Science.gov

Sample records for 1-0 s1 line

  1. Simple Line Access Protocol Version 1.0

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osuna, Pedro; Salgado, Jesus; Guainazzi, Matteo; Barbarisi, Isa; Dubernet, Marie-Lise; Tody, Doug; Osuna, Pedro; Salgado, Jesus

    2010-12-01

    The Simple Line Access Protocol (SLAP) is an IVOA Data Access protocol which defines a protocol for retrieving spectral lines coming from various Spectral Line Data Collections through a uniform interface within the VO framework. These lines can be either observed or theoretical and will be typically used to identify emission or absorption features in astronomical spectra. It makes use of the Simple Spectral Line Data Model (SSLDM [1]) to characterize spectral lines through the use of uTypes [14]. Physical quantities of units are described by using the standard Units DM [15]. SLAP services can be registered in an IVOA Registry of Resources using the VOResource [12] Extension standard, having a unique ResourceIdentifier [13] in the Registry. The SLAP interface is meant to be reasonably simple to implement by service providers. A basic query will be done in a wavelength range for the different services. The service returns a list of spectral lines formatted as a VOTable. Thus, an implementation of the service may support additional search parameters (some which may be custom to that particular service) to more finely control the selection of spectral lines. The specification also describes how the search on extra parameters has to be done, making use of the support provided by the Simple Spectral Line Data Model (SSLDM [1])

  2. (12)CO (3-2) & (1-0) emission line observations of nearby starburst galaxy nuclei

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Devereux, Nicholas; Taniguchi, Yoshiaki; Sanders, D. B.; Nakai, N.; Young, J. S.

    1994-01-01

    New measurements of the (12)CO (1-0) and (12)CO (3-2) line emission are presented for the nuclei of seven nearby starburst galaxies selected from a complete sample of 21 nearby starburst galaxies for which the nuclear star formation rates are measured to be comparable to the archetype starburst galaxies M82 and NGC 253. The new observations capitalize on the coincidence between the beam size of the 45 m Nobeyama telescope at 115 GHz and that of the 15 m James Clerk Maxwell Telescope at 345 GHz to measure the value of the (12)CO (3-2)/(1-0) emission line ratio in a 15 sec (less than or equal to 2.5 kpc) diameter region centered on the nuclear starburst. In principle, the (12)CO (3-2)/(1-0) emission line ratio provides a measure of temperature and optical depth for the (12)CO gas. The error weighted mean value of the (12)CO (3-2)/(1-0) emission line ratio measured for the seven starburst galaxy nuclei is -0.64 +/- 0.06. The (12)CO (3-2)/(1-0) emission line ratio measured for the starburst galaxy nuclei is significantly higher than the average value measured for molecular gas in the disk of the Galaxy, implying warmer temperatures for the molecular gas in starburst galaxy nuclei. On the other hand, the (12)CO (3-2)/(1-0) emission line ratio measured for the starburst galaxy nuclei is not as high as would be expected if the molecular gas were hot, greater than 20 K, and optically thin, tau much less than 1. The total mass of molecular gas contained within the central 1.2-2.8 kpc diameter region of the starburst galaxy nuclei ranges from 10(exp 8) to 10(exp 9) solar mass. While substantial, the molecular gas mass represents only a small percentage, approximately 9%-16%, of the dynamical mass in the same region.

  3. Size Effect on Deformation Mode in Micron-Sized Ti-5Al Single Crystal Loaded Along [2 /line 1 /line 1 0] and [0001

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, Lin; Yu, Qian; Sun, Qiaoyan; Sun, Jun

    Free-standing sub-micron Ti-5Al single crystal square pillars were fabricated along [2 /line 1 /line 1 0] double slip and [0001] twinning orientations using FIB fabrication processes. Samples in range of 0.4 to 2.0µm were compressed. The yield stress increases much higher than their bulk counterpart as the specimen width decreases. The tendency of "smaller is stronger" is displayed in Ti-5Al single crystals loaded along [2 /line 1 /line 1 0] and [0001] orientations. The number of slip systems is restricted by specimen physical size as it declines from 2µm to 0.5µm, when the specimens were subjected to double slip loading. Meanwhile, when sample size is less than 1.0µm, micro-pillars along twinning orientation have to compensate the incomplete twinning deformation via shearing due to geometrical restriction and dislocation starvation effects. This variation of deformation mode could be attributed to the starvation effect of dislocations.

  4. Very Large Array Mapping of the CO(1-0) Line in SMM J14011+0252

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharon, Chelsea E.; Baker, Andrew J.; Harris, Andrew I.; Thomson, Alasdair P.

    2013-03-01

    We present high-resolution CO(1-0) observations of the lensed submillimeter galaxy (SMG) SMM J14011+0252 at z = 2.6. Comparison to the previously detected CO(3-2) line gives an intensity ratio of r 3, 1 = 0.97 ± 0.16 in temperature units, larger than is typical for SMGs but within the range seen in the low-z ultraluminous infrared galaxy population. Combining our new data with previous mid-J CO observations, we perform a single-phase large velocity gradient (LVG) analysis to constrain the physical conditions of the molecular gas. Acceptable models have significant degeneracies between parameters, even when we rule out all models that produce optically thin emission, but we find that the bulk of the molecular gas has T kin = 20-60 K, n_H_2˜ 10^4-105 cm-3, and N CO/Δv = 1017.00 ± 0.25 cm-2 km-1 s. For our best-fit models to self-consistently recover a typical CO-to-H2 abundance and a plausible degree of virialization, the local velocity gradient in the molecular gas must be substantially larger than its galaxy-wide average. This conclusion is consistent with a scenario in which SMM J14011+0252 has a fairly face-on orientation and a molecular interstellar medium composed of many unresolved clouds. Using previous Hα observations, we find that SMM J14011+0252 has a spatially resolved star formation rate versus molecular gas surface density relation inconsistent with those of "normal" local star-forming galaxies, even if we adopt a local "disk-like" CO-to-H2 conversion factor as motivated by our LVG analysis. This discrepancy supports the inference of a star formation relation for high-z starbursts distinct from the local relation that is not solely due to differing choices of gas mass conversion factor.

  5. EDDINGTON RATIO DISTRIBUTION OF X-RAY-SELECTED BROAD-LINE AGNs AT 1.0 < z < 2.2

    SciTech Connect

    Suh, Hyewon; Hasinger, Günther; Steinhardt, Charles; Silverman, John D.; Schramm, Malte

    2015-12-20

    We investigate the Eddington ratio distribution of X-ray-selected broad-line active galactic nuclei (AGNs) in the redshift range 1.0 < z < 2.2, where the number density of AGNs peaks. Combining the optical and Subaru/Fiber Multi Object Spectrograph near-infrared spectroscopy, we estimate black hole masses for broad-line AGNs in the Chandra Deep Field South (CDF-S), Extended Chandra Deep Field South (E-CDF-S), and the XMM-Newton Lockman Hole (XMM-LH) surveys. AGNs with similar black hole masses show a broad range of AGN bolometric luminosities, which are calculated from X-ray luminosities, indicating that the accretion rate of black holes is widely distributed. We find a substantial fraction of massive black holes accreting significantly below the Eddington limit at z ≲ 2, in contrast to what is generally found for luminous AGNs at high redshift. Our analysis of observational selection biases indicates that the “AGN cosmic downsizing” phenomenon can be simply explained by the strong evolution of the comoving number density at the bright end of the AGN luminosity function, together with the corresponding selection effects. However, one might need to consider a correlation between the AGN luminosity and the accretion rate of black holes, in which luminous AGNs have higher Eddington ratios than low-luminosity AGNs, in order to understand the relatively small fraction of low-luminosity AGNs with high accretion rates in this epoch. Therefore, the observed downsizing trend could be interpreted as massive black holes with low accretion rates, which are relatively fainter than less-massive black holes with efficient accretion.

  6. VERY LARGE ARRAY MAPPING OF THE CO(1-0) LINE IN SMM J14011+0252

    SciTech Connect

    Sharon, Chelsea E.; Baker, Andrew J.; Harris, Andrew I.; Thomson, Alasdair P. E-mail: ajbaker@physics.rutgers.edu E-mail: at@roe.ac.uk

    2013-03-01

    We present high-resolution CO(1-0) observations of the lensed submillimeter galaxy (SMG) SMM J14011+0252 at z = 2.6. Comparison to the previously detected CO(3-2) line gives an intensity ratio of r {sub 3,1} = 0.97 {+-} 0.16 in temperature units, larger than is typical for SMGs but within the range seen in the low-z ultraluminous infrared galaxy population. Combining our new data with previous mid-J CO observations, we perform a single-phase large velocity gradient (LVG) analysis to constrain the physical conditions of the molecular gas. Acceptable models have significant degeneracies between parameters, even when we rule out all models that produce optically thin emission, but we find that the bulk of the molecular gas has T {sub kin} = 20-60 K, n{sub H{sub 2}}{approx}10{sup 4}-10{sup 5} cm{sup -3}, and N {sub CO}/{Delta}v = 10{sup 17.00{+-}0.25} cm{sup -2} km{sup -1} s. For our best-fit models to self-consistently recover a typical CO-to-H{sub 2} abundance and a plausible degree of virialization, the local velocity gradient in the molecular gas must be substantially larger than its galaxy-wide average. This conclusion is consistent with a scenario in which SMM J14011+0252 has a fairly face-on orientation and a molecular interstellar medium composed of many unresolved clouds. Using previous H{alpha} observations, we find that SMM J14011+0252 has a spatially resolved star formation rate versus molecular gas surface density relation inconsistent with those of 'normal' local star-forming galaxies, even if we adopt a local 'disk-like' CO-to-H{sub 2} conversion factor as motivated by our LVG analysis. This discrepancy supports the inference of a star formation relation for high-z starbursts distinct from the local relation that is not solely due to differing choices of gas mass conversion factor.

  7. Vertical Distributions of PH3 in Saturn from Observations of Its 1-0 and 3-2 Rotational Lines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Orton, G. S.; Serabyn, E.; Lee, Y. T.

    2000-01-01

    Far-infrared Fourier-transform spectrometer measurements of the 1-0 and 3-2 PH3 transitions in Saturn's disk near 267 and 800 GHz (8.9 and 26.7/cm), respectively, were analyzed simultaneously to derive a global mean profile for the PH3 vertical mixing ratio between 100 and 600 mbar total pressure. The far-infrared spectrum is relatively free from spectral interlopers, suffers minimal absorption or scattering by atmospheric particulates, and contains intrinsically weak PH3 lines that are sensitive to a range of atmospheric depths. The combined spectra are inconsistent with a uniform tropospheric mixing ratio, even with a stratospheric cut-off. They are consistent with a volume mixing ratio of PH3 that drops from 1.2 x 10(exp -5) at 645 mbar pressure to a value of 4.1 x 10(exp -7) at 150 mbar pressure, a decrease that is linear is log abundance vs log pressure. The mixing ratio could drop even more quickly at atmospheric pressures below 150 mbar and still be consistent with the data. The mixing ratio may well remain constant with depth for pressures above 630 mbar. The maximum PH3 mixing ratio in this model is consistent with a [P]/[H] ratio in the deep atmosphere that is about a factor of 10 higher than solar composition. Such a model is consistent with rapid mixing up to the radiative-convective boundary and transport by, for example, vertical waves just above this boundary. In the best fitting model, the eddy diffusion coefficient is approximately 10(exp 4) sq cm near 630 mbar, and it must increase with altitude. The predominant PH3 loss mechanisms are direct photolysis by UV radiation and scavenging by H atoms produced by the photolysis.

  8. CYP2S1 is negatively regulated by corticosteroids in human cell lines.

    PubMed

    Bebenek, Ilona G; Solaimani, Parrisa; Bui, Peter; Hankinson, Oliver

    2012-02-25

    Cytochrome P450s are monooxygenase proteins involved in the metabolism of both exogenous and endogenous compounds. CYP2S1 can metabolize eicosanoids in the absence of both NADPH and NADPH cytochrome P450 reductase, and can also activate the anticancer agent 1 AQ4N [1,4-bis{[2-(dimethylamino-N-oxide)ethyl]amino}-5,8-dihydroxy anthracene-9,10-dione]. CYP2S1 is mainly expressed in extrahepatic tissues such as the trachea, lung, stomach, small intestine, spleen, skin, breast, kidney and placenta. Furthermore, increased expression of CYP2S1 occurs in several tumors of epithelial origin, making the characterization of CYP2S1 regulation relevant to the treatment of disease. We report that the synthetic glucocorticoid receptor ligand dexamethasone (DEX) represses CYP2S1 expression. The ED(50) is between 1 nM and 3 nM and maximal repression is reached by 48 h. Other corticosteroids are also effective at repressing CYP2S1. We show that repression by DEX is mediated by the glucocorticoid receptor and requires histone deacetylase activity.

  9. CO J = 1-0 AND J = 2-1 LINE OBSERVATIONS OF THE MOLECULAR-CLOUD-BLOCKED SUPERNOVA REMNANT 3C434.1

    SciTech Connect

    Jeong, Il-Gyo; Koo, Bon-Chul; Cho, Wan-Kee; Kramer, Carsten; Stutzki, Juergen; Byun, Do-Young E-mail: koo@astro.snu.ac.kr

    2013-06-20

    We present the results of CO emission line observations toward the semicircular Galactic supernova remnant (SNR) 3C434.1 (G94.0+1.0). We mapped an area covering the whole SNR in the {sup 12}CO J = 1-0 emission line using the Seoul Radio Astronomy Observatory 6 m telescope and found a large molecular cloud superposed on the faint western part of the SNR. The cloud was elongated along the north-south direction and showed a very good spatial correlation with the radio features of the SNR. We carried out {sup 12}CO J = 2-1 line observations of this cloud using the Koelner Observatorium fuer Sub-Millimeter Astronomie 3 m telescope and found a region in which the {sup 12}CO J = 2-1 to J = 1-0 ratio was high ({approx}1.6). This higher excitation, together with the morphological relation, strongly suggested that the molecular cloud was interacting with the SNR. The systemic velocity of the molecular cloud (-13 km s{sup -1}) gave a kinematic distance of 3.0 kpc to the SNR-molecular cloud system. We derived the physical parameters of the SNR based on this new distance. We examined the variation of the radio spectral index over the remnant and found that it was flatter in the western part, wherein the SNR was interacting with the molecular cloud. We therefore propose that 3C434.1 is the remnant of a supernova explosion that occurred just outside the boundary of a relatively thin, sheet-like molecular cloud. We present a hydrodynamic model showing that its asymmetric radio morphology can result from its interaction with this blocking molecular cloud.

  10. CH+(1-0) Line Detection in a High-z Hyper-Luminous Galaxy SDP17b: the First Probe of a Massive Turbulent Region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Falgarone, E.; Zwaan, M.; Godard, B.; Bussmann, S.; Bergin, E.; Omont, A.; Bournaud, F.; Elbaz, D.; Andreani, P.

    2015-12-01

    We illustrate the power of CH+ spectroscopy at high spectral resolution with the first detection by ALMA of a CH+(J=1-0) line in an hyper-luminous galaxy, SDP17b at z=2.3. Unlike other molecular tracers, the unique chemical and spectroscopic properties of the CH+ cation make it a tracer of the turbulent energy trail, from its scale of injection to that of dissipation at which CH+ forms. In SDP17b, CH+ emission and absorption are detected. The emission line is broad and the absorption is seen against the dust continuum and the emission. The absorption probes a massive turbulent region of low density, while the emission may arise in a large number of irradiated shocks that could be located in the large turbulent region or in the star-forming disk.

  11. Second-Line Irinotecan, Leucovorin, and 5-Fluorouracil for Gastric Cancer Patients after Failed Docetaxel and S-1

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Joo Young; Ryu, Min-Hee; Ryoo, Baek-Yeol; Han, Boram; Cho, Ji Woong; Lim, Man Sup; Lim, Hyun; Kang, Ho Suk; Kim, Min-Jeong; Ha, Hong Il; Song, Hunho; Kim, Jung Han; Kim, Hyeong Su; Kang, Yoon-Koo; Zang, Dae Young

    2016-01-01

    Background. This retrospective study aimed to assess the efficacy and toxicities of second-line chemotherapy with irinotecan, leucovorin, and 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) in metastatic gastric cancer (MGC) patients previously treated with docetaxel and S-1 with or without oxaliplatin (DS/DOS). Patients and Methods. We reviewed the data of patients who had previously been treated with first-line DS/DOS and received biweekly irinotecan-based chemotherapy (FOLFIRI/IFL) between October 2004 and November 2011. Results. A total of 209 cycles were administered to 35 patients, with a median of 4 (range, 1–22) cycles each. The overall response rate in 29 response-assessable patients was 17.2%, including 2 complete and 3 partial responses. The median progression-free and overall survivals were 3.81 (95% confidence interval [CI], 1.82–5.80) months and 6.24 (95% CI, 1.44–11.04) months, respectively. The major grade 3/4 toxicity was neutropenia (8.6%). Conclusion. FOLFIRI/IFL chemotherapy showed modest antitumour activity and tolerable toxicities in DS/DOS-treated MGC patients. PMID:26839542

  12. Second-Line Irinotecan, Leucovorin, and 5-Fluorouracil for Gastric Cancer Patients after Failed Docetaxel and S-1.

    PubMed

    Jung, Joo Young; Ryu, Min-Hee; Ryoo, Baek-Yeol; Han, Boram; Cho, Ji Woong; Lim, Man Sup; Lim, Hyun; Kang, Ho Suk; Kim, Min-Jeong; Ha, Hong Il; Song, Hunho; Kim, Jung Han; Kim, Hyeong Su; Kang, Yoon-Koo; Zang, Dae Young

    2016-01-01

    Background. This retrospective study aimed to assess the efficacy and toxicities of second-line chemotherapy with irinotecan, leucovorin, and 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) in metastatic gastric cancer (MGC) patients previously treated with docetaxel and S-1 with or without oxaliplatin (DS/DOS). Patients and Methods. We reviewed the data of patients who had previously been treated with first-line DS/DOS and received biweekly irinotecan-based chemotherapy (FOLFIRI/IFL) between October 2004 and November 2011. Results. A total of 209 cycles were administered to 35 patients, with a median of 4 (range, 1-22) cycles each. The overall response rate in 29 response-assessable patients was 17.2%, including 2 complete and 3 partial responses. The median progression-free and overall survivals were 3.81 (95% confidence interval [CI], 1.82-5.80) months and 6.24 (95% CI, 1.44-11.04) months, respectively. The major grade 3/4 toxicity was neutropenia (8.6%). Conclusion. FOLFIRI/IFL chemotherapy showed modest antitumour activity and tolerable toxicities in DS/DOS-treated MGC patients. PMID:26839542

  13. Registration of high-oleic peanut germplasm line ARSOK-S1 (TX996784) with enhanced resistance to Sclerotinia blight and pod rot

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The high oleic Spanish peanut (Arachis hypogaea L. subsp. fastigiata var. vulgaris) germplasm line ARSOK-S1 was developed cooperatively between the USDA Agricultural Research Service, Texas AgriLife Research, and Oklahoma State University, and was released in 2013. ARSOK-S1 (tested early as TX99678...

  14. Indico 1.0

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonzalez Lopez, J. B.; Avilés, A.; Baron, T.; Ferreira, P.; Kolobara, B.; Pugh, M. A.; Resco, A.; Trzaskoma, J. P.

    2014-06-01

    Indico has evolved into the main event organization software, room booking tool and collaboration hub for CERN. The growth in its usage has only accelerated during the past 9 years, and today Indico holds more that 215,000 events and 1,100,000 files. The growth was also substantial in terms of functionalities and improvements. In the last year alone, Indico has matured considerably in 3 key areas: enhanced usability, optimized performance and additional features, especially those related to meeting collaboration. Along the course of 2012, much activity has centred around consolidating all this effort and investment into "version 1.0", recently released in 2013.Version 1.0 brings along new features, such as the Microsoft Exchange calendar synchronization for participants, many new and clean interfaces (badges and poster generation, list of contributions, abstracts, etc) and so forth. But most importantly, it brings a message: Indico is now stable, consolidated and mature after more than 10 years of non-stop development. This message is addressed not only to CERN users but also to the many organisations, in or outside HEP, which have already installed the software, and to others who might soon join this community. In this document, we describe the current state of the art of Indico, and how it was built. This does not mean that the Indico software is complete, far from it! We have plenty of new ideas and projects that we are working on and which we have shared during CHEP 2013.

  15. Measurement of the 3s1/2-3p3/2 resonance line of sodiumlike Eu52+

    DOE PAGES

    Träbert, E.; Beiersdorfer, P.; Hell, N.; Brown, G. V.

    2015-08-20

    We have measured the 3s1/2-3p3/2 transition in sodiumlike Eu52+ situated at 41.232 Å with an uncertainty of 73 ppm. Our measurement extends previous high-precision measurements into the 56< Z< 78 range of atomic numbers. We also present measurements of 3s1/2-3p3/2 and 3p1/2-3d3/2 transitions in the neighboring magnesiumlike, aluminumlike, and siliconlike europium ions.

  16. The optical depth of the 158 micron forbidden C-12 II line - Detection of the F = 1 - 0 forbidden C-13 II hyperfine-structure component. [in Orion nebula

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stacey, G. J.; Townes, C. H.; Geis, N.; Madden, S. C.; Herrmann, F.; Genzel, R.; Poglitsch, A.; Jackson, J. M.

    1991-01-01

    The detection of the F = 1 - 0 hyperfine component of the 158-micron forbidden C-13 II fine-structure line in the interstellar medium is reported. A 12-point intensity map was obtained of the forbidden C-13 distribution over the inner 190-arcsec (R.A.) X 190-arcsec (decl.) regions of the Orion Nebula using an imaging Fabry-Perot interferometer. The forbidden C-12 II/C-13 II line intensity ratio varies significantly over the region mapped. It is highest (86 +/-0) in the core of the Orion H II region, and significantly lower (62 +/-7) in the outer regions of the map, reflecting higher optical depth in the forbidden C-12 II line here. It is suggested that this enhanced optical depth is the result of limb brightening of the optically thin forbidden C-13 II line at the edges of the bowl-shaped H II region blister.

  17. Upregulation of CYP2S1 by oxaliplatin is associated with p53 status in colorectal cancer cell lines.

    PubMed

    Yang, Chao; Zhou, Qian; Li, Minle; Tong, Xuemei; Sun, Jiayi; Qing, Yin; Sun, Liya; Yang, Xuhan; Hu, Xiaowen; Jiang, Jie; Yan, Xiaomei; He, Lin; Wan, Chunling

    2016-01-01

    Oxaliplatin displays a wide spectrum of antitumor activities and is widely used in the treatment of metastatic colorectal cancer (CRC). However, tumor responses to this agent are variable, and the underlying mechanisms are poorly understood. In the present study, oxaliplatin was found to strongly inhibit the growth of HCT116 cells harboring wild-type p53 but to only weakly inhibit SW480 cells, HT29 cells or p53-/- HCT116 cells, which all lack p53 expression. Administration of oxaliplatin significantly induced p53 accumulation and enhanced expression of CYP2S1 in HCT116 cells with wild-type p53. CYP2S1 knockdown conferred a cell survival advantage after oxaliplatin treatment to cells harboring wild-type p53 in vitro and in vivo. Interestingly, enzyme immunoassays, TOPFlash/FOPFlash reporter activity assays and western blotting analysis demonstrated oxaliplatin-mediated downregulation of PGE2 and Wnt/β-catenin signaling in a manner dependent on p53. Moreover, oxaliplatin treatment of mice with subcutaneous tumor xenografts drastically reduced the volume of wild-type p53 HCT116 tumors but had no effect on isogenic p53-/- HCT116 tumors. These results suggest that oxaliplatin exerts its inhibitory effects in human CRC cells via upregulation of CYP2S1 expression in a p53-dependent manner. PMID:27609465

  18. Upregulation of CYP2S1 by oxaliplatin is associated with p53 status in colorectal cancer cell lines

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Chao; Zhou, Qian; Li, Minle; Tong, Xuemei; Sun, Jiayi; Qing, Yin; Sun, Liya; Yang, Xuhan; Hu, Xiaowen; Jiang, Jie; Yan, Xiaomei; He, Lin; Wan, Chunling

    2016-01-01

    Oxaliplatin displays a wide spectrum of antitumor activities and is widely used in the treatment of metastatic colorectal cancer (CRC). However, tumor responses to this agent are variable, and the underlying mechanisms are poorly understood. In the present study, oxaliplatin was found to strongly inhibit the growth of HCT116 cells harboring wild-type p53 but to only weakly inhibit SW480 cells, HT29 cells or p53−/− HCT116 cells, which all lack p53 expression. Administration of oxaliplatin significantly induced p53 accumulation and enhanced expression of CYP2S1 in HCT116 cells with wild-type p53. CYP2S1 knockdown conferred a cell survival advantage after oxaliplatin treatment to cells harboring wild-type p53 in vitro and in vivo. Interestingly, enzyme immunoassays, TOPFlash/FOPFlash reporter activity assays and western blotting analysis demonstrated oxaliplatin-mediated downregulation of PGE2 and Wnt/β-catenin signaling in a manner dependent on p53. Moreover, oxaliplatin treatment of mice with subcutaneous tumor xenografts drastically reduced the volume of wild-type p53 HCT116 tumors but had no effect on isogenic p53−/− HCT116 tumors. These results suggest that oxaliplatin exerts its inhibitory effects in human CRC cells via upregulation of CYP2S1 expression in a p53-dependent manner. PMID:27609465

  19. In-situ determination of astro-comb calibrator lines to better than 10 cm s(-1).

    PubMed

    Li, Chih-Hao; Glenday, Alexander G; Benedick, Andrew J; Chang, Guoqing; Chen, Li-Jin; Cramer, Claire; Fendel, Peter; Furesz, Gabor; Kärtner, Franz X; Korzennik, Sylvain; Phillips, David F; Sasselov, Dimitar; Szentgyorgyi, Andrew; Walsworth, Ronald L

    2010-06-01

    Improved wavelength calibrators for high-resolution astrophysical spectrographs will be essential for precision radial velocity (RV) detection of Earth-like exoplanets and direct observation of cosmological deceleration. The astro-comb is a combination of an octave-spanning femtosecond laser frequency comb and a Fabry-Pérot cavity used to achieve calibrator line spacings that can be resolved by an astrophysical spectrograph. Systematic spectral shifts associated with the cavity can be 0.1-1 MHz, corresponding to RV errors of 10-100 cm/s, due to the dispersive properties of the cavity mirrors over broad spectral widths. Although these systematic shifts are very stable, their correction is crucial to high accuracy astrophysical spectroscopy. Here, we demonstrate an in-situ technique to determine the systematic shifts of astro-comb lines due to finite Fabry-Pérot cavity dispersion. The technique is practical for implementation at a telescope-based spectrograph to enable wavelength calibration accuracy better than 10 cm/s.

  20. Generation of polarized 4He ion beam by optical pumping using circularly and linearly polarized radiation tuned to D0 line (He metastables 2S1→2P0)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suzuki, T.; Yamauchi, Y.

    2007-06-01

    It is demonstrated that simultaneous optical pumping (OP) by circularly and linearly polarized 1083 nm radiation tuned to the D0 line (He metastables 23S1→23P0 transition) substantially improves the polarization of the He+ ion beam, compared with conventional OP by the circularly polarized D1 ( 23S1→23P1) or D2 ( 23S1→23P2) line.

  1. Rotational level-dependent collisional broadening and line shift of the A2Sigma(+)-X2Pi (1,0) band of OH in hydrogen-air combustion gases

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kessler, W. J.; Allen, M. G.; Davis, S. J.

    1993-01-01

    Measurements of the collisional broadening and line shift of the (1,0) band of the A2Sigma(+)-X2Pi system of OH are reported in atmospheric pressure hydrogen-air combustion gases. The measurements were made using a single-mode, narrow linewidth, frequency-doubled ring dye laser operating near 283 nm. The OH was generated in the combustion gases of a flat flame H2-air burner. Collisional broadening parameters for equilibrium mixtures of H2, O2, H2O, and N2 were obtained spanning a range of fuel/air equivalence ratios from 0.6 to 1.6 and temperatures from 1500 to 2050 K. Measurements were obtained spanning rotational quantum numbers from 4.5 to 16.5. The collision induced frequency shift was determined to be 0.1 that of the collisional broadening.

  2. A molecular-beam optical Stark study of lines in the (1,0) band of the F4delta(7/2)-X4delta(7/2) transition of iron monohydride, FeH.

    PubMed

    Steimle, Timothy C; Chen, Jinhai; Harrison, Jeremy J; Brown, John M

    2006-05-14

    A supersonic molecular beam of iron monohydride, FeH, has been generated using a laser ablation/chemical reaction scheme and probed at near-natural linewidth resolution by optical Stark spectroscopy utilizing laser-induced fluorescence detection. The observed Stark splitting in Q(3.5) and R(3.5) lines of the F4delta(7/2) <-- X4delta(7/2) (1,0) transition were analyzed to determine values for the magnitudes of the permanent electric dipole moments, absolute value(mu), which were found to be 2.63(3) and 1.29(3) D for the X4delta (v = 0) and F4delta (v = 1) states, respectively. A comparison with ab initio theoretical predictions is made. The lambda doubling in the low-J levels of the F4delta(7/2) (v = 1) state is also modeled.

  3. Kendall-Theil Robust Line (KTRLine--version 1.0)-A Visual Basic Program for Calculating and Graphing Robust Nonparametric Estimates of Linear-Regression Coefficients Between Two Continuous Variables

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Granato, Gregory E.

    2006-01-01

    The Kendall-Theil Robust Line software (KTRLine-version 1.0) is a Visual Basic program that may be used with the Microsoft Windows operating system to calculate parameters for robust, nonparametric estimates of linear-regression coefficients between two continuous variables. The KTRLine software was developed by the U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the Federal Highway Administration, for use in stochastic data modeling with local, regional, and national hydrologic data sets to develop planning-level estimates of potential effects of highway runoff on the quality of receiving waters. The Kendall-Theil robust line was selected because this robust nonparametric method is resistant to the effects of outliers and nonnormality in residuals that commonly characterize hydrologic data sets. The slope of the line is calculated as the median of all possible pairwise slopes between points. The intercept is calculated so that the line will run through the median of input data. A single-line model or a multisegment model may be specified. The program was developed to provide regression equations with an error component for stochastic data generation because nonparametric multisegment regression tools are not available with the software that is commonly used to develop regression models. The Kendall-Theil robust line is a median line and, therefore, may underestimate total mass, volume, or loads unless the error component or a bias correction factor is incorporated into the estimate. Regression statistics such as the median error, the median absolute deviation, the prediction error sum of squares, the root mean square error, the confidence interval for the slope, and the bias correction factor for median estimates are calculated by use of nonparametric methods. These statistics, however, may be used to formulate estimates of mass, volume, or total loads. The program is used to read a two- or three-column tab-delimited input file with variable names in the first row and

  4. CCAIN, Version 1.0

    2005-05-26

    CCAIN, Version 1.0 Date: 06/15/2005 This software is an instantiation of Common Component Architecture (CCA) framework written in C. The framework is used to compose (create, register, destroy) C, C++, and Fortran components into a running CCA application. Language bindings are provided for F90 and F03 to allow codes in these languages to interface with the framework.

  5. NII Simulator 1.0

    2009-12-02

    The software listed here is a simulator for SAIC P7500 VACIS non intrusive inspection system. The simulator provides messages similar to those provided by this piece of equipment.To facilitate testing of the Second Line of Defense systems and similar software products from commercial software vendors, this software simulation application has been developed to simulate the P7500 that the Second Line of Defense communications software system must interface with. The primary use of this simulator ismore » for testing of both Sandia developed and DOE contractor developed software.« less

  6. Piro v. 1.0

    2010-02-24

    The Piro library is a new package that is part of the Trilinos framework. Piro is a convenience package provides a simple and unified interface to many of the solver and analysis packages in Trilinos. The Piro package wraps many of the common usages of other existing Trilinos packages (e.g. NOX, Rythmos, TriKota) and provides a simple interface. In this way, a computer simulation code that wants to use Trilinos analysis tools can access themmore » with just and handful of lines of Piro code. This saves much effort in interfacing their code to each of the other codes one at a time.« less

  7. Dependence of the bit error rate on the signal power and length of a single-channel coherent single-span communication line (100 Gbit s-1) with polarisation division multiplexing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gurkin, N. V.; Konyshev, V. A.; Nanii, O. E.; Novikov, A. G.; Treshchikov, V. N.; Ubaydullaev, R. R.

    2015-01-01

    We have studied experimentally and using numerical simulations and a phenomenological analytical model the dependences of the bit error rate (BER) on the signal power and length of a coherent single-span communication line with transponders employing polarisation division multiplexing and four-level phase modulation (100 Gbit s-1 DP-QPSK format). In comparing the data of the experiment, numerical simulations and theoretical analysis, we have found two optimal powers: the power at which the BER is minimal and the power at which the fade margin in the line is maximal. We have derived and analysed the dependences of the BER on the optical signal power at the fibre line input and the dependence of the admissible input signal power range for implementation of the communication lines with a length from 30 - 50 km up to a maximum length of 250 km.

  8. Insider Alert 1.0 Beta Version

    2004-02-01

    Insider Alert 1.0 Beta Version supports interactive selection and graphical display of data generated by the Sandia Cognitive Framework, which simulates the examination of security data by experts of various specialties. Insider Alert also encompasses the configuration and data files input to the Cognitive Framework for this application. Insider Alert 1.0 Beta Version is a computer program for analyzing data indicative of possible espionage or improper handling of data by employees at Sandia National Laboratoriesmore » (or other facilities with comparable policies and procedures for managing sensitive information) It prioritizes and displays information for review by security analysts.« less

  9. The LITHO1.0 Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pasyanos, M.; Masters, G.; Laske, G.; Ma, Z.

    2014-12-01

    We have developed LITHO1.0, a 1 degree model of the crust and uppermost mantle of the Earth which extends into the upper mantle to include the lithospheric lid and underlying asthenosphere. A description of the model and details of its construction were recently published in JGR (Pasyanos et al., 2014). The model is parameterized laterally by tessellated nodes and vertically as a series of geophysically identified layers, such as water, ice, sediments, crystalline crust, lithospheric lid, and asthenosphere. Model profiles are created by constructing an appropriate starting model and perturbing it to fit high-resolution surface wave dispersion maps (Love and Rayleigh, group and phase) over a wide frequency band (5-40 mHz). We will review the constructed model and compare it to a number of select studies at regional and global scales. We will also discuss avenues for future improvements if time and funding permit. The model and access tools are available to download at http://igppweb.ucsd.edu/~gabi/litho1.0.html. Pasyanos, M.E., T.G. Masters, G. Laske, and Z. Ma (2014). LITHO1.0: An updated crust and lithospheric model of the earth, J. Geophys. Res., 119, doi:10.1002/2013JB010626.

  10. Amesos 1.0 reference guide.

    SciTech Connect

    Sala, Marzio; Stanley, Ken D.

    2004-05-01

    This document describes the main functionalities of the Amesos package, version 1.0. Amesos, available as part of Trilinos 4.0, provides an object-oriented interface to several serial and parallel sparse direct solvers libraries, for the solution of the linear systems of equations A X = B where A is a real sparse, distributed matrix, defined as an EpetraRowMatrix object, and X and B are defined as EpetraMultiVector objects. Amesos provides a common look-and-feel to several direct solvers, insulating the user from each package's details, such as matrix and vector formats, and data distribution.

  11. TSA RPM Simulator 1.0

    2009-12-02

    The software listed here is a simulator for TSA Radiation Portal Monitors with version 1.10.1A firmware. The simulator provides messages similar to those provided by this piece of equipment.To facilitate testing of the Second Line of Defense systems and similar software products from commercial software vendors, this software simulation application has been developed that simulate the TSA Radiation Portal Monitor that Second Line of Defense communications software systems must interface with. The primary use ofmore » this simulator is for testing of both Sandia developed and DOE contractor developed software.« less

  12. Cpp Utility - Version 1.0

    SciTech Connect

    III, FredOppel; Rigdon, J. Brian

    2014-09-08

    A collection of general Umbra modules that are reused by other Umbra libraries. These capabilities include line segments, file utilities, color utilities, string utilities (for std::string), list utilities (for std ::vector ), bounding box intersections, range limiters, simple filters, cubic roots solvers and a few other utilities.

  13. Cpp Utility - Version 1.0

    2014-09-08

    A collection of general Umbra modules that are reused by other Umbra libraries. These capabilities include line segments, file utilities, color utilities, string utilities (for std::string), list utilities (for std ::vector ), bounding box intersections, range limiters, simple filters, cubic roots solvers and a few other utilities.

  14. LAPACK users' guide: Release 1. 0

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, E.; Bai, Z.; Bischof, C.; Demmel, J.; Dongarra, J.; Du Croz, J.; Greenbaum, A.; Hammarling, S.; McKenney, A.; Ostrouchov, S.; Sorensen, D.

    1992-01-31

    LAPACK is a transportable library of Fortran 77 subroutines for solving the most common problems in numerical linear algebra: systems of linear equations, linear least squares problems, eigenvalue problems and singular value problems. LAPACK is designed to supersede LINPACK and EISPACK, principally by restructuring the software to achieve much greater efficiency on vector processors, high-performance superscalar'' workstations, and shared-memory multi-processors. LAPACK also adds extra functionality, uses some new or improved algorithms, and integrates the two sets of algorithms into a unified package. The LAPACK Users' Guide gives an informal introduction to the design of the algorithms and software, summarizes the contents of the package, describes conventions used in the software and documentation, and includes complete specifications for calling the routines. This edition of the Users' guide describes Release 1.0 of LAPACK.

  15. LAPACK users` guide: Release 1.0

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, E.; Bai, Z.; Bischof, C.; Demmel, J.; Dongarra, J.; Du Croz, J.; Greenbaum, A.; Hammarling, S.; McKenney, A.; Ostrouchov, S.; Sorensen, D.

    1992-01-31

    LAPACK is a transportable library of Fortran 77 subroutines for solving the most common problems in numerical linear algebra: systems of linear equations, linear least squares problems, eigenvalue problems and singular value problems. LAPACK is designed to supersede LINPACK and EISPACK, principally by restructuring the software to achieve much greater efficiency on vector processors, high-performance ``superscalar`` workstations, and shared-memory multi-processors. LAPACK also adds extra functionality, uses some new or improved algorithms, and integrates the two sets of algorithms into a unified package. The LAPACK Users` Guide gives an informal introduction to the design of the algorithms and software, summarizes the contents of the package, describes conventions used in the software and documentation, and includes complete specifications for calling the routines. This edition of the Users` guide describes Release 1.0 of LAPACK.

  16. Virtual planets atlas 1.0 freeware

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Legrand, C.; Chevalley, P.

    2015-10-01

    Since 2002, we develop the "Virtual Moon Atlas -http://www.ap-i.net/avl/en/start" a freeware to help Moon observing and to improve interest for Moon in general public. VMA freeware has been downloaded near 900000 times all over the world and is or has been used by several professional organizations such as Kitt Peak Observatory, National Japan Observatory, Birkbeck College / University College London (K. Joy), BBC Sky at night, several French astronomy magazines and astronomy writers (P. Harrington, S. French...) . Recommended by ESA, registered as educational software by French ministry for education, it has also yet been presented at 2006 & 2007 LPSC and PCC2 in 2011 We have declined this freeware in a new tool with the same goals, but for the telluric planets and satellites, the "Virtual Planets Atlas (VPA / http://www.ap-i.net/avp/en/start") now in version 1.0.

  17. GlobiPack v. 1.0

    2010-03-31

    GlobiPack contains a small collection of optimization globalization algorithms. These algorithms are used by optimization and various nonlinear equation solver algorithms.Used as the line-search procedure with Newton and Quasi-Newton optimization and nonlinear equation solver methods. These are standard published 1-D line search algorithms such as are described in the book Nocedal and Wright Numerical Optimization: 2nd edition, 2006. One set of algorithms were copied and refactored from the existing open-source Trilinos package MOOCHO where themore » linear search code is used to globalize SQP methods. This software is generic to any mathematical optimization problem where smooth derivatives exist. There is no specific connection or mention whatsoever to any specific application, period. You cannot find more general mathematical software.« less

  18. GlobiPack v. 1.0

    SciTech Connect

    Bartlett, Roscoe

    2010-03-31

    GlobiPack contains a small collection of optimization globalization algorithms. These algorithms are used by optimization and various nonlinear equation solver algorithms.Used as the line-search procedure with Newton and Quasi-Newton optimization and nonlinear equation solver methods. These are standard published 1-D line search algorithms such as are described in the book Nocedal and Wright Numerical Optimization: 2nd edition, 2006. One set of algorithms were copied and refactored from the existing open-source Trilinos package MOOCHO where the linear search code is used to globalize SQP methods. This software is generic to any mathematical optimization problem where smooth derivatives exist. There is no specific connection or mention whatsoever to any specific application, period. You cannot find more general mathematical software.

  19. VISAR2KV1.0Beta

    2001-01-01

    The software provides a rapid and robust method for reducing fringe records obtained using eithe a line-imaging optically recording velocity interferometry system (ORVIS) or stop-motion imaging of the moving fringe field. The reduced records result in spatially resolved velocity profiles of rapidly accelerating objects. Complex, time-dependent fringe motion (corresponding to local velocity variations) can be evaluated and interpreted using this program.

  20. GreenArrow version 1.0

    SciTech Connect

    2006-03-29

    GreenArrow is a visualization program for displaying directed graphs that can use text in place of lines to represent the edges between nodes. This text can be animated to show the link direction, and allow for more text to be displayed then would normally be allowed. The text is also tapered and arced to show direction. The node labels can be wrapped around the node to avoid label crossing as well. The program is interactive, and allows the user to zoom, pan and rotate a graph, as well as manipulate the individual nodes.

  1. EM3DAVer1.0

    2000-07-13

    Software simulates low-frequency (~1 to 10^6 Hz) electromagnetic induction in an anisotropic conducting medium. Induction is stimulated by an arbitrary superposition of electric and magnetic dipoles as well as line sources. The anisotropic nature of the conducting medium is described by a fully generalized 3X3 conductivity tensor. Upon completion, software computes in-phrase and quadrature components of magnetic and electric fields at user-specified points. Values are further decomposed in terms of primary, background and total fields.more » Software also includes a graphical user interface for building anisotropy models and provides plotting capability for simulation output.« less

  2. GreenArrow version 1.0

    2006-03-29

    GreenArrow is a visualization program for displaying directed graphs that can use text in place of lines to represent the edges between nodes. This text can be animated to show the link direction, and allow for more text to be displayed then would normally be allowed. The text is also tapered and arced to show direction. The node labels can be wrapped around the node to avoid label crossing as well. The program is interactive,more » and allows the user to zoom, pan and rotate a graph, as well as manipulate the individual nodes.« less

  3. CYP2S1: A short review

    SciTech Connect

    Saarikoski, Sirkku T. . E-mail: sirkku.saarikoski@ktl.fi; Rivera, Steven P.; Hankinson, Oliver; Husgafvel-Pursiainen, Kirsti

    2005-09-01

    A new member of the cytochrome P450 superfamily, CYP2S1, has recently been identified in human and mouse. In this paper, we review the data currently available for CYP2S1. The human CYP2S1 gene is located in chromosome 19q13.2 within a cluster including CYP2 family members CYP2A6, CYP2A13, CYP2B6, and CYP2F1. These genes also show the highest homology to the human CYP2S1. The gene has recently been found to harbor genetic polymorphism. CYP2S1 is inducible by dioxin, the induction being mediated by the Aryl Hydrocarbon Receptor (AHR) and Aryl Hydrocarbon Nuclear Translocator (ARNT) in a manner typical for CYP1 family members. In line with this, CYP2S1 has been shown to be inducible by coal tar, an abundant source of PAHs, and it was recently reported to metabolize naphthalene. This points to the involvement of CYP2S1 in the metabolism of toxic and carcinogenic compounds, similar to other dioxin-inducible CYPs. CYP2S1 is expressed in epithelial cells of a wide variety of extrahepatic tissues. The highest expression levels have been observed in the epithelial tissues frequently exposed to xenobiotics, e.g., the respiratory, gastrointestinal, and urinary tracts, and in the skin. The observed ubiquitous tissue distribution, as well as the expression of CYP2S1 throughout embryogenesis suggest that CYP2S1 is likely to metabolize important endogenous substrates; thus far, retinoic acid has been identified. In conclusion, CYP2S1 exhibits many features of interest for human health and thus warrants further investigation.

  4. Molecular hydrogen line ratios in four regions of shock-excited gas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burton, M. G.; Brand, P. W. J. L.; Geballe, T. R.; Webster, A. S.

    1989-01-01

    Five emission lines of molecular hydrogen, with wavelengths in the ranges of 2.10-2.25 and 3.80-3.85 microns, have been observed in four objects of different type in which the line emission is believed to be excited by shocks. The relative intensities of the lines 1 - 0 S(1):1 - 0 S(O):2 - 1 S(1) are approximately 10.5:2.5:1.0 in all four objects. The 0 - 0 S(13):1 - 0 O(7) line ratio, however, varies from 1.05 in OMC-1 to about 2.3 in the Herbig-Haro object HH 7. The excitation temperature derived from the S(13) and O(7) lines is higher than that derived from the 1 - 0 and 2 - 1 S(1) lines in all four objects, so the shocked gas in these objects cannot be characterized by a single temperature. The constancy of the (1-0)/(2-1) S(1) line ratio between sources suggests that the post-shock gas is 'thermalized' in each source. The S(13)/O(7) ratio is particularly sensitive to the density and temperature conditions in the gas.

  5. Highly selective and potent agonists of sphingosine-1-phosphate 1 (S1P1) receptor.

    PubMed

    Vachal, Petr; Toth, Leslie M; Hale, Jeffrey J; Yan, Lin; Mills, Sander G; Chrebet, Gary L; Koehane, Carol A; Hajdu, Richard; Milligan, James A; Rosenbach, Mark J; Mandala, Suzanne

    2006-07-15

    Novel series of sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) receptor agonists were developed through a systematic SAR aimed to achieve high selectivity for a single member of the S1P family of receptors, S1P1. The optimized structure represents a highly S1P1-selective and efficacious agonist: S1P1/S1P2, S1P1/S1P3, S1P1/S1P4>10,000-fold, S1P1/S1P5>600-fold, while EC50 (S1P1) <0.2 nM. In vivo experiments are consistent with S1P1 receptor agonism alone being sufficient for achieving desired lymphocyte-lowering effect.

  6. Lines

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mires, Peter B.

    2006-01-01

    National Geography Standards for the middle school years generally stress the teaching of latitude and longitude. There are many creative ways to explain the great grid that encircles our planet, but the author has found that students in his college-level geography courses especially enjoy human-interest stories associated with lines of latitude…

  7. Cloud-cloud collision in the Galactic center 50 km s-1 molecular cloud

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsuboi, Masato; Miyazaki, Atsushi; Uehara, Kenta

    2015-12-01

    We performed a search of star-forming sites influenced by external factors, such as SNRs, H II regions, and cloud-cloud collisions (CCCs), to understand the star-forming activity in the Galactic center region using the NRO Galactic Center Survey in SiO v = 0, J = 2-1, H13CO+J = 1-0, and CS J = 1-0 emission lines obtained with the Nobeyama 45 m telescope. We found a half-shell-like feature (HSF) with a high integrated line intensity ratio of ∫TB(SiO v = 0, J = 2-1)dv/∫TB(H13CO+J = 1-0)dv ˜ 6-8 in the 50 km s-1 molecular cloud; the HSF is a most conspicuous molecular cloud in the region and harbors an active star-forming site where several compact H II regions can be seen. The high ratio in the HSF indicates that the cloud contains huge shocked molecular gas. The HSF can be also seen as a half-shell feature in the position-velocity diagram. A hypothesis explaining the chemical and kinetic properties of the HSF is that the feature originates from a CCC. We analyzed the CS J = 1-0 emission line data obtained with the Nobeyama Millimeter Array to reveal the relation between the HSF and the molecular cloud cores in the cloud. We made a cumulative core mass function (CMF) of the molecular cloud cores within the HSF. The CMF in the CCC region is not truncated at least up to ˜2500 M⊙, although the CMF of the non-CCC region reaches the upper limit of ˜1500 M⊙. Most massive molecular cores with Mgas > 750 M⊙ are located only around the ridge of the HSF and adjoin the compact H II region. These may be a sign of massive star formation induced by CCCs in the Galactic center region.

  8. Matrix Description of (1,0) Theories in six dimensions

    SciTech Connect

    Aharony, Ofer; Berkooz, Micha; Kachru, Shamit; Silverstein, Eva.

    1997-10-01

    We propose descriptions of interacting (1,0) supersymmetric theories without gravity in six dimensions in the infinite momentum frame. They are based on the large N limit of quantum mechanics or 1+1 dimensional field theories with SO(N) gauge group and four supercharges. We argue that this formulation allows for a concrete description of the chirality-changing phase transitions which connect (1,0) theories with different numbers of tensor multiplets.

  9. Noncollinear magnetism of Mn nanowires on Fe(1 1 0).

    PubMed

    Igarashi, R N; Miranda, I P; Eleno, L T F; Klautau, A B; Petrilli, H M

    2016-08-17

    Magnetic properties of Mn linear nanochains on a bcc Fe(1 1 0) surface have been studied using the first-principles real space-linear muffin-tin orbital atomic sphere approximation (RS-LMTO-ASA) method. We have considered up to nine Mn atoms deposited on bcc Fe(1 1 0). Our ab initio calculations reveal the competition between the antiferromagnetic Mn-Mn and Mn-Fe couplings, presenting a behavior which is very different from Mn nanowires on Fe(0 0 1), as shown in a previous publication. Due to this competition and non-negligible Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya interaction, noncollinear magnetic structures are stabilized as ground states for the Mn nanochains on Fe(1 1 0). PMID:27346457

  10. Noncollinear magnetism of Mn nanowires on Fe(1 1 0)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Igarashi, R. N.; Miranda, I. P.; Eleno, L. T. F.; Klautau, A. B.; Petrilli, H. M.

    2016-08-01

    Magnetic properties of Mn linear nanochains on a bcc Fe(1 1 0) surface have been studied using the first-principles real space-linear muffin-tin orbital atomic sphere approximation (RS–LMTO–ASA) method. We have considered up to nine Mn atoms deposited on bcc Fe(1 1 0). Our ab initio calculations reveal the competition between the antiferromagnetic Mn–Mn and Mn–Fe couplings, presenting a behavior which is very different from Mn nanowires on Fe(0 0 1), as shown in a previous publication. Due to this competition and non-negligible Dzyaloshinskii–Moriya interaction, noncollinear magnetic structures are stabilized as ground states for the Mn nanochains on Fe(1 1 0).

  11. Noncollinear magnetism of Mn nanowires on Fe(1 1 0).

    PubMed

    Igarashi, R N; Miranda, I P; Eleno, L T F; Klautau, A B; Petrilli, H M

    2016-08-17

    Magnetic properties of Mn linear nanochains on a bcc Fe(1 1 0) surface have been studied using the first-principles real space-linear muffin-tin orbital atomic sphere approximation (RS-LMTO-ASA) method. We have considered up to nine Mn atoms deposited on bcc Fe(1 1 0). Our ab initio calculations reveal the competition between the antiferromagnetic Mn-Mn and Mn-Fe couplings, presenting a behavior which is very different from Mn nanowires on Fe(0 0 1), as shown in a previous publication. Due to this competition and non-negligible Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya interaction, noncollinear magnetic structures are stabilized as ground states for the Mn nanochains on Fe(1 1 0).

  12. Noncollinear magnetism of Mn nanowires on Fe(1 1 0)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Igarashi, R. N.; Miranda, I. P.; Eleno, L. T. F.; Klautau, A. B.; Petrilli, H. M.

    2016-08-01

    Magnetic properties of Mn linear nanochains on a bcc Fe(1 1 0) surface have been studied using the first-principles real space-linear muffin-tin orbital atomic sphere approximation (RS-LMTO-ASA) method. We have considered up to nine Mn atoms deposited on bcc Fe(1 1 0). Our ab initio calculations reveal the competition between the antiferromagnetic Mn-Mn and Mn-Fe couplings, presenting a behavior which is very different from Mn nanowires on Fe(0 0 1), as shown in a previous publication. Due to this competition and non-negligible Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya interaction, noncollinear magnetic structures are stabilized as ground states for the Mn nanochains on Fe(1 1 0).

  13. Lithography on GaP(1 0 0) surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flores-Perez, Rosangelly; Zemlyanov, Dmitry Y.; Ivanisevic, Albena

    2008-06-01

    Two types of lithographic methods were used to modify GaP(1 0 0) surfaces with commercially available alkanethiol molecules: microcontact printing (μCP) and "dip-pen" nanolithography (DPN). The patterned surfaces were characterized by atomic force microscopy (AFM), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and Fourier transform infrared reflection absorption spectroscopy (FT-IRRAS). The characterization was done in order to understand the quality of each type of pattern, its chemical composition, and the organization of the molecules on the surface. Differences between the two lithographic methods used to do lithography on the GaP(1 0 0) in this study were dependent on the chosen molecular "ink".

  14. Data-driven Radiative Hydrodynamic Modeling of the 2014 March 29 X1.0 Solar Flare

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rubio da Costa, Fatima; Kleint, Lucia; Petrosian, Vahé; Liu, Wei; Allred, Joel C.

    2016-08-01

    Spectroscopic observations of solar flares provide critical diagnostics of the physical conditions in the flaring atmosphere. Some key features in observed spectra have not yet been accounted for in existing flare models. Here we report a data-driven simulation of the well-observed X1.0 flare on 2014 March 29 that can reconcile some well-known spectral discrepancies. We analyzed spectra of the flaring region from the Interface Region Imaging Spectrograph (IRIS) in Mg ii h&k, the Interferometric BIdimensional Spectropolarimeter at the Dunn Solar Telescope (DST/IBIS) in Hα 6563 Å and Ca ii 8542 Å, and the Reuven Ramaty High Energy Solar Spectroscope Imager (RHESSI) in hard X-rays. We constructed a multithreaded flare loop model and used the electron flux inferred from RHESSI data as the input to the radiative hydrodynamic code RADYN to simulate the atmospheric response. We then synthesized various chromospheric emission lines and compared them with the IRIS and IBIS observations. In general, the synthetic intensities agree with the observed ones, especially near the northern footpoint of the flare. The simulated Mg ii line profile has narrower wings than the observed one. This discrepancy can be reduced by using a higher microturbulent velocity (27 km s-1) in a narrow chromospheric layer. In addition, we found that an increase of electron density in the upper chromosphere within a narrow height range of ≈800 km below the transition region can turn the simulated Mg ii line core into emission and thus reproduce the single peaked profile, which is a common feature in all IRIS flares.

  15. High Resolution Cavity Ring Down Spectroscopy of the 3^{1}_{0} and 3^{1}_{0} 4^{1}_{0} Bands of the ˜{A}^2E^'' State of NO_3 Radical

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roudjane, Mourad; Codd, Terrance J.; Miller, Terry A.

    2013-06-01

    The NO_3 radical is expected to exhibit a Jahn-Teller (JT) effect in its degenerate ˜{A}^2E^'' electronic state. In the ˜{A} state there are two JT active modes, ν_3 and ν_4 (e^' stretch and in-plane bend respectively). Theoretical work has predicted that the JT effect in the ˜{A} state should be quite strong and approach the static case where the molecule is permanently distorted to a lower symmetry geometry. A more comprehensive understanding of its structure can be achieved using high resolution rotationally resolved absorption spectroscopy of its different vibronic bands. The high resolution absorption spectra of 3^{1}_{0} and 3^{1}_{0} 4^{1}_{0} vibronic bands of the ˜{A} ^2E^'' excited state of NO_3 have been successfully recorded for the first time using our jet cooled cavity ring down apparatus. These parallel bands are vibronically allowed transitions and shows the same contour. An oblate symmetric top model Hamiltonian including both centrifugal distortion and spin rotation terms is used to analyze the spectrum. The rotational analysis of this band, supported by combination differences, demonstrate the existence of doubled lines as were observed for 4^{n}_{0} (n=1,3) bands. E. Hirota, T. Ishiwata, K. Kawaguchi, M. Fujitake, N. Ohashi, and I. Tanaka, J. Chem. Phys., {107}, 2829, 1997. Roudjane, M. et al. 67{^{th}} OSU International Symposium on Molecular Spectroscopy, The Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio, 2011, talk TI-03.

  16. IDC Use Case Model Survey Version 1.0.

    SciTech Connect

    Carr, Dorthe B.; Harris, James M.

    2014-12-01

    This document contains the brief descriptions for the actors and use cases contained in the IDC Use Case Model Survey. REVISIONS Version Date Author/Team Revision Description Authorized by V1.0 12/2014 IDC Re- engineering Project Team Initial delivery M. Harris

  17. Enhancement of Spatial Thinking with Virtual Spaces 1.0

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hauptman, Hanoch

    2010-01-01

    Developing a software environment to enhance 3D geometric proficiency demands the consideration of theoretical views of the learning process. Simultaneously, this effort requires taking into account the range of tools that technology offers, as well as their limitations. In this paper, we report on the design of Virtual Spaces 1.0 software, a…

  18. MULTIPLE PROJECTIONS SYSTEM (MPS) - USER'S MANUAL VERSION 1.0

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report is a user's manual for version 1.0 of the Multiple Projections Systems (MPS), a computer system that can perform "what if" scenario analysis and report the final results (i.e., Rate of Further Progress - ROP - inventories) to EPA (i.e., the Aerometric Information Retri...

  19. Quick Overview Scout 2008 Version 1.0

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Scout 2008 version 1.0 statistical software package has been updated from past DOS and Windows versions to provide classical and robust univariate and multivariate graphical and statistical methods that are not typically available in commercial or freeware statistical softwar...

  20. Scout 2008 Version 1.0 User Guide

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Scout 2008 version 1.0 software package provides a wide variety of classical and robust statistical methods that are not typically available in other commercial software packages. A major part of Scout deals with classical, robust, and resistant univariate and multivariate ou...

  1. Vibrational entropy-driven dealloying of Mo(1 0 0) and W(1 0 0) surface alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Man, K. L.; Feng, Y. J.; Chan, C. T.; Altman, M. S.

    2007-08-01

    The formation and stability of Cu, Ag and Au-induced c(2 × 2) alloys at the Mo(1 0 0) and W(1 0 0) surfaces have been investigated with low-energy electron microscopy and diffraction. The ordered alloys transform to disordered overlayer structures at elevated temperature. Comparison of the transformation temperatures with energetics obtained from first principles calculations reveals the vibrational entropic contribution to the system free energy that defines alloy thermal stability. Effective Debye temperatures for metal adatoms are determined that exhibit the expected mass and bond strength dependence.

  2. Velocity profiles of high-excitation molecular hydrogen lines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moorhouse, A.; Brand, P. W. J. L.; Geballe, T. R.; Burton, M. G.

    1990-01-01

    Profiles of three lines of molecular hydrogen near 2.2 microns, originating from widely spaced energy levels, have been measured at a resolution of 32 km/s at Peak 1 in the Orion molecular outflow. The three lines, 1 - 0 S(1), 2 - 1 S(1), and 3 - 2 S(3), are found to have identical profiles. This result rules out any significant contribution to the population of the higher energy levels of molecular hydrogen at Peak 1 by fluorescence, and is generally consistent with emission from multiple J-type shocks.

  3. Gompertz type dechanneling functions for protons in <1 0 0>, <1 1 0> and <1 1 1> Si crystal channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrović, S.; Erić, M.; Kokkoris, M.; Nešković, N.

    2007-03-01

    In this work the energy dependences of the Gompertz type sigmoidal dechanneling function parameters for protons in <1 0 0>, <1 1 0> and <1 1 1> Si crystal channels is investigated theoretically. The proton energy range considered is between 1 and 10 MeV. The original dechanneling functions are generated using a realistic Monte Carlo computer simulation code. We show that the Gompertz type dechanneling function, having two parameters, lc and k, representing the dechanneling range and rate, respectively, approximate accurately the original dechanneling function. It is also shown that the energy dependences of parameters lc and k can be approximated by a linear function and a sum of two exponential functions, respectively. The results obtained can be used for accurate reproduction of experimental proton channeling spectra recorded in the backscattering geometry.

  4. Geometric structure of Be(10{bar 1}0)

    SciTech Connect

    Hofmann, P. |; Pohl, K. |; Stumpf, R.; Plummer, E.W. |

    1996-05-01

    The structure of clean Be(10{bar 1}0) was determined by low-energy electron-diffraction (LEED) {ital I}({ital V}) analysis and the result compared to first-principles calculations. Both theory and experiment indicate that from the two possible terminations of the truncated bulk, the one with the shorter first-interlayer spacing is realized. The values for the multilayer relaxations obtained by LEED essentially coincide with the theoretical prediction. Although the magnitude of the first- to second-layer relaxation fits well into the trend observed on other simple metal surfaces, the driving force is probably different for beryllium. {copyright} {ital 1996 The American Physical Society.}

  5. geophylobuilder 1.0: an arcgis extension for creating 'geophylogenies'.

    PubMed

    Kidd, David M; Liu, Xianhua

    2008-01-01

    Evolution is inherently a spatiotemporal process; however, despite this, phylogenetic and geographical data and models remain largely isolated from one another. Geographical information systems provide a ready-made spatial modelling, analysis and dissemination environment within which phylogenetic models can be explicitly linked with their associated spatial data and subsequently integrated with other georeferenced data sets describing the biotic and abiotic environment. geophylobuilder 1.0 is an extension for the arcgis geographical information system that builds a 'geophylogenetic' data model from a phylogenetic tree and associated geographical data. Geophylogenetic database objects can subsequently be queried, spatially analysed and visualized in both 2D and 3D within a geographical information systems.

  6. Hydrogen File Capture v1.0.DLL

    2006-03-28

    Postprocessor for the use with GoldSim commercial software. The program is intended as a DLL for use with a GoldSim model simulation to copy input/output files created during the simulation to a central location on a local LAN. The software is used as part of a modeling package that consists of GoldSim.exe and other external codes linked and executed during a GoldSim model simulation. The FileCapture_v1.0.DLL is used to run Monte Carlo analyses with amore » GoldSim simulation that is executed using the distributed processing module. When distributed processing (i.e., multi-processor run) is used for a GoldSim Model simulation that is comprised of one or more codes linked with the GoldSim.exe, it is sometimes necessary to capture the default input and/or output files generated by the external codes linked with the GoldSim.exe program. Using the input file "FileCapture.In' to list the filenames and path, FileCapture_v1.0.DLL copies the files listed in 'FileCapture.in' from each node on the LAN to a folder called 'FCAP Files' created in the location gie as the path. The DLL will execute for each realization and append 00xxx a number indication which realization the file was generated from.« less

  7. CHEETAH 1.0 user`s manual

    SciTech Connect

    Fried, L.E.

    1994-06-24

    CHEETAH is an effort to bring the TIGER thermochemical code into the 1990s. A wide variety of improvements have been made in Version 1.0, and a host of others will be implemented in the future. In CHEETAH 1.0 I have improved the robustness and ease of use of TIGER. All of TIGER`s solvers have been replaced by new algorithms. I find that CHEETAH solves a wider variety of problems with no user intervention (e.g. no guesses for the C-J state) than TIGER did. CHEETAH has been made simpler to use than TIGER; typical use of the code occurs with the new standard run command. I hope that CHEETAH makes the use of thermochemical codes more attractive to practical explosive formulators. In the future I plan to improve the underlying science in CHEETAH. More accurate equations of state will be used in the gas and the condensed phase. A kinetics capability will be added to the code that will predict reaction zone thickness. CHEETAH is currently a numerical implementation of C-J theory. It will,become an implementation of ZND theory. Further ease of use features will eventually be added; an automatic formulator that adjusts concentrations to match desired properties is planned.

  8. AREST-CT V1.0 software verification

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Y.; Engel, D.W.; McGrail, B.P.; Lessor, K.S.

    1995-07-01

    The Analyzer for Radionuclide Source-Term with Chemical Transport (AREST-CT) is a scientific computer code designed for performance assessments of engineered barrier system (EBS) concepts for the underground storage of nuclear waste, including high-level, intermediate, and low-level wastes. The AREST-CT code has features for analyzing the degradation of and release of radionuclides from the waste form, chemical reactions that depend on time and space, and transport of the waste and other products through the EBS. This document provides a description of the verification testing that has been performed on the initial version of ARESTCT (V1.0). Software verification is the process of confirming that the models and algorithms have been correctly implemented into a computer code. Software verification for V1.0 consisted of testing the individual modules (unit tests) and a test of the fully-coupled model (integration testing). The integration test was done by comparing the results from AREST-CT with the results from the reactive transport code CIRF.A. The test problem consisted of a 1-D analysis of the release, transport, and precipitation of {sup 99}{Tc} in an idealized LLW disposal system. All verification tests showed that AREST-CT works properly and in accordance with design specifications.

  9. Termination and hydration of forsteritic olivine (0 1 0) surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Hongping; Park, Changyong; Ahn, Gun; Hong, Seungbum; Keane, Denis T.; Kenney-Benson, Curtis; Chow, Paul; Xiao, Yuming; Shen, Guoyin

    2014-11-01

    Termination and hydration of the forsteritic (Fo90Fa10) olivine (0 1 0) surface have been investigated with high-resolution specular X-ray reflectivity and Atomic Force Microscopy. The surface was prepared by polishing a naturally grown {0 1 0} face, from which we found the polished surface in acidic (pH 3.5) alumina suspension exhibits regular steps while the basic (pH 9.5) silica polished surface is irregularly roughened, indicating there are two distinguishable mechanochemical processes for the surface dissolution. The quantitative interpretation of the regular steps from the alumina-polished surface suggests that the observed step heights correspond to multiples of crystallographic unit cell. Only this atomically terraced surface is investigated with the high-resolution X-ray reflectivity (HRXR) to determine the surface termination and hydration. The basic silica paste polished surface turned out too rough to measure with X-ray reflectivity. HRXR reveals that the alumina polished olivine (0 1 0) surface in pure water is terminated at a plane including half-occupied metal ion sites (M1), an oxygen vacancy site, and a silicate tetrahedral unit with one of its apices pointing outward with respect to the surface. An ideal termination with the oxygen vacancy would fulfill the stoichiometry of the formula unit; however, in the observation, the vacancy site is filled by an adsorbed water species and about a quarter of the remaining metal ions are further depleted. The terminating plane generates two distinct atomic layers in the laterally averaged electron density profile, on which two highly ordered adsorbed water layers are formed. The first layer formation is likely through the direct interaction with the M1 plane and the second layer is likely through the hydrogen bonding interaction with the first water layer. With this multilayered adsorbed water structure, the surface metal ion is partially hydrated by the vacancy-filling water species and adsorbed water

  10. Verification and validation of RADMODL Version 1.0

    SciTech Connect

    Kimball, K.D.

    1993-03-01

    RADMODL is a system of linked computer codes designed to calculate the radiation environment following an accident in which nuclear materials are released. The RADMODL code and the corresponding Verification and Validation (V&V) calculations (Appendix A), were developed for Westinghouse Savannah River Company (WSRC) by EGS Corporation (EGS). Each module of RADMODL is an independent code and was verified separately. The full system was validated by comparing the output of the various modules with the corresponding output of a previously verified version of the modules. The results of the verification and validation tests show that RADMODL correctly calculates the transport of radionuclides and radiation doses. As a result of this verification and validation effort, RADMODL Version 1.0 is certified for use in calculating the radiation environment following an accident.

  11. NIMS Radiance Point Spectra of Gaspra V1.0

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Granahan, J. C.

    2014-10-01

    This data volume contains radiometrically corrected point spectra of asteroid 951 as acquired by the Galileo spacecraft Near Infrared Mapping Spectrometer (NIMS) on October 29, 1991. They record the spectra collected as the Galileo spacecraft approached the target asteroid. These data are products of the calibration of the raw data number files gap015tn.qub, gap035tn.qub, gap036tn.qub, gap037tn.qub, and gap038tn.qub (DATA SET ID ='GO-A-NIMS-3 TUBE-V1.0') with calibration factors acquired during the first Earth/Moon encounter of the Galileo mission. These raw data .qub files are archived in the Imaging Node of the NASA Planetary Data System (PDS). The calibrated spectra consist of radiance measurements for wavelengths between 0.7 - 5.2 micrometers.

  12. VIPAR - Vortex Inflation PARachute Code Ver. 1.0

    SciTech Connect

    Strickland, James; Homicz, Greg; Porter, Vicki; Burns, Shawn; Gassler, Albert

    2001-11-01

    VIPAR is a 3-D fluid mechanics code for predicting flow past bluff bodies whose surfaces can be assumed to be made up of shell elements that are simply connected. Version 1.0 of the code contains several first order algorithms, which we are already in the process of replacing with higher order ones. These enhancements will appear in the next version of VIPAR. The present code contains a motion generator, which can be used to produce large class of rigid body motions. The present code has also been fully coupled to a structural dynamics code in which the geometry undergoes large time dependent deformations. Initial surface geometry is generated from triangular shell elements using a code such as Patran and is written into an Exodusll data base file for subsequent input into VIPAR. Surface and wake variable information is output into two Exodusll files which can be processed and viewed using software such as EnSight.

  13. Nanomechanical behavior of (1 0 0) oriented titanium thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vasu, Kuraganti; Ghanashyam Krishna, Mamidipudi; Padmanabhan, Kuppuswamy Anantha

    2014-03-01

    Titanium thin films were deposited on single crystal Si (3 1 1) and polycrystalline 316 LN nuclear grade stainless steel substrates by RF magnetron sputtering. X-ray diffraction revealed that, irrespective of substrate type, films exhibit preferential growth along the (1 0 0) plane. The microstructure of the films corresponds to the zone-I type in structure zone model on both substrates. The hardness and Young's modulus of the films were extracted from load-displacement curves. The maximum values of hardness and Young's modulus were 12 and 132 GPa respectively for 220 nm thin film on SS substrate. The electrical resistivity data revealed that the films are metallic in nature and the resistivity is lower in the case of the 220 nm thickness film, on both substrates. The observed changes in mechanical and electrical properties can be correlated with variations in the microstructure of Ti films.

  14. CONTROLITE 1.0. Lighting Control Energy Savings

    SciTech Connect

    Rubinstein, F.

    1985-11-01

    CONTROLITE 1.0 is a lighting energy analysis program designed to calculate the energy savings and cost benefits obtainable using lighting controls in buildings. The program can compute the lighting energy reductions that result from using daylighting, scheduling, and other control strategies. When modeling daylight control systems, the program uses QUICKLITE to compute the daylight illuminances at specified points 5 times a day, 12 days a year (the 21st of each month), and for two sky conditions (clear and overcast skies). Fourier series techniques are used to fit a continuous curve through the computed illuminance points. The energy use for each of the 12 days is then computed given user-specified power-in/light-out characteristics of the modeled control system. The monthly and annual energy usage for overcast and clear conditions are found separately by fitting two long-term Fourier series curves to the energy use computed for each of the 12 days. Finally, the monthly energy use is calculated by taking a weighted average for the monthly energy use computed for the overcast and clear sky conditions. The program only treats the energy use directly attributable to lighting. The impact of lighting control strategies on building thermal loads is not computed. The program allows input of different control schedules (i.e., on/off times for the lighting system) for each day of the week, but every week of the year is treated the same; thus, holidays cannot be modeled explicitly. When used for daylighting purposes, CONTROLITE1.0 understands only clear and overcast conditions. User-supplied values for the proportion of clear and overcast hours for each month of the year are required to accommodate different climatic conditions.

  15. High resolution analysis of the rotational levels of the (0 0 0), (0 1 0), (1 0 0), (0 0 1), (0 2 0), (1 1 0) and (0 1 1) vibrational states of 34S16O2

    SciTech Connect

    Lafferty, Walter; Flaud, Jean-marie; Sams, Robert L.; Ngom, El Hadji A.

    2008-11-01

    A high resolution (0.0018 cm-1) Fourier transform instrument has been used to record the spectrum of an enriched 34S (95.3 %) sample of sulfur dioxide. A thorough analysis of the ν2, 2ν2 - ν2 , ν1, ν1 + ν2 - ν2, ν3, ν2 + ν3 - ν2, ν1 + ν2 and ν2 + ν3 bands has been carried out leading to a large set of assigned lines. From these lines ground state combination differences were obtained and fitted together with the existing microwave, millimeter, and terahertz rotational lines. An improved set of ground state rotational constants were obtained. Next, the upper state rotational levels were fitted. For the (010), (110), (011) states, a simple Watson type Hamilton sufficed. However, it was necessary to include explicitly interacting terms in the Hamiltonian matrix in order to fit the rotational levels of the (020), (100) and (101) states to within their experimental accuracy. More explicitly, it was necessary to use a ΔK=2 term to model the Fermi interaction between the (020) and (100) levels and a ΔK=3 term to model the Coriolis interaction between the (100) and (001) levels. Precise Hamiltonian constants were derived for the (000), (010), (100), (001), (020), (110) and (011) vibrational states.

  16. Sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P)/S1P receptor 1 signaling regulates receptor activator of NF-{kappa}B ligand (RANKL) expression in rheumatoid arthritis

    SciTech Connect

    Takeshita, Harunori; Kitano, Masayasu; Iwasaki, Tsuyoshi; Kitano, Sachie; Tsunemi, Sachi; Sato, Chieri; Sekiguchi, Masahiro; Azuma, Naoto; Miyazawa, Keiji; Hla, Timothy; Sano, Hajime

    2012-03-09

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer MH7A cells and CD4{sup +} T cells expressed S1P1 and RANKL. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer S1P increased RANKL expression in MH7A cells and CD4{sup +} T cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The effect of S1P in MH7A cells was inhibited by specific Gi/Go inhibitors. -- Abstract: Sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P)/S1P receptor 1 (S1P1) signaling plays an important role in synovial cell proliferation and inflammatory gene expression by rheumatoid arthritis (RA) synoviocytes. The purpose of this study is to clarify the role of S1P/S1P1 signaling in the expression of receptor activator of NF-{kappa}B ligand (RANKL) in RA synoviocytes and CD4{sup +} T cells. We demonstrated MH7A cells, a human RA synovial cell line, and CD4{sup +} T cells expressed S1P1 and RANKL. Surprisingly, S1P increased RANKL expression in MH7A cells and CD4{sup +} T cells in a dose-dependent manner. Moreover, S1P enhanced RANKL expression induced by stimulation with TNF-{alpha} in MH7A cells and CD4{sup +} T cells. These effects of S1P in MH7A cells were inhibited by pretreatment with PTX, a specific Gi/Go inhibitor. These findings suggest that S1P/S1P1 signaling may play an important role in RANKL expression by MH7A cells and CD4{sup +} T cells. S1P/S1P1 signaling of RA synoviocytes is closely connected with synovial hyperplasia, inflammation, and RANKL-induced osteoclastogenesis in RA. Thus, regulation of S1P/S1P1 signaling may become a novel therapeutic target for RA.

  17. Land-Use Portfolio Modeler, Version 1.0

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Taketa, Richard; Hong, Makiko

    2010-01-01

    -on-investment. The portfolio model, now known as the Land-Use Portfolio Model (LUPM), provided the framework for the development of the Land-Use Portfolio Modeler, Version 1.0 software (LUPM v1.0). The software provides a geographic information system (GIS)-based modeling tool for evaluating alternative risk-reduction mitigation strategies for specific natural-hazard events. The modeler uses information about a specific natural-hazard event and the features exposed to that event within the targeted study region to derive a measure of a given mitigation strategy`s effectiveness. Harnessing the spatial capabilities of a GIS enables the tool to provide a rich, interactive mapping environment in which users can create, analyze, visualize, and compare different

  18. What sort of standard candle is Orion for studying molecular hydrogen line emission in galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burton, Michael; Puxley, Phil J.

    1990-01-01

    The total shocked and fluorescent molecular hydrogen 1-0 S(1) line luminosities from Orion have been measured to be about 2.5 solar luminosity and about 2.0 solar luminosity, respectively. The implications for using Orion to study the interstellar medium in galaxies is discussed.

  19. EOS7C-ECBM Version 1.0

    2012-11-14

    EOS7C is an equation of state module for the TOUGH2 program for CO2 or N2 in Methane (CH4) Reservoirs. In the present work, additions have been made to the EOS7C Version 1.0 module to include the Enhanced Coal Bed Methane (ECBM) modifications developed by Webb (2003). In addition, the Dusty Gas Model for gas-phase diffusion (Webb 2001) has been included. The ECBM modification to the EOS7C equation of state incorporate the extended Langmuir isothem formore » sorbing gases, including the change in porosity associated with the sorbed gas mass. Comparison to hand calculations for pure gas and binary mixture shows very good agreement. Application to a CO2 well injection problem by Law et al. (2002). The Dusty Model modification add options to calculate gas diffusion using the Dusty-Gas Model including separate and coupled approaches. Comparison to low-permeability pure gas diffusion data shows excellent agreement. The results from the DGM are compared to the Fick's Law behavior for diffusion across a capillary fringe. The differences between the models are small due to the relatively high permeability (10-11 m2) of the problem.« less

  20. NAS Parallel Benchmark Results 11-96. 1.0

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bailey, David H.; Bailey, David; Chancellor, Marisa K. (Technical Monitor)

    1997-01-01

    The NAS Parallel Benchmarks have been developed at NASA Ames Research Center to study the performance of parallel supercomputers. The eight benchmark problems are specified in a "pencil and paper" fashion. In other words, the complete details of the problem to be solved are given in a technical document, and except for a few restrictions, benchmarkers are free to select the language constructs and implementation techniques best suited for a particular system. These results represent the best results that have been reported to us by the vendors for the specific 3 systems listed. In this report, we present new NPB (Version 1.0) performance results for the following systems: DEC Alpha Server 8400 5/440, Fujitsu VPP Series (VX, VPP300, and VPP700), HP/Convex Exemplar SPP2000, IBM RS/6000 SP P2SC node (120 MHz), NEC SX-4/32, SGI/CRAY T3E, SGI Origin200, and SGI Origin2000. We also report High Performance Fortran (HPF) based NPB results for IBM SP2 Wide Nodes, HP/Convex Exemplar SPP2000, and SGI/CRAY T3D. These results have been submitted by Applied Parallel Research (APR) and Portland Group Inc. (PGI). We also present sustained performance per dollar for Class B LU, SP and BT benchmarks.

  1. EOS7C-ECBM Version 1.0

    SciTech Connect

    2012-11-14

    EOS7C is an equation of state module for the TOUGH2 program for CO2 or N2 in Methane (CH4) Reservoirs. In the present work, additions have been made to the EOS7C Version 1.0 module to include the Enhanced Coal Bed Methane (ECBM) modifications developed by Webb (2003). In addition, the Dusty Gas Model for gas-phase diffusion (Webb 2001) has been included. The ECBM modification to the EOS7C equation of state incorporate the extended Langmuir isothem for sorbing gases, including the change in porosity associated with the sorbed gas mass. Comparison to hand calculations for pure gas and binary mixture shows very good agreement. Application to a CO2 well injection problem by Law et al. (2002). The Dusty Model modification add options to calculate gas diffusion using the Dusty-Gas Model including separate and coupled approaches. Comparison to low-permeability pure gas diffusion data shows excellent agreement. The results from the DGM are compared to the Fick's Law behavior for diffusion across a capillary fringe. The differences between the models are small due to the relatively high permeability (10-11 m2) of the problem.

  2. VIPAR - Vortex Inflation PARachute Code Ver. 1.0

    2001-11-01

    VIPAR is a 3-D fluid mechanics code for predicting flow past bluff bodies whose surfaces can be assumed to be made up of shell elements that are simply connected. Version 1.0 of the code contains several first order algorithms, which we are already in the process of replacing with higher order ones. These enhancements will appear in the next version of VIPAR. The present code contains a motion generator, which can be used to producemore » large class of rigid body motions. The present code has also been fully coupled to a structural dynamics code in which the geometry undergoes large time dependent deformations. Initial surface geometry is generated from triangular shell elements using a code such as Patran and is written into an Exodusll data base file for subsequent input into VIPAR. Surface and wake variable information is output into two Exodusll files which can be processed and viewed using software such as EnSight.« less

  3. Data Acquisition Backbone Core DABC release v1.0

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adamczewski-Musch, J.; Essel, H. G.; Kurz, N.; Linev, S.

    2010-04-01

    The Data Acquisition Backbone Core (DABC) is a general purpose software framework designed for the implementation of a wide-range of data acquisition systems - from various small detector test beds to high performance systems. DABC consists of a compact data-flow kernel and a number of plug-ins for various functional components like data inputs, device drivers, user functional modules and applications. DABC provides configurable components for implementing event building over fast networks like InfiniBand or Gigabit Ethernet. A generic Java GUI provides the dynamic control and visualization of control parameters and commands, provided by DIM servers. A first set of application plug-ins has been implemented to use DABC as event builder for the front-end components of the GSI standard DAQ system MBS (Multi Branch System). Another application covers the connection to DAQ readout chains from detector front-end boards (N-XYTER) linked to read-out controller boards (ROC) over UDP into DABC for event building, archiving and data serving. This was applied for data taking in the September 2008 test beamtime for the CBM experiment at GSI. DABC version 1.0 is released and available from the website.

