Science.gov

Sample records for 1-0 s1 line

  1. (12)CO (3-2) & (1-0) emission line observations of nearby starburst galaxy nuclei

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Devereux, Nicholas; Taniguchi, Yoshiaki; Sanders, D. B.; Nakai, N.; Young, J. S.

    1994-01-01

    New measurements of the (12)CO (1-0) and (12)CO (3-2) line emission are presented for the nuclei of seven nearby starburst galaxies selected from a complete sample of 21 nearby starburst galaxies for which the nuclear star formation rates are measured to be comparable to the archetype starburst galaxies M82 and NGC 253. The new observations capitalize on the coincidence between the beam size of the 45 m Nobeyama telescope at 115 GHz and that of the 15 m James Clerk Maxwell Telescope at 345 GHz to measure the value of the (12)CO (3-2)/(1-0) emission line ratio in a 15 sec (less than or equal to 2.5 kpc) diameter region centered on the nuclear starburst. In principle, the (12)CO (3-2)/(1-0) emission line ratio provides a measure of temperature and optical depth for the (12)CO gas. The error weighted mean value of the (12)CO (3-2)/(1-0) emission line ratio measured for the seven starburst galaxy nuclei is -0.64 +/- 0.06. The (12)CO (3-2)/(1-0) emission line ratio measured for the starburst galaxy nuclei is significantly higher than the average value measured for molecular gas in the disk of the Galaxy, implying warmer temperatures for the molecular gas in starburst galaxy nuclei. On the other hand, the (12)CO (3-2)/(1-0) emission line ratio measured for the starburst galaxy nuclei is not as high as would be expected if the molecular gas were hot, greater than 20 K, and optically thin, tau much less than 1. The total mass of molecular gas contained within the central 1.2-2.8 kpc diameter region of the starburst galaxy nuclei ranges from 10(exp 8) to 10(exp 9) solar mass. While substantial, the molecular gas mass represents only a small percentage, approximately 9%-16%, of the dynamical mass in the same region.

  2. AI-BL1.0: a program for automatic on-line beamline optimization using the evolutionary algorithm.

    PubMed

    Xi, Shibo; Borgna, Lucas Santiago; Zheng, Lirong; Du, Yonghua; Hu, Tiandou

    2017-01-01

    In this report, AI-BL1.0, an open-source Labview-based program for automatic on-line beamline optimization, is presented. The optimization algorithms used in the program are Genetic Algorithm and Differential Evolution. Efficiency was improved by use of a strategy known as Observer Mode for Evolutionary Algorithm. The program was constructed and validated at the XAFCA beamline of the Singapore Synchrotron Light Source and 1W1B beamline of the Beijing Synchrotron Radiation Facility.

  3. Very Large Array Mapping of the CO(1-0) Line in SMM J14011+0252

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharon, Chelsea E.; Baker, Andrew J.; Harris, Andrew I.; Thomson, Alasdair P.

    2013-03-01

    We present high-resolution CO(1-0) observations of the lensed submillimeter galaxy (SMG) SMM J14011+0252 at z = 2.6. Comparison to the previously detected CO(3-2) line gives an intensity ratio of r 3, 1 = 0.97 ± 0.16 in temperature units, larger than is typical for SMGs but within the range seen in the low-z ultraluminous infrared galaxy population. Combining our new data with previous mid-J CO observations, we perform a single-phase large velocity gradient (LVG) analysis to constrain the physical conditions of the molecular gas. Acceptable models have significant degeneracies between parameters, even when we rule out all models that produce optically thin emission, but we find that the bulk of the molecular gas has T kin = 20-60 K, n_H_2˜ 10^4-105 cm-3, and N CO/Δv = 1017.00 ± 0.25 cm-2 km-1 s. For our best-fit models to self-consistently recover a typical CO-to-H2 abundance and a plausible degree of virialization, the local velocity gradient in the molecular gas must be substantially larger than its galaxy-wide average. This conclusion is consistent with a scenario in which SMM J14011+0252 has a fairly face-on orientation and a molecular interstellar medium composed of many unresolved clouds. Using previous Hα observations, we find that SMM J14011+0252 has a spatially resolved star formation rate versus molecular gas surface density relation inconsistent with those of "normal" local star-forming galaxies, even if we adopt a local "disk-like" CO-to-H2 conversion factor as motivated by our LVG analysis. This discrepancy supports the inference of a star formation relation for high-z starbursts distinct from the local relation that is not solely due to differing choices of gas mass conversion factor.

  4. EDDINGTON RATIO DISTRIBUTION OF X-RAY-SELECTED BROAD-LINE AGNs AT 1.0 < z < 2.2

    SciTech Connect

    Suh, Hyewon; Hasinger, Günther; Steinhardt, Charles; Silverman, John D.; Schramm, Malte

