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Sample records for 1 ribosomal frameshift

  1. -1 Programmed Ribosomal Frameshifting as a Force-Dependent Process.

    PubMed

    Visscher, Koen

    2016-01-01

    -1 Programmed ribosomal frameshifting is a translational recoding event in which ribosomes slip backward along messenger RNA presumably due to increased tension disrupting the codon-anticodon interaction at the ribosome's coding site. Single-molecule physical methods and recent experiments characterizing the physical properties of mRNA's slippery sequence as well as the mechanical stability of downstream mRNA structure motifs that give rise to frameshifting are discussed. Progress in technology, experimental assays, and data analysis methods hold promise for accurate physical modeling and quantitative understanding of -1 programmed ribosomal frameshifting. PMID:26970190

  2. A stochastic model of translation with -1 programmed ribosomal frameshifting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bailey, Brenae L.; Visscher, Koen; Watkins, Joseph

    2014-02-01

    Many viruses produce multiple proteins from a single mRNA sequence by encoding overlapping genes. One mechanism to decode both genes, which reside in alternate reading frames, is -1 programmed ribosomal frameshifting. Although recognized for over 25 years, the molecular and physical mechanism of -1 frameshifting remains poorly understood. We have developed a mathematical model that treats mRNA translation and associated -1 frameshifting as a stochastic process in which the transition probabilities are based on the energetics of local molecular interactions. The model predicts both the location and efficiency of -1 frameshift events in HIV-1. Moreover, we compute -1 frameshift efficiencies upon mutations in the viral mRNA sequence and variations in relative tRNA abundances, predictions that are directly testable in experiment.

  3. Interaction of the HIV-1 frameshift signal with the ribosome

    PubMed Central

    Mazauric, Marie-Hélène; Seol, Yeonee; Yoshizawa, Satoko; Visscher, Koen; Fourmy, Dominique

    2009-01-01

    Ribosomal frameshifting on viral RNAs relies on the mechanical properties of structural elements, often pseudoknots and more rarely stem-loops, that are unfolded by the ribosome during translation. In human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-1 type B a long hairpin containing a three-nucleotide bulge is responsible for efficient frameshifting. This three-nucleotide bulge separates the hairpin in two domains: an unstable lower stem followed by a GC-rich upper stem. Toeprinting and chemical probing assays suggest that a hairpin-like structure is retained when ribosomes, initially bound at the slippery sequence, were allowed multiple EF-G catalyzed translocation cycles. However, while the upper stem remains intact the lower stem readily melts. After the first, and single step of translocation of deacylated tRNA to the 30 S P site, movement of the mRNA stem-loop in the 5′ direction is halted, which is consistent with the notion that the downstream secondary structure resists unfolding. Mechanical stretching of the hairpin using optical tweezers only allows clear identification of unfolding of the upper stem at a force of 12.8 ± 1.0 pN. This suggests that the lower stem is unstable and may indeed readily unfold in the presence of a translocating ribosome. PMID:19812214

  4. High frequency of +1 programmed ribosomal frameshifting in Euplotes octocarinatus

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Ruanlin; Xiong, Jie; Wang, Wei; Miao, Wei; Liang, Aihua

    2016-01-01

    Programmed −1 ribosomal frameshifting (−1 PRF) has been identified as a mechanism to regulate the expression of many viral genes and some cellular genes. The slippery site of −1 PRF has been well characterized, whereas the +1 PRF signal and the mechanism involved in +1 PRF remain poorly understood. Previous study confirmed that +1 PRF is required for the synthesis of protein products in several genes of ciliates from the genus Euplotes. To accurately assess the frequency of genes requiring frameshift in Euplotes, the macronuclear genome and transcriptome of Euplotes octocarinatus were analyzed in this study. A total of 3,700 +1 PRF candidate genes were identified from 32,353 transcripts, and the gene products of these putative +1 PRFs were mainly identified as protein kinases. Furthermore, we reported a putative suppressor tRNA of UAA which may provide new insights into the mechanism of +1 PRF in euplotids. For the first time, our transcriptome-wide survey of +1 PRF in E. octocarinatus provided a dataset which serves as a valuable resource for the future understanding of the mechanism underlying +1 PRF. PMID:26891713

  5. FSscan: a mechanism-based program to identify +1 ribosomal frameshift hotspots

    PubMed Central

    Liao, Pei-Yu; Choi, Yong Seok; Lee, Kelvin H.

    2009-01-01

    In +1 programmed ribosomal frameshifting (PRF), ribosomes skip one nucleotide toward the 3′-end during translation. Most of the genes known to demonstrate +1 PRF have been discovered by chance or by searching homologous genes. Here, a bioinformatic framework called FSscan is developed to perform a systematic search for potential +1 frameshift sites in the Escherichia coli genome. Based on a current state of the art understanding of the mechanism of +1 PRF, FSscan calculates scores for a 16-nt window along a gene sequence according to different effects of the stimulatory signals, and ribosome E-, P- and A-site interactions. FSscan successfully identified the +1 PRF site in prfB and predicted yehP, pepP, nuoE and cheA as +1 frameshift candidates in the E. coli genome. Empirical results demonstrated that potential +1 frameshift sequences identified promoted significant levels of +1 frameshifting in vivo. Mass spectrometry analysis confirmed the presence of the frameshifted proteins expressed from a yehP-egfp fusion construct. FSscan allows a genome-wide and systematic search for +1 frameshift sites in E. coli. The results have implications for bioinformatic identification of novel frameshift proteins, ribosomal frameshifting, coding sequence detection and the application of mass spectrometry on studying frameshift proteins. PMID:19783813

  6. Analysis of tetra- and hepta-nucleotides motifs promoting -1 ribosomal frameshifting in Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Virag; Prère, Marie-Françoise; Canal, Isabelle; Firth, Andrew E.; Atkins, John F.; Baranov, Pavel V.; Fayet, Olivier

    2014-01-01

    Programmed ribosomal -1 frameshifting is a non-standard decoding process occurring when ribosomes encounter a signal embedded in the mRNA of certain eukaryotic and prokaryotic genes. This signal has a mandatory component, the frameshift motif: it is either a Z_ZZN tetramer or a X_XXZ_ZZN heptamer (where ZZZ and XXX are three identical nucleotides) allowing cognate or near-cognate repairing to the -1 frame of the A site or A and P sites tRNAs. Depending on the signal, the frameshifting frequency can vary over a wide range, from less than 1% to more than 50%. The present study combines experimental and bioinformatics approaches to carry out (i) a systematic analysis of the frameshift propensity of all possible motifs (16 Z_ZZN tetramers and 64 X_XXZ_ZZN heptamers) in Escherichia coli and (ii) the identification of genes potentially using this mode of expression amongst 36 Enterobacteriaceae genomes. While motif efficiency varies widely, a major distinctive rule of bacterial -1 frameshifting is that the most efficient motifs are those allowing cognate re-pairing of the A site tRNA from ZZN to ZZZ. The outcome of the genomic search is a set of 69 gene clusters, 59 of which constitute new candidates for functional utilization of -1 frameshifting. PMID:24875478

  7. Analysis of tetra- and hepta-nucleotides motifs promoting -1 ribosomal frameshifting in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Virag; Prère, Marie-Françoise; Canal, Isabelle; Firth, Andrew E; Atkins, John F; Baranov, Pavel V; Fayet, Olivier

    2014-06-01

    Programmed ribosomal -1 frameshifting is a non-standard decoding process occurring when ribosomes encounter a signal embedded in the mRNA of certain eukaryotic and prokaryotic genes. This signal has a mandatory component, the frameshift motif: it is either a Z_ZZN tetramer or a X_XXZ_ZZN heptamer (where ZZZ and XXX are three identical nucleotides) allowing cognate or near-cognate repairing to the -1 frame of the A site or A and P sites tRNAs. Depending on the signal, the frameshifting frequency can vary over a wide range, from less than 1% to more than 50%. The present study combines experimental and bioinformatics approaches to carry out (i) a systematic analysis of the frameshift propensity of all possible motifs (16 Z_ZZN tetramers and 64 X_XXZ_ZZN heptamers) in Escherichia coli and (ii) the identification of genes potentially using this mode of expression amongst 36 Enterobacteriaceae genomes. While motif efficiency varies widely, a major distinctive rule of bacterial -1 frameshifting is that the most efficient motifs are those allowing cognate re-pairing of the A site tRNA from ZZN to ZZZ. The outcome of the genomic search is a set of 69 gene clusters, 59 of which constitute new candidates for functional utilization of -1 frameshifting. PMID:24875478

  8. Asc1, homolog of human RACK1, prevents frameshifting in yeast by ribosomes stalled at CGA codon repeats.

    PubMed

    Wolf, Andrew S; Grayhack, Elizabeth J

    2015-05-01

    Quality control systems monitor and stop translation at some ribosomal stalls, but it is unknown if halting translation at such stalls actually prevents synthesis of abnormal polypeptides. In yeast, ribosome stalling occurs at Arg CGA codon repeats, with even two consecutive CGA codons able to reduce translation by up to 50%. The conserved eukaryotic Asc1 protein limits translation through internal Arg CGA codon repeats. We show that, in the absence of Asc1 protein, ribosomes continue translating at CGA codons, but undergo substantial frameshifting with dramatically higher levels of frameshifting occurring with additional repeats of CGA codons. Frameshifting depends upon the slow or inefficient decoding of these codons, since frameshifting is suppressed by increased expression of the native tRNA(Arg(ICG)) that decodes CGA codons by wobble decoding. Moreover, the extent of frameshifting is modulated by the position of the CGA codon repeat relative to the translation start site. Thus, translation fidelity depends upon Asc1-mediated quality control.

  9. Multiple Cis-acting elements modulate programmed -1 ribosomal frameshifting in Pea enation mosaic virus

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Feng; Simon, Anne E.

    2016-01-01

    Programmed -1 ribosomal frameshifting (-1 PRF) is used by many positive-strand RNA viruses for translation of required products. Despite extensive studies, it remains unresolved how cis-elements just downstream of the recoding site promote a precise level of frameshifting. The Umbravirus Pea enation mosaic virus RNA2 expresses its RNA polymerase by -1 PRF of the 5′-proximal ORF (p33). Three hairpins located in the vicinity of the recoding site are phylogenetically conserved among Umbraviruses. The central Recoding Stimulatory Element (RSE), located downstream of the p33 termination codon, is a large hairpin with two asymmetric internal loops. Mutational analyses revealed that sequences throughout the RSE and the RSE lower stem (LS) structure are important for frameshifting. SHAPE probing of mutants indicated the presence of higher order structure, and sequences in the LS may also adapt an alternative conformation. Long-distance pairing between the RSE and a 3′ terminal hairpin was less critical when the LS structure was stabilized. A basal level of frameshifting occurring in the absence of the RSE increases to 72% of wild-type when a hairpin upstream of the slippery site is also deleted. These results suggest that suppression of frameshifting may be needed in the absence of an active RSE conformation. PMID:26578603

  10. Stimulation of -1 programmed ribosomal frameshifting by a metabolite-responsive RNA pseudoknot.

    PubMed

    Chou, Ming-Yuan; Lin, Szu-Chieh; Chang, Kung-Yao

    2010-06-01

    Specific recognition of metabolites by functional RNA motifs within mRNAs has emerged as a crucial regulatory strategy for feedback control of biochemical reactions. Such riboswitches have been demonstrated to regulate different gene expression processes, including transcriptional termination and translational initiation in prokaryotic cells, as well as splicing in eukaryotic cells. The regulatory process is usually mediated by modulating the accessibility of specific sequence information of the expression platforms via metabolite-induced RNA conformational rearrangement. In eukaryotic systems, viral and the more limited number of cellular decoding -1 programmed ribosomal frameshifting (PRF) are commonly promoted by a 3' mRNA pseudoknot. In addition, such -1 PRF is generally constitutive rather than being regulatory, and usually results in a fixed ratio of products. We report here an RNA pseudoknot capable of stimulating -1 PRF whose efficiency can be tuned in response to the concentration of S-adenosylhomocysteine (SAH), and the improvement of its frameshifting efficiency by RNA engineering. In addition to providing an alternative approach for small-molecule regulation of gene expression in eukaryotic cells, such a metabolite-responsive pseudoknot suggests a plausible mechanism for metabolite-driven translational regulation of gene expression in eukaryotic systems. PMID:20435898

  11. Cell cycle control (and more) by programmed −1 ribosomal frameshifting: implications for disease and therapeutics

    PubMed Central

    Belew, Ashton T; Dinman, Jonathan D

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Like most basic molecular mechanisms, programmed –1 ribosomal frameshifting (−1 PRF) was first identified in viruses. Early observations that global dysregulation of −1 PRF had deleterious effects on yeast cell growth suggested that −1 PRF may be used to control cellular gene expression, and the cell cycle in particular. Collection of sufficient numbers of viral −1 PRF signals coupled with advances in computer sciences enabled 2 complementary computational approaches to identify −1 PRF signals in free living organisms. The unexpected observation that almost all −1 PRF events on eukaryotic mRNAs direct ribosomes to premature termination codons engendered the hypothesis that −1 PRF signals post-transcriptionally regulate gene expression by functioning as mRNA destabilizing elements. Emerging research suggests that some human diseases are associated with global defects in −1 PRF. The recent discovery of −1 PRF signal-specific trans-acting regulators may provide insight into novel therapeutic strategies aimed at treating diseases caused by changes in gene expression patterns. PMID:25584829

  12. A programmed –1 ribosomal frameshift signal can function as a cis-acting mRNA destabilizing element

    PubMed Central

    Plant, Ewan P.; Wang, Pinger; Jacobs, Jonathan L.; Dinman, Jonathan D.

    2004-01-01

    Nonsense-mediated mRNA decay (NMD) directs rapid degradation of premature termination codon (PTC)-containing mRNAs, e.g. those containing frameshift mutations. Many viral mRNAs encode polycistronic messages where programmed –1 ribosomal frameshift (–1 PRF) signals direct ribosomes to synthesize polyproteins. A previous study, which identified consensus –1 PRF signals in the yeast genome, found that, in contrast to viruses, the majority of predicted –1 PRF events would direct translating ribosomes to PTCs. Here we tested the hypothesis that a –1 PRF signal can function as a cis-acting mRNA destabilizing element by inserting an L-A viral –1 PRF signal into a PGK1 reporter construct in the ‘genomic’ orientation. The results show that even low levels of –1 PRF are sufficient to target the reporter mRNA for degradation via the NMD pathway, with half-lives similar to messages containing in-frame PTCs. The demonstration of an inverse correlation between frameshift efficiency and mRNA half-lives suggests that modulation of –1 PRF frequencies can be used to post-transcriptionally regulate gene expression. Analysis of the mRNA decay profiles of the frameshift-signal- containing reporter mRNAs also supports the notion that NMD remains active on mRNAs beyond the ‘pioneer round’ of translation in yeast. PMID:14762205

  13. Large-scale mass spectrometry-based analysis of Euplotes octocarinatus supports the high frequency of +1 programmed ribosomal frameshift.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ruanlin; Zhang, Zhiyun; Du, Jun; Fu, Yuejun; Liang, Aihua

    2016-01-01

    Programmed ribosomal frameshifting (PRF) is commonly used to express many viral and some cellular genes. We conducted a genome-wide investigation of +1 PRF in ciliate Euplotes octocarinatus through genome and transcriptome sequencing and our results demonstrated that approximately 11.4% of genes require +1 PRF to produce complete gene products. While nucleic acid-based evidence for candidate genes with +1 PRF is strong, only very limited information is available at protein levels to date. In this study, E. octocarinatus was subjected to large-scale mass spectrometry-based analysis to verify the high frequency of +1 PRF and 226 +1 PRF gene products were identified. Based on the amino acid sequences of the peptides spanning the frameshift sites, typical frameshift motif AAA-UAR for +1 PRF in Euplotes was identified. Our data in this study provide very useful insight into the understanding of the molecular mechanism of +1 PRF. PMID:27597422

  14. Large-scale mass spectrometry-based analysis of Euplotes octocarinatus supports the high frequency of +1 programmed ribosomal frameshift

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Ruanlin; Zhang, Zhiyun; Du, Jun; Fu, Yuejun; Liang, Aihua

    2016-01-01

    Programmed ribosomal frameshifting (PRF) is commonly used to express many viral and some cellular genes. We conducted a genome-wide investigation of +1 PRF in ciliate Euplotes octocarinatus through genome and transcriptome sequencing and our results demonstrated that approximately 11.4% of genes require +1 PRF to produce complete gene products. While nucleic acid-based evidence for candidate genes with +1 PRF is strong, only very limited information is available at protein levels to date. In this study, E. octocarinatus was subjected to large-scale mass spectrometry-based analysis to verify the high frequency of +1 PRF and 226 +1 PRF gene products were identified. Based on the amino acid sequences of the peptides spanning the frameshift sites, typical frameshift motif AAA-UAR for +1 PRF in Euplotes was identified. Our data in this study provide very useful insight into the understanding of the molecular mechanism of +1 PRF. PMID:27597422

  15. Large-scale mass spectrometry-based analysis of Euplotes octocarinatus supports the high frequency of +1 programmed ribosomal frameshift.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ruanlin; Zhang, Zhiyun; Du, Jun; Fu, Yuejun; Liang, Aihua

    2016-01-01

    Programmed ribosomal frameshifting (PRF) is commonly used to express many viral and some cellular genes. We conducted a genome-wide investigation of +1 PRF in ciliate Euplotes octocarinatus through genome and transcriptome sequencing and our results demonstrated that approximately 11.4% of genes require +1 PRF to produce complete gene products. While nucleic acid-based evidence for candidate genes with +1 PRF is strong, only very limited information is available at protein levels to date. In this study, E. octocarinatus was subjected to large-scale mass spectrometry-based analysis to verify the high frequency of +1 PRF and 226 +1 PRF gene products were identified. Based on the amino acid sequences of the peptides spanning the frameshift sites, typical frameshift motif AAA-UAR for +1 PRF in Euplotes was identified. Our data in this study provide very useful insight into the understanding of the molecular mechanism of +1 PRF.

  16. The three transfer RNAs occupying the A, P and E sites on the ribosome are involved in viral programmed -1 ribosomal frameshift

    PubMed Central

    Léger, Mélissa; Dulude, Dominic; Steinberg, Sergey V.; Brakier-Gingras, Léa

    2007-01-01

    The -1 programmed ribosomal frameshifts (PRF), which are used by many viruses, occur at a heptanucleotide slippery sequence and are currently thought to involve the tRNAs interacting with the ribosomal P- and A-site codons. We investigated here whether the tRNA occupying the ribosomal E site that precedes a slippery site influences -1 PRF. Using the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) frameshift region, we found that mutating the E-site codon altered the -1 PRF efficiency. When the HIV-1 slippery sequence was replaced with other viral slippery sequences, mutating the E-site codon also altered the -1 PRF efficiency. Because HIV-1 -1 PRF can be recapitulated in bacteria, we used a bacterial ribosome system to select, by random mutagenesis, 16S ribosomal RNA (rRNA) mutations that modify the expression of a reporter requiring HIV-1 -1 PRF. Three mutants were isolated, which are located in helices 21 and 22 of 16S rRNA, a region involved in translocation and E-site tRNA binding. We propose a novel model where -1 PRF is triggered by an incomplete translocation and depends not only on the tRNAs interacting with the P- and A-site codons, but also on the tRNA occupying the E site. PMID:17704133

  17. A Genome-Wide Analysis of RNA Pseudoknots That Stimulate Efficient −1 Ribosomal Frameshifting or Readthrough in Animal Viruses

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Qiang; Du, Zhihua

    2013-01-01

    Programmed −1 ribosomal frameshifting (PRF) and stop codon readthrough are two translational recoding mechanisms utilized by some RNA viruses to express their structural and enzymatic proteins at a defined ratio. Efficient recoding usually requires an RNA pseudoknot located several nucleotides downstream from the recoding site. To assess the strategic importance of the recoding pseudoknots, we have carried out a large scale genome-wide analysis in which we used an in-house developed program to detect all possible H-type pseudoknots within the genomic mRNAs of 81 animal viruses. Pseudoknots are detected downstream from ~85% of the recoding sites, including many previously unknown pseudoknots. ~78% of the recoding pseudoknots are the most stable pseudoknot within the viral genomes. However, they are not as strong as some designed pseudoknots that exhibit roadblocking effect on the translating ribosome. Strong roadblocking pseudoknots are not detected within the viral genomes. These results indicate that the decoding pseudoknots have evolved to possess optimal stability for efficient recoding. We also found that the sequence at the gag-pol frameshift junction of HIV1 harbors potential elaborated pseudoknots encompassing the frameshift site. A novel mechanism is proposed for possible involvement of the elaborated pseudoknots in the HIV1 PRF event. PMID:24298557

  18. A genome-wide analysis of RNA pseudoknots that stimulate efficient -1 ribosomal frameshifting or readthrough in animal viruses.

    PubMed

    Huang, Xiaolan; Cheng, Qiang; Du, Zhihua

    2013-01-01

    Programmed -1 ribosomal frameshifting (PRF) and stop codon readthrough are two translational recoding mechanisms utilized by some RNA viruses to express their structural and enzymatic proteins at a defined ratio. Efficient recoding usually requires an RNA pseudoknot located several nucleotides downstream from the recoding site. To assess the strategic importance of the recoding pseudoknots, we have carried out a large scale genome-wide analysis in which we used an in-house developed program to detect all possible H-type pseudoknots within the genomic mRNAs of 81 animal viruses. Pseudoknots are detected downstream from ~85% of the recoding sites, including many previously unknown pseudoknots. ~78% of the recoding pseudoknots are the most stable pseudoknot within the viral genomes. However, they are not as strong as some designed pseudoknots that exhibit roadblocking effect on the translating ribosome. Strong roadblocking pseudoknots are not detected within the viral genomes. These results indicate that the decoding pseudoknots have evolved to possess optimal stability for efficient recoding. We also found that the sequence at the gag-pol frameshift junction of HIV1 harbors potential elaborated pseudoknots encompassing the frameshift site. A novel mechanism is proposed for possible involvement of the elaborated pseudoknots in the HIV1 PRF event.

  19. Mof4-1 is an allele of the UPF1/IFS2 gene which affects both mRNA turnover and -1 ribosomal frameshifting efficiency.

    PubMed

    Cui, Y; Dinman, J D; Peltz, S W

    1996-10-15

    The mof4-1 (maintenance of frame) allele in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae was isolated as a chromosomal mutation that increased the efficiency of -1 ribosomal frameshifting at the L-A virus frameshift site and caused loss of M1, the satellite virus of L-A. Here, we demonstrate that strains harboring the mof4-1 allele inactivated the nonsense-mediated mRNA decay pathway. The MOF4 gene was shown to be allelic to UPF1, a gene whose product is involved in the nonsense-mediated mRNA decay pathway. Although cells harboring the mof4-1 allele of the UPF1 gene lose the M1 virus, mutations in other UPF genes involved in nonsense-mediated mRNA decay maintain the M1 virus. The mof4-1 strain is more sensitive to the aminoglycoside antibiotic paromomycin than a upf1 delta strain, and frameshifting efficiency increases in a mof4-1 strain grown in the presence of this drug. Further, the ifs1 and ifs2 alleles previously identified as mutations that enhance frameshifting were shown to be allelic to the UPF2 and UPF1 genes, respectively, and both ifs strains maintained M1. These results indicate that mof4-1 is a unique allele of the UPF1 gene and that the gene product of the mof4-1 allele affects both -1 ribosomal frameshifting and mRNA turnover. PMID:8896465

  20. Prokaryotic ribosomes recode the HIV-1 gag-pol-1 frameshift sequence by an E/P site post-translocation simultaneous slippage mechanism.

    PubMed Central

    Horsfield, J A; Wilson, D N; Mannering, S A; Adamski, F M; Tate, W P

    1995-01-01

    The mechanism favoured for -1 frameshifting at typical retroviral sites is a pre-translocation simultaneous slippage model. An alternative post-translocation mechanism would also generate the same protein sequence across the frameshift site and therefore in this study the strategic placement of a stop codon has been used to distinguish between the two mechanisms. A 26 base pair frameshift sequence from the HIV-1 gag-pol overlap has been modified to include a stop codon immediately 3' to the heptanucleotide frameshift signal, where it often occurs naturally in retroviral recoding sites. Stop codons at the 3'-end of the heptanucleotide sequence decreased the frame-shifting efficiency on prokaryote ribosomes and the recording event was further depressed when the levels of the release factors in vivo were increased. In the presence of elevated levels of a defective release factor 2, frameshifting efficiency in vivo was increased in the constructs containing the stop codons recognized specifically by that release factor. These results are consistent with the last six nucleotides of the heptanucleotide slippery sequence occupying the ribosomal E and P sites, rather than the P and A sites, with the next codon occupying the A site and therefore with a post-translocation rather than a pre-translocation -1 slippage model. Images PMID:7784201

  1. Rational design of a synthetic mammalian riboswitch as a ligand-responsive -1 ribosomal frame-shifting stimulator

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Ya-Hui; Chang, Kung-Yao

    2016-01-01

    Metabolite-responsive RNA pseudoknots derived from prokaryotic riboswitches have been shown to stimulate −1 programmed ribosomal frameshifting (PRF), suggesting −1 PRF as a promising gene expression platform to extend riboswitch applications in higher eukaryotes. However, its general application has been hampered by difficulty in identifying a specific ligand-responsive pseudoknot that also functions as a ligand-dependent -1 PRF stimulator. We addressed this problem by using the −1 PRF stimulation pseudoknot of SARS-CoV (SARS-PK) to build a ligand-dependent −1 PRF stimulator. In particular, the extra stem of SARS-PK was replaced by an RNA aptamer of theophylline and designed to couple theophylline binding with the stimulation of −1 PRF. Conformational and functional analyses indicate that the engineered theophylline-responsive RNA functions as a mammalian riboswitch with robust theophylline-dependent −1 PRF stimulation activity in a stable human 293T cell-line. Thus, RNA–ligand interaction repertoire provided by in vitro selection becomes accessible to ligand-specific −1 PRF stimulator engineering using SARS-PK as the scaffold for synthetic biology application. PMID:27521370

  2. Ribosomal frameshifting used in influenza A virus expression occurs within the sequence UCC_UUU_CGU and is in the +1 direction.

    PubMed

    Firth, A E; Jagger, B W; Wise, H M; Nelson, C C; Parsawar, K; Wills, N M; Napthine, S; Taubenberger, J K; Digard, P; Atkins, J F

    2012-10-01

    Programmed ribosomal frameshifting is used in the expression of many virus genes and some cellular genes. In eukaryotic systems, the most well-characterized mechanism involves -1 tandem tRNA slippage on an X_XXY_YYZ motif. By contrast, the mechanisms involved in programmed +1 (or -2) slippage are more varied and often poorly characterized. Recently, a novel gene, PA-X, was discovered in influenza A virus and found to be expressed via a shift to the +1 reading frame. Here, we identify, by mass spectrometric analysis, both the site (UCC_UUU_CGU) and direction (+1) of the frameshifting that is involved in PA-X expression. Related sites are identified in other virus genes that have previously been proposed to be expressed via +1 frameshifting. As these viruses infect insects (chronic bee paralysis virus), plants (fijiviruses and amalgamaviruses) and vertebrates (influenza A virus), such motifs may form a new class of +1 frameshift-inducing sequences that are active in diverse eukaryotes. PMID:23155484

  3. Crystal Structure of a Luteoviral RNA Pseudoknot and Model for a Minimal Ribosomal Frameshifting Motif

    SciTech Connect

    Pallan, Pradeep S.; Marshall, William S.; Harp, Joel; Jewett III, Frederic C.; Wawrzak, Zdzislaw; Brown II, Bernard A.; Rich, Alexander; Egli, Martin

    2010-03-08

    To understand the role of structural elements of RNA pseudoknots in controlling the extent of -1-type ribosomal frameshifting, we determined the crystal structure of a high-efficiency frameshifting mutant of the pseudoknot from potato leaf roll virus (PLRV). Correlations of the structure with available in vitro frameshifting data for PLRV pseudoknot mutants implicate sequence and length of a stem-loop linker as modulators of frameshifting efficiency. Although the sequences and overall structures of the RNA pseudoknots from PLRV and beet western yellow virus (BWYV) are similar, nucleotide deletions in the linker and adjacent minor groove loop abolish frameshifting only with the latter. Conversely, mutant PLRV pseudoknots with up to four nucleotides deleted in this region exhibit nearly wild-type frameshifting efficiencies. The crystal structure helps rationalize the different tolerances for deletions in the PLRV and BWYV RNAs, and we have used it to build a three-dimensional model of the PRLV pseudoknot with a four-nucleotide deletion. The resulting structure defines a minimal RNA pseudoknot motif composed of 22 nucleotides capable of stimulating -1-type ribosomal frameshifts.

  4. Correlation between mechanical strength of messenger RNA pseudoknots and ribosomal frameshifting

    PubMed Central

    Hansen, Thomas M.; Reihani, S. Nader S.; Oddershede, Lene B.; Sørensen, Michael A.

    2007-01-01

    Programmed ribosomal frameshifting is often used by viral pathogens including HIV. Slippery sequences present in some mRNAs cause the ribosome to shift reading frame. The resulting protein is thus encoded by one reading frame upstream from the slippery sequence and by another reading frame downstream from the slippery sequence. Although the mechanism is not well understood, frameshifting is known to be stimulated by an mRNA structure such as a pseudoknot. Here, we show that the efficiency of frameshifting relates to the mechanical strength of the pseudoknot. Two pseudoknots derived from the Infectious Bronchitis Virus were used, differing by one base pair in the first stem. In Escherichia coli, these two pseudoknots caused frameshifting frequencies that differed by a factor of two. We used optical tweezers to unfold the pseudoknots. The pseudoknot giving rise to the highest degree of frameshifting required a nearly 2-fold larger unfolding force than the other. The observed energy difference cannot be accounted for by any existing model. We propose that the degree of ribosomal frameshifting is related to the mechanical strength of RNA pseudoknots. Our observations support the “9 Å model” that predicts some physical barrier is needed to force the ribosome into the −1 frame. Also, our findings support the recent observation made by cryoelectron microscopy that mechanical interaction between a ribosome and a pseudoknot causes a deformation of the A-site tRNA. The result has implications for the understanding of genetic regulation, reading frame maintenance, tRNA movement, and unwinding of mRNA secondary structures by ribosomes. PMID:17389398

  5. A conserved predicted pseudoknot in the NS2A-encoding sequence of West Nile and Japanese encephalitis flaviviruses suggests NS1' may derive from ribosomal frameshifting

    PubMed Central

    Firth, Andrew E; Atkins, John F

    2009-01-01

    Japanese encephalitis, West Nile, Usutu and Murray Valley encephalitis viruses form a tight subgroup within the larger Flavivirus genus. These viruses utilize a single-polyprotein expression strategy, resulting in ~10 mature proteins. Plotting the conservation at synonymous sites along the polyprotein coding sequence reveals strong conservation peaks at the very 5' end of the coding sequence, and also at the 5' end of the sequence encoding the NS2A protein. Such peaks are generally indicative of functionally important non-coding sequence elements. The second peak corresponds to a predicted stable pseudoknot structure whose biological importance is supported by compensatory mutations that preserve the structure. The pseudoknot is preceded by a conserved slippery heptanucleotide (Y CCU UUU), thus forming a classical stimulatory motif for -1 ribosomal frameshifting. We hypothesize, therefore, that the functional importance of the pseudoknot is to stimulate a portion of ribosomes to shift -1 nt into a short (45 codon), conserved, overlapping open reading frame, termed foo. Since cleavage at the NS1-NS2A boundary is known to require synthesis of NS2A in cis, the resulting transframe fusion protein is predicted to be NS1-NS2AN-term-FOO. We hypothesize that this may explain the origin of the previously identified NS1 'extension' protein in JEV-group flaviviruses, known as NS1'. PMID:19196463

  6. Structure and Function of the Ribosomal Frameshifting Pseudoknot RNA from Beet Western Yellow Virus

    SciTech Connect

    Egli, M.; Sarkhel, S.; Minasov, G.; Rich, A.

    2010-03-05

    Many viruses reprogram ribosomes to produce two different proteins from two different reading frames. So-called -1 frameshifting often involves pairwise alignment of two adjacent tRNAs at a 'slippery' sequence in the ribosomal A and P sites such that an overlapping codon is shifted upstream by one base relative to the zero frame. In the majority of cases, an RNA pseudoknot located downstream stimulates this type of frameshift. Crystal structures of the frameshifting RNA pseudoknot from Beet Western Yellow Virus (BWYV) have provided a detailed picture of the tertiary interactions stabilizing this folding motif, including a minor-groove triplex and quadruple-base interactions. The structure determined at atomic resolution revealed the locations of several magnesium ions and provided insights into the role of structured water stabilizing the RNA. Systematic in vitro and in vivo mutational analyses based on the structural results revealed specific tertiary interactions and regions in the pseudoknot that drastically change frameshifting efficiency. Here, we summarize recent advances in our understanding of pseudoknot-mediated ribosomal frameshifting on the basis of the insights gained from structural and functional studies of the RNA pseudoknot from BWYV.

  7. Predicting genes expressed via −1 and +1 frameshifts

    PubMed Central

    Moon, Sanghoon; Byun, Yanga; Kim, Hong-Jin; Jeong, Sunjoo; Han, Kyungsook

    2004-01-01

    Computational identification of ribosomal frameshift sites in genomic sequences is difficult due to their diverse nature, yet it provides useful information for understanding the underlying mechanisms and discovering new genes. We have developed an algorithm that searches entire genomic or mRNA sequences for frameshifting sites, and implements the algorithm as a web-based program called FSFinder (Frameshift Signal Finder). The current version of FSFinder is capable of finding −1 frameshift sites on heptamer sequences X XXY YYZ, and +1 frameshift sites for two genes: protein chain release factor B (prfB) and ornithine decarboxylase antizyme (oaz). We tested FSFinder on ∼190 genomic and partial DNA sequences from a number of organisms and found that it predicted frameshift sites efficiently and with greater sensitivity and specificity than existing approaches. It has improved sensitivity because it considers many known components of a frameshifting cassette and searches these components on both + and − strands, and its specificity is increased because it focuses on overlapping regions of open reading frames and prioritizes candidate frameshift sites. FSFinder is useful for discovering unknown genes that utilize alternative decoding, as well as for analyzing frameshift sites. It is freely accessible at http://wilab.inha.ac.kr/FSFinder/. PMID:15371551

  8. Minor groove RNA triplex in the crystal structure of a ribosomal frameshifting viral pseudoknot

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Su, L.; Chen, L.; Egli, M.; Berger, J. M.; Rich, A.

    1999-01-01

    Many viruses regulate translation of polycistronic mRNA using a -1 ribosomal frameshift induced by an RNA pseudoknot. A pseudoknot has two stems that form a quasi-continuous helix and two connecting loops. A 1.6 A crystal structure of the beet western yellow virus (BWYV) pseudoknot reveals rotation and a bend at the junction of the two stems. A loop base is inserted in the major groove of one stem with quadruple-base interactions. The second loop forms a new minor-groove triplex motif with the other stem, involving 2'-OH and triple-base interactions, as well as sodium ion coordination. Overall, the number of hydrogen bonds stabilizing the tertiary interactions exceeds the number involved in Watson-Crick base pairs. This structure will aid mechanistic analyses of ribosomal frameshifting.

  9. A novel role for poly(C) binding proteins in programmed ribosomal frameshifting

    PubMed Central

    Napthine, Sawsan; Treffers, Emmely E.; Bell, Susanne; Goodfellow, Ian; Fang, Ying; Firth, Andrew E.; Snijder, Eric J.; Brierley, Ian

    2016-01-01

    Translational control through programmed ribosomal frameshifting (PRF) is exploited widely by viruses and increasingly documented in cellular genes. Frameshifting is induced by mRNA secondary structures that compromise ribosome fidelity during decoding of a heptanucleotide ‘slippery’ sequence. The nsp2 PRF signal of porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus is distinctive in directing both −2 and −1 PRF and in its requirement for a trans-acting protein factor, the viral replicase subunit nsp1β. Here we show that the the trans-activation of frameshifting is carried out by a protein complex composed of nsp1β and a cellular poly(C) binding protein (PCBP). From the results of in vitro translation and electrophoretic mobility shift assays, we demonstrate that a PCBP/nsp1β complex binds to a C-rich sequence downstream of the slippery sequence and here mimics the activity of a structured mRNA stimulator of PRF. This is the first description of a role for a trans-acting cellular protein in PRF. The discovery broadens the repertoire of activities associated with poly(C) binding proteins and prototypes a new class of virus–host interactions. PMID:27257056

  10. The highly conserved codon following the slippery sequence supports -1 frameshift efficiency at the HIV-1 frameshift site.

    PubMed

    Mathew, Suneeth F; Crowe-McAuliffe, Caillan; Graves, Ryan; Cardno, Tony S; McKinney, Cushla; Poole, Elizabeth S; Tate, Warren P

    2015-01-01

    HIV-1 utilises -1 programmed ribosomal frameshifting to translate structural and enzymatic domains in a defined proportion required for replication. A slippery sequence, U UUU UUA, and a stem-loop are well-defined RNA features modulating -1 frameshifting in HIV-1. The GGG glycine codon immediately following the slippery sequence (the 'intercodon') contributes structurally to the start of the stem-loop but has no defined role in current models of the frameshift mechanism, as slippage is inferred to occur before the intercodon has reached the ribosomal decoding site. This GGG codon is highly conserved in natural isolates of HIV. When the natural intercodon was replaced with a stop codon two different decoding molecules-eRF1 protein or a cognate suppressor tRNA-were able to access and decode the intercodon prior to -1 frameshifting. This implies significant slippage occurs when the intercodon is in the (perhaps distorted) ribosomal A site. We accommodate the influence of the intercodon in a model of frame maintenance versus frameshifting in HIV-1. PMID:25807539

  11. Programmed -1 frameshifting by kinetic partitioning during impeded translocation.

    PubMed

    Caliskan, Neva; Katunin, Vladimir I; Belardinelli, Riccardo; Peske, Frank; Rodnina, Marina V

    2014-06-19

    Programmed -1 ribosomal frameshifting (-1PRF) is an mRNA recoding event utilized by cells to enhance the information content of the genome and to regulate gene expression. The mechanism of -1PRF and its timing during translation elongation are unclear. Here, we identified the steps that govern -1PRF by following the stepwise movement of the ribosome through the frameshifting site of a model mRNA derived from the IBV 1a/1b gene in a reconstituted in vitro translation system from Escherichia coli. Frameshifting occurs at a late stage of translocation when the two tRNAs are bound to adjacent slippery sequence codons of the mRNA. The downstream pseudoknot in the mRNA impairs the closing movement of the 30S subunit head, the dissociation of EF-G, and the release of tRNA from the ribosome. The slippage of the ribosome into the -1 frame accelerates the completion of translocation, thereby further favoring translation in the new reading frame. PMID:24949973

  12. Evidence for ribosomal frameshifting and a novel overlapping gene in the genomes of insect-specific flaviviruses

    SciTech Connect

    Firth, Andrew E.; Blitvich, Bradley J.; Wills, Norma M.; Miller, Cathy L.; Atkins, John F.

    2010-03-30

    Flaviviruses have a positive-sense, single-stranded RNA genome of approx11 kb, encoding a large polyprotein that is cleaved to produce approx10 mature proteins. Cell fusing agent virus, Kamiti River virus, Culex flavivirus and several recently discovered flaviviruses have no known vertebrate host and apparently infect only insects. We present compelling bioinformatic evidence for a 253-295 codon overlapping gene (designated fifo) conserved throughout these insect-specific flaviviruses and immunofluorescent detection of its product. Fifo overlaps the NS2A/NS2B coding sequence in the - 1/+ 2 reading frame and is most likely expressed as a trans-frame fusion protein via ribosomal frameshifting at a conserved GGAUUUY slippery heptanucleotide with 3'-adjacent RNA secondary structure (which stimulates efficient frameshifting in vitro). The discovery bears striking parallels to the recently discovered ribosomal frameshifting site in the NS2A coding sequence of the Japanese encephalitis serogroup of flaviviruses and suggests that programmed ribosomal frameshifting may be more widespread in flaviviruses than currently realized.

  13. Ribosomal frameshifting and transcriptional slippage: From genetic steganography and cryptography to adventitious use.

    PubMed

    Atkins, John F; Loughran, Gary; Bhatt, Pramod R; Firth, Andrew E; Baranov, Pavel V

    2016-09-01

    Genetic decoding is not 'frozen' as was earlier thought, but dynamic. One facet of this is frameshifting that often results in synthesis of a C-terminal region encoded by a new frame. Ribosomal frameshifting is utilized for the synthesis of additional products, for regulatory purposes and for translational 'correction' of problem or 'savior' indels. Utilization for synthesis of additional products occurs prominently in the decoding of mobile chromosomal element and viral genomes. One class of regulatory frameshifting of stable chromosomal genes governs cellular polyamine levels from yeasts to humans. In many cases of productively utilized frameshifting, the proportion of ribosomes that frameshift at a shift-prone site is enhanced by specific nascent peptide or mRNA context features. Such mRNA signals, which can be 5' or 3' of the shift site or both, can act by pairing with ribosomal RNA or as stem loops or pseudoknots even with one component being 4 kb 3' from the shift site. Transcriptional realignment at slippage-prone sequences also generates productively utilized products encoded trans-frame with respect to the genomic sequence. This too can be enhanced by nucleic acid structure. Together with dynamic codon redefinition, frameshifting is one of the forms of recoding that enriches gene expression.

  14. Ribosomal frameshifting and transcriptional slippage: From genetic steganography and cryptography to adventitious use.

    PubMed

    Atkins, John F; Loughran, Gary; Bhatt, Pramod R; Firth, Andrew E; Baranov, Pavel V

    2016-09-01

    Genetic decoding is not 'frozen' as was earlier thought, but dynamic. One facet of this is frameshifting that often results in synthesis of a C-terminal region encoded by a new frame. Ribosomal frameshifting is utilized for the synthesis of additional products, for regulatory purposes and for translational 'correction' of problem or 'savior' indels. Utilization for synthesis of additional products occurs prominently in the decoding of mobile chromosomal element and viral genomes. One class of regulatory frameshifting of stable chromosomal genes governs cellular polyamine levels from yeasts to humans. In many cases of productively utilized frameshifting, the proportion of ribosomes that frameshift at a shift-prone site is enhanced by specific nascent peptide or mRNA context features. Such mRNA signals, which can be 5' or 3' of the shift site or both, can act by pairing with ribosomal RNA or as stem loops or pseudoknots even with one component being 4 kb 3' from the shift site. Transcriptional realignment at slippage-prone sequences also generates productively utilized products encoded trans-frame with respect to the genomic sequence. This too can be enhanced by nucleic acid structure. Together with dynamic codon redefinition, frameshifting is one of the forms of recoding that enriches gene expression. PMID:27436286

  15. Ribosomal frameshifting and transcriptional slippage: From genetic steganography and cryptography to adventitious use

    PubMed Central

    Atkins, John F.; Loughran, Gary; Bhatt, Pramod R.; Firth, Andrew E.; Baranov, Pavel V.

    2016-01-01

    Genetic decoding is not ‘frozen’ as was earlier thought, but dynamic. One facet of this is frameshifting that often results in synthesis of a C-terminal region encoded by a new frame. Ribosomal frameshifting is utilized for the synthesis of additional products, for regulatory purposes and for translational ‘correction’ of problem or ‘savior’ indels. Utilization for synthesis of additional products occurs prominently in the decoding of mobile chromosomal element and viral genomes. One class of regulatory frameshifting of stable chromosomal genes governs cellular polyamine levels from yeasts to humans. In many cases of productively utilized frameshifting, the proportion of ribosomes that frameshift at a shift-prone site is enhanced by specific nascent peptide or mRNA context features. Such mRNA signals, which can be 5′ or 3′ of the shift site or both, can act by pairing with ribosomal RNA or as stem loops or pseudoknots even with one component being 4 kb 3′ from the shift site. Transcriptional realignment at slippage-prone sequences also generates productively utilized products encoded trans-frame with respect to the genomic sequence. This too can be enhanced by nucleic acid structure. Together with dynamic codon redefinition, frameshifting is one of the forms of recoding that enriches gene expression. PMID:27436286

  16. Ribosome hopping and translational frameshifting are inadequate alternatives to translational attenuation in cat-86 regulation.

    PubMed Central

    Rogers, E J; Ambulos, N P; Lovett, P S

    1991-01-01

    The induction of cat-86 by chloramphenicol has been proposed to follow the translational attenuation model. In the absence of inducer, the cat-86 gene is transcribed but remains phenotypically unexpressed because the transcripts sequester the ribosome binding site for the cat coding sequence in a stable stem-loop structure, preventing translation initiation. The translational attenuation model proposes that the natural inducer, chloramphenicol, stalls a ribosome in the leader region of cat transcripts, which causes localized melting of the downstream stem-loop structure, allowing initiation of translation of the cat-86 coding sequence. Although it is established that ribosome stalling in the cat-86 leader can induce translation of the coding sequence, several subsequent steps predicted by the model remain to be experimentally confirmed. As a consequence, the present evidence for cat-86 regulation can also be explained by two other potential control devices, ribosome hopping and translational frameshifting. Here we describe experiments designed to determine whether the alternatives to translational attenuation regulate cat-86. The results obtained are inconsistent with both competing models and are consistent with predictions made by the translational attenuation model. Images FIG. 1 FIG. 4 PMID:1720771

  17. Ribosomal frameshifting in decoding antizyme mRNAs from yeast and protists to humans: close to 300 cases reveal remarkable diversity despite underlying conservation.

    PubMed

    Ivanov, Ivaylo P; Atkins, John F

    2007-01-01

    The protein antizyme is a negative regulator of intracellular polyamine levels. Ribosomes synthesizing antizyme start in one ORF and at the codon 5' adjacent to its stop codon, shift +1 to a second and partially overlapping ORF which encodes most of the protein. The ribosomal frameshifting is a sensor and effector of an autoregulatory circuit which is conserved in animals, fungi and protists. Stimulatory signals encoded 5' and 3' of the shift site act to program the frameshifting. Despite overall conservation, many individual branches have evolved specific features surrounding the frameshift site. Among these are RNA pseudoknots, RNA stem-loops, conserved primary RNA sequences, nascent peptide sequences and branch-specific 'shifty' codons.

  18. Ribosomal frameshifting in decoding antizyme mRNAs from yeast and protists to humans: close to 300 cases reveal remarkable diversity despite underlying conservation

    PubMed Central

    Ivanov, Ivaylo P.; Atkins, John F.

    2007-01-01

    The protein antizyme is a negative regulator of intracellular polyamine levels. Ribosomes synthesizing antizyme start in one ORF and at the codon 5′ adjacent to its stop codon, shift +1 to a second and partially overlapping ORF which encodes most of the protein. The ribosomal frameshifting is a sensor and effector of an autoregulatory circuit which is conserved in animals, fungi and protists. Stimulatory signals encoded 5′ and 3′ of the shift site act to program the frameshifting. Despite overall conservation, many individual branches have evolved specific features surrounding the frameshift site. Among these are RNA pseudoknots, RNA stem-loops, conserved primary RNA sequences, nascent peptide sequences and branch-specific ‘shifty’ codons. PMID:17332016

  19. The Interplay of mRNA Stimulatory Signals Required for AUU-Mediated Initiation and Programmed −1 Ribosomal Frameshifting in Decoding of Transposable Element IS911▿†

    PubMed Central

    Prère, Marie-Françoise; Canal, Isabelle; Wills, Norma M.; Atkins, John F.; Fayet, Olivier

    2011-01-01

    The IS911 bacterial transposable element uses −1 programmed translational frameshifting to generate the protein required for its mobility: translation initiated in one gene (orfA) shifts to the −1 frame and continues in a second overlapping gene (orfB), thus generating the OrfAB transposase. The A-AAA-AAG frameshift site of IS911 is flanked by two stimulatory elements, an upstream Shine-Dalgarno sequence and a downstream stem-loop. We show here that, while they can act independently, these stimulators have a synergistic effect when combined. Mutagenic analyses revealed features of the complex stem-loop that make it a low-efficiency stimulator. They also revealed the dual role of the upstream Shine-Dalgarno sequence as (i) a stimulator of frameshifting, by itself more potent than the stem-loop, and (ii) a mandatory determinant of initiation of OrfB protein synthesis on an AUU codon directly preceding the A6G motif. Both roles rely on transient base pairing of the Shine-Dalgarno sequence with the 3′ end of 16S rRNA. Because of its effect on frameshifting, the Shine-Dalgarno sequence is an important determinant of the level of transposase in IS911-containing cells, and hence of the frequency of transposition. PMID:21478364

  20. Orsay virus utilizes ribosomal frameshifting to express a novel protein that is incorporated into virions

    SciTech Connect

    Jiang, Hongbing; Franz, Carl J.; Wu, Guang; Renshaw, Hilary; Zhao, Guoyan; Firth, Andrew E.; Wang, David

    2014-02-15

    Orsay virus is the first identified virus that is capable of naturally infecting Caenorhabditis elegans. Although it is most closely related to nodaviruses, Orsay virus differs from nodaviruses in its genome organization. In particular, the Orsay virus RNA2 segment encodes a putative novel protein of unknown function, termed delta, which is absent from all known nodaviruses. Here we present evidence that Orsay virus utilizes a ribosomal frameshifting strategy to express a novel fusion protein from the viral capsid (alpha) and delta ORFs. Moreover, the fusion protein was detected in purified virus fractions, demonstrating that it is most likely incorporated into Orsay virions. Furthermore, N-terminal sequencing of both the fusion protein and the capsid protein demonstrated that these proteins must be translated from a non-canonical initiation site. While the function of the alpha–delta fusion remains cryptic, these studies provide novel insights into the fundamental properties of this new clade of viruses. - Highlights: • Orsay virus encodes a novel fusion protein by a ribosomal frameshifting mechanism. • Orsay capsid and fusion protein is translated from a non-canonical initiation site. • The fusion protein is likely incorporated into Orsay virions.

  1. Silencing quorum sensing and ICE mobility through antiactivation and ribosomal frameshifting

    PubMed Central

    Ramsay, Joshua P; Ronson, Clive W

    2015-01-01

    Mobile genetic elements run an evolutionary gauntlet to maintain their mobility in the face of selection against their selfish dissemination but, paradoxically, they can accelerate the adaptability of bacteria through the gene-transfer events that they facilitate. These temporally conflicting evolutionary forces have shaped exquisite regulation systems that silence mobility and maximize the competitive fitness of the host bacterium, but maintain the ability of the element to deliver itself to a new host should the opportunity arise. Here we review the excision regulation system of the Mesorhizobium loti symbiosis island ICEMlSymR7A, a 502-kb integrative and conjugative element (ICE) capable of converting non-symbiotic mesorhizobia into plant symbionts. ICEMlSymR7A excision is activated by quorum sensing, however, both quorum sensing and excision are strongly repressed in the vast majority of cells by dual-target antiactivation and programmed ribosomal-frameshifting mechanisms. We examine these recently discovered regulatory features under the light of natural selection and discuss common themes that can be drawn from recent developments in ICE biology. PMID:26942047

  2. Ribosomal frameshifting during translation of measles virus P protein mRNA is capable of directing synthesis of a unique protein.

    PubMed Central

    Liston, P; Briedis, D J

    1995-01-01

    Members of the Paramyxoviridae family utilize a variety of different strategies to increase coding capacity within their P cistrons. Translation initiation at alternative 5'-proximal AUG codons is used by measles virus (MV) to express the virus-specific P and C proteins from overlapping reading frames on their mRNAs. Additional species of mRNAs are transcribed from the MV P cistron by the insertion of extra nontemplated G residues at a specific site within the P transcript. Addition of only a single nontemplated G residue results in the expression of the V protein, which contains a unique carboxyl terminus. We have used an Escherichia coli system to express MV P cistron-related mRNAs and proteins. We have found that ribosomal frameshifting on the MV P protein mRNA is capable of generating a previously unrecognized P cistron-encoded protein that we have designated R. Some ribosomes which have initiated translation of the P protein mRNA use the sequence TCC CCG AG (24 nucleotides upstream of the V protein stop codon) to slip into the -1 reading frame, thus translating the sequence as TC CCC GAG. The resulting R protein terminates five codons downstream of the frameshift site at the V protein stop codon. We have gone on to use a chloramphenicol acetyltransferase reporter system to demonstrate that this MV-specific sequence is capable of directing frameshifting during in vivo translation in eukaryotic cells. Analysis of immunoprecipitated proteins from MV-infected cells by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis allowed detection of a protein species consistent with R protein in MV-infected cells. Quantitation of this protein species allowed a rough estimation of frameshift frequency of approximately 1.8%. Significant stimulation of ribosomal frameshift frequency at this locus of the MV P mRNA was mediated by a downstream stimulator element which, although not yet fully defined, appeared to be neither a conventional stem-loop nor an RNA pseudoknot structure. PMID:7474085

  3. A general strategy to inhibiting viral -1 frameshifting based on upstream attenuation duplex formation.

    PubMed

    Hu, Hao-Teng; Cho, Che-Pei; Lin, Ya-Hui; Chang, Kung-Yao

    2016-01-01

    Viral -1 programmed ribosomal frameshifting (PRF) as a potential antiviral target has attracted interest because many human viral pathogens, including human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and coronaviruses, rely on -1 PRF for optimal propagation. Efficient eukaryotic -1 PRF requires an optimally placed stimulator structure downstream of the frameshifting site and different strategies targeting viral -1 PRF stimulators have been developed. However, accessing particular -1 PRF stimulator information represents a bottle-neck in combating the emerging epidemic viral pathogens such as Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus (MERS-CoV). Recently, an RNA hairpin upstream of frameshifting site was shown to act as a cis-element to attenuate -1 PRF with mechanism unknown. Here, we show that an upstream duplex formed in-trans, by annealing an antisense to its complementary mRNA sequence upstream of frameshifting site, can replace an upstream hairpin to attenuate -1 PRF efficiently. This finding indicates that the formation of a proximal upstream duplex is the main determining factor responsible for -1 PRF attenuation and provides mechanistic insight. Additionally, the antisense-mediated upstream duplex approach downregulates -1 PRF stimulated by distinct -1 PRF stimulators, including those of MERS-CoV, suggesting its general application potential as a robust means to evaluating viral -1 PRF inhibition as soon as the sequence information of an emerging human coronavirus is available. PMID:26612863

  4. A Pilot Study of Bacterial Genes with Disrupted ORFs Reveals a Surprising Profusion of Protein Sequence Recoding Mediated by Ribosomal Frameshifting and Transcriptional Realignment

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Virag; Firth, Andrew E.; Antonov, Ivan; Fayet, Olivier; Atkins, John F.; Borodovsky, Mark; Baranov, Pavel V.

    2011-01-01

    Bacterial genome annotations contain a number of coding sequences (CDSs) that, in spite of reading frame disruptions, encode a single continuous polypeptide. Such disruptions have different origins: sequencing errors, frameshift, or stop codon mutations, as well as instances of utilization of nontriplet decoding. We have extracted over 1,000 CDSs with annotated disruptions and found that about 75% of them can be clustered into 64 groups based on sequence similarity. Analysis of the clusters revealed deep phylogenetic conservation of open reading frame organization as well as the presence of conserved sequence patterns that indicate likely utilization of the nonstandard decoding mechanisms: programmed ribosomal frameshifting (PRF) and programmed transcriptional realignment (PTR). Further enrichment of these clusters with additional homologous nucleotide sequences revealed over 6,000 candidate genes utilizing PRF or PTR. Analysis of the patterns of conservation apparently associated with nontriplet decoding revealed the presence of both previously characterized frameshift-prone sequences and a few novel ones. Since the starting point of our analysis was a set of genes with already annotated disruptions, it is highly plausible that in this study, we have identified only a fraction of all bacterial genes that utilize PRF or PTR. In addition to the identification of a large number of recoded genes, a surprising observation is that nearly half of them are expressed via PTR—a mechanism that, in contrast to PRF, has not yet received substantial attention. PMID:21673094

  5. The role of wobble uridine modifications in +1 translational frameshifting in eukaryotes

    PubMed Central

    Tükenmez, Hasan; Xu, Hao; Esberg, Anders; Byström, Anders S.

    2015-01-01

    In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, 11 out of 42 tRNA species contain 5-methoxycarbonylmethyl-2-thiouridine (mcm5s2U), 5-methoxycarbonylmethyluridine (mcm5U), 5-carbamoylmethyluridine (ncm5U) or 5-carbamoylmethyl-2′-O-methyluridine (ncm5Um) nucleosides in the anticodon at the wobble position (U34). Earlier we showed that mutants unable to form the side chain at position 5 (ncm5 or mcm5) or lacking sulphur at position 2 (s2) of U34 result in pleiotropic phenotypes, which are all suppressed by overexpression of hypomodified tRNAs. This observation suggests that the observed phenotypes are due to inefficient reading of cognate codons or an increased frameshifting. The latter may be caused by a ternary complex (aminoacyl-tRNA*eEF1A*GTP) with a modification deficient tRNA inefficiently being accepted to the ribosomal A-site and thereby allowing an increased peptidyl-tRNA slippage and thus a frameshift error. In this study, we have investigated the role of wobble uridine modifications in reading frame maintenance, using either the Renilla/Firefly luciferase bicistronic reporter system or a modified Ty1 frameshifting site in a HIS4A::lacZ reporter system. We here show that the presence of mcm5 and s2 side groups at wobble uridines are important for reading frame maintenance and thus the aforementioned mutant phenotypes might partly be due to frameshift errors. PMID:26283182

  6. Adjustable under-expression of yeast mating pathway proteins in Saccharomyces cerevisiae using a programmed ribosomal frameshift.

    PubMed

    Choi, Min-Yeon; Park, Sang-Hyun

    2016-06-01

    Experimental research in molecular biology frequently relies on the promotion or suppression of gene expression, an important tool in the study of its functions. Although yeast is among the most studied model systems with the ease of maintenance and manipulation, current experimental methods are mostly limited to gene deletion, suppression or overexpression of genes. Therefore, the ability to reduce protein expressions and then observing the effects would promote a better understanding of the exact functions and their interactions. Reducing protein expression is mainly limited by the difficulties associated with controlling the reduction level, and in some cases, the initial endogenous abundance is too low. For the under-expression to be useful as an experimental tool, repeatability and stability of reduced expression is important. We found that cis-elements in programmed -1 ribosomal frameshifting (-1RFS) of beet western yellow virus (BWYV) could be utilized to reduced protein expression in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The two main advantages of using -1RFS are adjustable reduction rates and ease of use. To demonstrate the utility of this under-expression system, examples of reduced protein abundance were shown using yeast mating pathway components. The abundance of MAP kinase Fus3 was reduced to approximately 28-75 % of the wild-type value. Other MAP kinase mating pathway components, including Ste5, Ste11, and Ste7, were also under-expressed to verify that the -1RFS system works with different proteins. Furthermore, reduced Fus3 abundance altered the overall signal transduction outcome of the mating pathway, demonstrating the potential for further studies of signal transduction adjustment via under-expression. PMID:26837218

  7. Programmed Ribosomal Frameshift Alters Expression of West Nile Virus Genes and Facilitates Virus Replication in Birds and Mosquitoes

    PubMed Central

    Du, Fangyao; Owens, Nick; Bosco-Lauth, Angela M.; Nagasaki, Tomoko; Rudd, Stephen; Brault, Aaron C.; Bowen, Richard A.; Hall, Roy A.; van den Hurk, Andrew F.; Khromykh, Alexander A.

    2014-01-01

    West Nile virus (WNV) is a human pathogen of significant medical importance with close to 40,000 cases of encephalitis and more than 1,600 deaths reported in the US alone since its first emergence in New York in 1999. Previous studies identified a motif in the beginning of non-structural gene NS2A of encephalitic flaviviruses including WNV which induces programmed −1 ribosomal frameshift (PRF) resulting in production of an additional NS protein NS1′. We have previously demonstrated that mutant WNV with abolished PRF was attenuated in mice. Here we have extended our previous observations by showing that PRF does not appear to have a significant role in virus replication, virion formation, and viral spread in several cell lines in vitro. However, we have also shown that PRF induces an over production of structural proteins over non-structural proteins in virus-infected cells and that mutation abolishing PRF is present in ∼11% of the wild type virus population. In vivo experiments in house sparrows using wild type and PRF mutant of New York 99 strain of WNV viruses showed some attenuation for the PRF mutant virus. Moreover, PRF mutant of Kunjin strain of WNV showed significant decrease compared to wild type virus infection in dissemination of the virus from the midgut through the haemocoel, and ultimately the capacity of infected mosquitoes to transmit virus. Thus our results demonstrate an important role for PRF in regulating expression of viral genes and consequently virus replication in avian and mosquito hosts. PMID:25375107

  8. The primary structure and expression of the second open reading frame of the polymerase gene of the coronavirus MHV-A59; a highly conserved polymerase is expressed by an efficient ribosomal frameshifting mechanism.

    PubMed Central

    Bredenbeek, P J; Pachuk, C J; Noten, A F; Charité, J; Luytjes, W; Weiss, S R; Spaan, W J

    1990-01-01

    Sequence analysis of a substantial part of the polymerase gene of the murine coronavirus MHV-A59 revealed the 3' end of an open reading frame (ORF1a) overlapping with a large ORF (ORF1b; 2733 amino acids) which covers the 3' half of the polymerase gene. The expression of ORF1b occurs by a ribosomal frameshifting mechanism since the ORF1a/ORF1b overlapping nucleotide sequence is capable of inducing ribosomal frameshifting in vitro as well as in vivo. A stem-loop structure and a pseudoknot are predicted in the nucleotide sequence involved in ribosomal frameshifting. Comparison of the predicted amino acid sequence of MHV ORF1b with the amino acid sequence deduced from the corresponding gene of the avian coronavirus IBV demonstrated that in contrast to the other viral genes this ORF is extremely conserved. Detailed analysis of the predicted amino acid sequence revealed sequence elements which are conserved in many DNA and RNA polymerases. Images PMID:2159623

  9. An Expanded CAG Repeat in Huntingtin Causes +1 Frameshifting.

    PubMed

    Saffert, Paul; Adamla, Frauke; Schieweck, Rico; Atkins, John F; Ignatova, Zoya

    2016-08-26

    Maintenance of triplet decoding is crucial for the expression of functional protein because deviations either into the -1 or +1 reading frames are often non-functional. We report here that expression of huntingtin (Htt) exon 1 with expanded CAG repeats, implicated in Huntington pathology, undergoes a sporadic +1 frameshift to generate from the CAG repeat a trans-frame AGC repeat-encoded product. This +1 recoding is exclusively detected in pathological Htt variants, i.e. those with expanded repeats with more than 35 consecutive CAG codons. An atypical +1 shift site, UUC C at the 5' end of CAG repeats, which has some resemblance to the influenza A virus shift site, triggers the +1 frameshifting and is enhanced by the increased propensity of the expanded CAG repeats to form a stem-loop structure. The +1 trans-frame-encoded product can directly influence the aggregation of the parental Htt exon 1. PMID:27382061

  10. Net -1 frameshifting on a noncanonical sequence in a herpes simplex virus drug-resistant mutant is stimulated by nonstop mRNA.

    PubMed

    Pan, Dongli; Coen, Donald M

    2012-09-11

    Ribosomal frameshifting entails slippage of the translational machinery during elongation. Frameshifting permits expression of more than one polypeptide from an otherwise monocistronic mRNA, and can restore expression of polypeptides in the face of frameshift mutations. A common mutation conferring acyclovir resistance in patients with herpes simplex virus disease deletes one cytosine from a run of six cytosines (C-chord) in the viral thymidine kinase (tk) gene. However, this mutation does not abolish TK activity, which is important for pathogenicity. To investigate how this mutant retains TK activity, we engineered and analyzed viruses expressing epitope-tagged TK. We found that the mutant's TK activity can be accounted for by low levels of full-length TK polypeptide produced by net -1 frameshifting during translation. The efficiency of frameshifting was relatively high, 3-5%, as the polypeptide from the reading frame generated by the deletion, which lacks stop codons (nonstop), was poorly expressed mainly because of inefficient protein synthesis. Stop codons introduced into this reading frame greatly increased its expression, but greatly decreased the level of full-length TK, indicating that frameshifting is strongly stimulated by a new mechanism, nonstop mRNA, which we hypothesize involves stalling of ribosomes on the polyA tail. Mutational studies indicated that frameshifting occurs on or near the C-chord, a region lacking a canonical slippery sequence. Nonstop stimulation of frameshifting also occurred when the C-chord was replaced with a canonical slippery sequence from HIV. This mechanism thus permits biologically and clinically relevant TK synthesis, and may occur more generally. PMID:22927407

  11. Selection and Characterization of Small Molecules That Bind the HIV-1 Frameshift Site RNA

    PubMed Central

    Marcheschi, Ryan J.; Mouzakis, Kathryn D.; Butcher, Samuel E.

    2009-01-01

    HIV-1 requires a −1 translational frameshift to properly synthesize the viral enzymes required for replication. The frameshift mechanism is dependent upon two RNA elements, a seven-nucleotide slippery sequence (UUUUUUA) and a downstream RNA structure. Frameshifting occurs with a frequency of ~5%, and increasing or decreasing this frequency may result in a decrease in viral replication. Here, we report the results of a high-throughput screen designed to find small molecules that bind to the HIV-1 frameshift site RNA. Out of 34,500 compounds screened, 202 were identified as positive hits. We show that one of these compounds, doxorubicin, binds the HIV-1 RNA with low micromolar affinity (Kd = 2.8 μM). This binding was confirmed and localized to the RNA using NMR. Further analysis revealed that this compound increased the RNA stability by approximately 5 °C and decreased translational frameshifting by 28% (±14%), as measured in vitro. PMID:19673541

  12. HIV-1 and Human PEG10 Frameshift Elements Are Functionally Distinct and Distinguished by Novel Small Molecule Modulators

    PubMed Central

    Sleebs, Brad E.; Lackovic, Kurt; Parisot, John P.; Moss, Rebecca M.; Crowe-McAuliffe, Caillan; Mathew, Suneeth F.; Edgar, Christina D.; Kleffmann, Torsten; Tate, Warren P.

    2015-01-01

    Frameshifting during translation of viral or in rare cases cellular mRNA results in the synthesis of proteins from two overlapping reading frames within the same mRNA. In HIV-1 the protease, reverse transcriptase, and integrase enzymes are in a second reading frame relative to the structural group-specific antigen (gag), and their synthesis is dependent upon frameshifting. This ensures that a strictly regulated ratio of structural proteins and enzymes, which is critical for HIV-1 replication and viral infectivity, is maintained during protein synthesis. The frameshift element in HIV-1 RNA is an attractive target for the development of a new class of anti HIV-1 drugs. However, a number of examples are now emerging of human genes using −1 frameshifting, such as PEG10 and CCR5. In this study we have compared the HIV-1 and PEG10 frameshift elements and shown they have distinct functional characteristics. Frameshifting occurs at several points within each element. Moreover, frameshift modulators that were isolated by high-throughput screening of a library of 114,000 lead-like compounds behaved differently with the PEG10 frameshift element. The most effective compounds affecting the HIV-1 element enhanced frameshifting by 2.5-fold at 10 μM in two different frameshift reporter assay systems. HIV-1 protease:gag protein ratio was affected by a similar amount in a specific assay of virally-infected cultured cell, but the modulation of frameshifting of the first-iteration compounds was not sufficient to show significant effects on viral infectivity. Importantly, two compounds did not affect frameshifting with the human PEG10 element, while one modestly inhibited rather than enhanced frameshifting at the human element. These studies indicate that frameshift elements have unique characteristics that may allow targeting of HIV-1 and of other viruses specifically for development of antiviral therapeutic molecules without effect on human genes like PEG10 that use the same

  13. Solenopsis invicta virus 3: mapping of structural proteins, ribosomal frameshifting, and similarities to Acyrthosiphon pisum virus and kelp fly virus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Solenopsis invicta virus 3 (SINV-3) is a positive-sense single-stranded RNA virus that infects the red imported fire ant, Solenopsis invicta. We show that the second open reading frame (ORF) of the dicistronic genome is expressed via a frameshifting mechanism and that the sequences encoding the stru...

  14. A Three-Stemmed mRNA Pseudoknot in the SARS Coronavirus Frameshift Signal

    PubMed Central

    2005-01-01

    A wide range of RNA viruses use programmed −1 ribosomal frameshifting for the production of viral fusion proteins. Inspection of the overlap regions between ORF1a and ORF1b of the SARS-CoV genome revealed that, similar to all coronaviruses, a programmed −1 ribosomal frameshift could be used by the virus to produce a fusion protein. Computational analyses of the frameshift signal predicted the presence of an mRNA pseudoknot containing three double-stranded RNA stem structures rather than two. Phylogenetic analyses showed the conservation of potential three-stemmed pseudoknots in the frameshift signals of all other coronaviruses in the GenBank database. Though the presence of the three-stemmed structure is supported by nuclease mapping and two-dimensional nuclear magnetic resonance studies, our findings suggest that interactions between the stem structures may result in local distortions in the A-form RNA. These distortions are particularly evident in the vicinity of predicted A-bulges in stems 2 and 3. In vitro and in vivo frameshifting assays showed that the SARS-CoV frameshift signal is functionally similar to other viral frameshift signals: it promotes efficient frameshifting in all of the standard assay systems, and it is sensitive to a drug and a genetic mutation that are known to affect frameshifting efficiency of a yeast virus. Mutagenesis studies reveal that both the specific sequences and structures of stems 2 and 3 are important for efficient frameshifting. We have identified a new RNA structural motif that is capable of promoting efficient programmed ribosomal frameshifting. The high degree of conservation of three-stemmed mRNA pseudoknot structures among the coronaviruses suggests that this presents a novel target for antiviral therapeutics. PMID:15884978

  15. N-Methylation as a Strategy for Enhancing the Affinity and Selectivity of RNA-binding Peptides: Application to the HIV-1 Frameshift-Stimulating RNA.

    PubMed

    Hilimire, Thomas A; Bennett, Ryan P; Stewart, Ryan A; Garcia-Miranda, Pablo; Blume, Alex; Becker, Jordan; Sherer, Nathan; Helms, Eric D; Butcher, Samuel E; Smith, Harold C; Miller, Benjamin L

    2016-01-15

    Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) type 1 uses a -1 programmed ribosomal frameshift (-1 PRF) event to translate its enzymes from the same transcript used to encode the virus' structural proteins. The frequency of this event is highly regulated, and significant deviation from the normal 5-10% frequency has been demonstrated to decrease viral infectivity. Frameshifting is primarily regulated by the Frameshift Stimulatory Signal RNA (FSS-RNA), a thermodynamically stable, highly conserved stem loop that has been proposed as a therapeutic target. We describe the design, synthesis, and testing of a series of N-methyl peptides able to bind the HIV-1 FSS RNA stem loop with low nanomolar affinity and high selectivity. Surface plasmon resonance (SPR) data indicates increased affinity is a reflection of a substantially enhanced on rate. Compounds readily penetrate cell membranes and inhibit HIV infectivity in a pseudotyped virus assay. Viral infectivity inhibition correlates with compound-dependent changes in the ratios of Gag and Gag-Pol in virus particles. As the first compounds with both single digit nanomolar affinities for the FSS RNA and an ability to inhibit HIV in cells, these studies support the use of N-methylation for enhancing the affinity, selectivity, and bioactivity of RNA-binding peptides. PMID:26496521

  16. N-Methylation as a Strategy for Enhancing the Affinity and Selectivity of RNA-binding Peptides: Application to the HIV-1 Frameshift-Stimulating RNA

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) type 1 uses a −1 programmed ribosomal frameshift (−1 PRF) event to translate its enzymes from the same transcript used to encode the virus’ structural proteins. The frequency of this event is highly regulated, and significant deviation from the normal 5–10% frequency has been demonstrated to decrease viral infectivity. Frameshifting is primarily regulated by the Frameshift Stimulatory Signal RNA (FSS-RNA), a thermodynamically stable, highly conserved stem loop that has been proposed as a therapeutic target. We describe the design, synthesis, and testing of a series of N-methyl peptides able to bind the HIV-1 FSS RNA stem loop with low nanomolar affinity and high selectivity. Surface plasmon resonance (SPR) data indicates increased affinity is a reflection of a substantially enhanced on rate. Compounds readily penetrate cell membranes and inhibit HIV infectivity in a pseudotyped virus assay. Viral infectivity inhibition correlates with compound-dependent changes in the ratios of Gag and Gag-Pol in virus particles. As the first compounds with both single digit nanomolar affinities for the FSS RNA and an ability to inhibit HIV in cells, these studies support the use of N-methylation for enhancing the affinity, selectivity, and bioactivity of RNA-binding peptides. PMID:26496521

  17. Mechanical unfolding of the beet western yellow virus -1 frameshift signal.

    PubMed

    White, Katherine H; Orzechowski, Marek; Fourmy, Dominique; Visscher, Koen

    2011-06-29

    Using mechanical unfolding by optical tweezers (OT) and steered molecular dynamics (SMD) simulations, we have demonstrated the critical role of Mg(2+) ions for the resistance of the Beet Western Yellow Virus (BWYV) pseudoknot (PK) to unfolding. The two techniques were found to be complementary, providing information at different levels of molecular scale. Findings from the OT experiments indicated a critical role of stem 1 for unfolding of the PK, which was confirmed in the SMD simulations. The unfolding pathways of wild type and mutant appeared to depend upon pH and nucleotide sequence. SMD simulations support the notion that the stability of stem 1 is critical for -1 frameshifting. The all-atom scale nature of the SMD enabled clarification of the precise role of two Mg(2+) ions, Mg45 and Mg52, as identified in the BWYV X-ray crystallography structure, in -1 frameshifting. On the basis of simulations with "partially" and "fully" hydrated Mg(2+) ions, two possible mechanisms of stabilizing stem 1 are proposed. In both these cases Mg(2+) ions play a critical role in stabilizing stem 1, either by directly forming a salt bridge between the strands of stem 1 or by stabilizing parallel orientation of the strands in stem 1, respectively. These findings explain the unexpected drop in frameshifting efficiency to null levels of the C8U mutant in a manner consistent with experimental observations.

  18. Mechanical unfolding of the beet western yellow virus -1 frameshift signal.

    PubMed

    White, Katherine H; Orzechowski, Marek; Fourmy, Dominique; Visscher, Koen

    2011-06-29

    Using mechanical unfolding by optical tweezers (OT) and steered molecular dynamics (SMD) simulations, we have demonstrated the critical role of Mg(2+) ions for the resistance of the Beet Western Yellow Virus (BWYV) pseudoknot (PK) to unfolding. The two techniques were found to be complementary, providing information at different levels of molecular scale. Findings from the OT experiments indicated a critical role of stem 1 for unfolding of the PK, which was confirmed in the SMD simulations. The unfolding pathways of wild type and mutant appeared to depend upon pH and nucleotide sequence. SMD simulations support the notion that the stability of stem 1 is critical for -1 frameshifting. The all-atom scale nature of the SMD enabled clarification of the precise role of two Mg(2+) ions, Mg45 and Mg52, as identified in the BWYV X-ray crystallography structure, in -1 frameshifting. On the basis of simulations with "partially" and "fully" hydrated Mg(2+) ions, two possible mechanisms of stabilizing stem 1 are proposed. In both these cases Mg(2+) ions play a critical role in stabilizing stem 1, either by directly forming a salt bridge between the strands of stem 1 or by stabilizing parallel orientation of the strands in stem 1, respectively. These findings explain the unexpected drop in frameshifting efficiency to null levels of the C8U mutant in a manner consistent with experimental observations. PMID:21598975

  19. Eight new mtDNA sequences of glass sponges reveal an extensive usage of +1 frameshifting in mitochondrial translation.

    PubMed

    Haen, Karri M; Pett, Walker; Lavrov, Dennis V

    2014-02-10

    Three previously studied mitochondrial genomes of glass sponges (phylum Porifera, class Hexactinellida) contained single nucleotide insertions in protein coding genes inferred as sites of +1 translational frameshifting. To investigate the distribution and evolution of these sites and to help elucidate the mechanism of frameshifting, we determined eight new complete or nearly complete mtDNA sequences from glass sponges and examined individual mitochondrial genes from three others. We found nine new instances of single nucleotide insertions in these sequences and analyzed them both comparatively and phylogenetically. The base insertions appear to have been gained and lost repeatedly in hexactinellid mt protein genes, suggesting no functional significance for the frameshifting sites. A high degree of sequence conservation, the presence of unusual tRNAs, and a distinct pattern of codon usage suggest the "out-of-frame pairing" model of translational frameshifting. Additionally, we provide evidence that relaxed selection pressure on glass sponge mtDNA - possibly a result of their low growth rates and deep-water lifestyle - has allowed frameshift insertions to be tolerated for hundreds of millions of years. Our study provides the first example of a phylogenetically diverse and extensive usage of translational frameshifting in animal mitochondrial coding sequences.

  20. DVL3 Alleles Resulting in a -1 Frameshift of the Last Exon Mediate Autosomal-Dominant Robinow Syndrome.

    PubMed

    White, Janson J; Mazzeu, Juliana F; Hoischen, Alexander; Bayram, Yavuz; Withers, Marjorie; Gezdirici, Alper; Kimonis, Virginia; Steehouwer, Marloes; Jhangiani, Shalini N; Muzny, Donna M; Gibbs, Richard A; van Bon, Bregje W M; Sutton, V Reid; Lupski, James R; Brunner, Han G; Carvalho, Claudia M B

    2016-03-01

    Robinow syndrome is a rare congenital disorder characterized by mesomelic limb shortening, genital hypoplasia, and distinctive facial features. Recent reports have identified, in individuals with dominant Robinow syndrome, a specific type of variant characterized by being uniformly located in the penultimate exon of DVL1 and resulting in a -1 frameshift allele with a premature termination codon that escapes nonsense-mediated decay. Here, we studied a cohort of individuals who had been clinically diagnosed with Robinow syndrome but who had not received a molecular diagnosis from variant studies of DVL1, WNT5A, and ROR2. Because of the uniform location of frameshift variants in DVL1-mediated Robinow syndrome and the functional redundancy of DVL1, DVL2, and DVL3, we elected to pursue direct Sanger sequencing of the penultimate exon of DVL1 and its paralogs DVL2 and DVL3 to search for potential disease-associated variants. Remarkably, targeted sequencing identified five unrelated individuals harboring heterozygous, de novo frameshift variants in DVL3, including two splice acceptor mutations and three 1 bp deletions. Similar to the variants observed in DVL1-mediated Robinow syndrome, all variants in DVL3 result in a -1 frameshift, indicating that these highly specific alterations might be a common cause of dominant Robinow syndrome. Here, we review the current knowledge of these peculiar variant alleles in DVL1- and DVL3-mediated Robinow syndrome and further elucidate the phenotypic features present in subjects with DVL1 and DVL3 frameshift mutations. PMID:26924530

  1. Ribosomes and Ribosomal Protein from Neurospora crassa I. Physical, Chemical, and Immunochemical Properties1

    PubMed Central

    Alberghina, F. A. M.; Suskind, S. R.

