical model to explain the segregation of this sterol- and GM1-enriched domain in live sperm, which is positioned to regulate sperm fertilization competence and mediate interactions with the oocyte. Moreover, our data suggest potential origins of sub-types of membrane raft microdomains enriched in sterols and/or GM1 that can be separated biochemically. PMID:19012288

  13. S-2 stage 1/25 scale model base region thermal environment test. Volume 1: Test results, comparison with theory and flight data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sadunas, J. A.; French, E. P.; Sexton, H.

    1973-01-01

    A 1/25 scale model S-2 stage base region thermal environment test is presented. Analytical results are included which reflect the effect of engine operating conditions, model scale, turbo-pump exhaust gas injection on base region thermal environment. Comparisons are made between full scale flight data, model test data, and analytical results. The report is prepared in two volumes. The description of analytical predictions and comparisons with flight data are presented. Tabulation of the test data is provided.

  14. The Hubble Space Telescope Extragalactic Distance Scale Key Project. 1: The discovery of Cepheids and a new distance to M81

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Freedman, Wendy L.; Hughes, Shaun M.; Madore, Barry F.; Mould, Jeremy R.; Lee, Myung Gyoon; Stetson, Peter; Kennicutt, Robert C.; Turner, Anne; Ferrarese, Laura; Ford, Holland

    1994-01-01

    We report on the discovery of 30 new Cepheids in the nearby galaxy M81 based on observations using the Hubble Space Telescope (HST). The periods of these Cepheids lie in the range of 10-55 days, based on 18 independent epochs using the HST wide-band F555W filter. The HST F555W and F785LP data have been transformed to the Cousins standard V and I magnitude system using a ground-based calibration. Apparent period-luminosity relations at V and I were constructed, from which apparent distance moduli were measured with respect to assumed values of mu(sub 0) = 18.50 mag and E(B - V) = 0.10 mag for the Large Magellanic Cloud. The difference in the apparent V and I moduli yields a measure of the difference in the total mean extinction between the M81 and the LMC Cepheid samples. A low total mean extinction to the M81 sample of E(B - V) = 0.03 +/- 0.05 mag is obtained. The true distance modulus to M81 is determined to be 27.80 +/- 0.20 mag, corresponding to a distance of 3.63 +/- 0.34 Mpc. These data illustrate that with an optimal (power-law) sampling strategy, the HST provides a powerful tool for the discovery of extragalactic Cepheids and their application to the distance scale. M81 is the first calibrating galaxy in the target sample of the HST Key Project on the Extragalactic Distance Scale, the ultimate aim of which is to provide a value of the Hubble constant to 10% accuracy.

  15. Results of direct containment heating integral experiments at 1/40th scale at Argonne National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Binder, J.L.; McUmber, L.M.; Spencer, B.W.

    1993-09-01

    A series of integral tests have been completed that investigate the effect of scale and containment atmosphere initial composition on Direct Containment Heating (DCH) phenomena at 1/40 linear scale. A portion of these experiments were performed as counterparts to integral experiments conducted at 1/10th linear scale at Sandia National Laboratories. The tests investigated DCH phenomena in a 1/40th scale mockup of Zion Nuclear Power Plant geometry. The test apparatus was a scaled down version of the SNL apparatus and included models of the reactor vessel lower head, containment cavity, instrument tunnel, lower subcompartment structures and the upper dome. A High Pressure Melt Ejection (HPME) was produced using steam as a blowdown gas and iron-alumina thermite with chromium as a core melt simulant. The results of the counterpart experiments indicated no effect of scale on debris/gas heat transfer and debris metal oxidation with steam. However, the tests indicated a slight effect of scale on hydrogen combustion, the results indicating slightly more efficient combustion with increasing scale. The experiments demonstrated the effectiveness of the subcompartment structures in trapping debris exiting the cavity and preventing it from reaching the upper dome. The test results also indicated that a 50% air -- 50% steam atmosphere prevented hydrogen combustion. However, a 50% air - 50% nitrogen did not prevent hydrogen combustion in a HPME with all other conditions being nominally the same.

  16. Low scale nonuniversal, nonanomalous U(1)F' in a minimal supersymmetric standard model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Mu-Chun; Huang, Jinrui

    2010-10-01

    We propose a nonuniversal U(1)F' symmetry combined with the minimal supersymmetric standard model. All anomaly cancellation conditions are satisfied without exotic fields other than three right-handed neutrinos. Because our model allows all three generations of chiral superfields to have different U(1)F' charges, upon the breaking of the U(1)F' symmetry at a low scale, realistic masses and mixing angles in both the quark and lepton sectors are obtained. In our model, neutrinos are predicted to be Dirac fermions and their mass ordering is of the inverted hierarchy type. The U(1)F' charges of the chiral superfields also naturally suppress the μ-term and automatically forbid baryon number and lepton number violating operators. While all flavor-changing neutral current constraints in the down quark and charged-lepton sectors can be satisfied, we find that the constraint from D0-D¯0 turns out to be much more stringent than the constraints from the precision electroweak data.

  17. Large-scale variations of the interplanetary magnetic field: Voyager 1 and 2 observations between 1-5 AU

    SciTech Connect

    Burlaga, L.F.; Lepping, R.P.; Behannon, K.W.; Klein, L.W.; Neubauer, F.M.

    1982-06-01

    Observations by the Voyager 1 and 2 spacecraft of the interplanetary magnetic field between 1 and 5 AU have been used to investigate the large-scale structure of the IMF in the years 1977 to 1979, a period of increasing solar activity. This complements the Pioneer 10, 11 investigation between 1 and 8.5 AU during 1972--1976 when the sun was less active. In contrast to the good agreement of the Pioneer observations with the ideal field configuration of the Parker spiral model during near solar minimum conditions, the Voyager spacecraft found notable deviations from that configuration. We attribute these deviations both to temporal variations associated with increasing solar activity, and to the effects of fluctuations of the field in the radial direction. The amplitude of the latter fluctuations was found to be large relative to the magnitude of the radial field component itself beyond approximately 3 AU. The IMF sector structure was generally not well-developed during the period of this study. Notable differences were found between Voyager 1 and 2 observations. Differences in the region 1--2 AU are attributed to the substantially different latitudes of the two spacecraft during much of the period. Later differences are most likely associated with the fact that the Voyagers moved through the region between 4 and 5 AU at different times. Both Voyager 1 and 2 observed decreases with increasing heliocentric distance in the amplitude of 'transverse' fluctuations in B that are consistent with the presence of predominantly undamped Alfven waves in the solar wind although not necessarily implying the presence of them. The presence of convective structures, compressive modes, and/or a saturated instability of Alfven waves cannot be excluded by these Voyager results.

  18. 52. EQUIPMENT HOUSE, Y&D No. 107730 Scales 1/4', 3/8', 3/4', ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    52. EQUIPMENT HOUSE, Y&D No. 107730 Scales 1/4', 3/8', 3/4', 1-1/2' and 3' = 1'; July 2, 1929 - U.S. Naval Submarine Base, New London Submarine Escape Training Tank, Albacore & Darter Roads, Groton, New London County, CT

  19. WindPACT Turbine Design Scaling Studies Technical Area 1-Composite Blades for 80- to 120-Meter Rotor

    SciTech Connect

    Griffin, D.A.

    2001-04-30

    The United States Department of Energy (DOE) through the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) implemented the Wind Partnership for Advanced Component Technologies (WindPACT) program. As part of the WindPACT program, Global Energy Concepts, LLC (GEC), was awarded contract number YAM-0-30203-01 to examine Technical Area 1-Blade Scaling, Technical Area 2-Turbine Rotor and Blade Logistics, and Technical Area 3-Self-Erecting Towers. This report documents the results of GEC's Technical Area 1-Blade Scaling. The primary objectives of the Blade-Scaling Study are to assess the scaling of current materials and manufacturing technologies for blades of 40 to 60 meters in length, and to develop scaling curves of estimated cost and mass for rotor blades in that size range.

  20. Brain activity mapping at multiple scales with silicon microprobes containing 1,024 electrodes

    PubMed Central

    Shobe, Justin L.; Claar, Leslie D.; Parhami, Sepideh; Bakhurin, Konstantin I.

    2015-01-01

    The coordinated activity of neural ensembles across multiple interconnected regions has been challenging to study in the mammalian brain with cellular resolution using conventional recording tools. For instance, neural systems regulating learned behaviors often encompass multiple distinct structures that span the brain. To address this challenge we developed a three-dimensional (3D) silicon microprobe capable of simultaneously measuring extracellular spike and local field potential activity from 1,024 electrodes. The microprobe geometry can be precisely configured during assembly to target virtually any combination of four spatially distinct neuroanatomical planes. Here we report on the operation of such a device built for high-throughput monitoring of neural signals in the orbitofrontal cortex and several nuclei in the basal ganglia. We perform analysis on systems-level dynamics and correlations during periods of conditioned behavioral responding and rest, demonstrating the technology's ability to reveal functional organization at multiple scales in parallel in the mouse brain. PMID:26133801

  1. 1:2,000,000-scale digital line graph data on CD-ROM

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    U.S. Geological Survey

    1995-01-01

    Updated U.S. Geological Survey digital line graph (DLG) data collected at a scale of 1:2,000,000 are now available on two compact discs-read only memory (CD-ROM). Each CD-ROM contains digital cartographic data for 49 States and the District of Columbia. The U.S. Virgin Islands, Puerto Rico, and Alaska will be ready within the next year. These DLG data were originally collected from maps published in 1970. Extensive revisions have been made and no data source more than 5 years old was used in this update. In addition, text files containing information such as place names and population have been added for the first time. The records in these text files can be related to corresponding features in the DLG data files. Metadata that comply with the Federal Geographic Data Committee Content Standards for Digital Geospatial Metadata are included for each category of DLG data.

  2. Spin-Tunnel Investigation of a 1/28-Scale Model of a Subsonic Attack Airplane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Henry A.; Healy, Frederick M.

    1964-01-01

    An investigation has been made of a 1/28-scale model of the Grumman A-6A airplane in the Langley spin tunnel. The erect spin and recovery characteristics of the model were determined for the flight design gross weight loading and for a loading with full internal fuel and empty external wing fuel tanks. The effects of extending slats and deflecting flaps were investigated. Inverted-spin and recovery characteristics of the model were determined for the flight design gross weight loading. The size of the spin-recovery tail parachute necessary to insure satisfactory spin-recovery was determined, and the effect of firing wing-mounded rockets during spins was investigated.

  3. Analysis and test for space shuttle propellant dynamics: 1/60th scale model test results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berry, R. L.; Tegart, J. R.

    1978-01-01

    During the abort sequence, the ET and orbiter separate under aerodynamic loading, with propellant remaining in the ET. The separation event included a seven second decelerating coast period during which the residual propellant accelerates relative to the ET/orbiter. At separation, ET clearance was primarily provided by aerodynamics acting on the ET to move it away. The motion of the propellant, primarily LOX, significantly influenced the resulting ET motion and could cause the ET to recontact the orbiter. A test program was conducted involving thirty-two drops with 1/60th scale models of the ET LOX tank. The objective was to acquire data on the nature of low g propellant reorientation, in the ET LOX tank, and to measure the forces exerted on the tank by the moving propellant.

  4. Large-scale variations of the interplanetary magnetic field: Voyager 1 and 2 observations between 1-5 AU

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burlaga, L. F.; Lepping, R. P.; Behannon, K. W.; Klein, L. W.; Neubauer, F. M.

    1981-01-01

    Observations by the Voyager 1 and 2 spacecraft of the interplanetary magnetic field between 1 and 5 AU were used to investigate the large scale structure of the IMF in a period of increasing solar activity. The Voyager spacecraft found notable deviations from the Parker axial model. These deviations are attributed both to temporal variations associated with increasing solar activity, and to the effects of fluctuations of the field in the radial direction. The amplitude of the latter fluctuations were found to be large relative to the magnitude of the radial field component itself beyond approximately 3 AU. Both Voyager 1 and Voyager 2 observed decreases with increasing heliocentric distance in the amplitude of transverse fluctuations in the averaged field strength (B) which are consistent with the presence of predominantly undamped Alfven waves in the solar wind, although and necessarily implying the presence of them. Fluctuations in the strength of B (relative to mean field strength) were found to be small in amplitude, with a RMS which is approximately one third of that for the transverse fluctuations and they are essentially independent of distance from the Sun.

  5. Scaling the weak-swirl burner from 15 kW to 1 MW

    SciTech Connect

    Yegian, D.T.; Cheng, R.K.; Hack, R.L.; Miyasato, M.M.; Chang, A.; Samuelsen, G.S.

    1998-03-01

    With the passage of SCAQMD 1146.2, low NO{sub x} regulations will be enforced for new water heaters and boilers from 22 to 585 kW starting January 1, 2000; less than two years away. This has given an added impetus to develop a burner capable of producing NO{sub x} < 30 ppm and CO < 400 ppm without substantial manufacturing costs or complexity. Developed at the Berkeley Lab, the Weak-Swirl Burner (WSB) operates in the lean premixed combustion mode over a wide firing and equivalence ratio range. This work investigated scaling issues (e.g. swirl rates and stability limits) of the WSB when fired at higher rates useful to industry. Three test configurations which varied the ratio of furnace area to burner area were utilized to understand the effects of burner chamber coupling on emissions and stability. Preliminary tests from 12 to 18 kW of a WSB in a commercial heat exchanger were undertaken at LBNL, with further testing from 18 to 105 kW completed at UCI Combustion Laboratory in an octagonal enclosure. After scaling the small (5 cm diameter) to a 10 cm WSB, the larger burner was fired from 150 to 600 kW within a 1.2 MW furnace simulator at UCICL. Test results demonstrate that NO{sub x} emissions (15 ppm at 3% O{sub 2} at equivalence ratio {phi} = 0.80) were invariant with firing rate and chamber/burner ratio. However, the data indicates that CO and UHC are dependent on system parameters, such that a minimum firing rate exists below which CO and UHC rise from lower limits of 25 ppm and 0 ppm respectively.

  6. Assessing of IDF curves for hydrological design by simple scaling of 1-day precipitation totals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bara, M.; Kohnová, S.; Szolgay, J.; Gaál, L.; Hlavčová, K.

    2010-09-01

    In this paper the scaling properties of short term extreme rainfall in Slovakia were investigated. The simple scaling theory was applied to the intensity-duration-frequency (IDF) characteristics of a short duration rainfall. This method allows for the estimation of the design values of rainfall of selected recurrence intervals and durations shorter than a day by using only the daily data. The scaling behavior of rainfall intensities was examined, and the possibility of using simple scaling in Slovakia was verified. The methodology for the simple scaling of rainfall is demonstrated using an example of the meteorological station in Ilava.

  7. Study of Structure and Small-Scale Fragmentation in TMC-1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Langer, W. D.; Velusamy, T.; Kuiper, T. B.; Levin, S.; Olsen, E.; Migenes, V.

    1995-01-01

    Large-scale C(sup 18)O maps show that the Taurus molecular cloud 1 (TMC-1) has numerous cores located along a ridge which extends about 12 minutes by at least 35 minutes. The cores traced by C(sup 18)O are about a few arcminutes (0.1-0.2 pc) in extent, typically contain about 0.5-3 solar mass, and are probably gravitationally bound. We present a detailed study of the small-scale fragmentary structure of one of these cores, called core D, within TMC-1 using very high spectral and spatial resolution maps of CCS and CS. The CCS lines are excellent tracers for investigating the density, temperature, and velocity structure in dense cores. The high spectral resolution, 0.008 km /s, data consist mainly of single-dish, Nyquist-sampled maps of CCS at 22 GHz with 45 sec spatial resolution taken with NASA's 70 m DSN antenna at Goldstone. The high spatial resolution spectral line maps were made with the Very Large Array (9 sec resolution) at 22 GHz and with the OVRO millimeter array in CCS and CS at 93 GHz and 98 GHz, respectively, with 6 sec resolution. These maps are supplemented with single-dish observations of CCS and CC(sup 34)S spectra at 33 GHz using a NASA 34 m DSN antenna, CCS 93 GHz, C(sup 34)S (2-1), and C(sup 18)O (1-0) single-dish observations made with the AT&T Bell Laboratories 7 m antenna. Our high spectral and spatial CCS and CS maps show that core D is highly fragmented. The single-dish CCS observations map out several clumps which range in size from approx. 45 sec to 90 sec (0.03-0.06 pc). These clumps have very narrow intrinsic line widths, 0.11-0.25 km/s, slightly larger than the thermal line width for CCS at 10 K, and masses about 0.03-0.2 solar mass. Interferometer observations of some of these clumps show that they have considerable additional internal structure, consisting of several condensations ranging in size from approx. 10 sec- 30 sec (0.007-0.021 pc), also with narrow line widths. The mass of these smallest fragments is of order 0.01 solar mass

  8. Spiral Galaxies with a Larger Fraction of Dark Matter in the Region of 3-10 Mpc Around the Virgo and Fornax Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kogoshvili, N. G.; Borchkhadze, T. M.; Kalloghlian, A. T.

    2015-09-01

    This is a study of the dynamic characteristics of spiral galaxies with absolute magnitudes M ≥ -20m.6 at distances of 3 to 10 Mpc from the Virgo and Fornax clusters based on data from the Merged Catalog of Galaxies MERCG. The diameters of the galaxies are used to determine the radius RD corresponding to the region with the greatest concentration of dark matter. Based on the condition of centrifugal equilibrium, the dynamic parameters of the spiral galaxies with M ≥ -20m.6 are calculated and compared with the dynamic characteristics of spiral galaxies with M ≥ -20m.6. It is found that there are many fewer spiral galaxies with M ≥ -20m.6 and a larger fraction of dark matter in the regions surrounding these clusters, estimated at 12.7% in the vicinity of the Virgo cluster and 15.3% in the vicinity of the Fornax cluster.

  9. Scaling to 150K cores: recent algorithm and performance engineering developments enabling XGC1 to run at scale

    SciTech Connect

    Mark F. Adams; Seung-Hoe Ku; Patrick Worley; Ed D'Azevedo; Julian C. Cummings; C.S. Chang

    2009-10-01

    Particle-in-cell (PIC) methods have proven to be eft#11;ective in discretizing the Vlasov-Maxwell system of equations describing the core of toroidal burning plasmas for many decades. Recent physical understanding of the importance of edge physics for stability and transport in tokamaks has lead to development of the fi#12;rst fully toroidal edge PIC code - XGC1. The edge region poses special problems in meshing for PIC methods due to the lack of closed flux surfaces, which makes fi#12;eld-line following meshes and coordinate systems problematic. We present a solution to this problem with a semi-#12;field line following mesh method in a cylindrical coordinate system. Additionally, modern supercomputers require highly concurrent algorithms and implementations, with all levels of the memory hierarchy being effe#14;ciently utilized to realize optimal code performance. This paper presents a mesh and particle partitioning method, suitable to our meshing strategy, for use on highly concurrent cache-based computing platforms.

  10. Evaluation of the pressure ulcers risk scales with critically ill patients: a prospective cohort study 1

    PubMed Central

    Borghardt, Andressa Tomazini; do Prado, Thiago Nascimento; de Araújo, Thiago Moura; Rogenski, Noemi Marisa Brunet; Bringuente, Maria Edla de Oliveira

    2015-01-01

    AIMS: to evaluate the accuracy of the Braden and Waterlow risk assessment scales in critically ill inpatients. METHOD: this prospective cohort study, with 55 patients in intensive care units, was performed through evaluation of sociodemographic and clinical variables, through the application of the scales (Braden and Waterlow) upon admission and every 48 hours; and through the evaluation and classification of the ulcers into categories. RESULTS: the pressure ulcer incidence was 30.9%, with the Braden and Waterlow scales presenting high sensitivity (41% and 71%) and low specificity (21% and 47%) respectively in the three evaluations. The cut off scores found in the first, second and third evaluations were 12, 12 and 11 in the Braden scale, and 16, 15 and 14 in the Waterlow scale. CONCLUSION: the Braden scale was shown to be a good screening instrument, and the Waterlow scale proved to have better predictive power. PMID:25806628

  11. Evidence for horizon-scale power from CMB polarization

    SciTech Connect

    Mortonson, Michael J.; Hu, Wayne

    2009-07-15

    The CMB temperature power spectrum offers ambiguous evidence for the existence of horizon-scale power in the primordial power spectrum due to uncertainties in spatial curvature and the physics of cosmic acceleration as well as the observed low quadrupole. Current polarization data from WMAP provide evidence for horizon-scale power that is robust to these uncertainties. Polarization on the largest scales arises mainly from scattering at z < or approx. 6 when the Universe is fully ionized, making the evidence robust to ionization history variations at higher redshifts as well. A cutoff in the power spectrum is limited to C=k{sub C}/10{sup -4} Mpc{sup -1}<5.2 (95% C.L.) by polarization, only slightly weaker than joint temperature and polarization constraints in flat {lambda}CDM (C<4.2). Planck should improve the polarization limit to C<3.6 for any model of the acceleration epoch and ionization history as well as provide tests for foreground and systematic contamination.

  12. First Results from the MADCASH Survey: A Faint Dwarf Galaxy Companion to the Low-mass Spiral Galaxy NGC 2403 at 3.2 Mpc

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carlin, Jeffrey L.; Sand, David J.; Price, Paul; Willman, Beth; Karunakaran, Ananthan; Spekkens, Kristine; Bell, Eric F.; Brodie, Jean P.; Crnojević, Denija; Forbes, Duncan A.; Hargis, Jonathan; Kirby, Evan; Lupton, Robert; Peter, Annika H. G.; Romanowsky, Aaron J.; Strader, Jay

    2016-09-01

    We report the discovery of the faintest known dwarf galaxy satellite of a Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC) stellar-mass host beyond the Local Group (LG), based on deep imaging with Subaru/Hyper Suprime-Cam. Magellanic Analog Dwarf Companions And Stellar Halos (MADCASH) J074238+652501-dw lies ∼35 kpc in projection from NGC 2403, a dwarf spiral galaxy at D ≈ 3.2 Mpc. This new dwarf has {M}g=-7.4+/- 0.4 and a half-light radius of 168 ± 70 pc, at the calculated distance of 3.39 ± 0.41 Mpc. The color–magnitude diagram reveals no evidence of young stellar populations, suggesting that MADCASH J074238+652501-dw is an old, metal-poor dwarf similar to low-luminosity dwarfs in the LG. The lack of either detected HI gas ({M}{HI}/{L}V\\lt 0.69 {M}ȯ /{L}ȯ , based on Green Bank Telescope observations) or GALEX NUV/FUV flux enhancement is consistent with a lack of young stars. This is the first result from the MADCASH survey, which is conducting a census of the stellar substructure and faint satellites in the halos of Local Volume LMC analogs via resolved stellar populations. Models predict a total of ∼4–10 satellites at least as massive as MADCASH J074238+652501-dw around a host with the mass of NGC 2403, with 2–3 within our field of view, slightly more than the one such satellite observed in our footprint. Based in part on data collected at Subaru Telescope, which is operated by the National Astronomical Observatory of Japan.