    2015-12-20

    We investigate the Eddington ratio distribution of X-ray-selected broad-line active galactic nuclei (AGNs) in the redshift range 1.0 < z < 2.2, where the number density of AGNs peaks. Combining the optical and Subaru/Fiber Multi Object Spectrograph near-infrared spectroscopy, we estimate black hole masses for broad-line AGNs in the Chandra Deep Field South (CDF-S), Extended Chandra Deep Field South (E-CDF-S), and the XMM-Newton Lockman Hole (XMM-LH) surveys. AGNs with similar black hole masses show a broad range of AGN bolometric luminosities, which are calculated from X-ray luminosities, indicating that the accretion rate of black holes is widely distributed. We find a substantial fraction of massive black holes accreting significantly below the Eddington limit at z ≲ 2, in contrast to what is generally found for luminous AGNs at high redshift. Our analysis of observational selection biases indicates that the “AGN cosmic downsizing” phenomenon can be simply explained by the strong evolution of the comoving number density at the bright end of the AGN luminosity function, together with the corresponding selection effects. However, one might need to consider a correlation between the AGN luminosity and the accretion rate of black holes, in which luminous AGNs have higher Eddington ratios than low-luminosity AGNs, in order to understand the relatively small fraction of low-luminosity AGNs with high accretion rates in this epoch. Therefore, the observed downsizing trend could be interpreted as massive black holes with low accretion rates, which are relatively fainter than less-massive black holes with efficient accretion.

  5. Vertical Distributions of PH3 in Saturn from Observations of Its 1-0 and 3-2 Rotational Lines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Orton, G. S.; Serabyn, E.; Lee, Y. T.

    2000-01-01

    Far-infrared Fourier-transform spectrometer measurements of the 1-0 and 3-2 PH3 transitions in Saturn's disk near 267 and 800 GHz (8.9 and 26.7/cm), respectively, were analyzed simultaneously to derive a global mean profile for the PH3 vertical mixing ratio between 100 and 600 mbar total pressure. The far-infrared spectrum is relatively free from spectral interlopers, suffers minimal absorption or scattering by atmospheric particulates, and contains intrinsically weak PH3 lines that are sensitive to a range of atmospheric depths. The combined spectra are inconsistent with a uniform tropospheric mixing ratio, even with a stratospheric cut-off. They are consistent with a volume mixing ratio of PH3 that drops from 1.2 x 10(exp -5) at 645 mbar pressure to a value of 4.1 x 10(exp -7) at 150 mbar pressure, a decrease that is linear is log abundance vs log pressure. The mixing ratio could drop even more quickly at atmospheric pressures below 150 mbar and still be consistent with the data. The mixing ratio may well remain constant with depth for pressures above 630 mbar. The maximum PH3 mixing ratio in this model is consistent with a [P]/[H] ratio in the deep atmosphere that is about a factor of 10 higher than solar composition. Such a model is consistent with rapid mixing up to the radiative-convective boundary and transport by, for example, vertical waves just above this boundary. In the best fitting model, the eddy diffusion coefficient is approximately 10(exp 4) sq cm near 630 mbar, and it must increase with altitude. The predominant PH3 loss mechanisms are direct photolysis by UV radiation and scavenging by H atoms produced by the photolysis.

  6. Size-resolved simulations of the aerosol inorganic composition with the new hybrid dissolution solver HyDiS-1.0: description, evaluation and first global modelling results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benduhn, François; Mann, Graham W.; Pringle, Kirsty J.; Topping, David O.; McFiggans, Gordon; Carslaw, Kenneth S.

    2016-11-01

    The dissolution of semi-volatile inorganic gases such as ammonia and nitric acid into the aerosol aqueous phase has an important influence on the composition, hygroscopic properties, and size distribution of atmospheric aerosol particles. The representation of dissolution in global models is challenging due to inherent issues of numerical stability and computational expense. For this reason, simplified approaches are often taken, with many models treating dissolution as an equilibrium process. In this paper we describe the new dissolution solver HyDiS-1.0, which was developed for the global size-resolved simulation of aerosol inorganic composition. The solver applies a hybrid approach, which allows for some particle size classes to establish instantaneous gas-particle equilibrium, whereas others are treated time dependently (or dynamically). Numerical accuracy at a competitive computational expense is achieved by using several tailored numerical formalisms and decision criteria, such as for the time- and size-dependent choice between the equilibrium and dynamic approaches. The new hybrid solver is shown to have numerical stability across a wide range of numerical stiffness conditions encountered within the atmosphere. For ammonia and nitric acid, HyDiS-1.0 is found to be in excellent agreement with a fully dynamic benchmark solver. In the presence of sea salt aerosol, a somewhat larger bias is found under highly polluted conditions if hydrochloric acid is represented as a third semi-volatile species. We present first results of the solver's implementation into a global aerosol microphysics and chemistry transport model. We find that (1) the new solver predicts surface concentrations of nitrate and ammonium in reasonable agreement with observations over Europe, the USA, and East Asia, (2) models that assume gas-particle equilibrium will not capture the partitioning of nitric acid and ammonia into Aitken-mode-sized particles, and thus may be missing an important

  7. Improved line parameters for the Chi 2Pi-Chi 2Pi (1-0) bands of (35)ClO and (37)ClO

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldman, Aaron; Gillis, James R.; Rinsland, Curtis P.; Burkholder, James B.

    1994-01-01

    Improved line parameters at 296 K for the Chi 2Pi-Chi 2Pi (1-0) bands of (35)ClO and (37)ClO have been calculated with J up to 43.5. The integrated intensity for the 2048 lines in the main and satellite bands has been normalized to 9.68-sq cm/atm at 296K.

  8. The O(1S - 1D,3P) Line Intensity Ratio

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slanger, T. G.; Sharpee, B. D.; Cosby, P. C.; Minschwaner, K. R.; Siskind, D. E.