    1967-01-01

    Ribosomes from Neurospora crassa, initially characterized by ultracentrifugal and immunochemical analyses, have been used to prepare ribosomal protein for physical, chemical, and immunochemical study. The acrylamide gel disc electrophoretic profiles of Neurospora ribosomal protein exhibit a degree of heterogeneity comparable to what has been observed in other systems. Only by chemical modification or by aggregation of the protein do alterations in the profile become apparent. Disulfide-bond formation appears to play a role in the aggregation of ribosomal protein to complexes of S20,w = 200. The aggregation can be prevented by alkylation of −SH groups, and protein treated in this fashion has a subunit molecular weight of about 20,000 as determined by equilibrium centrifugation. Finger-printing of tryptic peptides indicates that more than one unique sequence of amino acids must be present in ribosomal protein, although gross primary structural heterogeneity is questioned. Antigenic heterogeneity is much less apparent; only a few precipitin bands are resolved by immunodiffusion tests, although complete reactivity of total ribosomal protein is suggested by quantitative precipitin analysis. The antigenically active ribosomal protein components appear to reside in at least two fractions; one is removed readily from the ribosome by CsC1 treatment. Ribosomal protein of N. crassa possesses antigenic determinants present in E. coli ribosomal protein as judged by spur formation in immunodiffusion tests. Images PMID:4962303

  2. Short spacing between the Shine-Dalgarno sequence and P codon destabilizes codon-anticodon pairing in the P site to promote +1 programmed frameshifting

    PubMed Central

    Devaraj, Aishwarya; Fredrick, Kurt

    2010-01-01

    Summary Programmed frameshifting in the RF2 gene (prfB) involves an intragenic Shine-Dalgarno (SD) sequence. To investigate the role of SD-ASD pairing in the mechanism of frameshifting, we have analyzed the effect of spacing between the SD sequence and P codon on P-site tRNA binding and RF2-dependent termination. When the spacing between an extended SD sequence and the P codon is decreased from 4 to 1 nucleotides (nt), the dissociation rate (koff) for P-site tRNA increases by >100-fold. Toeprinting analysis shows that pretranslocation complexes cannot be formed when the spacer sequence is ≤ 2 nt. Instead, the tRNA added secondarily to fill the A site and its corresponding codon move spontaneously into the P site, resulting in a complex with a 3-nt longer spacer between the SD-ASD helix and the P codon. While close proximity of the SD clearly destabilizes P-site tRNA, RF2-dependent termination and EF-Tu-dependent decoding are largely unaffected in analogous complexes. These data support a model in which formation of the SD-ASD helix in ribosomes stalled at the in-frame UGA codon of prfB generates tension on the mRNA that destabilizes codon-anticodon pairing in the P site and promotes slippage of the mRNA in the 5′ direction. PMID:21143320

  3. Mutations in elongation factor EF-1 alpha affect the frequency of frameshifting and amino acid misincorporation in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Sandbaken, M G; Culbertson, M R

    1988-12-01

    A mutational analysis of the eukaryotic elongation factor EF-1 alpha indicates that this protein functions to limit the frequency of errors during genetic code translation. We found that both amino acid misincorporation and reading frame errors are controlled by EF-1 alpha. In order to examine the function of this protein, the TEF2 gene, which encodes EF-1 alpha in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, was mutagenized in vitro with hydroxylamine. Sixteen independent TEF2 alleles were isolated by their ability to suppress frameshift mutations. DNA sequence analysis identified eight different sites in the EF-1 alpha protein that elevate the frequency of mistranslation when mutated. These sites are located in two different regions of the protein. Amino acid substitutions located in or near the GTP-binding and hydrolysis domain of the protein cause suppression of frameshift and nonsense mutations. These mutations may effect mistranslation by altering the binding or hydrolysis of GTP. Amino acid substitutions located adjacent to a putative aminoacyl-tRNA binding region also suppress frameshift and nonsense mutations. These mutations may alter the binding of aminoacyl-tRNA by EF-1 alpha. The identification of frameshift and nonsense suppressor mutations in EF-1 alpha indicates a role for this protein in limiting amino acid misincorporation and reading frame errors. We suggest that these types of errors are controlled by a common mechanism or closely related mechanisms. PMID:3066688

  4. DVL3 Alleles Resulting in a −1 Frameshift of the Last Exon Mediate Autosomal-Dominant Robinow Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    White, Janson J.; Mazzeu, Juliana F.; Hoischen, Alexander; Bayram, Yavuz; Withers, Marjorie; Gezdirici, Alper; Kimonis, Virginia; Steehouwer, Marloes; Jhangiani, Shalini N.; Muzny, Donna M.; Gibbs, Richard A.; van Bon, Bregje W.M.; Sutton, V. Reid; Lupski, James R.; Brunner, Han G.; Carvalho, Claudia M.B.

    2016-01-01

    Robinow syndrome is a rare congenital disorder characterized by mesomelic limb shortening, genital hypoplasia, and distinctive facial features. Recent reports have identified, in individuals with dominant Robinow syndrome, a specific type of variant characterized by being uniformly located in the penultimate exon of DVL1 and resulting in a −1 frameshift allele with a premature termination codon that escapes nonsense-mediated decay. Here, we studied a cohort of individuals who had been clinically diagnosed with Robinow syndrome but who had not received a molecular diagnosis from variant studies of DVL1, WNT5A, and ROR2. Because of the uniform location of frameshift variants in DVL1-mediated Robinow syndrome and the functional redundancy of DVL1, DVL2, and DVL3, we elected to pursue direct Sanger sequencing of the penultimate exon of DVL1 and its paralogs DVL2 and DVL3 to search for potential disease-associated variants. Remarkably, targeted sequencing identified five unrelated individuals harboring heterozygous, de novo frameshift variants in DVL3, including two splice acceptor mutations and three 1 bp deletions. Similar to the variants observed in DVL1-mediated Robinow syndrome, all variants in DVL3 result in a −1 frameshift, indicating that these highly specific alterations might be a common cause of dominant Robinow syndrome. Here, we review the current knowledge of these peculiar variant alleles in DVL1- and DVL3-mediated Robinow syndrome and further elucidate the phenotypic features present in subjects with DVL1 and DVL3 frameshift mutations. PMID:26924530

  5. Rli1/ABCE1 Recycles Terminating Ribosomes and Controls Translation Reinitiation in 3'UTRs In Vivo.

    PubMed

    Young, David J; Guydosh, Nicholas R; Zhang, Fan; Hinnebusch, Alan G; Green, Rachel

    2015-08-13

    To study the function of Rli1/ABCE1 in vivo, we used ribosome profiling and biochemistry to characterize its contribution to ribosome recycling. When Rli1 levels were diminished, 80S ribosomes accumulated both at stop codons and in the adjoining 3'UTRs of most mRNAs. Frequently, these ribosomes reinitiated translation without the need for a canonical start codon, as small peptide products predicted by 3'UTR ribosome occupancy in all three reading frames were confirmed by western analysis and mass spectrometry. Eliminating the ribosome-rescue factor Dom34 dramatically increased 3'UTR ribosome occupancy in Rli1 depleted cells, indicating that Dom34 clears the bulk of unrecycled ribosomes. Thus, Rli1 is crucial for ribosome recycling in vivo and controls ribosome homeostasis. 3'UTR translation occurs in wild-type cells as well, and observations of elevated 3'UTR ribosomes during stress suggest that modulating recycling and reinitiation is involved in responding to environmental changes.

  6. Bmi1 promotes erythroid development through regulating ribosome biogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Rui; Chen, Sisi; Kobayashi, Michihiro; Yu, Hao; Zhang, Yingchi; Wan, Yang; Young, Sara K.; Soltis, Anthony; Yu, Ming; Vemula, Sasidhar; Fraenkel, Ernest; Cantor, Alan; Antipin, Yevgeniy; Xu, Yang; Yoder, Mervin C.; Wek, Ronald C.; Ellis, Steven R.; Kapur, Reuben; Zhu, Xiaofan; Liu, Yan

    2015-01-01

    While Polycomb group protein Bmi1 is important for stem cell maintenance, its role in lineage commitment is largely unknown. We have identified Bmi1 as a novel regulator of erythroid development. Bmi1 is highly expressed in mouse erythroid progenitor cells and its deficiency impairs erythroid differentiation. BMI1 is also important for human erythroid development. Furthermore, we discovered that loss of Bmi1 in erythroid progenitor cells results in down-regulation of transcription of multiple ribosomal protein genes and impaired ribosome biogenesis. Bmi1 deficiency stabilizes p53 protein, leading to upregulation of p21 expression and subsequent G0/G1 cell cycle arrest. Genetic inhibition of p53 activity rescues the erythroid defects seen in the Bmi1 null mice, demonstrating that a p53-dependent mechanism underlies the pathophysiology of the anemia. Mechanistically, Bmi1 is associated with multiple ribosomal protein genes and may positively regulate their expression in erythroid progenitor cells. Thus, Bmi1 promotes erythroid development, at least in part through regulating ribosome biogenesis. Ribosomopathies are human disorders of ribosome dysfunction, including diamond blackfan anemia (DBA) and 5q- syndrome, in which genetic abnormalities cause impaired ribosome biogenesis, resulting in specific clinical phenotypes. We observed that BMI1 expression in human hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSPCs) from patients with DBA is correlated with the expression of some ribosomal protein genes, suggesting that BMI1 deficiency may play a pathological role in DBA and other ribosomopathies. PMID:25385494

  7. Bmi1 promotes erythroid development through regulating ribosome biogenesis.

    PubMed

    Gao, Rui; Chen, Sisi; Kobayashi, Michihiro; Yu, Hao; Zhang, Yingchi; Wan, Yang; Young, Sara K; Soltis, Anthony; Yu, Ming; Vemula, Sasidhar; Fraenkel, Ernest; Cantor, Alan; Antipin, Yevgeniy; Xu, Yang; Yoder, Mervin C; Wek, Ronald C; Ellis, Steven R; Kapur, Reuben; Zhu, Xiaofan; Liu, Yan

    2015-03-01

    While Polycomb group protein Bmi1 is important for stem cell maintenance, its role in lineage commitment is largely unknown. We have identified Bmi1 as a novel regulator of erythroid development. Bmi1 is highly expressed in mouse erythroid progenitor cells and its deficiency impairs erythroid differentiation. BMI1 is also important for human erythroid development. Furthermore, we discovered that loss of Bmi1 in erythroid progenitor cells results in decreased transcription of multiple ribosomal protein genes and impaired ribosome biogenesis. Bmi1 deficiency stabilizes p53 protein, leading to upregulation of p21 expression and subsequent G0/G1 cell cycle arrest. Genetic inhibition of p53 activity rescues the erythroid defects seen in the Bmi1 null mice, demonstrating that a p53-dependent mechanism underlies the pathophysiology of the anemia. Mechanistically, Bmi1 is associated with multiple ribosomal protein genes and may positively regulate their expression in erythroid progenitor cells. Thus, Bmi1 promotes erythroid development, at least in part through regulating ribosome biogenesis. Ribosomopathies are human disorders of ribosome dysfunction, including Diamond-Blackfan anemia (DBA) and 5q- syndrome, in which genetic abnormalities cause impaired ribosome biogenesis, resulting in specific clinical phenotypes. We observed that BMI1 expression in human hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells from patients with DBA is correlated with the expression of some ribosomal protein genes, suggesting that BMI1 deficiency may play a pathological role in DBA and other ribosomopathies. PMID:25385494

  8. A novel frameshift mutation of DDHD1 in a Japanese patient with autosomal recessive spastic paraplegia.

    PubMed

    Miura, Shiroh; Morikawa, Takuya; Fujioka, Ryuta; Kosaka, Kengo; Yamada, Kohei; Hattori, Gohsuke; Motomura, Manabu; Taniwaki, Takayuki; Shibata, Hiroki

    2016-08-01

    Spastic paraplegia (SPG) type 28 is an autosomal recessive SPG caused by mutations in the DDHD1 gene. We examined a Japanese 54-years-old male patient with autosomal recessive SPG. His parents were consanguineous. He needed a wheelchair for transfer due to spastic paraplegia. There was a history of operations for bilateral hallux valgus, thoracic ossification of the yellow ligament, bilateral carpal tunnel syndrome, bilateral ankle contracture, and lumbar spinal canal stenosis. He noticed gait disturbance at age 14. He used a cane for walking in his 40s. On neurological examination, he showed hyperreflexia, spasticity, and weakness in the lower extremities and bilateral Babinski reflexes. Urinary dysfunctions and impaired vibration sense in the lower limbs were observed. By exome sequencing analysis using Agilent SureSelect and Illumina MiSeq, we identified 17,248 homozygous nucleotide variants in the patient. Through the examination of 48 candidate genes known to be responsible for autosomal recessive SPG, we identified a novel homozygous 4-bp deletion, c.914_917delGTAA, p.Ser305Ilefs*2 in exon2 of the DDHD1 gene encoding phosphatidic acid-preferring phospholipase A1 (PA-PLA1). The mutation is expected to cause a frameshift generating a premature stop codon 3-bp downstream from the deletion. In consequence, the DDHD domain that is known to be critical for PLA1 activity is completely depleted in the mutated DDHD1 protein, predicted to be a functionally null mutation of the DDHD1 gene. By Sanger sequencing, we confirmed that both parents are heterozygous for the mutation. This variation was not detected in 474 Japanese control subjects as well as the data of the 1,000G Project. We conclude that the novel mutation in DDHD1 is the causative variant for the SPG28 patient that is the first record of the disease in Japanese population. PMID:27216551

  9. Ribosomal protein methyltransferases in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae: Roles in ribosome biogenesis and translation.

    PubMed

    Al-Hadid, Qais; White, Jonelle; Clarke, Steven

    2016-02-12

    A significant percentage of the methyltransferasome in Saccharomyces cerevisiae and higher eukaryotes is devoted to methylation of the translational machinery. Methylation of the RNA components of the translational machinery has been studied extensively and is important for structure stability, ribosome biogenesis, and translational fidelity. However, the functional effects of ribosomal protein methylation by their cognate methyltransferases are still largely unknown. Previous work has shown that the ribosomal protein Rpl3 methyltransferase, histidine protein methyltransferase 1 (Hpm1), is important for ribosome biogenesis and translation elongation fidelity. In this study, yeast strains deficient in each of the ten ribosomal protein methyltransferases in S. cerevisiae were examined for potential defects in ribosome biogenesis and translation. Like Hpm1-deficient cells, loss of four of the nine other ribosomal protein methyltransferases resulted in defects in ribosomal subunit synthesis. All of the mutant strains exhibited resistance to the ribosome inhibitors anisomycin and/or cycloheximide in plate assays, but not in liquid culture. Translational fidelity assays measuring stop codon readthrough, amino acid misincorporation, and programmed -1 ribosomal frameshifting, revealed that eight of the ten enzymes are important for translation elongation fidelity and the remaining two are necessary for translation termination efficiency. Altogether, these results demonstrate that ribosomal protein methyltransferases in S. cerevisiae play important roles in ribosome biogenesis and translation. PMID:26801560

  10. Ribosomal protein methyltransferases in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae: Roles in ribosome biogenesis and translation.

    PubMed

    Al-Hadid, Qais; White, Jonelle; Clarke, Steven

    2016-02-12

    A significant percentage of the methyltransferasome in Saccharomyces cerevisiae and higher eukaryotes is devoted to methylation of the translational machinery. Methylation of the RNA components of the translational machinery has been studied extensively and is important for structure stability, ribosome biogenesis, and translational fidelity. However, the functional effects of ribosomal protein methylation by their cognate methyltransferases are still largely unknown. Previous work has shown that the ribosomal protein Rpl3 methyltransferase, histidine protein methyltransferase 1 (Hpm1), is important for ribosome biogenesis and translation elongation fidelity. In this study, yeast strains deficient in each of the ten ribosomal protein methyltransferases in S. cerevisiae were examined for potential defects in ribosome biogenesis and translation. Like Hpm1-deficient cells, loss of four of the nine other ribosomal protein methyltransferases resulted in defects in ribosomal subunit synthesis. All of the mutant strains exhibited resistance to the ribosome inhibitors anisomycin and/or cycloheximide in plate assays, but not in liquid culture. Translational fidelity assays measuring stop codon readthrough, amino acid misincorporation, and programmed -1 ribosomal frameshifting, revealed that eight of the ten enzymes are important for translation elongation fidelity and the remaining two are necessary for translation termination efficiency. Altogether, these results demonstrate that ribosomal protein methyltransferases in S. cerevisiae play important roles in ribosome biogenesis and translation.

  11. DVL1 frameshift mutations clustering in the penultimate exon cause autosomal-dominant Robinow syndrome.

    PubMed

    White, Janson; Mazzeu, Juliana F; Hoischen, Alexander; Jhangiani, Shalini N; Gambin, Tomasz; Alcino, Michele Calijorne; Penney, Samantha; Saraiva, Jorge M; Hove, Hanne; Skovby, Flemming; Kayserili, Hülya; Estrella, Elicia; Vulto-van Silfhout, Anneke T; Steehouwer, Marloes; Muzny, Donna M; Sutton, V Reid; Gibbs, Richard A; Lupski, James R; Brunner, Han G; van Bon, Bregje W M; Carvalho, Claudia M B

    2015-04-01

    Robinow syndrome is a genetically heterogeneous disorder characterized by mesomelic limb shortening, genital hypoplasia, and distinctive facial features and for which both autosomal-recessive and autosomal-dominant inheritance patterns have been described. Causative variants in the non-canonical signaling gene WNT5A underlie a subset of autosomal-dominant Robinow syndrome (DRS) cases, but most individuals with DRS remain without a molecular diagnosis. We performed whole-exome sequencing in four unrelated DRS-affected individuals without coding mutations in WNT5A and found heterozygous DVL1 exon 14 mutations in three of them. Targeted Sanger sequencing in additional subjects with DRS uncovered DVL1 exon 14 mutations in five individuals, including a pair of monozygotic twins. In total, six distinct frameshift mutations were found in eight subjects, and all were heterozygous truncating variants within the penultimate exon of DVL1. In five families in which samples from unaffected parents were available, the variants were demonstrated to represent de novo mutations. All variant alleles are predicted to result in a premature termination codon within the last exon, escape nonsense-mediated decay (NMD), and most likely generate a C-terminally truncated protein with a distinct -1 reading-frame terminus. Study of the transcripts extracted from affected subjects' leukocytes confirmed expression of both wild-type and variant alleles, supporting the hypothesis that mutant mRNA escapes NMD. Genomic variants identified in our study suggest that truncation of the C-terminal domain of DVL1, a protein hypothesized to have a downstream role in the Wnt-5a non-canonical pathway, is a common cause of DRS. PMID:25817016

  12. A net +1 frameshift permits synthesis of thymidine kinase from a drug-resistant herpes simplex virus mutant.

    PubMed Central

    Hwang, C B; Horsburgh, B; Pelosi, E; Roberts, S; Digard, P; Coen, D M

    1994-01-01

    Clinical resistance to antiviral drugs requires that a virus evade drug therapy yet retain pathogenicity. Thymidine kinase (TK)-negative mutants of herpes simplex virus are resistant to the drug, acyclovir, but are attenuated for pathogenicity in animal models. However, numerous cases of clinical resistance to acyclovir have been associated with viruses that were reported to express no TK activity. We studied an acyclovir-resistant clinical mutant that contains a single-base insertion in its tk gene, predicting the synthesis of a truncated TK polypeptide with no TK activity. Nevertheless, the mutant retained some TK activity and the ability to reactivate from latent infections of mouse trigeminal ganglia. The mutant expressed both the predicted truncated polypeptide and a low level of a polypeptide that comigrated with full-length TK on polyacrylamide gels and reacted with anti-TK antiserum, providing evidence for a frameshifting mechanism. In vitro transcription and translation of mutant tk genes, including constructs in which reporter epitopes could be expressed only if frameshifting occurred, also gave rise to truncated and full-length polypeptides. Reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction analysis coupled with open reading frame cloning failed to detect alterations in tk transcripts that could account for the synthesis of full-length polypeptide. Thus, synthesis of full-length TK was due to an unusual net +1 frameshift during translation, a phenomenon hitherto confined in eukaryotic cells to certain RNA viruses and retrotransposons. Utilization of cellular frameshifting mechanisms may permit an otherwise TK-negative virus to exhibit clinical acyclovir resistance. Images PMID:8202508

  13. A Stochastic Model of RNA Translation with Frameshifting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bailey, Brenae

    2011-10-01

    Many viruses can produce different proteins from the same RNA sequence by encoding them in overlapping genes. One mechanism that causes the ribosomes of infected cells to decode both genes is called programmed ribosomal frameshifting (PRF). Although PRF has been recognized for 25 years, the mechanism is not well understood. We have developed a model that treats RNA translation as a stochastic process in which the transition probabilities are based on the free energies of local molecular interactions. The model reproduces observed translation rates and frameshift efficiencies, and can be used to predict the effects of mutations in the viral RNA sequence on both the mean translation rate and the frameshift efficiency.

  14. A frameshift mutation in HTRA1 expands CARASIL syndrome and peripheral small arterial disease to the Chinese population.

    PubMed

    Cai, Bin; Zeng, Jiabin; Lin, Yi; Lin, Yu; Lin, WenPing; Lin, Wei; Li, Zhiwen; Wang, Ning

    2015-08-01

    Cerebral autosomal recessive arteriopathy with subcortical infarcts and leukoencephalopathy (CARASIL) is a rare hereditary cerebral artery disease. The HtrA serine protease 1 (HTRA1) gene has been identified as the causative gene of CARASIL. Here, we report a novel mutation in the HTRA1 gene in a CARASIL pedigree and explore its pathogenesis at the protein level. Subcutaneous tissue biopsy and HTRA1 gene analysis were performed in a CARASIL patient, and HTRA1 and TGF-β1 protein expression in subcutaneous tissue and cultured fibroblasts from the proband were detected by immunohistochemistry and western blotting. A 28-year-old male proband and his brother experienced recurrent stroke, hair loss and low back pain. Abnormalities in the proband were found in the elastic plate of subcutaneous small arteries, and a novel homozygous frameshift mutation (c.161_162insAG), leading to the formation of a stop codon 159 amino acids downstream of the insertion (p.Gly56Alafs*160) was detected. Reduced HTRA1 protein and increased TGF-β1 expression were detected in subcutaneous tissue and in cultured fibroblasts. A frameshift mutation in the HTRA1 gene detected in a CARASIL pedigree resulted in reduced HTRA1 protein and increased TGF-β1 expression, which may cause severe CARASIL and peripheral small arterial disease.

  15. A Nascent Peptide Signal Responsive to Endogenous Levels of Polyamines Acts to Stimulate Regulatory Frameshifting on Antizyme mRNA*

    PubMed Central

    Yordanova, Martina M.; Wu, Cheng; Andreev, Dmitry E.; Sachs, Matthew S.; Atkins, John F.

    2015-01-01

    The protein antizyme is a negative regulator of cellular polyamine concentrations from yeast to mammals. Synthesis of functional antizyme requires programmed +1 ribosomal frameshifting at the 3′ end of the first of two partially overlapping ORFs. The frameshift is the sensor and effector in an autoregulatory circuit. Except for Saccharomyces cerevisiae antizyme mRNA, the frameshift site alone only supports low levels of frameshifting. The high levels usually observed depend on the presence of cis-acting stimulatory elements located 5′ and 3′ of the frameshift site. Antizyme genes from different evolutionary branches have evolved different stimulatory elements. Prior and new multiple alignments of fungal antizyme mRNA sequences from the Agaricomycetes class of Basidiomycota show a distinct pattern of conservation 5′ of the frameshift site consistent with a function at the amino acid level. As shown here when tested in Schizosaccharomyces pombe and mammalian HEK293T cells, the 5′ part of this conserved sequence acts at the nascent peptide level to stimulate the frameshifting, without involving stalling detectable by toe-printing. However, the peptide is only part of the signal. The 3′ part of the stimulator functions largely independently and acts at least mostly at the nucleotide level. When polyamine levels were varied, the stimulatory effect was seen to be especially responsive in the endogenous polyamine concentration range, and this effect may be more general. A conserved RNA secondary structure 3′ of the frameshift site has weaker stimulatory and polyamine sensitizing effects on frameshifting. PMID:25998126

  16. Clinical and molecular characterization of a novel PLIN1 frameshift mutation identified in patients with familial partial lipodystrophy.

    PubMed

    Kozusko, Kristina; Tsang, Venessa H M; Bottomley, William; Cho, Yoon-Hi; Gandotra, Sheetal; Mimmack, Michael; Lim, Koini; Isaac, Iona; Patel, Satish; Saudek, Vladimir; O'Rahilly, Stephen; Srinivasan, Shubha; Greenfield, Jerry R; Barroso, Ines; Campbell, Lesley V; Savage, David B

    2015-01-01

    Perilipin 1 is a lipid droplet coat protein predominantly expressed in adipocytes, where it inhibits basal and facilitates stimulated lipolysis. Loss-of-function mutations in the PLIN1 gene were recently reported in patients with a novel subtype of familial partial lipodystrophy, designated as FPLD4. We now report the identification and characterization of a novel heterozygous frameshift mutation affecting the carboxy-terminus (439fs) of perilipin 1 in two unrelated families. The mutation cosegregated with a similar phenotype including partial lipodystrophy, severe insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes, extreme hypertriglyceridemia, and nonalcoholic fatty liver disease in both families. Poor metabolic control despite maximal medical therapy prompted two patients to undergo bariatric surgery, with remarkably beneficial consequences. Functional studies indicated that expression levels of the mutant protein were lower than wild-type protein, and in stably transfected preadipocytes the mutant protein was associated with smaller lipid droplets. Interestingly, unlike the previously reported 398 and 404 frameshift mutants, this variant binds and stabilizes ABHD5 expression but still fails to inhibit basal lipolysis as effectively as wild-type perilipin 1. Collectively, these findings highlight the physiological need for exquisite regulation of neutral lipid storage within adipocyte lipid droplets, as well as the possible metabolic benefits of bariatric surgery in this serious disease.

  17. Reading two bases twice: mammalian antizyme frameshifting in yeast.

    PubMed Central

    Matsufuji, S; Matsufuji, T; Wills, N M; Gesteland, R F; Atkins, J F

    1996-01-01

    Programmed translational frameshifting is essential for the expression of mammalian ornithine decarboxylase antizyme, a protein involved in the regulation of intracellular polyamines. A cassette containing antizyme frameshift signals is found to direct high-level (16%) frameshifting in yeast, Saccharomyces cerevisiae. In contrast to +1 frameshifting in the mammalian system, in yeast the same frame is reached by -2 frameshifting. Two bases are read twice. The -2 frameshifting is likely to be mediated by slippage of mRNA and re-pairing with the tRNA in the P-site. The downstream pseudoknot stimulates frameshifting by 30-fold compared with 2.5-fold in reticulocyte lysates. When the length of the spacer between the shift site and the pseudoknot is extended by three nucleotides, +1 and -2 frameshifting become equal. Images PMID:8635469

  18. A CNGB1 frameshift mutation in Papillon and Phalène dogs with progressive retinal atrophy.

    PubMed

    Ahonen, Saija J; Arumilli, Meharji; Lohi, Hannes

    2013-01-01

    Progressive retinal degenerations are the most common causes of complete blindness both in human and in dogs. Canine progressive retinal atrophy (PRA) or degeneration resembles human retinitis pigmentosa (RP) and is characterized by a progressive loss of rod photoreceptor cells followed by a loss of cone function. The primary clinical signs are detected as vision impairment in a dim light. Although several genes have been associated with PRAs, there are still PRAs of unknown genetic cause in many breeds, including Papillons and Phalènes. We have performed a genome wide association and linkage studies in cohort of 6 affected Papillons and Phalènes and 14 healthy control dogs to map a novel PRA locus on canine chromosome 2, with a 1.9 Mb shared homozygous region in the affected dogs. Parallel exome sequencing of a trio identified an indel mutation, including a 1-bp deletion, followed by a 6-bp insertion in the CNGB1 gene. This mutation causes a frameshift and premature stop codon leading to probable nonsense mediated decay (NMD) of the CNGB1 mRNA. The mutation segregated with the disease and was confirmed in a larger cohort of 145 Papillons and Phalènes (PFisher = 1.4×10(-8)) with a carrier frequency of 17.2 %. This breed specific mutation was not present in 334 healthy dogs from 10 other breeds or 121 PRA affected dogs from 44 other breeds. CNGB1 is important for the photoreceptor cell function its defects have been previously associated with retinal degeneration in both human and mouse. Our study indicates that a frameshift mutation in CNGB1 is a cause of PRA in Papillons and Phalènes and establishes the breed as a large functional animal model for further characterization of retinal CNGB1 biology and possible retinal gene therapy trials. This study enables also the development of a genetic test for breeding purposes.

  19. Dravet syndrome with favourable cognitive and behavioral development due to a novel SCN1A frameshift mutation.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Peifang; Shen, Jue; Yu, Yonglin; Jiang, Lihua; Xu, Jialu; Xu, Lu; Yu, Huimin; Gao, Feng

    2016-07-01

    Children with Dravet syndrome (DS) often have severe cognitive, behaviour and motor impairments. Patients with truncating mutations would logically have the more severe phenotype. Here we present a case of DS with an unusually favourable cognitive and behavioral development with a novel SCN1A frameshift mutation (c.4233-4234insAT). Under regular following up for ten years, the patient had normal expressive language and mild motor clumsiness. It is suggested that besides the type of SCN1A mutation, other mechanisms may be existed to influence the SCN1A phenotype, such as modifier genes, developmental variability, accumulation of somatic mutation in lifetime and environmental insults can all contribute to the cognitive and behavioral outcome.

  20. CAG tract of MJD-1 may be prone to frameshifts causing polyalanine accumulation.

    PubMed

    Gaspar, C; Jannatipour, M; Dion, P; Laganière, J; Sequeiros, J; Brais, B; Rouleau, G A

    2000-08-12

    Machado-Joseph disease (MJD) is one of several disorders caused by the expansion of a coding CAG repeat (exp-CAG). The presence of intranuclear inclusions (INIs) in patients and cellular models of exp-CAG-associated diseases has lead to a nuclear toxicity model. Similar INIs are found in oculopharyngeal muscular dystrophy, which is caused by a short expansion of an alanine-encoding GCG repeat. Here we propose that transcriptional or translational frameshifts occurring within expanded CAG tracts result in the production and accumulation of polyalanine-containing mutant proteins. We hypothesize that these alanine polymers deposit in cells forming INIs and may contribute to nuclear toxicity. We show evidence that supports our hypothesis in lymphoblast cells from MJD patients, as well as in pontine neurons of MJD brain and in in vitro cell culture models of the disease. We also provide evidence that alanine polymers alone are harmful to cells and predict that a similar pathogenic mechanism may occur in the other CAG repeat disorders.

  1. Proteomic analysis of rodent ribosomes revealed heterogeneity including ribosomal proteins L10-like, L22-like 1, and L39-like.

    PubMed

    Sugihara, Yoshihiko; Honda, Hiroki; Iida, Tomoharu; Morinaga, Takuma; Hino, Shingo; Okajima, Tetsuya; Matsuda, Tsukasa; Nadano, Daita

    2010-03-01

    Heterogeneity of ribosome structure, due to variations in ribosomal protein composition, has been shown to be of physiological significance in plants and yeast. Mammalian genomics have demonstrated numerous genes that are paralogous to genes encoding ribosomal proteins. Although the vast majority are considered to be pseudogenes, mRNA expression of a few paralogues, such as human ribosomal protein L39-like/L39-2, has been reported. In the present study, ribosomes from the liver, mammary gland, and testis of rodents were analyzed using a combination of two-dimensional gel electrophoresis under radical-free and highly reducing conditions, and mass spectrometry. This system allowed identification of 78 ribosomal proteins and Rack1 from a single gel. The degree of heterogeneity was far less than that reported for plant and yeast ribosomes, and was in accord with published biochemical and genetic data for mammalian ribosomes. Nevertheless, an uncharacterized paralogue of ribosomal protein L22, ribosomal protein L22-like 1, was identified as a minor ribosomal component. Ribosomal proteins L10-like and L39-like, paralogues of ribosomal proteins L10 and L39, respectively, were found in ribosomes only from the testis. Reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction yielded supportive evidence for specific expression of L10-like and L39-like in the testis. Newly synthesized L39-like is likely to be transported to the nucleolus, where ribosome biosynthesis occurs, and then incorporated into translating ribosomes in the cytoplasm. Heterogeneity of mammalian testicular ribosomes is structurally non-negligible, and may offer valuable insights into the function of the customized ribosome.

  2. Site-specific frame-shift mutagenesis by the 1-nitropyrene-DNA adduct N-(deoxyguanosin-8-y1)-1-aminopyrene located in the (CG)3 sequence: effects of SOS, proofreading, and mismatch repair.

    PubMed

    Malia, S A; Vyas, R R; Basu, A K

    1996-04-01

    1-Nitropyrene (1-NP), the predominant nitropolycyclic hydrocarbon found in diesel exhaust, is a mutagen and tumorigen. Nitroreduction is a major pathway by which 1-NP is metabolized. Reductively activated 1-NP forms a major DNA adduct, N-(deoxyguanosin-8-yl)-1-aminopyrene (dGAP), both in vitro and in vivo. In Salmonella typhimurium 1-NP induces a CpG deletion in a CGCGCGCG sequence. In Escherichia coli, however, mostly -1 and +1 frame-shifts are observed, which occur predominantly in 5'-CG, 5'-GC, and 5'-GG sequences. In order to determine the mechanism of mutagenesis by dGAP in a CpG repetitive sequence, we constructed a single-stranded M13 genome containing the adduct at the underscored deoxyguanosine of an inserted CGCGCG sequence. In E. coli strains with normal repair capability the adduct induced approximately 2% CpG deletions, which was 20-fold that of the control. With SOS, the frequency of frame-shift mutations increased to 2.6%, even though the frequency of CpG deletion accompanied 50% reduction. The enhancement in mutagenesis was due to a +1 frame-shift that occurred at a high frequency. In strains with a defect in methyl-directed mismatch repair, 50-70% increase in mutation frequency was observed. When these strains were SOS induced, frame-shift mutagenesis increased by approximately 100%. When transfections were carried out in dnaQ strains that are impaired in 3'-->5'exonuclease activity of DNA polymerase III, frame-shift mutagenesis increased 5-7-fold. dGAP-induced frame-shifts in the (CG)3 sequence, therefore, varied from 2% to 17% depending on the state of repair of the host cells. We conclude that dGAP induces both -2 and +1 frame-shifts in a CpG repetitive sequence and that these two mutagenic events are competing pathways. The CpG deletion does not require SOS functions, whereas the +1 frame-shifts are SOS-dependent. On the basis of the data in repair-deficient strains, it appears that both types of frame-shifts occurred as a result of

  3. Multiple nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome associated with congenital orbital teratoma, caused by a PTCH1 frameshift mutation.

    PubMed

    Rodrigues, A L; Carvalho, A; Cabral, R; Carneiro, V; Gilardi, P; Duarte, C P; Puente-Prieto, J; Santos, P; Mota-Vieira, L

    2014-01-01

    Gorlin-Goltz syndrome, or nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome (NBCCS), is a rare autosomal dominant disorder caused by mutations in the PTCH1 gene and shows a high level of penetrance and variable expressivity. The syndrome is characterized by developmental abnormalities or neoplasms and is diagnosed with 2 major criteria, or with 1 major and 2 minor criteria. Here, we report a new clinical manifestation associated with this syndrome in a boy affected by NBCCS who had congenital orbital teratoma at birth. Later, at the age of 15 years, he presented with 4 major and 4 minor criteria of NBCCS, including multiple basal cell carcinoma and 2 odontogenic keratocysts of the jaw, both confirmed by histology, more than 5 palmar pits, calcification of the cerebral falx, extensive meningeal calcifications, macrocephaly, hypertelorism, frontal bosses, and kyphoscoliosis. PTCH1 mutation analysis revealed the heterozygous germline mutation c.290dupA. This mutation generated a frameshift within exon 2 and an early premature stop codon (p.Asn97LysfsX43), predicting a truncated protein with complete loss of function. Identification of this mutation is useful for genetic counseling. Although the clinical symptoms are well-known, our case contributes to the understanding of phenotypic variability in NBCCS, highlighting that PTCH1 mutations cannot be used for predicting disease burden and reinforces the need of a multidisciplinary team in the diagnosis, treatment, and follow-up of NBCCS patients. PMID:25117323

  4. Multiple nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome associated with congenital orbital teratoma, caused by a PTCH1 frameshift mutation.

    PubMed

    Rodrigues, A L; Carvalho, A; Cabral, R; Carneiro, V; Gilardi, P; Duarte, C P; Puente-Prieto, J; Santos, P; Mota-Vieira, L

    2014-07-25

    Gorlin-Goltz syndrome, or nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome (NBCCS), is a rare autosomal dominant disorder caused by mutations in the PTCH1 gene and shows a high level of penetrance and variable expressivity. The syndrome is characterized by developmental abnormalities or neoplasms and is diagnosed with 2 major criteria, or with 1 major and 2 minor criteria. Here, we report a new clinical manifestation associated with this syndrome in a boy affected by NBCCS who had congenital orbital teratoma at birth. Later, at the age of 15 years, he presented with 4 major and 4 minor criteria of NBCCS, including multiple basal cell carcinoma and 2 odontogenic keratocysts of the jaw, both confirmed by histology, more than 5 palmar pits, calcification of the cerebral falx, extensive meningeal calcifications, macrocephaly, hypertelorism, frontal bosses, and kyphoscoliosis. PTCH1 mutation analysis revealed the heterozygous germline mutation c.290dupA. This mutation generated a frameshift within exon 2 and an early premature stop codon (p.Asn97LysfsX43), predicting a truncated protein with complete loss of function. Identification of this mutation is useful for genetic counseling. Although the clinical symptoms are well-known, our case contributes to the understanding of phenotypic variability in NBCCS, highlighting that PTCH1 mutations cannot be used for predicting disease burden and reinforces the need of a multidisciplinary team in the diagnosis, treatment, and follow-up of NBCCS patients.

  5. Identification of a novel COL1A1 frameshift mutation, c.700delG, in a Chinese osteogenesis imperfecta family.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiran; Pei, Yu; Dou, Jingtao; Lu, Juming; Li, Jian; Lv, Zhaohui

    2015-03-01

    Osteogenesis imperfecta (OI) is a family of genetic disorders associated with bone loss and fragility. Mutations associated with OI have been found in genes encoding the type I collagen chains. People with OI type I often produce insufficient α1-chain type I collagen because of frameshift, nonsense, or splice site mutations in COL1A1 or COL1A2. This report is of a Chinese daughter and mother who had both experienced two bone fractures. Because skeletal fragility is predominantly inherited, we focused on identifying mutations in COL1A1 and COL1A2 genes. A novel mutation in COL1A1, c.700delG, was detected by genomic DNA sequencing in the mother and daughter, but not in their relatives. The identification of this mutation led to the conclusion that they were affected by mild OI type I. Open reading frame analysis indicated that this frameshift mutation would truncate α1-chain type I collagen at residue p263 (p.E234KfsX264), while the wild-type protein would contain 1,464 residues. The clinical data were consistent with the patients' diagnosis of mild OI type I caused by haploinsufficiency of α1-chain type I collagen. Combined with previous reports, identification of the novel mutation COL1A1-c.700delG in these patients suggests that additional genetic and environmental factors may influence the severity of OI.

  6. NF1 frameshift mutation (c.6520_6523delGAGA) association with nervous system tumors and bone abnormalities in a Chinese patient with neurofibromatosis type 1.

    PubMed

    Su, S Y; Zhou, X; Pang, X M; Chen, C Y; Li, S H; Liu, J L

    2016-01-01

    Neurofibromatosis type 1, also known as NF1 or von Recklinghausen's disease, is a common neurocutaneous syndrome that presents with multiple café-au-lait patches, skinfold freckling, dermatofibromas, neurofibromas, and Lisch nodules. The mutations of the gene NF1, encoding the protein neurofibromin, have been identified as the cause of this disease. Here, we report a clinical and molecular study of a Chinese patient with multiple café-au-lait skin freckles, dermatofibroma, central and peripheral nervous system tumors, and bone abnormalities attributed to NF1. The patient showed >6 café-au-lait spots on the body and multiple dermatofibromas. A brain glioma and multiple nerve sheath tumors inside and outside the vertebral canal were identified by magnetic resonance imaging, which also showed multiple intercostal nerve schwannomas and hydrocephalies above the cerebellar tentorium. Talipes equinus was also apparent. A mutation analysis of the NF1 gene revealed a novel frameshift mutation in exon 43, consisting of a heterozygous deletion of four nucleotides (GAGA) between positions 6520 and 6523. No NF1 mutations were detected in the patient's parents or younger brother. These results extend the list of known mutations in this gene. The absence of the NF1 mutation in the healthy family members suggests that it is responsible for the NF1 phenotype. To our knowledge, this frameshift mutation represents a novel NF1 case, and may be associated with nervous system tumors and bone abnormalities. PMID:27173220

  7. A Tumor-Specific Neo-Antigen Caused by a Frameshift Mutation in BAP1 Is a Potential Personalized Biomarker in Malignant Peritoneal Mesothelioma.

    PubMed

    Lai, Jun; Zhou, Zhan; Tang, Xiao-Jing; Gao, Zhi-Bin; Zhou, Jie; Chen, Shu-Qing

    2016-05-14

    Malignant peritoneal mesothelioma (MPM) is an aggressive rare malignancy associated with asbestos exposure. A better understanding of the molecular pathogenesis of MPM will help develop a targeted therapy strategy. Oncogene targeted depth sequencing was performed on a tumor sample and paired peripheral blood DNA from a patient with malignant mesothelioma of the peritoneum. Four somatic base-substitutions in NOTCH2, NSD1, PDE4DIP, and ATP10B and 1 insert frameshift mutation in BAP1 were validated by the Sanger method at the transcriptional level. A 13-amino acids neo-peptide of the truncated Bap1 protein, which was produced as a result of this novel frameshift mutation, was predicted to be presented by this patient's HLA-B protein. The polyclonal antibody of the synthesized 13-mer neo-peptide was produced in rabbits. Western blotting results showed a good antibody-neoantigen specificity, and Immunohistochemistry (IHC) staining with the antibody of the neo-peptide clearly differentiated neoplastic cells from normal cells. A search of the Catalogue of Somatic Mutations in Cancer (COSMIC) database also revealed that 53.2% of mutations in BAP1 were frameshift indels with neo-peptide formation. An identified tumor-specific neo-antigen could be the potential molecular biomarker for personalized diagnosis to precisely subtype rare malignancies such as MPM.

  8. A Tumor-Specific Neo-Antigen Caused by a Frameshift Mutation in BAP1 Is a Potential Personalized Biomarker in Malignant Peritoneal Mesothelioma

    PubMed Central

    Lai, Jun; Zhou, Zhan; Tang, Xiao-Jing; Gao, Zhi-Bin; Zhou, Jie; Chen, Shu-Qing

    2016-01-01

    Malignant peritoneal mesothelioma (MPM) is an aggressive rare malignancy associated with asbestos exposure. A better understanding of the molecular pathogenesis of MPM will help develop a targeted therapy strategy. Oncogene targeted depth sequencing was performed on a tumor sample and paired peripheral blood DNA from a patient with malignant mesothelioma of the peritoneum. Four somatic base-substitutions in NOTCH2, NSD1, PDE4DIP, and ATP10B and 1 insert frameshift mutation in BAP1 were validated by the Sanger method at the transcriptional level. A 13-amino acids neo-peptide of the truncated Bap1 protein, which was produced as a result of this novel frameshift mutation, was predicted to be presented by this patient’s HLA-B protein. The polyclonal antibody of the synthesized 13-mer neo-peptide was produced in rabbits. Western blotting results showed a good antibody-neoantigen specificity, and Immunohistochemistry (IHC) staining with the antibody of the neo-peptide clearly differentiated neoplastic cells from normal cells. A search of the Catalogue of Somatic Mutations in Cancer (COSMIC) database also revealed that 53.2% of mutations in BAP1 were frameshift indels with neo-peptide formation. An identified tumor-specific neo-antigen could be the potential molecular biomarker for personalized diagnosis to precisely subtype rare malignancies such as MPM. PMID:27187383

  9. A Frame-Shift Mutation in CAV1 Is Associated with a Severe Neonatal Progeroid and Lipodystrophy Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Schrauwen, Isabelle; Szelinger, Szabolcs; Siniard, Ashley L; Kurdoglu, Ahmet; Corneveaux, Jason J; Malenica, Ivana; Richholt, Ryan; Van Camp, Guy; De Both, Matt; Swaminathan, Shanker; Turk, Mari; Ramsey, Keri; Craig, David W; Narayanan, Vinodh; Huentelman, Matthew J

    2015-01-01

    A 3-year-old female patient presenting with an unknown syndrome of a neonatal progeroid appearance, lipodystrophy, pulmonary hypertension, cutis marmorata, feeding disorder and failure to thrive was investigated by whole-genome sequencing. This revealed a de novo, heterozygous, frame-shift mutation in the Caveolin1 gene (CAV1) (p.Phe160X). Mutations in CAV1, encoding the main component of the caveolae in plasma membranes, cause Berardinelli-Seip congenital lipodystrophy type 3 (BSCL). Although BSCL is recessive, heterozygous carriers either show a reduced phenotype of partial lipodystrophy, pulmonary hypertension, or no phenotype. To investigate the pathogenic mechanisms underlying this syndrome in more depth, we performed next generation RNA sequencing of peripheral blood, which showed several dysregulated pathways in the patient that might be related to the phenotypic progeroid features (apoptosis, DNA repair/replication, mitochondrial). Secondly, we found a significant down-regulation of known Cav1 interaction partners, verifying the dysfunction of CAV1. Other known progeroid genes and lipodystrophy genes were also dysregulated. Next, western blotting of lysates of cultured fibroblasts showed that the patient shows a significantly decreased expression of wild-type CAV1 protein, demonstrating a loss-of-function mutation, though her phenotype is more severe that other heterozygotes with similar mutations. This phenotypic variety could be explained by differences in genetic background. Indications for this are supported by additional rare variants we found in AGPAT2 and LPIN1 lipodystrophy genes. CAV1, AGPAT2 and LPIN1 all play an important role in triacylglycerol (TAG) biosynthesis in adipose tissue, and the defective function in different parts of this pathway, though not all to the same extend, could contribute to a more severe lipoatrophic phenotype in this patient. In conclusion, we report, for the first time, an association of CAV1 dysfunction with a syndrome

  10. Genetic characterization of frameshift suppressors with new decoding properties.

    PubMed Central

    Hughes, D; Thompson, S; O'Connor, M; Tuohy, T; Nichols, B P; Atkins, J F

    1989-01-01

    Suppressor mutants that cause ribosomes to shift reading frame at specific and new sequences are described. Suppressors for trpE91, the only known suppressible -1 frameshift mutant, have been isolated in Escherichia coli and in Salmonella typhimurium. E. coli hopR acts on trpE91 within the 9-base-pair sequence GGA GUG UGA, is dominant, and is located at min 52 on the chromosome. Its Salmonella homolog maps at an equivalent position and arises as a rarer class in that organism as compared with E. coli. The Salmonella suppressor, hopE, believed to be in a duplicate copy of the same gene, maps at min 17. The +1 suppressor, sufT, acts at the nonmonotonous sequence CCGU, is dominant, and maps at min 59 on the Salmonella chromosome. PMID:2644219

  11. A frameshift mutation in MC1R and a high frequency of somatic reversions cause black spotting in pigs.

    PubMed Central

    Kijas, J M; Moller, M; Plastow, G; Andersson, L

    2001-01-01

    Black spotting on a red or white background in pigs is determined by the E(P) allele at the MC1R/Extension locus. A previous comparison of partial MC1R sequences revealed that E(P) shares a missense mutation (D121N) with the E(D2) allele for dominant black color. Sequence analysis of the entire coding region now reveals a second mutation in the form of a 2-bp insertion at codon 23 (nt67insCC). This mutation expands a tract of six C nucleotides to eight and introduces a premature stop codon at position 56. This frameshift mutation is expected to cause a recessive red color, which was in fact observed in some breeds with the E(P) allele present (Tamworth and Hereford). RT-PCR analyses were conducted using skin samples taken from both spotted and background areas of spotted pigs. The background red area had transcript only from the mutant nt67insCC MC1R allele, whereas the black spot also contained a transcript without the 2-bp insertion. This indicates that black spots are due to somatic reversion events that restore the frame and MC1R function. The phenotypic expression of the E(P) allele is highly variable and the associated coat color ranges from red, red with black spots, white with black spots, to almost completely solid black. In several breeds of pigs the phenotypic manifestation of this allele has been modified by selection for or against black spots. PMID:11404341

  12. PIM1 destabilization activates a p53-dependent response to ribosomal stress in cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Sagar, Vinay; Caldarola, Sara; Aria, Valentina; Monteleone, Valentina; Fuoco, Claudia; Gargioli, Cesare; Cannata, Stefano; Loreni, Fabrizio

    2016-01-01

    Defects in ribosome biogenesis triggers a stress response (ribosomal stress) that can lead to growth arrest and apoptosis. Signaling pathways activated by ribosomal stress are specifically involved in the pathological mechanism of a group of disorders defined as ribosomopathies. However, more generally, the quality control of ribosome synthesis is part of the regulatory circuits that control cell metabolism. A number of studies identified tumor suppressor p53 as a central player in ribosomal stress. We have previously reported that the kinase PIM1 plays a role as a sensor for ribosome deficiency. In this report we address the relationship between PIM1 and p53 in cancer cell lines after depletion of a ribosomal protein. We identified a novel signaling pathway that includes the kinase AKT and the ubiquitin ligase MDM2. In fact, our results indicate that the lower level of PIM1, induced by ribosomal stress, causes inactivation of AKT, inhibition of MDM2 and a consequent p53 stabilization. Therefore, we propose that activation of p53 in response to ribosomal stress, is dependent on the pathway PIM1-AKT-MDM2. In addition, we report evidence that PIM1 level may be relevant to assess the sensitivity of cancer cells to chemotherapeutic drugs that induce ribosomal stress. PMID:26993775

  13. PIM1 destabilization activates a p53-dependent response to ribosomal stress in cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Sagar, Vinay; Caldarola, Sara; Aria, Valentina; Monteleone, Valentina; Fuoco, Claudia; Gargioli, Cesare; Cannata, Stefano; Loreni, Fabrizio

    2016-04-26

    Defects in ribosome biogenesis triggers a stress response (ribosomal stress) that can lead to growth arrest and apoptosis. Signaling pathways activated by ribosomal stress are specifically involved in the pathological mechanism of a group of disorders defined as ribosomopathies. However, more generally, the quality control of ribosome synthesis is part of the regulatory circuits that control cell metabolism. A number of studies identified tumor suppressor p53 as a central player in ribosomal stress. We have previously reported that the kinase PIM1 plays a role as a sensor for ribosome deficiency. In this report we address the relationship between PIM1 and p53 in cancer cell lines after depletion of a ribosomal protein. We identified a novel signaling pathway that includes the kinase AKT and the ubiquitin ligase MDM2. In fact, our results indicate that the lower level of PIM1, induced by ribosomal stress, causes inactivation of AKT, inhibition of MDM2 and a consequent p53 stabilization. Therefore, we propose that activation of p53 in response to ribosomal stress, is dependent on the pathway PIM1-AKT-MDM2. In addition, we report evidence that PIM1 level may be relevant to assess the sensitivity of cancer cells to chemotherapeutic drugs that induce ribosomal stress. PMID:26993775

  14. Dystrophin in frameshift deletion patients with Becker Muscular Dystrophy

    SciTech Connect

    Gangopadhyay, S.B.; Ray, P.N.; Worton, R.G.; Sherratt, T.G.; Heckmatt, J.Z.; Dubowitz, V.; Strong, P.N.; Miller, G. ); Shokeir, M. )

    1992-09-01

    In a previous study the authors identified 14 cases with Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) or its milder variant, Becker muscular dystrophy (BMD), with a deletion of exons 3-7, a deletion that would be expected to shift the translational reading frame of the mRNA and give a severe phenotype. They have examined dystrophin and its mRNA from muscle biopsies of seven cases with either mild or intermediate phenotypes. In all cases they detected slightly lower-molecular-weight dystrophin in 12%-15% abundance relative to the normal. By sequencing amplified mRNA they have found that exon 2 is spliced to exon 8, a splice that produces a frameshifted mRNA, and have found no evidence for alternate splicing that might be involved in restoration of dystrophin mRNA reading frame in the patients with a mild phenotype. Other transcriptional and posttranscriptional mechanisms such as cryptic promoter, ribosomal frameshifting, and reinitiation are suggested that might play some role in restoring the reading frame. 34 refs., 5 figs. 1 tab.

  15. Ribosome-associated Asc1/RACK1 is required for endonucleolytic cleavage induced by stalled ribosome at the 3' end of nonstop mRNA.

    PubMed

    Ikeuchi, Ken; Inada, Toshifumi

    2016-01-01

    Dom34-Hbs1 stimulates degradation of aberrant mRNAs lacking termination codons by dissociating ribosomes stalled at the 3' ends, and plays crucial roles in Nonstop Decay (NSD) and No-Go Decay (NGD). In the dom34Δ mutant, nonstop mRNA is degraded by sequential endonucleolytic cleavages induced by a stalled ribosome at the 3' end. Here, we report that ribosome-associated Asc1/RACK1 is required for the endonucleolytic cleavage of nonstop mRNA by stalled ribosome at the 3' end of mRNA in dom34Δ mutant cells. Asc1/RACK1 facilitates degradation of truncated GFP-Rz mRNA in the absence of Dom34 and exosome-dependent decay. Asc1/RACK1 is required for the sequential endonucleolytic cleavages by the stalled ribosome in the dom34Δ mutant, depending on its ribosome-binding activity. The levels of peptidyl-tRNA derived from nonstop mRNA were elevated in dom34Δasc1Δ mutant cells, and overproduction of nonstop mRNA inhibited growth of mutant cells. E3 ubiquitin ligase Ltn1 degrades the arrest products from truncated GFP-Rz mRNA in dom34Δ and dom34Δasc1Δ mutant cells, and Asc1/RACK1 represses the levels of substrates for Ltn1-dependent degradation. These indicate that ribosome-associated Asc1/RACK1 facilitates endonucleolytic cleavage of nonstop mRNA by stalled ribosomes and represses the levels of aberrant products even in the absence of Dom34. We propose that Asc1/RACK1 acts as a fail-safe in quality control for nonstop mRNA. PMID:27312062

  16. Ribosome-associated Asc1/RACK1 is required for endonucleolytic cleavage induced by stalled ribosome at the 3′ end of nonstop mRNA

    PubMed Central

    Ikeuchi, Ken; Inada, Toshifumi

    2016-01-01

    Dom34-Hbs1 stimulates degradation of aberrant mRNAs lacking termination codons by dissociating ribosomes stalled at the 3′ ends, and plays crucial roles in Nonstop Decay (NSD) and No-Go Decay (NGD). In the dom34Δ mutant, nonstop mRNA is degraded by sequential endonucleolytic cleavages induced by a stalled ribosome at the 3′ end. Here, we report that ribosome-associated Asc1/RACK1 is required for the endonucleolytic cleavage of nonstop mRNA by stalled ribosome at the 3′ end of mRNA in dom34Δ mutant cells. Asc1/RACK1 facilitates degradation of truncated GFP-Rz mRNA in the absence of Dom34 and exosome-dependent decay. Asc1/RACK1 is required for the sequential endonucleolytic cleavages by the stalled ribosome in the dom34Δ mutant, depending on its ribosome-binding activity. The levels of peptidyl-tRNA derived from nonstop mRNA were elevated in dom34Δasc1Δ mutant cells, and overproduction of nonstop mRNA inhibited growth of mutant cells. E3 ubiquitin ligase Ltn1 degrades the arrest products from truncated GFP-Rz mRNA in dom34Δ and dom34Δasc1Δ mutant cells, and Asc1/RACK1 represses the levels of substrates for Ltn1-dependent degradation. These indicate that ribosome-associated Asc1/RACK1 facilitates endonucleolytic cleavage of nonstop mRNA by stalled ribosomes and represses the levels of aberrant products even in the absence of Dom34. We propose that Asc1/RACK1 acts as a fail-safe in quality control for nonstop mRNA. PMID:27312062

  17. Salt Effects on the Thermodynamics of a Frameshifting RNA Pseudoknot under Tension.

    PubMed

    Hori, Naoto; Denesyuk, Natalia A; Thirumalai, D

    2016-07-17

    Because of the potential link between -1 programmed ribosomal frameshifting and response of a pseudoknot (PK) RNA to force, a number of single-molecule pulling experiments have been performed on PKs to decipher the mechanism of programmed ribosomal frameshifting. Motivated in part by these experiments, we performed simulations using a coarse-grained model of RNA to describe the response of a PK over a range of mechanical forces (fs) and monovalent salt concentrations (Cs). The coarse-grained simulations quantitatively reproduce the multistep thermal melting observed in experiments, thus validating our model. The free energy changes obtained in simulations are in excellent agreement with experiments. By varying f and C, we calculated the phase diagram that shows a sequence of structural transitions, populating distinct intermediate states. As f and C are changed, the stem-loop tertiary interactions rupture first, followed by unfolding of the 3'-end hairpin (I⇌F). Finally, the 5'-end hairpin unravels, producing an extended state (E⇌I). A theoretical analysis of the phase boundaries shows that the critical force for rupture scales as (logCm)(α) with α=1(0.5) for E⇌I (I⇌F) transition. This relation is used to obtain the preferential ion-RNA interaction coefficient, which can be quantitatively measured in single-molecule experiments, as done previously for DNA hairpins. A by-product of our work is the suggestion that the frameshift efficiency is likely determined by the stability of the 5'-end hairpin that the ribosome first encounters during translation. PMID:27315694

  18. A novel NF1 frame-shift mutation (c.702_703delGT) in a Chinese family with neurofibromatosis type 1.

    PubMed

    Cai, S P; Fan, N; Chen, J; Xia, Z L; Wang, Y; Zhou, X M; Yin, Y; Wen, T L; Xia, Q J; Liu, X Y; Wang, H Y

    2014-01-01

    This study aimed to characterize the clinical features of a Chinese pedigree with neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1) and to identify mutations in the NF1 gene. In this three-generation family containing 8 members, 5 had been diagnosed with NF1 and the others were asymptomatic. All members of the family underwent complete medical examinations. Molecular genetic analyses were performed on all subjects included in the study. All exons of NF1 were amplified by polymerase chain reaction, sequenced, and compared with a reference database. Possible changes in function of the protein induced by amino acid variants were predicted by bioinformatic analysis. In this family, the 5 patients presented different clinical phenotypes, but all manifested typical café-au-lait macules. One novel frame-shift mutation, c.702_703delGT, in exon 7 of NF1 was identified in all affected family members, but not in the unaffected family members or in 102 normal controls. This mutation generates a premature stop codon at amino acid position 720. Additionally, a synonymous mutation c.702 G>A was found in 3 family members, including 2 affected and 1 normal individuals. In conclusion, our study suggests that a novel c.702_703delGT frame-shift mutation in NF1 is likely to be responsible for the pathogenesis of NF1 in this family. To the best of our knowledge, it is the first time that a c.702_703delGT mutation has been identified in a family with neurofibromatosis type 1.

  19. Novel NTRK1 Frameshift Mutation in Congenital Insensitivity to Pain With Anhidrosis.

    PubMed

    Liu, Sen; Wu, Nan; Liu, Jiaqi; Ming, Xuan; Chen, Jun; Pavelec, Derek; Su, Xinlin; Qiu, Guixing; Tian, Ye; Giampietro, Philip; Wu, Zhihong

    2015-09-01

    Congenital insensitivity to pain with anhidrosis is a rare autosomal recessive disorder. It has been reported that the defect in the NTRK1 gene encoding tropomyosin-related kinase A (TrkA) can cause congenital insensitivity to pain with anhidrosis. Nerve growth factor (NGF), the product of NGFB, mediates biological effects by binding to and activating tropomyosin-related kinase A. In addition, necdin (encoded by NDN) is also essential in nerve growth factor-tropomyosin-related kinase A pathway. We performed mutation analysis in NTRK1, NGFB, and NDN genes in a Chinese Han 17-year-old female patient with congenital insensitivity to pain with anhidrosis and her healthy family members. As a result, the patient was found to have a novel insertion in exon 7 (c.727insT) of NTRK1, which causes premature termination, and a single nucleotide polymorphism (rs2192206 G>A) in NDN. Our findings imply that the genetic variations of the nerve growth factor-tropomyosin-related kinase A pathway play an important role in congenital insensitivity to pain with anhidrosis.

  20. Slip of grip of a molecular motor on a crowded track: Modeling shift of reading frame of ribosome on RNA template

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mishra, Bhavya; Schütz, Gunter M.; Chowdhury, Debashish

    2016-06-01

    We develop a stochastic model for the programmed frameshift of ribosomes synthesizing a protein while moving along a mRNA template. Normally the reading frame of a ribosome decodes successive triplets of nucleotides on the mRNA in a step-by-step manner. We focus on the programmed shift of the ribosomal reading frame, forward or backward, by only one nucleotide which results in a fusion protein; it occurs when a ribosome temporarily loses its grip to its mRNA track. Special “slippery” sequences of nucleotides and also downstream secondary structures of the mRNA strand are believed to play key roles in programmed frameshift. Here we explore the role of an hitherto neglected parameter in regulating ‑1 programmed frameshift. Specifically, we demonstrate that the frameshift frequency can be strongly regulated also by the density of the ribosomes, all of which are engaged in simultaneous translation of the same mRNA, at and around the slippery sequence. Monte Carlo simulations support the analytical predictions obtained from a mean-field analysis of the stochastic dynamics.

  1. Slip of grip of a molecular motor on a crowded track: Modeling shift of reading frame of ribosome on RNA template

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mishra, Bhavya; Schütz, Gunter M.; Chowdhury, Debashish

    2016-06-01

    We develop a stochastic model for the programmed frameshift of ribosomes synthesizing a protein while moving along a mRNA template. Normally the reading frame of a ribosome decodes successive triplets of nucleotides on the mRNA in a step-by-step manner. We focus on the programmed shift of the ribosomal reading frame, forward or backward, by only one nucleotide which results in a fusion protein; it occurs when a ribosome temporarily loses its grip to its mRNA track. Special “slippery” sequences of nucleotides and also downstream secondary structures of the mRNA strand are believed to play key roles in programmed frameshift. Here we explore the role of an hitherto neglected parameter in regulating -1 programmed frameshift. Specifically, we demonstrate that the frameshift frequency can be strongly regulated also by the density of the ribosomes, all of which are engaged in simultaneous translation of the same mRNA, at and around the slippery sequence. Monte Carlo simulations support the analytical predictions obtained from a mean-field analysis of the stochastic dynamics.

  2. PSRP1 is not a ribosomal protein, but a ribosome-binding factor that is recycled by the ribosome-recycling factor (RRF) and elongation factor G (EF-G).

    PubMed

    Sharma, Manjuli R; Dönhöfer, Alexandra; Barat, Chandana; Marquez, Viter; Datta, Partha P; Fucini, Paola; Wilson, Daniel N; Agrawal, Rajendra K

    2010-02-01

    Plastid-specific ribosomal proteins (PSRPs) have been proposed to play roles in the light-dependent regulation of chloroplast translation. Here we demonstrate that PSRP1 is not a bona fide ribosomal protein, but rather a functional homologue of the Escherichia coli cold-shock protein pY. Three-dimensional Cryo-electron microscopic (Cryo-EM) reconstructions reveal that, like pY, PSRP1 binds within the intersubunit space of the 70S ribosome, at a site overlapping the positions of mRNA and A- and P-site tRNAs. PSRP1 induces conformational changes within ribosomal components that comprise several intersubunit bridges, including bridge B2a, thereby stabilizes the ribosome against dissociation. We find that the presence of PSRP1/pY lowers the binding of tRNA to the ribosome. Furthermore, similarly to tRNAs, PSRP1/pY is recycled from the ribosome by the concerted action of the ribosome-recycling factor (RRF) and elongation factor G (EF-G). These results suggest a novel function for EF-G and RRF in the post-stress return of PSRP1/pY-inactivated ribosomes to the actively translating pool. PMID:19965869

  3. Motion of individual ribosomes along mRNA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Visscher, Koen

    2004-11-01

    Ribosomes move along messenger RNA to translate a sequence of ribonucleotides into a corresponding sequence of amino acids that make up a protein. Efficient motion of ribosomes along the mRNA requires hydrolysis of GTP, converting chemical energy into mechanical work, like better known molecular motors such as kinesin. However, motion is just one of the many tasks of the ribosome, whereas for kinesin, motion itself is the main goal. In keeping with these functional differences, the ribosome is also much larger consisting of more than 50 proteins and with half of its mass made up of ribosomal RNA. Such structural complexity enables indirect ways of coupling GTP hydrolysis to directed motion. In order to elucidate the mechanochemical coupling in ribosomes we have developed a single-molecule assay based on using optical tweezers to record the motion of individual ribosomes along mRNA. Translation rates of 2-4 codons/s have been observed. However, when increasing the force opposing motion, we observe backward slippage of ribosomes along homopolymeric poly(U) messages. Currently, it is not clear if the motor operates in reverse or if backward motion has become completely uncoupled from GTP hydrolysis. Interestingly, force-induced backward motion is of biological relevance because of its possible role in -1 frameshifting, a mechanism used by viruses to regulate gene expression at the level of translation.

  4. A functional relationship between helix 1 and the 900 tetraloop of 16S ribosomal RNA within the bacterial ribosome.

    PubMed

    Bélanger, François; Théberge-Julien, Gabriel; Cunningham, Philip R; Brakier-Gingras, Léa

    2005-06-01

    The conserved 900 tetraloop that caps helix 27 of 16S ribosomal RNA (rRNA) interacts with helix 24 of 16S rRNA and also with helix 67 of 23S rRNA, forming the intersubunit bridge B2c, proximal to the decoding center. In previous studies, we investigated how the interaction between the 900 tetraloop and helix 24 participates in subunit association and translational fidelity. In the present study, we investigated whether the 900 tetraloop is involved in other undetected interactions with different regions of the Escherichia coli 16S rRNA. Using a genetic complementation approach, we selected mutations in 16S rRNA that compensate for a 900 tetraloop mutation, A900G, which severely impairs subunit association and translational fidelity. Mutations were randomly introduced in 16S rRNA, using either a mutagenic XL1-Red E. coli strain or an error-prone PCR strategy. Gain-offunction mutations were selected in vivo with a specialized ribosome system. Two mutations, the deletion of U12 and the U12C substitution, were thus independently selected in helix 1 of 16S rRNA. This helix is located in the vicinity of helix 27, but does not directly contact the 900 tetraloop in the crystal structures of the ribosome. Both mutations correct the subunit association and translational fidelity defects caused by the A900G mutation, revealing an unanticipated functional interaction between these two regions of 16S rRNA.

  5. The Saccharomyces cerevisiae protein Stm1p facilitates ribosome preservation during quiescence

    SciTech Connect

    Van Dyke, Natalya; Chanchorn, Ekkawit; Van Dyke, Michael W.

    2013-01-11

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Stm1p confers increased resistance to the macrolide starvation-mimic rapamycin. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Stm1p maintains 80S ribosome integrity during stationary phase-induced quiescence. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Stm1p facilitates polysome formation following quiescence exit. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Stm1p facilitates protein synthesis following quiescence exit. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Stm1p is a ribosome preservation factor under conditions of nutrient deprivation. -- Abstract: Once cells exhaust nutrients from their environment, they enter an alternative resting state known as quiescence, whereby proliferation ceases and essential nutrients are obtained through internal stores and through the catabolism of existing macromolecules and organelles. One example of this is ribophagy, the degradation of ribosomes through the process of autophagy. However, some ribosomes need to be preserved for an anticipated recovery from nutrient deprivation. We found that the ribosome-associated protein Stm1p greatly increases the quantity of 80S ribosomes present in quiescent yeast cells and that these ribosomes facilitate increased protein synthesis rates once nutrients are restored. These findings suggest that Stm1p can act as a ribosome preservation factor under conditions of nutrient deprivation and restoration.

  6. Postmortem diagnosis of Marfan syndrome in a case of sudden death due to aortic rupture: Detection of a novel FBN1 frameshift mutation.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yunyun; Chen, Shu; Wang, Rongshuai; Huang, Sizhe; Yang, Mingzhen; Liu, Liang; Liu, Qian

    2016-04-01

    To investigate the sudden death of a 36-year-old Chinese man, a medicolegal autopsy was performed, combining forensic pathological examinations and genetic sequencing analysis to diagnose the cause of death. Genomic DNA samples were extracted from blood and subjected to high-throughput sequencing. Major findings included a dilated aortic root with a ruptured and dissected aorta and consequent tamponade of the pericardial sac. Moreover, arachnodactyly and other skeletal deformities were noted. By sequencing the fibrillin-1 gene (FBN1), five genetic variations were found, including four previously known single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and a novel frameshift mutation, leading to the diagnosis of Marfan syndrome. The frameshift mutation (c.4921delG, p.glu1641llysFsX9) detected in exon 40 led to a stop codon after the next 8 amino acids. The four SNPs included a splice site mutation (c.3464-5 G>A, rs11853943), a synonymous mutation (p.Asn625Asn, rs25458), and two missense mutations (p.Pro1148Ala, rs140598; p.Cys472Tyr, rs4775765). Genetic screening was recommended for the relatives as it was reported that the father and brother of the deceased had died at the ages of 40 and 25, respectively, from sudden cardiac failure. The son of the deceased lacked the relevant mutations. This report emphasizes the important contribution of medicolegal postmortem analysis on the molecular pathogenesis study of Marfan syndrome and early diagnosis of at-risk relatives.

  7. GATA1 and PU.1 Bind to Ribosomal Protein Genes in Erythroid Cells: Implications for Ribosomopathies

    PubMed Central

    Amanatiadou, Elsa P.; Papadopoulos, Giorgio L.; Strouboulis, John; Vizirianakis, Ioannis S.

    2015-01-01

    The clear connection between ribosome biogenesis dysfunction and specific hematopoiesis-related disorders prompted us to examine the role of critical lineage-specific transcription factors in the transcriptional regulation of ribosomal protein (RP) genes during terminal erythroid differentiation. By applying EMSA and ChIP methodologies in mouse erythroleukemia cells we show that GATA1 and PU.1 bind in vitro and in vivo the proximal promoter region of the RPS19 gene which is frequently mutated in Diamond-Blackfan Anemia. Moreover, ChIPseq data analysis also demonstrates that several RP genes are enriched as potential GATA1 and PU.1 gene targets in mouse and human erythroid cells, with GATA1 binding showing an association with higher ribosomal protein gene expression levels during terminal erythroid differentiation in human and mouse. Our results suggest that RP gene expression and hence balanced ribosome biosynthesis may be specifically and selectively regulated by lineage specific transcription factors during hematopoiesis, a finding which may be clinically relevant to ribosomopathies. PMID:26447946

  8. GATA1 and PU.1 Bind to Ribosomal Protein Genes in Erythroid Cells: Implications for Ribosomopathies.

    PubMed

    Amanatiadou, Elsa P; Papadopoulos, Giorgio L; Strouboulis, John; Vizirianakis, Ioannis S

    2015-01-01

    The clear connection between ribosome biogenesis dysfunction and specific hematopoiesis-related disorders prompted us to examine the role of critical lineage-specific transcription factors in the transcriptional regulation of ribosomal protein (RP) genes during terminal erythroid differentiation. By applying EMSA and ChIP methodologies in mouse erythroleukemia cells we show that GATA1 and PU.1 bind in vitro and in vivo the proximal promoter region of the RPS19 gene which is frequently mutated in Diamond-Blackfan Anemia. Moreover, ChIPseq data analysis also demonstrates that several RP genes are enriched as potential GATA1 and PU.1 gene targets in mouse and human erythroid cells, with GATA1 binding showing an association with higher ribosomal protein gene expression levels during terminal erythroid differentiation in human and mouse. Our results suggest that RP gene expression and hence balanced ribosome biosynthesis may be specifically and selectively regulated by lineage specific transcription factors during hematopoiesis, a finding which may be clinically relevant to ribosomopathies. PMID:26447946

  9. Frameshift mutation of a histone methylation-related gene SETD1B and its regional heterogeneity in gastric and colorectal cancers with high microsatellite instability.

    PubMed

    Choi, Youn Jin; Oh, Hye Rim; Choi, Mi Ryoung; Gwak, Min; An, Chang Hyeok; Chung, Yeun Jun; Yoo, Nam Jin; Lee, Sug Hyung

    2014-08-01

    Histone methyltransferase (HMT), which catalyzes a histone methylation, is frequently altered in cancers at mutation and expression levels. The aims of this study were to explore whether SETD1B, SETDB2, and SETD2, SET domain-containing HMT genes, are mutated and expressionally altered in gastric (GC) and colorectal cancers (CRC). In a public database, we found that SETD1B, SETDB2, and SETD2 had mononucleotide repeats in coding sequences that might be mutation targets in cancers with microsatellite instability (MSI). We analyzed the mutations in 76 GCs and 93 CRCs and found SETD1B (38.7% of GC and 35.6% of CRC with high MSI [MSI-H]), SETDB2 (11.1% of CRC with MSI-H), and SETD2 frameshift mutations (6.7% of CRC with MSI-H). These mutations were not found in stable MSI/low MSI. In addition, we analyzed intratumoral heterogeneity (ITH) of SETD1B mutation in 6 CRCs and found that 2 CRCs harbored regional ITH of SETD1B. We also analyzed SETD1B expression in GC and CRC by immunohistochemistry. Loss of SETD1B expression was identified in 15% to 55% of the GC and CRC with respect to the MSI status. Of note, the loss of expression was more common in those with SETD1B mutations than those with wild-type SETD1B. We identified alterations of SET domain-containing HMT at various levels (frameshift mutations, genetic ITH, and expression loss), which together might play a role in tumorigenesis of GC and CRC with MSI-H. Our data suggest that mutation analysis in multiple regions is needed for a better evaluation of mutation status in CRC with MSI-H.

  10. Whole-exome sequencing of a patient with severe and complex hemostatic abnormalities reveals a possible contributing frameshift mutation in C3AR1

    PubMed Central

    Leinøe, Eva; Nielsen, Ove Juul; Jønson, Lars; Rossing, Maria

    2016-01-01

    The increasing availability of genome-wide analysis has made it possible to rapidly sequence the exome of patients with undiagnosed or unresolved medical conditions. Here, we present the case of a 64-yr-old male patient with schistocytes in the peripheral blood smear and a complex and life-threatening coagulation disorder causing recurrent venous thromboembolic events, severe thrombocytopenia, and subdural hematomas. Whole-exome sequencing revealed a frameshift mutation (C3AR1 c.355-356dup, p.Asp119Alafs*19) resulting in a premature stop codon in C3AR1 (Complement Component 3a Receptor 1). Based on this finding, atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome was suspected because of a genetic predisposition, and a targeted treatment regime with eculizumab was initiated. Life-threatening hemostatic abnormalities would most likely have persisted had it not been for the implementation of whole-exome sequencing in this particular clinical setting. PMID:27551680

  11. Whole-exome sequencing of a patient with severe and complex hemostatic abnormalities reveals a possible contributing frameshift mutation in C3AR1.

    PubMed

    Leinøe, Eva; Nielsen, Ove Juul; Jønson, Lars; Rossing, Maria

    2016-07-01

    The increasing availability of genome-wide analysis has made it possible to rapidly sequence the exome of patients with undiagnosed or unresolved medical conditions. Here, we present the case of a 64-yr-old male patient with schistocytes in the peripheral blood smear and a complex and life-threatening coagulation disorder causing recurrent venous thromboembolic events, severe thrombocytopenia, and subdural hematomas. Whole-exome sequencing revealed a frameshift mutation (C3AR1 c.355-356dup, p.Asp119Alafs*19) resulting in a premature stop codon in C3AR1 (Complement Component 3a Receptor 1). Based on this finding, atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome was suspected because of a genetic predisposition, and a targeted treatment regime with eculizumab was initiated. Life-threatening hemostatic abnormalities would most likely have persisted had it not been for the implementation of whole-exome sequencing in this particular clinical setting. PMID:27551680

  12. A frameshift mutation results in a truncated nonfunctional carboxyl-terminal pro alpha 1(I) propeptide of type I collagen in osteogenesis imperfecta.

    PubMed

    Bateman, J F; Lamande, S R; Dahl, H H; Chan, D; Mascara, T; Cole, W G

    1989-07-01

    A codon frameshift mutation caused by a single base (U) insertion after base pair 4088 of prepro alpha 1(I) mRNA of type I procollagen was identified in a baby with lethal perinatal osteogenesis imperfecta. The mutation was identified in fibroblast RNA by a new method that allows the direct detection of mismatched bases by chemical modification and cleavage in heteroduplexes formed between mRNA and control cDNA probes. The region of mismatches was specifically amplified by the polymerase chain reaction and sequenced. The heterozygous mutation in the amplified cDNA most likely resulted from a T insertion in exon 49 of COL1A1. The frameshift resulted in a truncated pro alpha 1(I) carboxyl-terminal propeptide in which the amino acid sequence was abnormal from Val1146 to the carboxyl terminus. The propeptide lacked Asn1187, which normally carries an N-linked oligosaccharide unit, and was more basic than the normal propeptide. The distribution of cysteines was altered and the mutant propeptide was unable to form normal interchain disulfide bonds. Some of the mutant pro alpha 1(I)' chains were incorporated into type I procollagen molecules but resulted in abnormal helix formation with over-hydroxylation of lysine residues, increased degradation, and poor secretion. Only normal type I collagen was incorporated into the extracellular matrix in vivo resulting in a tissue type I collagen content approximately 20% of that of control (Bateman, J. F., Chan, D., Mascara, T., Rogers, J. G., and Cole, W. G. (1986) Biochem. J. 240, 699-708).

  13. Maize reas1 Mutant Stimulates Ribosome Use Efficiency and Triggers Distinct Transcriptional and Translational Responses1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Qi, Weiwei; Zhu, Jie; Wu, Qiao; Wang, Qun; Li, Xia; Yao, Dongsheng; Jin, Ying; Wang, Gang; Wang, Guifeng

    2016-01-01

    Ribosome biogenesis is a fundamental cellular process in all cells. Impaired ribosome biogenesis causes developmental defects; however, its molecular and cellular bases are not fully understood. We cloned a gene responsible for a maize (Zea mays) small seed mutant, dek* (for defective kernel), and found that it encodes Ribosome export associated1 (ZmReas1). Reas1 is an AAA-ATPase that controls 60S ribosome export from the nucleus to the cytoplasm after ribosome maturation. dek* is a weak mutant allele with decreased Reas1 function. In dek* cells, mature 60S ribosome subunits are reduced in the nucleus and cytoplasm, but the proportion of actively translating polyribosomes in cytosol is significantly increased. Reduced phosphorylation of eukaryotic initiation factor 2α and the increased elongation factor 1α level indicate an enhancement of general translational efficiency in dek* cells. The mutation also triggers dramatic changes in differentially transcribed genes and differentially translated RNAs. Discrepancy was observed between differentially transcribed genes and differentially translated RNAs, indicating distinct cellular responses at transcription and translation levels to the stress of defective ribosome processing. DNA replication and nucleosome assembly-related gene expression are selectively suppressed at the translational level, resulting in inhibited cell growth and proliferation in dek* cells. This study provides insight into cellular responses due to impaired ribosome biogenesis. PMID:26645456

  14. Architecture of the Rix1-Rea1 checkpoint machinery during pre-60S-ribosome remodeling.

    PubMed

    Barrio-Garcia, Clara; Thoms, Matthias; Flemming, Dirk; Kater, Lukas; Berninghausen, Otto; Baßler, Jochen; Beckmann, Roland; Hurt, Ed

    2016-01-01

    Ribosome synthesis is catalyzed by ∼200 assembly factors, which facilitate efficient production of mature ribosomes. Here, we determined the cryo-EM structure of a Saccharomyces cerevisiae nucleoplasmic pre-60S particle containing the dynein-related 550-kDa Rea1 AAA(+) ATPase and the Rix1 subcomplex. This particle differs from its preceding state, the early Arx1 particle, by two massive structural rearrangements: an ∼180° rotation of the 5S ribonucleoprotein complex and the central protuberance (CP) rRNA helices, and the removal of the 'foot' structure from the 3' end of the 5.8S rRNA. Progression from the Arx1 to the Rix1 particle was blocked by mutational perturbation of the Rix1-Rea1 interaction but not by a dominant-lethal Rea1 AAA(+) ATPase-ring mutant. After remodeling, the Rix1 subcomplex and Rea1 become suitably positioned to sense correct structural maturation of the CP, which allows unidirectional progression toward mature ribosomes. PMID:26619264

  15. Architecture of the Rix1-Rea1 checkpoint machinery during pre-60S-ribosome remodeling.

    PubMed

    Barrio-Garcia, Clara; Thoms, Matthias; Flemming, Dirk; Kater, Lukas; Berninghausen, Otto; Baßler, Jochen; Beckmann, Roland; Hurt, Ed

    2016-01-01

    Ribosome synthesis is catalyzed by ∼200 assembly factors, which facilitate efficient production of mature ribosomes. Here, we determined the cryo-EM structure of a Saccharomyces cerevisiae nucleoplasmic pre-60S particle containing the dynein-related 550-kDa Rea1 AAA(+) ATPase and the Rix1 subcomplex. This particle differs from its preceding state, the early Arx1 particle, by two massive structural rearrangements: an ∼180° rotation of the 5S ribonucleoprotein complex and the central protuberance (CP) rRNA helices, and the removal of the 'foot' structure from the 3' end of the 5.8S rRNA. Progression from the Arx1 to the Rix1 particle was blocked by mutational perturbation of the Rix1-Rea1 interaction but not by a dominant-lethal Rea1 AAA(+) ATPase-ring mutant. After remodeling, the Rix1 subcomplex and Rea1 become suitably positioned to sense correct structural maturation of the CP, which allows unidirectional progression toward mature ribosomes.