  13. First Results from the MADCASH Survey: A Faint Dwarf Galaxy Companion to the Low-mass Spiral Galaxy NGC 2403 at 3.2 Mpc

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carlin, Jeffrey L.; Sand, David J.; Price, Paul; Willman, Beth; Karunakaran, Ananthan; Spekkens, Kristine; Bell, Eric F.; Brodie, Jean P.; Crnojević, Denija; Forbes, Duncan A.; Hargis, Jonathan; Kirby, Evan; Lupton, Robert; Peter, Annika H. G.; Romanowsky, Aaron J.; Strader, Jay

    2016-09-01

    We report the discovery of the faintest known dwarf galaxy satellite of a Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC) stellar-mass host beyond the Local Group (LG), based on deep imaging with Subaru/Hyper Suprime-Cam. Magellanic Analog Dwarf Companions And Stellar Halos (MADCASH) J074238+652501-dw lies ˜35 kpc in projection from NGC 2403, a dwarf spiral galaxy at D ≈ 3.2 Mpc. This new dwarf has {M}g=-7.4+/- 0.4 and a half-light radius of 168 ± 70 pc, at the calculated distance of 3.39 ± 0.41 Mpc. The color–magnitude diagram reveals no evidence of young stellar populations, suggesting that MADCASH J074238+652501-dw is an old, metal-poor dwarf similar to low-luminosity dwarfs in the LG. The lack of either detected HI gas ({M}{HI}/{L}V\\lt 0.69 {M}ȯ /{L}ȯ , based on Green Bank Telescope observations) or GALEX NUV/FUV flux enhancement is consistent with a lack of young stars. This is the first result from the MADCASH survey, which is conducting a census of the stellar substructure and faint satellites in the halos of Local Volume LMC analogs via resolved stellar populations. Models predict a total of ˜4–10 satellites at least as massive as MADCASH J074238+652501-dw around a host with the mass of NGC 2403, with 2–3 within our field of view, slightly more than the one such satellite observed in our footprint. Based in part on data collected at Subaru Telescope, which is operated by the National Astronomical Observatory of Japan.

  14. Chemical disinfection of Legionella in hot water systems biofilm: a pilot-scale 1 study.

    PubMed

    Farhat, Maha; Trouilhé, Marie-Cécile; Forêt, Christophe; Hater, Wolfgang; Moletta-Denat, Marina; Robine, Enric; Frère, Jacques

    2011-01-01

    Legionella bacteria encounter optimum growing conditions in hot water systems and cooling towers. A pilot-scale 1 unit was built in order to study the biofilm disinfection. It consisted of two identical loops, one used as a control and the other as a 'Test Loop'. A combination of a bio-detergent and a biocide (hydrogen peroxide + peracetic acid) was applied in the Test Loop three times under the same conditions at 100 and 1,000 mg/L with a contact time of 24 and 3-6 hours, respectively. Each treatment test was preceded by a three week period of biofilm re-colonization. Initial concentrations of culturable Legionella into biofilm were close to 10(3) CFU/cm2. Results showed that culturable Legionella spp. in biofilm were no longer detectable three days following each treatment. evertheless, initial Legionella spp. concentrations were recovered 7 days after the treatments (in two cases). Before the tests, Legionella spp. and L. pneumophila PCR counts were both about 10(4) GU/cm2 in biofilm and they both decreased by 1 to 2 log units 72 hours after each treatment. The three tests had a good but transient efficiency on Legionella disinfection in biofilm. PMID:22097051

  15. Quasars as a Tracer of Large-scale Structures in the Distant Universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Hyunmi; Park, Changbom; Lietzen, Heidi; Einasto, Maret

    2016-08-01

    We study the dependence of the number density and properties of quasars on the background galaxy density using the currently largest spectroscopic data sets of quasars and galaxies. We construct a galaxy number density field smoothed over the variable smoothing scale of between approximately 10 and 20 h ‑1 Mpc over the redshift range 0.46 < z < 0.59 using the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) Data Release 12 (DR12) Constant MASS galaxies. The quasar sample is prepared from the SDSS-I/II DR7. We examine the correlation of incidence of quasars with the large-scale background density and the dependence of quasar properties such as bolometric luminosity, black hole mass, and Eddington ratio on the large-scale density. We find a monotonic correlation between the quasar number density and large-scale galaxy number density, which is fitted well with a power-law relation, {n}Q\\propto {ρ }G0.618. We detect weak dependences of quasar properties on the large-scale density such as a positive correlation between black hole mass and density, and a negative correlation between luminosity and density. We discuss the possibility of using quasars as a tracer of large-scale structures at high redshifts, which may be useful for studies of the growth of structures in the high-redshift universe.

  16. Test of P3M-1 nacelle in Full-Scale Tunnel (FST)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1931-01-01

    Test of P3M-1 nacelle in Full-Scale Tunnel (FST). The NACA conducted drag tests on P3M-1 nacelle in 1931 which were presented in a special report to the Navy. Smith DeFrance described this work in the report's introduction: 'Tests were conducted in the full-scale wind tunnel on a five to four geared Pratt and Whitney Wasp engine mounted in a P3M-1 nacelle. In order to simulate the flight conditions the nacelle was assembled on a 15-foot span of wing from the same airplane. The purpose of the tests was to improve the cooling of the engine and to reduce the drag of the nacelle combination. Thermocouples were installed at various points on the cylinders and temperature readings were obtained from these by the power plants division. These results will be reported in a memorandum by that division. The drag results, which are covered by this memorandum, were obtained with the original nacelle condition as received from the Navy with the tail of the nacelle modified, with the nose section of the nacelle modified, with a Curtiss anti-drag ring attached to the engine, with a Type G ring developed by the N.A.C.A., and with a Type D cowling which was also developed by the N.A.C.A.' (p. 1) This picture shows the engine with a Curtiss anti-drag ring attached. The NACA tested several different modifications and cowlings as noted above. The Navy did not want to make any major structural alterations to the original wing and nacelle installation. Thus, the NACA did not conduct a full investigation of the aerodynamics of this particular configuration. DeFrance concludes his report with this note: 'in view of the limitations of the test, the drag data for the combinations tested may be summarized, and considering the necessity of temperature control and accessibility to the engine it is apparent that the best combination tested was with the large nose piece, the Curtiss anti-drag ring, and the modified tail section.'

  17. Ditching Tests of a 1/10-Scale Model of the North American XFJ-1 Airplane Ted No. NACA 314

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fisher, Lloyd J.; McBride, Ellis E.

    1948-01-01

    Tests were made of a 1/10-scale dynamically similar model of the North American XFJ-1 airplane to study its behavior when ditched. The model was landed in calm water at the Langley tank no. 2 monorail. Various landing attitudes, speeds, and conditions of damage were simulated. The behavior of the model was determined from visual observations, by recording the accelerations, and by taking motion pictures of the ditchings. Data are presented in tabular form, sequence photographs, and time-history acceleration curves. From the results of the tests it was concluded that the airplane should be ditched at the near-stall, tail-down landing attitude of 12 deg. The flaps should be fully extended to obtain the lowest possible landing speed. The wing-tip tanks should be jettisoned if any appreciable load of fuel remains; if empty, they should be retained for additional buoyancy. In a calm-water ditching the airplane will probably run about 600 feet Maximum longitudinal decelerations of about 2.5g and maximum vertical acceleration of about 2g will be encountered. The nose-intake duct will be clear of the water until practically all forward motion has stopped.

  18. Spatial and statistical differences between 1:250,000- and 1:24,000-scale digital soil databases

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Juracek, K.E.; Wolock, D.M.

    2002-01-01

    In this study, 1:250,000- and 1:24,000-scale digital soil databases for Kansas were compared statistically and spatially. The soil attributes used in this comparison were soil permeability, percent clay, and hydrologic group. Results indicate that, although the two databases were correlated, the potential exists for substantial site-specific variability between them. The largest differences between the two databases typically are in and along the stream networks. With distance away from the stream networks, the mean differences generally stabilize. The results also indicate the possibility of systematic bias between the two databases that varies with landscape position. For applications using mean soil attribute values, the two soil databases usually yield similar values for the three soil attributes analyzed, especially for areas of 25 km2 (9.7 mi2) or larger. However, for applications where more detailed information on soil variability and the spatial pattern of soil properties within the landscape is required, such as for studies focused on small areas or areas in and along stream networks, the two soil databases are sufficiently different such that using one or the other may result in substantially different results.

  19. The Homo floresiensis cranium (LB1): Size, scaling, and early Homo affinities

    PubMed Central

    Gordon, Adam D.; Nevell, Lisa; Wood, Bernard

    2008-01-01

    The skeletal remains of a diminutive small-brained hominin found in Late Pleistocene cave deposits on the island of Flores, Indonesia were assigned to a new species, Homo floresiensis [Brown P, et al. (2004) A new small-bodied hominin from the Late Pleistocene of Flores, Indonesia. Nature 431: 1055–1061]. A dramatically different interpretation is that this material belongs not to a novel hominin taxon but to a population of small-bodied modern humans affected, or unaffected, by microcephaly. The debate has primarily focused on the size and shape of the endocranial cavity of the type specimen, LB1, with less attention being paid to the morphological evidence provided by the rest of the LB1 cranium and postcranium, and no study thus far has addressed the problem of how scaling would affect shape comparisons between a diminutive cranium like LB1 and the much larger crania of modern humans. We show that whether or not the effects of its small cranial size are accounted for, the external cranial morphology of the LB1 cranium cannot be accommodated within a large global sample of normal modern human crania. Instead, the shape of LB1, which is shown by multivariate analysis to differ significantly from that of modern humans, is similar to that of Homo erectus sensu lato, and, to a lesser extent, Homo habilis. Our results are consistent with hypotheses that suggest the Liang Bua specimens represent a diminutive population closely related to either early H. erectus s. l. from East Africa and/or Dmanisi or to H. habilis. PMID:18356300

  20. The Homo floresiensis cranium (LB1): size, scaling, and early Homo affinities.

    PubMed

    Gordon, Adam D; Nevell, Lisa; Wood, Bernard

    2008-03-25

    The skeletal remains of a diminutive small-brained hominin found in Late Pleistocene cave deposits on the island of Flores, Indonesia were assigned to a new species, Homo floresiensis [Brown P, et al. (2004) A new small-bodied hominin from the Late Pleistocene of Flores, Indonesia. Nature 431: 1055-1061]. A dramatically different interpretation is that this material belongs not to a novel hominin taxon but to a population of small-bodied modern humans affected, or unaffected, by microcephaly. The debate has primarily focused on the size and shape of the endocranial cavity of the type specimen, LB1, with less attention being paid to the morphological evidence provided by the rest of the LB1 cranium and postcranium, and no study thus far has addressed the problem of how scaling would affect shape comparisons between a diminutive cranium like LB1 and the much larger crania of modern humans. We show that whether or not the effects of its small cranial size are accounted for, the external cranial morphology of the LB1 cranium cannot be accommodated within a large global sample of normal modern human crania. Instead, the shape of LB1, which is shown by multivariate analysis to differ significantly from that of modern humans, is similar to that of Homo erectus sensu lato, and, to a lesser extent, Homo habilis. Our results are consistent with hypotheses that suggest the Liang Bua specimens represent a diminutive population closely related to either early H. erectus s. l. from East Africa and/or Dmanisi or to H. habilis. PMID:18356300

  1. Centennial-scale paleoceanography during sapropel S1 deposition in the NE Aegean (Mediterranean Sea)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Triantaphyllou, Maria; Gogou, Alexandra; Dimiza, Margarita; Kostopoulou, Sofia; Parinos, Constantine; Roussakis, Grigoris; Geraga, Maria; Skampa, Elisavet; Bouloubassi, Ioanna; Fleitmann, Dominik; Zervakis, Vassilis; Velaoras, Dimitris; Diamantopoulou, Antonia; Sampatakaki, Angeliki; Lykousis, Vassilis

    2016-04-01

    Combined micropaleontological and geochemical analyses in the high-sedimentation gravity core M-4G, provided new centennial scale paleoceanographic data for the sapropel S1 deposition in the NE Aegean Sea. Sapropel layer S1a (10.2-8.0 ka) is deposited in dysoxic to oxic bottom waters; sediments are characterized by the high abundance of benthic foraminifers Chilostomella mediterranensis and Globobulimina affinis that are able to tolerate surface sediment and/or pore water oxygen depletion and the presence of the oxic mesotrophic-eutrophic U. mediterranea. Adequate preservation of organic matter is proven by the high organic carbon and loliolide and isololiolide contents, whereas the biomarker record and the abundances of eutrophic planktonic foraminifera document enhanced productivity. Both alkenone-based SSTs and δO18 G. bulloides records indicate coolings at 8.2 ka (S1a) and at ~7.8 ka (S1 interruption). Sapropelic layer S1b (7.7-6.4 ka) is characterized by rather oxic conditions marked by the prominent increase of U. mediterranea. The highly fluctuating SSTs demonstrate repeated coolings and associated dense water formation; major event at 7.4 ka, followed by cold spells at 7.0, 6.8, 6.5 ka. Besides, the increase of algal biomarkers, labile organic matter-feeding foraminifera and eutrophic planktonic species pinpoints rise in in situ marine productivity, which is enhanced by more efficient vertical convection due to repeated cold events. The associated contributions of labile marine organic matter (OM) along with fresher terrestrial OM inputs after ~7.7 ka BP imply alternative/ additional than the north Aegean riverine borderland sources for the influx of organic matter at the south Limnos Basin, also related to the inflow of highly productive Marmara/Black Sea waters

  2. Thermal and fluid mixing in a 1/2-scale test facility. Volume 2. Data report. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Dolan, F.X.; Valenzuela, J.A.

    1985-07-01

    This report presents data from an experimental study of fluid mixing in a 1/2-scale model of the cold leg, downcomer, lower plenum, pump simulator, and loop seal typical of a Westinghouse Pressurized Water Reactor. The tests were transient cooldown tests in that they simulated an extreme condition of Small Break Loss of Coolant Accident (SBLOCA) during which cold High Pressure Injection (HPI) fluid is injected into stagnant, hot primary fluid with complete loss of natural circulation in the loop. Extensive temperature, velocity, and heat transfer coefficient data are presented at two cold leg Froude numbers: 0.052 and 0.076. The 1/2-scale data are compared with earlier data from a 1/5-scale, geometrically similar facility to assess scaling principles.

  3. Bryonolic Acid: A Large-Scale Isolation and Evaluation of Heme Oxygenase 1 Expression in Activated Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Barker, Emily C.; Gatbonton-Schwager, Tonibelle N.; Han, Yong; Clay, Jennifer E.; Letterio, John J.; Tochtrop, Gregory P.

    2010-01-01

    Bryonolic acid (BA) is a triterpenoid found in the Cucurbitaceae family of plants. Our interests in the immunomodulatory effects of this class of natural products led us to discover that BA induces a marked increase in the expression of a phase 2 response enzyme, heme oxygenase 1 (HO-1) in a dose dependent manner. This phenotype has translational implications in malarial disease progression, and consequently we developed a large scale isolation method for BA that will be enabling in terms of future in vitro and in vivo analysis. We have determined ideal growth conditions and time scale for maximizing BA content in the roots of Cucurbita pepo L., and analyzed BA production by HPLC. Large-scale extraction yielded 1.34% BA based on dry weight, allowing for the isolation of BA on a multi-gram scale. PMID:20481554

  4. Measurements of a 1/4-scale model of a 60-kg explosives firing chamber

    SciTech Connect

    Pastrnak, J.W.; Baker, C.F.; Simmons, L.F.

    1995-01-27

    In anticipation of increasingly stringent environmental regulations, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) proposes to construct a 60-kg firing chamber to provide blast-effects containment for, most of its open-air, high-explosive, firing operations. Even though these operations are within current environmental limits, containment of the blast effects and hazardous debris will further drastically reduce emissions to the environment and minimize the generated hazardous waste. The major design consideration of such a chamber is its overall structural dynamic response in terms of long-term containment of all blast effects from repeated internal detonations of high explosives. Another concern is how much other portions of the facility must be hardened to ensure personnel protection in the event of an accidental detonation. To assess these concerns, a 1/4-scale replica model of the planned contained firing chamber was designed, constructed, and tested with scaled explosive charges ranging from 25 to 125% of the operational explosives limit of 60 kg. From 16 detonations of high explosives, 880 resulting strains, blast pressures, and temperatures within the model were measured. Factors of safety for dynamic yield of the firing chamber structure were calculated and compared to the design criterion of totally elastic response. The rectangular, reinforced-concrete chamber model exhibited a lightly damped vibrational response that placed the structure in alternating cycles of tension and compression. During compression, both the reinforcing steel and the concrete remained elastic. During tension, the reinforcing steel remained elastic, but the concrete elastic limit was exceeded in two areas, the center spans of the ceiling and the north wall, where elastic safety factors as low as 0.66 were obtained, thus indicating that the concrete would be expected to crack in those areas. Indeed, visual post-test inspection of those areas revealed tight cracks in the concrete.

  5. Measurements of a 1/4-scale model of an explosives firing chamber

    SciTech Connect

    Pastrnak, J.W.; Baker, C.F.; Simmons, L.F.

    1995-01-27

    In anticipation of increasingly stringent environmental regulations, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) proposes to construct a 60-kg firing chamber to provide blast-effects containment for most of its open-air, high-explosive, firing operations. Even though these operations are within current environmental limits, containment of the blast effects and hazardous debris will further drastically reduce emissions to the environment and minimize the generated hazardous waste. The major design consideration of such a chamber is its overall structural dynamic response in terms of long-term containment of all blast effects from repeated internal detonations of high explosives. Another concern is how much other portions of the facility outside the firing chamber must be hardened to ensure personnel protection in the event of an accidental detonation while the chamber door is open. To assess these concerns, a 1/4-scale replica model of the planned contained firing chamber was designed, constructed, and tested with scaled explosive charges ranging from 25 to 125% of the operational explosives limit of 60 kg. From 16 detonations of high explosives, 880 resulting strains, blast pressures, and temperatures within the model were measured to provide information for the final design. Factors of safety for dynamic yield of the firing chamber structure were calculated and compared to the design criterion of totally elastic response. The rectangular, reinforced-concrete chamber model exhibited a lightly damped vibrational response that placed the structure in alternating cycles of tension and compression. During compression, both the reinforcing steel and the concrete remained elastic.

  6. Unraveling the dynamics that scale cross-shore headland relief on rocky coastlines: 1. Model development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Limber, Patrick W.; Brad Murray, A.; Adams, Peter N.; Goldstein, Evan B.

    2014-04-01

    We have developed an exploratory model of plan view, millennial-scale headland and bay evolution on rocky coastlines. Cross-shore coastline relief, or amplitude, arises from alongshore differences in sea cliff lithology, where durable, erosion-resistant rocks protrude seaward as headlands and weaker rocks retreat landward as bays. The model is built around two concurrent negative feedbacks that control headland amplitude: (1) wave energy convergence and divergence at headlands and bays, respectively, that increases in intensity as cross-shore amplitude grows and (2) the combined processes of beach sediment production by sea cliff erosion, distribution of sediment to bays by waves, and beach accumulation that buffers sea cliffs from wave attack and limits further sea cliff retreat. Paired with the coastline relief model is a numerical wave transformation model that explores how wave energy is distributed along an embayed coastline. The two models are linked through genetic programming, a machine learning technique that parses wave model results into a tractable input for the coastline model. Using a pool of 4800 wave model simulations, genetic programming yields a function that relates breaking wave power density to cross-shore headland amplitude, offshore wave height, approach angle, and period. The goal of the coastline model is to make simple, but fundamental, scaling arguments on how different variables (such as sea cliff height and composition) affect the equilibrium cross-shore relief of headland and bays. The model's generality highlights the key feedbacks involved in coastline evolution and allows its equations (and model behaviors) to be easily modified by future users.

  7. Large-scale inhomogeneities and galaxy statistics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schaeffer, R.; Silk, J.

    1984-01-01

    The density fluctuations associated with the formation of large-scale cosmic pancake-like and filamentary structures are evaluated using the Zel'dovich approximation for the evolution of nonlinear inhomogeneities in the expanding universe. It is shown that the large-scale nonlinear density fluctuations in the galaxy distribution due to pancakes modify the standard scale-invariant correlation function xi(r) at scales comparable to the coherence length of adiabatic fluctuations. The typical contribution of pancakes and filaments to the J3 integral, and more generally to the moments of galaxy counts in a volume of approximately (15-40 per h Mpc)exp 3, provides a statistical test for the existence of large scale inhomogeneities. An application to several recent three dimensional data sets shows that despite large observational uncertainties over the relevant scales characteristic features may be present that can be attributed to pancakes in most, but not all, of the various galaxy samples.

  8. Pretest Round Robin Analysis of 1:4-Scale Prestressed Concrete Containment Vessel Model

    SciTech Connect

    HESSHEIMER,MICHAEL F.; LUK,VINCENT K.; KLAMERUS,ERIC W.; SHIBATA,S.; MITSUGI,S.; COSTELLO,J.F.

    2000-12-18

    The purpose of the program is to investigate the response of representative scale models of nuclear containment to pressure loading beyond the design basis accident and to compare analytical predictions to measured behavior. This objective is accomplished by conducting static, pneumatic overpressurization tests of scale models at ambient temperature. This research program consists of testing two scale models: a steel containment vessel (SCV) model (tested in 1996) and a prestressed concrete containment vessel (PCCV) model, which is the subject of this paper.