    2005-05-01

    The line intensity ratio of the two optically-forbidden atmospheric emissions, O(1S-1D) at 557.7 nm and O(1S-3P) at 297.2 nm, must be a single-valued number in the upper atmosphere because the upper level is common to both lines. The calculated transition probability ratio A(557.7)/A(297.2) is 16, by several authors, and the ratio found in the laboratory is significantly larger. Field observations require space-based instruments, in which case calibration between the two wavelengths is the critical issue. We circumvent this problem by using the O2 Herzberg I emission system as a bridge between the UV region below 310 nm and the ground-accessible region above that wavelength. These two spectral regions can be separately calibrated in terms of intensity, and the results of a disparate set of observations (satellite, rocket, ground-based) lead to A(557.7)/A(297.2) ratios that are consistently much smaller than the calculated value. These results have consequences for auroral and dayglow processes, and it is particularly important to ascertain the cause of the substantial difference between theory and observation.

  9. High-resolution mapping of the physical conditions in two nearby active galaxies based on 12CO(1-0), (2-1), and (3-2) lines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boone, F.; García-Burillo, S.; Combes, F.; Lim, J.; Ho, P.; Baker, A. J.; Matsushita, S.; Krips, M.; Dinh, V. T.; Schinnerer, E.

    2011-01-01

    We present a detailed analysis of high resolution observations of the three lowest CO transitions in two nearby active galaxies, NGC 4569 and NGC 4826. The CO(1-0) and (2-1) lines were observed with the Plateau de Bure Interferometer and the CO(3-2) line with the Submillimeter Array. Combining these data allows us to compare the emission in the three lines and to map the line ratios, R21 = ICO(2-1)/ICO(1-0) and R32 = ICO(3-2)/ICO(1-0) at a resolution of ~2”, i.e., a linear resolution of 160 pc for NGC 4569 and 40 pc for NGC 4826. In both galaxies the emission in the three lines is similarly distributed spatially and in velocity, and CO is less excited (R32 < 0.6) than in the Galactic Center or the centers of other active galaxies studied so far. According to a pseudo-LTE model the molecular gas in NGC 4569 is cold and mainly optically thick in the CO(1-0) and (2-1) lines; less than 50% of the gas is optically thin in the CO(3-2) line. LVG modeling suggests the presence of an elongated ring of cold and dense gas coinciding with the inner Lindblad resonance (ILR) of the stellar bar in agreement with a previous analysis of the kinematics. More excited gas is resolved in the circumnuclear disk of NGC 4826. According to our pseudo-LTE model this corresponds to warmer gas with a ~20% of the CO(3-2) emission being optically thin. LVG modeling indicates the presence of a semicircular arc of dense and cold gas centered on the dynamical center and ~70 pc in radius. The gas temperature increases and its density decreases toward the center. A near side/far side asymmetry noticeable in the CO, R32 and Paα maps suggests that opacity effects play a role. Examining published CO maps of nearby active galaxies we find similar asymmetries suggesting that this could be a common phenomenon in active galaxies. These mainly qualitative results open new perspectives for the study of active galaxies with the future Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array. Based on observations

  10. Line strength and self-broadening coefficient of the pure rotational S(1) quadrupole line in H2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reuter, Dennis C.; Sirota, J. Marcos

    1994-01-01

    The absolute intensity, S(sub 1), and self-broadening coefficient, gamma(sub L), for H2 S(sub zero)(1) pure rotational line at 17.0348 micrometers (587.032 cm(exp -1)) have been measured for the first time using a tunable diode laser spectrometer with a resolution of approximately 1 x 10(exp -3) cm(exp -1). By fitting a Galatry line shape convolved with a 1 x 10(exp -3) cm(exp -1) Gaussian instrument profile to absorption profiles, for H2 pressures ranging from 0.34 to 1.30 atm, values of s(sub 1) = (7.0 +/- 0.4) x 10(exp -8) cm(exp -2) atm(exp -1) and gamma(sub L) = (1.73 +/- 0.12) x 10(exp -3) cm(exp -1) atm(exp -1) were obtained.

  11. Early Science with the Large Millimeter Telescope: discovery of the 12CO(1-0) emission line in the ring galaxy VIIZw466

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wong, O. Ivy; Vega, O.; Sánchez-Argüelles, D.; Narayanan, G.; Wall, W. F.; Zwaan, M. A.; Rosa González, D.; Zeballos, M.; Bekki, K.; Mayya, Y. D.; Montaña, A.; Chung, A.

    2017-04-01

    We report an early science discovery of the 12CO(1-0) emission line in the collisional ring galaxy VII Zw466, using the Redshift Search Receiver instrument on the Large Millimeter Telescope Alfonso Serrano. The apparent molecular-to-atomic gas ratio either places the interstellar medium (ISM) of VII Zw466 in the H I-dominated regime or implies a large quantity of CO-dark molecular gas, given its high star formation rate. The molecular gas densities and star formation rate densities of VII Zw466 are consistent with the standard Kennicutt-Schmidt star formation law even though we find this galaxy to be H2-deficient. The choice of CO-to-H2 conversion factors cannot explain the apparent H2 deficiency in its entirety. Hence, we find that the collisional ring galaxy, VII Zw466, is either largely deficient in both H2 and H I or contains a large mass of CO-dark gas. A low molecular gas fraction could be due to the enhancement of feedback processes from previous episodes of star formation as a result of the star-forming ISM being confined to the ring. We conclude that collisional ring galaxy formation is an extreme form of galaxy interaction that triggers a strong galactic-wide burst of star formation that may provide immediate negative feedback towards subsequent episodes of star formation - resulting in a short-lived star formation history or, at least, the appearance of a molecular gas deficit.