  16. Case Report: Whole exome sequencing reveals a novel frameshift deletion mutation p.G2254fs in COL7A1 associated with autosomal recessive dystrophic epidermolysis bullosa

    PubMed Central

    Karuthedath Vellarikkal, Shamsudheen; Jayarajan, Rijith; Verma, Ankit; Nair, Sreelata; Ravi, Rowmika; Senthivel, Vigneshwar; Sivasubbu, Sridhar; Scaria, Vinod

    2016-01-01

    Dystrophic epidermolysis bullosa simplex (DEB) is a phenotypically diverse inherited skin fragility disorder. It is majorly manifested by appearance of epidermal bullae upon friction caused either by physical or environmental trauma. The phenotypic manifestations also include appearance of milia, scarring all over the body and nail dystrophy. DEB can be inherited in a recessive or dominant form and the recessive form of DEB (RDEB) is more severe. In the present study, we identify a novel p.G2254fs mutation in COL7A1 gene causing a sporadic case of RDEB by whole exome sequencing (WES). Apart from adding a novel frameshift Collagen VII mutation to the repertoire of known mutations reported in the disease, to the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of a genetically characterized case of DEB from India. PMID:27408687

  17. A novel COL4A1 frameshift mutation in familial kidney disease: the importance of the C-terminal NC1 domain of type IV collagen

    PubMed Central

    Gale, Daniel P.; Oygar, D. Deren; Lin, Fujun; Oygar, P. Derin; Khan, Nadia; Connor, Thomas M.F.; Lapsley, Marta; Maxwell, Patrick H.; Neild, Guy H.

    2016-01-01

    Background Hereditary microscopic haematuria often segregates with mutations of COL4A3, COL4A4 or COL4A5 but in half of families a gene is not identified. We investigated a Cypriot family with autosomal dominant microscopic haematuria with renal failure and kidney cysts. Methods We used genome-wide linkage analysis, whole exome sequencing and cosegregation analyses. Results We identified a novel frameshift mutation, c.4611_4612insG:p.T1537fs, in exon 49 of COL4A1. This mutation predicts truncation of the protein with disruption of the C-terminal part of the NC1 domain. We confirmed its presence in 20 family members, 17 with confirmed haematuria, 5 of whom also had stage 4 or 5 chronic kidney disease. Eleven family members exhibited kidney cysts (55% of those with the mutation), but muscle cramps or cerebral aneurysms were not observed and serum creatine kinase was normal in all individuals tested. Conclusions Missense mutations of COL4A1 that encode the CB3 [IV] segment of the triple helical domain (exons 24 and 25) are associated with HANAC syndrome (hereditary angiopathy, nephropathy, aneurysms and cramps). Missense mutations of COL4A1 that disrupt the NC1 domain are associated with antenatal cerebral haemorrhage and porencephaly, but not kidney disease. Our findings extend the spectrum of COL4A1 mutations linked with renal disease and demonstrate that the highly conserved C-terminal part of the NC1 domain of the α1 chain of type IV collagen is important in the integrity of glomerular basement membrane in humans. PMID:27190376

  18. Hrr25/CK1δ-directed release of Ltv1 from pre-40S ribosomes is necessary for ribosome assembly and cell growth

    PubMed Central

    Ghalei, Homa; Schaub, Franz X.; Doherty, Joanne R.; Noguchi, Yoshihiko; Roush, William R.; Cleveland, John L.; Stroupe, M. Elizabeth

    2015-01-01

    Casein kinase 1δ/ε (CK1δ/ε) and their yeast homologue Hrr25 are essential for cell growth. Further, CK1δ is overexpressed in several malignancies, and CK1δ inhibitors have shown promise in several preclinical animal studies. However, the substrates of Hrr25 and CK1δ/ε that are necessary for cell growth and survival are unknown. We show that Hrr25 is essential for ribosome assembly, where it phosphorylates the assembly factor Ltv1, which causes its release from nascent 40S subunits and allows subunit maturation. Hrr25 inactivation or expression of a nonphosphorylatable Ltv1 variant blocked Ltv1 release in vitro and in vivo, and prevented entry into the translation-like quality control cycle. Conversely, phosphomimetic Ltv1 variants rescued viability after Hrr25 depletion. Finally, Ltv1 knockdown in human breast cancer cells impaired apoptosis induced by CK1δ/ε inhibitors, establishing that the antiproliferative activity of these inhibitors is due, at least in part, to disruption of ribosome assembly. These findings validate the ribosome assembly pathway as a novel target for the development of anticancer therapeutics. PMID:25778921

  19. Insertion of the Biogenesis Factor Rei1 Probes the Ribosomal Tunnel during 60S Maturation.

    PubMed

    Greber, Basil Johannes; Gerhardy, Stefan; Leitner, Alexander; Leibundgut, Marc; Salem, Michèle; Boehringer, Daniel; Leulliot, Nicolas; Aebersold, Ruedi; Panse, Vikram Govind; Ban, Nenad

    2016-01-14

    Eukaryotic ribosome biogenesis depends on several hundred assembly factors to produce functional 40S and 60S ribosomal subunits. The final phase of 60S subunit biogenesis is cytoplasmic maturation, which includes the proofreading of functional centers of the 60S subunit and the release of several ribosome biogenesis factors. We report the cryo-electron microscopy (cryo-EM) structure of the yeast 60S subunit in complex with the biogenesis factors Rei1, Arx1, and Alb1 at 3.4 Å resolution. In addition to the network of interactions formed by Alb1, the structure reveals a mechanism for ensuring the integrity of the ribosomal polypeptide exit tunnel. Arx1 probes the entire set of inner-ring proteins surrounding the tunnel exit, and the C terminus of Rei1 is deeply inserted into the ribosomal tunnel, where it forms specific contacts along almost its entire length. We provide genetic and biochemical evidence that failure to insert the C terminus of Rei1 precludes subsequent steps of 60S maturation. PMID:26709046

  20. Both endonucleolytic and exonucleolytic cleavage mediate ITS1 removal during human ribosomal RNA processing.

    PubMed

    Sloan, Katherine E; Mattijssen, Sandy; Lebaron, Simon; Tollervey, David; Pruijn, Ger J M; Watkins, Nicholas J

    2013-03-01

    Human ribosome production is up-regulated during tumorogenesis and is defective in many genetic diseases (ribosomopathies). We have undertaken a detailed analysis of human precursor ribosomal RNA (pre-rRNA) processing because surprisingly little is known about this important pathway. Processing in internal transcribed spacer 1 (ITS1) is a key step that separates the rRNA components of the large and small ribosomal subunits. We report that this was initiated by endonuclease cleavage, which required large subunit biogenesis factors. This was followed by 3' to 5' exonucleolytic processing by RRP6 and the exosome, an enzyme complex not previously linked to ITS1 removal. In contrast, RNA interference-mediated knockdown of the endoribonuclease MRP did not result in a clear defect in ITS1 processing. Despite the apparently high evolutionary conservation of the pre-rRNA processing pathway and ribosome synthesis factors, each of these features of human ITS1 processing is distinct from those in budding yeast. These results also provide significant insight into the links between ribosomopathies and ribosome production in human cells. PMID:23439679

  1. The Drug Diazaborine Blocks Ribosome Biogenesis by Inhibiting the AAA-ATPase Drg1*

    PubMed Central

    Loibl, Mathias; Klein, Isabella; Prattes, Michael; Schmidt, Claudia; Kappel, Lisa; Zisser, Gertrude; Gungl, Anna; Krieger, Elmar; Pertschy, Brigitte; Bergler, Helmut

    2014-01-01

    The drug diazaborine is the only known inhibitor of ribosome biogenesis and specifically blocks large subunit formation in eukaryotic cells. However, the target of this drug and the mechanism of inhibition were unknown. Here we identify the AAA-ATPase Drg1 as a target of diazaborine. Inhibitor binding into the second AAA domain of Drg1 requires ATP loading and results in inhibition of ATP hydrolysis in this site. As a consequence the physiological activity of Drg1, i.e. the release of Rlp24 from pre-60S particles, is blocked, and further progression of cytoplasmic preribosome maturation is prevented. Our results identify the first target of an inhibitor of ribosome biogenesis and provide the mechanism of inhibition of a key step in large ribosomal subunit formation. PMID:24371142

  2. Molecular characterization of WFS1 in an Iranian family with Wolfram syndrome reveals a novel frameshift mutation associated with early symptoms.

    PubMed

    Sobhani, Maryam; Tabatabaiefar, Mohammad Amin; Rajab, Asadollah; Kajbafzadeh, Abdol-Mohammad; Noori-Daloii, Mohammad Reza

    2013-10-10

    Wolfram syndrome (WS) is a rare autosomal recessive neurodegenerative disorder that represents a likely source of childhood diabetes especially among countries in the consanguinity belt. The main responsible gene is WFS1 for which over one hundred mutations have been reported from different ethnic groups. The aim of this study was to identify the molecular etiology of WS and to perform a possible genotype-phenotype correlation in Iranian kindred. An Iranian family with two patients was clinically studied and WS was suspected. Genetic linkage analysis via 5 STR markers was carried out. For identification of mutations, DNA sequencing of WFS1 including all the exons, exon-intron boundaries and the promoter was performed. Linkage analysis indicated linkage to the WFS1 region. After DNA sequencing of WFS1, one novel pathogenic mutation, which causes frameshift alteration c.2177_2178insTCTTC (or c.2173_2177dupTCTTC) in exon eight, was found. The genotype-phenotype correlation analysis suggests that the presence of the homozygous mutation may be associated with early onset of disease symptoms. This study stresses the necessity of considering the molecular analysis of WFS1 in childhood diabetes with some symptoms of WS.

  3. PTRF/Cavin-1 promotes efficient ribosomal RNA transcription in response to metabolic challenges

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Libin; Pilch, Paul F

    2016-01-01

    Ribosomal RNA transcription mediated by RNA polymerase I represents the rate-limiting step in ribosome biogenesis. In eukaryotic cells, nutrients and growth factors regulate ribosomal RNA transcription through various key factors coupled to cell growth. We show here in mature adipocytes, ribosomal transcription can be acutely regulated in response to metabolic challenges. This acute response is mediated by PTRF (polymerase I transcription and release factor, also known as cavin-1), which has previously been shown to play a critical role in caveolae formation. The caveolae–independent rDNA transcriptional role of PTRF not only explains the lipodystrophy phenotype observed in PTRF deficient mice and humans, but also highlights its crucial physiological role in maintaining adipocyte allostasis. Multiple post-translational modifications of PTRF provide mechanistic bases for its regulation. The role of PTRF in ribosomal transcriptional efficiency is likely relevant to many additional physiological situations of cell growth and organismal metabolism. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.17508.001 PMID:27528195

  4. The essential function of Rrs1 in ribosome biogenesis is conserved in budding and fission yeasts.

    PubMed

    Wan, Kun; Kawara, Haruka; Yamamoto, Tomoyuki; Kume, Kazunori; Yabuki, Yukari; Goshima, Tetsuya; Kitamura, Kenji; Ueno, Masaru; Kanai, Muneyoshi; Hirata, Dai; Funato, Kouichi; Mizuta, Keiko

    2015-09-01

    The Rrs1 protein plays an essential role in the biogenesis of 60S ribosomal subunits in budding yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae). Here, we examined whether the fission yeast (Schizosaccharomyces pombe) homologue of Rrs1 also plays a role in ribosome biogenesis. To this end, we constructed two temperature-sensitive fission yeast strains, rrs1-D14/22G and rrs1-L51P, which had amino acid substitutions corresponding to those of the previously characterized budding yeast rrs1-84 (D22/30G) and rrs1-124 (L61P) strains, respectively. The fission yeast mutants exhibited severe defects in growth and 60S ribosomal subunit biogenesis at high temperatures. In addition, expression of the Rrs1 protein of fission yeast suppressed the growth defects of the budding yeast rrs1 mutants at high temperatures. Yeast two-hybrid analyses revealed that the interactions of Rrs1 with the Rfp2 and Ebp2 proteins were conserved in budding and fission yeasts. These results suggest that the essential function of Rrs1 in ribosome biogenesis may be conserved in budding and fission yeasts.

  5. Runx1 deficiency decreases ribosome biogenesis and confers stress resistance to hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells

    PubMed Central

    Cai, Xiongwei; Gao, Long; Teng, Li; Ge, Jingping; Oo, Zaw Min; Kumar, Ashish R.; Gilliland, D. Gary; Mason, Philip J.; Tan, Kai; Speck, Nancy A.

    2015-01-01

    Summary The transcription factor RUNX1 is frequently mutated in myelodysplastic syndrome and leukemia. RUNX1 mutations can be early events, creating pre-leukemic stem cells that expand in the bone marrow. Here we show, counter-intuitively, that Runx1 deficient hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSPCs) have a slow growth, low biosynthetic, small cell phenotype and markedly reduced ribosome biogenesis (Ribi). The reduced Ribi involved decreased levels of rRNA and many mRNAs encoding ribosome proteins. Runx1 appears to directly regulate Ribi; Runx1 is enriched on the promoters of genes encoding ribosome proteins, and binds the ribosomal DNA repeats. Runx1 deficient HSPCs have lower p53 levels, reduced apoptosis, an attenuated unfolded protein response, and accordingly are resistant to genotoxic and endoplasmic reticulum stress. The low biosynthetic activity and corresponding stress resistance provides a selective advantage to Runx1 deficient HSPCs, allowing them to expand in the bone marrow and outcompete normal HSPCs. PMID:26165925

  6. La Autoantigen Induces Ribosome Binding Protein 1 (RRBP1) Expression through Internal Ribosome Entry Site (IRES)-Mediated Translation during Cellular Stress Condition

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Wenqing; Li, Qi; Zhu, Ruiyu; Jin, Jian

    2016-01-01

    The function of ribosome binding protein 1 (RRBP1) is regulating the transportation and secretion of some intracellular proteins in mammalian cells. Transcription of RRBP1 is induced by various cytokines. However, few studies focused on the process of RRPB1 mRNA translation. The RRBP1 mRNA has a long 5′ untranslated region that potentially formed a stable secondary structure. In this study, we show that the 5′ UTR of RRBP1 mRNA contains an internal ribosome entry site (IRES). Moreover, the RRBP1 expression is induced by chemotherapeutic drug paclitaxel or adriamycin in human hepatocellular carcinoma cells and accompanied with the increased expression of La autoantigen (La), which binds to RRBP1 IRES element and facilitates translation initiation. Interestingly, we found IRES-mediated RRBP1 translation is also activated during serum-starvation condition which can induce cytoplasmic localization of La. After mapping the entire RRBP1 5′ UTR, we determine the core IRES activity is located between nt-237 and -58. Furthermore, two apical GARR loops within the functional RRBP1 IRES elements may be important for La binding. These results strongly suggest an important role for IRES-dependent translation of RRBP1 mRNA in hepatocellular carcinoma cells during cellular stress conditions. PMID:27447629

  7. La Autoantigen Induces Ribosome Binding Protein 1 (RRBP1) Expression through Internal Ribosome Entry Site (IRES)-Mediated Translation during Cellular Stress Condition.

    PubMed

    Gao, Wenqing; Li, Qi; Zhu, Ruiyu; Jin, Jian

    2016-01-01

    The function of ribosome binding protein 1 (RRBP1) is regulating the transportation and secretion of some intracellular proteins in mammalian cells. Transcription of RRBP1 is induced by various cytokines. However, few studies focused on the process of RRPB1 mRNA translation. The RRBP1 mRNA has a long 5' untranslated region that potentially formed a stable secondary structure. In this study, we show that the 5' UTR of RRBP1 mRNA contains an internal ribosome entry site (IRES). Moreover, the RRBP1 expression is induced by chemotherapeutic drug paclitaxel or adriamycin in human hepatocellular carcinoma cells and accompanied with the increased expression of La autoantigen (La), which binds to RRBP1 IRES element and facilitates translation initiation. Interestingly, we found IRES-mediated RRBP1 translation is also activated during serum-starvation condition which can induce cytoplasmic localization of La. After mapping the entire RRBP1 5' UTR, we determine the core IRES activity is located between nt-237 and -58. Furthermore, two apical GARR loops within the functional RRBP1 IRES elements may be important for La binding. These results strongly suggest an important role for IRES-dependent translation of RRBP1 mRNA in hepatocellular carcinoma cells during cellular stress conditions. PMID:27447629

  8. Resistance in the Ribosome: RUNX1, pre-LSCs, and HSPCs

    PubMed Central

    Ito, Kyoko; Ito, Keisuke

    2015-01-01

    Therapeutic targeting of pre-leukemic stem cells (pre-LSCs) may be a viable strategy to eradicate residual disease and prevent leukemia relapse. Now in Cell Stem Cell, Cai et al. (2015) show that loss-of-function mutations in RUNX1 reduce ribosome biogenesis and provide pre-LSCs a selective advantage over normal hematopoietic cells through increased stress resistance. PMID:26253196

  9. The nucleolar GTPase nucleostemin-like 1 plays a role in plant growth and senescence by modulating ribosome biogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Jeon, Young; Park, Yong-Joon; Cho, Hui Kyung; Jung, Hyun Ju; Ahn, Tae-Kyu; Kang, Hunseung; Pai, Hyun-Sook

    2015-01-01

    Nucleostemin is a nucleolar GTP-binding protein that is involved in stem cell proliferation, embryonic development, and ribosome biogenesis in mammals. Plant nucleostemin-like 1 (NSN1) plays a role in embryogenesis, and apical and floral meristem development. In this study, a nucleolar function of NSN1 in the regulation of ribosome biogenesis was identified. Green fluorescent protein (GFP)-fused NSN1 localized to the nucleolus, which was primarily determined by its N-terminal domain. Recombinant NSN1 and its N-terminal domain (NSN1-N) bound to RNA in vitro. Recombinant NSN1 expressed GTPase activity in vitro. NSN1 silencing in Arabidopsis thaliana and Nicotiana benthamiana led to growth retardation and premature senescence. NSN1 interacted with Pescadillo and EBNA1 binding protein 2 (EBP2), which are nucleolar proteins involved in ribosome biogenesis, and with several ribosomal proteins. NSN1, NSN1-N, and EBP2 co-fractionated primarily with the 60S ribosomal large subunit in vivo. Depletion of NSN1 delayed 25S rRNA maturation and biogenesis of the 60S ribosome subunit, and repressed global translation. NSN1-deficient plants exhibited premature leaf senescence, excessive accumulation of reactive oxygen species, and senescence-related gene expression. Taken together, these results suggest that NSN1 plays a crucial role in plant growth and senescence by modulating ribosome biogenesis. PMID:26163696

  10. Direct interaction of the N-terminal domain of ribosomal protein S1 with protein S2 in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Byrgazov, Konstantin; Manoharadas, Salim; Kaberdina, Anna C; Vesper, Oliver; Moll, Isabella

    2012-01-01

    Despite of the high resolution structure available for the E. coli ribosome, hitherto the structure and localization of the essential ribosomal protein S1 on the 30 S subunit still remains to be elucidated. It was previously reported that protein S1 binds to the ribosome via protein-protein interaction at the two N-terminal domains. Moreover, protein S2 was shown to be required for binding of protein S1 to the ribosome. Here, we present evidence that the N-terminal domain of S1 (amino acids 1-106; S1(106)) is necessary and sufficient for the interaction with protein S2 as well as for ribosome binding. We show that over production of protein S1(106) affects E. coli growth by displacing native protein S1 from its binding pocket on the ribosome. In addition, our data reveal that the coiled-coil domain of protein S2 (S2α(2)) is sufficient to allow protein S1 to bind to the ribosome. Taken together, these data uncover the crucial elements required for the S1/S2 interaction, which is pivotal for translation initiation on canonical mRNAs in gram-negative bacteria. The results are discussed in terms of a model wherein the S1/S2 interaction surface could represent a possible target to modulate the selectivity of the translational machinery and thereby alter the translational program under distinct conditions.

  11. A cis-eQTL of HLA-DRB1 and a frameshift mutation of MICA contribute to the pattern of association of HLA alleles with cervical cancer.

    PubMed

    Chen, Dan; Gyllensten, Ulf

    2014-04-01

    The association of classic human leukocyte antigen (HLA) alleles with risk of cervical cancer has been extensively studied, and a protective effect has consistently been found for DRB1*1301, DQA1*0103, and/or DQB1*0603 (these three alleles are in perfect linkage disequilibrium [LD] and often occur on the same haplotype in Europeans), while reports have differed widely with respect to the effect of HLA-B*07, DRB1*1501, and/or DQB1*0602 (the last two alleles are also in perfect LD in Europeans). It is not clear whether the reported HLA alleles are responsible for the differences in cervical cancer susceptibility, or if functional variants at other locations within the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) region may explain the effect. In order to assess the relative contribution of both classic HLA alleles and single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) within the MHC region to cervical cancer susceptibility, we have imputed classic HLA alleles in 1034 cervical cancer patients and 3948 controls in a Swedish population for an integrated analysis. We found that the protective haplotype DRB1*1301-DQA1*0103-DQB1*0603 has a direct effect on cervical cancer and always occurs together with the C allele of a HLA-DRB1 cis-eQTL (rs9272143), which increases the expression of HLA-DRB1. The haplotype rs9272143C-DRB1*1301-DQA1*0103-DQB1*0603 conferred the strongest protection against cervical cancer (odds ratio [OR] = 0.41, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 0.32-0.52, P = 6.2 × 10(-13)). On the other hand, the associations with HLA-B*0702 and DRB1*1501-DQB1*0602 are attributable to the joint effects of both the HLA-DRB1 cis-eQTL (rs9272143) and a frameshift mutation (G inserion of rs67841474, also known as A5.1) of the MHC class I polypeptide-related sequence A gene (MICA). Variation in LD between the classic HLA loci, rs9272143 and rs67841474 between populations may explain the different associations of HLA-B*07 and DRB1*1501-DQB1*0602 with cervical cancer between studies. The

  12. Mass spectrometric analysis of 40 S ribosomal proteins from Rat-1 fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Louie, D F; Resing, K A; Lewis, T S; Ahn, N G

    1996-11-01

    Although sequences of most mammalian ribosomal proteins are available, little is known about the post-translational processing of ribosomal proteins. To examine their post-translational modifications, 40 S subunit proteins purified from Rat-1 fibroblasts and their peptides were analyzed by liquid chromatography coupled with electrospray mass spectrometry. Of 41 proteins observed, 36 corresponded to the 32 rat 40 S ribosomal proteins with known sequences (S3, S5, S7, and S24 presented in two forms). The observed masses of S4, S6-S8, S13, S15a, S16, S17, S19, S27a, S29, and S30 matched those predicted. Sa, S3a, S5, S11, S15, S18, S20, S21, S24, S26-S28, and an S7 variant showed changes in mass that were consistent with N-terminal demethionylation and/or acetylation (S5 and S27 also appeared to be internally formylated and acetylated, respectively). S23 appeared to be internally hydroxylated or methylated. S2, S3, S9, S10, S12, S14, and S25 showed changes in mass inconsistent with known covalent modifications (+220, -75, +86, +56, -100, -117, and -103 Da, respectively), possibly representing novel post-translational modifications or allelic sequence variation. Five unidentified proteins (12,084, 13,706, 13,741, 13,884, and 34, 987 Da) were observed; for one, a sequence tag (PPGPPP), absent in any known ribosomal proteins, was determined, suggesting that it is a previously undescribed ribosome-associated protein. This study establishes a powerful method to rapidly analyze protein components of large biological complexes and their covalent modifications.

  13. Concerted removal of the Erb1-Ytm1 complex in ribosome biogenesis relies on an elaborate interface.

    PubMed

    Thoms, Matthias; Ahmed, Yasar Luqman; Maddi, Karthik; Hurt, Ed; Sinning, Irmgard

    2016-01-29

    The complicated process of eukaryotic ribosome biogenesis involves about 200 assembly factors that transiently associate with the nascent pre-ribosome in a spatiotemporally ordered way. During the early steps of 60S subunit formation, several proteins, collectively called A3 cluster factors, participate in the removal of the internal transcribed spacer 1 (ITS1) from 27SA3 pre-rRNA. Among these factors is the conserved hetero-trimeric Nop7-Erb1-Ytm1 complex (or human Pes1-Bop1-Wdr12), which is removed from the evolving pre-60S particle by the AAA ATPase Rea1 to allow progression in the pathway. Here, we clarify how Ytm1 and Erb1 interact, which has implications for the release mechanism of both factors from the pre-ribosome. Biochemical studies show that Ytm1 and Erb1 bind each other via their ß-propeller domains. The crystal structure of the Erb1-Ytm1 heterodimer determined at 2.67Å resolution reveals an extended interaction surface between the propellers in a rarely observed binding mode. Structure-based mutations in the interface that impair the Erb1-Ytm1 interaction do not support growth, with specific defects in 60S subunit synthesis. Under these mutant conditions, it becomes clear that an intact Erb1-Ytm1 complex is required for 60S maturation and that loss of this stable interaction prevents ribosome production. PMID:26657628

  14. Dom34-Hbs1 mediated dissociation of inactive 80S ribosomes promotes restart of translation after stress.

    PubMed

    van den Elzen, Antonia M G; Schuller, Anthony; Green, Rachel; Séraphin, Bertrand

    2014-02-01

    Following translation termination, ribosomal subunits dissociate to become available for subsequent rounds of protein synthesis. In many translation-inhibiting stress conditions, e.g. glucose starvation in yeast, free ribosomal subunits reassociate to form a large pool of non-translating 80S ribosomes stabilized by the 'clamping' Stm1 factor. The subunits of these inactive ribosomes need to be mobilized for translation restart upon stress relief. The Dom34-Hbs1 complex, together with the Rli1 NTPase (also known as ABCE1), have been shown to split ribosomes stuck on mRNAs in the context of RNA quality control mechanisms. Here, using in vitro and in vivo methods, we report a new role for the Dom34-Hbs1 complex and Rli1 in dissociating inactive ribosomes, thereby facilitating translation restart in yeast recovering from glucose starvation stress. Interestingly, we found that this new role is not restricted to stress conditions, indicating that in growing yeast there is a dynamic pool of inactive ribosomes that needs to be split by Dom34-Hbs1 and Rli1 to participate in protein synthesis. We propose that this provides a new level of translation regulation.

  15. Novel frameshift mutation in the CACNA1A gene causing a mixed phenotype of episodic ataxia and familiar hemiplegic migraine.

    PubMed

    Kinder, S; Ossig, C; Wienecke, M; Beyer, A; von der Hagen, M; Storch, A; Smitka, M

    2015-01-01

    Episodic ataxia type 2 (EA2, MIM#108500) is the most common form of EA and an autosomal-dominant inherited disorder characterized by paroxysmal episodes of ataxia. The disease causative gene CACNA1A encodes for the alpha 1A subunit of the voltage-gated P/Q-type calcium channel. We report on a family with a novel mutation in the CACNA1A gene. The clinical symptoms within the family varied from the typical clinical presentation of EA2 with dysarthria, gait ataxia and oculomotor symptoms to migraine and dystonia. A novel nonsense mutation of the CACNA1A gene was identified in all affected family members and is most likely the disease causing molecular defect. The pharmacological treatment with acetazolamide (AAA) was successful in three family members so far. Treatment with AAA led to a reduction of migraine attacks and an improvement of the dystonia. This relationship confirmed the hypothesis that this novel mutation results in a heterogeneous phenotype and confutes the coincidence with common migraine. Dystonia is potentially included as a further part of the phenotype spectrum of CACNA1A gene mutations.

  16. A folding zone in the ribosomal exit tunnel for Kv1.3 helix formation.

    PubMed

    Tu, Li Wei; Deutsch, Carol

    2010-03-12

    Although it is now clear that protein secondary structure can be acquired early, while the nascent peptide resides within the ribosomal exit tunnel, the principles governing folding of native polytopic proteins have not yet been elucidated. We now report an extensive investigation of native Kv1.3, a voltage-gated K(+) channel, including transmembrane and linker segments synthesized in sequence. These native segments form helices vectorially (N- to C-terminus) only in a permissive vestibule located in the last 20 A of the tunnel. Native linker sequences similarly fold in this vestibule. Finally, secondary structure acquired in the ribosome is retained in the translocon. These findings emerge from accessibility studies of a diversity of native transmembrane and linker sequences and may therefore be applicable to protein biogenesis in general.

  17. A Folding Zone in the Ribosomal Exit Tunnel for Kv1.3 Helix Formation

    PubMed Central

    Tu, LiWei; Deutsch, Carol

    2010-01-01

    SUMMARY Although it is now clear that protein secondary structure can be acquired early, while the nascent peptide resides within the ribosomal exit tunnel, the principles governing folding of native polytopic proteins have not yet been elucidated. We now report an extensive investigation of native Kv1.3, a voltage-gated K+ channel, including transmembrane and linker segments synthesized in sequence. These native segments form helices vectorially (N- to C-terminus) only in a permissive vestibule located in the last 20Å of the tunnel. Native linker sequences similarly fold in this vestibule. Finally, secondary structure acquired in the ribosome is retained in the translocon. These findings emerge from accessibility studies of a diversity of native transmembrane and linker sequences and may therefore be applicable to protein biogenesis in general. PMID:20060838

  18. The ribosomal protein Asc1/RACK1 is required for efficient translation of short mRNAs

    PubMed Central

    Thompson, Mary K; Rojas-Duran, Maria F; Gangaramani, Paritosh; Gilbert, Wendy V

    2016-01-01

    Translation is a core cellular process carried out by a highly conserved macromolecular machine, the ribosome. There has been remarkable evolutionary adaptation of this machine through the addition of eukaryote-specific ribosomal proteins whose individual effects on ribosome function are largely unknown. Here we show that eukaryote-specific Asc1/RACK1 is required for efficient translation of mRNAs with short open reading frames that show greater than average translational efficiency in diverse eukaryotes. ASC1 mutants in S. cerevisiae display compromised translation of specific functional groups, including cytoplasmic and mitochondrial ribosomal proteins, and display cellular phenotypes consistent with their gene-specific translation defects. Asc1-sensitive mRNAs are preferentially associated with the translational ‘closed loop’ complex comprised of eIF4E, eIF4G, and Pab1, and depletion of eIF4G mimics the translational defects of ASC1 mutants. Together our results reveal a role for Asc1/RACK1 in a length-dependent initiation mechanism optimized for efficient translation of genes with important housekeeping functions. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.11154.001 PMID:27117520

  19. GeneTack database: genes with frameshifts in prokaryotic genomes and eukaryotic mRNA sequences.

    PubMed

    Antonov, Ivan; Baranov, Pavel; Borodovsky, Mark

    2013-01-01

    Database annotations of prokaryotic genomes and eukaryotic mRNA sequences pay relatively low attention to frame transitions that disrupt protein-coding genes. Frame transitions (frameshifts) could be caused by sequencing errors or indel mutations inside protein-coding regions. Other observed frameshifts are related to recoding events (that evolved to control expression of some genes). Earlier, we have developed an algorithm and software program GeneTack for ab initio frameshift finding in intronless genes. Here, we describe a database (freely available at http://topaz.gatech.edu/GeneTack/db.html) containing genes with frameshifts (fs-genes) predicted by GeneTack. The database includes 206 991 fs-genes from 1106 complete prokaryotic genomes and 45 295 frameshifts predicted in mRNA sequences from 100 eukaryotic genomes. The whole set of fs-genes was grouped into clusters based on sequence similarity between fs-proteins (conceptually translated fs-genes), conservation of the frameshift position and frameshift direction (-1, +1). The fs-genes can be retrieved by similarity search to a given query sequence via a web interface, by fs-gene cluster browsing, etc. Clusters of fs-genes are characterized with respect to their likely origin, such as pseudogenization, phase variation, etc. The largest clusters contain fs-genes with programed frameshifts (related to recoding events).

  20. The A1 Subunit of Shiga Toxin 2 Has Higher Affinity for Ribosomes and Higher Catalytic Activity than the A1 Subunit of Shiga Toxin 1.

    PubMed

    Basu, Debaleena; Li, Xiao-Ping; Kahn, Jennifer N; May, Kerrie L; Kahn, Peter C; Tumer, Nilgun E

    2016-01-01

    Shiga toxin (Stx)-producing Escherichia coli (STEC) infections can lead to life-threatening complications, including hemorrhagic colitis (HC) and hemolytic-uremic syndrome (HUS), which is the most common cause of acute renal failure in children in the United States. Stx1 and Stx2 are AB5 toxins consisting of an enzymatically active A subunit associated with a pentamer of receptor binding B subunits. Epidemiological evidence suggests that Stx2-producing E. coli strains are more frequently associated with HUS than Stx1-producing strains. Several studies suggest that the B subunit plays a role in mediating toxicity. However, the role of the A subunits in the increased potency of Stx2 has not been fully investigated. Here, using purified A1 subunits, we show that Stx2A1 has a higher affinity for yeast and mammalian ribosomes than Stx1A1. Biacore analysis indicated that Stx2A1 has faster association and dissociation with ribosomes than Stx1A1. Analysis of ribosome depurination kinetics demonstrated that Stx2A1 depurinates yeast and mammalian ribosomes and an RNA stem-loop mimic of the sarcin/ricin loop (SRL) at a higher catalytic rate and is a more efficient enzyme than Stx1A1. Stx2A1 depurinated ribosomes at a higher level in vivo and was more cytotoxic than Stx1A1 in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Stx2A1 depurinated ribosomes and inhibited translation at a significantly higher level than Stx1A1 in human cells. These results provide the first direct evidence that the higher affinity for ribosomes in combination with higher catalytic activity toward the SRL allows Stx2A1 to depurinate ribosomes, inhibit translation, and exhibit cytotoxicity at a significantly higher level than Stx1A1.

  1. Reversible Top1 cleavage complexes are stabilized strand-specifically at the ribosomal replication fork barrier and contribute to ribosomal DNA stability.

    PubMed

    Krawczyk, Claudia; Dion, Vincent; Schär, Primo; Fritsch, Olivier

    2014-04-01

    Various topological constraints at the ribosomal DNA (rDNA) locus impose an extra challenge for transcription and DNA replication, generating constant torsional DNA stress. The topoisomerase Top1 is known to release such torsion by single-strand nicking and re-ligation in a process involving transient covalent Top1 cleavage complexes (Top1cc) with the nicked DNA. Here we show that Top1ccs, despite their usually transient nature, are specifically targeted to and stabilized at the ribosomal replication fork barrier (rRFB) of budding yeast, establishing a link with previously reported Top1 controlled nicks. Using ectopically engineered rRFBs, we establish that the rRFB sequence itself is sufficient for induction of DNA strand-specific and replication-independent Top1ccs. These Top1ccs accumulate only in the presence of Fob1 and Tof2, they are reversible as they are not subject to repair by Tdp1- or Mus81-dependent processes, and their presence correlates with Top1 provided rDNA stability. Notably, the targeted formation of these Top1ccs accounts for the previously reported broken replication forks at the rRFB. These findings implicate a novel and physiologically regulated mode of Top1 action, suggesting a mechanism by which Top1 is recruited to the rRFB and stabilized in a reversible Top1cc configuration to preserve the integrity of the rDNA.

  2. Structural insight into the functional mechanism of Nep1/Emg1 N1-specific pseudouridine methyltransferase in ribosome biogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, Seth R.; Keller, Christopher A.; Szyk, Agnieszka; Cannon, Joe R.; LaRonde-LeBlanc, Nicole A.

    2011-01-01

    Nucleolar Essential Protein 1 (Nep1) is required for small subunit (SSU) ribosomal RNA (rRNA) maturation and is mutated in Bowen–Conradi Syndrome. Although yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) Nep1 interacts with a consensus sequence found in three regions of SSU rRNA, the molecular details of the interaction are unknown. Nep1 is a SPOUT RNA methyltransferase, and can catalyze methylation at the N1 of pseudouridine. Nep1 is also involved in assembly of Rps19, an SSU ribosomal protein. Mutations in Nep1 that result in decreased methyl donor binding do not result in lethality, suggesting that enzymatic activity may not be required for function, and RNA binding may play a more important role. To study these interactions, the crystal structures of the scNep1 dimer and its complexes with RNA were determined. The results demonstrate that Nep1 recognizes its RNA site via base-specific interactions and stabilizes a stem-loop in the bound RNA. Furthermore, the RNA structure observed contradicts the predicted structures of the Nep1-binding sites within mature rRNA, suggesting that the Nep1 changes rRNA structure upon binding. Finally, a uridine base is bound in the active site of Nep1, positioned for a methyltransfer at the C5 position, supporting its role as an N1-specific pseudouridine methyltransferase. PMID:21087996

  3. Crystal structure of a mutant of archaeal ribosomal protein L1 from Methanococcus jannaschii

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarskikh, A. V.; Gabdulkhakov, A. G.; Kostareva, O. S.; Shklyaeva, A. A.; Tishchenko, S. V.

    2014-05-01

    The crystal structure of a mutant of archaeal ribosomal protein L1 from Methanococcus jannaschii with the deletion of a nonconserved positively charged cluster consisting of eight C-terminal amino acid residues is determined by the molecular replacement method at 1.75 Å resolution. This mutant is shown to form more stable and ordered crystals belonging to a space group other than that of the wild-type protein crystals. The positively charged C-terminal region has only a slight effect on the interaction between protein L1 and RNA molecules. Hence, this mutant can be used to prepare protein-RNA complexes and obtain their crystals.

  4. Cryo-EM visualization of the ribosome in termination complex with apo-RF3 and RF1

    PubMed Central

    Pallesen, Jesper; Hashem, Yaser; Korkmaz, Gürkan; Koripella, Ravi Kiran; Huang, Chenhui; Ehrenberg, Måns; Sanyal, Suparna; Frank, Joachim

    2013-01-01

    Termination of messenger RNA translation in Bacteria and Archaea is initiated by release factors (RFs) 1 or 2 recognizing a stop codon in the ribosomal A site and releasing the peptide from the P-site transfer RNA. After release, RF-dissociation is facilitated by the G-protein RF3. Structures of ribosomal complexes with RF1 or RF2 alone or with RF3 alone—RF3 bound to a non-hydrolyzable GTP-analog—have been reported. Here, we present the cryo-EM structure of a post-termination ribosome containing both apo-RF3 and RF1. The conformation of RF3 is distinct from those of free RF3•GDP and ribosome-bound RF3•GDP(C/N)P. Furthermore, the conformation of RF1 differs from those observed in RF3-lacking ribosomal complexes. Our study provides structural keys to the mechanism of guanine nucleotide exchange on RF3 and to an L12-mediated ribosomal recruitment of RF3. In conjunction with previous observations, our data provide the foundation to structurally characterize the complete action cycle of the G-protein RF3. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.00411.001 PMID:23755360

  5. Concerted removal of the Erb1–Ytm1 complex in ribosome biogenesis relies on an elaborate interface

    PubMed Central

    Thoms, Matthias; Ahmed, Yasar Luqman; Maddi, Karthik; Hurt, Ed; Sinning, Irmgard

    2016-01-01

    The complicated process of eukaryotic ribosome biogenesis involves about 200 assembly factors that transiently associate with the nascent pre-ribosome in a spatiotemporally ordered way. During the early steps of 60S subunit formation, several proteins, collectively called A3 cluster factors, participate in the removal of the internal transcribed spacer 1 (ITS1) from 27SA3 pre-rRNA. Among these factors is the conserved hetero-trimeric Nop7–Erb1–Ytm1 complex (or human Pes1–Bop1–Wdr12), which is removed from the evolving pre-60S particle by the AAA ATPase Rea1 to allow progression in the pathway. Here, we clarify how Ytm1 and Erb1 interact, which has implications for the release mechanism of both factors from the pre-ribosome. Biochemical studies show that Ytm1 and Erb1 bind each other via their ß-propeller domains. The crystal structure of the Erb1–Ytm1 heterodimer determined at 2.67Å resolution reveals an extended interaction surface between the propellers in a rarely observed binding mode. Structure-based mutations in the interface that impair the Erb1–Ytm1 interaction do not support growth, with specific defects in 60S subunit synthesis. Under these mutant conditions, it becomes clear that an intact Erb1–Ytm1 complex is required for 60S maturation and that loss of this stable interaction prevents ribosome production. PMID:26657628

  6. Effects of Tris(1,3-dichloro-2-propyl) Phosphate (TDCPP) in Tetrahymena Thermophila: Targeting the Ribosome.

    PubMed

    Li, Jing; Giesy, John P; Yu, Liqin; Li, Guangyu; Liu, Chunsheng

    2015-05-21

    Tris(1,3-dichloro-2-propyl) phosphate (TDCPP) has been frequently detected in the environment, and exposure to TDCPP appears widespread. It has been implicated to cause toxicity in vertebrates, but its potential to affect lower-trophic-level species remains unknown. In the present study, the ciliated protozoan, Tetrahymena thermophila, was used as a model to evaluate toxic effects of TDCPP and explore molecular mechanisms by integrating phenotypic observation, RNA-Seq and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) Imaging technologies. Exposure to 0.01, 0.1 or 1 μM TDCPP for 5 days significantly decreased the relative biomass by reducing number of cells, size of cells and quantity of cilia in a dose-dependent manner. RNA-Seq analysis demonstrated that expression of twenty-one ribosome protein genes was down-regulated and these genes were enriched in "ribosome" term in KEGG pathway analysis. Furthermore, down-regulation of genes expressing ribosome proteins was accompanied by decreased ribosome quantity in rough endoplasmic reticulum and cytoplasm and enlarged ribosome size. Therefore, taken together, the data from the present study suggest that exposure to TDCPP affects growth and reproduction of Tetrahymena thermophila by targeting the ribosome. This information might provide insights into critical mechanisms of toxic action in other species and lead to useful bioindicators of exposure to TDCPP.

  7. Pre-40S ribosome biogenesis factor Tsr1 is an inactive structural mimic of translational GTPases.

    PubMed

    McCaughan, Urszula M; Jayachandran, Uma; Shchepachev, Vadim; Chen, Zhuo Angel; Rappsilber, Juri; Tollervey, David; Cook, Atlanta G

    2016-01-01

    Budding yeast Tsr1 is a ribosome biogenesis factor with sequence similarity to GTPases, which is essential for cytoplasmic steps in 40S subunit maturation. Here we present the crystal structure of Tsr1 at 3.6 Å. Tsr1 has a similar domain architecture to translational GTPases such as EF-Tu and the selenocysteine incorporation factor SelB. However, active site residues required for GTP binding and hydrolysis are absent, explaining the lack of enzymatic activity in previous analyses. Modelling of Tsr1 into cryo-electron microscopy maps of pre-40S particles shows that a highly acidic surface of Tsr1 is presented on the outside of pre-40S particles, potentially preventing premature binding to 60S subunits. Late pre-40S maturation also requires the GTPase eIF5B and the ATPase Rio1. The location of Tsr1 is predicted to block binding by both factors, strongly indicating that removal of Tsr1 is an essential step during cytoplasmic maturation of 40S ribosomal subunits. PMID:27250689

  8. Pre-40S ribosome biogenesis factor Tsr1 is an inactive structural mimic of translational GTPases

    PubMed Central

    McCaughan, Urszula M.; Jayachandran, Uma; Shchepachev, Vadim; Chen, Zhuo Angel; Rappsilber, Juri; Tollervey, David; Cook, Atlanta G.

    2016-01-01

    Budding yeast Tsr1 is a ribosome biogenesis factor with sequence similarity to GTPases, which is essential for cytoplasmic steps in 40S subunit maturation. Here we present the crystal structure of Tsr1 at 3.6 Å. Tsr1 has a similar domain architecture to translational GTPases such as EF-Tu and the selenocysteine incorporation factor SelB. However, active site residues required for GTP binding and hydrolysis are absent, explaining the lack of enzymatic activity in previous analyses. Modelling of Tsr1 into cryo-electron microscopy maps of pre-40S particles shows that a highly acidic surface of Tsr1 is presented on the outside of pre-40S particles, potentially preventing premature binding to 60S subunits. Late pre-40S maturation also requires the GTPase eIF5B and the ATPase Rio1. The location of Tsr1 is predicted to block binding by both factors, strongly indicating that removal of Tsr1 is an essential step during cytoplasmic maturation of 40S ribosomal subunits. PMID:27250689

  9. Molecular insights into replication initiation by Qβ replicase using ribosomal protein S1

    PubMed Central

    Takeshita, Daijiro; Yamashita, Seisuke; Tomita, Kozo

    2014-01-01

    Ribosomal protein S1, consisting of six contiguous OB-folds, is the largest ribosomal protein and is essential for translation initiation in Escherichia coli. S1 is also one of the three essential host-derived subunits of Qβ replicase, together with EF-Tu and EF-Ts, for Qβ RNA replication in E. coli. We analyzed the crystal structure of Qβ replicase, consisting of the virus-encoded RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (β-subunit), EF-Tu, EF-Ts and the N-terminal half of S1, which is capable of initiating Qβ RNA replication. Structural and biochemical studies revealed that the two N-terminal OB-folds of S1 anchor S1 onto the β-subunit, and the third OB-fold is mobile and protrudes beyond the surface of the β-subunit. The third OB-fold mainly interacts with a specific RNA fragment derived from the internal region of Qβ RNA, and its RNA-binding ability is required for replication initiation of Qβ RNA. Thus, the third mobile OB-fold of S1, which is spatially anchored near the surface of the β-subunit, primarily recruits the Qβ RNA toward the β-subunit, leading to the specific and efficient replication initiation of Qβ RNA, and S1 functions as a replication initiation factor, beyond its established function in protein synthesis. PMID:25122749

  10. The RICE MINUTE-LIKE1 (RML1) gene, encoding a ribosomal large subunit protein L3B, regulates leaf morphology and plant architecture in rice

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Ming; Wang, Yihua; Liu, Xi; Sun, Juan; Wang, Yunlong; Xu, Yang; Lv, Jia; Long, Wuhua; Zhu, Xiaopin; Guo, Xiuping; Jiang, Ling; Wang, Chunming; Wan, Jianmin

    2016-01-01

    Mutations of ribosomal proteins (RPs) are known to cause developmental abnormalities in yeast, mammals, and dicotyledonous plants; however, their effects have not been studied in rice. Here, we identifiy a ribosomal biogenesis mutant, rice minute-like1 (rml1) that displays a minute phenotype as evidenced by retarded growth and defects in the vascular system. We determine that RML1 encodes a ribosome large subunit protein 3B (RPL3B) in rice by means of map-based cloning and genetic complementation. RPL3B is abundantly expressed in all the tissues, whereas RPL3A, another RPL3 gene family member, is expressed at low levels. Notably, the expression level of RPL3A in the rml1 mutant is similar to that in the wild-type, suggesting that RPL3A provides no functional compensation for RPL3B in rml1 plants. Ribosomal profiles show that mutation of RPL3B leads to a significant reduction in free 60S ribosomal subunits and polysomes, indicating a ribosomal insufficiency in the rml1 mutant. Our results demonstrate that the ribosomal protein gene RPL3B is required for maintaining normal leaf morphology and plant architecture in rice through its regulation of ribosome biogenesis. PMID:27241493

  11. Glutamate regulates eEF1A phosphorylation and ribosomal transit time in Bergmann glial cells.

    PubMed

    Barrera, Iliana; Flores-Méndez, Marco; Hernández-Kelly, Luisa C; Cid, Luis; Huerta, Miriam; Zinker, Samuel; López-Bayghen, Esther; Aguilera, José; Ortega, Arturo

    2010-12-01

    Glutamate, the major excitatory transmitter in the vertebrate brain, is involved in neuronal development and synaptic plasticity. Glutamatergic stimulation leads to differential gene expression patterns in neuronal and glial cells. A glutamate-dependent transcriptional control has been established for several genes. However, much less is known about the molecular events that modify the translational machinery upon exposure to this neurotransmitter. In a glial model of cerebellar cultured Bergmann cells, glutamate induces a biphasic effect on [(35)S]-methionine incorporation into proteins that suggests that the elongation phase of protein biosynthesis is the target for regulation. Indeed, after a 15 min exposure to glutamate a transient increase in elongation factor 2 phosphorylation has been reported, an effect mediated through the activation of the elongation factor 2 kinase. In this contribution, we sought to characterize the phosphorylation status of the eukaryotic elongation factor 1A (eEF1A) and the ribosomal transit time under glutamate exposure. A dose-dependent increase in eEF1A phosphorylation was found after a 60 min glutamate treatment; this phenomenon is Ca(2+)/CaM dependent, blocked with Src and phosphatidyl-inositol 3-kinase inhibitors and with rapamicyn. Concomitantly, the ribosomal transit time was increased with a 15 min glutamate exposure. After 60 more minutes, the average time used by the ribosomes to complete a polypeptide chain had almost returned to its initial level. These results strongly suggest that glutamate exerts an exquisite time-dependent translational control in glial cells, a process that might be critical for glia-neuron interactions.

  12. The Effects of Aflatoxin B1 in vivo on Membrane—Ribosome Association

    PubMed Central

    Williams, D. J.; Clark, R. P.; Rabin, B. R.

    1973-01-01

    The effects of aflatoxin B1 on the endoplasmic reticulum of rat liver has been examined in vivo. Electron microscopy has shown a disorganization and degranulation of rough surfaced membrane under these conditions and evidence is presented that this is a primary effect of the toxin, and results from the direct attack of the aflatoxin on the steroid-dependent ribosome binding sites on the membrane. A technique is described by which the presence of degranulated rough membrane may be detected in microsomal preparations. PMID:4144962

  13. Phylogenetic Information Content of Copepoda Ribosomal DNA Repeat Units: ITS1 and ITS2 Impact

    PubMed Central

    Zagoskin, Maxim V.; Lazareva, Valentina I.; Grishanin, Andrey K.; Mukha, Dmitry V.

    2014-01-01

    The utility of various regions of the ribosomal repeat unit for phylogenetic analysis was examined in 16 species representing four families, nine genera, and two orders of the subclass Copepoda (Crustacea). Fragments approximately 2000 bp in length containing the ribosomal DNA (rDNA) 18S and 28S gene fragments, the 5.8S gene, and the internal transcribed spacer regions I and II (ITS1 and ITS2) were amplified and analyzed. The DAMBE (Data Analysis in Molecular Biology and Evolution) software was used to analyze the saturation of nucleotide substitutions; this test revealed the suitability of both the 28S gene fragment and the ITS1/ITS2 rDNA regions for the reconstruction of phylogenetic trees. Distance (minimum evolution) and probabilistic (maximum likelihood, Bayesian) analyses of the data revealed that the 28S rDNA and the ITS1 and ITS2 regions are informative markers for inferring phylogenetic relationships among families of copepods and within the Cyclopidae family and associated genera. Split-graph analysis of concatenated ITS1/ITS2 rDNA regions of cyclopoid copepods suggested that the Mesocyclops, Thermocyclops, and Macrocyclops genera share complex evolutionary relationships. This study revealed that the ITS1 and ITS2 regions potentially represent different phylogenetic signals. PMID:25215300

  14. Production of truncated MBD4 protein by frameshift mutation in DNA mismatch repair-deficient cells enhances 5-fluorouracil sensitivity that is independent of hMLH1 status.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Satoshi; Iwaizumi, Moriya; Tseng-Rogenski, Stephanie; Hamaya, Yasushi; Miyajima, Hiroaki; Kanaoka, Shigeru; Sugimoto, Ken; Carethers, John M

    2016-07-01

    Methyl-CpG binding domain protein 4 (MBD4) is a DNA glycosylase that can remove 5-fluorodeoxyuracil from DNA as well as repair T:G or U:G mismatches. MBD4 is a target for frameshift mutation with DNA mismatch repair (MMR) deficiency, creating a truncated MBD4 protein (TruMBD4) that lacks its glycosylase domain. Here we show that TruMBD4 plays an important role for enhancing 5-fluorouracil (5FU) sensitivity in MMR-deficient colorectal cancer cells. We found biochemically that TruMBD4 binds to 5FU incorporated into DNA with higher affinity than MBD4. TruMBD4 reduced the 5FU affinity of the MMR recognition complexes that determined 5FU sensitivity by previous reports, suggesting other mechanisms might be operative to trigger cytotoxicity. To analyze overall 5FU sensitivity with TruMBD4, we established TruMBD4 overexpression in hMLH1-proficient or -deficient colorectal cancer cells followed by treatment with 5FU. 5FU-treated TruMBD4 cells demonstrated diminished growth characteristics compared to controls, independently of hMLH1 status. Flow cytometry revealed more 5FU-treated TruMBD4 cells in S phase than controls. We conclude that patients with MMR-deficient cancers, which show characteristic resistance to 5FU therapy, may be increased for 5FU sensitivity via secondary frameshift mutation of the base excision repair gene MBD4.

  15. Crystal structure of ribosomal protein L1 from the bacterium Aquifex aeolicus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nikonova, E. Yu.; Tishchenko, S. V.; Gabdulkhakov, A. G.; Shklyaeva, A. A.; Garber, M. B.; Nikonov, S. V.; Nevskaya, N. A.

    2011-07-01

    The crystal structure of ribosomal protein L1 from the bacterium Aquifex aeolicus was solved by the molecular-replacement method and refined to R cryst = 19.4% and R free = 25.1% at 2.1 Å protein consists of two domains linked together by a flexible hinge region. In the structure under consideration, the domains are in close proximity and adopt a closed conformation. Earlier, this conformation has been found in the structure of protein L1 from the bacterium Thermus thermophilus, whereas the structures of archaeal L1 proteins and the structures of all L1 proteins in the RNA-bound form have an open conformation. The fact that a closed conformation was found in the structures of two L1 proteins which crystallize in different space groups and belong to different bacteria suggests that this conformation is a characteristic feature of L1 bacterial proteins in the free form.

  16. Crystal structure of the RNA binding ribosomal protein L1 from Thermus thermophilus.

    PubMed Central

    Nikonov, S; Nevskaya, N; Eliseikina, I; Fomenkova, N; Nikulin, A; Ossina, N; Garber, M; Jonsson, B H; Briand, C; Al-Karadaghi, S; Svensson, A; Aevarsson, A; Liljas, A

    1996-01-01

    L1 has a dual function as a ribosomal protein binding rRNA and as a translational repressor binding mRNA. The crystal structure of L1 from Thermus thermophilus has been determined at 1.85 angstroms resolution. The protein is composed of two domains with the N- and C-termini in domain I. The eight N-terminal residues are very flexible, as the quality of electron density map shows. Proteolysis experiments have shown that the N-terminal tail is accessible and important for 23S rRNA binding. Most of the conserved amino acids are situated at the interface between the two domains. They probably form the specific RNA binding site of L1. Limited non-covalent contacts between the domains indicate an unstable domain interaction in the present conformation. Domain flexibility and RNA binding by induced fit seems plausible. Images PMID:8635468

  17. Effects of Tris(1,3-dichloro-2-propyl) Phosphate (TDCPP) in Tetrahymena Thermophila: Targeting the Ribosome

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jing; Giesy, John P.; Yu, Liqin; Li, Guangyu; Liu, Chunsheng

    2015-05-01

    Tris(1,3-dichloro-2-propyl) phosphate (TDCPP) has been frequently detected in the environment, and exposure to TDCPP appears widespread. It has been implicated to cause toxicity in vertebrates, but its potential to affect lower-trophic-level species remains unknown. In the present study, the ciliated protozoan, Tetrahymena thermophila, was used as a model to evaluate toxic effects of TDCPP and explore molecular mechanisms by integrating phenotypic observation, RNA-Seq and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) Imaging technologies. Exposure to 0.01, 0.1 or 1 μM TDCPP for 5 days significantly decreased the relative biomass by reducing number of cells, size of cells and quantity of cilia in a dose-dependent manner. RNA-Seq analysis demonstrated that expression of twenty-one ribosome protein genes was down-regulated and these genes were enriched in “ribosome” term in KEGG pathway analysis. Furthermore, down-regulation of genes expressing ribosome proteins was accompanied by decreased ribosome quantity in rough endoplasmic reticulum and cytoplasm and enlarged ribosome size. Therefore, taken together, the data from the present study suggest that exposure to TDCPP affects growth and reproduction of Tetrahymena thermophila by targeting the ribosome. This information might provide insights into critical mechanisms of toxic action in other species and lead to useful bioindicators of exposure to TDCPP.

  18. Effects of Tris(1,3-dichloro-2-propyl) Phosphate (TDCPP) in Tetrahymena Thermophila: Targeting the Ribosome

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jing; Giesy, John P.; Yu, Liqin; Li, Guangyu; Liu, Chunsheng

    2015-01-01

    Tris(1,3-dichloro-2-propyl) phosphate (TDCPP) has been frequently detected in the environment, and exposure to TDCPP appears widespread. It has been implicated to cause toxicity in vertebrates, but its potential to affect lower-trophic-level species remains unknown. In the present study, the ciliated protozoan, Tetrahymena thermophila, was used as a model to evaluate toxic effects of TDCPP and explore molecular mechanisms by integrating phenotypic observation, RNA-Seq and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) Imaging technologies. Exposure to 0.01, 0.1 or 1 μM TDCPP for 5 days significantly decreased the relative biomass by reducing number of cells, size of cells and quantity of cilia in a dose-dependent manner. RNA-Seq analysis demonstrated that expression of twenty-one ribosome protein genes was down-regulated and these genes were enriched in “ribosome” term in KEGG pathway analysis. Furthermore, down-regulation of genes expressing ribosome proteins was accompanied by decreased ribosome quantity in rough endoplasmic reticulum and cytoplasm and enlarged ribosome size. Therefore, taken together, the data from the present study suggest that exposure to TDCPP affects growth and reproduction of Tetrahymena thermophila by targeting the ribosome. This information might provide insights into critical mechanisms of toxic action in other species and lead to useful bioindicators of exposure to TDCPP. PMID:25994279

  19. A conserved domain important for association of eukaryotic J-protein co-chaperones Jjj1 and Zuo1 with the ribosome.

    PubMed

    Kaschner, Lindsey A; Sharma, Ruchika; Shrestha, Om Kumar; Meyer, Alison E; Craig, Elizabeth A

    2015-05-01

    J-proteins, obligate co-chaperones, provide specialization for Hsp70 function in a variety of cellular processes. Two of the 13 J-proteins of the yeast cytosol/nucleus, Zuo1 and Jjj1, are associated with 60S ribosomal subunits. Abundant Zuo1 facilitates folding of nascent polypeptides; Jjj1, of much lower abundance, functions in ribosome biogenesis. However, overexpression of Jjj1 substantially rescues growth defects of cells lacking Zuo1. We analyzed a region held in common by Zuo1 and Jjj1, outside the signature J-domain found in all J-proteins. This shared "zuotin homology domain" (ZHD) is important for ribosome association of both proteins. An N-terminal segment of Jjj1, containing the J-domain and ZHD, is ribosome-associated and, like full-length Jjj1, is competent to rescue both the cold- and cation-sensitivity of ∆zuo1. However, this fragment, when expressed at normal levels, cannot rescue the cytosolic ribosome biogenesis defect of ∆jjj1. Our results are consistent with a model in which the primary functions of Zuo1 and Jjj1 occur in the cytosol. In addition, our data suggest that Zuo1 and Jjj1 bind overlapping sites on ribosomes due to an interaction via their common ZHDs, but Jjj1 binds primarily to pre-60S particles and Zuo1 to mature subunits. We hypothesize that ZUO1 and JJJ1, which are conserved throughout eukaryotes, arose from an ancient duplication of a progenitor J-protein gene that encoded the ZHD ribosome-binding region; subsequently, specialized roles and additional ribosome interaction sites evolved.

  20. The structure of Rpf2–Rrs1 explains its role in ribosome biogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Kharde, Satyavati; Calviño, Fabiola R.; Gumiero, Andrea; Wild, Klemens; Sinning, Irmgard

    2015-01-01

    The assembly of eukaryotic ribosomes is a hierarchical process involving about 200 biogenesis factors and a series of remodeling steps. The 5S RNP consisting of the 5S rRNA, RpL5 and RpL11 is recruited at an early stage, but has to rearrange during maturation of the pre-60S ribosomal subunit. Rpf2 and Rrs1 have been implicated in 5S RNP biogenesis, but their precise role was unclear. Here, we present the crystal structure of the Rpf2–Rrs1 complex from Aspergillus nidulans at 1.5 Å resolution and describe it as Brix domain of Rpf2 completed by Rrs1 to form two anticodon-binding domains with functionally important tails. Fitting the X-ray structure into the cryo-EM density of a previously described pre-60S particle correlates with biochemical data. The heterodimer forms specific contacts with the 5S rRNA, RpL5 and the biogenesis factor Rsa4. The flexible protein tails of Rpf2–Rrs1 localize to the central protuberance. Two helices in the Rrs1 C-terminal tail occupy a strategic position to block the rotation of 25S rRNA and the 5S RNP. Our data provide a structural model for 5S RNP recruitment to the pre-60S particle and explain why removal of Rpf2–Rrs1 is necessary for rearrangements to drive 60S maturation. PMID:26117542

  1. Interaction of Streptococcus mutans YidC1 and YidC2 with translating and nontranslating ribosomes.

    PubMed

    Wu, Zht Cheng; de Keyzer, Jeanine; Berrelkamp-Lahpor, Greetje A; Driessen, Arnold J M

    2013-10-01

    The YidC/OxaI/Alb3 family of membrane proteins is involved in the biogenesis of integral membrane proteins in bacteria, mitochondria, and chloroplasts. Gram-positive bacteria often contain multiple YidC paralogs that can be subdivided into two major classes, namely, YidC1 and YidC2. The Streptococcus mutans YidC1 and YidC2 proteins possess C-terminal tails that differ in charges (+9 and + 14) and lengths (33 and 61 amino acids). The longer YidC2 C terminus bears a resemblance to the C-terminal ribosome-binding domain of the mitochondrial OxaI protein and, in contrast to the shorter YidC1 C terminus, can mediate the interaction with mitochondrial ribosomes. These observations have led to the suggestion that YidC1 and YidC2 differ in their abilities to interact with ribosomes. However, the interaction with bacterial translating ribosomes has never been addressed. Here we demonstrate that Escherichia coli ribosomes are able to interact with both YidC1 and YidC2. The interaction is stimulated by the presence of a nascent membrane protein substrate and abolished upon deletion of the C-terminal tail, which also abrogates the YidC-dependent membrane insertion of subunit c of the F1F0-ATPase into the membrane. It is concluded that both YidC1 and YidC2 interact with ribosomes, suggesting that the modes of membrane insertion by these membrane insertases are similar.

  2. Spi-1 and Fli-1 directly activate common target genes involved in ribosome biogenesis in Friend erythroleukemic cells.

    PubMed

    Juban, Gaëtan; Giraud, Guillaume; Guyot, Boris; Belin, Stéphane; Diaz, Jean-Jacques; Starck, Joëlle; Guillouf, Christel; Moreau-Gachelin, Françoise; Morlé, François

    2009-05-01

    Spi-1 and Fli-1 are ETS transcription factors recurrently deregulated in mouse erythroleukemia induced by Friend viruses. Since they share the same core DNA binding site, we investigated whether they may contribute to erythroleukemia by common mechanisms. Using inducible knockdown, we demonstrated that Fli-1 contributes to proliferation, survival, and differentiation arrest of erythroleukemic cells harboring an activated fli-1 locus. Similarly, we used inducible Fli-1 knockdown and either hexamethylenebisacetamide (HMBA)- or small interfering RNA-mediated Spi-1 knockdown to investigate their respective contributions in erythroleukemic cells harboring an activated spi-1 locus. In these cells, simple or double knockdown of both Spi-1 and Fli-1 additively contributed to induce proliferation arrest and differentiation. Transcriptome profiling revealed that virtually all transcripts affected by both Fli-1 knockdown and HMBA are affected in an additive manner. Among these additively downregulated transcripts, more than 20% encode proteins involved in ribosome biogenesis, and conserved ETS binding sites are present in their gene promoters. Through chromatin immunoprecipitation, we demonstrated the association of Spi-1 and Fli-1 on these promoters in Friend erythroleukemic cells. These data lead us to propose that the oncogenicity of Spi-1, Fli-1, and possibly other ETS transcription factors may involve their ability to stimulate ribosome biogenesis.

  3. Sudestada1, a Drosophila ribosomal prolyl-hydroxylase required for mRNA translation, cell homeostasis, and organ growth

    PubMed Central

    Katz, Maximiliano J.; Acevedo, Julieta M.; Loenarz, Christoph; Galagovsky, Diego; Liu-Yi, Phebee; Pérez-Pepe, Marcelo; Thalhammer, Armin; Sekirnik, Rok; Ge, Wei; Melani, Mariana; Thomas, María G.; Simonetta, Sergio; Boccaccio, Graciela L.; Schofield, Christopher J.; Cockman, Matthew E.; Ratcliffe, Peter J.; Wappner, Pablo

    2014-01-01

    Genome sequences predict the presence of many 2-oxoglutarate (2OG)-dependent oxygenases of unknown biochemical and biological functions in Drosophila. Ribosomal protein hydroxylation is emerging as an important 2OG oxygenase catalyzed pathway, but its biological functions are unclear. We report investigations on the function of Sudestada1 (Sud1), a Drosophila ribosomal oxygenase. As with its human and yeast homologs, OGFOD1 and Tpa1p, respectively, we identified Sud1 to catalyze prolyl-hydroxylation of the small ribosomal subunit protein RPS23. Like OGFOD1, Sud1 catalyzes a single prolyl-hydroxylation of RPS23 in contrast to yeast Tpa1p, where Pro-64 dihydroxylation is observed. RNAi-mediated Sud1 knockdown hinders normal growth in different Drosophila tissues. Growth impairment originates from both reduction of cell size and diminution of the number of cells and correlates with impaired translation efficiency and activation of the unfolded protein response in the endoplasmic reticulum. This is accompanied by phosphorylation of eIF2α and concomitant formation of stress granules, as well as promotion of autophagy and apoptosis. These observations, together with those on enzyme homologs described in the companion articles, reveal conserved biochemical and biological roles for a widely distributed ribosomal oxygenase. PMID:24550463

  4. RPLP1, a Crucial Ribosomal Protein for Embryonic Development of the Nervous System

    PubMed Central

    Perucho, Laura; Artero-Castro, Ana; Guerrero, Sergi; Ramón y Cajal, Santiago; LLeonart, Matilde E.; Wang, Zhao-Qi

    2014-01-01

    Ribosomal proteins are pivotal to development and tissue homeostasis. RP Large P1 (Rplp1) overexpression is associated with tumorigenesis. However, the physiological function of Rplp1 in mammalian development remains unknown. In this study, we disrupted Rplp1 in the mouse germline and central nervous system (Rplp1CNSΔ). Rplp1 heterozygosity caused body size reductions, male infertility, systemic abnormalities in various tissues and a high frequency of early postnatal death. Rplp1CNSΔ newborn mice exhibited perinatal lethality and brain atrophy with size reductions of the neocortex, midbrain and ganglionic eminence. The Rplp1 knockout neocortex exhibited progenitor cell proliferation arrest and apoptosis due to the dysregulation of key cell cycle and apoptosis regulators (cyclin A, cyclin E, p21CIP1, p27KIP1, p53). Similarly, Rplp1 deletion in pMEFs led to proliferation arrest and premature senescence. Importantly, Rplp1 deletion in primary mouse embryonic fibroblasts did not alter global protein synthesis, but did change the expression patterns of specific protein subsets involved in protein folding and the unfolded protein response, cell death, protein transport and signal transduction, among others. Altogether, we demonstrated that the translation “fine-tuning” exerted by Rplp1 is essential for embryonic and brain development and for proper cell proliferation. PMID:24959908

  5. Tigecycline resistance in Acinetobacter baumannii mediated by frameshift mutation in plsC, encoding 1-acyl-sn-glycerol-3-phosphate acyltransferase.

    PubMed

    Li, X; Liu, L; Ji, J; Chen, Q; Hua, X; Jiang, Y; Feng, Y; Yu, Y

    2015-03-01

    Acinetobacter baumannii is an important pathogen of healthcare-associated infections and shows multidrug resistance. With the increasing application of tigecycline, isolates resistant to this antibiotic are of growing concern clinically. However, the definitive mechanism of tigecycline resistance remains unclear. To explore the mechanism of tigecycline resistance in A. baumannii, a tigecycline-resistant strain was obtained by increasing the concentration of the antimicrobial in liquid culture. Three mutations were identified by the whole genome comparison, including one synonymous substitution in a hypothetical protein and a frameshift mutation in plsC and omp38. The plsC gene was confirmed to cause decreased susceptibility to tigecycline by a complementation experiment and cellular membrane change was detected by flow cytometry. By measuring the relative growth rate, the fitness cost of plsC was estimated to be approximately 8 %. In conclusion, plsC was found to play an important role in tigecycline resistance in A. baumannii. The minor fitness cost of plsC indicates a high risk of the emergence and development of tigecycline resistance in A. baumannii.

  6. Ribosome Protein L4 is essential for Epstein–Barr Virus Nuclear Antigen 1 function

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Chih-Lung; Liu, Cheng-Der; You, Ren-In; Ching, Yung-Hao; Liang, Jun; Ke, Liangru; Chen, Ya-Lin; Chen, Hong-Chi; Hsu, Hao-Jen; Liou, Je-Wen; Kieff, Elliott; Peng, Chih-Wen

    2016-01-01

    Epstein–Barr Virus (EBV) Nuclear Antigen 1 (EBNA1)-mediated origin of plasmid replication (oriP) DNA episome maintenance is essential for EBV-mediated tumorigenesis. We have now found that EBNA1 binds to Ribosome Protein L4 (RPL4). RPL4 shRNA knockdown decreased EBNA1 activation of an oriP luciferase reporter, EBNA1 DNA binding in lymphoblastoid cell lines, and EBV genome number per lymphoblastoid cell line. EBV infection increased RPL4 expression and redistributed RPL4 to cell nuclei. RPL4 and Nucleolin (NCL) were a scaffold for an EBNA1-induced oriP complex. The RPL4 N terminus cooperated with NCL-K429 to support EBNA1 and oriP-mediated episome binding and maintenance, whereas the NCL C-terminal K380 and K393 induced oriP DNA H3K4me2 modification and promoted EBNA1 activation of oriP-dependent transcription. These observations provide new insights into the mechanisms by which EBV uses NCL and RPL4 to establish persistent B-lymphoblastoid cell infection. PMID:26858444

  7. Cloning and characterization of a gene from Rhizobium melilotii 2011 coding for ribosomal protein S1.

    PubMed Central

    Schnier, J; Thamm, S; Lurz, R; Hussain, A; Faist, G; Dobrinski, B

    1988-01-01

    A 7 kb chromosomal DNA fragment from R. melilotii was cloned, which complemented temperature-sensitivity of an E. coli amber mutant in rpsA, the gene for ribosomal protein S1 (ES1). From complementation and maxicell analysis a 58 kd protein was identified as the homolog of protein S1 (RS1). DNA sequence analysis of the R. melilotii rpsA gene identified a protein of 568 amino acids, which showed 47% identical amino acid homology to protein S1 from E. coli. The RS1 protein lacked the two Cys residues which had been reported to play an important role for the function of ES1. Two repeats containing Shine-Dalgarno sequences were identified upstream of the structural gene. Binding studies with RNA polymerase from E. coli and Pseudomonas putida located one RNA-polymerase binding site close to the RS1 gene and another one several hundred basepairs upstream. One possible promoter was also identified by DNA sequence comparison with the corresponding E. coli promoter. Images PMID:3368316

  8. Structure of Intergenic Spacer IGS1 of Ribosomal Operon from Schistidium Mosses.

    PubMed

    Milyutina, I A; Ignatova, E A; Ignatov, M S; Goryunov, D V; Troitsky, A V

    2015-11-01

    The structure of the intergenic spacer 1 (IGS1) of the ribosomal operon from 12 species of Schistidium mosses was studied. In the IGS1 sequences of these species, three conserved regions and two areas of GC- and A-enriched repeats were identified. All of the studied mosses have a conserved pyrimidine-enriched motif at the 5'-end of IGS1. Species-specific nucleotide substitutions and insertions were found in the conserved areas. The repeated units contain single nucleotide substitutions that make unique the majority of repeated units. The positions of such repeats in IGS1 are species-specific, but their number can vary within the species and among operons of the same specimen. The comparison of IGS1 sequences from the Schistidium species and from representatives of ten other moss genera revealed the presence of common conserved motifs with similar localization. Presumably, these motifs are elements of termination of the pre-rRNA transcription and processing of rRNA. PMID:26615440

  9. Structure of Intergenic Spacer IGS1 of Ribosomal Operon from Schistidium Mosses.

    PubMed

    Milyutina, I A; Ignatova, E A; Ignatov, M S; Goryunov, D V; Troitsky, A V

    2015-11-01

    The structure of the intergenic spacer 1 (IGS1) of the ribosomal operon from 12 species of Schistidium mosses was studied. In the IGS1 sequences of these species, three conserved regions and two areas of GC- and A-enriched repeats were identified. All of the studied mosses have a conserved pyrimidine-enriched motif at the 5'-end of IGS1. Species-specific nucleotide substitutions and insertions were found in the conserved areas. The repeated units contain single nucleotide substitutions that make unique the majority of repeated units. The positions of such repeats in IGS1 are species-specific, but their number can vary within the species and among operons of the same specimen. The comparison of IGS1 sequences from the Schistidium species and from representatives of ten other moss genera revealed the presence of common conserved motifs with similar localization. Presumably, these motifs are elements of termination of the pre-rRNA transcription and processing of rRNA.

  10. Wnt5a Signals through DVL1 to Repress Ribosomal DNA Transcription by RNA Polymerase I.

    PubMed

    Dass, Randall A; Sarshad, Aishe A; Carson, Brittany B; Feenstra, Jennifer M; Kaur, Amanpreet; Obrdlik, Ales; Parks, Matthew M; Prakash, Varsha; Love, Damon K; Pietras, Kristian; Serra, Rosa; Blanchard, Scott C; Percipalle, Piergiorgio; Brown, Anthony M C; Vincent, C Theresa

    2016-08-01

    Ribosome biogenesis is essential for cell growth and proliferation and is commonly elevated in cancer. Accordingly, numerous oncogene and tumor suppressor signaling pathways target rRNA synthesis. In breast cancer, non-canonical Wnt signaling by Wnt5a has been reported to antagonize tumor growth. Here, we show that Wnt5a rapidly represses rDNA gene transcription in breast cancer cells and generates a chromatin state with reduced transcription of rDNA by RNA polymerase I (Pol I). These effects were specifically dependent on Dishevelled1 (DVL1), which accumulates in nucleolar organizer regions (NORs) and binds to rDNA regions of the chromosome. Upon DVL1 binding, the Pol I transcription activator and deacetylase Sirtuin 7 (SIRT7) releases from rDNA loci, concomitant with disassembly of Pol I transcription machinery at the rDNA promoter. These findings reveal that Wnt5a signals through DVL1 to suppress rRNA transcription. This provides a novel mechanism for how Wnt5a exerts tumor suppressive effects and why disruption of Wnt5a signaling enhances mammary tumor growth in vivo. PMID:27500936

  11. Wnt5a Signals through DVL1 to Repress Ribosomal DNA Transcription by RNA Polymerase I

    PubMed Central

    Dass, Randall A.; Sarshad, Aishe A.; Feenstra, Jennifer M.; Kaur, Amanpreet; Pietras, Kristian; Serra, Rosa; Blanchard, Scott C.; Percipalle, Piergiorgio; Brown, Anthony M. C.; Vincent, C. Theresa

    2016-01-01

    Ribosome biogenesis is essential for cell growth and proliferation and is commonly elevated in cancer. Accordingly, numerous oncogene and tumor suppressor signaling pathways target rRNA synthesis. In breast cancer, non-canonical Wnt signaling by Wnt5a has been reported to antagonize tumor growth. Here, we show that Wnt5a rapidly represses rDNA gene transcription in breast cancer cells and generates a chromatin state with reduced transcription of rDNA by RNA polymerase I (Pol I). These effects were specifically dependent on Dishevelled1 (DVL1), which accumulates in nucleolar organizer regions (NORs) and binds to rDNA regions of the chromosome. Upon DVL1 binding, the Pol I transcription activator and deacetylase Sirtuin 7 (SIRT7) releases from rDNA loci, concomitant with disassembly of Pol I transcription machinery at the rDNA promoter. These findings reveal that Wnt5a signals through DVL1 to suppress rRNA transcription. This provides a novel mechanism for how Wnt5a exerts tumor suppressive effects and why disruption of Wnt5a signaling enhances mammary tumor growth in vivo. PMID:27500936

  12. Ribosomal Biogenesis and Translational Flux Inhibition by the Selective Inhibitor of Nuclear Export (SINE) XPO1 Antagonist KPT-185

    PubMed Central

    Yamamoto, Shinichi; Sekihara, Kazumasa; Matsushita, Hiromichi; Davis, Richard Eric; Wang, Zhiqiang; Ma, Wencai; Ishizawa, Jo; Kazuno, Saiko; Kauffman, Michael; Shacham, Sharon; Fujimura, Tsutomu; Ueno, Takashi; Miida, Takashi; Andreeff, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Mantle cell lymphoma (MCL) is an aggressive B-cell lymphoma characterized by the aberrant expression of several growth-regulating, oncogenic effectors. Exportin 1 (XPO1) mediates the nucleocytoplasmic transport of numerous molecules including oncogenic growth-regulating factors, RNAs, and ribosomal subunits. In MCL cells, the small molecule KPT-185 blocks XPO1 function and exerts anti-proliferative effects. In this study, we investigated the molecular mechanisms of this putative anti-tumor effect on MCL cells using cell growth/viability assays, immunoblotting, gene expression analysis, and absolute quantification proteomics. KPT-185 exhibited a p53-independent anti-lymphoma effect on MCL cells, by suppression of oncogenic mediators (e.g., XPO1, cyclin D1, c-Myc, PIM1, and Bcl-2 family members), repression of ribosomal biogenesis, and downregulation of translation/chaperone proteins (e.g., PIM2, EEF1A1, EEF2, and HSP70) that are part of the translational/transcriptional network regulated by heat shock factor 1. These results elucidate a novel mechanism in which ribosomal biogenesis appears to be a key component through which XPO1 contributes to tumor cell survival. Thus, we propose that the blockade of XPO1 could be a promising, novel strategy for the treatment of MCL and other malignancies overexpressing XPO1. PMID:26340096

  13. Ribosomal Biogenesis and Translational Flux Inhibition by the Selective Inhibitor of Nuclear Export (SINE) XPO1 Antagonist KPT-185.