  9. A hydrologically explicit, spatially exact, classification of landforms for Canada at 1:500,000 scale.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacMillan, Robert A.; Geng, Xiaoyuan; Smith, Scott; Zawadzka, Joanna; Hengl, Tom

    2016-04-01

    A new approach for classifying landform types has been developed and applied to all of Canada using a 250 m DEM. The resulting LandMapR classification has been designed to provide a stable and consistent spatial fabric to act as initial proto-polygons to be used in updating the current 1:1 M scale Soil Landscapes of Canada map to 1:500,000 scale. There is a desire to make the current SLC polygon fabric more consistent across the country, more correctly aligned to observable hydrological and landscape features, more spatially exact, more detailed and more interpretable. The approach is essentially a modification of the Hammond (1954) criteria for classifying macro landform types as implemented for computerized analysis by Dikau (1989, 1991) and Brabyn (1998). The major modification is that the key input variables of local relief and relative position in the landscape are computed for specific hillslopes that occur between individual, explicitly defined, channels and divides. While most approaches, including Dikau et al., (1991) and SOTER (Dobos et al., 2005) compute relative relief and landscape position within a neighborhood analysis window (NAW) of some fixed size (9,600 m and 1 km respectively) the LandMapR method assesses these variables based on explicit analysis of flow paths between locally defined divides and channels (or lakes). We have modified the Hammond criteria by splitting the lowest relief class of 0-30 m into 4 classes of 0-0 m, 0-1 m, 1-10 m and 10-30 m) in order to be able to better differentiate subtle landform features in areas of low relief. Essentially this enables recognition of lakes and open water (0 relief and 0 slope), shorelines and littoral zones (0-1 m), nearly flat, low-relief landforms (1-10 m) and low relief undulating plains (10-30 m). We also modified the Hammond approach for separating upper versus lower landform positions used to differentiate flat areas in uplands from flat lowlands. We instead differentiate 3 relative slope

  10. Use of Orbital Shaken Disposable Bioreactors for Mammalian Cell Cultures from the Milliliter-Scale to the 1,000-Liter Scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xiaowei; Stettler, Matthieu; de Sanctis, Dario; Perrone, Marco; Parolini, Nicola; Discacciati, Marco; de Jesus, Maria; Hacker, David; Quarteroni, Alfio; Wurm, Florian

    Driven by the commercial success of recombinant biopharmaceuticals, there is an increasing demand for novel mammalian cell culture bioreactor systems for the rapid production of biologicals that require mammalian protein processing. Recently, orbitally shaken bioreactors at scales from 50 mL to 1,000 L have been explored for the cultivation of mammalian cells and are considered to be attractive alternatives to conventional stirred-tank bioreactors because of increased flexibility and reduced costs. Adequate oxygen transfer capacity was maintained during the scale-up, and strategies to increase further oxygen transfer rates (OTR) were explored, while maintaining favorable mixing parameters and low-stress conditions for sensitive lipid membrane-enclosed cells. Investigations from process development to the engineering properties of shaken bioreactors are underway, but the feasibility of establishing a robust, standardized, and transferable technical platform for mammalian cell culture based on orbital shaking and disposable materials has been established with further optimizations and studies ongoing.

  11. Intermediate scale structure of the interstellar medium towards NGC 6231 in Sco OB1 with FUSE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marggraf, O.; Bluhm, H.; de Boer, K. S.

    2004-03-01

    The FUSE far-ultraviolet interstellar spectra toward seven targets in NGC 6231 show that the molecules H2, HD, and CO as well as various atomic species are distributed in several clouds. The main absorption component found on the sight lines lies in the Lupus cloud region at a distance of about 150 pc, and there is a weaker second one, presumably in the Sco OB1 shell surrounding NGC 6231 (d≃1.8 kpc). H2 excitation modelling is used to constrain the radiation field and the density in the gas; HD is used to estimate the abundance of H+. The small angular separation of the target stars allows column density variations to be probed over the field of view, on scales of 0.05 pc in the case of the Lupus cloud distance. They are 40% for H2 and 60% for H I. A rather strong radiation field inside the molecular clouds suggests a separation of the gas into smaller cloudlets also along the line of sight. Based on observations made with the NASA-CNES-CSA Far Ultraviolet Spectroscopic Explorer. FUSE is operated for NASA by the Johns Hopkins University under NASA contract NAS5-32985.

  12. Z ', Higgses and heavy neutrinos in U(1)' models: from the LHC to the GUT scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Accomando, Elena; Corianò, Claudio; Rose, Luigi Delle; Fiaschi, Juri; Marzo, Carlo; Moretti, Stefano

    2016-07-01

    We study a class of non-exotic minimal U(1)' extensions of the Standard Model, which includes all scenarios that are anomaly-free with the ordinary fermion content augmented by one Right-Handed neutrino per generation, wherein the new Abelian gauge group is spontaneously broken by the non-zero Vacuum Expectation Value of an additional Higgs singlet field, in turn providing mass to a Z ' state. By adopting the B - L example, whose results can be recast into those pertaining to the whole aforementioned class, and allowing for both scalar and gauge mixing, we first extract the surviving parameter space in presence of up-to-date theoretical and experimental constraints. Over the corresponding parameter configurations, we then delineate the high energy behaviour of such constructs in terms of their stability and perturbativity. Finally, we highlight key production and decay channels of the new states entering the spectra of this class of models, i.e., heavy neutrinos, a second Higgs state and the Z ', which are amenable to experimental investigation at the Large Hadron Collider. We therefore set the stage to establish a direct link between measurements obtainable at the Electro-Weak scale and the dynamics of the underlying model up to those where a Grand Unification Theory embedding a U(1)' can be realised.

  13. A Clinical Indications Prediction Scale Based on TWIST1 for Human Mesenchymal Stem Cells.

    PubMed

    Boregowda, Siddaraju V; Krishnappa, Veena; Haga, Christopher L; Ortiz, Luis A; Phinney, Donald G

    2016-02-01

    In addition to their stem/progenitor properties, mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) also exhibit potent effector (angiogenic, antiinflammatory, immuno-modulatory) functions that are largely paracrine in nature. It is widely believed that effector functions underlie most of the therapeutic potential of MSCs and are independent of their stem/progenitor properties. Here we demonstrate that stem/progenitor and effector functions are coordinately regulated at the cellular level by the transcription factor Twist1 and specified within populations according to a hierarchical model. We further show that manipulation of Twist1 levels by genetic approaches or by exposure to widely used culture supplements including fibroblast growth factor 2 (Ffg2) and interferon gamma (IFN-gamma) alters MSC efficacy in cell-based and in vivo assays in a predictable manner. Thus, by mechanistically linking stem/progenitor and effector functions our studies provide a unifying framework in the form of an MSC hierarchy that models the functional complexity of populations. Using this framework, we developed a CLinical Indications Prediction (CLIP) scale that predicts how donor-to-donor heterogeneity and culture conditions impact the therapeutic efficacy of MSC populations for different disease indications. PMID:26981553

  14. Cochlea-scaled spectral entropy predicts rate-invariant intelligibility of temporally distorted sentences1

    PubMed Central

    Stilp, Christian E.; Kiefte, Michael; Alexander, Joshua M.; Kluender, Keith R.

    2010-01-01

    Some evidence, mostly drawn from experiments using only a single moderate rate of speech, suggests that low-frequency amplitude modulations may be particularly important for intelligibility. Here, two experiments investigated intelligibility of temporally distorted sentences across a wide range of simulated speaking rates, and two metrics were used to predict results. Sentence intelligibility was assessed when successive segments of fixed duration were temporally reversed (exp. 1), and when sentences were processed through four third-octave-band filters, the outputs of which were desynchronized (exp. 2). For both experiments, intelligibility decreased with increasing distortion. However, in exp. 2, intelligibility recovered modestly with longer desynchronization. Across conditions, performances measured as a function of proportion of utterance distorted converged to a common function. Estimates of intelligibility derived from modulation transfer functions predict a substantial proportion of the variance in listeners’ responses in exp. 1, but fail to predict performance in exp. 2. By contrast, a metric of potential information, quantified as relative dissimilarity (change) between successive cochlear-scaled spectra, is introduced. This metric reliably predicts listeners’ intelligibility across the full range of speaking rates in both experiments. Results support an information-theoretic approach to speech perception and the significance of spectral change rather than physical units of time. PMID:20968382

  15. A Large-scale Structure at Redshift 1.71 in the Lockman Hole

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henry, J. Patrick; Aoki, Kentaro; Finoguenov, Alexis; Fotopoulou, Sotiria; Hasinger, Günther; salvato, Mara; Suh, Hyewon; Tanaka, Masayuki

    2014-01-01

    We previously identified LH146, a diffuse X-ray source in the Lockman Hole, as a galaxy cluster at redshift 1.753. The redshift was based on one spectroscopic value, buttressed by seven additional photometric redshifts. We confirm here the previous spectroscopic redshift and present concordant spectroscopic redshifts for an additional eight galaxies. The average of these nine redshifts is 1.714 ± 0.012 (error on the mean). Scrutiny of the galaxy distribution in redshift space and the plane of the sky shows that there are two concentrations of galaxies near the X-ray source. In addition, there are three diffuse X-ray sources spread along the axis connecting the galaxy concentrations. LH146 is one of these three and lies approximately at the center of the two galaxy concentrations and the outer two diffuse X-ray sources. We thus conclude that LH146 is at the redshift initially reported but it is not a single virialized galaxy cluster, as previously assumed. Rather, it appears to mark the approximate center of a larger region containing more objects. For brevity, we refer to all these objects and their alignments as a large-scale structure. The exact nature of LH146 itself remains unclear.

  16. Dynamic stability test results on an 0.024 scale B-1 air vehicle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beeman, R. R.

    1972-01-01

    Dynamic longitudinal and lateral-directional stability characteristics of the B-1 air vehicle were investigated in three wind tunnels at the Langley Research Center. The main rotary derivatives were obtained for an angle of attack range of -3 degrees to +16 degrees for a Mach number range of 0.2 to 2.16. Damping in roll data could not be obtained at the supersonic Mach numbers. The Langley 7 x 10 foot high speed tunnel, the 8 foot transonic pressure tunnel, and the 4 foot Unitary Plan wind tunnel were the test sites. An 0.024 scale light-weight model was used on a forced oscillation type balance. Test Reynolds number varied from 474,000/ft to 1,550,000/ft. through the Mach number range tested. The results showed that the dynamic stability characteristics of the model in pitch and roll were generally satisfactory up to an angle attack of about +6 degrees. In the wing sweep range from 15 to 25 degrees the positive damping levels in roll deteriorated rapidly above +2 degrees angle of attack. This reduction in roll damping is believed to be due to the onset of separation over the wing as stall is approached.

  17. Assessment of improved root growth representation in a 1-D, field scale crop model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miltin Mboh, Cho; Gaiser, Thomas; Ewert, Frank

    2015-04-01

    Many 1-D, field scale crop models over-simplify root growth. The over-simplification of this "hidden half" of the crop may have significant consequences on simulated root water and nutrient uptake with a corresponding reflection on the simulated crop yields. Poor representation of root growth in crop models may therefore constitute a major source of uncertainty propagation. In this study we assess the effect of an improved representation of root growth in a model solution of the model framework SIMPLACE (Scientific Impact assessment and Modeling PLatform for Advanced Crop and Ecosystem management) compared to conventional 1-D approaches. The LINTUL5 crop growth model is coupled to the Hillflow soil water balance model within the SIMPLACE modeling framework (Gaiser et al, 2013). Root water uptake scenarios in the soil hydrological simulator Hillflow (Bronstert, 1995) together with an improved representation of root growth is compared to scenarios for which root growth is simplified. The improvement of root growth is achieved by integrating root growth solutions from R-SWMS (Javaux et al., 2008) into the SIMPLACE model solution. R-SWMS is a three dimensional model for simultaneous modeling of root growth, soil water fluxes and solute transport and uptake. These scenarios are tested by comparing how well the simulated water contents match with the observed soil water dynamics. The impacts of the scenarios on above ground biomass and wheat grain are assessed

  18. A Clinical Indications Prediction Scale Based on TWIST1 for Human Mesenchymal Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Boregowda, Siddaraju V.; Krishnappa, Veena; Haga, Christopher L.; Ortiz, Luis A.; Phinney, Donald G.

    2015-01-01

    In addition to their stem/progenitor properties, mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) also exhibit potent effector (angiogenic, antiinflammatory, immuno-modulatory) functions that are largely paracrine in nature. It is widely believed that effector functions underlie most of the therapeutic potential of MSCs and are independent of their stem/progenitor properties. Here we demonstrate that stem/progenitor and effector functions are coordinately regulated at the cellular level by the transcription factor Twist1 and specified within populations according to a hierarchical model. We further show that manipulation of Twist1 levels by genetic approaches or by exposure to widely used culture supplements including fibroblast growth factor 2 (Ffg2) and interferon gamma (IFN-gamma) alters MSC efficacy in cell-based and in vivo assays in a predictable manner. Thus, by mechanistically linking stem/progenitor and effector functions our studies provide a unifying framework in the form of an MSC hierarchy that models the functional complexity of populations. Using this framework, we developed a CLinical Indications Prediction (CLIP) scale that predicts how donor-to-donor heterogeneity and culture conditions impact the therapeutic efficacy of MSC populations for different disease indications. PMID:26981553

  19. Production of a national 1:1,000,000-scale hydrography dataset for the United States: feature selection, simplification, and refinement

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gary, Robin H.; Wilson, Zachary D.; Archuleta, Christy-Ann M.; Thompson, Florence E.; Vrabel, Joseph

    2009-01-01

    During 2006-09, the U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the National Atlas of the United States, produced a 1:1,000,000-scale (1:1M) hydrography dataset comprising streams and waterbodies for the entire United States, including Puerto Rico and the U.S. Virgin Islands, for inclusion in the recompiled National Atlas. This report documents the methods used to select, simplify, and refine features in the 1:100,000-scale (1:100K) (1:63,360-scale in Alaska) National Hydrography Dataset to create the national 1:1M hydrography dataset. Custom tools and semi-automated processes were created to facilitate generalization of the 1:100K National Hydrography Dataset (1:63,360-scale in Alaska) to 1:1M on the basis of existing small-scale hydrography datasets. The first step in creating the new 1:1M dataset was to address feature selection and optimal data density in the streams network. Several existing methods were evaluated. The production method that was established for selecting features for inclusion in the 1:1M dataset uses a combination of the existing attributes and network in the National Hydrography Dataset and several of the concepts from the methods evaluated. The process for creating the 1:1M waterbodies dataset required a similar approach to that used for the streams dataset. Geometric simplification of features was the next step. Stream reaches and waterbodies indicated in the feature selection process were exported as new feature classes and then simplified using a geographic information system tool. The final step was refinement of the 1:1M streams and waterbodies. Refinement was done through the use of additional geographic information system tools.

  20. Scale-4 analysis of pressurized water reactor critical configurations: Volume 5, North Anna Unit 1 Cycle 5

    SciTech Connect

    Bowman, S.M.; Suto, T. |

    1996-10-01

    ANSI/ANS 8.1 requires that calculational methods for away-from- reactor (AFR) criticality safety analyses be validated against experiment. This report summarizes part of the ongoing effort to benchmark AFR criticality analysis methods using selected critical configurations from commercial PWRs. Codes and data in the SCALE-4 code system were used. This volume documents the SCALE system analysis of one reactor critical configuration for North Anna Unit 1 Cycle 5. The KENO V.a criticality calculations for the North Anna 1 Cycle 5 beginning-of-cycle model yielded a value for k{sub eff} of 1. 0040{+-}0.0005.

  1. Effect of two-scale roughness on boundary layer transition over a heated flat plate: Part 1 -- Surface heat transfer

    SciTech Connect

    Pinson, M.W.; Wang, T.

    2000-04-01

    An experimental study was conducted to investigate surface heat transfer and boundary layer development associated with flow over a flat test surface covered with two roughness scales. Two-scale roughness was used because in-service aeroengines commonly display larger roughness concentrated at the leading edge with smaller roughness distributed downstream. The first scale, covering up to the first 5 cm of the test surface, was in the form of a sandpaper strip, an aluminum strip, or a cylinder. The second roughness scale covered the remainder of the test surface (2 m) in the form of sandpaper or a smooth surface. In Part 1, the surface heat transfer results are examined. Even though the roughness scales were hydraulically smooth, they induced significantly earlier transition onset, with the two-dimensional roughness causing earlier transition than three-dimensional roughness. All of the rough/smooth cases unexpectedly triggered earlier transition than rough/rough cases. This indicated that the scale of the step-change at the joint between two roughness scales was predominant over the downstream roughness on inducing early transition. Reducing the overall height of the step change was shown to have a greater effect on transition than the specific geometry of the roughness scale.

  2. PILOT-SCALE INVESTIGATION OF CLOSED-LOOP FLY ASH SLUICING. VOLUME 1. FINAL REPORT

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report gives results of a pilot-scale demonstration of the technical feasibility of closed-loop operation of fly ash sluicing systems. Chemical species leached from the ash increase the dissolved solids concentration of recycled sluice water to a point where equipment scaling...

  3. Free-Flight Zero-Lift Drag Results from a 1/5-Scale Model and Several Small-Scale Equivalent Bodies of Revolution of the Convair F-102 Configuration at Mach Numbers up to 1.34

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wallskog, Harvey A.

    1954-01-01

    A 1/5-scale, rocket-propelled model of the Convair F-102 configuration was tested in free flight to determine zero-lift drag at Mach numbers up to 1.34 and at Reynolds numbers comparable to those of the full-scale airplane. This large-scale model corresponded to the prototype airplane and had air flow through the duct. Additional zero-lift drag tests involved a series of small equivalent bodies of revolution which were launched by means of a helium gun. The several small-scale models tested corresponded to: the basic configuration, the 1/5-scale rocket-propelled model configuration, a 2-foot (full-scale) fuselage-extension configuration, and a 7-foot (full-scale) fuselage-extension configuration. Models designed to correspond to the area distribution at a Mach number of 1.0 were flown for each of these 'shapes and, in addition, models designed to correspond to the area distribution at a Mach number of 1.2 were flown for the 1/5-scale rocket-propelled model and the 7-foot-fuselage-extension configuration. The value of external pressure drag coefficient (including base drag) obtained from the large-scale rocket model was 0.0190 at a Mach number of 1..05 and the corresponding values from the equivalent-body tests varied from 0.0183 for the rocket-propelled model shape to 0.0137 for the 7-foot-fuselage-extension configuration. From the results of tests of equivalent bodies designed to correspond to the area distribution at a Mach number of 1.0, it is evident that the small changes in shape incorporated in the basic and 2-foot-fuselage-extension configurations from that of the rocket-propelled model configuration will provide no significant change in pressure drag. On the other hand, the data from the 7-foot-fuselage-extension model indicate a substantial reduction in pressure drag at transonic speeds.

  4. Evaluation of the First Transport Rotorcraft Airframe Crash Testbed (TRACT 1) Full-Scale Crash Test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Annett, Martin S.; Littell, Justin D.; Jackson, Karen E.; Bark, Lindley W.; DeWeese, Rick L.; McEntire, B. Joseph

    2014-01-01

    In 2012, the NASA Rotary Wing Crashworthiness Program initiated the Transport Rotorcraft Airframe Crash Testbed (TRACT) research program by obtaining two CH-46E helicopters from the Navy CH-46E Program Office (PMA-226) at the Navy Flight Readiness Center in Cherry Point, North Carolina. Full-scale crash tests were planned to assess dynamic responses of transport-category rotorcraft under combined horizontal and vertical impact loading. The first crash test (TRACT 1) was performed at NASA Langley Research Center's Landing and Impact Research Facility (LandIR), which enables the study of critical interactions between the airframe, seat, and occupant during a controlled crash environment. The CH-46E fuselage is categorized as a medium-lift rotorcraft with fuselage dimensions comparable to a regional jet or business jet. The first TRACT test (TRACT 1) was conducted in August 2013. The primary objectives for TRACT 1 were to: (1) assess improvements to occupant loads and displacement with the use of crashworthy features such as pre-tensioning active restraints and energy absorbing seats, (2) develop novel techniques for photogrammetric data acquisition to measure occupant and airframe kinematics, and (3) provide baseline data for future comparison with a retrofitted airframe configuration. Crash test conditions for TRACT 1 were 33-ft/s forward and 25-ft/s vertical combined velocity onto soft soil, which represent a severe, but potentially survivable impact scenario. The extraordinary value of the TRACT 1 test was reflected by the breadth of meaningful experiments. A total of 8 unique experiments were conducted to evaluate ATD responses, seat and restraint performance, cargo restraint effectiveness, patient litter behavior, and photogrammetric techniques. A combination of Hybrid II, Hybrid III, and ES-2 Anthropomorphic Test Devices (ATDs) were placed in forward and side facing seats and occupant results were compared against injury criteria. Loads from ATDs in energy

  5. Flight Characteristics of a 1/4-Scale Model of the XFV-1 Airplane (TED No. NACA DE-378)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kelly, Mark W.; Smaus, Louis H.

    1952-01-01

    A l/4-scale dynamically similar model of the XFV-1 airplane has been flown in the Ames 40- by 80-foot wind tunnel, using the trailing flight-cable technique. This investigation was devoted to establishing the flight characteristics of the model in forward flight from hovering to wing stall, and in yawed flight (wing span alined with the relative wind) from hovering to the maximum speed at which controlled flight could be maintained. Landings, take-offs, and hovering characteristics in flights close to the ground were also investigated.. Since the remote control system for the model was rather complicated and provided artificial damping about the pitch, roll, and yaw axes, sufficient data from the control-system calibration tests are included in this report to specify the performance of the control system in relation to both the model flight tests and the design of an automatic control system for the full-scale airplane. The model in hovering flight appeared to be neutrally stable. The response of the model to the controls was very rapid, and it was always necessary to provide some amount of artificial damping to maintain control. The model could be landed with little difficulty by hovering approximately a foot above the floor and then cutting the power. Take-offs were more difficult to perform, primarily because the rate of change in power to the model motors was limited by the characteristics of the available power source. The model was,capable of controlled yawed flight at translational velocities up to and including 20 feet per second. The effectiveness of the controls decreased with increasing speed, however, and at 25 fps control in pitch, and probably roll, was lost completely. The model was flown in controlled forward flight from hovering up to 70 fps. During these flights the model appeared to be more difficult to control in yaw than it was in pitch or roll. The flights of the model were recorded by motion picture cameras. These motion pictures are

  6. Population-scale assessment endpoints in ecological risk assessment. Part 1: Reflections of stakeholder values.

    PubMed

    Landis, Wayne G

    2006-01-01

    The selection of appropriate assessment endpoints is a basic element of an ecological risk assessment, especially at regional or watershed scales. Because ecological services often are tied to specific species, the risk to populations is a critical endpoint and feature of ecological risk assessments. The first item is a discussion of the replacement of population-level risk assessment with the construct of a population-scale assessment endpoint. Next, the criteria that are currently used for assessment endpoints are reviewed and evaluated for utility in an ecological risk assessment. Following this examination, assessment endpoints from a number of regional-scale ecological risk assessments are compared. The outcome of this evaluation is that population-scale assessment endpoints are important expressions of the valued components of ecological structures. Finally, a few recommendations for the selection of assessment endpoints at a population scale are listed. PMID:16640323

  7. Wind tunnel test results of a 1/8-scale fan-in-wing model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, John C.; Gentry, Garl L.; Gorton, Susan A.