  4. CO J = 1-0 SPECTROSCOPY OF FOUR SUBMILLIMETER GALAXIES WITH THE ZPECTROMETER ON THE GREEN BANK TELESCOPE

    SciTech Connect

    Harris, A. I.; Zonak, S. G.; Rauch, K.; Baker, A. J.; Sharon, C. E.; Genzel, R.; Watts, G.; Creager, R. E-mail: szonak@astro.umd.ed E-mail: ajbaker@physics.rutgers.ed E-mail: genzel@mpe.mpg.d E-mail: rcreager@nrao.ed

    2010-11-10

    We report detections of three z {approx} 2.5 submillimeter-selected galaxies (SMGs; SMM J14011+0252, SMM J14009+0252, SMM J04431+0210) in the lowest rotational transition of the carbon monoxide molecule (CO J = 1-0) and one nondetection (SMM J04433+0210). For the three galaxies we detected, we find a line-integrated brightness temperature ratio of the J = 3-2 and 1-0 lines of 0.68 {+-} 0.08; the 1-0 line is stronger than predicted by the frequent assumption of equal brightnesses in the two lines and by most single-component models. The observed ratio suggests that mass estimates for SMGs based on J = 3-2 observations and J = 1-0 column density or mass conversion factors are low by a factor of 1.5. Comparison of the 1-0 line intensities with intensities of higher-J transitions indicates that single-component models for the interstellar media in SMGs are incomplete. The small dispersion in the ratio, along with published detections of CO lines with J{sub upper}>3 in most of the sources, indicates that the emission is from multi-component interstellar media with physical structures common to many classes of galaxies. This result tends to rule out the lowest scaling factors between CO luminosity and molecular gas mass, and further increases molecular mass estimates calibrated against observations of galaxies in the local universe. We also describe and demonstrate a statistically sound method for finding weak lines in broadband spectra that will find application in searches for molecular lines from sources at unknown redshifts.

  5. Magnetic flux conversion and relaxation toward a minimum-energy state in S-1 spheromak plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Janos, A.

    1985-09-01

    S-1 Spheromak currents and magnetic fluxes have been measured with Rogowski coils and flux loops external to the plasma. Toroidal plasma currents up to 350 kA and spheromak configuration lifetimes over 1.0 msec have been achieved at moderate power levels. The plasma formation in the S-1 Spheromak device is based on an inductive transfer of poloidal and toroidal magnetic flux from a toroidal ''flux core'' to the plasma. Formation is programmed to guide the configuration into a force-free, minimum-energy Taylor state. Properly detailed programming of the formation process is found not to be essential since plasmas adjust themselves during formation to a final equilibrium near the Taylor state. After formation, if the plasma evolves away from the stable state, then distinct relaxation oscillation events occur which restore the configuration to that stable state. The relaxation process involves reconnection of magnetic field lines, and conversion of poloidal to toroidal magnetic flux (and vice versa) has been observed and documented. The scaling of toroidal plasma current and toroidal magnetic flux in the plasma with externally applied currents is consistent with the establishment of a Taylor state after formation. In addition, the magnetic helicity is proportional to that injected from the flux core, independent of how that helicity is generated.

  6. The growth modes of vapor-deposited Bi on Cu(2 1 0)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blum, B.; Ascolani, H.

    2001-06-01

    This work presents growth modes of vapor-deposited Bi on clean and C contaminated Cu(2 1 0) surfaces, characterized with low energy electron diffraction (LEED), Auger electron spectroscopy (AES), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), and work-function shifts ( Δeφ). Up to θBi=0.5 ML (monolayer, ML) fractional Bi coverage (equivalent to 0.686×10 15 at. cm -2) a p(1×1) structure is observed, associated with a gradual LEED pattern symmetry change from one mirror plane for clean Cu(2 1 0) to two, for θBi=0.5 ML. The higher symmetry phase is stable up to 723 K, and no appreciable binding-energy shifts are detected by XPS in the Bi (4f 7/2) and Cu (2p 3/2) core lines. Additional Bi results in Stranski-Krastanov growth of a compact Cu(2 1 0)-(6×1)-Bi structure with eight Bi atoms per unit cell, stable up to 628 K. Impurity levels of both either pre or coadsorbed C lower the stability temperature of the (6×1)-Bi phase. However, C does not have any appreciable influence on the p(1×1)-Bi phase. The presence of as little as θC=0.1 ML of preadsorbed C produces Frank-Van der Merwe (layer by layer) growth of the p(1×1) c2mm structure, up till completion of the third layer, and as much as 30% variation in Δeφ values with respect to C-free samples. Carbon appears to have no effect on the growth, at 723 K, of Cu(2 1 0)-p(1×1)-Bi facets from the Cu(1 0 0)-c(2×2)-Bi phase when sufficient defects (vacancies) are present in the selvedge.

  7. User's Manual for FEMOM3DR. Version 1.0

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reddy, C. J.

    1998-01-01

    FEMoM3DR is a computer code written in FORTRAN 77 to compute radiation characteristics of antennas on 3D body using combined Finite Element Method (FEM)/Method of Moments (MoM) technique. The code is written to handle different feeding structures like coaxial line, rectangular waveguide, and circular waveguide. This code uses the tetrahedral elements, with vector edge basis functions for FEM and triangular elements with roof-top basis functions for MoM. By virtue of FEM, this code can handle any arbitrary shaped three dimensional bodies with inhomogeneous lossy materials; and due to MoM the computational domain can be terminated in any arbitrary shape. The User's Manual is written to make the user acquainted with the operation of the code. The user is assumed to be familiar with the FORTRAN 77 language and the operating environment of the computers on which the code is intended to run.

  8. Sim Track User's Manual (v 1.0)

    SciTech Connect

    Luo, Y.

    2010-01-27

    SimTrack is a simple c++ library designed for the numeric particle tracking in the high energy accelerators. It adopts the 4th order symplectic integrator for the optical transport in the magnetic elements. The 4-D and 6-D weak-strong beam-beam treatments are integrated in it for the beam-beam studies. SimTrack is written with c++ class and standard template library. It provides versatile functions to manage elements and lines. It supports a large range of types of elements. New type of element can be easily created in the library. SimTrack calculates Twiss, coupling and fits tunes, chromaticities and corrects closed orbits. AC dipole and AC multipole are available in this library. SimTrack allows change of element parameters during tracking.

  9. Sub-Doppler Stark Spectroscopy in the A−X (1,0) Band of CN

    SciTech Connect

    Hall, G.E.; Hause, M.L.; Sears, T.J.

    2009-11-26

    The effect of external electric fields has been measured in hyperfine-resolved sub-Doppler transitions in the A {sup 2}{Pi}-X {sup 2}{Sigma} (1,0) band of the CN radical near 10900 cm{sup -1}. Static electric fields less than 1 kV/cm are sufficient to mix the most closely spaced {Lambda}-dpublets in the A state, leading to Stark spectra with both new and shifted resonances. Simulations of the saturation-dip Stark spectral line profiles allow extraction of the A-state permanent electric dipole moment with a magnitude of 0.06 {+-} 0.02 D.

  10. RHEED study of the (1 1 0) cleavage surface of CdTe:Cr single crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sagan, P.; Kuzma, M.

    2007-03-01

    The structure of (1 1 0) plane of Cr-doped CdTe single crystals has been studied by reflection high energy electron diffraction and scanning electron microscopy. Diffraction patterns consist of diffraction spots and Kikuchi lines. However, for very small incident angle, the Debye rings are observed. The constant lattice attributed to these rings is 0.8% less then for pure CdTe. These anomalous properties of the near surface layer are likely to occur due to the concentration of Cr atoms creating compressive surface strains or the effect of crystal cleavage.

  11. Sandia Compact Sensor Node (SCSN) v. 1.0

    2009-01-07

    The SCSN communication protocol is implemented in software and incorporates elements of Frequency Division Multiple Access (FDMA), Time Division Multiple Access (TDMA), and Carrier Sense Multiple Access (CSMA) to reduce radio message collisions, latency, and power consumption. Alarm messages are expeditiously routed to a central node as a 'star' network with minimum overhead. Other messages can be routed along network links between any two nodes so that peer-to-peer communication is possible. Broadcast messages can bemore » composed that flood the entire network or just specific portions with minimal radio traffic and latency. Two-way communication with sensor nodes, which sleep most of the time to conserve battery life, can occur at seven second intervals. SCSN software also incorporates special algorithms to minimize superfluous radio traffic that can result from excessive intrusion alarm messages. A built-in seismic detector is implemented with a geophone and software that distinguishes between pedestrian and vehicular targets. Other external sensors can be attached to a SCSN using supervised interface lines that are controlled by software. All software is written in the ANSI C language for ease of development, maintenance, and portability.« less

  12. Sandia Compact Sensor Node (SCSN) v. 1.0

    SciTech Connect

    HARRINGTON, JOHN

    2009-01-07

    The SCSN communication protocol is implemented in software and incorporates elements of Frequency Division Multiple Access (FDMA), Time Division Multiple Access (TDMA), and Carrier Sense Multiple Access (CSMA) to reduce radio message collisions, latency, and power consumption. Alarm messages are expeditiously routed to a central node as a 'star' network with minimum overhead. Other messages can be routed along network links between any two nodes so that peer-to-peer communication is possible. Broadcast messages can be composed that flood the entire network or just specific portions with minimal radio traffic and latency. Two-way communication with sensor nodes, which sleep most of the time to conserve battery life, can occur at seven second intervals. SCSN software also incorporates special algorithms to minimize superfluous radio traffic that can result from excessive intrusion alarm messages. A built-in seismic detector is implemented with a geophone and software that distinguishes between pedestrian and vehicular targets. Other external sensors can be attached to a SCSN using supervised interface lines that are controlled by software. All software is written in the ANSI C language for ease of development, maintenance, and portability.

  13. W delta doping in Si(1 0 0) using ultraclean low-pressure CVD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanaya, Toshiyuki; Sakuraba, Masao; Murota, Junichi

    2003-05-01

    W delta doping in Si epitaxial growth by WF 6 and SiH 4 reaction has been investigated using an ultraclean cold-wall low-pressure chemical vapor deposition (CVD) system. Atomic-layer order W deposition is performed on wet-cleaned Si(1 0 0) substrate at 100 °C using WF 6 and SiH 4. Si epitaxial growth is achieved by SiH 4 reaction at 480 °C on 4×10 13 cm -2 W deposited Si(1 0 0), however, it is found that almost all the deposited W atoms segregate on the deposited Si film. It is also found that such segregation is suppressed by the atomic-order W diffusion into Si(1 0 0) substrate by the heat treatment at 520 °C before the Si deposition. In the case of the Si film deposited on the 1.3×10 14 cm -2 W diffused Si, the reflection high-energy electron diffraction (RHEED) pattern indicates the crystallinity and the roughness degrade. In the case of the Si film deposited on the 5×10 13 cm -2 W diffused Si, the RHEED pattern shows streaks with Kikuchi lines. As a result, the W delta doping in the Si epitaxial growth is achieved, in which the W concentration is as high as 6×10 20 cm -3 and the incorporated W atoms is confined within 2 nm-thick region.

  14. Triggered star formation around the G54.1+0.3 supernova remnant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koo, Bon-Chul; Kim, Hyun-Jeong; Moon, Dae-Sik; Kurtz, Stanley; McKee, Christopher F.

    G54.1+0.3 is a young, Crab-like supernova remnant (SNR) at a distance of 8 kpc. Recently, an infrared loop with embedded stellar sources surrounding the SNR was discovered by the Spitzer Space Telescope and the AKARI infrared telescope. The stellar sources are bright in the mid-infrared with significant excess emission. Koo et al. (2008) showed that the broadband near-infrared properties are consistent with OB stars at the same distance as the SNR, and concluded that they are young (≤2 Myr) stellar objects, whose formation was possibly triggered by the progenitor of G54.1+0.3. We present near-infrared (1-2.4 µm) spectra of six sources obtained with the TripleSpec spectrograph on the Palomar 5-m Hale telescope. Strong hydrogen and moderate He I absorption lines in the spectra confirm that the stellar sources are late-O and early-B stars, while no emission lines such as Br γ indicates the absence of circumstellar disks near the central stars, as Koo et al. suggested. We have also analyzed archival VLA data at 4, 6 and 20 cm, and present continuum images of the pulsar wind nebula and a surrounding shell. A spectral index analysis suggests the presence of free-free emission associated with the massive stars. We discuss the relation between the stellar sources, the infrared loop, and the SNR.

  15. Hypothalamic S1P/S1PR1 axis controls energy homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Silva, Vagner R R; Micheletti, Thayana O; Pimentel, Gustavo D; Katashima, Carlos K; Lenhare, Luciene; Morari, Joseane; Mendes, Maria Carolina S; Razolli, Daniela S; Rocha, Guilherme Z; de Souza, Claudio T; Ryu, Dongryeol; Prada, Patrícia O; Velloso, Lício A; Carvalheira, José B C; Pauli, José Rodrigo; Cintra, Dennys E; Ropelle, Eduardo R

    2014-01-01

    Sphingosine 1-phosphate receptor 1 (S1PR1) is a G-protein-coupled receptor for sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) that has a role in many physiological and pathophysiological processes. Here we show that the S1P/S1PR1 signalling pathway in hypothalamic neurons regulates energy homeostasis in rodents. We demonstrate that S1PR1 protein is highly enriched in hypothalamic POMC neurons of rats. Intracerebroventricular injections of the bioactive lipid, S1P, reduce food consumption and increase rat energy expenditure through persistent activation of STAT3 and the melanocortin system. Similarly, the selective disruption of hypothalamic S1PR1 increases food intake and reduces the respiratory exchange ratio. We further show that STAT3 controls S1PR1 expression in neurons via a positive feedback mechanism. Interestingly, several models of obesity and cancer anorexia display an imbalance of hypothalamic S1P/S1PR1/STAT3 axis, whereas pharmacological intervention ameliorates these phenotypes. Taken together, our data demonstrate that the neuronal S1P/S1PR1/STAT3 signalling axis plays a critical role in the control of energy homeostasis in rats. PMID:25255053

  16. Millimeter-wave Molecular Line Observations of the Tornado Nebula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakai, D.; Oka, T.; Tanaka, K.; Matsumura, S.; Miura, K.; Takekawa, S.

    2014-08-01

    We report the results of millimeter-wave molecular line observations of the Tornado Nebula (G357.7-0.1), which is a bright radio source behind the Galactic center region. A 15' × 15' area was mapped in the J = 1-0 lines of CO, 13CO, and HCO+ with the Nobeyama Radio Observatory 45 m telescope. The Very Large Array archival data of OH at 1720 MHz were also reanalyzed. We found two molecular clouds with separate velocities, V LSR = -14 km s-1 and +5 km s-1. These clouds show rough spatial anti-correlation. Both clouds are associated with OH 1720 MHz emissions in the area overlapping with the Tornado Nebula. The spatial and velocity coincidence indicates violent interaction between the clouds and the Tornado Nebula. Modestly excited gas prefers the position of the Tornado "head" in the -14 km s-1 cloud, also suggesting the interaction. Virial analysis shows that the +5 km s-1 cloud is more tightly bound by self-gravity than the -14 km s-1 cloud. We propose a formation scenario for the Tornado Nebula; the +5 km s-1 cloud collided into the -14 km s-1 cloud, generating a high-density layer behind the shock front, which activates a putative compact object by Bondi-Hoyle-Lyttleton accretion to eject a pair of bipolar jets.

  17. Clinical efficacy assessment in photodamaged skin of 0.5% and 1.0% idebenone.

    PubMed

    McDaniel, D H; Neudecker, B A; DiNardo, J C; Lewis, J A; Maibach, H I

    2005-09-01

    Idebenone is an antioxidant lower molecular weight analogue of coenzyme Q10. Previously, idebenone was shown to be a very effective antioxidant in its ability to protect against cell damage from oxidative stress in a variety of biochemical, cell biological, and in vivo methods, including its ability to suppress sunburn cell (SBC) formation in living skin. However, no clinical studies have been previously conducted to establish the efficacy of idebenone in a topical skincare formulation for the treatment of photodamaged skin. In this nonvehicle control study, 0.5% and 1.0% idebenone commercial formulations were evaluated in a clinical trial for topical safety and efficacy in photodamaged skin. Forty-one female subjects, aged 30-65, with moderate photodamaged skin were randomized to use a blind labelled (either 0.5% or 1.0% idebenone in otherwise identical lotion bases) skincare preparation twice daily for six weeks. Blinded expert grader assessments for skin roughness/dryness, fine lines/wrinkles, and global improvement in photodamage were performed at baseline, three weeks and six weeks. Electrical conductance readings for skin surface hydration and 35 mm digital photography were made at baseline after six weeks. Punch biopsies were taken from randomly selected subjects, baseline and after six weeks, and stained for certain antibodies (interleukin IL-6, interleukin IL-1b, matrixmetalloproteinase MMP-1, collagen I) using immunofluorescence microscopy. After six weeks' use of the 1.0% idebenone formula, a 26% reduction in skin roughness/dryness was observed, a 37% increase in skin hydration, a 29% reduction in fine lines/wrinkles, and a 33% improvement in overall global assessment of photodamaged skin. For the 0.5% idebenone formulation, a 23% reduction in skin roughness/dryness was observed, a 37% increase in skin hydration, a 27% reduction in fine lines/wrinkles, and a 30% improvement in overall global assessment of photodamaged skin. The immunofluorescence

  18. The Global S$_1$ Ocean Tide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ray, Richard D.; Egbert, G. D.

    2003-01-01

    The small S$_1$ ocean tide is caused primarily by diurnal atmospheric pressure loading. Its excitation is therefore unlike any other diurnal tide. The global character of $S-1$ is here determined by numerical modeling and by analysis of Topex/Poseidon satellite altimeter data. The two approaches yield reasonably consistent results, and large ( $ greater than $l\\cm) amplitudes in several regions are further confirmed by comparison with coastal tide gauges. Notwithstanding their excitation differences, S$-1$ and other diurnal tides are found to share several common features, such as relatively large amplitudes in the Arabian Sea, the Sea of Okhotsk, and the Gulf of Alaska. The most noticeable difference is the lack of an S$-1$ Antarctic Kelvin wave. These similarities and differences can be explained in terms of the coherences between near-diurnal oceanic normal modes and the underlying tidal forcings. While gravitational diurnal tidal forces excite primarily a 28-hour Antarctic-Pacific mode, the S$_1$ air tide excites several other near-diurnal modes, none of which has large amplitudes near Antarctica.

  19. The 1.0 Megaparsec Galaxy Pair Sample in Low-Density Regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nordgren, Tyler E.; Chengalur, Jayaram N.; Salpeter, E. E.; Terzian, Yervant

    2000-11-01

    Using complete redshift catalogs, we have compiled a list of galaxy pairs based solely on a pair's projected separation, rp, and velocity difference, ΔV. We have made high-velocity precision H I observations of each galaxy in the sample and have reported these in the literature. Due to the nature of the redshift catalogs, we are able to quantitatively evaluate the effects of isolation and number density of surrounding galaxies on each pair in the sample. For the close galaxy pairs (rp<100 kpc), the degree of isolation (a measure of the number of near neighbors) has little effect on the median ΔV. This median is about 55 km s-1 for the 25 close pairs (if medium-density close pairs are omitted ΔV is even smaller, but the difference is not statistically significant). The effect of isolation is strong for the entire sample of galaxy pairs with separations as large as 1.0 Mpc. For these larger separation pairs, relaxation of strict isolation requirements introduces small groups into the sample, which dramatically increases the median ΔV. We find little evidence of an increase in the median ΔV with decreasing rp, nor with increasing total luminosity. For our isolated pairs in low-density regions, the overall median ΔV is only 30 km s-1. For similar separations and isolation criteria, galaxy satellites with larger luminosity ratios (i.e., less dynamical friction) in higher density regions have ΔV approximately twice as large. We conjecture that our orbits are highly eccentric, so that the indirect effect of dynamical friction leads to predominantly small ΔV. However, the halos of our galaxies may also be of low density (although highly extended).

  20. Design and performance of a 4He-evaporator at <1.0 K

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, N. K.; Pradhan, J.; Naser, Md. Z. A.; Roy, A.; Mandal, B. Ch.; Mallik, C.; Bhandari, R. K.

    2012-12-01

    A helium evaporator for obtaining 1 K temperature has been built and tested in laboratory. This will function primarily as the precooling stage for the circulating helium isotopic gas mixture. This works on evaporative cooling by way of pumping out the vapour from the top of the pot. A precision needle valve is used initially to fill up the pot and subsequently a permanent flow impedance maintains the helium flow from the bath into the pot to replenish the evaporative loss of helium. Considering the cooling power of 10 mW @1.0 K, a 99.0 cm3 helium evaporator was designed, fabricated from OFE copper and tested in the laboratory. A pumping station comprising of a roots pump backed by a dry pump was used for evacuation. The calibrated RuO thermometer and kapton film heater were used for measuring the temperature and cooling power of the system respectively. The continuously filled 1 K bath is tested in the laboratory and found to offer a temperature less than 1.0 K by withdrawing vapour from the evaporator. In order to minimize the heat load and to prevent film creep across the pumping tube, size optimization of the pumping line and pump-out port has been performed. The results of test run along with relevant analysis, mechanical fabrication of flow impedance are presented here.

  1. Discovery of an Energetic Pulsar Associated with SNR G76.9+1.0

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arzoumanian, Zaven; Gotthelf, E. V.; Ransom, S. M.; Safi-Harb, S.; Kothes, R.; Landecker, T. L.

    2012-01-01

    We report the discovery of PSR J2022-<-3842, a 24 ms radio and X-ray pulsar in the supernova remnant G76.9+i.0, in observations with the Chandra X-ray telescope, the Robert C. Byrd Green Bank Radio Telescope, and the Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer (RXTE). The pulsar's spin-down rate implies a rotation-powered luminosity E = 1.2 X 10(exp 38) erg/s, a surface dipole magnetic field strength B(sub S), = 1.0 X 10(exp 12) G, and a characteristic age of 8.9 kyr. PSR J2022+3842 is thus the second-most energetic Galactic pulsar known, after the Crab, as well as the most rapidly-rotating young, radio-bright pulsar known. The radio pulsations are highly dispersed and broadened by interstellar scattering, and we find that a large (delta f/f approximates 1.9 x 10(exp -6)) spin glitch must have occurred between our discovery and confirmation observations. The X-ray pulses are narrow (0.06 cycles FWHM) and visible up to 20 keV, consistent with magnetospheric emission from a rotation-powered pulsar. The Chandra X-ray image identifies the pulsar with a hard, unresolved source at the midpoint of the double-lobed radio morphology of G76.9+ 1.0 and embedded within faint, compact X-ray nebulosity. The spatial relationship of the X-ray and radio emissions is remarkably similar to extended structure seen around the Vela pulsar. The combined Chandra and RXTE pulsar spectrum is well-fitted by an absorbed power-law model with column density N(sub H) = (1.7 +/- 0.3) x 10(exp 22) / sq cm and photon index Gamma = 1.0 +/- 0.2; it implies that the Chandra point-source flux is virtually 100% pulsed. For a distance of 10 kpc, the X-ray luminosity of PSR J2022+3842 is L(sub x){2-1O keV) = 7.0 x 10(exp 33) erg/s. Despite being extraordinarily energetic, PSR J2022+3842 lacks a bright X-ray wind nebula and has an unusually low conversion efficiency of spin-down power to X-ray luminosity, Lx/E = 5.9 X 10(exp-5).

  2. Identification of benzoxazole analogs as novel, S1P(3) sparing S1P(1) agonists.

    PubMed

    Deng, Guanghui; Meng, Qinghua; Liu, Qian; Xu, Xuesong; Xu, Qiongfeng; Ren, Feng; Guo, Taylor B; Lu, Hongtao; Xiang, Jia-Ning; Elliott, John D; Lin, Xichen

    2012-06-15

    A novel series of benzoxazole-derived S1P(1) agonists were designed based on scaffold hopping molecular design strategy combined with computational approaches. Extensive SAR studies led to the discovery of compound 17d as a selective S1P(1) agonist (over S1P(3)) with high CNS penetration and favorable DMPK properties. 17d also demonstrated in vivo pharmacological efficacy to reduce blood lymphocyte in mice after oral administration.

  3. 28 MHz swept source at 1.0 μm for ultrafast quantitative phase imaging

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Xiaoming; Lau, Andy K. S.; Xu, Yiqing; Tsia, Kevin K.; Wong, Kenneth K. Y.

    2015-01-01

    Emerging high-throughput optical imaging modalities, in particular those providing phase information, necessitate a demanding speed regime (e.g. megahertz sweep rate) for those conventional swept sources; while an effective solution is yet to be demonstrated. We demonstrate a stable breathing laser as inertia-free swept source (BLISS) operating at a wavelength sweep rate of 28 MHz, particularly for the ultrafast interferometric imaging modality at 1.0 μm. Leveraging a tunable dispersion compensation element inside the laser cavity, the wavelength sweep range of BLISS can be tuned from ~10 nm to ~63 nm. It exhibits a good intensity stability, which is quantified by the ratio of standard deviation to the mean of the pulse intensity, i.e. 1.6%. Its excellent wavelength repeatability, <0.05% per sweep, enables the single-shot imaging at an ultrafast line-scan rate without averaging. To showcase its potential applications, it is applied to the ultrafast (28-MHz line-scan rate) interferometric time-stretch (iTS) microscope to provide quantitative morphological information on a biological specimen at a lateral resolution of 1.2 μm. This fiber-based inertia-free swept source is demonstrated to be robust and broadband, and can be applied to other established imaging modalities, such as optical coherence tomography (OCT), of which an axial resolution better than 12 μm can be achieved. PMID:26504636

  4. 28 MHz swept source at 1.0 μm for ultrafast quantitative phase imaging.

    PubMed

    Wei, Xiaoming; Lau, Andy K S; Xu, Yiqing; Tsia, Kevin K; Wong, Kenneth K Y

    2015-10-01

    Emerging high-throughput optical imaging modalities, in particular those providing phase information, necessitate a demanding speed regime (e.g. megahertz sweep rate) for those conventional swept sources; while an effective solution is yet to be demonstrated. We demonstrate a stable breathing laser as inertia-free swept source (BLISS) operating at a wavelength sweep rate of 28 MHz, particularly for the ultrafast interferometric imaging modality at 1.0 μm. Leveraging a tunable dispersion compensation element inside the laser cavity, the wavelength sweep range of BLISS can be tuned from ~10 nm to ~63 nm. It exhibits a good intensity stability, which is quantified by the ratio of standard deviation to the mean of the pulse intensity, i.e. 1.6%. Its excellent wavelength repeatability, <0.05% per sweep, enables the single-shot imaging at an ultrafast line-scan rate without averaging. To showcase its potential applications, it is applied to the ultrafast (28-MHz line-scan rate) interferometric time-stretch (iTS) microscope to provide quantitative morphological information on a biological specimen at a lateral resolution of 1.2 μm. This fiber-based inertia-free swept source is demonstrated to be robust and broadband, and can be applied to other established imaging modalities, such as optical coherence tomography (OCT), of which an axial resolution better than 12 μm can be achieved. PMID:26504636

  5. 28SiO v = 0 J = 1-0 emission from evolved stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Vicente, P.; Bujarrabal, V.; Díaz-Pulido, A.; Albo, C.; Alcolea, J.; Barcia, A.; Barbas, L.; Bolaño, R.; Colomer, F.; Diez, M. C.; Gallego, J. D.; Gómez-González, J.; López-Fernández, I.; López-Fernández, J. A.; López-Pérez, J. A.; Malo, I.; Moreno, A.; Patino, M.; Serna, J. M.; Tercero, F.; Vaquero, B.

    2016-05-01

    Aims: Observations of 28SiO v = 0J = 1-0 line emission (7-mm wavelength) from asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stars show in some cases peculiar profiles, composed of a central intense component plus a wider plateau. Very similar profiles have been observed in CO lines from some AGB stars and most post-AGB nebulae and, in these cases, they are clearly associated with the presence of conspicuous axial symmetry and bipolar dynamics. We aim to systematically study the profile shape of 28SiO v = 0J = 1-0 lines in evolved stars and to discuss the origin of the composite profile structure. Methods: We present observations of 28SiO v = 0J = 1-0 emission in 28 evolved stars, including O-rich, C-rich, and S-type Mira-type variables, OH/IR stars, semiregular long-period variables, red supergiants and one yellow hypergiant. Most objects were observed in several epochs, over a total period of time of one and a half years. The observations were performed with the 40 m radio telescope of the Instituto Geográfico Nacional (IGN) in Yebes, Spain. Results: We find that the composite core plus plateau profiles are systematically present in O-rich Miras, OH/IR stars, and red supergiants. They are also found in one S-type Mira (χ Cyg) and in two semiregular variables (X Her and RS Cnc) that are known to show axial symmetry. In the other objects, the profiles are simpler and similar to those observed in other molecular lines. The composite structure appears in the objects in which SiO emission is thought to come from the very inner circumstellar layers, prior to dust formation. The central spectral feature is found to be systematically composed of a number of narrow spikes, except for X Her and RS Cnc, in which it shows a smooth shape that is very similar to that observed in CO emission. These spikes show a significant (and mostly chaotic) time variation, while in all cases the smooth components remain constant within the uncertainties. The profile shape could come from the superposition

  6. The dehydrogenation of CH4 on Rh(1 1 1), Rh(1 1 0) and Rh(1 0 0) surfaces: A density functional theory study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Baojun; Song, Luzhi; Zhang, Riguang

    2012-02-01

    CH4 dehydrogenation on Rh(1 1 1), Rh(1 1 0) and Rh(1 0 0) surfaces has been investigated by using density functional theory (DFT) slab calculations. On the basis of energy analysis, the preferred adsorption sites of CHx (x = 0-4) and H species on Rh(1 1 1), Rh(1 1 0) and Rh(1 0 0) surfaces are located, respectively. Then, the stable co-adsorption configurations of CHx (x = 0-3) and H are obtained. Further, the kinetic results of CH4 dehydrogenation show that on Rh(1 1 1) and Rh(1 0 0) surfaces, CH is the most abundant species for CH4 dissociation; on Rh(1 1 0) surface, CH2 is the most abundant species, our results suggest that Rh catalyst can resist the carbon deposition in the CH4 dehydrogenation. Finally, results of thermodynamic and kinetic show that CH4 dehydrogenation on Rh(1 0 0) surface is the most preferable reaction pathway in comparison with that on Rh(1 1 1) and Rh(1 1 0) surfaces.

  7. Observations and Light Curve Solutions of the Eclipsing Binaries USNO-B1.0 1395-0370184 and USNO-B1.0 1395-0370731

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kjurkchieva, D.; Popov, V. A.; Vasileva, D.; Petrov, N.

    2016-07-01

    We present follow-up photometric observations in Sloan filters g', i' of the newly discovered eclipsing stars USNO-B1.0 1395-0370184 and USNO-B1.0 1395-0370731. Our data revealed that their orbital periods are considerably bigger than the previous values. This result changed the classification of USNO-B1.0 1395-0370184 from ultrashort-period binary (P=0.197 d) to short-period system (P=0.251 d). The light curve solutions of our observations revealed that USNO-B1.0 1395-0370184 and USNO-B1.0 1395-0370731 are overcontact binaries in which components are K dwarfs, close in masses and radii. The light curve distortions were reproduced by cool spots with angular radius of around 20°.

  8. Determination of growth modes of Cu on O/Ni( 1 0 0 ) and NiO( 1 0 0 ) surfaces by SIMS and secondary electron emission measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karolewski, M. A.

    2002-10-01

    The growth modes of Cu overlayers deposited on oxygen-predosed Ni(1 0 0) surfaces in the Cu coverage range 0-8 monolayers (ML) have been studied using secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) and ion-induced secondary electron emission measurements. On a c(2×2)-O/Ni(1 0 0) surface prepared by 40 L O 2 exposure of Ni(1 0 0), Cu grows according to the Frank-van der Merwe (FVDM, or layer-by-layer) mode up to at least 2 ML Cu coverage. In contrast, Cu grows by the Volmer-Weber mode on a NiO(1 0 0) surface prepared by 400 L O 2 exposure of Ni(1 0 0) up to at least 8 ML Cu coverage; three-dimensional growth of Cu clusters commences at about 0.2 ML Cu coverage. The characterisation of Cu overlayer growth modes from the measurement of SIMS intensity variations hinges largely on the behaviour of the Ni 2+ and Cu 2+ cluster ions which mainly originate from the surface layer of the sample. For example, the deposition of 1 ML Cu on c(2×2)-O/Ni(1 0 0) completely quenches Ni 2+ emission, whereas on NiO(1 0 0) this process is not complete even after deposition of 8 ML Cu. This behaviour can be formally described with a simple analytical model. On the basis of comparisons between the secondary ion and secondary electron emission properties of O/Cu/Ni(1 0 0) and Cu/O/Ni(1 0 0) surfaces, it is concluded that the Cu layers deposited on the c(2×2)-O/Ni(1 0 0) substrate are covered by an adsorbed layer of oxygen.

  9. The Clinically-tested S1P Receptor Agonists, FTY720 and BAF312, Demonstrate Subtype-Specific Bradycardia (S1P1) and Hypertension (S1P3) in Rat

    PubMed Central

    Fryer, Ryan M.; Muthukumarana, Akalushi; Harrison, Paul C.; Nodop Mazurek, Suzanne; Chen, Rong Rhonda; Harrington, Kyle E.; Dinallo, Roger M.; Horan, Joshua C.; Patnaude, Lori; Modis, Louise K.; Reinhart, Glenn A.

    2012-01-01

    Sphingosine-1-phospate (S1P) and S1P receptor agonists elicit mechanism-based effects on cardiovascular function in vivo. Indeed, FTY720 (non-selective S1PX receptor agonist) produces modest hypertension in patients (2–3 mmHg in 1-yr trial) as well as acute bradycardia independent of changes in blood pressure. However, the precise receptor subtypes responsible is controversial, likely dependent upon the cardiovascular response in question (e.g. bradycardia, hypertension), and perhaps even species-dependent since functional differences in rodent, rabbit, and human have been suggested. Thus, we characterized the S1P receptor subtype specificity for each compound in vitro and, in vivo, the cardiovascular effects of FTY720 and the more selective S1P1,5 agonist, BAF312, were tested during acute i.v. infusion in anesthetized rats and after oral administration for 10 days in telemetry-instrumented conscious rats. Acute i.v. infusion of FTY720 (0.1, 0.3, 1.0 mg/kg/20 min) or BAF312 (0.5, 1.5, 5.0 mg/kg/20 min) elicited acute bradycardia in anesthetized rats demonstrating an S1P1 mediated mechanism-of-action. However, while FTY720 (0.5, 1.5, 5.0 mg/kg/d) elicited dose-dependent hypertension after multiple days of oral administration in rat at clinically relevant plasma concentrations (24-hr mean blood pressure = 8.4, 12.8, 16.2 mmHg above baseline vs. 3 mmHg in vehicle controls), BAF312 (0.3, 3.0, 30.0 mg/kg/d) had no significant effect on blood pressure at any dose tested suggesting that hypertension produced by FTY720 is mediated S1P3 receptors. In summary, in vitro selectivity results in combination with studies performed in anesthetized and conscious rats administered two clinically tested S1P agonists, FTY720 or BAF312, suggest that S1P1 receptors mediate bradycardia while hypertension is mediated by S1P3 receptor activation. PMID:23285242

  10. The clinically-tested S1P receptor agonists, FTY720 and BAF312, demonstrate subtype-specific bradycardia (S1P₁) and hypertension (S1P₃) in rat.

    PubMed

    Fryer, Ryan M; Muthukumarana, Akalushi; Harrison, Paul C; Nodop Mazurek, Suzanne; Chen, Rong Rhonda; Harrington, Kyle E; Dinallo, Roger M; Horan, Joshua C; Patnaude, Lori; Modis, Louise K; Reinhart, Glenn A

    2012-01-01

    Sphingosine-1-phospate (S1P) and S1P receptor agonists elicit mechanism-based effects on cardiovascular function in vivo. Indeed, FTY720 (non-selective S1P(X) receptor agonist) produces modest hypertension in patients (2-3 mmHg in 1-yr trial) as well as acute bradycardia independent of changes in blood pressure. However, the precise receptor subtypes responsible is controversial, likely dependent upon the cardiovascular response in question (e.g. bradycardia, hypertension), and perhaps even species-dependent since functional differences in rodent, rabbit, and human have been suggested. Thus, we characterized the S1P receptor subtype specificity for each compound in vitro and, in vivo, the cardiovascular effects of FTY720 and the more selective S1P₁,₅ agonist, BAF312, were tested during acute i.v. infusion in anesthetized rats and after oral administration for 10 days in telemetry-instrumented conscious rats. Acute i.v. infusion of FTY720 (0.1, 0.3, 1.0 mg/kg/20 min) or BAF312 (0.5, 1.5, 5.0 mg/kg/20 min) elicited acute bradycardia in anesthetized rats demonstrating an S1P₁ mediated mechanism-of-action. However, while FTY720 (0.5, 1.5, 5.0 mg/kg/d) elicited dose-dependent hypertension after multiple days of oral administration in rat at clinically relevant plasma concentrations (24-hr mean blood pressure = 8.4, 12.8, 16.2 mmHg above baseline vs. 3 mmHg in vehicle controls), BAF312 (0.3, 3.0, 30.0 mg/kg/d) had no significant effect on blood pressure at any dose tested suggesting that hypertension produced by FTY720 is mediated S1P₃ receptors. In summary, in vitro selectivity results in combination with studies performed in anesthetized and conscious rats administered two clinically tested S1P agonists, FTY720 or BAF312, suggest that S1P₁ receptors mediate bradycardia while hypertension is mediated by S1P₃ receptor activation. PMID:23285242

  11. High dispersion spectroscopy of Venus at 1.0 μm using WINERED at Koyama Astronomical Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sagawa, Hideo; Hamano, Satoshi; Kawakita, Hideyo; Ikeda, Yuji; Otsubo, Shogo; Lee, Yeon Joo

    2016-10-01

    We obtained high dispersion near-infrared (NIR) spectra from the sunlit dayside hemisphere of Venus using a NIR high resolution spectrograph, WINERED, attached to the 1.3-m Araki telescope at Koyama Astronomical Observatory. The observation was carried out on 3 October 2015, and the cross-dispersed spectra cover the wavelength range of 0.9 - 1.1 μm with sperctral resolution of λ/Δλ ~50,000. Absorption lines of Venusian 12CO2 from the triad of (ν1, ν2, ν3) = (2,0,3), (1,2,3), and (0,4,3) bands are observed at 1.038, 1.051, and 1.065 μm, respectively. In addition, the hot band lines of (1,3,1) - (0,1,0) are also clearly seen in the measured spectra.Assuming the equivalent width of a CO2 line varies with respect to some power of the line intensity, we can derive the rotational temperature from the curve of growth. The derived rotational temperature from the 1.051 μm band is ~246 K, which agrees with early ground-based studies reported in 1970's. We present the detailed analysis of these high dispersion CO2 lines with the use of a radiative transfer model developed for the Venusian atmosphere.

  12. Quantum stabilities and growth modes of thin metal films: Unsupported and NiAl-supported Ag(1 1 0) and Ag(1 0 0)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Yong; Evans, J. W.; Liu, Da-Jiang

    2008-07-01

    We present density functional theory (DFT) analyses of the stability of Ag thin films versus film thicknesses for various surface orientations. We include benchmark results for freestanding films, but consider in detail Ag(1 1 0) films supported on a NiAl(1 1 0) substrate, and Ag(1 0 0) films supported on a NiAl(1 0 0) substrate. The supported films exhibit an almost perfect lattice-match between film and substrate surface unit cells, so one can assess film stability in the absence of significant lateral mismatch strain. We also provide a characterization of film growth modes for these NiAl-supported Ag films based on DFT results for the relevant energetics.

  13. Excitation Mechanisms for HCN (1-0) and HCO+ (1-0) in Galaxies from the Great Observatories All-sky LIRG Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Privon, G. C.; Herrero-Illana, R.; Evans, A. S.; Iwasawa, K.; Perez-Torres, M. A.; Armus, L.; Díaz-Santos, T.; Murphy, E. J.; Stierwalt, S.; Aalto, S.; Mazzarella, J. M.; Barcos-Muñoz, L.; Borish, H. J.; Inami, H.; Kim, D.-C.; Treister, E.; Surace, J. A.; Lord, S.; Conway, J.; Frayer, D. T.; Alberdi, A.

    2015-11-01

    We present new Institut de Radioastronomie Millimétrique (IRAM) 30 m spectroscopic observations of the ˜88 GHz band, including emission from the {CCH}(N=1\\to 0) multiplet, HCN (J=1\\to 0), {{HCO}}+(J=1\\to 0), and {HNC}(J=1\\to 0), for a sample of 58 local luminous and ultraluminous infrared galaxies from the Great Observatories All-sky LIRG Survey (GOALS). By combining our new IRAM data with literature data and Spitzer/IRS spectroscopy, we study the correspondence between these putative tracers of dense gas and the relative contribution of active galactic nuclei (AGNs) and star formation to the mid-infrared luminosity of each system. We find the HCN (1-0) emission to be enhanced in AGN-dominated systems (< {L}{HCN(1-0)}\\prime /{L}{{HCO}+(1-0)}\\prime > =1.84), compared to composite and starburst-dominated systems (< {L}{HCN(1-0)}\\prime /{L}{{HCO}+(1-0)}\\prime > =1.14, and 0.88, respectively). However, some composite and starburst systems have {L}{HCN(1-0)}\\prime /{L}{{HCO}+(1-0)}\\prime ratios comparable to those of AGNs, indicating that enhanced HCN emission is not uniquely associated with energetically dominant AGNs. After removing AGN-dominated systems from the sample, we find a linear relationship (within the uncertainties) between log10({L}{HCN(1-0)}\\prime ) and log10(LIR), consistent with most previous findings. {L}{HCN(1-0)}\\prime /LIR, typically interpreted as the dense-gas depletion time, appears to have no systematic trend with LIR for our sample of luminous and ultraluminous infrared galaxies, and has significant scatter. The galaxy-integrated {L}{HCN(1-0)}\\prime and {L}{{HCO}+(1-0)}\\prime emission do not appear to have a simple interpretation in terms of the AGN dominance or the star formation rate, and are likely determined by multiple processes, including density and radiative effects. Based on observations carried out with the IRAM 30 m Telescope. IRAM is supported by INSU/CNRS (France), MPG (Germany), and IGN (Spain).

  14. 30 CFR 57.22236 - Actions at 1.0 percent methane (VI mines).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Actions at 1.0 percent methane (VI mines). 57... MINES Safety Standards for Methane in Metal and Nonmetal Mines Ventilation § 57.22236 Actions at 1.0 percent methane (VI mines). If methane reaches 1.0 percent in the mine atmosphere, all persons other...

  15. 30 CFR 57.22236 - Actions at 1.0 percent methane (VI mines).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Actions at 1.0 percent methane (VI mines). 57... MINES Safety Standards for Methane in Metal and Nonmetal Mines Ventilation § 57.22236 Actions at 1.0 percent methane (VI mines). If methane reaches 1.0 percent in the mine atmosphere, all persons other...

  16. 30 CFR 57.22236 - Actions at 1.0 percent methane (VI mines).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Actions at 1.0 percent methane (VI mines). 57... MINES Safety Standards for Methane in Metal and Nonmetal Mines Ventilation § 57.22236 Actions at 1.0 percent methane (VI mines). If methane reaches 1.0 percent in the mine atmosphere, all persons other...

  17. On the quantum corrections to two-dimensional (1,0)-supersymmetric Abelian gauge models

    SciTech Connect

    Almeida, C.A.S.; De Oliveira, M.W. ); Kneipp, M.A.C. )

    1991-05-30

    In this paper the machinery of (1,0)-supergravity is employed to evaluate 1-loop corrections to the effective action and chiral symmetry supercurrent in the framework of an (1,0)-supersymmetric Abelian gauge model. As a by-product, a dynamically-generated mass is found out for the gauge (1,0)-superconductions.

  18. GBL-2D Version 1.0: a 2D geometry boolean library.

    SciTech Connect

    McBride, Cory L. (Elemental Technologies, American Fort, UT); Schmidt, Rodney Cannon; Yarberry, Victor R.; Meyers, Ray J.

    2006-11-01

    This report describes version 1.0 of GBL-2D, a geometric Boolean library for 2D objects. The library is written in C++ and consists of a set of classes and routines. The classes primarily represent geometric data and relationships. Classes are provided for 2D points, lines, arcs, edge uses, loops, surfaces and mask sets. The routines contain algorithms for geometric Boolean operations and utility functions. Routines are provided that incorporate the Boolean operations: Union(OR), XOR, Intersection and Difference. A variety of additional analytical geometry routines and routines for importing and exporting the data in various file formats are also provided. The GBL-2D library was originally developed as a geometric modeling engine for use with a separate software tool, called SummitView [1], that manipulates the 2D mask sets created by designers of Micro-Electro-Mechanical Systems (MEMS). However, many other practical applications for this type of software can be envisioned because the need to perform 2D Boolean operations can arise in many contexts.

  19. Superposed epoch analysis of CIRs at 0. 3 and 1. 0 AU: A comparative study

    SciTech Connect

    Richter, A.K.; Luttrell, A.H.

    1986-05-01

    Applying the superposed epoch analysis technique to 16 and to 31 well-defined, nonshock-associated stream-stream interaction regions observed by the Helios spacecraft in the distance ranges 0.3 to 0.4 AU and 0.9 to 1.0 AU, respectively, we obtain the average azimuthal variation in the solar wind density, velocity and temperature, in the magnetic field strength, and in the total proton plasma plus magnetic field pressure across CIRs at these two radial distances separately. For the radial evolution of these interaction regions we find by comparison: (1) due to compressional and rarefactional effects the amplitudes of all parameters in question taken along the leading as well as along the trailing part of the CIR are steadily increasing with the most pronounced increase in the pressure; (2) at the same time even the leading portion of the velocity profile steepens; (3) simultaneously, the positions in azimuth of the overall maximum values of the solar wind density and temperature, of the magnetic field strength and of the plasma plus magnetic field pressure are getting steadily lined up in longitude; (4) at the same time the leading portions of all profiles are steepening into discontinuous, shocklike structures. Thus, this analysis provides observational evidence for the following results obtained earlier from numerical simulation studies. Stream steepening does occur within 1 AU, and the probability of corotating shocks to form is, on average, much higher beyond than at or within 1 AU.

  20. Hyperfine structure in the J = 1-0 transitions of DCO^+, DNC, and HN13C: astronomical observations and quantum-chemical calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van der Tak, F. F. S.; Müller, H. S. P.; Harding, M. E.; Gauss, J.

    2009-11-01

    Context: Knowledge of the hyperfine structure of molecular lines is useful for estimating reliable column densities from observed emission, and essential for the derivation of kinematic information from line profiles. Aims: Deuterium bearing molecules are especially useful in this regard, because they are good probes of the physical and chemical structure of molecular cloud cores on the verge of star formation. However, the necessary spectroscopic data are often missing, especially for molecules which are too unstable for laboratory study. Methods: We have observed the ground-state (J = 1{-}0) rotational transitions of DCO^+, HN13C and DNC with the IRAM 30 m telescope toward the dark cloud LDN 1512 which has exceptionally narrow lines permitting hyperfine splitting to be resolved in part. The measured splittings of 50-300 kHz are used to derive nuclear quadrupole and spin-rotation parameters for these species. The measurements are supplemented by high-level quantum-chemical calculations using coupled-cluster techniques and large atomic-orbital basis sets. Results: We find eQq = + 151.12 (400) kHz and CI = -1.12 (43) kHz for DCO^+, eQq = 272.5 (51) kHz for HN13C, and eQq(D) =265.9 (83) kHz and eQq(N) = 288.2 (71) kHz for DNC. The numbers for DNC are consistent with previous laboratory data, while our constants for DCO+ are somewhat smaller than previous results based on astronomical data. For both DCO+ and DNC, our results are more accurate than previous determinations. Our results are in good agreement with the corresponding best theoretical estimates, which amount to eQq = 156.0 kHz and CI = -0.69 kHz for DCO^+, eQq = 279.5 kHz for HN13C, and eQq(D) = 257.6 kHz and eQq(N) = 309.6 kHz for DNC. We also derive updated rotational constants for HN13C: B = 43 545.6000 (47) MHz and D = 93.7 (20) kHz. Conclusions: The hyperfine splittings of the DCO^+, DNC and HN13C J = 1{-}0 lines range over 0.47-1.28 km s-1, which is comparable to typical line widths in pre

  1. Combined gemcitabine and S-1 chemotherapy for treating unresectable hilar cholangiocarcinoma: a randomized open-label clinical trial

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Zun-Qiang; Guan, Jiao; Tong, Da-Nian; Zhou, Guang-Wen

    2016-01-01

    Although the combination of cisplatin and gemcitabine (GEM) is considered the standard first-line chemotherapy against unresectable hilar cholangiocarcinoma (HC), its efficacy is discouraging. The present randomized open-label clinical trial aimed to evaluate the efficacy and safety of the GEM plus S-1 (GEM-S-1) combination against unresectable HC. Twenty-five patients per group were randomly assigned to receive GEM, S-1 or GEM-S-1. Neutropenia (56%) and leukopenia (40%) were the most common chemotherapy-related toxicities in the GEM-S-1 group. Median overall survival (OS) in the GEM-S-1, GEM and S-1 groups was 11, 10 and 6 months, respectively. GEM plus S-1 significantly improved OS compared to S-1 monotherapy (OR=0.68; 95%CI, 0.50–0.90; P=0.008). Median progression-free survival (PFS) times in the GEM-S-1, GEM and S-1 groups were 4.90, 3.70 and 1.60 months, respectively. GEM plus S-1 significantly improved PFS compared to S-1 monotherapy (OR=0.50; 95%CI, 0.27–0.91; P=0.024). Response rates were 36%, 24% and 8% in the GEM-S-1, GEM and S-1 groups, respectively. A statistically significant difference was found in response rates between the gemcitabine-S-1 and S-1 groups (36% vs 8%, P=0.017). Patients with CA19-9<466 U/ml were more responsive to chemotherapeutic agents than those with CA19-9≥571 U/ml (88.9% vs 0%, P<0.001). We conclude that the combination of GEM plus S-1 provides a better OS, PFS and response rate than S-1 monotherapy, but it did not significantly differ from GEM monotherapy. (ChiCTR-TRC-14004733). PMID:27058753

  2. Combined gemcitabine and S-1 chemotherapy for treating unresectable hilar cholangiocarcinoma: a randomized open-label clinical trial.

    PubMed

    Li, Hao; Zhang, Zheng-Yun; Zhou, Zun-Qiang; Guan, Jiao; Tong, Da-Nian; Zhou, Guang-Wen

    2016-05-01

    Although the combination of cisplatin and gemcitabine (GEM) is considered the standard first-line chemotherapy against unresectable hilar cholangiocarcinoma (HC), its efficacy is discouraging. The present randomized open-label clinical trial aimed to evaluate the efficacy and safety of the GEM plus S-1 (GEM-S-1) combination against unresectable HC. Twenty-five patients per group were randomly assigned to receive GEM, S-1 or GEM-S-1. Neutropenia (56%) and leukopenia (40%) were the most common chemotherapy-related toxicities in the GEM-S-1 group. Median overall survival (OS) in the GEM-S-1, GEM and S-1 groups was 11, 10 and 6 months, respectively. GEM plus S-1 significantly improved OS compared to S-1 monotherapy (OR=0.68; 95%CI, 0.50-0.90; P=0.008). Median progression-free survival (PFS) times in the GEM-S-1, GEM and S-1 groups were 4.90, 3.70 and 1.60 months, respectively. GEM plus S-1 significantly improved PFS compared to S-1 monotherapy (OR=0.50; 95%CI, 0.27-0.91; P=0.024). Response rates were 36%, 24% and 8% in the GEM-S-1, GEM and S-1 groups, respectively. A statistically significant difference was found in response rates between the gemcitabine-S-1 and S-1 groups (36% vs 8%, P=0.017). Patients with CA19-9<466 U/ml were more responsive to chemotherapeutic agents than those with CA19-9≥571 U/ml (88.9% vs 0%, P<0.001). We conclude that the combination of GEM plus S-1 provides a better OS, PFS and response rate than S-1 monotherapy, but it did not significantly differ from GEM monotherapy. (ChiCTR-TRC-14004733).

  3. Mechanically reinforced {1 1 0} <1 1 0> textured Ag/Ni-alloys composite substrates for low-cost coated conductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suo, Hongli; Genoud, Jean-Yves; Caracino, Paola; Spreafico, Sergio; Schindl, Michael; Walker, Eric; Flükiger, René

    2002-08-01

    New, reinforced {1 1 0} <1 1 0> textured Ag/Ni-alloys composite ribbons were developed as possible substrates for coated conductors without any buffer layer. The texture quality and tensile strength were investigated. A new technique to bond the Ag and Ni or alloy layers through a Cu foil was presented. The Ag/Ni-alloys composite ribbons were fabricated by choosing proper sintering processing to bond the different layers followed by cold rolling and recrystallization. A thin Cu foil was intercalated between the initial Ag and Ni or alloy pieces to get a tough bond. A unique and stable {1 1 0} <1 1 0> annealing texture was obtained in 300 μm thick Ag/Ni composite ribbon after annealing. X-ray ODF analysis and EBSD measurements in the top Ag layer showed distribution of misorientation angles around 10-15°. A {1 1 0} <1 1 0> texture was also found in ribbons as thin as 50 μm, which cannot be obtained with pure Ag ribbons. A pronounced reduction of Ag amount was obtained in 60 μm thick Ag/NiCrV ribbons, with a textured Ag top layer being as thin as 7 μm. The amount of Ag was decreased by 75% compared to pure Ag ribbons of the same thickness. A strong enhancement of the mechanical properties was observed. The yield strength σ0.2 at 77 K was 220 MPa for Ag/NiCrV ribbons, i.e. considerably higher than the 30 MPa for pure Ag ribbons.

  4. S1PR1-mediated IFNAR1 degradation modulates plasmacytoid dendritic cell interferon-α autoamplification

    PubMed Central

    Teijaro, John R.; Studer, Sean; Leaf, Nora; Kiosses, William B.; Nguyen, Nhan; Matsuki, Kosuke; Negishi, Hideo; Taniguchi, Tadatsugu; Oldstone, Michael B. A.; Rosen, Hugh

    2016-01-01

    Blunting immunopathology without abolishing host defense is the foundation for safe and effective modulation of infectious and autoimmune diseases. Sphingosine 1-phosphate receptor 1 (S1PR1) agonists are effective in treating infectious and multiple autoimmune pathologies; however, mechanisms underlying their clinical efficacy are yet to be fully elucidated. Here, we uncover an unexpected mechanism of convergence between S1PR1 and interferon alpha receptor 1 (IFNAR1) signaling pathways. Activation of S1PR1 signaling by pharmacological tools or endogenous ligand sphingosine-1 phosphate (S1P) inhibits type 1 IFN responses that exacerbate numerous pathogenic conditions. Mechanistically, S1PR1 selectively suppresses the type I IFN autoamplification loop in plasmacytoid dendritic cells (pDCs), a specialized DC subset, for robust type I IFN release. S1PR1 agonist suppression is pertussis toxin-resistant, but inhibited by an S1PR1 C-terminal–derived transactivating transcriptional activator (Tat)-fusion peptide that blocks receptor internalization. S1PR1 agonist treatment accelerates turnover of IFNAR1, suppresses signal transducer and activator of transcription 1 (STAT1) phosphorylation, and down-modulates total STAT1 levels, thereby inactivating the autoamplification loop. Inhibition of S1P-S1PR1 signaling in vivo using the selective antagonist Ex26 significantly elevates IFN-α production in response to CpG-A. Thus, multiple lines of evidence demonstrate that S1PR1 signaling sets the sensitivity of pDC amplification of IFN responses, thereby blunting pathogenic immune responses. These data illustrate a lipid G-protein coupled receptor (GPCR)-IFNAR1 regulatory loop that balances effective and detrimental immune responses and elevated endogenous S1PR1 signaling. This mechanism will likely be advantageous in individuals subject to a range of inflammatory conditions. PMID:26787880

  5. International Space Station (ISS) S1 Truss

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    Shown here is the International Space Station (ISS) S1 Truss in preparation for installation in the payload bay of the Space Shuttle Atlantis at NASA's Kennedy Space Center )KSC)in Florida. The truss launched October 7, 2002 on the STS-112 mission and will be attached during three spacewalks. Constructed primarily of aluminum, it measures 45 feet long, 15 feet wide, 10 feet tall, and weighs over 27,000 pounds. It is one of nine similar truss segments that, combined, will serve as the Station's main backbone, measuring 356 feet from end to end upon completion. Manufactured by the Boeing Company in Huntington Beach, California, the truss was flown to the Marshall Space Flight Center, in Huntsville, Alabama where brackets, cable trays, fluid tubing, and other secondary components and outfitting items were added. In Huntsville, it was screened for manufacturing flaws, including pressure and leak checking tubing, and electrical checks for cabling, before being shipped to KSC for final hardware installation and testing. The Space Station's labs, living modules, solar arrays, heat radiators, and other main components will be attached to the truss.

  6. Roles of sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) receptors in malignant behavior of glioma cells. Differential effects of S1P{sub 2} on cell migration and invasiveness

    SciTech Connect

    Young, Nicholas; Van Brocklyn, James R. . E-mail: james.vanbrocklyn@osumc.edu

    2007-05-01

    Sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) is a bioactive lipid that signals through a family of five G-protein-coupled receptors, termed S1P{sub 1-5}. S1P stimulates growth and invasiveness of glioma cells, and high expression levels of the enzyme that forms S1P, sphingosine kinase-1, correlate with short survival of glioma patients. In this study we examined the mechanism of S1P stimulation of glioma cell proliferation and invasion by either overexpressing or knocking down, by RNA interference, S1P receptor expression in glioma cell lines. S1P{sub 1}, S1P{sub 2} and S1P{sub 3} all contribute positively to S1P-stimulated glioma cell proliferation, with S1P{sub 1} being the major contributor. Stimulation of glioma cell proliferation by these receptors correlated with activation of ERK MAP kinase. S1P{sub 5} blocks glioma cell proliferation, and inhibits ERK activation. S1P{sub 1} and S1P{sub 3} enhance glioma cell migration and invasion. S1P{sub 2} inhibits migration through Rho activation, Rho kinase signaling and stress fiber formation, but unexpectedly, enhances glioma cell invasiveness by stimulating cell adhesion. S1P{sub 2} also potently enhances expression of the matricellular protein CCN1/Cyr61, which has been implicated in tumor cell adhesion, and invasion as well as tumor angiogenesis. A neutralizing antibody to CCN1 blocked S1P{sub 2}-stimulated glioma invasion. Thus, while S1P{sub 2} decreases glioma cell motility, it may enhance invasion through induction of proteins that modulate glioma cell interaction with the extracellular matrix.

  7. BADGER v1.0: A Fortran equation of state library

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heltemes, T. A.; Moses, G. A.

    2012-12-01

    The BADGER equation of state library was developed to enable inertial confinement fusion plasma codes to more accurately model plasmas in the high-density, low-temperature regime. The code had the capability to calculate 1- and 2-T plasmas using the Thomas-Fermi model and an individual electron accounting model. Ion equation of state data can be calculated using an ideal gas model or via a quotidian equation of state with scaled binding energies. Electron equation of state data can be calculated via the ideal gas model or with an adaptation of the screened hydrogenic model with ℓ-splitting. The ionization and equation of state calculations can be done in local thermodynamic equilibrium or in a non-LTE mode using a variant of the Busquet equivalent temperature method. The code was written as a stand-alone Fortran library for ease of implementation by external codes. EOS results for aluminum are presented that show good agreement with the SESAME library and ionization calculations show good agreement with the FLYCHK code. Program summaryProgram title: BADGERLIB v1.0 Catalogue identifier: AEND_v1_0 Program summary URL:http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/AEND_v1_0.html Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen's University, Belfast, N. Ireland Licensing provisions: Standard CPC licence, http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/licence/licence.html No. of lines in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 41 480 No. of bytes in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 2 904 451 Distribution format: tar.gz Programming language: Fortran 90. Computer: 32- or 64-bit PC, or Mac. Operating system: Windows, Linux, MacOS X. RAM: 249.496 kB plus 195.630 kB per isotope record in memory Classification: 19.1, 19.7. Nature of problem: Equation of State (EOS) calculations are necessary for the accurate simulation of high energy density plasmas. Historically, most EOS codes used in these simulations have relied on an ideal gas model. This model is inadequate for low

  8. Predicting microRNA modulation in human prostate cancer using a simple String IDentifier (SID1.0).

    PubMed

    Albertini, Maria C; Olivieri, Fabiola; Lazzarini, Raffaella; Pilolli, Francesca; Galli, Francesco; Spada, Giorgio; Accorsi, Augusto; Rippo, Maria R; Procopio, Antonio D

    2011-08-01

    To make faster and efficient the identification of mRNA targets common to more than one miRNA, and to identify new miRNAs modulated in specific pathways, a computer program identified as SID1.0 (simple String IDentifier) was developed and successfully applied in the identification of deregulated miRNAs in prostate cancer cells. This computationally inexpensive Fortran program is based on the strategy of exhaustive search and specifically designed to screen shared data (target genes, miRNAs and pathways) available from PicTar and DIANA-MicroT 3.0 databases. As far as we know this is the first software designed to filter data retrieved from available miRNA databases. SID1.0 takes advantage of the standard Fortran intrinsic functions for manipulating text strings and requires ASCII input files. In order to demonstrate SID1.0 applicability, some miRNAs expected from the literature to associate with cancerogenesis (miR-125b, miR-148a and miR-141), were randomly identified as main entries for SID1.0 to explore matching sequences of mRNA targets and also to explore KEGG pathways for the presence of ID codes of targeted genes. Besides genes and pathways already described in the literature, SID1.0 has proven to useful for predicting other genes involved in prostate carcinoma. These latter were used to identify new deregulated miRNAs: miR-141, miR-148a, miR-19a and miR-19b. Prediction data were preliminary confirmed by expression analysis of the identified miRNAs in androgen-dependent (LNCaP) and independent (PC3) prostate carcinoma cell lines and in normal prostatic epithelial cells (PrEC). PMID:21334455

  9. EUV resolution enhancement techniques (RETs) for k1 0.4 and below

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsu, Stephen; Howell, Rafael; Jia, Jianjun; Liu, Hua-Yu; Gronlund, Keith; Hansen, Steve; Zimmermann, Jörg

    2015-03-01

    Due to the exponential growth of mobile wireless devices, low-power logic chips continue to drive device scaling. To enable sub-10 nm device scaling at an affordable cost, there is a strong need for single exposure advanced lithography. Extreme ultraviolet lithography (EUVL) is one of the most promising candidates to support the design rules for sub-10 nm. The aggressive mobile device design rules continue to push the critical dimension (CD) and pitch and put very stringent demands on the lithography performance such as pattern placement control, image contrast, critical dimension uniformity (CDU), and line width roughness (LWR). In this paper we report the latest advances in resolution enhancement techniques to address low k1 challenges in EUV lithography, specifically: minimizing the pattern placement error, enhancing the through-focus contrast, and reducing the impact of stochastic effects. We have developed an innovative source-mask optimization (SMO) method to significantly reduce edge placement errors (EPE) [1] [2]. Aggressive design rules using the state-of-the-art NA of 0.33 of the NXE:3300B and its successor tools can have imaging below k1 = 0.4, which can extend the current process capabilities for single exposure high volume manufacturing (HVM). Burkhardt et al. reported in a previous study that inserting a sub-resolution assist feature (SRAF) within semi-isolated features introduces strong Bossung tilts and best focus shifts, and a general solution for random pitches is not apparent [3]. Kang observed the same issues and proposed to introduce spherical aberrations to correct these effects while having a global impact on the full-chip [4]. In this work we introduce a new methodology to apply SRAFs to improve contrast, reduce best focus shift, and improve process window. Finally, the lower number of photons of EUV and the small feature size brings serious issue of the stochastic effect that causes the line-edge-roughness (LER) and local CD uniformity

  10. m-Benzyne and bicyclo[3.1.0]hexatriene which isomer is more stable? a quantum chemical investigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kraka, Elfi; Anglada, Josep; Hjerpe, Angelica; Filatov, Michael; Cremer, Dieter

    2001-11-01

    Density functional theory (DFT) predicts that bicyclo[3.1.0]hexatriene ( 2) is more stable than its isomer m-benzyne ( 1). Hess [Eur. J. Org. Chem. (2001) 2185] has argued that experimental findings suggesting 1 can equally or even better be associated with 2. However, high level ab initio calculations (CCSD(T), CASPT2) show that 2 does not exist and that the previously measured infrared spectrum is correctly assigned to 1. Bond stretch isomers are possible for p-benzynes but not for m-benzynes. The electrophilic character of m-benzynes is in line with 1 but not with 2.

  11. Evolution and magnetic topology of the M 1.0 flare of October 22, 2002

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berlicki, A.; Schmieder, B.; Vilmer, N.; Aulanier, G.; Del Zanna, G.

    2004-09-01

    In this paper we analyse an M 1.0 confined flare observed mainly during its gradual phase. We use the data taken during a coordinated observational campaign between ground based instruments (THEMIS and VTT) and space observatories (SoHO/CDS and MDI, TRACE and RHESSI). We use these multi-wavelength observations to study the morphology and evolution of the flare, to analyse its gradual phase and to understand the role of various heating mechanisms. During the flare, RHESSI observed emission only within the 3-25 keV spectral range. The RHESSI spectra indicate that the emission of the flare was mainly of thermal origin with a small non-thermal component observed between 10 and 20 keV. Nevertheless, the energy contained in the non-thermal electrons is negligible compared to the thermal energy of the flaring plasma. The temperature of plasma obtained from the fitting of the RHESSI X-ray spectra was between 8.5 and 14 MK. The lower temperature limit is typical for a plasma contained in post flare loops observed in X-rays. Higher temperatures were observed during a secondary peak of emission corresponding to a small impulsive event. The SoHO/CDS observations performed in EUV Fe XIX line also confirm the presence of a hot plasma at temperatures similar to those obtained from RHESSI spectra. The EUV structures were located at the same place as RHESSI X-ray emission. The magnetic topology analysis of the AR coming from a linear force-free field extrapolation explains the observed features of the gradual phase of the flare i.e. the asymmetry of the ribbons and their fast propagation. The combination of the multi-wavelength observations with the magnetic model further suggests that the onset of the flare would be due to the reconnection of an emerging flux in a sheared magnetic configuration.

  12. Moreton and EUV Waves Associated with an X1.0 Flare and CME Ejection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Francile, Carlos; López, Fernando M.; Cremades, Hebe; Mandrini, Cristina H.; Luoni, María Luisa; Long, David M.

    2016-09-01

    A Moreton wave was detected in active region (AR) 12017 on 29 March 2014 with very high cadence with the H-Alpha Solar Telescope for Argentina (HASTA) in association with an X1.0 flare (SOL2014-03-29T17:48). Several other phenomena took place in connection with this event, such as low-coronal waves and a coronal mass ejection (CME). We analyze the association between the Moreton wave and the EUV signatures observed with the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly onboard the Solar Dynamics Observatory. These include their low-coronal surface-imprint, and the signatures of the full wave and shock dome propagating outward in the corona. We also study their relation to the white-light CME. We perform a kinematic analysis by tracking the wavefronts in several directions. This analysis reveals a high-directional dependence of accelerations and speeds determined from data at various wavelengths. We speculate that a region of open magnetic field lines northward of our defined radiant point sets favorable conditions for the propagation of a coronal magnetohydrodynamic shock in this direction. The hypothesis that the Moreton wavefront is produced by a coronal shock-wave that pushes the chromosphere downward is supported by the high compression ratio in that region. Furthermore, we propose a 3D geometrical model to explain the observed wavefronts as the chromospheric and low-coronal traces of an expanding and outward-traveling bubble intersecting the Sun. The results of the model are in agreement with the coronal shock-wave being generated by a 3D piston that expands at the speed of the associated rising filament. The piston is attributed to the fast ejection of the filament-CME ensemble, which is also consistent with the good match between the speed profiles of the low-coronal and white-light shock waves.

  13. Galaxy Zoo: Are bars responsible for the feeding of active galactic nuclei at 0.2 < z < 1.0?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheung, Edmond; Trump, Jonathan R.; Athanassoula, E.; Bamford, Steven P.; Bell, Eric F.; Bosma, A.; Cardamone, Carolin N.; Casteels, Kevin R. V.; Faber, S. M.; Fang, Jerome J.; Fortson, Lucy F.; Kocevski, Dale D.; Koo, David C.; Laine, Seppo; Lintott, Chris; Masters, Karen L.; Melvin, Thomas; Nichol, Robert C.; Schawinski, Kevin; Simmons, Brooke; Smethurst, Rebecca; Willett, Kyle W.

    2015-02-01

    We present a new study investigating whether active galactic nuclei (AGN) beyond the local universe are preferentially fed via large-scale bars. Our investigation combines data from Chandra and Galaxy Zoo: Hubble (GZH) in the AEGIS (All-wavelength Extended Groth strip International Survey), COSMOS (Cosmological Evolution Survey), and (Great Observatories Origins Deep Survey-South) GOODS-S surveys to create samples of face-on, disc galaxies at 0.2 < z < 1.0. We use a novel method to robustly compare a sample of 120 AGN host galaxies, defined to have 1042 erg s-1 < LX < 1044 erg s-1, with inactive control galaxies matched in stellar mass, rest-frame colour, size, Sérsic index, and redshift. Using the GZH bar classifications of each sample, we demonstrate that AGN hosts show no statistically significant enhancement in bar fraction or average bar likelihood compared to closely-matched inactive galaxies. In detail, we find that the AGN bar fraction cannot be enhanced above the control bar fraction by more than a factor of 2, at 99.7 per cent confidence. We similarly find no significant difference in the AGN fraction among barred and non-barred galaxies. Thus we find no compelling evidence that large-scale bars directly fuel AGN at 0.2 < z < 1.0. This result, coupled with previous results at z = 0, implies that moderate-luminosity AGN have not been preferentially fed by large-scale bars since z = 1. Furthermore, given the low bar fractions at z > 1, our findings suggest that large-scale bars have likely never directly been a dominant fuelling mechanism for supermassive black hole growth.

  14. S1PR1 Tyr143 phosphorylation downregulates endothelial cell surface S1PR1 expression and responsiveness

    PubMed Central

    Chavez, Alejandra; Schmidt, Tracy Thennes; Yazbeck, Pascal; Rajput, Charu; Desai, Bhushan; Sukriti, Sukriti; Giantsos-Adams, Kristina; Knezevic, Nebojsa; Malik, Asrar B.; Mehta, Dolly

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Activation of sphingosine-1-phosphate receptor 1 (S1PR1) plays a key role in repairing endothelial barrier function. We addressed the role of phosphorylation of the three intracellular tyrosine residues of S1PR1 in endothelial cells in regulating the receptor responsiveness and endothelial barrier function regulated by sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P)-mediated activation of S1PR1. We demonstrated that phosphorylation of only Y143 site was required for S1PR1 internalization in response to S1P. Maximal S1PR1 internalization was seen in 20 min but S1PR1 returned to the cell surface within 1 h accompanied by Y143-dephosphorylation. Cell surface S1PR1 loss paralleled defective endothelial barrier enhancement induced by S1P. Expression of phospho-defective (Y143F) or phospho-mimicking (Y143D) mutants, respectively, failed to internalize or showed unusually high receptor internalization, consistent with the requirement of Y143 in regulating cell surface S1PR1 expression. Phosphorylation of the five S1PR1 C-terminal serine residues did not affect the role of Y143 phosphorylation in signaling S1PR1 internalization. Thus, rapid reduction of endothelial cell surface expression of S1PR1 subsequent to Y143 phosphorylation is a crucial mechanism of modulating S1PR1 signaling, and hence the endothelial barrier repair function of S1P. PMID:25588843

  15. 26 CFR 1.0-1 - Internal Revenue Code of 1954 and regulations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... identified in each instance. The regulations in 26 CFR (1939) part 39 (Regulations 118) are continued in... 26 Internal Revenue 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 true Internal Revenue Code of 1954 and regulations. 1.0-1 Section 1.0-1 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY INCOME...

  16. Decorin in human oral cancer: A promising predictive biomarker of S-1 neoadjuvant chemosensitivity

    SciTech Connect

    Kasamatsu, Atsushi; Uzawa, Katsuhiro; Minakawa, Yasuyuki; Ishige, Shunsaku; Kasama, Hiroki; Endo-Sakamoto, Yosuke; Ogawara, Katsunori; Shiiba, Masashi; Takiguchi, Yuichi; Tanzawa, Hideki

    2015-01-30

    Highlights: • DCN is significantly up-regulated in chemoresistant cancer cell lines. • DCN is a key regulator for chemoresistant mechanisms in vitro and in vivo. • DCN predicts the clinical responses to S-1 NAC for patients with oral cancer. - Abstract: We reported previously that decorin (DCN) is significantly up-regulated in chemoresistant cancer cell lines. DCN is a small leucine-rich proteoglycan that exists and functions in stromal and epithelial cells. Accumulating evidence suggests that DCN affects the biology of several types of cancer by directly/indirectly targeting the signaling molecules involved in cell growth, survival, metastasis, and angiogenesis, however, the molecular mechanisms of DCN in chemoresistance and its clinical relevance are still unknown. Here we assumed that DCN silencing cells increase chemosusceptibility to S-1, consisted of tegafur, prodrug of 5-fluorouracil. We first established DCN knockdown transfectants derived from oral cancer cells for following experiments including chemosusceptibility assay to S-1. In addition to the in vitro data, DCN knockdown zenografting tumors in nude mice demonstrate decreasing cell proliferation and increasing apoptosis with dephosphorylation of AKT after S-1 chemotherapy. We also investigated whether DCN expression predicts the clinical responses of neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NAC) using S-1 (S-1 NAC) for oral cancer patients. Immunohistochemistry data in the preoperative biopsy samples was analyzed to determine the cut-off point for status of DCN expression by receiver operating curve analysis. Interestingly, low DCN expression was observed in five (83%) of six cases with complete responses to S-1 NAC, and in one (10%) case of 10 cases with stable/progressive disease, indicating that S-1 chemosensitivity is dramatically effective in oral cancer patients with low DCN expression compared with high DCN expression. Our findings suggest that DCN is a key regulator for chemoresistant mechanisms, and

  17. High spatial resolution observations of Orion bright bar: CS (J = 1-0) and H51. cap alpha. emission

    SciTech Connect

    Omodaka, T.; Hayashi, M.; Hasegawa, T.

    1984-07-15

    High-resolution strip maps of CS (J = 1-0) and H51..cap alpha.. line emission across the Orion bright bar are presented. The intensity of CS emission is weaker in the H II region with a rapid increase at the optical bar, while the H51 ..cap alpha.. line was detected only on the side of the H II region. The variation of the CS intensity can be reproduced by a beam-convolved step function with the position of the step coincident with the ionization front. The molecular cloud associated with the bright bar is redshifted relative to the ambient molecular cloud by about 2 km s/sup -1/. This may suggest the dynamical interactions between the molecular cloud and the H II region excited by the Trapezium stars.

  18. Excitation Mechanisms for HCN (1-0) and HCO+ (1-0) in Galaxies from the Great Observatories All-sky LIRG Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Privon, George; Herrero-Illana, Ruben; Evans, Aaron; Iwasawa, Kazushi; Perez-Torres, Miguel; Armus, Lee; Diaz-Santos, Tanio; Murphy, Eric; Stierwalt, Sabrina; Aalto, Susanne; Mazzarella, Joe; Barcos-Muñoz, Loreto; Borish, Jake; Inami, Hanae; Kim, Dongchan; Treister, Ezequiel; Surace, Jason; Lord, Steven; Conway, John; Frayer, David; Alberdi, Antonio

    2015-08-01

    We will present new IRAM 30m observations of the HCN (1-0) and HCO+ (1-0) emission in a sample of Luminous and Ultraluminous Infrared Galaxies from the Great Observatories All-sky LIRG Survey. These new measurements are compared with mid-infrared AGN diagnostics to ascertain if enhanced HCN emission (relative to HCO+) correlates with increased AGN dominance. I will also compare consider the global relationships of these dense gas tracers with the infrared luminosity, to investigate the relationship between the HCN and HCO+ luminosities and the ongoing star formation. These comparisons suggest the HCN and HCO+ emission depend on both density and radiative effects (XDRs, mid-infrared pumping), obstructing a simple interpretation of the HCN/HCO+ ratio.

  19. Extracellular vesicles shed by melanoma cells contain a modified form of H1.0 linker histone and H1.0 mRNA-binding proteins

    PubMed Central

    Schiera, Gabriella; Di Liegro, Carlo Maria; Puleo, Veronica; Colletta, Oriana; Fricano, Anna; Cancemi, Patrizia; Di Cara, Gianluca; Di Liegro, Italia

    2016-01-01

    Extracellular vesicles (EVs) are now recognized as a fundamental way for cell-to-cell horizontal transfer of properties, in both physiological and pathological conditions. Most of EV-mediated cross-talk among cells depend on the exchange of proteins, and nucleic acids, among which mRNAs, and non-coding RNAs such as different species of miRNAs. Cancer cells, in particular, use EVs to discard molecules which could be dangerous to them (for example differentiation-inducing proteins such as histone H1.0, or antitumor drugs), to transfer molecules which, after entering the surrounding cells, are able to transform their phenotype, and even to secrete factors, which allow escaping from immune surveillance. Herein we report that melanoma cells not only secrete EVs which contain a modified form of H1.0 histone, but also transport the corresponding mRNA. Given the already known role in tumorigenesis of some RNA binding proteins (RBPs), we also searched for proteins of this class in EVs. This study revealed the presence in A375 melanoma cells of at least three RBPs, with apparent MW of about 65, 45 and 38 kDa, which are able to bind H1.0 mRNA. Moreover, we purified one of these proteins, which by MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry was identified as the already known transcription factor MYEF2. PMID:27633859

  20. Detection of the 267 GHz J = 1-0 rotational transition of PH3 in Saturn with a new Fourier transform spectrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weisstein, Eric W.; Serabyn, E.

    1994-01-01

    In recent observations at the Caltech Submillimeter Observatory, the highly pressure-broadened (FWHM = 11.2 GHz) J = 1-0 rotational transition of PH3 (phosphine) was detected on Saturn. By modeling the Saturnian atmosphere with a radiative transfer code, the observed line profile was consistent with a constant PH3 mole fraction of 3.0 plus or minus 1.0 ppm in the upper troposphere. A best-fit to the depth of the line implies a cutoff at high altitudes, with no PH3 present at pressures approximately less than 100 mbar. The observed line depth, combined with the lack of a detectable emission core, implies that a cutoff in the PH3 abundance occurs at a pressure between 13 and 140 mbar. PH3 in Jupiter was not detected, nor any other molecular lines between 195 and 295 GHz (1.54 mm and 1.02 mm, respectively) in either Jupiter or Saturn.

  1. Exogenous S1P Exposure Potentiates Ischemic Stroke Damage That Is Reduced Possibly by Inhibiting S1P Receptor Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Moon, Eunjung; Han, Jeong Eun; Jeon, Sejin; Ryu, Jong Hoon; Choi, Ji Woong; Chun, Jerold

    2015-01-01

    Initial and recurrent stroke produces central nervous system (CNS) damage, involving neuroinflammation. Receptor-mediated S1P signaling can influence neuroinflammation and has been implicated in cerebral ischemia through effects on the immune system. However, S1P-mediated events also occur within the brain itself where its roles during stroke have been less well studied. Here we investigated the involvement of S1P signaling in initial and recurrent stroke by using a transient middle cerebral artery occlusion/reperfusion (M/R) model combined with analyses of S1P signaling. Gene expression for S1P receptors and involved enzymes was altered during M/R, supporting changes in S1P signaling. Direct S1P microinjection into the normal CNS induced neuroglial activation, implicating S1P-initiated neuroinflammatory responses that resembled CNS changes seen during initial M/R challenge. Moreover, S1P microinjection combined with M/R potentiated brain damage, approximating a model for recurrent stroke dependent on S1P and suggesting that reduction in S1P signaling could ameliorate stroke damage. Delivery of FTY720 that removes S1P signaling with chronic exposure reduced damage in both initial and S1P-potentiated M/R-challenged brain, while reducing stroke markers like TNF-α. These results implicate direct S1P CNS signaling in the etiology of initial and recurrent stroke that can be therapeutically accessed by S1P modulators acting within the brain. PMID:26576074

  2. A High Resolution Spectroscopic Study of the Nu2 Band of Hydrogen Sulfide and the 1-0 Band of Hydrogen Iodide. Ph.D. Thesis - Maryland Univ.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Strow, L. L.