  12. Second-Line Irinotecan, Leucovorin, and 5-Fluorouracil for Gastric Cancer Patients after Failed Docetaxel and S-1

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Joo Young; Ryu, Min-Hee; Ryoo, Baek-Yeol; Han, Boram; Cho, Ji Woong; Lim, Man Sup; Lim, Hyun; Kang, Ho Suk; Kim, Min-Jeong; Ha, Hong Il; Song, Hunho; Kim, Jung Han; Kim, Hyeong Su; Kang, Yoon-Koo; Zang, Dae Young

    2016-01-01

    Background. This retrospective study aimed to assess the efficacy and toxicities of second-line chemotherapy with irinotecan, leucovorin, and 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) in metastatic gastric cancer (MGC) patients previously treated with docetaxel and S-1 with or without oxaliplatin (DS/DOS). Patients and Methods. We reviewed the data of patients who had previously been treated with first-line DS/DOS and received biweekly irinotecan-based chemotherapy (FOLFIRI/IFL) between October 2004 and November 2011. Results. A total of 209 cycles were administered to 35 patients, with a median of 4 (range, 1–22) cycles each. The overall response rate in 29 response-assessable patients was 17.2%, including 2 complete and 3 partial responses. The median progression-free and overall survivals were 3.81 (95% confidence interval [CI], 1.82–5.80) months and 6.24 (95% CI, 1.44–11.04) months, respectively. The major grade 3/4 toxicity was neutropenia (8.6%). Conclusion. FOLFIRI/IFL chemotherapy showed modest antitumour activity and tolerable toxicities in DS/DOS-treated MGC patients. PMID:26839542

  13. Neutropenia as a prognostic factor and safety of second-line therapy with S-1 for advanced or recurrent pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Ikagawa, Makiko; Kimura, Michio; Iwai, Mina; Usami, Eiseki; Yoshimura, Tomoaki; Yasuda, Kimio

    2016-09-01

    The aim of this retrospective study was to investigate the safety of S-1 as second-line therapy and to evaluate the association between neutropenia occurring during first-line gemcitabine (GEM) therapy and survival for advanced or recurrent pancreatic cancer (APC). Between January, 2010 and December, 2014, 123 APC patients received chemotherapy at the Ogaki Municipal Hospital (Ogaki, Japan). Of those, 37 received GEM as first-line and S-1 as a second-line therapy (GEM→S-1 group). A further 60 patients received GEM as first-line therapy, but did not receive second-line therapy (GEM group). The median overall survival in the GEM→S-1 (n=37) and GEM (n=60) groups was 323 days [95% confidence interval (CI): 138-218.9 days] and 172 days (95% CI: 105-184.4 days), respectively (P=0.0004). The median overall survival in the mild (grade ≤2; n=63) and severe (grade ≥3; n=34) neutropenia groups was 178 days (95% CI: 182-275 days) and 330 days (95% CI: 297-514 days), respectively (log-rank test, P=0.0023). The severe non-haematological toxicities associated with S-1 as second-line therapy were nausea (2.7%) and hand-foot syndrome (2.7%). Second-line S-1 treatment was discontinued due to adverse events in 5.4% (2/37) of the cases. In conclusion, neutropenia occurring during GEM therapy administered as first-line treatment to APC patients was strongly associated with a better prognosis. S-1 therapy as second-line treatment was associated with a low incidence of severe adverse events and the patients were able to successfully continue treatment.

  14. Registration of high-oleic peanut germplasm line ARSOK-S1 (TX996784) with enhanced resistance to Sclerotinia blight and pod rot

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The high oleic Spanish peanut (Arachis hypogaea L. subsp. fastigiata var. vulgaris) germplasm line ARSOK-S1 was developed cooperatively between the USDA Agricultural Research Service, Texas AgriLife Research, and Oklahoma State University, and was released in 2013. ARSOK-S1 (tested early as TX99678...

  15. Randomised phase III trial of S-1 versus capecitabine in the first-line treatment of metastatic colorectal cancer: SALTO study by the Dutch Colorectal Cancer Group.

    PubMed

    Kwakman, J J M; Simkens, L H J; van Rooijen, J M; van de Wouw, A J; Ten Tije, A J; Creemers, G J M; Hendriks, M P; Los, M; van Alphen, R J; Polée, M B; Muller, E W; van der Velden, A M T; van Voorthuizen, T; Koopman, M; Mol, L; van Werkhoven, E; Punt, C J A

    2017-04-05

    Hand-foot syndrome (HFS) is a common side effect of capecitabine. S-1 is an oral fluoropyrimidine with comparable efficacy to capecitabine in gastrointestinal cancers but associated with a lower incidence of HFS in Asian patients. This study compares the incidence of HFS between S-1 and capecitabine as first-line treatment in Western metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC) patients.

  16. Indico 1.0

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonzalez Lopez, J. B.; Avilés, A.; Baron, T.; Ferreira, P.; Kolobara, B.; Pugh, M. A.; Resco, A.; Trzaskoma, J. P.