    1996-01-01

    A 1/8-scale model of a fan-in-wing concept considered for development by Grumman Aerospace Corporation for the U.S. Army was tested in the Langley 14- by 22-Foot Subsonic Tunnel. Hover testing, which included height above a pressure-instrumented ground plane, angle of pitch, and angle of roll for a range of fan thrust, was conducted in a model preparation area near the tunnel. The air loads and surface pressures on the model were measured for several configurations in the model preparation area and in the tunnel. The major hover configuration change was varying the angles of the vanes attached to the exit of the fans for producing propulsive force. As the model height above the ground was decreased, there was a significant variation of thrust-removed normal force with constant fan speed. The greatest variation was generally for the height-to-fan exit diameter ratio of less than 2.5; the variation was reduced by deflecting fan exit flow outboard with the vanes. In the tunnel angles of pitch and sideslip, height above the tunnel floor, and wind speed were varied for a range of fan thrust and different vane angle configurations. Other configuration features such as flap deflections and tail incidence were evaluated as well. Though the V-tail empennage provided an increase in static longitudinal stability, the total model configuration remained unstable.

  8. Safety analysis of the CSTR-1 bench-scale coal liquefaction unit

    SciTech Connect

    Hulburt, D.A.

    1981-05-01

    The objective of the program reported herein was to provide a Safety Analysis of the CSTR-1 bench scale unit located in Building 167 at the Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center. It was apparent that considerable effort was expended in the design and construction of the unit, and in the development of operating procedures, with regard to safety. Exhaust ventilation, H/sub 2/ and H/sub 2/S monitoring, overpressure protection, overtemperature protection, and interlock systems have been provided. Present settings on the pressure and temperature safety systems are too high, however, to insure prevention of vessel deformation or damage in all cases. While the occurrence of catastrophic rupture of a system pressure vessel (e.g., reactor, high pressure separators) is unlikely, the potential consequences to personnel are severe. Feasibility of providing shielding for these components should be considered. A more probable mode of vessel failure in the event of overpressure or overtemperature and failure of the safety system is yielding of the closure bolts followed by high pressure flow across the mating surfaces. As a minimum, shielding should be designed to restrict travel of resultant spray. The requirements for personal protective equipment are presently stated in rather broad and general terms in the operating procedures. Safe practices and procedures would be more assured if specific requirements were stated and included for each operational step. Recommendations were developed for all hazards triggered by the guidelines.

  9. Large scale prop-fan structural design study. Volume 1: Initial concepts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Billman, L. C.; Gruska, C. J.; Ladden, R. M.; Leishman, D. K.; Turnberg, J. E.

    1988-01-01

    In recent years, considerable attention has been directed toward improving aircraft fuel consumption. Studies have shown that the inherent efficiency advantage that turboprop propulsion systems have demonstrated at lower cruise speeds may now be extended to the higher speeds of today's turbofan and turbojet-powered aircraft. To achieve this goal, new propeller designs will require features such as thin, high speed airfoils and aerodynamic sweep, features currently found only in wing designs for high speed aircraft. This is Volume 1 of a 2 volume study to establish structural concepts for such advanced propeller blades, to define their structural properties, to identify any new design, analysis, or fabrication techniques which were required, and to determine the structural tradeoffs involved with several blade shapes selected primarily on the basis of aero/acoustic design considerations. The feasibility of fabricating and testing dynamically scaled models of these blades for aeroelastic testing was also established. The preliminary design of a blade suitable for flight use in a testbed advanced turboprop was conducted and is described in Volume 2.

  10. Large and small scale circulation signatures of the ERS-1 SAR over the Gulf Stream

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beal, R.; Kudryavtsev, V.; Thompson, D.; Grodsky, S.; Tilley, D.; Dulov, V.

    1994-01-01

    Since September 1991, the ERS-1 SAR (Synthetic Aperture Radar) has collected approximately 170 frames of ocean imagery on 28 passes over the western Gulf Stream in support of ESA experiment US8-2c. SAR signatures of the north wall are seen on nearly all passes, with modulation depth varying from 3% to 35% for 100 m samples. Many small and mesoscale circulation features associated with the Stream are evident. The detailed form of the signature varies considerably, however. Narrow bright or dark linear features appear to follow streamlines, and on one occasion a strong dark line was associated with an in situ measurement of a sharp current shear. Similarly, larger spatial scale changes in backscatter over the Stream were associated with in situ measurements of atmospheric stability transitions. Physical explanations for the narrow features are not so obvious. However, the accumulation of surfactants along converging current boundaries or local short wave straining and breaking appear plausible. These preliminary results strongly suggest that a wide swath (approximately 500 km) SAR with at least 100 m resolution would be a useful adjunct to existing satellite AVHRR (Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer) imagery.

  11. PROSPECTS FOR COLLIDERS AND COLLIDER PHYSICS TO THE 1 PEV ENERGY SCALE

    SciTech Connect

    KING,B.J.

    2000-05-05

    A review is given of the prospects for future colliders and collider physics at the energy frontier. A proof-of-plausibility scenario is presented for maximizing the authors progress in elementary particle physics by extending the energy reach of hadron and lepton colliders as quickly and economically as might be technically and financially feasible. The scenario comprises 5 colliders beyond the LHC--one each of e{sup +}e{sup {minus}} and hadron colliders and three {mu}{sup +}{mu}{sup {minus}} colliders--and is able to hold to the historical rate of progress in the log-energy reach of hadron and lepton colliders, reaching the 1 PeV constituent mass scale by the early 2040's. The technical and fiscal requirements for the feasibility of the scenario are assessed and relevant long-term R and D projects are identified. Considerations of both cost and logistics seem to strongly favor housing most or all of the colliders in the scenario in a new world high energy physics laboratory.

  12. Interferometric 30 m bench for calibrations of 1D scales and optical distance measuring instruments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Unkuri, J.; Rantanen, A.; Manninen, J.; Esala, V.-P.; Lassila, A.

    2012-09-01

    During construction of a new metrology building for MIKES, a 30 m interferometric bench was designed. The objective was to implement a straight, stable, adjustable and multifunctional 30 m measuring bench for calibrations. Special attention was paid to eliminating the effects of thermal expansion and inevitable concrete shrinkage. The linear guide, situated on top of a monolithic concrete beam, comprises two parallel round shafts with adjustable fixtures every 1 m. A carriage is moved along the rail and its position is followed by a reference interferometer. Depending on the measurement task, one or two retro-reflectors are fixed on the carriage. A microscope with a CCD camera and a monitor can be used to detect line mark positions on different line standards. When calibrating optical distance measuring instruments, various targets can be fixed to the carriage. For the most accurate measurements an online Abbe-error correction based on simultaneous carriage pitch measurement by a separate laser interferometer is applied. The bench is used for calibrations of machinist scales, tapes, circometers, electronic distance meters, total stations and laser trackers. The estimated expanded uncertainty for 30 m displacement for highest accuracy calibrations is 2.6 µm.

  13. Degree-scale Cosmic Microwave Background Polarization Measurements from Three Years of BICEP1 Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barkats, D.; Aikin, R.; Bischoff, C.; Buder, I.; Kaufman, J. P.; Keating, B. G.; Kovac, J. M.; Su, M.; Ade, P. A. R.; Battle, J. O.; Bierman, E. M.; Bock, J. J.; Chiang, H. C.; Dowell, C. D.; Duband, L.; Filippini, J.; Hivon, E. F.; Holzapfel, W. L.; Hristov, V. V.; Jones, W. C.; Kuo, C. L.; Leitch, E. M.; Mason, P. V.; Matsumura, T.; Nguyen, H. T.; Ponthieu, N.; Pryke, C.; Richter, S.; Rocha, G.; Sheehy, C.; Kernasovskiy, S. S.; Takahashi, Y. D.; Tolan, J. E.; Yoon, K. W.

    2014-03-01

    BICEP1 is a millimeter-wavelength telescope designed specifically to measure the inflationary B-mode polarization of the cosmic microwave background at degree angular scales. We present results from an analysis of the data acquired during three seasons of observations at the South Pole (2006-2008). This work extends the two-year result published in Chiang et al., with additional data from the third season and relaxed detector-selection criteria. This analysis also introduces a more comprehensive estimation of band power window functions, improved likelihood estimation methods, and a new technique for deprojecting monopole temperature-to-polarization leakage that reduces this class of systematic uncertainty to a negligible level. We present maps of temperature, E- and B-mode polarization, and their associated angular power spectra. The improvement in the map noise level and polarization spectra error bars are consistent with the 52% increase in integration time relative to Chiang et al. We confirm both self-consistency of the polarization data and consistency with the two-year results. We measure the angular power spectra at 21 <= l <= 335 and find that the EE spectrum is consistent with Lambda cold dark matter cosmology, with the first acoustic peak of the EE spectrum now detected at 15σ. The BB spectrum remains consistent with zero. From B-modes only, we constrain the tensor-to-scalar ratio to r = 0.03^{+0.27}_{-0.23}, or r < 0.70 at 95% confidence level.

  14. Laboratory-scale analysis of aquifer remediation by in-well vapor stripping 1. Laboratory results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonen, Ori; Gvirtzman, Haim

    1997-12-01

    This study is a laboratory test of the aquifer remediation concept proposed by Gvirtzman and Gorelick (1992, Transp. Porous Media, 8: 71-92), which involves the removal of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) dissolved in groundwater. The principle is to inject air into a well, creating air-lift pumping, which is used as a means of in-well vapor stripping. The partially treated water is separated from the VOC vapor and infiltrates back to the water table. A laboratory-scale aquifer model containing a remediation-well prototype was used to trace VOC removal over time. The removal rates of trichloroethylene (TCE), toluene and chloroform were monitored using eight triple-level observation wells. The continuous decrease of VOC concentrations in space and time was interpreted based on three processes: (1) the diffusional mass transfer between the contaminated water and the air bubbles during their rise within the well: (2) the desorption of VOCs from the solid matrix to the water phase; (3) the flow field in the saturated zone driven by the continuous water circulation between the pumping well and the recharging area. In a companion paper (Pinto et al., 1997), three-dimensional flow and transport modeling with inter-phase mass transfer is carried out to simulate these processes.

  15. An atomic scale STM study of the Fe 3O 4(0 0 1) surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ceballos, S. F.; Mariotto, G.; Jordan, K.; Murphy, S.; Seoighe, C.; Shvets, I. V.

    2004-01-01

    Despite the intensive investigation into the electronic properties of magnetite, fundamental issues related to the Verwey transition and the electronic transport mechanism are not fully understood. These issues are further complicated at the surface of magnetite crystals, due to the large number of possible surface terminations. The preparation procedure plays a fundamental role in determining the O/Fe ratio, and therefore the electronic properties of a magnetite crystal. We present a detailed investigation of the influence of the preparation conditions on the morphology of Fe 3O 4(0 0 1) single crystal surfaces using AES, LEED, and STM. We show that long anneals of single crystals in UHV cause segregation of contaminants to the surface and that a series of surface reconstructions is induced. A different preparation procedure gives rise to a clean surface exhibiting a ( 2× 2)R 45° reconstruction. This surface is terminated at the octahedral plane and has been imaged down to the atomic scale. This provides a useful test system to study the Verwey transition at the surface.

  16. Aerobic bioremediation of 1,2 dichloroethane and vinyl chloride at field scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davis, Gregory B.; Patterson, Bradley M.; Johnston, Colin D.

    2009-06-01

    Aerobic bioremediation of 1,2 dichloroethane (1,2 DCA) and vinyl chloride (VC) was evaluated at field scale in a layered, silty and fine-sand anaerobic aquifer. Maximum concentrations of 1,2 DCA (2 g/L) and VC (0.75 g/L) in groundwater were within 25% and 70% of pure compound solubility, respectively. Aerobic conditions were induced by injecting air into sparging wells screened 20.5-21.5 m below ground (17-18 m below the water table). Using a cycle of 23 h of air injection followed by three days of no air injection, fifty days of air injection were accumulated over a 12 month period which included some longer periods of operational shutdown. Oxygen and volatile organic compound probes, and multilevel samplers were used to determine changes of the primary contaminants and the associated inorganic chemistry at multiple locations and depths. Air (oxygen) was distributed laterally up to 25 m from the sparge points, with oxygen partial pressures up to 0.7 atmospheres (28-35 mg/L in groundwater) near to the sparge points. The dissolved mass of 1,2 DCA and VC was reduced by greater than 99% over the 590 m 2 trial plot. Significantly, pH declined from nearly 11 to less than 9, and sulfate concentrations increased dramatically, suggesting the occurrence of mineral sulfide (e.g., pyrite) oxidation. Chloride and bicarbonate (aerobic biodegradation by-products) concentration increases were used to estimate that 300-1000 kg of chlorinated hydrocarbons were biodegraded, although the ratio of 1,2 DCA to VC that was biodegraded remained uncertain. The mass biodegraded was comparable but less than the 400-1400 kg of chlorinated compounds removed from the aqueous phase within a 10,000 m 3 volume of the aquifer. Due to the likely presence of non-aqueous phase liquid, the relative proportion of volatilisation compared to biodegradation could not be determined. The aerobic biodegradation rates were greater than those previously estimated from laboratory-based studies.

  17. A Comparison of Pressure Measurements Between a Full-Scale and a 1/6-Scale F/A-18 Twin Tail During Buffet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moses, Robert W.; Pendleton, Ed

    1996-01-01

    In 1993, tail buffet tests were performed on a full-scale, production model F/A-18 in the 80 x 120-foot Wind Tunnel at NASA Ames Research Center. Steady and unsteady pressures were recorded on both sides of the starboard vertical tail for an angle-of-attack range of 20 to 40 degrees and at a sideslip range of -1 6 to 16 degrees at freestream velocities up to 100 knots (Mach 0.15, Reynolds number 1.23 x 10(exp 7). The aircraft was equipped with removable leading edge extension (LEX) fences that are used in flight to reduce tail buffet loads. In 1995, tail buffet tests were performed on a 1/6-scale F-18 A/B model in the Transonic Dynamics Tunnel (TDT) at NASA Langley Research Center. Steady and unsteady pressures were recorded on both sides of both vertical tails for an angle-of-attack range of 7 to 37 degrees at freestream velocities up to 65 knots (Mach 0.10). Comparisons of steady and unsteady pressures and root bending moments are presented for these wind-tunnel models for selected test cases. Representative pressure and root bending moment power spectra are also discussed, as are selected pressure cross-spectral densities.

  18. The Plate Scale of the SODISM Instrument and the Determination of the Solar Radius at 607.1 nm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meftah, M.; Hauchecorne, A.; Crepel, M.; Irbah, A.; Corbard, T.; Djafer, D.; Hochedez, J.-F.

    2014-01-01

    Knowledge of the Solar Diameter Imager and Surface Mapper (SODISM) plate scale is a fundamental parameter for obtaining the solar radius. We have determined the plate scale of the telescope on the ground and in flight onboard the Picard spacecraft. The results show significant differences; the main reason is that the conditions of observation are not the same. In addition, the space environment has an impact on the performance of a metrology instrument. Therefore, calibration in space and under the same conditions of observation is crucial. The transit of Venus allowed us to determine the plate scale of the SODISM telescope and hence the absolute value of the solar radius. The transit was observed from space by the Picard spacecraft on 5 - 6 June 2012. We exploited the data recorded by SODISM to determine the plate scale of the instrument, which depends on the characteristics of optical elements (mirrors, filters, or front window). The mean plate scale at 607.1 nm is found to be 1.0643 arcseconds pixel-1 with 3×10-4 RMS. The solar radius at 607.1 nm from 1 AU is found to be equal to 959.86 arcseconds.

  19. New mechanism for mass gap scaling and transfer-matrix study for (1+1)D directed percolation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henkel, Malte; Privman, Vladimir

    1990-10-01

    The standard scaling mechanism for matching asymptotic behaviors on the approach to criticality fails for directed percolation, as indicated by transfer-matrix calculations for sizes up to N=15. A formulation is proposed incorporating irrelevant-variable corrections in a new pattern of asymptotic scaling. Numerical data support these theoretical predictions and, among other results, yield a new estimate, λ=0.37+/-0.04, for the leading irrelevant-variable exponent.

  20. Design, construction, and evaluation of a 1:8 scale model binaural manikin.

    PubMed

    Robinson, Philip; Xiang, Ning

    2013-03-01

    Many experiments in architectural acoustics require presenting listeners with simulations of different rooms to compare. Acoustic scale modeling is a feasible means to create accurate simulations of many rooms at reasonable cost. A critical component in a scale model room simulation is a receiver that properly emulates a human receiver. For this purpose, a scale model artificial head has been constructed and tested. This paper presents the design and construction methods used, proper equalization procedures, and measurements of its response. A headphone listening experiment examining sound externalization with various reflection conditions is presented that demonstrates its use for psycho-acoustic testing. PMID:23464123

  1. Digital Renovation of the Atlas of Mars 1:15,000,000-Scale Global Geologic Series Maps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skinner, J. A., Jr.; Hare, T. M.; Tanaka, K. L.

    2006-03-01

    We have manually re-digitized the Viking-based 1:15M scale geologic maps using MDIM 2.1 and MOLA shaded-relief images as base images. These efforts have produced fully-registered geologic maps with structure and associated metadata.

  2. Relationship of L1 Skills and L2 Aptitude to L2 Anxiety on the Foreign Language Classroom Anxiety Scale

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sparks, Richard L.; Patton, Jon

    2013-01-01

    The Foreign Language Classroom Anxiety Scale (FLCAS) has been challenged on the grounds that it may also assess language learning skills. In this study, 128 students who had been administered measures of first language (L1) skills in elementary school were followed from 1st to 10th grade. Fifty-three students had completed second language (L2)…

  3. Scale up tools in reactive extrusion and compounding processes. Could 1D-computer modeling be helpful?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pradel, J.-L.; David, C.; Quinebèche, S.; Blondel, P.

    2014-05-01

    Industrial scale-up (or scale down) in Compounding and Reactive Extrusion processes is one of the most critical R&D challenges. Indeed, most of High Performances Polymers are obtained within a reactive compounding involving chemistry: free radical grafting, in situ compatibilization, rheology control... but also side reactions: oxidation, branching, chain scission... As described by basic Arrhenius and kinetics laws, the competition between all chemical reactions depends on residence time distribution and temperature. Then, to ensure the best possible scale up methodology, we need tools to match thermal history of the formulation along the screws from a lab scale twin screw extruder to an industrial one. This paper proposes a comparison between standard scale-up laws and the use of Computer modeling Software such as Ludovic® applied and compared to experimental data. Scaling data from a compounding line to another one, applying general rules (for example at constant specific mechanical energy), shows differences between experimental and computed data, and error depends on the screw speed range. For more accurate prediction, 1D-Computer Modeling could be used to optimize the process conditions to ensure the best scale-up product, especially in temperature sensitive reactive extrusion processes. When the product temperature along the screws is the key, Ludovic® software could help to compute the temperature profile along the screws and extrapolate conditions, even screw profile, on industrial extruders.

  4. Analysis of Multi-Scale Radiometric Data Collected during the Cold Land Processes Experiment-1 (CLPX-1)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tedesco, M.; Kim, E. J.; Gasiewski, A.; Stankov, B.

    2005-01-01

    Brightness temperature maps at 18.7 and 37 GHz collected at the Fraser and North Park Meso-Scale Areas during the Cold Land Processes Experiment by the NOAA Polarimetric Scanning Radiometer (PSWA) airborne sensor are analyzed. The Fraser site is mostly covered by forest with a typical snowpack depth of 1 m while North Park has no forest cover and is characterized by patches of shallow snow. We examine histograms of the brightness temperatures at 500 m resolution for both the Fraser and North Park areas. The histograms can be modelled by a log-normal distribution in the case of the Fraser MSA and by a bi-modal distribution in the case of the North Park MSA. The histograms of the brightness temperatures at coarser resolutions are also plotted to study the effects of sensor resolution on the shape of the distribution, on the values of the average brightness temperatures and standard deviations. Finally, the values of brightness temperatures obtained by re-sampling (aggregating) the data at 25 km resolution are compared with the values of the brightness temperatures collected by the Advanced Microwave Scanning Radiometer (AMSR-E) and Special Sensor Microwave/Imager (SSMII) satellite radiometers. The results show that in both areas for sensor footprint larger than 5000 m, the brightness temperatures show a flat distribution and the memory of the initial distribution is lost. The values of the brightness temperatures measured by the satellite radiometers are in good agreement with the values obtained averaging the airborne data, even if some discrepancies occur.