    1981-01-01

    A tunable diode laser spectrometer was constructed and used to study: (1) the effects of centrifugal distortion on the transition frequencies and strengths of the nu sub 2 band of H2S, and (2) nuclear quadrupole hyperfine structure in the 1-0 band of HI. A total of 126 line frequencies and 94 line strengths in the nu sub 2 band of H2S were measured. The average accuracy of the line frequency measurements was + or - 0.0016 cm. The line strengths were measured to an average accuracy of about 3 percent. The effect of the finite spectral width of the diode laser on the measurement of line strengths is discussed. The observed H2S line frequencies were fit to Watson's AS and NS reduced Hamiltonian in both the Ir and IIIr coordinate representations in order to determine the best set of rotation distortion constants for the upper state of the nu sub 2 band. Comparisons of the observed line strengths in this band to rigid rotor line strengths are also presented. Nuclear quadrupole hyperfine structure in the low J lines of the 1-0 band of HI was observed. The upper vibrational state nuclear quadrupole coupling constant, determined from the observed splittings, was -1850 MHz + or - 12 MHz or 1.2 percent + or - 0.7 percent larger than the ground state coupling constant.

  3. Surface structures of Fe on Mo(1 1 0) surface investigated by RHEED

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maehara, Y.; Yamada, A.; Kawanowa, H.; Gotoh, Y.

    2004-10-01

    The surface structures of iron deposited on a Mo(1 1 0) surface have been investigated by reflection high-energy electron diffraction (RHEED), and three kinds of surface structures were observed. Up to 1.0 ML of Fe deposition thickneeses, 1 × 1 structure appeared in all substrate temperature range from RT to 1200 °C. At thicknesses ranging from 0.5 to 1.0 ML, α structure which is the commensurate structure expressed by [3 1, 0 2] in matrix notation appeared at 300-550 °C. More than 1.0 ML, the β structure appeared at 400-800 °C. The β structure is also the commensurate structure expressed by [12 0, 0 12], exhibiting the same atomic arrangement as bcc(1 1 0) surface. In the thickness range beyond 1.0 ML, Fe film grew as the Frank-van der Merwe growth mode at room temperature to 400 °C and Stranski-Krastanov growth mode from 400 to 800 °C, in which the β structure was the first monolayer.

  4. Blocking S1P interaction with S1P{sub 1} receptor by a novel competitive S1P{sub 1}-selective antagonist inhibits angiogenesis

    SciTech Connect

    Fujii, Yasuyuki; Ueda, Yasuji; Ohtake, Hidenori; Ono, Naoya; Takayama, Tetsuo; Nakazawa, Kiyoshi; Igarashi, Yasuyuki; Goitsuka, Ryo

    2012-03-23

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The effect of a newly developed S1P{sub 1}-selective antagonist on angiogenic responses. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer S1P{sub 1} is a critical component of VEGF-related angiogenic responses. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer S1P{sub 1}-selective antagonist showed in vitro activity to inhibit angiogenesis. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer S1P{sub 1}-selective antagonist showed in vivo activity to inhibit angiogenesis. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The efficacy of S1P{sub 1}-selective antagonist for anti-cancer therapies. -- Abstract: Sphingosine 1-phosphate receptor type 1 (S1P{sub 1}) was shown to be essential for vascular maturation during embryonic development and it has been demonstrated that substantial crosstalk exists between S1P{sub 1} and other pro-angiogenic growth factors, such as vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and basic fibroblast growth factor. We developed a novel S1P{sub 1}-selective antagonist, TASP0277308, which is structurally unrelated to S1P as well as previously described S1P{sub 1} antagonists. TASP0277308 inhibited S1P- as well as VEGF-induced cellular responses, including migration and proliferation of human umbilical vein endothelial cells. Furthermore, TASP0277308 effectively blocked a VEGF-induced tube formation in vitro and significantly suppressed tumor cell-induced angiogenesis in vivo. These findings revealed that S1P{sub 1} is a critical component of VEGF-related angiogenic responses and also provide evidence for the efficacy of TASP0277308 for anti-cancer therapies.

  5. Conformationally Constrained, Stable, Triplet Ground State (S = 1) Nitroxide Diradicals. Antiferromagnetic Chains of S = 1 Diradicals

    SciTech Connect

    Rajca, Andrzej; Takahashi, Masahiro; Pink, Maren; Spagnol, Gaelle; Rajca, Suchada

    2008-06-30

    Nitroxide diradicals, in which nitroxides are annelated to m-phenylene forming tricyclic benzobisoxazine-like structures, have been synthesized and characterized by X-ray crystallography, magnetic resonance (EPR and {sup 1}H NMR) spectroscopy, as well as magnetic studies in solution and in solid state. For the octamethyl derivative of benzobisoxazine nitroxide diradical, the conformationally constrained nitroxide moieties are coplanar with the m-phenylene, leading to large values of 2J (2J/k > 200 K in solution and 2J/k >> 300 K in the solid state). For the diradical, in which all ortho and para positions of the m-phenylene are sterically shielded, distortion of the nitroxide moieties from coplanarity is moderate, such that the singlet-triplet gaps remain large in both solution (2J/k > 200 K) and the solid state (2J/k {approx} 400-800 K), though an onset of thermal depopulation of the triplet ground state is detectable near room temperature. These diradicals have robust triplet ground states with strong ferromagnetic coupling and good stability at ambient conditions. Magnetic behavior of the nitroxide diradicals at low temperature is best fit to the model of one-dimensional S = 1 Heisenberg chains with intrachain antiferromagnetic coupling. The antiferromagnetic coupling between the S = 1 diradicals may be associated with the methyl nitroxide C-H {hor_ellipsis} O contacts, including nonclassical hydrogen bonds. These unprecedented organic S = 1 antiferromagnetic chains are highly isotropic, compared to those of the extensively studied Ni(II)-based chains.

  6. 32 CFR 1636.5 - Exclusion from Class 1-A-0 and Class 1-0.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... be excluded from Class 1-A-0 or Class 1-0: (a) Who asserts beliefs which are of a religious, moral or... participation in war does not rest at all upon moral, ethical, or religious principle, but instead rests...

  7. Structural and magnetic properties of L1(0)/A1, FePt nanocomposites

    SciTech Connect

    Giannopoulos, G; Speliotis, T; Li, WF; Hadjipanayis, G; Niarchos, D

    2013-01-01

    In this work structural and magnetic properties of (L1(0)-FePt/A1-FePt) exchange coupled nanocomposites are presented. Semi spherical "dome-like" nanocomposites with L1(0) FePt isolated nanoparticles and A1 FePt (fcc) cap layers were obtained by depositing A1-FePt on type L1(0) FePt nanoparticles in order to understand the influence of the soft magnetic layer thickness on the magnetic properties of the system. Epitaxial growth is confirmed by X-ray diffraction and TEM, while the coercivity decreases dramatically for the L1(0)/A1-FePt system when the thickness of the A1-FePt cap layers is increased. This result can be used to realize ultrahigh magnetic recording media with tunable coercivity, suitable for conventional write heads. (C) 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Dissociative chemisorption of methylsilane and methylchloride on the Si(1 0 0) surface from first principles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silvestrelli, Pier Luigi; Sbraccia, Carlo; Romero, Aldo H.; Ancilotto, Francesco

    2003-06-01

    The chemisorption process of methylsilane and methylchloride on the Si(1 0 0) surface is studied from first principles. Both the molecules are found to chemisorb dissociatively. The most stable adsorption structures are described. Moreover, the detailed adsorption processes are investigated by considering different possible reaction paths and evaluating the corresponding energy barriers that the molecules must overcome to dissociatively chemisorb on Si(1 0 0). Our results are compared with recent experimental observations.

  9. Results of 1.0-L sample bottle pressurization tests for the pit burst experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Veirs, K.D.; Prenger, F.C.; Harradine, D.M.; McFarlan, J.T.

    1997-02-01

    Pressurization tests were performed on a 1.0-L sample bottle to verify operational aspects of the pit burst experimental test apparatus. The 1.0-L sample bottle was selected because of its known geometry, certified performance and ready availability. Redundant strain gage instrumentation was installed on the test sample enabling evaluation of the repeatability and consistency of data acquisition. Test results were compared with analytical model predictions to evaluate instrumentation accuracy.

  10. Airborne imagery of a disintegrating Sargassum drift line

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marmorino, George O.; Miller, W. D.; Smith, Geoffrey B.; Bowles, Jeffrey H.

    2011-03-01

    Airborne hyperspectral and thermal infrared imagery collected over the Florida Current provide a view of the disintegration of a Sargassum drift line in 5 m s -1 winds. The drift line consists mostly of rafts 20-80 m 2 in size, though aggregations larger than 1000 m 2 also occur. Rafts tend to be elongated, curved in the upwind direction, and 0.1-0.5 °C warmer than the surrounding ocean surface. Long weed 'trails' extending upwind from the rafts are evidence of plants dropping out and being left behind more rapidly drifting rafts. The raft line may be a remnant of an earlier Sargassum frontal band, which is detectible as an upwind thermal front and areas of submerged weed. Issues are identified that require future field measurements.

  11. Computer simulation of sputtering at the low index (1 0 0), (1 1 0) and (1 1 1) surfaces of Ni3Al in a STEM

    SciTech Connect

    Lai, Wenshen; Yu, J. J.; Gao, Fei; Bacon, David J.

    2009-09-15

    The present study is relevant to the preferential Al sputtering and/or enhancement of the Ni/Al ratio in Ni3Al observed by the scanning transmission electron microscopy fitted with a field emission gun (FEG STEM). Atomic recoil events at the low index (1 0 0), (1 1 0) and (1 1 1) surfaces of Ni3Al through elastic collisions between electrons and atoms are simulated using molecular dynamics (MD) methods. The threshold energy for sputtering, Esp, and adatom creation, Ead, are determined as a function of recoil direction. Based on the MD determined Esp, the sputtering cross-sections for Ni and Al atoms in these surfaces are calculated with the previous proposed model. It is found that the sputtering cross-section for Al atoms is about 7–8 times higher than that for Ni, indicating the preferential sputtering of Al in Ni3Al, in good agreement with experiments. It is also found that the sputtering cross-sections for Ni atoms are almost the same in these three surfaces, suggesting that they are independent of surface orientation. Thus, the sputtering process is almost independent of the surface orientation in Ni3Al, as it is controlled by the sputtering of Ni atoms with a lower sputtering rate.

  12. Pan-STARRS 1 observations of the unusual active Centaur P/2011 S1(Gibbs)

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, H. W.; Ip, W. H.; Chen, W. P.; Chen, Y. T.; Lacerda, P.; Holman, M.; Protopapas, P.; Burgett, W. S.; Chambers, K. C.; Flewelling, H.; Huber, M. E.; Jedicke, R.; Kaiser, N.; Magnier, E. A.; Metcalfe, N.; Price, P. A.

    2014-05-01

    P/2011 S1 (Gibbs) is an outer solar system comet or active Centaur with a similar orbit to that of the famous 29P/Schwassmann-Wachmann 1. P/2011 S1 (Gibbs) has been observed by the Pan-STARRS 1 (PS1) sky survey from 2010 to 2012. The resulting data allow us to perform multi-color studies of the nucleus and coma of the comet. Analysis of PS1 images reveals that P/2011 S1 (Gibbs) has a small nucleus <4 km radius, with colors g {sub P1} – r {sub P1} = 0.5 ± 0.02, r {sub P1} – i {sub P1} = 0.12 ± 0.02, and i {sub P1} – z {sub P1} = 0.46 ± 0.03. The comet remained active from 2010 to 2012, with a model-dependent mass-loss rate of ∼100 kg s{sup –1}. The mass-loss rate per unit surface area of P/2011 S1 (Gibbs) is as high as that of 29P/Schwassmann-Wachmann 1, making it one of the most active Centaurs. The mass-loss rate also varies with time from ∼40 kg s{sup –1} to 150 kg s{sup –1}. Due to its rather circular orbit, we propose that P/2011 S1 (Gibbs) has 29P/Schwassmann-Wachmann 1-like outbursts that control the outgassing rate. The results indicate that it may have a similar surface composition to that of 29P/Schwassmann-Wachmann 1. Our numerical simulations show that the future orbital evolution of P/2011 S1 (Gibbs) is more similar to that of the main population of Centaurs than to that of 29P/Schwassmann-Wachmann 1. The results also demonstrate that P/2011 S1 (Gibbs) is dynamically unstable and can only remain near its current orbit for roughly a thousand years.

  13. Micromachining of mesa and pyramidal-shaped objects in (1 0 0) InP substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eliás, P.; Martaus, J.; Soltýs, J.; Kostic, I.

    2005-05-01

    Generally oriented mesas and pyramidal-shaped objects were patterned in (1 0 0) InP substrate by etching in 3HCl:1H3PO4 at (16 ± 0.05) °C through convex InGaAs mask patterns. The mesas were revealed through long (~2 mm) parallelogram-shaped mask strips whose long edges lay between [0 1 1] and [0\\,\\bar{1} \\,1] at a variable angle ω, with ω ≡ 0° at [0 1 1]. The mesas were re-entrant for ω epsi [0°, 45°) and ordinary for ω epsi (45°, 90°]. The tilt of mesa side facets α and the associated mask underetching rates were evaluated using SEM, AFM and optical microscopy. The underetching rate was zero at ω = 0° and 90°. With |(ω - 45°)| → 0° it increased asymmetrically about [0 0 1]: for |(ω1 - 45°)| = |(ω2 - 45°)| it was higher at ω1 < 45° than at ω2 > 45°. At ω = 45.5° ordinary (1 1 0)- and (1\\,\\bar{1}\\,0) -related facets, tilted at α ap 45°, were revealed at a rate of (310.1 ± 8.1) nm min-1. Likewise at ω = 45.5° off [0 1 1] to [0\\,1\\,\\bar{1}] (1 0 1)- and (1\\,0\\,\\bar{1}) -related facets formed. In theory, (1 1 0), (1\\,\\bar{1}\\,0) , (1 0 1) and (1\\,0\\,\\bar{1}) define a pyramidal shape with the sides tilted at 45° to (1 0 0). In practice, an object confined by facets related to (1 1 0), (1\\,\\bar{1}\\,0) , (1 0 1) and (1\\,0\\,\\bar{1}) cannot be revealed via a convex-cornered lozenge-shaped pattern with the edges at ω = 45.5° and diagonals parallel with [0 1 1] and [0\\,1\\,\\bar{1}] because the 'pyramidal' facets are suppressed by fast-etching re-entrant facets that form at the [0\\,1\\,\\bar{1}] - and [0\\,\\bar{1} \\,1] -oriented corners. If compensated with e.g. rectangular strips, the pyramidal facets can be revealed at the lozenge edges. Etch-stop (2 1 1)A-related facets were formed along the compensation strip edges and fast-etching re-entrant facets at the convex corners of the compensation strips. The angular orientation of the pyramidal facets slightly shifted with etching time: the normal vector of the

  14. CHROMOSPHERIC EVAPORATION IN AN X1.0 FLARE ON 2014 MARCH 29 OBSERVED WITH IRIS AND EIS

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Y.; Ding, M. D.; Qiu, J.; Cheng, J. X.

    2015-09-20

    Chromospheric evaporation refers to dynamic mass motions in flare loops as a result of rapid energy deposition in the chromosphere. These motions have been observed as blueshifts in X-ray and extreme-ultraviolet (EUV) spectral lines corresponding to upward motions at a few tens to a few hundreds of km s{sup −1}. Past spectroscopic observations have also revealed a dominant stationary component, in addition to the blueshifted component, in emission lines formed at high temperatures (∼10 MK). This is contradictory to evaporation models predicting predominant blueshifts in hot lines. The recently launched Interface Region Imaging Spectrograph (IRIS) provides high-resolution imaging and spectroscopic observations that focus on the chromosphere and transition region in the UV passband. Using the new IRIS observations, combined with coordinated observations from the EUV Imaging Spectrometer, we study the chromospheric evaporation process from the upper chromosphere to the corona during an X1.0 flare on 2014 March 29. We find evident evaporation signatures, characterized by Doppler shifts and line broadening, at two flare ribbons that are separating from each other, suggesting that chromospheric evaporation takes place in successively formed flaring loops throughout the flare. More importantly, we detect dominant blueshifts in the high-temperature Fe xxi line (∼10 MK), in agreement with theoretical predictions. We also find that, in this flare, gentle evaporation occurs at some locations in the rise phase of the flare, while explosive evaporation is detected at some other locations near the peak of the flare. There is a conversion from gentle to explosive evaporation as the flare evolves.

  15. A Sensitive CO(1-0) Survey in Pegasus-Pisces; Reducing the Dark Gas Inventory the Old-Fashioned Way

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Magnani, Loris A.; Donate, Emmanuel

    2016-06-01

    The idea that substantial molecular gas is present in the ISM but is not detectable by the CO(1-0) emission line at 115 GHz has become fairly prevalent in the last decade. This component has come to be known as “dark gas” in the sense that it is hard to trace using the standard spectral line tracers. It is usually identified by gamma-ray or infrared emission, or via the C+ spectral line at 158 microns. However, in determining the dark gas component and comparing it to the molecular gas traced by the CO(1-0) line, existing CO surveys of varying sensitivity are employed. Even the most sensitive CO surveys typically employed in this fashion have at best 1-sigma rms values of about 0.1 K in antenna temperature. We surveyed a small region in the vicinity of the high-latitude molecular cloud MBM 55 in the CO(1-0) line using the Arizona Radio Observatory 12-meter telescope. The 1-sigma rms of our survey (0.02 – 0.03 K) was significantly better than that of typical CO surveys. We detected more CO emission than previous work had found and increased the known H2 in the region by nearly 80%, thereby reducing significantly the contribution from dark gas.

  16. EMPOWER-1.0: an Efficient Model of Planktonic ecOsystems WrittEn in R

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, T. R.; Gentleman, W. C.; Yool, A.

    2015-01-01

    Modelling marine ecosystems requires insight and judgement when it comes to deciding upon appropriate model structure, equations and parameterisation. Many processes are relatively poorly understood and tough decisions must be made as to how to mathematically simplify the real world. Here, we present an efficient plankton modelling testbed, EMPOWER-1.0, coded in the freely available language R. The testbed uses simple two-layer "slab" physics whereby a seasonally varying mixed layer which contains the planktonic marine ecosystem is positioned above a deep layer that contains only nutrient. As such, EMPOWER-1.0 provides a readily available and easy to use tool for evaluating model structure, formulations and parameterisation. The code is transparent and modular such that modifications and changes to model formulation are easily implemented allowing users to investigate and familiarise themselves with the inner workings of their models. It can be used either for preliminary model testing to set the stage for further work, e.g., coupling the ecosystem model to 1-D or 3-D physics, or for undertaking front line research in its own right. EMPOWER-1.0 also serves as an ideal teaching tool. In order to demonstrate the utility of EMPOWER-1.0, we carried out both a parameter tuning exercise and structural sensitivity analysis. Parameter tuning was demonstrated for four contrasting ocean sites, focusing on Station India in the North Atlantic (60° N, 20° W), highlighting both the utility of undertaking a planned sensitivity analysis for this purpose, yet also the subjectivity which nevertheless surrounds the choice of which parameters to tune. Structural sensitivity tests were then performed comparing different equations for calculating daily depth-integrated photosynthesis, as well as mortality terms for both phytoplankton and zooplankton. Regarding the calculation of daily photosynthesis, for example, results indicated that the model was relatively insensitive to the

  17. EMPOWER-1.0: an Efficient Model of Planktonic ecOsystems WrittEn in R

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, T. R.; Gentleman, W. C.; Yool, A.

    2015-07-01

    Modelling marine ecosystems requires insight and judgement when it comes to deciding upon appropriate model structure, equations and parameterisation. Many processes are relatively poorly understood and tough decisions must be made as to how to mathematically simplify the real world. Here, we present an efficient plankton modelling testbed, EMPOWER-1.0 (Efficient Model of Planktonic ecOsystems WrittEn in R), coded in the freely available language R. The testbed uses simple two-layer "slab" physics whereby a seasonally varying mixed layer which contains the planktonic marine ecosystem is positioned above a deep layer that contains only nutrient. As such, EMPOWER-1.0 provides a readily available and easy to use tool for evaluating model structure, formulations and parameterisation. The code is transparent and modular such that modifications and changes to model formulation are easily implemented allowing users to investigate and familiarise themselves with the inner workings of their models. It can be used either for preliminary model testing to set the stage for further work, e.g. coupling the ecosystem model to 1-D or 3-D physics, or for undertaking front line research in its own right. EMPOWER-1.0 also serves as an ideal teaching tool. In order to demonstrate the utility of EMPOWER-1.0, we implemented a simple nutrient-phytoplankton-zooplankton-detritus (NPZD) ecosystem model and carried out both a parameter tuning exercise and structural sensitivity analysis. Parameter tuning was demonstrated for four contrasting ocean sites, focusing on station BIOTRANS in the North Atlantic (47° N, 20° W), highlighting both the utility of undertaking a planned sensitivity analysis for this purpose, yet also the subjectivity which nevertheless surrounds the choice of which parameters to tune. Structural sensitivity tests were then performed comparing different equations for calculating daily depth-integrated photosynthesis, as well as mortality terms for both phytoplankton and

  18. The growth and structure of titanium dioxide films on a Re(1 0 -1 0) surface: Rutile(0 1 1)-(2 × 1)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosenthal, D.; Zizak, I.; Darowski, N.; Magkoev, T. T.; Christmann, K.

    2006-07-01

    Titanium dioxide films were grown on Re(1 0 -1 0) by Ti vapor deposition in oxygen at T = 830 K and studied by means of low-energy electron diffraction (LEED), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), low-energy ion scattering (LEIS) and X-ray diffraction (XRD). The Ti oxide stoichiometry was determined by XPS as Ti:O = 1:2, with the Ti oxidation state (4+). The TiO 2 growth was monitored by means of LEED as a function of film thickness. Extending the coverage from the submonolayer into the multilayer regime gives rise to a p(2 × 2) pattern, a (poorly ordered) (1 × 1), and, finally, a stable (2 × 2) structure, the latter being associated with a homogeneous TiO 2 phase. For normal electron incidence, the (2 × 2) LEED pattern exhibits systematically extinguished beams at ( n ± 1/2, 0) positions, indicating a glide mirror plane. The pg(2 × 2) structure could be explained by both a rutile(0 1 1)-(2 × 1) reconstructed surface and a bulk truncated brookite(0 0 1) surface. Faceting phenomena, i.e. running LEED spots, observed with thin TiO 2 films point to the formation of a rutile(0 1 1)-(2 × 1) surface with two domains and {0 1 1}-(2 × 1) facets and rule out the brookite alternative. Confirmation of this assignment was obtained by an XRD analysis performed at the Berlin synchrotron facility BESSY.

  19. Sputtering and secondary ion emission from Cu/Ni(1 0 0)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karolewski, M. A.; Cavell, R. G.

    2001-05-01

    The growth and sputtering of Cu/Ni(1 0 0) in the Cu coverage range 0-2 monolayers (ML) have been studied using secondary ion mass spectrometry. Relative secondary ion (SI) yield data derived from these measurements have been compared with ballistic sputter yields predicted by molecular dynamics computer simulations. From the comparison, it is suggested that ionisation probabilities for atoms and dimers sputtered from Cu/Ni(1 0 0) are attenuated by a factor of 2-3 with respect to clean Ni(1 0 0), probably due to the work function shift accompanying Cu deposition. Two simple models of the ionisation process for sputtered atoms have been implemented. The electron tunnelling model proved to be more successful at predicting the variation of relative SI yields with Cu coverage than the thermalisation model. The mean information depth for atomic secondary ions (Ni +, Cu +) is found to be 0.39±0.15 ML beneath the surface layer of a 1 ML Cu/Ni(1 0 0) target. The surface layer of Cu/Ni(1 0 0) contributes ˜69% of atomic secondary ions, and ˜81% of the atomic constituents of dimer secondary ions (Ni 2+, NiCu +, Cu 2+).

  20. Ultrathin films of Cu on Ru(1 0 1bar 0): Flat bilayers and mesa islands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brona, J.; Wasielewski, R.; Ciszewski, A.

    2012-10-01

    The Cu/Ru(1 0 1bar 0) adsorption system was investigated by STM, LEED and AES. Cu was deposited at room temperature (RT) and 800 K, with the coverage ranging from a fraction up to 4 bilayers (BL). The first two Cu BL grow in the bilayer-by-bilayer mode. Their structure is pseudomorphic and does not depend on the temperature. For coverage higher than 2 BL, Cu deposited at elevated temperature forms three-dimensional islands in mesa shape with Cu(1 1 1) facets on their tops. The facets and the substrate are epitaxially oriented with Cu(1 1 1)||Ru(1 0 1bar 0) and Cu[0 1 1bar]||Ru[1 2bar 1 0]. Obtained results can be helpful in search for an optimal method of Cu deposition onto Ru in the damascene process in microelectronics, and could be also of interest to catalysis.

  1. Spacesuit Portable Life Support System Breadboard (PLSS 1.0) Development and Test Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vogel, Matt R.; Watts, Carly

    2011-01-01

    A multi-year effort has been carried out at NASA-JSC to develop an advanced Extravehicular Activity (EVA) PLSS design intended to further the current state of the art by increasing operational flexibility, reducing consumables, and increasing robustness. Previous efforts have focused on modeling and analyzing the advanced PLSS architecture, as well as developing key enabling technologies. Like the current International Space Station (ISS) Extravehicular Mobility Unit (EMU) PLSS, the advanced PLSS comprises of three subsystems required to sustain the crew during EVA including the Thermal, Ventilation, and Oxygen Subsystems. This multi-year effort has culminated in the construction and operation of PLSS 1.0, a test rig that simulates full functionality of the advanced PLSS design. PLSS 1.0 integrates commercial off the shelf hardware with prototype technology development components, including the primary and secondary oxygen regulators, ventilation loop fan, Rapid Cycle Amine (RCA) swingbed, and Spacesuit Water Membrane Evaporator (SWME). Testing accumulated 239 hours over 45 days, while executing 172 test points. Specific PLSS 1.0 test objectives assessed during this testing include: confirming key individual components perform in a system level test as they have performed during component level testing; identifying unexpected system-level interactions; operating PLSS 1.0 in nominal steady-state EVA modes to baseline subsystem performance with respect to metabolic rate, ventilation loop pressure and flow rate, and environmental conditions; simulating nominal transient EVA operational scenarios; simulating contingency EVA operational scenarios; and further evaluating individual technology development components. Successful testing of the PLSS 1.0 provided a large database of test results that characterize system level and component performance. With the exception of several minor anomalies, the PLSS 1.0 test rig performed as expected; furthermore, many system

  2. A tilt-dependent diffusional potential energy landscape: benzyne on Ir{1 0 0}

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamagishi, S.; Jenkins, S. J.; King, D. A.

    2003-01-01

    Molecular diffusion across a surface is typically assumed to involve only relatively minor changes in molecular orientation and internal structure. Nevertheless, it is expected (in principle) that certain molecules may diffuse in more complex ways; rolling, deforming, or otherwise adapting their configuration as they make their way across the surface. Here we show that adsorbed benzyne on the Ir{1 0 0} surface displays three distinct diffusional pathways through its configuration space, corresponding to three different values of the molecular tilt. The lowest barrier to diffusion is 1.0 eV.

  3. Spacesuit Portable Life Support System Breadboard (PLSS 1.0) Development and Test Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Watts, Carly A.; Vogel, Matt

    2012-01-01

    A multi-year effort has been carried out at the Johnson Space Center to develop an advanced EVA PLSS design intended to further the current state of the art by increasing operational flexibility, reducing consumables, and increasing robustness. This multi-year effort has culminated in the construction and operation of PLSS 1.0, a test rig that simulates full functionality of the advanced PLSS design. PLSS 1.0 integrates commercial off-the-shelf hardware with prototype technology development components, including the primary and secondary oxygen regulators, ventilation loop fan, Rapid Cycle Amine (RCA) swingbed, and Spacesuit Water Membrane Evaporator (SWME). PLSS 1.0 was tested from June 17th through September 30th, 2011. Testing accumulated 233 hours over 45 days, while executing 119 test points. An additional 164 hours of operational time were accrued during the test series, bringing the total operational time for PLSS 1.0 testing to 397 hours. Specific PLSS 1.0 test objectives assessed during this testing include: (1) Confirming prototype components perform in a system level test as they have performed during component level testing, (2) Identifying unexpected system-level interactions (3) Operating PLSS 1.0 in nominal steady-state EVA modes to baseline subsystem performance with respect to metabolic rate, ventilation loop pressure and flow rate, and environmental conditions (4) Simulating nominal transient EVA operational scenarios (5) Simulating contingency EVA operational scenarios (6) Further evaluating prototype technology development components Successful testing of the PLSS 1.0 provided a large database of test results that characterize system level and component performance. With the exception of several minor anomalies, the PLSS 1.0 test rig performed as expected. Documented anomalies and observations include: (1) Ventilation loop fan controller issues at high fan speeds (near 70,000 rpm, whereas the fan speed during nominal operations would be closer

  4. Symmetry enhancements via 5d instantons, q{W} -algebrae and (1 , 0) superconformal index

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benvenuti, Sergio; Bonelli, Giulio; Ronzani, Massimiliano; Tanzini, Alessandro

    2016-09-01

    We explore {N}=(1,0) superconformal six-dimensional theories arising from M5 branes probing a transverse A k singularity. Upon circle compactification to 5 dimensions, we describe this system with a dual pq-web of five-branes and propose the spectrum of basic five-dimensional instanton operators driving global symmetry enhancement. For a single M5 brane, we find that the exact partition function of the 5d quiver gauge theory matches the 6d (1, 0) index, which we compute by letter counting. We finally show that S-duality of the pq-web implies new relations among vertex correlators of q{W} algebrae.

  5. GREEN BANK TELESCOPE ZPECTROMETER CO(1-0) OBSERVATIONS OF THE STRONGLY LENSED SUBMILLIMETER GALAXIES FROM THE HERSCHEL ATLAS

    SciTech Connect

    Frayer, D. T.; Maddalena, R.; Harris, A. I.; Baker, A. J.; Ivison, R. J.; Smail, Ian; Negrello, M.; Aretxaga, I.; Baes, M.; Birkinshaw, M.; Bonfield, D. G.; Burgarella, D.; Buttiglione, S.; Cava, A.; Cooray, A.; Dannerbauer, H.

    2011-01-10

    The Herschel Astrophysical Terahertz Large Area Survey (H-ATLAS) has uncovered a population of strongly lensed submillimeter galaxies (SMGs). The Zpectrometer instrument on the Green Bank Telescope (GBT) was used to measure the redshifts and constrain the masses of the cold molecular gas reservoirs for two candidate high-redshift lensed sources. We derive CO(1-0) redshifts of z = 3.042 {+-} 0.001 and z = 2.625 {+-} 0.001, and measure molecular gas masses of (1-3) x10{sup 10} M{sub sun}, corrected for lens amplification and assuming a conversion factor of {alpha} = 0.8 M{sub sun}( K km s{sup -1} pc{sup 2}){sup -1}. We find typical L(IR)/L'(CO) ratios of 120 {+-} 40 and 140 {+-} 50 L{sub sun}( K km s{sup -1} pc{sup 2}){sup -1}, which are consistent with those found for local ultraluminous infrared galaxies (ULIRGs) and other high-redshift SMGs. From analysis of published data, we find no evidence for enhanced L(IR)/L'(CO(1-0)) ratios for the SMG population in comparison to local ULIRGs. The GBT results highlight the power of using the CO lines to derive blind redshifts, which is challenging for the SMGs at optical wavelengths given their high obscuration.

  6. Geometric modeling of homoepitaxial CVD diamond growth: I. The {1 0 0}{1 1 1}{1 1 0}{1 1 3} system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silva, F.; Bonnin, X.; Achard, J.; Brinza, O.; Michau, A.; Gicquel, A.

    2008-01-01

    Plasma-assisted CVD homoepitaxial diamond growth is a process that must satisfy many stringent requirements to meet industrial applications, particularly in high-power electronics. Purity control and crystalline quality of the obtained samples are of paramount importance and their optimization is a subject of active research. In the process of such studies, we have obtained high purity CVD diamond monocrystals with unusual morphologies, namely with apparent {1 1 3} stable faces. This phenomenon has led us to examine the process of CVD diamond growth and build up a 3D geometrical model, presented here, describing the film growth as a function of time. The model has been able to successfully describe the morphology of our obtained crystals and can be used as a predictive tool to predetermine the shape and size of a diamond crystal grown in a given process configuration. This renders accessible control of desirable properties such as largest usable diamond surface area and/or film thickness, before the cutting and polishing manufacture steps take place. The two latter steps are more sensitive to the geometry of the growth sectors, which will be addressed in a companion paper. Our model, applicable to the growth of any cubic lattice material, establishes a complete mapping of the final morphology state of growing diamond, as a function of the growth rates of the crystalline planes considered, namely {1 0 0}, {1 1 1}, {1 1 0}, and {1 1 3} planes, all of which have been observed experimentally in diamond films. The model makes no claim as to the stability of the obtained faces, such as the occurrence of non-epitaxial crystallites or twinning. It is also possible to deduce transient behavior of the crystal morphology as growth time is increased. The model conclusions are presented in the form of a series of diagrams, which trace the existence (and dominance) boundaries of each face type, in presence of the others, and where each boundary crossing represent a topology

  7. Resonating Valence Bond states for low dimensional S=1 antiferromagnets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Zheng-Xin; Zhou, Yi; Ng, Tai-Kai

    2014-03-01

    We study S = 1 spin liquid states in low dimensions. We show that the resonating-valence-bond (RVB) picture of S = 1 / 2 spin liquid state can be generalized to S = 1 case. For S = 1 system, a many-body singlet (with even site number) can be decomposed into superposition of products of two-body singlets. In other words, the product states of two-body singlets, called the singlet pair states (SPSs), are over complete to span the Hilbert space of many-body singlets. Furthermore, we generalized fermionic representation and the corresponding mean field theory and Gutzwiller projected stats to S = 1 models. We applied our theory to study 1D anti-ferromagnetic bilinear-biquadratic model and show that both the ground states (including the phase transition point) and the excited states can be understood excellently well within the framework. Our method can be applied to 2D S = 1 antiferromagnets.

  8. 26 CFR 1.414(s)-1 - Definition of compensation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... prior regulation provisions of § 1.414(s)-1T. (See § 1.414(s)-1T as contained in the CFR edition revised... to the extent necessary to satisfy the requirements of 29 CFR 2530.204-2(d) (regarding double... 26 Internal Revenue 5 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Definition of compensation. 1.414(s)-1 Section...

  9. 26 CFR 1.414(s)-1 - Definition of compensation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... prior regulation provisions of § 1.414(s)-1T. (See § 1.414(s)-1T as contained in the CFR edition revised... to the extent necessary to satisfy the requirements of 29 CFR 2530.204-2(d) (regarding double... 26 Internal Revenue 5 2012-04-01 2011-04-01 true Definition of compensation. 1.414(s)-1 Section...

  10. 26 CFR 1.414(s)-1 - Definition of compensation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... prior regulation provisions of § 1.414(s)-1T. (See § 1.414(s)-1T as contained in the CFR edition revised... to the extent necessary to satisfy the requirements of 29 CFR 2530.204-2(d) (regarding double... 26 Internal Revenue 5 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Definition of compensation. 1.414(s)-1 Section...

  11. 26 CFR 1.414(s)-1 - Definition of compensation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... prior regulation provisions of § 1.414(s)-1T. (See § 1.414(s)-1T as contained in the CFR edition revised... to the extent necessary to satisfy the requirements of 29 CFR 2530.204-2(d) (regarding double... 26 Internal Revenue 5 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Definition of compensation. 1.414(s)-1 Section...

  12. LABCORE post release 1.0 development system project management plan

    SciTech Connect

    Rich, H.S.

    1994-09-29

    The LABCORE post release 1.0 development system project management plan (SPMP) is the primary planning document governing the development of specific enhancements to the LABCORE project. The mission of the Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC) laboratories is changing from supporting the 200 Area chemical processing plants for process control, waste management, and effluent monitoring to supporting environmental restoration and regulatory compliance commitments. The LABCORE program was implemented as the key element for meeting the commitments by upgrading the laboratories through the implementation of an Automated Data Processing improvement program in January 1994. Scope for LABCORE release 1.0 consisted of hardware and software implementation required to support a minimum number of analyses (Single-Shell Tank [SST] analysis at 222S Laboratory and Performance Evaluation samples at the Waste Sampling Characterization Facility laboratory) using manual entry of data, and to support routine laboratory functions, common to all laboratories. LABCORE post release 1.0 enhancements will expand the functionality presented to the laboratory. Post release 1.0 enhancements will also address the integration of a database for Analytical Services Program Integration, budgeting, and scheduling offices into LABCORE.

  13. Conformation of bicyclo[ n.1.0] derivatives . Part 4. bicycloalkenes and bicyclic methylenecyclopropanes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Favini, Giorgio; Sottocornola, Manuela; Todeschini, Roberto

    The conformational geometries and possible conformational equilibria of some bicyclo[ n.1.0] alkenes and bicyclic methylenecyclopropanes have been studied by molecular mechanics method. The theoretical results are in agreement with the equilibrium ratios determined in kinetics experiments and with the interpretation of electron diffraction patterns or high resolution PMR spectra.

  14. A Review of DIMPACK Version 1.0: Conditional Covariance-Based Test Dimensionality Analysis Package

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Deng, Nina; Han, Kyung T.; Hambleton, Ronald K.

    2013-01-01

    DIMPACK Version 1.0 for assessing test dimensionality based on a nonparametric conditional covariance approach is reviewed. This software was originally distributed by Assessment Systems Corporation and now can be freely accessed online. The software consists of Windows-based interfaces of three components: DIMTEST, DETECT, and CCPROX/HAC, which…

  15. Optical positions of ICRF sources from CTIO 1.0m data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zacharias, M. I.; Berghea, C.; Dieck, C.; Dudik, R.; Hennessy, G.; Veillette, D.; Zacharias, N.

    2015-10-01

    As part of the USNO radio-optical reference frame link project, data were taken with the CTIO 1.0 m telescope in 2009. First position results of 5 ICRF sources are presented as part of this primarily photometric investigation of optical counterparts.

  16. SAGE FOR MACINTOSH (MSAGE) VERSION 1.0 SOLVENT ALTERNATIVES GUIDE - USER'S GUIDE

    EPA Science Inventory

    The guide provides instructions for using the Solvent Alternatives Guide (SAGE) for Macintosh, version 1.0. The guide assumes that the user is familiar with the fundamentals of operating a
    Macintosh personal computer under the System 7.0 (or higher) operating system. SAGE for ...

  17. SAGE FOR WINDOWS (WSAGE) VERSION 1.0 SOLVENT ALTERNATIVES GUIDE - USER'S GUIDE

    EPA Science Inventory

    The guide provides instructions for using the Solvent Alternatives Guide (SAGE) for Windows, version 1.0. The guide assumes that the user is familiar with the fundamentals of operating Windows 3.1 (or higher) on a personal computer under the DOS 5.0 (or higher) operating system. ...

  18. VizieR Online Data Catalog: VCC 2062 CO(1-0) data cubes (Lisenfeld+, 2016)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lisenfeld, U.; Braine, J.; Duc, P. A.; Boquien, M.; Brinks, E.; Bournaud, F.; Lelli, F.; Charmandaris, V.

    2016-04-01

    The two fits files contain the data cube of CO(1-0) observed with Plateau de Bure Interferometer. Both cubes were obtained with natural weighting and with different taperings. The velocity resolution is 1.8km/s. More details about the data acquisition and reduction are in the paper. (2 data files).

  19. STATE ACID RAIN RESEARCH AND SCREENING SYSTEM - VERSION 1.0 USER'S MANUAL

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report is a user's manual that describes Version 1.0 of EPA's STate Acid Rain Research and Screening System (STARRSS), developed to assist utility regulatory commissions in reviewing utility acid rain compliance plans. It is a screening tool that is based on scenario analysis...

  20. 32 CFR 1636.5 - Exclusion from Class 1-A-0 and Class 1-0.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... participation in war does not rest at all upon moral, ethical, or religious principle, but instead rests solely... be excluded from Class 1-A-0 or Class 1-0: (a) Who asserts beliefs which are of a religious, moral or...) Whose objection to participation in war is directed against a particular war rather than against war...

  1. 32 CFR 1636.5 - Exclusion from Class 1-A-0 and Class 1-0.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... participation in war does not rest at all upon moral, ethical, or religious principle, but instead rests solely... be excluded from Class 1-A-0 or Class 1-0: (a) Who asserts beliefs which are of a religious, moral or...) Whose objection to participation in war is directed against a particular war rather than against war...

  2. 32 CFR 1636.5 - Exclusion from Class 1-A-0 and Class 1-0.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... participation in war does not rest at all upon moral, ethical, or religious principle, but instead rests solely... be excluded from Class 1-A-0 or Class 1-0: (a) Who asserts beliefs which are of a religious, moral or...) Whose objection to participation in war is directed against a particular war rather than against war...

  3. 32 CFR 1636.5 - Exclusion from Class 1-A-0 and Class 1-0.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... participation in war does not rest at all upon moral, ethical, or religious principle, but instead rests solely... be excluded from Class 1-A-0 or Class 1-0: (a) Who asserts beliefs which are of a religious, moral or...) Whose objection to participation in war is directed against a particular war rather than against war...

  4. Adsorbate induced mesoscopic surface reconstruction of the system Te/Pd(1 0 2)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Godzik, G.; Pfnür, H.

    2001-08-01

    Low energy electron diffraction (LEED) measurements have been carried out on the clean and Te covered Pd(1 0 2) surface. This is the surface into which the Pd(1 0 0) surface is reconstructed by a concentration of more than 0.5 ML of Te. The Pd(1 0 2) surface was produced with a terrace width of more than 1000 Å. Up to 0.5 ML the adsorption of Te takes place on the flat (1 0 2) surface, on which islands with (2×1) structure are formed coupled with a reduction of the terrace widths to about half the initial value. Above 0.5 ML, and up to 1 ML, the adsorbed Te atoms produce a structural change of the surface, i.e. a terrace structure is formed with a clear average terrace length that depends on Te concentration and with step edges in [ 2¯ 0 1] direction. As concluded from the characteristic splitting of LEED spots as a function of energy, these terraces occupy only two height levels in an alternating sequence and are separated by steps of single atomic height. The terrace width of the alternating terraces increases with increasing Te-concentration. Again a flat surface is formed at 1 ML of Te. A geometrical model is established and discussed.

  5. Patriot Script 1.0.13 User Guide for PEM 1.3.2

    SciTech Connect

    Cleland, Timothy James; Kubicek, Deborah Ann; Stroud, Phillip David; Cuellar-Hengartner, Leticia; Mathis, Mark

    2015-11-02

    This document provides an updated user guide for Patriot Script Version 1.0.13, for release with PEM 1.3.1 (LAUR-1422817) that adds description and instructions for the new excursion capability (see section 4.5.1).

  6. Kinomer v. 1.0: a database of systematically classified eukaryotic protein kinases.

    PubMed

    Martin, David M A; Miranda-Saavedra, Diego; Barton, Geoffrey J

    2009-01-01

    The regulation of protein function through reversible phosphorylation by protein kinases and phosphatases is a general mechanism controlling virtually every cellular activity. Eukaryotic protein kinases can be classified into distinct, well-characterized groups based on amino acid sequence similarity and function. We recently reported a highly sensitive and accurate hidden Markov model-based method for the automatic detection and classification of protein kinases into these specific groups. The Kinomer v. 1.0 database presented here contains annotated classifications for the protein kinase complements of 43 eukaryotic genomes. These span the taxonomic range and include fungi (16 species), plants (6), diatoms (1), amoebas (2), protists (1) and animals (17). The kinomes are stored in a relational database and are accessible through a web interface on the basis of species, kinase group or a combination of both. In addition, the Kinomer v. 1.0 HMM library is made available for users to perform classification on arbitrary sequences. The Kinomer v. 1.0 database is a continually updated resource where direct comparison of kinase sequences across kinase groups and across species can give insights into kinase function and evolution. Kinomer v. 1.0 is available at http://www.compbio.dundee.ac.uk/kinomer/.

  7. Space Suit Portable Life Support System Test Bed (PLSS 1.0) Development and Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Watts, Carly; Campbell, Colin; Vogel, Matthew; Conger, Bruce

    2012-01-01

    A multi-year effort has been carried out at NASA-JSC to develop an advanced extra-vehicular activity Portable Life Support System (PLSS) design intended to further the current state of the art by increasing operational flexibility, reducing consumables, and increasing robustness. Previous efforts have focused on modeling and analyzing the advanced PLSS architecture, as well as developing key enabling technologies. Like the current International Space Station Extra-vehicular Mobility Unit PLSS, the advanced PLSS comprises three subsystems required to sustain the crew during extra-vehicular activity including the Thermal, Ventilation, and Oxygen Subsystems. This multi-year effort has culminated in the construction and operation of PLSS 1.0, a test bed that simulates full functionality of the advanced PLSS design. PLSS 1.0 integrates commercial off the shelf hardware with prototype technology development components, including the primary and secondary oxygen regulators, Ventilation Subsystem fan, Rapid Cycle Amine swingbed carbon dioxide and water vapor removal device, and Spacesuit Water Membrane Evaporator heat rejection device. The overall PLSS 1.0 test objective was to demonstrate the capability of the Advanced PLSS to provide key life support functions including suit pressure regulation, carbon dioxide and water vapor removal, thermal control and contingency purge operations. Supplying oxygen was not one of the specific life support functions because the PLSS 1.0 test was not oxygen rated. Nitrogen was used for the working gas. Additional test objectives were to confirm PLSS technology development components performance within an integrated test bed, identify unexpected system level interactions, and map the PLSS 1.0 performance with respect to key variables such as crewmember metabolic rate and suit pressure. Successful PLSS 1.0 testing completed 168 test points over 44 days of testing and produced a large database of test results that characterize system level

  8. Evolution of SINE S1 retroposons in Cruciferae plant species.

    PubMed

    Lenoir, A; Cournoyer, B; Warwick, S; Picard, G; Deragon, J M

    1997-09-01

    The S1 element is a plant short interspersed element (SINE) that was first described and studied in Brassica napus. In this work, we investigated the distribution and the molecular phylogeny of the S1 element within the Cruciferae (= Brassicaceae). S1 elements were found to be widely distributed within the Cruciferae, especially in species of the tribe Brassiceae. The molecular phylogeny of S1 elements in eight Cruciferae species (Brassica oleracea, Brassica rapa, Brassica napus, Brassica nigra, Sinapis, arvensis, Sinapis pubescens, Coincya monensis, and Vella spinosa) was inferred using 14-36 elements per species. Significant neighbor-joining and maximum-parsimony phylogenetic clusters, supported by high bootstrap P values and/or represented in 100% of the most-parsimonious trees, were observed for each species. Most of these clusters probably correspond to recent species-specific bursts of S1 amplification. Since these species diverged recently, S1 amplification in Cruciferae plants is proposed to be a highly dynamic process that could contribute to genome rearrangements and eventually lead to reproductive isolation. S1 sequence analysis also revealed putative gene conversion events that occurred between different S1 elements of a given species. These events suggest that gene conversion is a minor but significant component of the molecular drive governing S1 concerted evolution.

  9. Radiation hardness assessment of the charge-integrating hybrid pixel detector JUNGFRAU 1.0 for photon science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jungmann-Smith, J. H.; Bergamaschi, A.; Brückner, M.; Cartier, S.; Dinapoli, R.; Greiffenberg, D.; Jaggi, A.; Maliakal, D.; Mayilyan, D.; Medjoubi, K.; Mezza, D.; Mozzanica, A.; Ramilli, M.; Ruder, Ch.; Schädler, L.; Schmitt, B.; Shi, X.; Tinti, G.

    2015-12-01

    JUNGFRAU (adJUstiNg Gain detector FoR the Aramis User station) is a two-dimensional hybrid pixel detector for photon science applications in free electron lasers, particularly SwissFEL, and synchrotron light sources. JUNGFRAU is an automatic gain switching, charge-integrating detector which covers a dynamic range of more than 104 photons of an energy of 12 keV with a good linearity, uniformity of response, and spatial resolving power. The JUNGFRAU 1.0 application-specific integrated circuit (ASIC) features a 256 × 256 pixel matrix of 75 × 75 μm2 pixels and is bump-bonded to a 320 μm thick Si sensor. Modules of 2 × 4 chips cover an area of about 4 × 8 cm2. Readout rates in excess of 2 kHz enable linear count rate capabilities of 20 MHz (at 12 keV) and 50 MHz (at 5 keV). The tolerance of JUNGFRAU to radiation is a key issue to guarantee several years of operation at free electron lasers and synchrotrons. The radiation hardness of JUNGFRAU 1.0 is tested with synchrotron radiation up to 10 MGy of delivered dose. The effect of radiation-induced changes on the noise, baseline, gain, and gain switching is evaluated post-irradiation for both the ASIC and the hybridized assembly. The bare JUNGFRAU 1.0 chip can withstand doses as high as 10 MGy with minor changes to its noise and a reduction in the preamplifier gain. The hybridized assembly, in particular the sensor, is affected by the photon irradiation which mainly shows as an increase in the leakage current. Self-healing of the system is investigated during a period of 11 weeks after the delivery of the radiation dose. Annealing radiation-induced changes by bake-out at 100 °C is investigated. It is concluded that the JUNGFRAU 1.0 pixel is sufficiently radiation-hard for its envisioned applications at SwissFEL and synchrotron beam lines.

  10. Radiation hardness assessment of the charge-integrating hybrid pixel detector JUNGFRAU 1.0 for photon science.

    PubMed

    Jungmann-Smith, J H; Bergamaschi, A; Brückner, M; Cartier, S; Dinapoli, R; Greiffenberg, D; Jaggi, A; Maliakal, D; Mayilyan, D; Medjoubi, K; Mezza, D; Mozzanica, A; Ramilli, M; Ruder, Ch; Schädler, L; Schmitt, B; Shi, X; Tinti, G

    2015-12-01

    JUNGFRAU (adJUstiNg Gain detector FoR the Aramis User station) is a two-dimensional hybrid pixel detector for photon science applications in free electron lasers, particularly SwissFEL, and synchrotron light sources. JUNGFRAU is an automatic gain switching, charge-integrating detector which covers a dynamic range of more than 10(4) photons of an energy of 12 keV with a good linearity, uniformity of response, and spatial resolving power. The JUNGFRAU 1.0 application-specific integrated circuit (ASIC) features a 256 × 256 pixel matrix of 75 × 75 μm(2) pixels and is bump-bonded to a 320 μm thick Si sensor. Modules of 2 × 4 chips cover an area of about 4 × 8 cm(2). Readout rates in excess of 2 kHz enable linear count rate capabilities of 20 MHz (at 12 keV) and 50 MHz (at 5 keV). The tolerance of JUNGFRAU to radiation is a key issue to guarantee several years of operation at free electron lasers and synchrotrons. The radiation hardness of JUNGFRAU 1.0 is tested with synchrotron radiation up to 10 MGy of delivered dose. The effect of radiation-induced changes on the noise, baseline, gain, and gain switching is evaluated post-irradiation for both the ASIC and the hybridized assembly. The bare JUNGFRAU 1.0 chip can withstand doses as high as 10 MGy with minor changes to its noise and a reduction in the preamplifier gain. The hybridized assembly, in particular the sensor, is affected by the photon irradiation which mainly shows as an increase in the leakage current. Self-healing of the system is investigated during a period of 11 weeks after the delivery of the radiation dose. Annealing radiation-induced changes by bake-out at 100 °C is investigated. It is concluded that the JUNGFRAU 1.0 pixel is sufficiently radiation-hard for its envisioned applications at SwissFEL and synchrotron beam lines.

  11. Radiation hardness assessment of the charge-integrating hybrid pixel detector JUNGFRAU 1.0 for photon science

    SciTech Connect

    Jungmann-Smith, J. H. Bergamaschi, A.; Brückner, M.; Dinapoli, R.; Greiffenberg, D.; Jaggi, A.; Maliakal, D.; Mayilyan, D.; Mezza, D.; Mozzanica, A.; Ramilli, M.; Ruder, Ch.; Schädler, L.; Schmitt, B.; Shi, X.; Tinti, G.; Cartier, S.; Medjoubi, K.

    2015-12-15

    JUNGFRAU (adJUstiNg Gain detector FoR the Aramis User station) is a two-dimensional hybrid pixel detector for photon science applications in free electron lasers, particularly SwissFEL, and synchrotron light sources. JUNGFRAU is an automatic gain switching, charge-integrating detector which covers a dynamic range of more than 10{sup 4} photons of an energy of 12 keV with a good linearity, uniformity of response, and spatial resolving power. The JUNGFRAU 1.0 application-specific integrated circuit (ASIC) features a 256 × 256 pixel matrix of 75 × 75 μm{sup 2} pixels and is bump-bonded to a 320 μm thick Si sensor. Modules of 2 × 4 chips cover an area of about 4 × 8 cm{sup 2}. Readout rates in excess of 2 kHz enable linear count rate capabilities of 20 MHz (at 12 keV) and 50 MHz (at 5 keV). The tolerance of JUNGFRAU to radiation is a key issue to guarantee several years of operation at free electron lasers and synchrotrons. The radiation hardness of JUNGFRAU 1.0 is tested with synchrotron radiation up to 10 MGy of delivered dose. The effect of radiation-induced changes on the noise, baseline, gain, and gain switching is evaluated post-irradiation for both the ASIC and the hybridized assembly. The bare JUNGFRAU 1.0 chip can withstand doses as high as 10 MGy with minor changes to its noise and a reduction in the preamplifier gain. The hybridized assembly, in particular the sensor, is affected by the photon irradiation which mainly shows as an increase in the leakage current. Self-healing of the system is investigated during a period of 11 weeks after the delivery of the radiation dose. Annealing radiation-induced changes by bake-out at 100 °C is investigated. It is concluded that the JUNGFRAU 1.0 pixel is sufficiently radiation-hard for its envisioned applications at SwissFEL and synchrotron beam lines.

  12. Development of Activity in Comet C/2012 S1 ISON

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meech, K. J.; Yang, B.; Keane, J.; Ansdell, M.; Riesen, T.; Kleyna, J.; Hsieh, H.; Mottola, S.; Kuhrt, E.; Chiang, H.; Reipurth, B.; Michaud, P.; Rector, T.

    2013-12-01

    We report photometric observations for comet C/2012 S1 ISON obtained immediately after discovery (22 Sep. 2012; r = 6.28 AU) until moving into solar conjunction in mid-June 2013 using the UH2.2m, and Gemini North 8-m telescopes on Mauna Kea, the Lowell 1.8m in Flagstaff, the Calar Alto 1.2m telescope in Spain, and the VYSOS-5 and VYSOS-20 telescopes on Mauna Loa Hawai'i. An additional pre-discovery data point from the Pan STARRS1 survey extends the light curve back to 28 Jan. 2012 (r = 8.4 AU). The images showed similar tail morphology throughout this period, largely because of projection effects. Additional observations at sub-mm wavelengths using the JCMT on 15 nights between 9 March (r = 4.52 AU) and 16 June 2013 (r = 3.35 AU) were used to search for CO J(3-2), CO J(2-1), HCN J(4-3), and HCN J(3-2) rotation lines. No gas was detected, with preliminary upper limits for CO during 14-15 June (r = 3.3 AU) of Q < 6.4 x 10^27 molec/s based on the observations of the CO J(2-1) line. Using these production rates, the Q(H2O) published by Schleicher (2013; IAUC 9254), and the preliminary radius from the HST measurements (J.-Y. Li et al., 2013; STScI-2013-14) we have generated ice sublimation models consistent with the photometric light curve. The inbound light curve is likely controlled by sublimation of CO or CO2; at these distances water is not a strong contributor to the outgassing. Without more sensitive limits on CO, we cannot yet constrain which of these volatiles is controlling the activity. It is clear from the photometric light curve that the fractional active area of the nucleus increased linearly by about a factor of 2 from Jan. 2012 until mid Jan. 2013 (r ~ 5 AU) at which point the activity decreased by 30% by early May 2013. We will discuss these models and data obtained from Mauna Kea after the comet comes out of solar conjunction in late August 2013. Our team has a comprehensive plan of observation to look at the evolution of activity as the comet goes

  13. Development of Activity in Comet C/2012 S1 ISON

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meech, Karen J.; Yang, B.; Keane, J. V.; Ansdell, M.; Riesen, T. E.; Kleyna, J.; Hsieh, H.; Mottola, S.; Kuehrt, E.; Chiang, H.; Reipurth, B.; Milani, G.; Bryssinck, E.; Michaud, P.; Rector, T.

    2013-10-01

    We report photometric observations for comet C/2012 S1 ISON obtained immediately after discovery (22 Sep. 2012; r = 6.28 AU) until moving into solar conjunction in mid-June 2013 using the UH2.2m, and Gemini North 8-m telescopes on Mauna Kea, the Lowell 1.8m in Flagstaff, the Calar Alto 1.2m telescope in Spain, and the VYSOS-5 and VYSOS-20 telescopes on Mauna Loa Hawai’i. An additional pre-discovery data point from the Pan STARRS1 survey extends the light curve back to 28 Jan. 2012 (r = 8.4 AU). The images showed similar tail morphology throughout this period, largely because of projection effects. Additional observations at sub-mm wavelengths using the JCMT on 15 nights between 9 March (r = 4.52 AU) and 16 June 2013 (r = 3.35 AU) were used to search for CO J(3-2), CO J(2-1), HCN J(4-3), and HCN J(3-2) rotation lines. No gas was detected, with preliminary upper limits for CO during 14-15 June (r = 3.3 AU) of Q < 6.4 x 10^27 molec/s based on the observations of the CO J(2-1) line. Using these production rates, the Q(H2O) published by Schleicher (2013; IAUC 9254), and the preliminary radius from the HST measurements (J.-Y. Li et al., 2013; STScI-2013-14) we have generated ice sublimation models consistent with the photometric light curve. The inbound light curve is likely controlled by sublimation of CO or CO2; at these distances water is not a strong contributor to the outgassing. Without more sensitive limits on CO, we cannot yet constrain which of these volatiles is controlling the activity. It is clear from the photometric light curve that the fractional active area of the nucleus increased linearly by about a factor of 2 from Jan. 2012 until mid Jan. 2013 (r ~ 5 AU) at which point the activity decreased by 30% by early May 2013. This suggests that a limited supply of volatile material was driving the current activity.

  14. Emissions in potassium vapour under 4S1/2-7S1/2 two-photon nsec excitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pentaris, D.; Chatzikyriakos, G.; Armyras, A.; Efthimiopoulos, T.

    2010-11-01

    The two-photon excitation of 4S1/2-7S1/2 transition of potassium atoms is studied. Several coherent emissions and processes are possible, such as parametric four-wave (PFWM), parametric six-wave (PSWM) mixing and competition with the stimulated hyper Raman (SHRS) and the amplified spontaneous emission (ASE). The radiations at the transitions 6P3/2,1/2-4S1/2, 6S1/2-4P3/2,1/2 and 5P3/2,1/2-4S1/2 are emitted only in the forward direction (indicating a parametric process), while the radiation at the transition 4P3/2,1/2-4S1/2 is emitted in the forward and in the backward direction, indicating an ASE process.

  15. Precision polarizability measurements of atomic cesium's 8 s 2S1 / 2 and 9 s 2S1 / 2 states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weaver, Hannah; Kortyna, Andrew

    2013-05-01

    We report hyperfine-resolved scalar polarizabilities for cesium's 8 s 2S1 / 2 and 9 s 2S1 / 2 states using resonant two-photon spectroscopy. Two single-mode, external-cavity diode lasers drive the 6 s 2S1 / 2 --> 6 p 2P1 / 2 --> ns 2S1 / 2 transition (n = 8 or 9). Both laser beams are split and counter-propagate through an effusive beam and a vapor cell. An electric field applied across two parallel plates imposes Stark shifts on the ns 2S1 / 2 levels in the effusive beam. Electric-field strengths are measured in situ. The laser frequency is calibrated in the vapor cell using a phase modulation technique, with the modulation frequency referenced to the ground-state hyperfine splitting of atomic rubidium. Our measured 8 s 2S1 / 2 polarizability, 38370 +/- 380 a03, agrees with previous theory and experiments. Our measured 9 s 2S1 / 2 polarizability, 150700 +/- 1100 a03, agrees within two sigma of theory, but we are unaware of previous measurements. We also verify that these polarizabilities are independent of the hyperfine levels, placing upper limits on the differential polarizabilities of 200 +/- 260 a03 for the 8 s 2S1 / 2 state and 490 +/- 450 a03 for the 9 s 2S1 / 2 state. Supported by the National Science Foundation under Grant PHY-0653107.

  16. Discovery of a pre-existing molecular filament associated with supernova remnant G127.1+0.5

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, Xin; Yang, Ji; Fang, Min; Su, Yang

    2014-08-20

    We performed millimeter observations in CO lines toward the supernova remnant (SNR) G127.1+0.5. We found a molecular filament at 4-13 km s{sup –1} consisting of two distinct parts: a straight part coming out of the remnant region and a curved part in the remnant region. The curved part is coincides well with the bright SNR shell detected in 1420 MHz radio continuum and mid-infrared observations in the northeastern region. In addition, redshifted line wing broadening is found only in the curved part of the molecular filament, which indicates a physical interaction. These provide strong evidences, for the first time, to confirm the association between an SNR and a pre-existing long molecular filament. Multi-band observations in the northeastern remnant shell could be explained by the interaction between the remnant shock and the dense molecular filament. RADEX radiative transfer modeling of the quiet and shocked components yield physical conditions consistent with the passage of a non-dissociative J-type shock. We argue that the curved part of the filament is fully engulfed by the remnant's forward shock. A spatial correlation between aggregated young stellar objects (YSOs) and the adjacent molecular filament close to the SNR is also found, which could be related to the progenitor's activity.

  17. RGUI 1.0, New Graphical User Interface for RELAP5-3D

    SciTech Connect

    Mesina, George Lee; Galbraith, James Andrew

    1999-04-01

    With the advent of three-dimensional modeling in nuclear safety analysis codes, the need has arisen for a new display methodology. Currently, analysts either sort through voluminous numerical displays of data at points in a region, or view color coded interpretations of the data on a two-dimensional rendition of the plant. RGUI 1.0 provides 3D capability for displaying data. The 3D isometric hydrodynamic image is built automatically from the input deck without additional input from the user. Standard view change features allow the user to focus on only the important data. Familiar features that are standard to the nuclear industry, such as run, interact, and monitor, are included. RGUI 1.0 reduces the difficulty of analyzing complex three dimensional plants.

  18. RGUI 1.0, New Graphical User Interface for RELAP5-3D

    SciTech Connect

    G. L. Mesina; J. Galbraith

    1999-04-01

    With the advent of three-dimensional modeling in nuclear safety analysis codes, the need has arisen for a new display methodology. Currently, analysts either sort through voluminous numerical displays of data at points in a region, or view color coded interpretations of the data on a two-dimensional rendition of the plant. RGUI 1.0 provides 3D capability for displaying data. The 3D isometric hydrodynamic image is built automatically from the input deck without additional input from the user. Standard view change features allow the user to focus on only the important data. Familiar features that are standard to the nuclear industry, such as run, interact, and monitor, are included. RGUI 1.0 reduces the difficulty of analyzing complex three-dimensional plants.

  19. High resolution core level spectroscopy of hydrogen-terminated (1 0 0) diamond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schenk, A. K.; Rietwyk, K. J.; Tadich, A.; Stacey, A.; Ley, L.; Pakes, C. I.

    2016-08-01

    Synchrotron-based photoelectron spectroscopy experiments are presented that address a long standing inconsistency in the treatment of the C1s core level of hydrogen terminated (1 0 0) diamond. Through a comparison of surface and bulk sensitive measurements we show that there is a surface related core level component to lower binding energy of the bulk diamond component; this component has a chemical shift of -0.16+/- 0.05 eV which has been attributed to carbon atoms which are part of the hydrogen termination. Additionally, our results indicate that the asymmetry of the hydrogen terminated (1 0 0) diamond C1s core level is an intrinsic aspect of the bulk diamond peak which we have attributed to sub-surface carbon layers.

  20. The Titan -1:0 Nodal Bending Wave in Saturn's Ring C.

    PubMed

    Rosen, P A; Lissauer, J J

    1988-08-01

    The most prominent oscillatory feature observed in the Voyager 1 radio occultation of Saturn's rings is identified as a one-armed spiral bending wave excited by Titan's -1:0 nodal inner vertical resonance. Ring partides in a bending wave move in coherently inclined orbits, warping the local mean plane of the rings. The Titan -1:0 wave is the only known bending wave that propagates outward, away from Saturn, and the only spiral wave yet observed in which the wave pattern rotates opposite to the orbital direction of the ring particles. It is also the first bending wave identified in ring C. Modeling the observed feature with existing bending wave theory gives a surface mass density of approximately 0.4 g/cm(2) outside the wave region and a local ring thickness of [unknown]5 meters, and suggests that surface mass density is not constant in the wave region.

  1. Preparation of {0 1 0}-faceted anatase TiO2 nanocuboids from peroxotitanium complex solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miao, Yigao; Gao, Jiacheng

    2012-12-01

    {0 1 0}-faceted anatase TiO2 nanocuboids have been fabricated by hydrothermal route using peroxotitanium complex solution as precursor. The effects of reaction time, the amount of urea and temperature on the formation of {0 1 0}-faceted anatase TiO2 were characterized by XRD, FESEM and TEM. The growth mechanism of nanocuboids was proposed that the nanocuboids were formed by the transition from H2Ti2O5·H2O phase to anatase TiO2 in the basic condition. The photocatalytic performance of the prepared samples was tested in the degradation of Rhodamine B and the anatase nanocuboids exhibited enhanced photocatalytic activity compared with the standard P25 powders.

  2. Building the Fire Energetics and Emissions Research (FEER) Smoke Emissions Inventory Version 1.0

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ellison, Luke; Ichoku, Charles; Zhang, Feng; Wang, Jun

    2014-01-01

    The Fire Energetics and Emissions Research (FEER) group's new coefficient of emission global gridded product at 1x1 resolution that directly relates fire readiative energy (FRE) to smoke aerosol release, FEERv1.0 Ce, made its public debut in August 2013. Since then, steps have been taken to generate corresponding maps and totals of total particulate matter (PM) emissions using different sources of FRE, and subsequently to simulate the resulting PM(sub 2.5) in the WRF-Chem 3.5 model using emission rates from FEERv1.0 as well as other standard biomass burning emission inventories. An flowchart of the FEER algorithm to calculate Ce is outlined here along with a display of the resulting emissions of total PM globally and also regionally. The modeling results from the WRF-Chem3.5 simulations are also shown.

  3. ISIS++ reference guide (Iterative Scalable Implicit Solver in C++) version 1.0

    SciTech Connect

    Clay, R.L.; Williams, A.B.; Mish, K.D.

    1997-09-01

    ISIS++ (Iterative Scalable Implicit Solver in C++) Version 1.0 is a portable, object-oriented framework for solving sparse linear systems of equations. It includes a collection of Krylov solution methods and preconditioners, as well as both uni-processor (serial) and multi-processor (scalable) matrix and vector classes. Though it was developed to solve systems of equations originating from large-scale, 3-D, finite element analyses, it has applications in many other fields. This document defines the v1.0 interface specification, and includes the necessary instructions for building and running ISIS++ on Unix platforms. The interface is presented in annotated header format, along with background on design and implementation considerations. A finite difference modeling example problem is included to demonstrate the overall setup and use.

  4. Frequency measurement of the J = 1-0 rotational transition of HD

    SciTech Connect

    Evenson, K.M.; Jennings, D.A.; Brown, J.M.; Zink, L.R.; Leopold, K.R.

    1988-07-01

    The frequency of the astronomically important J = 1-0 rotational transition of HD at 2.7 THz (90/cm) has been measured with tunable FIR radiation with an accuracy of 150 kHz. This frequency is now known to sufficient accuracy for use in future astrophysical heterodyne observations of HD in planetary atmospheres (reported by Bezard et al., 1986) and in the interstellar medium (reported by Bussoletti et al., 1975). 14 references.

  5. Poblano v1.0 : a Matlab toolbox for gradient-based optimization.

    SciTech Connect

    Dunlavy, Daniel M.; Acar, Evrim; Kolda, Tamara Gibson

    2010-03-01

    We present Poblano v1.0, a Matlab toolbox for solving gradient-based unconstrained optimization problems. Poblano implements three optimization methods (nonlinear conjugate gradients, limited-memory BFGS, and truncated Newton) that require only first order derivative information. In this paper, we describe the Poblano methods, provide numerous examples on how to use Poblano, and present results of Poblano used in solving problems from a standard test collection of unconstrained optimization problems.

  6. RealGasBrine v1.0 option of TOUGH+ v1.5

    SciTech Connect

    Moridis, George

    2015-02-27

    RealGasBrine v1.0 is a numerical code that for the simulation of the behavior of gas-bearing porous and/fractured geologic media. It is an option of TOUGH+ v1.5 [Moridis, 2014], a successor to the TOUGH2 [Pruess et al., 1999; 2012] family of codes for multi-component, multiphase ?uid and heat ?ow developed at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. RealGasBrine v1.0 needs the TOUGH+ v1.5 core code in order to compile and execute. It is written in standard FORTRAN 95/2003, and can be run on any computational platform (workstation, PC, Macintosh) for which such compilers are available. RealGasBrine v1.0 describes the non-isothermal two- (for pure water) or three-phase (for brine) flow of an aqueous phase and a real gas mixture in a gas-bearing medium, with a particular focus in ultra-tight (such as tight-sand and shale gas) systems. Up to 12 individual real gases can be tracked, and salt can precipitate as solid halite. The capabilities of the code include coupled flow and thermal effects, real gas behavior, Darcy and non-Darcy flow, several isotherm options of gas sorption onto the grains of the porous media, complex fracture descriptions, gas solubility into water, and geomechanical effects on flow properties. RealGasBrine v1.0 allows the study of flow and transport of fluids and heat over a wide range of time frames and spatial scales not only in gas reservoirs, but also in any problem involving the flow of gases in geologic media, including the geologic storage of greenhouse gas mixtures, the behavior of geothermal reservoirs with multi-component condensable (H2O and CO2) and non-condensable gas mixtures, the transport of water and released H2 in nuclear waste storage applications, etc.

  7. Pulmonary response to threshold levels of sulfur dioxide (1. 0 ppm) and ozone (0. 3 ppm)

    SciTech Connect

    Folinsbee, L.J.; Bedi, J.F.; Horvath, S.M.

    1985-06-01

    The authors exposed 22 healthy adult nonsmoking male subjects for 2 h to filtered air, 1.0 ppm sulfur dioxide (SO/sub 2/), 0.3 ppm ozone (O/sub 3/), or the combination of 1.0 ppm SO/sub 2/ + 0.3 ppm O/sub 3/. They hypothesized that exposure to near-threshold concentrations of these pollutants would allow them to observe any interaction between the two pollutants that might have been masked by the more obvious response to the higher concentrations of O/sub 3/ used in previous studies. Each subject alternated 30-min treadmill exercise with 10-min rest periods for the 2 h. The average exercise ventilation measured during the last 5 min of exercise was 38 1/min (BTPS). Forced expiratory maneuvers were performed before exposure and 5 min after each of the three exercise periods. Maximum voluntary ventilation, He dilution functional residual capacity, thoracic gas volume, and airway resistance were measured before and after the exposure. After O/sub 3/ exposure alone, forced expiratory measurements (FVC, FEV1.0, and FEF25-75%) were significantly decreased. The combined exposure to SO/sub 2/ + O/sub 3/ produced similar but smaller decreases in these measures. There were small but significant differences between the O/sub 3/ and the O/sub 3/ + SO/sub 2/ exposure for FVC, FEV1.0, FEV2.0, FEV3.0, and FEF25-75% at the end of the 2-h exposure. The authors conclude that, with these pollutant concentrations, there is no additive or synergistic effect of the two pollutants on pulmonary function.

  8. Slab1.0: A three-dimensional model of global subduction zone geometries

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hayes, G.P.; Wald, D.J.; Johnson, R.L.

    2012-01-01

    We describe and present a new model of global subduction zone geometries, called Slab1.0. An extension of previous efforts to constrain the two-dimensional non-planar geometry of subduction zones around the focus of large earthquakes, Slab1.0 describes the detailed, non-planar, three-dimensional geometry of approximately 85% of subduction zones worldwide. While the model focuses on the detailed form of each slab from their trenches through the seismogenic zone, where it combines data sets from active source and passive seismology, it also continues to the limits of their seismic extent in the upper-mid mantle, providing a uniform approach to the definition of the entire seismically active slab geometry. Examples are shown for two well-constrained global locations; models for many other regions are available and can be freely downloaded in several formats from our new Slab1.0 website, http://on.doi.gov/ d9ARbS. We describe improvements in our two-dimensional geometry constraint inversion, including the use of average active source seismic data profiles in the shallow trench regions where data are otherwise lacking, derived from the interpolation between other active source seismic data along-strike in the same subduction zone. We include several analyses of the uncertainty and robustness of our three-dimensional interpolation methods. In addition, we use the filtered, subduction-related earthquake data sets compiled to build Slab1.0 in a reassessment of previous analyses of the deep limit of the thrust interface seismogenic zone for all subduction zones included in our global model thus far, concluding that the width of these seismogenic zones is on average 30% larger than previous studies have suggested. Copyright 2011 by the American Geophysical Union.

  9. Transferable Output ASCII Data (TOAD) gateway: Version 1.0 user's guide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bingel, Bradford D.

    1991-01-01

    The Transferable Output ASCII Data (TOAD) Gateway, release 1.0 is described. This is a software tool for converting tabular data from one format into another via the TOAD format. This initial release of the Gateway allows free data interchange among the following file formats: TOAD; Standard Interface File (SIF); Program to Optimize Simulated Trajectories (POST) input; Comma Separated Value (TSV); and a general free-form file format. As required, additional formats can be accommodated quickly and easily.

  10. Energy-resolved study of laser-stimulated Si + desorption from Si(1 0 0)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, H. T.; Wu, Z.

    1995-06-01

    An energy-resolved study of Si + desorption from Si(1 0 0) under the irradiation of low fluence 193 nm pulsed laser beam is made using high resolution mass-selected time-of-flight (TOF) technique. New features in the kinetic energy distribution of desorbed Si ions have been observed. A simple DIET model is found to provide a reasonably good understanding for the main features in the TOF spectra.

  11. Intrinsic magnetic properties of L1(0) FeNi obtained from meteorite NWA 6259

    SciTech Connect

    Poirier, E; Pinkerton, FE; Kubic, R; Mishra, RK; Bordeaux, N; Mubarok, A; Lewis, LH; Goldstein, JI; Skomski, R; Barmak, K

    2015-05-07

    FeNi having the tetragonal L1(0) crystal structure is a promising new rare-earth-free permanent magnet material. Laboratory synthesis is challenging, however, tetragonal L1(0) FeNi-the mineral "tetrataenite"-has been characterized using specimens found in nickel-iron meteorites. Most notably, the meteorite NWA 6259 recovered from Northwest Africa is 95 vol.% tetrataenite with a composition of 43 at.% Ni. Hysteresis loops were measured as a function of sample orientation on a specimen cut from NWA 6259 in order to rigorously deduce the intrinsic hard magnetic properties of its L1(0) phase. Electron backscatter diffraction showed that NWA 6259 is strongly textured, containing L1(0) grains oriented along any one of the three equivalent cubic directions of the parent fcc structure. The magnetic structure was modeled as a superposition of the three orthonormal uniaxial variants. By simultaneously fitting first-quadrant magnetization data for 13 different orientations of the sample with respect to the applied field direction, the intrinsic magnetic properties were estimated to be saturation magnetization 4 pi M-s = 14.7 kG and anisotropy field H-a = 14.4 kOe. The anisotropy constant K = 0.84 MJ/m(3) is somewhat smaller than the value K = 1.3 MJ/m(3) obtained by earlier researchers from nominally equiatomic FeNi prepared by neutron irradiation accompanied by annealing in a magnetic field, suggesting that higher Ni content (fewer Fe antisite defects) may improve the anisotropy. The fit also indicated that NWA 6259 contains one dominant variant (62% by volume), the remainder of the sample being a second variant, and the third variant being absent altogether. (C) 2015 AIP Publishing LLC.

  12. RoboNet-1.0: A Prototype Global Network of Large Robotic Telescopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bode, M. F.; Cardiff U. Collaboration; U. Hertfordshire Collaboration; U. Leicester Collaboration; St Andrews U. Collaboration; Queens U., Belfast Collaboration; Mullard Space Science Lab. Collaboration; U. Exeter Collaboration; U. Southampton Collaboration; U. Manchester Collaboration

    2004-12-01

    Involving a consortium of 10 UK universities, RoboNet-1.0 comprises the Liverpool Telescope (LT, La Palma), plus specially allocated time on the Faulkes Telescope North (FTN, Maui) and Faulkes Telescope South (FTS, Siding Spring, Australia). All three are essentially identical 2m telescopes equipped for both optical photometry and spectroscopy and operated from a common centre in Liverpool. The LT is primarily for research use whereas the FTs are mainly dedicated to education. Software developed by the eSTAR GRID project is being applied and enhanced to enable efficient and effective operation of the network. The primary scientific projects being addressed by RoboNet-1.0 are (a) rapid follow-up of Gamma Ray Burst sources detected by missions such as Swift, and (b) the detection of extra-solar planets via microlensing. Observations with the network began in August 2004. This is a pre-cursor project to the establishment of the full RoboNet global network of six dedicated telescopes which would greatly enhance work in several important branches of time domain astrophysics. Operation of the Liverpool Telescope and RoboNet-1.0 are funded by the UK Particle Physics and Astronomy Research Council. The Faulkes Telescopes are funded by the Dill Faulkes Educational Trust.

  13. 2-Chlorophenol adsorption on Cu(1 0 0): First-principles density functional study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Altarawneh, Mohammednoor; Radny, Marian W.; Smith, Phillip V.; Mackie, John C.; Kennedy, Eric M.; Dlugogorski, Bogdan Z.

    2008-04-01

    Interactions between a 2-chlorophenol molecule and the Cu(1 0 0) surface have been analyzed using a first-principles density functional theory (DFT) plane-wave method as the first step in gaining a detailed understanding at the molecular level of the copper catalyzed formation of PCDD/F's (dioxin compounds). While the 2-chlorophenol molecule is found to be only very weakly bound to the Cu(1 0 0) surface in a number of vertical and flat-lying configurations, its dissociation into either 2-hydroxyl-phenyl (C 6H 4OH) or benzyne (C 6H 4) results in chemisorption on the surface. The dissociative reaction (2-chlorophenol + Cu surface → 2-chlorophenoxy + H-Cu surface), which is an initial and key step in the catalytic process, is also found to be exothermic on two considered sites. The 2-chlorophenoxy radical on the Cu(1 0 0) surface transforms into a mono chloro-phenolate and is more stable than the gas-phase species by about 1.74 eV. The most stable configurations occur when the benzyne moiety, hydroxyl group and chlorine atom are all separately chemisorbed on the surface with an overall stability of 0.97 eV.

  14. Geometric engineering, mirror symmetry and 6{d}_{(1,0)}to 4{d}_{(N=2)}

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Del Zotto, Michele; Vafa, Cumrun; Xie, Dan

    2015-11-01

    We study compactification of 6 dimensional (1,0) theories on T 2. We use geometric engineering of these theories via F-theory and employ mirror symmetry technology to solve for the effective 4d N=2 geometry for a large number of the (1 ,0) theories including those associated with conformal matter. Using this we show that for a given 6d theory we can obtain many inequivalent 4d N=2 SCFTs. Some of these respect the global symmetries of the 6d theory while others exhibit SL(2 , ℤ) duality symmetry inherited from global diffeomorphisms of the T 2. This construction also explains the 6d origin of moduli space of 4d affine ADE quiver theories as flat ADE connections on T 2. Among the resulting 4 d N=2 CFTs we find theories whose vacuum geometry is captured by an LG theory (as opposed to a curve or a local CY geometry). We obtain arbitrary genus curves of class S with punctures from toroidal compactification of (1 , 0) SCFTs where the curve of the class S theory emerges through mirror symmetry. We also show that toroidal compactification of the little string version of these theories can lead to class S theories with no punctures on arbitrary genus Riemann surface.