    PubMed

    Tabe, Yoko; Kojima, Kensuke; Yamamoto, Shinichi; Sekihara, Kazumasa; Matsushita, Hiromichi; Davis, Richard Eric; Wang, Zhiqiang; Ma, Wencai; Ishizawa, Jo; Kazuno, Saiko; Kauffman, Michael; Shacham, Sharon; Fujimura, Tsutomu; Ueno, Takashi; Miida, Takashi; Andreeff, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Mantle cell lymphoma (MCL) is an aggressive B-cell lymphoma characterized by the aberrant expression of several growth-regulating, oncogenic effectors. Exportin 1 (XPO1) mediates the nucleocytoplasmic transport of numerous molecules including oncogenic growth-regulating factors, RNAs, and ribosomal subunits. In MCL cells, the small molecule KPT-185 blocks XPO1 function and exerts anti-proliferative effects. In this study, we investigated the molecular mechanisms of this putative anti-tumor effect on MCL cells using cell growth/viability assays, immunoblotting, gene expression analysis, and absolute quantification proteomics. KPT-185 exhibited a p53-independent anti-lymphoma effect on MCL cells, by suppression of oncogenic mediators (e.g., XPO1, cyclin D1, c-Myc, PIM1, and Bcl-2 family members), repression of ribosomal biogenesis, and downregulation of translation/chaperone proteins (e.g., PIM2, EEF1A1, EEF2, and HSP70) that are part of the translational/transcriptional network regulated by heat shock factor 1. These results elucidate a novel mechanism in which ribosomal biogenesis appears to be a key component through which XPO1 contributes to tumor cell survival. Thus, we propose that the blockade of XPO1 could be a promising, novel strategy for the treatment of MCL and other malignancies overexpressing XPO1. PMID:26340096

  14. Bms1p, a novel GTP-binding protein, and the related Tsr1p are required for distinct steps of 40S ribosome biogenesis in yeast.

    PubMed Central

    Gelperin, D; Horton, L; Beckman, J; Hensold, J; Lemmon, S K

    2001-01-01

    Bms1p and Tsr1p define a novel family of proteins required for synthesis of 40S ribosomal subunits in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Both are essential and localize to the nucleolus. Tsr1p shares two extended regions of similarity with Bms1p, but the two proteins function at different steps in 40S ribosome maturation. Inactivation of Bms1p blocks at an early step, leading to disappearance of 20S and 18S rRNA precursors. Also, slight accumulation of an aberrant 23S product and significant 35S accumulation are observed, indicating that pre-rRNA processing at sites A0, A1, and A2 is inhibited. In contrast, depletion of Tsr1p results in accumulation of 20S rRNA. Because processing of 20S to 18S rRNA occurs in the cytoplasm, this suggests that Tsr1p is required for assembly of a transport- or maturation-competent particle or is specifically required for transport of 43S pre-ribosomal particles, but not 60S ribosome precursors, from the nucleus to the cytosol. Finally, Bms1p is a GTP-binding protein, the first found to function in ribosome assembly or rRNA processing. PMID:11565749

  15. SIRT1 regulates the ribosomal DNA locus: epigenetic candles twinkle longevity in the Christmas tree.

    PubMed

    Salminen, Antero; Kaarniranta, Kai

    2009-01-01

    Ribosomal RNA (rRNA) genes arrange themselves in a tandem pattern in nucleolus and during the transcription of rRNA genes, the elongating nascent rRNA transcripts create a structure called Christmas tree. rRNA genes in the rDNA locus can be either active or silent depending on the epigenetic regulation of the chromatin structure. Yeast Sir2 (silent information regulator 2) protein containing complexes can repress the recombination in the rDNA locus and subsequently extend the replicative lifespan of the budding yeast. The mammalian rDNA locus is also under the epigenetic regulation by protein complexes, such as NoRC (nucleolar remodeling complex) and eNoSC (energy-dependent nucleolar silencing complex), involving histone deacetylases and methyltransferases. SIRT1, a NAD(+)-dependent histone deacetylase, is the key component in the eNoSC complex and hence energetic changes can regulate the activation of eNoSC complex and in this way mediate the epigenetic silencing of rRNA gene expression. The eNoSC complex links SIRT1-induced longevity regulation to the metabolic rate theory of aging.

  16. Characterization of Regulatory Events Associated with Membrane Targeting of p90 Ribosomal S6 Kinase 1

    PubMed Central

    Richards, Stephanie A.; Dreisbach, Valley C.; Murphy, Leon O.; Blenis, John

    2001-01-01

    RSK is a serine/threonine kinase containing two distinct catalytic domains. Found at the terminus of the Ras/extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK)–mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) kinase cascade, mitogen-stimulated ribosomal S6 kinase (RSK) activity requires multiple inputs. These inputs include phosphorylation of the C-terminal kinase domain activation loop by ERK1/2 and phosphorylation of the N-terminal kinase domain activation loop by phosphoinositide-dependent protein kinase-1 (PDK1). Previous work has shown that upon mitogen stimulation, RSK accumulates in the nucleus. Here we show that prior to nuclear translocation, epidermal growth factor-stimulated RSK1 transiently associates with the plasma membrane. Myristylation of wild-type RSK1 results in an activated enzyme in the absence of added growth factors. When RSK is truncated at the C terminus, the characterized ERK docking is removed and RSK phosphotransferase activity is completely abolished. When myristylated, however, this myristylated C-terminal truncated form (myrCTT) is activated at a level equivalent to myristylated wild-type (myrWT) RSK. Both myrWT RSK and myrCTT RSK can signal to the RSK substrate c-Fos in the absence of mitogen activation. Unlike myrWT RSK, myrCTT RSK is not further activated by serum. Only the myristylated RSK proteins are basally phosphorylated on avian RSK1 serine 381, a site critical for RSK activity. The myristylated and unmyristylated RSK constructs interact with PDK1 upon mitogen stimulation, and this interaction is insensitive to the MEK inhibitor UO126. Because a kinase-inactive CTT RSK can be constitutively activated by targeting to the membrane, we propose that ERK may have a dual role in early RSK activation events: preliminary phosphorylation of RSK and escorting RSK to a membrane-associated complex, where additional MEK/ERK-independent activating inputs are encountered. PMID:11585927

  17. Pineapple translation factor SUI1 and ribosomal protein L36 promoters drive constitutive transgene expression patterns in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Koia, Jonni; Moyle, Richard; Hendry, Caroline; Lim, Lionel; Botella, José Ramón

    2013-03-01

    The availability of a variety of promoter sequences is necessary for the genetic engineering of plants, in basic research studies and for the development of transgenic crops. In this study, the promoter and 5' untranslated regions of the evolutionally conserved protein translation factor SUI1 gene and ribosomal protein L36 gene were isolated from pineapple and sequenced. Each promoter was translationally fused to the GUS reporter gene and transformed into the heterologous plant system Arabidopsis thaliana. Both the pineapple SUI1 and L36 promoters drove GUS expression in all tissues of Arabidopsis at levels comparable to the CaMV35S promoter. Transient assays determined that the pineapple SUI1 promoter also drove GUS expression in a variety of climacteric and non-climacteric fruit species. Thus the pineapple SUI1 and L36 promoters demonstrate the potential for using translation factor and ribosomal protein genes as a source of promoter sequences that can drive constitutive transgene expression patterns.

  18. Shiga toxin 1 is more dependent on the P proteins of the ribosomal stalk for depurination activity than Shiga toxin 2.

    PubMed

    Chiou, Jia-Chi; Li, Xiao-Ping; Remacha, Miguel; Ballesta, Juan P G; Tumer, Nilgun E

    2011-12-01

    Shiga toxins produced by Escherichia coli O157:H7 are responsible for food poisoning and hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS). The A subunits of Shiga toxins (Stx1A and Stx2A) inhibit translation by depurinating a specific adenine in the large rRNA. To determine if Stx1A and Stx2A require the ribosomal stalk for depurination, their activity and cytotoxicity were examined in the yeast P protein deletion mutants. Stx1A and Stx2A were less toxic and depurinated ribosomes less in a strain lacking P1/P2 on the ribosome and in the cytosol (ΔP2) than in a strain lacking P1/P2 on the ribosome, but containing free P2 in the cytosol (ΔP1). To determine if cytoplasmic P proteins facilitated depurination, Stx1A and Stx2A were expressed in the P0ΔAB mutant, in which the binding sites for P1/P2 were deleted on the ribosome, and P1/P2 accumulated in the cytosol. Stx1A was less toxic and depurinated ribosomes less in P0ΔAB, suggesting that intact binding sites for P1/P2 were critical. In contrast, Stx2A was toxic and depurinated ribosomes in P0ΔAB as in wild type, suggesting that it did not require the P1/P2 binding sites. Depurination of ΔP1, but not P0ΔAB ribosomes increased upon addition of purified P1α/P2βin vitro, and the increase was greater for Stx1 than for Stx2. We conclude that cytoplasmic P proteins stimulate depurination by Stx1 by facilitating the access of the toxin to the ribosome. Although ribosomal stalk is important for Stx1 and Stx2 to depurinate the ribosome, Stx2 is less dependent on the stalk proteins for activity than Stx1 and can depurinate ribosomes with an incomplete stalk better than Stx1. PMID:21907821

  19. Ribosomal proteins: functions beyond the ribosome

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Xiang; Liao, Wen-Juan; Liao, Jun-Ming; Liao, Peng; Lu, Hua

    2015-01-01

    Although ribosomal proteins are known for playing an essential role in ribosome assembly and protein translation, their ribosome-independent functions have also been greatly appreciated. Over the past decade, more than a dozen of ribosomal proteins have been found to activate the tumor suppressor p53 pathway in response to ribosomal stress. In addition, these ribosomal proteins are involved in various physiological and pathological processes. This review is composed to overview the current understanding of how ribosomal stress provokes the accumulation of ribosome-free ribosomal proteins, as well as the ribosome-independent functions of ribosomal proteins in tumorigenesis, immune signaling, and development. We also propose the potential of applying these pieces of knowledge to the development of ribosomal stress-based cancer therapeutics. PMID:25735597

  20. The D1-D2 region of the large subunit ribosomal DNA as barcode for ciliates.

    PubMed

    Stoeck, T; Przybos, E; Dunthorn, M

    2014-05-01

    Ciliates are a major evolutionary lineage within the alveolates, which are distributed in nearly all habitats on our planet and are an essential component for ecosystem function, processes and stability. Accurate identification of these unicellular eukaryotes through, for example, microscopy or mating type reactions is reserved to few specialists. To satisfy the demand for a DNA barcode for ciliates, which meets the standard criteria for DNA barcodes defined by the Consortium for the Barcode of Life (CBOL), we here evaluated the D1-D2 region of the ribosomal DNA large subunit (LSU-rDNA). Primer universality for the phylum Ciliophora was tested in silico with available database sequences as well as in the laboratory with 73 ciliate species, which represented nine of 12 ciliate classes. Primers tested in this study were successful for all tested classes. To test the ability of the D1-D2 region to resolve conspecific and congeneric sequence divergence, 63 Paramecium strains were sampled from 24 mating species. The average conspecific D1-D2 variation was 0.18%, whereas congeneric sequence divergence averaged 4.83%. In pairwise genetic distance analyses, we identified a D1-D2 sequence divergence of <0.6% as an ideal threshold to discriminate Paramecium species. Using this definition, only 3.8% of all conspecific and 3.9% of all congeneric sequence comparisons had the potential of false assignments. Neighbour-joining analyses inferred monophyly for all taxa but for two Paramecium octaurelia strains. Here, we present a protocol for easy DNA amplification of single cells and voucher deposition. In conclusion, the presented data pinpoint the D1-D2 region as an excellent candidate for an official CBOL barcode for ciliated protists.

  1. Eaf1p Is Required for Recruitment of NuA4 in Targeting TFIID to the Promoters of the Ribosomal Protein Genes for Transcriptional Initiation In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Uprety, Bhawana; Sen, Rwik

    2015-01-01

    NuA4 (nucleosome acetyltransferase of H4) promotes transcriptional initiation of TFIID (a complex of TBP and TBP-associated factors [TAFs])-dependent ribosomal protein genes involved in ribosome biogenesis. However, it is not clearly understood how NuA4 regulates the transcription of ribosomal protein genes. Here, we show that NuA4 is recruited to the promoters of ribosomal protein genes, such as RPS5, RPL2B, and RPS11B, for TFIID recruitment to initiate transcription, and the recruitment of NuA4 to these promoters is impaired in the absence of its Eaf1p component. Intriguingly, impaired NuA4 recruitment in a Δeaf1 strain depletes recruitment of TFIID (a TAF-dependent form of TBP) but not the TAF-independent form of TBP to the promoters of ribosomal protein genes. However, in the absence of NuA4, SAGA (Spt-Ada-Gcn5-acetyltransferase) is involved in targeting the TAF-independent form of TBP to the promoters of ribosomal protein genes for transcriptional initiation. Thus, NuA4 plays an important role in targeting TFIID to the promoters of ribosomal protein genes for transcriptional initiation in vivo. Such a function is mediated via its targeted histone acetyltransferase activity. In the absence of NuA4, ribosomal protein genes lose TFIID dependency and become SAGA dependent for transcriptional initiation. Collectively, these results provide significant insights into the regulation of ribosomal protein gene expression and, hence, ribosome biogenesis and functions. PMID:26100014

  2. Skeletal muscle plasticity induced by seasonal acclimatization involves IGF1 signaling: implications in ribosomal biogenesis and protein synthesis.

    PubMed

    Fuentes, Eduardo N; Zuloaga, Rodrigo; Valdes, Juan Antonio; Molina, Alfredo; Alvarez, Marco

    2014-10-01

    One of the most fundamental biological processes in living organisms that are affected by environmental fluctuations is growth. In fish, skeletal muscle accounts for the largest proportion of body mass, and the growth of this tissue is mainly controlled by the insulin-like growth factor (IGF) system. By using the carp (Cyprinus carpio), a fish that inhabits extreme conditions during winter and summer, we assessed the skeletal muscle plasticity induced by seasonal acclimatization and the relation of IGF signaling with protein synthesis and ribosomal biogenesis. The expression of igf1 in muscle decreased during winter in comparison with summer, whereas the expression for both paralogues of igf2 did not change significantly between seasons. The expression of igf1 receptor a (igf1ra), but not of igf1rb, was down-regulated in muscle during the winter as compared to the summer. A decrease in protein contents and protein phosphorylation for IGF signaling molecules in muscle was observed in winter-acclimatized carp. This was related with a decreased expression in muscle for markers of myogenesis (myoblast determination factor (myod), myogenic factor 5 (myf5), and myogenin (myog)); protein synthesis (myosin heavy chain (mhc) and myosin light chain (mlc3 and mlc1b)); and ribosomal biogenesis (pre-rRNA and ribosomal proteins). IGF signaling, and key markers of ribosomal biogenesis, protein synthesis, and myogenesis were affected by seasonal acclimatization, with differential regulation in gene expression and signaling pathway activation observed in muscle between both seasons. This suggests that these molecules are responsible for the muscle plasticity induced by seasonal acclimatization in carp.

  3. The location of spermine in bacterial ribosomes as indicated by 1,5-difluoro-2,4-dinitrobenzene and by ethidium bromide

    PubMed Central

    Stevens, L.; Pascoe, Genevieve

    1972-01-01

    1. When the binding of ethidium bromide to rRNA is measured both in the presence and in the absence of spermine, by spectrophotometric titrations, by gel filtration, or by the changes in fluorescence intensity, spermine competes with ethidium bromide for sites on the rRNA; under the conditions used in these experiments ethidium bromide is bound to the double-stranded regions of rRNA. 2. When an excess of ethidium bromide is added to ribosomes from Bacillus stearothermophilus approx. 80% of the endogenous spermine is displaced from the ribosomes. 3. [14C]Spermine is fixed to ribosomes by either formaldehyde or 1,5-difluoro-2,4-dinitrobenzene. Most of the [14C]spermine, fixed to ribosomes by 1,5-difluoro-2,4-dinitrobenzene, attaches to the ribosomal protein. 4. It is concluded that most of the endogenous spermine is bound to the double-stranded RNA in ribosomes, and that some of these double-stranded regions to which spermine is attached also have ribosomal proteins bound to them. PMID:5084791

  4. Anti-Human Endoglin (hCD105) Immunotoxin-Containing Recombinant Single Chain Ribosome-Inactivating Protein Musarmin 1.

    PubMed

    Barriuso, Begoña; Antolín, Pilar; Arias, F Javier; Girotti, Alessandra; Jiménez, Pilar; Cordoba-Diaz, Manuel; Cordoba-Diaz, Damián; Girbés, Tomás

    2016-01-01

    Endoglin (CD105) is an accessory component of the TGF-β receptor complex, which is expressed in a number of tissues and over-expressed in the endothelial cells of tumor neovasculature. Targeting endoglin with immunotoxins containing type 2 ribosome-inactivating proteins has proved an effective tool to reduce blood supply to B16 mice tumor xenografts. We prepared anti-endoglin immunotoxin (IT)-containing recombinant musarmin 1 (single chain ribosome-inactivating proteins) linked to the mouse anti-human CD105 44G4 mouse monoclonal antibody via N-succinimidyl 3-(2-pyridyldithio) propionate (SPDP). The immunotoxin specifically killed L929 fibroblast mouse cells transfected with the short form of human endoglin with IC50 values in the range of 5 × 10(-10) to 10(-9) M. PMID:27294959

  5. Anti-Human Endoglin (hCD105) Immunotoxin—Containing Recombinant Single Chain Ribosome-Inactivating Protein Musarmin 1

    PubMed Central

    Barriuso, Begoña; Antolín, Pilar; Arias, F. Javier; Girotti, Alessandra; Jiménez, Pilar; Cordoba-Diaz, Manuel; Cordoba-Diaz, Damián; Girbés, Tomás

    2016-01-01

    Endoglin (CD105) is an accessory component of the TGF-β receptor complex, which is expressed in a number of tissues and over-expressed in the endothelial cells of tumor neovasculature. Targeting endoglin with immunotoxins containing type 2 ribosome-inactivating proteins has proved an effective tool to reduce blood supply to B16 mice tumor xenografts. We prepared anti-endoglin immunotoxin (IT)—containing recombinant musarmin 1 (single chain ribosome-inactivating proteins) linked to the mouse anti-human CD105 44G4 mouse monoclonal antibody via N-succinimidyl 3-(2-pyridyldithio) propionate (SPDP). The immunotoxin specifically killed L929 fibroblast mouse cells transfected with the short form of human endoglin with IC50 values in the range of 5 × 10−10 to 10−9 M. PMID:27294959

  6. Isolation, characterization, sequencing and crystal structure of charybdin, a type 1 ribosome-inactivating protein from Charybdis maritima agg.

    PubMed

    Touloupakis, Eleftherios; Gessmann, Renate; Kavelaki, Kalliopi; Christofakis, Emmanuil; Petratos, Kyriacos; Ghanotakis, Demetrios F

    2006-06-01

    A novel, type 1 ribosome-inactivating protein designated charybdin was isolated from bulbs of Charybdis maritima agg. The protein, consisting of a single polypeptide chain with a molecular mass of 29 kDa, inhibited translation in rabbit reticulocytes with an IC50 of 27.2 nm. Plant genomic DNA extracted from the bulb was amplified by PCR between primers based on the N-terminal and C-terminal sequence of the protein from dissolved crystals. The complete mature protein sequence was derived by partial DNA sequencing and terminal protein sequencing, and was confirmed by high-resolution crystal structure analysis. The protein contains Val at position 79 instead of the conserved Tyr residue of the ribosome-inactivating proteins known to date. To our knowledge, this is the first observation of a natural substitution of a catalytic residue at the active site of a natural ribosome-inactivating protein. This substitution in the active site may be responsible for the relatively low in vitro translation inhibitory effect compared with other ribosome-inactivating proteins. Single crystals were grown in the cold room from PEG6000 solutions. Diffraction data collected to 1.6 A resolution were used to determine the protein structure by the molecular replacement method. The fold of the protein comprises two structural domains: an alpha + beta N-terminal domain (residues 4-190) and a mainly alpha-helical C-terminal domain (residues 191-257). The active site is located in the interface between the two domains and comprises residues Val79, Tyr117, Glu167 and Arg170.

  7. Classification of a frameshift/extended and a stop mutation in WT1 as gain-of-function mutations that activate cell cycle genes and promote Wilms tumour cell proliferation

    PubMed Central

    Busch, Maike; Schwindt, Heinrich; Brandt, Artur; Beier, Manfred; Görldt, Nicole; Romaniuk, Paul; Toska, Eneda; Roberts, Stefan; Royer, Hans-Dieter; Royer-Pokora, Brigitte

    2014-01-01

    The WT1 gene encodes a zinc finger transcription factor important for normal kidney development. WT1 is a suppressor for Wilms tumour development and an oncogene for diverse malignant tumours. We recently established cell lines from primary Wilms tumours with different WT1 mutations. To investigate the function of mutant WT1 proteins, we performed WT1 knockdown experiments in cell lines with a frameshift/extension (p.V432fsX87 = Wilms3) and a stop mutation (p.P362X = Wilms2) of WT1, followed by genome-wide gene expression analysis. We also expressed wild-type and mutant WT1 proteins in human mesenchymal stem cells and established gene expression profiles. A detailed analysis of gene expression data enabled us to classify the WT1 mutations as gain-of-function mutations. The mutant WT1Wilms2 and WT1Wilms3 proteins acquired an ability to modulate the expression of a highly significant number of genes from the G2/M phase of the cell cycle, and WT1 knockdown experiments showed that they are required for Wilms tumour cell proliferation. p53 negatively regulates the activity of a large number of these genes that are also part of a core proliferation cluster in diverse human cancers. Our data strongly suggest that mutant WT1 proteins facilitate expression of these cell cycle genes by antagonizing transcriptional repression mediated by p53. We show that mutant WT1 can physically interact with p53. Together the findings show for the first time that mutant WT1 proteins have a gain-of-function and act as oncogenes for Wilms tumour development by regulating Wilms tumour cell proliferation. PMID:24619359

  8. Nuclear ribosomal internal transcribed spacer 1 (ITS1) variation in the Anastrepha fraterculus cryptic species complex (Diptera, Tephritidae) of the Andean region

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The nuclear ribosomal internal transcribed spacer 1 (ITS1) was sequenced for Anastrepha fraterculus (Wiedemann, 1830) originating from 85 collections from the northern and central Andean countries of South America including Argentina (Tucumán), Bolivia, Perú, Ecuador, Colombia, and Venezuela. The IT...

  9. Ornithine decarboxylase antizyme finder (OAF): Fast and reliable detection of antizymes with frameshifts in mRNAs

    PubMed Central

    Bekaert, Michaël; Ivanov, Ivaylo P; Atkins, John F; Baranov, Pavel V

    2008-01-01

    Background Ornithine decarboxylase antizymes are proteins which negatively regulate cellular polyamine levels via their affects on polyamine synthesis and cellular uptake. In virtually all organisms from yeast to mammals, antizymes are encoded by two partially overlapping open reading frames (ORFs). A +1 frameshift between frames is required for the synthesis of antizyme. Ribosomes change translation phase at the end of the first ORF in response to stimulatory signals embedded in mRNA. Since standard sequence analysis pipelines are currently unable to recognise sites of programmed ribosomal frameshifting, proper detection of full length antizyme coding sequences (CDS) requires conscientious manual evaluation by a human expert. The rapid growth of sequence information demands less laborious and more cost efficient solutions for this problem. This manuscript describes a rapid and accurate computer tool for antizyme CDS detection that requires minimal human involvement. Results We have developed a computer tool, OAF (ODC antizyme finder) for identifying antizyme encoding sequences in spliced or intronless nucleic acid sequenes. OAF utilizes a combination of profile hidden Markov models (HMM) built separately for the products of each open reading frame constituting the entire antizyme coding sequence. Profile HMMs are based on a set of 218 manually assembled antizyme sequences. To distinguish between antizyme paralogs and orthologs from major phyla, antizyme sequences were clustered into twelve groups and specific combinations of profile HMMs were designed for each group. OAF has been tested on the current version of dbEST, where it identified over six thousand Expressed Sequence Tags (EST) sequences encoding antizyme proteins (over two thousand antizyme CDS in these ESTs are non redundant). Conclusion OAF performs well on raw EST sequences and mRNA sequences derived from genomic annotations. OAF will be used for the future updates of the RECODE database. OAF can also

  10. Atrial natriuretic peptide frameshift mutation in familial atrial fibrillation.

    PubMed

    Hodgson-Zingman, Denice M; Karst, Margaret L; Zingman, Leonid V; Heublein, Denise M; Darbar, Dawood; Herron, Kathleen J; Ballew, Jeffrey D; de Andrade, Mariza; Burnett, John C; Olson, Timothy M

    2008-07-10

    Atrial fibrillation is a common arrhythmia that is hereditary in a small subgroup of patients. In a family with 11 clinically affected members, we mapped an atrial fibrillation locus to chromosome 1p36-p35 and identified a heterozygous frameshift mutation in the gene encoding atrial natriuretic peptide. Circulating chimeric atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) was detected in high concentration in subjects with the mutation, and shortened atrial action potentials were seen in an isolated heart model, creating a possible substrate for atrial fibrillation. This report implicates perturbation of the atrial natriuretic peptide-cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP) pathway in cardiac electrical instability. PMID:18614783

  11. Non-mutagenic Suppression of Enterocyte Ferroportin 1 by Chemical Ribosomal Inactivation via p38 Mitogen-activated Protein Kinase (MAPK)-mediated Regulation: EVIDENCE FOR ENVIRONMENTAL HEMOCHROMATOSIS.

    PubMed

    Oh, Chang-Kyu; Park, Seong-Hwan; Kim, Juil; Moon, Yuseok

    2016-09-16

    Iron transfer across the basolateral membrane of an enterocyte into the circulation is the rate-limiting step in iron absorption and is regulated by various pathophysiological factors. Ferroportin (FPN), the only known mammalian iron exporter, transports iron from the basolateral surface of enterocytes, macrophages, and hepatocytes into the blood. Patients with genetic mutations in FPN or repeated blood transfusion develop hemochromatosis. In this study, non-mutagenic ribosomal inactivation was assessed as an etiological factor of FPN-associated hemochromatosis in enterocytes. Non-mutagenic chemical ribosomal inactivation disrupted iron homeostasis by regulating expression of the iron exporter FPN-1, leading to intracellular accumulation in enterocytes. Mechanistically, a xenobiotic insult stimulated the intracellular sentinel p38 MAPK signaling pathway, which was positively involved in FPN-1 suppression by ribosomal dysfunction. Moreover, ribosomal inactivation-induced iron accumulation in Caenorhabditis elegans as a simplified in vivo model for gut nutrition uptake was dependent on SEK-1, a p38 kinase activator, leading to suppression of FPN-1.1 expression and iron accumulation. In terms of gene regulation, ribosomal stress-activated p38 signaling down-regulated NRF2 and NF-κB, both of which were positive transcriptional regulators of FPN-1 transcription. This study provides molecular evidence for the modulation of iron bioavailability by ribosomal dysfunction as a potent etiological factor of non-mutagenic environmental hemochromatosis in the gut-to-blood axis.

  12. Evidence that Synthesis of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae Mitochondrially Encoded Ribosomal Protein Var1p May Be Membrane Localized

    PubMed Central

    Fiori, Alessandro; Mason, Thomas L.; Fox, Thomas D.

    2003-01-01

    The 5′-untranslated leaders of mitochondrial mRNAs appear to localize translation within the organelle. VAR1 is the only yeast mitochondrial gene encoding a major soluble protein. A chimeric mRNA bearing the VAR1 untranslated regions and the coding sequence for pre-Cox2p appears to be translated at the inner membrane surface. We propose that translation of the ribosomal protein Var1p is also likely to occur in close proximity to the inner membrane. PMID:12796311

  13. Ribosomal L22-like1 (RPL22L1) Promotes Ovarian Cancer Metastasis by Inducing Epithelial-to-Mesenchymal Transition

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Nan; Wei, Jia; Wang, Yuhui; Yan, Jinyan; Qin, Ying; Tong, Dandan; Pang, Bo; Sun, Donglin; Sun, Haiming; Yu, Yang; Sun, Wenjing; Meng, Xiangning; Zhang, Chunyu; Bai, Jing; Chen, Feng; Geng, Jingshu; Lee, Ki-Young; Fu, Songbin; Jin, Yan

    2015-01-01

    Double minute chromosomes (DMs) have important implications for cancer progression because oncogenes frequently amplified on them. We previously detected a functionally undefined gene amplified on DMs, Ribosomal L22-like1 (RPL22L1). The relationship between RPL22L1 and cancer progression is unknown. Here, RPL22L1 was characterized for its role in ovarian cancer (OC) metastasis and its underlying mechanism was examined. DNA copy number and mRNA expression of RPL22L1 in OC cells was analyzed using data obtained from The Cancer Genome Atlas and the Gene Expression Omnibus database. An immunohistochemical analysis of clinical OC specimens was performed and the relationships between expression level and clinicopathological factors were evaluated. Additionally, in vivo and in vitro assays were performed to understand the role of RPL22L1 in OC. RPL22L1 expression was higher in OC specimens than in normal tissues, and its expression level was highly positively correlated with invasion and lymph node metastasis (P < 0.05). RPL22L1 over-expression significantly enhanced intraperitoneal xenograft tumor development in nude mice and promoted invasion and migration in vitro. Additionally, RPL22L1 knockdown remarkably inhibited UACC-1598 cells invasion and migration. Further, RPL22L1 over-expression up-regulated the mesenchymal markers vimentin, fibronectin, and α-SMA, reduced expression of the epithelial markers E-cadherin, α-catenin, and β-catenin. RPL22L1 inhibition reduced expression of vimentin and N-cadherin. These results suggest that RPL22L1 induces epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT). Our data showed that the DMs amplified gene RPL22L1 is critical in maintaining the aggressive phenotype of OC and in triggering cell metastasis by inducing EMT. It could be employed as a novel prognostic marker and/or effective therapeutic target for OC. PMID:26618703

  14. Both microsatellite length and sequence context determine frameshift mutation rates in defective DNA mismatch repair.

    PubMed

    Chung, Heekyung; Lopez, Claudia G; Holmstrom, Joy; Young, Dennis J; Lai, Jenny F; Ream-Robinson, Deena; Carethers, John M

    2010-07-01

    It is generally accepted that longer microsatellites mutate more frequently in defective DNA mismatch repair (MMR) than shorter microsatellites. Indeed, we have previously observed that the A10 microsatellite of transforming growth factor beta type II receptor (TGFBR2) frameshifts -1 bp at a faster rate than the A8 microsatellite of activin type II receptor (ACVR2), although both genes become frameshift-mutated in >80% of MMR-defective colorectal cancers. To experimentally determine the effect of microsatellite length upon frameshift mutation in gene-specific sequence contexts, we altered the microsatellite length within TGFBR2 exon 3 and ACVR2 exon 10, generating A7, A10 and A13 constructs. These constructs were cloned 1 bp out of frame of EGFP, allowing a -1 bp frameshift to drive EGFP expression, and stably transfected into MMR-deficient cells. Subsequent non-fluorescent cells were sorted, cultured for 7-35 days and harvested for EGFP analysis and DNA sequencing. Longer microsatellites within TGFBR2 and ACVR2 showed significantly higher mutation rates than shorter ones, with TGFBR2 A13, A10 and A7 frameshifts measured at 22.38x10(-4), 2.17x10(-4) and 0.13x10(-4), respectively. Surprisingly, shorter ACVR2 constructs showed three times higher mutation rates at A7 and A10 lengths than identical length TGFBR2 constructs but comparably lower at the A13 length, suggesting influences from both microsatellite length as well as the sequence context. Furthermore, the TGFBR2 A13 construct mutated into 33% A11 sequences (-2 bp) in addition to expected A12 (-1 bp), indicating that this construct undergoes continual subsequent frameshift mutation. These data demonstrate experimentally that both the length of a mononucleotide microsatellite and its sequence context influence mutation rate in defective DNA MMR.

  15. All Ribosomes Are Created Equal. Really?

    PubMed

    Preiss, Thomas

    2016-02-01

    Ribosomes are generally thought of as molecular machines with a constitutive rather than regulatory role during protein synthesis. A study by Slavov et al.[1] now shows that ribosomes of distinct composition and functionality exist within eukaryotic cells, giving credence to the concept of 'specialized' ribosomes.

  16. Ribosome-inactivating proteins

    PubMed Central

    Walsh, Matthew J; Dodd, Jennifer E; Hautbergue, Guillaume M

    2013-01-01

    Ribosome-inactivating proteins (RIPs) were first isolated over a century ago and have been shown to be catalytic toxins that irreversibly inactivate protein synthesis. Elucidation of atomic structures and molecular mechanism has revealed these proteins to be a diverse group subdivided into two classes. RIPs have been shown to exhibit RNA N-glycosidase activity and depurinate the 28S rRNA of the eukaryotic 60S ribosomal subunit. In this review, we compare archetypal RIP family members with other potent toxins that abolish protein synthesis: the fungal ribotoxins which directly cleave the 28S rRNA and the newly discovered Burkholderia lethal factor 1 (BLF1). BLF1 presents additional challenges to the current classification system since, like the ribotoxins, it does not possess RNA N-glycosidase activity but does irreversibly inactivate ribosomes. We further discuss whether the RIP classification should be broadened to include toxins achieving irreversible ribosome inactivation with similar turnovers to RIPs, but through different enzymatic mechanisms. PMID:24071927

  17. The DEAD-box Protein Rok1 Orchestrates 40S and 60S Ribosome Assembly by Promoting the Release of Rrp5 from Pre-40S Ribosomes to Allow for 60S Maturation

    PubMed Central

    Khoshnevis, Sohail; Askenasy, Isabel; Dattolo, Maria D.; Young-Erdos, Crystal L.; Stroupe, M. Elizabeth; Karbstein, Katrin

    2016-01-01

    DEAD-box proteins are ubiquitous regulators of RNA biology. While commonly dubbed “helicases,” their activities also include duplex annealing, adenosine triphosphate (ATP)-dependent RNA binding, and RNA-protein complex remodeling. Rok1, an essential DEAD-box protein, and its cofactor Rrp5 are required for ribosome assembly. Here, we use in vivo and in vitro biochemical analyses to demonstrate that ATP-bound Rok1, but not adenosine diphosphate (ADP)-bound Rok1, stabilizes Rrp5 binding to 40S ribosomes. Interconversion between these two forms by ATP hydrolysis is required for release of Rrp5 from pre-40S ribosomes in vivo, thereby allowing Rrp5 to carry out its role in 60S subunit assembly. Furthermore, our data also strongly suggest that the previously described accumulation of snR30 upon Rok1 inactivation arises because Rrp5 release is blocked and implicate a previously undescribed interaction between Rrp5 and the DEAD-box protein Has1 in mediating snR30 accumulation when Rrp5 release from pre-40S subunits is blocked. PMID:27280440

  18. The DEAD-box Protein Rok1 Orchestrates 40S and 60S Ribosome Assembly by Promoting the Release of Rrp5 from Pre-40S Ribosomes to Allow for 60S Maturation.

    PubMed

    Khoshnevis, Sohail; Askenasy, Isabel; Johnson, Matthew C; Dattolo, Maria D; Young-Erdos, Crystal L; Stroupe, M Elizabeth; Karbstein, Katrin

    2016-06-01

    DEAD-box proteins are ubiquitous regulators of RNA biology. While commonly dubbed "helicases," their activities also include duplex annealing, adenosine triphosphate (ATP)-dependent RNA binding, and RNA-protein complex remodeling. Rok1, an essential DEAD-box protein, and its cofactor Rrp5 are required for ribosome assembly. Here, we use in vivo and in vitro biochemical analyses to demonstrate that ATP-bound Rok1, but not adenosine diphosphate (ADP)-bound Rok1, stabilizes Rrp5 binding to 40S ribosomes. Interconversion between these two forms by ATP hydrolysis is required for release of Rrp5 from pre-40S ribosomes in vivo, thereby allowing Rrp5 to carry out its role in 60S subunit assembly. Furthermore, our data also strongly suggest that the previously described accumulation of snR30 upon Rok1 inactivation arises because Rrp5 release is blocked and implicate a previously undescribed interaction between Rrp5 and the DEAD-box protein Has1 in mediating snR30 accumulation when Rrp5 release from pre-40S subunits is blocked. PMID:27280440

  19. TORC1 and TORC2 work together to regulate ribosomal protein S6 phosphorylation in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Yerlikaya, Seda; Meusburger, Madeleine; Kumari, Romika; Huber, Alexandre; Anrather, Dorothea; Costanzo, Michael; Boone, Charles; Ammerer, Gustav; Baranov, Pavel V.; Loewith, Robbie

    2016-01-01

    Nutrient-sensitive phosphorylation of the S6 protein of the 40S subunit of the eukaryote ribosome is highly conserved. However, despite four decades of research, the functional consequences of this modification remain unknown. Revisiting this enigma in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, we found that the regulation of Rps6 phosphorylation on Ser-232 and Ser-233 is mediated by both TOR complex 1 (TORC1) and TORC2. TORC1 regulates phosphorylation of both sites via the poorly characterized AGC-family kinase Ypk3 and the PP1 phosphatase Glc7, whereas TORC2 regulates phosphorylation of only the N-terminal phosphosite via Ypk1. Cells expressing a nonphosphorylatable variant of Rps6 display a reduced growth rate and a 40S biogenesis defect, but these phenotypes are not observed in cells in which Rps6 kinase activity is compromised. Furthermore, using polysome profiling and ribosome profiling, we failed to uncover a role of Rps6 phosphorylation in either global translation or translation of individual mRNAs. Taking the results together, this work depicts the signaling cascades orchestrating Rps6 phosphorylation in budding yeast, challenges the notion that Rps6 phosphorylation plays a role in translation, and demonstrates that observations made with Rps6 knock-ins must be interpreted cautiously. PMID:26582391

  20. High-Resolution Analysis of Coronavirus Gene Expression by RNA Sequencing and Ribosome Profiling.

    PubMed

    Irigoyen, Nerea; Firth, Andrew E; Jones, Joshua D; Chung, Betty Y-W; Siddell, Stuart G; Brierley, Ian

    2016-02-01

    Members of the family Coronaviridae have the largest genomes of all RNA viruses, typically in the region of 30 kilobases. Several coronaviruses, such as Severe acute respiratory syndrome-related coronavirus (SARS-CoV) and Middle East respiratory syndrome-related coronavirus (MERS-CoV), are of medical importance, with high mortality rates and, in the case of SARS-CoV, significant pandemic potential. Other coronaviruses, such as Porcine epidemic diarrhea virus and Avian coronavirus, are important livestock pathogens. Ribosome profiling is a technique which exploits the capacity of the translating ribosome to protect around 30 nucleotides of mRNA from ribonuclease digestion. Ribosome-protected mRNA fragments are purified, subjected to deep sequencing and mapped back to the transcriptome to give a global "snap-shot" of translation. Parallel RNA sequencing allows normalization by transcript abundance. Here we apply ribosome profiling to cells infected with Murine coronavirus, mouse hepatitis virus, strain A59 (MHV-A59), a model coronavirus in the same genus as SARS-CoV and MERS-CoV. The data obtained allowed us to study the kinetics of virus transcription and translation with exquisite precision. We studied the timecourse of positive and negative-sense genomic and subgenomic viral RNA production and the relative translation efficiencies of the different virus ORFs. Virus mRNAs were not found to be translated more efficiently than host mRNAs; rather, virus translation dominates host translation at later time points due to high levels of virus transcripts. Triplet phasing of the profiling data allowed precise determination of translated reading frames and revealed several translated short open reading frames upstream of, or embedded within, known virus protein-coding regions. Ribosome pause sites were identified in the virus replicase polyprotein pp1a ORF and investigated experimentally. Contrary to expectations, ribosomes were not found to pause at the ribosomal

  1. High-Resolution Analysis of Coronavirus Gene Expression by RNA Sequencing and Ribosome Profiling

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Joshua D.; Chung, Betty Y.-W.; Siddell, Stuart G.; Brierley, Ian

    2016-01-01

    Members of the family Coronaviridae have the largest genomes of all RNA viruses, typically in the region of 30 kilobases. Several coronaviruses, such as Severe acute respiratory syndrome-related coronavirus (SARS-CoV) and Middle East respiratory syndrome-related coronavirus (MERS-CoV), are of medical importance, with high mortality rates and, in the case of SARS-CoV, significant pandemic potential. Other coronaviruses, such as Porcine epidemic diarrhea virus and Avian coronavirus, are important livestock pathogens. Ribosome profiling is a technique which exploits the capacity of the translating ribosome to protect around 30 nucleotides of mRNA from ribonuclease digestion. Ribosome-protected mRNA fragments are purified, subjected to deep sequencing and mapped back to the transcriptome to give a global “snap-shot” of translation. Parallel RNA sequencing allows normalization by transcript abundance. Here we apply ribosome profiling to cells infected with Murine coronavirus, mouse hepatitis virus, strain A59 (MHV-A59), a model coronavirus in the same genus as SARS-CoV and MERS-CoV. The data obtained allowed us to study the kinetics of virus transcription and translation with exquisite precision. We studied the timecourse of positive and negative-sense genomic and subgenomic viral RNA production and the relative translation efficiencies of the different virus ORFs. Virus mRNAs were not found to be translated more efficiently than host mRNAs; rather, virus translation dominates host translation at later time points due to high levels of virus transcripts. Triplet phasing of the profiling data allowed precise determination of translated reading frames and revealed several translated short open reading frames upstream of, or embedded within, known virus protein-coding regions. Ribosome pause sites were identified in the virus replicase polyprotein pp1a ORF and investigated experimentally. Contrary to expectations, ribosomes were not found to pause at the ribosomal

  2. The catalytic subunit of shiga-like toxin 1 interacts with ribosomal stalk proteins and is inhibited by their conserved C-terminal domain.

    PubMed

    McCluskey, Andrew J; Poon, Gregory M K; Bolewska-Pedyczak, Eleonora; Srikumar, Tharan; Jeram, Stanley M; Raught, Brian; Gariépy, Jean

    2008-04-25

    Shiga-like toxin 1 (SLT-1) is a type II ribosome-inactivating protein; its A(1) domain blocks protein synthesis in eukaryotic cells by catalyzing the depurination of a single adenine base in 28 S rRNA. The molecular mechanism leading to this site-specific depurination event is thought to involve interactions with eukaryotic ribosomal proteins. Here, we present evidence that the A(1) chain of SLT-1 binds to the ribosomal proteins P0, P1, and P2. These proteins were identified from a HeLa cell lysate by tandem mass spectrometry, and subsequently confirmed to bind to SLT-1 A(1) chain by yeast-two-hybrid and pull-down experiments using candidate full-length proteins. Moreover, the removal of the last 17 amino acids of either protein P1 or P2 abolishes the interaction with the A(1) chain, whereas P0, lacking this common C terminus, still binds to the A(1) domain. In vitro pull-down experiments using fusion protein-tagged C-terminal peptides corresponding to the common 7, 11, and 17 terminal residues of P1 and P2 confirmed that the A(1) chain of SLT-1 as well as the A chain of ricin bind to this shared C-terminal peptide motif. More importantly, a synthetic peptide corresponding to the 17 amino acid C terminus of P1 and P2 was shown to inhibit the ribosome-inactivating function of the A(1) chain of SLT-1 in an in vitro transcription and translation-coupled assay. These results suggest a role for the ribosomal stalk in aiding the A(1) chain of SLT-1 and other type II ribosome-inactivating proteins in localizing its catalytic domain near the site of depurination in the 28 S rRNA. PMID:18358491

  3. A frameshift error detection algorithm for DNA sequencing projects.

    PubMed Central

    Fichant, G A; Quentin, Y

    1995-01-01

    During the determination of DNA sequences, frameshift errors are not the most frequent but they are the most bothersome as they corrupt the amino acid sequence over several residues. Detection of such errors by sequence alignment is only possible when related sequences are found in the databases. To avoid this limitation, we have developed a new tool based on the distribution of non-overlapping 3-tuples or 6-tuples in the three frames of an ORF. The method relies upon the result of a correspondence analysis. It has been extensively tested on Bacillus subtilis and Saccharomyces cerevisiae sequences and has also been examined with human sequences. The results indicate that it can detect frameshift errors affecting as few as 20 bp with a low rate of false positives (no more than 1.0/1000 bp scanned). The proposed algorithm can be used to scan a large collection of data, but it is mainly intended for laboratory practice as a tool for checking the quality of the sequences produced during a sequencing project. PMID:7659513

  4. Ribosome recycling depends on a mechanistic link between the FeS cluster domain and a conformational switch of the twin-ATPase ABCE1.

    PubMed

    Barthelme, Dominik; Dinkelaker, Stephanie; Albers, Sonja-Verena; Londei, Paola; Ermler, Ulrich; Tampé, Robert

    2011-02-22

    Despite some appealing similarities of protein synthesis across all phyla of life, the final phase of mRNA translation has yet to be captured. Here, we reveal the ancestral role and mechanistic principles of the newly identified twin-ATPase ABCE1 in ribosome recycling. We demonstrate that the unique iron-sulfur cluster domain and an ATP-dependent conformational switch of ABCE1 are essential both for ribosome binding and recycling. By direct (11) interaction, the peptide release factor aRF1 is shown to synergistically promote ABCE1 function in posttermination ribosome recycling. Upon ATP binding, ABCE1 undergoes a conformational switch from an open to a closed ATP-occluded state, which drives ribosome dissociation as well as the disengagement of aRF1. ATP hydrolysis is not required for a single round of ribosome splitting but for ABCE1 release from the 30S subunit to reenter a new cycle. These results provide a mechanistic understanding of final phases in mRNA translation.

  5. The transcription factor EGR1 localizes to the nucleolus and is linked to suppression of ribosomal precursor synthesis.

    PubMed

    Ponti, Donatella; Bellenchi, Gian Carlo; Puca, Rosa; Bastianelli, Daniela; Maroder, Marella; Ragona, Giuseppe; Roussel, Pascal; Thiry, Marc; Mercola, Dan; Calogero, Antonella

    2014-01-01

    EGR1 is an immediate early gene with a wide range of activities as transcription factor, spanning from regulation of cell growth to differentiation. Numerous studies show that EGR1 either promotes the proliferation of stimulated cells or suppresses the tumorigenic growth of transformed cells. Upon interaction with ARF, EGR1 is sumoylated and acquires the ability to bind to specific targets such as PTEN and in turn to regulate cell growth. ARF is mainly localized to the periphery of nucleolus where is able to negatively regulate ribosome biogenesis. Since EGR1 colocalizes with ARF under IGF-1 stimulation we asked the question of whether EGR1 also relocate to the nucleolus to interact with ARF. Here we show that EGR1 colocalizes with nucleolar markers such as fibrillarin and B23 in the presence of ARF. Western analysis of nucleolar extracts from HeLa cells was used to confirm the presence of EGR1 in the nucleolus mainly as the 100 kDa sumoylated form. We also show that the level of the ribosomal RNA precursor 47S is inversely correlated to the level of EGR1 transcripts. The EGR1 iseffective to regulate the synthesis of the 47S rRNA precursor. Then we demonstrated that EGR1 binds to the Upstream Binding Factor (UBF) leading us to hypothesize that the regulating activity of EGR1 is mediated by its interaction within the transcriptional complex of RNA polymerase I. These results confirm the presence of EGR1 in the nucleolus and point to a role for EGR1 in the control of nucleolar metabolism.

  6. One Novel Frameshift Mutation on Exon 64 of COL7A1 Gene in an Iranian Individual Suffering Recessive Dystrophic Epidermolysis Bullosa.

    PubMed

    Khaniani, Mahmoud Shekari; Sohrabi, Nasrin; Derakhshan, Neda Mansoori; Derakhshan, Sima Mansoori

    2015-01-01

    Recessive dystrophic epidermolysis bullosa (RDEB) is an extremely rare subtype of bullous dermatosis caused by the COL7A1 gene mutation. After genomic DNA extraction from the peripheral blood sample of all subjects (3 pedigree members and 3 unrelated control individuals), COL7A1 gene screening was performed by PCR amplification and direct DNA sequencing of all of the coding exons and flanking intronic regions. Genetic analysis of the COL7A1 gene in an affected individual revealed a novel mutation: c.5493delG (p.K1831Nfs*10) in exon 64 of the COL7A1 gene in homozygous state. This mutation was not discovered in 3 unrelated Iranian control individuals. These data suggest that c.5493delG may influence the phenotype of RDEB. The result of this case report contributes to the expanding database on COL7A1 mutations.

  7. An AP4B1 frameshift mutation in siblings with intellectual disability and spastic tetraplegia further delineates the AP-4 deficiency syndrome.

    PubMed

    Abdollahpour, Hengameh; Alawi, Malik; Kortüm, Fanny; Beckstette, Michael; Seemanova, Eva; Komárek, Vladimír; Rosenberger, Georg; Kutsche, Kerstin

    2015-02-01

    The recently proposed adaptor protein 4 (AP-4) deficiency syndrome comprises a group of congenital neurological disorders characterized by severe intellectual disability (ID), delayed or absent speech, hereditary spastic paraplegia, and growth retardation. AP-4 is a heterotetrameric protein complex with important functions in vesicle trafficking. Mutations in genes affecting different subunits of AP-4, including AP4B1, AP4E1, AP4S1, and AP4M1, have been reported in patients with the AP-4 deficiency phenotype. We describe two siblings from a non-consanguineous couple who presented with severe ID, absent speech, microcephaly, growth retardation, and progressive spastic tetraplegia. Whole-exome sequencing in the two patients identified the novel homozygous 2-bp deletion c.1160_1161delCA (p.(Thr387Argfs*30)) in AP4B1. Sanger sequencing confirmed the mutation in the siblings and revealed it in the heterozygous state in both parents. The AP4B1-associated phenotype has previously been assigned to spastic paraplegia-47. Identification of a novel AP4B1 alteration in two patients with clinical manifestations highly similar to other individuals with mutations affecting one of the four AP-4 subunits further supports the observation that loss of AP-4 assembly or functionality underlies the common clinical features in these patients and underscores the existence of the clinically recognizable AP-4 deficiency syndrome.

  8. An AP4B1 frameshift mutation in siblings with intellectual disability and spastic tetraplegia further delineates the AP-4 deficiency syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Abdollahpour, Hengameh; Alawi, Malik; Kortüm, Fanny; Beckstette, Michael; Seemanova, Eva; Komárek, Vladimír; Rosenberger, Georg; Kutsche, Kerstin

    2015-01-01

    The recently proposed adaptor protein 4 (AP-4) deficiency syndrome comprises a group of congenital neurological disorders characterized by severe intellectual disability (ID), delayed or absent speech, hereditary spastic paraplegia, and growth retardation. AP-4 is a heterotetrameric protein complex with important functions in vesicle trafficking. Mutations in genes affecting different subunits of AP-4, including AP4B1, AP4E1, AP4S1, and AP4M1, have been reported in patients with the AP-4 deficiency phenotype. We describe two siblings from a non-consanguineous couple who presented with severe ID, absent speech, microcephaly, growth retardation, and progressive spastic tetraplegia. Whole-exome sequencing in the two patients identified the novel homozygous 2-bp deletion c.1160_1161delCA (p.(Thr387Argfs*30)) in AP4B1. Sanger sequencing confirmed the mutation in the siblings and revealed it in the heterozygous state in both parents. The AP4B1-associated phenotype has previously been assigned to spastic paraplegia-47. Identification of a novel AP4B1 alteration in two patients with clinical manifestations highly similar to other individuals with mutations affecting one of the four AP-4 subunits further supports the observation that loss of AP-4 assembly or functionality underlies the common clinical features in these patients and underscores the existence of the clinically recognizable AP-4 deficiency syndrome. PMID:24781758

  9. The Interaction Pattern between a Homology Model of 40S Ribosomal S9 Protein of Rhizoctonia solani and 1-Hydroxyphenaize by Docking Study

    PubMed Central

    Dharni, Seema; Sanchita; Sharma, Ashok; Patra, Dharani Dhar

    2014-01-01

    1-Hydroxyphenazine (1-OH-PHZ), a natural product from Pseudomonas aeruginosa strain SD12, was earlier reported to have potent antifungal activity against Rhizoctonia solani. In the present work, the antifungal activity of 1-OH-PHZ on 40S ribosomal S9 protein was validated by molecular docking approach. 1-OH-PHZ showed interaction with two polar contacts with residues, Arg69 and Phe19, which inhibits the synthesis of fungal protein. Our study reveals that 1-OH-PHZ can be a potent inhibitor of 40S ribosomal S9 protein of R. solani that may be a promising approach for the management of fungal diseases. PMID:24864254

  10. Structure of the no-go mRNA decay complex Dom34-Hbs1 bound to a stalled 80S ribosome.

    PubMed

    Becker, Thomas; Armache, Jean-Paul; Jarasch, Alexander; Anger, Andreas M; Villa, Elizabeth; Sieber, Heidemarie; Motaal, Basma Abdel; Mielke, Thorsten; Berninghausen, Otto; Beckmann, Roland

    2011-06-01

    No-go decay (NGD) is a mRNA quality-control mechanism in eukaryotic cells that leads to degradation of mRNAs stalled during translational elongation. The key factors triggering NGD are Dom34 and Hbs1. We used cryo-EM to visualize NGD intermediates resulting from binding of the Dom34-Hbs1 complex to stalled ribosomes. At subnanometer resolution, all domains of Dom34 and Hbs1 were identified, allowing the docking of crystal structures and homology models. Moreover, the close structural similarity of Dom34 and Hbs1 to eukaryotic release factors (eRFs) enabled us to propose a model for the ribosome-bound eRF1-eRF3 complex. Collectively, our data provide structural insights into how stalled mRNA is recognized on the ribosome and how the eRF complex can simultaneously recognize stop codons and catalyze peptide release.

  11. X-ray sequence and crystal structure of luffaculin 1, a novel type 1 ribosome-inactivating protein

    PubMed Central

    Hou, Xiaomin; Chen, Minghuang; Chen, Liqing; Meehan, Edward J; Xie, Jieming; Huang, Mingdong

    2007-01-01

    Background Protein sequence can be obtained through Edman degradation, mass spectrometry, or cDNA sequencing. High resolution X-ray crystallography can also be used to derive protein sequence information, but faces the difficulty in distinguishing the Asp/Asn, Glu/Gln, and Val/Thr pairs. Luffaculin 1 is a new type 1 ribosome-inactivating protein (RIP) isolated from the seeds of Luffa acutangula. Besides rRNA N-glycosidase activity, luffaculin 1 also demonstrates activities including inhibiting tumor cells' proliferation and inducing tumor cells' differentiation. Results The crystal structure of luffaculin 1 was determined at 1.4 Å resolution. Its amino-acid sequence was derived from this high resolution structure using the following criteria: 1) high resolution electron density; 2) comparison of electron density between two molecules that exist in the same crystal; 3) evaluation of the chemical environment of residues to break down the sequence assignment ambiguity in residue pairs Glu/Gln, Asp/Asn, and Val/Thr; 4) comparison with sequences of the homologous proteins. Using the criteria 1 and 2, 66% of the residues can be assigned. By incorporating with criterion 3, 86% of the residues were assigned, suggesting the effectiveness of chemical environment evaluation in breaking down residue ambiguity. In total, 94% of the luffaculin 1 sequence was assigned with high confidence using this improved X-ray sequencing strategy. Two N-acetylglucosamine moieties, linked respectively to the residues Asn77 and Asn84, can be identified in the structure. Residues Tyr70, Tyr110, Glu159 and Arg162 define the active site of luffaculin 1 as an RNA N-glycosidase. Conclusion X-ray sequencing method can be effective to derive sequence information of proteins. The evaluation of the chemical environment of residues is a useful method to break down the assignment ambiguity in Glu/Gln, Asp/Asn, and Val/Thr pairs. The sequence and the crystal structure confirm that luffaculin 1 is a new

  12. Marfan syndrome with neonatal progeroid syndrome-like lipodystrophy associated with a novel frameshift mutation at the 3' terminus of the FBN1-gene.

    PubMed

    Graul-Neumann, Luitgard M; Kienitz, Tina; Robinson, Peter N; Baasanjav, Sevjidmaa; Karow, Benjamin; Gillessen-Kaesbach, Gabriele; Fahsold, Raimund; Schmidt, Hartmut; Hoffmann, Katrin; Passarge, Eberhard

    2010-11-01

    We report on a 25-year-old woman with pronounced generalized lipodystrophy and a progeroid aspect since birth, who also had Marfan syndrome (MFS; fulfilling the Ghent criteria) with mild skeletal features, dilated aortic bulb, dural ectasia, bilateral subluxation of the lens, and severe myopia in addition to the severe generalized lipodystrophy. She lacked insulin resistance, hypertriglyceridemia, hepatic steatosis, and diabetes. Mutation analysis in the gene encoding fibrillin 1 (FBN1) revealed a novel de novo heterozygous deletion, c.8155_8156del2 in exon 64. The severe generalized lipodystrophy in this patient with progeroid features has not previously been described in other patients with MFS and FBN1 mutations. We did not find a mutation in genes known to be associated with congenital lipodystrophy (APGAT2, BSCL2, CAV1, PTRF-CAVIN, PPARG, LMNB2) or with Hutchinson-Gilford progeria (ZMPSTE24, LMNA/C). Other progeria syndromes were considered unlikely because premature greying, hypogonadism, and scleroderma-like skin disease were not present. Our patient shows striking similarity to two patients who have been published in this journal by O'Neill et al. [O'Neill et al. (2007); Am J Med Genet Part A 143A:1421-1430] with the diagnosis of neonatal progeroid syndrome (NPS). This condition also known as Wiedemann-Rautenstrauch syndrome is a rare disorder characterized by accelerated aging and lipodystrophy from birth, poor postnatal weight gain, and characteristic facial features. The course is usually progressive with early lethality. However this entity seems heterogeneous. We suggest that our patient and the two similar cases described before represent a new entity, a subgroup of MFS with overlapping features to NPS syndrome.

  13. First application of next-generation sequencing in Moroccan breast/ovarian cancer families and report of a novel frameshift mutation of the BRCA1 gene

    PubMed Central

    Jouali, Farah; Laarabi, Fatima-Zahra; Marchoudi, Nabila; Ratbi, Ilham; Elalaoui, Siham Chafai; Rhaissi, Houria; Fekkak, Jamal; Sefiani, Abdelaziz

    2016-01-01

    At present, breast cancer is the most common type of cancer in females. The majority of cases are sporadic, but 5–10% are due to an inherited predisposition to develop breast and ovarian cancers, which are transmitted as an autosomal dominant form with incomplete penetrance. The beneficial effects of clinical genetic testing, including next generation sequencing (NGS) for BRCA1/2 mutations, is major; in particular, it benefits the care of patients and the counseling of relatives that are at risk of breast cancer, in order to reduce breast cancer mortality. BRCA genetic testing was performed in 15 patients with breast cancer and a family with positivity for the heterozygous c.6428C>A mutation of the BRCA2 gene. Informed consent was obtained from all the subjects. Genomic DNAs were extracted and the NGS for genes was performed using the Ion Torrent Personal Genome Machine (PGM) with a 316 chip. The reads were aligned with the human reference HG19 genome to elucidate variants in the BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes. Mutations detected by the PGM platform were confirmed by target direct Sanger sequencing on a second patient DNA sample. In total, 4 BRCA variants were identified in 6 families by NGS. Of these, 3 mutations had been previously reported: c.2126insA of BRCA1, and c.1310_1313delAAGA and c.7235insG of BRCA2. The fourth variant, c.3453delT in BRCA1, has, to the best of our knowledge, never been previously reported. The present study is the first to apply NGS of the BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes to a Moroccan population, prompting additional investigation into local founder mutations and variant characteristics in the region. The variants with no clear clinical significance may present a diagnostic challenge when performing targeted resequencing. These results confirm that an NGS approach based on Ampliseq libraries and PGM sequencing is a highly efficient, speedy and high-throughput mutation detection method, which may be preferable in lower income countries. PMID:27446417

  14. Rmt1 catalyzes zinc-finger independent arginine methylation of ribosomal protein Rps2 in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    SciTech Connect

    Lipson, Rebecca S.; Webb, Kristofor J.; Clarke, Steven G.

    2010-01-22

    Rps2/rpS2 is a well conserved protein of the eukaryotic ribosomal small subunit. Rps2 has previously been shown to contain asymmetric dimethylarginine residues, the addition of which is catalyzed by zinc-finger-containing arginine methyltransferase 3 (Rmt3) in the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe and protein arginine methyltransferase 3 (PRMT3) in mammalian cells. Here, we demonstrate that despite the lack of a zinc-finger-containing homolog of Rmt3/PRMT3 in the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Rps2 is partially modified to generate asymmetric dimethylarginine and monomethylarginine residues. We find that this modification of Rps2 is dependent upon the major arginine methyltransferase 1 (Rmt1) in S. cerevisiae. These results are suggestive of a role for Rmt1 in modifying the function of Rps2 in a manner distinct from that occurring in S. pombe and mammalian cells.

  15. 20-Hydroxyecdysone stimulates nuclear accumulation of BmNep1, a nuclear ribosome biogenesis-related protein in the silkworm, Bombyx mori.

    PubMed

    Ji, M-M; Liu, A-Q; Sima, Y-H; Xu, S-Q

    2016-10-01

    The pathway of communication between endocrine hormones and ribosome biogenesis critical for physiological adaptation is largely unknown. Nucleolar essential protein 1 (Nep1) is an essential gene for ribosome biogenesis and is functionally conserved in many in vertebrate and invertebrate species. In this study, we cloned Bombyx mori Nep1 (BmNep1) due to its high expression in silk glands of silkworms on day 3 of the fifth instar. We found that BmNep1 mRNA and protein levels were upregulated in silk glands during fourth-instar ecdysis and larval-pupal metamorphosis. By immunoprecipitation with the anti-BmNep1 antibody and liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry analyses, it was shown that BmNep1 probably interacts with proteins related to ribosome structure formation. Immunohistochemistry, biochemical fractionation and immunocytochemistry revealed that BmNep1 is localized to the nuclei in Bombyx cells. Using BmN cells originally derived from ovaries, we demonstrated that 20-hydroxyecdysone (20E) induced BmNep1 expression and stimulated nuclear accumulation of BmNep1. Under physiological conditions, BmNep1 was also upregulated in ovaries during larval-pupal metamorphosis. Overall, our results indicate that the endocrine hormone 20E facilitates nuclear accumulation of BmNep1, which is involved in nuclear ribosome biogenesis in Bombyx. PMID:27329527

  16. Characterizing inactive ribosomes in translational profiling.

    PubMed

    Liu, Botao; Qian, Shu-Bing

    2016-01-01

    The broad impact of translational regulation has emerged explosively in the last few years in part due to the technological advance in genome-wide interrogation of gene expression. During mRNA translation, the majority of actively translating ribosomes exist as polysomes in cells with multiple ribosomes loaded on a single transcript. The importance of the monosome, however, has been less appreciated in translational profiling analysis. Here we report that the monosome fraction isolated by sucrose sedimentation contains a large quantity of inactive ribosomes that do not engage on mRNAs to direct translation. We found that the elongation factor eEF2, but not eEF1A, stably resides in these non-translating ribosomes. This unique feature permits direct evaluation of ribosome status under various stress conditions and in the presence of translation inhibitors. Ribosome profiling reveals that the monosome has a similar but not identical pattern of ribosome footprints compared to the polysome. We show that the association of free ribosomal subunits minimally contributes to ribosome occupancy outside of the coding region. Our results not only offer a quantitative method to monitor ribosome availability, but also uncover additional layers of ribosome status needed to be considered in translational profiling analysis. PMID:27335722

  17. Dictyostelium ribosomal protein genes and the elongation factor 1B gene show coordinate developmental regulation which is under post-transcriptional control.

    PubMed

    Agarwal, A K; Blumberg, D D

    1999-06-01

    Starvation for amino acids initiates the developmental program in the cellular slime mold, Dictyostelium discoideum [19, 20]. One of the earliest developmental events is the decline in ribosomal protein synthesis [2, 17, 29, 30]. The ribosomal protein mRNAs are excluded from polysomes with 20 min to 1 h following the removal of nutrients, and their mRNA levels decline sharply at about 9 h into the 24-h developmental cycle [28, 31, 35, 36]. It has been generally assumed that the decline in r-protein mRNA levels during late development reflected a decline in the transcription rate [12, 32, 43]. Here we demonstrate that this is not the case. The transcription rates of three ribosomal protein genes, rpL11, rpL23 and rpS9 as well as an elongation factor 1B gene have been determined during growth and development in Dictyostelium. Throughout growth and development the transcription rate of the ribosomal protein genes remains relatively constant at 0.2%-0.5% of the rate of rRNA transcription while the elongation factor 1B gene is transcribed at 0.4%-0.6% of the rRNA rate. This low but constant transcription rate is in contrast to a spore coat protein gene Psp D, which is transcribed at 6% of the rRNA rate in late developing cells. The elongation factor 1B gene appears to be co-regulated with the ribosomal protein genes both in terms of its transcription rate and mRNA accumulation. Dictyostelium has been a popular model for understanding signal transduction and the growth to differentiation transition, thus it is of significance that the regulation of ribosome biosynthesis in Dictyostelium resembles that of higher eukaryotes in being regulated largely at the post-transcriptional level in response to starvation as opposed to yeasts where the regulation is largely transcriptional [27]. PMID:10374261

  18. Specific sequences in the fragile X syndrome protein FMR1 and the FXR proteins mediate their binding to 60S ribosomal subunits and the interactions among them.

    PubMed Central

    Siomi, M C; Zhang, Y; Siomi, H; Dreyfuss, G

    1996-01-01

    Fragile X syndrome, the most common form of hereditary mental retardation, usually results from lack of expression of the FMR1 gene. The FMR1 protein is a cytoplasmic RNA-binding protein. The RNA-binding activity of FMR1 is an essential feature of FMR1, as fragile X syndrome can also result from the expression of mutant FMR1 protein that is impaired in RNA binding. Recently, we described two novel cytoplasmic proteins, FXR1 and FXR2, which are both very similar in amino acid sequence to FMR1 and which also interact strongly with FMR1 and with each other. To understand the function of FMR1 and the FXR proteins, we carried out cell fractionation and sedimentation experiments with monoclonal antibodies to these proteins to characterize the complexes they form. Here, we report that the FMR1 and FXR proteins are associated with ribosomes, predominantly with 60S large ribosomal subunits. The FXR proteins are associated with 60S ribosomal subunits even in cells that lack FMR1 and that are derived from a fragile X syndrome patient, indicating that FMR1 is not required for this association. We delineated the regions of FMR1 that mediate its binding to 60S ribosomal subunits and the interactions among the FMR1-FXR family members. Both regions contain sequences predicted to have a high propensity to form coiled coil interactions, and the sequences are highly evolutionarily conserved in this protein family. The association of the FMR1, FXR1, and FXR2 proteins with ribosomes suggests they have functions in translation or mRNA stability. PMID:8668200

  19. Ribosomal Database Project II

    DOE Data Explorer

    The Ribosomal Database Project (RDP) provides ribosome related data and services to the scientific community, including online data analysis and aligned and annotated Bacterial small-subunit 16S rRNA sequences. As of March 2008, RDP Release 10 is available and currently (August 2009) contains 1,074,075 aligned 16S rRNA sequences. Data that can be downloaded include zipped GenBank and FASTA alignment files, a histogram (in Excel) of the number of RDP sequences spanning each base position, data in the Functional Gene Pipeline Repository, and various user submitted data. The RDP-II website also provides numerous analysis tools.[From the RDP-II home page at http://rdp.cme.msu.edu/index.jsp

  20. A Neurospora crassa ribosomal protein gene, homologous to yeast CRY1, contains sequences potentially coordinating its transcription with rRNA genes.

    PubMed Central

    Tyler, B M; Harrison, K

    1990-01-01

    We have isolated and sequenced a Neurospora crassa ribosomal protein gene (designated crp-2) strongly homologous to the rp59 gene (CRY1) of yeast and the S14 ribosomal protein gene of mammals. The inferred sequence of the crp-2 protein is more homologous (83%) to the mammalian S14 sequence than to the yeast rp59 sequence (69%). The gene has three intervening sequences (IVSs) two of which are offset 7 bp from the position of IVSs in the mammalian genes. None correspond to the position of the IVS in the yeast gene. Crp-2 was mapped by RFLP analysis to the right arm of linkage group III. The 5' region of the gene contains three copies of a sequence, the Ribo box, previously shown to be required for transcription of both 5S and 40S rRNA genes. We speculate that the Ribo box may coordinate ribosomal protein and rRNA gene transcription. Images PMID:1977135

  1. A functional interaction between ribosomal proteins S7 and S11 within the bacterial ribosome.

    PubMed

    Robert, Francis; Brakier-Gingras, Léa

    2003-11-01

    In this study, we used site-directed mutagenesis to disrupt an interaction that had been detected between ribosomal proteins S7 and S11 in the crystal structure of the bacterial 30 S subunit. This interaction, which is located in the E site, connects the head of the 30 S subunit to the platform and is involved in the formation of the exit channel through which passes the 30 S-bound messenger RNA. Neither mutations in S7 nor mutations in S11 prevented the incorporation of the proteins into the 30 S subunits but they perturbed the function of the ribosome. In vivo assays showed that ribosomes with either mutated S7 or S11 were altered in the control of translational fidelity, having an increased capacity for frameshifting, readthrough of a nonsense codon and codon misreading. Toeprinting and filter-binding assays showed that 30 S subunits with either mutated S7 or S11 have an enhanced capacity to bind mRNA. The effects of the S7 and S11 mutations can be related to an increased flexibility of the head of the 30 S, to an opening of the mRNA exit channel and to a perturbation of the proposed allosteric coupling between the A and E sites. Altogether, our results demonstrate that S7 and S11 interact in a functional manner and support the notion that protein-protein interactions contribute to the dynamics of the ribosome.

  2. The Crystal Structure of the Ubiquitin-like Domain of Ribosome Assembly Factor Ytm1 and Characterization of Its Interaction with the AAA-ATPase Midasin.

    PubMed

    Romes, Erin M; Sobhany, Mack; Stanley, Robin E

    2016-01-01

    The synthesis of eukaryotic ribosomes is a complex, energetically demanding process requiring the aid of numerous non-ribosomal factors, such as the PeBoW complex. The mammalian PeBoW complex, composed of Pes1, Bop1, and WDR12, is essential for the processing of the 32S preribosomal RNA. Previous work in Saccharomyces cerevisiae has shown that release of the homologous proteins in this complex (Nop7, Erb1, and Ytm1, respectively) from preribosomal particles requires Rea1 (midasin or MDN1 in humans), a large dynein-like protein. Midasin contains a C-terminal metal ion-dependent adhesion site (MIDAS) domain that interacts with the N-terminal ubiquitin-like (UBL) domain of Ytm1/WDR12 as well as the UBL domain of Rsa4/Nle1 in a later step in the ribosome maturation pathway. Here we present the crystal structure of the UBL domain of the WDR12 homologue from S. cerevisiae at 1.7 Å resolution and demonstrate that human midasin binds to WDR12 as well as Nle1 through their respective UBL domains. Midasin contains a well conserved extension region upstream of the MIDAS domain required for binding WDR12 and Nle1, and the interaction is dependent upon metal ion coordination because removal of the metal or mutation of residues that coordinate the metal ion diminishes the interaction. Mammalian WDR12 displays prominent nucleolar localization that is dependent upon active ribosomal RNA transcription. Based upon these results, we propose that release of the PeBoW complex and subsequent release of Nle1 by midasin is a well conserved step in the ribosome maturation pathway in both yeast and mammalian cells. PMID:26601951

  3. Ribosomal protein S6 kinase1 coordinates with TOR-Raptor2 to regulate thylakoid membrane biosynthesis in rice.

    PubMed

    Sun, Linxiao; Yu, Yonghua; Hu, Weiqin; Min, Qiming; Kang, Huiling; Li, Yilu; Hong, Yue; Wang, Xuemin; Hong, Yueyun

    2016-07-01

    Ribosomal protein S6 kinase (S6K) functions as a key component in the target of rapamycin (TOR) pathway involved in multiple processes in eukaryotes. The role and regulation of TOR-S6K in lipid metabolism remained unknown in plants. Here we provide genetic and pharmacological evidence that TOR-Raptor2-S6K1 is important for thylakoid galactolipid biosynthesis and thylakoid grana modeling in rice (Oryza sativa L.). Genetic suppression of S6K1 caused pale yellow-green leaves, defective thylakoid grana architecture. S6K1 directly interacts with Raptor2, a core component in TOR signaling, and S6K1 activity is regulated by Raptor2 and TOR. Plants with suppressed Raptor2 expression or reduced TOR activity by inhibitors mimicked the S6K1-deficient phenotype. A significant reduction in galactolipid content was found in the s6k1, raptor2 mutant or TOR-inhibited plants, which was accompanied by decreased transcript levels of the set of genes such as lipid phosphate phosphatase α5 (LPPα5), MGDG synthase 1 (MGD1), and DGDG synthase 1 (DGD1) involved in galactolipid synthesis, compared to the control plants. Moreover, loss of LPPα5 exhibited a similar phenotype with pale yellow-green leaves. These results suggest that TOR-Raptor2-S6K1 is important for modulating thylakoid membrane lipid biosynthesis, homeostasis, thus enhancing thylakoid grana architecture and normal photosynthesis ability in rice. PMID:27102613

  4. Ribosomal protein S6 kinase1 coordinates with TOR-Raptor2 to regulate thylakoid membrane biosynthesis in rice.

    PubMed

    Sun, Linxiao; Yu, Yonghua; Hu, Weiqin; Min, Qiming; Kang, Huiling; Li, Yilu; Hong, Yue; Wang, Xuemin; Hong, Yueyun

    2016-07-01

    Ribosomal protein S6 kinase (S6K) functions as a key component in the target of rapamycin (TOR) pathway involved in multiple processes in eukaryotes. The role and regulation of TOR-S6K in lipid metabolism remained unknown in plants. Here we provide genetic and pharmacological evidence that TOR-Raptor2-S6K1 is important for thylakoid galactolipid biosynthesis and thylakoid grana modeling in rice (Oryza sativa L.). Genetic suppression of S6K1 caused pale yellow-green leaves, defective thylakoid grana architecture. S6K1 directly interacts with Raptor2, a core component in TOR signaling, and S6K1 activity is regulated by Raptor2 and TOR. Plants with suppressed Raptor2 expression or reduced TOR activity by inhibitors mimicked the S6K1-deficient phenotype. A significant reduction in galactolipid content was found in the s6k1, raptor2 mutant or TOR-inhibited plants, which was accompanied by decreased transcript levels of the set of genes such as lipid phosphate phosphatase α5 (LPPα5), MGDG synthase 1 (MGD1), and DGDG synthase 1 (DGD1) involved in galactolipid synthesis, compared to the control plants. Moreover, loss of LPPα5 exhibited a similar phenotype with pale yellow-green leaves. These results suggest that TOR-Raptor2-S6K1 is important for modulating thylakoid membrane lipid biosynthesis, homeostasis, thus enhancing thylakoid grana architecture and normal photosynthesis ability in rice.

  5. Dominant Rio1 kinase/ATPase catalytic mutant induces trapping of late pre-40S biogenesis factors in 80S-like ribosomes.

    PubMed

    Ferreira-Cerca, Sébastien; Kiburu, Irene; Thomson, Emma; LaRonde, Nicole; Hurt, Ed

    2014-07-01

    During eukaryotic ribosome biogenesis, members of the conserved atypical serine/threonine protein kinase family, the RIO kinases (Rio1, Rio2 and Rio3) function in small ribosomal subunit biogenesis. Structural analysis of Rio2 indicated a role as a conformation-sensing ATPase rather than a kinase to regulate its dynamic association with the pre-40S subunit. However, it remained elusive at which step and by which mechanism the other RIO kinase members act. Here, we have determined the crystal structure of the human Rio1-ATP-Mg(2+) complex carrying a phosphoaspartate in the active site indicative of ATPase activity. Structure-based mutations in yeast showed that Rio1's catalytic activity regulates its pre-40S association. Furthermore, we provide evidence that Rio1 associates with a very late pre-40S via its conserved C-terminal domain. Moreover, a rio1 dominant-negative mutant defective in ATP hydrolysis induced trapping of late biogenesis factors in pre-ribosomal particles, which turned out not to be pre-40S but 80S-like ribosomes. Thus, the RIO kinase fold generates a versatile ATPase enzyme, which in the case of Rio1 is activated following the Rio2 step to regulate one of the final 40S maturation events, at which time the 60S subunit is recruited for final quality control check.

  6. Na+/H+ exchanger isoform 1 induced cardiomyocyte hypertrophy involves activation of p90 ribosomal s6 kinase.

    PubMed

    Jaballah, Maiy; Mohamed, Iman A; Alemrayat, Bayan; Al-Sulaiti, Fatima; Mlih, Mohamed; Mraiche, Fatima

    2015-01-01

    Studies using pharmacological and genetic approaches have shown that increased activity/expression of the Na+/H+ exchanger isoform 1 (NHE1) play a critical role in the pathogenesis of cardiac hypertrophy. Despite the importance of NHE1 in cardiac hypertrophy, severe cerebrovascular side effects were associated with the use of NHE1 inhibitors when administered to patients with myocardial infarctions. p90 ribosomal S6 Kinase (RSK), a downstream regulator of the mitogen-activated protein kinase pathway, has also been implicated in cardiac hypertrophy. We hypothesized that RSK plays a role in the NHE1 induced cardiomyocyte hypertrophic response. Infection of H9c2 cardiomyoblasts with the active form of the NHE1 adenovirus induced hypertrophy and was associated with an increase in the phosphorylation of RSK (P<0.05). Parameters of hypertrophy such as cell area, protein content and atrial natriuretic mRNA expression were significantly reduced in H9c2 cardiomyoblasts infected with active NHE1 in the presence of dominant negative RSK (DN-RSK) (P<0.05). These results confirm that NHE1 lies upstream of RSK. Increased phosphorylation and activation of GATA4 at Ser261 was correlated with increased RSK phosphorylation. This increase was reversed upon inhibition of RSK or NHE1. These findings demonstrate for the first time that the NHE1 mediated hypertrophy is accounted for by increased activation and phosphorylation of RSK, which subsequently increased the phosphorylation of GATA4; eventually activating fetal gene transcriptional machinery. PMID:25830299

  7. Comparative evolution of S7 Intron 1 and ribosomal internal transcribed spacer in Coilia nasus (Clupeiformes: Engraulidae).

    PubMed

    Liu, Dong; Guo, Hong-Yi; Tang, Wen-Qiao; Yang, Jin-Quan

    2012-01-01

    Coilia nasus is widely distributed in the Yangtze River, the coastal waters of China, Korea and the Ariake Sound of Japan. Several ecotypes exist and this provides a useful model for the study of comparative diversity between molecular markers. Here we analyze and compare the nucleotide sequences between single-copy ribosomal protein S7 gene intron 1 (rpS7) and multiple-copy ribosomal internal transcribed spacer 1 (ITS1) in this species to compare the phylogenetic signal of the two nuclear genes. Nucleotide substitutions among the two gene sequences and partial sequence of mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase subunit I (COI) gene were also analyzed. A total of 115 clones for rpS7 and 122 clones for ITS1 were obtained from 37 specimens. The nucleotide sequence length is 741 to 743 bp for rpS7 and 334 to 348 bp for ITS1. Intra- and inter-specimen variation in rpS7 results from nucleotide substitution, while such variation in ITS1 is mainly due to different numbers of short base repeats. The content of G + C is lower in rpS7 (43.5%) than in ITS1 (68.2%). Our results indicate that the proportion of the sequence variable sites is higher in rpS7 (61) than in ITS1 (23); the informative parsimony of rpS7 is evidently higher than that of ITS1 (26 vs. 2); the overall ratio between transitions and transversions in ITS1 is slightly lower than in rpS7, but remarkably lower than in COI. These results suggest that rpS7 is more suitable than ITS1 as a marker for genetic divergence of this group. Furthermore, gene flow is observed between the different geographic populations of C. nasus from the phylogeny of this species based on rpS7, showing that rpS7 has more evolutionary characteristics for understanding the processes of genomic evolution at the intraspecific level.

  8. Structural domains within the HIV-1 mRNA and the ribosomal protein S25 influence cap-independent translation initiation.