  5. The technological influence on health professionals' care: translation and adaptation of scales1

    PubMed Central

    Almeida, Carlos Manuel Torres; Almeida, Filipe Nuno Alves dos Santos; Escola, Joaquim José Jacinto; Rodrigues, Vitor Manuel Costa Pereira

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: in this study, two research tools were validated to study the impact of technological influence on health professionals' care practice. Methods: the following methodological steps were taken: bibliographic review, selection of the scales, translation and cultural adaptation and analysis of psychometric properties. Results: the psychometric properties of the scale were assessed based on its application to a sample of 341 individuals (nurses, physicians, final-year nursing and medical students). The validity, reliability and internal consistency were tested. Two scales were found: Caring Attributes Questionnaire (adapted) with a Cronbach's Alpha coefficient of 0.647 and the Technological Influence Questionnaire (adapted) with an Alpha coefficient of 0.777. Conclusions: the scales are easy to apply and reveal reliable psychometric properties, an additional quality as they permit generalized studies on a theme as important as the impact of technological influence in health care. PMID:27143537

  6. Development of scales to measure psychosocial care needs of children with seizures and their parents. 1.

    PubMed

    Austin, J; Dunn, D; Huster, G; Rose, D

    1998-06-01

    There is little research and no self-report assessment instruments available to guide nurses in the provision of psychosocial care to children with seizures and their families. Information on the development of two instruments, Report of Psychosocial Care Scale and Child Report of Psycyhosocial Care Scale, and their use in a research study to measure psychosocial care of children with new-onset seizures and their parents are presented in three parts. This first article describes development and initial testing of their psychometric properties. The second article, Part 2, "Psychosocial Care Needs of Parents of Children with New-Onset Seizures," describes results from the use of the parent scale with mothers and fathers of children with new-onset seizures. The third article, Part 3, "Psychosocial Care Needs of Children with New-Onset Seizures," reports findings from the use of the child scale with children ages 8-14 years with new-onset seizures. PMID:9689606

  7. Developing the Psychological Strain Scales (PSS): Reliability, Validity, and Preliminary Hypothesis Tests1

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jie; Lu, Juncheng; Zhao, Sibo; Lamis, Dorian A.; Li, Ning; Kong, Yuanyuan; Jia, Cunxian; Zhou, Li; Ma, Zhenyu

    2012-01-01

    Since its inception, the Strain Theory of Suicide has been tested and supported in a number of empirical studies. This social psychological theory can be employed as a complementary conceptualization to account for suicidal behaviors as well as mental disorders. However, the lack of consistent measurements of the strains limits the application of the theory in scientific research. Our research team has developed such scales for future testing of the Strain Theory of Suicide in a more systematic approach. For the initial items to measure the four strains (value, aspiration, deprivation, and coping), we solicited approximately 40 items for each strain with high face validity by about 30 fellow researchers. A preliminary examination of about 160 items for consistency and validity, with a sample of about 300 college students, yielded 20 consistent items for each of the four strain scales. Then, a second study was conducted at a different university with approximately 500 students to further streamline each of the four strain scales and test the validity of each with corresponding established scales and variables. As a result, 15 items were selected for each of the four Psychological Strain Scales (PSS). In correlation and multiple regression analyses, we found support for the hypotheses regarding the positive associations between psychological strains measured by the PSS and psychopathology including suicidal ideation. Follow up research with the new scales needs to be carried out in order to test the effects of psychological strains on suicide and mental disorders for various populations. PMID:24443628

  8. A Comparison of Pressure Measurements Between a Full-Scale and a 1/16-Scale F/A-18 Twin Tail During Buffet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moses, Robert W.; Pendleton, Ed

    1997-01-01

    In 1993, tail buffet tests were performed on a full-scale, production model F/A-18 in the 80-by-120 Foot Wind Tunnel at NASA Ames Research Center. Steady and unsteady pressures were recorded on both sides of the starboard vertical tail for an angle of attack range of 20 to 40 degrees and at a sideslip range of -16 to 16 degrees at freestream velocities up to 100 knots (Mach 0.15, Reynolds number 1.23 x 10(exp 7)). The aircraft was equipped with removable leading edge extension (LEX) fences that are used in flight to reduce tail buffet loads. In 1995, tail buffet tests were performed on a 1/6-scale F-18 A/B model in the Transonic Dynamics Tunnel (TDT) at NASA Langley Research Center. Steady and unsteady pressures were recorded on both sides of both vertical tails for an angle-of-attack range of 7 to 37 degrees at freestream velocities up to 65 knots (Mach 0.10). Comparisons of steady and unsteady pressures and root bending moments are presented for these wind-tunnel models for selected test cases. Representative pressure and root bending moment power spectra are also discussed, as are selected pressure cross-spectral densities.

  9. Data from Tests of a 1/5-Scale Model of a Proposed High-Speed Submarine in the Langley Full-Scale Tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cocke, Bennie W.; Lipson, Stanley; Scallion, William I.

    1950-01-01

    Tests of a 1/5 scale model of a proposed 153-foot high-speed submarine have been conducted in the Langley full-scale tunnel at the request of the Bureau of Ships, Department of the Navy. The test program included: (1) force tests to determine the drag, control effectiveness, and static stability characteristics for a number of model configurations, both in pitch and in yaw, (2) pressure measurements to determine the boundary-layer conditions and flow characteristics in the region of the propeller, and (3) an investigation of the effects of propeller operation on the model aerodynamic characteristics. In response to oral requests from the Bureau of Ships representatives t hat the basic data obtained in these tests be made available to them as rapidly as possible, this data report has been prepared to present some of the more pertinent results. All test results given in the present paper are for the propeller-removed condition and were obtained at a Reynolds number of approximately 22,300,000 based on model length.

  10. Spin Tests of 1/20-Scale Models of the Chance Vought Revised XF6U-1 and F6U-1 Airplanes, TED No. NACA 2390

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klinar, Walter J.; Berman, Theodore

    1948-01-01

    An investigation has been conducted in the Langley 20-foot free-spinning tunnel on the 1/20-scale model of the Chance Vought XF6U-1 airplane altered to represent the XF6U-1 airplane as it will be spin-tested in flight, and also altered to represent the F6U-1 airplane as it will be produced for service use. Spin tests were made to determine the effects of control settings and movements at the normal loading. The results show that the spins obtained on the revised XF6U-1 airplane will be oscillatory in roll and yaw and that recoveries by rudder reversal will be rapid. Model test results indicate that the F6U-1 airplane will probably not spin. Inasmuch as the results of this investigation show that the new designs are as good as or better than the original XF6U-1 design in regard to spin recovery, it is felt that the conclusions and recommendations reached for the original design can be applied to the new designs for all loading conditions.

  11. Degree-scale cosmic microwave background polarization measurements from three years of BICEP1 data

    SciTech Connect

    Barkats, D.; Aikin, R.; Bock, J. J.; Filippini, J.; Hristov, V. V.; Bischoff, C.; Buder, I.; Kovac, J. M.; Kaufman, J. P.; Keating, B. G.; Bierman, E. M.; Su, M.; Ade, P. A. R.; Battle, J. O.; Dowell, C. D.; Chiang, H. C.; Duband, L.; Hivon, E. F.; Holzapfel, W. L.; Jones, W. C.; and others

    2014-03-10

    BICEP1 is a millimeter-wavelength telescope designed specifically to measure the inflationary B-mode polarization of the cosmic microwave background at degree angular scales. We present results from an analysis of the data acquired during three seasons of observations at the South Pole (2006-2008). This work extends the two-year result published in Chiang et al., with additional data from the third season and relaxed detector-selection criteria. This analysis also introduces a more comprehensive estimation of band power window functions, improved likelihood estimation methods, and a new technique for deprojecting monopole temperature-to-polarization leakage that reduces this class of systematic uncertainty to a negligible level. We present maps of temperature, E- and B-mode polarization, and their associated angular power spectra. The improvement in the map noise level and polarization spectra error bars are consistent with the 52% increase in integration time relative to Chiang et al. We confirm both self-consistency of the polarization data and consistency with the two-year results. We measure the angular power spectra at 21 ≤ ℓ ≤ 335 and find that the EE spectrum is consistent with Lambda cold dark matter cosmology, with the first acoustic peak of the EE spectrum now detected at 15σ. The BB spectrum remains consistent with zero. From B-modes only, we constrain the tensor-to-scalar ratio to r=0.03{sub −0.23}{sup +0.27}, or r < 0.70 at 95% confidence level.

  12. QSAR Modeling Using Large-Scale Databases: Case Study for HIV-1 Reverse Transcriptase Inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Tarasova, Olga A; Urusova, Aleksandra F; Filimonov, Dmitry A; Nicklaus, Marc C; Zakharov, Alexey V; Poroikov, Vladimir V

    2015-07-27

    Large-scale databases are important sources of training sets for various QSAR modeling approaches. Generally, these databases contain information extracted from different sources. This variety of sources can produce inconsistency in the data, defined as sometimes widely diverging activity results for the same compound against the same target. Because such inconsistency can reduce the accuracy of predictive models built from these data, we are addressing the question of how best to use data from publicly and commercially accessible databases to create accurate and predictive QSAR models. We investigate the suitability of commercially and publicly available databases to QSAR modeling of antiviral activity (HIV-1 reverse transcriptase (RT) inhibition). We present several methods for the creation of modeling (i.e., training and test) sets from two, either commercially or freely available, databases: Thomson Reuters Integrity and ChEMBL. We found that the typical predictivities of QSAR models obtained using these different modeling set compilation methods differ significantly from each other. The best results were obtained using training sets compiled for compounds tested using only one method and material (i.e., a specific type of biological assay). Compound sets aggregated by target only typically yielded poorly predictive models. We discuss the possibility of "mix-and-matching" assay data across aggregating databases such as ChEMBL and Integrity and their current severe limitations for this purpose. One of them is the general lack of complete and semantic/computer-parsable descriptions of assay methodology carried by these databases that would allow one to determine mix-and-matchability of result sets at the assay level. PMID:26046311

  13. KPC-SCALE STUDY OF SUBSTRUCTURES INSIDE GALAXIES out to z ~ 1.3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hemmati, Shoubaneh; Mobasher, B.; Miller, S.; Nayyeri, H.

    2014-01-01

    Studying the resolved properties of galaxies in kpc scale has the capability to address major questions in galaxy structure formation and stellar properties evolution. We use a unique sample of 129 morphologically inclusive disk-like galaxies in the redshift range 0.21.3, spread over both GOODS fields with available dynamics from the Deep Imaging Multi-Object Spectrograph (DEIMOS) on the KECK II telescope, with extended integration times leading to significant improvements in determining rotational velocity for each galaxy. We take advantage of Hubble Space Telescope (HST) ACS and WFC3 mosaics from the CANDELS program, to perform SED modeling per resolution element in each galaxy and produce resolved rest-frame (U-V) color, stellar mass, star formation rate, age and extinction map for each galaxy. We analyze the effect of changing the Metallicity from solar to sub-solar on all our measurements. We identify red and blue regions inside galaxies based on their rest-frame (U-V) color maps with an innovative method. We show that red regions have higher stellar masses and older ages compared to the blue regions in galaxies. We also demonstrate that red regions are on average closer to the center of the galaxy than the blue regions and their spatial distance does not show a significant evolution with redshift and stellar mass of the host galaxy. Investigating the specific star formation rate evolution with redshift and dynamical mass, we notice that the evolutions in the whole galaxies are in perfect agreement with predictions from theory and previous observations. Blue regions show significantly higher sSFR and also higher slopes with redshift and dynamical mass compared to the whole galaxies and red regions are below the well-defined relation for the main sequence of star forming galaxies.

  14. 1/48-scale model of an F-18 aircraft in Flow Visualization Facility (FVF)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1985-01-01

    This image shows a plastic 1/48-scale model of an F-18 aircraft inside the 'Water Tunnel' more formally known as the NASA Dryden Flow Visualization Facility. Water is pumped through the tunnel in the direction of normal airflow over the aircraft; then, colored dyes are pumped through tubes with needle valves. The dyes flow back along the airframe and over the airfoils highlighting their aerodynamic characteristics. The aircraft can also be moved through its pitch axis to observe airflow disruptions while simulating actual flight at high angles of attack. The Water Tunnel at NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, CA, became operational in 1983 when Dryden was a Flight Research Facility under the management of the Ames Research Center in Mountain View, CA. As a medium for visualizing fluid flow, water has played a significant role. Its use dates back to Leonardo da Vinci (1452-1519), the Renaissance Italian engineer, architect, painter, and sculptor. In more recent times, water tunnels have assisted the study of complex flows and flow-field interactions on aircraft shapes that generate strong vortex flows. Flow visualization in water tunnels assists in determining the strength of vortices, their location, and possible methods of controlling them. The design of the Dryden Water Tunnel imitated that of the Northrop Corporation's tunnel in Hawthorne, CA. Called the Flow Visualization Facility, the Dryden tunnel was built to assist researchers in understanding the aerodynamics of aircraft configured in such a way that they create strong vortex flows, particularly at high angles of attack. The tunnel provides results that compare well with data from aircraft in actual flight in another fluid-air. Other uses of the tunnel have included study of how such flight hardware as antennas, probes, pylons, parachutes, and experimental fixtures affect airflow. The facility has also been helpful in finding the best locations for emitting smoke from flight vehicles for flow

  15. 1/48-scale model of an F-18 aircraft in Flow Visualization Facility (FVF)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1980-01-01

    This short movie clip shows a plastic 1/48-scale model of an F-18 aircraft inside the 'Water Tunnel' more formally known as the NASA Dryden Flow Visualization Facility. Water is pumped through the tunnel in the direction of normal airflow over the aircraft; then, colored dyes are pumped through tubes with needle valves. The dyes flow back along the airframe and over the airfoils highlighting their aerodynamic characteristics. The aircraft can also be moved through its pitch axis to observe airflow disruptions while simulating actual flight at high angles of attack. The Water Tunnel at NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, CA, became operational in 1983 when Dryden was a Flight Research Facility under the management of the Ames Research Center in Mountain View, CA. As a medium for visualizing fluid flow, water has played a significant role. Its use dates back to Leonardo da Vinci (1452-1519), the Renaissance Italian engineer, architect, painter, and sculptor. In more recent times, water tunnels have assisted the study of complex flows and flow-field interactions on aircraft shapes that generate strong vortex flows. Flow visualization in water tunnels assists in determining the strength of vortices, their location, and possible methods of controlling them. The design of the Dryden Water Tunnel imitated that of the Northrop Corporation's tunnel in Hawthorne, CA. Called the Flow Visualization Facility, the Dryden tunnel was built to assist researchers in understanding the aerodynamics of aircraft configured in such a way that they create strong vortex flows, particularly at high angles of attack. The tunnel provides results that compare well with data from aircraft in actual flight in another fluid-air. Other uses of the tunnel have included study of how such flight hardware as antennas, probes, pylons, parachutes, and experimental fixtures affect airflow. The facility has also been helpful in finding the best locations for emitting smoke from flight vehicles

  16. A Tunable Lyot Filter at Prime Focus: a Method for Tracing Supercluster Scales at z ~ 1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bland-Hawthorn, J.; van Breugel, W.; Gillingham, P. R.; Baldry, I. K.; Jones, D. H.

    2001-12-01

    Tunable narrowband emission line surveys have begun to show the ease with which star-forming galaxies can be identified in restricted redshift intervals to z~5 with a 4 m class telescope. These surveys have been carried out with imaging systems at the Cassegrain or Nasmyth focus, and are therefore restricted to fields smaller than 10'. We now show that tunable narrowband imaging is possible over a 30' field with a high-performance Lyot filter placed directly in front of a CCD mosaic at the prime focus. Our design is intended for the f/3.3 prime focus of the Anglo-Australian Telescope (AAT) 3.9 m, although similar devices can be envisaged for the Subaru 8 m (f/2), Palomar 5 m (f/3.4), Visible and Infrared Survey Telescope for Astronomy (VISTA) 4 m (f/6), Mayall 4 m (f/2.6), or the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope (CFHT) 3.6 m (f/4). A modified Wynne doublet ensures subarcsecond performance over the field. In combination with the new Wide-Field Imager 8k×8k mosaic (WFI) at the AAT, the overall throughput (35%) of the system to unpolarized light is expected to be comparable to the TAURUS Tunable Filter (TTF). Unlike the TTF, the field is fully monochromatic, and the instrumental profile has much better wing suppression. For targeted surveys of emission line sources at z~1, a low-resolution (R~150 at 550 nm) Lyot filter on a 4 m telescope is expected to be comparable or superior to current instruments on 8-10 m class telescopes. We demonstrate that the 30' field is well matched to superclusters at these redshifts, such that large-scale structure should be directly observable.

  17. Weak gravitational lensing due to large-scale structure of the universe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jaroszynski, Michal; Park, Changbom; Paczynski, Bohdan; Gott, J. Richard, III

    1990-01-01

    The effect of the large-scale structure of the universe on the propagation of light rays is studied. The development of the large-scale density fluctuations in the omega = 1 universe is calculated within the cold dark matter scenario using a smooth particle approximation. The propagation of about 10 to the 6th random light rays between the redshift z = 5 and the observer was followed. It is found that the effect of shear is negligible, and the amplification of single images is dominated by the matter in the beam. The spread of amplifications is very small. Therefore, the filled-beam approximation is very good for studies of strong lensing by galaxies or clusters of galaxies. In the simulation, the column density was averaged over a comoving area of approximately (1/h Mpc)-squared. No case of a strong gravitational lensing was found, i.e., no 'over-focused' image that would suggest that a few images might be present. Therefore, the large-scale structure of the universe as it is presently known does not produce multiple images with gravitational lensing on a scale larger than clusters of galaxies.

  18. Calcium mobilization from fish scales is mediated by parathyroid hormone related protein via the parathyroid hormone type 1 receptor.

    PubMed

    Rotllant, J; Redruello, B; Guerreiro, P M; Fernandes, H; Canario, A V M; Power, D M

    2005-12-15

    The scales of bony fish represent a significant reservoir of calcium but little is known about their contribution, as well as of bone, to calcium balance and how calcium deposition and mobilization are regulated in calcified tissues. In the present study we report the action of parathyroid hormone-related protein (PTHrP) on calcium mobilization from sea bream (Sparus auratus) scales in an in vitro bioassay. Ligand binding studies of piscine 125I-(1-35(tyr))PTHrP to the membrane fraction of isolated sea bream scales revealed the existence of a single PTH receptor (PTHR) type. RT-PCR of fish scale cDNA using specific primers for two receptor types found in teleosts, PTH1R, and PTH3R, showed expression only of PTH1R. The signalling mechanisms mediating binding of the N-terminal amino acid region of PTHrP were investigated. A synthetic peptide (10(-8) M) based on the N-terminal 1-34 amino acid residues of Fugu rubripes PTHrP strongly stimulated cAMP synthesis and [3H]myo-inositol incorporation in sea bream scales. However, peptides (10(-8) M) with N-terminal deletions, such as (2-34), (3-34) and (7-34)PTHrP, were defective in stimulating cAMP production but stimulated [3H]myo-inositol incorporation. (1-34)PTHrP induced significant osteoclastic activity in scale tissue as indicated by its stimulation of tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase. In contrast, (7-34)PTHrP failed to stimulate the activity of this enzyme. This activity could also be abolished by the adenylyl cyclase inhibitor SQ-22536, but not by the phospholipase C inhibitor U-73122. The results of the study indicate that one mechanism through which N-terminal (1-34)PTHrP stimulates osteoclastic activity of sea bream scales, is through PTH1R and via the cAMP/AC intracellular signalling pathway. It appears, therefore, that fish scales can act as calcium stores and that (1-34)PTHrP regulates calcium mobilization from them; it remains to be established if this mechanism contributes to calcium homeostasis in vivo

  19. 1:100,000-scale topographic contours derived from digital elevation models, San Francisco Bay region, California: a digital database

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wright, Heather M.; Wentworth, Carl M.

    2001-01-01

    This report presents a consistent set of 1:100,000-scale vector topographic contours for all eleven 30x60-minute quadrangles in the San Francisco Bay region for use in visualizing the topography and preparing maps of the region. The contours were prepared by contouring an areally continuous 30-m altitude grid (National Elevation Dataset, Jan., 1999), and differ from USGS hypsographic DLG's (available for only part of the region). The report consists of 26 numbered parts, which represent text, spatial data, and 1:100,000-scale map graphics. Most of the files are provided in two or three different digital formats. All files are available for download here.

  20. Trends of abiotic damage in forest ecosystems in Germany at regional scale under SRES A1B, B1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panferov, O.; Doering, C.; Sogachev, A.; Merklein, J.; Ahrends, B.

    2009-09-01

    Current climate projections indicate that the ongoing climate change may cause an increase of frequency of weather extremes (Leckebusch et al., 2008), which can result in wide area abiotic and consequent biotic damage events (e.g. drought and following insect attacks) within forest ecosystems. The type and degree of damage depends not only on the strength of a primary driving force itself (e.g. wind speed) but also on complex interactions between combinations of effecting agents with above- and belowground forest structure characteristics. The present study investigates the projected trends of abiotic risks factors and their combinations on coniferous and deciduous forests during the 21st Century under conditions of SRES scenarios A1B and B1. The downscaling of ECHAM5-MPIOM by the regional climate model (CLM) to the spatial resolution of 0.2° x 0.2° with daily time-steps is used for the analysis of future climate extremes and their combinations. With these input data the small-scale modeling with coupled process based sub-models (Jansen et al., 2008) was carried out for Solling region, (Central Germany) calculating the water and energy balance of spruce and beech forest ecosystems on cambisols and podzols with BROOK90 (Federer et al. 2003) and wind loading on trees with 3D ABL model SCADIS (Panferov and Sogachev, 2008). The risks of drought or wind damage for a certain forest stand result from combinations of soil water characteristics, static and gust wind loads, which in turn depend on current above- and belowground tree structure and on soil texture. The actual soil water content and forest structure depends on climate-soil-vegetation interactions in previous years. Therefore, differences of microclimatological conditions in the remaining stand after changes in forest structure are taken into account. Model outputs are aggregated to 30-years periods and compared to "present” conditions of 1971-2000. The results demonstrate an increment of abiotic risks

  1. SECTORS AND LARGE-SCALE MAGNETIC FIELD STRENGTH FLUCTUATIONS IN THE HELIOSHEATH NEAR 110 AU: VOYAGER 1, 2009

    SciTech Connect

    Burlaga, L. F.; Ness, N. F. E-mail: nfnudel@yahoo.co

    2010-12-10

    This paper describes observations of daily averages of the magnetic field strength B and the magnetic polarity measured by Voyager 1 (V1) in the heliosheath during 2009 between 108.5 and 112.1 AU and at heliographic latitude 34.{sup 0}4. A negative magnetic polarity sector was observed during 2009 DOY 43-255. A positive polarity sector was observed during 2009 DOY 256-365. We offer the hypothesis that the existence of the two sectors is the result of the displacement of the wavy heliospheric current sheet to the position of V1 as a result of northward flow in the heliosheath. The large size of the sectors is caused by the slow radial motion of the flow observed by V1 in the heliosheath. The distribution of B during 2009 was lognormal, in contrast to the Gaussian distributions observed by V1 in the heliosheath prior to 2009. The large-scale fluctuations of B, described by the distribution of increments of daily averages of B, have a Tsallis distribution with q = 1.6. The large-scale fluctuations of B observed by V1 during 2009 have a multifractal spectrum with the same parameters that V1 observed during 2005 close to the termination shock at 94 AU. These results suggest that the large-scale magnetic fluctuations of B are in a metastable equilibrium state in the heliosheath between 94 AU and 112.1 AU.