  15. Pantheon 1.0, a manually verified dataset of globally famous biographies.

    PubMed

    Yu, Amy Zhao; Ronen, Shahar; Hu, Kevin; Lu, Tiffany; Hidalgo, César A

    2016-01-05

    We present the Pantheon 1.0 dataset: a manually verified dataset of individuals that have transcended linguistic, temporal, and geographic boundaries. The Pantheon 1.0 dataset includes the 11,341 biographies present in more than 25 languages in Wikipedia and is enriched with: (i) manually verified demographic information (place and date of birth, gender) (ii) a taxonomy of occupations classifying each biography at three levels of aggregation and (iii) two measures of global popularity including the number of languages in which a biography is present in Wikipedia (L), and the Historical Popularity Index (HPI) a metric that combines information on L, time since birth, and page-views (2008-2013). We compare the Pantheon 1.0 dataset to data from the 2003 book, Human Accomplishments, and also to external measures of accomplishment in individual games and sports: Tennis, Swimming, Car Racing, and Chess. In all of these cases we find that measures of popularity (L and HPI) correlate highly with individual accomplishment, suggesting that measures of global popularity proxy the historical impact of individuals.

  16. Pantheon 1.0, a manually verified dataset of globally famous biographies

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Amy Zhao; Ronen, Shahar; Hu, Kevin; Lu, Tiffany; Hidalgo, César A.

    2016-01-01

    We present the Pantheon 1.0 dataset: a manually verified dataset of individuals that have transcended linguistic, temporal, and geographic boundaries. The Pantheon 1.0 dataset includes the 11,341 biographies present in more than 25 languages in Wikipedia and is enriched with: (i) manually verified demographic information (place and date of birth, gender) (ii) a taxonomy of occupations classifying each biography at three levels of aggregation and (iii) two measures of global popularity including the number of languages in which a biography is present in Wikipedia (L), and the Historical Popularity Index (HPI) a metric that combines information on L, time since birth, and page-views (2008–2013). We compare the Pantheon 1.0 dataset to data from the 2003 book, Human Accomplishments, and also to external measures of accomplishment in individual games and sports: Tennis, Swimming, Car Racing, and Chess. In all of these cases we find that measures of popularity (L and HPI) correlate highly with individual accomplishment, suggesting that measures of global popularity proxy the historical impact of individuals. PMID:26731133

  17. Pantheon 1.0, a manually verified dataset of globally famous biographies.

    PubMed

    Yu, Amy Zhao; Ronen, Shahar; Hu, Kevin; Lu, Tiffany; Hidalgo, César A

    2016-01-01

    We present the Pantheon 1.0 dataset: a manually verified dataset of individuals that have transcended linguistic, temporal, and geographic boundaries. The Pantheon 1.0 dataset includes the 11,341 biographies present in more than 25 languages in Wikipedia and is enriched with: (i) manually verified demographic information (place and date of birth, gender) (ii) a taxonomy of occupations classifying each biography at three levels of aggregation and (iii) two measures of global popularity including the number of languages in which a biography is present in Wikipedia (L), and the Historical Popularity Index (HPI) a metric that combines information on L, time since birth, and page-views (2008-2013). We compare the Pantheon 1.0 dataset to data from the 2003 book, Human Accomplishments, and also to external measures of accomplishment in individual games and sports: Tennis, Swimming, Car Racing, and Chess. In all of these cases we find that measures of popularity (L and HPI) correlate highly with individual accomplishment, suggesting that measures of global popularity proxy the historical impact of individuals. PMID:26731133

  18. Quantum states of hydrogen atom on Pd(1 1 0) surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Padama, Allan Abraham B.; Nakanishi, Hiroshi; Kasai, Hideaki

    2015-12-01

    The quantum states of adsorbed hydrogen atom on Pd(1 1 0) surface are investigated in this work. From the calculated potential energy surface (PES) of hydrogen atom on Pd(1 1 0), the wave functions and eigenenergies in the ground and few excited states of protium (H) and deuterium (D) are calculated. Localized wave functions of hydrogen atom exist on pseudo-threefold and long bridge sites of Pd(1 1 0). The short bridge site is a local minimum from the result of PES, however, quantum behavior of hydrogen revealed that its vibration would allow it to hop to other pseudo-threefold site (that crosses the short bridge site) than to stay on the short bridge site. Exchange of ordering of the wave functions between H and D is attributed to the difference in their masses. The calculated eigenenergies are found to be in fair agreement with experimental data based from the identified vibrations of hydrogen with component perpendicular to the surface. The activation barriers measured from the eigenenergies are in better agreement with experimental findings in comparison to the data gathered from PES.

  19. Seasonal changes, identification and source apportionment of PAH in PM1.0

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agudelo-Castañeda, Dayana Milena; Teixeira, Elba Calesso

    2014-10-01

    The objective of this research was to evaluate the seasonal variation of PAHs in PM1.0, as well as to identify and quantify the contributions of each source profile using the PMF receptor model. PM1.0 samples were collected on PTFE filters from August 2011 to July 2013 in the Metropolitan Area of Porto Alegre, Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil. The samples were extracted using the EPA method TO-13A and 16 Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons (PAHs) were analyzed using a gaseous chromatograph coupled with a mass spectrometer (GC-MS). Also, the data discussed in this study were analyzed to identify the relations of the PAHs concentrations with NOx, NO, O3 and meteorological parameters (temperature, solar radiation, wind speed, relative humidity). The results showed that in winter, concentrations of total PAHs were significantly higher than in summer, thus showing their seasonal variation. The identification of emission sources by applying diagnostic ratios confirmed that PAHs in the study area originate from mobile sources, especially, from diesel and gasoline emissions. The analysis by PMF receptor model showed the contribution of these two main sources of emissions, too, followed by coal combustion, incomplete combustion/unburned petroleum and wood combustion. The toxic equivalent factors were calculated to characterize the risk of cancer from PAH exposure to PM1.0 samples, and BaP and DahA dominated BaPeq levels.

  20. Human casein alpha s1 (CSN1S1) skews in vitro differentiation of monocytes towards macrophages

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The milk-derived protein human Casein alpha s1 (CSN1S1) has recently been detected in blood cells and was shown to possess proinflammatory properties. In the present study, we investigated the effect of CSN1S1 on the differentiation of monocytes. Methods Primary human monocytes were stimulated with recombinant CSN1S1 and compared to cells stimulated with GM-CSF/IL-4 or M-CSF/IFNγ. Morphological changes were assessed by microscopy and quantification of surface markers of differentiation by FACS analysis. Phagocytic activity of CSN1S1 stimulated cells was measured by quantification of zymosan labeled particle uptake. The role of mitogen activated protein kinases for CSN1S1-induced differentiation of monocytes and proinflammatory cytokine expression was assessed by supplementation of specific inhibitors. Results CSN1S1 at a concentration of 10 μg/ml resulted in morphological changes (irregular shape, pseudopodia) and aggregation of cells, comparable to changes observed in M-CSF/IFNγ differentiated macrophages. Surface marker expression was altered after 24 h with an upregulation of CD14 (mean 2.5 fold) and CD64 (1.9 fold) in CSN1S1 stimulated cells. CSN1S1 treated cells showed a characteristic surface marker pattern for macrophages after 120 h of incubation (CD14high, CD64high, CD83low, CD1alow) comparable to changes observed in M-CSF/IFNγ treated monocytes. Furthermore, phagocytic activity was increased 1.4 and 1.9 fold following stimulation with 10 μg/ml CSN1S1 after 24 and 48 h, respectively. Early GM-CSF, but not GM-CSF/IL-4 induced differentiation of monocytes towards dendritic cells (DC) was inhibited by addition of CSN1S1. Finally, CSN1S1 induced upregulation of CD14 was impeded by inhibition of ERK1/2, while inhibition of the mitogen activated protein kinases JNK and p38 did not influence cellular differentiation. However, JNK and p38 inhibitors impeded CSN1S1 induced secretion of the proinflammatory cytokines IL-1b or IL-6. Conclusions CSN1S1

  1. Predicted Fe II Spectra plus UV through sub-mm Emission Line Fluxes for Other Species Arising in Narrow Line Regions of AGNs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verner, Ekaterina; Bruhweiler, F. C.; Wills, B. J.

    2009-01-01

    Optical and UV spectra indicate pronounced Fe II emission from multitudinous lines superposed on the underlying UV and optical continua of Seyferts and QSOs. Although the intrinsic UV of the these objects exhibit strong Fe II emission arising in higher density Broad Line Region (BLR) gas, observations at visual wavelengths indicate Fe II originating in both BLR and lower density Narrow Line Region (NLR) gas. Our modeling of observed intrinsic UV Fe II emission produces better fits with both BLR and NLR components. We have calculated a grid of photoionization models appropriate for NLR, spanning a range of number density [log (n/cm-3) = 1.0 to 8.0], photoionizing flux [log (Φ/cm-2 s-1) = 10.0-18.0], microturbulence (ξ = 0, 2, 10, and 20 km s-1), and abundance (0.1, 0.5, 1.0 and 5 times solar). These models include the effects of cooling from Fe II. The effects of Fe II cooling and the use of a 371 versus an 830-level atom for Fe II in producing the Fe II emission spectra are explored. We present predicted Fe II spectra from the UV through the IR, plus fluxes of important lines of other species from the UV through the sub-mm wavelength range. These predictions, besides being relevant for studies of Fe II in AGNs, provide predicted fluxes for important lines for upcoming missions such as Herschel and SOPHIA. These results will be made available to researchers via the World Wide Web. We acknowledge the support of the National Science Foundation through grant AST-0607465 to CUA.

  2. Unshifted Metastable He I* Mini-broad Absorption Line System in the Narrow-line Type 1 Quasar SDSS J080248.18+551328.9

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ji, Tuo; Zhou, Hongyan; Jiang, Peng; Wang, Tinggui; Ge, Jian; Wang, Huiyuan; Komossa, S.; Hamann, Fred; Zuther, Jens; Liu, Wenjuan; Lu, Honglin; Zuo, Wenwen; Yang, Chenwei; Yuan, Weimin

    2015-02-01

    We report the identification of an unusual absorption-line system in the quasar SDSS J080248.18+551328.9 and present a detailed study of the system, incorporating follow-up optical and near-IR spectroscopy. A few tens of absorption lines are detected, including He I*, Fe II*, and Ni II*, which arise from metastable or excited levels, as well as resonant lines in Mg I, Mg II, Fe II, Mn II, and Ca II. All of the isolated absorption lines show the same profile of width Δv ~ 1500 km s-1 centered at a common redshift as that of the quasar emission lines, such as [O II], [S II], and hydrogen Paschen and Balmer series. With narrow Balmer lines, strong optical Fe II multiplets, and weak [O III] doublets, its emission-line spectrum is typical for that of a narrow-line Seyfert 1 galaxy (NLS1). We have derived reliable measurements of the gas-phase column densities of the absorbing ions/levels. Photoionization modeling indicates that the absorber has a density of n H ~ (1.0-2.5) × 105 cm-3 and a column density of N H ~ (1.0-3.2) × 1021 cm-2 and is located at R ~100-250 pc from the central supermassive black hole. The location of the absorber, the symmetric profile of the absorption lines, and the coincidence of the absorption- and emission-line centroid jointly suggest that the absorption gas originates from the host galaxy and is plausibly accelerated by stellar processes, such as stellar winds and/or supernova explosions. The implications for the detection of such a peculiar absorption-line system in an NLS1 are discussed in the context of coevolution between supermassive black hole growth and host galaxy buildup.

  3. Ring-strain-enabled reaction discovery: new heterocycles from bicyclo[1.1.0]butanes.

    PubMed

    Walczak, Maciej A A; Krainz, Tanja; Wipf, Peter

    2015-04-21

    Mechanistically as well as synthetically, bicyclo[1.1.0]butanes represent one of the most fascinating classes of organic compounds. They offer a unique blend of compact size (four carbon atoms), high reactivity (strain energy of 66 kcal/mol), and mechanistic pathway diversity that can be harvested for the rapid assembly of complex scaffolds. The C(1)-C(3) bond combines the electronic features of both σ and π bonds with facile homolytic and heterolytic bond dissociation properties and thereby readily engages pericyclic, transition-metal-mediated, nucleophilic, and electrophilic pathways as well as radical acceptor and donor substrates. Despite this multifaceted reaction profile and recent advances in the preparation of bicylo[1.1.0]butanes, the current portfolio of synthetic applications is still limited compared with those of cyclopropanes and cyclobutanes. In this Account, we describe our work over the past decade on the exploration of substituent effects on the ring strain and the reactivity of bicyclo[1.1.0]butanes, particularly in the context of metal-mediated processes. We first describe Rh(I)-catalyzed cycloisomerization reactions of N-allyl amines to give pyrrolidine and azepine heterocycles. The regioselectivity of the C,C-bond insertion/ring-opening step in these reactions is controlled by the phosphine ligand. After metal carbene formation, an intramolecular cyclopropanation adds a second fused ring system. A proposed mechanism rationalizes why rhodium(I) complexes with monodentate ligands favor five-membered heterocycles, as opposed to Rh(I)-bidentate ligand catalysts, which rearrange N-allyl amines to seven-membered heterocycles. The scope of Rh(I)-catalyzed cycloisomerization reactions was extended to allyl ethers, which provide a mixture of five- and seven-membered cyclic ethers regardless of the nature of the phosphine additive and Rh(I) precatalyst. The chemical diversity of these cycloisomerization products was further expanded by a consecutive

  4. Synthesis, EPR and luminescent properties of YAlO3:Fe3+ (0.1-0.9 mol%) nanopowders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Premkumar, H. B.; Nagabhushana, H.; Sharma, S. C.; Daruka Prasad, B.; Nagabhushana, B. M.; Rao, J. L.; Chakradhar, R. P. S.

    A simple and inexpensive combustion method was used to prepare Fe3+ doped YAlO3 perovskite within few minutes at low temperature (400 ± 10 °C). This might be useful in lowering the cost of the material. The final products were well characterized by various spectroscopic techniques such as PXRD, SEM, TEM, FTIR and UV-Visible. The average crystallite size was estimated from the broadening of the PXRD peaks and found to be in the range 45-90 nm, the results were in good agreement with the W-H plots and TEM. The crystallites show dumbbell shape, agglomerated particles with different size. The TL glow curves of 1-5 kGy γ-irradiated YAlO3:Fe3+ (0.1 mol%) nanopowder warmed at a heating rate of 3 °C s-1 records a single glow peak at ∼260 °C. The kinetic parameters namely activation energy (E), order of kinetics (b) and frequency factor (s) were determined at different gamma doses using the Chens glow peak shape method and the results were discussed in detail. The photoluminescence spectra for Fe3+ (0.1-0.9 mol%) doped YAlO3 records the lower energy band at 720 nm (4T1 (4G) → 6A1 (6S)) and the intermediate band located at 620 nm (4T2 (4G) → 6A1 (6S)) with the excitation of 378 nm. The higher energy band located at 514 nm was associated to 4E + 4A1 (4G) → 6A1 (6S) transition. The resonance signals at g values 7.6, 4.97, 4.10, 2.94, 2.33 and 1.98 were observed in EPR spectra of Fe3+ (0.1-0.9 mol%) doped YAlO3 recorded at room temperature. The g values indicate that the iron ions were in trivalent state and distorted octahedral site symmetry was observed.

  5. Severe adverse effects of 5-fluorouracil in S-1 were lessened by haemodialysis due to elimination of the drug.

    PubMed

    Inoue, Kazunori; Nagasawa, Yasuyuki; Yamamoto, Ryohei; Omori, Hiroki; Kimura, Tomonori; Tomida, Kodo; Furumatsu, Yoshiyuki; Imai, Enyu; Isaka, Yoshitaka; Rakugi, Hiromi

    2009-04-01

    S-1 and cisplatin are used as one of the first-line chemotherapies for gastric cancer in Japan. The plasma concentration of 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) is increased in patients with renal dysfunction because gimeracil in S-1 inhibits the degradation of 5-FU and about 50% of gimeracil is excreted in the urine. We describe a 35-year-old man with acute kidney injury while taking S-1 and cisplatin for advanced gastric cancer and who presented severe adverse effects of 5-FU. This case report describes the evolution of the plasma concentrations of 5-FU with haemodialysis along with a decrease in the adverse drug effects.

  6. Update on CRUST1.0 - A 1-degree Global Model of Earth's Crust

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laske, Gabi; Masters, Guy; Ma, Zhitu; Pasyanos, Mike

    2013-04-01

    Our new 1-by-1 degree global crustal model, CRUST1.0, was introduced last year and serves as starting model in a comprehensive effort to compile a global model of Earth's crust and lithosphere, LITHO1.0 (Pasyanos et al., 2012). The Moho depth in CRUST1.0 is based on 1-degree averages of a recently updated database of crustal thickness data from active source seismic studies as well as from receiver function studies. In areas where such constraints are still missing, for example in Antarctica, crustal thicknesses are estimated using gravity constraints. The compilation of the new crustal model initially followed the philosophy of the widely used crustal model CRUST2.0 (Bassin et al., 2000; http://igppweb.ucsd.edu/~gabi/crust2.html) to assign elastic properties in the crystalline crust according to basement age or tectonic setting (loosely following an updated map by Artemieva and Mooney (2001; http://www.lithosphere.info). For cells with no local seismic or gravity constraints, statistical averages of crustal properties, including crustal thickness, were extrapolated. However, in places with constraints the depth to basement and mantle are given explicitly and no longer assigned by crustal type. This allows for much smaller errors in both. In each 1-degree cell, boundary depth, compressional and shear velocity as well as density is given for 8 layers: water, ice, 3 sediment layers and upper, middle and lower crystalline crust. Topography, bathymetry and ice cover are taken from ETOPO1. The sediment cover is based on our sediment model (Laske and Masters, 1997; http://igppweb.ucsd.edu/~sediment.html), with some near-coastal updates. In an initial step toward LITHO1.0, the model is then validated against new global surface wave disperison maps and adjusted in areas of extreme misfit. This poster presents the next validation step: compare the new Moho depths with in-situ active source and receiver function results. We also present comparisons with CRUST2.0. CRUST1.0 is

  7. High coverage hydrogen adsorption on the Fe3O4(1 1 0) surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Xiaohu; Zhang, Xuemei; Wang, Shengguang

    2015-10-01

    Hydrogen adsorption on the A and B termination layers of the Fe3O4(1 1 0) surface at different coverage has been systematically studied by density functional theory calculations including an on-site Hubbard term (GGA + U). The adsorption of hydrogen prefers surface oxygen atoms on both layers. The more stable A layer has stronger adsorption energy than the less stable B layer. The saturation coverage has two dissociatively adsorbed H2 on the A layer, and one dissociatively adsorbed H2 on the B layer. The adsorption mechanism has been analyzed on the basis of projected density of states (PDOS).

  8. Respiratory effects of 2-hr exposure to 1. 0 ppm nitric oxide in normal subjects

    SciTech Connect

    Kagawa, J.

    1982-04-01

    Eight adult healthy male volunteers were exposed to 1.0 ppm nitric oxide (NO) with intermittent light exercise for 2 hr. No one showed any symptoms during NO exposure. A small, but significant, decrease of specific airway conductance was observed in half of the subjects. As a group, a significant reduction of the percentage increase of maximal expiratory flow at 50% of forced vital capacity while breathing a He-O/sub 2/ gas mixture as compared with air was observed among various pulmonary function tests. These results suggested that some physiological response to NO exposure might be observed in some subjects when performing exercise.

  9. Observation of J = 1-0 emission from H/N-15/C. [in radio astronomy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, R. D.; Godfrey, P. D.; Gunn, H. I.; Blackman, G. L.; Storey, J. W. V.

    1977-01-01

    Emission from the J = 1-0 transition of H(N-15)C has been detected in the direction of DR21(OH). The transition frequency of 88,865.69 MHz was measured in the laboratory by microwave absorption spectroscopy. The computed N-15/C-13 isotopic abundance ratio of 1.01 for DR21(OH) is larger than those calculated from isotopes of HCN in other interstellar clouds, perhaps implying a localized enrichment in N-15 in DR21(OH).

  10. FePt L1 0 ordering and grain growth using millisecond pulse laser processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inaba, Yuki; Torres, Karen L.; Kang, Shishou; Vanfleet, Richard; Izatt, Jerald R.; Harrell, J. W.; Thompson, Gregory B.; Klemmer, Tim; Kubota, Yukiko

    2010-12-01

    The structural and magnetic properties of ˜12 nm thick FePt thin films grown on Si substrates annealed using a 1064 nm wavelength laser with a 10 ms pulse have been examined. The A1 to L1 0 ordering phase transformation was confirmed by electron and X-ray diffraction. An order parameter near 50% and a maximum coercivity of 12 kOe were obtained with laser energy densities of 25-32 J/cm 2. Grain growth, quantified by dark field transmission electron microscopy, occurred during chemical ordering at the laser pulse widths studied.

  11. Structural homogeneity of nanocrystalline VT1-0 titanium. Low-temperature micromechanical properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rusakova, A. V.; Lubenets, S. V.; Fomenko, L. S.; Moskalenko, V. A.

    2012-10-01

    The microhardness of samples of VT1-0 titanium with grain sizes ranging from 35 nm to 10 μm is measured at temperatures of 77-300 K. Nanocrystalline samples produced by rolling at low temperatures are found to be quite homogeneous, and their structure is stable with respect to thermal and mechanical interactions. The interrelationship between microhardness and grain size is well described by the Hall-Petch relationship, the parameters of which depend on temperature. Data on the temperature dependence of the microhardness and the Hall-Petch coefficient indicate that the microplastic deformation is of a thermally activated, dislocation character, regardless of grain size.

  12. The SeaFlux Turbulent Flux Dataset Version 1.0 Documentation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clayson, Carol Anne; Roberts, J. Brent; Bogdanoff, Alec S.

    2012-01-01

    Under the auspices of the World Climate Research Programme (WCRP) Global Energy and Water cycle EXperiment (GEWEX) Data and Assessment Panel (GDAP), the SeaFlux Project was created to investigate producing a high-resolution satellite-based dataset of surface turbulent fluxes over the global oceans. The most current release of the SeaFlux product is Version 1.0; this represents the initial release of turbulent surface heat fluxes, associated near-surface variables including a diurnally varying sea surface temperature.

  13. Data appendix: F-number=1.0 EMR with a flexible back electrode

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mihora, D. J.

    1984-01-01

    A 12.5 micron Tedlar low f-number electrostatic membrane reflector was tested. The antenna reflector was designed to achieve a spherical reflector surface with a focal length to diameter ratio f(sub n) of one and a potential accuracy of 1.0 over its 4.88 m diameter. The configuration required the cutting and joining of twelve pie-shaped panels to form the reflector surface. Electrostatic forces are used to tension this preformed membrane reflector. The test data is spare-only three sets of measurements were taken due to lack of funds.

  14. RealGasBrine v1.0 option of TOUGH+ v1.5

    2015-02-27

    RealGasBrine v1.0 is a numerical code that for the simulation of the behavior of gas-bearing porous and/fractured geologic media. It is an option of TOUGH+ v1.5 [Moridis, 2014], a successor to the TOUGH2 [Pruess et al., 1999; 2012] family of codes for multi-component, multiphase ?uid and heat ?ow developed at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. RealGasBrine v1.0 needs the TOUGH+ v1.5 core code in order to compile and execute. It is written in standard FORTRANmore » 95/2003, and can be run on any computational platform (workstation, PC, Macintosh) for which such compilers are available. RealGasBrine v1.0 describes the non-isothermal two- (for pure water) or three-phase (for brine) flow of an aqueous phase and a real gas mixture in a gas-bearing medium, with a particular focus in ultra-tight (such as tight-sand and shale gas) systems. Up to 12 individual real gases can be tracked, and salt can precipitate as solid halite. The capabilities of the code include coupled flow and thermal effects, real gas behavior, Darcy and non-Darcy flow, several isotherm options of gas sorption onto the grains of the porous media, complex fracture descriptions, gas solubility into water, and geomechanical effects on flow properties. RealGasBrine v1.0 allows the study of flow and transport of fluids and heat over a wide range of time frames and spatial scales not only in gas reservoirs, but also in any problem involving the flow of gases in geologic media, including the geologic storage of greenhouse gas mixtures, the behavior of geothermal reservoirs with multi-component condensable (H2O and CO2) and non-condensable gas mixtures, the transport of water and released H2 in nuclear waste storage applications, etc.« less

  15. The 1.0-4.5 GHz Zebras in the June 6, 2000 Flare

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sawant, H. S.; Karlický, M.; Fernandes, F. C. R.; Cecatto, J. R.

    2002-01-01

    For the first time we are reporting harmonically related zebra structures above 1000 MHz, having ratio of 1:2. Zebra structures show up to 8 zebra lines. In individual zebra patterns the frequency ratio of the neighbouring zebra lines are less than 1.03 and these ratios decrease with the frequency decrease. The zebra patterns are analyzed and interpreted assuming double plasma resonance instability as the cause for their generation. The longitudinal upper hybrid waves are excited at positions of cyclotron resonances and then transformed into electromagnetic ones. Using this model the magnetic field strengths in the flaring loops are estimated in the range of 110-230 G.

  16. 7S(1/2) ? 9S(1/2) two-photon spectroscopy of trapped francium.

    PubMed

    Simsarian, J E; Shi, W; Orozco, L A; Sprouse, G D; Zhao, W Z

    1996-12-01

    We report on the spectroscopic measurement of the (210)Fr 9S(1/2) energy obtained by two-photon excitation of atoms confined and cooled in a magneto-optic trap. The resonant intermediate level 7P(3/2) is the upper state of the trapping transition. We have measured the energy difference between the 9S(1/2) state and the 7S(1/2) ground state to be 25 671.021 +/- 0.006 cm(-1). PMID:19881852

  17. An automated system for evaluation of the potential functionome: MAPLE version 2.1.0

    PubMed Central

    Takami, Hideto; Taniguchi, Takeaki; Arai, Wataru; Takemoto, Kazuhiro; Moriya, Yuki; Goto, Susumu

    2016-01-01

    Metabolic and physiological potential evaluator (MAPLE) is an automatic system that can perform a series of steps used in the evaluation of potential comprehensive functions (functionome) harboured in the genome and metagenome. MAPLE first assigns KEGG Orthology (KO) to the query gene, maps the KO-assigned genes to the Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG) functional modules, and then calculates the module completion ratio (MCR) of each functional module to characterize the potential functionome in the user’s own genomic and metagenomic data. In this study, we added two more useful functions to calculate module abundance and Q-value, which indicate the functional abundance and statistical significance of the MCR results, respectively, to the new version of MAPLE for more detailed comparative genomic and metagenomic analyses. Consequently, MAPLE version 2.1.0 reported significant differences in the potential functionome, functional abundance, and diversity of contributors to each function among four metagenomic datasets generated by the global ocean sampling expedition, one of the most popular environmental samples to use with this system. MAPLE version 2.1.0 is now available through the web interface (http://www.genome.jp/tools/maple/) 17 June 2016, date last accessed. PMID:27374611

  18. Geoacoustic inversion techniques (GAIT) Version 1.0 global search (GS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neumann, Peter; Muncill, Gregory

    2003-04-01

    Geoacoustic Inversion Techniques (GAIT) Version 1.0 is a PEO (C4I and Space) PMW 155 funded product that accepts measured acoustic data and produces an optimized estimate of the bottom environment that produced the observed acoustic data. The Global Search (GS) segment of GAIT pairs the Adaptive Simulated Annealing (ASA) algorithm with a variety of Navy standard propagation loss models (PE, ASTRAL and Nautilus) and an active sonar performance prediction model (ASPM). The goal of the GS segment of GAIT is to provide a best estimate of the geoacoustic properties of the ocean bottom that, when paired with a selected model, result in the observed acoustic data. An overview of the GS segment of GAIT 1.0 will be presented with details on the ASA algorithm, component models, cost functions and geoacoustic parametrizations. Inversion results will be shown for synthetic test cases from the Inversion Technique Workshop (ITW) held in May 2001 and from both narrowband and broadband measured data test cases. [Work supported by PEO (C4I and Space) PMW 155 and uses the products of a Phase I and II SBIR from the ONR (Code 321US).

  19. A ROSAT HRI observation of the supernova remnant G109.1 - 1.0

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hurford, Alan P.; Fesen, Robert A.

    1995-11-01

    We present results of a search using ROSAT HRI data for X-ray spatial substructures in the galactic supernova remnant G109.1 - 1.0 which might indicate a connection between the remnant's bright X-ray blob and its X-ray pulsar, 1E2259+586. A 0.1-2.4 keV HRI image, created by combining separate 28- and 22-ks pointings, reveals the presence of a few small-scale X-ray features, including a NE-SW emission ridge in the remnant's X-ray blob. Two diffuse knots in the X-ray blob, previously suggested as being aligned with the X-ray pulsar, appear to be statistical fluctuations in the Einstein HRI data. We find no morphological evidence in the X-ray spatial substructures of G109.1 - 1.0 to support a pulsar jet origin for the X-ray blob as proposed by Gregory & Fahlman.

  20. Ultrasonic micro-motor using miniature piezoelectric tube with diameter of 1.0 mm.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hui; Dong, Shu-xiang; Zhang, Shu-yi; Wang, Tian-hua; Zhang, Zhong-ning; Fan, Li

    2006-12-22

    At the present moment, the smallest piezoelectric ultrasonic micro-motors utilizing miniature PZT piezoelectric ceramic tubes were developed. The motor consists of a PZT-metal composite tube stator, two steel rotors and a thin shaft that keeps the two rotors pressing on both ends of the stator elastically. The dimensions of the PZT tube are 1.0 mm in outer diameter, 0.6 mm in inner diameter and 5.0 mm in length. The diameter and total length of the assembled micro-motor is 1.0 mm and 8 mm (including an adjusting spring), respectively. The tube-type micro-motor is driven by two pairs of alternative voltages with phase shift 90 degrees between the adjacent electrodes and operated in the first circular-bending vibration mode of the stator with the resonance frequency about 58 kHz. The experimental results show that the tube-type micro-motors have perfect performances: (i) high rotation frequency over 3000 rpm and (ii) large starting torque over 7.8 microN m under the conditions of the input voltage of 110 V(p-p) and the resonance frequency. The micro-motor is well suitable for operating in micro-spaces, such as in intravascular, micro-robots and micro-craft applications.

  1. Exoplanet detection via microlensing with RoboNet-1.0

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burgdorf, M. J.; Bramich, D. M.; Dominik, M.; Bode, M. F.; Horne, K. D.; Steele, I. A.; Rattenbury, N.; Tsapras, Y.

    2007-04-01

    RoboNet-1.0 is a prototype global network of three two-meter robotic telescopes, placed in La Palma (Canary Islands), Maui (Hawaii), and Siding Spring (Australia). In April 2004, funding for RoboNet-1.0 until July 2007 was approved by PPARC's Science Committee, and the project commenced in earnest in August 2004. The search for cool extra-solar planets by optimised robotic monitoring of Galactic microlensing events is one of the two core elements of its scientific programme - observations of gamma-ray bursts is the other. During the 2005 observing season, light curves of more than 60 microlensing events have been sampled at regular intervals. One particular event, OGLE-2005-BLG-71, showed an anomaly caused by an extrasolar planet, which constituted the second detection of a planet by microlensing. As a by-product, our dense monitoring during caustic crossing events can resolve the brightness profile of observed source stars, providing an observational test of stellar atmosphere models. Current development work uses e-science to create a fully automated chain linking event monitoring to the detection of anomalies in the microlensing lightcurves that could be indications of planetary companions and on to the triggering of follow-up observations. In order to fully exploit the potential of such a network for detecting exoplanets, it will be necessary to complement the existing RoboNet with additional telescopes in the southern hemisphere.

  2. Intrinsic Properties of Fe-Substituted L1(0) Magnets

    SciTech Connect

    Manchanda, P; Kumar, P; Kashyap, A; Lucis, MJ; Shield, JE; Mubarok, A; Goldstein, JI; Constantinides, S; Barmak, K; Lewis, LH; Sellmyer, DJ; Skomski, R

    2013-10-01

    First-principle supercell calculations are used to determine how 3d elemental additions, especially Fe additions, modify the magnetization, exchange and anisotropy of L1(0)-ordered ferromagnets. Calculations are performed using the VASP code and partially involve configurational averaging over site disorder. Three isostructural systems are investigated: Fe-Co-Pt, Mn-Al-Fe, and transition metal-doped Fe-Ni. In all three systems the iron strongly influences the magnetic properties of these compounds, but the specific effect depends on the host. In CoPt(Fe) iron enhances the magnetization, with subtle changes in the magnetic moments that depend on the distribution of the Fe and Co atoms. The addition of Fe to MnAl is detrimental to the magnetization, because it creates antiferromagnetic exchange interactions, but it enhances the magnetic anisotropy. The replacement of 50% of Mn by Fe in MnFeAl2 enhances the anisotropy from 1.77 to 2.5 MJ/m(3). Further, the substitution of light 3d elements such as Ti, V, Cr into L1(0)-ordered FeNi is shown to substantially reduce the magnetization.

  3. Surface structure of SrTiO 3(1 0 0)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kubo, T.; Nozoye, H.

    2003-09-01

    Atomic and electronic structures of the SrTiO 3(1 0 0) surface have been studied by using scanning tunneling microscopy (STM). We observed the c(4 × 2) ( θ=0.25) phase and the series of the structural phase transitions, e.g., c(2 × 2) ( θ=0.5) → c(4 × 4) ( θ=0.375) → 2 × 2 ( θ=0.25) → c(4 × 4) ( θ=0.125) → 4 × 4 ( θ=0.0625) → disorder → ( 5× 5)-R26.6° ( θ=0.2) → ( 13× 13)-R33.7° ( θ=0.0769). For the SrTiO 3(1 0 0) surface reconstructions, Sr adatom model, consisting of ordered Sr adatoms at the oxygen fourfold sites of a TiO 2-terminated layer, can explain the experimental results very well. We theoretically simulated the model clusters with the first-principles total-energy calculation. Calculated density of states and images for STM are in good agreement with the experimental results.

  4. The MASH 1.0 code system: Utilization of morse in the adjoint mode

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, J.O.; Santoro, R.T.

    1993-06-01

    The Monte Carlo Adjoint Shielding Code System -- MASH 1.0, principally developed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), represents an advanced method of calculating neutron and gamma-ray environments and radiation protection factors for complex shielding configurations by coupling a forward discrete ordinates radiation environment (i.e. air-over-ground) transport calculation with an adjoint Monte Carlo treatment of the shielding geometry. The primary application to date has been to determine the radiation shielding characteristics of armored vehicles exposed to prompt radiation from a nuclear weapon detonation. Other potential applications include analyses of the mission equipment associated with space exploration, the civilian airline industry, and other problems associated with an external neutron and gamma-ray radiation environment. This paper will provide an overview of the MASH 1.0 code system, including the verification, validation, and application to {open_quotes}benchmark{close_quotes} experimental data. Attention will be given to the adjoint Monte Carlo calculation, the use of {open_quotes}in-group{close_quotes} biasing to control the weights of the adjoint particles, and the coupling of a new graphics package for the diagnosis of combinatorial geometry descriptions and visualization of radiation transport results.

  5. Structural determination and magnetic properties for Co-rubrene composite films on Si(1 0 0)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hou, Yong-Jhih; Chang, Cheng-Hsun-Tony; Yang, Chun-Kai; Hsu, Chih-Yu; Jhou, Yen-Wei; Tsay, Jyh-Shen

    2015-11-01

    Because of the potential uses toward low-cost and flexible-substrate-based electronics, semiconducting organic materials have attracted much attention. In this contribution, structures and magnetic properties of Co-rubrene composite films on Si(1 0 0) have been studied by employing atomic force microscopy (AFM) and magneto-optic Kerr effect techniques. For composite films prepared by co-depositions of Co and rubrene on Si(1 0 0), the surface is smooth while a layered distribution of Co atoms is detected. For thick composite films, surfactant effects of rubrene molecules cause smooth surfaces and reduced interaction at the film/Si interface. For thin composite films, the formation of separated Co clusters in the films results in a larger coercive force due to the imperfection introduced by rough interface to impede the magnetization reversal. By increasing the rubrene concentration, more Co/rubrene interfaces are introduced in the composite films and the more rubrene served as a surfactant enhances the quality of the films. These information are valuable for future applications combining organic semiconductor and spintronics.

  6. Coadsorption of lanthanum with boron and gadolinium with boron on Mo(1 1 0)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Magkoev, Tamerlan T.; Vladimirov, Georgij G.; Rump, Gennadij A.

    2008-05-01

    Submonolayer to multilayer coadsorption of lanthanum (La) with boron (B) and gadolinium (Gd) with boron on the surface of Mo(1 1 0) has been studied by means of Auger electron spectroscopy (AES), electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS) and work function ( ϕ) measurements. The equilibrium state of double adsorbate systems achieved either by adsorption of rare-earth metal (REM) on boron precovered Mo(1 1 0) surface held at room temperature or after moderate annealing of the system with opposite order of adsorption (B on REM films) is the layer which is the inhomogeneous mixture of boron and REM atoms with preferential concentration of boron in the surface area of the mixed film. The work function of such films even at REM to boron concentration ratio much higher than 1/6 are very close to the values of corresponding bulk LaB 6 and GdB 6, favoring assumption of surface rearrangement as the dominant reason of high electron emission efficiency of hexaborides. Almost total similarity of the results for La-B and Gd-B systems can be viewed as the consequence of weak participation of Gd f-electrons in determining the thermionic properties of corresponding double layers.

  7. Sphingosine phosphate lyase regulates myogenic differentiation via S1P receptor-mediated effects on myogenic microRNA expression.

    PubMed

    de la Garza-Rodea, Anabel S; Baldwin, Dianna M; Oskouian, Babak; Place, Robert F; Bandhuvula, Padmavathi; Kumar, Ashok; Saba, Julie D

    2014-01-01

    S1P lyase (SPL) catalyzes the irreversible degradation of sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P), a bioactive lipid whose signaling activities regulate muscle differentiation, homeostasis, and satellite cell (SC) activation. By regulating S1P levels, SPL also controls SC recruitment and muscle regeneration, representing a potential therapeutic target for muscular dystrophy. We found that SPL is induced during myoblast differentiation. To investigate SPL's role in myogenesis at the cellular level, we generated and characterized a murine myoblast SPL-knockdown (SPL-KD) cell line lacking SPL. SPL-KD cells accumulated intracellular and extracellular S1P and failed to form myotubes under conditions that normally stimulate myogenic differentiation. Under differentiation conditions, SPL-KD cells also demonstrated delayed induction of 3 myogenic microRNAs (miRNAs), miR-1, miR-206, and miR-486. SPL-KD cells successfully differentiated when treated with an S1P1 agonist, S1P2 antagonist, and combination treatments, which also increased myogenic miRNA levels. SPL-KD cells transfected with mimics for miR-1 or miR-206 also overcame the differentiation block. Thus, we show for the first time that the S1P/SPL/S1P-receptor axis regulates the expression of a number of miRNAs, thereby contributing to myogenic differentiation.

  8. EPIC Study of Two Enigmatic Sources: The Mouse and SNR 359.1-0.5

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pavlov, George

    2004-01-01

    The objective of the original proposal was to observe the Mouse pulsar wind nebula (associated with PSR J1744-2958) and the nearby supernova remnant G359.1-0.5, where the pulsar was probably born, with the XMM-Newton observatory to study the properties of these objects. SNR G359.1-0.5 was accepted as a Category C target and has not been observed. The Mouse was observed on April 27,2003 for 52 ks. The image analysis has shown that the Mouse is extended in the East-West direction, possibly along the direction of the pulsar's proper motion. The spectrum of this pulsar wind nebula can be described as an absorbed power law with the photon index GAMMA = 1.9 plus or minus 0.1, effective hydrogen column density n(sub H) = (2.6 plus or minus 0.1) x 10(exp 22) per square centimeter, and flux F = 1.8 x 10(exp -11) erg per square centimeter per second in the 1-10 keV energy range. Based on the n(sub H) value, the distance to the source is about 5 kpc, which results in the luminosity 3.7 x 10(exp 34) erg per second. We conclude that PSR J1744-2958 and the Mouse are not physically associated with G359.1-0.5, which lies at a larger distance. In addition to the Mouse, we also detected two Low-Mass X-ray Binaries, SLX 1744-299 and 1744-300, in the EPIC MOS and PN fields of view. The latter of these objects showed a Type I X-ray burst during our observation, with a rise time of 5 s and decay time of 60 s. A very strong pileup during the burst made the analysis of the burst properties unreliable. The spectral analysis of the persistent radiation from SLX 1744-299 and 1744-300 yields the hydrogen column densities of 3.2 plus or minus 0.1 and (3.6 plus or minus 0.2) x 10(exp 22) per square centimeter, respectively, which suggests that the sources are close to the Galactic center (d = 8-9 kpc). The spectra can be reasonably well fitted with a blackbody plus thin disk model, with the blackbody temperatures of 1.7 plus or minus 0.2 and 1.8 plus or minus 0.2 keV, respectively.

  9. The Zeeman effect and hyperfine interactions in J = 1-0 transitions of CH+ and its isotopologues.

    PubMed

    Amano, T

    2010-12-28

    The J = 1-0 transitions of (12)CH(+), (13)CH(+), and (12)CD(+) in the ground X(1)Σ(+) state have been unambiguously identified by using an extended negative glow discharge as an ion source. Unexpectedly large Zeeman splittings have been observed, and the (13)CH(+) line exhibits nuclear spin-rotation hyperfine splitting in addition to the Zeeman effect. The nuclear spin-rotation coupling constant was determined to be 1.087(50) MHz for the (13)C species. The rotational g-factor is found to be -7.65(29), in terms of the nuclear magneton for the J = 1 and v = 0 state, more than an order of magnitude larger than values for typical diamagnetic closed shell molecules. These larger than usual magnetic interactions for a (1)Σ molecule are caused by the large rotational energy and relatively small excitation energy of the excited A(1)Π state. The effective g-factor and the spin-rotation coupling constant obtained by ab initio calculations agree very well with the experimentally determined values.

  10. Absolute dynamic viscosity measurements of subcooled liquid oxygen from 0.15 MPa to 1.0 MPa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hilton, D. K.; Van Sciver, S. W.

    2008-01-01

    New absolute dynamic viscosity measurements of subcooled liquid oxygen are presented which were acquired in the pressure and temperature domains from 0.15 MPa to 1.0 MPa and from 55.20 K to 90.19 K, respectively. The measurements were acquired with an uncertainty of 1% at a 95% confidence level using a pressurized gravitational capillary (PGC) viscometer specifically designed for subcooled liquefied gases. The measurements are summarized by Arrhenius-Eyring plot parameters ( μ = Ae E/ RT), and interpreted with respect to the chemical reaction rate theory of viscosity by Eyring. The Arrhenius-Eyring plot parameters reproduce the dynamic viscosity measurements with only a 2% RMS error, which is remarkable considering just two parameters are involved, A, the factor which includes the weak pressure dependence of the dynamic viscosity, and E/ R, the barrier energy of the flow, where R is the universal gas constant. Although the Arrhenius-Eyring plot parameters do not have a discernible pressure dependence in the present work, the pressure coefficient versus temperature for the dynamic viscosity was determined from line plots of the dynamic viscosity versus pressure. The pressure coefficients suggest that the pressure dependence is very weak, yet positive, and increases with decreasing temperature. Measurements at pressures an order-of-magnitude higher are required to confirm this suggestion.

  11. Simulating supersymmetry with ISAJET 7.0/ISASUSY 1.0

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baer, H.; Paige, F. E.; Protopopescu, S. D.; Tata, X.

    1993-04-01

    This document reviews the physics assumptions and input embedded in ISAJET 7.0/ISASUSY 1.0 which is relevant for simulating fundamental processes within the framework of the Minimal Supersymmetric Model (MSSM) at p(bar p) and pp colliders. After a brief discussion of the underlying MSSM framework, the authors discuss event simulation and list the particle production processes and decay modes that have been incorporated into the calculations. They then describe how to set up and run an ISAJET/ISASUSY job, as well as the user input and output formats. The ISAJET program is sufficiently flexible that some non-miminal supersymmetry scenarios may be simulated as well. Finally, plans for future upgrades which include the extension to e(sup +)e(sup -) collisions are listed.

  12. The Mars Analysis Correction Data Assimilation (MACDA) Dataset V1.0

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montabone, L.; Marsh, K.; Lewis, S. R.; Read, P. L.; Smith, M. D.; Holmes, J.; Spiga, A.; Lowe, D.; Pamment, A.

    2014-06-01

    The Mars Analysis Correction Data Assimilation (MACDA) dataset version 1.0 contains the reanalysis of fundamental atmospheric and surface variables for the planet Mars covering a period of about three Martian years (a Martian year is about 1.88 terrestrial years). This has been produced by data assimilation of observations from NASA's Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) spacecraft during its science mapping phase (February 1999-August 2004). In particular, we have used retrieved thermal profiles and total dust optical depths from the Thermal Emission Spectrometer (TES) on board MGS. Data have been assimilated into a Mars global climate model (MGCM) using the Analysis Correction scheme developed at the UK Meteorological Office. The MGCM used is the UK spectral version of the Laboratoire de Météorologie Dynamique (LMD, Paris, France) MGCM. MACDA is a joint project of the University of Oxford and The Open University in the UK.

  13. Structure and composition of the NiPd(1 1 0) surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Derry, G. N.; Wan, R.; Krueger, E.; Waldt, J.; English, C.

    2009-07-01

    The NiPd(1 1 0) alloy surface was studied using low energy electron diffraction to measure the structure and composition of the first three atomic layers. The surface layer is highly enriched in Pd and has a significantly buckled structure. The second layer is also buckled, with displacements even larger than the surface layer. The second layer also exhibits intralayer segregation (chemical ordering), with alternate close-packed rows of atoms being Ni enriched and Pd enriched. The third layer has a structure and composition close to that of the bulk alloy. These results are compared with results for the other low index faces of NiPd, the extensive literature on NiPt alloy surfaces, and the growing body of theoretical literature for NiPd alloy surfaces.

  14. A structural analysis of Bi/Si(1 0 0) 2 × n surfaces by ICISS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oishi, N.; Saitoh, N.; Naitoh, M.; Nishigaki, S.; Shoji, F.; Nakanishi, S.; Umezawa, K.

    2003-05-01

    We have investigated the structure of Bi-adsorbed Si(1 0 0) 2× n surfaces with various Bi coverages by low-energy electron diffraction (LEED) and impact-collision ion scattering spectroscopy (ICISS). Intensities of He + scattered from Bi and Si atoms were measured as a function of ion incidence angle. Bi-Bi interatomic distances for the toplayer including Bi-dimers were estimated by the shadow-cone technique. Bi-signal peaks appeared even at considerably large angles of incidence, which are attributed to collisions with Bi atoms in sub-surface layers. Bi adsorption is not completed at a mono-layer level, but continues to form multiple layers, fitted in the Si lattice, in the Frank-van der Merwe growth mode.

  15. Hardening of the surface layers of commercial pure titanium VT1-0 under combined treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Bashchenko, Lyudmila P. Gromov, Viktor E. Budovskikh, Evgenii A. Soskova, Nina A.; Ivanov, Yurii F.

    2015-10-27

    The treatment of VT1-0 titanium samples was carried out by concentrated energy fluxes. The combined treatment included surface carburizing with the joint use of powder samples of compounds with high physical and mechanical properties (namely, titanium diboride TiB{sub 2}, silicon carbide SiC and zirconium oxide ZrO{sub 2}) and subsequent electron beam treatment of surface layers formed in electroexplosive treatment. The combined treatment of surface layers resulted in the multifold increase in microhardness, which reduces depending on the depth of hardening zone. After electron-beam treatment, the depth of hardening zone is increased. During electron-beam treatment, the two-layer hardening zone forms.

  16. Hyperon vector coupling f{sub 1}(0) from 2+1 flavor lattice QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Sasaki, Shoichi

    2011-10-21

    We present results for the hyperon vector form factor f{sub 1} for {Xi}{sup 0}{yields}{Sigma}{sup +}l{nu}-bar and {Sigma}{sup -}{yields}nl{nu}-bar semileptonic decays from dynamical lattice QCD with domain-wall quarks. Simulations are performed on the 2+1 flavor gauge configurations generated by the RBC and UKQCD Collaborations with a lattice cutoff of a{sup -1} = 1.7 GeV. Our preliminary results, which are calculated at the lightest sea quark mass (pion mass down to approximately 330 MeV), show that a sign of the second-order correction of SU(3) breaking on hyperon vector coupling f{sub 1}(0) is likely negative.

  17. Spacecraft Orbit Design and Analysis (SODA), version 1.0 user's guide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stallcup, Scott S.; Davis, John S.

    1989-01-01

    The Spacecraft Orbit Design and Analysis (SODA) computer program, Version 1.0 is described. SODA is a spaceflight mission planning system which consists of five program modules integrated around a common database and user interface. SODA runs on a VAX/VMS computer with an EVANS & SUTHERLAND PS300 graphics workstation. BOEING RIM-Version 7 relational database management system performs transparent database services. In the current version three program modules produce an interactive three dimensional (3D) animation of one or more satellites in planetary orbit. Satellite visibility and sensor coverage capabilities are also provided. One module produces an interactive 3D animation of the solar system. Another module calculates cumulative satellite sensor coverage and revisit time for one or more satellites. Currently Earth, Moon, and Mars systems are supported for all modules except the solar system module.

  18. Damage formation during 1.0 MeV Si self-implantation at low temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, M.B.; Mitchell, I.V.

    1999-04-01

    The effect of substrate temperature and ion flux on lattice damage in silicon induced by 1.0 MeV Si ion implantation has been investigated using Rutherford backscattering channeling (RBSC) and Raman spectroscopy. Over the temperature range of 77--323K, the temperature dependence of near-surface damage is found to be different from that of end-of-range damage. This may suggest that different mechanisms for damage growth are dominant along the ion path. The flux effect on damage accumulation varies with substrate temperatures. Around liquid nitrogen temperature (77K), the near-surface damage decreases with increasing flux, contrary to the case around room temperature (300K). In the temperature range of {approximately}120--250K, damage is almost independent of implant flux. Possible causes of the observed phenomena are discussed.

  19. Design document for the MOODS Data Management System (MDMS), version 1.0

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    The MOODS Data Management System (MDMS) provides access to the Master Oceanographic Observation Data Set (MOODS) which is maintained by the Naval Oceanographic Office (NAVOCEANO). The MDMS incorporates database technology in providing seamless access to parameter (temperature, salinity, soundspeed) vs. depth observational profile data. The MDMS is an interactive software application with a graphical user interface (GUI) that supports user control of MDMS functional capabilities. The purpose of this document is to define and describe the structural framework and logical design of the software components/units which are integrated into the major computer software configuration item (CSCI) identified as MDMS, Version 1.0. The preliminary design is based on functional specifications and requirements identified in the governing Statement of Work prepared by the Naval Oceanographic Office (NAVOCEANO) and distributed as a request for proposal by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA).

  20. Design document for the Surface Currents Data Base (SCDB) Management System (SCDBMS), version 1.0

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krisnnamagaru, Ramesh; Cesario, Cheryl; Foster, M. S.; Das, Vishnumohan

    1994-01-01

    The Surface Currents Database Management System (SCDBMS) provides access to the Surface Currents Data Base (SCDB) which is maintained by the Naval Oceanographic Office (NAVOCEANO). The SCDBMS incorporates database technology in providing seamless access to surface current data. The SCDBMS is an interactive software application with a graphical user interface (GUI) that supports user control of SCDBMS functional capabilities. The purpose of this document is to define and describe the structural framework and logistical design of the software components/units which are integrated into the major computer software configuration item (CSCI) identified as the SCDBMS, Version 1.0. The preliminary design is based on functional specifications and requirements identified in the governing Statement of Work prepared by the Naval Oceanographic Office (NAVOCEANO) and distributed as a request for proposal by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA).

  1. Physics of the Be(10{bar 1} 0) Surface Core Level Spectrum

    SciTech Connect

    Lizzit, S.; Pohl, K. |; Baraldi, A.; Comelli, G.; Fritzsche, V.; Plummer, E.W. |; Stumpf, R.; Hofmann, P. ||

    1998-10-01

    Photoelectron diffraction has been utilized to confirm the theoretical prediction that the surface core level shifts observed for Be(10{bar 1}0) have been improperly assigned. The original assignment based upon the relative intensity of the shifted components was intuitively obvious: the peak with the largest shift of {minus}0.7 eV with respect to the bulk was associated with the surface plane, the next peak shifted by {minus}0.5 eV stems from the second layer, and the third peak at {minus}0.22 eV from the third and fourth layers. First-principles theory and our experimental data show that the largest shift is associated with the second plane, not the first plane. {copyright} {ital 1998} {ital The American Physical Society }

  2. Hardening of the surface layers of commercial pure titanium VT1-0 under combined treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bashchenko, Lyudmila P.; Gromov, Viktor E.; Budovskikh, Evgenii A.; Ivanov, Yurii F.; Soskova, Nina A.

    2015-10-01

    The treatment of VT1-0 titanium samples was carried out by concentrated energy fluxes. The combined treatment included surface carburizing with the joint use of powder samples of compounds with high physical and mechanical properties (namely, titanium diboride TiB2, silicon carbide SiC and zirconium oxide ZrO2) and subsequent electron beam treatment of surface layers formed in electroexplosive treatment. The combined treatment of surface layers resulted in the multifold increase in microhardness, which reduces depending on the depth of hardening zone. After electron-beam treatment, the depth of hardening zone is increased. During electron-beam treatment, the two-layer hardening zone forms.

  3. Global Deployment of Geothermal Energy Using a New Characterization in GCAM 1.0

    SciTech Connect

    Hannam, Phil; Kyle, G. Page; Smith, Steven J.

    2009-09-01

    This report documents modeling of geothermal energy in GCAM 1.0 (formerly MiniCAM) from FY2008 to FY2009, from the inputs to the U.S. Climate Change Technology Program report (Clarke et al., 2008a) to the present representation, which will be used in future work. To demonstrate the newest representation, we describe the procedure and outcome of six model runs that illustrate the potential role of geothermal energy in the U.S. and global regions through different futures climate policy, development and deployment of engineered, or enhanced, geothermal systems (EGS), and availability of other low-cost, low-carbon electricity generation technologies such as nuclear energy and carbon capture and storage (CCS).

  4. HyRAM (Hydrogen Risk Assessment Models) v. 1.0 (alpha)

    2014-12-19

    HyRAM is a software toolkit that integrates data and methods relevant to assessing the safety of hydrogen fueling and storage infrastructure. The HyRAM toolkit integrates deterministic and probabilistic models for quantifying accident scenarios, predicting physical effects, and characterizing the impact of hydrogen hazards (thermal effects from jet fires, thermal pressure effects from deflagrations) on people and structures. HyRAM incorporates generic probabilities for equipment failures for nine types of components, and probabilistic models for the impactmore » of heat flux on humans and structures, with computationally and experimentally validated models of hydrogen release and flame physics. Version 1.0.0.280 can be used to quantify the likelihood and thermal consequences associated with gaseous hydrogen releases from user-defined hydrogen installations.« less

  5. HI-SIMv1.0--towards the virtual reality of hearing impairments.

    PubMed

    Körkkö, P; Huttunen, K; Sorri, M

    2001-01-01

    The virtual reality of hearing impairments has obvious practical applications in areas such as audiology, speech therapy and hearing aid technology and serves as an informational tool for the family members of the hearing impaired. To simulate hearing impairment, a CD-ROM with filtered speech material accessible through a graphical user-interface was produced; the user-interface was created with standard multimedia tools. The CD-ROM, HI-SIMv1.0, intended as an interactive educational tool, offers a virtual experience of the effects of a selection of common types of hearing impairment. The options available in this simulation include grade of hearing impairment, audiometric configuration and the type and level of background noise. Word recognition scores can be computed for standard Finnish audiometric material.

  6. Power, Avionics and Software - Phase 1.0:. [Subsystem Integration Test Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ivancic, William D.; Sands, Obed S.; Bakula, Casey J.; Oldham, Daniel R.; Wright, Ted; Bradish, Martin A.; Klebau, Joseph M.

    2014-01-01

    This report describes Power, Avionics and Software (PAS) 1.0 subsystem integration testing and test results that occurred in August and September of 2013. This report covers the capabilities of each PAS assembly to meet integration test objectives for non-safety critical, non-flight, non-human-rated hardware and software development. This test report is the outcome of the first integration of the PAS subsystem and is meant to provide data for subsequent designs, development and testing of the future PAS subsystems. The two main objectives were to assess the ability of the PAS assemblies to exchange messages and to perform audio testing of both inbound and outbound channels. This report describes each test performed, defines the test, the data, and provides conclusions and recommendations.

  7. Supporting And Figuring Of SOFIA F/1.0 Thin Zerodur Meniscus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knohl, E.-D.

    1988-04-01

    The SOFIA telescope concept was discussed with respect to the ambitious NASA specification. Comparisons were drawn between SOFIA and other Zeiss optics like 3.5 m Telescope MPIA and ESO NTT. Recently developed technologies in producing ZERODUR blanks were presented. A distribution of tolerances for the optical system SOFIA was made. The axial mirror support in the telescope was optimized and the lateral support was calculated accordingly. Results for a radial backface support with correcting moment were given. For the SOFIA primary the deformation modes with lowest plate stiffness were calculated and load tolerances were derived. Fast flexible tools for figuring a F/1.0 asphere were discussed - developed in the ROFT program - that could be adapted to the SOFIA thin meniscus. Also a fast interferometric metrology was presented.

  8. Transition-metal and metalloid substitutions in L1(0)-ordered FeNi

    SciTech Connect

    Manchanda, P; Skomski, R; Bordeaux, N; Lewis, LH; Kashyap, A

    2014-05-07

    The effect of atomic substitutions on the magnetization, exchange, and magnetocrystalline anisotropy energy of L1(0)-ordered FeNi (tetrataenite) is computationally investigated. The compound naturally occurs in meteorites but has attracted renewed attention as a potential material for permanent magnets, and elemental additives will likely be necessary to facilitate the phase formation. Our density functional theory calculations use the Vienna ab-initio simulation package, applied to 4-atom unit cells of Fe2XNi and 32-atom supercells (X = Al, P, S, Ti, V, Cr, Mn, Fe, Co). While it is found that most additives deteriorate the magnetic properties, there are exceptions: excess substitutional Fe and Co additions improve the magnetization, whereas Cr, S, and interstitial B additions improve the magnetocrystalline anisotropy. (C) 2014 AIP Publishing LLC.

  9. HyRAM (Hydrogen Risk Assessment Models) v. 1.0 (alpha)

    SciTech Connect

    Groth, Katrina M.; Hecht, Ethan; Reynolds, John T.; Ekoto, Isaac W.; Walkup, Gregory W.

    2014-12-19

    HyRAM is a software toolkit that integrates data and methods relevant to assessing the safety of hydrogen fueling and storage infrastructure. The HyRAM toolkit integrates deterministic and probabilistic models for quantifying accident scenarios, predicting physical effects, and characterizing the impact of hydrogen hazards (thermal effects from jet fires, thermal pressure effects from deflagrations) on people and structures. HyRAM incorporates generic probabilities for equipment failures for nine types of components, and probabilistic models for the impact of heat flux on humans and structures, with computationally and experimentally validated models of hydrogen release and flame physics. Version 1.0.0.280 can be used to quantify the likelihood and thermal consequences associated with gaseous hydrogen releases from user-defined hydrogen installations.

  10. GridLAB-D Technical Support Document: Residential End-Use Module Version 1.0

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor, Zachary T.; Gowri, Krishnan; Katipamula, Srinivas

    2008-07-31

    1.0 Introduction The residential module implements the following end uses and characteristics to simulate the power demand in a single family home: • Water heater • Lights • Dishwasher • Range • Microwave • Refrigerator • Internal gains (plug loads) • House (heating/cooling loads) The house model considers the following four major heat gains/losses that contribute to the building heating/cooling load: 1. Conduction through exterior walls, roof and fenestration (based on envelope UA) 2. Air infiltration (based on specified air change rate) 3. Solar radiation (based on CLTD model and using tmy data) 4. Internal gains from lighting, people, equipment and other end use objects. The Equivalent Thermal Parameter (ETP) approach is used to model the residential loads and energy consumption. The following sections describe the modeling assumptions for each of the above end uses and the details of power demand calculations in the residential module.

  11. LANDSAT multispectral scanner computer-compatible tape format, version 1.0

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1982-01-01

    Unlike previous LANDSAT computer compatible tape (CCT) formats, the standard format of CCT's now includes a comprehensive field location and data description information superstructure composed of four records. The volume descriptor record, the text record, and the file pointer record reside in a volume directory file, which generally describes the data configuration and provides pointers to each data file. The file descriptor record for each data file describes the data structure within the file and provides pointers to certain fields within the file. These superstructure records primarily supply information about the data on the CCT as opposed to carrying the data themselves. The EROS Data Center's LANDSAT CCT version 1.0 product is presented which conforms to the concepts of the standard format as much as is possible with existing EDC systems.

  12. Theoretical study of SO2 adsorption on goethite (1 1 0) surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zubieta, Carolina E.; Fortunato, Leandro F.; Belelli, Patricia G.; Ferullo, Ricardo M.

    2014-09-01

    Adsorption of SO2 on fully hydrated and partially dehydrated (1 1 0) surface of goethite (α-FeOOH) has been investigated using density functional theory (DFT) and periodic conditions. Different degrees of dehydration were modeled by eliminating one or two water molecules from the fully hydrated surface. Calculations indicate that SO2 shows preference to adsorb on dehydrated surface and the transformation to surface sulfite, bisulfite and sulfate was observed. In particular, surface sulfite can be formed over a variety of different dehydrated surfaces as monodentate and bidentate complexes. Theoretical vibrational frequencies of all the species have also been computed. Taking into account all the structures, we found frequency values within the 650-1030 cm-1 region due to Ssbnd OFe stretching, and between 1010 and 1190 cm-1 due to Ssbnd O stretching. Furthermore, monodentate mononuclear and bidentate binuclear sulfite complexes present distinctive features at low frequencies (600-700 cm-1).

  13. Pd(1 1 0) surface oxide structures investigated by STM and DFT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kralj, M.; Pertram, T.; Seriani, N.; Mittendorfer, F.; Krupski, A.; Becker, C.; Wandelt, K.

    2008-12-01

    The adsorption of oxygen on a Pd(1 1 0) surface has been studied with scanning tunneling microscopy (STM). The particular emphasis was given to the preparation of low oxygen coverages with the well known c(2 × 4)-O oxygen phase as a starting structure in the experiments. The oxygen content, surface morphology and structure were changed by annealing the sample to temperatures below the onset of oxygen desorption. The surface was characterized after cool-down to room temperature or temperatures in the range 100-140 K. At low temperatures we found a new oxygen adsorption structure characterized by a (3 × 2) periodicity. We also calculate the O/Pd(1 1 0) surface phase diagram by first-principles thermodynamics. For small coverages, near the low-coverage end of the large stability region of the c(2 × 4)-O structure it was found that a (2 × 3)-deep-O and a (2 × 3)-1D-O structures, which are degenerate in energy, are most stable. Conversely, at high chemical potentials, i.e. high coverages, a (7 × √3)-O structure becomes more stable. The formation of the metastable (3 × 2)-O phase is explained in terms of partial deoxidation via the interaction with residual hydrogen and by quenching of other types of restructuring at low temperatures since the (3 × 2)-O phase can be derived from the c(2 × 4)-O phase by slight rearrangement of oxygen atoms after the oxygen content was lowered from 1/2 to 1/3 of a monolayer. This is not the case with more stable structures of the same coverage which require an additional rearrangement of palladium atoms.

  14. The central point source in G76.9+1.0

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marthi, V. R.; Chengalur, J. N.; Gupta, Y.; Dewangan, G. C.; Bhattacharya, D.

    2011-10-01

    We describe the serendipitous discovery of a radio point source in a 618-MHz image of the supernova remnant(SNR) G76.9+1.0. The SNR has a bipolar structure and the point source is located near a faint bridge of emission joining the two lobes of emission. The point source was also detected in follow-up higher frequency (1170 MHz) observations. The spectral index for the point source obtained from the Giant Metrewave Radio Telescope (GMRT) observations is α=-2.1-0.45+ 0.36. The steep spectrum as well as the location of the point source near the centre of the SNR establishes the fact that it is indeed the pulsar J2022+3842 associated with this SNR. The weighted-mean radio position of this point source is ?, J2000. Consistent with this, subsequent analysis of archival Chandra X-ray data shows a point source coincident with the radio point source, as well as diffuse extended X-ray emission surrounding the unresolved source. However, no pulsed emission was detected despite deep searches at both 610 and 1160 MHz, although pulsed emission has been seen at 2 GHz. It appears that the most likely reason for not detecting the pulsed signal at the GMRT is temporal broadening: for the estimated Dispersion Measure (DM) towards this SNR, the pulse broadening time could be as large as tens of milliseconds. The diffuse X-ray emission is elongated along the same direction as the bipolar structure seen in the radio. We interpret the radio lobes as having been formed from an equatorial wind. Although direct detection of pulsed signal has not been possible, we show convincingly that sensitive, high-resolution radio imaging at multiple frequencies is a useful method to search for pulsar candidates.

  15. Changes in S1 Neural Responses During Tactile Discrimination Learning

    PubMed Central

    Wiest, Michael C.; Pantoja, Janaina; Nicolelis, Miguel A. L.

    2010-01-01

    In freely moving rats that are actively performing a discrimination task, single-unit responses in primary somatosensory cortex (S1) are strikingly different from responses to comparable tactile stimuli in immobile rats. For example, in the active discrimination context prestimulus response modulations are common, responses are longer in duration and more likely to be inhibited. To determine whether these differences emerge as rats learned a whisker-dependent discrimination task, we recorded single-unit S1 activity while rats learned to discriminate aperture-widths using their whiskers. Even before discrimination training began, S1 responses in freely moving rats showed many of the signatures of active responses, such as increased duration of response and prestimulus response modulations. As rats subsequently learned the discrimination task, single unit responses changed: more cortical units responded to the stimuli, neuronal sensory responses grew in duration, and individual neurons better predicted aperture-width. In summary, the operant behavioral context changes S1 tactile responses even in the absence of tactile discrimination, whereas subsequent width discrimination learning refines the S1 representation of aperture-width. PMID:20445033

  16. Satellite Data Processing System (SDPS) users manual V1.0

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Caruso, Michael; Dunn, Chris

    1989-01-01

    SDPS is a menu driven interactive program designed to facilitate the display and output of image and line-based data sets common to telemetry, modeling and remote sensing. This program can be used to display up to four separate raster images and overlay line-based data such as coastlines, ship tracks and velocity vectors. The program uses multiple windows to communicate information with the user. At any given time, the program may have up to four image display windows as well as auxiliary windows containing information about each image displayed. SDPS is not a commercial program. It does not contain complete type checking or error diagnostics which may allow the program to crash. Known anomalies will be mentioned in the appropriate section as notes or cautions. SDPS was designed to be used on Sun Microsystems Workstations running SunView1 (Sun Visual/Integrated Environment for Workstations). It was primarily designed to be used on workstations equipped with color monitors, but most of the line-based functions and several of the raster-based functions can be used with monochrome monitors. The program currently runs on Sun 3 series workstations running Sun OS 4.0 and should port easily to Sun 4 and Sun 386 series workstations with SunView1. Users should also be familiar with UNIX, Sun workstations and the SunView window system.

  17. The Integrated Truss Assembly S-1 (S-One) Buildup

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    This image shows the Integrated Truss Assembly S-1 (S-One), the Starboard Side Thermal Radiator Truss, for the International Space Station (ISS) undergoing final construction in the Space Station manufacturing facility at the Marshall Space Flight Center. The S1 truss provides structural support for the orbiting research facility's radiator panels, which use ammonia to cool the Station's complex power system. Delivered and installed by the STS-112 mission, the S1 truss, attached to the S0 (S Zero) truss installed by the previous STS-110 mission, flows 637 pounds of anhydrous ammonia through three heat rejection radiators. The truss is 45-feet long, 15-feet wide, 10-feet tall, and weighs approximately 32,000 pounds. Manufactured by the Boeing Company in Huntington Beach, California, the truss primary structure was transferred to the Marshall Space Flight Center in February 1999 for hardware installations and manufacturing acceptance testing.

  18. S-1-based vs non-S-1-based chemotherapy in advanced gastric cancer: A meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Jian; Zhou, Yan; Min, Ke; Yao, Qiang; Xu, Chun-Ni

    2014-01-01

    AIM: To assess the efficacy and tolerability of S-1-based vs non-S-1-based chemotherapy in advanced gastric cancer (AGC). METHODS: We extracted reported endpoints, including overall survival (OS), progression-free survival (PFS), time-to-treatment failure (TTF), objective response rate (ORR) and adverse effects, from randomized controlled trials identified in PubMed, the Cochrane library, Science Direct, EMBASE and American Society of Clinical Oncology meetings. Stata software was used to calculate the pooled values. RESULTS: Seven randomized controlled trials involving 2176 patients were included in this meta-analysis. Compared to non-S-1-based regimens, the use of S-1-based regimens were associated with an increase in ORR (RR = 1.300; 95%CI: 1.028-1.645); OS (HR = 0.89; 95%CI: 0.81-0.99; P = 0.025), TTF (HR = 0.83; 95%CI: 0.75-0.92; P = 0.000), and a lower risk of febrile neutropenia (RR = 0.225; P = 0.000) and stomatitis (RR = 0.230; P = 0.032). OS, PFS and TTF were prolonged, especially in the Asian population. In subgroup analysis, statistically significant increases in ORR (RR = 1.454; P = 0.029), OS (HR = 0.895; P = 0.041) and TTF (HR = 0.832; P = 0.000) were found when S-1-based chemotherapy was compared to 5-fluorouracil (5-FU)-based chemotherapy. The incidence of leukopenia (RR = 0.584; P = 0.002) and stomatitis (RR = 0.230; P = 0.032) was higher in the 5-FU-based arm. S-1-based regimens had no advantage in ORR, OS, PFS, TTF and grade 3 or 4 adverse events over capecitabine-based regimens. CONCLUSION: S-1-based chemotherapy may be a good choice for AGC because of longer survival times, better tolerance and more convenient use. PMID:25206296

  19. Field-Induced Quantum Phase Transitions in S = 1/2 J1-J2 Heisenberg Model on Square Lattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morita, Katsuhiro; Shibata, Naokazu

    2016-09-01

    We study the magnetic field dependence of the ground state of the S = 1/2 J1-J2 Heisenberg model on the square lattice by the density matrix renormalization group (DMRG) method. With the use of the sine-square deformation, we obtain eight different ground states including plaquette valence-bond crystal with a finite spin gap, transverse Néel, transverse stripe, 1/2 magnetization plateau with up-up-up-down (uuud), and three new states we named the Y-like, V-like, and Ψ states around J2/J1 = 0.55-0.6. The phase transitions from the transverse Néel (at J2/J1 = 0.55) and stripe (at J2/J1 = 0.6) states to the uuud and Y-like states, respectively, are discontinuous, as in the case of a spin flop.

  20. Production of recombinant Conkunitzin-S1 in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Bayrhuber, Monika; Graf, Roland; Ferber, Michael; Zweckstetter, Markus; Imperial, Julita; Garrett, James E; Olivera, Baldomero M; Terlau, Heinrich; Becker, Stefan

    2006-06-01

    Conkunitzin-S1 from the cone snail Conus striatus is the first member of a new neurotoxin family with a canonical Kunitz domain fold. Conk-S1 is 60 amino acids long and lacks one of the three conserved disulfide bonds typically found in Kunitz domain modules. It binds specifically to voltage activated potassium channels of the Shaker family. The peptide was expressed in insoluble form in fusion with an N-terminal intein. Refolding in the presence of glutathione followed by pH shift-induced cleavage of the fusion protein resulted in a functional toxin as demonstrated by voltage-clamp measurements. PMID:16542850

  1. The S=1 Underscreened Anderson Lattice model for Uranium compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, C.; Simões, A. S. R.; Iglesias, J. R.; Lacroix, C.; Perkins, N. B.; Coqblin, B.

    2011-01-01

    Magnetic properties of uranium and neptunium compounds showing coexistence of the Kondo effect and ferromagnetic order are investigated within the degenerate Anderson Lattice Hamiltonian, describing a 5f2 electronic configuration with S = 1 spins. Through the Schrieffer-Wolff transformation, both an exchange Kondo interaction for the S = 1 f-spins and an effective f-band term are obtained, allowing to describe the coexistence of Kondo effect and ferromagnetic ordering and a weak delocalization of the 5f-electrons. We calculate the Kondo and Curie temperatures and we can account for the pressure dependence of the Curie temperature of UTe.

  2. Winding Hopfions on R2×S1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kobayashi, Michikazu; Nitta, Muneto

    2013-11-01

    We study Hopfions in the Faddeev-Skyrme model with potential terms on R2×S1. Apart from the conventional Hopfions, there exist winding Hopfions, that is, the lump (baby Skyrmion) strings with the lump charge Q with the U(1) modulus twisted P times along S1, having the Hopf charge PQ. We consider two kinds of potential terms, that is, the potential linear in the field and the ferromagnetic potential with two easy axes, and present stable solutions numerically. We also point out that a Q-lump carries the unit Hopf charge per the period in d=2+1.

  3. Theoretical investigation of the aromaticity and electronic properties of protonated and unprotonated molecules in the series hexaphyrin(1.0.0.1.0.0) to hexaphyrin(1.1.1.1.1.1).

    PubMed

    Sun, Gang; Duan, Xi-Xin; Yu, Chun-Hui; Liu, Chun-Guang

    2015-12-01

    A series of hexaphyrins with different meso-carbon atoms and their protonated structures were investigated using density functional theory (DFT) and time-dependent DFT. Frontier molecular orbitals (FMOs), aromaticity, and electronic spectra were investigated systematically before and after protonation. The FMO energy gaps before and after protonation were different for the antiaromatic molecules, while they were only slightly different for the aromatic molecules. By analyzing the electronic spectra of the aromatic molecules, the absorption peaks in the Q-like and B-like bands were not significantly different before and after protonation. However, the absorption peaks of the antiaromatic molecules were clearly different before and after protonation in both the Q-like and B-like bands. [24]Hexaphyrin (1.0.1.0.1.0) has 24 π-electrons and is Hückel antiaromatic. However, the absorption spectrum of protonated [24]hexaphyrin (1.0.1.0.1.0) showed aromaticity. In addition, these conclusions were generally consistent with the FMOs, nucleus-independent chemical shifts, harmonic oscillator model of aromaticity, and absorption spectra. Although protonated [24]hexaphyrin (1.0.1.0.1.0) has 24 π-electrons and is Hückel antiaromatic, it has Möbius aromaticity because of the single-sided Möbius topological structure. This explains why [24]hexaphyrin (1.0.1.0.1.0) has diatropic ring currents in solvent. To the best of our knowledge, this system is the smallest Möbius aromatic molecule among the many uncoordinated extended porphyrins. PMID:26589408

  4. Advanced modelling of the multiphase DMS chemistry with the CAPRAM DMS module 1.0

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoffmann, Erik Hans; Tilgner, Andreas; Schrödner, Roland; Wolke, Ralf; Herrmann, Hartmut

    2016-04-01

    Oceans are the general emitter of dimethyl sulphide (DMS), the major natural sulphur source (Andreae, 1990), and cover approximately 70 % of earth's surface. The main DMS oxidation products are SO2, H2SO4 and methyl sulfonic acid (MSA). Hence, DMS is very important for formation of non-sea salt sulphate (nss SO42-) aerosols and secondary particulate matter and thus global climate. Despite many previous model studies, there are still important knowledge gaps, especially in aqueous phase DMS chemistry, of its atmospheric fate (Barnes et al., 2006). Therefore, a comprehensive multiphase DMS chemistry mechanism, the CAPRAM DMS module 1.0 (DM1.0), has been developed. The DM1.0 includes 103 gas phase reactions, 5 phase transfers and 54 aqueous phase reactions. It was coupled with the multiphase chemistry mechanism MCMv3.2/CAPRAM4.0α (Rickard et al., 2015; Bräuer et al., 2016) and the extended CAPRAM halogen module 2.1 (HM2.1, Bräuer et al., 2013) for investigation of multiphase DMS oxidation in the marine boundary layer. Then, a pristine ocean scenario was simulated using the air parcel model SPACCIM (Wolke et al., 2005) including 8 non-permanent cloud passages - 4 at noon and 4 at midnight. This allows the investigation of the influence of deliquesced particles and clouds on multiphase DMS chemistry during both daytime and nighttime conditions as well as under cloud formation and evaporation. To test the influence of various subsystems on multiphase DMS chemistry different sensitivity runs were performed. Investigations of multiphase chemistry of DMS and its important oxidation products were done using concentration-time profiles and detailed time-resolved reaction flux analyses. The model studies revealed the importance of aqueous phase chemistry for DMS and its oxidation products. Overall about 7.0% of DMS is effectively oxidised by O3 in the aqueous phase of clouds. The simulations revealed the importance of halogen and aqueous phase chemistry for DMS and its

  5. Advanced modelling of the multiphase DMS chemistry with the CAPRAM DMS module 1.0

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoffmann, Erik Hans; Tilgner, Andreas; Schrödner, Roland; Wolke, Ralf; Herrmann, Hartmut

    2016-04-01

    Oceans are the general emitter of dimethyl sulphide (DMS), the major natural sulphur source (Andreae, 1990), and cover approximately 70 % of earth's surface. The main DMS oxidation products are SO2, H2SO4 and methyl sulfonic acid (MSA). Hence, DMS is very important for formation of non-sea salt sulphate (nss SO42-) aerosols and secondary particulate matter and thus global climate. Despite many previous model studies, there are still important knowledge gaps, especially in aqueous phase DMS chemistry, of its atmospheric fate (Barnes et al., 2006). Therefore, a comprehensive multiphase DMS chemistry mechanism, the CAPRAM DMS module 1.0 (DM1.0), has been developed. The DM1.0 includes 103 gas phase reactions, 5 phase transfers and 54 aqueous phase reactions. It was coupled with the multiphase chemistry mechanism MCMv3.2/CAPRAM4.0α (Rickard et al., 2015; Bräuer et al., 2016) and the extended CAPRAM halogen module 2.1 (HM2.1, Bräuer et al., 2013) for investigation of multiphase DMS oxidation in the marine boundary layer. Then, a pristine ocean scenario was simulated using the air parcel model SPACCIM (Wolke et al., 2005) including 8 non-permanent cloud passages - 4 at noon and 4 at midnight. This allows the investigation of the influence of deliquesced particles and clouds on multiphase DMS chemistry during both daytime and nighttime conditions as well as under cloud formation and evaporation. To test the influence of various subsystems on multiphase DMS chemistry different sensitivity runs were performed. Investigations of multiphase chemistry of DMS and its important oxidation products were done using concentration-time profiles and detailed time-resolved reaction flux analyses. The model studies revealed the importance of aqueous phase chemistry for DMS and its oxidation products. Overall about 7.0% of DMS is effectively oxidised by O3 in the aqueous phase of clouds. The simulations revealed the importance of halogen and aqueous phase chemistry for DMS and its

  6. Polymorphism in supramolecular chiral structures of R- and S-alanine on Cu(1 1 0)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barlow, S. M.; Louafi, S.; Le Roux, D.; Williams, J.; Muryn, C.; Haq, S.; Raval, R.

