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Sample records for 1,2,3-trihydroxybenzene

  1. Structure-reactivity relationships of flavan-3-ols on product generation in aqueous glucose/glycine model systems.

    PubMed

    Noda, Yuko; Peterson, Devin G

    2007-05-02

    Ring structure-reactivity relationships of three flavan-3-ols [epicatechin (EC), epicatechin gallate (ECG), and epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG)] and three simple phenolic compounds (1,3,5-trihydroxybenzene, 1,2,3-trihydroxybenzene, and methylgallate as the analogous individual A, B, and C benzene rings of EGCG) on product generation in an aqueous glucose-glycine reaction model system (125 degrees C and 30 min) were investigated. The addition of EC, ECG, or EGCG to a glucose-glycine model was reported to similarly significantly reduce the formation of pyrazine, methyl-substituted pyrazines, and cyclotene. All three flavan-3-ols were also reported to generate phenolic-C2, C3, C4, and C6 sugar fragment adducts and to statistically reduce the concentration of glyoxal, glycolaldehyde, methylglyoxal, hydroxyacetone, diacetyl, acetoin, and 3-deoxyglucosone during the reaction time course, except for the EGCG reaction where 3-deoxyglucosone was not statistically different from the control after 20 min. For the simple phenolic compounds, methylgallate followed by 1,2,3-trihydroxybenzene was the least reactive, while 1,3,5-trihydroxybenzene was reported as the most reactive phenolic structure for quenching or reducing the concentration of the alpha-hydroxy- and alpha-dicarbonyl sugar fragments during the reaction time course. These results imply that the main mechanism flavan-3-ols reduced product generation was phenolic-sugar fragment carbonyl trapping reactions primarily on the A ring (the meta-polyhydroxylated benzene ring) or not due to the alteration of the reaction reduction potential.

  2. The surface characterization of a series of hydroxybenzenes on Ag(111): An EELS and TDS study

    SciTech Connect

    Nielsen, B.S.

    1993-01-27

    Interaction of a series of hydroxybenzenes with Ag(111) is investigated by thermal desorption spectroscopy (TDS) and high resolution electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS). Studied were the mono-hydroxybenzene, phenol, the o-, m- and p-dihydroxybenzenes, catechol, resorcinol, hydroquinone, respectively, and the 1,2.3-trihydroxybenzene, pyrogallol. Dehydrogenation of the hydroxyl groups upon adsorption is not directly observed in the TDS studies: however, the EELS results suggest possible dehydrogenation. The apparent O-H bond scission is attributed to hydrogen bonding between the surface molecules or to the orientation of the O-H bond aids with respect to the metal surface. Orientations of the mono- and dihydroxybenzene molecules are temperature dependent, whereas that of the trihydroxybenzene may be attributed to the number and position of the hydroxyl substitutents. Phenol and catechol both undergo an inclined-to-perpendicular orientational change. Resorcinol and hydroquinone undergo a perpendicular-to-inclined transformation. Finally, pyrogallol remains inclined at all temperatures until decomposition.

  3. Identification of Pyrogallol in the Ethyl Acetate-Soluble Part of Coffee as the Main Contributor to Its Xanthine Oxidase Inhibitory Activity.

    PubMed

    Honda, Sari; Masuda, Toshiya

    2016-10-10

    In this study, ethyl acetate-soluble parts of hot-water extracts from roasted coffee beans were found to demonstrate potent xanthine oxidase (XO) inhibition. The XO inhibitory activities and chlorogenic lactone contents (chlorogenic lactones have previously been identified as XO inhibitors in roast coffee) were measured for ethyl acetate-soluble parts prepared from coffee beans roasted to three different degrees. Although chlorogenic lactone contents decreased with higher degrees of roasting, the XO inhibitory activity did not decrease. These data led us to investigate new potent inhibitors present in these ethyl acetate-soluble extracts. Repeated assay-guided purifications afforded a highly potent XO inhibitor, which was eluted before chlorogenic lactones via medium-pressure chromatography using an octadecylsilica gel column. The obtained inhibitor was identified as pyrogallol (1,2,3-trihydroxybenzene), which had an IC50 of 0.73 μmol L(-1), much stronger than that of other related polyphenolic compounds. Quantitative analysis of pyrogallol and chlorogenic lactones revealed that pyrogallol (at concentrations of 33.9 ± 4.2 nmol mL(-1) in light roast coffee and 39.4 ± 3.9 nmol mL(-1) in dark roast coffee) was the main XO inhibitor in hot-water extracts of roasted coffee beans (i.e., drinking coffee).

  4. Superoxide generated by pyrogallol reduces highly water-soluble tetrazolium salt to produce a soluble formazan: a simple assay for measuring superoxide anion radical scavenging activities of biological and abiological samples.