  2. Sectors and Large-Scale Magnetic Field Strength Fluctuations in the Heliosheath Near 110 AU: Voyager 1,2009

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burlaga, L. F.; Ness, N. F.

    2010-01-01

    This paper describes observations of daily averages of the magnetic field strength B and the magnetic polarity measured by Voyager 1 (V1) in the heliosheath during 2009 between 108.5 and 112.1 AU and at heliographic latitude 34. . 4. A negative magnetic polarity sector was observed during 2009 DOY 43.255. A positive polarity sector was observed during 2009 DOY 256.365. We offer the hypothesis that the existence of the two sectors is the result of the displacement of the wavy heliospheric current sheet to the position of V1 as a result of northward flow in the heliosheath. The large size of the sectors is caused by the slow radial motion of the flow observed by V1 in the heliosheath. The distribution of B during 2009 was lognormal, in contrast to the Gaussian distributions observed by V1 in the heliosheath prior to 2009. The large-scale fluctuations of B, described by the distribution of increments of daily averages of B, have a Tsallis distribution with q = 1.6. The large-scale fluctuations of B observed by V1 during 2009 have a multifractal spectrum with the same parameters that V1 observed during 2005 close to the termination shock at 94 AU. These results suggest that the large-scale magnetic fluctuations of B are in a metastable equilibrium state in the heliosheath between 94 AU and 112.1 AU.

  3. A coarse grained perturbation theory for the Large Scale Structure, with cosmology and time independence in the UV

    SciTech Connect

    Manzotti, Alessandro; Peloso, Marco; Pietroni, Massimo; Viel, Matteo; Villaescusa-Navarro, Francisco E-mail: peloso@physics.umn.edu E-mail: viel@oats.inaf.it

    2014-09-01

    Standard cosmological perturbation theory (SPT) for the Large Scale Structure (LSS) of the Universe fails at small scales (UV) due to strong nonlinearities and to multistreaming effects. In ref. [1] a new framework was proposed in which the large scales (IR) are treated perturbatively while the information on the UV, mainly small scale velocity dispersion, is obtained by nonlinear methods like N-body simulations. Here we develop this approach, showing that it is possible to reproduce the fully nonlinear power spectrum (PS) by combining a simple (and fast) 1-loop computation for the IR scales and the measurement of a single, dominant, correlator from N-body simulations for the UV ones. We measure this correlator for a suite of seven different cosmologies, and we show that its inclusion in our perturbation scheme reproduces the fully non-linear PS with percent level accuracy, for wave numbers up to k∼ 0.4 h Mpc{sup -1} down to 0z=. We then show that, once this correlator has been measured in a given cosmology, there is no need to run a new simulation for a different cosmology in the suite. Indeed, by rescaling this correlator by a proper function computable in SPT, the reconstruction procedure works also for the other cosmologies and for all redshifts, with comparable accuracy. Finally, we clarify the relation of this approach to the Effective Field Theory methods recently proposed in the LSS context.

  4. The Lyman-α forest in three dimensions: measurements of large scale flux correlations from BOSS 1st-year data

    SciTech Connect

    Slosar, Anže; Font-Ribera, Andreu; Pieri, Matthew M.; Rich, James; Goff, Jean-Marc Le; Charlassier, Romain; Aubourg, Éric; Busca, Nicolas; Hamilton, Jean-Christophe; Carithers, Bill; Cortês, Marina; Ho, Shirley; McDonald, Patrick; Croft, Rupert; Dawson, Kyle S.; Eisenstein, Daniel; Lee, Khee-Gan; Lupton, Robert; Medolin, Bumbarija; and others

    2011-09-01

    Using a sample of approximately 14,000 z > 2.1 quasars observed in the first year of the Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey (BOSS), we measure the three-dimensional correlation function of absorption in the Lyman-α forest. The angle-averaged correlation function of transmitted flux (F = e{sup −τ}) is securely detected out to comoving separations of 60 h{sup −1}Mpc, the first detection of flux correlations across widely separated sightlines. A quadrupole distortion of the redshift-space correlation function by peculiar velocities, the signature of the gravitational instability origin of structure in the Lyman-α forest, is also detected at high significance. We obtain a good fit to the data assuming linear theory redshift-space distortion and linear bias of the transmitted flux, relative to the matter fluctuations of a standard ΛCDM cosmological model (inflationary cold dark matter with a cosmological constant). At 95% confidence, we find a linear bias parameter 0.16 < b < 0.24 and redshift-distortion parameter 0.44 < β < 1.20, at central redshift z = 2.25, with a well constrained combination b(1+β) = 0.336±0.012. The errors on β are asymmetric, with β = 0 excluded at over 5σ confidence level. The value of β is somewhat low compared to theoretical predictions, and our tests on synthetic data suggest that it is depressed (relative to expectations for the Lyman-α forest alone) by the presence of high column density systems and metal line absorption. These results set the stage for cosmological parameter determinations from three-dimensional structure in the Lyman-α forest, including anticipated constraints on dark energy from baryon acoustic oscillations.

  5. The Lyman-α forest in three dimensions: measurements of large scale flux correlations from BOSS 1st-year data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slosar, Anže; Font-Ribera, Andreu; Pieri, Matthew M.; Rich, James; Le Goff, Jean-Marc; Aubourg, Éric; Brinkmann, Jon; Busca, Nicolas; Carithers, Bill; Charlassier, Romain; Cortês, Marina; Croft, Rupert; Dawson, Kyle S.; Eisenstein, Daniel; Hamilton, Jean-Christophe; Ho, Shirley; Lee, Khee-Gan; Lupton, Robert; McDonald, Patrick; Medolin, Bumbarija; Muna, Demitri; Miralda-Escudé, Jordi; Myers, Adam D.; Nichol, Robert C.; Palanque-Delabrouille, Nathalie; Pâris, Isabelle; Petitjean, Patrick; Piškur, Yodovina; Rollinde, Emmanuel; Ross, Nicholas P.; Schlegel, David J.; Schneider, Donald P.; Sheldon, Erin; Weaver, Benjamin A.; Weinberg, David H.; Yeche, Christophe; York, Donald G.

    2011-09-01

    Using a sample of approximately 14,000 z > 2.1 quasars observed in the first year of the Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey (BOSS), we measure the three-dimensional correlation function of absorption in the Lyman-α forest. The angle-averaged correlation function of transmitted flux (F = e-τ) is securely detected out to comoving separations of 60 h-1Mpc, the first detection of flux correlations across widely separated sightlines. A quadrupole distortion of the redshift-space correlation function by peculiar velocities, the signature of the gravitational instability origin of structure in the Lyman-α forest, is also detected at high significance. We obtain a good fit to the data assuming linear theory redshift-space distortion and linear bias of the transmitted flux, relative to the matter fluctuations of a standard ΛCDM cosmological model (inflationary cold dark matter with a cosmological constant). At 95% confidence, we find a linear bias parameter 0.16 < b < 0.24 and redshift-distortion parameter 0.44 < β < 1.20, at central redshift z = 2.25, with a well constrained combination b(1+β) = 0.336±0.012. The errors on β are asymmetric, with β = 0 excluded at over 5σ confidence level. The value of β is somewhat low compared to theoretical predictions, and our tests on synthetic data suggest that it is depressed (relative to expectations for the Lyman-α forest alone) by the presence of high column density systems and metal line absorption. These results set the stage for cosmological parameter determinations from three-dimensional structure in the Lyman-α forest, including anticipated constraints on dark energy from baryon acoustic oscillations.

  6. Rantiga Osservatorio, Tincana (MPC-D03): Observations and searching for small Solar System bodies using a remotely controlled telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zolnowski, M.; Kusiak, M.

    2014-07-01

    Rantiga Osservatorio is the first Polish project aimed at discovering and observing small solar-system objects, including near-Earth objects and comets. The observatory officially started in March 2012, as a result of cooperation between two amateur astronomers: Michal Zolnowski and Michal Kusiak. Subsequently, our station received official designation D03 assigned by the IAU's Minor Planet Center. The equipment is installed in northern Italy, on the border between Emilia-Romagna and Tuscany, in the small village of Tincana at an altitude of 643 m. The heart of the observatory is a 0.4-meter reflector f/3.8, mounted on Paramount ME and CCD camera SBIG STX-16803. The equipment is controlled by an industrial computer connected to the internet, and software allowing for automation and remote control of the telescope from Poland. It is also the first Polish amateur observatory which has been used for the discoveries of potentially new asteroids since 1949. Between 2012 and 2013, Rantiga Osservatorio made it possible to submit over 13,000 astrometric measurements of 3,500 asteroids, and we also reported 1,151 candidates for potentially unknown objects. During our presentation, we would like to introduce details of design and several enhancements to allow a convenient and safe way to control an observing session from anywhere in the world using a smartphone.

  7. Lars Onsager Prize Talk: 1+1d conformal field theories as natural languages for asymptotically large-scale quantum computing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Friedan, Daniel

    2010-03-01

    An abstract argument is offered that the ideal physical systems for asymptotically large-scale quantum computers are near-critical quantum circuits, critical in the bulk, whose bulk universality classes are described by 1+1d conformal field theories. One in particular -- the Monster conformal field theory -- is especially ideal, because all of its bulk couplings are irrelevant.

  8. FILAMENTARY LARGE-SCALE STRUCTURE TRACED BY SIX Ly{alpha} BLOBS AT z = 2.3

    SciTech Connect

    Erb, Dawn K.; Bogosavljevic, Milan; Steidel, Charles C.

    2011-10-10

    Extended nebulae of Ly{alpha} emission ('Ly{alpha} blobs') are known to be associated with overdense regions at high redshift. Here we present six large Ly{alpha} blobs in a previously known protocluster with galaxy overdensity {delta} {approx} 7 at z = 2.3; this is the richest field of giant Ly{alpha} blobs detected to date. The blobs have linear sizes of {approx}> 100 kpc and Ly{alpha} luminosities of {approx}10{sup 43} erg s{sup -1}. The positions of the blobs define two linear filaments with an extent of at least 12 comoving Mpc; these filaments intersect at the center of one of the blobs. Measurement of the position angles of the blobs indicates that five of the six are aligned with these filaments to within {approx}10{sup 0}, suggesting a connection between the physical processes powering extended Ly{alpha} emission and those driving structure on larger scales.

  9. 17.1%-Efficient Multi-Scale-Textured Black Silicon Solar Cells without Dielectric Antireflection Coating: Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Toor, F.; Page, M. R.; Branz, H. M.; Yuan, H. C.

    2011-07-01

    In this work we present 17.1%-efficient p-type single crystal Si solar cells with a multi-scale-textured surface and no dielectric antireflection coating. Multi-scale texturing is achieved by a gold-nanoparticle-assisted nanoporous etch after conventional micron scale KOH-based pyramid texturing (pyramid black etching). By incorporating geometric enhancement of antireflection, this multi-scale texturing reduces the nanoporosity depth required to make silicon 'black' compared to nanoporous planar surfaces. As a result, it improves short-wavelength spectral response (blue response), previously one of the major limiting factors in 'black-Si' solar cells. With multi-scale texturing, the spectrum-weighted average reflectance from 350- to 1000-nm wavelength is below 2% with a 100-nm deep nanoporous layer. In comparison, roughly 250-nm deep nanopores are needed to achieve similar reflectance on planar surface. Here, we characterize surface morphology, reflectivity and solar cell performance of the multi-scale textured solar cells.

  10. Titius-Bode laws in the solar system. 1: Scale invariance explains everything

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Graner, F.; Dubrulle, B.

    1994-02-01

    According to the Titius-Bode law, the planetary distances to the sun follow a geometric progression. We review the major interpretations and explanations of the law. We show that most derivations of Titius-Bode law are implicitely based on the assumption of both rotational and scale invariance. In absence of any radial length scale, linear instabilities cause periodic perturbations in the variable x = ln(r/r0). Since maxima equidistant in x obey a geometric progression in the variable r, Titius-Bode type of laws are natural outcome of the linear regime of systems in which both symmetries are present; we discuss possible nonlinear corrections to the law. Thus, if Titius-Bode law is real, it is probably only a consequence of the scale invariance of the disk which gave rise to the planets.

  11. Vibration characteristics of 1/8-scale dynamic models of the space-shuttle solid-rocket boosters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leadbetter, S. A.; Stephens, W.; Sewall, J. L.; Majka, J. W.; Barret, J. R.

    1976-01-01

    Vibration tests and analyses of six 1/8 scale models of the space shuttle solid rocket boosters are reported. Natural vibration frequencies and mode shapes were obtained for these aluminum shell models having internal solid fuel configurations corresponding to launch, midburn (maximum dynamic pressure), and near endburn (burnout) flight conditions. Test results for longitudinal, torsional, bending, and shell vibration frequencies are compared with analytical predictions derived from thin shell theory and from finite element plate and beam theory. The lowest analytical longitudinal, torsional, bending, and shell vibration frequencies were within + or - 10 percent of experimental values. The effects of damping and asymmetric end skirts on natural vibration frequency were also considered. The analytical frequencies of an idealized full scale space shuttle solid rocket boosted structure are computed with and without internal pressure and are compared with the 1/8 scale model results.

  12. Utility-Scale Future, Continuum Magazine: Clean Energy Innovation at NREL, Spring 2011, Issue 1 Vol. 1

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2011-08-01

    This quarterly magazine is dedicated to stepping beyond the technical journals to reveal NREL's vital work in a real-world context for our stakeholders. Continuum provides insights into the latest and most impactful clean energy innovations, while spotlighting those talented researchers and unique facilities that make it all happen. This edition focuses on creating a utility-scale future.

  13. Large scale production of Bacillus thuringiensis PS149B1 insecticidal proteins Cry34Ab1 and Cry35Ab1 from Pseudomonas fluorescens.

    PubMed

    Huang, Ke-Xue; Badger, Monty; Haney, Keith; Evans, Steve L

    2007-06-01

    The 14kDa (Cry34Ab1) and 44kDa (Cry35Ab1) binary insecticidal proteins are produced naturally by Bacillus thuringiensis PS149B1 as parasporal inclusion bodies. Here, we show production of these two insecticidal proteins in recombinant Pseudomonas fluorescens and their subsequent purification to near homogeneity to provide large quantities of protein for safety-assessment studies associated with the registration of transgenic corn plants. The gene sequence specific for each protein was expressed in P. fluorescens and fermented at the 75-L scale. For Cry34Ab1, the protein accumulated as insoluble inclusion bodies, and was purified by extraction directly from the cell pastes at pH 3.4 with a sodium acetate buffer, selective precipitation at pH 7.0, and differential centrifugation. For Cry35Ab1, the protein was extracted from the purified inclusion bodies with sodium acetate buffer (pH 3.5) containing 0.5M urea, followed by diafiltration. No chromatography steps were required to produce over 30g of lyophilized protein powder with purity greater than 98%, while retaining full insecticidal activity against Western corn rootworm larvae. The proteins were further characterized to assure identity and suitability for use in safety-assessment studies. PMID:17337206

  14. Propeller propulsion integration, phase 1. [conducted in langley 30 by 60 foot full scale wind tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bennett, G.; Koenig, K.; Miley, S. J.; Mcwhorter, J.; Wells, G.

    1981-01-01

    A bibliography was compiled of all readily available sources of propeller analytical and experimental studies conducted during the 1930 through 1960 period. A propeller test stand was developed for the measurement of thrust and torque characteristics of full scale general aviation propellers and installed in the LaRC 30 x 60 foot full scale wind tunnel. A tunnel entry was made during the January through February 1980 period. Several propellers were tested, but unforseen difficulties with the shaft thrust torque balance severely degraded the data quality.

  15. Episiotomy healing assessment: Redness, Oedema, Ecchymosis, Discharge, Approximation (REEDA) scale reliability1

    PubMed Central

    Alvarenga, Marina Barreto; Francisco, Adriana Amorim; de Oliveira, Sonia Maria Junqueira Vasconcellos; da Silva, Flora Maria Barbosa; Shimoda, Gilcéria Tochika; Damiani, Lucas Petri

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: to analyse the Redness, Oedema, Ecchymosis, Discharge, Approximation (REEDA) scale reliability when evaluating perineal healing after a normal delivery with a right mediolateral episiotomy. METHOD: observational study based on data from a clinical trial conducted with 54 randomly selected women, who had their perineal healing assessed at four time points, from 6 hours to 10 days after delivery, by nurses trained in the use of this scale. The kappa coefficient was used in the reliability analysis of the REEDA scale. RESULTS: the results indicate good agreement in the evaluation of the discharge item (0.75< Kappa ≥0.88), marginal and good agreement in the first three assessments of oedema (0.16< Kappa ≥0.46), marginal agreement in the evaluation of ecchymosis (0.25< Kappa ≥0.42) and good agreement regarding redness (0.46< Kappa ≥0.66). For the item coaptation, the agreement decreased from excellent in the first assessment to good in the last assessment. In the fourth evaluation, the assessment of all items displayed excellent or good agreement among the evaluators. CONCLUSION: the difference in the scores among the evaluators when applying the scale indicates that this tool must be improved to allow an accurate assessment of the episiotomy healing process. PMID:25806645

  16. Improved scaling laws for stage inert mass of space propulsion systems. Volume 1: Summary

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1971-01-01

    Summarized is a study which satisfies the need for improved scaling laws for stage inert mass of space propulsion systems. The resulting laws are applicable to current and future vehicle systems and designs for a comprehensive spectrum of anticipated planetary missions.

  17. REGIONAL SCALE (1000 KM) MODEL OF PHOTOCHEMICAL AIR POLLUTION. PART 1. THEORETICAL FORMULATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    A theoretical framework for a multi-day 1000 km scale simulation model of photochemical oxidant is developed. It is structured in a highly modular form so that eventually the model can be applied through straightforward modifications to simulations of particulates, visibility and...

  18. Aeroelastic Tests of an Eight Percent Scale Saturn C-1 Block II

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1963-01-01

    Buffet and flutter characteristics of Saturn Apollo mission were studied using a dynamically scaled model. The model was built around a central aluminum tube for scaled stiffness distribution and strength to resist loads imposed during testing. Styrofoam sections attached to the core provided the correct external contours. Lead weights were added for correct mass distribution. An electromagnetic shaker was used to excite the model in its flexible modes of vibration during portions of the test. The model was supported on a sting, mounted by leaf springs, cables and torsion bars. The support system provided for simulating the full scale rigid body pitch frequency with minimum restraint imposed on elastic deflections. Bending moments recorded by sensors on the aluminum tube. Several modified nose configurations were tested: The basic configuration was tested with and without a flow separator disk on the escape rocket motor, tests also were made with the escape tower and rocket motor removed completely. For the final test, the Apollo capsule was replaced with a Jupiter nose cone. The test program consisted of determining model response throughout the transonic speed range at angles of attack up to 6 degrees and measuring the aerodynamic damping over the same range for the basic model and the modified configurations. Signals from the model pickup were recorded on tape for later analysis. The data obtained were used to estimate bending moments that would be produced on the full-scale vehicle by aerodynamic forces due to buffeting.

  19. Kinetic and morphological development of oxide-sulfide scales on manganese at 1,073 K

    SciTech Connect

    McAdam, G.; Yound, D.J. )

    1992-04-01

    The corrosion behavior of manganese in controlled gas atmospheres of SO{sub 2}-CO{sub 2}-CO-N{sub 2} at 1073 K was studied. Under all conditions, the gas phase was slow to equilibrate, and catalysis of the gas affected the corrosion mechanism and resulting scale morphologies. Product scales invariably became detached from the metal during reaction, but the high manganese vapor pressure meant that no slowing of reaction resulted. Corrosion under conditions where MnS was the equilibrium reaction product led to the formation of a sulfide scale. At low p{sub s{sub 2}} values, this scale grew by reaction with either COS or SO{sub 2} according to parabolic kinetics. Gases with equilibrium compositions calculated to produce MnO, in fact corroded manganese to produce an inner layer of oxide plus sulfide, and an outer layer of MnO. The tendency to form sulfide was more marked at lower SO{sub 2} partial pressure and higher sulfur activities, the latter resulting from gas catalysis. These effects are due to the fact that SO{sub 2} is the principal reactant species.

  20. Effect of organic material on field-scale emissions of 1,3-dichloropropene

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Soil fumigation is important for growing many fruits and vegetable crops, but fumigant emissions may contaminate the atmosphere. A large-scale fi eld experiment was initiated to test the hypothesis that adding composted municipal green waste to the soil surface in an agricultural fi eld would reduce...