    2014-06-01

    Indico has evolved into the main event organization software, room booking tool and collaboration hub for CERN. The growth in its usage has only accelerated during the past 9 years, and today Indico holds more that 215,000 events and 1,100,000 files. The growth was also substantial in terms of functionalities and improvements. In the last year alone, Indico has matured considerably in 3 key areas: enhanced usability, optimized performance and additional features, especially those related to meeting collaboration. Along the course of 2012, much activity has centred around consolidating all this effort and investment into "version 1.0", recently released in 2013.Version 1.0 brings along new features, such as the Microsoft Exchange calendar synchronization for participants, many new and clean interfaces (badges and poster generation, list of contributions, abstracts, etc) and so forth. But most importantly, it brings a message: Indico is now stable, consolidated and mature after more than 10 years of non-stop development. This message is addressed not only to CERN users but also to the many organisations, in or outside HEP, which have already installed the software, and to others who might soon join this community. In this document, we describe the current state of the art of Indico, and how it was built. This does not mean that the Indico software is complete, far from it! We have plenty of new ideas and projects that we are working on and which we have shared during CHEP 2013.

  17. Measurement of the 3s1/2-3p3/2 resonance line of sodiumlike Eu52+

    DOE PAGES

    Träbert, E.; Beiersdorfer, P.; Hell, N.; ...

    2015-08-20

    We have measured the 3s1/2-3p3/2 transition in sodiumlike Eu52+ situated at 41.232 Å with an uncertainty of 73 ppm. Our measurement extends previous high-precision measurements into the 56< Z< 78 range of atomic numbers. We also present measurements of 3s1/2-3p3/2 and 3p1/2-3d3/2 transitions in the neighboring magnesiumlike, aluminumlike, and siliconlike europium ions.

  18. The optical depth of the 158 micron forbidden C-12 II line - Detection of the F = 1 - 0 forbidden C-13 II hyperfine-structure component. [in Orion nebula

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stacey, G. J.; Townes, C. H.; Geis, N.; Madden, S. C.; Herrmann, F.; Genzel, R.; Poglitsch, A.; Jackson, J. M.

    1991-01-01

    The detection of the F = 1 - 0 hyperfine component of the 158-micron forbidden C-13 II fine-structure line in the interstellar medium is reported. A 12-point intensity map was obtained of the forbidden C-13 distribution over the inner 190-arcsec (R.A.) X 190-arcsec (decl.) regions of the Orion Nebula using an imaging Fabry-Perot interferometer. The forbidden C-12 II/C-13 II line intensity ratio varies significantly over the region mapped. It is highest (86 +/-0) in the core of the Orion H II region, and significantly lower (62 +/-7) in the outer regions of the map, reflecting higher optical depth in the forbidden C-12 II line here. It is suggested that this enhanced optical depth is the result of limb brightening of the optically thin forbidden C-13 II line at the edges of the bowl-shaped H II region blister.

  19. In-situ determination of astro-comb calibrator lines to better than 10 cm s(-1).

    PubMed

    Li, Chih-Hao; Glenday, Alexander G; Benedick, Andrew J; Chang, Guoqing; Chen, Li-Jin; Cramer, Claire; Fendel, Peter; Furesz, Gabor; Kärtner, Franz X; Korzennik, Sylvain; Phillips, David F; Sasselov, Dimitar; Szentgyorgyi, Andrew; Walsworth, Ronald L

    2010-06-07

    Improved wavelength calibrators for high-resolution astrophysical spectrographs will be essential for precision radial velocity (RV) detection of Earth-like exoplanets and direct observation of cosmological deceleration. The astro-comb is a combination of an octave-spanning femtosecond laser frequency comb and a Fabry-Pérot cavity used to achieve calibrator line spacings that can be resolved by an astrophysical spectrograph. Systematic spectral shifts associated with the cavity can be 0.1-1 MHz, corresponding to RV errors of 10-100 cm/s, due to the dispersive properties of the cavity mirrors over broad spectral widths. Although these systematic shifts are very stable, their correction is crucial to high accuracy astrophysical spectroscopy. Here, we demonstrate an in-situ technique to determine the systematic shifts of astro-comb lines due to finite Fabry-Pérot cavity dispersion. The technique is practical for implementation at a telescope-based spectrograph to enable wavelength calibration accuracy better than 10 cm/s.

  20. Generation of polarized 4He ion beam by optical pumping using circularly and linearly polarized radiation tuned to D0 line (He metastables 2S1→2P0)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suzuki, T.; Yamauchi, Y.

    2007-06-01

    It is demonstrated that simultaneous optical pumping (OP) by circularly and linearly polarized 1083 nm radiation tuned to the D0 line (He metastables 23S1→23P0 transition) substantially improves the polarization of the He+ ion beam, compared with conventional OP by the circularly polarized D1 ( 23S1→23P1) or D2 ( 23S1→23P2) line.

  1. Rotational Energy Levels and Line Intensities for 2S+1Sigma-2S+1Sigma Transitions in an Open-Shell Diatomic Molecule Weakly Bonded to a Closed-Shell Partner.