    PubMed

    Xu, Chen; Liu, Shu; Liu, Zhiqiang; Song, Fengrui; Liu, Shuying

    2013-09-02

    Superoxide anion radical (O2(˙-)) plays an important role in several human diseases. The xanthine/xanthine oxidase system is frequently utilized to produce O2(˙-). However, false positive results are easily got by using this system. The common spectrophotometric probes for O2(˙-) are nitroblue tetrazolium (NBT) and cytochrome c. Nevertheless, the application of NBT method is limited because of the water-insolubility of NBT formazan and the assay using cytochrome c lacks sensitivity and is not suitable for microplate measurement. We overcome these problems by using 1,2,3-trihydroxybenzene (pyrogallol) as O2(˙-)-generating system and a highly water-soluble tetrazolium salt, 2-(4-iodophenyl)-3-(4-nitrophenyl)-5-(2,4-disulfophenyl)-2H-tetrazolium sodium salt (WST-1) which can be reduced by superoxide anion radical to a stable water-soluble formazan with a high absorbance at 450 nm. The method is simple, rapid and sensitive. Moreover, it can be adapted to microplate format. In this study, the O2(˙-) scavenging activities of superoxide dismutase (SOD), L-ascorbic acid, N-acetyl-L-cysteine (NAC), albumin from human serum, flavonoids and herbal extracts were assessed by using this method. Meanwhile, the activities of tissue homogenates and serum were determined by using this validated method. This method, applicable to tissue homogenates, serum and herbal extracts, proved to be efficient for measuring O2(˙-) scavenging activities of biological and abiological samples.

  5. Adsorption and detection of some phenolic compounds by rice husk ash of Kenyan origin.

    PubMed

    Mbui, Damaris N; Shiundu, Paul M; Ndonye, Rachel M; Kamau, Geoffrey N

    2002-12-01

    Rice husk ash (RHA) obtained from a rice mill in Kenya has been used as an inexpensive and effective adsorbent (and reagent) for the removal (and detection) of some phenolic compounds in water. The abundantly available rice mill waste was used in dual laboratory-scale batch experiments to evaluate its potential in: (i) the removal of phenol, 1,3-dihydroxybenzene (resorcinol) and 2-chlorophenol from water; and (ii) the detection of 1,2-dihydroxybenzene (pyrocatechol) and 1,2,3-trihydroxybenzene (pyrogallol) present in an aqueous medium. The studies were conducted using synthetic water with different initial concentrations of the phenolic compounds. The effects of different operating conditions (such as contact time, concentration of the phenolic compounds, adsorbent quantity, temperature, and pH) were assessed by evaluating the phenolic compound removal efficiency as well as the extent of their color formation reactions (where applicable). RHA exhibits reasonable adsorption capacity for the phenolic compounds and follows both Langmuir and Freundlich isotherm models. Adsorption capacities of 1.53 x 10(-4), 8.07 x 10(-5), and 1.63 x 10(-6) mol g(-1) were determined for phenol, resorcinol and 2-chlorophenol, respectively. Nearly 100% adsorption of the phenolic compounds was possible and this depended on the weight of RHA employed. For the detection experiments, pyrocatechol and pyrogallol present in water formed coloured complexes with RHA, with the rate of colour formation increasing with temperature, weight of RHA, concentration of the phenolic compounds and sonication. This study has proven that RHA is a useful agricultural waste product for the removal and detection of some phenolic compounds.

  6. The Extent of Fermentative Transformation of Phenolic Compounds in the Bioanode Controls Exoelectrogenic Activity in a Microbial Electrolysis Cell

    DOE PAGES

    Zeng, Xiaofei; Collins, Maya; Borole, Abhijeet P.; ...

    2016-11-27

    Phenolic compounds in hydrolysate/pyrolysate and wastewater streams produced during the pretreatment of lignocellulosic biomass for biofuel production present a significant challenge in downstream processes. Bioelectrochemical systems are increasingly recognized as an alternative technology to handle biomass-derived streams and to promote water reuse in biofuel production. Thus, a thorough understanding of the fate of phenolic compounds in bioanodes is urgently needed. The present study investigated the biotransformation of three structurally similar phenolic compounds (syringic acid, SA; vanillic acid, VA; 4-hydroxybenzoic acid, HBA), and their individual contribution to exoelectrogenesis in a microbial electrolysis cell (MEC) bioanode. Fermentation of SA resulted in themore » highest exoelectrogenic activity among the three compounds tested, with 50% of the electron equivalents converted to current, compared to 12 and 9% for VA and HBA, respectively. The biotransformation of SA, VA and HBA was initiated by demethylation and decarboxylation reactions common to all three compounds, resulting in their corresponding hydroxylated analogs. SA was transformed to pyrogallol (1,2,3-trihydroxybenzene), whose aromatic ring was then cleaved via a phloroglucinol pathway, resulting in acetate production, which was then used in exoelectrogenesis. In contrast, more than 80% of VA and HBA was converted to catechol (1,2-dihydroxybenzene) and phenol (hydroxybenzene) as their respective dead-end products. The persistence of catechol and phenol is explained by the fact that the phloroglucinol pathway does not apply to di- or mono-hydroxylated benzenes. Previously reported, alternative ring-cleaving pathways were either absent in the bioanode microbial community or unfavorable due to high energy-demand reactions. With the exception of acetate oxidation, all biotransformation steps in the bioanode occurred via fermentation, independently of exoelectrogenesis. Therefore, the observed