  1. Validation of the Adherence Determinants Questionnaire scale among women with breast and cervical cancer1

    PubMed Central

    Lessa, Paula Renata Amorim; Ribeiro, Samila Gomes; Aquino, Priscila de Souza; de Almeida, Paulo Cesar; Pinheiro, Ana Karina Bezerra

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: the aim was to translate and culturally adapt the Adherence Determinants Questionnaire scale for the Portuguese language in the Brazilian context, and to check its reliability and validity to analyze the elements of the adherence of patients to the clinical treatment for breast and cervical cancer. Method: this was a methodological study, carried out in two oncology reference centers. The sample consisted of 198 participants, with 152 being treated for breast cancer and 46 being treated for cervical cancer. The content validation was performed by a committee of experts. The construct validation was demonstrated through factor analysis and the reliability was analyzed using Cronbach's alpha. Results: the committee of experts made the necessary adjustments so that the scale was adapted to the Brazilian context. The factor analysis suggested a reduction from seven to five factors and the maintenance of 38 items similar to those of the original scale. The reliability, investigated through Cronbach's alpha, was .829, showing high internal consistency. Conclusion: it was concluded that the Brazilian version of the Adherence Determinants Questionnaire scale is a valid and reliable instrument that is able to measure the elements of adherence to the treatment for breast and cervical cancer. PMID:26487149

  2. Validation of the Comfort scale for relatives of people in critical states of health 1

    PubMed Central

    Freitas, Kátia Santana; Menezes, Igor Gomes; Mussi, Fernanda Carneiro

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Objective: this methodological study aims to present the construct validity of the Comfort scale for family members of people in a critical state of health (ECONF). Method: this is a methodological study. The sample was made up of 274 family members of adults receiving inpatient treatment in six Intensive Care Units (ICU) in the State of Bahía responded to 62 items distributed in 7 dimensions. The validation procedures adopted were based on the techniques of the Classical Test Theory. Results: the analysis of dimensionality was undertaken through principal components analysis, a scale being obtained with 55 items distributed in four factors: Safety, Support, Family member-relative interaction and Integration with oneself and the everyday. The analysis of the items' , discriminative power, undertaken by the item-total correlation-coefficient showed a good relationship of the items with their respective factors. From the ECONF's reliability test, from the analysis of internal consistency, a raised Alpha Cronbach coefficient was obtained for the 4 factors and the general measurement. Conclusion: the comfort scale presented satisfactory psychometric parameters, thus constituting the first valid instrument for evaluating the comfort of family members of people in a critical state of health. The advance made by the study lies in its theoretical framework on comfort, and provides the health team with a scale based on empirical evidence. PMID:26444168

  3. RAILROADS (1:100,000 SCALE) DIGITAL LINE GRAPH (NEUSE RIVER BASIN, NC)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Railroads from USGS 100,000-scale Digital Line Graphs (DLG) Transportation for extended Neuse River Watershed study area.
    Purpose:
    To define railroads in the Neuse River Watershed. The Neuse River Watershed is defined by 6 digit HUC.

  4. The Abbey pain scale: a 1-minute numerical indicator for people with end-stage dementia.

    PubMed

    Abbey, Jennifer; Piller, Neil; De Bellis, Anita; Esterman, Adrian; Parker, Deborah; Giles, Lynne; Lowcay, Belinda

    2004-01-01

    The need for a specialized clinical regimen for patients with dementia who require palliative care has only recently been recognized. Structured approaches to palliative care are not well developed. The recognition and treatment of pain is an important part of this management risk. However, pain is consistently underdiagnosed and undertreated in this population. A factor contributing to this has been a lack of appropriate tools to help recognize and document pain. This study sought to develop and validate an easy-to-use pain scale for use in residential aged care homes. The tool was developed with residents with end- or late-stage dementia who were unable to articulate their needs, identified by the registered nurses who knew them. Results showed that following pain-relief intervention the average pain score recorded using the scale fell by more than half. A paired Student's t-test showed the reduction to be highly significant (P<0.001). Validity and internal reliability, assessed by calculating Gamma and Cronbach's alpha, were found to be satisfactory. Qualitative evidence gathered from users of the scale indicated that it was considered a useful clinical device that could be completed within one minute. Further analysis of the use of the scale in clinical settings, testing of inter-rater reliability and examination of the limitations found in this study will commence early in 2004. PMID:14966439

  5. Scale-up of miscible flood processes. Quarterly report, July 1, 1993--September 30, 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Orr, F.M. Jr.

    1993-12-31

    Progress is reported for a comprehensive investigation of the scaling behavior of gas injection processes in heterogeneous reservoirs. The interplay of phase behavior, viscous fingering, gravity segregation, capillary imbibition and drainage, and reservoir heterogeneity is examined in a series of simulations and experiments. Compositional and first-contact miscible simulations of viscous fingering and gravity segregation are compared to show that the two techniques can give very different results. Also, analyzed are two-dimensional and three-dimensional flows in which gravity segregation and viscous fingering interact. The simulations show that 2D and 3D flows can differ significantly. A comparison of analytical solutions for three-component two-phase flow with experimental results for oil/water/alcohol systems is reported. While the experiments and theory show reasonable agreement, some differences remain to be explained. The scaling behavior of the interaction of gravity segregation and capillary forces is investigated through simulations and through scaling arguments based on analysis of the differential equations. The simulations show that standard approaches do not agree well with results of low IFT displacements. The scaling analyses, however, reveal flow regimes where capillary, gravity, or viscous forces dominate the flow.

  6. COMMODITY SCALE SYNTHESIS OF 1-METHYLIMIDAZOLE BASED IONIC LIQUIDS USING A SPINNING TUBE-IN-TUBE REACTOR

    EPA Science Inventory

    The continuous large-scale preparation of several 1-methylimidazole based ionic liquids was carried out using a Spinning Tube-in-Tube (STT) reactor (manufactured by Kreido Laboratories). This reactor, which embodies and facilitates the use of Green Chemistry principles and Proce...

  7. Observation of Nuclear Scaling in the A(e,e{prime}) Reaction at x{sub B} > 1

    SciTech Connect

    Kim Egiyan; Natalya Dashyan; Misak Sargsian; Stepan Stepanyan; Lawrence Weinstein; et. al.

    2003-07-01

    The ratios of inclusive electron scattering cross sections of 4He, 12C, and 56Fe to 3He have been measured for the first time. It is shown that these ratios are independent of xB at Q2 > 1.4 GeV2 for xB > 1.5, where the inclusive cross section depends primarily on the high momentum components of the nuclear wave function. The observed scaling shows that the momentum distributions at high-momenta have the same shape for all nuclei and differ only by a scale factor. The observed onset of the scaling at Q2 > 1.4 GeV2 and xB > 1.5 is consistent with the kinematical expectation that two-nucleon short range correlations (SRC) dominate the nuclear wave function at pm300 MeV/c. The values of these ratios in the scaling region can be related to the relative probabilities of SRC in nuclei with A3. Our data, combined with calculations and other measurements of the 3He/deuterium ratio, demonstrate that for nuclei with A12 these probabilities are 4.9-5.9 times larger than in deuterium, while for 4He it is larger by a factor of about 3.8.

  8. Status of 1:24,000-Scale Geologic Mapping of Basin Strata Exposed in Central Hadriacus Cavi, Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skinner, J. A.; Fortezzo, C. M.

    2016-06-01

    We describe a "type" cross-section of the major groups of stratified units in central Hadriacus Cavi, Mars, discuss the range of potential stratigraphic interpretations, and review how these details will translate to the final 1:24,000 scale map.

  9. Development and validation of a basin scale model PCPF-1@SWAT for simulating fate and transport of rice pesticides

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The objective of this study was to develop, verify, and validate a new GIS-based model for simulating the fate and transport of rice pesticides in river basins. A plot scale model simulating pesticide fate and transport in rice paddies (PCPF-1) was incorporated into the Soil and Water Assessment To...

  10. ESTABLISHMENT OF DESIGN CRITERIA FOR OPTIMUM BURNERS FOR APPLICATION TO HEAVY FUEL FIRED PACKAGE BOILERS. VOLUME 1. LABORATORY SCALE TESTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report gives results of a research program to develop low-NOx heavy oil burners for application to industrial package boilers. Volume I documents Phase 1 of the program, bench scale studies which defined optimum conditions for two-stage combustion. The information led to a co...

  11. Spin tests of a 1/20-scale model of the XP-39 airplane, 15 March 1939

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Donlan, C. J.

    1976-01-01

    The tests were performed to determine the spinning characteristics of a 1/20-scale model of the Bell XP-39 airplane. Effects of loading changes and of various control dispositions were studied. Subsequent tests were performed to determine the effect of a change in wing dihedral.

  12. Performance and energy costs associated with scaling infrared heater arrays for warming field plots from 1 to 100 m

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    To study the likely effects of global warming on open-field vegetation, hexagonal arrays of infrared heaters are currently being used for low-stature (<1 m) plants in small (=3 m) plots. To address larger ecosystem scales, herein we show that excellent uniformity of the warming can be achieved using...

  13. Tributyltin-binding protein type 1, a lipocalin, prevents inhibition of osteoblastic activity by tributyltin in fish scales.

    PubMed

    Satone, Hina; Lee, Jae Man; Oba, Yumi; Kusakabe, Takahiro; Akahoshi, Eriko; Miki, Shizuho; Suzuki, Nobuo; Sasayama, Yuichi; Nassef, Mohamed; Shimasaki, Yohei; Kawabata, Shun-Ichiro; Honjo, Tsuneo; Oshima, Yuji

    2011-05-01

    Tributyltin-binding protein type 1 (TBT-bp1) is a member of the lipocalin family of proteins which bind to small hydrophobic molecules. In this study, we expressed a recombinant TBT-bp1 (rTBT-bp1, ca. 35kDa) in a baculovirus expression system and purified the protein from the hemolymph of silkworm larvae injected with recombinant baculovirus. After incubation of a mixture of rTBT-bp1 and TBT and its fractionation by means of gel filtration chromatography, TBT was detected in the elution peak of rTBT-bp1, confirming the binding potential of rTBT-bp1 for TBT. An assay of the ability of rTBT-bp1 or native TBT-bp1 (nTBT-bp1) to restore osteoblastic activity inhibited by TBT showed that co-treatment of the scales with rTBT-bp1 or nTBT-bp1 in combination with TBT restored osteoblastic activity in goldfish scales, whereas treatment with TBT alone significantly inhibited osteoblastic activity. These results suggest that TBT-bp1 as a lipocalin member might function to decrease the toxicity of TBT by binding to TBT. PMID:21396342

  14. Dangers of using the growth equation on large scales in the Newtonian gauge

    SciTech Connect

    Dent, James B.; Dutta, Sourish

    2009-03-15

    We examine the accuracy of the growth equation {delta}+2H{delta}-4{pi}G{rho}{delta}=0, which is ubiquitous in the cosmological literature, in the context of the Newtonian gauge. By comparing the growth predicted by this equation to a numerical solution of the linearized Einstein equations in the {lambda}CDM scenario, we show that while this equation is a reliable approximation on small scales (k > or approx. h Mpc{sup -1}), it can be disastrously inaccurate ({approx}10{sup 4}%) on larger scales in this gauge. We propose a modified version of the growth equation for the Newtonian gauge, which while preserving the simplicity of the original equation, provides considerably more accurate results. We examine the implications of the failure of the growth equation on a few recent studies, aimed at discriminating general relativity from modified gravity, which use this equation as a starting point. We show that while the results of these studies are valid on small scales, they are not reliable on large scales or high redshifts, if one works in the Newtonian gauge. Finally, we discuss the growth equation in the synchronous gauge and show that the corrections to the Poisson equation are exactly equivalent to the difference between the overdensities in the synchronous and Newtonian gauges.

  15. Constraints on small-scale cosmological fluctuations from SNe lensing dispersion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ben-Dayan, Ido; Takahashi, Ryuichi

    2016-01-01

    We provide predictions on small-scale cosmological density power spectrum from supernova lensing dispersion. Parametrizing the primordial power spectrum with running α and running of running β of the spectral index, we exclude large positive α and β parameters which induce too large lensing dispersions over current observational upper bound. We ran cosmological N-body simulations of collisionless dark matter particles to investigate non-linear evolution of the primordial power spectrum with positive running parameters. The initial small-scale enhancement of the power spectrum is largely erased when entering into the non-linear regime. For example, even if the linear power spectrum at k > 10 h Mpc-1 is enhanced by 1-2 orders of magnitude, the enhancement much decreases to a factor of 2-3 at late time (z ≤ 1.5). Therefore, the lensing dispersion induced by the dark matter fluctuations weakly constrains the running parameters. When including baryon-cooling effects (which strongly enhance the small-scale clustering), the constraint is comparable to the Planck constraint, depending on the UV cut-off. Further investigations of the non-linear matter spectrum with baryonic processes is needed to reach a firm constraint.

  16. Small-Scale Power Spectrum and Correlations in Lambda + Cold Dark Matter Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klypin, Anatoly; Primack, Joel; Holtzman, Jon

    1996-07-01

    Cosmological models with a positive cosmological constant ({LAMBDA} > 0) and {OMEGA}_0_ < 1 have a number of attractive features. A larger Hubble constant H_0_, which can be compatible with the recent Hubble Space Telescope (HST) estimate, and a large fraction of baryon density in galaxy clusters make them current favorites. Early galaxy formation also is considered as a welcome feature of these models. But early galaxy formation implies that fluctuations on scales of a few megaparsecs spent more time in the nonlinear regime, as compared With standard cold dark matter (CDM) or cold + hot dark matter (CHDM) models. As has been known for a long time, this results in excessive clustering on small scales. We show that a typical {LAMBDA}CDM model with H_0_ = 70 km s^-1^ Mpc^-1^, {OMEGA}_0_ = 0.3, and cosmological constant {LAMBDA} such that {OMEGA}LAMBDA_ = {LAMBDA}/(3H_0_^2^) = 1 - {OMEGA}_0_, normalized to COBE on large scales and compatible with the number density of galaxy clusters, predicts a power spectrum of galaxy clustering in real space which is too high: at least twice larger than CfA estimates and 3 times larger than estimates for the APM Galaxy Survey for wavenumbers k = (0.4- 1)h Mpc^-1^. This conclusion holds if we assume either that galaxies trace the dark matter (σ_8_ ~ 1.1 for this model) or just that a region with higher density produces more galaxies than a region with lower density. The only way to reconcile the model with the observed power spectrum P(k) is to assume that regions with high dark matter density produce fewer galaxies than regions with low density. Theoretically this is possible, but it seems very unlikely: X-ray emission from groups and clusters indicates that places with a large density of dark matter produce a large number of galaxies. Since it follows that the low-{OMEGA} {LAMBDA}CDM models are in serious trouble, we discuss which ACDM models have the best hope of surviving the confrontation with all available observational data.

  17. Time scaling relations for step bunches from models with step-step attractions (B1-type models)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krasteva, A.; Popova, H.; Akutsu, N.; Tonchev, V.

    2016-03-01

    The step bunching instability is studied in three models of step motion defined in terms of ordinary differential equations (ODE). The source of instability in these models is step-step attraction, it is opposed by step-step repulsion and the developing surface patterns reflect the balance between the two. The first model, TE2, is a generalization of the seminal model of Tersoff et al. (1995). The second one, LW2, is obtained from the model of Liu and Weeks (1998) using the repulsions term to construct the attractions one with retained possibility to change the parameters in the two independently. The third model, MM2, is a minimal one constructed ad hoc and in this article it plays a central role. New scheme for scaling the ODE in vicinal studies is applied towards deciphering the pre-factors in the time-scaling relations. In all these models the patterned surface is self-similar - only one length scale is necessary to describe its evolution (hence B1-type). The bunches form finite angles with the terraces. Integrating numerically the equations for step motion and changing systematically the parameters we obtain the overall dependence of time-scaling exponent β on the power of step-step attractions p as β = 1/(3+p) for MM2 and hypothesize based on restricted set of data that it is β = 1/(5+p) for LW2 and TE2.

  18. Sub-wavelength focusing of cylindrical vector beams by a 1D metallic photonic crystal plano-concave lens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhong, Yi; Wang, Jin; Xu, Ji

    2014-10-01

    The fine manipulations of cylindrical vector beams (CVBs) based on metallic microstructures, such as sub-wavelength focusing, have entered many interdisciplinary areas, and the important applications have been found in many fields including optical micromanipulation, super-resolution imaging, micro-machining and so on. But so far, the sub-wavelength focusing of azimuthally polarized beams is encountered, since the manipulation mechanisms rely heavily on the excitation of surface plasmon polaritons, which brings the polarization limitation. We theoretically investigated the focusing behavior of CVBs in 1D metallic photonic crystals (MPCs). The simulation results show that a 1D MPC plano-concave lens can focus cylindrical vector beams into scale of sub-wavelength. The negative refraction at the interface between the air and the 1D MPC is analyzed at the frequencies corresponding to the second photonic band, which makes the 1D MPC has the ability to focus higher Fourier components of light beams. The cylindrical plano-concave structure is constructed to focus the radially and azimuthally polarized beams simultaneously. The behavior is demonstrated by Finite Element Method (FEM). The shape of focusing field can be tailored, by changing the polarization ratio of the incident beams. In addition, the effective sub-wavelength focusing phenomenon can also be realized in variety of wave ranges, by choosing the proper materials and adjusting the parameters. We believe that it's the first time to realize the simultaneous sub-wavelength focusing of radially and azimuthally polarized beams, the application of which is quite promising in broad prospects.

  19. Results of static tests of a 1/4 scale model of the Boeing YC-14 powered-lift system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hassell, J. L., Jr.

    1976-01-01

    One quarter scale static ground tests of the Boeing YC-14 powered lift system were conducted for correlation with full scale test results. The 1/4 scale model utilized a JT-15D turbofan engine to represent the CF6-50D engine employed on the YC-14 advanced medium STOL transport prototype aircraft. The tests included evaluation of static turning performance, static surface pressure and temperature distributions, fluctuating loads, and accelerations of portions of the wing, flaps, and fuselage. Results are presented for the landing flap configuration over an appropriate range of fan pressure ratio as affected by several variables including ground height and vortex generator modifications. Static turning angles of the order of 60 deg were obtained. The highest surface pressures and temperatures were concentrated over the upper surface of the flaps in the region immediately aft of the upper surface blown nozzle.

  20. Ground-Handling Forces on a 1/40-scale Model of the U. S. Airship "Akron."

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Silverstein, Abe; Gulick, B G

    1937-01-01

    This report presents the results of full-scale wind tunnel tests conducted to determine the ground-handling forces on a 1/40-scale model of the U. S. Airship "Akron." Ground-handling conditions were simulated by establishing a velocity gradient above a special ground board in the tunnel comparable with that encountered over a landing field. The tests were conducted at Reynolds numbers ranging from 5,000,000 to 19,000,000 at each of six angles of yaw between 0 degree and 180 degrees and at four heights of the model above the ground board. The ground-handling forces vary greatly with the angle of yaw and reach large values at appreciable angles of yaw. Small changes in height, pitch, or roll did not critically affect the forces on the model. In the range of Reynolds numbers tested, no significant variation of the forces with the scale was disclosed.

  1. Atomic-scale insights into 1D and 2D nano-materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bangert, U.; Pierce, W.; Boothroyd, C. B.; Migliorato, M.; Pan, C.-T.; Harvey, A. J.; Kepatsoglou, D. M.; Ramasse, Q. M.

    2015-10-01

    Atomic resolution imaging and narrow-energy spread spectroscopy in aberration corrected (scanning) transmission electron microscopes, in combination with DFT modelling has made it possible to uncover atomic-scale morphology, defect constellations, lattice impurities and ad-atoms in nano-materials, as well as revealing their influence on the surrounding bandstructure. Using atomic-scale imaging, EEL spectroscopy and EFTEM, we address issues beyond the more common investigations of their atomic lattice structure. We focus on the demonstration of (i) ripples in graphene and on effects of (ii) metal ad-atoms as well as of (iii) controllably introduced impurities -via low energy ion implantation- in both, graphene and carbon nanotubes, on the electronic band structure. We demonstrate the creation of a new feature with collective charge carrier behaviour (plasmon) in the UV/vis range in graphene and carbon nanotubes via EEL spectrum imaging and EFTEM, and support this with dielectric theory modelling.

  2. Pangolin v1.0, a conservative 2-D transport model for large scale parallel calculation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Praga, A.; Cariolle, D.; Giraud, L.

    2014-07-01

    To exploit the possibilities of parallel computers, we designed a large-scale bidimensional atmospheric transport model named Pangolin. As the basis for a future chemistry-transport model, a finite-volume approach was chosen both for mass preservation and to ease parallelization. To overcome the pole restriction on time-steps for a regular latitude-longitude grid, Pangolin uses a quasi-area-preserving reduced latitude-longitude grid. The features of the regular grid are exploited to improve parallel performances and a custom domain decomposition algorithm is presented. To assess the validity of the transport scheme, its results are compared with state-of-the-art models on analytical test cases. Finally, parallel performances are shown in terms of strong scaling and confirm the efficient scalability up to a few hundred of cores.

  3. Spatial clustering in the ESO-Sculptor survey: two-point correlation functions by galaxy type at redshifts 0.1-0.5

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Lapparent, V.; Slezak, E.

    2007-09-01

    Context: Galaxy clustering shows segregation effects with galaxy type, color and luminosity, which bring clues on the relationship with the underlying density field. Aims: We explore these effects among the populations of giant and dwarf galaxies detected in the ESO-Sculptor survey. Methods: We calculate the spatial two-point auto and cross-correlation functions for the 765 galaxies with R_c≤ 21.5 and 0.1 ≤ z ≤ 0.51 and for subsets by spectral type and luminosity. Results: At separation of 0.3 h-1 Mpc, pairs of early-type galaxies dominate the clustering over all the other types of pairs. At intermediate scales, 0.3-5 h-1 Mpc, mixed pairs of dwarf and giant galaxies contribute equally as pairs of giant galaxies, whereas the latter dominate at ≃10 h-1 Mpc. Moreover, the correlation functions per galaxy type display the expected transition between the 1-halo and 2-halo regimes in the scenario of hierarchical merging of dark matter halos. The 1-halo component of the early-type galaxies largely outdoes that for the late spiral galaxies, and that for the dwarf galaxies is intermediate between both. In contrast, the 2-halo component of the early-type galaxies and late spiral galaxies are comparable, whereas that for the dwarf galaxies is consistent with null clustering. Conclusions: We link the clustering segregation of the early-type and late spiral galaxies to their spatial distribution within the underlying dark matter halos. The early-type galaxies are preferentially located near the centers of the most massive halos, whereas late spiral galaxies tend to occupy their outskirts or the centers of less massive halos. This appears to be independent of luminosity for the early-type galaxies, whereas faint late spiral galaxies might reside in less dense regions than their bright analogs. The present analysis also unveils unprecedented results on the contribution from dwarf galaxies: at the scale at which they significantly cluster inside the halos (≤0.3 h-1 Mpc

  4. Report on phase 1 of the Microprocessor Seminar. [and associated large scale integration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1977-01-01

    Proceedings of a seminar on microprocessors and associated large scale integrated (LSI) circuits are presented. The potential for commonality of device requirements, candidate processes and mechanisms for qualifying candidate LSI technologies for high reliability applications, and specifications for testing and testability were among the topics discussed. Various programs and tentative plans of the participating organizations in the development of high reliability LSI circuits are given.

  5. Galaxy and Mass Assembly: the evolution of bias in the radio source population to z˜1.5

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lindsay, S. N.; Jarvis, M. J.; Santos, M. G.; Brown, M. J. I.; Croom, S. M.; Driver, S. P.; Hopkins, A. M.; Liske, J.; Loveday, J.; Norberg, P.; Robotham, A. S. G.