    PubMed

    Fawzy

    1998-09-01

    This paper concerns rotational energy levels and line intensities for electronic, vibrational, and microwave transitions in an open-shell complex consisting of an open-shell diatomic molecule and a closed-shell partner. The electronic state of the open-shell diatomic fragment is a 2S+1Sigma state, where S >/= 12, the close-shell partner could be a rare gas atom or a diatomic molecule or a planar polyatomic molecule. We are considering a near-rigid rotor model for a nonlinear complex, taking into account thoroughly all effects of the electron spin and the quartic centrifugal distortion correction terms. The total Hamiltonian is expressed as H=Hrot+Hsr+Hss+Hcd+Hsrcd+Hsscd. We have derived all the nonvanishing matrix elements of the Hamiltonian operators in the molecular basis set. The rotational energy levels are calculated by numerical diagonalization of the total Hamiltonian matrix for each J value. The nonvanishing matrix elements of the electric dipole moment operator are derived in the molecular basis set for electronic, vibrational, and microwave transitions within the complex. Expectation values of the quantum numbers and of the parities of the rotational states are derived in the molecular basis set. Relative intensities of the allowed rotational transitions, expectation values of the quantum numbers and the parities are calculated numerically in the space of the eigenvectors obtained from diagonalization of the Hamiltonian matrix. The formalism and the computer program of this paper are considered as extensions to our previous work [W. M. Fawzy and J. T. Hougen, J. Mol. Spectrosc. 137, 154-165 (1989); W. M. Fawzy, J. Mol. Spectrosc. 160, 84-96 (1993)] and are expected to be particularly useful for analyzing and fitting high-resolution spectra of weakly bonded oxygen complexes. A brief discussion of the Hamiltonian operators, the matrix elements, and the computer program is given. Copyright 1998 Academic Press.

  2. S-1-Based Chemotherapy versus Capecitabine-Based Chemotherapy as First-Line Treatment for Advanced Gastric Carcinoma: A Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Zhi-qiang; Zhang, Dong-sheng; Luo, Hui-yan; Qiu, Miao-zhen; Wang, Feng-hua; Ren, Chao; Zeng, Zhao-lei; Xu, Rui-hua

    2013-01-01

    Background Although both oral fluoropyrimidines were reported effective and safe, doubts exist about whether S-1 or capecitabine is more advantageous in advanced gastric carcinoma (AGC). Herein, we performed a meta-analysis to comprehensively compare the efficacy and safety of S-1-based chemotherapy versus capecitabine-based chemotherapy as first-line treatment for AGC. Methods PubMed/Medline, EmBase, Cochrane library, and China National Knowledge Infrastructure databases were searched for articles comparing S-1-based chemotherapy to capecitabine-based chemotherapy for AGC. Primary outcomes were overall response rate (ORR), time to progression (TTP), overall survival (OS), progression-free probability, and survival probability. Secondary outcomes were toxicities. Fixed-effects model were used and all the results were confirmed by random-effects model. Results Five randomized controlled trials and five cohort studies with 821 patients were included. We found equivalent ORR (38.3% vs. 39.1%, odds ratio [OR] 0.92, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.69-1.24, P = 0.59), TTP (harzad ratio [HR] 0.98, 95% CI 0.82-1.16, P = 0.79), OS (HR 0.99, 95% CI 0.87-1.13, P = 0.91), progression-free probability (3-month OR 1.02, 95% CI 0.62-1.68, P = 0.94; 6-month OR 1.34, 95% CI 0.88-2.04, P = 0.18) and survival probability (0.5-year OR 0.90, 95% CI 0.61-1.31, P =0.57; 1-year OR 0.97, 95% CI 0.70- 1.33, P = 0.84; 2-year OR 1.15, 95% CI 0.61-2.17, P = 0.66). Equivalent grade 3 to 4 hematological and non-hematological toxicities were found except hand-foot syndrome was less prominent in S-1-based chemotherapy (0.3% vs. 5.9%, OR 0.19, 95% CI 0.06-0.56, P = 0.003). There’re no significant heterogeneity and publication bias. Cumulative analysis found stable time-dependent trend. Consistent results stratified by study design, age, regimen, cycle, country were observed. Conclusion S-1-based chemotherapy was associated with non-inferior antitumor efficacy and better safety profile, compared

  3. Kendall-Theil Robust Line (KTRLine--version 1.0)-A Visual Basic Program for Calculating and Graphing Robust Nonparametric Estimates of Linear-Regression Coefficients Between Two Continuous Variables

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Granato, Gregory E.

    2006-01-01

    The Kendall-Theil Robust Line software (KTRLine-version 1.0) is a Visual Basic program that may be used with the Microsoft Windows operating system to calculate parameters for robust, nonparametric estimates of linear-regression coefficients between two continuous variables. The KTRLine software was developed by the U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the Federal Highway Administration, for use in stochastic data modeling with local, regional, and national hydrologic data sets to develop planning-level estimates of potential effects of highway runoff on the quality of receiving waters. The Kendall-Theil robust line was selected because this robust nonparametric method is resistant to the effects of outliers and nonnormality in residuals that commonly characterize hydrologic data sets. The slope of the line is calculated as the median of all possible pairwise slopes between points. The intercept is calculated so that the line will run through the median of input data. A single-line model or a multisegment model may be specified. The program was developed to provide regression equations with an error component for stochastic data generation because nonparametric multisegment regression tools are not available with the software that is commonly used to develop regression models. The Kendall-Theil robust line is a median line and, therefore, may underestimate total mass, volume, or loads unless the error component or a bias correction factor is incorporated into the estimate. Regression statistics such as the median error, the median absolute deviation, the prediction error sum of squares, the root mean square error, the confidence interval for the slope, and the bias correction factor for median estimates are calculated by use of nonparametric methods. These statistics, however, may be used to formulate estimates of mass, volume, or total loads. The program is used to read a two- or three-column tab-delimited input file with variable names in the first row and

  4. CCAIN, Version 1.0

    SciTech Connect

    Rickett, Christopher D.; Rasmussen, Craig E.; Sottile, Matthew J.