    PubMed

    Carvajal, Felipe; Vallejos, Maricarmen; Walters, Beth; Contreras, Nataly; Hertz, Marla I; Olivares, Eduardo; Cáceres, Carlos J; Pino, Karla; Letelier, Alejandro; Thompson, Sunnie R; López-Lastra, Marcelo

    2016-07-01

    The 5' leader of the HIV-1 genomic RNA is a multifunctional region that folds into secondary/tertiary structures that regulate multiple processes during viral replication including translation initiation. In this work, we examine the internal ribosome entry site (IRES) located in the 5' leader that drives translation initiation of the viral Gag protein under conditions that hinder cap-dependent translation initiation. We show that activity of the HIV-1 IRES relies on ribosomal protein S25 (eS25). Additionally, a mechanistic and mutational analysis revealed that the HIV-1 IRES is modular in nature and that once the 40S ribosomal subunit is recruited to the IRES, translation initiates without the need of ribosome scanning. These findings elucidate a mechanism of initiation by the HIV-1 IRES whereby a number of highly structured sites present within the HIV-1 5' leader leads to the recruitment of the 40S subunit directly at the site of initiation of protein synthesis. PMID:27191820

  9. LKB1 promotes cell survival by modulating TIF-IA-mediated pre-ribosomal RNA synthesis under uridine downregulated conditions.

    PubMed

    Liu, Fakeng; Jin, Rui; Liu, Xiuju; Huang, Henry; Wilkinson, Scott C; Zhong, Diansheng; Khuri, Fadlo R; Fu, Haian; Marcus, Adam; He, Yulong; Zhou, Wei

    2016-01-19

    We analyzed the mechanism underlying 5-aminoimidazole-4-carboxamide riboside (AICAR) mediated apoptosis in LKB1-null non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) cells. Metabolic profile analysis revealed depletion of the intracellular pyrimidine pool after AICAR treatment, but uridine was the only nucleotide precursor capable of rescuing this apoptosis, suggesting the involvement of RNA metabolism. Because half of RNA transcription in cancer is for pre-ribosomal RNA (rRNA) synthesis, which is suppressed by over 90% after AICAR treatment, we evaluated the role of TIF-IA-mediated rRNA synthesis. While the depletion of TIF-IA by RNAi alone promoted apoptosis in LKB1-null cells, the overexpression of a wild-type or a S636A TIF-IA mutant, but not a S636D mutant, attenuated AICAR-induced apoptosis. In LKB1-null H157 cells, pre-rRNA synthesis was not suppressed by AICAR when wild-type LKB1 was present, and cellular fractionation analysis indicated that TIF-IA quickly accumulated in the nucleus in the presence of a wild-type LKB1 but not a kinase-dead mutant. Furthermore, ectopic expression of LKB1 was capable of attenuating AICAR-induced death in AMPK-null cells. Because LKB1 promotes cell survival by modulating TIF-IA-mediated pre-rRNA synthesis, this discovery suggested that targeted depletion of uridine related metabolites may be exploited in the clinic to eliminate LKB1-null cancer cells.

  10. Ribosome engineering to promote new crystal forms

    SciTech Connect

    Selmer, Maria; Gao, Yong-Gui; Weixlbaumer, Albert; Ramakrishnan, V.

    2012-05-01

    Truncation of ribosomal protein L9 in T. thermophilus allows the generation of new crystal forms and the crystallization of ribosome–GTPase complexes. Crystallographic studies of the ribosome have provided molecular details of protein synthesis. However, the crystallization of functional complexes of ribosomes with GTPase translation factors proved to be elusive for a decade after the first ribosome structures were determined. Analysis of the packing in different 70S ribosome crystal forms revealed that regardless of the species or space group, a contact between ribosomal protein L9 from the large subunit and 16S rRNA in the shoulder of a neighbouring small subunit in the crystal lattice competes with the binding of GTPase elongation factors to this region of 16S rRNA. To prevent the formation of this preferred crystal contact, a mutant strain of Thermus thermophilus, HB8-MRCMSAW1, in which the ribosomal protein L9 gene has been truncated was constructed by homologous recombination. Mutant 70S ribosomes were used to crystallize and solve the structure of the ribosome with EF-G, GDP and fusidic acid in a previously unobserved crystal form. Subsequent work has shown the usefulness of this strain for crystallization of the ribosome with other GTPase factors.

  11. The human 18S rRNA base methyltransferases DIMT1L and WBSCR22-TRMT112 but not rRNA modification are required for ribosome biogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Zorbas, Christiane; Nicolas, Emilien; Wacheul, Ludivine; Huvelle, Emmeline; Heurgué-Hamard, Valérie; Lafontaine, Denis L. J.

    2015-01-01

    At the heart of the ribosome lie rRNAs, whose catalytic function in translation is subtly modulated by posttranscriptional modifications. In the small ribosomal subunit of budding yeast, on the 18S rRNA, two adjacent adenosines (A1781/A1782) are N6-dimethylated by Dim1 near the decoding site, and one guanosine (G1575) is N7-methylated by Bud23-Trm112 at a ridge between the P- and E-site tRNAs. Here we establish human DIMT1L and WBSCR22-TRMT112 as the functional homologues of yeast Dim1 and Bud23-Trm112. We report that these enzymes are required for distinct pre-rRNA processing reactions leading to synthesis of 18S rRNA, and we demonstrate that in human cells, as in budding yeast, ribosome biogenesis requires the presence of the modification enzyme rather than its RNA-modifying catalytic activity. We conclude that a quality control mechanism has been conserved from yeast to human by which binding of a methyltransferase to nascent pre-rRNAs is a prerequisite to processing, so that all cleaved RNAs are committed to faithful modification. We further report that 18S rRNA dimethylation is nuclear in human cells, in contrast to yeast, where it is cytoplasmic. Yeast and human ribosome biogenesis thus have both conserved and distinctive features. PMID:25851604

  12. Structure and expression of the nuclear gene coding for the plastid CS1 ribosomal protein from spinach.

    PubMed Central

    Franzetti, B; Zhou, D X; Mache, R

    1992-01-01

    The chloroplast ribosomal protein CS1 is an essential component of the plastids translational machinery involved in translation initiation. Southern analysis suggests that the corresponding nuclear gene is present in one copy in the spinach genome. We have isolated and sequenced the gene (rps1) to study its expression at the transcriptional level. The gene consists of 7 exons and 6 introns including an unusually large intron in the 5' coding region. No canonical TATA-box is found in the 5' upstream region of the gene. rps1 transcripts are detected early during germination and a significant accumulation is observed after the protrusion of the radicle. CS1 mRNAs are present in all organs of young seedlings although there are dramatic differences in the steady state level of the mRNAs between leaves and roots tissues. Transcripts accumulate independently of the presence or absence of light. Band shift analysis shows that the +1, -400 bp region of the gene can bind different sets of proteins isolated from roots and leaves nuclei. We suggest that the expression of the housekeeping plastid-related rps1 gene is regulated in a tissue-specific manner by transcriptional trans-acting factors. Images PMID:1508710

  13. Structome Analysis of Virulent Mycobacterium tuberculosis, Which Survives with Only 700 Ribosomes per 0.1 fl of Cytoplasm

    PubMed Central

    Yamada, Hiroyuki; Yamaguchi, Masashi; Chikamatsu, Kinuyo; Aono, Akio; Mitarai, Satoshi

    2015-01-01

    We previously reported the exquisite preservation of the ultrastructures of virulent Mycobacterium tuberculosis cells processed through cryofixation and rapid freeze substitution. Here, we report the “structome” analysis (i.e., the quantitative three-dimensional structural analysis of a whole cell at the electron microscopic level) of virulent M. tuberculosis using serial ultrathin sections prepared after cryofixation and rapid freeze substitution and analyzed by transmission electron microscopy. Five M. tuberculosis cells, which were contained in the serial ultrathin cross sections encompassing from one end to the other, were cut into 24, 36, 69, 55, and 63 serial ultrathin sections, respectively. On average, the cells were 2.71 ± 1.05 μm in length, and the average diameter of the cell was 0.345 ± 0.029 μm. The outer membrane and plasma membrane surface areas were 3.04 ± 1.33 μm2 and 2.67 ± 1.19 μm2, respectively. The cell, outer membrane, periplasm, plasma membrane, and cytoplasm volumes were 0.293 ± 0.113 fl (= μm3), 0.006 ± 0.003 fl, 0.060 ± 0.021 fl, 0.019 ± 0.008 fl, and 0.210 ± 0.091 fl, respectively. The average total ribosome number was 1,672 ± 568, and the ribosome density was 716.5 ± 171.4/0.1 fl. This is the first report of a structome analysis of M. tuberculosis cells prepared as serial ultrathin sections following cryofixation and rapid freeze substitution and examined by transmission electron microscopy. These data are based on the direct measurement and enumeration of exquisitely preserved single-cell structures in transmission electron microscopy images rather than calculations or assumptions from indirect biochemical or molecular biological data. In addition, these data may explain the slow growth of M. tuberculosis and enhance understanding of the structural properties related to the expression of antigenicity, acid-fastness, and the mechanism of drug resistance, particularly in regard to the ratio of target to drug

  14. Type 1 ribosome-inactivating proteins from Phytolacca dioica L. leaves: differential seasonal and age expression, and cellular localization.

    PubMed

    Parente, Augusto; Conforto, Barbara; Di Maro, Antimo; Chambery, Angela; De Luca, Paolo; Bolognesi, Andrea; Iriti, Marcello; Faoro, Franco

    2008-11-01

    The expression of type 1 ribosome-inactivating proteins (RIPs) in Phytolacca dioica L. leaves was investigated. Fully expanded leaves of young P. dioica plants (up to 3 years old) expressed two novel RIPs, dioicin 1 and dioicin 2. The former was also found in developing leaves from adult P. dioica within about two and a half weeks after leaf development, and the latter continuously synthesized, with no seasonal or ontogenetic constraint. Fully expanded leaves from adult P. dioica expressed four RIPs (PD-Ls1-4) exhibiting seasonal variation. RIPs were localized in the extracellular space, in the vacuole and in the Golgi apparatus of mesophyll cells. Dioicin 1 and dioicin 2 showed rRNA N-beta-glycosidase activity and displayed the following properties, respectively: (1) Mr values of 30,047.00 and 29,910.00, (2) pIs of 8.74 and 9.37, and (3) IC(50) values of 19.74 (0.658 nM) and 6.85 ng/mL (0.229 nM). Furthermore, they showed adenine polynucleotide glycosylase activity and nicked pBR322 dsDNA. The amino acid sequence of dioicin 2 had 266 amino acid residues, and the highest percentage identity (81.6%) and similarity (84.6%) with PAP-II from Phytolacca americana, while its identity with other RIPs from Phytolaccaceae was around 40%.

  15. Structure of the mammalian antimicrobial peptide Bac7(1-16) bound within the exit tunnel of a bacterial ribosome.

    PubMed

    Seefeldt, A Carolin; Graf, Michael; Pérébaskine, Natacha; Nguyen, Fabian; Arenz, Stefan; Mardirossian, Mario; Scocchi, Marco; Wilson, Daniel N; Innis, C Axel

    2016-03-18

    Proline-rich antimicrobial peptides (PrAMPs) produced as part of the innate immune response of animals, insects and plants represent a vast, untapped resource for the treatment of multidrug-resistant bacterial infections. PrAMPs such as oncocin or bactenecin-7 (Bac7) interact with the bacterial ribosome to inhibit translation, but their supposed specificity as inhibitors of bacterial rather than mammalian protein synthesis remains unclear, despite being key to developing drugs with low toxicity. Here, we present crystal structures of the Thermus thermophilus 70S ribosome in complex with the first 16 residues of mammalian Bac7, as well as the insect-derived PrAMPs metalnikowin I and pyrrhocoricin. The structures reveal that the mammalian Bac7 interacts with a similar region of the ribosome as insect-derived PrAMPs. Consistently, Bac7 and the oncocin derivative Onc112 compete effectively with antibiotics, such as erythromycin, which target the ribosomal exit tunnel. Moreover, we demonstrate that Bac7 allows initiation complex formation but prevents entry into the elongation phase of translation, and show that it inhibits translation on both mammalian and bacterial ribosomes, explaining why this peptide needs to be stored as an inactive pro-peptide. These findings highlight the need to consider the specificity of PrAMP derivatives for the bacterial ribosome in future drug development efforts. PMID:26792896

  16. A single missense mutation in a coiled-coil domain of Escherichia coli ribosomal protein S2 confers a thermosensitive phenotype that can be suppressed by ribosomal protein S1.

    PubMed

    Aseev, Leonid V; Chugunov, Anton O; Efremov, Roman G; Boni, Irina V

    2013-01-01

    Ribosomal protein S2 is an essential component of translation machinery, and its viable mutated variants conferring distinct phenotypes serve as a valuable tool in studying the role of S2 in translation regulation. One of a few available rpsB mutants, rpsB1, shows thermosensitivity and ensures enhanced expression of leaderless mRNAs. In this study, we identified the nature of the rpsB1 mutation. Sequencing of the rpsB1 allele revealed a G-to-A transition in the part of the rpsB gene which encodes a coiled-coil domain of S2. The resulting E132K substitution resides in a highly conserved site, TKKE, a so-called N-terminal capping box, at the beginning of the second alpha helix. The protruding coiled-coil domain of S2 is known to provide binding with 16S rRNA in the head of the 30S subunit and, in addition, to interact with a key mRNA binding protein, S1. Molecular dynamics simulations revealed a detrimental impact of the E132K mutation on the coiled-coil structure and thereby on the interactions between S2 and 16S rRNA, providing a clue for the thermosensitivity of the rpsB1 mutant. Using a strain producing a leaderless lacZ transcript from the chromosomal lac promoter, we demonstrated that not only the rpsB1 mutation generating S2/S1-deficient ribosomes but also the rpsA::IS10 mutation leading to partial deficiency in S1 alone increased translation efficiency of the leaderless mRNA by about 10-fold. Moderate overexpression of S1 relieved all these effects and, moreover, suppressed the thermosensitive phenotype of rpsB1, indicating the role of S1 as an extragenic suppressor of the E132K mutation.

  17. Rrp12 and the Exportin Crm1 participate in late assembly events in the nucleolus during 40S ribosomal subunit biogenesis.

    PubMed

    Moriggi, Giulia; Nieto, Blanca; Dosil, Mercedes

    2014-12-01

    During the biogenesis of small ribosomal subunits in eukaryotes, the pre-40S particles formed in the nucleolus are rapidly transported to the cytoplasm. The mechanisms underlying the nuclear export of these particles and its coordination with other biogenesis steps are mostly unknown. Here we show that yeast Rrp12 is required for the exit of pre-40S particles to the cytoplasm and for proper maturation dynamics of upstream 90S pre-ribosomes. Due to this, in vivo elimination of Rrp12 leads to an accumulation of nucleoplasmic 90S to pre-40S transitional particles, abnormal 35S pre-rRNA processing, delayed elimination of processing byproducts, and no export of intermediate pre-40S complexes. The exportin Crm1 is also required for the same pre-ribosome maturation events that involve Rrp12. Thus, in addition to their implication in nuclear export, Rrp12 and Crm1 participate in earlier biosynthetic steps that take place in the nucleolus. Our results indicate that, in the 40S subunit synthesis pathway, the completion of early pre-40S particle assembly, the initiation of byproduct degradation and the priming for nuclear export occur in an integrated manner in late 90S pre-ribosomes.

  18. WHITE PANICLE1, a Val-tRNA Synthetase Regulating Chloroplast Ribosome Biogenesis in Rice, Is Essential for Early Chloroplast Development1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Chunming; Zheng, Ming; Lyu, Jia; Xu, Yang; Li, Xiaohui; Niu, Mei; Long, Wuhua; Wang, Di; Wang, Yihua; Wan, Jianmin

    2016-01-01

    Chloroplasts and mitochondria contain their own genomes and transcriptional and translational systems. Establishing these genetic systems is essential for plant growth and development. Here we characterized a mutant form of a Val-tRNA synthetase (OsValRS2) from Oryza sativa that is targeted to both chloroplasts and mitochondria. A single base change in OsValRS2 caused virescent to albino phenotypes in seedlings and white panicles at heading. We therefore named this mutant white panicle 1 (wp1). Chlorophyll autofluorescence observations and transmission electron microscopy analyses indicated that wp1 mutants are defective in early chloroplast development. RNA-seq analysis revealed that expression of nuclear-encoded photosynthetic genes is significantly repressed, while expression of many chloroplast-encoded genes also changed significantly in wp1 mutants. Western-blot analyses of chloroplast-encoded proteins showed that chloroplast protein levels were reduced in wp1 mutants, although mRNA levels of some genes were higher in wp1 than in wild type. We found that wp1 was impaired in chloroplast ribosome biogenesis. Taken together, our results show that OsValRS2 plays an essential role in chloroplast development and regulating chloroplast ribosome biogenesis. PMID:26839129

  19. Mitochondrial ribosomal protein S18-2 is highly expressed in endometrial cancers along with free E2F1

    PubMed Central

    Iurchenko, Natalia; Kovalevska, Larysa; Stip, Maria C; Budnikova, Daria; Andersson, Sonia; Polischuk, Ludmila; Buchynska, Lubov; Kashuba, Elena

    2016-01-01

    Endometrial cancer (EC) is one of the most frequent causes of cancer death among women in developed countries. Histopathological diagnosis and imaging techniques for EC are limited, thus new prognostic markers are needed to offer patients the best treatment and follow-up. In the present paper we showed that the level of mitochondrial ribosomal protein MRPS18-2 (S18-2) increased in EC compared with the normal endometrium and hyperplasia, based on a study of 42 patient biopsies. Importantly, high expression of free E2F1 in EC correlates well with high S18-2 expression. The EC cell line HEC-1-A, which overexpresses S18-2 constitutively, showed an increased proliferation capacity in vitro and in vivo (in SCID mice). Moreover, pan-keratin, beta-catenin and E-cadherin signals are diminished in these cells, compared to the parental HEC-1-A line, in contrast to vimentin signal that is increased. This may be associated with epithelial-mesenchymal cell transition (EMT). We conclude that high expression of S18-2 and free E2F1, and low pan-keratin, beta-catenin, and E-cadherin signals might be a good set of prognostic markers for EC. PMID:26959119

  20. Symportin 1 chaperones 5S RNP assembly during ribosome biogenesis by occupying an essential rRNA-binding site.

    PubMed

    Calviño, Fabiola R; Kharde, Satyavati; Ori, Alessandro; Hendricks, Astrid; Wild, Klemens; Kressler, Dieter; Bange, Gert; Hurt, Ed; Beck, Martin; Sinning, Irmgard

    2015-04-07

    During 60S biogenesis, mature 5S RNP consisting of 5S RNA, RpL5 and RpL11, assembles into a pre-60S particle, where docking relies on RpL11 interacting with helix 84 (H84) of the 25S RNA. How 5S RNP is assembled for recruitment into the pre-60S is not known. Here we report the crystal structure of a ternary symportin Syo1-RpL5-N-RpL11 complex and provide biochemical and structural insights into 5S RNP assembly. Syo1 guards the 25S RNA-binding surface on RpL11 and competes with H84 for binding. Pull-down experiments show that H84 releases RpL11 from the ternary complex, but not in the presence of 5S RNA. Crosslinking mass spectrometry visualizes structural rearrangements on incorporation of 5S RNA into the Syo1-RpL5-RpL11 complex supporting the formation of a pre-5S RNP. Our data underline the dual role of Syo1 in ribosomal protein transport and as an assembly platform for 5S RNP.

  1. Mitochondrial ribosomal protein S18-2 is highly expressed in endometrial cancers along with free E2F1.

    PubMed

    Mints, Miriam; Mushtaq, Muhammad; Iurchenko, Natalia; Kovalevska, Larysa; Stip, Maria C; Budnikova, Daria; Andersson, Sonia; Polischuk, Ludmila; Buchynska, Lubov; Kashuba, Elena

    2016-04-19

    Endometrial cancer (EC) is one of the most frequent causes of cancer death among women in developed countries. Histopathological diagnosis and imaging techniques for EC are limited, thus new prognostic markers are needed to offer patients the best treatment and follow-up.In the present paper we showed that the level of mitochondrial ribosomal protein MRPS18-2 (S18-2) increased in EC compared with the normal endometrium and hyperplasia, based on a study of 42 patient biopsies. Importantly, high expression of free E2F1 in EC correlates well with high S18-2 expression. The EC cell line HEC-1-A, which overexpresses S18-2 constitutively, showed an increased proliferation capacity in vitro and in vivo (in SCID mice). Moreover, pan-keratin, beta-catenin and E-cadherin signals are diminished in these cells, compared to the parental HEC-1-A line, in contrast to vimentin signal that is increased. This may be associated with epithelial-mesenchymal cell transition (EMT).We conclude that high expression of S18-2 and free E2F1, and low pan-keratin, beta-catenin, and E-cadherin signals might be a good set of prognostic markers for EC. PMID:26959119

  2. Symportin 1 chaperones 5S RNP assembly during ribosome biogenesis by occupying an essential rRNA-binding site

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calviño, Fabiola R.; Kharde, Satyavati; Ori, Alessandro; Hendricks, Astrid; Wild, Klemens; Kressler, Dieter; Bange, Gert; Hurt, Ed; Beck, Martin; Sinning, Irmgard

    2015-04-01

    During 60S biogenesis, mature 5S RNP consisting of 5S RNA, RpL5 and RpL11, assembles into a pre-60S particle, where docking relies on RpL11 interacting with helix 84 (H84) of the 25S RNA. How 5S RNP is assembled for recruitment into the pre-60S is not known. Here we report the crystal structure of a ternary symportin Syo1-RpL5-N-RpL11 complex and provide biochemical and structural insights into 5S RNP assembly. Syo1 guards the 25S RNA-binding surface on RpL11 and competes with H84 for binding. Pull-down experiments show that H84 releases RpL11 from the ternary complex, but not in the presence of 5S RNA. Crosslinking mass spectrometry visualizes structural rearrangements on incorporation of 5S RNA into the Syo1-RpL5-RpL11 complex supporting the formation of a pre-5S RNP. Our data underline the dual role of Syo1 in ribosomal protein transport and as an assembly platform for 5S RNP.

  3. Expression of ribosome-binding protein 1 correlates with shorter survival in Her-2 positive breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Xiaoshuan; Sun, Shanshan; Zhang, Xianyu; Wu, Hao; Tao, Weiyang; Liu, Tong; Wei, Wei; Geng, Jingshu; Pang, Da

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study is to investigate the expression of ribosome-binding protein 1 (RRBP1) in invasive breast cancer and to analyze its relationship to clinical features and prognosis. RRBP1 expression was studied using real-time quantitative PCR and western blotting using pair-matched breast samples and immunohistochemical staining using a tissue microarray. Then the correlation between RRBP1 expression and clinicopathologic features was analyzed. RRBP1 mRNA and protein expression were significantly increased in breast cancer tissues compared with normal tissues. The protein level of RRBP1 is proved to be positively related to histological grade (P = 0.02), molecular subtype (P = 0.048) and status of Her-2 (P = 0.026) and P53 (P = 0.015). We performed a grade-stratified analysis of all patients according to the level of RRBP1 expression and found that RRBP1 overexpression highly affected overall survival in patients with early-stage (I and II) tumors (P = 0.042). Furthermore, Her-2 positive patients with negative RRBP1 expression had longer overall survival rates than those with positive RRBP1 expression (P = 0.031). Using multivariate analysis, it was determined that lymph node metastasis (LNM, P = 0.002) and RRBP1 expression (P = 0.005) were independent prognosis factors for overall survival. RRBP1 is a valuable prognostic factor in Her-2-positive breast cancer patients, indicating that RRBP1 is a potentially important target for the prediction of prognosis. PMID:25845758

  4. Synthesis of ribosomes in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed Central

    Warner, J R

    1989-01-01

    The assembly of a eucaryotic ribosome requires the synthesis of four ribosomal ribonucleic acid (RNA) molecules and more than 75 ribosomal proteins. It utilizes all three RNA polymerases; it requires the cooperation of the nucleus and the cytoplasm, the processing of RNA, and the specific interaction of RNA and protein molecules. It is carried out efficiently and is exquisitely sensitive to the needs of the cell. Our current understanding of this process in the genetically tractable yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae is reviewed. The ribosomal RNA genes are arranged in a tandem array of 100 to 200 copies. This tandem array has led to unique ways of carrying out a number of functions. Replication is asymmetric and does not initiate from every autonomously replicating sequence. Recombination is suppressed. Transcription of the major ribosomal RNA appears to involve coupling between adjacent transcription units, which are separated by the 5S RNA transcription unit. Genes for many ribosomal proteins have been cloned and sequenced. Few are linked; most are duplicated; most have an intron. There is extensive homology between yeast ribosomal proteins and those of other species. Most, but not all, of the ribosomal protein genes have one or two sites that are essential for their transcription and that bind a common transcription factor. This factor binds also to many other places in the genome, including the telomeres. There is coordinated transcription of the ribosomal protein genes under a variety of conditions. However, the cell seems to possess no mechanism for regulating the transcription of individual ribosomal protein genes in response either to a deficiency or an excess of a particular ribosomal protein. A deficiency causes slow growth. Any excess ribosomal protein is degraded very rapidly, with a half-life of 1 to 5 min. Unlike most types of cells, yeast cells appear not to regulate the translation of ribosomal proteins. However, in the case of ribosomal protein L32

  5. Ribosomes in a stacked array: elucidation of the step in translation elongation at which they are stalled during S-adenosyl-L-methionine-induced translation arrest of CGS1 mRNA.

    PubMed

    Yamashita, Yui; Kadokura, Yoshitomo; Sotta, Naoyuki; Fujiwara, Toru; Takigawa, Ichigaku; Satake, Akiko; Onouchi, Hitoshi; Naito, Satoshi

    2014-05-01

    Expression of CGS1, which codes for an enzyme of methionine biosynthesis, is feedback-regulated by mRNA degradation in response to S-adenosyl-L-methionine (AdoMet). In vitro studies revealed that AdoMet induces translation arrest at Ser-94, upon which several ribosomes stack behind the arrested one, and mRNA degradation occurs at multiple sites that presumably correspond to individual ribosomes in a stacked array. Despite the significant contribution of stacked ribosomes to inducing mRNA degradation, little is known about the ribosomes in the stacked array. Here, we assigned the peptidyl-tRNA species of the stacked second and third ribosomes to their respective codons and showed that they are arranged at nine-codon intervals behind the Ser-94 codon, indicating tight stacking. Puromycin reacts with peptidyl-tRNA in the P-site, releasing the nascent peptide as peptidyl-puromycin. This reaction is used to monitor the activity of the peptidyltransferase center (PTC) in arrested ribosomes. Puromycin reaction of peptidyl-tRNA on the AdoMet-arrested ribosome, which is stalled at the pre-translocation step, was slow. This limited reactivity can be attributed to the peptidyl-tRNA occupying the A-site at this step rather than to suppression of PTC activity. In contrast, puromycin reactions of peptidyl-tRNA with the stacked second and third ribosomes were slow but were not as slow as pre-translocation step ribosomes. We propose that the anticodon end of peptidyl-tRNA resides in the A-site of the stacked ribosomes and that the stacked ribosomes are stalled at an early step of translocation, possibly at the P/E hybrid state.

  6. Atomic resolution structure of cucurmosin, a novel type 1 ribosome-inactivating protein from the sarcocarp of Cucurbita moschata.

    PubMed

    Hou, Xiaomin; Meehan, Edward J; Xie, Jieming; Huang, Mingdong; Chen, Minghuang; Chen, Liqing

    2008-10-01

    A novel type 1 ribosome-inactivating protein (RIP) designated cucurmosin was isolated from the sarcocarp of Cucurbita moschata (pumpkin). Besides rRNA N-glycosidase activity, cucurmosin exhibits strong cytotoxicities to three cancer cell lines of both human and murine origins, but low toxicity to normal cells. Plant genomic DNA extracted from the tender leaves was amplified by PCR between primers based on the N-terminal sequence and X-ray sequence of the C-terminal. The complete mature protein sequence was obtained from N-terminal protein sequencing and partial DNA sequencing, confirmed by high resolution crystal structure analysis. The crystal structure of cucurmosin has been determined at 1.04A, a resolution that has never been achieved before for any RIP. The structure contains two domains: a large N-terminal domain composed of seven alpha-helices and eight beta-strands, and a smaller C-terminal domain consisting of three alpha-helices and two beta-strands. The high resolution structure established a glycosylation pattern of GlcNAc(2)Man(3)Xyl. Asn225 was identified as a glycosylation site. Residues Tyr70, Tyr109, Glu158 and Arg161 define the active site of cucurmosin as an RNA N-glycosidase. The structural basis of cytotoxicity difference between cucurmosin and trichosanthin is discussed.

  7. Atomic resolution structure of cucurmosin, a novel type 1 ribosome-inactivating protein from the sarcocarp of Cucurbita moschata

    SciTech Connect

    Hou, Xiaomin; Meehan, Edward J.; Xie, Jieming; Huang, Mingdong; Chen, Minghuang; Chen, Liqing

    2008-10-27

    A novel type 1 ribosome-inactivating protein (RIP) designated cucurmosin was isolated from the sarcocarp of Cucurbita moschata (pumpkin). Besides rRNA N-glycosidase activity, cucurmosin exhibits strong cytotoxicities to three cancer cell lines of both human and murine origins, but low toxicity to normal cells. Plant genomic DNA extracted from the tender leaves was amplified by PCR between primers based on the N-terminal sequence and X-ray sequence of the C-terminal. The complete mature protein sequence was obtained from N-terminal protein sequencing and partial DNA sequencing, confirmed by high resolution crystal structure analysis. The crystal structure of cucurmosin has been determined at 1.04 {angstrom}, a resolution that has never been achieved before for any RIP. The structure contains two domains: a large N-terminal domain composed of seven {alpha}-helices and eight {beta}-strands, and a smaller C-terminal domain consisting of three {alpha}-helices and two {beta}-strands. The high resolution structure established a glycosylation pattern of GlcNAc{sub 2}Man3Xyl. Asn225 was identified as a glycosylation site. Residues Tyr70, Tyr109, Glu158 and Arg161 define the active site of cucurmosin as an RNA N-glycosidase. The structural basis of cytotoxicity difference between cucurmosin and trichosanthin is discussed.

  8. Tn9 and IS1 inserts in a ribosomal ribonucleic acid operon of Escherichia coli are incompletely polar.

    PubMed Central

    Brewster, J M; Morgan, E A

    1981-01-01

    Transcription is known to be coupled to translation in many or all bacterial operons which code for proteins. In these operons, nonsense codons which prevent normal translation often result in premature termination of transcription (polarity). However, efficient transcription of ribosomal ribonucleic acid operons (rrn operons) occurs, although rrn transcripts are not translated. It therefore seemed possible that insertion sequences and transposable elements which are polar in protein-coding operons might not be polar in rrn operons. Previously, it has been shown (E. A. Morgan, Cell 21:257-265, 1980) that Tn10 is incompletely polar in the rrnX operon. Here we show that the transposon Tn9 and the insertion sequence IS1 also incompletely polar in rrnX. In normal cells expression of sequences distal to the insertions can be detected by genetic methods. In ultraviolet-irradiated cells expression of distal sequences is about 80% of that observed in uninterrupted rrnX operons. These observations provide evidence that ribonucleic acid polymerase molecules beginning at rrnX promoters can read through Tn9 and IS1 and that, at least in ultraviolet-irradiated cells, read-through is very efficient. Images PMID:6171559

  9. Mechanistic Target of Rapamycin Complex 1/S6 Kinase 1 Signals Influence T Cell Activation Independently of Ribosomal Protein S6 Phosphorylation

    PubMed Central

    Salmond, Robert J.; Brownlie, Rebecca J.; Meyuhas, Oded

    2015-01-01

    Ag-dependent activation of naive T cells induces dramatic changes in cellular metabolism that are essential for cell growth, division, and differentiation. In recent years, the serine/threonine kinase mechanistic target of rapamycin (mTOR) has emerged as a key integrator of signaling pathways that regulate these metabolic processes. However, the role of specific downstream effectors of mTOR function in T cells is poorly understood. Ribosomal protein S6 (rpS6) is an essential component of the ribosome and is inducibly phosphorylated following mTOR activation in eukaryotic cells. In the current work, we addressed the role of phosphorylation of rpS6 as an effector of mTOR function in T cell development, growth, proliferation, and differentiation using knockin and TCR transgenic mice. Surprisingly, we demonstrate that rpS6 phosphorylation is not required for any of these processes either in vitro or in vivo. Indeed, rpS6 knockin mice are completely sensitive to the inhibitory effects of rapamycin and an S6 kinase 1 (S6K1)–specific inhibitor on T cell activation and proliferation. These results place the mTOR complex 1-S6K1 axis as a crucial determinant of T cell activation independently of its ability to regulate rpS6 phosphorylation. PMID:26453749

  10. CRM1 and its ribosome export adaptor NMD3 localize to the nucleolus and affect rRNA synthesis.

    PubMed

    Bai, Baoyan; Moore, Henna M; Laiho, Marikki

    2013-01-01

    CRM1 is an export factor that together with its adaptor NMD3 transports numerous cargo molecules from the nucleus to cytoplasm through the nuclear pore. Previous studies have suggested that CRM1 and NMD3 are detected in the nucleolus. However, their localization with subnucleolar domains or participation in the activities of the nucleolus are unclear. We demonstrate here biochemically and using imaging analyses that CRM1 and NMD3 co-localize with nucleolar marker proteins in the nucleolus. In particular, their nucleolar localization is markedly increased by inhibition of RNA polymerase I (Pol I) transcription by actinomycin D or by silencing Pol I catalytic subunit, RPA194. We show that CRM1 nucleolar localization is dependent on its activity and the expression of NMD3, whereas NMD3 nucleolar localization is independent of CRM1. This suggests that NMD3 provides nucleolar tethering of CRM1. While inhibition of CRM1 by leptomycin B inhibited processing of 28S ribosomal (r) RNA, depletion of NMD3 did not, suggesting that their effects on 28S rRNA processing are distinct. Markedly, depletion of NMD3 and inhibition of CRM1 reduced the rate of pre-47S rRNA synthesis. However, their inactivation did not lead to nucleolar disintegration, a hallmark of Pol I transcription stress, suggesting that they do not directly regulate transcription. These results indicate that CRM1 and NMD3 have complex functions in pathways that couple rRNA synthetic and processing engines and that the rRNA synthesis rate may be adjusted according to proficiency in rRNA processing and export.

  11. Mitochondrial ribosomal protein L41 mediates serum starvation-induced cell-cycle arrest through an increase of p21{sup WAF1/CIP1}

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Mi Jin; Yoo, Young A.; Kim, Hyung Jung; Kang, Seongman; Kim, Yong Geon; Kim, Jun Suk; Yoo, Young Do . E-mail: ydy1130@korea.ac.kr

    2005-12-16

    Ribosomal proteins not only act as components of the translation apparatus but also regulate cell proliferation and apoptosis. A previous study reported that MRPL41 plays an important role in p53-dependent apoptosis. It also showed that MRPL41 arrests the cell cycle by stabilizing p27{sup Kip1} in the absence of p53. This study found that MRPL41 mediates the p21{sup WAF1/CIP1}-mediated G1 arrest in response to serum starvation. The cells were released from serum starvation-induced G1 arrest via the siRNA-mediated blocking of MRPL41 expression. Overall, these results suggest that MRPL41 arrests the cell cycle by increasing the p21{sup WAF1/CIP1} and p27{sup Kip1} levels under the growth inhibitory conditions.

  12. LKB1 promotes cell survival by modulating TIF-IA-mediated pre-ribosomal RNA synthesis under uridine downregulated conditions

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xiuju; Huang, Henry; Wilkinson, Scott C.; Zhong, Diansheng; Khuri, Fadlo R.; Fu, Haian; Marcus, Adam; He, Yulong; Zhou, Wei

    2016-01-01

    We analyzed the mechanism underlying 5-aminoimidazole-4-carboxamide riboside (AICAR) mediated apoptosis in LKB1-null non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) cells. Metabolic profile analysis revealed depletion of the intracellular pyrimidine pool after AICAR treatment, but uridine was the only nucleotide precursor capable of rescuing this apoptosis, suggesting the involvement of RNA metabolism. Because half of RNA transcription in cancer is for pre-ribosomal RNA (rRNA) synthesis, which is suppressed by over 90% after AICAR treatment, we evaluated the role of TIF-IA-mediated rRNA synthesis. While the depletion of TIF-IA by RNAi alone promoted apoptosis in LKB1-null cells, the overexpression of a wild-type or a S636A TIF-IA mutant, but not a S636D mutant, attenuated AICAR-induced apoptosis. In LKB1-null H157 cells, pre-rRNA synthesis was not suppressed by AICAR when wild-type LKB1 was present, and cellular fractionation analysis indicated that TIF-IA quickly accumulated in the nucleus in the presence of a wild-type LKB1 but not a kinase-dead mutant. Furthermore, ectopic expression of LKB1 was capable of attenuating AICAR-induced death in AMPK-null cells. Because LKB1 promotes cell survival by modulating TIF-IA-mediated pre-rRNA synthesis, this discovery suggested that targeted depletion of uridine related metabolites may be exploited in the clinic to eliminate LKB1-null cancer cells. PMID:26506235

  13. The site-specific ribosomal DNA insertion element R1Bm belongs to a class of non-long-terminal-repeat retrotransposons

    SciTech Connect

    Xiong, Y.; Eickbush, T.H.

    1988-01-01

    Two types of insertion elements, R1 and R2 (previously called type I and type II), are known to interrupt the 28S ribosomal genes of several insect species. In the silkmoth, Bombyx mori, each element occupies approximately 10% of the estimated 240 ribosomal DNA units, while at most only a few copies are located outside the ribosomal DNA units. The authors present here the complete nucleotide sequence of an R1 insertion from B. mori (R1Bm). This 5.1-kilobase element contains two overlapping open reading frames (ORFs) which together occupy 88% of its length. ORF1 is 461 amino acids in length and exhibits characteristics of retroviral gag genes. ORF2 is 1,051 amino acids in length and contains homology to reverse transcriptase-like enzymes. The analysis of 3' and 5' ends of independent isolates from the ribosomal locus supports the suggestion that R1 is still functioning as a transposable element. The precise location of the element within the genome implies that its transposition must occur with remarkable insertion sequence specificity. Comparison of the deduced amino acid sequences from six retrotransposons, R1 and R2 of B. mori, I factor and F element of Drosophila melanogaster, L1 of Mus domesticus, and Ingi of Trypanosoma brucei, reveals a relatively high level of sequence homology in the reverse transcriptase region. Like R1, these elements lack long terminal repeats. The authors therefore named this class of related elements the non-long-terminal-repeat (non-LTR) retrotransposons.

  14. Cytochrome c oxidase subunit 1 and 12S ribosomal RNA characterization of Coenurus cerebralis from sheep in Iran.

    PubMed

    Rostami, Sima; Salavati, Reza; Beech, Robin N; Sharbatkhori, Mitra; Babaei, Zahra; Saedi, Sadegh; Harandi, Majid Fasihi

    2013-10-18

    Taenia multiceps is a widely distributed zoonotic tapeworm of canids. The larval stage of the parasite (Coenurus) occurs in sheep, goat and cattle and has been rarely reported from humans. This study investigated genetic variability of two mitochondrial genes in 102 isolates of T. multiceps. Metacestodes were collected from brains and hearts of sheep in Tehran and Qom provinces of Iran. DNA of each isolate was extracted and used for PCR amplification of cytochrome c oxidase subunit I (CO1) and 12S ribosomal DNA (12S rRNA) genes. All amplicons were sequenced and the sequence data were analyzed using NCBI Blast and BioEdit. Phylogenetic trees and pairwise calculations were obtained by using Mega5 software. In total 7 and 25 representative haplotypes were differentiated for CO1 and 12S rRNA genes, respectively. For CO1 sequences 11 segregation sites within 7 haplotypes were observed. For 12S rRNA sequences a total of 32 segregation sites were observed in 25 haplotypes. CO1 gene displayed lower diversity than 12S rRNA gene with an overall nucleotide variation of 3.0% for CO1 vs. 7.2% for 12S rRNA. Pairwise comparisons among 7 haplotypes in CO1 and 12S rRNA genes showed the level of nucleotide differences 0.3-2.5% and 0.2-4.0%, respectively. A high degree of genetic variation was found in the isolates of T. multiceps in Iran. Additional molecular studies are required on the parasite from other intermediate hosts. PMID:23890823

  15. Modification of Escherichia coli ribosomes with the fluorescent reagent N-[[(iodoacetyl)amino]ethyl]-5-naphthylamine-1-sulfonic acid. Identification of derivatized L31' and studies on its intraribosomal properties.

    PubMed

    Hanas, J S; Simpson, M V

    1985-12-01

    N-[[(Iodoacetyl)amino]ethyl]-5-naphthylamine-1-sulfonic acid (IAEDANS) is a fluorescent reagent which reacts covalently with the free thiol groups of proteins. When the reagent is reacted with the Escherichia coli ribosome under mild conditions, gel electrophoresis shows modification of predominantly two proteins, S18 and L31', which become labeled to an equal extent. When the native (i.e., untreated) ribosome is dissociated into 30S and 50S subunits, only the 30S ribosomal protein S18 reacts with IAEDANS despite the fact that L31' is still present on the large subunit. Upon heat activation of the subunits, a procedure which alters subunit conformation, S18 plus a number of higher molecular weight proteins is modified, but not L31'; the latter reacts with IAEDANS only in the 70S ribosome or when it is free. In contrast to the relatively stable association of L31' with native or with dissociated ribosomes, dissociation of N-[(acetylamino)ethyl]-5-naphthylaminesulfonic acid (AEDANS)-treated ribosomes weakens the AEDANS-L31'/ribosome interaction, resulting, upon gel filtration analysis, in ribosomes devoid of this derivatized protein.

  16. Sequence analysis of genes encoding ribosomal proteins of amitochondriate protists: L1 of Trichomonas vaginalis and L29 of Giardia lamblia.

    PubMed

    Wu, G; Hashimoto, T

    1999-08-01

    Two genes encoding the ribosomal proteins were cloned and sequenced from amitochondriate protists, L1 (L10a in mammalian nomenclature) from Trichomonas vaginalis and L29 (L35 in mammalian nomenclature) from Giardia lamblia. The deduced amino acid sequences were analyzed by sequence alignments and phylogenetic reconstructions. Both the T. vaginalis L1 and the G. lamblia L29 displayed eukaryotic sequence features, when compared with all the homologs from the three primary kingdoms.

  17. Modified nucleotides in T1 RNase oligonucleotides of 18S ribosomal RNA of the Novikoff hepatoma.

    PubMed

    Choi, Y C; Busch, H

    1978-06-27

    The primary structure of 18S rRNA of the Novikoff hepatoma cells was investigated. Regardless of whether the primary sequence of 18S rRNA is finally determined by RNA sequencing methods or DNA sequencing methods, it is important to identify numbers and types of the modified nucleotides and accordingly the present study was designed to localize the modified regions in T1 RNase derived oligonucleotide. Modified nucleotides found in 66 different oligonucleotide sequences included 2 m62A, 1 m6A, 1 m7G, 1m1cap3psi, 7 Cm, 13 Am, 9 Gm, 11 Um, and 38 psi residues. A number of these modified nucleotides are now placed in defined sequences of T1 RNase oligonucleotides which are now being searched for in larger fragments derived from partial T1 RNase digests of 18S rRNA. Improved homochromatography fingerprinting (Choi et al. (1976) Cancer Res. 36, 4301) of T1 RNase derived oligonucleotides provided a distinctive pattern for 18S rRNA of Novikoff hepatoma ascites cells. The 116 spots obtained by homochromatography contain 176 oligonucleotide sequences. PMID:209819

  18. Growth inhibition by bupivacaine is associated with inactivation of ribosomal protein S6 kinase 1.

    PubMed

    Beigh, Mushtaq Ahmad; Showkat, Mehvish; Bashir, Basharat; Bashir, Asma; Hussain, Mahboob ul; Andrabi, Khurshid Iqbal

    2014-01-01

    Bupivacaine is an amide type long acting local anesthetic used for epidural anesthesia and nerve blockade in patients. Use of bupivacaine is associated with severe cytotoxicity and apoptosis along with inhibition of cell growth and proliferation. Although inhibition of Erk, Akt, and AMPK seemingly appears to mediate some of the bupivacaine effects, potential downstream targets that mediate its effect remain unknown. S6 kinase 1 is a common downstream effector of several growth regulatory pathways involved in cell growth and proliferation known to be affected by bupivacaine. We have accordingly attempted to relate the growth inhibitory effects of bupivacaine with the status of S6K1 activity and we present evidence that decrease in cell growth and proliferation by bupivacaine is mediated through inactivation of S6 kinase 1 in a concentration and time dependent manner. We also show that ectopic expression of constitutively active S6 kinase 1 imparts substantial protection from bupivacaine induced cytotoxicity. Inactivation of S6K1 though associated with loss of putative mTOR mediated phosphorylation did not correspond with loss of similar phosphorylations in 4EBP1 indicating that S6K1 inhibition was not mediated through inactivation of mTORC1 signaling pathway or its down regulation.

  19. Nuclear ribosomal internal transcribed spacer 1 (ITS1) variation in the Anastrepha fraterculus cryptic species complex (Diptera, Tephritidae) of the Andean region

    PubMed Central

    Sutton, Bruce D.; Steck, Gary J.; Norrbom, Allen L.; Rodriguez, Erick J.; Srivastava, Pratibha; Alvarado, Norma Nolazco; Colque, Fredy; Landa, Erick Yábar; Sánchez, Juan José Lagrava; Quisberth, Elizabeth; Peñaranda, Emilio Arévalo; Clavijo, P. A. Rodriguez; Alvarez-Baca, Jeniffer K.; Zapata, Tito Guevara; Ponce, Patricio

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The nuclear ribosomal internal transcribed spacer 1 (ITS1) was sequenced for Anastrepha fraterculus (Wiedemann, 1830) originating from 85 collections from the northern and central Andean countries of South America including Argentina (Tucumán), Bolivia, Perú, Ecuador, Colombia, and Venezuela. The ITS1 regions of additional specimens (17 collections) from Central America (México, Guatemala, Costa Rica, and Panamá), Brazil, Caribbean Colombia, and coastal Venezuela were sequenced and together with published sequences (Paraguay) provided context for interpretation. A total of six ITS1 sequence variants were recognized in the Andean region comprising four groups. Type I predominates in the southernmost range of Anastrepha fraterculus. Type II predominates in its northernmost range. In the central and northern Andes, the geographic distributions overlap and interdigitate with a strong elevational effect. A discussion of relationships between observed ITS1 types and morphometric types is included. PMID:26798259

  20. Nuclear ribosomal internal transcribed spacer 1 (ITS1) variation in the Anastrepha fraterculus cryptic species complex (Diptera, Tephritidae) of the Andean region.

    PubMed

    Sutton, Bruce D; Steck, Gary J; Norrbom, Allen L; Rodriguez, Erick J; Srivastava, Pratibha; Alvarado, Norma Nolazco; Colque, Fredy; Landa, Erick Yábar; Sánchez, Juan José Lagrava; Quisberth, Elizabeth; Peñaranda, Emilio Arévalo; Clavijo, P A Rodriguez; Alvarez-Baca, Jeniffer K; Zapata, Tito Guevara; Ponce, Patricio

    2015-01-01

    The nuclear ribosomal internal transcribed spacer 1 (ITS1) was sequenced for Anastrepha fraterculus (Wiedemann, 1830) originating from 85 collections from the northern and central Andean countries of South America including Argentina (Tucumán), Bolivia, Perú, Ecuador, Colombia, and Venezuela. The ITS1 regions of additional specimens (17 collections) from Central America (México, Guatemala, Costa Rica, and Panamá), Brazil, Caribbean Colombia, and coastal Venezuela were sequenced and together with published sequences (Paraguay) provided context for interpretation. A total of six ITS1 sequence variants were recognized in the Andean region comprising four groups. Type I predominates in the southernmost range of Anastrepha fraterculus. Type II predominates in its northernmost range. In the central and northern Andes, the geographic distributions overlap and interdigitate with a strong elevational effect. A discussion of relationships between observed ITS1 types and morphometric types is included. PMID:26798259

  1. Nuclear ribosomal internal transcribed spacer 1 (ITS1) variation in the Anastrepha fraterculus cryptic species complex (Diptera, Tephritidae) of the Andean region.

    PubMed

    Sutton, Bruce D; Steck, Gary J; Norrbom, Allen L; Rodriguez, Erick J; Srivastava, Pratibha; Alvarado, Norma Nolazco; Colque, Fredy; Landa, Erick Yábar; Sánchez, Juan José Lagrava; Quisberth, Elizabeth; Peñaranda, Emilio Arévalo; Clavijo, P A Rodriguez; Alvarez-Baca, Jeniffer K; Zapata, Tito Guevara; Ponce, Patricio

    2015-01-01

    The nuclear ribosomal internal transcribed spacer 1 (ITS1) was sequenced for Anastrepha fraterculus (Wiedemann, 1830) originating from 85 collections from the northern and central Andean countries of South America including Argentina (Tucumán), Bolivia, Perú, Ecuador, Colombia, and Venezuela. The ITS1 regions of additional specimens (17 collections) from Central America (México, Guatemala, Costa Rica, and Panamá), Brazil, Caribbean Colombia, and coastal Venezuela were sequenced and together with published sequences (Paraguay) provided context for interpretation. A total of six ITS1 sequence variants were recognized in the Andean region comprising four groups. Type I predominates in the southernmost range of Anastrepha fraterculus. Type II predominates in its northernmost range. In the central and northern Andes, the geographic distributions overlap and interdigitate with a strong elevational effect. A discussion of relationships between observed ITS1 types and morphometric types is included.

  2. Escorted by chaperones: Sti1 helps to usher precursor proteins from the ribosome to mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Hansen, Katja G; Schlagowski, Anna; Herrmann, Johannes M

    2016-09-01

    Little is known about factors that interact with mitochondrial precursor proteins in the cytosol. Employing site-specific crosslinking this study identifies chaperones of the Hsp70 and Hsp90 families as well as Sti1 as escorts of cytosolic preproteins. Sti1 presumably helps to hand-over preproteins from Hsp70 to the Hsp90 system and thereby facilitates their binding to TOM receptors on the mitochondrial surface. PMID:27515587

  3. Human acidic ribosomal phosphoproteins P0, P1, and P2: Analysis of cDNA clones, in vitro synthesis, and assembly

    SciTech Connect

    Rich, B.E.; Steitz, J.A.

    1987-11-01

    cDNA clones encoding three antigenically related human ribosomal phosophoproteins (P-proteins) P0, P1, and P2 were isolated and sequenced. P1 and P2 are analogous to Escherichia coli ribosomal protein L7/L12, and P0 is likely to be an analog of L10. The three proteins have a nearly identical carboxy-terminal 17-amino-acid sequence (KEESEESD(D/E)DMGFGLFD-COOH) that is the basis of their immunological cross-reactivity. The identifies of the P1 and P2 cDNAs were confirmed by the strong similarities of their encoded amino acid sequences to published primary structures of the homologous rat, brine shrimp, and Saccharomyces cerevisiae proteins. The P0 cDNA was initially identified by translation of hybrid-selected mRNA and immunoprecipitation of the products. To demonstrate that the coding sequences are full length, the P0, P1, and P2 cDNAs were transcribed in vitro by bacteriophage T7 RNA polymerase and the resulting mRNAs were translated in vitro. The synthetic P0, P1, and P2 proteins were serologically and electrophoretically identical to P-proteins extracted from HeLa cells. These synthetic P-proteins were incorporated into 60S but not 40S ribosomes and also assembled into a complex similar to that described for E. coli L7/L12 and L10.

  4. The structure of Erb1-Ytm1 complex reveals the functional importance of a high-affinity binding between two β-propellers during the assembly of large ribosomal subunits in eukaryotes.

    PubMed

    Wegrecki, Marcin; Rodríguez-Galán, Olga; de la Cruz, Jesús; Bravo, Jeronimo

    2015-12-15

    Ribosome biogenesis is one of the most essential pathways in eukaryotes although it is still not fully characterized. Given the importance of this process in proliferating cells, it is obvious that understanding the macromolecular details of the interactions that take place between the assembly factors, ribosomal proteins and nascent pre-rRNAs is essentially required for the development of new non-genotoxic treatments for cancer. Herein, we have studied the association between the WD40-repeat domains of Erb1 and Ytm1 proteins. These are essential factors for the biogenesis of 60S ribosomal subunits in eukaryotes that form a heterotrimeric complex together with the also essential Nop7 protein. We provide the crystal structure of a dimer formed by the C-terminal part of Erb1 and Ytm1 from Chaetomium thermophilum at 2.1 Å resolution. Using a multidisciplinary approach we show that the β-propeller domains of these proteins interact in a novel manner that leads to a high-affinity binding. We prove that a point mutation within the interface of the complex impairs the interaction between the two proteins and negatively affects growth and ribosome production in yeast. Our study suggests insights into the association of the Erb1-Ytm1 dimer with pre-ribosomal particles. PMID:26476442

  5. The structure of Erb1-Ytm1 complex reveals the functional importance of a high-affinity binding between two β-propellers during the assembly of large ribosomal subunits in eukaryotes

    PubMed Central

    Wegrecki, Marcin; Rodríguez-Galán, Olga; de la Cruz, Jesús; Bravo, Jeronimo

    2015-01-01

    Ribosome biogenesis is one of the most essential pathways in eukaryotes although it is still not fully characterized. Given the importance of this process in proliferating cells, it is obvious that understanding the macromolecular details of the interactions that take place between the assembly factors, ribosomal proteins and nascent pre-rRNAs is essentially required for the development of new non-genotoxic treatments for cancer. Herein, we have studied the association between the WD40-repeat domains of Erb1 and Ytm1 proteins. These are essential factors for the biogenesis of 60S ribosomal subunits in eukaryotes that form a heterotrimeric complex together with the also essential Nop7 protein. We provide the crystal structure of a dimer formed by the C-terminal part of Erb1 and Ytm1 from Chaetomium thermophilum at 2.1 Å resolution. Using a multidisciplinary approach we show that the β-propeller domains of these proteins interact in a novel manner that leads to a high-affinity binding. We prove that a point mutation within the interface of the complex impairs the interaction between the two proteins and negatively affects growth and ribosome production in yeast. Our study suggests insights into the association of the Erb1-Ytm1 dimer with pre-ribosomal particles. PMID:26476442

  6. Profiling of Mycoplasma gallisepticum Ribosomes.

    PubMed

    Fisunov, G Y; Evsyutina, D V; Arzamasov, A A; Butenko, I O; Govorun, V M

    2015-01-01

    The development of high-throughput technologies is increasingly resulting in identification of numerous cases of low correlation between mRNA and the protein level in cells. These controversial observations were made on various bacteria, such as E. coli, Desulfovibrio vulgaris, and Lactococcus lactis. Thus, it is important to develop technologies, including high-throughput techniques, aimed at studying gene expression regulation at the level of translation. In the current study, we performed proteomic profiling of M. gallisepticum ribosomes and identified high abundant noncanonical proteins. We found that binding of mRNAs to ribosomes is mainly determined by two parameters: (1) abundance of mRNA itself and (2) complimentary interactions between the 3' end of 16S rRNA and the ribosome binding site in the 5'-untranslated region of mRNA. PMID:26798497

  7. Ribosomes: lifting the nuclear export ban.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Arlen W

    2014-02-01

    A recent study shows that nuclear export of the large ribosomal subunit is regulated by a GTPase that blocks recruitment of the nuclear export factor Nmd3 until remodeling of the pre-ribosome by the AAA-ATPase Rea1 (Midasin).

  8. RF1 Knockout Allows Ribosomal Incorporation of Unnatural Amino Acids at Multiple Sites

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, David B.F.; Xu, Jianfeng; Shen, Zhouxin; Takimoto, Jeffrey K.; Schultz, Matthew D.; Schmitz, Robert J.; Ecker, Joseph R.; Briggs, Steven P.; Wang, Lei

    2011-01-01

    Stop codons have been exploited for genetic incorporation of unnatural amino acids (Uaas) in live cells, but the efficiency is low possibly due to competition from release factors, limiting the power and scope of this technology. Here we show that the reportedly essential release factor 1 can be knocked out from Escherichia coli by fixing release factor 2. The resultant strain JX33 is stable and independent, and reassigns UAG from a stop signal to an amino acid when a UAG-decoding tRNA/synthetase pair is introduced. Uaas were efficiently incorporated at multiple UAG sites in the same gene without translational termination in JX33. We also found that amino acid incorporation at endogenous UAG codons is dependent on RF1 and mRNA context, which explains why E. coli tolerates apparent global suppression of UAG. JX33 affords a unique autonomous host for synthesizing and evolving novel protein functions by enabling Uaa incorporation at multiple sites. PMID:21926996

  9. RF1 knockout allows ribosomal incorporation of unnatural amino acids at multiple sites.

    PubMed

    Johnson, David B F; Xu, Jianfeng; Shen, Zhouxin; Takimoto, Jeffrey K; Schultz, Matthew D; Schmitz, Robert J; Xiang, Zheng; Ecker, Joseph R; Briggs, Steven P; Wang, Lei

    2011-11-01

    Stop codons have been exploited for genetic incorporation of unnatural amino acids (Uaas) in live cells, but their low incorporation efficiency, which is possibly due to competition from release factors, limits the power and scope of this technology. Here we show that the reportedly essential release factor 1 (RF1) can be knocked out from Escherichia coli by 'fixing' release factor 2 (RF2). The resultant strain JX33 is stable and independent, and it allows UAG to be reassigned from a stop signal to an amino acid when a UAG-decoding tRNA-synthetase pair is introduced. Uaas were efficiently incorporated at multiple UAG sites in the same gene without translational termination in JX33. We also found that amino acid incorporation at endogenous UAG codons is dependent on RF1 and mRNA context, which explains why E. coli tolerates apparent global suppression of UAG. JX33 affords a unique autonomous host for synthesizing and evolving new protein functions by enabling Uaa incorporation at multiple sites. PMID:21926996

  10. The Ribosomal Database Project.

    PubMed Central

    Maidak, B L; Larsen, N; McCaughey, M J; Overbeek, R; Olsen, G J; Fogel, K; Blandy, J; Woese, C R

    1994-01-01

    The Ribosomal Database Project (RDP) is a curated database that offers ribosome-related data, analysis services, and associated computer programs. The offerings include phylogenetically ordered alignments of ribosomal RNA (rRNA) sequences, derived phylogenetic trees, rRNA secondary structure diagrams, and various software for handling, analyzing and displaying alignments and trees. The data are available via anonymous ftp (rdp.life.uiuc.edu), electronic mail (server/rdp.life.uiuc.edu) and gopher (rdpgopher.life.uiuc.edu). The electronic mail server also provides ribosomal probe checking, approximate phylogenetic placement of user-submitted sequences, screening for chimeric nature of newly sequenced rRNAs, and automated alignment. PMID:7524021

  11. Dom34 rescues ribosomes in 3' untranslated regions.

    PubMed

    Guydosh, Nicholas R; Green, Rachel

    2014-02-27

    Ribosomes that stall before completing peptide synthesis must be recycled and returned to the cytoplasmic pool. The protein Dom34 and cofactors Hbs1 and Rli1 can dissociate stalled ribosomes in vitro, but the identity of targets in the cell is unknown. Here, we extend ribosome profiling methodology to reveal a high-resolution molecular characterization of Dom34 function in vivo. Dom34 removes stalled ribosomes from truncated mRNAs, but, in contrast, does not generally dissociate ribosomes on coding sequences known to trigger stalling, such as polyproline. We also show that Dom34 targets arrested ribosomes near the ends of 3' UTRs. These ribosomes appear to gain access to the 3' UTR via a mechanism that does not require decoding of the mRNA. These results suggest that ribosomes frequently enter downstream noncoding regions and that Dom34 carries out the important task of rescuing them.

  12. Phylogenetic Relationships and Genetic Variation in Longidorus and Xiphinema Species (Nematoda: Longidoridae) Using ITS1 Sequences of Nuclear Ribosomal DNA.

    PubMed

    Ye, Weimin; Szalanski, Allen L; Robbins, R T

    2004-03-01

    Genetic analyses using DNA sequences of nuclear ribosomal DNA ITS1 were conducted to determine the extent of genetic variation within and among Longidorus and Xiphinema species. DNA sequences were obtained from samples collected from Arkansas, California and Australia as well as 4 Xiphinema DNA sequences from GenBank. The sequences of the ITS1 region including the 3' end of the 18S rDNA gene and the 5' end of the 5.8S rDNA gene ranged from 1020 bp to 1244 bp for the 9 Longidorus species, and from 870 bp to 1354 bp for the 7 Xiphinema species. Nucleotide frequencies were: A = 25.5%, C = 21.0%, G = 26.4%, and T = 27.1%. Genetic variation between the two genera had a maximum divergence of 38.6% between X. chambersi and L. crassus. Genetic variation among Xiphinema species ranged from 3.8% between X. diversicaudatum and X. bakeri to 29.9% between X. chambersi and X. italiae. Within Longidorus, genetic variation ranged from 8.9% between L. crassus and L. grandis to 32.4% between L. fragilis and L. diadecturus. Intraspecific genetic variation in X. americanum sensu lato ranged from 0.3% to 1.9%, while genetic variation in L. diadecturus had 0.8% and L. biformis ranged from 0.6% to 10.9%. Identical sequences were obtained between the two populations of L. grandis, and between the two populations of X. bakeri. Phylogenetic analyses based on the ITS1 DNA sequence data were conducted on each genus separately using both maximum parsimony and maximum likelihood analysis. Among the Longidorus taxa, 4 subgroups are supported: L. grandis, L. crassus, and L. elongatus are in one cluster; L. biformis and L. paralongicaudatus are in a second cluster; L. fragilis and L. breviannulatus are in a third cluster; and L. diadecturus is in a fourth cluster. Among the Xiphinema taxa, 3 subgroups are supported: X. americanum with X. chambersi, X. bakeri with X. diversicaudatum, and X. italiae and X. vuittenezi forming a sister group with X. index. The relationships observed in this study

  13. Beclin-1-independent autophagy positively regulates internal ribosomal entry site-dependent translation of hypoxia-inducible factor 1α under nutrient deprivation

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Ching-An; Huang, Duen-Yi; Lin, Wan-Wan

    2014-01-01

    Hypoxia has been shown to induce hypoxia-inducible factor-1alpha (HIF-1α) expression to support many cellular changes required for tumor growth and metastasis. In addition to hypoxia, nutrient deprivation is another stress condition widely existing in solid tumors due to the poor blood supply. Our data showed that nutrient deprivation induces a significant HIF-1α protein expression and potentiates the HIF-1α responses of hypoxia and CoCl2. This effect is not because of enhancement of HIF-1α stability or transcription. Rather we found it is through the cap-independent but internal ribosome entry site (IRES)-dependent translation. Notably inhibition of autophagy by si-ATG5, 3-methyladenine and chloroquine, but not si-Beclin-1, significantly reverses nutrient deprivation-induced HIF-1α responses. Furthermore, it is interesting to note the contribution of IRES activation for hypoxia-induced HIF-1α expression, however, different from nutrient starvation, si-Beclin 1 but not si-ATG5 can inhibit hypoxia-induced HIF-1α IRES activation and protein expression. Taken together, we for the first time highlight a link from alternative autophagy to cap-independent protein translation of HIF-1α under two unique stress conditions. We demonstrate Beclin 1-independent autophagy is involved to positively regulate nutrient deprivation induced-HIF-1α IRES activity and protein expression, while ATG5-independent autophagy is involved in the HIF-1 IRES activation caused by hypoxia. PMID:25115400

  14. Mescaline-induced changes of brain-cortex ribosomes. Effect of mescaline on the stability of brain-cortex ribosomes.

    PubMed

    Datta, R K; Ghosh, J J

    1970-05-01

    1. During the action of mescaline sulphate on goat brain-cortex slices the ribosomal particles become susceptible to breakdown, releasing protein, RNA, acidsoluble nucleotides and ninhydrin-positive materials, resulting in loss of ribosomal enzyme activities. 2. Ribosomes of the mescaline-treated cortex slices undergo rapid degradation in the presence of trypsin and ribonuclease. 3. Mescaline does not alter the chemical and nucleotide compositions or the u.v.-absorption characteristics of ribosomal particles, however.

  15. The Ribosomal Database Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Olsen, G. J.; Overbeek, R.; Larsen, N.; Marsh, T. L.; McCaughey, M. J.; Maciukenas, M. A.; Kuan, W. M.; Macke, T. J.; Xing, Y.; Woese, C. R.

    1992-01-01

    The Ribosomal Database Project (RDP) complies ribosomal sequences and related data, and redistributes them in aligned and phylogenetically ordered form to its user community. It also offers various software packages for handling, analyzing and displaying sequences. In addition, the RDP offers (or will offer) certain analytic services. At present the project is in an intermediate stage of development.

  16. A Nucleolar Protein, Ribosomal RNA Processing 1 Homolog B (RRP1B), Enhances the Recruitment of Cellular mRNA in Influenza Virus Transcription

    PubMed Central

    Su, Wen-Chi; Hsu, Shih-Feng; Lee, Yi-Yuan; Jeng, King-Song

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Influenza A virus (IAV) undergoes RNA transcription by a unique capped-mRNA-dependent transcription, which is carried out by the viral RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RdRp), consisting of the viral PA, PB1, and PB2 proteins. However, how the viral RdRp utilizes cellular factors for virus transcription is not clear. Previously, we conducted a genome-wide pooled short hairpin RNA (shRNA) screen to identify host factors important for influenza A virus replication. Ribosomal RNA processing 1 homolog B (RRP1B) was identified as one of the candidates. RRP1B is a nucleolar protein involved in ribosomal biogenesis. Upon IAV infection, part of RRP1B was translocated from the nucleolus to the nucleoplasm, where viral RNA synthesis likely takes place. The depletion of RRP1B significantly reduced IAV mRNA transcription in a minireplicon assay and in virus-infected cells. Furthermore, we showed that RRP1B interacted with PB1 and PB2 of the RdRp and formed a coimmunoprecipitable complex with RdRp. The depletion of RRP1B reduced the amount of capped mRNA in the RdRp complex. Taken together, these findings indicate that RRP1B is a host factor essential for IAV transcription and provide a target for new antivirals. IMPORTANCE Influenza virus is an important human pathogen that causes significant morbidity and mortality and threatens the human population with epidemics and pandemics every year. Due to the high mutation rate of the virus, antiviral drugs targeting viral proteins might ultimately lose their effectiveness. An alternative strategy that explores the genetic stability of host factors indispensable for influenza virus replication would thus be desirable. Here, we characterized the rRNA processing 1 homolog B (RRP1B) protein as an important cellular factor for influenza A virus transcription. We showed that silencing RRP1B hampered viral RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RdRp) activity, which is responsible for virus transcription and replication. Furthermore, we

  17. New Evidence for Differential Roles of L10 Ribosomal Proteins from Arabidopsis1[C][W][OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Falcone Ferreyra, María Lorena; Casadevall, Romina; Luciani, Marianela Dana; Pezza, Alejandro; Casati, Paula

    2013-01-01

    The RIBOSOMAL PROTEIN L10 (RPL10) is an integral component of the eukaryotic ribosome large subunit. Besides being a constituent of ribosomes and participating in protein translation, additional extraribosomal functions in the nucleus have been described for RPL10 in different organisms. Previously, we demonstrated that Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) RPL10 genes are involved in development and translation under ultraviolet B (UV-B) stress. In this work, transgenic plants expressing ProRPL10:β-glucuronidase fusions show that, while AtRPL10A and AtRPL10B are expressed both in the female and male reproductive organs, AtRPL10C expression is restricted to pollen grains. Moreover, the characterization of double rpl10 mutants indicates that the three AtRPL10s differentially contribute to the total RPL10 activity in the male gametophyte. All three AtRPL10 proteins mainly accumulate in the cytosol but also in the nucleus, suggesting extraribosomal functions. After UV-B treatment, only AtRPL10B localization increases in the nuclei. We also here demonstrate that the three AtRPL10 genes can complement a yeast RPL10 mutant. Finally, the involvement of RPL10B and RPL10C in UV-B responses was analyzed by two-dimensional gels followed by mass spectrometry. Overall, our data provide new evidence about the nonredundant roles of RPL10 proteins in Arabidopsis. PMID:23886624

  18. The Arabidopsis gene DIG6 encodes a large 60S subunit nuclear export GTPase 1 that is involved in ribosome biogenesis and affects multiple auxin-regulated development processes.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Huayan; Lü, Shiyou; Li, Ruixi; Chen, Tao; Zhang, Huoming; Cui, Peng; Ding, Feng; Liu, Pei; Wang, Guangchao; Xia, Yiji; Running, Mark P; Xiong, Liming

    2015-11-01

    The circularly permuted GTPase large subunit GTPase 1 (LSG1) is involved in the maturation step of the 60S ribosome and is essential for cell viability in yeast. Here, an Arabidopsis mutant dig6 (drought inhibited growth of lateral roots) was isolated. The mutant exhibited multiple auxin-related phenotypes, which included reduced lateral root number, altered leaf veins, and shorter roots. Genetic mapping combined with next-generation DNA sequencing identified that the mutation occurred in AtLSG1-2. This gene was highly expressed in regions of auxin accumulation. Ribosome profiling revealed that a loss of function of AtLSG1-2 led to decreased levels of monosomes, further demonstrating its role in ribosome biogenesis. Quantitative proteomics showed that the expression of certain proteins involved in ribosome biogenesis was differentially regulated, indicating that ribosome biogenesis processes were impaired in the mutant. Further investigations showed that an AtLSG1-2 deficiency caused the alteration of auxin distribution, response, and transport in plants. It is concluded that AtLSG1-2 is integral to ribosome biogenesis, consequently affecting auxin homeostasis and plant development.

  19. Structural characterization and comparative modeling of PD-Ls 1-3, type 1 ribosome-inactivating proteins from summer leaves of Phytolacca dioica L.

    PubMed

    Di Maro, Antimo; Chambery, Angela; Carafa, Vincenzo; Costantini, Susan; Colonna, Giovanni; Parente, Augusto

    2009-03-01

    The amino acid sequence and glycan structure of PD-L1, PD-L2 and PD-L3, type 1 ribosome-inactivating proteins isolated from Phytolacca dioica L. leaves, were determined using a combined approach based on peptide mapping, Edman degradation and ESI-Q-TOF MS in precursor ion discovery mode. The comparative analysis of the 261 amino acid residue sequences showed that PD-L1 and PD-L2 have identical primary structure, as it is the case of PD-L3 and PD-L4. Furthermore, the primary structure of PD-Ls 1-2 and PD-Ls 3-4 have 81.6% identity (85.1% similarity). The ESI-Q-TOF MS analysis confirmed that PD-Ls 1-3 were glycosylated at different sites. In particular, PD-L1 contained three glycidic chains with the well known paucidomannosidic structure (Man)(3) (GlcNAc)(2) (Fuc)(1) (Xyl)(1) linked to Asn10, Asn43 and Asn255. PD-L2 was glycosylated at Asn10 and Asn43, and PD-L3 was glycosylated only at Asn10. PD-L4 was confirmed to be not glycosylated. Despite an overall high structural similarity, the comparative modeling of PD-L1, PD-L2, PD-L3 and PD-L4 has shown potential influences of the glycidic chains on their adenine polynucleotide glycosylase activity on different substrates.

  20. Escherichia coli frameshift mutation rate depends on the chromosomal context but not on the GATC content near the mutation site.

    PubMed

    Martina, Mariana A; Correa, Elisa M E; Argaraña, Carlos E; Barra, José L

    2012-01-01

    Different studies have suggested that mutation rate varies at different positions in the genome. In this work we analyzed if the chromosomal context and/or the presence of GATC sites can affect the frameshift mutation rate in the Escherichia coli genome. We show that in a mismatch repair deficient background, a condition where the mutation rate reflects the fidelity of the DNA polymerization process, the frameshift mutation rate could vary up to four times among different chromosomal contexts. Furthermore, the mismatch repair efficiency could vary up to eight times when compared at different chromosomal locations, indicating that detection and/or repair of frameshift events also depends on the chromosomal context. Also, GATC sequences have been proved to be essential for the correct functioning of the E. coli mismatch repair system. Using bacteriophage heteroduplexes molecules it has been shown that GATC influence the mismatch repair efficiency in a distance- and number-dependent manner, being almost nonfunctional when GATC sequences are located at 1 kb or more from the mutation site. Interestingly, we found that in E. coli genomic DNA the mismatch repair system can efficiently function even if the nearest GATC sequence is located more than 2 kb away from the mutation site. The results presented in this work show that even though frameshift mutations can be efficiently generated and/or repaired anywhere in the genome, these processes can be modulated by the chromosomal context that surrounds the mutation site.

  1. Evidence that GCN1 and GCN20, translational regulators of GCN4, function on elongating ribosomes in activation of eIF2alpha kinase GCN2.

    PubMed Central

    Marton, M J; Vazquez de Aldana, C R; Qiu, H; Chakraburtty, K; Hinnebusch, A G

    1997-01-01

    In the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, phosphorylation of translation initiation factor eIF2 by protein kinase GCN2 leads to increased translation of the transcriptional activator GCN4 in amino acid-starved cells. The GCN1 and GCN20 proteins are components of a protein complex required for the stimulation of GCN2 kinase activity under starvation conditions. GCN20 is a member of the ATP-binding cassette (ABC) family, most of the members of which function as membrane-bound transporters, raising the possibility that the GCN1/GCN20 complex regulates GCN2 indirectly as an amino acid transporter. At odds with this idea, indirect immunofluorescence revealed cytoplasmic localization of GCN1 and no obvious association with plasma or vacuolar membranes. In addition, a fraction of GCN1 and GCN20 cosedimented with polysomes and 80S ribosomes, and the ribosome association of GCN20 was largely dependent on GCN1. The C-terminal 84% of GCN20 containing the ABCs was found to be dispensable for complex formation with GCN1 and for the stimulation of GCN2 kinase function. Because ABCs provide the energy-coupling mechanism for ABC transporters, these results also contradict the idea that GCN20 regulates GCN2 as an amino acid transporter. The N-terminal 15 to 25% of GCN20, which is critically required for its regulatory function, was found to interact with an internal segment of GCN1 similar in sequence to translation elongation factor 3 (EF3). Based on these findings, we propose that GCN1 performs an EF3-related function in facilitating the activation of GCN2 by uncharged tRNA on translating ribosomes. The physical interaction between GCN20 and the EF3-like domain in GCN1 could allow for modulation of GCN1 activity, and the ABC domains in GCN20 may be involved in this regulatory function. A human homolog of GCN1 has been identified, and the portion of this protein most highly conserved with yeast GCN1 has sequence similarity to EF3. Thus, similar mechanisms for the detection of

  2. Determination of the nucleotide sequence of the 23S ribosomal RNA and flanking spacers of an Enterococcus faecium strain, reveals insertion-deletion events in the ribosomal spacer 1 of enterococci.

    PubMed

    Naimi, A; Beck, G; Monique, M; Lefèbvre, G; Branlanti, C

    1999-02-01

    The usefulness of 16S-23S (ITS1) and 23S-5S (ITS2) ribosomal spacer nucleotide sequence determination, as a complementary approach to the biochemical tests traditionally used for enterococcal species identification, is shown by its application to the identification of a strain, E27, isolated from a natural bacteria mixture used for cheese production. Using combined approaches we showed, unambiguously, that strain E27 belongs to the Enterococcus faecium species. However, its ITS1 region has an interesting peculiarity. In our previous study of ITS1s from various enterococcal species (NAIMI et al., 1997, Microbiology 143, 823-834), the ITS1s of the two E. faecium strains studied, were found to contain an additional 115-nt long stem-loop structure as compared to the ITS1s of other enterococci, only one out of the 3 ITS1s of E. hirae ATCC 9790, was found to contain a similar 107-nt long stem-loop structure. The ITS1 of strain E27 is 100% identical to that of E. faecium ATCC 19434T, except that the 115-nt additional fragment is absent. This strongly suggests the existence of lateral DNA transfer or DNA recombination events at a hot spot position of the ITS1s from E. faecium and E. hirae. Small and large ITS1 nucleotide sequence determination for strain E27 generalized the notion of two kinds of ITSs in enterococci: one with a tRNA(Ala) gene, one without tRNA gene. To complete strain E27 characterization, its 23S rRNA sequence was established. This is the first complete 23S rRNA nucleotide sequence determined for an enterococcal species.

  3. Frameshift mutation hotspot identified in Smith-Magenis syndrome: case report and review of literature.

    PubMed

    Truong, Hoa T; Dudding, Tracy; Blanchard, Christopher L; Elsea, Sarah H

    2010-10-08

    Smith-Magenis syndrome (SMS) is a complex syndrome involving intellectual disabilities, sleep disturbance, behavioural problems, and a variety of craniofacial, skeletal, and visceral anomalies. While the majority of SMS cases harbor an ~3.5 Mb common deletion on 17p11.2 that encompasses the retinoic acid induced-1 (RAI1) gene, some patients carry small intragenic deletions or point mutations in RAI1. We present data on two cases of Smith-Magenis syndrome with mutation of RAI1. Both cases are phenotypically consistent with SMS and RAI1 mutation but also have other anomalies not previously reported in SMS, including spontaneous pneumothoraces. These cases also illustrate variability in the SMS phenotype not previously shown for RAI1 mutation cases, including hearing loss, absence of self-abusive behaviours, and mild global delays. Sequencing of RAI1 revealed mutation of the same heptameric C-tract (CCCCCCC) in exon 3 in both cases (c.3103delC one case and and c.3103insC in the other), resulting in frameshift mutations. Of the seven reported frameshift mutations occurring in poly C-tracts in RAI1, four cases (~57%) occur at this heptameric C-tract. Collectively, these results indicate that this heptameric C-tract is a preferential hotspot for single nucleotide insertion/deletions (SNindels) and therefore, should be considered a primary target for analysis in patients suspected for mutations in RAI1. We expect that as more patients are sequenced for mutations in RAI1, the incidence of frameshift mutations in this hotspot will become more evident.

  4. The K+-dependent GTPase Nug1 is implicated in the association of the helicase Dbp10 to the immature peptidyl transferase centre during ribosome maturation

    PubMed Central

    Manikas, Rizos-Georgios; Thomson, Emma; Thoms, Matthias; Hurt, Ed

    2016-01-01

    Ribosome synthesis employs a number of energy-consuming enzymes in both eukaryotes and prokaryotes. One such enzyme is the conserved circularly permuted GTPase Nug1 (nucleostemin in human). Nug1 is essential for 60S subunit assembly and nuclear export, but its role and time of action during maturation remained unclear. Based on in vitro enzymatic assays using the Chaetomium thermophilum (Ct) orthologue, we show that Nug1 exhibits a low intrinsic GTPase activity that is stimulated by potassium ions, rendering Nug1 a cation-dependent GTPase. In vivo we observe 60S biogenesis defects upon depletion of yeast Nug1 or expression of a Nug1 nucleotide-binding mutant. Most prominently, the RNA helicase Dbp10 was lost from early pre-60S particles, which suggested a physical interaction that could be reconstituted in vitro using CtNug1 and CtDbp10. In vivo rRNA–protein crosslinking revealed that Nug1 and Dbp10 bind at proximal and partially overlapping sites on the 60S pre-ribosome, most prominently to H89 that will constitute part of the peptidyl transferase center (PTC). The binding sites of Dbp10 are the same as those identified for the prokaryotic helicase DbpA bound to the 50S subunit. We suggest that Dbp10 and DbpA are performing a conserved role during PTC formation in all organisms. PMID:26823502

  5. The K⁺-dependent GTPase Nug1 is implicated in the association of the helicase Dbp10 to the immature peptidyl transferase centre during ribosome maturation.