    2005-10-01

    A comprehensive study of the local and supramolecular adsorption structures created by the chiral R- and S-enantiomers of alanine on the Cu(1 1 0) surface has been conducted using a multi-technique approach, including reflection absorption infrared spectroscopy (RAIRS), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), low energy electron diffraction (LEED) and scanning tunnelling microscopy (STM). Over the entire 300-470 K temperature range studied, the amino acid is found to adsorb as an alaninate species with a local chiral adsorption motif. However, this singular preference of local chemical form contrasts sharply with the supramolecular organisation at the surface where polymorphism is exhibited. This polymorphic behaviour arises from subtle and dynamic changes in the bonding, orientation and adsorption footprints of individual molecules, leading to alterations in the molecule-metal, intermolecular and metal-metal interactions that dictate self-assembly. Thus, at low coverage, a single disordered phase is observed but at higher coverage, three other temperature dependent phases occur. At room temperature, a two-dimensional equivalent of a 'nematic' phase is constructed from short single- and double-chain chiral assemblies that possess a preferred chiral orientation but no long range periodicity. This 'nematic' phase acts as a precursor to a highly ordered chiral supramolecular assembly, created at 430 K, that consists of regular arrays of size- and shape-defined chiral clusters. This phase possesses global organisational chirality with only one chiral domain observed for each enantiomer. For both the 'nematic' and the highly ordered chiral phase, the organisation for the R-enantiomer is the mirror image of that seen for the S-enantiomer, i.e., there is chirality transfer from the nanoscale to the macroscale. By 470 K, both R- and S-alanine form an achirally organised (3 × 2) structure that appears to be the thermodynamically favoured phase for the alanine/Cu(1 1 0

  7. V-SUIT Model Validation Using PLSS 1.0 Test Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Olthoff, Claas

    2015-01-01

    The dynamic portable life support system (PLSS) simulation software Virtual Space Suit (V-SUIT) has been under development at the Technische Universitat Munchen since 2011 as a spin-off from the Virtual Habitat (V-HAB) project. The MATLAB(trademark)-based V-SUIT simulates space suit portable life support systems and their interaction with a detailed and also dynamic human model, as well as the dynamic external environment of a space suit moving on a planetary surface. To demonstrate the feasibility of a large, system level simulation like V-SUIT, a model of NASA's PLSS 1.0 prototype was created. This prototype was run through an extensive series of tests in 2011. Since the test setup was heavily instrumented, it produced a wealth of data making it ideal for model validation. The implemented model includes all components of the PLSS in both the ventilation and thermal loops. The major components are modeled in greater detail, while smaller and ancillary components are low fidelity black box models. The major components include the Rapid Cycle Amine (RCA) CO2 removal system, the Primary and Secondary Oxygen Assembly (POS/SOA), the Pressure Garment System Volume Simulator (PGSVS), the Human Metabolic Simulator (HMS), the heat exchanger between the ventilation and thermal loops, the Space Suit Water Membrane Evaporator (SWME) and finally the Liquid Cooling Garment Simulator (LCGS). Using the created model, dynamic simulations were performed using same test points also used during PLSS 1.0 testing. The results of the simulation were then compared to the test data with special focus on absolute values during the steady state phases and dynamic behavior during the transition between test points. Quantified simulation results are presented that demonstrate which areas of the V-SUIT model are in need of further refinement and those that are sufficiently close to the test results. Finally, lessons learned from the modelling and validation process are given in combination

  8. Bacterial versus human sphingosine-1-phosphate lyase (S1PL) in the design of potential S1PL inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Sanllehí, Pol; Abad, José-Luis; Casas, Josefina; Bujons, Jordi; Delgado, Antonio

    2016-09-15

    A series of potential active-site sphingosine-1-phosphate lyase (S1PL) inhibitors have been designed from scaffolds 1 and 2, arising from virtual screening using the X-ray structures of the bacterial (StS1PL) and the human (hS1PL) enzymes. Both enzymes are very similar at the active site, as confirmed by the similar experimental kinetic constants shown by the fluorogenic substrate RBM13 in both cases. However, the docking scoring functions used probably overestimated the weight of electrostatic interactions between the ligands and key active-site residues in the protein environment, which may account for the modest activity found for the designed inhibitors. In addition, the possibility that the inhibitors do not reach the enzyme active site should not be overlooked. Finally, since both enzymes show remarkable structural differences at the access channel and in the proximity to the active site cavity, caution should be taken when designing inhibitors acting around that area, as evidenced by the much lower activity found in StS1PL for the potent hS1PL inhibitor D. PMID:27475537

  9. Efficacy and safety of oxaliplatin, bevacizumab and oral S-1 for advanced recurrent colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Suzuki, Shuji; Shimazaki, Jiro; Morishita, Keiichi; Koike, Nobusada; Harada, Nobuhiko; Hayashi, Tsuneo; Suzuki, Mamoru

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy and safety of co-administration of oral S-1 and oxaliplatin (SOX) in combination with bevacizumab (bev) in patients with advanced recurrent colorectal cancer. A retrospective study of 36 patients with advanced recurrent colorectal cancer was performed, of whom 27 received first-line and 9 received second-line SOX+bev chemotherapy between 2010 and 2013 at the Hachioji Digestive Disease Hospital (Hachioji, Japan). The SOX+bev regimen consisted of administration of intravenous oxaliplatin (85 mg/m2) on days 1 and 14, bevacizumab (5 mg/kg) on day 1, and co-administration of oral S-1 twice daily on days 1–14. The drug regimen was repeated every 4 weeks. SOX+bev treatment was associated with a response rate of 45.2%, a disease control rate of 71%, and a median progression-free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS) of 9.9 and 21.9 months, respectively. Patients who received first-line chemotherapy benefited from treatment in terms of prolonged PFS (13.8 months) and OS (28.2 months). Grade 3/4 adverse events were infrequent and included anaemia, thrombocytopenia, anorexia, diarrhea, sensory neuropathy, increased aspartate aminotransferase level and skin rash. In conclusion, SOX+bev therapy was found to be feasible and safe for patients with advanced and recurrent colorectal cancer.

  10. NIMS Radiance Point Spectra of Ida and Dactyl V1.0

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Granahan, J. C.

    2013-08-01

    This data volume contains radiometrically corrected point spectra of asteroid 243 Ida and a spectrum of the asteroid satellite Dactyl (Ida I) as acquired by the Galileo spacecraft Near Infrared Mapping Spectrometer (NIMS) on August 28, 1993. They record the spectra collected as the Galileo spacecraft approached the 243 Ida system. These data are products of the calibration of the raw data number files idu002tn.qub, idu005tn.qub, idu006tn.qub, idu007tn.qub, idu019tn.qub, idu020tn.qub, idu022tn.qub, idu028tn.qub, idu032tn.qub, idu033tn.qub, and idu035tn.qub (DATA SET ID ='GO-A-NIMS-3-TUBE-V1.0') with calibration factors acquired during the Jovian tour of the Galileo mission. These raw data .qub files are archived in the Imaging Node of the NASA Planetary Data System (PDS). The calibrated spectra consist of radiance and incidence/flux measurements for wavelengths between 0.7 - 5.2 micrometers.

  11. The Star Formation History of read and dead galaxies at z=[1.0--1.5

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Domínguez Sánchez, H.; Pérez González, P.; Esquej, P.; Eliche Moral, C.; Alcalde Pampliega, B.; SHARDS Team

    2015-05-01

    We analyse the star formation histories (SFH) of M > 10^{10} M_⊙ read and dead galaxies at intermediate redshift (z=1.0-1.5). Current hierarchical models of galaxy formation predict many less massive high-z systems than observed. By combining SHARDS deep spectro-photometric optical data (25 contiguous OSIRIS/GTC medium band filters with R ˜ 50 at 4500-900 nm) with HST-WFC3 grism in the NIR (G141, 1.1-1.6 μm) and broad-band photometry (from FUV to FIR) we construct well-sampled optical SEDs with up to 150 photometric points and sufficient spectral resolution to obtain reliable stellar population parameters such as ages, star formation timescales, dust extinctions and metallicities. We define a complete and uncontaminated sample of red & dead galaxies by combining the color-color UVJ selection with a cut in sSFR (SFR/Mass). We check the robustness of the results depending on different stellar population models (Bruzual & Charlot 2003, Maraston 2005), SED fitting-codes (synthesizer, FAST) or star formation histories (exp{-t/τ}, t exp{-t/τ}). Finally, the dependence of the SFH with the galaxy stellar mass will be studied, to actually measure if more massive galaxies are formed earlier and more rapidly as downsizing suggests.

  12. Regional stochastic generation of streamflows using an ARIMA (1,0,1) process and disaggregation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Armbruster, Jeffrey T.

    1979-01-01

    An ARIMA (1,0,1) model was calibrated and used to generate long annual flow sequences at three sites in the Juniata River basin, Pennsylvania. The model preserves the mean, variance, and cross correlations of the observed station data. In addition, it has a desirable blend of both high and low frequency characteristics and therefore is capable of preserving the Hurst coefficient, h. The generated annual flows are disaggregated into monthly sequences using a modification of the Valencia-Schaake model. The low-flow frequency and flow duration characteristics of the generated monthly flows, with length equal to the historical data, compare favorably with the historical data. Once the models were verified, 100-year sequences were generated and analyzed for their low flow characteristics. One-, three- and six- month low-flow frequencies at recurrence intervals greater than 10 years are generally found to be lower than flow computed from the historical flows. A method is proposed for synthesizing flows at ungaged sites. (Kosco-USGS)

  13. The mGA1.0: A common LISP implementation of a messy genetic algorithm

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldberg, David E.; Kerzic, Travis

    1990-01-01

    Genetic algorithms (GAs) are finding increased application in difficult search, optimization, and machine learning problems in science and engineering. Increasing demands are being placed on algorithm performance, and the remaining challenges of genetic algorithm theory and practice are becoming increasingly unavoidable. Perhaps the most difficult of these challenges is the so-called linkage problem. Messy GAs were created to overcome the linkage problem of simple genetic algorithms by combining variable-length strings, gene expression, messy operators, and a nonhomogeneous phasing of evolutionary processing. Results on a number of difficult deceptive test functions are encouraging with the mGA always finding global optima in a polynomial number of function evaluations. Theoretical and empirical studies are continuing, and a first version of a messy GA is ready for testing by others. A Common LISP implementation called mGA1.0 is documented and related to the basic principles and operators developed by Goldberg et. al. (1989, 1990). Although the code was prepared with care, it is not a general-purpose code, only a research version. Important data structures and global variations are described. Thereafter brief function descriptions are given, and sample input data are presented together with sample program output. A source listing with comments is also included.

  14. Nano-pits on GaAs (1 0 0) surface: Preferential sputtering and diffusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Tanuj; Panchal, Vandana; Kumar, Ashish; Kanjilal, D.

    2016-07-01

    Self organized nano-structure array on the surfaces of semiconductors have potential applications in photonics, magnetic devices, photovoltaics, and surface-wetting tailoring etc. Therefore, the control over their dimensions is gaining scientific interest in last couple of decades. In this work, fabrication of pits of nano-dimensions is carried out on the GaAs (1 0 0) surface using 50 keV Ar+ at normal incidence. Variation in fluence from 3 × 1017 ions/cm2 to 5 × 1018 ions/cm2 does not make a remarkable variation in the dimension of pits such as size and depth, which is confirmed by atomic force microscopy (AFM) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). However the simultaneous dots formation is observed along with the pits at higher fluences. Average size of pits is found to be of 22 nm with depth of 1-5 nm for the used fluences. The importance of preferential sputtering of 'As' as compared to 'Ga' is estimated using energy dispersive X-ray analysis (EDX). The observed alteration in near surface composition shows the Ga enrichment of surface, which is not being much affected by variation in fluence. The growth evolution of pits and dots for the used experimental conditions is explained on the basis of ion beam induced preferential sputtering and surface diffusion.

  15. FR database 1.0: a resource focused on fruit development and ripening.

    PubMed

    Yue, Junyang; Ma, Xiaojing; Ban, Rongjun; Huang, Qianli; Wang, Wenjie; Liu, Jia; Liu, Yongsheng

    2015-01-01

    Fruits form unique growing period in the life cycle of higher plants. They provide essential nutrients and have beneficial effects on human health. Characterizing the genes involved in fruit development and ripening is fundamental to understanding the biological process and improving horticultural crops. Although, numerous genes that have been characterized are participated in regulating fruit development and ripening at different stages, no dedicated bioinformatic resource for fruit development and ripening is available. In this study, we have developed such a database, FR database 1.0, using manual curation from 38 423 articles published before 1 April 2014, and integrating protein interactomes and several transcriptome datasets. It provides detailed information for 904 genes derived from 53 organisms reported to participate in fleshy fruit development and ripening. Genes from climacteric and non-climacteric fruits are also annotated, with several interesting Gene Ontology (GO) terms being enriched for these two gene sets and seven ethylene-related GO terms found only in the climacteric fruit group. Furthermore, protein-protein interaction analysis by integrating information from FR database presents the possible function network that affects fleshy fruit size formation. Collectively, FR database will be a valuable platform for comprehensive understanding and future experiments in fruit biology. Database URL: http://www.fruitech.org/

  16. Structural/aerodynamic Blade Analyzer (SAB) User's Guide, Version 1.0

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morel, M. R.

    1994-01-01

    The structural/aerodynamic blade (SAB) analyzer provides an automated tool for the static-deflection analysis of turbomachinery blades with aerodynamic and rotational loads. A structural code calculates a deflected blade shape using aerodynamic loads input. An aerodynamic solver computes aerodynamic loads using deflected blade shape input. The two programs are iterated automatically until deflections converge. Currently, SAB version 1.0 is interfaced with MSC/NASTRAN to perform the structural analysis and PROP3D to perform the aerodynamic analysis. This document serves as a guide for the operation of the SAB system with specific emphasis on its use at NASA Lewis Research Center (LeRC). This guide consists of six chapters: an introduction which gives a summary of SAB; SAB's methodology, component files, links, and interfaces; input/output file structure; setup and execution of the SAB files on the Cray computers; hints and tips to advise the user; and an example problem demonstrating the SAB process. In addition, four appendices are presented to define the different computer programs used within the SAB analyzer and describe the required input decks.

  17. FR database 1.0: a resource focused on fruit development and ripening

    PubMed Central

    Yue, Junyang; Ma, Xiaojing; Ban, Rongjun; Huang, Qianli; Wang, Wenjie; Liu, Jia; Liu, Yongsheng

    2015-01-01

    Fruits form unique growing period in the life cycle of higher plants. They provide essential nutrients and have beneficial effects on human health. Characterizing the genes involved in fruit development and ripening is fundamental to understanding the biological process and improving horticultural crops. Although, numerous genes that have been characterized are participated in regulating fruit development and ripening at different stages, no dedicated bioinformatic resource for fruit development and ripening is available. In this study, we have developed such a database, FR database 1.0, using manual curation from 38 423 articles published before 1 April 2014, and integrating protein interactomes and several transcriptome datasets. It provides detailed information for 904 genes derived from 53 organisms reported to participate in fleshy fruit development and ripening. Genes from climacteric and non-climacteric fruits are also annotated, with several interesting Gene Ontology (GO) terms being enriched for these two gene sets and seven ethylene-related GO terms found only in the climacteric fruit group. Furthermore, protein–protein interaction analysis by integrating information from FR database presents the possible function network that affects fleshy fruit size formation. Collectively, FR database will be a valuable platform for comprehensive understanding and future experiments in fruit biology. Database URL: http://www.fruitech.org/ PMID:25725058

  18. VALDRIFT 1.0: A valley atmospheric dispersion model with deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Allwine, K.J.; Bian, X.; Whiteman, C.D.

    1995-05-01

    VALDRIFT version 1.0 is an atmospheric transport and diffusion model for use in well-defined mountain valleys. It is designed to determine the extent of ddft from aedal pesticide spraying activities, but can also be applied to estimate the transport and diffusion of various air pollutants in valleys. The model is phenomenological -- that is, the dominant meteorological processes goveming the behavior of the valley atmosphere are formulated explicitly in the model, albeit in a highly parameterized fashion. The key meteorological processes treated are: (1) nonsteady and nonhomogeneous along-valley winds and turbulent diffusivities, (2) convective boundary layer growth, (3) inversion descent, (4) noctumal temperature inversion breakup, and (5) subsidence. The model is applicable under relatively cloud-free, undisturbed synoptic conditions and is configured to operate through one diumal cycle for a single valley. The inputs required are the valley topographical characteristics, pesticide release rate as a function of time and space, along-valley wind speed as a function of time and space, temperature inversion characteristics at sunrise, and sensible heat flux as a function of time following sunrise. Default values are provided for certain inputs in the absence of detailed observations. The outputs are three-dimensional air concentration and ground-level deposition fields as a function of time.

  19. A 3-D Vortex Code for Parachute Flow Predictions: VIPAR Version 1.0

    SciTech Connect

    STRICKLAND, JAMES H.; HOMICZ, GREGORY F.; PORTER, VICKI L.; GOSSLER, ALBERT A.

    2002-07-01

    This report describes a 3-D fluid mechanics code for predicting flow past bluff bodies whose surfaces can be assumed to be made up of shell elements that are simply connected. Version 1.0 of the VIPAR code (Vortex Inflation PARachute code) is described herein. This version contains several first order algorithms that we are in the process of replacing with higher order ones. These enhancements will appear in the next version of VIPAR. The present code contains a motion generator that can be used to produce a large class of rigid body motions. The present code has also been fully coupled to a structural dynamics code in which the geometry undergoes large time dependent deformations. Initial surface geometry is generated from triangular shell elements using a code such as Patran and is written into an ExodusII database file for subsequent input into VIPAR. Surface and wake variable information is output into two ExodusII files that can be post processed and viewed using software such as EnSight{trademark}.

  20. Aspects of native oxides etching on n-GaSb(1 0 0) surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cotirlan, C.; Ghita, R. V.; Negrila, C. C.; Logofatu, C.; Frumosu, F.; Lungu, G. A.

    2016-02-01

    Gallium antimonide (GaSb) is the basis of the most photovoltaic and thermophotovoltaic (TPV) systems and its innovative technological aspects based on modern ultra-high vacuum techniques are in trend for device achievement. The real surface of GaSb is modified by technological processes that can conduce to problems related to the reproducible control of its surface properties. The GaSb surface is reactive in atmosphere due to oxygen presence and exhibits a native oxide layer. The evolution of native oxides during the ion sputtering, chemical etching and thermal annealing processes for preparing the surface is presented in detailed way. Ratios of surface constituents are obtained by Angle Resolved X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (ARXPS). Moreover, Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM), Energy Dispersive X-ray Spectroscopy (EDS), Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) and Low-Energy Electron Diffraction (LEED) are used for characterization. The surface stoichiometry is changed using a specific etchant (e.g. citric acid) at different etching time and is analyzed by ARXPS, SEM, EDS and AFM methods. The experimental results provide useful information regarding surface native oxides characteristics on n-GaSb(1 0 0) to be taken into account for development of low resistance contacts for TPV devices based on GaSb alloy.

  1. Magnetic properties of self-organized L1 0 FePtAg nanoparticle arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, S.; Kang, S. S.; Nikles, D. E.; Harrell, J. W.; Wu, X. W.

    2003-10-01

    The magnetic properties of chemically synthesized high anisotropy L1 0 [Fe 49Pt 51] 88Ag 12 nanoparticle arrays have been studied as a function of annealing temperature. Particles were prepared by the simultaneous polyol reduction of platinum acetylacetonate and silver acetate and the thermal decomposition of iron carbonyl, yielding monodispersed particles of diameter ˜3.5 nm. Addition of Ag lowers the ordering temperature of self-assembled arrays by ˜150°C. After annealing at Ta=500°C for 30 min in an Ar/H 2 atmosphere, the coercivity was 13,800 Oe. TEM and delta- M measurements indicate weak particle aggregation up to Ta=400°C, with evidence of sintering at higher temperatures. Large ratios of remanent to hysteresis coercivity indicate a large distribution in anisotropy energies. Anomalously large thermal stability constants, KV/ kBT, and switching volumes were measured, even in samples with very little evidence of sintering. Zero field viscosity versus remanence curves show evidence of exchange interactions.

  2. FPLUME-1.0: An integrated volcanic plume model accounting for ash aggregation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Folch, A.; Costa, A.; Macedonio, G.

    2015-09-01

    Eruption Source Parameters (ESP) characterizing volcanic eruption plumes are crucial inputs for atmospheric tephra dispersal models, used for hazard assessment and risk mitigation. We present FPLUME-1.0, a steady-state 1-D cross-section averaged eruption column model based on the Buoyant Plume Theory (BPT). The model accounts for plume bent over by wind, entrainment of ambient moisture, effects of water phase changes, particle fallout and re-entrainment, a new parameterization for the air entrainment coefficients and a model for wet aggregation of ash particles in presence of liquid water or ice. In the occurrence of wet aggregation, the model predicts an "effective" grain size distribution depleted in fines with respect to that erupted at the vent. Given a wind profile, the model can be used to determine the column height from the eruption mass flow rate or vice-versa. The ultimate goal is to improve ash cloud dispersal forecasts by better constraining the ESP (column height, eruption rate and vertical distribution of mass) and the "effective" particle grain size distribution resulting from eventual wet aggregation within the plume. As test cases we apply the model to the eruptive phase-B of the 4 April 1982 El Chichón volcano eruption (México) and the 6 May 2010 Eyjafjallajökull eruption phase (Iceland).

  3. Magnetoelastic stresses in epitaxial (1 1 0) Terfenol-D thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arnaudas, J. I.; de la Fuente, C.; Ciria, M.; Benito, L.; Dufour, C.; Dumesnil, K.; del Moral, A.

    2002-02-01

    The magnetic and magnetoelastic (MEL) behaviour of single-crystal (1 1 0) Terfenol-D thin films, 600 and 1000 Å thick, have been investigated by performing magnetization and MEL stress measurements between 12 and 290 K, up to 12 T. Magnetization isotherms were performed by applying the magnetic field within the growth plane of the samples. The magnetization is more easily saturated along [1 1¯ 0] than along [1 1¯ 1] at 290 K, contrarily to the bulk case. However, on decreasing the temperature, below 200 K, [0 0 1] is the easiest direction. Furthermore, the combination of different MEL stress measurements allowed us to determine the MEL stress parameters b0 (associated to volume and tetragonal magnetostriction (MS)), b1 (to tetragonal MS alone) and b2 (to rhombohedral MS). The values of b0 MEL stress parameters are negligible. The b1 and b2 values agree in sign with the respective bulk values; the order of magnitude of b2 is the same as for the bulk, however, the b1 MEL stresses are about three times larger. The thermal dependencies of b2 and b1 show a peak at around 50 K. The above facts indicate that non-linear volume terms and interfacial contributions play an important role in the MEL energy.

  4. Safety assessment comparison methodology for toxic and radioactive wastes (SACO version 1.0)

    SciTech Connect

    Torres, C.; Simon, I.; Agueero, A.; Little, R.H.; Smith, G.M.

    1993-12-31

    As part of a research contract jointly funded by the Commission of the European Communities (CEC) and Empresa Nacional de Residuos Radiactivos S.A. (Enresa, Spain), the Instituto de Medioambiente of the CIEMAT Research Centre and Intera (UK) are developing and testing a general methodology (SACO) to assess the post-disposal environmental impact produced by waste disposal practices. The scope of the methodology includes toxic, radioactive and mixed hazardous wastes. The term toxic is interpreted broadly to include any kind of liquid or solid non-radioactive waste which could give rise to some detrimental environmental effects post-disposal. Radioactive wastes considered include the full range from low to high level solid wastes arising inside and outside the nuclear power industry. Mixed hazardous waste is taken to be waste presenting both radioactive and other toxic hazard potential. In this paper SACO version 1.0 methodology is presented and it is applied to the assessment of the impact of shallow and deep disposal of waste.

  5. CaveMan Enterprise version 1.0 Software Validation and Verification.

    SciTech Connect

    Hart, David

    2014-10-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy Strategic Petroleum Reserve stores crude oil in caverns solution-mined in salt domes along the Gulf Coast of Louisiana and Texas. The CaveMan software program has been used since the late 1990s as one tool to analyze pressure mea- surements monitored at each cavern. The purpose of this monitoring is to catch potential cavern integrity issues as soon as possible. The CaveMan software was written in Microsoft Visual Basic, and embedded in a Microsoft Excel workbook; this method of running the CaveMan software is no longer sustainable. As such, a new version called CaveMan Enter- prise has been developed. CaveMan Enterprise version 1.0 does not have any changes to the CaveMan numerical models. CaveMan Enterprise represents, instead, a change from desktop-managed work- books to an enterprise framework, moving data management into coordinated databases and porting the numerical modeling codes into the Python programming language. This document provides a report of the code validation and verification testing.

  6. Photon-counting 1.0 GHz-phase-modulation fluorometer

    SciTech Connect

    Mizuno, T.; Nakao, S.; Mizutani, Y.; Iwata, T.

    2015-04-15

    We have constructed an improved version of a photon-counting phase-modulation fluorometer (PC-PMF) with a maximum modulation frequency of 1.0 GHz, where a phase domain measurement is conducted with a time-correlated single-photon-counting electronics. While the basic concept of the PC-PMF has been reported previously by one of the authors, little attention has been paid to its significance, other than its weak fluorescence measurement capability. Recently, we have recognized the importance of the PC-PMF and its potential for fluorescence lifetime measurements. One important aspect of the PC-PMF is that it enables us to perform high-speed measurements that exceed the frequency bandwidths of the photomultiplier tubes that are commonly used as fluorescence detectors. We describe the advantages of the PC-PMF and demonstrate its usefulness based on fundamental performance tests. In our new version of the PC-PMF, we have used a laser diode (LD) as an excitation light source rather than the light-emitting diode that was used in the primary version. We have also designed a simple and stable LD driver to modulate the device. Additionally, we have obtained a sinusoidal histogram waveform that has multiple cycles within a time span to be measured, which is indispensable for precise phase measurements. With focus on the fluorescence intensity and the resolution time, we have compared the performance of the PC-PMF with that of a conventional PMF using the analogue light detection method.

  7. spads 1.0: a toolbox to perform spatial analyses on DNA sequence data sets.

    PubMed

    Dellicour, Simon; Mardulyn, Patrick

    2014-05-01

    SPADS 1.0 (for 'Spatial and Population Analysis of DNA Sequences') is a population genetic toolbox for characterizing genetic variability within and among populations from DNA sequences. In view of the drastic increase in genetic information available through sequencing methods, spads was specifically designed to deal with multilocus data sets of DNA sequences. It computes several summary statistics from populations or groups of populations, performs input file conversions for other population genetic programs and implements locus-by-locus and multilocus versions of two clustering algorithms to study the genetic structure of populations. The toolbox also includes two MATLAB and r functions, GDISPAL and GDIVPAL, to display differentiation and diversity patterns across landscapes. These functions aim to generate interpolating surfaces based on multilocus distance and diversity indices. In the case of multiple loci, such surfaces can represent a useful alternative to multiple pie charts maps traditionally used in phylogeography to represent the spatial distribution of genetic diversity. These coloured surfaces can also be used to compare different data sets or different diversity and/or distance measures estimated on the same data set.

  8. STM excitation of individual biphenyl molecules on Si(1 0 0) surface: DIET or DIEF?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cranney, M.; Mayne, A. J.; Laikhtman, A.; Comtet, G.; Dujardin, G.

    2005-11-01

    We have studied the excitation of individual biphenyl molecules adsorbed on Si(1 0 0)-(2 × 1) surface by using a scanning tunnelling microscope in ultra-high vacuum at room-temperature. Exciting these molecules in their unstable state with a voltage pulse can stabilise them. We have investigated in detail this transformation in order to determine the reaction mechanisms induced by the pulse: is it due to an electronic excitation or is it an effect of the electric field between the tip and the sample during the pulse? It is quite difficult to distinguish between the dynamics induced by electronic transition (DIET) and the dynamics induced by electric field (DIEF): when increasing the number and the energy of electrons for electronic excitation (DIET), the electric field under the tip can be strong enough to induce reaction by lowering the energy barrier (DIEF). By using a program to compute the electric field in three dimensions, we conclude that the transformation of the unstable configuration into the stable one is due to an electronic excitation.

  9. Motivation and Design of the Sirocco Storage System Version 1.0.

    SciTech Connect

    Curry, Matthew Leon; Ward, H. Lee; Danielson, Geoffrey Charles

    2015-07-01

    Sirocco is a massively parallel, high performance storage system for the exascale era. It emphasizes client-to-client coordination, low server-side coupling, and free data movement to improve resilience and performance. Its architecture is inspired by peer-to-peer and victim- cache architectures. By leveraging these ideas, Sirocco natively supports several media types, including RAM, flash, disk, and archival storage, with automatic migration between levels. Sirocco also includes storage interfaces and support that are more advanced than typical block storage. Sirocco enables clients to efficiently use key-value storage or block-based storage with the same interface. It also provides several levels of transactional data updates within a single storage command, including full ACID-compliant updates. This transaction support extends to updating several objects within a single transaction. Further support is provided for con- currency control, enabling greater performance for workloads while providing safe concurrent modification. By pioneering these and other technologies and techniques in the storage system, Sirocco is poised to fulfill a need for a massively scalable, write-optimized storage system for exascale systems. This is version 1.0 of a document reflecting the current and planned state of Sirocco. Further versions of this document will be accessible at http://www.cs.sandia.gov/Scalable_IO/ sirocco .

  10. NEAR-INFRARED SPECTROSCOPY OF INFRARED-EXCESS STELLAR OBJECTS IN THE YOUNG SUPERNOVA REMNANT G54.1+0.3

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Hyun-Jeong; Koo, Bon-Chul; Moon, Dae-Sik E-mail: koo@astro.snu.ac.kr

    2013-09-01

    We present the results of broadband near-infrared spectroscopic observations of the recently discovered mysterious stellar objects in the young supernova remnant G54.1+0.3. These objects, which show significant mid-infrared-excess emission, are embedded in a diffuse loop structure of {approx}1' in radius. Their near-infrared spectra reveal characteristics of late O- or early B-type stars with numerous H and He I absorption lines, and we classify their spectral types to be between O9 and B2 based on an empirical relation derived here between the equivalent widths of the H lines and stellar photospheric temperatures. The spectral types, combined with the results of spectral energy distribution fits, constrain the distance to the objects to be 6.0 {+-} 0.4 kpc. The photometric spectral types of the objects are consistent with those from the spectroscopic analyses, and the extinction distributions indicate a local enhancement of matter in the western part of the loop. If these objects originate via triggered formation by the progenitor star of G54.1+0.3, then their formations likely began during the later evolutionary stages of the progenitor, although a rather earlier formation may still be possible. If the objects and the progenitor belong to the same cluster of stars, then our results constrain the progenitor mass of G54.1+0.3 to be between 18 and {approx}35 M{sub Sun} and suggest that G54.1+0.3 was either a Type IIP supernova or, with a relatively lower possibility, Type Ib/c from a binary system.

  11. Emerging role of S-1 in gastric cancer.

    PubMed

    Krasniqi, Eriseld; Pellicori, Stefania; Formica, Vincenzo

    2015-01-01

    Gastric cancer remains one of the most important malignancies worldwide in terms of incidence and mortality. The treatment is based on the combination of local surgery and radiation therapy as well as systemic chemotherapy and targeted molecules. Fluoropyrimidines and particularly 5-fluorouracil (FU) represent still the backbone for gastric cancer chemotherapy and new molecular versions of this molecule have been brought to clinical practice in order to improve benefits and reduce adverse effects. S-1 is an oral prodrug of 5-FU, which has demonstrated high effectiveness for gastric cancer treatment and a favorable safety profile. Currently, there are geographic differences in the treatment of gastric cancer and in the use of S-1, which is a mainstay of gastric cancer management in Eastern countries, but is not part of the standard care in the rest of the world. In this review, we gathered data from phase I, II, and III trials of S-1 in gastric cancer, in order to define its real benefit-risk ratio and assess whether geographic differences in S-1 use are justified by unchangeable factors.

  12. L5-S1 Laparoscopic Anterior Interbody Fusion

    PubMed Central

    Zeni, Tallal M.; Phillips, Frank M.; Mathur, Sameer; Zografakis, John G.; Moore, Ronald M.; Laguna, Luis E.

    2006-01-01

    Objective: We evaluated our experience with laparoscopic L5-S1 anterior lumbar interbody fusion (ALIF). Methods: This represents a retrospective analysis of consecutive patients who underwent L5-S1 laparoscopic ALIF between February 1998 and August 2003. Results: Twenty-eight patients underwent L5-S1 LAIF (15 males and 13 females). The mean age was 43 years (range, 26 to 67). Mean operative time was 225 minutes (range, 137 to 309 minutes). No conversions to an open procedure were necessary. Twenty-four (85.7%) patients underwent successful bilateral cage placement. Four patients (14.3%) in whom only a single cage could be placed underwent supplementary posterior pedicle screw placement. Mean length of stay (LOS) was 4.1 days (range, 2 to 15). Two patients underwent reoperation subacutely secondary to symptomatic lateral displacement of the cage. One patient developed radiculopathy 6 months postoperatively and required reoperation. One patient developed a small bowel obstruction secondary to adhesions to the cage requiring laparoscopic reoperation. Fusion was achieved in all patients. Visual analogue scale scores for back pain were significantly improved from 8.6±0.8 to 2.8±0.8 (P<0.0001) at 1 year. Conclusion: L5-S1 LAIF is feasible and safe with all the advantages of minimally invasive surgery. Fusion rates and pain improvement were comparable to those with an open repair. PMID:17575763

  13. GRIDGEN Version 1.0: a computer program for generating unstructured finite-volume grids

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lien, Jyh-Ming; Liu, Gaisheng; Langevin, Christian D.

    2015-01-01

    GRIDGEN is a computer program for creating layered quadtree grids for use with numerical models, such as the MODFLOW–USG program for simulation of groundwater flow. The program begins by reading a three-dimensional base grid, which can have variable row and column widths and spatially variable cell top and bottom elevations. From this base grid, GRIDGEN will continuously divide into four any cell intersecting user-provided refinement features (points, lines, and polygons) until the desired level of refinement is reached. GRIDGEN will then smooth, or balance, the grid so that no two adjacent cells, including overlying and underlying cells, differ by more than a user-specified level tolerance. Once these gridding processes are completed, GRIDGEN saves a tree structure file so that the layered quadtree grid can be quickly reconstructed as needed. Once a tree structure file has been created, GRIDGEN can then be used to (1) export the layered quadtree grid as a shapefile, (2) export grid connectivity and cell information as ASCII text files for use with MODFLOW–USG or other numerical models, and (3) intersect the grid with shapefiles of points, lines, or polygons, and save intersection output as ASCII text files and shapefiles. The GRIDGEN program is demonstrated by creating a layered quadtree grid for the Biscayne aquifer in Miami-Dade County, Florida, using hydrologic features to control where refinement is added.

  14. Late-stage optimization of a tercyclic class of S1P3-sparing, S1P1 receptor agonists.

    PubMed

    Horan, Joshua C; Kuzmich, Daniel; Liu, Pingrong; DiSalvo, Darren; Lord, John; Mao, Can; Hopkins, Tamara D; Yu, Hui; Harcken, Christian; Betageri, Raj; Hill-Drzewi, Melissa; Patenaude, Lori; Patel, Monica; Fletcher, Kimberly; Terenzzio, Donna; Linehan, Brian; Xia, Heather; Patel, Mita; Studwell, Debbie; Miller, Craig; Hickey, Eugene; Levin, Jeremy I; Smith, Dustin; Kemper, Raymond A; Modis, Louise K; Bannen, Lynne C; Chan, Diva S; Mac, Morrison B; Ng, Stephanie; Wang, Yong; Xu, Wei; Lemieux, René M

    2016-01-15

    Poor solubility and cationic amphiphilic drug-likeness were liabilities identified for a lead series of S1P3-sparing, S1P1 agonists originally developed from a high-throughput screening campaign. This work describes the subsequent optimization of these leads by balancing potency, selectivity, solubility and overall molecular charge. Focused SAR studies revealed favorable structural modifications that, when combined, produced compounds with overall balanced profiles. The low brain exposure observed in rat suggests that these compounds would be best suited for the potential treatment of peripheral autoimmune disorders. PMID:26687487

  15. CO(J = 1-0) Imaging of M51 with CARMA and the Nobeyama 45 m Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koda, Jin; Sawada, Tsuyoshi; Wright, Melvyn C. H.; Teuben, Peter; Corder, Stuartt A.; Patience, Jenny; Scoville, Nick; Donovan Meyer, Jennifer; Egusa, Fumi

    2011-03-01

    We report the CO(J = 1-0) observations of the Whirlpool Galaxy M51 using both the Combined Array for Research in Millimeter Astronomy (CARMA) and the Nobeyama 45 m telescope (NRO45). We describe a procedure for the combination of interferometer and single-dish data. In particular, we discuss (1) the joint imaging and deconvolution of heterogeneous data, (2) the weighting scheme based on the root-mean-square (rms) noise in the maps, (3) the sensitivity and uv coverage requirements, and (4) the flux recovery of a combined map. We generate visibilities from the single-dish map and calculate the noise of each visibility based on the rms noise. Our weighting scheme, though it is applied to discrete visibilities in this paper, should be applicable to grids in uv space, and this scheme may advance in future software development. For a realistic amount of observing time, the sensitivities of the NRO45 and CARMA visibility data sets are best matched by using the single-dish baselines only up to 4-6 kλ (about 1/4-1/3 of the dish diameter). The synthesized beam size is determined to conserve the flux between the synthesized beam and convolution beam. The superior uv coverage provided by the combination of CARMA long baseline data with 15 antennas and NRO45 short spacing data results in the high image fidelity, which is evidenced by the excellent overlap between even the faint CO emission and dust lanes in an optical Hubble Space Telescope image and polycyclicaromatichydrocarbon emission in a Spitzer 8 μm image. The total molecular gas masses of NGC 5194 and 5195 (d = 8.2 Mpc) are 4.9 × 109 M sun and 7.8 × 107 M sun, respectively, assuming the CO-to-H2 conversion factor of X CO = 1.8 × 1020 cm-2(K km s-1)-1. The presented images are an indication of the millimeter-wave images that will become standard in the next decade with CARMA and NRO45, and the Atacama Large Millimeter/Submillimeter Array.

  16. Photon-counting 1.0 GHz-phase-modulation fluorometer.

    PubMed

    Mizuno, T; Nakao, S; Mizutani, Y; Iwata, T

    2015-04-01

    We have constructed an improved version of a photon-counting phase-modulation fluorometer (PC-PMF) with a maximum modulation frequency of 1.0 GHz, where a phase domain measurement is conducted with a time-correlated single-photon-counting electronics. While the basic concept of the PC-PMF has been reported previously by one of the authors, little attention has been paid to its significance, other than its weak fluorescence measurement capability. Recently, we have recognized the importance of the PC-PMF and its potential for fluorescence lifetime measurements. One important aspect of the PC-PMF is that it enables us to perform high-speed measurements that exceed the frequency bandwidths of the photomultiplier tubes that are commonly used as fluorescence detectors. We describe the advantages of the PC-PMF and demonstrate its usefulness based on fundamental performance tests. In our new version of the PC-PMF, we have used a laser diode (LD) as an excitation light source rather than the light-emitting diode that was used in the primary version. We have also designed a simple and stable LD driver to modulate the device. Additionally, we have obtained a sinusoidal histogram waveform that has multiple cycles within a time span to be measured, which is indispensable for precise phase measurements. With focus on the fluorescence intensity and the resolution time, we have compared the performance of the PC-PMF with that of a conventional PMF using the analogue light detection method. PMID:25933844

  17. Application of the MASH v1.0 Code System to radiological warfare radiation threats

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, J.O.; Santoro, R.T.; Smith, M.S.

    1994-03-01

    Nuclear hardening capabilities of US and foreign ground force systems is a primary concern of the Department of Defense (DoD) and US Army. The Monte Carlo Adjoint Shielding Code System -- MASH v1.0 was developed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) to analyze these capabilities, i.e. the shielding effectiveness, for prompt radiation from a nuclear weapon detonation. Rapidly changing world events and the proliferation of nuclear weapons related technology have increased the kinds of nuclear threats to include intentionally dispersed radiation sources and fallout from tactical nuclear weapons used in the modern AirLand battlefield scenario. Consequently, a DoD area of increasing interest focuses on determining the shielding effectiveness of foreign and US armored vehicles to radiological warfare and fallout radiation threats. To demonstrate the applicability of MASH for analyzing dispersed radiation source problems, calculations have been completed for two distributed sources; a dispersed radiation environment simulated by a uniformly distributed {sup 60}Co source, and a {sup 235}U fission weapon fallout source. Fluence and dose assessments were performed for the free-field, the inside of a steel-walled two-meter box, in a phantom standing in the free-field, and in a phantom standing in the two-meter box. The results indicate substantial radiation protection factors for the {sup 60}Co dispersed radiation source and the fallout source compared to the prompt radiation protection factors. The dose protection factors ranged from 40 to 95 for the two-meter box and from 55 to 123 for the mid-gut position of the phantom standing in the box. The results further indicate that a {sup 60}Co source might be a good first order approximation for a tactical fission weapon fallout protection factor analysis.

  18. The structure of CO2 hydrate between 0.7 and 1.0 GPa

    DOE PAGES

    Tulk, Chris A.; Machida, Shinichi; Klug, Dennis D.; Lu, H.; Guthrie, Malcolm; Molaison, Jamie J.

    2014-11-05

    A deuterated sample of CO2 structure I (sI) clathrate hydrate (CO2 ∙ 8.3 D2O) has been formed and neutron diffraction experiments up to 1.0 GPa at 240 K were performed. The sI CO2 hydrate transformed at 0.7 GPa into the high pressure phase that had been observed previously by Hirai, et al. (J. Phys. Chem. 133, 124511 (2010)) and O. Bollengier et al. (Geochim. Cosmochim. AC. 119, 322 (2013)), but which had not been structurally identified. The current neutron diffraction data were successfully fitted to a filled ice structure with CO2 molecules filling the water channels. This CO2+water system hasmore » also been investigated using classical molecular dynamics and density functional ab initio methods to provide additional characterization of the high pressure structure. Both models indicate the water network adapts an MH-III ‘like’ filled ice structure with considerable disorder of the orientations of the CO2molecule. Furthermore, the disorder appears be a direct result of the level of proton disorder in the water network. In contrast to the conclusions of Bollengier et al. our neutron diffraction data shows that the filled ice phase can be recovered to ambient pressure (0.1 MPa) at 96 K, and recrystallization to sI hydrate occurs upon subsequent heating to 150 K, possibly by first forming low density amorphous ice. Unlike other clathrate hydrate systems, which transform from the sI or sII structure to the hexagonal structure (sH) then to the filled ice structure, CO2 hydrate transforms directly from the sI form to the filled ice structure.« less

  19. FPLUME-1.0: An integral volcanic plume model accounting for ash aggregation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Folch, A.; Costa, A.; Macedonio, G.

    2016-02-01

    Eruption source parameters (ESP) characterizing volcanic eruption plumes are crucial inputs for atmospheric tephra dispersal models, used for hazard assessment and risk mitigation. We present FPLUME-1.0, a steady-state 1-D (one-dimensional) cross-section-averaged eruption column model based on the buoyant plume theory (BPT). The model accounts for plume bending by wind, entrainment of ambient moisture, effects of water phase changes, particle fallout and re-entrainment, a new parameterization for the air entrainment coefficients and a model for wet aggregation of ash particles in the presence of liquid water or ice. In the occurrence of wet aggregation, the model predicts an effective grain size distribution depleted in fines with respect to that erupted at the vent. Given a wind profile, the model can be used to determine the column height from the eruption mass flow rate or vice versa. The ultimate goal is to improve ash cloud dispersal forecasts by better constraining the ESP (column height, eruption rate and vertical distribution of mass) and the effective particle grain size distribution resulting from eventual wet aggregation within the plume. As test cases we apply the model to the eruptive phase-B of the 4 April 1982 El Chichón volcano eruption (México) and the 6 May 2010 Eyjafjallajökull eruption phase (Iceland). The modular structure of the code facilitates the implementation in the future code versions of more quantitative ash aggregation parameterization as further observations and experiment data will be available for better constraining ash aggregation processes.

  20. FPLUME-1.0: An integral volcanic plume model accounting for ash aggregation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Folch, Arnau; Costa, Antonio; Macedonio, Giovanni

    2016-04-01

    Eruption Source Parameters (ESP) characterizing volcanic eruption plumes are crucial inputs for atmospheric tephra dispersal models, used for hazard assessment and risk mitigation. We present FPLUME-1.0, a steady-state 1D cross-section averaged eruption column model based on the Buoyant Plume Theory (BPT). The model accounts for plume bending by wind, entrainment of ambient moisture, effects of water phase changes, particle fallout and re-entrainment, a new parameterization for the air entrainment coefficients and a model for wet aggregation of ash particles in presence of liquid water or ice. In the occurrence of wet aggregation, the model predicts an "effective" grain size distribution depleted in fines with respect to that erupted at the vent. Given a wind profile, the model can be used to determine the column height from the eruption mass flow rate or vice-versa. The ultimate goal is to improve ash cloud dispersal forecasts by better constraining the ESP (column height, eruption rate and vertical distribution of mass) and the "effective" particle grain size distribution resulting from eventual wet aggregation within the plume. As test cases we apply the model to the eruptive phase-B of the 4 April 1982 El Chichón volcano eruption (México) and the 6 May 2010 Eyjafjallajökull eruption phase (Iceland). The modular structure of the code facilitates the implementation in the future code versions of more quantitative ash aggregation parameterization as further observations and experiments data will be available for better constraining ash aggregation processes.

  1. Increased mRNA Levels of Sphingosine Kinases and S1P Lyase and Reduced Levels of S1P Were Observed in Hepatocellular Carcinoma in Association with Poorer Differentiation and Earlier Recurrence

    PubMed Central

    Uranbileg, Baasanjav; Ikeda, Hitoshi; Kurano, Makoto; Enooku, Kenichiro; Sato, Masaya; Saigusa, Daisuke; Aoki, Junken; Ishizawa, Takeaki; Hasegawa, Kiyoshi; Kokudo, Norihiro; Yatomi, Yutaka

    2016-01-01

    Although sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P) has been reported to play an important role in cancer pathophysiology, little is known about S1P and hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). To clarify the relationship between S1P and HCC, 77 patients with HCC who underwent surgical treatment were consecutively enrolled in this study. In addition, S1P and its metabolites were quantitated by LC-MS/MS. The mRNA levels of sphingosine kinases (SKs), which phosphorylate sphingosine to generate S1P, were increased in HCC tissues compared with adjacent non-HCC tissues. Higher mRNA levels of SKs in HCC were associated with poorer differentiation and microvascular invasion, whereas a higher level of SK2 mRNA was a risk factor for intra- and extra-hepatic recurrence. S1P levels, however, were unexpectedly reduced in HCC compared with non-HCC tissues, and increased mRNA levels of S1P lyase (SPL), which degrades S1P, were observed in HCC compared with non-HCC tissues. Higher SPL mRNA levels in HCC were associated with poorer differentiation. Finally, in HCC cell lines, inhibition of the expression of SKs or SPL by siRNA led to reduced proliferation, invasion and migration, whereas overexpression of SKs or SPL enhanced proliferation. In conclusion, increased SK and SPL mRNA expression along with reduced S1P levels were more commonly observed in HCC tissues compared with adjacent non-HCC tissues and were associated with poor differentiation and early recurrence. SPL as well as SKs may be therapeutic targets for HCC treatment. PMID:26886371

  2. Change of the kinetics of shock-wave deformation and fracture of VT1-0 titanium as a result of annealing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanel, G. I.; Razorenov, S. V.; Garkushin, G. V.; Pavlenko, A. V.; Malyugina, S. N.

    2016-06-01

    The paper presents the results of measurements of shock-wave compression profiles of VT1-0 titanium samples after rolling and in the annealed state. In the experiments, the pressure of shock compression and distance passed by the wave before emerging to the sample surface were varied. From measurements of the elastic precursor decay and compression rate in a plastic shock wave of different amplitudes, the plastic strain and the corresponding shear stresses in the initial and subsequent stages of high-rate deformation in an elastoplastic shock wave are determined. It is found that the reduction in the dislocation density as a result of annealing reduces the hardness of the material but significantly increases its dynamic yield strengh, corresponding to the strain rate above 104 s-1. With a reduction in the strain rate, this anomalous difference in the flow stresses is leveled off.

  3. Software Development Plan for DESCARTES and CIDER. Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Project: Version 1.0

    SciTech Connect

    Eslinger, P.W.

    1992-12-08

    This Software Development Plan (SDP) outlines all software activities required to obtain functional environmental accumulation and individual dose codes for the Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction (HEDR) project. The modeling activities addressed use the output of the air transport-code HATCHET to compute radionuclide concentrations in environmental pathways, and continue on through calculations of dose for individuals. The Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction (HEDR) Project has a deliverable in the June 1993 time frame to be able to start computing doses to individuals from nuclear-related activities on the Hanford Site during and following World War II. The CIDER code will compute doses and their uncertainties for individuals living in the contaminated environment computed by DESCARTES. The projected size of the code is 3000 lines.

  4. Transferable Output ASCII Data (TOAD) editor version 1.0 user's guide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bingel, Bradford D.; Shea, Anne L.; Hofler, Alicia S.

    1991-01-01

    The Transferable Output ASCII Data (TOAD) editor is an interactive software tool for manipulating the contents of TOAD files. The TOAD editor is specifically designed to work with tabular data. Selected subsets of data may be displayed to the user's screen, sorted, exchanged, duplicated, removed, replaced, inserted, or transferred to and from external files. It also offers a number of useful features including on-line help, macros, a command history, an 'undo' option, variables, and a full compliment of mathematical functions and conversion factors. Written in ANSI FORTRAN 77 and completely self-contained, the TOAD editor is very portable and has already been installed on SUN, SGI/IRIS, and CONVEX hosts.

  5. Pipe Axial Flaw Failure Criteria (PAFFC): Version 1.0 user`s manual and software

    SciTech Connect

    Leis, B.N.; Ghadiali, N.D.

    1994-05-04

    This topical report is the technical manual and basis for delivery of the software tided Pipe Axial Flaw Failure Criterion. This criterion was developed under SI Task 1. 13 for the Line Pipe Research Supervisory Committee of the Pipeline Research Committee. This software has been given the acronym PAFFC, which follows from the underlined letters in the title for this code. The purpose of PAFFC is to determine the failure conditions associated with a single external axial flaw in a gas transmission pipeline. Failure is determined concurrently in terms of two independent failure processes - fracture and/or net-section (plastic) collapse of the ligament between the flaw and the inside surface of the pipe.

  6. SHARP pre-release v1.0 - Current Status and Documentation

    SciTech Connect

    Mahadevan, Vijay S.; Rahaman, Ronald O.

    2015-09-30

    The NEAMS Reactor Product Line effort aims to develop an integrated multiphysics simulation capability for the design and analysis of future generations of nuclear power plants. The Reactor Product Line code suite’s multi-resolution hierarchy is being designed to ultimately span the full range of length and time scales present in relevant reactor design and safety analyses, as well as scale from desktop to petaflop computing platforms. In this report, building on a several previous report issued in September 2014, we describe our continued efforts to integrate thermal/hydraulics, neutronics, and structural mechanics modeling codes to perform coupled analysis of a representative fast sodium-cooled reactor core in preparation for a unified release of the toolkit. The work reported in the current document covers the software engineering aspects of managing the entire stack of components in the SHARP toolkit and the continuous integration efforts ongoing to prepare a release candidate for interested reactor analysis users. Here we report on the continued integration effort of PROTEUS/Nek5000 and Diablo into the NEAMS framework and the software processes that enable users to utilize the capabilities without losing scientific productivity. Due to the complexity of the individual modules and their necessary/optional dependency library chain, we focus on the configuration and build aspects for the SHARP toolkit, which includes capability to autodownload dependencies and configure/install with optimal flags in an architecture-aware fashion. Such complexity is untenable without strong software engineering processes such as source management, source control, change reviews, unit tests, integration tests and continuous test suites. Details on these processes are provided in the report as a building step for a SHARP user guide that will accompany the first release, expected by Mar 2016.

  7. Physical characterization of laminar spray flames in the pressure range 0.1-0.9 MPa

    SciTech Connect

    Russo, Stefano; Gomez, Alessandro

    2006-04-15

    An experimental study is reported on the physical characterization of the structure of ethanol/argon/oxygen coflow laminar spray diffusion flames in the pressure range 0.1-0.9 MPa. Diagnostic techniques include phase Doppler anemometry to measure the droplet size distribution and the axial and radial velocity components of the droplets. The gas-phase velocity is determined using measurements from the smallest (low Stokes number) droplets and is corrected for thermophoretic effects. Temperature information is obtained using thin-film pyrometry combined with an infrared camera. All flames present a cold inner core, in which little or no vaporization takes place, surrounded by an envelope flame buried in a thermal boundary layer, where most of the droplet evaporation occurs. The thickness of this thermal boundary layer scales with the inverse of the Peclet number. Especially near the base of the flame, photographic evidence of streaks, which in some case even reveal the presence of soot, suggests that some droplets survive the common envelope flame and burn isolated on the oxidizer side in a mixed regime of internal/external group combustion. The reconstruction of the entire droplet vaporization history confirms this evidence quantitatively. A criterion for droplet survival beyond the envelope flame based on the critical value of a suitably defined vaporization Damkohler number is proposed. The scaling and self-similar behavior of the investigated flames suggest that a mixed regime is established, with a momentum-controlled cold core and a buoyancy-controlled high-temperature boundary layer, the thickness of which varies significantly with pressure, as expected from Peclet number scaling. The growth of this layer and the thickness of the vaporization region are reduced at pressures above atmospheric because of density effects on thermal diffusivity. Some aspects of the design of the combustion chamber and of the atomizer system are discussed in detail since they are

  8. TEJAS - TELEROBOTICS/EVA JOINT ANALYSIS SYSTEM VERSION 1.0

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Drews, M. L.

    1994-01-01

    The primary objective of space telerobotics as a research discipline is the augmentation and/or support of extravehicular activity (EVA) with telerobotic activity; this allows increased emplacement of on-orbit assets while providing for their "in situ" management. Development of the requisite telerobot work system requires a well-understood correspondence between EVA and telerobotics that to date has been only partially established. The Telerobotics/EVA Joint Analysis Systems (TEJAS) hypermedia information system uses object-oriented programming to bridge the gap between crew-EVA and telerobotics activities. TEJAS Version 1.0 contains twenty HyperCard stacks that use a visual, customizable interface of icon buttons, pop-up menus, and relational commands to store, link, and standardize related information about the primitives, technologies, tasks, assumptions, and open issues involved in space telerobot or crew EVA tasks. These stacks are meant to be interactive and can be used with any database system running on a Macintosh, including spreadsheets, relational databases, word-processed documents, and hypermedia utilities. The software provides a means for managing volumes of data and for communicating complex ideas, relationships, and processes inherent to task planning. The stack system contains 3MB of data and utilities to aid referencing, discussion, communication, and analysis within the EVA and telerobotics communities. The six baseline analysis stacks (EVATasks, EVAAssume, EVAIssues, TeleTasks, TeleAssume, and TeleIssues) work interactively to manage and relate basic information which you enter about the crew-EVA and telerobot tasks you wish to analyze in depth. Analysis stacks draw on information in the Reference stacks as part of a rapid point-and-click utility for building scripts of specific task primitives or for any EVA or telerobotics task. Any or all of these stacks can be completely incorporated within other hypermedia applications, or they can be

  9. STS-112 S1 Truss Payload arrives at KSC

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Inside the Operations and Checkout Building, a strongback is lowered toward the S1 truss below it in order to lift the truss from the Guppy cargo carrier that protected it during flight and transfer. Manufactured by the Boeing Co. in Huntington Beach, Calif., this component of the International Space Station is the first starboard (right-side) truss segment, whose main job is providing structural support for the orbiting research facility's radiator panels that cool the Space Station's complex power system. The S1 truss segment also will house communications systems, external experiment positions and other subsystems. Primarily constructed of aluminum, the truss segment is 45 feet long, 15 feet wide and 6 feet tall. When full y outfitted, it will weigh 31,137 pounds. The truss is slated for flight in 2001

  10. STS-112 S1 Truss Payload arrives at KSC

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Inside the Operations and Checkout Building, the top of the Guppy cargo carrier is lifted off the S1 truss (background). Manufactured by the Boeing Co. in Huntington Beach, Calif., this component of the International Space Station is the first starboard (right-side) truss segment, whose main job is providing structural support for the orbiting research facility's radiator panels that cool the Space Station's complex power system. The S1 truss segment also will house communica tions systems, external experiment positions and other subsystems. Primarily constructed of aluminum, the truss segment is 45 feet long, 15 feet wide and 6 feet tall. When fully outfitted, it will weigh 31,137 pounds. The truss is slated for flight in 200 1

  11. STS-112 S1 Truss Payload arrives at KSC

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- A KSC transporter moves the Guppy cargo carrier encasing the S1 truss into the Operations and Checkout Building. Manufactured by the Boeing Co. in Huntington Beach, Calif., this component of the International Space Station is the first starboard (right-side) truss segment, whose main job is providing structural support for the orbiting research facility's radiator panels that cool the Space Station's complex power system. The S1 truss segment also will house communications systems, external experiment positions and other subsystems. Primarily constructed of aluminum, the truss segment is 45 feet long, 15 feet wide and 6 feet tall. When fully outfitted, it will weigh 31,137 pounds. The truss is slated for flight in 2001.

  12. STS-112 S1 Truss Payload arrives at KSC

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Inside the Operations and Checkout Building, a strongback lifts the S1 truss from the Guppy cargo carrier that protected it during flight and transfer. Manufactured by the Boeing Co. in Huntington Beach, Calif., this component of the International Space Station is the first starboard (right-side) truss segment, whose main job is providing structural support for the orbiting research facility's radiator panels that cool the Space Station's complex power system. The S1 truss se gment also will house communications systems, external experiment positions and other subsystems. Primarily constructed of aluminum, the truss segment is 45 feet long, 15 feet wide and 6 feet tall. When fully outfitted, it will weigh 31,137 pounds. The tr uss is slated for flight in 2001

  13. Spatially frustrated S = 1 Heisenberg antiferromagnet with single ion anisotropy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pires, A. S. T.

    2016-10-01

    Using the SU(3) Schwinger boson formalism, I study the S = 1 square lattice Heisenberg antiferromagnet, at zero temperature, with spatially anisotropic nearest-neighbor couplings frustrated by a next-nearest neighbor interaction and single ion anisotropy. The phase diagram at zero temperature is presented. My calculations show two magnetically ordered phases separated by a quantum-disordered region for all values of the anisotropy.

  14. The Global S_1 Tide in Earth's Nutation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schindelegger, Michael; Einšpigel, David; Salstein, David; Böhm, Johannes

    2016-05-01

    Diurnal S_1 tidal oscillations in the coupled atmosphere-ocean system induce small perturbations of Earth's prograde annual nutation, but matching geophysical model estimates of this Sun-synchronous rotation signal with the observed effect in geodetic Very Long Baseline Interferometry (VLBI) data has thus far been elusive. The present study assesses the problem from a geophysical model perspective, using four modern-day atmospheric assimilation systems and a consistently forced barotropic ocean model that dissipates its energy excess in the global abyssal ocean through a parameterized tidal conversion scheme. The use of contemporary meteorological data does, however, not guarantee accurate nutation estimates per se; two of the probed datasets produce atmosphere-ocean-driven S_1 terms that deviate by more than 30 μ as (microarcseconds) from the VLBI-observed harmonic of -16.2+i113.4 μ as. Partial deficiencies of these models in the diurnal band are also borne out by a validation of the air pressure tide against barometric in situ estimates as well as comparisons of simulated sea surface elevations with a global network of S_1 tide gauge determinations. Credence is lent to the global S_1 tide derived from the Modern-Era Retrospective Analysis for Research and Applications (MERRA) and the operational model of the European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts (ECMWF). When averaged over a temporal range of 2004 to 2013, their nutation contributions are estimated to be -8.0+i106.0 μ as (MERRA) and -9.4+i121.8 μ as (ECMWF operational), thus being virtually equivalent with the VLBI estimate. This remarkably close agreement will likely aid forthcoming nutation theories in their unambiguous a priori account of Earth's prograde annual celestial motion.

  15. Angular momentum budget of the radiational S1 ocean tide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schindelegger, Michael; Dobslaw, Henryk; Poropat, Lea; Salstein, David; Böhm, Johannes

    2016-04-01

    The balance of diurnal S1 oceanic angular momentum (OAM) variations through torques at the sea surface and the bottom topography is validated using both a barotropic and a baroclinic numerical tide model. This analysis discloses the extent to which atmosphere-driven S1 forward simulations are reliable for use in studies of high-frequency polar motion and changes in length-of-day. Viscous and dissipative torques associated with wind stress, bottom friction, as well as internal tidal energy conversion are shown to be small, and they are overshadowed by gravitational and pressure-related interaction forces. In particular, the zonal OAM variability of S1 is almost completely balanced by the water pressure torque on the local bathymetry, whereas in the prograde equatorial case also the air pressure torque on the seafloor as well as ellipsoidal contributions from the non-spherical atmosphere and solid Earth must be taken into account. Overall, the OAM budget is well closed in both the axial and the equatorial directions, thus allowing for an identification of the main diurnal angular momentum sinks in the ocean. The physical interaction forces are found to be largest at shelf breaks and continental slopes in low latitudes, with the most dominant contribution coming from the Indonesian archipelago.

  16. Search for ammonia in comet C/2012 S1 (ISON)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faggi, S.; Codella, C.; Tozzi, G. P.; Comoretto, G.; Crovisier, J.; Nesti, R.; Panella, D.; Boissier, J.; Brucato, J. R.; Bolli, P.; Massi, F.; Tofani, G.

    2015-12-01

    Comets are uniquely pristine bodies providing unique insights about the formation of our Solar System. In this work, we focus on a dynamically new comet as it enters the inner Solar System for the first time after residing for billion of years in the Oort Cloud. Such comets are particularly important because they are thought to be not differentiated by solar radiation and they are supposed to have a large quantity of organic matter close to the surface. Here we report the results of a search for NH3(1,1) emission at 23.7 GHz towards comet C/2012 S1 (ISON) using a new dual-feed K band receiver mounted on the Medicina 32-m antenna. We observed the comet close to its perihelion, from 25 to 29 November 2013, when its heliocentric distance changed from 0.25 AU to 0.03 AU. We derive an upper limit of Q(NH3) of about 2.5×1029 mol s-1 on 26 November, that is consistent with the last peak of water production rate of ∼2×1030 mol s-1 within the last few days before the perihelion.

  17. Technical documentation and user's guide for City-County Allocation Model (CCAM). Version 1. 0

    SciTech Connect

    Clark, L.T. Jr.; Scott, M.J.; Hammer, P.

    1986-05-01

    The City-County Allocation Model (CCAM) was developed as part of the Monitored Retrievable Storage (MRS) Program. The CCAM model was designed to allocate population changes forecasted by the MASTER model to specific local communities within commuting distance of the MRS facility. The CCAM model was designed to then forecast the potential changes in demand for key community services such as housing, police protection, and utilities for these communities. The CCAM model uses a flexible on-line data base on demand for community services that is based on a combination of local service levels and state and national service standards. The CCAM model can be used to quickly forecast the potential community service consequence of economic development for local communities anywhere in the country. The remainder of this document is organized as follows. The purpose of this manual is to assist the user in understanding and operating the City-County Allocation Model (CCAM). The annual explains the data sources for the model and code modifications as well as the operational procedures.

  18. Polarity driven morphology of CeO2(1 0 0) islands on Cu(1 1 1)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stetsovych, O.; Beran, J.; Dvořák, F.; Mašek, K.; Mysliveček, J.; Matolín, V.

    2013-11-01

    Thin ceria films supported by metal substrates represent important model systems for reactivity studies in heterogeneous catalysis. Here we report the growth study of the polar CeO2(1 0 0) phase as part of a mixed CeO2(1 1 1)-CeO2(1 0 0) thin film supported by Cu(1 1 1). The two ceria phases grow on different areas of the substrate, what allows a reliable growth characterization of the CeO2(1 0 0) islands on Cu(1 1 1). Scanning tunneling microscopy measurements reveal CeO2(1 0 0) to grow in the form of highly dispersed three dimensional (3D) islands on a CeO2(1 0 0) interfacial layer. The CeO2(1 0 0) islands exhibit a 2 × 2 surface reconstruction. The presence of the surface reconstruction together with the highly dispersed growth of CeO2(1 0 0) islands corresponds to the requirement for compensation of the surface dipole moment on the CeO2(1 0 0). CeO2(1 0 0) islands are further characterized by reflection high energy electron diffraction yielding their epitaxial relations with respect to the Cu(1 1 1) substrate. The growth of well characterized CeO2(1 0 0) islands supported by Cu(1 1 1) represents a starting point for developing a novel template for structure-related reactivity studies of ceria based model catalysts.

  19. SPLICER - A GENETIC ALGORITHM TOOL FOR SEARCH AND OPTIMIZATION, VERSION 1.0 (MACINTOSH VERSION)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, L.

    1994-01-01

    SPLICER is a genetic algorithm tool which can be used to solve search and optimization problems. Genetic algorithms are adaptive search procedures (i.e. problem solving methods) based loosely on the processes of natural selection and Darwinian "survival of the fittest." SPLICER provides the underlying framework and structure for building a genetic algorithm application. These algorithms apply genetically-inspired operators to populations of potential solutions in an iterative fashion, creating new populations while searching for an optimal or near-optimal solution to the problem at hand. SPLICER 1.0 was created using a modular architecture that includes a Genetic Algorithm Kernel, interchangeable Representation Libraries, Fitness Modules and User Interface Libraries, and well-defined interfaces between these components. The architecture supports portability, flexibility, and extensibility. SPLICER comes with all source code and several examples. For instance, a "traveling salesperson" example searches for the minimum distance through a number of cities visiting each city only once. Stand-alone SPLICER applications can be used without any programming knowledge. However, to fully utilize SPLICER within new problem domains, familiarity with C language programming is essential. SPLICER's genetic algorithm (GA) kernel was developed independent of representation (i.e. problem encoding), fitness function or user interface type. The GA kernel comprises all functions necessary for the manipulation of populations. These functions include the creation of populations and population members, the iterative population model, fitness scaling, parent selection and sampling, and the generation of population statistics. In addition, miscellaneous functions are included in the kernel (e.g., random number generators). Different problem-encoding schemes and functions are defined and stored in interchangeable representation libraries. This allows the GA kernel to be used with any

  20. Search for Transient gamma -Ray Line Emission Between 400 and 600 keV from the Crab Nebula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harris, M. J.; Share, G. H.; Leising, M. D.

    1992-12-01

    Previous experiments reported transient gamma -ray line emission from the Crab Nebula for periods of several hr, at energies 400-460 keV (Leventhal et al. 1977, Yoshimori et al. 1979, Owens et al. 1985, Massaro et al. 1991) and 545 keV (Sunyaev et al. 1992). We have searched data taken by the SMM Gamma Ray Spectrometer for lines at these energies, using the method of Harris et al. (1991). Line features associated with the pulse period cannot be resolved by this method. We find no evidence of significant line emission at any energy during 1981-1989 on time-scales between ~ 1 d and ~ 1 yr. Our 3 sigma upper limits on the transient flux in any line are characteristically ~ 1.0 times 10(-3) gamma cm(-2) s(-1) over time-scales 12 d or greater, and ~ 2.5 times 10(-3) gamma cm(-2) s(-1) over time-scales ~ 1 d. The duty cycle during 1981-1989 for strong (>> 1times 10(-3) gamma cm(-2) s(-1) ) transient lines on ~ 1 d time-scales, such as those detected by Leventhal et al. (1977), Yoshimori et al. (1979), Owens et al. (1985) and Sunyaev et al. (1992), must have been <1%. We searched our data for the ~ 5 hr on 1981 June 6 coinciding with the transient line at 405 keV detected by Owens et al. (1985). Our null result for this line during that period is inconsistent with the measurement of Owens et al. This work was performed under NASA Grant NAGW-2789. M.J. Harris et al. 1991, Bull AAS 23, 1440. M. Leventhal et al. 1977 ApJ 216, 491. E. Massaro et al. 1991, ApJ 376, L11. A. Owens et al. 1985, Proc. 19th ICRC 1, 145. R. Sunyaev et al. 1992, IAUC 5481. M. Yoshimori et al. 1979, Aust.J. Phys. 32, 375.

  1. A theoretical study of stability and vacancy replenishing of MoO3(0 1 0) surfaces in oxygen atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lei, Yan-Hua; Chen, Zhao-Xu

    2016-01-01

    Oxygen vacancies on transition metal oxide surfaces are catalytically very important. The stability, shape and replenishing process of the vacancies are critical to understanding reactions happening on the surfaces. In this paper we investigate the stability of various defective MoO3(0 1 0) surfaces and examine the influence of environmental oxygen on the stability as well as the active sites for the replenishing process. Our calculations reveal that the line oxygen defect along a (asymmetric oxygen) direction is thermodynamically most favorable at higher defect concentration whereas point defect surfaces are unfavorable. Under normal experimental conditions the perfect surface dominates the MoO3(0 1 0). We show that for stoichiometric surfaces of any oxides (AxOy) the formation energy per vacancy controls the favorable defect shape (line or point defects). Calculations indicate that O2 can dissociate readily on the surfaces that double vacancies share one Mo atom. The replenishing process of the oxygen vacancies through O2 dissociation most likely occurs on the double-vacancy containing one terminal and one asymmetrical oxygen vacancies.

  2. The apoptotic effect of 1's-1'-acetoxychavicol acetate from Alpinia conchigera on human cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Awang, Khalijah; Azmi, Mohamad Nurul; Aun, Lionel In Lian; Aziz, Ahmad Nazif; Ibrahim, Halijah; Nagoor, Noor Hasima

    2010-11-09

    1'-(S)-1'-Acetoxychavicol acetate (ACA) isolated from the Malaysian ethno-medicinal plant Alpinia conchigera Griff. was investigated for its potential as an anticancer drug. In this communication, we describe the cytotoxic and apoptotic properties of ACA on five human tumour cell lines. Data from MTT cell viability assays indicated that ACA induced both time- and dose-dependent cytotoxicity on all tumour cell lines tested and had no adverse cytotoxic effects on normal cells. Total mortality of the entire tumour cell population was achieved within 30 hrs when treated with ACA at 40.0 µM concentration. Flow cytometric analysis for annexin-V and PI dual staining demonstrated that cell death occurred via apoptosis, followed by secondary necrosis. The apoptotic effects of ACA were confirmed via the DNA fragmentation assay, in which consistent laddering of genomic DNA was observed for all tumour cell lines after a 24 hrs post-treatment period at the IC(50) concentration of ACA. A cell cycle analysis using PI staining also demonstrated that ACA induced cell cycle arrest at the G(0)/G(1) phase, corresponding to oral tumour cell lines. In conclusion, ACA exhibits enormous potential for future development as a chemotherapeutic drug against various malignancies.

  3. A Unified Geodetic Vertical Velocity Field (UGVVF), Version 1.0

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmalzle, G.; Wdowinski, S.

    2014-12-01

    become available. A database and scripts to access the database will be available through the University of Miami (http://www.geodesy.miami.edu) website. Figure 1. Vertical velocity comparisons between processing groups (blue dots). Red line indicates equal velocities. Weighted Root Mean Square (WRMS) is shown.

  4. Spangolite: an s = 1/2 maple leaf lattice antiferromagnet?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fennell, T.; Piatek, J. O.; Stephenson, R. A.; Nilsen, G. J.; Rønnow, H. M.

    2011-04-01

    Spangolite, Cu6Al(SO4)(OH)12Cl·3H2O, is a hydrated layered copper sulfate mineral. The Cu2 + ions of each layer form a systematically depleted triangular lattice which approximates a maple leaf lattice. We present details of the crystal structure, which suggest that in spangolite this lattice actually comprises two species of edge linked trimers with different exchange parameters. However, magnetic susceptibility measurements show that despite the structural trimers, the magnetic properties are dominated by dimerization. The high temperature magnetic moment is strongly reduced below that expected for the six s = 1/2 in the unit cell.

  5. Local carbon diffusion coefficient measurement in the S-1 spheromak

    SciTech Connect

    Mayo, R.M.; Levinton, F.M.; Meyerhofer, D.D.; Chu, T.K.; Paul, S.F.; Yamada, M.

    1988-10-01

    The local carbon diffusion coefficient was measured in the S - 1 spheromak by detecting the radial spread of injected carbon impurity. The radial impurity density profile is determined by the balance of ionization and diffusion. Using measured local electron temperature T/sub e/ and density n/sub e/, the ionization rate is determined from which the particle diffusion coefficient is inferred. The results found in this work are consistent with Bohm diffusion. The absolute magnitude of D/sub /perpendicular// was determined to be (4/approximately/6) /times/ D/sub Bohm/. 25 refs., 13 figs., 2 tabs.

  6. ALMA Multi-line Observations of the IR-bright Merger VV 114

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saito, Toshiki; Iono, Daisuke; Yun, Min S.; Ueda, Junko; Nakanishi, Kouichiro; Sugai, Hajime; Espada, Daniel; Imanishi, Masatoshi; Motohara, Kentaro; Hagiwara, Yosiaki; Tateuchi, Ken; Lee, Minju; Kawabe, Ryohei

    2015-04-01

    We present Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array cycle 0 observations of the molecular gas and dust in the IR-bright mid-stage merger VV 114 obtained at 160-800 pc resolution. The main aim of this study is to investigate the distribution and kinematics of the cold/warm gas and to quantify the spatial variation of the excitation conditions across the two merging disks. The data contain 10 molecular lines, including the first detection of extranuclear CH3OH emission in interacting galaxies, as well as continuum emission. We map the 12CO(3-2)/12CO(1-0) and the 12CO(1-0)/13CO(1-0) line ratio at 800 pc resolution (in the units of K km s-1), and find that these ratios vary from 0.2-0.8 and 5-50, respectively. Conversely, the 200 pc resolution HCN(4-3)/HCO+(4-3) line ratio shows low values (<0.5) at a filament across the disks except for the unresolved eastern nucleus which is three times higher (1.34 ± 0.09). We conclude from our observations and a radiative transfer analysis that the molecular gas in the VV 114 system consists of five components with different physical and chemical conditions, i.e., (1) dust-enshrouded nuclear starbursts and/or active galactic nuclei, (2) widespread star-forming dense gas, (3) merger-induced shocked gas, (4) quiescent tenuous gas arms without star formation, and (5) H2 gas mass of (3.8 ± 0.7) × 107 {{M}⊙ } (assuming a conversion factor of αCO = 0.8 {{M}⊙ } {{(K km {{s}-1} p{{c}2})}-1}) at the tip of the southern tidal arm, as a potential site of tidal dwarf galaxy formation.

  7. Fabrication and characterization of periodic arrays of epitaxial Ni-silicide nanocontacts on (1 1 0)Si

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, S. L.; Chang, L. H.; Chuang, C. F.; Chen, H.

    2015-07-01

    In this study, we report on the fabrication and characterization of periodic Ni and Ni-silicide nanocontact arrays on (1 1 0)Si substrates. From transmission electron microscopy and selected-area electron diffraction analysis, it is found that the epitaxial NiSi2 is the first and the only silicide phase formed in the nanoscale Ni contact/(1 1 0)Si sample after annealing at a temperature as low as 300 °C, demonstrating that the nanoscale Ni contact is more favorable for the epitaxial growth of NiSi2 phase on (1 1 0)Si. The orientation relationship between the epitaxial NiSi2 nanocontacts and the (1 1 0)Si substrate is identified as [1 1 0]NiSi2//[1 1 0]Si and (1 bar 1 1 bar)NiSi2//(1 bar 1 1 bar)Si. For the samples annealed at higher temperatures, all the epitaxial NiSi2 nanocontacts formed on (1 1 0)Si are anisotropic in shape and elongated along the crystallographic < 1 1 bar 0 > directions. The observed results can be attributed to the higher surface area to volume ratio of Ni nanocontacts and the faster growth rate along the <1 1 0> directions than along other directions. The size and periodicity of the nanocontacts can be readily controlled by adjusting the diameter of the colloidal nanosphere template. The self-assembled approach proposed here will provide the capability to fabricate other highly-ordered metal silicide nanocontact arrays and may offer potential applications in constructing silicide-based nanodevices.

  8. STS-112 S1 Truss Payload arrives at KSC

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- At the Shuttle Landing Facility, the newly arrived S1 truss, a segment of the International Space Station (ISS), is offloaded from NASA's Super Guppy aircraft. Manufactured by the Boeing Co. in Huntington Beach, Calif., this component of the ISS is the first starboard (right-side) truss segment, whose main job is providing structural support for the orbiting research facility's radiator panels that cool the Space Station's complex power system. The S1 truss segment also will house communications systems, external experiment positions and other subsystems. Primarily constructed of aluminum, the truss segment is 45 feet long, 15 feet wide and 6 feet tall. When fully outfitted, it will weigh 31,137 pounds. The truss is slated fo r flight in 2001. The Super Guppy, with its 25-foot diameter fuselage designed to handle oversized loads, is well prepared to transport the truss and other ISS segments. Loading the Guppy is easy because of the unique 'fold-away' nose of the aircraft that opens 110 degrees for cargo loading. A system of rails in the cargo compartment, used with either Guppy pallets or fixtures designed for specific cargo, makes cargo loading simple and efficient. Rollers mounted in the rails allow pallets or fixtures to b e moved by an electric winch mounted beneath the cargo floor. Automatic hydraulic lock pins in each rail secure the pallet for flight. The truss is being transferred to the Operations and Checkout Building.

  9. STS-112 S1 Truss Payload arrives at KSC

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Escort vehicles prepare to leave the Shuttle Landing Facility with the S1 truss (at right) on its trek to the Operations and Checkout Building. Manufactured by the Boeing Co. in Huntington Beach, Calif., this component of the ISS is the first starboard (right-side) truss segment, whose main job is providing structural support for the orbiting research facility's radiator panels that cool the Space Station's complex power system. The S1 truss segment also will house communications systems, external experiment positions and other subsystems. Primarily constructed of aluminum, the truss segment is 45 feet long, 15 feet wide and 6 feet tall. When fully outfitted, it will weigh 31,137 pounds. The truss is slated for flight in 2001. The truss arrived at KSC aboard NASA's Super Guppy, seen in the background. The aircraft is uniquely built with a 25-foot diameter fuselage designed to handle oversized loads and a 'fold-away' nose that opens 110 degrees for cargo loading. A system of rails in the cargo compartment, used with either Guppy pallets or fixtures designed for specific cargo, makes cargo loading simple and efficient. Rollers mounted in the rails allow pallets or fixtures to be moved by an electric winch mounted beneath the cargo floor. Automatic hydraulic lock pins in each rail secure the pallet for flight

  10. STS-112 S1 Truss Payload arrives at KSC

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- At the Shuttle Landing Facility, workers attach cranes to the S1 truss, a segment of the International Space Station, to lift the truss to a payload transporter for its transfer to the Operations and Checkout Building. Manufa ctured by the Boeing Co. in Huntington Beach, Calif., this component of the ISS is the first starboard (right-side) truss segment, whose main job is providing structural support for the orbiting research facility's radiator panels that cool the Space Station's complex power system. The S1 truss segment also will house communications systems, external experiment positions and other subsystems. Primarily constructed of aluminum, the truss segment is 45 feet long, 15 feet wide and 6 feet tall. When fully out fitted, it will weigh 31,137 pounds. The truss is slated for flight in 2001. The truss arrived at KSC aboard NASA's Super Guppy, with a 25-foot diameter fuselage designed to handle oversized loads. Loading the Guppy is easy because of the unique 'fold-away' nose of the aircraft that opens 110 degrees for cargo loading. A system of rails in the cargo compartment, used with either Guppy pallets or fixtures designed for specific cargo, makes cargo loading simple and efficient. Rollers mounted in the rails al low pallets or fixtures to be moved by an electric winch mounted beneath the cargo floor. Automatic hydraulic lock pins in each rail secure the pallet for flight

  11. STS-112 S1 Truss Payload arrives at KSC

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- NASA's Super Guppy airplane, with the International Space Station's (ISS) S1 truss aboard, arrives at KSC's Shuttle Landing Facility from Marshall Space Flight Center. Manufactured by the Boeing Co. in Huntington Beach, Calif ., this component of the ISS is the first starboard (right-side) truss segment, whose main job is providing structural support for the orbiting research facility's radiator panels that cool the Space Station's complex power system. The S1 truss segment al so will house communications systems, external experiment positions and other subsystems. Primarily constructed of aluminum, the truss segment is 45 feet long, 15 feet wide and 6 feet tall. When fully outfitted, it will weigh 31,137 pounds. The truss is s lated for flight in 2001. The Super Guppy, with its 25-foot diameter fuselage designed to handle oversized loads, is well prepared to transport the truss and other ISS segments. Loading the Guppy is easy because of the unique 'fold-away' nose of the aircr aft that opens 110 degrees for cargo loading. A system of rails in the cargo compartment, used with either Guppy pallets or fixtures designed for specific cargo, makes cargo loading simple and efficient. Rollers mounted in the rails allow pallets or fixtu res to be moved by an electric winch mounted beneath the cargo floor. Automatic hydraulic lock pins in each rail secure the pallet for flight. The truss is to be moved to the Operations and Checkout Building

  12. STS-112 S1 Truss Payload arrives at KSC

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- NASA's Super Guppy airplane, with the International Space Station's (ISS) S1 truss aboard, rolls to a stop at KSC's Shuttle Landing Facility. Manufactured by the Boeing Co. in Huntington Beach, Calif., this component of the I SS is the first starboard (right-side) truss segment, whose main job is providing structural support for the orbiting research facility's radiator panels that cool the Space Station's complex power system. The S1 truss segment also will house communicatio ns systems, external experiment positions and other subsystems. Primarily constructed of aluminum, the truss segment is 45 feet long, 15 feet wide and 6 feet tall. When fully outfitted, it will weigh 31,137 pounds. The truss is slated for flight in 2001. The Super Guppy, with its 25-foot diameter fuselage designed to handle oversized loads, is well prepared to transport the truss and other ISS segments. Loading the Guppy is easy because of the unique 'fold-away' nose of the aircraft that opens 110 degrees for cargo loading. A system of rails in the cargo compartment, used with either Guppy pallets or fixtures designed for specific cargo, makes cargo loading simple and efficient. Rollers mounted in the rails allow pallets or fixtures to be moved by an elec tric winch mounted beneath the cargo floor. Automatic hydraulic lock pins in each rail secure the pallet for flight. The truss is to be transferred to the Operations and Checkout Building

  13. STS-112 S1 Truss Payload arrives at KSC

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- At KSC's Shuttle Landing Facility, NASA's Super Guppy opens to reveal its cargo, the International Space Station's (ISS) S1 truss. Manufactured by the Boeing Co. in Huntington Beach, Calif., this component of the ISS is the f irst starboard (right-side) truss segment, whose main job is providing structural support for the orbiting research facility's radiator panels that cool the Space Station's complex power system. The S1 truss segment also will house communications systems, external experiment positions and other subsystems. Primarily constructed of aluminum, the truss segment is 45 feet long, 15 feet wide and 6 feet tall. When fully outfitted, it will weigh 31,137 pounds. The truss is slated for flight in 2001. The Super G uppy, with its 25-foot diameter fuselage designed to handle oversized loads, is well prepared to transport the truss and other ISS segments. Loading the Guppy is easy because of the unique 'fold-away' nose of the aircraft that opens 110 degrees for cargo loading. A system of rails in the cargo compartment, used with either Guppy pallets or fixtures designed for specific cargo, makes cargo loading simple and efficient. Rollers mounted in the rails allow pallets or fixtures to be moved by an electric winch mounted beneath the cargo floor. Automatic hydraulic lock pins in each rail secure the pallet for flight. The truss is to be transferred to the Operations and Checkout Building

  14. Argyres-Douglas theories, S 1 reductions, and topological symmetries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buican, Matthew; Nishinaka, Takahiro

    2016-01-01

    In a recent paper, we proposed closed-form expressions for the superconformal indices of the ({A}1,{A}2n-3) and ({A}1,{D}2n) Argyres-Douglas (AD) superconformal field theories (SCFTs) in the Schur limit. Following up on our results, we turn our attention to the small S 1 regime of these indices. As expected on general grounds, our study reproduces the S 3 partition functions of the resulting dimensionally reduced theories. However, we show that in all cases—with the exception of the reduction of the ({A}1,{D}4) SCFT—certain imaginary partners of real mass terms are turned on in the corresponding mirror theories. We interpret these deformations as R symmetry mixing with the topological symmetries of the direct S 1 reductions. Moreover, we argue that these shifts occur in any of our theories whose four-dimensional { N }=2 superconformal U{(1)}R symmetry does not obey an SU(2) quantization condition. We then use our R symmetry map to find the four-dimensional ancestors of certain three-dimensional operators. Somewhat surprisingly, this picture turns out to imply that the scaling dimensions of many of the chiral operators of the four-dimensional theory are encoded in accidental symmetries of the three-dimensional theory. We also comment on the implications of our work on the space of general { N }=2 SCFTs.