    2005-05-26

    CCAIN, Version 1.0 Date: 06/15/2005 This software is an instantiation of Common Component Architecture (CCA) framework written in C. The framework is used to compose (create, register, destroy) C, C++, and Fortran components into a running CCA application. Language bindings are provided for F90 and F03 to allow codes in these languages to interface with the framework.

  5. Reactive Oxygen Stimulation of Interleukin-6 Release in the Human Trophoblast Cell Line HTR-8/SVneo by the Trichlorethylene Metabolite S-(1,2-Dichloro)-l-Cysteine.

    PubMed

    Hassan, Iman; Kumar, Anjana M; Park, Hae-Ryung; Lash, Lawrence H; Loch-Caruso, Rita

    2016-09-01

    Trichloroethylene (TCE) is a common environmental pollutant associated with adverse reproductive outcomes in humans. TCE intoxication occurs primarily through its biotransformation to bioactive metabolites, including S-(1,2-dichlorovinyl)-l-cysteine (DCVC). TCE induces oxidative stress and inflammation in the liver and kidney. Although the placenta is capable of xenobiotic metabolism and oxidative stress and inflammation in placenta have been associated with adverse pregnancy outcomes, TCE toxicity in the placenta remains poorly understood. We determined the effects of DCVC by using the human extravillous trophoblast cell line HTR-8/SVneo. Exposure to 10 and 20 μM DCVC for 10 h increased reactive oxygen species (ROS) as measured by carboxydichlorofluorescein fluorescence. Moreover, 10 and 20 μM DCVC increased mRNA expression and release of interleukin-6 (IL-6) after 24-h exposure, and these responses were inhibited by the cysteine conjugate beta-lyase inhibitor aminooxyacetic acid and by treatments with antioxidants (alpha-tocopherol and deferoxamine), suggesting that DCVC-stimulated IL-6 release in HTR-8/SVneo cells is dependent on beta-lyase metabolic activation and increased generation of ROS. HTR-8/SVneo cells exhibited decreased mitochondrial membrane potential at 5, 10, and 20 μM DCVC at 5, 10, and 24 h, showing that DCVC induces mitochondrial dysfunction in HTR-8/Svneo cells. The present study demonstrates that DCVC stimulated ROS generation in the human placental cell line HTR-8/SVneo and provides new evidence of mechanistic linkage between DCVC-stimulated ROS and increase in proinflammatory cytokine IL-6. Because abnormal activation of cytokines can disrupt trophoblast functions necessary for placental development and successful pregnancy, follow-up investigations relating these findings to physiologic outcomes are warranted.

  6. BOREFIELD v. 1.0

    SciTech Connect

    Aldridge, David F.

    2016-09-21

    Program BOREFIELD is an electromagnetic data modeling algorithm that calculates the frequency-domain electric vector E (with SI unit (V/m)/Hz) and magnetic vector H (in (A/m)/Hz) generated by an electric current source deployed within a fluid-filled, steel-cased (and possibly cemented) geologic borehole. The medium surrounding the borehole is assumed to be a homogeneous and isotropic electrically conducting wholespace. The source may involve axial, azimuthal, or radial current flow, localized at a point or along a finite-length line aligned with the borehole axis.

  7. Dependence of the bit error rate on the signal power and length of a single-channel coherent single-span communication line (100 Gbit s-1) with polarisation division multiplexing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gurkin, N. V.; Konyshev, V. A.; Nanii, O. E.; Novikov, A. G.; Treshchikov, V. N.; Ubaydullaev, R. R.

    2015-01-01

    We have studied experimentally and using numerical simulations and a phenomenological analytical model the dependences of the bit error rate (BER) on the signal power and length of a coherent single-span communication line with transponders employing polarisation division multiplexing and four-level phase modulation (100 Gbit s-1 DP-QPSK format). In comparing the data of the experiment, numerical simulations and theoretical analysis, we have found two optimal powers: the power at which the BER is minimal and the power at which the fade margin in the line is maximal. We have derived and analysed the dependences of the BER on the optical signal power at the fibre line input and the dependence of the admissible input signal power range for implementation of the communication lines with a length from 30 - 50 km up to a maximum length of 250 km.

  8. BenMAP 1.0

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    BenMAP 1.0 is the legacy version of the BenMAP software that the EPA is making available for archival purposes. It is designed for regional and national-scale analyses within the Continental United States.

  9. Insider Alert 1.0 Beta Version

    SciTech Connect

    Abbott, Robert

    2004-02-01

    Insider Alert 1.0 Beta Version supports interactive selection and graphical display of data generated by the Sandia Cognitive Framework, which simulates the examination of security data by experts of various specialties. Insider Alert also encompasses the configuration and data files input to the Cognitive Framework for this application. Insider Alert 1.0 Beta Version is a computer program for analyzing data indicative of possible espionage or improper handling of data by employees at Sandia National Laboratories (or other facilities with comparable policies and procedures for managing sensitive information) It prioritizes and displays information for review by security analysts.