    PubMed

    Manikas, Rizos-Georgios; Thomson, Emma; Thoms, Matthias; Hurt, Ed

    2016-02-29

    Ribosome synthesis employs a number of energy-consuming enzymes in both eukaryotes and prokaryotes. One such enzyme is the conserved circularly permuted GTPase Nug1 (nucleostemin in human). Nug1 is essential for 60S subunit assembly and nuclear export, but its role and time of action during maturation remained unclear. Based on in vitro enzymatic assays using the Chaetomium thermophilum (Ct) orthologue, we show that Nug1 exhibits a low intrinsic GTPase activity that is stimulated by potassium ions, rendering Nug1 a cation-dependent GTPase. In vivo we observe 60S biogenesis defects upon depletion of yeast Nug1 or expression of a Nug1 nucleotide-binding mutant. Most prominently, the RNA helicase Dbp10 was lost from early pre-60S particles, which suggested a physical interaction that could be reconstituted in vitro using CtNug1 and CtDbp10. In vivo rRNA-protein crosslinking revealed that Nug1 and Dbp10 bind at proximal and partially overlapping sites on the 60S pre-ribosome, most prominently to H89 that will constitute part of the peptidyl transferase center (PTC). The binding sites of Dbp10 are the same as those identified for the prokaryotic helicase DbpA bound to the 50S subunit. We suggest that Dbp10 and DbpA are performing a conserved role during PTC formation in all organisms. PMID:26823502

  6. Structural analysis of a type 1 ribosome inactivating protein reveals multiple L-asparagine-N-acetyl-D-glucosamine monosaccharide modifications: Implications for cytotoxicity

    PubMed Central

    HOGG, TANIS; MENDEL, JAMESON T.; LAVEZO, JONATHAN L.

    2015-01-01

    Pokeweed antiviral protein (PAP) belongs to the family of type I ribosome-inactivating proteins (RIPs): Ribotoxins, which function by depurinating the sarcin-ricin loop of ribosomal RNA. In addition to its antibacterial and antifungal properties, PAP has shown promise in antiviral and targeted tumor therapy owing to its ability to depurinate viral RNA and eukaryotic rRNA. Several PAP genes are differentially expressed across pokeweed tissues, with natively isolated seed forms of PAP exhibiting the greatest cytotoxicity. To help elucidate the molecular basis of increased cytotoxicity of PAP isoenzymes from seeds, the present study used protein sequencing, mass spectroscopy and X-ray crystallography to determine the complete covalent structure and 1.7 Å X-ray crystal structure of PAP-S1aci isolated from seeds of Asian pokeweed (Phytolacca acinosa). PAP-S1aci shares ~95% sequence identity with PAP-S1 from P. americana and contains the signature catalytic residues of the RIP superfamily, corresponding to Tyr72, Tyr122, Glu175 and Arg178 in PAP-S1aci. A rare proline substitution (Pro174) was identified in the active site of PAP-S1aci, which has no effect on catalytic Glu175 positioning or overall active-site topology, yet appears to come at the expense of strained main-chain geometry at the pre-proline residue Val173. Notably, a rare type of N-glycosylation was detected consisting of N-acetyl-D-glucosamine monosaccharide residues linked to Asn10, Asn44 and Asn255 of PAP-S1aci. Of note, our modeling studies suggested that the ribosome depurination activity of seed PAPs would be adversely affected by the N-glycosylation of Asn44 and Asn255 with larger and more typical oligosaccharide chains, as they would shield the rRNA-binding sites on the protein. These results, coupled with evidence gathered from the literature, suggest that this type of minimal N-glycosylation in seed PAPs and other type I seed RIPs may serve to enhance cytotoxicity by exploiting receptor

  7. Characterization of Two Novel Type I Ribosome-Inactivating Proteins from the Storage Roots of the Andean Crop Mirabilis expansa1

    PubMed Central

    Vivanco, Jorge M.; Savary, Brett J.; Flores, Hector E.

    1999-01-01

    Two novel type I ribosome-inactivating proteins (RIPs) were found in the storage roots of Mirabilis expansa, an underutilized Andean root crop. The two RIPs, named ME1 and ME2, were purified to homogeneity by ammonium sulfate precipitation, cation-exchange perfusion chromatography, and C4 reverse-phase chromatography. The two proteins were found to be similar in size (27 and 27.5 kD) by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, and their isoelectric points were determined to be greater than pH 10.0. Amino acid N-terminal sequencing revealed that both ME1 and ME2 had conserved residues characteristic of RIPs. Amino acid composition and western-blot analysis further suggested a structural similarity between ME1 and ME2. ME2 showed high similarity to the Mirabilis jalapa antiviral protein, a type I RIP. Depurination of yeast 26S rRNA by ME1 and ME2 demonstrated their ribosome-inactivating activity. Because these two proteins were isolated from roots, their antimicrobial activity was tested against root-rot microorganisms, among others. ME1 and ME2 were active against several fungi, including Pythium irregulare, Fusarium oxysporum solani, Alternaria solani, Trichoderma reesei, and Trichoderma harzianum, and an additive antifungal effect of ME1 and ME2 was observed. Antibacterial activity of both ME1 and ME2 was observed against Pseudomonas syringae, Agrobacterium tumefaciens, Agrobacterium radiobacter, and others. PMID:10198104

  8. Nuclear ribosome biogenesis mediated by the DIM1A rRNA dimethylase is required for organized root growth and epidermal patterning in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Wieckowski, Yana; Schiefelbein, John

    2012-07-01

    Position-dependent patterning of hair and non-hair cells in the Arabidopsis thaliana root epidermis is a powerful system to study the molecular basis of cell fate specification. Here, we report an epidermal patterning mutant affecting the ADENOSINE DIMETHYL TRANSFERASE 1A (DIM1A) rRNA dimethylase gene, predicted to participate in rRNA posttranscriptional processing and base modification. Consistent with a role in ribosome biogenesis, DIM1A is preferentially expressed in regions of rapid growth, and its product is nuclear localized with nucleolus enrichment. Furthermore, DIM1A preferentially accumulates in the developing hair cells, and the dim1A point mutant alters the cell-specific expression of the transcriptional regulators GLABRA2, CAPRICE, and WEREWOLF. Together, these findings suggest that establishment of cell-specific gene expression during root epidermis development is dependent upon proper ribosome biogenesis, possibly due to the sensitivity of the cell fate decision to relatively small differences in gene regulatory activities. Consistent with its effect on the predicted S-adenosyl-l-Met binding site, dim1A plants lack the two 18S rRNA base modifications but exhibit normal pre-rRNA processing. In addition to root epidermal defects, the dim1A mutant exhibits abnormal root meristem division, leaf development, and trichome branching. Together, these findings provide new insights into the importance of rRNA base modifications and translation regulation for plant growth and development.

  9. GUN1 Controls Accumulation of the Plastid Ribosomal Protein S1 at the Protein Level and Interacts with Proteins Involved in Plastid Protein Homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Tadini, Luca; Pesaresi, Paolo; Kleine, Tatjana; Rossi, Fabio; Guljamow, Arthur; Sommer, Frederik; Mühlhaus, Timo; Schroda, Michael; Masiero, Simona; Pribil, Mathias; Rothbart, Maxi; Hedtke, Boris; Grimm, Bernhard; Leister, Dario

    2016-03-01

    Developmental or metabolic changes in chloroplasts can have profound effects on the rest of the plant cell. Such intracellular responses are associated with signals that originate in chloroplasts and convey information on their physiological status to the nucleus, which leads to large-scale changes in gene expression (retrograde signaling). A screen designed to identify components of retrograde signaling resulted in the discovery of the so-called genomes uncoupled (gun) mutants. Genetic evidence suggests that the chloroplast protein GUN1 integrates signals derived from perturbations in plastid redox state, plastid gene expression, and tetrapyrrole biosynthesis (TPB) in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) seedlings, exerting biogenic control of chloroplast functions. However, the molecular mechanism by which GUN1 integrates retrograde signaling in the chloroplast is unclear. Here we show that GUN1 also operates in adult plants, contributing to operational control of chloroplasts. The gun1 mutation genetically interacts with mutations of genes for the chloroplast ribosomal proteins S1 (PRPS1) and L11. Analysis of gun1 prps1 lines indicates that GUN1 controls PRPS1 accumulation at the protein level. The GUN1 protein physically interacts with proteins involved in chloroplast protein homeostasis based on coimmunoprecipitation experiments. Furthermore, yeast two-hybrid and bimolecular fluorescence complementation experiments suggest that GUN1 might transiently interact with several TPB enzymes, including Mg-chelatase subunit D (CHLD) and two other TPB enzymes known to activate retrograde signaling. Moreover, the association of PRPS1 and CHLD with protein complexes is modulated by GUN1. These findings allow us to speculate that retrograde signaling might involve GUN1-dependent formation of protein complexes. PMID:26823545

  10. Reduction of Ribosome Level Triggers Flocculation of Fission Yeast Cells

    PubMed Central

    Li, Rongpeng; Li, Xuesong; Sun, Lei; Chen, Feifei; Liu, Zhenxing; Gu, Yuyu; Gong, Xiaoyan; Liu, Zhonghua; Wei, Hua; Huang, Ying

    2013-01-01

    Deletion of ribosomal protein L32 genes resulted in a nonsexual flocculation of fission yeast. Nonsexual flocculation also occurred when two other ribosomal protein genes, rpl21-2 and rpl9-2, were deleted. However, deletion of two nonribosomal protein genes, mpg and fbp, did not cause flocculation. Overall transcript levels of rpl32 in rpl32-1Δ and rpl32-2Δ cells were reduced by 35.9% and 46.9%, respectively, and overall ribosome levels in rpl32-1Δ and rpl32-2Δ cells dropped 31.1% and 27.8%, respectively, compared to wild-type cells. Interestingly, ribosome protein expression levels and ribosome levels were also reduced greatly in sexually flocculating diploid YHL6381/WT (h+/h−) cells compared to a mixture of YHL6381 (h+) and WT (h−) nonflocculating haploid cells. Transcriptome analysis indicated that the reduction of ribosomal levels in sexual flocculating cells was caused by more-extensive suppression of ribosomal biosynthesis gene expression, while the reduction of ribosomal levels caused by deleting ribosomal protein genes in nonsexual flocculating cells was due to an imbalance between ribosomal proteins. We propose that once the reduction of ribosomal levels is below a certain threshold value, flocculation is triggered. PMID:23355005

  11. The ribosomal subunit assembly line

    PubMed Central

    Dlakić, Mensur

    2005-01-01

    Recent proteomic studies in Saccharomyces cerevisiae have identified nearly 200 proteins, other than the structural ribosomal proteins, that participate in the assembly of ribosomal subunits and their transport from the nucleus. In a separate line of research, proteomic studies of mature plant ribosomes have revealed considerable variability in the protein composition of individual ribosomes. PMID:16207363

  12. Role of the pks15/1 gene in the biosynthesis of phenolglycolipids in the Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex. Evidence that all strains synthesize glycosylated p-hydroxybenzoic methyl esters and that strains devoid of phenolglycolipids harbor a frameshift mutation in the pks15/1 gene.

    PubMed

    Constant, Patricia; Perez, Esther; Malaga, Wladimir; Lanéelle, Marie-Antoinette; Saurel, Olivier; Daffé, Mamadou; Guilhot, Christophe

    2002-10-11

    Diesters of phthiocerol and phenolphthiocerol are important virulence factors of Mycobacterium tuberculosis and Mycobacterium leprae, the two main mycobacterial pathogens in humans. They are both long-chain beta-diols, and their biosynthetic pathway is beginning to be elucidated. Although the two classes of molecules share a common lipid core, phthiocerol diesters have been found in all the strains of the M. tuberculosis complex examined although phenolphthiocerol diesters are produced by only a few groups of strains. To address the question of the origin of this diversity 8 reference strains and 10 clinical isolates of M. tuberculosis were analyzed. We report the presence of glycosylated p-hydroxybenzoic acid methyl esters, structurally related to the type-specific phenolphthiocerol glycolipids, in the culture media of all reference strains of M. tuberculosis, suggesting that the strains devoid of phenolphthiocerol derivatives are unable to elongate the putative p-hydroxybenzoic acid precursor. We also show that all the strains of M. tuberculosis examined and deficient in the production of phenolphthiocerol derivatives are natural mutants with a frameshift mutation in pks15/1 whereas a single open reading frame for pks15/1 is found in Mycobacterium bovis BCG, M. leprae, and strains of M. tuberculosis that produce phenolphthiocerol derivatives. Complementation of the H37Rv strain of M. tuberculosis, which is devoid of phenolphthiocerol derivatives, with the fused pks15/1 gene from M. bovis BCG restored phenolphthiocerol glycolipids production. Conversely, disruption of the pks15/1 gene in M. bovis BCG led to the abolition of the synthesis of type-specific phenolphthiocerol glycolipid. These data indicate that Pks15/1 is involved in the elongation of p-hydroxybenzoic acid to give p-hydroxyphenylalkanoates, which in turn are converted, presumably by the PpsA-E synthase, to phenolphthiocerol derivatives.

  13. Plant L10 Ribosomal Proteins Have Different Roles during Development and Translation under Ultraviolet-B Stress1[C][W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Ferreyra, María Lorena Falcone; Pezza, Alejandro; Biarc, Jordane; Burlingame, Alma L.; Casati, Paula

    2010-01-01

    Ribosomal protein L10 (RPL10) proteins are ubiquitous in the plant kingdom. Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) has three RPL10 genes encoding RPL10A to RPL10C proteins, while two genes are present in the maize (Zea mays) genome (rpl10-1 and rpl10-2). Maize and Arabidopsis RPL10s are tissue-specific and developmentally regulated, showing high levels of expression in tissues with active cell division. Coimmunoprecipitation experiments indicate that RPL10s in Arabidopsis associate with translation proteins, demonstrating that it is a component of the 80S ribosome. Previously, ultraviolet-B (UV-B) exposure was shown to increase the expression of a number of maize ribosomal protein genes, including rpl10. In this work, we demonstrate that maize rpl10 genes are induced by UV-B while Arabidopsis RPL10s are differentially regulated by this radiation: RPL10A is not UV-B regulated, RPL10B is down-regulated, while RPL10C is up-regulated by UV-B in all organs studied. Characterization of Arabidopsis T-DNA insertional mutants indicates that RPL10 genes are not functionally equivalent. rpl10A and rpl10B mutant plants show different phenotypes: knockout rpl10A mutants are lethal, rpl10A heterozygous plants are deficient in translation under UV-B conditions, and knockdown homozygous rpl10B mutants show abnormal growth. Based on the results described here, RPL10 genes are not redundant and participate in development and translation under UV-B stress. PMID:20516338

  14. Is the extraction by Whatman FTA filter matrix technology and sequencing of large ribosomal subunit D1-D2 region sufficient for identification of clinical fungi?

    PubMed

    Kiraz, Nuri; Oz, Yasemin; Aslan, Huseyin; Erturan, Zayre; Ener, Beyza; Akdagli, Sevtap Arikan; Muslumanoglu, Hamza; Cetinkaya, Zafer

    2015-10-01

    Although conventional identification of pathogenic fungi is based on the combination of tests evaluating their morphological and biochemical characteristics, they can fail to identify the less common species or the differentiation of closely related species. In addition these tests are time consuming, labour-intensive and require experienced personnel. We evaluated the feasibility and sufficiency of DNA extraction by Whatman FTA filter matrix technology and DNA sequencing of D1-D2 region of the large ribosomal subunit gene for identification of clinical isolates of 21 yeast and 160 moulds in our clinical mycology laboratory. While the yeast isolates were identified at species level with 100% homology, 102 (63.75%) clinically important mould isolates were identified at species level, 56 (35%) isolates at genus level against fungal sequences existing in DNA databases and two (1.25%) isolates could not be identified. Consequently, Whatman FTA filter matrix technology was a useful method for extraction of fungal DNA; extremely rapid, practical and successful. Sequence analysis strategy of D1-D2 region of the large ribosomal subunit gene was found considerably sufficient in identification to genus level for the most clinical fungi. However, the identification to species level and especially discrimination of closely related species may require additional analysis.

  15. Paradigms of ribosome synthesis: Lessons learned from ribosomal proteins

    PubMed Central

    Gamalinda, Michael; Woolford, John L

    2015-01-01

    The proteome in all cells is manufactured via the intricate process of translation by multimolecular factories called ribosomes. Nevertheless, these ribonucleoprotein particles, the largest of their kind, also have an elaborate assembly line of their own. Groundbreaking discoveries that bacterial ribosomal subunits can be self-assembled in vitro jumpstarted studies on how ribosomes are constructed. Until recently, ribosome assembly has been investigated almost entirely in vitro with bacterial small subunits under equilibrium conditions. In light of high-resolution ribosome structures and a more sophisticated toolkit, the past decade has been defined by a burst of kinetic studies in vitro and, importantly, also a shift to examining ribosome maturation in living cells, especially in eukaryotes. In this review, we summarize the principles governing ribosome assembly that emerged from studies focusing on ribosomal proteins and their interactions with rRNA. Understanding these paradigms has taken center stage, given the linkage between anomalous ribosome biogenesis and proliferative disorders. PMID:26779413

  16. [Study of the surface of Escherichia coli ribosomes and ribosomal particles by the tritium bombardment method].

    PubMed

    Iusupov, M M; Spirin, A S

    1986-11-01

    A new technique of atomic tritium bombardment has been used to study the surface topography of Escherichia coli ribosomes and ribosomal subunits. The technique provides for the labeling of proteins exposed on the surface of ribosomal particles, the extent of protein labeling being proportional to the degree of exposure. The following proteins were considerably tritiated in the 70S ribosomes: S1, S4, S7, S9 and/or S11, S12 and/or L20, S13, S18, S20, S21, L1, L5, L6, L7/L12, L10, L11, L16, L17, L24, L26 and L27. A conclusion is drawn that these proteins are exposed on the ribosome surface to an essentially greater extent than the others. Dissociation of 70S ribosomes into the ribosomal subunits by decreasing Mg2+ concentration does not lead to the exposure of additional ribosomal proteins. This implies that there are no proteins on the contacting surfaces of the subunits. However, if a mixture of subunits has been subjected to centrifugation in a low Mg2+ concentration at high concentrations of a monovalent cation, proteins S3, S5, S7, S14, S18 and L16 are more exposed on the surface of the isolated 30S and 50S subunits than in the subunit mixture or in the 70S ribosomes. The exposure of additional proteins is explained by distortion of the native quaternary structure of ribosomal subunits as a result of the separation procedure. Reassociation of isolated subunits at high Mg2+ concentration results in shielding of proteins S3, S5, S7 and S18 and can be explained by reconstitution of the intact 30S subunit structure. PMID:3542056

  17. Loss of Nucleolar Histone Chaperone NPM1 Triggers Rearrangement of Heterochromatin and Synergizes with a Deficiency in DNA Methyltransferase DNMT3A to Drive Ribosomal DNA Transcription*

    PubMed Central

    Holmberg Olausson, Karl; Nistér, Monica; Lindström, Mikael S.

    2014-01-01

    Nucleoli are prominent nuclear structures assembled and organized around actively transcribed ribosomal DNA (rDNA). The nucleolus has emerged as a platform for the organization of chromatin enriched for repressive histone modifications associated with repetitive DNA. NPM1 is a nucleolar protein required for the maintenance of genome stability. However, the role of NPM1 in nucleolar chromatin dynamics and ribosome biogenesis remains unclear. We found that normal fibroblasts and cancer cells depleted of NPM1 displayed deformed nucleoli and a striking rearrangement of perinucleolar heterochromatin, as identified by immunofluorescence staining of trimethylated H3K9, trimethylated H3K27, and heterochromatin protein 1γ (HP1γ/CBX3). By co-immunoprecipitation we found NPM1 associated with HP1γ and core and linker histones. Moreover, NPM1 was required for efficient tethering of HP1γ-enriched chromatin to the nucleolus. We next tested whether the alterations in perinucleolar heterochromatin architecture correlated with a difference in the regulation of rDNA. U1242MG glioma cells depleted of NPM1 presented with altered silver staining of nucleolar organizer regions, coupled to a modest decrease in H3K9 di- and trimethylation at the rDNA promoter. rDNA transcription and cell proliferation were sustained in these cells, indicating that altered organization of heterochromatin was not secondary to inhibition of rDNA transcription. Furthermore, knockdown of DNA methyltransferase DNMT3A markedly enhanced rDNA transcription in NPM1-depleted U1242MG cells. In summary, this study highlights a function of NPM1 in the spatial organization of nucleolus-associated heterochromatin. PMID:25349213

  18. Loss of nucleolar histone chaperone NPM1 triggers rearrangement of heterochromatin and synergizes with a deficiency in DNA methyltransferase DNMT3A to drive ribosomal DNA transcription.

    PubMed

    Holmberg Olausson, Karl; Nistér, Monica; Lindström, Mikael S

    2014-12-12

    Nucleoli are prominent nuclear structures assembled and organized around actively transcribed ribosomal DNA (rDNA). The nucleolus has emerged as a platform for the organization of chromatin enriched for repressive histone modifications associated with repetitive DNA. NPM1 is a nucleolar protein required for the maintenance of genome stability. However, the role of NPM1 in nucleolar chromatin dynamics and ribosome biogenesis remains unclear. We found that normal fibroblasts and cancer cells depleted of NPM1 displayed deformed nucleoli and a striking rearrangement of perinucleolar heterochromatin, as identified by immunofluorescence staining of trimethylated H3K9, trimethylated H3K27, and heterochromatin protein 1γ (HP1γ/CBX3). By co-immunoprecipitation we found NPM1 associated with HP1γ and core and linker histones. Moreover, NPM1 was required for efficient tethering of HP1γ-enriched chromatin to the nucleolus. We next tested whether the alterations in perinucleolar heterochromatin architecture correlated with a difference in the regulation of rDNA. U1242MG glioma cells depleted of NPM1 presented with altered silver staining of nucleolar organizer regions, coupled to a modest decrease in H3K9 di- and trimethylation at the rDNA promoter. rDNA transcription and cell proliferation were sustained in these cells, indicating that altered organization of heterochromatin was not secondary to inhibition of rDNA transcription. Furthermore, knockdown of DNA methyltransferase DNMT3A markedly enhanced rDNA transcription in NPM1-depleted U1242MG cells. In summary, this study highlights a function of NPM1 in the spatial organization of nucleolus-associated heterochromatin.

  19. Phosphatidylinositol-4-phosphate 5-Kinase 1α Modulates Ribosomal RNA Gene Silencing through Its Interaction with Histone H3 Lysine 9 Trimethylation and Heterochromatin Protein HP1-α*

    PubMed Central

    Chakrabarti, Rajarshi; Sanyal, Sulagna; Ghosh, Amit; Bhar, Kaushik; Das, Chandrima; Siddhanta, Anirban

    2015-01-01

    Phosphoinositide signaling has been implicated in the regulation of numerous cellular processes including cytoskeletal dynamics, cellular motility, vesicle trafficking, and gene transcription. Studies have also shown that nuclear phosphoinositide(s) regulates processes such as mRNA export, cell cycle progression, gene transcription, and DNA repair. We have shown previously that the nuclear form of phosphatidylinositol-4-phosphate 5-kinase 1α (PIP5K), the enzyme responsible for phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate synthesis, is modified by small ubiquitin-like modifier (SUMO)-1. In this study, we have shown that due to the site-specific Lys to Ala mutations of PIP5K at Lys-244 and Lys-490, it is unable to localize in the nucleus and nucleolus, respectively. Furthermore, by using chromatin immunoprecipitation assays, we have observed that PIP5K associates with the chromatin silencing complex constituted of H3K9me3 and heterochromatin protein 1α at multiple ribosomal DNA (rDNA) loci. These interactions followed a definite cyclical pattern of occupancy (mostly G1) and release from the rDNA loci (G1/S) throughout the cell cycle. Moreover, the immunoprecipitation results clearly demonstrate that PIP5K SUMOylated at Lys-490 interacts with components of the chromatin silencing machinery, H3K9me3 and heterochromatin protein 1α. However, PIP5K does not interact with the gene activation signature protein H3K4me3. This study, for the first time, demonstrates that PIP5K, an enzyme actively associated with lipid modification pathway, has additional roles in rDNA silencing. PMID:26157143

  20. Organization and nucleotide sequence of a gene cluster comprising the translation elongation factor 1 alpha, ribosomal protein S10 and tRNA(Ala) from Halobacterium halobium.

    PubMed

    Fujita, T; Itoh, T

    1995-09-01

    Lambda EMBL clone containing a gene cluster coding for the translation elongation factor 1alpha, ribosomal protein S10 and tRNA(ala) was identified in a genomic library for the halophilic archaebacterium Halobacterium halobium using a PCR probe amplified by two oligonucleotide primers for conserved amino acid sequences of the elongation factor 1 alpha family. The gene coding for elongation factor EF-2 was also found 4.3kb upstream from the 5'end of the elongation factor 1 alpha by hybridization analysis using a DNA fragment specific for EF-2 from Halobacterium halobium [1]. Halobacterial and eukaryotic elongation factor 1 alpha homologues are very similar in sequence and in length and appear to be more closely related to each other than to the eubacterial protein. PMID:8653072

  1. Detection and discrimination of Loa loa, Mansonella perstans and Wuchereria bancrofti by PCR-RFLP and nested-PCR of ribosomal DNA ITS1 region.

    PubMed

    Jiménez, Maribel; González, Luis Miguel; Carranza, Cristina; Bailo, Begoña; Pérez-Ayala, Ana; Muro, Antonio; Pérez-Arellano, José Luis; Gárate, Teresa

    2011-01-01

    The ribosomal deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) internal transcribed spacer region (ITS1) of two filarial nematodes, Loa loa and Mansonella perstans, was amplified and further sequenced to develop an species-specific polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP) protocol for the differentiation of both species from Wuchereria bancrofti, three filarial nematodes with blood circulating microfilariae. The ITS1-PCR product digested with the restriction endonuclease Ase I generated an specific diagnostic pattern for each of the three species. Moreover, three new specific nested-PCRs, targeting the ITS1 region, for differential detection of L. loa, M. perstans and W. bancrofti were developed and used when the ITS1-PCR products were insufficient for the Ase I enzymatic digestion. These filarial species-specific molecular protocols were evaluated in forty blood samples from African adult immigrants attending in the Hospital Insular of Gran Canaria, Canarias, Spain. PMID:20599994

  2. Structural analysis of a type 1 ribosome inactivating protein reveals multiple L‑asparagine‑N‑acetyl‑D‑glucosamine monosaccharide modifications: Implications for cytotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Hogg, Tanis; Mendel, Jameson T; Lavezo, Jonathan L

    2015-10-01

    Pokeweed antiviral protein (PAP) belongs to the family of type I ribosome‑inactivating proteins (RIPs): Ribotoxins, which function by depurinating the sarcin‑ricin loop of ribosomal RNA. In addition to its antibacterial and antifungal properties, PAP has shown promise in antiviral and targeted tumor therapy owing to its ability to depurinate viral RNA and eukaryotic rRNA. Several PAP genes are differentially expressed across pokeweed tissues, with natively isolated seed forms of PAP exhibiting the greatest cytotoxicity. To help elucidate the molecular basis of increased cytotoxicity of PAP isoenzymes from seeds, the present study used protein sequencing, mass spectroscopy and X-ray crystallography to determine the complete covalent structure and 1.7 Å X‑ray crystal structure of PAP‑S1aci isolated from seeds of Asian pokeweed (Phytolacca acinosa). PAP‑S1aci shares ~95% sequence identity with PAP‑S1 from P. americana and contains the signature catalytic residues of the RIP superfamily, corresponding to Tyr72, Tyr122, Glu175 and Arg178 in PAP‑S1aci. A rare proline substitution (Pro174) was identified in the active site of PAP‑S1aci, which has no effect on catalytic Glu175 positioning or overall active‑site topology, yet appears to come at the expense of strained main‑chain geometry at the pre‑proline residue Val173. Notably, a rare type of N‑glycosylation was detected consisting of N‑acetyl‑D‑glucosamine monosaccharide residues linked to Asn10, Asn44 and Asn255 of PAP‑S1aci. Of note, our modeling studies suggested that the ribosome depurination activity of seed PAPs would be adversely affected by the N‑glycosylation of Asn44 and Asn255 with larger and more typical oligosaccharide chains, as they would shield the rRNA‑binding sites on the protein. These results, coupled with evidence gathered from the literature, suggest that this type of minimal N‑glycosylation in seed PAPs and other type I seed RIPs may serve to enhance

  3. Purification of 70S ribosomes.

    PubMed

    Rivera, Maria C; Maguire, Bruce; Lake, James A

    2015-03-01

    Here we describe the further purification of prokaryotic ribosomal particles obtained after the centrifugation of a crude cell lysate through a sucrose cushion. In this final purification step, a fraction containing ribosomes, ribosomal subunits, and polysomes is centrifuged through a 7%-30% (w/w) linear sucrose gradient to isolate tight couple 70S ribosomes, as well as dissociated 30S and 50S subunits. The tight couples fraction, or translationally active ribosome fraction, is composed of intact vacant ribosomes that can be used in cell-free translation systems.

  4. Identification of nucleosome assembly protein 1 (NAP1) as an interacting partner of plant ribosomal protein S6 (RPS6) and a positive regulator of rDNA transcription.

    PubMed

    Son, Ora; Kim, Sunghan; Shin, Yun-Jeong; Kim, Woo-Young; Koh, Hee-Jong; Cheon, Choong-Ill

    2015-09-18

    The ribosomal protein S6 (RPS6) is a downstream component of the signaling mediated by the target of rapamycin (TOR) kinase that acts as a central regulator of the key metabolic processes, such as protein translation and ribosome biogenesis, in response to various environmental cues. In our previous study, we identified a novel role of plant RPS6, which negatively regulates rDNA transcription, forming a complex with a plant-specific histone deacetylase, AtHD2B. Here we report that the Arabidopsis RPS6 interacts additionally with a histone chaperone, nucleosome assembly protein 1(AtNAP1;1). The interaction does not appear to preclude the association of RPS6 with AtHD2B, as the AtNAP1 was also able to interact with AtHD2B as well as with an RPS6-AtHD2B fusion protein in the BiFC assay and pulldown experiment. Similar to a positive effect of the ribosomal S6 kinase 1 (AtS6K1) on rDNA transcription observed in this study, overexpression or down regulation of the AtNAP1;1 resulted in concomitant increase and decrease, respectively, in rDNA transcription suggesting a positive regulatory role played by AtNAP1 in plant rDNA transcription, possibly through derepression of the negative effect of the RPS6-AtHD2B complex. PMID:26241676

  5. Crystallography of ribosomal particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yonath, A.; Frolow, F.; Shoham, M.; Müssig, J.; Makowski, I.; Glotz, C.; Jahn, W.; Weinstein, S.; Wittmann, H. G.

    1988-07-01

    Several forms of three-dimensional crystals and two-dimensional sheets of intact ribosomes and their subunits have been obtained as a result of: (a) an extensive systematic investigation of the parameters involved in crystallization, (b) a development of an experimental procedure for controlling the volumes of the crystallization droplets, (c) a study of the nucleation process, and (d) introducing a delicate seeding procedure coupled with variations in the ratios of mono- and divalent ions in the crystallization medium. In all cases only biologically active particles could be crystallized, and the crystalline material retains its integrity and activity. Crystallographic data have been collected from crystals of 50S ribosomal subunits, using synchrotron radiation at temperatures between + 19 and - 180°C. Although at 4°C the higher resolution reflections decay within minutes in the synchrotron beam, at cryo-temperature there was hardly any radiation damage, and a complete set of data to about 6Åresolution could be collected from a single crystal. Heavy-atom clusters were used for soaking as well as for specific binding to the surface of the ribosomal subunits prior to crystallization. The 50S ribosomal subunits from a mutant of B. stearothermophilus which lacks the ribosomal protein BL11 crystallize isomorphously with in the native ones. Models, aimed to be used for low resolution phasing, have been reconstructed from two-dimensional sheets of 70S ribosomes and 50S subunits at 47 and 30Å, respectively. These models show the overall structure of these particles, the contact areas between the large and small subunits, the space where protein synthesis might take place and a tunnel which may provide the path for the nascent protein chain.

  6. The vhs1 mutant form of herpes simplex virus virion host shutoff protein retains significant internal ribosome entry site-directed RNA cleavage activity.

    PubMed

    Lu, P; Saffran, H A; Smiley, J R

    2001-01-01

    The virion host shutoff (vhs) protein of herpes simplex virus (HSV) triggers global shutoff of host protein synthesis and accelerated turnover of host and viral mRNAs during HSV infection. As well, it induces endoribonucleolytic cleavage of RNA substrates when produced in a rabbit reticulocyte lysate (RRL) in vitro translation system. The vhs1 point mutation (Thr 214-->Ile) eliminates vhs function during virus infection and in transiently transfected mammalian cells and was therefore previously considered to abolish vhs activity. Here we demonstrate that the vhs1 mutant protein induces readily detectable endoribonuclease activity on RNA substrates bearing the internal ribosome entry site of encephalomyocarditis virus in the RRL assay system. These data document that the vhs1 mutation does not eliminate catalytic activity and raise the possibility that the vhs-dependent endoribonuclease employs more than one mode of substrate recognition.

  7. Frameshift mutation in the PTCH2 gene can cause nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome.

    PubMed

    Fujii, Katsunori; Ohashi, Hirofumi; Suzuki, Maiko; Hatsuse, Hiromi; Shiohama, Tadashi; Uchikawa, Hideki; Miyashita, Toshiyuki

    2013-12-01

    Nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome (NBCCS) is an autosomal dominant disorder characterized by developmental defects and tumorigenesis. The gene responsible for NBCCS is PTCH1, encoding a receptor for the secreted protein, sonic hedgehog. Recently, a Chinese family with NBCCS carrying a missense mutation in PTCH2, a close homolog of PTCH1, was reported. However, the pathological significance of missense mutations should be discussed cautiously. Here, we report a 13-year-old girl diagnosed with NBCCS based on multiple keratocystic odontogenic tumors and rib anomalies carrying a frameshift mutation in the PTCH2 gene (c.1172_1173delCT). Considering the deleterious nature of the frameshift mutation, our study further confirmed a causative role for the PTCH2 mutation in NBCCS. The absence of typical phenotypes in this case such as palmar/plantar pits, macrocephaly, falx calcification, hypertelorism and coarse face, together with previously reported cases, suggested that individuals with NBCCS carrying a PTCH2 mutation may have a milder phenotype than those with a PTCH1 mutation.

  8. Dual Role of a SAS10/C1D Family Protein in Ribosomal RNA Gene Expression and Processing Is Essential for Reproduction in Arabidopsis thaliana

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Ying-Jiun C.; Wang, Huei-Jing

    2016-01-01

    In eukaryotic cells, ribosomal RNAs (rRNAs) are transcribed, processed, and assembled with ribosomal proteins in the nucleolus. Regulatory mechanisms of rRNA gene (rDNA) transcription and processing remain elusive in plants, especially their connection to nucleolar organization. We performed an in silico screen for essential genes of unknown function in Arabidopsis thaliana and identified Thallo (THAL) encoding a SAS10/C1D family protein. THAL disruption caused enlarged nucleoli in arrested embryos, aberrant processing of precursor rRNAs at the 5’ External Transcribed Spacer, and repression of the major rDNA variant (VAR1). THAL overexpression lines showed de-repression of VAR1 and overall reversed effects on rRNA processing sites. Strikingly, THAL overexpression also induced formation of multiple nucleoli per nucleus phenotypic of mutants of heterochromatin factors. THAL physically associated with histone chaperone Nucleolin 1 (NUC1), histone-binding NUC2, and histone demethylase Jumonji 14 (JMJ14) in bimolecular fluorescence complementation assay, suggesting that it participates in chromatin regulation. Furthermore, investigation of truncated THAL proteins revealed that the SAS10 C-terminal domain is likely important for its function in chromatin configuration. THAL also interacted with putative Small Subunit processome components, including previously unreported Arabidopsis homologue of yeast M Phase Phosphoprotein 10 (MPP10). Our results uncovering the dual role of THAL in transcription and processing events critical for proper rRNA biogenesis and nucleolar organization during reproduction are the first to define the function of SAS10/C1D family members in plants. PMID:27792779

  9. Expanding the ribosomal universe.

    PubMed

    Dinman, Jonathan D; Kinzy, Terri Goss

    2009-12-01

    In this issue of Structure, Taylor et al. (2009) present the most complete model of an eukaryotic ribosome to date. This achievement represents a critical milestone along the path to structurally defining the unique aspects of the eukaryotic protein synthetic machinery.

  10. Ribosomal Antibiotics: Contemporary Challenges.

    PubMed

    Auerbach-Nevo, Tamar; Baram, David; Bashan, Anat; Belousoff, Matthew; Breiner, Elinor; Davidovich, Chen; Cimicata, Giuseppe; Eyal, Zohar; Halfon, Yehuda; Krupkin, Miri; Matzov, Donna; Metz, Markus; Rufayda, Mruwat; Peretz, Moshe; Pick, Ophir; Pyetan, Erez; Rozenberg, Haim; Shalev-Benami, Moran; Wekselman, Itai; Zarivach, Raz; Zimmerman, Ella; Assis, Nofar; Bloch, Joel; Israeli, Hadar; Kalaora, Rinat; Lim, Lisha; Sade-Falk, Ofir; Shapira, Tal; Taha-Salaime, Leena; Tang, Hua; Yonath, Ada

    2016-06-29

    Most ribosomal antibiotics obstruct distinct ribosomal functions. In selected cases, in addition to paralyzing vital ribosomal tasks, some ribosomal antibiotics are involved in cellular regulation. Owing to the global rapid increase in the appearance of multi-drug resistance in pathogenic bacterial strains, and to the extremely slow progress in developing new antibiotics worldwide, it seems that, in addition to the traditional attempts at improving current antibiotics and the intensive screening for additional natural compounds, this field should undergo substantial conceptual revision. Here, we highlight several contemporary issues, including challenging the common preference of broad-range antibiotics; the marginal attention to alterations in the microbiome population resulting from antibiotics usage, and the insufficient awareness of ecological and environmental aspects of antibiotics usage. We also highlight recent advances in the identification of species-specific structural motifs that may be exploited for the design and the creation of novel, environmental friendly, degradable, antibiotic types, with a better distinction between pathogens and useful bacterial species in the microbiome. Thus, these studies are leading towards the design of "pathogen-specific antibiotics," in contrast to the current preference of broad range antibiotics, partially because it requires significant efforts in speeding up the discovery of the unique species motifs as well as the clinical pathogen identification.

  11. Ribosomal Antibiotics: Contemporary Challenges.

    PubMed

    Auerbach-Nevo, Tamar; Baram, David; Bashan, Anat; Belousoff, Matthew; Breiner, Elinor; Davidovich, Chen; Cimicata, Giuseppe; Eyal, Zohar; Halfon, Yehuda; Krupkin, Miri; Matzov, Donna; Metz, Markus; Rufayda, Mruwat; Peretz, Moshe; Pick, Ophir; Pyetan, Erez; Rozenberg, Haim; Shalev-Benami, Moran; Wekselman, Itai; Zarivach, Raz; Zimmerman, Ella; Assis, Nofar; Bloch, Joel; Israeli, Hadar; Kalaora, Rinat; Lim, Lisha; Sade-Falk, Ofir; Shapira, Tal; Taha-Salaime, Leena; Tang, Hua; Yonath, Ada

    2016-01-01

    Most ribosomal antibiotics obstruct distinct ribosomal functions. In selected cases, in addition to paralyzing vital ribosomal tasks, some ribosomal antibiotics are involved in cellular regulation. Owing to the global rapid increase in the appearance of multi-drug resistance in pathogenic bacterial strains, and to the extremely slow progress in developing new antibiotics worldwide, it seems that, in addition to the traditional attempts at improving current antibiotics and the intensive screening for additional natural compounds, this field should undergo substantial conceptual revision. Here, we highlight several contemporary issues, including challenging the common preference of broad-range antibiotics; the marginal attention to alterations in the microbiome population resulting from antibiotics usage, and the insufficient awareness of ecological and environmental aspects of antibiotics usage. We also highlight recent advances in the identification of species-specific structural motifs that may be exploited for the design and the creation of novel, environmental friendly, degradable, antibiotic types, with a better distinction between pathogens and useful bacterial species in the microbiome. Thus, these studies are leading towards the design of "pathogen-specific antibiotics," in contrast to the current preference of broad range antibiotics, partially because it requires significant efforts in speeding up the discovery of the unique species motifs as well as the clinical pathogen identification. PMID:27367739

  12. Ribosomal Antibiotics: Contemporary Challenges

    PubMed Central

    Auerbach-Nevo, Tamar; Baram, David; Bashan, Anat; Belousoff, Matthew; Breiner, Elinor; Davidovich, Chen; Cimicata, Giuseppe; Eyal, Zohar; Halfon, Yehuda; Krupkin, Miri; Matzov, Donna; Metz, Markus; Rufayda, Mruwat; Peretz, Moshe; Pick, Ophir; Pyetan, Erez; Rozenberg, Haim; Shalev-Benami, Moran; Wekselman, Itai; Zarivach, Raz; Zimmerman, Ella; Assis, Nofar; Bloch, Joel; Israeli, Hadar; Kalaora, Rinat; Lim, Lisha; Sade-Falk, Ofir; Shapira, Tal; Taha-Salaime, Leena; Tang, Hua; Yonath, Ada

    2016-01-01

    Most ribosomal antibiotics obstruct distinct ribosomal functions. In selected cases, in addition to paralyzing vital ribosomal tasks, some ribosomal antibiotics are involved in cellular regulation. Owing to the global rapid increase in the appearance of multi-drug resistance in pathogenic bacterial strains, and to the extremely slow progress in developing new antibiotics worldwide, it seems that, in addition to the traditional attempts at improving current antibiotics and the intensive screening for additional natural compounds, this field should undergo substantial conceptual revision. Here, we highlight several contemporary issues, including challenging the common preference of broad-range antibiotics; the marginal attention to alterations in the microbiome population resulting from antibiotics usage, and the insufficient awareness of ecological and environmental aspects of antibiotics usage. We also highlight recent advances in the identification of species-specific structural motifs that may be exploited for the design and the creation of novel, environmental friendly, degradable, antibiotic types, with a better distinction between pathogens and useful bacterial species in the microbiome. Thus, these studies are leading towards the design of “pathogen-specific antibiotics,” in contrast to the current preference of broad range antibiotics, partially because it requires significant efforts in speeding up the discovery of the unique species motifs as well as the clinical pathogen identification. PMID:27367739

  13. Constructing ribosomes along the Danube

    PubMed Central

    Warner, Jonathan R.

    2010-01-01

    The EMBO Conference on Ribosome Synthesis held last summer explored the latest breakthroughs in ribosome assembly and how it affects disease. Both of these topics have recently seen important advances that enlighten how almost 200 proteins cooperate to produce a ribosome and how the cell responds to a malfunction in this process. PMID:20010797

  14. New RNA-protein crosslinks in domains 1 and 2 of E. coli 30S ribosomal subunits obtained by means of an intrinsic photoaffinity probe.

    PubMed Central

    Hajnsdorf, E; Favre, A; Expert-Bezançon, A

    1989-01-01

    Functionally active 70S ribosomes containing 4-thiouridine (s4U) in place of uridine were prepared by a formerly described in vivo substitution method. Proteins were crosslinked to RNA by 366 nm photoactivation of s4U. We observe the systematic and characteristic formation of 30S dimers; they were eliminated for analysis of RNA-protein crosslinks. M13 probes containing rDNA inserts complementary to domains 1 and 2 of 16S RNA from the 5'end up to nucleotide 868 were used to select contiguous or overlapping RNA sections. The proteins covalently crosslinked to each RNA section were identified as S3, S4, S5, S7, S9, S18, S20 and S21. Several crosslinks are compatible with previously published sites for proteins S5, S18, S20 and S21; others for proteins S3, S4, S7, S9, S18 correspond necessarily to new sites. Images PMID:2646595

  15. The CCA-end of P-tRNA Contacts Both the Human RPL36AL and the A-site Bound Translation Termination Factor eRF1 at the Peptidyl Transferase Center of the Human 80S Ribosome.

    PubMed

    Hountondji, Codjo; Bulygin, Konstantin; Créchet, Jean-Bernard; Woisard, Anne; Tuffery, Pierre; Nakayama, Jun-Ichi; Frolova, Ludmila; Nierhaus, Knud H; Karpova, Galina; Baouz, Soria

    2014-01-01

    We have demonstrated previously that the E-site specific protein RPL36AL present in human ribosomes can be crosslinked with the CCA-end of a P-tRNA in situ. Here we report the following: (i) We modeled RPL36AL into the structure of the archaeal ortholog RPL44E extracted from the known X-ray structure of the 50S subunit of Haloarcula marismortui. Superimposing the obtained RPL36AL structure with that of P/E tRNA observed in eukaryotic 80S ribosomes suggested that RPL36AL might in addition to its CCA neighbourhood interact with the inner site of the tRNA elbow similar to an interaction pattern known from tRNA•synthetase pairs. (ii) Accordingly, we detected that the isolated recombinant protein RPL36AL can form a tight binary complex with deacylated tRNA, and even tRNA fragments truncated at their CCA end showed a high affinity in the nanomolar range supporting a strong interaction outside the CCA end. (iii) We constructed programmed 80S complexes containing the termination factor eRF1 (stop codon UAA at the A-site) and a 2',3'-dialdehyde tRNA (tRNAox) analog at the P-site. Surprisingly, we observed a crosslinked ternary complex containing the tRNA, eRF1 and RPL36AL crosslinked both to the aldehyde groups of tRNAox at the 2'- and 3'-positions of the ultimate A. We also demonstrated that, upon binding to the ribosomal A-site, eRF1 induces an alternative conformation of the ribosome and/or the tRNA, leading to a novel crosslink of tRNAox to another large-subunit ribosomal protein (namely L37) rather than to RPL36AL, both ribosomal proteins being labeled in a mutually exclusive fashion. Since the human 80S ribosome in complex with P-site bound tRNAox and A-site bound eRF1 corresponds to the post-termination state of the ribosome, the results represent the first biochemical evidence for the positioning of the CCA-arm of the P-tRNA in close proximity to both RPL36AL and eRF1 at the end of the translation process.

  16. A 'garbage can' for ribosomes: how eukaryotes degrade their ribosomes.

    PubMed

    Lafontaine, Denis L J

    2010-05-01

    Ribosome synthesis is a major metabolic activity that involves hundreds of individual reactions, each of which is error-prone. Ribosomal insults occur in cis (alteration in rRNA sequences) and in trans (failure to bind to, or loss of, an assembly factor or ribosomal protein). In addition, specific growth conditions, such as starvation, require that excess ribosomes are turned over efficiently. Recent work indicates that cells evolved multiple strategies to recognize specifically, and target for clearance, ribosomes that are structurally and/or functionally deficient, as well as in excess. This surveillance is active at every step of the ribosome synthesis pathway and on mature ribosomes, involves nearly entirely different mechanisms for the small and large subunits, and requires specialized subcellular organelles. PMID:20097077

  17. [Ribosomal RNA Evolution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    It is generally believed that an RNA World existed at an early stage in the history of life. During this early period, RNA molecules are seen to be potentially involved in both catalysis and the storage of genetic information. Translation presents several interrelated themes of inquiry for exobiology. First, it is essential, for understanding the very origin of life, how peptides and eventually proteins might have come to be made on the early Earth in a template directed manner. Second, it is necessary to understand how a machinery of similar complexity to that found in the ribosomes of modern organisms came to exist by the time of the last common ancestor (as detected by 16S rRNA sequence studies). Third, the ribosomal RNAs themselves likely had a very early origin and studies of their history may be very informative about the nature of the RNA World. Moreover, studies of these RNAs will contribute to a better understanding of the potential roles of RNA in early evolution.During the past year we have ave conducted a comparative study of four completely sequenced bacterial genoames. We have focused initially on conservation of gene order. The second component of the project continues to build on the model system for studying the validity of variant 5S rRNA sequences in the vicinity of the modern Vibrio proteolyticus 5S rRNA that we established earlier. This system has made it possible to conduct a detailed and extensive analysis of a local portion of the sequence space. These core methods have been used to construct numerous mutants during the last several years. Although it has been a secondary focus, this work has continued over the last year such that we now have in excess of 125 V. proteolyticus derived constructs which have been made and characterized. We have also continued high resolution NMR work on RNA oligomers originally initiated by G. Kenneth Smith who was funded by a NASA Graduate Student Researcher's Fellowship Award until May of 1996. Mr. Smith

  18. Isolation of ribosomes and polysomes.

    PubMed

    Rivera, Maria C; Maguire, Bruce; Lake, James A

    2015-03-01

    Here we describe a preparative differential centrifugation protocol for the isolation of ribosomes from a crude cell homogenate. The subcellular fraction obtained is enriched in ribosome monomers and polysomes. The protocol has been optimized for the homogenization and collection of the ribosomal fraction from prokaryotic cells, mammalian and plant tissues, reticulocytes, and chloroplasts. The quality of the ribosomal preparation is enhanced by the removal of the remaining cellular components and adsorbed proteins by pelleting through a sucrose cushion with a high concentration of monovalent salts, NH4Cl or KCl. The different components of the ribosomal fraction isolated using this protocol can be further purified by sucrose gradient centrifugation.

  19. Ribosome Assembly as Antimicrobial Target.

    PubMed

    Nikolay, Rainer; Schmidt, Sabine; Schlömer, Renate; Deuerling, Elke; Nierhaus, Knud H

    2016-01-01

    Many antibiotics target the ribosome and interfere with its translation cycle. Since translation is the source of all cellular proteins including ribosomal proteins, protein synthesis and ribosome assembly are interdependent. As a consequence, the activity of translation inhibitors might indirectly cause defective ribosome assembly. Due to the difficulty in distinguishing between direct and indirect effects, and because assembly is probably a target in its own right, concepts are needed to identify small molecules that directly inhibit ribosome assembly. Here, we summarize the basic facts of ribosome targeting antibiotics. Furthermore, we present an in vivo screening strategy that focuses on ribosome assembly by a direct fluorescence based read-out that aims to identify and characterize small molecules acting as primary assembly inhibitors. PMID:27240412

  20. Ribosome Assembly as Antimicrobial Target

    PubMed Central

    Nikolay, Rainer; Schmidt, Sabine; Schlömer, Renate; Deuerling, Elke; Nierhaus, Knud H.

    2016-01-01

    Many antibiotics target the ribosome and interfere with its translation cycle. Since translation is the source of all cellular proteins including ribosomal proteins, protein synthesis and ribosome assembly are interdependent. As a consequence, the activity of translation inhibitors might indirectly cause defective ribosome assembly. Due to the difficulty in distinguishing between direct and indirect effects, and because assembly is probably a target in its own right, concepts are needed to identify small molecules that directly inhibit ribosome assembly. Here, we summarize the basic facts of ribosome targeting antibiotics. Furthermore, we present an in vivo screening strategy that focuses on ribosome assembly by a direct fluorescence based read-out that aims to identify and characterize small molecules acting as primary assembly inhibitors. PMID:27240412

  1. Ribosomes in the squid giant axon.

    PubMed

    Bleher, R; Martin, R

    2001-01-01

    Ribosome clusters, referred to as endoaxoplasmic plaques, were documented and quantitatively analyzed in the squid giant axon at the light and electron microscopic levels. The methods included nonspecific high affinity fluorescence staining of RNA by YOYO-1, specific immunofluorescence labeling of ribosomal RNA, electron energy loss spectroscopic mapping of ribosomal phosphorus, and conventional transmission electron microscopy. The endoaxoplasmic plaques were sharply defined, oval in shape, and less than 2 microm in diameter. While they were very numerous in the postsynaptic axonal area of the giant synapse, the frequency of occurrence was much lower in the peripheral giant axon, with a density of about 1 plaque/1000 microm3. Their distribution was random within axoplasm, with no preferential localization near the membrane. The several thousand ribosomes in a plaque usually were not membrane bound, but vesicular structures were observed in or near plaques; plaques were often surrounded by mitochondria. We conclude that ribosomes, a requisite machinery for protein synthesis, are present in the squid giant axon in discrete configurations.

  2. Activity of the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 cell cycle-dependent internal ribosomal entry site is modulated by IRES trans-acting factors

    PubMed Central

    Vallejos, Maricarmen; Deforges, Jules; Plank, Terra-Dawn M.; Letelier, Alejandro; Ramdohr, Pablo; Abraham, Christopher G.; Valiente-Echeverría, Fernando; Kieft, Jeffrey S.; Sargueil, Bruno; López-Lastra, Marcelo

    2011-01-01

    The 5′ leader of the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) genomic RNA harbors an internal ribosome entry site (IRES) that is functional during the G2/M phase of the cell cycle. Here we show that translation initiation mediated by the HIV-1 IRES requires the participation of trans-acting cellular factors other than the canonical translational machinery. We used ‘standard’ chemical and enzymatic probes and an ‘RNA SHAPE’ analysis to model the structure of the HIV-1 5′ leader and we show, by means of a footprinting assay, that G2/M extracts provide protections to regions previously identified as crucial for HIV-1 IRES activity. We also assessed the impact of mutations on IRES function. Strikingly, mutations did not significantly affect IRES activity suggesting that the requirement for pre-formed stable secondary or tertiary structure within the HIV-1 IRES may not be as strict as has been described for other viral IRESes. Finally, we used a proteomic approach to identify cellular proteins within the G2/M extracts that interact with the HIV-1 5′ leader. Together, data show that HIV-1 IRES-mediated translation initiation is modulated by cellular proteins. PMID:21482538

  3. Identification of nucleosome assembly protein 1 (NAP1) as an interacting partner of plant ribosomal protein S6 (RPS6) and a positive regulator of rDNA transcription

    SciTech Connect

    Son, Ora; Kim, Sunghan; Shin, Yun-jeong; Kim, Woo-Young; Koh, Hee-Jong; Cheon, Choong-Ill

    2015-09-18

    The ribosomal protein S6 (RPS6) is a downstream component of the signaling mediated by the target of rapamycin (TOR) kinase that acts as a central regulator of the key metabolic processes, such as protein translation and ribosome biogenesis, in response to various environmental cues. In our previous study, we identified a novel role of plant RPS6, which negatively regulates rDNA transcription, forming a complex with a plant-specific histone deacetylase, AtHD2B. Here we report that the Arabidopsis RPS6 interacts additionally with a histone chaperone, nucleosome assembly protein 1(AtNAP1;1). The interaction does not appear to preclude the association of RPS6 with AtHD2B, as the AtNAP1 was also able to interact with AtHD2B as well as with an RPS6-AtHD2B fusion protein in the BiFC assay and pulldown experiment. Similar to a positive effect of the ribosomal S6 kinase 1 (AtS6K1) on rDNA transcription observed in this study, overexpression or down regulation of the AtNAP1;1 resulted in concomitant increase and decrease, respectively, in rDNA transcription suggesting a positive regulatory role played by AtNAP1 in plant rDNA transcription, possibly through derepression of the negative effect of the RPS6-AtHD2B complex. - Highlights: • Nucleosome assembly protein 1 (AtNAP1) interacts with RPS6 as well as with AtHD2B. • rDNA transcription is regulated S6K1. • Overexpression or down regulation of AtNAP1 results in concomitant increase or decrease in rDNA transcription.

  4. A new β⁰-thalassemia frameshift mutation [β 48 (-T)] in a Uruguayan family.

    PubMed

    Da Luz, J; López, P; Kimura, E M; Albuquerque, D M; Costa, F F; Sans, M; Sonati, M F

    2013-02-01

    We describe here a new frameshift mutation of β-thalassemia in a Uruguayan family with Italian ancestry [β48 (-T); HBB:c.146delT]. This frameshift results in formation of premature stop codon (TGA) 40 bp downstream and in a short unstable product that is degraded in the cell.

  5. Yeast linker histone Hho1p is required for efficient RNA polymerase I processivity and transcriptional silencing at the ribosomal DNA.

    PubMed

    Levy, Anat; Eyal, Miri; Hershkovits, Gitit; Salmon-Divon, Mali; Klutstein, Michael; Katcoff, Don Jay

    2008-08-19

    Nucleosome core particles in eukaryotes are linked by a stretch of DNA that is usually associated with a linker histone. Here, we show in yeast, that the presence of yeast linker histone Hho1p represses expression of a pol II transcribed gene (MET15) embedded in the rDNA. In vivo deletions of Hho1p sequences showed that the second globular domain is sufficient for that repression, whereas the presence of the N terminus is required for its derepression. In contrast, a run-on assay confirmed by a ChIP experiment showed that Hho1p is required for maximal pol I processivity during rDNA transcription. Psoralen accessibility experiments indicated that Hho1p is necessary for normal rDNA compaction. DNA array expression analysis comparing RNA transcripts in wild-type and hho1 strains before and after a heat-shock showed that Hho1p is necessary to achieve wild-type mRNA levels of transcripts that encode ribosomal components. Taken together, our results suggest that Hho1p is involved in rDNA compaction, and like core histones, is required for efficient rDNA transcription by pol I. PMID:18687885

  6. Functional and Structural Analysis of the Internal Ribosome Entry Site Present in the mRNA of Natural Variants of the HIV-1

    PubMed Central

    Vallejos, Maricarmen; Carvajal, Felipe; Pino, Karla; Navarrete, Camilo; Ferres, Marcela; Huidobro-Toro, Juan Pablo; Sargueil, Bruno; López-Lastra, Marcelo

    2012-01-01

    The 5′untranslated regions (UTR) of the full length mRNA of the HIV-1 proviral clones pNL4.3 and pLAI, harbor an internal ribosomal entry site (IRES). In this study we extend this finding by demonstrating that the mRNA 5′UTRs of natural variants of HIV-1 also exhibit IRES-activity. Cap-independent translational activity was demonstrated using bicistronic mRNAs in HeLa cells and in Xenopus laevis oocytes. The possibility that expression of the downstream cistron in these constructs was due to alternative splicing or to cryptic promoter activity was ruled out. The HIV-1 variants exhibited significant 5′UTR nucleotide diversity with respect to the control sequence recovered from pNL4.3. Interestingly, translational activity from the 5′UTR of some of the HIV-1 variants was enhanced relative to that observed for the 5′UTR of pNL4.3. In an attempt to explain these findings we probed the secondary structure of the variant HIV-1 5′UTRs using enzymatic and chemical approaches. Yet subsequent structural analyses did not reveal significant variations when compared to the pNL4.3-5′UTR. Thus, the increased IRES-activity observed for some of the HIV-1 variants cannot be ascribed to a specific structural modification. A model to explain these findings is proposed. PMID:22496887

  7. The short 5' untranslated region of the betaA3/A1-crystallin mRNA is responsible for leaky ribosomal scanning.

    PubMed

    Werten, P J; Stege, G J; de Jong, W W

    1999-08-01

    Leaky ribosomal scanning allows the expression of multiple proteins from a single mRNA by occasionally skipping the first start codon, and initiating translation at a subsequent one. BetaA3- and betaA1-crystallin, two members of the beta-crystallin family of vertebrate eye lens proteins, are produced via this mechanism, of which, until now, only very few examples have been found in eukaryotic genes. Since the two start codons on the betaA3/A1 messenger lie in the same reading frame, the two translated proteins are identical, except for the 17 residues shorter N-terminal extension of betaA1-crystallin. It has been suggested that the very short leader (5-7 nucleotides) of the betaA3/A1 messenger might cause slippage at the first start codon, although the unfavorable context of this start codon might also be responsible. Using transient transfections, we now demonstrate that increasing the length of the leader sequence to 67 nucleotides indeed completely abolishes translation initiation at the second start codon, and thus expression of the betaA1-crystallin protein. Messengers having a leader of 5, 7 or 14 nucleotides all express both betaA3- and betaA1-crystallin at very similar relative levels.

  8. The first internal transcribed spacer (ITS-1) of ribosomal DNA as a molecular marker for phylogenetic and population analyses in crustacea.

    PubMed

    Chu, K H; Li, C P; Ho, H Y

    2001-07-01

    The objective of the present study is to explore the feasibility of using the first internal transcribed spacer (ITS-1) of ribosomal DNA as a molecular marker for studying the interspecific and intraspecific genetic variations among crustaceans. We designed primers that could amplify ITS-1 from a majority of taxonomic groups of crustaceans. The gene was found to exhibit a high degree of length polymorphism among different groups, ranging from 182 bp in the barnacle Balanus amphitrite to approximately 820 bp in the spiny lobster Panulirus japonicus. With respect to differences between congeneric species, it was found that the ITS-1 sequences of 3 mitten crabs, Eriocheir sinensis, Eriocheir leptognathus, and Eriocheir formosa, exhibit 5.4% to 16.3% nucleotide divergence, suggesting that ITS-1 is informative for phylogenetic analysis at the species level. Yet there are extensive (0.9%-2.3%) variations within individual E. formosa, so that phylogenetic analyses could be obscured. ITS-1 was found to vary between 2 geographical populations of the shrimp Penaeus japonicus. The variations involved substitutions as well as insertions/deletions between shrimp from Australia and South China Sea. These results show that ITS-1 is highly divergent among different crustaceans and could be an appropriate marker for molecular systematic studies at the species and population levels, although the presence of intragenomic variation needs to be taken into consideration.

  9. Essential ribosome assembly factor Fap7 regulates a hierarchy of RNA–protein interactions during small ribosomal subunit biogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Hellmich, Ute A.; Weis, Benjamin L.; Lioutikov, Anatoli; Wurm, Jan Philip; Kaiser, Marco; Christ, Nina A.; Hantke, Katharina; Kötter, Peter; Entian, Karl-Dieter; Schleiff, Enrico; Wöhnert, Jens

    2013-01-01

    Factor activating Pos9 (Fap7) is an essential ribosome biogenesis factor important for the assembly of the small ribosomal subunit with an uncommon dual ATPase and adenylate kinase activity. Depletion of Fap7 or mutations in its ATPase motifs lead to defects in small ribosomal subunit rRNA maturation, the absence of ribosomal protein Rps14 from the assembled subunit, and retention of the nascent small subunit in a quality control complex with the large ribosomal subunit. The molecular basis for the role of Fap7 in ribosome biogenesis is, however, not yet understood. Here we show that Fap7 regulates multiple interactions between the precursor rRNA, ribosomal proteins, and ribosome assembly factors in a hierarchical manner. Fap7 binds to Rps14 with a very high affinity. Fap7 binding blocks both rRNA-binding elements of Rps14, suggesting that Fap7 inhibits premature interactions of Rps14 with RNA. The Fap7/Rps14 interaction is modulated by nucleotide binding to Fap7. Rps14 strongly activates the ATPase activity but not the adenylate kinase activity of Fap7, identifying Rps14 as an example of a ribosomal protein functioning as an ATPase-activating factor. In addition, Fap7 inhibits the RNA cleavage activity of Nob1, the endonuclease responsible for the final maturation step of the small subunit rRNA, in a nucleotide independent manner. Thus, Fap7 may regulate small subunit biogenesis at multiple stages. PMID:24003121

  10. A key role for the mRNA leader structure in translational control of ribosomal protein S1 synthesis in γ-proteobacteria

    PubMed Central

    Tchufistova, Ludmila S.; Komarova, Anastassia V.; Boni, Irina V.

    2003-01-01

    The translation initiation region (TIR) of the Escherichia coli rpsA mRNA coding for ribosomal protein S1 is characterized by a remarkable efficiency in driving protein synthesis despite the absence of the canonical Shine–Dalgarno element, and by a strong and specific autogenous repression in the presence of free S1 in trans. The efficient and autoregulated E.coli rpsA TIR comprises not less than 90 nt upstream of the translation start and can be unambiguously folded into three irregular hairpins (HI, HII and HIII) separated by A/U-rich single-stranded regions (ss1 and ss2). Phylogenetic comparison revealed that this specific fold is highly conserved in the γ-subdivision of proteobacteria (but not in other subdivisions), except for the Pseudomonas group. To test phylogenetic predictions experimentally, we have generated rpsA′–′lacZ translational fusions by inserting the rpsA TIRs from various γ-proteobacteria in-frame with the E.coli chromosomal lacZ gene. Measurements of their translation efficiency and negative regulation by excess protein S1 in trans have shown that only those rpsA TIRs which share the structural features with that of E.coli can govern efficient and regulated translation. We conclude that the E.coli-like mechanism for controlling the efficiency of protein S1 synthesis evolved after divergence of Pseudomona PMID:14627832

  11. Additive Promotion of Viral Internal Ribosome Entry Site-Mediated Translation by Far Upstream Element-Binding Protein 1 and an Enterovirus 71-Induced Cleavage Product

    PubMed Central

    Hung, Chuan-Tien; Kung, Yu-An; Li, Mei-Ling; Lee, Kuo-Ming; Liu, Shih-Tung; Shih, Shin-Ru

    2016-01-01

    The 5' untranslated region (5' UTR) of the enterovirus 71 (EV71) RNA genome contains an internal ribosome entry site (IRES) that is indispensable for viral protein translation. Due to the limited coding capacity of their RNA genomes, EV71 and other picornaviruses typically recruit host factors, known as IRES trans-acting factors (ITAFs), to mediate IRES-dependent translation. Here, we show that EV71 viral proteinase 2A is capable of cleaving far upstream element-binding protein 1 (FBP1), a positive ITAF that directly binds to the EV71 5' UTR linker region to promote viral IRES-driven translation. The cleavage occurs at the Gly-371 residue of FBP1 during the EV71 infection process, and this generates a functional cleavage product, FBP11-371. Interestingly, the cleavage product acts to promote viral IRES activity. Footprinting analysis and gel mobility shift assay results showed that FBP11-371 similarly binds to the EV71 5' UTR linker region, but at a different site from full-length FBP1; moreover, FBP1 and FBP11-371 were found to act additively to promote IRES-mediated translation and virus yield. Our findings expand the current understanding of virus-host interactions with regard to viral recruitment and modulation of ITAFs, and provide new insights into translational control during viral infection. PMID:27780225

  12. Structure of the mammalian antimicrobial peptide Bac7(1–16) bound within the exit tunnel of a bacterial ribosome

    PubMed Central

    Seefeldt, A. Carolin; Graf, Michael; Pérébaskine, Natacha; Nguyen, Fabian; Arenz, Stefan; Mardirossian, Mario; Scocchi, Marco; Wilson, Daniel N.; Innis, C. Axel

    2016-01-01

    Proline-rich antimicrobial peptides (PrAMPs) produced as part of the innate immune response of animals, insects and plants represent a vast, untapped resource for the treatment of multidrug-resistant bacterial infections. PrAMPs such as oncocin or bactenecin-7 (Bac7) interact with the bacterial ribosome to inhibit translation, but their supposed specificity as inhibitors of bacterial rather than mammalian protein synthesis remains unclear, despite being key to developing drugs with low toxicity. Here, we present crystal structures of the Thermus thermophilus 70S ribosome in complex with the first 16 residues of mammalian Bac7, as well as the insect-derived PrAMPs metalnikowin I and pyrrhocoricin. The structures reveal that the mammalian Bac7 interacts with a similar region of the ribosome as insect-derived PrAMPs. Consistently, Bac7 and the oncocin derivative Onc112 compete effectively with antibiotics, such as erythromycin, which target the ribosomal exit tunnel. Moreover, we demonstrate that Bac7 allows initiation complex formation but prevents entry into the elongation phase of translation, and show that it inhibits translation on both mammalian and bacterial ribosomes, explaining why this peptide needs to be stored as an inactive pro-peptide. These findings highlight the need to consider the specificity of PrAMP derivatives for the bacterial ribosome in future drug development efforts. PMID:26792896

  13. Dynamic Regulation of a Ribosome Rescue Pathway in Erythroid Cells and Platelets.

    PubMed

    Mills, Eric W; Wangen, Jamie; Green, Rachel; Ingolia, Nicholas T

    2016-09-27

    Protein synthesis continues in platelets and maturing reticulocytes, although these blood cells lack nuclei and do not make new mRNA or ribosomes. Here, we analyze translation in primary human cells from anucleate lineages by ribosome profiling and uncover a dramatic accumulation of post-termination unrecycled ribosomes in the 3' UTRs of mRNAs. We demonstrate that these ribosomes accumulate as a result of the natural loss of the ribosome recycling factor ABCE1 during terminal differentiation. Induction of the ribosome rescue factors PELO and HBS1L is required to support protein synthesis when ABCE1 levels fall and for hemoglobin production during blood cell development. Our observations suggest that this distinctive loss of ABCE1 in anucleate blood lineages could sensitize them to defects in ribosome homeostasis, perhaps explaining in part why genetic defects in the fundamental process of ribosome production ("ribosomopathies") often affect hematopoiesis specifically. PMID:27681415

  14. Structural snapshots of actively translating human ribosomes.

    PubMed

    Behrmann, Elmar; Loerke, Justus; Budkevich, Tatyana V; Yamamoto, Kaori; Schmidt, Andrea; Penczek, Pawel A; Vos, Matthijn R; Bürger, Jörg; Mielke, Thorsten; Scheerer, Patrick; Spahn, Christian M T

    2015-05-01

    Macromolecular machines, such as the ribosome, undergo large-scale conformational changes during their functional cycles. Although their mode of action is often compared to that of mechanical machines, a crucial difference is that, at the molecular dimension, thermodynamic effects dominate functional cycles, with proteins fluctuating stochastically between functional states defined by energetic minima on an energy landscape. Here, we have used cryo-electron microscopy to image ex-vivo-derived human polysomes as a source of actively translating ribosomes. Multiparticle refinement and 3D variability analysis allowed us to visualize a variety of native translation intermediates. Significantly populated states include not only elongation cycle intermediates in pre- and post-translocational states, but also eEF1A-containing decoding and termination/recycling complexes. Focusing on the post-translocational state, we extended this assessment to the single-residue level, uncovering striking details of ribosome-ligand interactions and identifying both static and functionally important dynamic elements.

  15. Transcription Termination Factor reb1p Causes Two Replication Fork Barriers at Its Cognate Sites in Fission Yeast Ribosomal DNA In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Sánchez-Gorostiaga, Alicia; López-Estraño, Carlos; Krimer, Dora B.; Schvartzman, Jorge B.; Hernández, Pablo

    2004-01-01

    Polar replication fork barriers (RFBs) near the 3′ end of the rRNA transcriptional unit are a conserved feature of ribosomal DNA (rDNA) replication in eukaryotes. In the mouse, in vivo studies indicate that the cis-acting Sal boxes required for rRNA transcription termination are also involved in replication fork blockage. On the contrary, in the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the rRNA transcription termination factors are not required for RFBs. Here we characterized the rDNA RFBs in the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe. S. pombe rDNA contains three closely spaced polar replication barriers named RFB1, RFB2, and RFB3 in the 3′ to 5′ order. The transcription termination protein reb1 and its two binding sites, present at the 3′ end of the coding region, were required for fork arrest at RFB2 and RFB3 in vivo. On the other hand, fork arrest at the strongest RFB1 barrier was independent of the above transcription termination factors. Therefore, RFB2 and RFB3 resemble the barriers present in the mouse rDNA, whereas RFB1 is similar to the budding yeast RFBs. These results suggest that during evolution, cis- and trans-acting factors required for rRNA transcription termination became involved in replication fork blockage also. S. pombe is suggested to be a transitional species in which both mechanisms coexist. PMID:14673172

  16. Structure and thermodynamic insights on acetylaminofluorene-modified deletion DNA duplexes as models for frameshift mutagenesis

    PubMed Central

    Sandineni, Anusha; Lin, Bin; MacKerell, Alexander D.; Cho, Bongsup P.

    2013-01-01

    2-Acetylaminofluorene (AAF) is a prototype arylamine carcinogen that forms C8-substituted dG-AAF and dG-AF as the major DNA lesions. The bulky N-acetylated dG-AAF lesion can induce various frameshift mutations depending on the base sequence around the lesion. We hypothesized that the thermodynamic stability of bulged-out slipped mutagenic intermediates (SMIs) is directly related to deletion mutations. The objective of the present study was to probe the structural/conformational basis of various dG-AAF–induced SMIs formed during a translesion synthesis. We performed spectroscopic, thermodynamic, and molecular dynamics studies of several AAF-modified 16-mer model DNA duplexes, including fully paired and −1, −2, and −3 deletion duplexes of the 5′-CTCTCGATG[FAAF]CCATCAC-3′ sequence and an additional −1 deletion duplex of the 5′-CTCTCGGCG[FAAF]CCATCAC-3′ NarI sequence. Modified deletion duplexes existed in a mixture of external B and stacked S conformers, with the population of the S conformer being ‘GC’ −1 (73%) > ‘AT’ −1 (72%) > full (60%) > −2 (55%) > −3 (37%). Thermodynamic stability was in the order of −1 deletion > −2 deletion > fully paired > −3 deletion duplexes. These results indicate that the stacked S-type conformer of SMIs are thermodynamically more stable than the conformationally flexible external B conformer. Results from the molecular dynamics simulations indicate perturbation of base stacking dominate the relative stability along with contributions from bending, duplex dynamics, solvation effects that are important in specific cases. Taken together, these results support a hypothesis that the conformational and thermodynamic stabilities of the SMIs are critical determinants for the induction of frameshift mutations. PMID:23688347

  17. Structural analysis of a class III preQ1 riboswitch reveals an aptamer distant from a ribosome-binding site regulated by fast dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Liberman, Joseph A.; Suddala, Krishna C.; Aytenfisu, Asaminew; Chan, Dalen; Belashov, Ivan A.; Salim, Mohammad; Mathews, David H.; Spitale, Robert C.; Walter, Nils G.; Wedekind, Joseph E.

    2015-01-01

    PreQ1-III riboswitches are newly identified RNA elements that control bacterial genes in response to preQ1 (7-aminomethyl-7-deazaguanine), a precursor to the essential hypermodified tRNA base queuosine. Although numerous riboswitches fold as H-type or HLout-type pseudoknots that integrate ligand-binding and regulatory sequences within a single folded domain, the preQ1-III riboswitch aptamer forms a HLout-type pseudoknot that does not appear to incorporate its ribosome-binding site (RBS). To understand how this unusual organization confers function, we determined the crystal structure of the class III preQ1 riboswitch from Faecalibacterium prausnitzii at 2.75 Å resolution. PreQ1 binds tightly (KD,app 6.5 ± 0.5 nM) between helices P1 and P2 of a three-way helical junction wherein the third helix, P4, projects orthogonally from the ligand-binding pocket, exposing its stem-loop to base pair with the 3′ RBS. Biochemical analysis, computational modeling, and single-molecule FRET imaging demonstrated that preQ1 enhances P4 reorientation toward P1–P2, promoting a partially nested, H-type pseudoknot in which the RBS undergoes rapid docking (kdock ∼0.6 s−1) and undocking (kundock ∼1.1 s−1). Discovery of such dynamic conformational switching provides insight into how a riboswitch with bipartite architecture uses dynamics to modulate expression platform accessibility, thus expanding the known repertoire of gene control strategies used by regulatory RNAs. PMID:26106162

  18. Isolation of ribosomes by chromatography.

    PubMed

    Maguire, Bruce A

    2015-04-01

    Mixed-mode chromatography on cysteine-SulfoLink resin efficiently separates ribosomes from cell lysates and is particularly effective at rapidly removing endogenous proteases and nucleases, resulting in ribosomes of improved purity, integrity, and activity. Binding occurs partly by anion exchange of the RNA of the ribosomes, so that cells must be lysed in a buffer of moderate ionic strength (conductivity no more than 20 mS for chromatography of bacterial ribosomes) without any highly charged additives (e.g., heparin, which is used to inhibit RNases in yeast). A robust protocol for Escherichia coli is given here as an example.

  19. ATM-dependent E2F1 accumulation in the nucleolus is an indicator of ribosomal stress in early response to DNA damage.

    PubMed

    Jin, Ya-Qiong; An, Guo-Shun; Ni, Ju-Hua; Li, Shu-Yan; Jia, Hong-Ti

    2014-01-01

    The nucleolus plays a major role in ribosome biogenesis. Most genotoxic agents disrupt nucleolar structure and function, which results in the stabilization/activation of p53, inducing cell cycle arrest or apoptosis. Likewise, transcription factor E2F1 as a DNA damage responsive protein also plays roles in cell cycle arrest, DNA repair, or apoptosis in response to DNA damage through transcriptional response and protein-protein interaction. Furthermore, E2F1 is known to be involved in regulating rRNA transcription. However, how E2F1 displays in coordinating DNA damage and nucleolar stress is unclear. In this study, we demonstrate that ATM-dependent E2F1 accumulation in the nucleolus is a characteristic feature of nucleolar stress in early response to DNA damage. We found that at the early stage of DNA damage, E2F1 accumulation in the nucleolus was an ATM-dependent and a common event in p53-suficient and -deficient cells. Increased nucleolar E2F1 was sequestered by the nucleolar protein p14ARF, which repressed E2F1-dependent rRNA transcription initiation, and was coupled with S phase. Our data indicate that early accumulation of E2F1 in the nucleolus is an indicator for nucleolar stress and a component of ATM pathway, which presumably buffers elevation of E2F1 in the nucleoplasm and coordinates the diversifying mechanisms of E2F1 acts in cell cycle progression and apoptosis in early response to DNA damage.

  20. Consequences of frameshift mutations at the immunoglobulin heavy chain locus of the mouse.

    PubMed Central

    Baumann, B; Potash, M J; Köhler, G

    1985-01-01

    From an IgM secreting hybridoma line we have isolated 16 spontaneous mutants that produce truncated IgM polypeptides. The size of the mu-mRNAs produced by these mutants is normal, but they express 3- to 100-fold less mu-mRNA and mutant mu-protein than the parental cell line. Nucleotide sequence analysis of cloned mu-genes and/or their mRNAs show frameshift mutations that generate in-phase chain termination codons. The extent of the reduction in mu-mRNA levels depends on the position of the nonsense codon within the gene. Images Fig. 1. Fig. 2. Fig. 3. Fig. 5. PMID:3926482

  1. Overexpression of Pa_1_10620 encoding a mitochondrial Podospora anserina protein with homology to superoxide dismutases and ribosomal proteins leads to lifespan extension.

    PubMed

    Grimm, Carolin; Böhl, Lena; Osiewacz, Heinz D

    2015-02-01

    In biological systems, reactive oxygen species (ROS) represent 'double edged swords': as signaling molecules they are essential for proper development, as reactive agents they cause molecular damage and adverse effects like degeneration and aging. A well-coordinated control of ROS is therefore of key importance. Superoxide dismutases (SODs) are enzymes active in the detoxification of superoxide. The number of isoforms of these proteins varies among species. Here we report the characterization of the putative protein encoded by Pa_1_10620 that has been previously annotated to code for a mitochondrial ribosomal protein but shares also sequence domains with SODs. We report that the gene is transcribed in P. anserina cultures of all ages and that the encoded protein localizes to mitochondria. In strains overexpressing Pa_1_10620 in a genetic background in which PaSod3, the mitochondrial MnSOD of P. anserina, is deleted, no SOD activity could be identified in isolated mitochondria. However, overexpression of the gene leads to lifespan extension suggesting a pro-survival function of the protein in P. anserina. PMID:25151510

  2. Detection of coding microsatellite frameshift mutations in DNA mismatch repair-deficient mouse intestinal tumors.

    PubMed

    Woerner, Stefan M; Tosti, Elena; Yuan, Yan P; Kloor, Matthias; Bork, Peer; Edelmann, Winfried; Gebert, Johannes

    2015-11-01

    Different DNA mismatch repair (MMR)-deficient mouse strains have been developed as models for the inherited cancer predisposing Lynch syndrome. It is completely unresolved, whether coding mononucleotide repeat (cMNR) gene mutations in these mice can contribute to intestinal tumorigenesis and whether MMR-deficient mice are a suitable molecular model of human microsatellite instability (MSI)-associated intestinal tumorigenesis. A proof-of-principle study was performed to identify mouse cMNR-harboring genes affected by insertion/deletion mutations in MSI murine intestinal tumors. Bioinformatic algorithms were developed to establish a database of mouse cMNR-harboring genes. A panel of five mouse noncoding mononucleotide markers was used for MSI classification of intestinal matched normal/tumor tissues from MMR-deficient (Mlh1(-/-) , Msh2(-/-) , Msh2(LoxP/LoxP) ) mice. cMNR frameshift mutations of candidate genes were determined by DNA fragment analysis. Murine MSI intestinal tumors but not normal tissues from MMR-deficient mice showed cMNR frameshift mutations in six candidate genes (Elavl3, Tmem107, Glis2, Sdccag1, Senp6, Rfc3). cMNRs of mouse Rfc3 and Elavl3 are conserved in type and length in their human orthologs that are known to be mutated in human MSI colorectal, endometrial and gastric cancer. We provide evidence for the utility of a mononucleotide marker panel for detection of MSI in murine tumors, the existence of cMNR instability in MSI murine tumors, the utility of mouse subspecies DNA for identification of polymorphic repeats, and repeat conservation among some orthologous human/mouse genes, two of them showing instability in human and mouse MSI intestinal tumors. MMR-deficient mice hence are a useful molecular model system for analyzing MSI intestinal carcinogenesis.