  15. S1P metabolism in cancer and other pathological conditions.

    PubMed

    Leong, Weng In; Saba, Julie D

    2010-06-01

    Nearly two decades ago, the sphingolipid metabolite sphingosine 1-phosphate was discovered to function as a lipid mediator and regulator of cell proliferation. Since that time, sphingosine 1-phosphate has been shown to mediate a diverse array of fundamental biological processes including cell proliferation, migration, invasion, angiogenesis, vascular maturation and lymphocyte trafficking. Sphingosine 1-phosphate acts primarily via signaling through five ubiquitously expressed G protein-coupled receptors. Intracellular sphingosine 1-phosphate molecules are transported extracellularly and gain access to cognate receptors for autocrine and paracrine signaling and for signaling at distant sites reached through blood and lymphatic circulation systems. Intracellular pools of sphingosine 1-phosphate available for signaling are tightly regulated primarily by three enzymes: sphinosine kinase, S1P lyase and S1P phosphatase. Alterations in sphingosine 1-phosphate as well as the enzymes involved in its synthesis and catabolism have been observed in many types of malignancy. These enzymes are being evaluated for their role in mediating cancer formation and progression, as well as their potential to serve as targets of anti-cancer therapeutics. In this review, the impact of sphingosine 1-phosphate, its cognate receptors, and the enzymes of sphingosine 1-phosphate metabolism on cell survival, apoptosis, autophagy, cellular transformation, invasion, angiogenesis and hypoxia in relation to cancer biology and treatment are discussed.

  16. Knockdown of the Symbiotic Sucrose Synthase MtSucS1 Affects Arbuscule Maturation and Maintenance in Mycorrhizal Roots of Medicago truncatula1[W

    PubMed Central

    Baier, Markus Christian; Keck, Matthias; Gödde, Victoria; Niehaus, Karsten; Küster, Helge; Hohnjec, Natalija

    2010-01-01

    The relevance of the symbiosis-induced Medicago truncatula sucrose synthase gene MtSucS1 for an efficient arbuscular mycorrhiza (AM) was studied using two independent antisense lines that displayed up to 10-fold reduced SucS1 levels in roots. Mycorrhizal MtSucS1-reduced lines exhibited an overall stunted aboveground growth under inorganic phosphorus limitation. Apart from a reduced plant height, shoot weight, and leaf development, a delayed flowering, resulting in a lower seed yield, was observed. In addition, the root-to-shoot and root weight ratios increased significantly. Gene expression studies demonstrated a major reversion of AM-associated transcription, exhibiting a significant repression of well-known plant AM marker and mycosymbiont genes, together indicating a diminished AM fungus colonization of MtSucS1-antisense lines. Concomitantly, gas chromatography-mass spectrometry-based metabolite profiling revealed that mycorrhizal MtSucS1-reduced lines were affected in important nodes of the carbon, nitrogen, and phosphorus metabolism, accentuating a physiological significance of MtSucS1 for AM. In fact, antisensing MtSucS1 provoked an impaired fungal colonization within the less abundant infected regions, evident from strongly reduced frequencies of internal hyphae, vesicles, and arbuscules. Moreover, arbuscules were early senescing, accompanied with a reduced development of mature arbuscules. This defective mycorrhiza status correlated with reduced phosphorus and nitrogen levels and was proportional to the extent of MtSucS1 knockdown. Together, our results point to an important role for MtSucS1 in the establishment and maintenance of arbuscules in the AM symbiosis. PMID:20007443

  17. Potential of MuS1 Transgenic Tobacco for Phytoremediation of the Urban Soils Contaminated with Cadmium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, K. H.; Kim, Y. N.; Kim, S. H.

    2010-05-01

    Urban soils are prone to contamination by trace elements such as Cd, Cu, Pb and Zn. Phytoremediation is one of the attractive remediation methods for soils contaminated with trace elements due to its non-destructive and environmentally-friendly characteristic. Scientists have tried to find hyper-accumulator plants in nature or to develop transgenic plant through genetic engineering. This study was carried out to identify a potential of MuS1 transgenic tobacco for phytoremediation of the urban soils contaminated with Cd. MuS1 is known as a multiple stress related gene with several lines. The previous study using RT-PCR showed that the expression of MuS1 gene in tobacco plant induced tolerance to Cd stress. For this study, MuS1 transgenic tobacco and wild-type tobacco (control) were cultivated in a hydroponic system treated with Cd (0, 50, 100 and 200μM Cd) for 3 weeks. At harvest, both tobacco and nutrient solution were collected and were analyzed for Cd. Effect of Cd treatment on morphological change of the tobacco leaves was also observed by variable-pressure scanning electron microscopy (VP-SEM). The tolerance of MuS1 transgenic tobacco to Cd stress was better than that of wild-type tobacco at all Cd levels. Especially, wild-type tobacco showed chlorosis and withering with 200μM Cd treatment, whereas MuS1 transgenic tobacco gradually recovered from Cd damage. Wild-type tobacco accumulated more Cd (4.65mg per plant) than MuS1 transgenic tobacco (2.37mg per plant) with 200μM Cd treatment. Cd translocation rate from root to leaves was 81.8 % for wild-type tobacco compared to 37.1 % for MuS1 transgenic tobacco. Result of VP-SEM showed that the number of trichome in the leaves for wild-type tobacco increased in comparison with that for untreated samples after 3 weeks, while that for MuS1 transgenic tobacco was not changed by Cd treatment. Results showed that the mechanism of the recovery of the MuS1 tobacco plant was not by high level of Cd uptake and accumulation

  18. The CO-12 and CO-13 J=2-1 and J=1-0 observations of hot and cold galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Xie, Shuding; Schloerb, F. Peter; Young, Judith

    1990-01-01

    Researchers observed the nuclear regions of the galaxies NGC 2146 and IC 342 in CO-12 and CO-13 J=1-0 and J=2-1 lines using the Five College Radio Astronomy Observatory (FCRAO) 14m telescope. NGC 2146 is a peculiar Sab spiral galaxy. Its complex optical morphology and strong nuclear radio continuum emission suggest that it is experiencing a phase of violent activity and could have a polar ring which may have resulted from an interaction. IC 342 is a nearby luminous Scd spiral galaxy. Strong CO, infrared and radio continuum emission from the nuclear region of IC 342 indicate enhanced star-forming activity, and interferometric CO-12 J=1-0 observations reveal a bar-like structure centered on the nucleus, along the dark lane in the NS direction. These two galaxies are selected based on their different dust temperatures and star formation efficiencies (SFE) as derived from the Infrared Astronomy Satellite (IRAS) S sub 60 mu/S sub 100 mu flux density ratio and L sub IR/M(H2), respectively, with a relatively high SFE and dust temperature of 45 K in NGC 2146 and a relatively low SFE and dust temperature of 35 K in IC 342. The data from the different CO-12 and CO-13 lines are used to study the physical conditions in the molecular clouds in the galaxies. Researchers also consider the radiative transfer to determine whether a warm and optically thin gas component exists in these galaxies, as has been suggested in the case of M82 (Knapp et al. 1980), and whether the warm gas is related to the dust properties. Since optically thin CO-12 gas is rarely detected in our own Galaxy (except in outflow sources), to confirm its existence in external galaxies is very important in understanding the molecular content of external galaxies and its relationship to star formation activity. The present CO-12 J=2-1 and CO-13 J=2-1 and J=1-0 data for NGC 2146 are the first detections of this galaxy to our knowledge. The CO-12 J=1-0 distribution in NGC 2146 has been measured as part of the FCRAO

  19. Discovery of potent 3,5-diphenyl-1,2,4-oxadiazole sphingosine-1-phosphate-1 (S1P1) receptor agonists with exceptional selectivity against S1P2 and S1P3.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhen; Chen, Weirong; Hale, Jeffrey J; Lynch, Christopher L; Mills, Sander G; Hajdu, Richard; Keohane, Carol Ann; Rosenbach, Mark J; Milligan, James A; Shei, Gan-Ju; Chrebet, Gary; Parent, Stephen A; Bergstrom, James; Card, Deborah; Forrest, Michael; Quackenbush, Elizabeth J; Wickham, L Alexandra; Vargas, Hugo; Evans, Rose M; Rosen, Hugh; Mandala, Suzanne

    2005-10-01

    A class of 3,5-diphenyl-1,2,4-oxadiazole based compounds have been identified as potent sphingosine-1-phosphate-1 (S1P1) receptor agonists with minimal affinity for the S1P2 and S1P3 receptor subtypes. Analogue 26 (S1P1 IC50 = 0.6 nM) has an excellent pharmacokinetics profile in the rat and dog and is efficacious in a rat skin transplant model, indicating that S1P3 receptor agonism is not a component of immunosuppressive efficacy.

  20. MOLECULAR CO(1-0) GAS IN THE z {approx} 2 RADIO GALAXY MRC 0152-209

    SciTech Connect

    Emonts, B. H. C.; Feain, I.; Mao, M. Y.; Norris, R. P.; Ekers, R. D.; Rees, G.; Stevens, J. B.; Miley, G.; Roettgering, H. J. A.; Villar-Martin, M.; Sadler, E. M.; Morganti, R.; Oosterloo, T. A.; Saikia, D. J.; Tadhunter, C. N.

    2011-06-10

    We report the detection of molecular CO(1-0) gas in the high-z radio galaxy MRC 0152-209 (z = 1.92) with the Australia Telescope Compact Array Broadband Backend (ATCA/CABB). This is the third known detection of CO(1-0) in a high-z radio galaxy to date. CO(1-0) is the most robust tracer of the overall molecular gas content (including the widespread, low-density, and sub-thermally excited component), hence observations of CO(1-0) are crucial for studying galaxy evolution in the early universe. We derive L'{sub CO} = 6.6 {+-} 2.0 x 10{sup 10} K km s{sup -1} pc{sup 2} for MRC 0152-209, which is comparable to that derived from CO(1-0) observations of several high-z submillimeter and star-forming BzK galaxies. The CO(1-0) traces a total molecular hydrogen mass of M{sub H{sub 2}} = 5 x 10{sup 10} ({alpha}{sub x}/0.8) M{sub sun}. MRC 0152-209 is an infrared bright radio galaxy, in which a large reservoir of cold molecular gas has not (yet) been depleted by star formation or radio source feedback. Its compact radio source is reliably detected at 40 GHz and has a steep spectral index of {alpha} = -1.3 between 1.4 and 40 GHz (4-115 GHz in the galaxy's rest frame). MRC 0152-209 is part of an ongoing systematic ATCA/CABB survey of CO(1-0) in high-z radio galaxies between 1.7 < z < 3.

  1. Dynamical instability in the S =1 Bose-Hubbard model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asaoka, Rui; Tsuchiura, Hiroki; Yamashita, Makoto; Toga, Yuta

    2016-01-01

    We study the dynamical instabilities of superfluid flows in the S =1 Bose-Hubbard model. The time evolution of each spin component in a condensate is calculated based on the dynamical Gutzwiller approximation for a wide range of interactions, from a weakly correlated regime to a strongly correlated regime near the Mott-insulator transition. Owing to the spin-dependent interactions, the superfluid flow of the spin-1 condensate decays at a different critical momentum from a spinless case when the interaction strength is the same. We furthermore calculate the dynamical phase diagram of this model and clarify that the obtained phase boundary has very different features depending on whether the average number of particles per site is even or odd. Finally, we analyze the density and spin modulations that appear in association with the dynamical instability. We find that spin modulations are highly sensitive to the presence of a uniform magnetic field.

  2. Lattice study of the exotic s = +1 baryon.

    PubMed

    Sasaki, Shoichi

    2004-10-01

    We propose S = +1 baryon interpolating operators, which are based on an exotic description of the antidecuplet baryon, like the diquark-diquark-antiquark structure. By using one of the new operators, the mass spectrum of the spin-1/2 pentaquark states is calculated in quenched lattice QCD at beta = 6/g(2) = 6.2 on a 32(3) x 48 lattice. It is found that the J(P) assignment of the lowest Theta(uudds) state is most likely (1/2)(-). We also calculate the mass of the charm analog of the Theta and find that the Theta(c)(uuddc) state lies much higher than the DN threshold, in contrast to several model predictions. PMID:15524864

  3. Effect of anisotropy in the S=1 underscreened Kondo lattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, Christopher; da Rosa Simões, Acirete S.; Lacroix, Claudine; Iglesias, José Roberto; Coqblin, Bernard

    2014-12-01

    We study the effect of crystal field anisotropy in the underscreened S=1 Kondo lattice model. Starting from the two orbital Anderson lattice model and including a local anisotropy term, we show, through Schrieffer-Wolff transformation, that local anisotropy is equivalent to an anisotropic Kondo interaction (J∥≠J⊥). The competition and coexistence between ferromagnetism and Kondo effect in this effective model is studied within a generalized mean-field approximation. Several regimes are obtained, depending on the parameters, exhibiting or not coexistence of magnetic order and Kondo effect. Particularly, we show that a re-entrant Kondo phase at low temperature can be obtained. We are also able to describe phases where the Kondo temperature is smaller than the Curie temperature (TK

  4. The preS1 antigen of hepatitis B virus is highly immunogenic at the T cell level in man.

    PubMed Central

    Ferrari, C; Penna, A; Bertoletti, A; Cavalli, A; Valli, A; Schianchi, C; Fiaccadori, F

    1989-01-01

    14 hepatitis B vaccine recipients who showed high titers of anti-hepatitis B surface antibodies in serum after booster immunization with a polyvalent hepatitis B surface antigen vaccine that contained trace amounts of hepatitis B virus (HBV) preS1 and preS2 envelope antigens were studied for their in vitro T cell response to these antigens. All 14 subjects displayed a significant proliferative T cell response to the S/p25 envelope region encoded polypeptide; 8 also responded to preS1, while only 1 showed a significant level of T cell proliferation to preS2. Limiting dilution analysis demonstrated that the frequency of preS-specific T cells in two of these vaccine recipients was higher than that of S/p25-specific T cells. T cell cloning was then performed and a total of 29 HBV envelope antigen-reactive CD4+ cloned lines were generated from two preS-responsive vaccines. 21 of these lines were S/p25 specific, 7 preS1 specific, and 1 preS2 specific. Taken together, all these results suggest that the preS1 antigen may function as a strong T cell immunogen in man. PMID:2529268

  5. Regulation of human cerebro-microvascular endothelial baso-lateral adhesion and barrier function by S1P through dual involvement of S1P1 and S1P2 receptors.

    PubMed

    Wiltshire, Rachael; Nelson, Vicky; Kho, Dan Ting; Angel, Catherine E; O'Carroll, Simon J; Graham, E Scott

    2016-01-27

    Herein we show that S1P rapidly and acutely reduces the focal adhesion strength and barrier tightness of brain endothelial cells. xCELLigence biosensor technology was used to measure focal adhesion, which was reduced by S1P acutely and this response was mediated through both S1P1 and S1P2 receptors. S1P increased secretion of several pro-inflammatory mediators from brain endothelial cells. However, the magnitude of this response was small in comparison to that mediated by TNFα or IL-1β. Furthermore, S1P did not significantly increase cell-surface expression of any key cell adhesion molecules involved in leukocyte recruitment, included ICAM-1 and VCAM-1. Finally, we reveal that S1P acutely and dynamically regulates microvascular endothelial barrier tightness in a manner consistent with regulated rapid opening followed by closing and strengthening of the barrier. We hypothesise that the role of the S1P receptors in this process is not to cause barrier dysfunction, but is related to controlled opening of the endothelial junctions. This was revealed using real-time measurement of barrier integrity using ECIS ZΘ TEER technology and endothelial viability using xCELLigence technology. Finally, we show that these responses do not occur simply though the pharmacology of a single S1P receptor but involves coordinated action of S1P1 and S1P2 receptors.

  6. Analysis Of The California Molecular Cloud Through CS J(2-1), HCN J(1-0), And C18O J(2-1)molecular Tracers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jasso, Steven; Shirley, Y.; Bieging, J.; Rudolph, A.; Lada, C.; Forbrich, J.; Roman, C.

    2012-01-01

    The California Molecular Cloud (CMC) is a nearby (D 450 pc) complex cloud with a total mass similar to the Orion Molecular Cloud but with only one-tenth the star formation rate. Studies of the CMC therefore provide a unique opportunity to probe the conditions of dense molecular gas in a quiescent star forming environment. We provide CS J(2-1) and HCN J(1-0) spectra taken with the Arizona Radio Observatory 12m telescope at Kitt Peak, as well as C18O J(2-1) spectra from the Heinrich Hertz Submillimeter Telescope on Mt. Graham, AZ, for 37 high opacity cores chosen from a near-infrared extinction map of the CMC. Analysis of the line properties were made through Gaussian fits to the line profiles. We present a statistical comparison of the line properties for sources in the CMC with a sample of 36 cores in Orion A from Tatematsu et al. and a larger sample of 150 intermediate and high-mass cores from Plume et al. We acknowledge the NSF for funding under Award No. AST-0847170, a PAARE Grant for the Calfornia-Arizona Minority Partnership for Astronomy Research and Education (CAMPARE).

  7. An 80-kilodalton protein that binds to the pre-S1 domain of hepatitis B virus.

    PubMed

    Ryu, C J; Cho, D Y; Gripon, P; Kim, H S; Guguen-Guillouzo, C; Hong, H J

    2000-01-01

    It has been suggested that hepatitis B virus (HBV) binds to a receptor on the plasma membrane of human hepatocytes via the pre-S1 domain of the large envelope protein as an initial step in HBV infection. However, the nature of the receptor remains controversial. In an attempt to identify a cell surface receptor for HBV, purified recombinant fusion protein of the pre-S1 domain of HBV with glutathione S-transferase (GST), expressed in Escherichia coli, was used as a ligand. The surface of human hepatocytes or HepG2 cells was biotinylated, and the cell lysate (precleared lysate) which did not bind to GST and glutathione-Sepharose beads was used as a source of receptor molecules. The precleared lysate of the biotinylated cells was incubated with the GST-pre-S1 fusion protein, and the bound proteins were visualized by Western blotting and enhanced chemiluminescence. An approximately 80-kDa protein (p80) was shown to bind specifically to the pre-S1 domain of the fusion protein. The receptor binding assay using serially or internally deleted segments of pre-S1 showed that amino acid residues 12 to 20 and 82 to 90 are essential for the binding of pre-S1 to p80. p80 also bound specifically to the pre-S1 of native HBV particles. Analysis of the tissue and species specificity of p80 expression in several available human primary cultures and cell lines of different tissue origin showed that p80 expression is not restricted to human hepatocytes. Taken together the results suggest that p80 may be a component of the viral entry machinery.

  8. Measure Lines

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crissman, Sally

    2011-01-01

    One tool for enhancing students' work with data in the science classroom is the measure line. As a coteacher and curriculum developer for The Inquiry Project, the author has seen how measure lines--a number line in which the numbers refer to units of measure--help students not only represent data but also analyze it in ways that generate…

  9. A laser frequency comb that enables radial velocity measurements with a precision of 1 cm s(-1).

    PubMed

    Li, Chih-Hao; Benedick, Andrew J; Fendel, Peter; Glenday, Alexander G; Kärtner, Franz X; Phillips, David F; Sasselov, Dimitar; Szentgyorgyi, Andrew; Walsworth, Ronald L

    2008-04-01

    Searches for extrasolar planets using the periodic Doppler shift of stellar spectral lines have recently achieved a precision of 60 cm s(-1) (ref. 1), which is sufficient to find a 5-Earth-mass planet in a Mercury-like orbit around a Sun-like star. To find a 1-Earth-mass planet in an Earth-like orbit, a precision of approximately 5 cm s(-1) is necessary. The combination of a laser frequency comb with a Fabry-Pérot filtering cavity has been suggested as a promising approach to achieve such Doppler shift resolution via improved spectrograph wavelength calibration, with recent encouraging results. Here we report the fabrication of such a filtered laser comb with up to 40-GHz (approximately 1-A) line spacing, generated from a 1-GHz repetition-rate source, without compromising long-term stability, reproducibility or spectral resolution. This wide-line-spacing comb, or 'astro-comb', is well matched to the resolving power of high-resolution astrophysical spectrographs. The astro-comb should allow a precision as high as 1 cm s(-1) in astronomical radial velocity measurements. PMID:18385734

  10. Aperture Synthesis C18O J = 1-0 Observations of L1551 IRS 5: Detailed Structure of the Infalling Envelope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Momose, Munetake; Ohashi, Nagayoshi; Kawabe, Ryohei; Nakano, Takenori; Hayashi, Masahiko

    1998-09-01

    We report aperture synthesis C18O J = 1-0 observations of L1551 IRS 5 with a spatial resolution of 2.8" × 2.5" using the Nobeyama Millimeter Array. We have detected an emission component centrally condensed around IRS 5, as well as a diffuse component extending in the north-south direction from the centrally condensed component. The centrally condensed component, 2380 × 1050 AU in size, is elongated in the direction perpendicular to the outflow axis, indicating the existence of a flattened circumstellar envelope around L1551 IRS 5. The mass of the centrally condensed component is estimated to be 0.062 M⊙. The position-velocity (P-V) diagrams reveal that the velocity field in the centrally condensed component is composed of infall and slight rotation. The infall velocity in the outer part is equal to the free-fall velocity around a central mass of ~0.1 M⊙, e.g., 0.5 km s-1 at r = 700 AU, whereas the rotation velocity, 0.24 km s-1 at the same radius, gets prominent at inner radii with a radial dependence of r-1. We make up P-V diagrams for the model envelopes with vertical structure, in which the matter falls under the gravity and eventually settles down in Keplerian rotation inside the centrifugal radius, and compare them with the observed P-V diagrams of the centrally condensed component. The main characteristics of the observed P-V diagrams are reproduced by either (1) an envelope with a moderately flattened density distribution, or (2) a spherical envelope with a bipolar cavity whose half-opening angle is about 50°. Detailed comparison of the observed and model P-V diagrams suggests that the C18O J = 1-0 emission from the outer part of the centrally condensed component is well reproduced with the models with the central mass ~0.15 M⊙ and the mass infall rate ~6 × 10-6 M⊙ yr-1. However, the higher velocity features of the emission near the star cannot be reproduced unless the central mass is taken to be ~0.5 M⊙. These facts suggest either that the

  11. Selecting against S1P3 enhances the acute cardiovascular tolerability of 3-(N-benzyl)aminopropylphosphonic acid S1P receptor agonists.

    PubMed

    Hale, Jeffrey J; Doherty, George; Toth, Leslie; Mills, Sander G; Hajdu, Richard; Keohane, Carol Ann; Rosenbach, Mark; Milligan, James; Shei, Gan-Ju; Chrebet, Gary; Bergstrom, James; Card, Deborah; Forrest, Michael; Sun, Shu-Yu; West, Sarah; Xie, Huijuan; Nomura, Naomi; Rosen, Hugh; Mandala, Suzanne

    2004-07-01

    Structurally modified 3-(N-benzylamino)propylphosphonic acid S1P receptor agonists that maintain affinity for S1P1, and have decreased affinity for S1P3 are efficacious, but exhibit decreased acute cardiovascular toxicity in rodents than do nonselective agonists.

  12. A lang1 0 0rang direction front-etched membrane structure for a micro-bolometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Tieying; Liu, Yidong; Li, Tie

    2009-03-01

    In this work, a CMOS-compatible membrane-supported micro-bolometer with a front-etched design along the lang1 1 0rang direction is fabricated. The openings in the absorbing area make etching faster on (1 0 0) planes and form a perfect suspending structure. The experiment shows that the design of lang1 0 0rang-oriented windows in an IR absorbing area together with a thermal sensitive thin film results in short releasing time and good IR absorption. The typical measured responsivity and detectivity of such a bolometer are 8.685 × 103 V W-1 and 2.451 × 108 cm Hz1/2 W-1, respectively. The easy and fast fabrication design makes this structure very suitable for low cost, high performance applications.

  13. Self-absorption theory applied to rocket measurements of the nitric oxide (1, 0) gamma band in the daytime thermosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eparvier, F. G.; Barth, C. A.

    1992-01-01

    Observations of the UV fluorescent emissions of the NO (1, 0) and (0, 1) gamma bands in the lower-thermospheric dayglow, made with a sounding rocket launched on March 7, 1989 from Poker Flat, Alaska, were analyzed. The resonant (1, 0) gamma band was found to be attenuated below an altitude of about 120 km. A self-absorption model based on Holstein transmission functions was developed for the resonant (1, 0) gamma band under varying conditions of slant column density and temperature and was applied for the conditions of the rocket flight. The results of the model agreed with the measured attenuation of the band, indicating the necessity of including self-absorption theory in the analysis of satellite and rocket limb data of NO.

  14. Evidence for charged B meson decays to a1+/-(1260)pi0 and a1(0)(1260)pi+/-.

    PubMed

    Aubert, B; Bona, M; Boutigny, D; Karyotakis, Y; Lees, J P; Poireau, V; Prudent, X; Tisserand, V; Zghiche, A; Garra Tico, J; Grauges, E; Lopez, L; Palano, A; Eigen, G; Stugu, B; Sun, L; Abrams, G S; Battaglia, M; Brown, D N; Button-Shafer, J; Cahn, R N; Groysman, Y; Jacobsen, R G; Kadyk, J A; Kerth, L T; Kolomensky, Yu G; Kukartsev, G; Lopes Pegna, D; Lynch, G; Mir, L M; Orimoto, T J; Ronan, M T; Tackmann, K; Wenzel, W A; Del Amo Sanchez, P; Hawkes, C M; Watson, A T; Held, T; Koch, H; Lewandowski, B; Pelizaeus, M; Schroeder, T; Steinke, M; Walker, D; Asgeirsson, D J; Cuhadar-Donszelmann, T; Fulsom, B G; Hearty, C; Mattison, T S; McKenna, J A; Khan, A; Saleem, M; Teodorescu, L; Blinov, V E; Bukin, A D; Druzhinin, V P; Golubev, V B; Onuchin, A P; Serednyakov, S I; Skovpen, Yu I; Solodov, E P; Todyshev, K Yu; Bondioli, M; Curry, S; Eschrich, I; Kirkby, D; Lankford, A J; Lund, P; Mandelkern, M; Martin, E C; Stoker, D P; Abachi, S; Buchanan, C; Foulkes, S D; Gary, J W; Liu, F; Long, O; Shen, B C; Zhang, L; Paar, H P; Rahatlou, S; Sharma, V; Berryhill, J W; Campagnari, C; Cunha, A; Dahmes, B; Hong, T M; Kovalskyi, D; Richman, J D; Beck, T W; Eisner, A M; Flacco, C J; Heusch, C A; Kroseberg, J; Lockman, W S; Schalk, T; Schumm, B A; Seiden, A; Wilson, M G; Winstrom, L O; Chen, E; Cheng, C H; Fang, F; Hitlin, D G; Narsky, I; Piatenko, T; Porter, F C; Andreassen, R; Mancinelli, G; Meadows, B T; Mishra, K; Sokoloff, M D; Blanc, F; Bloom, P C; Chen, S; Ford, W T; Hirschauer, J F; Kreisel, A; Nagel, M; Nauenberg, U; Olivas, A; Smith, J G; Ulmer, K A; Wagner, S R; Zhang, J; Gabareen, A M; Soffer, A; Toki, W H; Wilson, R J; Winklmeier, F; Altenburg, D D; Feltresi, E; Hauke, A; Jasper, H; Merkel, J; Petzold, A; Spaan, B; Wacker, K; Klose, V; Kobel, M J; Lacker, H M; Mader, W F; Nogowski, R; Schubert, J; Schubert, K R; Schwierz, R; Sundermann, J E; Volk, A; Bernard, D; Bonneaud, G R; Latour, E; Lombardo, V; Thiebaux, Ch; Verderi, M; Clark, P J; Gradl, W; Muheim, F; Playfer, S; Robertson, A I; Xie, Y; Andreotti, M; Bettoni, D; Bozzi, C; Calabrese, R; Cecchi, A; Cibinetto, G; Franchini, P; Luppi, E; Negrini, M; Petrella, A; Piemontese, L; Prencipe, E; Santoro, V; Anulli, F; Baldini-Ferroli, R; Calcaterra, A; de Sangro, R; Finocchiaro, G; Pacetti, S; Patteri, P; Peruzzi, I M; Piccolo, M; Rama, M; Zallo, A; Buzzo, A; Contri, R; Lo Vetere, M; Macri, M M; Monge, M R; Passaggio, S; Patrignani, C; Robutti, E; Santroni, A; Tosi, S; Chaisanguanthum, K S; Morii, M; Wu, J; Dubitzky, R S; Marks, J; Schenk, S; Uwer, U; Bard, D J; Dauncey, P D; Flack, R L; Nash, J A; Panduro Vazquez, W; Tibbetts, M; Behera, P K; Chai, X; Charles, M J; Mallik, U; Ziegler, V; Cochran, J; Crawley, H B; Dong, L; Eyges, V; Meyer, W T; Prell, S; Rosenberg, E I; Rubin, A E; Gao, Y Y; Gritsan, A V; Guo, Z J; Lae, C K; Denig, A G; Fritsch, M; Schott, G; Arnaud, N; Béquilleux, J; Davier, M; Grosdidier, G; Höcker, A; Lepeltier, V; Le Diberder, F; Lutz, A M; Pruvot, S; Rodier, S; Roudeau, P; Schune, M H; Serrano, J; Sordini, V; Stocchi, A; Wang, W F; Wormser, G; Lange, D J; Wright, D M; Bingham, I; Chavez, C A; Forster, I J; Fry, J R; Gabathuler, E; Gamet, R; Hutchcroft, D E; Payne, D J; Schofield, K C; Touramanis, C; Bevan, A J; George, K A; Di Lodovico, F; Menges, W; Sacco, R; Cowan, G; Flaecher, H U; Hopkins, D A; Paramesvaran, S; Salvatore, F; Wren, A C; Brown, D N; Davis, C L; Allison, J; Barlow, N R; Barlow, R J; Chia, Y M; Edgar, C L; Lafferty, G D; West, T J; Yi, J I; Anderson, J; Chen, C; Jawahery, A; Roberts, D A; Simi, G; Tuggle, J M; Blaylock, G; Dallapiccola, C; Hertzbach, S S; Li, X; Moore, T B; Salvati, E; Saremi, S; Cowan, R; Dujmic, D; Fisher, P H; Koeneke, K; Sciolla, G; Sekula, S J; Spitznagel, M; Taylor, F; Yamamoto, R K; Zhao, M; Zheng, Y; McLachlin, S E; Patel, P M; Robertson, S H; Lazzaro, A; Palombo, F; Bauer, J M; Cremaldi, L; Eschenburg, V; Godang, R; Kroeger, R; Sanders, D A; Summers, D J; Zhao, H W; Brunet, S; Côté, D; Simard, M; Taras, P; Viaud, F B; Nicholson, H; De Nardo, G; Fabozzi, F; Lista, L; Monorchio, D; Sciacca, C; Baak, M A; Raven, G; Snoek, H L; Jessop, C P; Losecco, J M; Benelli, G; Corwin, L A; Honscheid, K; Kagan, H; Kass, R; Morris, J P; Rahimi, A M; Regensburger, J J; Wong, Q K; Blount, N L; Brau, J; Frey, R; Igonkina, O; Kolb, J A; Lu, M; Rahmat, R; Sinev, N B; Strom, D; Strube, J; Torrence, E; Gagliardi, N; Gaz, A; Margoni, M; Morandin, M; Pompili, A; Posocco, M; Rotondo, M; Simonetto, F; Stroili, R; Voci, C; Ben-Haim, E; Briand, H; Calderini, G; Chauveau, J; David, P; Del Buono, L; de la Vaissière, Ch; Hamon, O; Leruste, Ph; Malclès, J; Ocariz, J; Perez, A; Gladney, L; Biasini, M; Covarelli, R; Manoni, E; Angelini, C; Batignani, G; Bettarini, S; Carpinelli, M; Cenci, R; Cervelli, A; Forti, F; Giorgi, M A; Lusiani, A; Marchiori, G; Mazur, M A; Morganti, M; Neri, N; Paoloni, E; Rizzo, G; Walsh, J J; Haire, M; Biesiada, J; Elmer, P; Lau, Y P; Lu, C; Olsen, J; Smith, A J S; Telnov, A V; Baracchini, E; Bellini, F; Cavoto, G; D'Orazio, A; Del Re, D; Di Marco, E; Faccini, R; Ferrarotto, F; Ferroni, F; Gaspero, M; Jackson, P D; Li Gioi, L; Mazzoni, M A; Morganti, S; Piredda, G; Polci, F; Renga, F; Voena, C; Ebert, M; Hartmann, T; Schröder, H; Waldi, R; Adye, T; Castelli, G; Franek, B; Olaiya, E O; Ricciardi, S; Roethel, W; Wilson, F F; Aleksan, R; Emery, S; Escalier, M; Gaidot, A; Ganzhur, S F; Hamel de Monchenault, G; Kozanecki, W; Vasseur, G; Yèche, Ch; Zito, M; Chen, X R; Liu, H; Park, W; Purohit, M V; Wilson, J R; Allen, M T; Aston, D; Bartoldus, R; Bechtle, P; Berger, N; Claus, R; Coleman, J P; Convery, M R; Dingfelder, J C; Dorfan, J; Dubois-Felsmann, G P; Dunwoodie, W; Field, R C; Glanzman, T; Gowdy, S J; Graham, M T; Grenier, P; Hast, C; Hryn'ova, T; Innes, W R; Kaminski, J; Kelsey, M H; Kim, H; Kim, P; Kocian, M L; Leith, D W G S; Li, S; Luitz, S; Luth, V; Lynch, H L; Macfarlane, D B; Marsiske, H; Messner, R; Muller, D R; O'Grady, C P; Ofte, I; Perazzo, A; Perl, M; Pulliam, T; Ratcliff, B N; Roodman, A; Salnikov, A A; Schindler, R H; Schwiening, J; Snyder, A; Stelzer, J; Su, D; Sullivan, M K; Suzuki, K; Swain, S K; Thompson, J M; Va'vra, J; van Bakel, N; Wagner, A P; Weaver, M; Wisniewski, W J; Wittgen, M; Wright, D H; Yarritu, A K; Yi, K; Young, C C; Burchat, P R; Edwards, A J; Majewski, S A; Petersen, B A; Wilden, L; Ahmed, S; Alam, M S; Bula, R; Ernst, J A; Jain, V; Pan, B; Saeed, M A; Wappler, F R; Zain, S B; Bugg, W; Krishnamurthy, M; Spanier, S M; Eckmann, R; Ritchie, J L; Ruland, A M; Schilling, C J; Schwitters, R F; Izen, J M; Lou, X C; Ye, S; Bianchi, F; Gallo, F; Gamba, D; Pelliccioni, M; Bomben, M; Bosisio, L; Cartaro, C; Cossutti, F; Della Ricca, G; Lanceri, L; Vitale, L; Azzolini, V; Lopez-March, N; Martinez-Vidal, F; Milanes, D A; Oyanguren, A; Albert, J; Banerjee, Sw; Bhuyan, B; Hamano, K; Kowalewski, R; Nugent, I M; Roney, J M; Sobie, R J; Harrison, P F; Ilic, J; Latham, T E; Mohanty, G B; Pappagallo, M; Band, H R; Chen, X; Dasu, S; Flood, K T; Hollar, J J; Kutter, P E; Pan, Y; Pierini, M; Prepost, R; Wu, S L; Neal, H

    2007-12-31

    We present measurements of the branching fractions for the decays B;{+/-}-->a_{1};{+/-}(1260)pi;{0} and B;{+/-}-->a_{1};{0}(1260)pi;{+/-} from a data sample of 232x10;{6} BB[over ] pairs produced in e;{+}e;{-} annihilation through the Upsilon(4S) resonance. We measure the branching fraction B(B;{+/-}-->a_{1};{+/-}(1260)pi;{0})xB(a_{1};{+/-}(1260)-->pi;{-}pi;{+}pi;{+/-})=(13.2+/-2.7+/-2.1)x10;{-6} with a significance of 4.2sigma, and the branching fraction B(B;{+/-}-->a_{1};{0}(1260)pi;{+/-})xB(a_{1};{0}(1260)-->pi;{-}pi;{+}pi;{0})=(20.4+/-4.7+/-3.4)x10;{-6} with a significance of 3.8sigma, where the first error quoted is statistical and the second is systematic. PMID:18233566

  15. Density relative change and interface zone mutual diffusion of BiFeO3 films prepared on Si (1 0 0), SiO2 and SiO2/Si (1 0 0)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, RenZheng; Wang, ZeSong; Yuan, XianBao; Zhou, JianJun; Mao, ZhangLiang; Su, HuaShan; Li, Bo; Fu, DeJun

    2016-10-01

    The mutual diffusion taken place in the interface zone between BiFeO3 (BFO) films and substrates (Si (1 0 0), SiO2 and SiO2/Si (1 0 0)) has been revealed by energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) and Rutherford Backscattering Spectrometry (RBS). RBS spectra provide the relative atomic concentrations of Bi, Fe, Si, and O elements changed with the samples' depth as analyzed by RBS spectra fitting SIMNRA software. A certain width of the intermixing layer is probably formed between BFO films and individual substrate which is attributed to mutual diffusion in the interface zone during annealing process. The mechanism of concerted exchange component can explain the interface zone mutual diffusion phenomenon between BFO films and substrates. The width of the interface zone between BFO film and Si (1 0 0), SiO2, and SiO2/Si (1 0 0) substrate is about 1.94 × 1017, 2.01 × 1017 and 3.05 × 1017 atoms/cm2, respectively, which are equivalent to 30.9, 36.7, and 52.9 nm, respectively. It has been declared that the effect on density relative to BFO film is loosen or attenuation is presented in the interface zone, which can be interpreted as a migration or diffusion of various atoms during the annealing. This can also provide an evidence of atomic dynamics and defect engineering on interface diffusion.

  16. A national FFQ for the Netherlands (the FFQ-NL 1.0): validation of a comprehensive FFQ for adults.

    PubMed

    Sluik, Diewertje; Geelen, Anouk; de Vries, Jeanne H M; Eussen, Simone J P M; Brants, Henny A M; Meijboom, Saskia; van Dongen, Martien C J M; Bueno-de-Mesquita, H Bas; Wijckmans-Duysens, Nicole E G; van 't Veer, Pieter; Dagnelie, Pieter C; Ocké, Marga C; Feskens, Edith J M

    2016-09-01

    A standardised, national, 160-item FFQ, the FFQ-NL 1.0, was recently developed for Dutch epidemiological studies. The objective was to validate the FFQ-NL 1.0 against multiple 24-h recalls (24hR) and recovery and concentration biomarkers. The FFQ-NL 1.0 was filled out by 383 participants (25-69 years) from the Nutrition Questionnaires plus study. For each participant, one to two urinary and blood samples and one to five (mean 2·7) telephone-based 24hR were available. Group-level bias, correlation coefficients, attenuation factors, de-attenuated correlation coefficients and ranking agreement were assessed. Compared with the 24hR, the FFQ-NL 1.0 estimated the intake of energy and macronutrients well. However, it underestimated intakes of SFA and trans-fatty acids and alcohol and overestimated intakes of most vitamins by >5 %. The median correlation coefficient was 0·39 for energy and macronutrients, 0·30 for micronutrients and 0·30 for food groups. The FFQ underestimated protein intake by an average of 16 % and K by 5 %, relative to their urinary recovery biomarkers. Attenuation factors were 0·44 and 0·46 for protein and K, respectively. Correlation coefficients were 0·43-0·47 between (fatty) fish intake and plasma EPA and DHA and 0·24-0·43 between fruit and vegetable intakes and plasma carotenoids. In conclusion, the overall validity of the newly developed FFQ-NL 1.0 was acceptable to good. The FFQ-NL 1.0 is well suited for future use within Dutch cohort studies among adults. PMID:27452894

  17. [Modulation of S-1 conformation and inhibition of the skeletal muscle S-1-ATPase by calponin of the mussel].

    PubMed

    Sirenko, V V; Simonian, A O; Dobrzhanskaia, A V; Shelud'ko, N S; Borovikov, Iu S

    2014-01-01

    A novel 40 kDa protein has been detected in native thin filaments from catch muscles of the mussel Crenomytilus grayanus. In this study, using skeletal muscle actin and S-1, we investigated the effects of the mussel 40-kDa actin-binding protein on the acto · S-1 ATPase activity. On increasing the 40-kDa actin-binding protein (CaP-40) concentration, the actin-activated ATPase activity decreased, and was inhibited 80% at a CaP-40 to actin ratio of 0.5. Polarized fluorimetry technique and glycerinated muscle fibers were used to study effects of CaP-40 on the orientation and mobility of fluorescent label 1.5-IAEDANS specifically bound to CyS-707 of myosin subfragment-1 in the absence of nucleotide, and in the presence of MgADP or MgATP. We have concluded that CaP-40 binding to actin affects the strong binding of myosin to actin but has no effect on the weak binding. Thus, the influence of the CaP-40 on the formation of strong actomyosin binding forms A · M and A · M · ADP manifests itself by a decrease in the relative content of myosin cross-bridges strongly bound with actin, which probably results in a decrease in the relative content of "switch on" actin monomers in thin filaments. This suggests that, as calponin CaP-40 selects its target the phase of strong actomyosin binding binding which preceded by a phase generating power stroke.

  18. Solwnd: A 3D Compressible MHD Code for Solar Wind Studies. Version 1.0: Cartesian Coordinates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deane, Anil E.

    1996-01-01

    Solwnd 1.0 is a three-dimensional compressible MHD code written in Fortran for studying the solar wind. Time-dependent boundary conditions are available. The computational algorithm is based on Flux Corrected Transport and the code is based on the existing code of Zalesak and Spicer. The flow considered is that of shear flow with incoming flow that perturbs this base flow. Several test cases corresponding to pressure balanced magnetic structures with velocity shear flow and various inflows including Alfven waves are presented. Version 1.0 of solwnd considers a rectangular Cartesian geometry. Future versions of solwnd will consider a spherical geometry. Some discussions of this issue is presented.

  19. Induced low-energy effective action in the 6D, N = (1 , 0) hypermultiplet theory on the vector multiplet background

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buchbinder, I. L.; Merzlikin, B. S.; Pletnev, N. G.

    2016-08-01

    We consider the six dimensional N = (1 , 0) hypermultiplet model coupled to an external field of the Abelian vector multiplet in harmonic superspace approach. Using the superfield proper-time technique we find the divergent part of the effective action and derive the complete finite induced low-energy superfield effective action. This effective action depends on external field and contains in bosonic sector all the powers of the constant Maxwell field strength. The obtained result can be treated as the 6D, N = (1 , 0) supersymmetric Heisenberg-Euler type effective action.

  20. S1 domain-containing STF modulates plastid transcription and chloroplast biogenesis in Nicotiana benthamiana.

    PubMed

    Jeon, Young; Jung, Hyun Ju; Kang, Hunseung; Park, Youn-Il; Lee, Soon Hee; Pai, Hyun-Sook

    2012-01-01

    • In this study, we examined the biochemical and physiological functions of Nicotiana benthamiana S1 domain-containing Transcription-Stimulating Factor (STF) using virus-induced gene silencing (VIGS), cosuppression, and overexpression strategies. • STF : green fluorescent protein (GFP) fusion protein colocalized with sulfite reductase (SiR), a chloroplast nucleoid-associated protein also present in the stroma. Full-length STF and its S1 domain preferentially bound to RNA, probably in a sequence-nonspecific manner. • STF silencing by VIGS or cosuppression resulted in severe leaf yellowing caused by disrupted chloroplast development. STF deficiency significantly perturbed plastid-encoded multimeric RNA polymerase (PEP)-dependent transcript accumulation. Chloroplast transcription run-on assays revealed that the transcription rate of PEP-dependent plastid genes was reduced in the STF-silenced leaves. Conversely, the exogenously added recombinant STF protein increased the transcription rate, suggesting a direct role of STF in plastid transcription. Etiolated seedlings of STF cosuppression lines showed defects in the light-triggered transition from etioplasts to chloroplasts, accompanied by reduced light-induced expression of plastid-encoded genes. • These results suggest that STF plays a critical role as an auxiliary factor of the PEP transcription complex in the regulation of plastid transcription and chloroplast biogenesis in higher plants. PMID:22050604

  1. Targeted Proteomics-Driven Computational Modeling of Macrophage S1P Chemosensing.

    PubMed

    Manes, Nathan P; Angermann, Bastian R; Koppenol-Raab, Marijke; An, Eunkyung; Sjoelund, Virginie H; Sun, Jing; Ishii, Masaru; Germain, Ronald N; Meier-Schellersheim, Martin; Nita-Lazar, Aleksandra

    2015-10-01

    Osteoclasts are monocyte-derived multinuclear cells that directly attach to and resorb bone. Sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P)(1) regulates bone resorption by functioning as both a chemoattractant and chemorepellent of osteoclast precursors through two G-protein coupled receptors that antagonize each other in an S1P-concentration-dependent manner. To quantitatively explore the behavior of this chemosensing pathway, we applied targeted proteomics, transcriptomics, and rule-based pathway modeling using the Simmune toolset. RAW264.7 cells (a mouse monocyte/macrophage cell line) were used as model osteoclast precursors, RNA-seq was used to identify expressed target proteins, and selected reaction monitoring (SRM) mass spectrometry using internal peptide standards was used to perform absolute abundance measurements of pathway proteins. The resulting transcript and protein abundance values were strongly correlated. Measured protein abundance values, used as simulation input parameters, led to in silico pathway behavior matching in vitro measurements. Moreover, once model parameters were established, even simulated responses toward stimuli that were not used for parameterization were consistent with experimental findings. These findings demonstrate the feasibility and value of combining targeted mass spectrometry with pathway modeling for advancing biological insight.

  2. Targeted Proteomics-Driven Computational Modeling of Macrophage S1P Chemosensing*

    PubMed Central

    Manes, Nathan P.; Angermann, Bastian R.; Koppenol-Raab, Marijke; An, Eunkyung; Sjoelund, Virginie H.; Sun, Jing; Ishii, Masaru; Germain, Ronald N.; Meier-Schellersheim, Martin; Nita-Lazar, Aleksandra

    2015-01-01

    Osteoclasts are monocyte-derived multinuclear cells that directly attach to and resorb bone. Sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P)1 regulates bone resorption by functioning as both a chemoattractant and chemorepellent of osteoclast precursors through two G-protein coupled receptors that antagonize each other in an S1P-concentration-dependent manner. To quantitatively explore the behavior of this chemosensing pathway, we applied targeted proteomics, transcriptomics, and rule-based pathway modeling using the Simmune toolset. RAW264.7 cells (a mouse monocyte/macrophage cell line) were used as model osteoclast precursors, RNA-seq was used to identify expressed target proteins, and selected reaction monitoring (SRM) mass spectrometry using internal peptide standards was used to perform absolute abundance measurements of pathway proteins. The resulting transcript and protein abundance values were strongly correlated. Measured protein abundance values, used as simulation input parameters, led to in silico pathway behavior matching in vitro measurements. Moreover, once model parameters were established, even simulated responses toward stimuli that were not used for parameterization were consistent with experimental findings. These findings demonstrate the feasibility and value of combining targeted mass spectrometry with pathway modeling for advancing biological insight. PMID:26199343

  3. Targeted Proteomics-Driven Computational Modeling of Macrophage S1P Chemosensing.

    PubMed

    Manes, Nathan P; Angermann, Bastian R; Koppenol-Raab, Marijke; An, Eunkyung; Sjoelund, Virginie H; Sun, Jing; Ishii, Masaru; Germain, Ronald N; Meier-Schellersheim, Martin; Nita-Lazar, Aleksandra

    2015-10-01

    Osteoclasts are monocyte-derived multinuclear cells that directly attach to and resorb bone. Sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P)(1) regulates bone resorption by functioning as both a chemoattractant and chemorepellent of osteoclast precursors through two G-protein coupled receptors that antagonize each other in an S1P-concentration-dependent manner. To quantitatively explore the behavior of this chemosensing pathway, we applied targeted proteomics, transcriptomics, and rule-based pathway modeling using the Simmune toolset. RAW264.7 cells (a mouse monocyte/macrophage cell line) were used as model osteoclast precursors, RNA-seq was used to identify expressed target proteins, and selected reaction monitoring (SRM) mass spectrometry using internal peptide standards was used to perform absolute abundance measurements of pathway proteins. The resulting transcript and protein abundance values were strongly correlated. Measured protein abundance values, used as simulation input parameters, led to in silico pathway behavior matching in vitro measurements. Moreover, once model parameters were established, even simulated responses toward stimuli that were not used for parameterization were consistent with experimental findings. These findings demonstrate the feasibility and value of combining targeted mass spectrometry with pathway modeling for advancing biological insight. PMID:26199343

  4. Possible Dust Models for C/2012 S1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yanamandra-Fisher, P. A.

    2014-12-01

    Comet C/2012 S1 (ISON) provided a great opportunity to study a dynamically new Oort-cloud comet on its initial and only passage through the inner solar system. Contrary to expectations, the comet's activity fluctuated from high through a quiescent phase, and a major outburst days before its perihelion passage, ending in a dramatic race to complete disintegration on perihelion day, 28 November 2013. Amateur observations to professional ground-based, sub-orbital telescopes indicate the various changes of visible factors such as Afrho, a proxy for dust activity, and the measured production rates for water, consistent with the disintegration of the nucleus. Hines et al. (2013; ApJ Lett. 780) detected positive polarization in the inner coma and negative polarization in the outer coma, indicative of a jet, independently confirmed by Li et al. (2013, ApJ Lett., 779). Thermal emission observations of the comet pre-perihelion from NAOJ/Subaru/COMICS, a mid-infrared spectrometer, indicated a body with an equivalent brightness temperature of 265K (Ootsubo et al., 2013, ACM, Helsinki,FI); thermal observations acquired at the NASA/Infrared Telescope Facility (IRTF) with The Aerospace Corporation spectrometer (BASS, PI. R. Russell), before and after the November 12, 2013 outburst observed by the CIOC_ISON amateur network, indicates a brightness temperature of 330K and the presence, albeit weak, of the 11.3-micron crystalline silicate feature (Sitko et al., 2014, LPI abstract 1537). A Monte Carlo comet dust tail model, applied to extract the dust environment parameters of comet C/2012 S1 (ISON) from both Earth-based and Solar and Heliospheric Observatory (SOHO) calibrated observations, performed from about 6 AU (inbound), to right after perihelion passage, when just a small portion of the original comet nucleus survived in the form of a cloud of tiny particles, indicates that particles underwent disintegration and fragmentation (Moreno et al., 2014, ApJ Lett., 791). Ongoing work

  5. Sphingosine kinase-1, S1P transporter spinster homolog 2 and S1P2 mRNA expressions are increased in liver with advanced fibrosis in human

    PubMed Central

    Sato, Masaya; Ikeda, Hitoshi; Uranbileg, Baasanjav; Kurano, Makoto; Saigusa, Daisuke; Aoki, Junken; Maki, Harufumi; Kudo, Hiroki; Hasegawa, Kiyoshi; Kokudo, Norihiro; Yatomi, Yutaka

    2016-01-01

    The role of sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P) in liver fibrosis or inflammation was not fully examined in human. Controversy exists which S1P receptors, S1P1 and S1P3 vs S1P2, would be importantly involved in its mechanism. To clarify these matters, 80 patients who received liver resection for hepatocellular carcinoma and 9 patients for metastatic liver tumor were enrolled. S1P metabolism was analyzed in background, non-tumorous liver tissue. mRNA levels of sphingosine kinase 1 (SK1) but not SK2 were increased in livers with fibrosis stages 3–4 compared to those with 0–2 and to normal liver. However, S1P was not increased in advanced fibrotic liver, where mRNA levels of S1P transporter spinster homolog 2 (SPNS2) but not S1P-degrading enzymes were enhanced. Furthermore, mRNA levels of S1P2 but not S1P1 or S1P3 were increased in advanced fibrotic liver. These increased mRNA levels of SK1, SPNS2 and S1P2 in fibrotic liver were correlated with α-smooth muscle actin mRNA levels in liver, and with serum ALT levels. In conclusion, S1P may be actively generated, transported to outside the cells, and bind to its specific receptor in human liver to play a role in fibrosis or inflammation. Altered S1P metabolism in fibrotic liver may be their therapeutic target. PMID:27562371

  6. Sphingosine kinase-1, S1P transporter spinster homolog 2 and S1P2 mRNA expressions are increased in liver with advanced fibrosis in human.

    PubMed

    Sato, Masaya; Ikeda, Hitoshi; Uranbileg, Baasanjav; Kurano, Makoto; Saigusa, Daisuke; Aoki, Junken; Maki, Harufumi; Kudo, Hiroki; Hasegawa, Kiyoshi; Kokudo, Norihiro; Yatomi, Yutaka

    2016-01-01

    The role of sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P) in liver fibrosis or inflammation was not fully examined in human. Controversy exists which S1P receptors, S1P1 and S1P3 vs S1P2, would be importantly involved in its mechanism. To clarify these matters, 80 patients who received liver resection for hepatocellular carcinoma and 9 patients for metastatic liver tumor were enrolled. S1P metabolism was analyzed in background, non-tumorous liver tissue. mRNA levels of sphingosine kinase 1 (SK1) but not SK2 were increased in livers with fibrosis stages 3-4 compared to those with 0-2 and to normal liver. However, S1P was not increased in advanced fibrotic liver, where mRNA levels of S1P transporter spinster homolog 2 (SPNS2) but not S1P-degrading enzymes were enhanced. Furthermore, mRNA levels of S1P2 but not S1P1 or S1P3 were increased in advanced fibrotic liver. These increased mRNA levels of SK1, SPNS2 and S1P2 in fibrotic liver were correlated with α-smooth muscle actin mRNA levels in liver, and with serum ALT levels. In conclusion, S1P may be actively generated, transported to outside the cells, and bind to its specific receptor in human liver to play a role in fibrosis or inflammation. Altered S1P metabolism in fibrotic liver may be their therapeutic target. PMID:27562371

  7. A program for confidence interval calculations for a Poisson process with background including systematic uncertainties: POLE 1.0

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conrad, Jan

    2004-04-01

    A Fortran 77 routine has been developed to calculate confidence intervals with and without systematic uncertainties using a frequentist confidence interval construction with a Bayesian treatment of the systematic uncertainties. The routine can account for systematic uncertainties in the background prediction and signal/background efficiencies. The uncertainties may be separately parametrized by a Gauss, log-normal or flat probability density function (PDF), though since a Monte Carlo approach is chosen to perform the necessary integrals a generalization to other parameterizations is particularly simple. Full correlation between signal and background efficiency is optional. The ordering schemes for frequentist construction currently supported are the likelihood ratio ordering (also known as Feldman-Cousins) and Neyman ordering. Optionally, both schemes can be used with conditioning, meaning the probability density function is conditioned on the fact that the actual outcome of the background process can not have been larger than the number of observed events. Program summaryTitle of program: POLE version 1.0 Catalogue identifier: ADTA Program summary URL:http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/ADTA Program available from: CPC Program Library, Queen's University of Belfast, N. Ireland Licensing provisions: None Computer for which the program is designed: DELL PC 1 GB 2.0 Ghz Pentium IV Operating system under which the program has been tested: RH Linux 7.2 Kernel 2.4.7-10 Programming language used: Fortran 77 Memory required to execute with typical data: ˜1.6 Mbytes No. of bytes in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 373745 No. of lines in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 2700 Distribution format: tar gzip file Keywords: Confidence interval calculation, Systematic uncertainties Nature of the physical problem: The problem is to calculate a frequentist confidence interval on the parameter of a Poisson process with known background in presence of

  8. DENSIFYV1.0

    2000-02-02

    This code is for the prediction of microstructural evolution during solid state sintering. The mechanism simulated in this code are curvature-driven grain growth, pore migration by surface diffusion, vacancy formation, grain boundary migration of vacancies and vacancy annihilation.

  9. MAUIV1.0

    2002-04-01

    MAUI is a software system that allows design analysts to access computational services through a graphical user interface. Services that may be made accessible through MAUI could include tools for design space exploration and optimization. Additionally, existing simulation codes may be integrated into the MAUI system such that input to the simulation code would be entered through the graphical user interface, and the input data would be propagated to the simulation code on a localmore » or remote machine. MAUI automatically produces a graphical user interface from an XML description of both the graphical user interface formatting, and the input data objects required by the underlying software service. This allows for simple generation of a common look-and-feel interface to a variety of simulation and analysis software. The graphical user interface is generated from Java Swing components.« less

  10. CABRAKAN1.0

    2007-05-15

    Cabrakan is a software framework designed for cognitive modeling, machine learning, and pattern recognition. This software has a graphical user interface that can be used to visualize graphical structures and build models graphically. Cabrakan models are created using with a collection of application-specific modules, which can be reused from previous applications or designed for a particular algorithm to incorporate.

  11. CLAROV1.0

    2004-06-01

    CLARO is a highly customizable graphical user interface package built on QT and Python. It has basic functions useful for the generation, display and manipulation of geometry and mesh data. This includes picking and CAD-like graphics and rotations. The menus presented to the user can be quickly customized and modules that use CLARO dynamically loaded at runtime.

  12. SALINAS1.0

    SciTech Connect

    Reese, Garth; Bhardwaj, Manoj; Pierson, Kendall; Walsh, Tim; Day, David

    2002-10-01

    Salinas isa general purpose finite element package for structural dynamics analysis, written pecifically for distributed memory computers. It has been used for the analysis of structures ranging MEMs, to weapons components to aircraft carriers. The package provides eigenanalysis, and implicit linear and nonlinear transient and static analysis of structures, and incorporates sensitivity analysis. A full range of structural elements is provided.

  13. GOSOV1.0

    2000-08-16

    The Genetic Optimization Software Object is a 32-bit object. It is delivered as a Dynamic Link Library (DLL) and runs under all 32-bit versions of Microsoft Windows. Genetic Optimization refers to an optimization scheme used to solve large combinatorial problems using "genetic" algorithms. The DLL is a software object, which means that it must be instantiated by a host application before it's properties and methods can be used. to perform an optimization analysis, the hostmore » application must also include a user-supplied process model.« less

  14. BABELV1.0

    2001-11-26

    Babel reads binary data representing a wave-propagation signal in a drill pipe generated by the Sandia National Laboratories, Acoustic Telemetry Tool. Babel then processes that data to extract, display, and store the information modulated on that signal.

  15. MURDAM1. 0

    SciTech Connect

    Poyer, D.A.; Butler, J.G. )

    1993-01-01

    Econometric model simulates consumer demand response to various user-supplied, two-part tariff electricity rate designs and assesses their economic welfare impact on black, hispanic, poor and majority households.

  16. CHARICE1.0

    2007-10-25

    CHARICE analyzes velcity waveform data from ramp-wave experiments to determine a sample material's quasi-isentropic loading response in stress and density. A graphical interface handles all user interaction. CHARICE uses a generalized ASCII file format for input waveform data, obviating the need for pre-processing of these data. Capabilities include calculation of uncertainty bounds, correction for non-uniform baseplate thickness, and user-provided ramp-wave loading response for interferometer window materials. Output consists of particle velocity, lagrangian wave speed, density,more » and stress along the loading quasi-isentrope, as well as in-situ time istory for any of these variables at the front or back surface of each sample.« less

  17. GBS 1.0

    SciTech Connect

    2010-09-30

    The Umbra gbs (Graph-Based Search) library provides implementations of graph-based search/planning algorithms that can be applied to legacy graph data structures. Unlike some other graph algorithm libraries, this one does not require your graph class to inherit from a specific base class. Implementations of Dijkstra's Algorithm and A-Star search are included and can be used with graphs that are lazily-constructed.

  18. THE BOLOCAM GALACTIC PLANE SURVEY. XII. DISTANCE CATALOG EXPANSION USING KINEMATIC ISOLATION OF DENSE MOLECULAR CLOUD STRUCTURES WITH {sup 13}CO(1-0)

    SciTech Connect

    Ellsworth-Bowers, Timothy P.; Glenn, Jason; Rosolowsky, Erik; Ginsburg, Adam; Evans II, Neal J.; Battersby, Cara; Shirley, Yancy L.; Svoboda, Brian

    2015-01-20

    We present an expanded distance catalog for 1710 molecular cloud structures identified in the Bolocam Galactic Plane Survey (BGPS) version 2, representing a nearly threefold increase over the previous BGPS distance catalog. We additionally present a new method for incorporating extant data sets into our Bayesian distance probability density function (DPDF) methodology. To augment the dense-gas tracers (e.g., HCO{sup +}(3-2), NH{sub 3}(1,1)) used to derive line-of-sight velocities for kinematic distances, we utilize the Galactic Ring Survey (GRS) {sup 13}CO(1-0) data to morphologically extract velocities for BGPS sources. The outline of a BGPS source is used to select a region of the GRS {sup 13}CO data, along with a reference region to subtract enveloping diffuse emission, to produce a line profile of {sup 13}CO matched to the BGPS source. For objects with a HCO{sup +}(3-2) velocity, ≈95% of the new {sup 13}CO(1-0) velocities agree with that of the dense gas. A new prior DPDF for kinematic distance ambiguity (KDA) resolution, based on a validated formalism for associating molecular cloud structures with known objects from the literature, is presented. We demonstrate this prior using catalogs of masers with trigonometric parallaxes and H II regions with robust KDA resolutions. The distance catalog presented here contains well-constrained distance estimates for 20% of BGPS V2 sources, with typical distance uncertainties ≲ 0.5 kpc. Approximately 75% of the well-constrained sources lie within 6 kpc of the Sun, concentrated in the Scutum-Centaurus arm. Galactocentric positions of objects additionally trace out portions of the Sagittarius, Perseus, and Outer arms in the first and second Galactic quadrants, and we also find evidence for significant regions of interarm dense gas.

  19. Gravitational dynamics in s+1+1 dimensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gergely, László Á.; Kovács, Zoltán

    2005-09-01

    We present the concomitant decomposition of an (s+2)-dimensional space-time both with respect to a timelike and a spacelike direction. The formalism we develop is suited for the study of the initial value problem and for canonical gravitational dynamics in braneworld scenarios. The bulk metric is replaced by two sets of variables. The first set consists of one tensorial (the induced metric gij), one vectorial (Mi) and one scalar (M) dynamical quantity, all defined on the s space. Their time evolutions are related to the second fundamental form (the extrinsic curvature Kij), the normal fundamental form (Ki) and normal fundamental scalar (K), respectively. The nondynamical set of variables is given by the lapse function and the shift vector, which however has one component less. The missing component is due to the externally imposed constraint, which states that physical trajectories are confined to the (s+1)-dimensional brane. The pair of dynamical variables (gij, Kij), well known from the Arnowitt-Deser-Misner decomposition is supplemented by the pairs (Mi, Ki) and (M, K) due to the bulk curvature. We give all projections of the junction condition across the brane and prove that for a perfect fluid brane neither of the dynamical variables has jump across the brane. Finally we complete the set of equations needed for gravitational dynamics by deriving the evolution equations of Kij, Ki and K on a brane with arbitrary matter.

  20. Outgassing and chemical evolution of C/2012 S1 (ISON)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dello Russo, Neil; Vervack, Ronald J.; Kawakita, Hideyo; Cochran, Anita; McKay, Adam J.; Harris, Walter M.; Weaver, Harold A.; Lisse, Carey M.; DiSanti, Michael A.; Kobayashi, Hitomi; Biver, Nicolas; Bockelée-Morvan, Dominique; Crovisier, Jacques; Opitom, Cyrielle; Jehin, Emmanuel

    2015-11-01

    Volatile production rates, relative abundances, rotational temperatures, and spatial distributions in the coma were measured in C/2012 S1 (ISON) using long-slit high-dispersion (λ/Δλ ~ 25,000) infrared spectroscopy as part of a worldwide observing campaign. Spectra were obtained on UT 2013 October 26 and 28 with NIRSPEC at the W. M. Keck Observatory, and UT 2013 November 19 and 20 with CSHELL at the NASA IRTF. H2O was detected on all dates, with production rates increasing by about a factor of 40 between October 26 (Rh = 1.12 AU) and November 20 (Rh = 0.43 AU). Short-term variability of H2O was also seen as the production rate increased by nearly a factor of two during observations obtained over a period of about six hours on November 19. C2H6, CH3OH and CH4 abundances were slightly depleted relative to H2O in ISON compared to mean values for comets measured at infrared wavelengths. On the November dates, C2H2, HCN and OCS abundances relative to H2O appear to be close to the range of mean values, whereas H2CO and NH3 were significantly enhanced. We will compare derived chemical abundances in ISON to other comets measured with infrared spectroscopy.

  1. Will Comet ISON (C/2012 S1) Survive Perihelion?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knight, Matthew M.; Walsh, Kevin J.

    2013-10-01

    On 2013 November 28 Comet ISON (C/2012 S1) will pass by the Sun with a perihelion distance of 2.7 solar radii. Understanding the possible outcomes for the comet's response to such a close passage by the Sun is important for planning observational campaigns and for inferring ISON's physical properties. We present new numerical simulations and interpret them in context with the historical track record of comet disruptions and of sungrazing comet behavior. Historical data suggest that sizes below ~200 m are susceptible to destruction by sublimation driven mass loss, while we find that for ISON's perihelion distance, densities lower than 0.1 g cm-3 are required to tidally disrupt a retrograde or non-spinning body. Such low densities are substantially below the range of the best-determined comet nucleus densities, though dynamically new comets such as ISON have few measurements of physical properties. Disruption may occur for prograde rotation at densities up to 0.7 g cm-3, with the chances of disruption increasing for lower density, faster prograde rotation, and increasing elongation of the nucleus. Given current constraints on ISON's nucleus properties and the typically determined values for these properties among all comets, we find tidal disruption to be unlikely unless other factors (e.g., spin-up via torquing) affect ISON substantially. Whether or not disruption occurs, the largest remnant must be big enough to survive subsequent mass loss due to sublimation in order for ISON to remain a viable comet well after perihelion.

  2. 76 FR 23630 - Office of New Reactors; Proposed Revision 2 to Standard Review Plan, Section 1.0 on Introduction...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-04-27

    ...), Section 1.0, ``Introduction and Interfaces'' (Agencywide Documents Access and Management System (ADAMS... as shown in the description of changes. This update also incorporates into the guidance previously issued Interim Staff Guidance on Post-Combined License Commitments (ESP/DC/COL-ISG-015, see...

  3. Enhancement of CO(3-2)/CO(1-0) ratios and star formation efficiencies in supergiant H II regions

    SciTech Connect

    Miura, Rie E.; Espada, Daniel; Komugi, Shinya; Nakanishi, Kouichiro; Sawada, Tsuyoshi; Fujii, Kosuke; Kawabe, Ryohei; Kohno, Kotaro; Tosaki, Tomoka; Hirota, Akihiko; Minamidani, Tetsuhiro; Okumura, Sachiko K.; Kuno, Nario; Muraoka, Kazuyuki; Onodera, Sachiko; Kaneko, Hiroyuki

    2014-06-20

    We present evidence that super giant H II regions (GHRs) and other disk regions of the nearby spiral galaxy, M33, occupy distinct locations in the correlation between molecular gas, Σ{sub H{sub 2}}, and the star formation rate surface density, Σ{sub SFR}. This result is based on wide-field and high-sensitivity CO(3-2) observations at 100 pc resolution. Star formation efficiencies (SFEs), defined as Σ{sub SFR}/Σ{sub H{sub 2}}, in GHRs are found to be ∼1 dex higher than in other disk regions. The CO(3-2)/CO(1-0) integrated intensity ratio, R {sub 3-2/1-0}, is also higher than the average over the disk. Such high SFEs and R {sub 3-2/1-0} can reach the values found in starburst galaxies, which suggests that GHRs may be the elements building up a larger-scale starburst region. Three possible contributions to high SFEs in GHRs are investigated: (1) the I {sub CO}-N(H{sub 2}) conversion factor, (2) the dense gas fraction traced by R {sub 3-2/1-0}, and (3) the initial mass function (IMF). We conclude that these starburst-like properties in GHRs can be interpreted by a combination of both a top-heavy IMF and a high dense gas fraction, but not by changes in the I {sub CO}-N(H{sub 2}) conversion factor.

  4. VizieR Online Data Catalog: J=1-0 transitions of argonium (ArH+) (Bizzocchi+,

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bizzocchi, L.; Dore, L.; Degli Esposti, C.; Tamassia, F.

    2016-06-01

    The J=1-0 pure rotational transition of the argonium ion was observed in absorption with a frequency-modulated millimeter-wave spectrometer equipped with a negative glow discharge cell. See section 2 for the experimental details. (1 data file).

  5. 76 FR 77025 - Office of New Reactors; Notice of Availability of the Final Staff Guidance Section 1.0, Revision...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-09

    ... Review of Safety Analysis Reports for Nuclear Power Plants: LWR Edition,'' Section 1.0, Revision 2 on... Advanced Reactors and Rulemaking, Office of New Reactors, U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Washington... Nuclear Regulatory Commission. Amy E. Cubbage, Chief, Policy Branch, Division of Advanced Reactors...

  6. Evaluation of Tafel-Volmer kinetic parameters for the hydrogen oxidation reaction on Pt(1 1 0) electrodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mann, R. F.; Thurgood, C. P.

    2011-05-01

    Modelling of PEM fuel cells has long been an active research area to improve understanding of cell and stack operation, facilitate design improvements and support simulation studies. The prediction of activation polarization in most PEM models has concentrated on the cathode losses since anode losses are commonly much smaller and tend to be ignored. Further development of the anode activation polarization term is being undertaken to broaden the application and usefulness of PEM models in general. Published work on the kinetics of the hydrogen oxidation reaction (HOR) using Pt(h k l) electrodes in dilute H2SO4 has been recently reassessed and published. Correlations for diffusion-free exchange current densities were developed and empirical predictive equations for the anode activation polarization were proposed for the experimental conditions of the previously published work: Pt(1 0 0), Pt(1 1 0) and Pt(1 1 1) electrodes, pH2 of 1 atm, and temperatures of 1, 30 and 60 °C. It was concluded that the HOR on Pt(1 1 0) electrodes followed a Tafel-Volmer reaction sequence. The aim of the present paper is to generalize these Tafel-Volmer correlations, apply them to published data for Pt(1 1 0) electrodes and further develop the modelling of anode activation polarization over the range of operating conditions found in PEMFC operation.

  7. Time-motion analysis of basketball players: a reliability assessment of Video Manual Motion Tracker 1.0 software.

    PubMed

    Hulka, Karel; Cuberek, Roman; Svoboda, Zdenek

    2014-01-01

    This study assessed the measurement error of a monitoring system, the Video Manual Motion Tracker 1.0 (VMMT1.0), during time-motion analysis of basketball players. In this study, four reliability parameters were used to assess the measurement error of the system: the systematic bias, the inter-observer reliability, the intra-observer reliability and the absolute reliability. A basketball game video was used for the analysis. To assess the inter-observer reliability, two observers analysed a player's covered distance for 50 different periods of the game. To assess the relative and absolute reliability of the covered distance, the chosen players were monitored three times by 41 qualified observers. The findings did not indicate a significant systematic bias in the measurement error using the VMMT1.0 (one-way ANOVA, P > 0.05). The intra-observer reliability of the monitoring system was rated as very high (intraclass correlation, ICC = 0.999), similar to its inter-observer reliability (Pearson product-moment correlation, r = 0.994). The absolute reliability does not appear to be significant (standard error of measurement, SEM = 0.34 m). The results showed that the measurement error of the VMMT1.0 is acceptable and comparable with that of other time-motion analysis techniques.

  8. Sphingosine 1-Phosphate (S1P) Receptor Agonists Mediate Pro-fibrotic Responses in Normal Human Lung Fibroblasts via S1P2 and S1P3 Receptors and Smad-independent Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Sobel, Katrin; Menyhart, Katalin; Killer, Nina; Renault, Bérengère; Bauer, Yasmina; Studer, Rolf; Steiner, Beat; Bolli, Martin H.; Nayler, Oliver; Gatfield, John

    2013-01-01

    Synthetic sphingosine 1-phosphate receptor 1 modulators constitute a new class of drugs for the treatment of autoimmune diseases. Sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P) signaling, however, is also involved in the development of fibrosis. Using normal human lung fibroblasts, we investigated the induction of fibrotic responses by the S1P receptor (S1PR) agonists S1P, FTY720-P, ponesimod, and SEW2871 and compared them with the responses induced by the known fibrotic mediator TGF-β1. In contrast to TGF-β1, S1PR agonists did not induce expression of the myofibroblast marker α-smooth muscle actin. However, TGF-β1, S1P, and FTY720-P caused robust stimulation of extracellular matrix (ECM) synthesis and increased pro-fibrotic marker gene expression including connective tissue growth factor. Ponesimod showed limited and SEW2871 showed no pro-fibrotic potential in these readouts. Analysis of pro-fibrotic signaling pathways showed that in contrast to TGF-β1, S1PR agonists did not activate Smad2/3 signaling but rather activated PI3K/Akt and ERK1/2 signaling to induce ECM synthesis. The strong induction of ECM synthesis by the nonselective agonists S1P and FTY720-P was due to the stimulation of S1P2 and S1P3 receptors, whereas the weaker induction of ECM synthesis at high concentrations of ponesimod was due to a low potency activation of S1P3 receptors. Finally, in normal human lung fibroblast-derived myofibroblasts that were generated by TGF-β1 pretreatment, S1P and FTY720-P were effective stimulators of ECM synthesis, whereas ponesimod was inactive, because of the down-regulation of S1P3R expression in myofibroblasts. These data demonstrate that S1PR agonists are pro-fibrotic via S1P2R and S1P3R stimulation using Smad-independent pathways. PMID:23589284

  9. Electron-impact excitation of the Rb 7 2S1/2, 8 2S1/2, 5 2D3/2, and 6 2D3/2 states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Zuyi; Flynn, Connor; Redd, Aaron; Stumpf, Bernhard

    1993-03-01

    Electron-impact cross sections for excitation of the 7 2S1/2, 8 2S1/2, 5 2D3/2, and 6 2D3/2 states of rubidium have been measured from threshold to 1000 eV. The optical-excitation-function method has been employed in a crossed atom- and electron-beam apparatus. Relative, total (cascade including) experimental cross sections are made absolute by comparison with the known total cross section of the Rb D1 line. Total excitation cross sections are compared with theoretical calculations employing first Born approximation and theoretical branching ratios. Born cross sections for the 7 2S1/2 and 8 2S1/2 states are obtained from the literature, while Born cross sections for the 5 2D3/2, 6 2D3/2, and all cascading states are calculated in this paper. At high energies, the measured total 2D3/2 state cross sections show 1/E behavior and converge to first Born theory; for E>100 eV, experiment and theory agree within 6.7% for 5 2D3/2 and within 3.7% for 6 2D3/2. The total cross sections for the 2S1/2 states do not converge to Born theory even at 1000 eV, and it is shown that this cannot be attributed to cascading. At low energies, 2S1/2 and 2D3/2 state total excitation cross sections have similar shapes with sharply peaked maxima at about 0.9 eV above threshold. After cascading is corrected using first Born theory, estimated experimental cross sections for direct excitation of higher fine-structure states of rubidium are given.

  10. Observation of an Exotic Baryon with S=+1 in Photoproduction from the Proton

    SciTech Connect

    Valery Kubarovsky; Lei Guo; Dennis Weygand; Paul Stoler; Marco Battaglieri; Raffaella De Vita; Gary Adams; Ji Li; Mina Nozar; Carlos Salgado; Pawel Ambrozewicz; Eric Anciant; Marco Anghinolfi; Burin Asavapibhop; Gerard Audit; Thierry Auger; Harutyun AVAKIAN; Hovhannes Baghdasaryan; Jacques Ball; Steve Barrow

    2004-01-01

    The reaction {gamma}p {yields} {pi}{sup +} K{sup -} K{sup +}n was studied at Jefferson Lab using a tagged photon beam with an energy range of 3-5.47 GeV. A narrow baryon state with strangeness S = +1 and mass M = 1555 {+-} 10 MeV/c{sup 2} was observed in the nK{sup +} invariant mass spectrum. The peak's width is consistent with the CLAS resolution (FWHM = 26 MeV/c{sup 2}), and its statistical significance is 7.8 {+-} 1.0 {sigma}. A baryon with positive strangeness has exotic structure and cannot be described in the framework of the naive constituent quark model. The mass of the observed state is consistent with the mass predicted by a chiral soliton model for the {Theta}{sup +} baryon. In addition, the pK{sup +} invariant mass distribution was analyzed in the reaction {gamma} p {yields} K{sup -} K{sup +}p with high statistics in search of doubly-charged exotic baryon states. No resonance structures were found in this spectrum.

  11. The turbomachine blading design using S2-S1 approach

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Luu, T. S.; Bencherif, L.; Viney, B.; Duc, J. M. Nguyen

    1991-01-01

    The boundary conditions corresponding to the design problem when the blades being simulated by the bound vorticity distribution are presented. The 3D flow is analyzed by the two steps S2 - S1 approach. In the first step, the number of blades is supposed to be infinite, the vortex distribution is transformed into an axisymmetric one, so that the flow field can be analyzed in a meridional plane. The thickness distribution of the blade producing the flow channel striction is taken into account by the modification of metric tensor in the continuity equation. Using the meridional stream function to define the flow field, the mass conservation is satisfied automatically. The governing equation is deduced from the relation between the azimuthal component of the vorticity and the meridional velocity. The value of the azimuthal component of the vorticity is provided by the hub to shroud equilibrium condition. This step leads to the determination of the axisymmetric stream sheets as well as the approximate camber surface of the blade. In the second step, the finite number of blades is taken into account, the inverse problem corresponding to the blade to blade flow confined in each stream sheet is analyzed. The momentum equation implies that the free vortex of the absolute velocity must be tangential to the stream sheet. The governing equation for the blade to blade flow stream function is deduced from this condition. At the beginning, the upper and the lower surfaces of the blades are created from the camber surface obtained from the first step with the assigned thickness distribution. The bound vorticity distribution and the penetrating flux conservation applied on the presumed blade surface constitute the boundary conditions of the inverse problem. The detection of this flux leads to the rectification of the geometry of the blades.

  12. Nijmegen Baryon-Baryon Interactions for S = -1, -2 Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rijken, Th. A.; Nagels, M. M.; Yamamoto, Y.