    2014-05-01

    We present a large-scale clustering analysis of radio galaxies in the Very Large Array Faint Images of the Radio Sky at Twenty-cm survey over the Galaxy and Mass Assembly (GAMA) survey area, limited to S1.4 GHz > 1 mJy with spectroscopic and photometric redshift limits up to r < 19.8 and <22 mag, respectively. For the GAMA spectroscopic matches, we present the redshift space and projected correlation functions, the latter of which yielding a correlation length r0 ˜ 8.2 h-1 Mpc and linear bias of ˜1.9 at z ˜ 0.34. Furthermore, we use the angular two-point correlation function w(θ) to determine spatial clustering properties at higher redshifts. We find r0 to increase from ˜6 to ˜14 h-1 Mpc between z = 0.3 and 1.55, with the corresponding bias increasing from ˜2 to ˜10 over the same range. Our results are consistent with the bias prescription implemented in the SKA Design Study simulations at low redshift, but exceed these predictions at z > 1. This is indicative of an increasing (rather than fixed) halo mass and/or active galactic nuclei fraction at higher redshifts or a larger typical halo mass for the more abundant Fanaroff and Riley Class I sources.

  6. A Compendium of Scale Surface Microstructures: Ni(pt)al Coatings Oxidized at 1150 C for 2000 1-h Cycles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smialek, James L.; Garg, Anita

    2010-01-01

    The surface structure of scales formed on Ni(Pt)Al coatings was characterized by SEM/EDS/BSE in plan view. Two nominally identical {100} samples of aluminide coated CMSX4 single crystal were oxidized at 1150 C for 2000 1-h cycles and were found to produce somewhat disparate behavior. One sample, with less propensity for coating grain boundary ridge deformation, presented primarily alpha-Al2O3 scale structures, with minimal weight loss and spallation. The original scale structure, still retained over most of the sample, consisted of the classic theta-alpha transformation-induced ridge network structure, with approx. 25 nm crystallographic steps and terraces indicative of surface rearrangement to low energy alumina planes. The scale grain boundary ridges were often decorated with a fine, uniform distribution of (Hf,Ti)O2 particles. Another sample, producing steady state weight losses, exhibited much interfacial spallation and a complex assortment of different structures. Broad areas of interfacial spalling, crystallographically-faceted (Ni,Co)(Al,Cr)2O4 spinel, with an alpha-Al2O3 base scale, were the dominant features. Other regions exhibited nodular spinel grains, with fine or (Ta,Ti)-rich (rutile) particles decorating or interspersed with the spinel. While these features were consistent with a coating that presented more deformation at extruded grain boundaries, the root cause of the different behavior between the duplicate samples could not be conclusively identified.

  7. Cosmological constraints from the large-scale weak lensing of SDSS MaxBCG clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zu, Ying; Weinberg, David H.; Rozo, Eduardo; Sheldon, Erin S.; Tinker, Jeremy L.; Becker, Matthew R.

    2014-04-01

    We derive constraints on the matter density Ωm and the amplitude of matter clustering σ8 from measurements of large-scale weak lensing (projected separation R = 5-30 h-1 Mpc) by clusters in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey MaxBCG catalogue. The weak lensing signal is proportional to the product of Ωm and the cluster-mass correlation function ξcm. With the relation between optical richness and cluster mass constrained by the observed cluster number counts, the predicted lensing signal increases with increasing Ωm or σ8, with mild additional dependence on the assumed scatter between richness and mass. The dependence of the signal on scale and richness partly breaks the degeneracies among these parameters. We incorporate external priors on the richness-mass scatter from comparisons to X-ray data and on the shape of the matter power spectrum from galaxy clustering, and we test our adopted model for ξcm against N-body simulations. Using a Bayesian approach with minimal restrictive priors, we find σ8(Ωm/0.325)0.501 = 0.828 ± 0.049, with marginalized constraints of Ω _m=0.325_{-0.067}^{+0.086} and σ _8=0.828_{-0.097}^{+0.111}, consistent with constraints from other MaxBCG studies that use weak lensing measurements on small scales (R ≤ 2 h-1 Mpc). The (Ωm, σ8) constraint is consistent with and orthogonal to the one inferred from Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe cosmic microwave background data, reflecting agreement with the structure growth predicted by General Relativity for a Λ cold dark matter (ΛCDM) cosmological model. A joint constraint assuming ΛCDM yields Ω _m=0.298_{-0.020}^{+0.019} and σ _8=0.831_{-0.020}^{+0.020}. For these parameters and our best-fitting scatter, we obtain a tightly constrained mean richness-mass relation of MaxBCG clusters, N200 = 25.4(M/3.61 × 1014 h-1 M⊙)0.74, with a normalization uncertainty of 1.5 per cent. Our cosmological parameter errors are dominated by the statistical uncertainties of the large-scale weak

  8. Cross-cultural adaptation and validation of the Protective Nursing Advocacy Scale for Brazilian nurses 1

    PubMed Central

    Tomaschewski-Barlem, Jamila Geri; Lunardi, Valéria Lerch; Barlem, Edison Luiz Devos; da Silveira, Rosemary Silva; Dalmolin, Graziele de Lima; Ramos, Aline Marcelino

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Objective: to adapt culturally and validate the Protective Nursing Advocacy Scale for Brazilian nurses. Method: methodological study carried out with 153 nurses from two hospitals in the South region of Brazil, one public and the other philanthropic. The cross-cultural adaptation of the Protective Nursing Advocacy Scale was performed according to international standards, and its validation was carried out for use in the Brazilian context, by means of factor analysis and Cronbach's alpha as measure of internal consistency. Results: by means of evaluation by a committee of experts and application of pre-test, face validity and content validity of the instrument were considered satisfactory. From the factor analysis, five constructs were identified: negative implications of the advocacy practice, advocacy actions, facilitators of the advocacy practice, perceptions that favor practice advocacy and barriers to advocacy practice. The instrument showed satisfactory internal consistency, with Cronbach's alpha values ranging from 0.70 to 0.87. Conclusion: it was concluded that the Protective Nursing Advocacy Scale - Brazilian version, is a valid and reliable instrument for use in the evaluation of beliefs and actions of health advocacy, performed by Brazilian nurses in their professional practice environment. PMID:26444169

  9. Form drag in rivers due to small-scale natural topographic features: 1. Regular sequences

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kean, J.W.; Smith, J.D.

    2006-01-01

    Small-scale topographic features are commonly found on the boundaries of natural rivers, streams, and floodplains. A simple method for determining the form drag on these features is presented, and the results of this model are compared to laboratory measurements. The roughness elements are modeled as Gaussian-shaped features defined in terms of three parameters: a protrusion height, H; a streamwise length scale, ??; and a spacing between crests, ??. This shape is shown to be a good approximation to a wide variety of natural topographic bank features. The form drag on an individual roughness element embedded in a series of identical elements is determined using the drag coefficient of the individual element and a reference velocity that includes the effects of roughness elements further upstream. In addition to calculating the drag on each element, the model determines the spatially averaged total stress, skin friction stress, and roughness height of the boundary. The effects of bank roughness on patterns of velocity and boundary shear stress are determined by combining the form drag model with a channel flow model. The combined model shows that drag on small-scale topographic features substantially alters the near-bank flow field. These methods can be used to improve predictions of flow resistance in rivers and to form the basis for fully predictive (no empirically adjusted parameters) channel flow models. They also provide a foundation for calculating the near-bank boundary shear stress fields necessary for determining rates of sediment transport and lateral erosion.

  10. Validation and Simulation of ARES I Scale Model Acoustic Test -1- Pathfinder Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Putnam, G. C.

    2011-01-01

    The Ares I Scale Model Acoustics Test (ASMAT) is a series of live-fire tests of scaled rocket motors meant to simulate the conditions of the Ares I launch configuration. These tests have provided a well documented set of high fidelity measurements useful for validation including data taken over a range of test conditions and containing phenomena like Ignition Over-Pressure and water suppression of acoustics. To take advantage of this data, a digital representation of the ASMAT test setup has been constructed and test firings of the motor have been simulated using the Loci/CHEM computational fluid dynamics software. Within this first of a series of papers, results from ASMAT simulations with the rocket in a held down configuration and without water suppression have then been compared to acoustic data collected from similar live-fire tests to assess the accuracy of the simulations. Detailed evaluations of the mesh features, mesh length scales relative to acoustic signals, Courant-Friedrichs-Lewy numbers, and spatial residual sources have been performed to support this assessment. Results of acoustic comparisons have shown good correlation with the amplitude and temporal shape of pressure features and reasonable spectral accuracy up to approximately 1000 Hz. Major plume and acoustic features have been well captured including the plume shock structure, the igniter pulse transient, and the ignition overpressure. Finally, acoustic propagation patterns illustrated a previously unconsidered issue of tower placement inline with the high intensity overpressure propagation path.

  11. Local Scale Radiobrightness Modeling During the Intensive Observing Period-4 of the Cold Land Processes Experiment-1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, Edward J.; Tedesco, Marco; deRoo, Roger; England, Anthony W.; Gu, Hao-Yu; Pham, Hanh; Boprie, David; Graf, Tobias; Koike, Toshio; Armstrong, Richard

    2005-01-01

    The NASA Cold Land Processes Field Experiment (CLPX-1) was designed to provide microwave remote sensing observations and ground truth for studies of snow and frozen ground remote sensing, particularly issues related to scaling. CLPX-1 was conducted in 2002 and 2003 in Colorado, USA. One of the goals of the experiment was to test the capabilities of microwave emission models at different scales. Initial forward model validation work has concentrated on the Local-Scale Observation Site (LSOS), a 0.8 ha study site consisting of open meadows separated by trees where the most detailed measurements were made of snow depth and temperature, density, and grain size profiles. Results obtained in the case of the 3& Intensive Observing Period (IOP3) period (Feb., 2003, dry snow) suggest that a model based on Dense Medium Radiative Transfer (DMRT) theory is able to model the recorded brightness temperatures using snow parameters derived from field measurements. This paper focuses on the ability of forward DMRT modelling, combined with snowpack measurements, to reproduce the radiobrightness signatures observed by the University of Michigan s Truck-Mounted Radiometer System (TMRS) at 19 and 37 GHz during the 4th IOP (IOP4) in March, 2003. Unlike IOP3, conditions during IOP4 include both wet and dry periods, providing a valuable test of DMRT model performance. In addition, a comparison will be made for the one day of coincident observations by the University of Tokyo's Ground-Based Microwave Radiometer-7 (GBMR-7) and the TMRS. The plot-scale study in this paper establishes a baseline of DMRT performance for later studies at successively larger scales. And these scaling studies will help guide the choice of future snow retrieval algorithms and the design of future Cold Lands observing systems.

  12. Scale-4 Analysis of Pressurized Water Reactor Critical Configurations: Volume 5 - North Anna Unit 1 Cycle 5

    SciTech Connect

    Bowman, S.M.

    1993-01-01

    The requirements of ANSI/ANS 8.1 specify that calculational methods for away-from-reactor (AFR) criticality safety analyses be validated against experimental measurements. If credit for the negative reactivity of the depleted (or spent) fuel isotopics is desired, it is necessary to benchmark computational methods against spent fuel critical configurations. This report summarizes a portion of the ongoing effort to benchmark AFR criticality analysis methods using selected critical configurations from commercial pressurized-water reactors (PWR). The analysis methodology selected for all calculations reported herein was the codes and data provided in the SCALE-4 code system. The isotopic densities for the spent fuel assemblies in the critical configurations were calculated using the SAS2H analytical sequence of the SCALE-4 system. The sources of data and the procedures for deriving SAS2H input parameters are described in detail. The SNIKR code module was used to extract the necessary isotopic densities from the SAS2H results and to provide the data in the format required by the SCALE criticality analysis modules. The CSASN analytical sequence in SCALE-4 was used to perform resonance processing of the cross sections. The KENO V.a module of SCALE-4 was used to calculate the effective multiplication factor (k{sub eff}) of each case. The SCALE-4 27-group burnup library containing ENDF/B-IV (actinides) and ENDF/B-V (fission products) data was used for all the calculations. This volume of the report documents the SCALE system analysis of one reactor critical configuration for North Anna Unit 1 Cycle 5. This unit and cycle were chosen for a previous analysis using a different methodology because detailed isotopics from multidimensional reactor calculations were available from the Virginia Power Company. These data permitted comparison of criticality calculations directly using the utility-calculated isotopics to those using the isotopics generated by the SCALE-4 SAS2H

  13. Topology of large-scale structure in seeded hot dark matter models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beaky, Matthew M.; Scherrer, Robert J.; Villumsen, Jens V.

    1992-01-01

    The topology of the isodensity surfaces in seeded hot dark matter models, in which static seed masses provide the density perturbations in a universe dominated by massive neutrinos is examined. When smoothed with a Gaussian window, the linear initial conditions in these models show no trace of non-Gaussian behavior for r0 equal to or greater than 5 Mpc (h = 1/2), except for very low seed densities, which show a shift toward isolated peaks. An approximate analytic expression is given for the genus curve expected in linear density fields from randomly distributed seed masses. The evolved models have a Gaussian topology for r0 = 10 Mpc, but show a shift toward a cellular topology with r0 = 5 Mpc; Gaussian models with an identical power spectrum show the same behavior.

  14. Power scaling and wavelength tuning of diode-pumped Nd:LSO laser at 1.35 μm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Xiaoxu; Lan, Jinglong; Lin, Zhi; Cui, Shengwei; Wang, Yi; Xu, Bin; Xu, Huiying; Cai, Zhiping; Xu, Xiaodong; Xu, Jun

    2016-08-01

    We report a power scaled laser operation of diode-pumped Nd:LSO lasers at 1.35 μm. With single-end-pumping scheme, maximum output power reaches 0.77 W at 1358.99 nm in free-running mode. By inserting an etalon, wavelength tuning can be realized with tuning range of at least 6.5 nm from 1356.95 nm to 1363.39 nm. Simultaneous dual-wavelength laser at 1331.63 and 1357.43 nm can also be generated with total output power of 0.19 W, for the first time to our knowledge. Further power scaling to 1.03 W of the 1358.99 nm laser is finally achieved by recycling the remaining pump power, which represents the highest output power so far for 1.3 μm silicate lasers.

  15. An evaluation of acoustic seabed classification techniques for marine biotope monitoring over broad-scales (>1 km 2) and meso-scales (10 m 2-1 km 2)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Rein, H.; Brown, C. J.; Quinn, R.; Breen, J.; Schoeman, D.

    2011-07-01

    Acoustic seabed classification is a useful tool for monitoring marine benthic habitats over broad-scales (>1 km 2) and meso-scales (10 m 2-1 km 2). Its utility in this context was evaluated using two approaches: by describing natural changes in the temporal distribution of marine biotopes across the broad-scale (4 km 2), and by attempting to detect specific experimentally-induced changes to kelp-dominated biotopes across the meso-scale (100 m 2). For the first approach, acoustic backscatter mosaics were constructed using sidescan sonar and multibeam echosounder data collected from Church Bay (Rathlin Island, Northern Ireland) in 1999, 2008 and 2009. The mosaics were manually segmented into acoustic facies, which were ground-truthed using a drop-video camera. Biotopes were classified from the video by multivariate exploratory analysis and cross-tabulated with the acoustic facies, showing a positive correlation. These results were integrated with bathymetric data to map the distribution of seven unique biotopes in Church Bay. Kappa analysis showed the biotope distribution was highly similar between the biotope maps, possibly due to the stability of bedforms shaped by the tidal regime around Rathlin Island. The greatest biotope change in this approach was represented by seasonal and annual changes in the growth of the seagrass, Zostera marina. In the second approach, sidescan sonar data were collected before and after the removal of 100 m 2 of kelp from three sites. Comparison of the data revealed no differences between the high-resolution backscatter imagery. It is concluded that acoustic seabed classification can be used to monitor change over broad- and meso-scales but not necessarily for all biotopes; its success depends on the type of acoustic system employed and the biological characteristics of the target biotope.

  16. Large Scale Structure in Absorption up to z~0.4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tejos, Nicolas

    2012-10-01

    We propose to observe and characterize IGM absorption systems associated with Large Scale Structure {LSS} in a statistical manner up to redshift 0.4. For this purpose, we have used a recently published cluster catalog {GMBCG; Hao et al., 2010} to identify massive nodes in the 'cosmic web'. Then, we used cluster pairs with small separations {<20 Mpc} at similar redshifts to identify zones where filaments should reside with high probabilities. Combining the GMBCG cluster catalog with the SDSS DR7 QSO catalog, we selected a single QSO whose sightline passes through a total of 6 predicted filaments {3 of which are independent} and 3 clusters with spectroscopic redshifts at impact parameters <1.5 Mpc. This will considerably increase the sample of known LSS {especially filaments} at low redshift. We propose to observe the QSO with HST/COS using the G130M and G160M gratings to cover the full FUV spectral range at high resolution {R 20000}. We require observations at S/N 10 to ensure a full characterization of HI and OVI lines at small column densities {N 10^13 cm^-2}. These low column densities will allow us to detect broad and shallow HI lines with OVI, believed to be associated with portions of the warm-hot intergalactic medium {WHIM}. Our results will also be suitable for testing an alternative hypothesis which states that the majority of OVI absorbers at low-z are confined within <300 kpc from galaxies and are not directly related to the WHIM {Prochaska et al., 2011; Tumlinson et al., 2011}. Our findings will test our understanding of galaxy formation and the importance of AGN/supernova feedbacks by comparing them with state-of-the-art hydrodynamical simulations.

  17. THE DETECTION OF THE LARGE-SCALE ALIGNMENT OF MASSIVE GALAXIES AT z {approx} 0.6

    SciTech Connect

    Li Cheng; Jing, Y. P.; Faltenbacher, A.; Wang Jie

    2013-06-10

    We report on the detection of the alignment between galaxies and large-scale structure at z {approx} 0.6 based on the CMASS galaxy sample from the Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopy Survey Data Release 9. We use two statistics to quantify the alignment signal: (1) the alignment two-point correlation function that probes the dependence of galaxy clustering at a given separation in redshift space on the projected angle ({theta}{sub p}) between the orientation of galaxies and the line connecting to other galaxies, and (2) the cos (2{theta})-statistic that estimates the average of cos (2{theta}{sub p}) for all correlated pairs at a given separation s. We find a significant alignment signal out to about 70 h {sup -1} Mpc in both statistics. Applications of the same statistics to dark matter halos of mass above 10{sup 12} h {sup -1} M{sub Sun} in a large cosmological simulation show scale-dependent alignment signals similar to the observation, but with higher amplitudes at all scales probed. We show that this discrepancy may be partially explained by a misalignment angle between central galaxies and their host halos, though detailed modeling is needed in order to better understand the link between the orientations of galaxies and host halos. In addition, we find systematic trends of the alignment statistics with the stellar mass of the CMASS galaxies, in the sense that more massive galaxies are more strongly aligned with the large-scale structure.

  18. Bench-scale development of mild gasification char desulfurization. Technical report, 1 December 1993--28 February 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Knight, R.A.

    1994-06-01

    The goal of this project is to scale up a process, developed under a previous ICCI grant, for desulfurization of mild gasification char by treatment with hydrogen-rich process-derived fuel gas at 650--760 C and 7-15 atm. The char can be converted into a low-sulfur metallurgical form coke. In the prior study, IBC-105 coal with 4.0 wt % sulfur was converted to chars with less than 1.0 wt% sulfur was converted to chars with less than 1.0 wt % sulfur in a laboratory-scale batch reactor. The susceptibility of the char to desulfurization was correlated with physicochemical char properties and mild gasification conditions. Acid pretreatment of the coal prior to mild gasification was also shown to significantly enhance subsequent sulfur removal. In this study, IGT is conducting continuous bench-scale tests in a 1-lb/h fluidized-bed reactor to determine the preferred process conditions and obtain steady-state data necessary for process conditions and obtain steady-state data necessary for process design and scale-up. The desulfurized chars are to be used to produce low-sulfur form coke, which will be evaluated for density, reactivity, and strength properties relevant to utilization in blast furnaces. During the second quarter, the authors completed the acid pretreatment of 25 lb (11 kg) of the 40 x 80-mesh IBC-105 coal and 7 lb (3 kg) of carbonizer char. Modifications of the bench-scale fluidized-bed reactor were completed, permitting extended-duration char-producing runs with caking coal. Char-producing runs were initiated at 1100 F and 20 psig in nitrogen, and will continue into the third quarter.

  19. The cluster-scale environment of PKS 2155-304

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farina, E. P.; Fumagalli, M.; Decarli, R.; Fanidakis, N.

    2016-01-01

    PKS 2155-304 is one of the brightest extragalactic source in the X-ray and EUV bands, and is a prototype for the BL Lac class of objects. In this paper, we investigate the large-scale environment of this source using new multi-object as well as long-slit spectroscopy, together with archival spectra and optical images. We find clear evidence of a modest overdensity of galaxies at z = 0.116 10 ± 0.000 06, consistent with previous determinations of the BL Lac redshift. The galaxy group has a radial velocity dispersion of 250^{+80}_{-40} km s-1 and a virial radius of 0.22 Mpc, yielding a role-of-thumb estimate of the virial mass of Mvir ˜ 1.5 × 1013 M⊙, i.e. one order of magnitude less than that observed in similar objects. This result hints towards a relatively wide diversity in the environmental properties of BL Lac objects.

  20. Nonlinear power spectrum from resummed perturbation theory: a leap beyond the BAO scale

    SciTech Connect

    Anselmi, Stefano; Pietroni, Massimo E-mail: massimo.pietroni@pd.infn.it

    2012-12-01

    A new computational scheme for the nonlinear cosmological matter power spectrum (PS) is presented. Our method is based on evolution equations in time, which can be cast in a form extremely convenient for fast numerical evaluations. A nonlinear PS is obtained in a time comparable to that needed for a simple 1-loop computation, and the numerical implementation is very simple. Our results agree with N-body simulations at the percent level in the BAO range of scales, and at the few-percent level up to k ≅ 1 h/Mpc at z∼>0.5, thereby opening the possibility of applying this tool to scales interesting for weak lensing. We clarify the approximations inherent to this approach as well as its relations to previous ones, such as the Time Renormalization Group, and the multi-point propagator expansion. We discuss possible lines of improvements of the method and its intrinsic limitations by multi streaming at small scales and low redshifts.