  3. DNA adduct-induced stabilization of slipped frameshift intermediates within repetitive sequences: implications for mutagenesis.

    PubMed Central

    Garcia, A; Lambert, I B; Fuchs, R P

    1993-01-01

    Chemical carcinogens such as the aromatic amide 2-acetylaminofluorene (AAF) are known to induce -1 frameshift mutation hotspots at repetitive sequences. This mutagenesis pathway was suggested to involve slipped intermediates formed during replication. To investigate the stability and structure of such intermediates we have constructed DNA duplexes containing single AAF adducts within a run of three guanine residues. The strand complementary to that bearing the AAF adducts contained either the wild-type sequence (homoduplexes) or lacked one cytosine directly opposite the run of guanines containing the AAF adduct and thus modeled the putative slipped mutagenic intermediates (SMIs). The melting temperature of AAF-modified homoduplexes or the unmodified SMI was reduced by approximately 10 degrees C relative to the unmodified homoduplex. Surprisingly, AAF adducts stabilized the SMIs as evidenced by an increase in melting temperature to a level approaching that of the unmodified homoduplex. The chemical probes hydroxylamine and bromoacetaldehyde were strongly reactive toward cytosine residues opposite the adduct in AAF-modified homoduplexes, indicating adduct-induced denaturation. In contrast, no cytosine reactivities were observed in the AAF-modified SMIs, suggesting that the two cytosines were paired with unmodified guanines. Use of diethyl pyrocarbonate to probe the guanine residues showed that all three guanines in the unmodified SMI adopted a transient single-stranded state which was delocalized along the repetitive sequence. However, when an AAF adduct was present, reduced diethyl pyrocarbonate reactivity at guanines adjacent to the adduct in AAF-modified SMIs reflected localization of the bulge to the adducted base. Our results suggest that AAF exerts a local denaturing and destabilizing effect within the homoduplex which is alleviated by the formation of a bulge. The stabilization by the AAF adduct of the SMIs may contribute to the dramatic increase in -1

  4. Regulation of ribosomal DNA amplification by the TOR pathway

    PubMed Central

    Jack, Carmen V.; Cruz, Cristina; Hull, Ryan M.; Keller, Markus A.; Ralser, Markus; Houseley, Jonathan

    2015-01-01

    Repeated regions are widespread in eukaryotic genomes, and key functional elements such as the ribosomal DNA tend to be formed of high copy repeated sequences organized in tandem arrays. In general, high copy repeats are remarkably stable, but a number of organisms display rapid ribosomal DNA amplification at specific times or under specific conditions. Here we demonstrate that target of rapamycin (TOR) signaling stimulates ribosomal DNA amplification in budding yeast, linking external nutrient availability to ribosomal DNA copy number. We show that ribosomal DNA amplification is regulated by three histone deacetylases: Sir2, Hst3, and Hst4. These enzymes control homologous recombination-dependent and nonhomologous recombination-dependent amplification pathways that act in concert to mediate rapid, directional ribosomal DNA copy number change. Amplification is completely repressed by rapamycin, an inhibitor of the nutrient-responsive TOR pathway; this effect is separable from growth rate and is mediated directly through Sir2, Hst3, and Hst4. Caloric restriction is known to up-regulate expression of nicotinamidase Pnc1, an enzyme that enhances Sir2, Hst3, and Hst4 activity. In contrast, normal glucose concentrations stretch the ribosome synthesis capacity of cells with low ribosomal DNA copy number, and we find that these cells show a previously unrecognized transcriptional response to caloric excess by reducing PNC1 expression. PNC1 down-regulation forms a key element in the control of ribosomal DNA amplification as overexpression of PNC1 substantially reduces ribosomal DNA amplification rate. Our results reveal how a signaling pathway can orchestrate specific genome changes and demonstrate that the copy number of repetitive DNA can be altered to suit environmental conditions. PMID:26195783

  5. Regulation of ribosomal DNA amplification by the TOR pathway.

    PubMed

    Jack, Carmen V; Cruz, Cristina; Hull, Ryan M; Keller, Markus A; Ralser, Markus; Houseley, Jonathan

    2015-08-01

    Repeated regions are widespread in eukaryotic genomes, and key functional elements such as the ribosomal DNA tend to be formed of high copy repeated sequences organized in tandem arrays. In general, high copy repeats are remarkably stable, but a number of organisms display rapid ribosomal DNA amplification at specific times or under specific conditions. Here we demonstrate that target of rapamycin (TOR) signaling stimulates ribosomal DNA amplification in budding yeast, linking external nutrient availability to ribosomal DNA copy number. We show that ribosomal DNA amplification is regulated by three histone deacetylases: Sir2, Hst3, and Hst4. These enzymes control homologous recombination-dependent and nonhomologous recombination-dependent amplification pathways that act in concert to mediate rapid, directional ribosomal DNA copy number change. Amplification is completely repressed by rapamycin, an inhibitor of the nutrient-responsive TOR pathway; this effect is separable from growth rate and is mediated directly through Sir2, Hst3, and Hst4. Caloric restriction is known to up-regulate expression of nicotinamidase Pnc1, an enzyme that enhances Sir2, Hst3, and Hst4 activity. In contrast, normal glucose concentrations stretch the ribosome synthesis capacity of cells with low ribosomal DNA copy number, and we find that these cells show a previously unrecognized transcriptional response to caloric excess by reducing PNC1 expression. PNC1 down-regulation forms a key element in the control of ribosomal DNA amplification as overexpression of PNC1 substantially reduces ribosomal DNA amplification rate. Our results reveal how a signaling pathway can orchestrate specific genome changes and demonstrate that the copy number of repetitive DNA can be altered to suit environmental conditions.

  6. Overlapping genetic codes for overlapping frameshifted genes in Testudines, and Lepidochelys olivacea as special case.

    PubMed

    Seligmann, Hervé

    2012-12-01

    Mitochondrial genes code for additional proteins after +2 frameshifts by reassigning stops to code for amino acids, which defines overlapping genetic codes for overlapping genes. Turtles recode stops UAR → Trp and AGR → Lys (AGR → Gly in the marine Olive Ridley turtle, Lepidochelys olivacea). In Lepidochelys the +2 frameshifted mitochondrial Cytb gene lacks stops, open reading frames from other genes code for unknown proteins, and for regular mitochondrial proteins after frameshifts according to the overlapping genetic code. Lepidochelys' inversion between proteins coded by regular and overlapping genetic codes substantiates the existence of overlap coding. ND4 differs among Lepidochelys mitochondrial genomes: it is regular in DQ486893; in NC_011516, the open reading frame codes for another protein, the regular ND4 protein is coded by the frameshifted sequence reassigning stops as in other turtles. These systematic patterns are incompatible with Genbank/sequencing errors and DNA decay. Random mixing of synonymous codons, conserving main frame coding properties, shows optimization of natural sequences for overlap coding; Ka/Ks analyses show high positive (directional) selection on overlapping genes. Tests based on circular genetic codes confirm programmed frameshifts in ND3 and ND4l genes, and predicted frameshift sites for overlap coding in Lepidochelys. Chelonian mitochondria adapt for overlapping gene expression: cloverleaf formation by antisense tRNAs with predicted anticodons matching stops coevolves with overlap coding; antisense tRNAs with predicted expanded anticodons (frameshift suppressor tRNAs) associate with frameshift-coding in ND3 and ND4l, a potential regulation of frameshifted overlap coding. Anaeroby perhaps switched between regular and overlap coding genes in Lepidochelys.

  7. G-rich telomeric and ribosomal DNA sequences from the fission yeast genome form stable G-quadruplex DNA structures in vitro and are unwound by the Pfh1 DNA helicase.

    PubMed

    Wallgren, Marcus; Mohammad, Jani B; Yan, Kok-Phen; Pourbozorgi-Langroudi, Parham; Ebrahimi, Mahsa; Sabouri, Nasim

    2016-07-27

    Certain guanine-rich sequences have an inherent propensity to form G-quadruplex (G4) structures. G4 structures are e.g. involved in telomere protection and gene regulation. However, they also constitute obstacles during replication if they remain unresolved. To overcome these threats to genome integrity, organisms harbor specialized G4 unwinding helicases. In Schizosaccharomyces pombe, one such candidate helicase is Pfh1, an evolutionarily conserved Pif1 homolog. Here, we addressed whether putative G4 sequences in S. pombe can adopt G4 structures and, if so, whether Pfh1 can resolve them. We tested two G4 sequences, derived from S. pombe ribosomal and telomeric DNA regions, and demonstrated that they form inter- and intramolecular G4 structures, respectively. Also, Pfh1 was enriched in vivo at the ribosomal G4 DNA and telomeric sites. The nuclear isoform of Pfh1 (nPfh1) unwound both types of structure, and although the G4-stabilizing compound Phen-DC3 significantly enhanced their stability, nPfh1 still resolved them efficiently. However, stable G4 structures significantly inhibited adenosine triphosphate hydrolysis by nPfh1. Because ribosomal and telomeric DNA contain putative G4 regions conserved from yeasts to humans, our studies support the important role of G4 structure formation in these regions and provide further evidence for a conserved role for Pif1 helicases in resolving G4 structures.

  8. E1BF/Ku interacts physically and functionally with the core promoter binding factor CPBF and promotes the basal transcription of rat and human ribosomal RNA genes.

    PubMed

    Niu, H; Zhang, J; Jacob, S T

    1995-01-01

    We have previously characterized an RNA polymerase (pol) I transcription factor, E1BF, from rat cells. This protein is immunologically related to Ku autoantigen and is required in pol-I directed transcription of rodent ribosomal RNA gene (rDNA). Glycerol density gradient fractionation and in situ UV cross-linking analysis of the purified factor showed directly that it consists of a heterodimer of 85 and 72 kDa polypeptides. E1BF also interacted with the human core promoter and augmented transcription of human rDNA as much as fivefold in HeLa nuclear extract, whereas transcription from adenovirus major late promoter, CMV or SV40 early promoters by pol II and of U6 and 5S RNA genes by pol III were either unaffected or minimally inhibited by the antibodies. Purified rat E1BF partially restored the suppression of human rDNA transcription by anti-Ku antibodies. Immunoprecipitation of rat cell extract with the anti-Ku antibodies followed by SDS-PAGE of the precipitated proteins and Southwestern analysis showed that E1BF interacts with CPBF, a core promoter binding factor. When the majority of CPBF and E1BF was removed from the reaction mixture by preincubation with a core promoter oligo nucleotide fragment, rDNA transcription was severely impaired. Addition of exogenous CPBF or E1BF to such a reaction resulted in significant restoration of the transcription, whereas inclusion of both factors caused further enhancement of rDNA transcription. These data demonstrate that E1BF is a basal pol I transcription factor that interacts with a core promoter binding factor both physically and functionally, and that is not a general pol II or pol III transcription factor.

  9. Magnesium ions mediate contacts between phosphoryl oxygens at positions 2122 and 2176 of the 23S rRNA and ribosomal protein L1.

    PubMed Central

    Drygin, D; Zimmermann, R A

    2000-01-01

    The complex of ribosomal protein L1 with 23S rRNA from Escherichia coli is of great interest because of the unique structural and functional aspects of this ribonucleoprotein domain. We have minimized the binding site for protein L1 on the 23S rRNA to nt 2120-2129, 2159-2162, and 2167-2178. This RNA fragment consists of two helices as well as an interconnecting loop of unknown structure. RNA molecules corresponding to the minimized L1 binding site, in which G, A, U, or C were individually replaced by their deoxyribo- (dN) or alpha-thio- (rNaS) analogs have been synthesized by T7 transcription in vitro and analyzed for their ability to bind protein L1. It has been demonstrated that the substitution of rNaS at position 2122 or 2176 decreases the affinity of the RNA for the protein in the presence of magnesium five- to tenfold, whereas the same changes have little effect on binding in the presence of manganese. This suggests that Rp oxygens in the phosphates preceding positions 2122 and 2176 are coordinated with Mg2+ and may participate in L1-23S rRNA interaction via magnesium bridges. We have also shown that this interaction is impaired by the presence of dC at position 2122 coupled with the presence of deoxyribonucleotide(s) at other positions in the RNA. This study demonstrates that the ribose-phosphate backbone of the helix encompassing nt 2120-2124/2174-2178 is intimately involved in the interaction of protein L1 with the 23S rRNA. In particular, we suggest that this helix is positioned in the cleft between the two domains of protein L1. PMID:11142372

  10. Exploring Ribosome Positioning on Translating Transcripts with Ribosome Profiling.

    PubMed

    Spealman, Pieter; Wang, Hao; May, Gemma; Kingsford, Carl; McManus, C Joel

    2016-01-01

    Recent technological advances (e.g., microarrays and massively parallel sequencing) have facilitated genome-wide measurement of many aspects of gene regulation. Ribosome profiling is a high-throughput sequencing method used to measure gene expression at the level of translation. This is accomplished by quantifying both the number of translating ribosomes and their locations on mRNA transcripts. The inventors of this approach have published several methods papers detailing its implementation and addressing the basics of ribosome profiling data analysis. Here we describe our lab's procedure, which differs in some respects from those published previously. In addition, we describe a data analysis pipeline, Ribomap, for ribosome profiling data. Ribomap allocates sequence reads to alternative mRNA isoforms, normalizes sequencing bias along transcripts using RNA-seq data, and outputs count vectors of per-codon ribosome occupancy for each transcript.

  11. [Internal structure of ribosomes using different types of emission].

    PubMed

    Serdiuk, I N

    1979-01-01

    A review is made of the experimental results obtained by the author and co-workers on the study of the structural organization of the RNA and the protein in ribosomes by the method of joint use of light, X-ray and neutron scattering and by the method of contrast variation in neutron scattering. Two rules are formulated for the folding of the ribonucleoprotein strand in ribosomes: (1) in each ribosomal subparticle the RNA is concentrated predominantly closer to the center of the particle whereas the protein has a more peripherical localization; (2) the compact ("crystallic") packing of hydrated RNA helices is an essential feature of the nucleus (nuclei) organization of the particles. An analysis of the experimental data on neutron scattering by ribosomal proteins has been done and the globulin conformation in solution of some of these proteins has been established. The widespread concept according to which the majority of ribosomal proteins on the ribosome and in solution are enlongated expanded structures is disputed. It is suggested that all, or almost all, ribosomal proteins are usual globular proteins recognizing the specific sequence of RNA on the periphery of the particles, and , hence, that the formation of functional centrers on the ribosome is, in principle, analogous to the formation of functional centers of other complex proteins with a quaternary structure. PMID:388192

  12. The structure of the human intron-containing S8 ribosomal protein gene and determination of its chromosomal location at 1p32-p32. 4

    SciTech Connect

    Davies, B.; Fried, M. )

    1993-01-01

    The intron-containing gene encoding human ribosomal protein SS (RPS8) has been cloned and characterized, and its chromosomal position determined. Using a PCR-based cloning strategy, we have isolated the intron-containing gene in the presence of its many processed pseudogenes and determined the DNA sequence of the entire gene and its upstream and downstream flanking regions. The human RPS8 gene is 3161 bp in length and comprises six exons. Despite lacking a consensus TATA box, primer extension analysis indicates that the start of transcription is precisely located at a C residue within an 11-bp oligopyrimidine tract. The first exon, which contains the ATG start codon, is just 27 bp in length. The DNA sequence 5[prime] to the RPS8 gene and within the first exon and intron shows several features of a CpG island. A combination of Southern blotting, PCR, and fluorescence in situ hybridization analyses has enabled the chromosomal location of the human RPSS gene to be determined as lp32-p34.1. 51 refs., 5 figs.

  13. Carcinogens as Frameshift Mutagens: Metabolites and Derivatives of 2-Acetylaminofluorene and Other Aromatic Amine Carcinogens

    PubMed Central

    Ames, Bruce N.; Gurney, E. G.; Miller, James A.; Bartsch, H.

    1972-01-01

    Several carcinogenic metabolites of the carcinogen 2-acetyl-aminofluorene, especially 2-nitrosofluorene and N-hydroxy-2-aminofluorene, are potent frameshift mutagens for Salmonella typhimurium. 2-Nitrosonaphthalene, 2-nitrosophenanthrene, 4-nitroso-trans-stilbene, 4-nitrosobiphenyl, and 4-nitrosoazobenzene, all of which are metabolites or likely metabolites of carcinogenic aromatic amines, are also potent frameshift mutagens. These compounds may be frameshift mutagens of the class that intercalates into DNA and then reacts covalently with the DNA; various ultimate carcinogens may be of this type. The utility of a set of bacterial strains for detecting carcinogens as mutagens is shown. PMID:4564203

  14. Molecular characterisation of three regions of the nuclear ribosomal DNA unit and the mitochondrial cox1 gene of Sarcocystis fusiformis from water buffaloes (Bubalus bubalis) in Egypt.

    PubMed

    Gjerde, Bjørn; Hilali, Mosaad; Mawgood, Sahar Abdel

    2015-09-01

    A total of 33 macroscopically visible (3-11 × 1-5 mm) sarcocysts of Sarcocystis fusiformis were excised from the oesophagus of 12 freshly slaughtered water buffalos in Giza, Egypt. Genomic DNA was extracted from the sarcocysts, and all isolates were characterised at the mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase subunit I (cox1) gene through PCR amplification and direct sequencing, whereas a few selected isolates were characterised at the 18S and 28S ribosomal (r) RNA genes and the internal transcribed spacer 1 (ITS1) region of the nuclear rDNA unit following cloning. Among the 33 cox1 sequences (1,038-bp long), there was a total of 13 haplotypes, differing from each other by one to seven substitutions and sharing an identity of 99.3-99.9 %. In comparison, the sequence identity was 98.8-99.0 % among eight complete 18S rRNA gene sequences (1,873-1,879-bp long), 98.1-100 % among 28 complete ITS1 sequences (853-864-bp long) and 97.4-99.6 % among five partial 28S rRNA gene sequences (1,607-1,622 bp). At the three nuclear loci, the intraspecific (and intra-isolate) sequence variation was due to both substitutions and indels, which necessitated cloning of the PCR products before sequencing. Some additional clones of the 18S and 28S rRNA genes were highly divergent from the more typical clones, but the true nature of these aberrant clones could not be determined. Sequence comparisons and phylogenetic analyses based on either 18S rRNA gene or cox1 nucleotide sequences, placed S. fusiformis closest to Sarcocystis cafferi from the African buffalo, but only the analyses based on cox1 data separated the two taxa clearly from each other and showed that they were separate species (monophyletic clusters and 93 % sequence identity at cox1 versus interleaved sequences and 98.7-99.1 % sequence identity at the 18S rRNA gene). Two cats experimentally infected with sarcocysts of S. fusiformis started shedding small numbers of sporocysts 8-10 days post-infection (dpi) and were euthanized 15

  15. Molecular identification of veterinary yeast isolates by use of sequence-based analysis of the D1/D2 region of the large ribosomal subunit.

    PubMed

    Garner, Cherilyn D; Starr, Jennifer K; McDonough, Patrick L; Altier, Craig

    2010-06-01

    Conventional methods of yeast identification are often time-consuming and difficult; however, recent studies of sequence-based identification methods have shown promise. Additionally, little is known about the diversity of yeasts identified from various animal species in veterinary diagnostic laboratories. Therefore, in this study, we examined three methods of identification by using 109 yeast samples isolated during a 1-year period from veterinary clinical samples. Comparison of the three methods-traditional substrate assimilation, fatty acid profile analysis, and sequence-based analysis of the region spanning the D1 and D2 regions (D1/D2) of the large ribosomal subunit-showed that sequence analysis provided the highest percent identification among the three. Sequence analysis identified 87% of isolates to the species level, whereas substrate assimilation and fatty acid profile analysis identified only 54% and 47%, respectively. Less-stringent criteria for identification increased the percentage of isolates identified to 98% for sequence analysis, 62% for substrate assimilation, and 55% for fatty acid profile analysis. We also found that sequence analysis of the internal transcribed spacer 2 (ITS2) region provided further identification for 36% of yeast not identified to the species level by D1/D2 sequence analysis. Additionally, we identified a large variety of yeast from animal sources, with at least 30 different species among the isolates tested, and with the majority not belonging to the common Candida spp., such as C. albicans, C. glabrata, C. tropicalis, and the C. parapsilosis group. Thus, we determined that sequence analysis of the D1/D2 region was the best method for identification of the variety of yeasts found in a veterinary population.

  16. Molecular Identification of Veterinary Yeast Isolates by Use of Sequence-Based Analysis of the D1/D2 Region of the Large Ribosomal Subunit▿

    PubMed Central

    Garner, Cherilyn D.; Starr, Jennifer K.; McDonough, Patrick L.; Altier, Craig

    2010-01-01

    Conventional methods of yeast identification are often time-consuming and difficult; however, recent studies of sequence-based identification methods have shown promise. Additionally, little is known about the diversity of yeasts identified from various animal species in veterinary diagnostic laboratories. Therefore, in this study, we examined three methods of identification by using 109 yeast samples isolated during a 1-year period from veterinary clinical samples. Comparison of the three methods—traditional substrate assimilation, fatty acid profile analysis, and sequence-based analysis of the region spanning the D1 and D2 regions (D1/D2) of the large ribosomal subunit—showed that sequence analysis provided the highest percent identification among the three. Sequence analysis identified 87% of isolates to the species level, whereas substrate assimilation and fatty acid profile analysis identified only 54% and 47%, respectively. Less-stringent criteria for identification increased the percentage of isolates identified to 98% for sequence analysis, 62% for substrate assimilation, and 55% for fatty acid profile analysis. We also found that sequence analysis of the internal transcribed spacer 2 (ITS2) region provided further identification for 36% of yeast not identified to the species level by D1/D2 sequence analysis. Additionally, we identified a large variety of yeast from animal sources, with at least 30 different species among the isolates tested, and with the majority not belonging to the common Candida spp., such as C. albicans, C. glabrata, C. tropicalis, and the C. parapsilosis group. Thus, we determined that sequence analysis of the D1/D2 region was the best method for identification of the variety of yeasts found in a veterinary population. PMID:20392917

  17. Different forms of U15 snoRNA are encoded in the introns of the ribosomal protein S1 gene of Xenopus laevis.

    PubMed Central

    Pellizzoni, L; Crosio, C; Campioni, N; Loreni, F; Pierandrei-Amaldi, P

    1994-01-01

    Recent cloning and sequencing of one of the two Xenopus gene copies (S1b) coding for the ribosomal protein S1 has revealed that its introns III, V and VI carry a region of about 150 nt that shares an identity of 60%. We show here the presence in Xenopus oocytes and cultured cells of a 143-147 nt long RNA species encoded by these three repeated sequences on the same strand as the S1 mRNA and by at least one repeat present in the S1 a copy of the r-protein gene. We identify these RNAs as forms of the small nucleolar RNA U15 (U15 snoRNA) because of their sequence homology with an already described human U15 RNA encoded in the first intron of the human r-protein S3 gene, which is homologous to Xenopus S1. Comparison of the various Xenopus and human U15 RNA forms shows a very high conservation in some regions, but considerable divergence in others. In particular the most conserved sequences include two box C and two box D motifs, typical of most snoRNAs interacting with the nucleolar protein fibrillarin. Adjacent to the two D boxes there are two sequences, 9 and 10 nt in length, which are perfectly complementary to an evolutionary conserved sequence of the 28S rRNA. Modeling the possible secondary structure of Xenopus and human U15 RNAs reveals that, in spite of the noticeable sequence diversity, a high structural conservation in some cases may be maintained by compensatory mutations. We show also that the different Xenopus U15 RNA forms are expressed at comparable levels, localized in the nucleoli and produced by processing of the intronic sequences, as recently described for other snoRNAs. Images PMID:7984408

  18. New developmental evidence supports a homeotic frameshift of digit identity in the evolution of the bird wing

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The homology of the digits in the bird wing is a high-profile controversy in developmental and evolutionary biology. The embryonic position of the digits cartilages with respect to the primary axis (ulnare and ulna) corresponds to 2, 3, 4, but comparative-evolutionary morphology supports 1, 2, 3. A homeotic frameshift of digit identity in evolution could explain how cells in embryonic positions 2, 3, 4 began developing morphologies 1, 2, 3. Another alternative is that no re-patterning of cell fates occurred, and the primary axis shifted its position by some other mechanism. In the wing, only the anterior digit lacks expression of HoxD10 and HoxD12, resembling digit 1 of other limbs, as predicted by 1, 2, 3. However, upon loss of digit 1 in evolution, the most anterior digit 2 could have lost their expression, deceitfully resembling a digit 1. To test this notion, we observed HoxD10 and HoxD12 in a limb where digit 2 is the most anterior digit: The rabbit foot. We also explored whether early inhibition of Shh signalling in the embryonic wing bud induces an experimental homeotic frameshift, or an experimental axis shift. We tested these hypotheses using DiI injections to study the fate of cells in these experimental wings. Results We found strong transcription of HoxD10 and HoxD12 was present in the most anterior digit 2 of the rabbit foot. Thus, we found no evidence to question the use of HoxD expression as support for 1, 2, 3. When Shh signalling in early wing buds is inhibited, our fate maps demonstrate that an experimental homeotic frameshift is induced. Conclusion Along with comparative morphology, HoxD expression provides strong support for 1, 2, 3 identity of wing digits. As an explanation for the offset 2, 3, 4 embryological position, the homeotic frameshift hypothesis is consistent with known mechanisms of limb development, and further proven to be experimentally possible. In contrast, the underlying mechanisms and experimental plausibility of an

  19. Localization of eukaryote-specific ribosomal proteins in a 5.5-Å cryo-EM map of the 80S eukaryotic ribosome

    PubMed Central

    Armache, Jean-Paul; Jarasch, Alexander; Anger, Andreas M.; Villa, Elizabeth; Becker, Thomas; Bhushan, Shashi; Jossinet, Fabrice; Habeck, Michael; Dindar, Gülcin; Franckenberg, Sibylle; Marquez, Viter; Mielke, Thorsten; Thomm, Michael; Berninghausen, Otto; Beatrix, Birgitta; Söding, Johannes; Westhof, Eric; Wilson, Daniel N.; Beckmann, Roland

    2010-01-01

    Protein synthesis in all living organisms occurs on ribonucleoprotein particles, called ribosomes. Despite the universality of this process, eukaryotic ribosomes are significantly larger in size than their bacterial counterparts due in part to the presence of 80 r proteins rather than 54 in bacteria. Using cryoelectron microscopy reconstructions of a translating plant (Triticum aestivum) 80S ribosome at 5.5-Å resolution, together with a 6.1-Å map of a translating Saccharomyces cerevisiae 80S ribosome, we have localized and modeled 74/80 (92.5%) of the ribosomal proteins, encompassing 12 archaeal/eukaryote-specific small subunit proteins as well as the complete complement of the ribosomal proteins of the eukaryotic large subunit. Near-complete atomic models of the 80S ribosome provide insights into the structure, function, and evolution of the eukaryotic translational apparatus. PMID:20974910

  20. Composition and structure of the 80S ribosome from the green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii: 80S ribosomes are conserved in plants and animals.

    PubMed

    Manuell, Andrea L; Yamaguchi, Kenichi; Haynes, Paul A; Milligan, Ronald A; Mayfield, Stephen P

    2005-08-12

    We have conducted a proteomic analysis of the 80S cytosolic ribosome from the eukaryotic green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, and accompany this with a cryo-electron microscopy structure of the ribosome. Proteins homologous to all but one rat 40S subunit protein, including a homolog of RACK1, and all but three rat 60S subunit proteins were identified as components of the C. reinhardtii ribosome. Expressed Sequence Tag (EST) evidence and annotation of the completed C. reinhardtii genome identified genes for each of the four proteins not identified by proteomic analysis, showing that algae potentially have a complete set of orthologs to mammalian 80S ribosomal proteins. Presented at 25A, the algal 80S ribosome is very similar in structure to the yeast 80S ribosome, with only minor distinguishable differences. These data show that, although separated by billions of years of evolution, cytosolic ribosomes from photosynthetic organisms are highly conserved with their yeast and animal counterparts.

  1. Stimulation of ribosomal RNA gene promoter by transcription factor Sp1 involves active DNA demethylation by Gadd45-NER pathway.

    PubMed

    Rajput, Pallavi; Pandey, Vijaya; Kumar, Vijay

    2016-08-01

    The well-studied Pol II transcription factor Sp1 has not been investigated for its regulatory role in rDNA transcription. Here, we show that Sp1 bound to specific sites on rDNA and localized into the nucleoli during the G1 phase of cell cycle to activate rDNA transcription. It facilitated the recruitment of Pol I pre-initiation complex and impeded the binding of nucleolar remodeling complex (NoRC) to rDNA resulting in the formation of euchromatin active state. More importantly, Sp1 also orchestrated the site-specific binding of Gadd45a-nucleotide excision repair (NER) complex resulting in active demethylation and transcriptional activation of rDNA. Interestingly, knockdown of Sp1 impaired rDNA transcription due to reduced engagement of the Gadd45a-NER complex and hypermethylation of rDNA. Thus, the present study unveils a novel role of Sp1 in rDNA transcription involving promoter demethylation. PMID:27156884

  2. Reducing Ribosomal Protein S6 Kinase 1 Expression Improves Spatial Memory and Synaptic Plasticity in a Mouse Model of Alzheimer's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Caccamo, Antonella; Branca, Caterina; Talboom, Joshua S.; Shaw, Darren M.; Turner, Dharshaun; Ma, Luyao; Messina, Angela; Huang, Zebing; Wu, Jie

    2015-01-01

    Aging is the most important risk factor associated with Alzheimer's disease (AD); however, the molecular mechanisms linking aging to AD remain unclear. Suppression of the ribosomal protein S6 kinase 1 (S6K1) increases healthspan and lifespan in several organisms, from nematodes to mammals. Here we show that S6K1 expression is upregulated in the brains of AD patients. Using a mouse model of AD, we found that genetic reduction of S6K1 improved synaptic plasticity and spatial memory deficits, and reduced the accumulation of amyloid-β and tau, the two neuropathological hallmarks of AD. Mechanistically, these changes were linked to reduced translation of tau and the β-site amyloid precursor protein cleaving enzyme 1, a key enzyme in the generation of amyloid-β. Our results implicate S6K1 dysregulation as a previously unidentified molecular mechanism underlying synaptic and memory deficits in AD. These findings further suggest that therapeutic manipulation of S6K1 could be a valid approach to mitigate AD pathology. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Aging is the most important risk factor for Alzheimer's disease (AD). However, little is known about how it contributes to AD pathogenesis. S6 kinase 1 (S6K1) is a protein kinase involved in regulation of protein translation. Reducing S6K1 activity increases lifespan and healthspan. We report the novel finding that reducing S6K1 activity in 3xTg-AD mice ameliorates synaptic and cognitive deficits. These improvement were associated with a reduction in amyloid-β and tau pathology. Mechanistically, lowering S6K1 levels reduced translation of β-site amyloid precursor protein cleaving enzyme 1 and tau, two key proteins involved in AD pathogenesis. These data suggest that S6K1 may represent a molecular link between aging and AD. Given that aging is the most important risk factor for most neurodegenerative diseases, our results may have far-reaching implications into other diseases. PMID:26468204

  3. The Synthesis of Ribosomes in E. coli

    PubMed Central

    McCarthy, B. J.; Britten, R. J.; Roberts, R. B.

    1962-01-01

    Techniques of chromatography on columns of DEAE1 cellulose and sedimentation analysis through a sucrose gradient have been used to study the flow of C14-uracil label through precursors to completed ribosomes. Analysis by chromatography shows the existence of two sequential precursors constituting together some 10 per cent of the total ribosomal RNA. The chromatographic separation into three fractions is ascribed to the lower protein/RNA ratios of the precursor. By sedimentation the primary precursor (eosome) is identified as a component of average sedimentation coefficient 14S. The second precursor stage (neosome) is divided among at least two particles, one of 43S and the other of about 30S. Detailed kinetic analysis shows that all the radioactivity passes through the eosome on its way to finished 50S and 30S ribosomes. The delay in the entry of radioactivity to ribosomes is that expected from the quantity of eosome precursor. The obvious conclusion that there exists a precursor-product relationship is discussed together with possible interpretations. PMID:19431315

  4. Evaluation of a ribosomal vaccine against pertussis.

    PubMed Central

    Field, L H; Parker, C D; Manclark, C R; Berry, L J

    1979-01-01

    A crude ribosomal vaccine derived from Bordetella pertussis administered to ICR and N:NIH (SW) strains of mice protected them effectively against a standardized intracranial challenge. The dose of vaccine that protected half the mice was less for N:NIH (SW) than for ICR mice and compared favorably with a killed reference vaccine. Ribosomes prepared from bacteria ground with washed sea sand were more immunogenic than those obtained by rupture with alumina or with a Braun homogenizer. The protective effect of the crude ribosomes was not an innate part of the organelle but was due to a substance or substances that could be removed from them by a 1 M NH4Cl wash. The material in the wash was highly immunogenic and retained both the histamine-sensitizing and leukocytosis-promoting properties. It lost much of the dermonecrotic activity and was poorly pyrogenic in rabbits. The most potent pyrogen was present in the washed ribosomes, which apparently, retained the endotoxic components of the cell wall. The best vaccines permitted acceptable weight gain in the immunized mice. PMID:222684

  5. Proteomic characterization of the small subunit of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii chloroplast ribosome: identification of a novel S1 domain-containing protein and unusually large orthologs of bacterial S2, S3, and S5.

    PubMed

    Yamaguchi, Kenichi; Prieto, Susana; Beligni, María Verónica; Haynes, Paul A; McDonald, W Hayes; Yates, John R; Mayfield, Stephen P

    2002-11-01

    To understand how chloroplast mRNAs are translated into functional proteins, a detailed understanding of all of the components of chloroplast translation is needed. To this end, we performed a proteomic analysis of the plastid ribosomal proteins in the small subunit of the chloroplast ribosome from the green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. Twenty proteins were identified, including orthologs of Escherichia coli S1, S2, S3, S4, S5, S6, S7, S9, S10, S12, S13, S14, S15, S16, S17, S18, S19, S20, and S21 and a homolog of spinach plastid-specific ribosomal protein-3 (PSRP-3). In addition, a novel S1 domain-containing protein, PSRP-7, was identified. Among the identified proteins, S2 (57 kD), S3 (76 kD), and S5 (84 kD) are prominently larger than their E. coli or spinach counterparts, containing N-terminal extensions (S2 and S5) or insertion sequence (S3). Structural predictions based on the crystal structure of the bacterial 30S subunit suggest that the additional domains of S2, S3, and S5 are located adjacent to each other on the solvent side near the binding site of the S1 protein. These additional domains may interact with the S1 protein and PSRP-7 to function in aspects of mRNA recognition and translation initiation that are unique to the Chlamydomonas chloroplast.

  6. The small subunit of the mammalian mitochondrial ribosome. Identification of the full complement of ribosomal proteins present.

    PubMed

    Cavdar Koc, E; Burkhart, W; Blackburn, K; Moseley, A; Spremulli, L L

    2001-06-01

    Identification of all the protein components of the small subunit (28 S) of the mammalian mitochondrial ribosome has been achieved by carrying out proteolytic digestions of whole 28 S subunits followed by analysis of the resultant peptides by liquid chromatography and tandem mass spectrometry (LC/MS/MS). Peptide sequence information was used to search the human EST data bases and complete coding sequences of the proteins were assembled. The human mitochondrial ribosome has 29 distinct proteins in the small subunit. Fourteen of this group of proteins are homologs of the Escherichia coli 30 S ribosomal proteins S2, S5, S6, S7, S9, S10, S11, S12, S14, S15, S16, S17, S18, and S21. All of these proteins have homologs in Drosophila melanogaster, Caenorhabditis elegans, and Saccharomyces cerevisiae mitochondrial ribosomes. Surprisingly, three variants of ribosomal protein S18 are found in the mammalian and D. melanogaster mitochondrial ribosomes while C. elegans has two S18 homologs. The S18 homologs tend to be more closely related to chloroplast S18s than to prokaryotic S18s. No mitochondrial homologs to prokaryotic ribosomal proteins S1, S3, S4, S8, S13, S19, and S20 could be found in the peptides obtained from the whole 28 S subunit digests or by analysis of the available data bases. The remaining 15 proteins present in mammalian mitochondrial 28 S subunits (MRP-S22 through MRP-S36) are specific to mitochondrial ribosomes. Proteins in this group have no apparent homologs in bacterial, chloroplast, archaebacterial, or cytosolic ribosomes. All but two of these proteins have a clear homolog in D. melanogaster while all but three can be found in the genome of C. elegans. Five of the mitochondrial specific ribosomal proteins have homologs in S. cerevisiae.

  7. Endoplasmic reticulum ribosome-binding protein 1 (RRBP1) overexpression is frequently found in lung cancer patients and alleviates intracellular stress-induced apoptosis through the enhancement of GRP78.

    PubMed

    Tsai, H-Y; Yang, Y-F; Wu, A T; Yang, C-J; Liu, Y-P; Jan, Y-H; Lee, C-H; Hsiao, Y-W; Yeh, C-T; Shen, C-N; Lu, P-J; Huang, M-S; Hsiao, M

    2013-10-10

    Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer deaths and is the most occurring malignancy worldwide. Unraveling the molecular mechanisms involved in lung tumorigenesis will greatly improve therapy. During early tumorigenesis, rapid proliferating tumor cells require increased activity of endoplasmic reticulum (ER) for protein synthesis, folding and secretion, thereby are subjected to ER stress. Ribosome-binding protein 1 (RRBP1) was originally identified as a ribosome-binding protein located on the rough ER and associated with unfolding protein response (UPR). In this report, we investigated the role of RRBP1 in lung cancer. RRBP1 was highly expressed in lung cancer tissue, as compared with adjacent normal tissues as assessed by immunohistochemistry (IHC) using lung cancer tissue array (n=87). Knockdown of RRBP1 by short-hairpin RNAs caused ER stress and significantly reduced cell viability and tumorigenicity. This effect was associated with a significant reduction in the expression of glucose-regulated protein 78 (GRP78). UPR regulator GRP78, an anti-apoptotic protein that is widely upregulated in cancer, has a critical role in chemotherapy resistance in some cancers. According to our results, cells with a higher level of RRBP1 were more resistant to ER stress. Ectopic expression of RRBP1 alleviated apoptosis that was induced by the ER-stress agent tunicamycin, 2-deoxy-D-glucose (2DG) or doxorubicin via enhancing GRP78 protein expression. A strong correlation was observed between the expression of RRBP1 and GRP78 in tumor biopsies using the database GSE10072. Our results also indicated that RRBP1 may involve in the regulation of mRNA stability of UPR components including ATF6 and GRP78. Taken together, RRBP1 could alleviate ER stress and help cancer cell survive. RRBP1 is critical for tumor cell survival, which may make it a useful target in lung cancer treatment and a candidate for the development of new targeted therapeutics.

  8. Stochastic and nonstochastic post-transcriptional silencing of chitinase and beta-1,3-glucanase genes involves increased RNA turnover-possible role for ribosome-independent RNA degradation.

    PubMed Central

    Holtorf, H; Schöb, H; Kunz, C; Waldvogel, R; Meins, F

    1999-01-01

    Stochastic and nonstochastic post-transcriptional gene silencing (PTGS) in Nicotiana sylvestris plants carrying tobacco class I chitinase (CHN) and beta-1,3-glucanase transgenes differs in incidence, stability, and pattern of expression. Measurements with inhibitors of RNA synthesis (cordycepin, actinomycin D, and alpha-amanitin) showed that both forms of PTGS are associated with increased sequence-specific degradation of transcripts, suggesting that increased RNA turnover may be a general feature of PTGS. The protein synthesis inhibitors cycloheximide and verrucarin A did not inhibit degradation of CHN RNA targeted for PTGS, confirming that PTGS-related RNA degradation does not depend on ongoing protein synthesis. Because verrucarin A, unlike cycloheximide, dissociates mRNA from ribosomes, our results also suggest that ribosome-associated RNA degradation pathways may not be involved in CHN PTGS. PMID:10072405

  9. Effect of alpha-sarcin and ribosome-inactivating proteins on the interaction of elongation factors with ribosomes.

    PubMed

    Brigotti, M; Rambelli, F; Zamboni, M; Montanaro, L; Sperti, S

    1989-02-01

    alpha-Sarcin from Aspergillus giganteus and the ribosome-inactivating proteins (RIPs) from higher plants inactivate the 60 S ribosomal subunit. The former is an RNAase, whereas RIPs are N-glycosidases. The site of cleavage of RNA and that of N-glycosidic depurinization are at one nucleotide distance in 28 S rRNA [Endo & Tsurugi (1987) J. Biol. Chem. 262, 8128-8130]. The effect of alpha-sarcin and that of RIPs on the interaction of elongation factors with Artemia salina (brine shrimp) ribosomes have been investigated. alpha-Sarcin inhibits both the EF1 (elongation factor 1)-dependent binding of aminoacyl-tRNA and the GTP-dependent binding of EF2 (elongation factor 2) to ribosomes, whereas two of the RIPs tested, ricin from Ricinus communis (castor bean) and volkensin from Adenia volkensii (kilyambiti), inhibit only the latter reaction. EF2 protects ribosomes from inactivation by both alpha-sarcin and ricin. The EF1-binding site is affected only by alpha-sarcin. The sensitivity of this site to alpha-sarcin is increased by pretreatment of ribosomes with ricin. A. salina ribosomes were highly resistant to the third RIP tested, namely gelonin from Gelonium multiflorum. All four proteins tested have, however, a comparable activity on the rabbit reticulocyte-lysate system. PMID:2930482

  10. RiboVision suite for visualization and analysis of ribosomes.

    PubMed

    Bernier, Chad R; Petrov, Anton S; Waterbury, Chris C; Jett, James; Li, Fengbo; Freil, Larry E; Xiong, Xiao; Wang, Lan; Migliozzi, Blacki L R; Hershkovits, Eli; Xue, Yuzhen; Hsiao, Chiaolong; Bowman, Jessica C; Harvey, Stephen C; Grover, Martha A; Wartell, Zachary J; Williams, Loren Dean

    2014-01-01

    RiboVision is a visualization and analysis tool for the simultaneous display of multiple layers of diverse information on primary (1D), secondary (2D), and three-dimensional (3D) structures of ribosomes. The ribosome is a macromolecular complex containing ribosomal RNA and ribosomal proteins and is a key component of life responsible for the synthesis of proteins in all living organisms. RiboVision is intended for rapid retrieval, analysis, filtering, and display of a variety of ribosomal data. Preloaded information includes 1D, 2D, and 3D structures augmented by base-pairing, base-stacking, and other molecular interactions. RiboVision is preloaded with rRNA secondary structures, rRNA domains and helical structures, phylogeny, crystallographic thermal factors, etc. RiboVision contains structures of ribosomal proteins and a database of their molecular interactions with rRNA. RiboVision contains preloaded structures and data for two bacterial ribosomes (Thermus thermophilus and Escherichia coli), one archaeal ribosome (Haloarcula marismortui), and three eukaryotic ribosomes (Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Drosophila melanogaster, and Homo sapiens). RiboVision revealed several major discrepancies between the 2D and 3D structures of the rRNAs of the small and large subunits (SSU and LSU). Revised structures mapped with a variety of data are available in RiboVision as well as in a public gallery (). RiboVision is designed to allow users to distill complex data quickly and to easily generate publication-quality images of data mapped onto secondary structures. Users can readily import and analyze their own data in the context of other work. This package allows users to import and map data from CSV files directly onto 1D, 2D, and 3D levels of structure. RiboVision has features in rough analogy with web-based map services capable of seamlessly switching the type of data displayed and the resolution or magnification of the display. RiboVision is available at .

  11. The Ribosomal Database Project (RDP).

    PubMed Central

    Maidak, B L; Olsen, G J; Larsen, N; Overbeek, R; McCaughey, M J; Woese, C R

    1996-01-01

    The Ribosomal Database Project (RDP) is a curated database that offers ribosome-related data, analysis services and associated computer programs. The offerings include phylogenetically ordered alignments of ribosomal RNA (rRNA) sequences, derived phylogenetic trees, rRNA secondary structure diagrams and various software for handling, analyzing and displaying alignments and trees. The data are available via anonymous ftp (rdp.life.uiuc.edu), electronic mail (server@rdp.life.uiuc.edu), gopher (rdpgopher.life.uiuc.edu) and World Wide Web (WWW)(http://rdpwww.life.uiuc.edu/). The electronic mail and WWW servers provide ribosomal probe checking, screening for possible chimeric rRNA sequences, automated alignment and approximate phylogenetic placement of user-submitted sequences on an existing phylogenetic tree. PMID:8594608

  12. The Ribosomal Database Project (RDP).

    PubMed

    Maidak, B L; Olsen, G J; Larsen, N; Overbeek, R; McCaughey, M J; Woese, C R

    1996-01-01

    The Ribosomal Database Project (RDP) is a curated database that offers ribosome-related data, analysis services and associated computer programs. The offerings include phylogenetically ordered alignments of ribosomal RNA (rRNA) sequences, derived phylogenetic trees, rRNA secondary structure diagrams and various software for handling, analyzing and displaying alignments and trees. The data are available via anonymous ftp (rdp.life.uiuc.edu), electronic mail (server@rdp.life.uiuc.edu), gopher (rdpgopher.life.uiuc.edu) and World Wide Web (WWW)(http://rdpwww.life.uiuc.edu/). The electronic mail and WWW servers provide ribosomal probe checking, screening for possible chimeric rRNA sequences, automated alignment and approximate phylogenetic placement of user-submitted sequences on an existing phylogenetic tree.

  13. A new mutagenicity assay method for frameshift mutagens based on deleting or inserting a guanosine nucleotide in the beta-lactamase gene.

    PubMed

    Hour, T C; Lee, C C; Lin, J K

    1995-09-01

    The conventional method of site-directed mutagenesis was used to develop two Salmonella strains, JK-1 and JK-2, for detecting frameshift mutagens. The JK-1 strain was derived from Salmonella typhimurium TA1537 strain transformed by a mutant construct. A guanosine nucleotide was inserted between nucleotide residues 312 and 313 of the beta-lactamase gene. The JK-2 strain was obtained by the same procedure, but a guanosine nucleotide in position 315 of the beta-lactamase gene was deleted. The strains were tested with ten frameshift mutagens and the revertants were selected by ampicillin resistance. Representative mutagens including 2-nitrofluorene (2-NF), 2-acetylaminofluorene (AAF), 9-aminoacridine (9-AA), 2,7-diaminofluorene (2,7-DAF) and 2-methoxy-6-chloro-9-(3-(ethyl-2-chloro-ethyl)-aminopropylamino)acridine (ICR-170) were more potent in the JK-1 strain than the JK-2 strain, and the number of revertant colonies were dose related. Under the same conditions, the ampicillin test was more sensitive than the Ames test. Other types of compounds such as 2-methoxy-6-chloro-9-(2-chloroethylaminopropylamino)acridine (ICR-191), benzo[a]pyrene (BP), 4-nitroquinoline N-oxide (4-NQNO), hycanthone and aflatoxin B1 (AFB1) were not as mutagenic to these new strains. The method is quite promising for studying certain specific frameshift mutagens, but more chemical mutagens should be tested to validate its applicability and reproducibility in general use. PMID:8544757

  14. Ribosome dynamics and the evolutionary history of ribosomes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fox, George E.; Paci, Maxim; Tran, Quyen; Petrov, Anton S.; Williams, Loren D.

    2015-09-01

    The ribosome is a dynamic nanomachine responsible for coded protein synthesis. Its major subsystems were essentially in place at the time of the last universal common ancestor (LUCA). Ribosome evolutionary history thus potentially provides a window into the pre- LUCA world. This history begins with the origins of the peptidyl transferase center where the actual peptide is synthesized and then continues over an extended timeframe as additional functional centers including the GTPase center are added. The large ribosomal RNAs (rRNAs) have grown over time by an accretion process and a model exists that proposes a relative age of each accreted element. We have compared atomic resolution ribosome structures before and after EF-G bound GTP hydrolysis and thereby identified the location of 23 pivot points in the large rRNAs that facilitate ribosome dynamics. Pivots in small subunit helices h28 and h44 appear to be especially central to the process and according to the accretion model significantly older than the other helices containing pivots. Overall, the results suggest that ribosomal dynamics occurred in two phases. In the first phase, an inherently mobile h28/h44 combination provided the flexibility needed to create a dynamic ribosome that was essentially a Brownian machine. This addition likely made coded peptide synthesis possible by facilitating movement of a primitive mRNA. During the second phase, addition of pivoting elements and the creation of a factor binding site allowed the regulation of the inherent motion created by h28/h44. All of these events likely occurred before LUCA.

  15. Truncation of the Mrp20 protein reveals new ribosome-assembly subcomplex in mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Kaur, Jasvinder; Stuart, Rosemary A

    2011-09-01

    Mitochondrial ribosomal protein 20 (Mrp20) is a component of the yeast mitochondrial large (54S) ribosomal subunit and is homologous to the bacterial L23 protein, located at the ribosomal tunnel exit site. The carboxy-terminal mitochondrial-specific domain of Mrp20 was found to have a crucial role in the assembly of the ribosomes. A new, membrane-bound, ribosomal-assembly subcomplex composed of known tunnel-exit-site proteins, an uncharacterized ribosomal protein, MrpL25, and the mitochondrial peroxiredoxin (Prx), Prx1, accumulates in an mrp20ΔC yeast mutant. Finally, data supporting the idea that the inner mitochondrial membrane acts as a platform for the ribosome assembly process are discussed.

  16. A mutation in ribosomal protein L9 affects ribosomal hopping during translation of gene 60 from bacteriophage T4.

    PubMed Central

    Herbst, K L; Nichols, L M; Gesteland, R F; Weiss, R B

    1994-01-01

    Ribosomes hop over a 50-nt coding gap during translation of gene 60 mRNA from bacteriophage T4. This event occurs with near-unitary efficiency when gene 60-lacZ fusions are expressed in Escherichia coli. One of the components necessary for this hop is an RNA hairpin structure containing the 5' junction of the 50-nt coding gap. A mutant E. coli was isolated and found to significantly increase hopping when carrying gene 60-lacZ constructs with altered hairpins. The mutation, hop-1, changed Ser93 to Phe in rplI, the gene coding for ribosomal large-subunit protein L9. Ribosomal hopping on a synthetic sequence in the absence of a hairpin was also increased by this mutation. These data suggest that hop-1 may substitute for the function of the hairpin during ribosomal hopping. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 4 PMID:7809071

  17. Ribosome Inactivating Proteins from Rosaceae.

    PubMed

    Shang, Chenjing; Rougé, Pierre; Van Damme, Els J M

    2016-01-01

    Ribosome-inactivating proteins (RIPs) are widespread among higher plants of different taxonomic orders. In this study, we report on the RIP sequences found in the genome/transcriptome of several important Rosaceae species, including many economically important edible fruits such as apple, pear, peach, apricot, and strawberry. All RIP domains from Rosaceae share high sequence similarity with conserved residues in the catalytic site and the carbohydrate binding sites. The genomes of Malus domestica and Pyrus communis contain both type 1 and type 2 RIP sequences, whereas for Prunus mume, Prunus persica, Pyrus bretschneideri, and Pyrus communis a complex set of type 1 RIP sequences was retrieved. Heterologous expression and purification of the type 1 as well as the type 2 RIP from apple allowed to characterize the biological activity of the proteins. Both RIPs from Malus domestica can inhibit protein synthesis. Furthermore, molecular modelling suggests that RIPs from Rosaceae possess three-dimensional structures that are highly similar to the model proteins and can bind to RIP substrates. Screening of the recombinant type 2 RIP from apple on a glycan array revealed that this type 2 RIP interacts with terminal sialic acid residues. Our data suggest that the RIPs from Rosaceae are biologically active proteins. PMID:27556443

  18. Ribosome Inactivating Proteins from Rosaceae.

    PubMed

    Shang, Chenjing; Rougé, Pierre; Van Damme, Els J M

    2016-01-01

    Ribosome-inactivating proteins (RIPs) are widespread among higher plants of different taxonomic orders. In this study, we report on the RIP sequences found in the genome/transcriptome of several important Rosaceae species, including many economically important edible fruits such as apple, pear, peach, apricot, and strawberry. All RIP domains from Rosaceae share high sequence similarity with conserved residues in the catalytic site and the carbohydrate binding sites. The genomes of Malus domestica and Pyrus communis contain both type 1 and type 2 RIP sequences, whereas for Prunus mume, Prunus persica, Pyrus bretschneideri, and Pyrus communis a complex set of type 1 RIP sequences was retrieved. Heterologous expression and purification of the type 1 as well as the type 2 RIP from apple allowed to characterize the biological activity of the proteins. Both RIPs from Malus domestica can inhibit protein synthesis. Furthermore, molecular modelling suggests that RIPs from Rosaceae possess three-dimensional structures that are highly similar to the model proteins and can bind to RIP substrates. Screening of the recombinant type 2 RIP from apple on a glycan array revealed that this type 2 RIP interacts with terminal sialic acid residues. Our data suggest that the RIPs from Rosaceae are biologically active proteins.

  19. Neuron-Like Networks Between Ribosomal Proteins Within the Ribosome.

    PubMed

    Poirot, Olivier; Timsit, Youri

    2016-01-01

    From brain to the World Wide Web, information-processing networks share common scale invariant properties. Here, we reveal the existence of neural-like networks at a molecular scale within the ribosome. We show that with their extensions, ribosomal proteins form complex assortative interaction networks through which they communicate through tiny interfaces. The analysis of the crystal structures of 50S eubacterial particles reveals that most of these interfaces involve key phylogenetically conserved residues. The systematic observation of interactions between basic and aromatic amino acids at the interfaces and along the extension provides new structural insights that may contribute to decipher the molecular mechanisms of signal transmission within or between the ribosomal proteins. Similar to neurons interacting through "molecular synapses", ribosomal proteins form a network that suggest an analogy with a simple molecular brain in which the "sensory-proteins" innervate the functional ribosomal sites, while the "inter-proteins" interconnect them into circuits suitable to process the information flow that circulates during protein synthesis. It is likely that these circuits have evolved to coordinate both the complex macromolecular motions and the binding of the multiple factors during translation. This opens new perspectives on nanoscale information transfer and processing. PMID:27225526

  20. Neuron-Like Networks Between Ribosomal Proteins Within the Ribosome

    PubMed Central

    Poirot, Olivier; Timsit, Youri

    2016-01-01

    From brain to the World Wide Web, information-processing networks share common scale invariant properties. Here, we reveal the existence of neural-like networks at a molecular scale within the ribosome. We show that with their extensions, ribosomal proteins form complex assortative interaction networks through which they communicate through tiny interfaces. The analysis of the crystal structures of 50S eubacterial particles reveals that most of these interfaces involve key phylogenetically conserved residues. The systematic observation of interactions between basic and aromatic amino acids at the interfaces and along the extension provides new structural insights that may contribute to decipher the molecular mechanisms of signal transmission within or between the ribosomal proteins. Similar to neurons interacting through “molecular synapses”, ribosomal proteins form a network that suggest an analogy with a simple molecular brain in which the “sensory-proteins” innervate the functional ribosomal sites, while the “inter-proteins” interconnect them into circuits suitable to process the information flow that circulates during protein synthesis. It is likely that these circuits have evolved to coordinate both the complex macromolecular motions and the binding of the multiple factors during translation. This opens new perspectives on nanoscale information transfer and processing. PMID:27225526

  1. Functional characterization of the ribosome biogenesis factors PES, BOP1, and WDR12 (PeBoW), and mechanisms of defective cell growth and proliferation caused by PeBoW deficiency in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Ahn, Chang Sook; Cho, Hui Kyung; Lee, Du-Hwa; Sim, Hee-Jung; Kim, Sang-Gyu; Pai, Hyun-Sook

    2016-09-01

    The nucleolar protein pescadillo (PES) controls biogenesis of the 60S ribosomal subunit through functional interactions with Block of Proliferation 1 (BOP1) and WD Repeat Domain 12 (WDR12) in plants. In this study, we determined protein characteristics and in planta functions of BOP1 and WDR12, and characterized defects in plant cell growth and proliferation caused by a deficiency of PeBoW (PES-BOP1-WDR12) proteins. Dexamethasone-inducible RNAi of BOP1 and WDR12 caused developmental arrest and premature senescence in Arabidopsis, similar to the phenotype of PES RNAi. Both the N-terminal domain and WD40 repeats of BOP1 and WDR12 were critical for specific associations with 60S/80S ribosomes. In response to nucleolar stress or DNA damage, PeBoW proteins moved from the nucleolus to the nucleoplasm. Kinematic analyses of leaf growth revealed that depletion of PeBoW proteins led to dramatically suppressed cell proliferation, cell expansion, and epidermal pavement cell differentiation. A deficiency in PeBoW proteins resulted in reduced cyclin-dependent kinase Type A activity, causing reduced phosphorylation of histone H1 and retinoblastoma-related (RBR) protein. PeBoW silencing caused rapid transcriptional modulation of cell-cycle genes, including reduction of E2Fa and Cyclin D family genes, and induction of several KRP genes, accompanied by down-regulation of auxin-related genes and up-regulation of jasmonic acid-related genes. Taken together, these results suggest that the PeBoW proteins involved in ribosome biogenesis play a critical role in plant cell growth and survival, and their depletion leads to inhibition of cell-cycle progression, possibly modulated by phytohormone signaling. PMID:27440937

  2. Functional characterization of the ribosome biogenesis factors PES, BOP1, and WDR12 (PeBoW), and mechanisms of defective cell growth and proliferation caused by PeBoW deficiency in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Ahn, Chang Sook; Cho, Hui Kyung; Lee, Du-Hwa; Sim, Hee-Jung; Kim, Sang-Gyu; Pai, Hyun-Sook

    2016-01-01

    The nucleolar protein pescadillo (PES) controls biogenesis of the 60S ribosomal subunit through functional interactions with Block of Proliferation 1 (BOP1) and WD Repeat Domain 12 (WDR12) in plants. In this study, we determined protein characteristics and in planta functions of BOP1 and WDR12, and characterized defects in plant cell growth and proliferation caused by a deficiency of PeBoW (PES-BOP1-WDR12) proteins. Dexamethasone-inducible RNAi of BOP1 and WDR12 caused developmental arrest and premature senescence in Arabidopsis, similar to the phenotype of PES RNAi. Both the N-terminal domain and WD40 repeats of BOP1 and WDR12 were critical for specific associations with 60S/80S ribosomes. In response to nucleolar stress or DNA damage, PeBoW proteins moved from the nucleolus to the nucleoplasm. Kinematic analyses of leaf growth revealed that depletion of PeBoW proteins led to dramatically suppressed cell proliferation, cell expansion, and epidermal pavement cell differentiation. A deficiency in PeBoW proteins resulted in reduced cyclin-dependent kinase Type A activity, causing reduced phosphorylation of histone H1 and retinoblastoma-related (RBR) protein. PeBoW silencing caused rapid transcriptional modulation of cell-cycle genes, including reduction of E2Fa and Cyclin D family genes, and induction of several KRP genes, accompanied by down-regulation of auxin-related genes and up-regulation of jasmonic acid-related genes. Taken together, these results suggest that the PeBoW proteins involved in ribosome biogenesis play a critical role in plant cell growth and survival, and their depletion leads to inhibition of cell-cycle progression, possibly modulated by phytohormone signaling. PMID:27440937

  3. Identification of a frameshift mutation responsible for the silent phenotype of human serum cholinesterase, Gly 117 (GGT----GGAG).

    PubMed Central

    Nogueira, C P; McGuire, M C; Graeser, C; Bartels, C F; Arpagaus, M; Van der Spek, A F; Lightstone, H; Lockridge, O; La Du, B N

    1990-01-01

    A frameshift mutation that causes a silent phenotype for human serum cholinesterase was identified in the DNA of seven individuals of two unrelated families. The mutation, identified using the polymerase chain reaction, causes a shift in the reading frame from Gly 117, where GGT (Gly)----GGAG (Gly+ 1 base) to a new stop codon created at position 129. This alteration is upstream of the active site (Ser 198), and, if any protein were made, it would represent only 22% of the mature enzyme found in normal serum. Results of analysis of the enzymatic activities in serum agreed with the genotypes inferred from the nucleotide sequence. Rocket immunoelectrophoresis using alpha-naphthyl acetate to detect enzymatic activity showed an absence of cross-reactive material, as expected. One additional individual with a silent phenotype did not show the same frameshift mutation. This was not unexpected, since there must be considerable molecular heterogeneity involved in causes for the silent cholinesterase phenotype. This is the first report of a molecular mechanism underlying the silent phenotype for serum cholinesterase. The analytical approach used was similar to the one we recently employed to identify the mutation that causes the atypical cholinesterase variant. Images Figure 3 Figure 5 Figure 6 PMID:2339692

  4. A novel frameshift mutation in FGA (c.1846 del A) leading to congenital afibrinogenemia in a consanguineous Syrian family.

    PubMed

    Levrat, Emmanuel; Aboukhamis, Imad; de Moerloose, Philippe; Farho, Jaafar; Chamaa, Sahar; Reber, Guido; Fort, Alexandre; Neerman-Arbez, Marguerite

    2011-03-01

    Congenital afibrinogenemia is a rare autosomal recessive coagulation disorder characterized essentially by bleeding symptoms, but miscarriages and, paradoxically, thromboembolic events can also occur. Most reported mutations leading to congenital afibrinogenemia are located in FGA encoding the fibrinogen A α-chain. In this study, we analysed 12 individuals from a consanguineous Syrian family with reduced or absent fibrinogen levels: those with fibrinogen levels around 1 g/l (n = 7) were found to be heterozygous for a novel frameshift mutation in FGA exon 5 (c.1846 del A) and those with undetectable fibrinogen levels (n = 5) were homozygous for the same mutation. This novel frameshift mutation is the most C-terminal causative FGA mutation identified to date in afibrinogenemic patients. The resulting aberrant Aα-chain (p.Thr616HisfsX32) is most likely synthesized, but is less efficiently assembled and/or secreted into the circulation given the phenotype of asymptomatic hypofibrinogenemia in heterozygous individuals and bleeding diathesis in homozygous individuals.

  5. Chloroplast ribosomes and protein synthesis.

    PubMed Central

    Harris, E H; Boynton, J E; Gillham, N W

    1994-01-01

    Consistent with their postulated origin from endosymbiotic cyanobacteria, chloroplasts of plants and algae have ribosomes whose component RNAs and proteins are strikingly similar to those of eubacteria. Comparison of the secondary structures of 16S rRNAs of chloroplasts and bacteria has been particularly useful in identifying highly conserved regions likely to have essential functions. Comparative analysis of ribosomal protein sequences may likewise prove valuable in determining their roles in protein synthesis. This review is concerned primarily with the RNAs and proteins that constitute the chloroplast ribosome, the genes that encode these components, and their expression. It begins with an overview of chloroplast genome structure in land plants and algae and then presents a brief comparison of chloroplast and prokaryotic protein-synthesizing systems and a more detailed analysis of chloroplast rRNAs and ribosomal proteins. A description of the synthesis and assembly of chloroplast ribosomes follows. The review concludes with discussion of whether chloroplast protein synthesis is essential for cell survival. PMID:7854253

  6. Defective ribosome assembly in Shwachman-Diamond syndrome.

    PubMed

    Wong, Chi C; Traynor, David; Basse, Nicolas; Kay, Robert R; Warren, Alan J

    2011-10-20

    Shwachman-Diamond syndrome (SDS), a recessive leukemia predisposition disorder characterized by bone marrow failure, exocrine pancreatic insufficiency, skeletal abnormalities and poor growth, is caused by mutations in the highly conserved SBDS gene. Here, we test the hypothesis that defective ribosome biogenesis underlies the pathogenesis of SDS. We create conditional mutants in the essential SBDS ortholog of the ancient eukaryote Dictyostelium discoideum using temperature-sensitive, self-splicing inteins, showing that mutant cells fail to grow at the restrictive temperature because ribosomal subunit joining is markedly impaired. Remarkably, wild type human SBDS complements the growth and ribosome assembly defects in mutant Dictyostelium cells, but disease-associated human SBDS variants are defective. SBDS directly interacts with the GTPase elongation factor-like 1 (EFL1) on nascent 60S subunits in vivo and together they catalyze eviction of the ribosome antiassociation factor eukaryotic initiation factor 6 (eIF6), a prerequisite for the translational activation of ribosomes. Importantly, lymphoblasts from SDS patients harbor a striking defect in ribosomal subunit joining whose magnitude is inversely proportional to the level of SBDS protein. These findings in Dictyostelium and SDS patient cells provide compelling support for the hypothesis that SDS is a ribosomopathy caused by corruption of an essential cytoplasmic step in 60S subunit maturation.

  7. Mescaline-induced changes of brain-cortex ribosomes. Effect of mescaline on the hydrogen-bonded structure of ribonucleic acid of brain-cortex ribosomes.

    PubMed

    Datta, R K; Ghosh, J J

    1970-05-01

    1. The action of mescaline sulphate on the hydrogen-bonded structure of the RNA constituent of ribosomes of goat brain-cortex slices was studied by using the hyperchromic effect of heating and formaldehyde reaction. 2. The ribosomal total RNA species of the mescaline-treated brain-cortex slices have a smaller proportion of hydrogen-bonded structure than the ribosomal RNA species of the untreated brain-cortex slices. 3. Mescaline also appears to have affected this lowering of hydrogen-bonded structure of the ribosomal 28S RNA of brain-cortex tissue.

  8. Structural snapshots of actively translating human ribosomes

    PubMed Central

    Behrmann, Elmar; Loerke, Justus; Budkevich, Tatyana V.; Yamamoto, Kaori; Schmidt, Andrea; Penczek, Pawel A.; Vos, Matthijn R.; Bürger, Jörg; Mielke, Thorsten; Scheerer, Patrick; Spahn, Christian M.T.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Macromolecular machines, such as the ribosome, undergo large-scale conformational changes during their functional cycles. While their mode of action is often compared to that of mechanical machines, a crucial difference is that at the molecular dimension, thermodynamic effects dominate functional cycles, with proteins fluctuating stochastically between functional states defined by energetic minima on an energy landscape. Here, we have used cryo-electron microscopy to image ex vivo-derived human polysomes as a source of actively translating ribosomes. Multiparticle refinement and three-dimensional variability analysis allowed us to visualize a variety of native translation intermediates. Significantly populated states include not only elongation cycle intermediates in pre- and post-translocational states, but also eEF1A-containing decoding and termination/recycling complexes. Focusing on the post-translocational state, we extended this assessment to the single-residue level, uncovering striking details of ribosome-ligand interactions and identifying both static and functionally important dynamic elements. PMID:25957688

  9. Pseudomonas ribosomal vaccines: preparation, properties, and immunogenicity.

    PubMed Central

    Lieberman, M M

    1978-01-01

    The preparation, properties, and immunogenicity of ribosomal vaccines from Pseudomonas aeruginosa are described. These preparations, containing protein and RNA, were tested for immunogenicity by active immunization of mice and subsequent challenge with homologous, live bacteria. The results demonstrated that vaccines prepared from a majority of serotypes used were immunogenic, i.e., afforded 60 to 100% mouse protection against a challenge inoculum containing 8 to 50 50% lethal doses. In some cases vaccine doses as low as 1 microgram of RNA provided 100% mouse protection. Molecular sieve chromatography of a highly immunogenic ribosomal preparation on Sepharose 4B demonstrated the presence of two molecular weight fractions: (i) peak A, an excluded peak (thus having a molecular weight of at least 2 times 10(7)), and (ii) peak B, considerably retarded, with an elution position corresponding to a molecular weight of about 2.2 X 10(6), approximating that of typical 70S ribosomes. Both peaks A and B were immunogenic; however, the immunogenicity of peak A was greater (i.e., a smaller immunizing dose was required) than that of peak B. Peak A was shown to contain components of lipopolysaccharide in addition to protein and RNA (which comprised 80% of the dry weight of peak A). On the other hand, peak B was shown to be free of lipopolysaccharide, and 100% of its dry weight consisted of protein and RNA. PMID:101464

  10. DMR1 (CCM1/YGR150C) of Saccharomyces cerevisiae encodes an RNA-binding protein from the pentatricopeptide repeat family required for the maintenance of the mitochondrial 15S ribosomal RNA.

    PubMed

    Puchta, Olga; Lubas, Michal; Lipinski, Kamil A; Piatkowski, Jakub; Malecki, Michal; Golik, Pawel

    2010-04-01

    Pentatricopeptide repeat (PPR) proteins form the largest known RNA-binding protein family and are found in all eukaryotes, being particularly abundant in higher plants. PPR proteins localize mostly in mitochondria and chloroplasts, where they modulate organellar genome expression on the post-transcriptional level. The Saccharomyces cerevisiae DMR1 (CCM1, YGR150C) encodes a PPR protein that localizes to mitochondria. Deletion of DMR1 results in a complete and irreversible loss of respiratory capacity and loss of wild-type mtDNA by conversion to rho(-)/rho(0) petites, regardless of the presence of introns in mtDNA. The phenotype of the dmr1Delta mitochondria is characterized by fragmentation of the small subunit mitochondrial rRNA (15S rRNA), that can be reversed by wild-type Dmr1p. Other mitochondrial transcripts, including the large subunit mitochondrial rRNA (21S rRNA), are not affected by the lack of Dmr1p. The purified Dmr1 protein specifically binds to different regions of 15S rRNA in vitro, consistent with the deletion phenotype. Dmr1p is therefore the first yeast PPR protein, which has an rRNA target and is probably involved in the biogenesis of mitochondrial ribosomes and translation.

  11. Leucine does not affect mechanistic target of rapamycin complex 1 assembly but is required for maximal ribosomal protein s6 kinase 1 activity in human skeletal muscle following resistance exercise.

    PubMed

    Apró, William; Moberg, Marcus; Hamilton, D Lee; Ekblom, Björn; Rooyackers, Olav; Holmberg, Hans-Christer; Blomstrand, Eva

    2015-10-01

    We examined how the stimulatory effect of leucine on the mechanistic target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) pathway is affected by the presence of the remaining essential amino acids (EAAs). Nine male subjects performed resistance exercise on 4 occasions and were randomly supplied EAAs with leucine, EAAs without leucine (EAA-Leu), leucine alone, or flavored water (placebo; control). Muscle biopsies were taken from the vastus lateralis before and 60 and 90 min after exercise. Biopsies were analyzed for protein phosphorylation, kinase activity, protein-protein interactions, amino acid concentrations, and tracer incorporation. Leucine alone stimulated ribosomal protein s6 kinase 1 (S6K1) phosphorylation ∼280% more than placebo and EAA-Leu after exercise. Moreover, this response was enhanced by 60-75% after intake of EAAs compared with that of leucine alone (P < 0.05). Kinase activity of S6K1 reflected that of S6K1 phosphorylation; 60 min after exercise, the activity was elevated 3.3- and 4.2-fold with intake of leucine alone and with EAAs, respectively (P < 0.05). The interaction between mammalian target of rapamycin and regulatory-associated protein of mammalian target of rapamycin was unaltered in response to both resistance exercise and amino acid provision. Leucine alone stimulates mTORC1 signaling, although this response is enhanced by other EAAs and does not appear to be caused by alterations in mTORC1 assembly.

  12. Comprehensive Analysis of Phosphorylated Proteins of E. coli Ribosomes

    PubMed Central

    Soung, George Y.; Miller, Jennifer L.; Koc, Hasan; Koc, Emine C.

    2009-01-01

    Phosphorylation of bacterial ribosomal proteins has been known for decades; however, there is still very limited information available on specific locations of the phosphorylation sites in ribosomal proteins and the role they might play in protein synthesis. In this study, we have mapped the specific phosphorylation sites in twenty-four E. coli ribosomal proteins by tandem mass spectrometry. Specific detection of phosphorylation was achieved by either phosphorylation specific visualization techniques, ProQ staining and antibodies for phospho-Ser, Thr, and Tyr, or by mass spectrometry equipped with a capability to detect addition and the loss of the phosphate moiety. Enrichment by immobilized metal affinity and/or strong cation exchange chromatography was used to improve the success of detection of the low abundance phosphopeptides. We found the small subunit (30S) proteins S3, S4, S5, S7, S11, S12, S13, S18, and S21 and the large subunit (50S) proteins L1, L2, L3, L5, L6, L7/L12, L13, L14, L16, L18, L19, L21, L22, L28, L31 to be phosphorylated at one or more residues. Potential roles for each specific site in ribosome function were deduced through careful evaluation of the given site of the phosphorylation in 3D-crystal structure models of ribosomes and the previous mutational studies of E. coli ribosomal proteins. PMID:19469554

  13. Familial Dilated Cardiomyopathy Caused by a Novel Frameshift in the BAG3 Gene

    PubMed Central

    Moncayo-Arlandi, Javier; Allegue, Catarina; Iglesias, Anna; Mangas, Alipio; Brugada, Ramon

    2016-01-01

    Background Dilated cardiomyopathy, a major cause of chronic heart failure and cardiac transplantation, is characterized by left ventricular or biventricular heart dilatation. In nearly 50% of cases the pathology is inherited, and more than 60 genes have been reported as disease-causing. However, in 30% of familial cases the mutation remains unidentified even after comprehensive genetic analysis. This study clinically and genetically assessed a large Spanish family affected by dilated cardiomyopathy to search for novel variations. Methods and Results Our study included a total of 100 family members. Clinical assessment was performed in alive, and genetic analysis was also performed in alive and 1 deceased relative. Genetic screening included resequencing of 55 genes associated with sudden cardiac death, and Sanger sequencing of main disease-associated genes. Genetic analysis identified a frame-shift variation in BAG3 (p.H243Tfr*64) in 32 patients. Genotype-phenotype correlation identified substantial heterogeneity in disease expression. Of 32 genetic carriers (one deceased), 21 relatives were clinically affected, and 10 were asymptomatic. Seventeen of the symptomatic genetic carriers exhibited proto-diastolic septal knock by echocardiographic assessment. Conclusions We report p.H243Tfr*64_BAG3 as a novel pathogenic variation responsible for familial dilated cardiomyopathy. This variation correlates with a more severe phenotype of the disease, mainly in younger individuals. Genetic analysis in families, even asymptomatic individuals, enables early identification of individuals at risk and allows implementation of preventive measures. PMID:27391596

  14. A CHRNE frameshift mutation causes congenital myasthenic syndrome in young Jack Russell Terriers.

    PubMed

    Rinz, Caitlin J; Lennon, Vanda A; James, Fiona; Thoreson, James B; Tsai, Kate L; Starr-Moss, Alison N; Humphries, H Dale; Guo, Ling T; Palmer, Anthony C; Clark, Leigh Anne; Shelton, G Diane

    2015-12-01

    Congenital myasthenic syndromes (CMSs) are a group of rare genetic disorders of the neuromuscular junction resulting in structural or functional causes of fatigable weakness that usually begins early in life. Mutations in pre-synaptic, synaptic and post-synaptic proteins have been demonstrated in human cases, with more than half involving aberrations in nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (AChR) subunits. CMS was first recognized in dogs in 1974 as an autosomal recessive trait in Jack Russell Terriers (JRTs). A deficiency of junctional AChRs was demonstrated. Here we characterize a CMS in 2 contemporary cases of JRT littermates with classic clinical and electromyographic findings, and immunochemical confirmation of an approximately 90% reduction in AChR protein content. Loci encoding the 5 AChR subunits were evaluated using microsatellite markers, and CHRNB1 and CHRNE were identified as candidate genes. Sequences of the splice sites and exons of both genes revealed a single base insertion in exon 7 of CHRNE that predicts a frameshift mutation and a premature stop codon. We further demonstrated this pathogenic mutation in CHRNE in archival tissues from unrelated JRTs studied 34 years ago.

  15. A CHRNE frameshift mutation causes congenital myasthenic syndrome in young Jack Russell Terriers.

    PubMed

    Rinz, Caitlin J; Lennon, Vanda A; James, Fiona; Thoreson, James B; Tsai, Kate L; Starr-Moss, Alison N; Humphries, H Dale; Guo, Ling T; Palmer, Anthony C; Clark, Leigh Anne; Shelton, G Diane

    2015-12-01

    Congenital myasthenic syndromes (CMSs) are a group of rare genetic disorders of the neuromuscular junction resulting in structural or functional causes of fatigable weakness that usually begins early in life. Mutations in pre-synaptic, synaptic and post-synaptic proteins have been demonstrated in human cases, with more than half involving aberrations in nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (AChR) subunits. CMS was first recognized in dogs in 1974 as an autosomal recessive trait in Jack Russell Terriers (JRTs). A deficiency of junctional AChRs was demonstrated. Here we characterize a CMS in 2 contemporary cases of JRT littermates with classic clinical and electromyographic findings, and immunochemical confirmation of an approximately 90% reduction in AChR protein content. Loci encoding the 5 AChR subunits were evaluated using microsatellite markers, and CHRNB1 and CHRNE were identified as candidate genes. Sequences of the splice sites and exons of both genes revealed a single base insertion in exon 7 of CHRNE that predicts a frameshift mutation and a premature stop codon. We further demonstrated this pathogenic mutation in CHRNE in archival tissues from unrelated JRTs studied 34 years ago. PMID:26429099

  16. Reading-frame restoration with an apolipoprotein B gene frameshift mutation.

    PubMed Central

    Linton, M F; Pierotti, V; Young, S G

    1992-01-01

    We examined a mutant human apolipoprotein B (apoB) allele that causes hypobetalipoproteinemia and has a single cytosine deletion in exon 26. This frameshift mutation was associated with the synthesis of a truncated apoB protein of the predicted size; however, studies in human subjects and minigene expression studies in cultured cells indicated that the mutant allele also yielded a full-length apoB protein. The 1-base-pair deletion in the mutant apoB allele created a stretch of eight consecutive adenines. To understand the mechanism whereby the mutant apoB allele yielded a full-length apoB protein, the cDNA from cells transfected with the mutant apoB minigene expression vector was examined. Splicing of the mRNA was normal; however, 11% of the cDNA clones had an additional adenine within the stretch of eight adenines, yielding nine consecutive adenines. The insertion of the extra adenine, presumably during apoB gene transcription, is predicted to restore the correct apoB reading frame, thereby permitting the synthesis of a full-length apoB protein. Images PMID:1454832

  17. Interaction of neomycin with ribosomes and ribosomal ribonucleic acid.

    PubMed

    Dahlberg, A E; Horodyski, F; Keller, P

    1978-02-01

    Neomycin binds ribosomes and ribosomal ribonucleic acid (rRNA) in vivo and in vitro producing changes detectable by increases in gel electrophoretic mobility. These changes were observed in gels that contain ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid or no added magnesium ion. The progressive increase in gel electrophoretic mobility with increasing antibiotic concentrations suggests that neomycin is binding at multiple sites on RNA. The binding was reversible but sufficiently stable to survive dialysis and electrophoresis. It is proposed that bound neomycin stabilizes the ribosome and RNA structures, restricting the unfolding of the particles during electrophoresis and thus allowing for a more rapid migration in the gel. Gentamicin produced an effect similar to that of neomycin. Paromomycin, differing from neomycin by only one amino group, had considerably less effect on ribosome and rRNA mobilities. The binding of neomycin to rRNA improved the linearity of the plot of log molecular weight versus mobility and thus may be of benefit in providing a more accurate estimation of molecular weights of large RNAs.

  18. Initiation factor 2 stabilizes the ribosome in a semirotated conformation

    PubMed Central

    Ling, Clarence; Ermolenko, Dmitri N.