    We present and discuss the most recent version of the extended-soft-core (ESC) interactions. The ESC-model describes the nucleon-nucleon (NN), hyperon-nucleon (YN), and hyperon-hyperon (YY), in terms of meson-exchanges using (broken) SUF(3)-symmetry. In this approach to baryon-baryon (BB) the dynamics is derived from (i) one-boson-exchanges (OBE), (ii) two-meson-exchanges (TME), and (iii) meson-pair-exchanges (MPE), (iv) gluon-exchanges, and (v) quark-core effects. In the OBE-sector, a special feature is the importance of the axial-vector meson potentials, and the inclusion of a zero in the scalar- and axial- meson form-factors. Novelties are the inclusion of (a) odderon-exchange, and (b) special pronounced effects of the appearance of forbidden six-quark configurations. With these ingredients, a rather flexible dynamical framework is constructed. Namely, it appeared feasible to keep the parameters of the model in reasonable accordance with the predictions of the 3P0 quark-pair-creation model (QPC). This is the case for the meson- and meson-pair-baryon coupling constants and the F/(F + D)-ratio's as well. The NN, YN, and YY results for this model are rather promising. In particular, we improved the ΛN spin-orbit interaction greatly by the inclusion of (a) the Brown, Downs, and Iddings anti-symmetric spin-orbit potentials, and (b) new corrections to the MPE-potentials. Also, the special quark-core effects provide ample repulsion in the Σ+p(3S1,T = 3/2)- and ΣN(1S0,T = 1/2)-channels. The new version of the ESC-model reported here will be referred to as ESC07 henceforth.

  13. Nijmegen Baryon-Baryon Interactions for S = -1, -2 Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rijken, Th. A.; Nagels, M. M.; Yamamoto, Y.

    2010-10-01

    We present and discuss the most recent version of the extended-soft-core (ESC) interactions. The ESC-model describes the nucleon-nucleon (NN), hyperon-nucleon (YN), and hyperon-hyperon (YY), in terms of meson-exchanges using (broken) SUF(3)-symmetry. In this approach to baryon-baryon (BB) the dynamics is derived from (i) one-boson-exchanges (OBE), (ii) two-meson-exchanges (TME), and (iii) meson-pair-exchanges (MPE), (iv) gluon-exchanges, and (v) quark-core effects. In the OBE-sector, a special feature is the importance of the axial-vector meson potentials, and the inclusion of a zero in the scalar- and axial- meson form-factors. Novelties are the inclusion of (a) odderon-exchange, and (b) special pronounced effects of the appearance of forbidden six-quark configurations. With these ingredients, a rather flexible dynamical framework is constructed. Namely, it appeared feasible to keep the parameters of the model in reasonable accordance with the predictions of the 3P0 quark-pair-creation model (QPC). This is the case for the meson- and meson-pair-baryon coupling constants and the F/(F + D)-ratio's as well. The NN, YN, and YY results for this model are rather promising. In particular, we improved the ΛN spin-orbit interaction greatly by the inclusion of (a) the Brown, Downs, and Iddings anti-symmetric spin-orbit potentials, and (b) new corrections to the MPE-potentials. Also, the special quark-core effects provide ample repulsion in the Σ+p(3S1, T = 3/2)- and ΣN(1S0,T = l/2)-channels. The new version of the ESC-model reported here will be referred to as ESC07 henceforth.

  14. WILL COMET ISON (C/2012 S1) SURVIVE PERIHELION?

    SciTech Connect

    Knight, Matthew M.; Walsh, Kevin J.

    2013-10-10

    On 2013 November 28 Comet ISON (C/2012 S1) will pass by the Sun with a perihelion distance of 2.7 solar radii. Understanding the possible outcomes for the comet's response to such a close passage by the Sun is important for planning observational campaigns and for inferring ISON's physical properties. We present new numerical simulations and interpret them in context with the historical track record of comet disruptions and of sungrazing comet behavior. Historical data suggest that sizes below ∼200 m are susceptible to destruction by sublimation driven mass loss, while we find that for ISON's perihelion distance, densities lower than 0.1 g cm{sup –3} are required to tidally disrupt a retrograde or non-spinning body. Such low densities are substantially below the range of the best-determined comet nucleus densities, though dynamically new comets such as ISON have few measurements of physical properties. Disruption may occur for prograde rotation at densities up to 0.7 g cm{sup –3}, with the chances of disruption increasing for lower density, faster prograde rotation, and increasing elongation of the nucleus. Given current constraints on ISON's nucleus properties and the typically determined values for these properties among all comets, we find tidal disruption to be unlikely unless other factors (e.g., spin-up via torquing) affect ISON substantially. Whether or not disruption occurs, the largest remnant must be big enough to survive subsequent mass loss due to sublimation in order for ISON to remain a viable comet well after perihelion.

  15. Search for ammonia in comet C/2012 S1 (ISON)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faggi, S.; Codella, C.; Tozzi, G.; Comoretto, G.; Crovisier, J.; Nesti, R.; Panella, D.; Boissier, J.; Bolli, P.; Brucato, J.; Massi, F.; Tofani, G.

    2014-07-01

    Comets are pristine bodies of the Solar System and their studies can give precious hints on the formation of the Solar System itself. New comets, coming form the Oort Colud at their first passage close to the Sun, are particularly important, because they are not differentiated by the Solar radiation and they are supposed to have a large quantity of organic matter close to the surface. Here we report the results of a search for NH_3(1,1) emission at 23.7 GHz in comet C/2012 S1 ISON using a new dual-feed K-band receiver mounted on the Medicina 32-m antenna. We observed the comet once close to its perihelion, from 2013 Nov. 25 to Nov. 28, when its heliocentric distance changed from 0.25 au to 0.03 au. We integrated about 6 hrs per day, obtaining high-spectral-resolution (1 km/s) spectra with a typical rms noise of 10 mK. Such sensitivity allowed us to derive an upper limit of Q(NH_3) of about 2.5 ×10^{29} mol/s on November 26. This upper limit would correspond to a Q(H_2O) of about 2.5 ×10^{31} mol/s, assuming the typical Q(H_2O)/Q(NH_3) ratio of 100. These findings confirm that no significant Q(H_2O) enhancement happened near the perihelion, consistent with a definitive decrease of molecules production rate.

  16. Discovery of Extremely Broad Balmer Absorption Lines in SDSS J152350.42+391405.2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Shaohua; Zhou, Hongyan; Shi, Xiheng; Shu, Xinwen; Liu, Wenjuan; Ji, Tuo; Jiang, Peng; Sun, Luming; Zhou, Junyan; Pan, Xiang

    2015-12-01

    We present the discovery of Balmer line absorption from Hα to Hγ in an iron low-ionization broad absorption line (FeLoBAL) quasar SDSS J152350.42+391405.2 (hereafter SDSS J1523+3914), by the quasi-simultaneous optical and near-infrared spectroscopy. The Balmer line absorption is at {z}{absor}=0.6039+/- 0.0021 and blueshifted by v = 10,353 km s-1 with respect to the Balmer emission lines. All Balmer BALs have a uniform absorption profile with the widths of {{Δ }}v˜ 12,000 km s-1. We also found the absorption trough in He i* λ10830 with the same velocity and width in the H-band TripleSpec spectrum of SDSS J1523+3914. This object is only the 10th active galactic nucleus known to exhibit nonstellar Balmer absorption, as well as the case with the highest velocity and broadest Balmer absorption lines that have ever been found. A CLOUDY analysis shows that the absorbers require a gas density of {{log}}10 {n}{{e}} ({{cm}}-3)=9 and an ionization parameter of {{log}}10 U=-1.0. They are located at a distance of ˜0.2 pc from the central ionizing source, which is slightly farther than that of broad emission line regions. Furthermore, SDSS J1523+3914 is one of the brightest Balmer BAL quasars ever reported, with unique iron absorption variations, making it the most promising candidate for follow-up high-resolution spectroscopy, multiband observations, and long-term monitoring.

  17. Observing Comet C/2012 S1 (ISON) With Spitzer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lisse, Carey M.; Vervack, R. J.; Weaver, H. A.; Bauer, J. M.; Fernandez, Y. R.; Kelley, M. S.; Knight, M. M.; Hines, D. C.; Li, J.; Reach, W. T.; Sitko, M. L.; Yanamandra-Fisher, P.; Meech, K. J.; Rayner, J. T.

    2013-10-01

    In this talk we discuss the design, implementation, and reduction of observations of Comet ISON from space using the Spitzer Space Telescope on 13.00 - 13.96 Jun UT and from the ground at Lowell Observatory on Jun 11.16 UT and from APO on 14.13 Jun UT. The comet was at distance rh = 3.34 AU from the Sun, distance ΔSpitzer = 3.29 AU and 17.4o phase from SST, and distance ΔEarth = 4.25 AU and 6.8 - 7.3o phase at the time of observation. Preliminary analyses show ISON's Spitzer coma morphology was relatively compact and simple, with a linear anti-solar dust tail > 3x105 km in length and a 1/p profile gas coma extending > 105 km from the nucleus. Afp values in an 18,200 km radius aperture of 840, 890, and 840 ± 80 cm were found at VRI, and 650 ± 100 cm were found at 3.6 micron. Together, the ground-based and Spitzer photometry imply near-neutral dust scattering from the visual through the infrared. An excess at 4.5 µm due to emission from a neutral gas coma is clearly found both morphologically and photometrically. The gas coma total flux and spatial profile and ISON’s discovery distance imply a coma dominated by the stronger CO_2 line emission at 4.67 μm, but we cannot rule out a preponderance of CO emission at 4.26 μm. No variability in our Spitzer photometry at the 0.03 mag level over 24 hrs was seen. We present our imagery, spectrophotometry, and lightcurves, and discuss the physical implications of these measurements of the comet made well outside the ice line.

  18. Search for stopped gluinos from pp collisions at square root s = 1.96 TeV.

    PubMed

    Abazov, V M; Abbott, B; Abolins, M; Acharya, B S; Adams, M; Adams, T; Aguilo, E; Ahn, S H; Ahsan, M; Alexeev, G D; Alkhazov, G; Alton, A; Alverson, G; Alves, G A; Anastasoaie, M; Ancu, L S; Andeen, T; Anderson, S; Andrieu, B; Anzelc, M S; Arnoud, Y; Arov, M; Arthaud, M; Askew, A; Asman, B; Jesus, A C S Assis; Atramentov, O; Autermann, C; Avila, C; Ay, C; Badaud, F; Baden, A; Bagby, L; Baldin, B; Bandurin, D V; Banerjee, P; Banerjee, S; Barberis, E; Barfuss, A-F; Bargassa, P; Baringer, P; Barreto, J; Bartlett, J F; Bassler, U; Bauer, D; Beale, S; Bean, A; Begalli, M; Begel, M; Belanger-Champagne, C; Bellantoni, L; Bellavance, A; Benitez, J A; Beri, S B; Bernardi, G; Bernhard, R; Berntzon, L; Bertram, I; Besançon, M; Beuselinck, R; Bezzubov, V A; Bhat, P C; Bhatnagar, V; Biscarat, C; Blazey, G; Blekman, F; Blessing, S; Bloch, D; Bloom, K; Boehnlein, A; Boline, D; Bolton, T A; Borissov, G; Bos, K; Bose, T; Brandt, A; Brock, R; Brooijmans, G; Bross, A; Brown, D; Buchanan, N J; Buchholz, D; Buehler, M; Buescher, V; Burdin, S; Burke, S; Burnett, T H; Buszello, C P; Butler, J M; Calfayan, P; Calvet, S; Cammin, J; Caron, S; Carvalho, W; Casey, B C K; Cason, N M; Castilla-Valdez, H; Chakrabarti, S; Chakraborty, D; Chan, K; Chan, K M; Chandra, A; Charles, F; Cheu, E; Chevallier, F; Cho, D K; Choi, S; Choudhary, B; Christofek, L; Christoudias, T; Cihangir, S; Claes, D; Clément, B; Clément, C; Coadou, Y; Cooke, M; Cooper, W E; Corcoran, M; Couderc, F; Cousinou, M-C; Crépé-Renaudin, S; Cutts, D; Cwiok, M; da Motta, H; Das, A; Davies, G; De, K; de Jong, P; de Jong, S J; De La Cruz-Burelo, E; De Oliveira Martins, C; Degenhardt, J D; Déliot, F; Demarteau, M; Demina, R; Denisov, D; Denisov, S P; Desai, S; Diehl, H T; Diesburg, M; Dominguez, A; Dong, H; Dudko, L V; Duflot, L; Dugad, S R; Duggan, D; Duperrin, A; Dyer, J; Dyshkant, A; Eads, M; Edmunds, D; Ellison, J; Elvira, V D; Enari, Y; Eno, S; Ermolov, P; Evans, H; Evdokimov, A; Evdokimov, V N; Ferapontov, A V; Ferbel, T; Fiedler, F; Filthaut, F; Fisher, W; Fisk, H E; Ford, M; Fortner, M; Fox, H; Fu, S; Fuess, S; Gadfort, T; Galea, C F; Gallas, E; Galyaev, E; Garcia, C; Garcia-Bellido, A; Gavrilov, V; Gay, P; Geist, W; Gelé, D; Gerber, C E; Gershtein, Y; Gillberg, D; Ginther, G; Gollub, N; Gómez, B; Goussiou, A; Grannis, P D; Greenlee, H; Greenwood, Z D; Gregores, E M; Grenier, G; Gris, Ph; Grivaz, J-F; Grohsjean, A; Grünendahl, S; Grünewald, M W; Guo, F; Guo, J; Gutierrez, G; Gutierrez, P; Haas, A; Hadley, N J; Haefner, P; Hagopian, S; Haley, J; Hall, I; Hall, R E; Han, L; Hanagaki, K; Hansson, P; Harder, K; Harel, A; Harrington, R; Hauptman, J M; Hauser, R; Hays, J; Hebbeker, T; Hedin, D; Hegeman, J G; Heinmiller, J M; Heinson, A P; Heintz, U; Hensel, C; Herner, K; Hesketh, G; Hildreth, M D; Hirosky, R; Hobbs, J D; Hoeneisen, B; Hoeth, H; Hohlfeld, M; Hong, S J; Hooper, R; Hossain, S; Houben, P; Hu, Y; Hubacek, Z; Hynek, V; Iashvili, I; Illingworth, R; Ito, A S; Jabeen, S; Jaffré, M; Jain, S; Jakobs, K; Jarvis, C; Jesik, R; Johns, K; Johnson, C; Johnson, M; Jonckheere, A; Jonsson, P; Juste, A; Käfer, D; Kahn, S; Kajfasz, E; Kalinin, A M; Kalk, J M; Kalk, J R; Kappler, S; Karmanov, D; Kasper, J; Kasper, P; Katsanos, I; Kau, D; Kaur, R; Kaushik, V; Kehoe, R; Kermiche, S; Khalatyan, N; Khanov, A; Kharchilava, A; Kharzheev, Y M; Khatidze, D; Kim, H; Kim, T J; Kirby, M H; Kirsch, M; Klima, B; Kohli, J M; Konrath, J-P; Kopal, M; Korablev, V M; Kothari, B; Kozelov, A V; Krop, D; Kryemadhi, A; Kuhl, T; Kumar, A; Kunori, S; Kupco, A; Kurca, T; Kvita, J; Lam, D; Lammers, S; Landsberg, G; Lazoflores, J; Lebrun, P; Lee, W M; Leflat, A; Lehner, F; Lellouch, J; Lesne, V; Leveque, J; Lewis, P; Li, J; Li, L; Li, Q Z; Lietti, S M; Lima, J G R; Lincoln, D; Linnemann, J; Lipaev, V V; Lipton, R; Liu, Y; Liu, Z; Lobo, L; Lobodenko, A; Lokajicek, M; Lounis, A; Love, P; Lubatti, H J; Lyon, A L; Maciel, A K A; Mackin, D; Madaras, R J; Mättig, P; Magass, C; Magerkurth, A; Makovec, N; Mal, P K; Malbouisson, H B; Malik, S; Malyshev, V L; Mao, H S; Maravin, Y; Martin, B; McCarthy, R; Melnitchouk, A; Mendes, A; Mendoza, L; Mercadante, P G; Merkin, M; Merritt, K W; Meyer, A; Meyer, J; Michaut, M; Millet, T; Mitrevski, J; Molina, J; Mommsen, R K; Mondal, N K; Moore, R W; Moulik, T; Muanza, G S; Mulders, M; Mulhearn, M; Mundal, O; Mundim, L; Nagy, E; Naimuddin, M; Narain, M; Naumann, N A; Neal, H A; Negret, J P; Neustroev, P; Nilsen, H; Noeding, C; Nomerotski, A; Novaes, S F; Nunnemann, T; O'dell, V; O'neil, D C; Obrant, G; Ochando, C; Onoprienko, D; Oshima, N; Osta, J; Otec, R; Y Garzón, G J Otero; Owen, M; Padley, P; Pangilinan, M; Parashar, N; Park, S-J; Park, S K; Parsons, J; Partridge, R; Parua, N; Patwa, A; Pawloski, G; Perea, P M; Peters, K; Peters, Y; Pétroff, P; Petteni, M; Piegaia, R; Piper, J; Pleier, M-A; Podesta-Lerma, P L M; Podstavkov, V M; Pogorelov, Y; Pol, M-E; Pompos, A; Pope, B G; Popov, A V; Potter, C; da Silva, W L Prado; Prosper, H B; Protopopescu, S; Qian, J; Quadt, A; Quinn, B; Rakitine, A; Rangel, M S; Rani, K J; Ranjan, K; Ratoff, P N; Renkel, P; Reucroft, S; Rich, P; Rijssenbeek, M; Ripp-Baudot, I; Rizatdinova, F; Robinson, S; Rodrigues, R F; Royon, C; Rubinov, P; Ruchti, R; Safronov, G; Sajot, G; Sánchez-Hernández, A; Sanders, M P; Santoro, A; Savage, G; Sawyer, L; Scanlon, T; Schaile, D; Schamberger, R D; Scheglov, Y; Schellman, H; Schieferdecker, P; Schliephake, T; Schmitt, C; Schwanenberger, C; Schwartzman, A; Schwienhorst, R; Sekaric, J; Sengupta, S; Severini, H; Shabalina, E; Shamim, M; Shary, V; Shchukin, A A; Shivpuri, R K; Shpakov, D; Siccardi, V; Simak, V; Sirotenko, V; Skubic, P; Slattery, P; Smirnov, D; Smith, R P; Snow, G R; Snow, J; Snyder, S; Söldner-Rembold, S; Sonnenschein, L; Sopczak, A; Sosebee, M; Soustruznik, K; Souza, M; Spurlock, B; Stark, J; Steele, J; Stolin, V; Stone, A; Stoyanova, D A; Strandberg, J; Strandberg, S; Strang, M A; Strauss, M; Ströhmer, R; Strom, D; Strovink, M; Stutte, L; Sumowidagdo, S; Svoisky, P; Sznajder, A; Talby, M; Tamburello, P; Tanasijczuk, A; Taylor, W; Telford, P; Temple, J; Tiller, B; Tissandier, F; Titov, M; Tokmenin, V V; Tomoto, M; Toole, T; Torchiani, I; Trefzger, T; Tsybychev, D; Tuchming, B; Tully, C; Tuts, P M; Unalan, R; Uvarov, L; Uvarov, S; Uzunyan, S; Vachon, B; van den Berg, P J; van Eijk, B; Van Kooten, R; van Leeuwen, W M; Varelas, N; Varnes, E W; Vartapetian, A; Vasilyev, I A; Vaupel, M; Verdier, P; Vertogradov, L S; Verzocchi, M; Villeneuve-Seguier, F; Vint, P; Von Toerne, E; Voutilainen, M; Vreeswijk, M; Wagner, R; Wahl, H D; Wang, L; Wang, M H L S; Warchol, J; Watts, G; Wayne, M; Weber, G; Weber, M; Weerts, H; Wenger, A; Wermes, N; Wetstein, M; White, A; Wicke, D; Wilson, G W; Wimpenny, S J; Wobisch, M; Wood, D R; Wyatt, T R; Xie, Y; Yacoob, S; Yamada, R; Yan, M; Yasuda, T; Yatsunenko, Y A; Yip, K; Yoo, H D; Youn, S W; Yu, C; Yu, J; Yurkewicz, A; Zatserklyaniy, A; Zeitnitz, C; Zhang, D; Zhao, T; Zhou, B; Zhu, J; Zielinski, M; Zieminska, D; Zieminski, A; Zivkovic, L; Zutshi, V; Zverev, E G

    2007-09-28

    Long-lived, heavy particles are predicted in a number of models beyond the standard model of particle physics. We present the first direct search for such particles' decays, occurring up to 100 h after their production and not synchronized with an accelerator bunch crossing. We apply the analysis to the gluino (g), predicted in split supersymmetry, which after hadronization can become charged and lose enough momentum through ionization to come to rest in dense particle detectors. Approximately 410 pb(-1) of pp collisions at square root(s) = 1.96 TeV collected with the D0 detector during Run II of the Fermilab Tevatron collider are analyzed in search of such "stopped gluinos" decaying into a gluon and a neutralino (chi(1)(0)). Limits are placed on the (gluino cross section) x (probability to stop) x [BR(g --> g chi(1)(0))] as a function of the gluino and chi(1)(0) masses, for gluino lifetimes from 30 micros-100 h. PMID:17930574

  19. Comparison of T{sub z} = +-1->0 GT Transitions Studied in beta--decay and CE Reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Molina, F.; Rubio, B.; Fujita, Y.; Gelletly, W.

    2010-04-26

    Gamow-Teller (GT) transitions can be studied in both beta- decay and charge exchange(CE) reactions. If isospin is a good quantum number, then the T{sub z} = -1->0 and T{sub z} = +1->0 GT mirror transitions, are identical. Therefore, a comparison of the results from studies of beta decay and CE should shed light on this assumption. Accordingly we have studied the beta decay of the T{sub z} = -1 fp-shell nuclei, {sup 54}Ni, {sup 50}Fe, {sup 46}Cr, and {sup 42}Ti, produced in fragmentation and we have compared our results with the spectra from (3He, t) measurements on the mirror T{sub z} = +1 target nuclei studied in high resolution at RCNP, Osaka. The experiments were performed as part of the STOPPED beam RISING campaign at GSI.

  20. Corrosion Inhibition of Mild Steel in 1.0 M HCl by Amino Compound: Electrochemical and DFT Studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Musa, Ahmed Y.; Mohamad, Abu Bakar; Kadhum, Abdul Amir H.; Takriff, Mohd Sobri

    2012-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the inhibitory effect of 4-amino-5-methyl-4H-1, 2, 4-triazole-3-thiol (AMTT) on the corrosion of mild steel in 1.0 M HCl solution using weight loss, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS), and potentiodynamic polarization. The results indicate that AMTT performed as a good mixed-type inhibitor for mild steel corrosion in a 1.0 M HCl solution, and the inhibition efficiencies increased and tend to saturate with inhibitor concentration. Potentiodynamic polarization results showed that AMTT is a mixed-type inhibitor. Adsorption of AMTT molecules is a spontaneous process, and its adsorption behavior obeys Langmuir's adsorption isotherm model. The reactivity of AMTT was analyzed through theoretical calculations based on density functional theory. Results showed that the reactive sites were located on the nitrogen and sulfur (N1, N2, and S) atoms.

  1. Corrosion Inhibition of Mild Steel in 1.0 M HCl by Amino Compound: Electrochemical and DFT Studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Musa, Ahmed Y.; Mohamad, Abu Bakar; Kadhum, Abdul Amir H.; Takriff, Mohd Sobri

    2012-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the inhibitory effect of 4-amino-5-methyl-4H-1, 2, 4-triazole-3-thiol (AMTT) on the corrosion of mild steel in 1.0 M HCl solution using weight loss, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS), and potentiodynamic polarization. The results indicate that AMTT performed as a good mixed-type inhibitor for mild steel corrosion in a 1.0 M HCl solution, and the inhibition efficiencies increased and tend to saturate with inhibitor concentration. Potentiodynamic polarization results showed that AMTT is a mixed-type inhibitor. Adsorption of AMTT molecules is a spontaneous process, and its adsorption behavior obeys Langmuir's adsorption isotherm model. The reactivity of AMTT was analyzed through theoretical calculations based on density functional theory. Results showed that the reactive sites were located on the nitrogen and sulfur (N1, N2, and S) atoms.

  2. DCPT v1.0 - New particle tracker for modeling transport in dual-continuum - User's Manual

    SciTech Connect

    Pan, Lehua; Liu, Hui Hai; Cushey, Mark; Bodvarsson, Gudmundur

    2001-04-01

    DCPT (Dual-Continuum Particle Tracker) V1.0 is a new software for simulating solute transport in the subsurface. It is based on the random-walk method for modeling transport processes such as advection, dispersion/diffusion, linear sorption, radioactive decay, and fracture-matrix mass exchange (in fractured porous media). The user shall provide flow-field and other parameters in the form of input files. In Comparison to several analytical and numerical solutions for a number of test cases, DCPT shows excellent performance in both accuracy and efficiency. This report serves as a user's manual of DCPT V1.0. It includes theoretical basis, numerical methods, software structure, input/output description, and examples.

  3. The implementation of NEMS GFS Aerosol Component (NGAC) Version 1.0 for global dust forecasting at NOAA/NCEP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Cheng-Hsuan; da Silva, Arlindo; Wang, Jun; Moorthi, Shrinivas; Chin, Mian; Colarco, Peter; Tang, Youhua; Bhattacharjee, Partha S.; Chen, Shen-Po; Chuang, Hui-Ya; Juang, Hann-Ming Henry; McQueen, Jeffery; Iredell, Mark

    2016-05-01

    The NOAA National Centers for Environmental Prediction (NCEP) implemented the NOAA Environmental Modeling System (NEMS) Global Forecast System (GFS) Aerosol Component (NGAC) for global dust forecasting in collaboration with NASA Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC). NGAC Version 1.0 has been providing 5-day dust forecasts at 1° × 1° resolution on a global scale, once per day at 00:00 Coordinated Universal Time (UTC), since September 2012. This is the first global system capable of interactive atmosphere aerosol forecasting at NCEP. The implementation of NGAC V1.0 reflects an effective and efficient transitioning of NASA research advances to NCEP operations, paving the way for NCEP to provide global aerosol products serving a wide range of stakeholders, as well as to allow the effects of aerosols on weather forecasts and climate prediction to be considered.

  4. Synthesis and evaluation of influenza A viral neuraminidase candidate inhibitors based on a bicyclo[3.1.0]hexane scaffold.

    PubMed

    Colombo, Cinzia; Pinto, B Mario; Bernardi, Anna; Bennet, Andrew J

    2016-07-01

    This manuscript describes a novel class of derivatives based on a bicyclo[3.1.0]hexane scaffold, proposed as mimics of sialic acid in a distorted boat conformation that is on the catalytic pathway of neuraminidases (sialidases). A general synthetic route for these constrained-ring molecules was developed using a photochemical reaction followed by a Johnson-Corey-Chaykovsky cyclopropanation. Functionalization with the goal of occupying the 150-cavity was also exploited. Inhibition assays demonstrated low micromolar inhibition against both group-1 (H5N1) and group-2 (H9N2) influenza neuraminidase subtypes, indicating good affinity for the alpha and beta sialic acid mimics and 150-cavity-targeted derivatives. These results provide a validation of a bicyclo[3.1.0]hexane scaffold as a mimic of a distorted sialic acid bound in the neuraminidase active site during catalysis. PMID:27305457

  5. Effect of Yttrium on the Fracture Strength of the Sn-1.0Ag-0.5Cu Solder Joints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Hyelim; Kaplan, Wayne D.; Choe, Heeman

    2016-07-01

    This is a preliminary investigation on the mechanical properties of Pb-free Sn-1.0Ag-0.5Cu solder joints containing 0.02 wt.% to 0.1 wt.% Y under a range of thermal aging and reflow conditions. Despite the significantly thicker intermetallic compound (IMC) formed at the solder joint, the 0.1 wt.% Y-doped joint exhibited a higher fracture strength than its baseline Sn-1.0Ag-0.5Cu counterpart under most aging and reflow conditions. This may be associated with the formation of Y-Cu IMCs formed at the interface between the solder and the Cu substrate, because the Y-Cu IMCs have recently been referred to as relatively `ductile' IMCs.

  6. Structural and electronic properties of an ordered grain boundary formed by separated (1,0) dislocations in graphene.

    PubMed

    Ma, Chuanxu; Sun, Haifeng; Du, Hongjian; Wang, Jufeng; Zhao, Aidi; Li, Qunxiang; Wang, Bing; Hou, J G

    2015-02-21

    We present an investigation of the structural and electronic properties of an ordered grain boundary (GB) formed by separated pentagon-heptagon pairs in single-layer graphene/SiO2 using scanning tunneling microscopy/spectroscopy (STM/STS), coupled with density functional theory (DFT) calculations. It is observed that the pentagon-heptagon pairs, i.e., (1,0) dislocations, form a periodic quasi-one-dimensional chain. The (1,0) dislocations are separated by 8 transverse rows of carbon rings, with a period of ∼2.1 nm. The protruded feature of each dislocation shown in the STM images reflects its out-of-plane buckling structure, which is supported by the DFT simulations. The STS spectra recorded along the small-angle GB show obvious differential-conductance peaks, the positions of which qualitatively accord with the van Hove singularities from the DFT calculations. PMID:25603956

  7. OPACOS: OVRO POST-AGB CO (1-0) EMISSION SURVEY. I. DATA AND DERIVED NEBULAR PARAMETERS

    SciTech Connect

    Sanchez Contreras, C.; Sahai, R.

    2012-11-15

    We have performed interferometric observations of the {sup 12}CO (J = 1-0) emission in a sample of 27 objects spanning different evolutionary stages from the late asymptotic giant branch (late-AGB), through the post-AGB (pAGB) phase, and to the planetary nebula (PN) stage, but dominated by pAGB objects and young PNs ({>=}81%). In this paper (the first in a series) we present our maps and main nebular properties derived for the whole sample. Observations were performed with the Caltech Millimeter Array at the Owens Valley Radio Observatory. The angular resolution obtained in our survey ranges between 2.''3 and 10.''7. The {sup 13}CO and C{sup 18}O (J = 1-0) transitions as well as the 2.6 mm continuum emission have also been observed in several objects. The detection statistics in the {sup 12}CO, {sup 13}CO, C{sup 18}O transitions and 2.6 mm continuum are 89%, 83%, 0%, and 37%, respectively. We report first detections of {sup 12}CO (J = 1-0) emission in 13 targets and confirm emission from several previous marginal detections. The molecular envelope probed by {sup 12}CO (J = 1-0) emission is extended for 18 (out of 24) sources; envelope asymmetries and/or velocity gradients are found in most extended objects. Our data have been used to derive accurate target coordinates and systemic velocities and to characterize the envelope size, morphology, and kinematics. We also provide an estimate of the total molecular mass and the fraction of it contained in fast flows, lower limits to the linear momentum and to the isotopic {sup 12}C/{sup 13}C ratio, as well as the AGB mass-loss rate and timescale for sources with extended CO emission.

  8. RG flows from (1,0) 6D SCFTs to N = 1 SCFTs in four and three dimensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karndumri, Parinya

    2015-06-01

    We study AdS 5 × Σ2 and AdS 4 × Σ3 solutions of N = 2, SO(4) gauged supergravity in seven dimensions with Σ2,3 being S 2,3 or H 2,3. The SO(4) gauged supergravity is obtained from coupling three vector multiplets to the pure N = 2, SU(2) gauged supergravity. With a topological mass term for the 3-form field, the SO(4) ˜ SU(2) × SU(2) gauged supergravity admits two supersymmetric AdS 7 critical points, with SO(4) and SO(3) symmetries, provided that the two SU(2) gauge couplings are different. These vacua correspond to N = (1 , 0) superconformal field theories (SCFTs) in six dimensions. In the case of Σ2, we find a class of AdS 5 × S 2 and AdS 5 × H 2 solutions preserving eight supercharges and SO(2) × SO(2) symmetry, but only AdS 5 × H 2 solutions exist for SO(2) symmetry. These should correspond to some N = 1 four-dimensional SCFTs. We also give RG flow solutions from the N = (1 , 0) SCFTs in six dimensions to these four-dimensional fixed points including a two-step flow from the SO(4) N = (1 , 0) SCFT to the SO(3) N = (1 , 0) SCFT that eventually flows to the N = 1 SCFT in four dimensions. For AdS 4 × Σ3, we find a class of AdS 4 × S 3 and AdS 4 × H 3 solutions with four supercharges, corresponding to N =1 SCFTs in three dimensions. When the two SU(2) gauge couplings are equal, only AdS 4 × H 3 are possible. The uplifted solutions for equal SU(2) gauge couplings to eleven dimensions are also given.

  9. Torsion and vibration-torsion levels of the S1 and ground cation electronic states of para-fluorotoluene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gardner, Adrian M.; Tuttle, William D.; Whalley, Laura; Claydon, Andrew; Carter, Joseph H.; Wright, Timothy G.

    2016-09-01

    We investigate the low-energy transitions (0-570 cm-1) of the S1 state of para-fluorotoluene (pFT) using a combination of resonance-enhanced multiphoton ionization and zero-kinetic-energy (ZEKE) spectroscopy and quantum chemical calculations. By using various S1 states as intermediate levels, we obtain ZEKE spectra. The differing activity observed allows detailed assignments to be made of both the cation and S1 low-energy levels. The assignments are in line with the recently published work on toluene from the Lawrance group [J. R. Gascooke et al., J. Chem. Phys. 143, 044313 (2015)], which considered vibration-torsion coupling in depth for the S1 state of toluene. In addition, we investigate whether two bands that occur in the range 390-420 cm-1 are the result of a Fermi resonance; we present evidence for weak coupling between various vibrations and torsions that contribute to this region. This work has led to the identification of a number of misassignments in the literature, and these are corrected.

  10. Si-Ge-Sn alloys with 1.0 eV gap for CPV multijunction solar cells

    SciTech Connect

    Roucka, Radek Clark, Andrew; Landini, Barbara

    2015-09-28

    Si-Ge-Sn ternary group IV alloys offer an alternative to currently used 1.0 eV gap materials utilized in multijunction solar cells. The advantage of Si-Ge-Sn is the ability to vary both the bandgap and lattice parameter independently. We present current development in fabrication of Si-Ge-Sn alloys with gaps in the 1.0 eV range. Produced material exhibits excellent structural properties, which allow for integration with existing III-V photovoltaic cell concepts. Time dependent room temperature photoluminescence data demonstrate that these materials have long carrier lifetimes. Absorption tunable by compositional changes is observed. As a prototype device set utilizing the 1 eV Si-Ge-Sn junction, single junction Si-Ge-Sn device and triple junction device with Si-Ge-Sn subcell have been fabricated. The resulting I-V and external quantum efficiency data show that the Si-Ge-Sn junction is fully functional and the performance is comparable to other 1.0 eV gap materials currently used.

  11. Thermal behaviour of ultra-thin Co overlayers on rutile TiO 2(1 0 0) surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chai, J. W.; Pan, J. S.; Wang, S. J.; Huan, C. H. A.; Lau, G. S.; Zheng, Y. B.; Xu, S.

    2005-09-01

    Thermal behaviour of ultra-thin Co overlayers on rutile TiO 2(1 0 0) surface has been studied by in situ X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). Metal Co overlayers of about 30 Å have been deposited at room temperature on rutile TiO 2(1 0 0) surfaces, followed by annealing to different temperatures. It was found that the interfacial reaction between the Co overlayers and TiO 2(1 0 0) surfaces occurred upon annealing to temperatures above 400 °C. Above these temperatures, all metallic Co atoms were oxidized into the Co 2+ state, while some Ti 4+ were reduced to Ti 3+ with increasing temperature. Ex situ surface morphology studies by atomic force microscopy (AFM) suggest that thermal annealing resulted in the agglomeration of the metal film deposited at room temperature and the formation of islands. Annealing to higher temperature led to the dissociation of the small Co islands due to Co oxidation while the larger islands remained and grew continuously. Two types of island nanostructures were observed by ex situ high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM).

  12. FTIR analysis and evaluation of carcinogenic and mutagenic risks of nitro-polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in PM1.0.

    PubMed

    Schneider, Ismael Luís; Teixeira, Elba Calesso; Agudelo-Castañeda, Dayana Milena; Silva e Silva, Gabriel; Balzaretti, Naira; Braga, Marcel Ferreira; Oliveira, Luís Felipe Silva

    2016-01-15

    Nitro-polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (NPAHs) represent a group of organic compounds of significant interest due to their presence in airborne particulates of urban centers, wide distribution in the environment, and mutagenic and carcinogenic properties. These compounds, associated with atmospheric particles of size < 1 μm, have been reported as a major risk to human health. This study aims at identifying the spectral features of NPAHs (1-nitropyrene, 2-nitrofluorene, and 6-nitrochrysene) in emissivity and transmittance spectra of samples of particulate matter < 1 μm (PM1.0) using infrared spectrometry. Carcinogenic and mutagenic risks of the studied NPAHs associated with PM1.0 samples were also determined for two sampling sites: Canoas and Sapucaia do Sul. The results showed that NPAH standard spectra can effectively identify NPAHs in PM1.0 samples. The transmittance and emissivity sample spectra showed broader bands and lower relative intensity than the standard NPAH spectra. The carcinogenic risk and the total mutagenic risk were calculated using the toxic equivalent factors and mutagenic potency factors, respectively. Canoas showed the highest total carcinogenic risk, while Sapucaia do Sul had the highest mutagenic risk. The seasonal analysis suggested that in the study area the ambient air is more toxic during the cold periods. These findings might of significant importance for the decision and policy making authorities.

  13. Influence of the tensile strain on CH4 dissociation on Cu(1 0 0) surface: A theoretical study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Feng; Li, Kai; Xie, Guangyou; Wang, Ying; Jiao, Menggai; Tang, Hao; Wu, Zhijian

    2016-01-01

    Tensile strain is widespread on the catalyst surface due to the lattice mismatch between the catalyst and substrate, such as Cu/MgO in this work. Thus, it is important to investigate the influence of tensile strain on the catalytic properties. In this study, we have investigated the CH4 dissociation on Cu(1 0 0) surface by considering the tensile strain. Our results showed that compared with the unstrained Cu(1 0 0) surface, the most stable sites for dissociation species CHx (x = 0-3) and H adsorption on strained surface remain unchanged. The surface strain strengthens CHx (x = 0-3) adsorption, while weakens H adsorption. The elementary reaction for CH4 dissociation with the largest electronic energy barrier changes from CH → C + H on the unstrained surface to CH4 → CH3 + H on the strained surface (for strain equal to and larger than 3%), in agreement with the experimental observation that CH4 dissociation into CH3 and H is the most difficult reaction. The tensile strain accelerates C migration while has no obvious influence for C polymerization. Both DFT calculations and microkinetic model demonstrated that the strain hinders the CH4 dissociation process on Cu(1 0 0) surface. CH4 dissociation rate depends sensitively on the magnitude of the surface tensile strain.

  14. Adsorption and dehydrogenation mechanism of methane on clean and oxygen-covered Pd (1 0 0) surfaces: A DFT study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Zhao; Wang, Bin; Fang, Tao

    2014-11-01

    Using density functional theory (DFT) together with periodic slab models, the adsorption and dehydrogenation mechanisms of methane on clean and oxygen-covered Pd (1 0 0) surfaces have been studied systematically. Different adsorption geometries were investigated for CH4 and related intermediates (CH3, CH2, CH, C, H, O and OH). It was found that CH4 and CH3 prefer to adsorb on the top site, CH2 and OH are favorable on the bridge site, while CH, C, O and H species adsorb preferentially on the hollow site. In addition, this work identified the stable co-adsorption configurations for the relevant co-adsorption groups. It was concluded that the effect of co-adsorbed oxygen atom tends to weaken the adsorbate-substrate interaction on the Pd (1 0 0) surface. Finally, transition states, energy barriers and reaction energies were determined to confirm the mechanism of dehydrogenation of CH4 on clean and oxygen-covered Pd (1 0 0) surfaces. The existence of oxygen atom increases the energy barriers obviously and inhibits the dissociation of CHx (x = 1, 2 and 4) except for CH3 group.

  15. AN XMM-NEWTON STUDY OF THE BRIGHT, NEARBY SUPERNOVA REMNANT G296.1-0.5

    SciTech Connect

    Castro, D.; Slane, P. O.; Patnaude, D. J.; Gaensler, B. M.; Hughes, J. P.

    2011-06-20

    We present a detailed study of the supernova remnant (SNR) G296.1-0.5, performed using observations with the European Photon Imaging Camera (EPIC) and Reflection Grating Spectrometer instruments of the XMM-Newton satellite. G296.1-0.5 is a bright remnant that displays an incomplete multiple-shell morphology in both its radio and X-ray images. We use a set of observations toward G296.1-0.5, from three distinct pointings of EPIC, in order to perform a thorough spatial and spectral analysis of this remnant, and hence determine what type of progenitor gave rise to the supernova explosion, and describe the evolutionary state of the SNR. Our XMM-Newton observations establish that the spectral characteristics are consistent across the X-ray bright regions of the object and are best described by a model of the emission from a nonequilibrium ionization collisional plasma. The study reveals that the emission from the shell is characterized by an excess of N and an underabundance of O, which is typical of wind material from red supergiant and Wolf-Rayet stars. Additionally, we have detected transient X-ray source 2XMMi J115004.8-622442 at the edge of the SNR whose properties suggest that it is the result of stellar flare, and we discuss its nature in more detail.

  16. Transverse momentum distribution of primary charged particles in the p-Pb interactions using HIJING 1.0

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tabassam, U.; Ali, Y.; Suleymanov, M.; Bhatti, A. S.; Butt, J. B.; Amjad, M. S.

    2016-08-01

    The shape of the transverse momentum (pT) distribution of primary charged particles in minimum bias (nonsingle-diffractive) p-Pb collisions at sNN = 5.02TeV is studied in the pseudorapidity regions: |η| < 0.3, 0.3 < η < 0.8 and 0.8 < η < 1.3 and in the transverse momentum range 0.5 < pT < 20GeV/c using simulated data produced with the HIJING 1.0 code. These are compared with the ALICE data measured by the ALICE detector at the LHC. In the model, the central and forward η-regions differ more than in the ALICE data and due to this fact HIJING 1.0 cannot describe well the high pT region in the pT distributions. The comparison of results from simulation implies that the HIJING 1.0 considered narrower pseudorapidity distribution for the charged particles than it is in the ALICE data. It cannot take into account satisfactorily leading effect due to the asymmetric p-Pb fragmentation.

  17. FTIR analysis and evaluation of carcinogenic and mutagenic risks of nitro-polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in PM1.0.

    PubMed

    Schneider, Ismael Luís; Teixeira, Elba Calesso; Agudelo-Castañeda, Dayana Milena; Silva e Silva, Gabriel; Balzaretti, Naira; Braga, Marcel Ferreira; Oliveira, Luís Felipe Silva

    2016-01-15

    Nitro-polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (NPAHs) represent a group of organic compounds of significant interest due to their presence in airborne particulates of urban centers, wide distribution in the environment, and mutagenic and carcinogenic properties. These compounds, associated with atmospheric particles of size < 1 μm, have been reported as a major risk to human health. This study aims at identifying the spectral features of NPAHs (1-nitropyrene, 2-nitrofluorene, and 6-nitrochrysene) in emissivity and transmittance spectra of samples of particulate matter < 1 μm (PM1.0) using infrared spectrometry. Carcinogenic and mutagenic risks of the studied NPAHs associated with PM1.0 samples were also determined for two sampling sites: Canoas and Sapucaia do Sul. The results showed that NPAH standard spectra can effectively identify NPAHs in PM1.0 samples. The transmittance and emissivity sample spectra showed broader bands and lower relative intensity than the standard NPAH spectra. The carcinogenic risk and the total mutagenic risk were calculated using the toxic equivalent factors and mutagenic potency factors, respectively. Canoas showed the highest total carcinogenic risk, while Sapucaia do Sul had the highest mutagenic risk. The seasonal analysis suggested that in the study area the ambient air is more toxic during the cold periods. These findings might of significant importance for the decision and policy making authorities. PMID:26473715

  18. Epitaxial NiO (1 0 0) and NiO (1 1 1) films grown by atomic layer deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lindahl, E.; Lu, J.; Ottosson, M.; Carlsson, J.-O.

    2009-08-01

    Epitaxial NiO (1 1 1) and NiO (1 0 0) films have been grown by atomic layer deposition on both MgO (1 0 0) and α-Al 2O 3 (0 0 l) substrates at temperatures as low as 200 °C by using bis(2,2,6,6-tetramethyl-3,5-heptanedionato)Ni(II) and water as precursors. The films grown on the MgO (1 0 0) substrate show the expected cube on cube growth while the NiO (1 1 1) films grow with a twin rotated 180° on the α-Al 2O 3 (0 0 l) substrate surface. The films had columnar microstructures on both substrate types. The single grains were running throughout the whole film thickness and were significantly smaller in the direction parallel to the surface. Thin NiO (1 1 1) films can be grown with high crystal quality with a FWHM of 0.02-0.05° in the rocking curve measurements.

  19. Susceptibility to urinary bladder cancer: relevance of rs9642880[T], GSTM1 0/0 and occupational exposure.

    PubMed

    Golka, Klaus; Hermes, Matthias; Selinski, Silvia; Blaszkewicz, Meinolf; Bolt, Hermann M; Roth, Gerhard; Dietrich, Holger; Prager, Hans-Martin; Ickstadt, Katja; Hengstler, Jan G

    2009-11-01

    Recently, a genome-wide single nucleotide polymorphism association study has identified a sequence variant 30 kb upstream of the c-Myc gene (allele T of rs9642880) that confers susceptibility to bladder cancer. However, the role of exposure to bladder carcinogens has not been considered. This prompted us to analyse the relevance of this polymorphism in 515 bladder cancer cases and 893 controls where the quality and quantity of occupational exposure to bladder carcinogens has been documented. When we analysed a hospital-based case-control series not selected for occupational exposure, rs9642880[T] was influential, in contrast to GSTM1 0/0. However, in a case-control series of patients that have been occupationally exposed to aromatic amines and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, rs9642880[T] was not influential but GSTM1 0/0 was significantly associated with bladder cancer risk. Therefore, the degree to which rs9642880[T] and GSTM1 0/0 confer susceptibility to urinary bladder cancer seems to depend on the extent of exposure to urinary bladder carcinogens.

  20. A practical process for the preparation of [32P]S1P and binding assay for S1P receptor ligands

    PubMed Central

    Rosenberg, Adam J.; Liu, Hui; Tu, Zhude

    2015-01-01

    Sphingosine-1-phosphate receptors (S1PRs) are important regulators of vascular permeability, inflammation, angiogenesis and vascular maturation. Identifying a specific S1PR PET radioligand is imperative, but it is hindered by the complexity and variability of current for binding affinity measurement procedures. Herein, we report a streamlined protocol for radiosynthesis of [32P]S1P with good radiochemical yield (36 – 50%) and high radiochemical purity (>99%). We also report a reproducible procedure for determining the binding affinity for compounds targeting S1PRs in vitro. PMID:25931137

  1. Full pharmacological efficacy of a novel S1P1 agonist that does not require S1P-like head-group interactions

    PubMed Central

    Gonzalez-Cabrera, Pedro J.; Jo, Euijung; Sanna, M. Germana; Brown, Steven; Leaf, Nora; Marsolais, David; Schaeffer, Marie-Therese; Chapman, Jacqueline; Cameron, Michael; Guerrero, Miguel; Roberts, Edward; Rosen, Hugh

    2008-01-01

    Strong evidence exists for interactions of zwitterionic phosphate and amine groups in Sphingosine-1 phosphate (S1P) to conserved R and E residues present at the extracellular face of transmembrane-3 (TM3) of S1P receptors. The contribution of R120 and E121 for high affinity ligand-receptor interactions is essential, as single-point R120A or E121A S1P1 mutants neither bind S1P nor transduce S1P function. Because S1P receptors are therapeutically interesting, identifying potent selective agonists with different binding modes and in vivo efficacy is of pharmacological importance. Here we describe a modestly water-soluble highly-selective S1P1 agonist (CYM-5442) that does not require R120 or E121 residues for activating S1P1-dependent p42/p44 MAPK phosphorylation, which defines a new hydrophobic pocket in S1P1. CYM-5442 is a full agonist in vitro for S1P1 internalization, phosphorylation and ubiquitination. Importantly, CYM-5442 was a full agonist for induction and maintenance of S1P1-dependent lymphopenia, decreasing B-lymphocytes by 65% and T-lymphocytes by 85% of vehicle. Induction of CYM-5442 lymphopenia was dose and time-dependent, requiring serum concentrations in the 50 nM range. In vitro measures of S1P1 activation by CYM-5442 were non-competitively inhibited by a specific S1P1 antagonist (W146), competitive for S1P, FTY720-P and SEW2871. In addition, lymphopenia by CYM-5442 was reversed by W146 administration or upon pharmacokinetic agonist clearance. Pharmacokinetics in mice also indicated that CYM-5442 partitions significantly in central nervous tissue. These data show that CYM-5442 activates S1P1-dependent pathways in vitro and to levels of full efficacy in vivo through a hydrophobic pocket, separable from the orthosteric site of S1P binding that is headgroup dependent. PMID:18708635

  2. Ligand-binding pocket shape differences between S1P1 and S1P3 determine efficiency of chemical probe identification by uHTS

    PubMed Central

    Schürer, Stephan C.; Brown, Steven J.; Cabrera, Pedro Gonzales; Schaeffer, Marie-Therese; Chapman, Jacqueline; Jo, Euijung; Chase, Peter; Spicer, Tim; Hodder, Peter; Rosen, Hugh

    2008-01-01

    We have studied the Sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P) receptor system to better understand why certain molecular targets within a closely related family are much more tractable when identifying compelling chemical leads. Five medically important G protein-coupled receptors for S1P regulate heart rate, coronary artery caliber, endothelial barrier integrity, and lymphocyte trafficking. Selective S1P receptor agonist probes would be of great utility to study receptor subtype-specific function. Through systematic screening of the same libraries, we identified novel selective agonists chemotypes for each of the S1P1 and S1P3 receptors. uHTS for S1P1 was more effective than for S1P3, with many selective, low nanomolar hits of proven mechanism emerging for. Receptor structure modeling and ligand docking reveal differences between the receptor binding pockets, which are the basis for sub-type selectivity. Novel selective agonists interact primarily in the hydrophobic pocket of the receptor in the absence of head-group interactions. Chemistry-space and shape-based analysis of the screening libraries in combination with the binding models explain the observed differential hit rates and enhanced efficiency for lead discovery for S1P1 vs. S1P3 in this closely related receptor family. PMID:18590333

  3. Aberrant expression of the S1P regulating enzymes, SPHK1 and SGPL1, contributes to a migratory phenotype in OSCC mediated through S1PR2

    PubMed Central

    Patmanathan, Sathya Narayanan; Johnson, Steven P.; Lai, Sook Ling; Panja Bernam, Suthashini; Lopes, Victor; Wei, Wenbin; Ibrahim, Maha Hafez; Torta, Federico; Narayanaswamy, Pradeep; Wenk, Markus R.; Herr, Deron R.; Murray, Paul G.; Yap, Lee Fah; Paterson, Ian C.

    2016-01-01

    Oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) is a lethal disease with a 5-year mortality rate of around 50%. Molecular targeted therapies are not in routine use and novel therapeutic targets are required. Our previous microarray data indicated sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P) metabolism and signalling was deregulated in OSCC. In this study, we have investigated the contribution of S1P signalling to the pathogenesis of OSCC. We show that the expression of the two major enzymes that regulate S1P levels were altered in OSCC: SPHK1 was significantly upregulated in OSCC tissues compared to normal oral mucosa and low levels of SGPL1 mRNA correlated with a worse overall survival. In in vitro studies, S1P enhanced the migration/invasion of OSCC cells and attenuated cisplatin-induced death. We also demonstrate that S1P receptor expression is deregulated in primary OSCCs and that S1PR2 is over-expressed in a subset of tumours, which in part mediates S1P-induced migration of OSCC cells. Lastly, we demonstrate that FTY720 induced significantly more apoptosis in OSCC cells compared to non-malignant cells and that FTY720 acted synergistically with cisplatin to induce cell death. Taken together, our data show that S1P signalling promotes tumour aggressiveness in OSCC and identify S1P signalling as a potential therapeutic target. PMID:27160553

  4. Assessment of radionuclide databases in CAP88 mainframe version 1.0 and Windows-based version 3.0.

    PubMed

    LaBone, Elizabeth D; Farfán, Eduardo B; Lee, Patricia L; Jannik, G Timothy; Donnelly, Elizabeth H; Foley, Trevor Q

    2009-09-01

    In this study the radionuclide databases for two versions of the Clean Air Act Assessment Package-1988 (CAP88) computer model were assessed in detail. CAP88 estimates radiation dose and the risk of health effects to human populations from radionuclide emissions to air. This program is used by several U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) facilities to comply with National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants regulations. CAP88 Mainframe, referred to as version 1.0 on the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Web site (http://www.epa.gov/radiation/assessment/CAP88/), was the very first CAP88 version released in 1988. Some DOE facilities including the Savannah River Site still employ this version (1.0) while others use the more user-friendly personal computer Windows-based version 3.0 released in December 2007. Version 1.0 uses the program RADRISK based on International Commission on Radiological Protection Publication 30 as its radionuclide database. Version 3.0 uses half-life, dose, and risk factor values based on Federal Guidance Report 13. Differences in these values could cause different results for the same input exposure data (same scenario), depending on which version of CAP88 is used. Consequently, the differences between the two versions are being assessed in detail at Savannah River National Laboratory. The version 1.0 and 3.0 database files contain 496 and 838 radionuclides, respectively, and though one would expect the newer version to include all the 496 radionuclides, 35 radionuclides are listed in version 1.0 that are not included in version 3.0. The majority of these has either extremely short or long half-lives or is no longer in production; however, some of the short-lived radionuclides might produce progeny of great interest at DOE sites. In addition, 122 radionuclides were found to have different half-lives in the two versions, with 21 over 3 percent different and 12 over 10 percent different.

  5. ASSESSMENT OF RADIONUCLIDES DATABASES IN CAP88 MAINFRAME VERSION 1.0 AND WINDOWS-BASED VERSION 3.0

    SciTech Connect

    Farfan, E.; Lee, P.; Jannik, T.; Donnelly, E.

    2008-09-16

    In this study the radionuclide databases for two versions of the Clean Air Act Assessment Package-1988 (CAP88) computer model were assessed in detail. CAP88 estimates radiation dose and the risk of health effects to human populations from radionuclide emissions to air. This program is used by several Department of Energy (DOE) facilities to comply with National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants (NESHAP) regulations. CAP88 Mainframe, referred to as Version 1.0 on the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) website (http://www.epa.gov/radiation/assessment/CAP88/), was the very first CAP88 version released in 1988. Some DOE facilities including the Savannah River Site still employ this version (1.0) while others use the more user-friendly personal computer Windows-based Version 3.0 released in December 2007. Version 1.0 uses the program RADRISK based on International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) Publication 30 as its radionuclide database. Version 3.0 uses half-life, dose and risk factor values based on Federal Guidance Report 13. Differences in these values could cause different results for the same input exposure data (same scenario), depending on which version of CAP88 is used. Consequently, the differences between the two versions are being assessed in detail at Savannah River National Laboratory. The version 1.0 and 3.0 database files contain 496 and 838 radionuclides, respectively, and though one would expect the newer version to include all the 496 radionuclides, thirty-five radionuclides are listed in version 1.0 that are not included in version 3.0. The majority of these has either extremely short or long half-lives or is no longer in production; however, some of the short-lived radionuclides might produce progeny of great interest at DOE sites. In addition, one hundred and twenty-two radionuclides were found to have different half-lives in the two versions, with 21 over 3 percent different and 12 over 10 percent different.

  6. Photodetectors of IR radiation on the basis of CdS1-xSex films deposited from solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdinov, Ahmed S.; Jafarov, Maarif A.; Mechtiyev, Nemat M.; Nasirov, Elshan F.; Mamedov, Huseyn M.

    2000-11-01

    In this work the results on the investigation of the photosensitivity near the IR region, of CdS1-xSex (0 less than or equal to x less than or equal to 0.4) films 8 divided by 9 micrometers thick prepared on glass-ceramic substrates by precipitation from aqueous solutions are presented. The temperature dependence of dark and light conductivity, spectrum and optical quenching of primary and impurity photoconductivity are investigated. The obtained results show that when controlling ionic composition and heat-treatment (HT) conditions, one can purposely control the properties of CdS1-xSex (0 less than or equal to x less than or equal to 0.4) films, achieve the appropriate degree of compensation of different recombination levels and traps attributed to intrinsic defects or impurities, which result in high level of photoelectrical parameters near the IR region. Just after deposition the photoconductivity spectrum maximum of CdS1-xSex (0 less than or equal to x less than or equal to 0.4) films is observed at (lambda)1=0.495 divided by 0.545 micrometers versus the film composition. Subsequent to HT, the photoconductivity spectrum considerably widens and appears the impurity maximums at (lambda)2=0.58 divided by 0.69 micrometers and (lambda)3=0.95 divided by 1.05 micrometers. At (lambda)=0.88 divided by 1.56 micrometers wavelength region, the primary photocurrent optical quenching (POQ) of the films takes place. The POQ spectrum in photosensitive CdS1-xSex films consists band with the maximum at (lambda)max-1.28 divided by 1.38 micrometers, versus the film composition and HT conditions. At optimum conditions, the degree of quenching attains to 12%. The quenching of the primary photoconductivity by infrared light, leads to the occupation of the r-centers by holes.

  7. Search for pair production of scalar bottom quarks in pp collisions at square root of s = 1.96 TeV.

    PubMed

    Abazov, V M; Abbott, B; Abolins, M; Acharya, B S; Adams, M; Adams, T; Agelou, M; Ahn, S H; Ahsan, M; Alexeev, G D; Alkhazov, G; Alton, A; Alverson, G; Alves, G A; Anastasoaie, M; Andeen, T; Anderson, S; Andrieu, B; Anzelc, M S; Arnoud, Y; Arov, M; Askew, A; Asman, B; Jesus, A C S Assis; Atramentov, O; Autermann, C; Avila, C; Ay, C; Badaud, F; Baden, A; Bagby, L; Baldin, B; Bandurin, D V; Banerjee, P; Banerjee, S; Barberis, E; Bargassa, P; Baringer, P; Barnes, C; Barreto, J; Bartlett, J F; Bassler, U; Bauer, D; Bean, A; Begalli, M; Begel, M; Belanger-Champagne, C; Bellantoni, L; Bellavance, A; Benitez, J A; Beri, S B; Bernardi, G; Bernhard, R; Berntzon, L; Bertram, I; Besançon, M; Beuselinck, R; Bezzubov, V A; Bhat, P C; Bhatnagar, V; Binder, M; Biscarat, C; Black, K M; Blackler, I; Blazey, G; Blekman, F; Blessing, S; Bloch, D; Bloom, K; Blumenschein, U; Boehnlein, A; Boeriu, O; Bolton, T A; Borissov, G; Bos, K; Bose, T; Brandt, A; Brock, R; Brooijmans, G; Bross, A; Brown, D; Buchanan, N J; Buchholz, D; Buehler, M; Buescher, V; Burdin, S; Burke, S; Burnett, T H; Busato, E; Buszello, C P; Butler, J M; Calfayan, P; Calvet, S; Cammin, J; Caron, S; Carvalho, W; Casey, B C K; Cason, N M; Castilla-Valdez, H; Chakraborty, D; Chan, K M; Chandra, A; Charles, F; Cheu, E; Chevallier, F; Cho, D K; Choi, S; Choudhary, B; Christofek, L; Claes, D; Clément, B; Clément, C; Coadou, Y; Cooke, M; Cooper, W E; Coppage, D; Corcoran, M; Cousinou, M-C; Cox, B; Crépé-Renaudin, S; Cutts, D; Cwiok, M; da Motta, H; Das, A; Das, M; Davies, B; Davies, G; Davis, G A; De, K; de Jong, P; de Jong, S J; De La Cruz-Burelo, E; De Oliveira Martins, C; Degenhardt, J D; Déliot, F; Demarteau, M; Demina, R; Demine, P; Denisov, D; Denisov, S P; Desai, S; Diehl, H T; Diesburg, M; Doidge, M; Dominguez, A; Dong, H; Dudko, L V; Duflot, L; Dugad, S R; Duggan, D; Duperrin, A; Dyer, J; Dyshkant, A; Eads, M; Edmunds, D; Edwards, T; Ellison, J; Elmsheuser, J; Elvira, V D; Eno, S; Ermolov, P; Evans, H; Evdokimov, A; Evdokimov, V N; Fatakia, S N; Feligioni, L; Ferapontov, A V; Ferbel, T; Fiedler, F; Filthaut, F; Fisher, W; Fisk, H E; Fleck, I; Ford, M; Fortner, M; Fox, H; Fu, S; Fuess, S; Gadfort, T; Galea, C F; Gallas, E; Galyaev, E; Garcia, C; Garcia-Bellido, A; Gardner, J; Gavrilov, V; Gay, A; Gay, P; Gelé, D; Gelhaus, R; Gerber, C E; Gershtein, Y; Gillberg, D; Ginther, G; Gollub, N; Gómez, B; Goussiou, A; Grannis, P D; Greenlee, H; Greenwood, Z D; Gregores, E M; Grenier, G; Gris, Ph; Grivaz, J-F; Grünendahl, S; Grünewald, M W; Guo, F; Guo, J; Gutierrez, G; Gutierrez, P; Haas, A; Hadley, N J; Haefner, P; Hagopian, S; Haley, J; Hall, I; Hall, R E; Han, L; Hanagaki, K; Harder, K; Harel, A; Harrington, R; Hauptman, J M; Hauser, R; Hays, J; Hebbeker, T; Hedin, D; Hegeman, J G; Heinmiller, J M; Heinson, A P; Heintz, U; Hensel, C; Herner, K; Hesketh, G; Hildreth, M D; Hirosky, R; Hobbs, J D; Hoeneisen, B; Hoeth, H; Hohlfeld, M; Hong, S J; Hooper, R; Houben, P; Hu, Y; Hubacek, Z; Hynek, V; Iashvili, I; Illingworth, R; Ito, A S; Jabeen, S; Jaffré, M; Jain, S; Jakobs, K; Jarvis, C; Jenkins, A; Jesik, R; Johns, K; Johnson, C; Johnson, M; Jonckheere, A; Jonsson, P; Juste, A; Käfer, D; Kahn, S; Kajfasz, E; Kalinin, A M; Kalk, J M; Kalk, J R; Kappler, S; Karmanov, D; Kasper, J; Kasper, P; Katsanos, I; Kau, D; Kaur, R; Kehoe, R; Kermiche, S; Khalatyan, N; Khanov, A; Kharchilava, A; Kharzheev, Y M; Khatidze, D; Kim, H; Kim, T J; Kirby, M H; Klima, B; Kohli, J M; Konrath, J-P; Kopal, M; Korablev, V M; Kotcher, J; Kothari, B; Koubarovsky, A; Kozelov, A V; Kozminski, J; Krop, D; Kryemadhi, A; Kuhl, T; Kumar, A; Kunori, S; Kupco, A; Kurca, T; Kvita, J; Lammers, S; Landsberg, G; Lazoflores, J; Le Bihan, A-C; Lebrun, P; Lee, W M; Leflat, A; Lehner, F; Lesne, V; Leveque, J; Lewis, P; Li, J; Li, Q Z; Lima, J G R; Lincoln, D; Linnemann, J; Lipaev, V V; Lipton, R; Liu, Z; Lobo, L; Lobodenko, A; Lokajicek, M; Lounis, A; Love, P; Lubatti, H J; Lynker, M; Lyon, A L; Maciel, A K A; Madaras, R J; Mättig, P; Magass, C; Magerkurth, A; Magnan, A-M; Makovec, N; Mal, P K; Malbouisson, H B; Malik, S; Malyshev, V L; Mao, H S; Maravin, Y; Martens, M; McCarthy, R; Meder, D; Melnitchouk, A; Mendes, A; Mendoza, L; Merkin, M; Merritt, K W; Meyer, A; Meyer, J; Michaut, M; Miettinen, H; Millet, T; Mitrevski, J; Molina, J; Mondal, N K; Monk, J; Moore, R W; Moulik, T; Muanza, G S; Mulders, M; Mulhearn, M; Mundim, L; Mutaf, Y D; Nagy, E; Naimuddin, M; Narain, M; Naumann, N A; Neal, H A; Negret, J P; Neustroev, P; Noeding, C; Nomerotski, A; Novaes, S F; Nunnemann, T; O'Dell, V; O'Neil, D C; Obrant, G; Oguri, V; Oliveira, N; Oshima, N; Otec, R; Y Garzón, G J Otero; Owen, M; Padley, P; Parashar, N; Park, S-J; Park, S K; Parsons, J; Partridge, R; Parua, N; Patwa, A; Pawloski, G; Perea, P M; Perez, E; Peters, K; Pétroff, P; Petteni, M; Piegaia, R; Piper, J; Pleier, M-A; Podesta-Lerma, P L M; Podstavkov, V M; Pogorelov, Y; Pol, M-E; Pompos, A; Pope, B G; Popov, A V; Potter, C; Prado da Silva, W L; Prosper, H B; Protopopescu, S; Qian, J; Quadt, A; Quinn, B; Rangel, M S; Rani, K J; Ranjan, K; Ratoff, P N; Renkel, P; Reucroft, S; Rijssenbeek, M; Ripp-Baudot, I; Rizatdinova, F; Robinson, S; Rodrigues, R F; Royon, C; Rubinov, P; Ruchti, R; Rud, V I; Sajot, G; Sánchez-Hernández, A; Sanders, M P; Santoro, A; Savage, G; Sawyer, L; Scanlon, T; Schaile, D; Schamberger, R D; Scheglov, Y; Schellman, H; Schieferdecker, P; Schmitt, C; Schwanenberger, C; Schwartzman, A; Schwienhorst, R; Sekaric, J; Sengupta, S; Severini, H; Shabalina, E; Shamim, M; Shary, V; Shchukin, A A; Shephard, W D; Shivpuri, R K; Shpakov, D; Siccardi, V; Sidwell, R A; Simak, V; Sirotenko, V; Skubic, P; Slattery, P; Smith, R P; Snow, G R; Snow, J; Snyder, S; Söldner-Rembold, S; Song, X; Sonnenschein, L; Sopczak, A; Sosebee, M; Soustruznik, K; Souza, M; Spurlock, B; Stark, J; Steele, J; Stolin, V; Stone, A; Stoyanova, D A; Strandberg, J; Strandberg, S; Strang, M A; Strauss, M; Ströhmer, R; Strom, D; Strovink, M; Stutte, L; Sumowidagdo, S; Sznajder, A; Talby, M; Tamburello, P; Taylor, W; Telford, P; Temple, J; Tiller, B; Titov, M; Tokmenin, V V; Tomoto, M; Toole, T; Torchiani, I; Towers, S; Trefzger, T; Trincaz-Duvoid, S; Tsybychev, D; Tuchming, B; Tully, C; Turcot, A S; Tuts, P M; Unalan, R; Uvarov, L; Uvarov, S; Uzunyan, S; Vachon, B; van den Berg, P J; Van Kooten, R; van Leeuwen, W M; Varelas, N; Varnes, E W; Vartapetian, A; Vasilyev, I A; Vaupel, M; Verdier, P; Vertogradov, L S; Verzocchi, M; Villeneuve-Seguier, F; Vint, P; Vlimant, J-R; Von Toerne, E; Voutilainen, M; Vreeswijk, M; Wahl, H D; Wang, L; Wang, M H L S; Warchol, J; Watts, G; Wayne, M; Weber, M; Weerts, H; Wermes, N; Wetstein, M; White, A; Wicke, D; Wilson, G W; Wimpenny, S J; Wobisch, M; Womersley, J; Wood, D R; Wyatt, T R; Xie, Y; Xuan, N; Yacoob, S; Yamada, R; Yan, M; Yasuda, T; Yatsunenko, Y A; Yip, K; Yoo, H D; Youn, S W; Yu, C; Yu, J; Yurkewicz, A; Zatserklyaniy, A; Zeitnitz, C; Zhang, D; Zhao, T; Zhou, B; Zhu, J; Zielinski, M; Zieminska, D; Zieminski, A; Zutshi, V; Zverev, E G

    2006-10-27

    A search for direct production of scalar bottom quarks (b) is performed with 310 pb(-1) of data collected by the D0 experiment in pp collisions at square root s = 1.96 TeV at the Fermilab Tevatron Collider. The topology analyzed consists of two b jets and an imbalance in transverse momentum due to undetected neutralinos (chi(1)0), with chi(1)0 assumed to be the lightest supersymmetric particle. We find the data consistent with standard model expectations, and set a 95% C.L. exclusion domain in the (m(b), m(chi(1)0)) mass plane, improving significantly upon the results from run I of the Tevatron. PMID:17155465

  8. Search for pair production of scalar bottom quarks in pp collisions at square root of s = 1.96 TeV.

    PubMed

    Abazov, V M; Abbott, B; Abolins, M; Acharya, B S; Adams, M; Adams, T; Agelou, M; Ahn, S H; Ahsan, M; Alexeev, G D; Alkhazov, G; Alton, A; Alverson, G; Alves, G A; Anastasoaie, M; Andeen, T; Anderson, S; Andrieu, B; Anzelc, M S; Arnoud, Y; Arov, M; Askew, A; Asman, B; Jesus, A C S Assis; Atramentov, O; Autermann, C; Avila, C; Ay, C; Badaud, F; Baden, A; Bagby, L; Baldin, B; Bandurin, D V; Banerjee, P; Banerjee, S; Barberis, E; Bargassa, P; Baringer, P; Barnes, C; Barreto, J; Bartlett, J F; Bassler, U; Bauer, D; Bean, A; Begalli, M; Begel, M; Belanger-Champagne, C; Bellantoni, L; Bellavance, A; Benitez, J A; Beri, S B; Bernardi, G; Bernhard, R; Berntzon, L; Bertram, I; Besançon, M; Beuselinck, R; Bezzubov, V A; Bhat, P C; Bhatnagar, V; Binder, M; Biscarat, C; Black, K M; Blackler, I; Blazey, G; Blekman, F; Blessing, S; Bloch, D; Bloom, K; Blumenschein, U; Boehnlein, A; Boeriu, O; Bolton, T A; Borissov, G; Bos, K; Bose, T; Brandt, A; Brock, R; Brooijmans, G; Bross, A; Brown, D; Buchanan, N J; Buchholz, D; Buehler, M; Buescher, V; Burdin, S; Burke, S; Burnett, T H; Busato, E; Buszello, C P; Butler, J M; Calfayan, P; Calvet, S; Cammin, J; Caron, S; Carvalho, W; Casey, B C K; Cason, N M; Castilla-Valdez, H; Chakraborty, D; Chan, K M; Chandra, A; Charles, F; Cheu, E; Chevallier, F; Cho, D K; Choi, S; Choudhary, B; Christofek, L; Claes, D; Clément, B; Clément, C; Coadou, Y; Cooke, M; Cooper, W E; Coppage, D; Corcoran, M; Cousinou, M-C; Cox, B; Crépé-Renaudin, S; Cutts, D; Cwiok, M; da Motta, H; Das, A; Das, M; Davies, B; Davies, G; Davis, G A; De, K; de Jong, P; de Jong, S J; De La Cruz-Burelo, E; De Oliveira Martins, C; Degenhardt, J D; Déliot, F; Demarteau, M; Demina, R; Demine, P; Denisov, D; Denisov, S P; Desai, S; Diehl, H T; Diesburg, M; Doidge, M; Dominguez, A; Dong, H; Dudko, L V; Duflot, L; Dugad, S R; Duggan, D; Duperrin, A; Dyer, J; Dyshkant, A; Eads, M; Edmunds, D; Edwards, T; Ellison, J; Elmsheuser, J; Elvira, V D; Eno, S; Ermolov, P; Evans, H; Evdokimov, A; Evdokimov, V N; Fatakia, S N; Feligioni, L; Ferapontov, A V; Ferbel, T; Fiedler, F; Filthaut, F; Fisher, W; Fisk, H E; Fleck, I; Ford, M; Fortner, M; Fox, H; Fu, S; Fuess, S; Gadfort, T; Galea, C F; Gallas, E; Galyaev, E; Garcia, C; Garcia-Bellido, A; Gardner, J; Gavrilov, V; Gay, A; Gay, P; Gelé, D; Gelhaus, R; Gerber, C E; Gershtein, Y; Gillberg, D; Ginther, G; Gollub, N; Gómez, B; Goussiou, A; Grannis, P D; Greenlee, H; Greenwood, Z D; Gregores, E M; Grenier, G; Gris, Ph; Grivaz, J-F; Grünendahl, S; Grünewald, M W; Guo, F; Guo, J; Gutierrez, G; Gutierrez, P; Haas, A; Hadley, N J; Haefner, P; Hagopian, S; Haley, J; Hall, I; Hall, R E; Han, L; Hanagaki, K; Harder, K; Harel, A; Harrington, R; Hauptman, J M; Hauser, R; Hays, J; Hebbeker, T; Hedin, D; Hegeman, J G; Heinmiller, J M; Heinson, A P; Heintz, U; Hensel, C; Herner, K; Hesketh, G; Hildreth, M D; Hirosky, R; Hobbs, J D; Hoeneisen, B; Hoeth, H; Hohlfeld, M; Hong, S J; Hooper, R; Houben, P; Hu, Y; Hubacek, Z; Hynek, V; Iashvili, I; Illingworth, R; Ito, A S; Jabeen, S; Jaffré, M; Jain, S; Jakobs, K; Jarvis, C; Jenkins, A; Jesik, R; Johns, K; Johnson, C; Johnson, M; Jonckheere, A; Jonsson, P; Juste, A; Käfer, D; Kahn, S; Kajfasz, E; Kalinin, A M; Kalk, J M; Kalk, J R; Kappler, S; Karmanov, D; Kasper, J; Kasper, P; Katsanos, I; Kau, D; Kaur, R; Kehoe, R; Kermiche, S; Khalatyan, N; Khanov, A; Kharchilava, A; Kharzheev, Y M; Khatidze, D; Kim, H; Kim, T J; Kirby, M H; Klima, B; Kohli, J M; Konrath, J-P; Kopal, M; Korablev, V M; Kotcher, J; Kothari, B; Koubarovsky, A; Kozelov, A V; Kozminski, J; Krop, D; Kryemadhi, A; Kuhl, T; Kumar, A; Kunori, S; Kupco, A; Kurca, T; Kvita, J; Lammers, S; Landsberg, G; Lazoflores, J; Le Bihan, A-C; Lebrun, P; Lee, W M; Leflat, A; Lehner, F; Lesne, V; Leveque, J; Lewis, P; Li, J; Li, Q Z; Lima, J G R; Lincoln, D; Linnemann, J; Lipaev, V V; Lipton, R; Liu, Z; Lobo, L; Lobodenko, A; Lokajicek, M; Lounis, A; Love, P; Lubatti, H J; Lynker, M; Lyon, A L; Maciel, A K A; Madaras, R J; Mättig, P; Magass, C; Magerkurth, A; Magnan, A-M; Makovec, N; Mal, P K; Malbouisson, H B; Malik, S; Malyshev, V L; Mao, H S; Maravin, Y; Martens, M; McCarthy, R; Meder, D; Melnitchouk, A; Mendes, A; Mendoza, L; Merkin, M; Merritt, K W; Meyer, A; Meyer, J; Michaut, M; Miettinen, H; Millet, T; Mitrevski, J; Molina, J; Mondal, N K; Monk, J; Moore, R W; Moulik, T; Muanza, G S; Mulders, M; Mulhearn, M; Mundim, L; Mutaf, Y D; Nagy, E; Naimuddin, M; Narain, M; Naumann, N A; Neal, H A; Negret, J P; Neustroev, P; Noeding, C; Nomerotski, A; Novaes, S F; Nunnemann, T; O'Dell, V; O'Neil, D C; Obrant, G; Oguri, V; Oliveira, N; Oshima, N; Otec, R; Y Garzón, G J Otero; Owen, M; Padley, P; Parashar, N; Park, S-J; Park, S K; Parsons, J; Partridge, R; Parua, N; Patwa, A; Pawloski, G; Perea, P M; Perez, E; Peters, K; Pétroff, P; Petteni, M; Piegaia, R; Piper, J; Pleier, M-A; Podesta-Lerma, P L M; Podstavkov, V M; Pogorelov, Y; Pol, M-E; Pompos, A; Pope, B G; Popov, A V; Potter, C; Prado da Silva, W L; Prosper, H B; Protopopescu, S; Qian, J; Quadt, A; Quinn, B; Rangel, M S; Rani, K J; Ranjan, K; Ratoff, P N; Renkel, P; Reucroft, S; Rijssenbeek, M; Ripp-Baudot, I; Rizatdinova, F; Robinson, S; Rodrigues, R F; Royon, C; Rubinov, P; Ruchti, R; Rud, V I; Sajot, G; Sánchez-Hernández, A; Sanders, M P; Santoro, A; Savage, G; Sawyer, L; Scanlon, T; Schaile, D; Schamberger, R D; Scheglov, Y; Schellman, H; Schieferdecker, P; Schmitt, C; Schwanenberger, C; Schwartzman, A; Schwienhorst, R; Sekaric, J; Sengupta, S; Severini, H; Shabalina, E; Shamim, M; Shary, V; Shchukin, A A; Shephard, W D; Shivpuri, R K; Shpakov, D; Siccardi, V; Sidwell, R A; Simak, V; Sirotenko, V; Skubic, P; Slattery, P; Smith, R P; Snow, G R; Snow, J; Snyder, S; Söldner-Rembold, S; Song, X; Sonnenschein, L; Sopczak, A; Sosebee, M; Soustruznik, K; Souza, M; Spurlock, B; Stark, J; Steele, J; Stolin, V; Stone, A; Stoyanova, D A; Strandberg, J; Strandberg, S; Strang, M A; Strauss, M; Ströhmer, R; Strom, D; Strovink, M; Stutte, L; Sumowidagdo, S; Sznajder, A; Talby, M; Tamburello, P; Taylor, W; Telford, P; Temple, J; Tiller, B; Titov, M; Tokmenin, V V; Tomoto, M; Toole, T; Torchiani, I; Towers, S; Trefzger, T; Trincaz-Duvoid, S; Tsybychev, D; Tuchming, B; Tully, C; Turcot, A S; Tuts, P M; Unalan, R; Uvarov, L; Uvarov, S; Uzunyan, S; Vachon, B; van den Berg, P J; Van Kooten, R; van Leeuwen, W M; Varelas, N; Varnes, E W; Vartapetian, A; Vasilyev, I A; Vaupel, M; Verdier, P; Vertogradov, L S; Verzocchi, M; Villeneuve-Seguier, F; Vint, P; Vlimant, J-R; Von Toerne, E; Voutilainen, M; Vreeswijk, M; Wahl, H D; Wang, L; Wang, M H L S; Warchol, J; Watts, G; Wayne, M; Weber, M; Weerts, H; Wermes, N; Wetstein, M; White, A; Wicke, D; Wilson, G W; Wimpenny, S J; Wobisch, M; Womersley, J; Wood, D R; Wyatt, T R; Xie, Y; Xuan, N; Yacoob, S; Yamada, R; Yan, M; Yasuda, T; Yatsunenko, Y A; Yip, K; Yoo, H D; Youn, S W; Yu, C; Yu, J; Yurkewicz, A; Zatserklyaniy, A; Zeitnitz, C; Zhang, D; Zhao, T; Zhou, B; Zhu, J; Zielinski, M; Zieminska, D; Zieminski, A; Zutshi, V; Zverev, E G

    2006-10-27

    A search for direct production of scalar bottom quarks (b) is performed with 310 pb(-1) of data collected by the D0 experiment in pp collisions at square root s = 1.96 TeV at the Fermilab Tevatron Collider. The topology analyzed consists of two b jets and an imbalance in transverse momentum due to undetected neutralinos (chi(1)0), with chi(1)0 assumed to be the lightest supersymmetric particle. We find the data consistent with standard model expectations, and set a 95% C.L. exclusion domain in the (m(b), m(chi(1)0)) mass plane, improving significantly upon the results from run I of the Tevatron.

  9. A bio-inspired real-time capable artificial lateral line system for freestream flow measurements.

    PubMed

    Abels, C; Qualtieri, A; De Vittorio, M; Megill, W M; Rizzi, F

    2016-06-03

    To enhance today's artificial flow sensing capabilities in aerial and underwater robotics, future robots could be equipped with a large number of miniaturized sensors distributed over the surface to provide high resolution measurement of the surrounding fluid flow. In this work we show a linear array of closely separated bio-inspired micro-electro-mechanical flow sensors whose sensing mechanism is based on a piezoresistive strain-gauge along a stress-driven cantilever beam, mimicking the biological superficial neuromasts found in the lateral line organ of fishes. Aiming to improve state-of-the-art flow sensing capability in autonomously flying and swimming robots, our artificial lateral line system was designed and developed to feature multi-parameter freestream flow measurements which provide information about (1) local flow velocities as measured by the signal amplitudes from the individual cantilevers as well as (2) propagation velocity, (3) linear forward/backward direction along the cantilever beam orientation and (4) periodicity of pulses or pulse trains determined by cross-correlating sensor signals. A real-time capable cross-correlation procedure was developed which makes it possible to extract freestream flow direction and velocity information from flow fluctuations. The computed flow velocities deviate from a commercial system by 0.09 m s(-1) at 0.5 m s(-1) and 0.15 m s(-1) at 1.0 m s(-1) flow velocity for a sampling rate of 240 Hz and a sensor distance of 38 mm. Although experiments were performed in air, the presented flow sensing system can be applied to underwater vehicles as well, once the sensors are embedded in a waterproof micro-electro-mechanical systems package.