  7. The extent of fermentative transformation of phenolic compounds in the bioanode controls exoelectrogenic activity in a microbial electrolysis cell.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Xiaofei; Collins, Maya A; Borole, Abhijeet P; Pavlostathis, Spyros G

    2017-02-01

    Phenolic compounds in hydrolysate/pyrolysate and wastewater streams produced during the pretreatment of lignocellulosic biomass for biofuel production present a significant challenge in downstream processes. Bioelectrochemical systems are increasingly recognized as an alternative technology to handle biomass-derived streams and to promote water reuse in biofuel production. Thus, a thorough understanding of the fate of phenolic compounds in bioanodes is urgently needed. The present study investigated the biotransformation of three structurally similar phenolic compounds (syringic acid, SA; vanillic acid, VA; 4-hydroxybenzoic acid, HBA), and their individual contribution to exoelectrogenesis in a microbial electrolysis cell (MEC) bioanode. Fermentation of SA resulted in the highest exoelectrogenic activity among the three compounds tested, with 50% of the electron equivalents converted to current, compared to 12 and 9% for VA and HBA, respectively. The biotransformation of SA, VA and HBA was initiated by demethylation and decarboxylation reactions common to all three compounds, resulting in their corresponding hydroxylated analogs. SA was transformed to pyrogallol (1,2,3-trihydroxybenzene), whose aromatic ring was then cleaved via a phloroglucinol pathway, resulting in acetate production, which was then used in exoelectrogenesis. In contrast, more than 80% of VA and HBA was converted to catechol (1,2-dihydroxybenzene) and phenol (hydroxybenzene) as their respective dead-end products. The persistence of catechol and phenol is explained by the fact that the phloroglucinol pathway does not apply to di- or mono-hydroxylated benzenes. Previously reported, alternative ring-cleaving pathways were either absent in the bioanode microbial community or unfavorable due to high energy-demand reactions. With the exception of acetate oxidation, all biotransformation steps in the bioanode occurred via fermentation, independently of exoelectrogenesis. Therefore, the observed

  8. The Extent of Fermentative Transformation of Phenolic Compounds in the Bioanode Controls Exoelectrogenic Activity in a Microbial Electrolysis Cell

    SciTech Connect

    Zeng, Xiaofei; Collins, Maya; Borole, Abhijeet P.; Pavlostathis, Spyros

    2016-11-27

    Phenolic compounds in hydrolysate/pyrolysate and wastewater streams produced during the pretreatment of lignocellulosic biomass for biofuel production present a significant challenge in downstream processes. Bioelectrochemical systems are increasingly recognized as an alternative technology to handle biomass-derived streams and to promote water reuse in biofuel production. Thus, a thorough understanding of the fate of phenolic compounds in bioanodes is urgently needed. The present study investigated the biotransformation of three structurally similar phenolic compounds (syringic acid, SA; vanillic acid, VA; 4-hydroxybenzoic acid, HBA), and their individual contribution to exoelectrogenesis in a microbial electrolysis cell (MEC) bioanode. Fermentation of SA resulted in the highest exoelectrogenic activity among the three compounds tested, with 50% of the electron equivalents converted to current, compared to 12 and 9% for VA and HBA, respectively. The biotransformation of SA, VA and HBA was initiated by demethylation and decarboxylation reactions common to all three compounds, resulting in their corresponding hydroxylated analogs. SA was transformed to pyrogallol (1,2,3-trihydroxybenzene), whose aromatic ring was then cleaved via a phloroglucinol pathway, resulting in acetate production, which was then used in exoelectrogenesis. In contrast, more than 80% of VA and HBA was converted to catechol (1,2-dihydroxybenzene) and phenol (hydroxybenzene) as their respective dead-end products. The persistence of catechol and phenol is explained by the fact that the phloroglucinol pathway does not apply to di- or mono-hydroxylated benzenes. Previously reported, alternative ring-cleaving pathways were either absent in the bioanode microbial community or unfavorable due to high energy-demand reactions. With the exception of acetate oxidation, all biotransformation steps in the bioanode occurred via fermentation, independently of exoelectrogenesis. Therefore, the observed