    2015-01-01

    Intersubunit rotation and movement of the L1 stalk, a mobile domain of the large ribosomal subunit, have been shown to accompany the elongation cycle of translation. The initiation phase of protein synthesis is crucial for translational control of gene expression; however, in contrast to elongation, little is known about the conformational rearrangements of the ribosome during initiation. Bacterial initiation factors (IFs) 1, 2, and 3 mediate the binding of initiator tRNA and mRNA to the small ribosomal subunit to form the initiation complex, which subsequently associates with the large subunit by a poorly understood mechanism. Here, we use single-molecule FRET to monitor intersubunit rotation and the inward/outward movement of the L1 stalk of the large ribosomal subunit during the subunit-joining step of translation initiation. We show that, on subunit association, the ribosome adopts a distinct conformation in which the ribosomal subunits are in a semirotated orientation and the L1 stalk is positioned in a half-closed state. The formation of the semirotated intermediate requires the presence of an aminoacylated initiator, fMet-tRNAfMet, and IF2 in the GTP-bound state. GTP hydrolysis by IF2 induces opening of the L1 stalk and the transition to the nonrotated conformation of the ribosome. Our results suggest that positioning subunits in a semirotated orientation facilitates subunit association and support a model in which L1 stalk movement is coupled to intersubunit rotation and/or IF2 binding. PMID:26668356

  19. Ribosomal ribonucleic acid and ribosomal precursor ribonucleic acid in Anacystis nidulans.

    PubMed

    Szalay, A; Munsche, D; Wolligiehn, R; Parthier, B

    1972-08-01

    The RNA of the blue-green alga Anacystis nidulans contains three ribosomal RNA species with molecular weights of 0.56x10(6), 0.9x10(6), and 1.1x10(6) if the RNA is extracted in the absence of Mg(2+). The 0.9x10(6)mol.wt. rRNA is extremely slowly labelled in (32)P-incorporation experiments. This rRNA may be a cleavage product of the 1.1x10(6)mol.wt. rRNA from the ribosomes of cells in certain physiological states (e.g. light-deficiency during growth). The cleavage of the 1.1x10(6)mol.wt. rRNA during the extraction procedure can be prevented by the addition of 10mm-MgCl(2). (32)P-pulse-labelling studies demonstrate the rapid synthesis of two ribosomal precursor RNA species. One precursor RNA migrating slightly slower than the 1.1x10(6)mol.wt. rRNA appears much less stable than the other precursor RNA, which shows the electrophoretic behaviour of the 0.7x10(6)mol.wt. rRNA. Our observations support the close relationship between bacteria and blue-green algae also with respect to rRNA maturation. The conversion of the ribosomal precursor RNA species into 0.56x10(6)- and 1.1x10(6)-mol.wt. rRNA species requires Mg(2+) in the incubation medium.

  20. ABCA7 frameshift deletion associated with Alzheimer disease in African Americans

    PubMed Central

    Cukier, Holly N.; Kunkle, Brian W.; Vardarajan, Badri N.; Rolati, Sophie; Hamilton-Nelson, Kara L.; Kohli, Martin A.; Whitehead, Patrice L.; Dombroski, Beth A.; Van Booven, Derek; Lang, Rosalyn; Dykxhoorn, Derek M.; Farrer, Lindsay A.; Cuccaro, Michael L.; Vance, Jeffery M.; Gilbert, John R.; Beecham, Gary W.; Martin, Eden R.; Carney, Regina M.; Mayeux, Richard; Schellenberg, Gerard D.; Byrd, Goldie S.; Haines, Jonathan L.

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To identify a causative variant(s) that may contribute to Alzheimer disease (AD) in African Americans (AA) in the ATP-binding cassette, subfamily A (ABC1), member 7 (ABCA7) gene, a known risk factor for late-onset AD. Methods: Custom capture sequencing was performed on ∼150 kb encompassing ABCA7 in 40 AA cases and 37 AA controls carrying the AA risk allele (rs115550680). Association testing was performed for an ABCA7 deletion identified in large AA data sets (discovery n = 1,068; replication n = 1,749) and whole exome sequencing of Caribbean Hispanic (CH) AD families. Results: A 44-base pair deletion (rs142076058) was identified in all 77 risk genotype carriers, which shows that the deletion is in high linkage disequilibrium with the risk allele. The deletion was assessed in a large data set (531 cases and 527 controls) and, after adjustments for age, sex, and APOE status, was significantly associated with disease (p = 0.0002, odds ratio [OR] = 2.13 [95% confidence interval (CI): 1.42–3.20]). An independent data set replicated the association (447 cases and 880 controls, p = 0.0117, OR = 1.65 [95% CI: 1.12–2.44]), and joint analysis increased the significance (p = 1.414 × 10−5, OR = 1.81 [95% CI: 1.38–2.37]). The deletion is common in AA cases (15.2%) and AA controls (9.74%), but in only 0.12% of our non-Hispanic white cohort. Whole exome sequencing of multiplex, CH families identified the deletion cosegregating with disease in a large sibship. The deleted allele produces a stable, detectable RNA strand and is predicted to result in a frameshift mutation (p.Arg578Alafs) that could interfere with protein function. Conclusions: This common ABCA7 deletion could represent an ethnic-specific pathogenic alteration in AD. PMID:27231719

  1. Ribosomal protein uS19 mutants reveal its role in coordinating ribosome structure and function

    PubMed Central

    Bowen, Alicia M; Musalgaonkar, Sharmishtha; Moomau, Christine A; Gulay, Suna P; Mirvis, Mary; Dinman, Jonathan D

    2015-01-01

    Prior studies identified allosteric information pathways connecting functional centers in the large ribosomal subunit to the decoding center in the small subunit through the B1a and B1b/c intersubunit bridges in yeast. In prokaryotes a single SSU protein, uS13, partners with H38 (the A-site finger) and uL5 to form the B1a and B1b/c bridges respectively. In eukaryotes, the SSU component was split into 2 separate proteins during the course of evolution. One, also known as uS13, participates in B1b/c bridge with uL5 in eukaryotes. The other, called uS19 is the SSU partner in the B1a bridge with H38. Here, polyalanine mutants of uS19 involved in the uS19/uS13 and the uS19/H38 interfaces were used to elucidate the important amino acid residues involved in these intersubunit communication pathways. Two key clusters of amino acids were identified: one located at the junction between uS19 and uS13, and a second that appears to interact with the distal tip of H38. Biochemical analyses reveal that these mutations shift the ribosomal rotational equilibrium toward the unrotated state, increasing ribosomal affinity for tRNAs in the P-site and for ternary complex in the A-site, and inhibit binding of the translocase, eEF2. These defects in turn affect specific aspects of translational fidelity. These findings suggest that uS19 plays a critical role as a conduit of information exchange between the large and small ribosomal subunits directly through the B1a, and indirectly through the B1b/c bridges. PMID:26824029

  2. AMPLIFICATION OF RIBOSOMAL RNA SEQUENCES

    EPA Science Inventory

    This book chapter offers an overview of the use of ribosomal RNA sequences. A history of the technology traces the evolution of techniques to measure bacterial phylogenetic relationships and recent advances in obtaining rRNA sequence information. The manual also describes procedu...

  3. Methylation of yeast ribosomal protein S2 is elevated during stationary phase growth conditions.

    PubMed

    Ladror, Daniel T; Frey, Brian L; Scalf, Mark; Levenstein, Mark E; Artymiuk, Jacklyn M; Smith, Lloyd M

    2014-03-14

    Ribosomes, as the center of protein translation in the cell, require careful regulation via multiple pathways. While regulation of ribosomal synthesis and function has been widely studied on the transcriptional and translational "levels," the biological roles of ribosomal post-translational modifications (PTMs) are largely not understood. Here, we explore this matter by using quantitative mass spectrometry to compare the prevalence of ribosomal methylation and acetylation for yeast in the log phase and the stationary phase of growth. We find that of the 27 modified peptides identified, two peptides experience statistically significant changes in abundance: a 1.9-fold decrease in methylation for k(Me)VSGFKDEVLETV of ribosomal protein S1B (RPS1B), and a 10-fold increase in dimethylation for r(DiMe)GGFGGR of ribosomal protein S2 (RPS2). While the biological role of RPS1B methylation has largely been unexplored, RPS2 methylation is a modification known to have a role in processing and export of ribosomal RNA. This suggests that yeast in the stationary phase increase methylation of RPS2 in order to regulate ribosomal synthesis. These results demonstrate the utility of mass spectrometry for quantifying dynamic changes in ribosomal PTMs.

  4. Methylation of Yeast Ribosomal Protein S2 is Elevated During Stationary Phase Growth Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Ladror, Daniel T.; Frey, Brian L.; Scalf, Mark; Levenstein, Mark E.; Artymiuk, Jacklyn M.; Smith, Lloyd M.

    2014-01-01

    Ribosomes, as the center of protein translation in the cell, require careful regulation via multiple pathways. While regulation of ribosomal synthesis and function has been widely studied on the transcriptional and translational “levels,” the biological roles of ribosomal post-translational modifications (PTMs) are largely not understood. Here, we explore this matter by using quantitative mass spectrometry to compare the prevalence of ribosomal methylation and acetylation for yeast in the log phase and the stationary phase of growth. We find that of the 27 modified peptides identified, two peptides experience statistically significant changes in abundance: a 1.9-fold decrease in methylation for k(Me)VSGFKDEVLETV of ribosomal protein S1B (RPS1B), and a 10-fold increase in dimethylation for r(DiMe)GGFGGR of ribosomal protein S2 (RPS2). While the biological role of RPS1B methylation has largely been unexplored, RPS2 methylation is a modification known to have a role in processing and export of ribosomal RNA. This suggests that yeast in the stationary phase increase methylation of RPS2 in order to regulate ribosomal synthesis. These results demonstrate the utility of mass spectrometry for quantifying dynamic changes in ribosomal PTMs. PMID:24486316

  5. Release factor eRF3 mediates premature translation termination on polylysine-stalled ribosomes in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Chiabudini, Marco; Tais, Arlette; Zhang, Ying; Hayashi, Sachiko; Wölfle, Tina; Fitzke, Edith; Rospert, Sabine

    2014-11-01

    Ribosome stalling is an important incident enabling the cellular quality control machinery to detect aberrant mRNA. Saccharomyces cerevisiae Hbs1-Dom34 and Ski7 are homologs of the canonical release factor eRF3-eRF1, which recognize stalled ribosomes, promote ribosome release, and induce the decay of aberrant mRNA. Polyadenylated nonstop mRNA encodes aberrant proteins containing C-terminal polylysine segments which cause ribosome stalling due to electrostatic interaction with the ribosomal exit tunnel. Here we describe a novel mechanism, termed premature translation termination, which releases C-terminally truncated translation products from ribosomes stalled on polylysine segments. Premature termination during polylysine synthesis was abolished when ribosome stalling was prevented due to the absence of the ribosomal protein Asc1. In contrast, premature termination was enhanced, when the general rate of translation elongation was lowered. The unconventional termination event was independent of Hbs1-Dom34 and Ski7, but it was dependent on eRF3. Moreover, premature termination during polylysine synthesis was strongly increased in the absence of the ribosome-bound chaperones ribosome-associated complex (RAC) and Ssb (Ssb1 and Ssb2). On the basis of the data, we suggest a model in which eRF3-eRF1 can catalyze the release of nascent polypeptides even though the ribosomal A-site contains a sense codon when the rate of translation is abnormally low.

  6. Structure–function insights reveal the human ribosome as a cancer target for antibiotics

    PubMed Central

    Myasnikov, Alexander G.; Kundhavai Natchiar, S.; Nebout, Marielle; Hazemann, Isabelle; Imbert, Véronique; Khatter, Heena; Peyron, Jean-François; Klaholz, Bruno P.

    2016-01-01

    Many antibiotics in clinical use target the bacterial ribosome by interfering with the protein synthesis machinery. However, targeting the human ribosome in the case of protein synthesis deregulations such as in highly proliferating cancer cells has not been investigated at the molecular level up to now. Here we report the structure of the human 80S ribosome with a eukaryote-specific antibiotic and show its anti-proliferative effect on several cancer cell lines. The structure provides insights into the detailed interactions in a ligand-binding pocket of the human ribosome that are required for structure-assisted drug design. Furthermore, anti-proliferative dose response in leukaemic cells and interference with synthesis of c-myc and mcl-1 short-lived protein markers reveals specificity of a series of eukaryote-specific antibiotics towards cytosolic rather than mitochondrial ribosomes, uncovering the human ribosome as a promising cancer target. PMID:27665925

  7. Efficient translation initiation directed by the 900-nucleotide-long and GC-rich 5' untranslated region of the human retrotransposon LINE-1 mRNA is strictly cap dependent rather than internal ribosome entry site mediated.

    PubMed

    Dmitriev, Sergey E; Andreev, Dmitri E; Terenin, Ilya M; Olovnikov, Ivan A; Prassolov, Vladimir S; Merrick, William C; Shatsky, Ivan N

    2007-07-01

    Retrotransposon L1 is a mobile genetic element of the LINE family that is extremely widespread in the mammalian genome. It encodes a dicistronic mRNA, which is exceptionally rare among eukaryotic cellular mRNAs. The extremely long and GC-rich L1 5' untranslated region (5'UTR) directs synthesis of numerous copies of RNA-binding protein ORF1p per mRNA. One could suggest that the 5'UTR of L1 mRNA contained a powerful internal ribosome entry site (IRES) element. Using transfection of cultured cells with the polyadenylated monocistronic (L1 5'UTR-Fluc) or bicistronic (Rluc-L1 5'UTR-Fluc) RNA constructs, capped or uncapped, it has been firmly established that the 5'UTR of L1 does not contain an IRES. Uncapping reduces the initiation activity of the L1 5'UTR to that of background. Moreover, the translation is inhibited by upstream AUG codons in the 5'UTR. Nevertheless, this cap-dependent initiation activity of the L1 5'UTR was unexpectedly high and resembles that of the beta-actin 5'UTR (84 nucleotides long). Strikingly, the deletion of up to 80% of the nucleotide sequence of the L1 5'UTR, with most of its stem loops, does not significantly change its translation initiation efficiency. These data can modify current ideas on mechanisms used by 40S ribosomal subunits to cope with complex 5'UTRs and call into question the conception that every long GC-rich 5'UTR working with a high efficiency has to contain an IRES. Our data also demonstrate that the ORF2 translation initiation is not directed by internal initiation, either. It is very inefficient and presumably based on a reinitiation event.

  8. Efficient Translation Initiation Directed by the 900-Nucleotide-Long and GC-Rich 5′ Untranslated Region of the Human Retrotransposon LINE-1 mRNA Is Strictly Cap Dependent Rather than Internal Ribosome Entry Site Mediated▿

    PubMed Central

    Dmitriev, Sergey E.; Andreev, Dmitri E.; Terenin, Ilya M.; Olovnikov, Ivan A.; Prassolov, Vladimir S.; Merrick, William C.; Shatsky, Ivan N.

    2007-01-01

    Retrotransposon L1 is a mobile genetic element of the LINE family that is extremely widespread in the mammalian genome. It encodes a dicistronic mRNA, which is exceptionally rare among eukaryotic cellular mRNAs. The extremely long and GC-rich L1 5′ untranslated region (5′UTR) directs synthesis of numerous copies of RNA-binding protein ORF1p per mRNA. One could suggest that the 5′UTR of L1 mRNA contained a powerful internal ribosome entry site (IRES) element. Using transfection of cultured cells with the polyadenylated monocistronic (L1 5′UTR-Fluc) or bicistronic (Rluc-L1 5′UTR-Fluc) RNA constructs, capped or uncapped, it has been firmly established that the 5′UTR of L1 does not contain an IRES. Uncapping reduces the initiation activity of the L1 5′UTR to that of background. Moreover, the translation is inhibited by upstream AUG codons in the 5′UTR. Nevertheless, this cap-dependent initiation activity of the L1 5′UTR was unexpectedly high and resembles that of the beta-actin 5′UTR (84 nucleotides long). Strikingly, the deletion of up to 80% of the nucleotide sequence of the L1 5′UTR, with most of its stem loops, does not significantly change its translation initiation efficiency. These data can modify current ideas on mechanisms used by 40S ribosomal subunits to cope with complex 5′UTRs and call into question the conception that every long GC-rich 5′UTR working with a high efficiency has to contain an IRES. Our data also demonstrate that the ORF2 translation initiation is not directed by internal initiation, either. It is very inefficient and presumably based on a reinitiation event. PMID:17470553

  9. Ligation-free ribosome profiling of cell type-specific translation in the brain.

    PubMed

    Hornstein, Nicholas; Torres, Daniela; Das Sharma, Sohani; Tang, Guomei; Canoll, Peter; Sims, Peter A

    2016-01-01

    Ribosome profiling has emerged as a powerful tool for genome-wide measurements of translation, but library construction requires multiple ligation steps and remains cumbersome relative to more conventional deep-sequencing experiments. We report a new, ligation-free approach to ribosome profiling that does not require ligation. Library construction for ligation-free ribosome profiling can be completed in one day with as little as 1 ng of purified RNA footprints. We apply ligation-free ribosome profiling to mouse brain tissue to identify new patterns of cell type-specific translation and test its ability to identify translational targets of mTOR signaling in the brain.

  10. Molecular alterations resulting from frameshift mutations in peripheral myelin protein 22: implications for neuropathy severity.

    PubMed

    Johnson, J S; Roux, K J; Fletcher, B S; Fortun, J; Notterpek, L

    2005-12-15

    Alterations in peripheral myelin protein 22 (PMP22) expression are associated with a heterogeneous group of hereditary demyelinating peripheral neuropathies. Two mutations at glycine 94, a single guanine insertion or deletion in PMP22, result in different reading frameshifts and, consequently, an extended G94fsX222 or a truncated G94fsX110 protein, respectively. Both of these autosomal dominant mutations alter the second half of PMP22 and yet are linked to clinical phenotypes with distinct severities. The G94fsX222 is associated with hereditary neuropathy with liability to pressure palsies, whereas G94fsX110 causes severe neuropathy diagnosed as Dejerine-Sottas disease or Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease type IA. To investigate the subcellular changes associated with the G94 frameshift mutations, we expressed epitope-tagged forms in primary rat Schwann cells. Biochemical and immunolabeling studies indicate that, unlike the wild-type protein, which is targeted for the plasma membrane, frameshift PMP22s are retained in the cell, prior to reaching the medial Golgi compartment. Similar to Wt-PMP22, both frameshift mutants are targeted for proteasomal degradation and accumulate in detergent-insoluble, ubiquitin-containing aggregates upon inhibition of this pathway. The extended frameshift PMP22 shows the ability to form spontaneous aggregates in the absence of proteasome inhibition. On the other hand, Schwann cells expressing the truncated protein proliferate at a significantly higher rate than Schwann cells expressing the wild-type or the extended PMP22. In summary, these results suggest that a greater potential for PMP22 aggregation is associated with a less severe phenotype, whereas dysregulation of Schwann cell proliferation is linked to severe neuropathy. PMID:16273544

  11. Coordinated movements of eukaryotic translation initiation factors eIF1, eIF1A, and eIF5 trigger phosphate release from eIF2 in response to start codon recognition by the ribosomal preinitiation complex.

    PubMed

    Nanda, Jagpreet S; Saini, Adesh K; Muñoz, Antonio M; Hinnebusch, Alan G; Lorsch, Jon R

    2013-02-22

    Accurate recognition of the start codon in an mRNA by the eukaryotic translation preinitiation complex (PIC) is essential for proper gene expression. The process is mediated by eukaryotic translation initiation factors (eIFs) in conjunction with the 40 S ribosomal subunit and (initiator) tRNA(i). Here, we provide evidence that the C-terminal tail (CTT) of eIF1A, which we previously implicated in start codon recognition, moves closer to the N-terminal domain of eIF5 when the PIC encounters an AUG codon. Importantly, this movement is coupled to dissociation of eIF1 from the PIC, a critical event in start codon recognition, and is dependent on the scanning enhancer elements in the eIF1A CTT. The data further indicate that eIF1 dissociation must be accompanied by the movement of the eIF1A CTT toward eIF5 in order to trigger release of phosphate from eIF2, which converts the latter to its GDP-bound state. Our results also suggest that release of eIF1 from the PIC and movement of the CTT of eIF1A are triggered by the same event, most likely accommodation of tRNA(i) in the P site of the 40 S subunit driven by base pairing between the start codon in the mRNA and the anticodon in tRNA(i). Finally, we show that the C-terminal domain of eIF5 is responsible for the factor's activity in antagonizing eIF1 binding to the PIC. Together, our data provide a more complete picture of the chain of molecular events that is triggered when the scanning PIC encounters an AUG start codon in the mRNA.

  12. Structure of Ribosomal Silencing Factor Bound to Mycobacterium tuberculosis Ribosome.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiaojun; Sun, Qingan; Jiang, Cai; Yang, Kailu; Hung, Li-Wei; Zhang, Junjie; Sacchettini, James C

    2015-10-01

    The ribosomal silencing factor RsfS slows cell growth by inhibiting protein synthesis during periods of diminished nutrient availability. The crystal structure of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) RsfS, together with the cryo-electron microscopy (EM) structure of the large subunit 50S of Mtb ribosome, reveals how inhibition of protein synthesis by RsfS occurs. RsfS binds to the 50S at L14, which, when occupied, blocks the association of the small subunit 30S. Although Mtb RsfS is a dimer in solution, only a single subunit binds to 50S. The overlap between the dimer interface and the L14 binding interface confirms that the RsfS dimer must first dissociate to a monomer in order to bind to L14. RsfS interacts primarily through electrostatic and hydrogen bonding to L14. The EM structure shows extended rRNA density that it is not found in the Escherichia coli ribosome, the most striking of these being the extended RNA helix of H54a.

  13. Alcoholic Liver Disease and the Mitochondrial Ribosome

    PubMed Central

    Cahill, Alan; Sykora, Peter

    2009-01-01

    Summary Chronic alcohol consumption has been shown to severely compromise mitochondrial protein synthesis. Hepatic mitochondria isolated from alcoholic animals contain decreased levels of respiratory complexes and display depressed respiration rates when compared to pair-fed controls. One underlying mechanism for this involves ethanol-elicited alterations in the structural and functional integrity of the mitochondrial ribosome. Ethanol feeding results in ribosomal changes that include decreased sedimentation rates, larger hydrodynamic volumes, increased levels of unassociated subunits and changes in the levels of specific ribosomal proteins. The methods presented in this chapter detail how to isolate mitochondrial ribosomes, determine ribosomal activity, separate ribosomes into nucleic acid and protein, and perform two-dimensional nonequilibrium pH gradient electrophoretic polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis to separate and subsequently identify mitochondrial ribosomal proteins. PMID:18369931

  14. The Synthesis of Ribosomes in E. coli

    PubMed Central

    Britten, R. J.; McCarthy, B. J.; Roberts, R. B.

    1962-01-01

    The incorporation of C14 leucine into the protein moiety of ribosomes has been studied as a sequel to the studies of ribosomal RNA synthesis. In contrast to the latter studies, labeled leucine is incorporated directly into 50S and 30S ribosomes without measurable delay by precursor stages. There is, however, evidence of some transfer of radioactivity from the 43S group of particles to the 50S. The inhibition of protein synthesis by chloramphenicol results in the accumulation of material similar to the eosome—the primary precursor in ribosome synthesis. There is also evidence for the synthesis of some neosome. The results of the studies of ribosomal RNA and protein synthesis are combined into a model of ribosome synthesis. Finally, consideration is made of the significance of these studies of ribosome synthesis for general problems of protein synthesis and information transfer. PMID:13873182

  15. Crystal structure of the eukaryotic ribosome.

    PubMed

    Ben-Shem, Adam; Jenner, Lasse; Yusupova, Gulnara; Yusupov, Marat

    2010-11-26

    Crystal structures of prokaryotic ribosomes have described in detail the universally conserved core of the translation mechanism. However, many facets of the translation process in eukaryotes are not shared with prokaryotes. The crystal structure of the yeast 80S ribosome determined at 4.15 angstrom resolution reveals the higher complexity of eukaryotic ribosomes, which are 40% larger than their bacterial counterparts. Our model shows how eukaryote-specific elements considerably expand the network of interactions within the ribosome and provides insights into eukaryote-specific features of protein synthesis. Our crystals capture the ribosome in the ratcheted state, which is essential for translocation of mRNA and transfer RNA (tRNA), and in which the small ribosomal subunit has rotated with respect to the large subunit. We describe the conformational changes in both ribosomal subunits that are involved in ratcheting and their implications in coordination between the two associated subunits and in mRNA and tRNA translocation.

  16. 5S rRNA and ribosome.

    PubMed

    Gongadze, G M

    2011-12-01

    5S rRNA is an integral component of the ribosome of all living organisms. It is known that the ribosome without 5S rRNA is functionally inactive. However, the question about the specific role of this RNA in functioning of the translation apparatus is still open. This review presents a brief history of the discovery of 5S rRNA and studies of its origin and localization in the ribosome. The previously expressed hypotheses about the role of this RNA in the functioning of the ribosome are discussed considering the unique location of 5S rRNA in the ribosome and its intermolecular contacts. Based on analysis of the current data on ribosome structure and its functional complexes, the role of 5S rRNA as an intermediary between ribosome functional domains is discussed.

  17. Pathways to Specialized Ribosomes: The Brussels Lecture.

    PubMed

    Dinman, Jonathan D

    2016-05-22

    "Specialized ribosomes" is a topic of intense debate and research whose provenance can be traced to the earliest days of molecular biology. Here, the history of this idea is reviewed, and critical literature in which the specialized ribosomes have come to be presently defined is discussed. An argument supporting the evolution of a variety of ribosomes with specialized functions as a consequence of selective pressures acting on a near-infinite set of possible ribosomes is presented, leading to a discussion of how this may also serve as a biological buffering mechanism. The possible relationship between specialized ribosomes and human health is explored. A set of criteria and possible approaches are also presented to help guide the definitive identification of "specialized" ribosomes, and this is followed by a discussion of how synthetic biology approaches might be used to create new types of special ribosomes.

  18. Ribosomal targets for antibiotic drug discovery

    DOEpatents

    Blanchard, Scott C.; Feldman, Michael Brian; Wang, Leyi; Doudna Cate, James H.; Pulk, Arto; Altman, Roger B.; Wasserman, Michael R

    2016-09-13

    The present invention relates to methods to identify molecules that binds in the neomycin binding pocket of a bacterial ribosome using structures of an intact bacterial ribosome that reveal how the ribosome binds tRNA in two functionally distinct states, determined by x-ray crystallography. One state positions tRNA in the peptidyl-tRNA binding site. The second, a fully rotated state, is stabilized by ribosome recycling factor (RRF) and binds tRNA in a highly bent conformation in a hybrid peptidyl/exit (P/E) site. Additionally, the invention relates to various assays, including single-molecule assay for ribosome recycling, and methods to identify compounds that interfere with ribosomal function by detecting newly identified intermediate FRET states using known and novel FRET pairs on the ribosome. The invention also provides vectors and compositions with an N-terminally tagged S13 protein.

  19. [About the ribosomal biogenesis in human].

    PubMed

    Tafforeau, Lionel

    2015-01-01

    Ribosomes are cellular ribonucleoprotein particles required for a fundamental mechanism, translation of the genetic information into proteins. Ribosome biogenesis is a highly complex pathway involving many maturation steps: ribosomal RNA (rRNA) synthesis, rRNA processing, pre-rRNA modifications, its assembly with ribosomal proteins in the nuceolus, export of the subunit precursors to the nucleoplasm and the cytoplasm. Ribosome biogenesis has mainly being investigated in yeast during these last 25 years. However, recent works have shown that, despite many similarities between yeast and human ribosome structure and biogenesis, human pre-rRNA processing is far more complex than in yeast. In order to better understand diseases related to a malfunction in ribosome synthesis, the ribosomopathies, research should be conducted directly in human cells and animal models. PMID:26152166

  20. Pathways to Specialized Ribosomes: The Brussels Lecture.

    PubMed

    Dinman, Jonathan D

    2016-05-22

    "Specialized ribosomes" is a topic of intense debate and research whose provenance can be traced to the earliest days of molecular biology. Here, the history of this idea is reviewed, and critical literature in which the specialized ribosomes have come to be presently defined is discussed. An argument supporting the evolution of a variety of ribosomes with specialized functions as a consequence of selective pressures acting on a near-infinite set of possible ribosomes is presented, leading to a discussion of how this may also serve as a biological buffering mechanism. The possible relationship between specialized ribosomes and human health is explored. A set of criteria and possible approaches are also presented to help guide the definitive identification of "specialized" ribosomes, and this is followed by a discussion of how synthetic biology approaches might be used to create new types of special ribosomes. PMID:26764228

  1. [Structure and function of the eukaryotic ribosome].

    PubMed

    Bakowska-Zywicka, Kamilla; Twardowski, Tomasz

    2008-01-01

    The protein biosynthesis is a complicated process and not fully understood yet. According to smaller size and less complicated structure, understanding of prokaryotic 70S ribosomes is much more advanced. Eucaryotic 80S ribosomes are more complex and generate more difficulties in research. The morphology of 80S ribosome has been pretty well resolved and we know a lot about mechanism of functioning. Determination of the interactions between the ribosomes and the factors taking part in protein biosynthesis is still a great challenge. Dynamic changes of these interactions during particular steps of elongation cycle are quite difficult to understand. Conformational changes of the ribosome are of great functional and regulatory importance during protein biosynthesis. They are essential for the whole gene expression process. Only further research of the structure and function of the ribosome will lead us to knowledge about specificity of the mechanism of their action. In this article we present current opinions concerning structure and function of the eukaryotic ribosomes.

  2. A set of lacZ mutations in Escherichia coli that allow rapid detection of specific frameshift mutations.

    PubMed

    Cupples, C G; Cabrera, M; Cruz, C; Miller, J H

    1990-06-01

    We have used site-directed mutagenesis to alter bases in lacZ near the region encoding essential residues in the active site of beta-galactosidase. The altered sequences generate runs of six or seven identical base pairs which create a frameshift, resulting in a Lac- phenotype. Reversion to Lac+ in each strain can occur only by a specific frameshift at these sequences. Monotonous runs of A's (or of T's on the opposite strand) and G's (or C's) have been constructed, as has an alternating -C-G- sequence. These specific frameshift indicator strains complement a set of six previously described strains which detect each of the base substitutions. We have examined a variety of mutagens and mutators for their ability to cause reversion to Lac+. Surprisingly, frameshifts are well stimulated at many of these runs by ethyl methanesulfonate, N-methyl-N'-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine and 2-amino-purine, mutagens not widely known to induce frameshifts. A comparison of ethyl methanesulfonate, N-methyl-N'-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine and 2-aminopurine frameshift specificity with that found with a mutH strain suggests that these mutagens partially or fully saturate or inactivate the methylation-directed mismatch repair system and allow replication errors leading to frameshifts to escape repair. This results in a form of indirect mutagenesis, which can be detected at certain sites. PMID:2199309

  3. Serum antibodies against frameshift peptides in microsatellite unstable colorectal cancer patients with Lynch syndrome.

    PubMed

    Reuschenbach, Miriam; Kloor, Matthias; Morak, Monika; Wentzensen, Nicolas; Germann, Anja; Garbe, Yvette; Tariverdian, Mirjam; Findeisen, Peter; Neumaier, Michael; Holinski-Feder, Elke; von Knebel Doeberitz, Magnus

    2010-06-01

    High level microsatellite instability (MSI-H) occurs in about 15% of colorectal cancer (CRCs), either as sporadic cancers or in the context of hereditary non-polyposis cancer or Lynch syndrome. In MSI-H CRC, mismatch repair deficiency leads to insertion/deletion mutations at coding microsatellites and thus to the translation of frameshift peptides (FSPs). FSPs are potent inductors of T cell responses in vitro and in vivo. The present study aims at the identification of FSP-specific humoral immune responses in MSI-H CRC and Lynch syndrome. Sera from patients with history of MSI-H CRC (n = 69), healthy Lynch syndrome mutation carriers (n = 31) and healthy controls (n = 52) were analyzed for antibodies against FSPs using peptide ELISA. Reactivities were measured against FSPs derived from genes frequently mutated in MSI-H CRCs, AIM2, TGFBR2, CASP5, TAF1B, ZNF294, and MARCKS. Antibody reactivity against FSPs was significantly higher in MSI-H CRC patients than in healthy controls (P = 0.036, Mann-Whitney) and highest in patients with shortest interval between tumor resection and serum sampling. Humoral immune responses in patients were most frequently directed against FSPs derived from mutated TAF1B (11.6%, 8/69) and TGFBR2 (10.1%, 7/69). Low level FSP-specific antibodies were also detected in healthy mutation carriers. Our results show that antibody responses against FSPs are detectable in MSI-H CRC patients and healthy Lynch syndrome mutation carriers. Based on the high number of defined FSP antigens, measuring FSP-specific humoral immune responses is a highly promising tool for future diagnostic application in MSI-H cancer patients.

  4. Serum antibodies against frameshift peptides in microsatellite unstable colorectal cancer patients with Lynch syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Reuschenbach, Miriam; Kloor, Matthias; Morak, Monika; Wentzensen, Nicolas; Germann, Anja; Garbe, Yvette; Tariverdian, Mirjam; Findeisen, Peter; Neumaier, Michael; Holinski-Feder, Elke; Doeberitz, Magnus von Knebel

    2014-01-01

    High level microsatellite instability (MSI-H) occurs in about 15% of colorectal cancer (CRCs), either as sporadic cancers or in the context of hereditary non-polyposis cancer (HNPCC) or Lynch syndrome. In MSI-H CRC, mismatch repair deficiency leads to insertion/deletion mutations at coding microsatellites (cMS) and thus to the translation of frameshift peptides (FSPs). FSPs are potent inductors of T cell responses in vitro and in vivo. The present study aims at the identification of FSP-specific humoral immune responses in MSI-H CRC and Lynch syndrome. Sera from patients with history of MSI-H CRC (n=69), healthy Lynch syndrome mutation carriers (n=31) and healthy controls (n=52) were analyzed for antibodies against FSPs using peptide ELISA. Reactivities were measured against FSPs derived from genes frequently mutated in MSI-H CRCs, AIM2, TGFBR2, CASP5, TAF1B, ZNF294, and MARCKS. Antibody reactivity against FSPs was significantly higher in MSI-H CRC patients than in healthy controls (p=0.036, Mann-Whitney) and highest in patients with shortest interval between tumor resection and serum sampling. Humoral immune responses in patients were most frequently directed against FSPs derived from mutated TAF1B (11.6%, 8/69) and TGFBR2 (10.1%, 7/69). Low level FSP-specific antibodies were also detected in healthy mutation carriers. Our results show that antibody responses against FSPs are detectable in MSI-H CRC patients and healthy Lynch syndrome mutation carriers. Based on the high number of defined FSP antigens, measuring FSP-specific humoral immune responses is a highly promising tool for future diagnostic application in MSI-H cancer patients. PMID:19957108

  5. [Topography of ribosomal proteins: reconsideration of of protein map of small ribosomal subunit].

    PubMed

    Spirin, A S; Agafonov, D E; Kolb, V A; Kommer, A

    1996-11-01

    Exposure of proteins on the surface of the small (30S) ribosomal subunit of Escherichia coli was studied by the hot tritium bombardment technique. Eight of 21 proteins of the 30 S subunit (S3, S8, S10, S12, S15, S16, S17, and S19) had virtually no groups exposed on the surface of the particle, i.e., they were mainly hidden inside. Seven proteins (S1, S4, S5, S7, S18, S20, and S21) were all well exposed on the surface of the particle, thus being outside proteins. The remaining proteins (S2, S6, S9 and/or S11, S13, and S14) were partially exposed. On the basis of these results a reconcilement of the three-dimensional protein map of the small ribosomal subunit has been done and corrected model is proposed.

  6. Mescaline-induced changes of brain-cortex ribosomes. Role of sperimidine in counteracting the destabilizing effect of mescaline of brain-cortex ribosomes.

    PubMed

    Datta, R K; Antopol, W; Ghosh, J J

    1971-11-01

    1. The effect of spermidine on the mescaline-induced changes of brain-cortex ribosomes was studied by adding spermidine during the treatment of goat brain-cortex slices with mescaline. 2. Mescaline treatment of brain-cortex slices removed a portion of the endogenous spermidine from ribosomes and this removal was significantly prevented when spermidine was present during mescaline treatment. 3. Spermidine present during mescaline treatment of brain-cortex slices counteracted, to some extent, the destabilizing effect of mescaline on ribosomes with respect to heat denaturation. 4. Mescaline treatment of brain-cortex slices made ribosomes more susceptible to breakdown, releasing protein and RNA, and resulting in loss of ribosomal enzymic activities. However, spermidine present during mescaline treatment counteracted moderately the mescaline-induced ribosomal susceptibility to breakdown and ribosomal loss of enzymic activities. 5. Ribosomes of mescaline-treated cortex slices were rapidly degraded by ribonuclease and trypsin. However, if spermidine was present during mescaline treatment of brain-cortex slices the rates of degradation diminished.

  7. Yeast ribosomal protein L7 and its homologue Rlp7 are simultaneously present at distinct sites on pre-60S ribosomal particles

    PubMed Central

    Babiano, Reyes; Badis, Gwenael; Saveanu, Cosmin; Namane, Abdelkader; Doyen, Antonia; Díaz-Quintana, Antonio; Jacquier, Alain; Fromont-Racine, Micheline; de la Cruz, Jesús

    2013-01-01

    Ribosome biogenesis requires >300 assembly factors in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Ribosome assembly factors Imp3, Mrt4, Rlp7 and Rlp24 have sequence similarity to ribosomal proteins S9, P0, L7 and L24, suggesting that these pre-ribosomal factors could be placeholders that prevent premature assembly of the corresponding ribosomal proteins to nascent ribosomes. However, we found L7 to be a highly specific component of Rlp7-associated complexes, revealing that the two proteins can bind simultaneously to pre-ribosomal particles. Cross-linking and cDNA analysis experiments showed that Rlp7 binds to the ITS2 region of 27S pre-rRNAs, at two sites, in helix III and in a region adjacent to the pre-rRNA processing sites C1 and E. However, L7 binds to mature 25S and 5S rRNAs and cross-linked predominantly to helix ES7Lb within 25S rRNA. Thus, despite their predicted structural similarity, our data show that Rlp7 and L7 clearly bind at different positions on the same pre-60S particles. Our results also suggest that Rlp7 facilitates the formation of the hairpin structure of ITS2 during 60S ribosomal subunit maturation. PMID:23945946

  8. Interrelationships between Yeast Ribosomal Protein Assembly Events and Transient Ribosome Biogenesis Factors Interactions in Early Pre-Ribosomes

    PubMed Central

    Jakob, Steffen; Ohmayer, Uli; Neueder, Andreas; Hierlmeier, Thomas; Perez-Fernandez, Jorge; Hochmuth, Eduard; Deutzmann, Rainer; Griesenbeck, Joachim; Tschochner, Herbert; Milkereit, Philipp

    2012-01-01

    Early steps of eukaryotic ribosome biogenesis require a large set of ribosome biogenesis factors which transiently interact with nascent rRNA precursors (pre-rRNA). Most likely, concomitant with that initial contacts between ribosomal proteins (r-proteins) and ribosome precursors (pre-ribosomes) are established which are converted into robust interactions between pre-rRNA and r-proteins during the course of ribosome maturation. Here we analysed the interrelationship between r-protein assembly events and the transient interactions of ribosome biogenesis factors with early pre-ribosomal intermediates termed 90S pre-ribosomes or small ribosomal subunit (SSU) processome in yeast cells. We observed that components of the SSU processome UTP-A and UTP-B sub-modules were recruited to early pre-ribosomes independently of all tested r-proteins. On the other hand, groups of SSU processome components were identified whose association with early pre-ribosomes was affected by specific r-protein assembly events in the head-platform interface of the SSU. One of these components, Noc4p, appeared to be itself required for robust incorporation of r-proteins into the SSU head domain. Altogether, the data reveal an emerging network of specific interrelationships between local r-protein assembly events and the functional interactions of SSU processome components with early pre-ribosomes. They point towards some of these components being transient primary pre-rRNA in vivo binders and towards a role for others in coordinating the assembly of major SSU domains. PMID:22431976

  9. Phylogenetic relationships of the marine Haplosclerida (Phylum Porifera) employing ribosomal (28S rRNA) and mitochondrial (cox1, nad1) gene sequence data.

    PubMed

    Redmond, Niamh E; Raleigh, Jean; van Soest, Rob W M; Kelly, Michelle; Travers, Simon A A; Bradshaw, Brian; Vartia, Salla; Stephens, Kelly M; McCormack, Grace P

    2011-01-01

    The systematics of the poriferan Order Haplosclerida (Class Demospongiae) has been under scrutiny for a number of years without resolution. Molecular data suggests that the order needs revision at all taxonomic levels. Here, we provide a comprehensive view of the phylogenetic relationships of the marine Haplosclerida using many species from across the order, and three gene regions. Gene trees generated using 28S rRNA, nad1 and cox1 gene data, under maximum likelihood and Bayesian approaches, are highly congruent and suggest the presence of four clades. Clade A is comprised primarily of species of Haliclona and Callyspongia, and clade B is comprised of H. simulans and H. vansoesti (Family Chalinidae), Amphimedon queenslandica (Family Niphatidae) and Tabulocalyx (Family Phloeodictyidae), Clade C is comprised primarily of members of the Families Petrosiidae and Niphatidae, while Clade D is comprised of Aka species. The polyphletic nature of the suborders, families and genera described in other studies is also found here.

  10. Human ribosomes from cells with reduced dyskerin levels are intrinsically altered in translation.

    PubMed

    Penzo, Marianna; Rocchi, Laura; Brugiere, Sabine; Carnicelli, Domenica; Onofrillo, Carmine; Couté, Yohann; Brigotti, Maurizio; Montanaro, Lorenzo

    2015-08-01

    Dyskerin is a pseudouridine (ψ) synthase involved in fundamental cellular processes including uridine modification in rRNA and small nuclear RNA and telomere stabilization. Dyskerin functions are altered in X-linked dyskeratosis congenita (X-DC) and cancer. Dyskerin's role in rRNA pseudouridylation has been suggested to underlie the alterations in mRNA translation described in cells lacking dyskerin function, although relevant direct evidences are currently lacking. Our purpose was to establish definitely whether defective dyskerin function might determine an intrinsic ribosomal defect leading to an altered synthetic activity. Therefore, ribosomes from dyskerin-depleted human cells were purified and 1) added to a controlled reticulocyte cell-free system devoid of ribosomes to study mRNA translation; 2) analyzed for protein contamination and composition by mass spectrometry, 3) analyzed for global pseudouridylation levels. Ribosomes purified from dyskerin-depleted cells showed altered translational fidelity and internal ribosome entry site (IRES)-mediated translation. These ribosomes displayed reduced uridine modification, whereas they were not different in terms of protein contamination or ribosomal protein composition with respect to ribosomes from matched control cells with full dyskerin activity. In conclusion, lack of dyskerin function in human cells induces a defect in rRNA uridine modification, which is sufficient to alter ribosome activity.

  11. p90 ribosomal S6 kinases play a significant role in early gene regulation in the cardiomyocyte response to G(q)-protein-coupled receptor stimuli, endothelin-1 and α(1)-adrenergic receptor agonists.

    PubMed

    Amirak, Emre; Fuller, Stephen J; Sugden, Peter H; Clerk, Angela

    2013-03-01

    ERK1/2 (extracellular-signal-regulated kinase 1/2) and their substrates RSKs (p90 ribosomal S6 kinases) phosphorylate different transcription factors, contributing differentially to transcriptomic profiles. In cardiomyocytes ERK1/2 are required for >70% of the transcriptomic response to endothelin-1. In the present study we investigated the role of RSKs in the transcriptomic responses to the G(q)-protein-coupled receptor agonists endothelin-1, phenylephrine (a generic α(1)-adrenergic receptor agonist) and A61603 (α(1A)-adrenergic receptor selective). Phospho-ERK1/2 and phospho-RSKs appeared in cardiomyocyte nuclei within 2-3 min of stimulation (endothelin-1>A61603≈phenylephrine). All agonists increased nuclear RSK2, but only endothelin-1 increased the nuclear RSK1 content. PD184352 (inhibits ERK1/2 activation) and BI-D1870 (inhibits RSKs) were used to dissect the contribution of RSKs to the endothelin-1-responsive transcriptome. Of the 213 RNAs up-regulated after 1 h, 51% required RSKs for their up-regulation, whereas 29% required ERK1/2 but not RSKs. The transcriptomic response to phenylephrine overlapped with, but was not identical with, endothelin-1. As with endothelin-1, PD184352 inhibited the up-regulation of most phenylephrine-responsive transcripts, but the greater variation in the effects of BI-D1870 suggests that differential RSK signalling influences global gene expression. A61603 induced similar changes in RNA expression in cardiomyocytes as phenylephrine, indicating that the signal was mediated largely through α(1A)-adrenergic receptors. A61603 also increased expression of immediate early genes in perfused adult rat hearts and, as in cardiomyocytes, up-regulation of the majority of genes was inhibited by PD184352. PD184352 or BI-D1870 prevented the increased surface area induced by endothelin-1 in cardiomyocytes. Thus RSKs play a significant role in regulating cardiomyocyte gene expression and hypertrophy in response to G

  12. Phylogenomics of Prokaryotic Ribosomal Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Yutin, Natalya; Puigbò, Pere; Koonin, Eugene V.; Wolf, Yuri I.

    2012-01-01

    Archaeal and bacterial ribosomes contain more than 50 proteins, including 34 that are universally conserved in the three domains of cellular life (bacteria, archaea, and eukaryotes). Despite the high sequence conservation, annotation of ribosomal (r-) protein genes is often difficult because of their short lengths and biased sequence composition. We developed an automated computational pipeline for identification of r-protein genes and applied it to 995 completely sequenced bacterial and 87 archaeal genomes available in the RefSeq database. The pipeline employs curated seed alignments of r-proteins to run position-specific scoring matrix (PSSM)-based BLAST searches against six-frame genome translations, mitigating possible gene annotation errors. As a result of this analysis, we performed a census of prokaryotic r-protein complements, enumerated missing and paralogous r-proteins, and analyzed the distributions of ribosomal protein genes among chromosomal partitions. Phyletic patterns of bacterial and archaeal r-protein genes were mapped to phylogenetic trees reconstructed from concatenated alignments of r-proteins to reveal the history of likely multiple independent gains and losses. These alignments, available for download, can be used as search profiles to improve genome annotation of r-proteins and for further comparative genomics studies. PMID:22615861

  13. A Ribosome Flow Model for Analyzing Translation Elongation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reuveni, Shlomi; Meilijson, Isaac; Kupiec, Martin; Ruppin, Eytan; Tuller, Tamir

    We describe the first genome wide analysis of translation based on a model aimed at capturing the physical and dynamical aspects of this process. The Ribosomal Flow Model (RFM) is a computationally efficient approximation of the Totally Asymmetric Exclusion Process (TASEP) model (e.g. see [1]). The RFM is sensitive to the order of codons in the coding sequence, the tRNA pool of the organism, interactions between ribosomes and their size (see Figure [1]). The RFM predicts fundamental outcomes of the translation process, including translation rates, protein abundance and ribosomal densities [2] and the relation between all these variables, better than alternative ('non-physical') approaches (e.g. see [3,4]). In addition, we show that the RFM model can be used for accurate inference of initiation rates, the effect of codon order on protein abundance and the cost of translation. All these variables could not be inferred by previous predictors.

  14. Architecture of the 90S Pre-ribosome: A Structural View on the Birth of the Eukaryotic Ribosome.

    PubMed

    Kornprobst, Markus; Turk, Martin; Kellner, Nikola; Cheng, Jingdong; Flemming, Dirk; Koš-Braun, Isabelle; Koš, Martin; Thoms, Matthias; Berninghausen, Otto; Beckmann, Roland; Hurt, Ed

    2016-07-14

    The 90S pre-ribosome is an early biogenesis intermediate formed during co-transcriptional ribosome formation, composed of ∼70 assembly factors and several small nucleolar RNAs (snoRNAs) that associate with nascent pre-rRNA. We report the cryo-EM structure of the Chaetomium thermophilum 90S pre-ribosome, revealing how a network of biogenesis factors including 19 β-propellers and large α-solenoid proteins engulfs the pre-rRNA. Within the 90S pre-ribosome, we identify the UTP-A, UTP-B, Mpp10-Imp3-Imp4, Bms1-Rcl1, and U3 snoRNP modules, which are organized around 5'-ETS and partially folded 18S rRNA. The U3 snoRNP is strategically positioned at the center of the 90S particle to perform its multiple tasks during pre-rRNA folding and processing. The architecture of the elusive 90S pre-ribosome gives unprecedented structural insight into the early steps of pre-rRNA maturation. Nascent rRNA that is co-transcriptionally folded and given a particular shape by encapsulation within a dedicated mold-like structure is reminiscent of how polypeptides use chaperone chambers for their protein folding.

  15. Potent, Reversible, and Specific Chemical Inhibitors of Eukaryotic Ribosome Biogenesis.

    PubMed

    Kawashima, Shigehiro A; Chen, Zhen; Aoi, Yuki; Patgiri, Anupam; Kobayashi, Yuki; Nurse, Paul; Kapoor, Tarun M

    2016-10-01

    All cellular proteins are synthesized by ribosomes, whose biogenesis in eukaryotes is a complex multi-step process completed within minutes. Several chemical inhibitors of ribosome function are available and used as tools or drugs. By contrast, we lack potent validated chemical probes to analyze the dynamics of eukaryotic ribosome assembly. Here, we combine chemical and genetic approaches to discover ribozinoindoles (or Rbins), potent and reversible triazinoindole-based inhibitors of eukaryotic ribosome biogenesis. Analyses of Rbin sensitivity and resistance conferring mutations in fission yeast, along with biochemical assays with recombinant proteins, provide evidence that Rbins' physiological target is Midasin, an essential ∼540-kDa AAA+ (ATPases associated with diverse cellular activities) protein. Using Rbins to acutely inhibit or activate Midasin function, in parallel experiments with inhibitor-sensitive or inhibitor-resistant cells, we uncover Midasin's role in assembling Nsa1 particles, nucleolar precursors of the 60S subunit. Together, our findings demonstrate that Rbins are powerful probes for eukaryotic ribosome assembly.

  16. Yeast Ribosomal Stalk Heterogeneity In Vivo Shown by Two-Photon FCS and Molecular Brightness Analysis

    PubMed Central

    García-Marcos, Alberto; Sánchez, Susana A.; Parada, Pilar; Eid, John; Jameson, David M.; Remacha, Miguel; Gratton, Enrico; Ballesta, Juan P. G.

    2008-01-01

    The stalk of Saccharomyces cerevisiae ribosomes contains, on average, five distinct proteins, namely P0 and four acidic proteins, P1α, P1β, P2α, and P2β. Each ribosome contains only one copy of P0, but the distribution of the acidic proteins among the ribosome population in vivo has not been determined. Using two-photon fluorescence correlation spectroscopy and scanning FCS, on cells expressing EGFP-tagged P0, P1, and P2 proteins, we show, with brightness analysis, that individual yeast ribosomes in vivo are compositionally heterogeneous in regard to P1α, P1β, P2α, and P2β. These results are relevant to the hypothesis, based on in vitro studies, that the overall cellular pattern of expressed proteins can be determined by the distribution of the stalk proteins among the ribosome population. PMID:18096629

  17. Clinical and neurocognitive characterization of a family with a novel MED12 gene frameshift mutation.

    PubMed

    Lesca, Gaetan; Moizard, Marie-Pierre; Bussy, Gerald; Boggio, Dominique; Hu, Hao; Haas, Stefan A; Ropers, Hans-Hilger; Kalscheuer, Vera M; Des Portes, Vincent; Labalme, Audrey; Sanlaville, Damien; Edery, Patrick; Raynaud, Martine; Lespinasse, James

    2013-12-01

    FG syndrome, Lujan syndrome, and Ohdo syndrome, the Maat-Kievit-Brunner type, have been described as distinct syndromes with overlapping non-specific features and different missense mutations of the MED12 gene have been reported in all of them. We report a family including 10 males and 1 female affected with profound non-specific intellectual disability (ID) which was linked to a 30-cM region extending from Xp11.21 (ALAS2) to Xq22.3 (COL4A5). Parallel sequencing of all X-chromosome exons identified a frameshift mutation (c.5898dupC) of MED12. Mutated mRNA was not affected by non-sense mediated RNA decay and induced an additional abnormal isoform due to activation of cryptic splice-sites in exon 41. Dysmorphic features common to most affected males were long narrow face, high forehead, flat malar area, high nasal bridge, and short philtrum. Language was absent or very limited. Most patients had a friendly personality. Cognitive impairment, varying from borderline to profound ID was similarly observed in seven heterozygous females. There was no correlation between cognitive function and X-chromosome inactivation profiles in blood cells. The severe degree of ID in male patients, as well as variable cognitive impairment in heterozygous females suggests that the duplication observed in the present family may have a more severe effect on MED12 function than missense mutations. In a cognitively impaired male from this family, who also presented with tall stature and dysmorphism and did not have the MED12 mutation, a 600-kb duplication at 17p13.3 including the YWHAE gene, was found in a mosaic state.

  18. Neutron scattering in the ribosome structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Serdyuk, Igor N.

    1997-02-01

    Thermal neutron scattering has become a powerful instrument for studying the ribosome and its components. The application of neutron scattering allowed to establish some principal features of the ribosome structure: non-homogeneous distribution of the RNA and protein within ribosomal particles, the RNA role as a framework in the arrangement and maintenance of the structure of ribosomal particles, and the globular character of ribosomal proteins. The use of selective deuteration of separate ribosomal proteins in combination with the triangulation method revealed mutual spatial arrangement (the 3D-map) of all the ribosomal proteins within the small particle and in the most part of the large ribosomal particle. An essential impact has been made in the structural studies of ribosomes with the development of novel experimental approaches: triple isotopic substitution and spin contrast variation. These approaches with direct interpretation of spherical harmonics provide new possibilities for constructing models of ribosomal particles, opening principally new perspectives for joint use of X-ray synchrotron diffraction in crystals and small-angle neutron scattering in solution.

  19. Luteolin is a novel p90 ribosomal S6 kinase (RSK) inhibitor that suppresses Notch4 signaling by blocking the activation of Y-box binding protein-1 (YB-1).

    PubMed

    Reipas, Kristen M; Law, Jennifer H; Couto, Nicole; Islam, Sumaiya; Li, Yvonne; Li, Huifang; Cherkasov, Artem; Jung, Karen; Cheema, Amarpal S; Jones, Steven J M; Hassell, John A; Dunn, Sandra E

    2013-02-01

    Triple-negative breast cancers (TNBC) are notoriously difficult to treat because they lack hormone receptors and have limited targeted therapies. Recently, we demonstrated that p90 ribosomal S6 kinase (RSK) is essential for TNBC growth and survival indicating it as a target for therapeutic development. RSK phosphorylates Y-box binding protein-1 (YB-1), an oncogenic transcription/translation factor, highly expressed in TNBC (~70% of cases) and associated with poor prognosis, drug resistance and tumor initiation. YB-1 regulates the tumor-initiating cell markers, CD44 and CD49f however its role in Notch signaling has not been explored. We sought to identify novel chemical entities with RSK inhibitory activity. The Prestwick Chemical Library of 1120 off-patent drugs was screened for RSK inhibitors using both in vitro kinase assays and molecular docking. The lead candidate, luteolin, inhibited RSK1 and RSK2 kinase activity and suppressed growth in TNBC, including TIC-enriched populations. Combining luteolin with paclitaxel increased cell death and unlike chemotherapy alone, did not enrich for CD44(+) cells. Luteolin's efficacy against drug-resistant cells was further indicated in the primary x43 cell line, where it suppressed monolayer growth and mammosphere formation. We next endeavored to understand how the inhibition of RSK/YB-1 signaling by luteolin elicited an effect on TIC-enriched populations. ChIP-on-ChIP experiments in SUM149 cells revealed a 12-fold enrichment of YB-1 binding to the Notch4 promoter. We chose to pursue this because there are several reports indicating that Notch4 maintains cells in an undifferentiated, TIC state. Herein we report that silencing YB-1 with siRNA decreased Notch4 mRNA. Conversely, transient expression of Flag:YB-1(WT) or the constitutively active mutant Flag:YB-1(D102) increased Notch4 mRNA. The levels of Notch4 transcript and the abundance of the Notch4 intracellular domain (N4ICD) correlated with activation of P-RSK(S221/7) and

  20. Sites of synthesis of chloroplast ribosomal proteins in Chlamydomonas

    PubMed Central

    1983-01-01

    Cells of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii were pulse-labeled in vivo in the presence of inhibitors of cytoplasmic (anisomycin) or chloroplast (lincomycin) protein synthesis to ascertain the sites of synthesis of chloroplast ribosomal proteins. Fluorographs of the labeled proteins, resolved on two-dimensional (2-D) charge/SDS and one-dimensional (1-D) SDS-urea gradient gels, demonstrated that five to six of the large subunit proteins are products of chloroplast protein synthesis while 26 to 27 of the large subunit proteins are synthesized on cytoplasmic ribosomes. Similarly, 14 of 31 small subunit proteins are products of chloroplast protein synthesis, while the remainder are synthesized in the cytoplasm. The 20 ribosomal proteins shown to be made in the chloroplast of Chlamydomonas more than double the number of proteins known to be synthesized in the chloroplast of this alga. PMID:6841455

  1. Loss-of-function mutations in the RNA biogenesis factor NAF1 predispose to pulmonary fibrosis-emphysema.

    PubMed

    Stanley, Susan E; Gable, Dustin L; Wagner, Christa L; Carlile, Thomas M; Hanumanthu, Vidya Sagar; Podlevsky, Joshua D; Khalil, Sara E; DeZern, Amy E; Rojas-Duran, Maria F; Applegate, Carolyn D; Alder, Jonathan K; Parry, Erin M; Gilbert, Wendy V; Armanios, Mary

    2016-08-10

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and pulmonary fibrosis have been hypothesized to represent premature aging phenotypes. At times, they cluster in families, but the genetic basis is not understood. We identified rare, frameshift mutations in the gene for nuclear assembly factor 1, NAF1, a box H/ACA RNA biogenesis factor, in pulmonary fibrosis-emphysema patients. The mutations segregated with short telomere length, low telomerase RNA levels, and extrapulmonary manifestations including myelodysplastic syndrome and liver disease. A truncated NAF1 was detected in cells derived from patients, and, in cells in which the frameshift mutation was introduced by genome editing, telomerase RNA levels were reduced. The mutant NAF1 lacked a conserved carboxyl-terminal motif, which we show is required for nuclear localization. To understand the disease mechanism, we used CRISPR (clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats)/Cas9 (CRISPR-associated protein-9 nuclease) to generate Naf1(+/-) mice and found that they had half the levels of telomerase RNA. Other box H/ACA RNA levels were also decreased, but rRNA pseudouridylation, which is guided by snoRNAs, was intact. Moreover, first-generation Naf1(+/-) mice showed no evidence of ribosomal pathology. Our data indicate that disease in NAF1 mutation carriers is telomere-mediated; they show that NAF1 haploinsufficiency selectively disturbs telomere length homeostasis by decreasing the levels of telomerase RNA while sparing rRNA pseudouridylation. PMID:27510903

  2. A frameshift mutation in the cubilin gene (CUBN) in Border Collies with Imerslund-Gräsbeck syndrome (selective cobalamin malabsorption).

    PubMed

    Owczarek-Lipska, Marta; Jagannathan, Vidhya; Drögemüller, Cord; Lutz, Sabina; Glanemann, Barbara; Leeb, Tosso; Kook, Peter H

    2013-01-01

    Imerslund-Gräsbeck syndrome (IGS) or selective cobalamin malabsorption has been described in humans and dogs. IGS occurs in Border Collies and is inherited as a monogenic autosomal recessive trait in this breed. Using 7 IGS cases and 7 non-affected controls we mapped the causative mutation by genome-wide association and homozygosity mapping to a 3.53 Mb interval on chromosome 2. We re-sequenced the genome of one affected dog at ∼10× coverage and detected 17 non-synonymous variants in the critical interval. Two of these non-synonymous variants were in the cubilin gene (CUBN), which is known to play an essential role in cobalamin uptake from the ileum. We tested these two CUBN variants for association with IGS in larger cohorts of dogs and found that only one of them was perfectly associated with the phenotype. This variant, a single base pair deletion (c.8392delC), is predicted to cause a frameshift and premature stop codon in the CUBN gene. The resulting mutant open reading frame is 821 codons shorter than the wildtype open reading frame (p.Q2798Rfs*3). Interestingly, we observed an additional nonsense mutation in the MRC1 gene encoding the mannose receptor, C type 1, which was in perfect linkage disequilibrium with the CUBN frameshift mutation. Based on our genetic data and the known role of CUBN for cobalamin uptake we conclude that the identified CUBN frameshift mutation is most likely causative for IGS in Border Collies.

  3. Ribosome-associated protein quality control

    PubMed Central

    Brandman, Onn; Hegde, Ramanujan S

    2016-01-01

    Protein synthesis by the ribosome can fail for numerous reasons including faulty mRNA, insufficient availability of charged tRNAs and genetic errors. All organisms have evolved mechanisms to recognize stalled ribosomes and initiate pathways for recycling, quality control and stress signaling. Here we review the discovery and molecular dissection of the eukaryotic ribosome-associated quality-control pathway for degradation of nascent polypeptides arising from interrupted translation. PMID:26733220

  4. Seeing is Believing in Ribosome Assembly.

    PubMed

    Warner, Jonathan R

    2016-07-14

    Many proteins have been implicated genetically and biochemically in the assembly of eukaryotic ribosomes. Now, Kornprobst et al. show us how they are put together with a cryoEM structure of the 90S processome that initiates ribosome assembly, revealing the arrangement of U3 RNA and the several UTP complexes that form a chaperone-like structure around and within the developing 40S ribosomal subunit. PMID:27419867

  5. Mechanisms of Spontaneous and Induced Frameshift Mutation in Bacteriophage T4

    PubMed Central

    Streisinger, George; Owen, Joyce Emrich

    1985-01-01

    Frequencies of spontaneous and proflavine-induced frameshift mutations increase dramatically as a function of the number of reiterated base pairs at each of two sites in the lysozyme gene of bacteriophage T4. At each site, proflavine induces addition mutations more frequently than deletion mutations. We confirm that the steroidal diamine, irehdiamine A, induces frameshift addition mutations. At sites of reiterated bases, we propose that base pairing is misaligned adjacent to a gap. The misaligned configuration is stabilized by the stacking of mutagen molecules around the extrahelical base, forming a sandwich. Proflavine induces addition mutations efficiently at a site without any reiterated bases. Mutagenesis at such sites may be due to mutagen-induced stuttering of the replication complex. PMID:3988038

  6. The nucleolus and transcription of ribosomal genes.

    PubMed

    Raska, Ivan; Koberna, Karel; Malínský, Jan; Fidlerová, Helena; Masata, Martin

    2004-10-01

    Ribosome biogenesis is a highly dynamic, steady-state nucleolar process that involves synthesis and maturation of rRNA, its transient interactions with non-ribosomal proteins and RNPs and assembly with ribosomal proteins. In the few years of the 21st century, an exciting progress in the molecular understanding of rRNA and ribosome biogenesis has taken place. In this review, we discuss the recent results on the regulation of rRNA synthesis in relation to the functional organization of the nucleolus, and put an emphasis on the situation encountered in mammalian somatic cells.

  7. Scattering studies on ribosomes in solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramakrishnan, V.

    1986-02-01

    Ribosomes are organelles that play a central role in protein synthesis. They are complexes of protein and nucleic acid, and can be analysed as two-component systems by neutron scattering. Moreover, ribosomes can be biochemically prepared that have specific proteins deuterated. Both these properties have been exploited to study the structure of the ribosome by neutron scattering. This article reviews the studies carried out on the small ribosomal subunit, and describes a recent study that has resolved a conflict between the results of two classes of experiments.

  8. Ribosome biogenesis in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Woolford, John L; Baserga, Susan J

    2013-11-01

    Ribosomes are highly conserved ribonucleoprotein nanomachines that translate information in the genome to create the proteome in all cells. In yeast these complex particles contain four RNAs (>5400 nucleotides) and 79 different proteins. During the past 25 years, studies in yeast have led the way to understanding how these molecules are assembled into ribosomes in vivo. Assembly begins with transcription of ribosomal RNA in the nucleolus, where the RNA then undergoes complex pathways of folding, coupled with nucleotide modification, removal of spacer sequences, and binding to ribosomal proteins. More than 200 assembly factors and 76 small nucleolar RNAs transiently associate with assembling ribosomes, to enable their accurate and efficient construction. Following export of preribosomes from the nucleus to the cytoplasm, they undergo final stages of maturation before entering the pool of functioning ribosomes. Elaborate mechanisms exist to monitor the formation of correct structural and functional neighborhoods within ribosomes and to destroy preribosomes that fail to assemble properly. Studies of yeast ribosome biogenesis provide useful models for ribosomopathies, diseases in humans that result from failure to properly assemble ribosomes. PMID:24190922

  9. Oligosaccharyltransferase directly binds to ribosome at a location near the translocon-binding site

    SciTech Connect

    Harada, Y.; Li, H.; Li, Hua; Lennarz, W. J.

    2009-04-28

    Oligosaccharyltransferase (OT) transfers high mannose-type glycans to the nascent polypeptides that are translated by the membrane-bound ribosome and translocated into the lumen of the endoplasmic reticulum through the Sec61 translocon complex. In this article, we show that purified ribosomes and OT can form a binary complex with a stoichiometry of {approx}1 to 1 in the presence of detergent. We present evidence that OT may bind to the large ribosomal subunit near the site where nascent polypeptides exit. We further show that OT and the Sec61 complex can simultaneously bind to ribosomes in vitro. Based on existing data and our findings, we propose that cotranslational translocation and N-glycosylation of nascent polypeptides are mediated by a ternary supramolecular complex consisting of OT, the Sec61 complex, and ribosomes.

  10. The ribosome-associated complex antagonizes prion formation in yeast.

    PubMed

    Amor, Alvaro J; Castanzo, Dominic T; Delany, Sean P; Selechnik, Daniel M; van Ooy, Alex; Cameron, Dale M

    2015-01-01

    The number of known fungal proteins capable of switching between alternative stable conformations is steadily increasing, suggesting that a prion-like mechanism may be broadly utilized as a means to propagate altered cellular states. To gain insight into the mechanisms by which cells regulate prion formation and toxicity we examined the role of the yeast ribosome-associated complex (RAC) in modulating both the formation of the [PSI(+)] prion - an alternative conformer of Sup35 protein - and the toxicity of aggregation-prone polypeptides. The Hsp40 RAC chaperone Zuo1 anchors the RAC to ribosomes and stimulates the ATPase activity of the Hsp70 chaperone Ssb. We found that cells lacking Zuo1 are sensitive to over-expression of some aggregation-prone proteins, including the Sup35 prion domain, suggesting that co-translational protein misfolding increases in Δzuo1 strains. Consistent with this finding, Δzuo1 cells exhibit higher frequencies of spontaneous and induced prion formation. Cells expressing mutant forms of Zuo1 lacking either a C-terminal charged region required for ribosome association, or the J-domain responsible for Ssb ATPase stimulation, exhibit similarly high frequencies of prion formation. Our findings are consistent with a role for the RAC in chaperoning nascent Sup35 to regulate folding of the N-terminal prion domain as it emerges from the ribosome.

  11. Molecular mechanisms of ribosomal protein gene coregulation

    PubMed Central

    Reja, Rohit; Vinayachandran, Vinesh; Ghosh, Sujana; Pugh, B. Franklin

    2015-01-01

    The 137 ribosomal protein genes (RPGs) of Saccharomyces provide a model for gene coregulation. We examined the positional and functional organization of their regulators (Rap1 [repressor activator protein 1], Fhl1, Ifh1, Sfp1, and Hmo1), the transcription machinery (TFIIB, TFIID, and RNA polymerase II), and chromatin at near-base-pair resolution using ChIP-exo, as RPGs are coordinately reprogrammed. Where Hmo1 is enriched, Fhl1, Ifh1, Sfp1, and Hmo1 cross-linked broadly to promoter DNA in an RPG-specific manner and demarcated by general minor groove widening. Importantly, Hmo1 extended 20–50 base pairs (bp) downstream from Fhl1. Upon RPG repression, Fhl1 remained in place. Hmo1 dissociated, which was coupled to an upstream shift of the +1 nucleosome, as reflected by the Hmo1 extension and core promoter region. Fhl1 and Hmo1 may create two regulatable and positionally distinct barriers, against which chromatin remodelers position the +1 nucleosome into either an activating or a repressive state. Consistent with in vitro studies, we found that specific TFIID subunits, in addition to cross-linking at the core promoter, made precise cross-links at Rap1 sites, which we interpret to reflect native Rap1–TFIID interactions. Our findings suggest how sequence-specific DNA binding regulates nucleosome positioning and transcription complex assembly >300 bp away and how coregulation coevolved with coding sequences. PMID:26385964

  12. Pseudo-polyprotein translated from the full-length ORF1 of capillovirus is important for pathogenicity, but a truncated ORF1 protein without variable and CP regions is sufficient for replication.

    PubMed

    Hirata, Hisae; Yamaji, Yasuyuki; Komatsu, Ken; Kagiwada, Satoshi; Oshima, Kenro; Okano, Yukari; Takahashi, Shuichiro; Ugaki, Masashi; Namba, Shigetou

    2010-09-01

    The first open-reading frame (ORF) of the genus Capillovirus encodes an apparently chimeric polyprotein containing conserved regions for replicase (Rep) and coat protein (CP), while other viruses in the family Flexiviridae have separate ORFs encoding these proteins. To investigate the role of the full-length ORF1 polyprotein of capillovirus, we generated truncation mutants of ORF1 of apple stem grooving virus by inserting a termination codon into the variable region located between the putative Rep- and CP-coding regions. These mutants were capable of systemic infection, although their pathogenicity was attenuated. In vitro translation of ORF1 produced both the full-length polyprotein and the smaller Rep protein. The results of in vivo reporter assays suggested that the mechanism of this early termination is a ribosomal -1 frame-shift occurring downstream from the conserved Rep domains. The mechanism of capillovirus gene expression and the very close evolutionary relationship between the genera Capillovirus and Trichovirus are discussed.

  13. Ribosome-Inactivating and Related Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Schrot, Joachim; Weng, Alexander; Melzig, Matthias F.

    2015-01-01

    Ribosome-inactivating proteins (RIPs) are toxins that act as N-glycosidases (EC 3.2.2.22). They are mainly produced by plants and classified as type 1 RIPs and type 2 RIPs. There are also RIPs and RIP related proteins that cannot be grouped into the classical type 1 and type 2 RIPs because of their different sizes, structures or functions. In addition, there is still not a uniform nomenclature or classification existing for RIPs. In this review, we give the current status of all known plant RIPs and we make a suggestion about how to unify those RIPs and RIP related proteins that cannot be classified as type 1 or type 2 RIPs. PMID:26008228

  14. SERPINB11 Frameshift Variant Associated with Novel Hoof Specific Phenotype in Connemara Ponies

    PubMed Central

    Young, Amy; Affolter, Verena; Joshi, Nikhil A.; Ramsay, Sheila; Bannasch, Danika L.

    2015-01-01

    Horses belong to the order Perissodactyla and bear the majority of their weight on their third toe; therefore, tremendous force is applied to each hoof. An inherited disease characterized by a phenotype restricted to the dorsal hoof wall was identified in the Connemara pony. Hoof wall separation disease (HWSD) manifests clinically as separation of the dorsal hoof wall along the weight-bearing surface of the hoof during the first year of life. Parents of affected ponies appeared clinically normal, suggesting an autosomal recessive mode of inheritance. A case-control allelic genome wide association analysis was performed (ncases = 15, ncontrols = 24). Population stratification (λ = 1.48) was successfully improved by removing outliers (ncontrols = 7) identified on a multidimensional scaling plot. A genome-wide significant association was detected on chromosome 8 (praw = 1.37x10-10, pgenome = 1.92x10-5). A homozygous region identified in affected ponies spanned from 79,936,024-81,676,900 bp and contained a family of 13 annotated SERPINB genes. Whole genome next-generation sequencing at 6x coverage of two cases and two controls revealed 9,758 SNVs and 1,230 indels within the ~1.7-Mb haplotype, of which 17 and 5, respectively, segregated with the disease and were located within or adjacent to genes. Additional genotyping of these 22 putative functional variants in 369 Connemara ponies (ncases = 23, ncontrols = 346) and 169 horses of other breeds revealed segregation of three putative variants adjacent or within four SERPIN genes. Two of the variants were non-coding and one was an insertion within SERPINB11 that introduced a frameshift resulting in a premature stop codon. Evaluation of mRNA levels at the proximal hoof capsule (ncases = 4, ncontrols = 4) revealed that SERPINB11 expression was significantly reduced in affected ponies (p<0.001). Carrier frequency was estimated at 14.8%. This study describes the first genetic variant associated with a hoof wall specific

  15. Mutations Outside the Anisomycin-Binding Site Can Make Ribosomes Drug-Resistant

    SciTech Connect

    Blaha,G.; Gurel, G.; Schroeder, S.; Moore, P.; Steitz, T.

    2008-01-01

    Eleven mutations that make Haloarcula marismortui resistant to anisomycin, an antibiotic that competes with the amino acid side chains of aminoacyl tRNAs for binding to the A-site cleft of the large ribosomal unit, have been identified in 23S rRNA. The correlation observed between the sensitivity of H. marismortui to anisomycin and the affinity of its large ribosomal subunits for the drug indicates that its response to anisomycin is determined primarily by the binding of the drug to its large ribosomal subunit. The structures of large ribosomal subunits containing resistance mutations show that these mutations can be divided into two classes: (1) those that interfere with specific drug-ribosome interactions and (2) those that stabilize the apo conformation of the A-site cleft of the ribosome relative to its drug-bound conformation. The conformational effects of some mutations of the second kind propagate through the ribosome for considerable distances and are reversed when A-site substrates bind to the ribosome.

  16. The structure of the eukaryotic ribosome at 3.0 Å resolution.

    PubMed

    Ben-Shem, Adam; Garreau de Loubresse, Nicolas; Melnikov, Sergey; Jenner, Lasse; Yusupova, Gulnara; Yusupov, Marat

    2011-12-16

    Ribosomes translate genetic information encoded by messenger RNA into proteins. Many aspects of translation and its regulation are specific to eukaryotes, whose ribosomes are much larger and intricate than their bacterial counterparts. We report the crystal structure of the 80S ribosome from the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae--including nearly all ribosomal RNA bases and protein side chains as well as an additional protein, Stm1--at a resolution of 3.0 angstroms. This atomic model reveals the architecture of eukaryote-specific elements and their interaction with the universally conserved core, and describes all eukaryote-specific bridges between the two ribosomal subunits. It forms the structural framework for the design and analysis of experiments that explore the eukaryotic translation apparatus and the evolutionary forces that shaped it.

  17. A novel Drosophila Minute locus ribosomal protein S13

    SciTech Connect

    Saeboe-Larssen, S.; Lambertsson, A.

    1996-06-01

    Minutes comprise >50 phenotypically similar Drosophila mutations believed to affect ribosomal protein genes. Common traits of the Minute phenotype are short and thin bristles, slow development, and recessive lethality. To further investigate the proposed Minute to ribosomal protein correspondence, loss-of-function Minute mutations were induced by P-element mutagenesis. Here, we report a previously undescribed Minute locus that maps to 32A on chromosome 2L; this Minute allele is named P(lacW)M(2)32A{sup 1} and the gene M(2)32A. Flies heterozygous for P(lacW)M(2)32A{sup 1} have a medium Minute phenotype. The gene interrupted by the P-element insertion was cloned. Sequence analyses revealed that it encodes the Drosophila homologue of eukaryotic ribosomal protein S13. It is a single-copy gene and the level of RPS13 transcript is reduced to {approximately}50% in P(lacW)M(2)32A{sup 1} heterozygotes. Both transcript level and phenotype are restored to wild type by remobilizing the P element, demonstrating that the mutation is caused by insertion of the P-element construct. These results further strengthen the notion that Minutes encode ribosomal proteins and demonstrate the P-element mutagenesis is a fruitful approach to use in these studies. 47 refs., 7 figs.

  18. Evolution of the ribosome at atomic resolution

    PubMed Central

    Petrov, Anton S.; Bernier, Chad R.; Hsiao, Chiaolong; Norris, Ashlyn M.; Kovacs, Nicholas A.; Waterbury, Chris C.; Stepanov, Victor G.; Harvey, Stephen C.; Fox, George E.; Wartell, Roger M.; Hud, Nicholas V.; Williams, Loren Dean

    2014-01-01

    The origins and evolution of the ribosome, 3–4 billion years ago, remain imprinted in the biochemistry of extant life and in the structure of the ribosome. Processes of ribosomal RNA (rRNA) expansion can be “observed” by comparing 3D rRNA structures of bacteria (small), yeast (medium), and metazoans (large). rRNA size correlates well with species complexity. Differences in ribosomes across species reveal that rRNA expansion segments have been added to rRNAs without perturbing the preexisting core. Here we show that rRNA growth occurs by a limited number of processes that include inserting a branch helix onto a preexisting trunk helix and elongation of a helix. rRNA expansions can leave distinctive atomic resolution fingerprints, which we call “insertion fingerprints.” Observation of insertion fingerprints in the ribosomal common core allows identification of probable ancestral expansion segments. Conceptually reversing these expansions allows extrapolation backward in time to generate models of primordial ribosomes. The approach presented here provides insight to the structure of pre-last universal common ancestor rRNAs and the subsequent expansions that shaped the peptidyl transferase center and the conserved core. We infer distinct phases of ribosomal evolution through which ribosomal particles evolve, acquiring coding and translocation, and extending and elaborating the exit tunnel. PMID:24982194

  19. Transcriptional frameshifting rescues Citrobacter rodentium type VI secretion by the production of two length variants from the prematurely interrupted tssM gene.

    PubMed

    Gueguen, Erwan; Wills, Norma M; Atkins, John F; Cascales, Eric

    2014-12-01

    The Type VI secretion system (T6SS) mediates toxin delivery into both eukaryotic and prokaryotic cells. It is composed of a cytoplasmic structure resembling the tail of contractile bacteriophages anchored to the cell envelope through a membrane complex composed of the TssL and TssM inner membrane proteins and of the TssJ outer membrane lipoprotein. The C-terminal domain of TssM is required for its interaction with TssJ, and for the function of the T6SS. In Citrobacter rodentium, the tssM1 gene does not encode the C-terminal domain. However, the stop codon is preceded by a run of 11 consecutive adenosines. In this study, we demonstrate that this poly-A tract is a transcriptional slippery site that induces the incorporation of additional adenosines, leading to frameshifting, and hence the production of two TssM1 variants, including a full-length canonical protein. We show that both forms of TssM1, and the ratio between these two forms, are required for the function of the T6SS in C. rodentium. Finally, we demonstrate that the tssM gene associated with the Yersinia pseudotuberculosis T6SS-3 gene cluster is also subjected to transcriptional frameshifting.

  20. Differential Stoichiometry among Core Ribosomal Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Slavov, Nikolai; Semrau, Stefan; Airoldi, Edoardo; Budnik, Bogdan; van Oudenaarden, Alexander

    2015-01-01

    Summary Understanding the regulation and structure of ribosomes is essential to understanding protein synthesis and its dysregulation in disease. While ribosomes are believed to have a fixed stoichiometry among their core ribosomal proteins (RPs), some experiments suggest a more variable composition. Testing such variability requires direct and precise quantification of RPs. We used mass spectrometry to directly quantify RPs across monosomes and polysomes of mouse embryonic stem cells (ESC) and budding yeast. Our data show that the stoichiometry among core RPs in wild-type yeast cells and ESC depends both on the growth conditions and on the number of ribosomes bound per mRNA. Furthermore, we find that the fitness of cells with a deleted RP-gene is inversely proportional to the enrichment of the corresponding RP in polysomes. Together, our findings support the existence of ribosomes with distinct protein composition and physiological function. PMID:26565899