  10. A bio-inspired real-time capable artificial lateral line system for freestream flow measurements.

    PubMed

    Abels, C; Qualtieri, A; De Vittorio, M; Megill, W M; Rizzi, F

    2016-06-01

    To enhance today's artificial flow sensing capabilities in aerial and underwater robotics, future robots could be equipped with a large number of miniaturized sensors distributed over the surface to provide high resolution measurement of the surrounding fluid flow. In this work we show a linear array of closely separated bio-inspired micro-electro-mechanical flow sensors whose sensing mechanism is based on a piezoresistive strain-gauge along a stress-driven cantilever beam, mimicking the biological superficial neuromasts found in the lateral line organ of fishes. Aiming to improve state-of-the-art flow sensing capability in autonomously flying and swimming robots, our artificial lateral line system was designed and developed to feature multi-parameter freestream flow measurements which provide information about (1) local flow velocities as measured by the signal amplitudes from the individual cantilevers as well as (2) propagation velocity, (3) linear forward/backward direction along the cantilever beam orientation and (4) periodicity of pulses or pulse trains determined by cross-correlating sensor signals. A real-time capable cross-correlation procedure was developed which makes it possible to extract freestream flow direction and velocity information from flow fluctuations. The computed flow velocities deviate from a commercial system by 0.09 m s(-1) at 0.5 m s(-1) and 0.15 m s(-1) at 1.0 m s(-1) flow velocity for a sampling rate of 240 Hz and a sensor distance of 38 mm. Although experiments were performed in air, the presented flow sensing system can be applied to underwater vehicles as well, once the sensors are embedded in a waterproof micro-electro-mechanical systems package. PMID:27257144

  11. Genetic characterization of three qnrS1-harbouring multidrug-resistance plasmids and qnrS1-containing transposons circulating in Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam

    PubMed Central

    Le, Vien; Nhu, Nguyen Thi Khanh; Cerdeno-Tarraga, Ana; Campbell, James I.; Tuyen, Ha Thanh; Nhu, Tran Do Hoang; Tam, Pham Thi Thanh; Schultsz, Constance; Thwaites, Guy; Thomson, Nicholas R.

    2015-01-01

    Plasmid-mediated quinolone resistance (PMQR) refers to a family of closely related genes that confer decreased susceptibility to fluoroquinolones. PMQR genes are generally associated with integrons and/or plasmids that carry additional antimicrobial resistance genes active against a range of antimicrobials. In Ho Chi Minh City (HCMC), Vietnam, we have previously shown a high frequency of PMQR genes within commensal Enterobacteriaceae. However, there are limited available sequence data detailing the genetic context in which the PMQR genes reside, and a lack of understanding of how these genes spread across the Enterobacteriaceae. Here, we aimed to determine the genetic background facilitating the spread and maintenance of qnrS1, the dominant PMQR gene circulating in HCMC. We sequenced three qnrS1-carrying plasmids in their entirety to understand the genetic context of these qnrS1-embedded plasmids and also the association of qnrS1-mediated quinolone resistance with other antimicrobial resistance phenotypes. Annotation of the three qnrS1-containing plasmids revealed a qnrS1-containing transposon with a closely related structure. We screened 112 qnrS1-positive commensal Enterobacteriaceae isolated in the community and in a hospital in HCMC to detect the common transposon structure. We found the same transposon structure to be present in 71.4 % (45/63) of qnrS1-positive hospital isolates and in 36.7 % (18/49) of qnrS1-positive isolates from the community. The resulting sequence analysis of the qnrS1 environment suggested that qnrS1 genes are widely distributed and are mobilized on elements with a common genetic background. Our data add additional insight into mechanisms that facilitate resistance to multiple antimicrobials in Gram-negative bacteria in Vietnam. PMID:26272054

  12. Genetic characterization of three qnrS1-harbouring multidrug-resistance plasmids and qnrS1-containing transposons circulating in Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam.

    PubMed

    Le, Vien; Nhu, Nguyen Thi Khanh; Cerdeno-Tarraga, Ana; Campbell, James I; Tuyen, Ha Thanh; Nhu, Tran Do Hoang; Tam, Pham Thi Thanh; Schultsz, Constance; Thwaites, Guy; Thomson, Nicholas R; Baker, Stephen

    2015-08-01

    Plasmid-mediated quinolone resistance (PMQR) refers to a family of closely related genes that confer decreased susceptibility to fluoroquinolones. PMQR genes are generally associated with integrons and/or plasmids that carry additional antimicrobial resistance genes active against a range of antimicrobials. In Ho Chi Minh City (HCMC), Vietnam, we have previously shown a high frequency of PMQR genes within commensal Enterobacteriaceae. However, there are limited available sequence data detailing the genetic context in which the PMQR genes reside, and a lack of understanding of how these genes spread across the Enterobacteriaceae. Here, we aimed to determine the genetic background facilitating the spread and maintenance of qnrS1, the dominant PMQR gene circulating in HCMC. We sequenced three qnrS1-carrying plasmids in their entirety to understand the genetic context of these qnrS1-embedded plasmids and also the association of qnrS1-mediated quinolone resistance with other antimicrobial resistance phenotypes. Annotation of the three qnrS1-containing plasmids revealed a qnrS1-containing transposon with a closely related structure. We screened 112 qnrS1-positive commensal Enterobacteriaceae isolated in the community and in a hospital in HCMC to detect the common transposon structure. We found the same transposon structure to be present in 71.4 % (45/63) of qnrS1-positive hospital isolates and in 36.7 % (18/49) of qnrS1-positive isolates from the community. The resulting sequence analysis of the qnrS1 environment suggested that qnrS1 genes are widely distributed and are mobilized on elements with a common genetic background. Our data add additional insight into mechanisms that facilitate resistance to multiple antimicrobials in Gram-negative bacteria in Vietnam.

  13. A Prokaryotic S1P Lyase Degrades Extracellular S1P In Vitro and In Vivo: Implication for Treating Hyperproliferative Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Huwiler, Andrea; Bourquin, Florence; Kotelevets, Nataliya; Pastukhov, Oleksandr; Capitani, Guido; Grütter, Markus G.; Zangemeister-Wittke, Uwe

    2011-01-01

    Sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) regulates a broad spectrum of fundamental cellular processes like proliferation, death, migration and cytokine production. Therefore, elevated levels of S1P may be causal to various pathologic conditions including cancer, fibrosis, inflammation, autoimmune diseases and aberrant angiogenesis. Here we report that S1P lyase from the prokaryote Symbiobacterium thermophilum (StSPL) degrades extracellular S1P in vitro and in blood. Moreover, we investigated its effect on cellular responses typical of fibrosis, cancer and aberrant angiogenesis using renal mesangial cells, endothelial cells, breast (MCF-7) and colon (HCT 116) carcinoma cells as disease models. In all cell types, wild-type StSPL, but not an inactive mutant, disrupted MAPK phosphorylation stimulated by exogenous S1P. Functionally, disruption of S1P receptor signaling by S1P depletion inhibited proliferation and expression of connective tissue growth factor in mesangial cells, proliferation, migration and VEGF expression in carcinoma cells, and proliferation and migration of endothelial cells. Upon intravenous injection of StSPL in mice, plasma S1P levels rapidly declined by 70% within 1 h and then recovered to normal 6 h after injection. Using the chicken chorioallantoic membrane model we further demonstrate that also under in vivo conditions StSPL, but not the inactive mutant, inhibited tumor cell-induced angiogenesis as an S1P-dependent process. Our data demonstrate that recombinant StSPL is active under extracellular conditions and holds promise as a new enzyme therapeutic for diseases associated with increased levels of S1P and S1P receptor signaling. PMID:21829623

  14. Variability of Phenology and Fluxes of Water and Carbon with Observed and Simulated Soil Moisture in the Ent Terrestrial Biosphere Model (Ent TBM Version 1.0.1.0.0)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, Y.; Moorcroft, P. R.; Aleinov, Igor; Puma, M. J.; Kiang, N. Y.

    2015-01-01

    The Ent Terrestrial Biosphere Model (Ent TBM) is a mixed-canopy dynamic global vegetation model developed specifically for coupling with land surface hydrology and general circulation models (GCMs). This study describes the leaf phenology submodel implemented in the Ent TBM version 1.0.1.0.0 coupled to the carbon allocation scheme of the Ecosystem Demography (ED) model. The phenology submodel adopts a combination of responses to temperature (growing degree days and frost hardening), soil moisture (linearity of stress with relative saturation) and radiation (light length). Growth of leaves, sapwood, fine roots, stem wood and coarse roots is updated on a daily basis. We evaluate the performance in reproducing observed leaf seasonal growth as well as water and carbon fluxes for four plant functional types at five Fluxnet sites, with both observed and prognostic hydrology, and observed and prognostic seasonal leaf area index. The phenology submodel is able to capture the timing and magnitude of leaf-out and senescence for temperate broadleaf deciduous forest (Harvard Forest and Morgan- Monroe State Forest, US), C3 annual grassland (Vaira Ranch, US) and California oak savanna (Tonzi Ranch, US). For evergreen needleleaf forest (Hyytiäla, Finland), the phenology submodel captures the effect of frost hardening of photosynthetic capacity on seasonal fluxes and leaf area. We address the importance of customizing parameter sets of vegetation soil moisture stress response to the particular land surface hydrology scheme. We identify model deficiencies that reveal important dynamics and parameter needs.

  15. Variability of phenology and fluxes of water and carbon with observed and simulated soil moisture in the Ent Terrestrial Biosphere Model (Ent TBM version 1.0.1.0.0)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Y.; Moorcroft, P. R.; Aleinov, I.; Puma, M. J.; Kiang, N. Y.

    2015-12-01

    The Ent Terrestrial Biosphere Model (Ent TBM) is a mixed-canopy dynamic global vegetation model developed specifically for coupling with land surface hydrology and general circulation models (GCMs). This study describes the leaf phenology submodel implemented in the Ent TBM version 1.0.1.0.0 coupled to the carbon allocation scheme of the Ecosystem Demography (ED) model. The phenology submodel adopts a combination of responses to temperature (growing degree days and frost hardening), soil moisture (linearity of stress with relative saturation) and radiation (light length). Growth of leaves, sapwood, fine roots, stem wood and coarse roots is updated on a daily basis. We evaluate the performance in reproducing observed leaf seasonal growth as well as water and carbon fluxes for four plant functional types at five Fluxnet sites, with both observed and prognostic hydrology, and observed and prognostic seasonal leaf area index. The phenology submodel is able to capture the timing and magnitude of leaf-out and senescence for temperate broadleaf deciduous forest (Harvard Forest and Morgan-Monroe State Forest, US), C3 annual grassland (Vaira Ranch, US) and California oak savanna (Tonzi Ranch, US). For evergreen needleleaf forest (Hyytiäla, Finland), the phenology submodel captures the effect of frost hardening of photosynthetic capacity on seasonal fluxes and leaf area. We address the importance of customizing parameter sets of vegetation soil moisture stress response to the particular land surface hydrology scheme. We identify model deficiencies that reveal important dynamics and parameter needs.

  16. CYP2S1 depletion enhances colorectal cell proliferation is associated with PGE2-mediated activation of β-catenin signaling

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Chao; Li, Changyuan; Li, Minle; Tong, Xuemei; Hu, Xiaowen; Yang, Xuhan; Yan, Xiaomei; He, Lin; Wan, Chunling

    2015-02-15

    Colorectal epithelial cancer is one of the most common cancers in the world and its 5-year survival rate is still relatively low. Cytochrome P450 (CYP) enzymes in epithelial cells lining the alimentary tract play an important role in the oxidative metabolism of a wide range of xenobiotics, including (pro-)carcinogens and endogenous compounds. Although CYP2S1, a member of CYP family, strongly expressed in many extrahepatic tissues, the role of CYP2S1 in cancer remains unclear. To investigate whether CYP2S1 involves in colorectal carcinogenesis, cell proliferation was analyzed in HCT116 cells depleted of CYP2S1 using small hairpin interfering RNA. Our data show that CYP2S1 knockdown promotes cell proliferation through increasing the level of endogenous prostaglandin E2(PGE2). PGE2, in turn, reduces phosphorylation of β-catenin and activates β-catenin signaling, which contributes to the cell proliferation. Furthermore, CYP2S1 knockdown increase tumor growth in xenograft mouse model. In brief, these results demonstrate that CYP2S1 regulates colorectal cancer growth through associated with PGE2-mediated activation of β-catenin signaling. - Highlights: • Knockdown of CYP2S1 expression improve HCT116 cell proliferation in vitro and in vivo. • Elevate PGE2 production in CYP2S1 knockdown cell is associated with its proliferation. • Elevate PGE2 level in CYP2S1 knockdown cells enhance β-catenin accumulation. • β-catenin activate TCF/LEF and target gene expression thus promote cell proliferation.

  17. High expression of sphingosine kinase 1 and S1P receptors in chemotherapy-resistant prostate cancer PC3 cells and their camptothecin-induced up-regulation

    SciTech Connect

    Akao, Yukihiro . E-mail: yakao@giib.or.jp; Banno, Yoshiko; Nakagawa, Yoshihito; Hasegawa, Nobuko; Kim, Tack-Joong; Murate, Takashi; Igarashi, Yasuyuki; Nozawa, Yoshinori

    2006-04-21

    Although most of pharmacological therapies for cancer utilize the apoptotic machinery of the cells, the available anti-cancer drugs are limited due to the ability of prostate cancer cells to escape from the anti-cancer drug-induced apoptosis. A human prostate cancer cell line PC3 is resistant to camptothecin (CPT). To elucidate the mechanism of this resistance, we have examined the involvement of sphingosine kinase (SPHK) and sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P) receptor in CPT-resistant PC3 and -sensitive LNCaP cells. PC3 cells exhibited higher activity accompanied with higher expression levels of protein and mRNA of SPHK1, and also elevated expression of S1P receptors, S1P{sub 1} and S1P{sub 3}, as compared with those of LNCaP cells. The knockdown of SPHK1 by small interfering RNA and inhibition of S1P receptor signaling by pertussis toxin in PC3 cells induced significant inhibition of cell growth, suggesting implication of SPHK1 and S1P receptors in cell proliferation in PC3 cells. Furthermore, the treatment of PC3 cells with CPT was found to induce up-regulation of the SPHK1/S1P signaling by induction of both SPHK1 enzyme and S1P{sub 1}/S1P{sub 3} receptors. These findings strongly suggest that high expression and up-regulation of SPHK1 and S1P receptors protect PC3 cells from the apoptosis induced by CPT.

  18. Cardiomyocyte S1P1 Receptor–mediated Extracellular Signal–related Kinase Signaling and Desensitization

    PubMed Central

    Tao, Rong; Hoover, Holly E.; Zhang, Jianqing; Honbo, Norman; Alano, Conrad C.; Karliner, Joel S.

    2010-01-01

    We examined the ability of sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) to desensitize extracellular signal–related kinase (ERK), a mitogen-activated protein kinase linked to antiapoptotic responses in the heart. In isolated adult mouse cardiomyocytes, S1P (10 nM–5 μM) induced ERK phosphorylation in a time- and dose-dependent manner. S1P stimulation of ERK was completely inhibited by an S1P1/3 subtype receptor antagonist (VPC23019), by a Gi protein inhibitor (pertussis toxin) and by a mitogen-activated protein kinase/ERK kinase inhibitor (PD98059). A selective S1P3 receptor antagonist (CAY10444) had no effect on S1P-induced ERK activation. The selective S1P1 agonist SEW2871 also induced ERK phosphorylation. Activation of ERK by restimulation with 100 nM S1P was suppressed after 1 hour of preincubation with 100 nM S1P but recovered fully the next day, suggesting receptor recycling. Similar results were obtained in protein kinase Cε-null cardiomyocytes. Treatment with the nonselective S1P receptor agonist FTY720 for 1 hour also reduced phospho-ERK expression in response to subsequent S1P stimulation. In contrast to S1P, some desensitization to FTY720 persisted after overnight exposure. Cell death induced by hypoxia/reoxygenation was reduced by pretreatment with exogenous S1P. This enhanced survival was abrogated by pretreatment with PD98059, VPC23019, or pertussis toxin. Thus, exogenous S1P induces rapid and reversible S1P1-mediated ERK phosphorylation. S1P-induced adult mouse cardiomyocyte survival requires ERK activation mediated via an S1P1–Gi pathway. PMID:19433984

  19. The STP (Solar-Terrestrial Physics) Semantic Web based on the RSS1.0 and the RDF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kubo, T.; Murata, K. T.; Kimura, E.; Ishikura, S.; Shinohara, I.; Kasaba, Y.; Watari, S.; Matsuoka, D.

    2006-12-01

    In the Solar-Terrestrial Physics (STP), it is pointed out that circulation and utilization of observation data among researchers are insufficient. To archive interdisciplinary researches, we need to overcome this circulation and utilization problems. Under such a background, authors' group has developed a world-wide database that manages meta-data of satellite and ground-based observation data files. It is noted that retrieving meta-data from the observation data and registering them to database have been carried out by hand so far. Our goal is to establish the STP Semantic Web. The Semantic Web provides a common framework that allows a variety of data shared and reused across applications, enterprises, and communities. We also expect that the secondary information related with observations, such as event information and associated news, are also shared over the networks. The most fundamental issue on the establishment is who generates, manages and provides meta-data in the Semantic Web. We developed an automatic meta-data collection system for the observation data using the RSS (RDF Site Summary) 1.0. The RSS1.0 is one of the XML-based markup languages based on the RDF (Resource Description Framework), which is designed for syndicating news and contents of news-like sites. The RSS1.0 is used to describe the STP meta-data, such as data file name, file server address and observation date. To describe the meta-data of the STP beyond RSS1.0 vocabulary, we defined original vocabularies for the STP resources using the RDF Schema. The RDF describes technical terms on the STP along with the Dublin Core Metadata Element Set, which is standard for cross-domain information resource descriptions. Researchers' information on the STP by FOAF, which is known as an RDF/XML vocabulary, creates a machine-readable metadata describing people. Using the RSS1.0 as a meta-data distribution method, the workflow from retrieving meta-data to registering them into the database is automated

  20. SIMILARITY BETWEEN THE C{sup 18}O (J = 1-0) CORE MASS FUNCTION AND THE INITIAL MASS FUNCTION (IMF) IN THE S140 REGION

    SciTech Connect

    Ikeda, Norio; Kitamura, Yoshimi

    2011-05-10

    We present the results of C{sup 18}O(J = 1-0) mapping observations of a 20' x 18' area in the Lynds 1204 molecular cloud associated with the Sharpless 2-140 (S140) H II region. The C{sup 18}O cube ({alpha}-{delta}-v{sub LSR}) data show that there are three clumps of sizes {approx}1 pc in the region. Two of these have peculiar redshifted velocity components at their edges, which can be interpreted as the results of the interaction between the cloud and the Cepheus Bubble. From the C{sup 18}O cube data, clumpfind identified 123 C{sup 18}O cores, which have mean radius, velocity width in FWHM, and LTE mass of 0.36 {+-} 0.07 pc, 0.37 {+-} 0.09 km s{sup -1}, and 41 {+-} 29 M{sub sun}, respectively. Considering the uncertainty in the C{sup 18}O abundance, all the cores in S140 are most likely to be gravitationally bound. We derived a C{sup 18}O core mass function (CMF), which shows a power-law-like behavior above a turnover at 30 M{sub sun}. The best-fit power-law index of -2.1 {+-} 0.2 is quite consistent with that of the initial mass function (IMF) and the C{sup 18}O CMF in the OMC-1 region as found by Ikeda and Kitamura. Kramer et al. estimated the power-law index of -1.65 in S140 from the C{sup 18}O(J = 2-1) data, which is inconsistent with this study. The C{sup 18}O(J = 2-1) data are spatially limited to the central part of the cloud and are likely to be biased toward high-mass cores, leading to the flatter CMF. Consequently, this study and our previous study strongly support that the power-law form of the IMF has already been determined at the density of {approx}< 10{sup 3}-10{sup 4} cm{sup -3}, traced by the C{sup 18}O(J = 1-0) line.

  1. Application of USNO-B1.0 towards selecting objects with displaced blue and red components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jayson, Joel S.

    2016-03-01

    We have conducted a feasibility study to determine the effectiveness of using USNO-B1.0 data to preferentially detect objects with displaced red and blue components. A procedure was developed to search catalogue entries for such objects, which include M dwarfs paired with white dwarfs or with earlier main-sequence stars, and galaxies with asymmetric colour distributions. Residual differences between red and blue and infrared and blue scanned emulsion images define vectors, which, when appropriately aligned and of sufficient length, signal potential candidates. Test sample sets were analysed to evaluate the effective discrimination of the technique. Over 91 000 USNO-B1.0 catalogue entries at points throughout the celestial sphere were then filtered for acceptable combinations of entry observations and magnitudes and the resulting total of about 17 000 entries was winnowed down to a little more than 200 objects of interest. These were screened by visual examination of photo images to a final total of 146 candidates. About one quarter of these candidates coincide with SDSS (Sloan Digital Sky Survey) data. Those constituents fall into two groups, single and paired objects. SDSS identified several galaxies in the first group. Regarding the second group, at least half of its members were tentatively identified as main-sequence pairs, the greater portion being of widely separated spectral types. Two white dwarf-main-sequence pairs were also identified. Most importantly, the vectors formed from USNO-B1.0 residuals were in alignment with corresponding SDSS pair position angles, thereby supporting this work's central thesis.

  2. The interaction of 1-butyl iodide with the Mo 2C/Mo( 1 0 0 ) surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bugyi, L.; Oszkó, A.; Solymosi, F.

    2004-07-01

    The adsorption and dissociation of 1-butyl iodide and the reactions of butyl species have been investigated on the Mo 2C/Mo(1 0 0) surface by thermal desorption spectroscopy (TDS), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and high resolution electron energy loss spectroscopy (HREELS) in the temperature-range of 100-1200 K. 1-Butyl iodide adsorbed molecularly on the clean Mo 2C/Mo(1 0 0) surface at 100 K. A fraction of the C 4H 9I (a) desorbed in two peaks at 166 and 280 K, characteristic of condensed and weakly adsorbed layers, respectively. XPS data indicated that the scission of the C-I bond in C 4H 9I (a) started at as low temperature as 140 K and was completed at 280-300 K. The promotion of rupture of the C-I bond in the adsorbed 1-butyl iodide was achieved by UV irradiation even at 100 K. The dissociation process was not accompanied by any significant changes in the HREEL spectra. Among the reaction products, the thermal desorption of butane was characterized by Tp=246-290 K and that of butene by Tp=246 and 322 K, suggesting the disproportionation reaction of butyl groups. The release of both compounds was a reaction-rate limited process, as confirmed by the separate determination of their bonding to the Mo 2C/Mo(1 0 0) surface. A very limited coupling of butyl species was indicated by the desorption of octane with Tp˜415 K. Heating the adsorbed layer to 470 K the formation of adsorbed butylidyne group was detected, which decomposed to carbon and hydrogen above 600 K.

  3. The S1P/S1PR2 axis regulates early airway T cell infiltration in murine mast cell-dependent acute allergic responses

    PubMed Central

    Oskeritzian, Carole A.; Hait, Nitai C.; Wedman, Piper; Chumanevich, Alena; Kolawole, Elizabeth M.; Price, Megan M.; Falanga, Yves T.; Harikumar, Kuzhuvelil B.; Ryan, John J.; Milstien, Sheldon; Sabbadini, Roger; Spiegel, Sarah

    2014-01-01

    Background Sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) is a bioactive sphingolipid produced by mast cells (MC) upon cross-linking of their high affinity receptors for IgE by antigen (Ag) that can amplify MC responses by binding to its S1P receptors. Acute MC-dependent allergic reaction can lead to systemic shock but the early events of its development in lung tissues have not been investigated, and S1P functions in the onset of allergic processes remain to be examined. Objective We used a highly specific neutralizing anti-S1P antibody (mAb) and an S1P receptor 2 (S1PR2) antagonist, JTE-013, to study S1P and S1PR2 signaling contributions to MC- and IgE-dependent airway allergic responses in mice within minutes after Ag challenge. Methods Allergic reaction was triggered by a single intraperitoneal (i.p.) dose of Ag in sensitized mice pre-treated i.p. with anti-S1P or isotype control mAb, or JTE-013 or vehicle prior to Ag challenge. Results Kinetics experiments revealed early pulmonary infiltration of mostly T cells around blood vessels of sensitized mice 20 minutes post-Ag exposure. Pre-treatment with anti-S1P mAb inhibited in vitro MC activation, as well as in vivo development of airway infiltration and MC activation, reducing serum levels of histamine, cytokines and the chemokines MCP-1/CCL2, MIP-1α/CCL3 and RANTES/CCL5. S1PR2 antagonism or deficiency, or MC deficiency recapitulated these results. Both in vitro and in vivo experiments demonstrated MC S1PR2 dependency for chemokine release and the necessity for signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (Stat3) activation. Conclusion Activation of S1PR2 by S1P and downstream Stat3 signaling in MC regulate early T cell recruitment to antigen-challenged lungs by chemokine production. PMID:25512083

  4. Embedding the outer chain movement for main partition of β-number with length [1, 0, 0,…

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohommed, Eman F.; Ibrahim, Haslinda; Ahmad, Nazihah; Mahmood, Ammar

    2016-08-01

    One of the graphical representations for any partition of a non-negative integers in the modular representation theory of diagram algebra is James abacus using Beta numbers. In this work James abacus is divided positions into several chains. A new diagram Atco is introduced by employing on the outer chain with length [1, 0, 0,…] on the active James abacus. Finally a consecutive new diagram of b2, b3,…, be can be found from active diagram Atco which is found after applying chain movement.

  5. New approach to parton shower Monte Carlo event generators for precision QCD theory: HERWIRI1.0(31)

    SciTech Connect

    Joseph, S.; Ward, B. F. L.; Majhi, S.; Yost, S. A.

    2010-04-01

    By implementing the new IR-improved Dokshitzer-Gribov-Lipatov-Altarelli-Parisi-Callan-Symanzik (DGLAP-CS) kernels recently developed by one of us in the HERWIG6.5 environment we generate a new Monte Carlo (MC), HERWIRI1.0(31), for hadron-hadron scattering at high energies. We use MC data to illustrate the comparison between the parton shower generated by the standard DGLAP-CS kernels and that generated by the new IR-improved DGLAP-CS kernels. The interface to MC-NLO, MC-NLO/HERWIRI, is illustrated. Comparisons with FNAL data and some discussion of possible implications for LHC phenomenology are also presented.

  6. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Disk galaxies at 0.11.0 (Boehm+, 2016)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boehm, A.; Ziegler, B. L.

    2016-06-01

    Redshifts, maximum rotation velocities, (Johnson) B-band absolute magnitudes and sizes are presented for a sample of 124 disk galaxies covering redshifts 0.11.0. The galaxies are selected from the FORS Deep Field (FDF), see Heidt et al. (2003A&A...398..49H), and the William Herschel Deep Field (WHDF), see Metcalfe et al. (2001MNRAS.323..779M). All given parameters assume a flat cosmology with H0=70km/s/Mpc, Omegamatter=0.3 and Omegalambda=0.7. (1 data file).

  7. Design and Development Comparison of Rapid Cycle Amine 1.0, 2.0, and 3.0

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chullen, Cinda; Campbell, Colin; Papale, William; Murray, Sean; Wichowski, Robert; Conger, Bruce; McMillin, Summer

    2016-01-01

    The development of the Rapid Cycle Amine (RCA) swing-bed technology for carbon dioxide (CO2) removal has been in progress since favorable results were published in 1996. Shortly thereafter, a prototype was designed, developed, and tested successfully and delivered to Johnson Space Center in 1999. An improved prototype was delivered to NASA in 2006 and was notated as RCA 1.0 and sized for the extravehicular activity (EVA). The new RCA swing-bed technology is a regenerative system which employs two alternating solid-amine sorbent beds to remove CO2 and water. The two- bed design employs a chemisorption process whereby the beds alternate between adsorbtion and desorbsion. This process provides for an efficient operation of the RCA so that while one bed is in adsorb (uptake) mode, the other is in the desorb (regeneration) mode. The RCA has now progressed through several iterations of technology readiness levels. Test articles have now been designed, developed, and tested for the advanced space suit portable life support system (PLSS) including RCA 1.0, RCA 2.0, and RCA 3.0. The RCA 3.0 was the most recent RCA fabrication and was delivered to NASA-JSC in June 2015. The RCA 1.0 test article was designed with a pneumatically actuated linear motion spool valve. The RCA 2.0 and 3.0 test articles were designed with a valve assembly which allows for switching between uptake and regeneration modes while minimizing gas volume losses to the vacuum source. RCA 2.0 and 3.0 also include an embedded controller design to control RCA operation and provide the capability of interfacing with various sensors and other ventilation loop components. The RCA technology is low power, small, and has fulfilled all test requirements levied upon the technology during development testing thus far. This paper will provide an overreview of the design and development of RCA 1.0, 2.0 and 3.0 including detail differences between the design specifications of each.

  8. Both-end opened nanostructure holes by embedded carbon nanotubes realized on thinned membranes on (1 0 0) silicon substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdi, Y.; Mohajerzadeh, S.; Darbari, S.; Arzi, E.

    2007-03-01

    Vertically aligned carbon nanotubes (CNT) have been grown in a DC-PECVD apparatus on quartz membranes. <1 0 0>-oriented Si wafer has been anisotropically etched in a KOH solution. A mixture of acetylene and hydrogen gases is used to grow CNT while Ni acts as the catalyst layer. As-grown structures have been coated by titanium dioxide using chemical vapor deposition at atmospheric pressure. By means of a polishing and ashing process steps followed by total removing of the quartz membrane both ends of CNTs are opened and nano holes are obtained. SEM analysis is used to study the evolution of such nanostructures.

  9. Design and Development Comparison of Rapid Cycle Amine 1.0, 2.0, and 3.0

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chullen, Cinda; Campbell, Colin; Papale, William; Murray, Sean; Wichowski, Robert; Conger, Bruce; McMillin, Summer

    2016-01-01

    The development of the Rapid Cycle Amine (RCA) swing-bed technology for carbon dioxide (CO2) removal has been in progress since favorable results were published in 1996. Shortly thereafter, a prototype was designed, developed, and tested successfully and delivered to Johnson Space Center in 1999. An improved prototype (RCA 1.0) was delivered to NASA in 2006 and sized for the extravehicular activity (EVA). The RCA swing-bed technology is a regenerative system which employs two alternating solid-amine sorbent beds to remove CO2 and water. The two-bed design employs a chemisorption process whereby the beds alternate between adsorption and desorption. This process provides for an efficient RCA operation that enables one bed to be in adsorb (uptake) mode, while the other is in the desorb (regeneration) mode. The RCA has progressed through several iterations of technology readiness levels. Test articles have now been designed, developed, and tested for the advanced space suit portable life support system (PLSS) including RCA 1.0, RCA 2.0, and RCA 3.0. The RCA 3.0 was the most recent RCA fabrication and was delivered to NASA-JSC in June 2015. The RCA 1.0 test article was designed with a pneumatically actuated linear motion spool valve. The RCA 2.0 and 3.0 test articles were designed with a valve assembly which allows for switching between uptake and regeneration modes while minimizing gas volume losses to the vacuum source. RCA 2.0 and 3.0 also include an embedded controller design to control RCA operation and provide the capability of interfacing with various sensors and other ventilation loop components. The RCA technology is low power, small, and has fulfilled all test requirements levied upon the technology during development testing thus far. This paper will provide an overview of the design and development of RCA 1.0, 2.0 and 3.0 including detail differences between the design specifications of each. Nomenclature.

  10. Effect of CSN1S1-CSN3 (α(S1)-κ-casein) composite genotype on milk production traits and milk coagulation properties in Mediterranean water buffalo.

    PubMed

    Bonfatti, V; Giantin, M; Gervaso, M; Coletta, A; Dacasto, M; Carnier, P

    2012-06-01

    The aim of this study was to estimate effects of CSN1S1-CSN3 (α(S1)-κ-casein) composite genotypes on milk production traits and milk coagulation properties (MCP) in Mediterranean water buffalo. Genotypes at CSN1S1 and CSN3 and coagulation properties [rennet clotting time (RCT), curd firming time (K₂₀), and curd firmness (A₃₀)] were assessed by reversed-phase HPLC and computerized renneting meter analysis, respectively, using single test-day milk samples of 536 animals. Alternative protein variants of α(S1)-CN and κ-CN were detected by HPLC, and identification of the corresponding genetic variants was carried out by DNA analysis. Two genetic variants were detected at CSN1S1 (A and B variants) and 2 at CSN3 (X1 and X2 variants). Statistical inference was based on a linear model including the CSN1S1-CSN3 composite genotype effect (7 genotypes), the effects of herd-test-day (8 levels), and a combined days in milk (DIM)-parity class. Composite genotype AB-X2X2 was associated with decreased test-day milk yield [-0.21 standard deviation (SD) units of the trait] relative to genotype BB-X2X2. Genotypes did not affect milk protein content, but genotype AB-X1X1 was associated with increased fat content compared with genotype BB-X2X2 (+0.28 SD units of the trait) and AB-X1X1 (+0.43 SD units of the trait). For RCT, the largest difference (+1.91 min; i.e., 0.61 SD units of the trait) was observed between genotype AA-X1X2 and AB-X1X1. Direction of genotype effects on K(20) was consistent with that for RCT. The maximum variation in K₂₀ due to genotype effects (between AA-X1X2 and AB-X1X1 genotypes) was almost 0.9 SD units of the trait. Magnitude of genotype effects was smaller for A₃₀ than for RCT and K₂₀, with a maximum difference of 0.5 SD units of the trait between genotype AA-X1X2 and AA-X1X1. The B allele at CSN1S1 was associated with increased RCT and K₂₀ and with weaker curds compared with allele A. Allele X2 at CSN3 exerted opposite effects on

  11. Effect of CSN1S1-CSN3 (α(S1)-κ-casein) composite genotype on milk production traits and milk coagulation properties in Mediterranean water buffalo.

    PubMed

    Bonfatti, V; Giantin, M; Gervaso, M; Coletta, A; Dacasto, M; Carnier, P

    2012-06-01

    The aim of this study was to estimate effects of CSN1S1-CSN3 (α(S1)-κ-casein) composite genotypes on milk production traits and milk coagulation properties (MCP) in Mediterranean water buffalo. Genotypes at CSN1S1 and CSN3 and coagulation properties [rennet clotting time (RCT), curd firming time (K₂₀), and curd firmness (A₃₀)] were assessed by reversed-phase HPLC and computerized renneting meter analysis, respectively, using single test-day milk samples of 536 animals. Alternative protein variants of α(S1)-CN and κ-CN were detected by HPLC, and identification of the corresponding genetic variants was carried out by DNA analysis. Two genetic variants were detected at CSN1S1 (A and B variants) and 2 at CSN3 (X1 and X2 variants). Statistical inference was based on a linear model including the CSN1S1-CSN3 composite genotype effect (7 genotypes), the effects of herd-test-day (8 levels), and a combined days in milk (DIM)-parity class. Composite genotype AB-X2X2 was associated with decreased test-day milk yield [-0.21 standard deviation (SD) units of the trait] relative to genotype BB-X2X2. Genotypes did not affect milk protein content, but genotype AB-X1X1 was associated with increased fat content compared with genotype BB-X2X2 (+0.28 SD units of the trait) and AB-X1X1 (+0.43 SD units of the trait). For RCT, the largest difference (+1.91 min; i.e., 0.61 SD units of the trait) was observed between genotype AA-X1X2 and AB-X1X1. Direction of genotype effects on K(20) was consistent with that for RCT. The maximum variation in K₂₀ due to genotype effects (between AA-X1X2 and AB-X1X1 genotypes) was almost 0.9 SD units of the trait. Magnitude of genotype effects was smaller for A₃₀ than for RCT and K₂₀, with a maximum difference of 0.5 SD units of the trait between genotype AA-X1X2 and AA-X1X1. The B allele at CSN1S1 was associated with increased RCT and K₂₀ and with weaker curds compared with allele A. Allele X2 at CSN3 exerted opposite effects on

  12. Benzyl butyl phthalate promotes breast cancer stem cell expansion via SPHK1/S1P/S1PR3 signaling.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yu-Chih; Tsai, Cheng-Fang; Chuang, Hsiao-Li; Chang, Yi-Chih; Chen, Hung-Sheng; Lee, Jau-Nan; Tsai, Eing-Mei

    2016-05-17

    Understanding the regulatory mechanisms unique to breast cancer stem cells (BCSCs) is required to control breast cancer metastasis. We found that phthalates promote BCSCs in human breast cancer cell cultures and xenograft tumors. A toxic phthalate, benzyl butyl phthalate (BBP), activated aryl hydrocarbon receptor in breast cancer cells to stimulate sphingosine kinase 1 (SPHK1)/sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P)/sphingosine-1-phosphate receptor 3 (S1PR3) signaling and enhance formation of metastasis-initiating BCSCs. BBP induced histone modifications in S1PR3 in side population (SP) cells, but not in non-SP cells. SPHK1 or S1PR3 knockdown in breast cancer cells effectively reduced tumor growth and lung metastasis in vivo. Our findings suggest S1PR3 is a determinant of phthalate-driven breast cancer metastasis and a possible therapeutic target for regulating BCSC populations. Furthermore, the association between breast carcinogenesis and environmental pollutants has important implications for public health.

  13. Potential Link between the Sphingosine-1-Phosphate (S1P) System and Defective Alveolar Macrophage Phagocytic Function in Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD)

    PubMed Central

    Barnawi, Jameel; Tran, Hai; Jersmann, Hubertus; Pitson, Stuart; Roscioli, Eugene; Hodge, Greg; Meech, Robyn; Haberberger, Rainer; Hodge, Sandra

    2015-01-01

    Introduction We previously reported that alveolar macrophages from patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) are defective in their ability to phagocytose apoptotic cells, with a similar defect in response to cigarette smoke. The exact mechanisms for this defect are unknown. Sphingolipids including ceramide, sphingosine and sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) are involved in diverse cellular processes and we hypothesised that a comprehensive analysis of this system in alveolar macrophages in COPD may help to delineate the reasons for defective phagocytic function. Methods We compared mRNA expression of sphingosine kinases (SPHK1/2), S1P receptors (S1PR1-5) and S1P-degrading enzymes (SGPP1, SGPP2, SGPL1) in bronchoalveolar lavage-derived alveolar macrophages from 10 healthy controls, 7 healthy smokers and 20 COPD patients (10 current- and 10 ex-smokers) using Real-Time PCR. Phagocytosis of apoptotic cells was investigated using flow cytometry. Functional associations were assessed between sphingosine signalling system components and alveolar macrophage phagocytic ability in COPD. To elucidate functional effects of increased S1PR5 on macrophage phagocytic ability, we performed the phagocytosis assay in the presence of varying concentrations of suramin, an antagonist of S1PR3 and S1PR5. The effects of cigarette smoking on the S1P system were investigated using a THP-1 macrophage cell line model. Results We found significant increases in SPHK1/2 (3.4- and 2.1-fold increases respectively), S1PR2 and 5 (4.3- and 14.6-fold increases respectively), and SGPL1 (4.5-fold increase) in COPD vs. controls. S1PR5 and SGPL1 expression was unaffected by smoking status, suggesting a COPD “disease effect” rather than smoke effect per se. Significant associations were noted between S1PR5 and both lung function and phagocytosis. Cigarette smoke extract significantly increased mRNA expression of SPHK1, SPHK2, S1PR2 and S1PR5 by THP-1 macrophages, confirming the results in

  14. HDL-S1P: cardiovascular functions, disease-associated alterations, and therapeutic applications

    PubMed Central

    Levkau, Bodo

    2015-01-01

    Sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) is a bioactive sphingolipid contained in High-density lipoproteins (HDL) and has drawn considerable attention in the lipoprotein field as numerous studies have demonstrated its contribution to several functions inherent to HDL. Some of them are partly and some entirely due to the S1P contained in HDL (HDL-S1P). Despite the presence of over 1000 different lipids in HDL, S1P stands out as it possesses its own cell surface receptors through which it exercises key physiological functions. Most of the S1P in human plasma is associated with HDL, and the amount of HDL-S1P influences the quality and quantity of HDL-dependent functions. The main binding partner of S1P in HDL is apolipoprotein M but others may also exist particularly under conditions of acute S1P elevations. HDL not only exercise functions through their S1P content but have also an impact on genuine S1P signaling by influencing S1P bioactivity and receptor presentation. HDL-S1P content is altered in human diseases such as atherosclerosis, coronary artery disease, myocardial infarction, renal insufficiency and diabetes mellitus. Low HDL-S1P has also been linked to impaired HDL functions associated with these disorders. Although the pathophysiological and molecular reasons for such disease-associated shifts in HDL-S1P are little understood, there have been successful approaches to circumvent their adverse implications by pharmacologically increasing HDL-S1P as means to improve HDL function. This mini-review will cover the current understanding of the contribution of HDL-S1P to physiological HDL function, its alteration in disease and ways for its restoration to correct HDL dysfunction. PMID:26539121

  15. neuTube 1.0: A New Design for Efficient Neuron Reconstruction Software Based on the SWC Format.

    PubMed

    Feng, Linqing; Zhao, Ting; Kim, Jinhyun

    2015-01-01

    Brain circuit mapping requires digital reconstruction of neuronal morphologies in complicated networks. Despite recent advances in automatic algorithms, reconstruction of neuronal structures is still a bottleneck in circuit mapping due to a lack of appropriate software for both efficient reconstruction and user-friendly editing. Here we present a new software design based on the SWC format, a standardized neuromorphometric format that has been widely used for analyzing neuronal morphologies or sharing neuron reconstructions via online archives such as NeuroMorpho.org. We have also implemented the design in our open-source software called neuTube 1.0. As specified by the design, the software is equipped with parallel 2D and 3D visualization and intuitive neuron tracing/editing functions, allowing the user to efficiently reconstruct neurons from fluorescence image data and edit standard neuron structure files produced by any other reconstruction software. We show the advantages of neuTube 1.0 by comparing it to two other software tools, namely Neuromantic and Neurostudio. The software is available for free at http://www.neutracing.com, which also hosts complete software documentation and video tutorials. PMID:26464967

  16. SOLWEIG 1.0--modelling spatial variations of 3D radiant fluxes and mean radiant temperature in complex urban settings.

    PubMed

    Lindberg, Fredrik; Holmer, Björn; Thorsson, Sofia

    2008-09-01

    The mean radiant temperature, T(mrt), which sums up all shortwave and longwave radiation fluxes (both direct and reflected) to which the human body is exposed is one of the key meteorological parameters governing human energy balance and the thermal comfort of man. In this paper, a new radiation model (SOLWEIG 1.0), which simulates spatial variations of 3D radiation fluxes and T(mrt) in complex urban settings, is presented. The T(mrt) is derived by modelling shortwave and longwave radiation fluxes in six directions (upward, downward and from the four cardinal points) and angular factors. The model requires a limited number of inputs, such as direct, diffuse and global shortwave radiation, air temperature, relative humidity, urban geometry and geographical information (latitude, longitude and elevation). The model was evaluated using 7 days of integral radiation measurements at two sites with different building geometries--a large square and a small courtyard in Göteborg, Sweden (57 degrees N)--across different seasons and in various weather conditions. The evaluation reveals good agreement between modelled and measured values of T(mrt), with an overall good correspondence of R (2) = 0.94, (p < 0.01, RMSE = 4.8 K). SOLWEIG 1.0 is still under development. Future work will incorporate a vegetation scheme, as well as an improvement of the estimation of fluxes from the four cardinal points.

  17. Pulmonary response to threshold levels of sulfur dioxide (1. 0 ppm) and ozone (0. 3 ppm) (journal version)

    SciTech Connect

    Folinsbee, L.J.; Bedi, J.F.; Horvath, S.M.

    1985-01-01

    The authors exposed 22 healthy adult non-smoking men for 2 hours to either filtered air, 1.0 ppm sulfur dioxide, 0.30 ppm ozone, or the combination of 1.0 ppm sulfur dioxide plus 0.30 ppm ozone. It was hypothesized that exposure to near-threshold concentrations of these pollutants would show any interaction between the two pollutants that might have been masked by the more-obvious response to the higher concentrations of ozone used in previous studies. Each subject alternated 30-minute treadmill exercise with 10-minute rest periods for the 2 hours. Following ozone exposure alone, forced expiratory measurements (FVC, FEV-1, and FEF25-75%) were significantly decreased. The combined exposure to SO/sub 2/ plus O/sub 3/ produced similar but smaller decreases in these measures. There were small but significant differences between the ozone and the ozone plus sulfur dioxide exposure for FVC, FEV-1,-2,-3, and FEF25-75% at the end of the 2-hour exposure. It was concluded that, with these pollutant concentrations, there is no additive or synergistic effect of the two pollutants on pulmonary function.

  18. Data Evaluation Acquired Talys 1.0 Code to Produce 111In from Various Accelerator-Based Reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alipoor, Zahra; Gholamzadeh, Zohreh; Sadeghi, Mahdi; Seyyedi, Solaleh; Aref, Morteza

    The Indium-111 physical-decay parameters as a β-emitter radionuclide show some potential for radiodiagnostic and radiotherapeutic purposes. Medical investigators have shown that 111In is an important radionuclide for locating and imaging certain tumors, visualization of the lymphatic system and thousands of labeling reactions have been suggested. The TALYS 1.0 code was used here to calculate excitation functions of 112/114-118Sn+p, 110Cd+3He, 109Ag+3He, 111-114Cd+p, 110/111Cd+d, 109Ag+α to produce 111In using low and medium energy accelerators. Calculations were performed up to 200 MeV. Appropriate target thicknesses have been assumed based on energy loss calculations with the SRIM code. Theoretical integral yields for all the latter reactions were calculated. The TALYS 1.0 code predicts that the production of a few curies of 111In is feasible using a target of isotopically highly enriched 112Cd and a proton energy between 12 and 25 MeV with a production rate as 248.97 MBq·μA-1 · h-1. Minimum impurities shall be produced during the proton irradiation of an enriched 111Cd target yielding a production rate for 111In of 67.52 MBq· μA-1 · h-1.

  19. Optimal Revascularization Strategy on Medina 0,1,0 Left Main Bifurcation Lesions in Type 2 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Xuwei; Peng, Hongyu; Zhao, Donghui; Ma, Qin; Fu, Kun; Chen, Guo

    2016-01-01

    Aim. Diabetes mellitus (DM) is a major risk factor for cardiovascular disease. The implications of a diagnosis of DM are as severe as the diagnosis of coronary artery disease. For many patients with complex coronary artery disease, optimal revascularization strategy selection and optimal medical therapy are equally important. In this study, we compared the hemodynamic results of different stenting techniques for Medina 0,1,0 left main bifurcation lesions. Methods. We use idealized left main bifurcation models and computational fluid dynamics analysis to evaluate hemodynamic parameters which are known to affect the risk of restenosis and thrombosis at stented bifurcation. The surface integrals of time-averaged wall shear stress (TAWSS) and oscillatory shear index (OSI) at bifurcation site were quantified. Results. Crossover stenting without final kissing balloon angioplasty provided the most favorable hemodynamic results (integrated values of TAWSS = 2.96 × 10−4 N, OSI = 4.75 × 10−6 m2) with bifurcation area subjected to OSI values >0.25, >0.35, and >0.45 calculated as 0.39 mm2, 0.06 mm2, and 0 mm2, respectively. Conclusion. Crossover stenting only offers hemodynamic advantages over other stenting techniques for Medina 0,1,0 left main bifurcation lesions and large bifurcation angle is associated with unfavorable flow profiles. PMID:27777957

  20. Laminar burning velocities of lean hydrogen-air mixtures at pressures up to 1.0 MPa

    SciTech Connect

    Bradley, D.; Lawes, M.; Liu, Kexin; Woolley, R.; Verhelst, S.

    2007-04-15

    Values of laminar burning velocity, u{sub l}, and the associated strain rate Markstein number, Ma{sub sr}, of H{sub 2}-air mixtures have been obtained from measurements of flame speeds in a spherical explosion bomb with central ignition. Pressures ranged from 0.1 to 1.0 MPa, with values of equivalence ratio between 0.3 and 1.0. Many of the flames soon became unstable, with an accelerating flame speed, due to Darrieus-Landau and thermodiffusive instabilities. This effect increased with pressure. The flame wrinkling arising from the instabilities enhanced the flame speed. A method is described for allowing for this effect, based on measurements of the flame radii at which the instabilities increased the flame speed. This enabled u{sub l} and Ma{sub sr} to be obtained, devoid of the effects of instabilities. With increasing pressure, the time interval between the end of the ignition spark and the onset of flame instability, during which stable stretched flame propagation occurred, became increasingly small and very high camera speeds were necessary for accurate measurement. Eventually this time interval became so short that first Ma{sub sr} and then u{sub l} could not be measured. Such flame instabilities throw into question the utility of u{sub l} for high pressure, very unstable, flames. The measured values of u{sub l} are compared with those predicted by detailed chemical kinetic models of one-dimensional flames. (author)

  1. BasinVis 1.0: A MATLAB®-based program for sedimentary basin subsidence analysis and visualization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Eun Young; Novotny, Johannes; Wagreich, Michael

    2016-06-01

    Stratigraphic and structural mapping is important to understand the internal structure of sedimentary basins. Subsidence analysis provides significant insights for basin evolution. We designed a new software package to process and visualize stratigraphic setting and subsidence evolution of sedimentary basins from well data. BasinVis 1.0 is implemented in MATLAB®, a multi-paradigm numerical computing environment, and employs two numerical methods: interpolation and subsidence analysis. Five different interpolation methods (linear, natural, cubic spline, Kriging, and thin-plate spline) are provided in this program for surface modeling. The subsidence analysis consists of decompaction and backstripping techniques. BasinVis 1.0 incorporates five main processing steps; (1) setup (study area and stratigraphic units), (2) loading well data, (3) stratigraphic setting visualization, (4) subsidence parameter input, and (5) subsidence analysis and visualization. For in-depth analysis, our software provides cross-section and dip-slip fault backstripping tools. The graphical user interface guides users through the workflow and provides tools to analyze and export the results. Interpolation and subsidence results are cached to minimize redundant computations and improve the interactivity of the program. All 2D and 3D visualizations are created by using MATLAB plotting functions, which enables users to fine-tune the results using the full range of available plot options in MATLAB. We demonstrate all functions in a case study of Miocene sediment in the central Vienna Basin.

  2. Accelerator System Model (ASM) user manual with physics and engineering model documentation. ASM version 1.0

    SciTech Connect

    1993-07-01

    The Accelerator System Model (ASM) is a computer program developed to model proton radiofrequency accelerators and to carry out system level trade studies. The ASM FORTRAN subroutines are incorporated into an intuitive graphical user interface which provides for the {open_quotes}construction{close_quotes} of the accelerator in a window on the computer screen. The interface is based on the Shell for Particle Accelerator Related Codes (SPARC) software technology written for the Macintosh operating system in the C programming language. This User Manual describes the operation and use of the ASM application within the SPARC interface. The Appendix provides a detailed description of the physics and engineering models used in ASM. ASM Version 1.0 is joint project of G. H. Gillespie Associates, Inc. and the Accelerator Technology (AT) Division of the Los Alamos National Laboratory. Neither the ASM Version 1.0 software nor this ASM Documentation may be reproduced without the expressed written consent of both the Los Alamos National Laboratory and G. H. Gillespie Associates, Inc.

  3. DISCOVERY OF VERY HIGH ENERGY {gamma}-RAY EMISSION FROM THE SNR G54.1+0.3

    SciTech Connect

    Acciari, V. A.; Benbow, W.; Aliu, E.; Boltuch, D.; Arlen, T.; Aune, T.; Bautista, M.; Beilicke, M.; Buckley, J. H.; Bugaev, V.; Dickherber, R.; Bradbury, S. M.; Butt, Y.; Byrum, K.; Cesarini, A.; Ciupik, L.; Cui, W.; Finley, J. P.; Duke, C.; Finnegan, G. E-mail: wakely@uchicago.ed

    2010-08-10

    We report the discovery of very high energy (VHE) gamma-ray emission from the direction of the SNR G54.1+0.3 using the VERITAS ground-based gamma-ray observatory. The TeV signal has an overall significance of 6.8{sigma} and appears pointlike given the resolution of the instrument. The integral flux above 1 TeV is 2.5% of the Crab Nebula flux and significant emission is measured between 250 GeV and 4 TeV, well described by a power-law energy spectrum dN/dE {approx} E {sup -{Gamma}} with a photon index {Gamma} = 2.39 {+-} 0.23{sub stat} {+-} 0.30{sub sys}. We find no evidence of time variability among observations spanning almost two years. Based on the location, the morphology, the measured spectrum, the lack of variability, and a comparison with similar systems previously detected in the TeV band, the most likely counterpart of this new VHE gamma-ray source is the pulsar wind nebula (PWN) in the SNR G54.1+0.3. The measured X-ray to VHE gamma-ray luminosity ratio is the lowest among all the nebulae supposedly driven by young rotation-powered pulsars, which could indicate a particle-dominated PWN.

  4. A database of global reference sites to support validation of satellite surface albedo datasets (SAVS 1.0)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loew, Alexander; Bennartz, Ralf; Fell, Frank; Lattanzio, Alessio; Doutriaux-Boucher, Marie; Schulz, Jörg

    2016-09-01

    Validating the accuracy and long-term stability of terrestrial satellite data products necessitates a network of reference sites. This paper documents a global database of more than 2000 sites globally which have been characterized in terms of their spatial heterogeneity. The work was motivated by the need for potential validation sites for geostationary surface albedo data products, but the resulting database is useful also for other applications. The database (SAVS 1.0) is publicly available through the EUMETSAT website (http://savs.eumetsat.int/, doi:10.15770/EUM_SEC_CLM_1001). Sites can be filtered according to different criteria, providing a flexible way to identify potential validation sites for further studies and a traceable approach to characterize the heterogeneity of these reference sites. The present paper describes the detailed information on the generation of the SAVS 1.0 database and its characteristics.

  5. neuTube 1.0: A New Design for Efficient Neuron Reconstruction Software Based on the SWC Format 123

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Linqing

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Brain circuit mapping requires digital reconstruction of neuronal morphologies in complicated networks. Despite recent advances in automatic algorithms, reconstruction of neuronal structures is still a bottleneck in circuit mapping due to a lack of appropriate software for both efficient reconstruction and user-friendly editing. Here we present a new software design based on the SWC format, a standardized neuromorphometric format that has been widely used for analyzing neuronal morphologies or sharing neuron reconstructions via online archives such as NeuroMorpho.org. We have also implemented the design in our open-source software called neuTube 1.0. As specified by the design, the software is equipped with parallel 2D and 3D visualization and intuitive neuron tracing/editing functions, allowing the user to efficiently reconstruct neurons from fluorescence image data and edit standard neuron structure files produced by any other reconstruction software. We show the advantages of neuTube 1.0 by comparing it to two other software tools, namely Neuromantic and Neurostudio. The software is available for free at http://www.neutracing.com, which also hosts complete software documentation and video tutorials. PMID:26464967

  6. L1(0)-FePd nanocluster wires by template-directed thermal decomposition and subsequent hydrogen reduction

    SciTech Connect

    Cui, BZ; Marinescu, M; Liu, JF

    2013-12-14

    This paper reports the nanostructure, formation mechanism, and magnetic properties of tetragonal L1(0)-type Fe55Pd45 (at. %) nanocluster wires (NCWs) fabricated by thermal decomposition of metal nitrates and subsequent hydrogen reduction in nanoporous anodized aluminum oxide templates. The as-synthesized NCWs have diameters in the range of 80-300 nm, and lengths in the range of 0.5-10 mu m. The NCWs are composed of roughly round-shaped nanoclusters in the range of 3-30 nm in size and a weighted average size of 10 nm with a mixture of single-crystal and poly-crystalline structures. The obtained intrinsic coercivity H-i(c) of 3.32 kOe at room temperature for the tetragonal Fe55Pd45 NCWs is higher than those of electrodeposited Fe-Pd solid nanowires while among the highest values reported so far for L1(0)-type FePd nanoparticles. (C) 2013 AIP Publishing LLC.

  7. 26 CFR 31.3121(s)-1 - Concurrent employment by related corporations with common paymaster.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... with common paymaster. 31.3121(s)-1 Section 31.3121(s)-1 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE... Revenue Code of 1954) General Provisions § 31.3121(s)-1 Concurrent employment by related corporations with... this section. Section 3121(s) and this section apply only to remuneration disbursed in the form...

  8. The phylogeny of C/S1 bZIP transcription factors reveals a shared algal ancestry and the pre-angiosperm translational regulation of S1 transcripts

    PubMed Central

    Peviani, Alessia; Lastdrager, Jeroen; Hanson, Johannes; Snel, Berend

    2016-01-01

    Basic leucine zippers (bZIPs) form a large plant transcription factor family. C and S1 bZIP groups can heterodimerize, fulfilling crucial roles in seed development and stress response. S1 sequences also harbor a unique regulatory mechanism, termed Sucrose-Induced Repression of Translation (SIRT). The conservation of both C/S1 bZIP interactions and SIRT remains poorly characterized in non-model species, leaving their evolutionary origin uncertain and limiting crop research. In this work, we explored recently published plant sequencing data to establish a detailed phylogeny of C and S1 bZIPs, investigating their intertwined role in plant evolution, and the origin of SIRT. Our analyses clarified C and S1 bZIP orthology relationships in angiosperms, and identified S1 sequences in gymnosperms. We experimentally showed that the gymnosperm orthologs are regulated by SIRT, tracing back the origin of this unique regulatory mechanism to the ancestor of seed plants. Additionally, we discovered an earlier S ortholog in the charophyte algae Klebsormidium flaccidum, together with a C ortholog. This suggests that C and S groups originated by duplication from a single algal proto-C/S ancestor. Based on our observations, we propose a model wherein the C/S1 bZIP dimer network evolved in seed plants from pre-existing C/S bZIP interactions. PMID:27457880

  9. Evidence for Ultra-fast Outflows in Radio-quiet Active Galactic Nuclei. II. Detailed Photoionization Modeling of Fe K-shell Absorption Lines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tombesi, F.; Cappi, M.; Reeves, J. N.; Palumbo, G. G. C.; Braito, V.; Dadina, M.

    2011-11-01

    X-ray absorption line spectroscopy has recently shown evidence for previously unknown Ultra-fast Outflows (UFOs) in radio-quiet active galactic nuclei (AGNs). These have been detected essentially through blueshifted Fe XXV/XXVI K-shell transitions. In the previous paper of this series we defined UFOs as those highly ionized absorbers with an outflow velocity higher than 10,000 km s-1 and assessed the statistical significance of the associated blueshifted absorption lines in a large sample of 42 local radio-quiet AGNs observed with XMM-Newton. The present paper is an extension of that work. First, we report a detailed curve of growth analysis of the main Fe XXV/XXVI transitions in photoionized plasmas. Then, we estimate an average spectral energy distribution for the sample sources and directly model the Fe K absorbers in the XMM-Newton spectra with the detailed Xstar photoionization code. We confirm that the frequency of sources in the radio-quiet sample showing UFOs is >35% and that the majority of the Fe K absorbers are indeed associated with UFOs. The outflow velocity distribution spans from ~10,000 km s-1 (~0.03c) up to ~100,000 km s-1 (~0.3c), with a peak and mean value of ~42,000 km s-1 (~0.14c). The ionization parameter is very high and in the range log ξ ~ 3-6 erg s-1 cm, with a mean value of log ξ ~ 4.2 erg s-1 cm. The associated column densities are also large, in the range N H ~ 1022-1024 cm-2, with a mean value of N H ~ 1023 cm-2. We discuss and estimate how selection effects, such as those related to the limited instrumental sensitivity at energies above 7 keV, may hamper the detection of even higher velocities and higher ionization absorbers. We argue that, overall, these results point to the presence of extremely ionized and possibly almost Compton-thick outflowing material in the innermost regions of AGNs. This also suggests that UFOs may potentially play a significant role in the expected cosmological feedback from AGNs and their study can

  10. Measurement of the Radiative Decay Rate and Energy of the Metastable (2s22p51=23s1=2)(J=0) Level in Fe XVII

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beiersdorfer, P.; Crespo López-Urrutia, J. R.; Träbert, E.

    2016-01-01

    Measurements at the Livermore electron beam ion trap have been performed in order to infer the energy and the radiative lifetime of the {(1{s}22{s}22{p}1/253{s}1/2)}J=0 level in the Fe xvii spectrum. This is the longest-lived level in the neonlike iron ion, and its radiative decay produces the Fe xvii line at 1153 Å, feeding the population of the {(1{s}22{s}22{p}3/253{s}1/2)}J=1 upper level of one of the most prominent lines in the Fe xvii L-shell X-ray spectrum, commonly dubbed 3G. In the presence of a strong (≥slant few kG) magnetic field, the {(1{s}22{s}22{p}1/253{s}1/2)}J=0 level has a finite probability to decay directly to the {(1{s}22{s}22{p}6)}J=0 neonlike ground level via the emission of an L-shell X-ray. Our measurements allow us to observe this X-ray line in the Fe xvii L-shell spectrum and from it to infer the radiative rate for the magnetic dipole decay of the {(1{s}22{s}22{p}1/253{s}1/2)}J=0 level to the {(1{s}22{s}22{p}3/253{s}1/2)}J=1. Our result of (1.45+/- 0.15)× {10}4 s-1 is in agreement with predictions. We have also measured the wavelength of the associated X-ray line to be 16.804 ± 0.002 Å, which means that the line is displaced 1.20 ± 0.05 eV from the neighboring {(2{s}22{p}1/253{s}1/2)}J=1\\to {(2{s}22{p}6)}J=0 transition, commonly labeled 3F. From our measurement, we infer 5950570 ± 710 cm-1 for the energy of the {(1{s}22{s}22{p}1/253{s}1/2)}J=0 level.

  11. ALMA 0.1-0.2 arcsec Resolution Imaging of the NGC 1068 Nucleus: Compact Dense Molecular Gas Emission at the Putative AGN Location

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Imanishi, Masatoshi; Nakanishi, Kouichiro; Izumi, Takuma

    2016-05-01

    We present the results of our ALMA Cycle 2 high angular resolution (0.″1-0.″2) observations of the nuclear region of the nearby well-studied type-2 active galactic nucleus (AGN), NGC 1068, at HCN J = 3-2 and HCO+ J = 3-2 emission lines. For the first time, due to a higher angular resolution than previous studies, we clearly detected dense molecular gas emission at the putative AGN location, identified as a ˜1.1 mm (˜266 GHz) continuum emission peak, by separating this emission from brighter emission located at 0.″5-2.″0 on the eastern and western sides of the AGN. The estimated intrinsic molecular emission size and dense molecular mass, which are thought to be associated with the putative dusty molecular torus around an AGN, were ˜10 pc and ˜several × 105 M ⊙, respectively. HCN-to-HCO+ J = 3-2 flux ratios substantially higher than unity were found throughout the nuclear region of NGC 1068. The continuum emission displayed an elongated morphology along the direction of the radio jet located at the northern side of the AGN, as well as a weak spatially-resolved component at ˜2.″0 on the southwestern side of the AGN. The latter component most likely originated from star formation, with the estimated luminosity more than one order of magnitude lower than the luminosity of the central AGN. No vibrationally excited (v 2 = 1f) J = 3-2 emission lines were detected for HCN and HCO+ across the field of view.

  12. TeV γ-ray observations of the young synchrotron-dominated SNRs G1.9+0.3 and G330.2+1.0 with H.E.S.S.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    H.E.S.S. Collaboration; Abramowski, A.; Aharonian, F.; Benkhali, F. Ait; Akhperjanian, A. G.; Angüner, E.; Anton, G.; Balenderan, S.; Balzer, A.; Barnacka, A.; Becherini, Y.; Becker Tjus, J.; Bernlöhr, K.; Birsin, E.; Bissaldi, E.; Biteau, J.; Böttcher, M.; Boisson, C.; Bolmont, J.; Bordas, P.; Brucker, J.; Brun, F.; Brun, P.; Bulik, T.; Carrigan, S.; Casanova, S.; Cerruti, M.; Chadwick, P. M.; Chalme-Calvet, R.; Chaves, R. C. G.; Cheesebrough, A.; Chrétien, M.; Colafrancesco, S.; Cologna, G.; Conrad, J.; Couturier, C.; Cui, Y.; Dalton, M.; Daniel, M. K.; Davids, I. D.; Degrange, B.; Deil, C.; deWilt, P.; Dickinson, H. J.; Djannati-Ataï, A.; Domainko, W.; O'C. Drury, L.; Dubus, G.; Dutson, K.; Dyks, J.; Dyrda, M.; Edwards, T.; Egberts, K.; Eger, P.; Espigat, P.; Farnier, C.; Fegan, S.; Feinstein, F.; Fernandes, M. V.; Fernandez, D.; Fiasson, A.; Fontaine, G.; Förster, A.; Füßling, M.; Gajdus, M.; Gallant, Y. A.; Garrigoux, T.; Giavitto, G.; Giebels, B.; Glicenstein, J. F.; Grondin, M.-H.; Grudzińska, M.; Häffner, S.; Hahn, J.; Harris, J.; Heinzelmann, G.; Henri, G.; Hermann, G.; Hervet, O.; Hillert, A.; Hinton, J. A.; Hofmann, W.; Hofverberg, P.; Holler, M.; Horns, D.; Jacholkowska, A.; Jahn, C.; Jamrozy, M.; Janiak, M.; Jankowsky, F.; Jung, I.; Kastendieck, M. A.; Katarzyński, K.; Katz, U.; Kaufmann, S.; Khélifi, B.; Kieffer, M.; Klepser, S.; Klochkov, D.; Kluźniak, W.; Kneiske, T.; Kolitzus, D.; Komin, Nu.; Kosack, K.; Krakau, S.; Krayzel, F.; Krüger, P. P.; Laffon, H.; Lamanna, G.; Lefaucheur, J.; Lemière, A.; Lemoine-Goumard, M.; Lenain, J.-P.; Lennarz, D.; Lohse, T.; Lopatin, A.; Lu, C.-C.; Marandon, V.; Marcowith, A.; Marx, R.; Maurin, G.; Maxted, N.; Mayer, M.; McComb, T. J. L.; Méhault, J.; Meintjes, P. J.; Menzler, U.; Meyer, M.; Moderski, R.; Mohamed, M.; Moulin, E.; Murach, T.; Naumann, C. L.; de Naurois, M.; Niemiec, J.; Nolan, S. J.; Oakes, L.; Ohm, S.; Wilhelmi, E. de Oña; Opitz, B.; Ostrowski, M.; Oya, I.; Panter, M.; Parsons, R. D.; Arribas, M. Paz; Pekeur, N. W.; Pelletier, G.; Perez, J.; Petrucci, P.-O.; Peyaud, B.; Pita, S.; Poon, H.; Pühlhofer, G.; Punch, M.; Quirrenbach, A.; Raab, S.; Raue, M.; Reimer, A.; Reimer, O.; Renaud, M.; Reyes, R. de los; Rieger, F.; Rob, L.; Romoli, C.; Rosier-Lees, S.; Rowell, G.; Rudak, B.; Rulten, C. B.; Sahakian, V.; Sanchez, D. A.; Santangelo, A.; Schlickeiser, R.; Schüssler, F.; Schulz, A.; Schwanke, U.; Schwarzburg, S.; Schwemmer, S.; Sol, H.; Spengler, G.; Spies, F.; Stawarz, Ł.; Steenkamp, R.; Stegmann, C.; Stinzing, F.; Stycz, K.; Sushch, I.; Szostek, A.; Tavernet, J.-P.; Tavernier, T.; Taylor, A. M.; Terrier, R.; Tluczykont, M.; Trichard, C.; Valerius, K.; van Eldik, C.; van Soelen, B.; Vasileiadis, G.; Venter, C.; Viana, A.; Vincent, P.; Völk, H. J.; Volpe, F.; Vorster, M.; Vuillaume, T.; Wagner, S. J.; Wagner, P.; Ward, M.; Weidinger, M.; Weitzel, Q.; White, R.; Wierzcholska, A.; Willmann, P.; Wörnlein, A.; Wouters, D.; Zabalza, V.; Zacharias, M.; Zajczyk, A.; Zdziarski, A. A.; Zech, A.; Zechlin, H.-S.

    2014-06-01

    The non-thermal nature of the X-ray emission from the shell-type supernova remnants (SNRs) G1.9+0.3 and G330.2+1.0 is an indication of intense particle acceleration in the shock fronts of both objects. This suggests that the SNRs are prime candidates for very-high-energy (VHE; E > 0.1 TeV) γ-ray observations. G1.9+0.3, recently established as the youngest known SNR in the Galaxy, also offers a unique opportunity to study the earliest stages of SNR evolution in the VHE domain. The purpose of this work is to probe the level of VHE γ-ray emission from both SNRs and use this to constrain their physical properties. Observations were conducted with the H.E.S.S. (High Energy Stereoscopic System) Cherenkov Telescope Array over a more than six-year period spanning 2004-2010. The obtained data have effective livetimes of 67 h for G1.9+0.3 and 16 h for G330.2+1.0. The data are analysed in the context of the multiwavelength observations currently available and in the framework of both leptonic and hadronic particle acceleration scenarios. No significant γ-ray signal from G1.9+0.3 or G330.2+1.0 was detected. Upper limits (99 per cent confidence level) to the TeV flux from G1.9+0.3 and G330.2+1.0 for the assumed spectral index Γ = 2.5 were set at 5.6 × 10-13 cm-2 s-1 above 0.26 TeV and 3.2 × 10-12 cm-2 s-1 above 0.38 TeV, respectively. In a one-zone leptonic scenario, these upper limits imply lower limits on the interior magnetic field to BG1.9 ≳ 12 μG for G1.9+0.3 and to BG330 ≳ 8 μG for G330.2+1.0. In a hadronic scenario, the low ambient densities and the large distances to the SNRs result in very low predicted fluxes, for which the H.E.S.S. upper limits are not constraining.

  13. A randomized phase II study of S-1 plus oral leucovorin versus S-1 monotherapy in patients with gemcitabine-refractory advanced pancreatic cancer†

    PubMed Central

    Ueno, M.; Okusaka, T.; Omuro, Y.; Isayama, H.; Fukutomi, A.; Ikeda, M.; Mizuno, N.; Fukuzawa, K.; Furukawa, M.; Iguchi, H.; Sugimori, K.; Furuse, J.; Shimada, K.; Ioka, T.; Nakamori, S.; Baba, H.; Komatsu, Y.; Takeuchi, M.; Hyodo, I.; Boku, N.

    2016-01-01

    Background We evaluated the efficacy and toxicity of adding oral leucovorin (LV) to S-1 when compared with S-1 monotherapy in patients with gemcitabine-refractory pancreatic cancer (PC). Patients and methods Gemcitabine-refractory PC patients were randomly assigned in a 1:1 ratio to receive S-1 at 40, 50, or 60 mg according to body surface area plus LV 25 mg, both given orally twice daily for 1 week, repeated every 2 weeks (SL group), or S-1 monotherapy at the same dose as the SL group for 4 weeks, repeated every 6 weeks (S-1 group). The primary end point was progression-free survival (PFS). Results Among 142 patients enrolled, 140 were eligible for efficacy assessment (SL: n = 69 and S-1: n = 71). PFS was significantly longer in the SL group than in the S-1 group [median PFS, 3.8 versus 2.7 months; hazard ratio (HR), 0.56; 95% confidence interval (CI), 0.37–0.85; P = 0.003]). The disease control rate was significantly higher in the SL group than in the S-1 group (91% versus 72%; P = 0.004). Overall survival (OS) was similar in both groups (median OS, 6.3 versus 6.1 months; HR, 0.82; 95% CI, 0.54–1.22; P = 0.463). After adjusting for patient background factors in a multivariate analysis, OS tended to be better in the SL group (HR, 0.71; 95% CI, 0.47–1.07; P = 0.099). Both treatments were well tolerated, although gastrointestinal toxicities were slightly more severe in the SL group. Conclusion The addition of LV to S-1 significantly improved PFS in patients with gemcitabine-refractory advanced PC, and a phase III trial has been initiated in a similar setting. Clinical trials number Japan Pharmaceutical Information Center: JapicCTI-111554. PMID:26681680

  14. Doppler-free approach to optical pumping dynamics in the 6S_1/2‑5D_5/2 electric quadrupole transition of cesium vapor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chan, Eng Aik; Aljunid, Syed Abdullah; Zheludev, Nikolay I.; Wilkowski, David; Ducloy, Martial

    2016-05-01

    The $6S_{1/2}-5D_{5/2}$ electric quadrupole transition is investigated in Cesium vapor at room temperature via nonlinear Doppler-free 6P-6S-5D three-level spectroscopy. Frequency-resolved studies of individual E2 hyperfine lines allow one to analyze optical pumping dynamics, polarization selection rules and line intensities. It opens the way to studies of transfer of light orbital angular momentum to atoms, and the influence of metamaterials on E2 line spectra.

  15. Doppler-free approach to optical pumping dynamics in the 6S_1/2-5D_5/2 electric quadrupole transition of cesium vapor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chan, Eng Aik; Aljunid, Syed Abdullah; Zheludev, Nikolay I.; Wilkowski, David; Ducloy, Martial

    2016-05-01

    The $6S_{1/2}-5D_{5/2}$ electric quadrupole transition is investigated in Cesium vapor at room temperature via nonlinear Doppler-free 6P-6S-5D three-level spectroscopy. Frequency-resolved studies of individual E2 hyperfine lines allow one to analyze optical pumping dynamics, polarization selection rules and line intensities. It opens the way to studies of transfer of light orbital angular momentum to atoms, and the influence of metamaterials on E2 line spectra.

  16. Validation of GOSAT/TANSO-FTS TIR UTLS CO2 data (Version 1.0) using CONTRAIL measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saitoh, N.; Kimoto, S.; Sugimura, R.; Imasu, R.; Kawakami, S.; Shiomi, K.; Kuze, A.; Machida, T.; Sawa, Y.; Matsueda, H.

    2015-12-01

    The thermal infrared (TIR) band of the Thermal and Near Infrared Sensor for Carbon Observation (TANSO)-Fourier Transform Spectrometer (FTS) on board the Greenhouse Gases Observing Satellite (GOSAT) has been observing carbon dioxide (CO2) concentrations in several atmospheric layers since its launch. This study compared TANSO-FTS TIR V1.0 CO2 data and CO2 data obtained in the Comprehensive Observation Network for TRace gases by AIrLiner (CONTRAIL) project in the upper troposphere and lower stratosphere (UTLS), where the TIR band of TANSO-FTS is most sensitive to CO2 concentrations, to validate the quality of the TIR V1.0 UTLS CO2 data from 287 to 162 hPa. From a comparison made during flights between Tokyo and Sydney, the averages of the TIR upper atmospheric CO2 data agreed well with the averages of the data obtained by the CONTRAIL Continuous CO2 Measuring Experiment (CME) within 0.1 % for all of the seasons in the Southern Hemisphere. The results of a comparison for all of the eight airline routes showed that the agreement between the TIR and CONTRAIL CO2 data was within 0.5 % on average in the Northern Hemisphere, which was better than the agreement between a priori and CONTRAIL CO2 data. The quality of TIR lower stratospheric CO2 data depends largely on the information content, and therefore has a seasonal dependence. In high latitudes, TIR V1.0 lower stratospheric CO2 data are only valid in the summer. The magnitude of bias in the TIR upper atmospheric CO2 data did not have a clear longitudinal dependence. The comparison results for flights in northern low and middle latitudes showed that the agreement between TIR and CONTRAIL CO2 data in the upper troposphere was worse in the spring and summer than in the fall and winter. This could be attributed to a larger negative bias in the upper atmospheric a priori CO2 data in the spring and summer and a seasonal dependence of spectral bias in TANSO-FTS TIR Level 1B (L1B) radiance data. The negative bias in northern

  17. Plasma distribution of Comet ISON (C/2012 S1) observed using the radio scintillation method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iju, Tomoya; Abe, Shinsuke; Tokumaru, Munetoshi; Fujiki, Ken'ichi

    2015-05-01

    We report the electron density in a plasma tail of Comet ISON (C/2012 S1) derived from interplanetary scintillation (IPS) observations during November 1-28, 2013. Comet ISON showed a well-developed plasma tail (longer than 2.98 ×107 km) before its perihelion passage on November 28. We identified a radio source whose line-of-sight approached the ISON's plasma tail in the above period and obtained its IPS data using the Solar Wind Imaging Facility at 327 MHz. We used the Heliospheric Imager onboard the Solar-Terrestrial Relation Observatory to distinguish between the cometary tail and solar eruption origins of their enhanced scintillation. From our examinations, we confirmed three IPS enhancements of a radio source 1148-00 on November 13, 16, and 17, which could be attributed to the disturbance in the cometary tail. Power spectra of 1148-00 had the steeper slope than normal ones during its occultation by the plasma tail. We estimated the electron density in the ISON's plasma tail and found 84 cm-3 around the tail axis at a distance of 3.74 ×107 km from the cometary nucleus and an unexpected variation of the electron density in the vicinity of the tail boundary.

  18. Capture of Cometary Dust Grains in Impacts at 6.1 km s-1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burchell, M. J.; Foster, N.; Kearsley, A.; Wozniakiewicz, P.

    2009-12-01

    The NASA Stardust mission to comet 81P/Wild 2 collected grains of cometary dust freshly ejected from the comet during a fly-by at a speed of 6.1 km s-1. These were captured on aluminum foils and in blocks of silica aerogel. The dust underwent a severe shock during capture. The nature of the shock process depends on the properties of the dust and the collecting media. On the aluminium, the shock process and impact damage is typical of that between high-density (or hard materials) at high velocity, resulting in craters lined with impactor residues. The peak shock pressures are estimated at 60-80 GPa. Two main crater types are seen, simple bowl shaped and multiple pit craters: these reflect the degree of consolidation of the original dust grain. Capture in the low density aerogel was via a more gradual slowing of the dust grains accompanied by a variety of effects on the grains (complete break up of weak grains vs. ablation of well consolidated grains). The relation between the structure of the dust grains and the resulting impact features in both collector materials is discussed.

  19. DEEP CHANDRA OBSERVATIONS OF THE CRAB-LIKE PULSAR WIND NEBULA G54.1+0.3 AND SPITZER SPECTROSCOPY OF THE ASSOCIATED INFRARED SHELL

    SciTech Connect

    Temim, Tea; Slane, Patrick; Raymond, John C.; Reynolds, Stephen P.; Borkowski, Kazimierz J.

    2010-02-10

    G54.1+0.3 is a young pulsar wind nebula (PWN), closely resembling the Crab, for which no thermal shell emission has been detected in X-rays. Recent Spitzer observations revealed an infrared (IR) shell containing a dozen point sources arranged in a ring-like structure, previously proposed to be young stellar objects. An extended knot of emission located in the NW part of the shell appears to be aligned with the pulsar's X-ray jet, suggesting a possible interaction with the shell material. Surprisingly, the IR spectrum of the knot resembles the spectrum of freshly formed dust in Cas A, and is dominated by an unidentified dust emission feature at 21 {mu}m. The spectra of the shell also contain various emission lines and show that some are significantly broadened, suggesting that they originate in rapidly expanding supernova (SN) ejecta. We present the first evidence that the PWN is driving shocks into expanding SN ejecta and we propose an alternative explanation for the origin of the IR emission in which the shell is composed entirely of SN ejecta. In this scenario, the freshly formed SN dust is being heated by early-type stars belonging to a cluster in which the SN exploded. Simple dust models show that this interpretation can give rise to the observed shell emission and the IR point sources.

  20. Utilization of Photo-Cross-Linkable Polymer for Mild Steel Corrosion Inhibition in 1.0 M HCl Medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baskar, R.; Gopiraman, M.; Kesavan, D.; Subramanian, K.; Gopalakrishnan, S.

    2015-08-01

    Novel biphenyl-based photo-cross-linkable polymers were synthesized and characterized by nuclear magnetic resonance and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. Upon UV irradiation, the polymers were cross-linked even in the absence of photo initiator or sensitizers, and the rate of photo-cross-linking was examined and discussed. The effectiveness of both virgin and cross-linked polymers for corrosion resistance on mild steel in 1.0 M hydrochloric acid medium was investigated, using polarization studies, electrochemical impedance measurements as well as by adsorption isotherm and surface analysis. The results clearly indicated a dramatic increase in the efficiency of inhibition of corrosion on mild steel by the photo-cross-linked polymer as compared to virgin polymers.