  10. Optimal Path Analyzer (Version 1.0)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-10-01

    ABSTRACT (Continue on reverse if necessary and identify by block number) This report describes the function, operation, test and evaluation results of the...14 Technical Description ........................................ 14 Test and Evaluation .......................................... 16...Neural Network .................................. 10 5. Output Iteration Test Results ........................... 19 6. OPA 1.0 Sample Run B3 - S3

  11. Amesos 1.0 reference guide.

    SciTech Connect

    Sala, Marzio; Stanley, Ken D.

    2004-05-01

    This document describes the main functionalities of the Amesos package, version 1.0. Amesos, available as part of Trilinos 4.0, provides an object-oriented interface to several serial and parallel sparse direct solvers libraries, for the solution of the linear systems of equations A X = B where A is a real sparse, distributed matrix, defined as an EpetraRowMatrix object, and X and B are defined as EpetraMultiVector objects. Amesos provides a common look-and-feel to several direct solvers, insulating the user from each package's details, such as matrix and vector formats, and data distribution.

  12. Discovery of the HCV NS3/4A protease inhibitor (1R,5S)-N-[3-amino-1-(cyclobutylmethyl)-2,3-dioxopropyl]-3- [2(S)-[[[(1,1-dimethylethyl)amino]carbonyl]amino]-3,3-dimethyl-1-oxobutyl]- 6,6-dimethyl-3-azabicyclo[3.1.0]hexan-2(S)-carboxamide (Sch 503034) II. Key steps in structure-based optimization.

    PubMed

    Prongay, Andrew J; Guo, Zhuyan; Yao, Nanhua; Pichardo, John; Fischmann, Thierry; Strickland, Corey; Myers, Joseph; Weber, Patricia C; Beyer, Brian M; Ingram, Richard; Hong, Zhi; Prosise, Winifred W; Ramanathan, Lata; Taremi, S Shane; Yarosh-Tomaine, Taisa; Zhang, Rumin; Senior, Mary; Yang, Rong-Sheng; Malcolm, Bruce; Arasappan, Ashok; Bennett, Frank; Bogen, Stephane L; Chen, Kevin; Jao, Edwin; Liu, Yi-Tsung; Lovey, Raymond G; Saksena, Anil K; Venkatraman, Srikanth; Girijavallabhan, Viyyoor; Njoroge, F George; Madison, Vincent

    2007-05-17

    The structures of both the native holo-HCV NS3/4A protease domain and the protease domain with a serine 139 to alanine (S139A) mutation were solved to high resolution. Subsequently, structures were determined for a series of ketoamide inhibitors in complex with the protease. The changes in the inhibitor potency were correlated with changes in the buried surface area upon binding the inhibitor to the active site. The largest contribution to the binding energy arises from the hydrophobic interactions of the P1 and P2 groups as they bind to the S1 and S2 pockets [the numbering of the subsites is as defined in Berger, A.; Schechter, I. Philos. Trans. R. Soc. London, Ser. B 1970, 257, 249-264]. This correlation of the changes in potency with increased buried surface area contributed directly to the design of a potent tripeptide inhibitor of the HCV NS3/4A protease that is currently in clinical trials.

  13. TOUGH3 v1.0

    SciTech Connect

    PAU, GEORGE; JUNG, YOOJIN; FINSTERLE, STEFAN; ZHANG, YINGQI

    2016-09-14

    TOUGH3 V1.0 capabilities to simulate multi-dimensional, multi-phase, multi-component, non-isothermal flow and transport in fractured porous media, with applications geosciences and reservoir engineering and other application areas. TOUGH3 V1.0 supports a number of different combinations of fluids and components (updated equation-of-state (EOS) modules from previous versions of TOUGH, including EOS1, EOS2, EOS3, EOS4, EOS5, EOS7, EOS7R, EOS7C, EOS7CA, EOS8, EOS9, EWASG, TMVOC, ECO2N, and ECO2M). This upgrade includes (a) expanded list of updated equation-of-state (EOS) modules, (b) new hysteresis models, (c) new implementation of parallel and solver functionalities, (d) new linear solver options based on PETSc libraries, (e) new automatic build system that automatically downloads and builds third-party libraries and TOUGH3, (f) new printout in CSV format, (g) dynamic memory allocation, (h) various user features, and (i) bug fixes.

  14. Methanethiolate structural phases on Cu(1 0 0) and Cu(4 1 0)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Driver, S. M.; Woodruff, D. P.

    2001-08-01

    Scanning tunnelling microscopy has been used to study the interaction of dimethyl disulphide and methanethiol with Cu(1 0 0) and Cu(4 1 0) surfaces at room temperature, conditions believed to lead to the formation of adsorbed methanethiolate CH 3S-. On Cu(1 1 1) these interactions are known to produce a pseudo-(1 0 0) reconstruction of the surface, but with a periodicity some 14% larger than on the ideal Cu(1 0 0) surface. On Cu(1 0 0) there is no evidence of adsorbate-induced substrate reconstruction, with commensurate (2×2) and (defected) c(2×2) overlayers being formed, although at the highest coverages the surface appears to be characterised by a c(2×6) phase which is sometimes poorly ordered. On Cu(4 1 0) the structure formed on the (1 0 0) terraces appears to be c(2×2), although characteristic patterns of kink formation on the steps may be explained in terms of relief of adsorbate-induced compressive surface stress as may be expected if a larger lattice parameter is preferred. The c(2×6) phase on the extended (1 0 0) surface is explained in terms of a buckled c(2×2) structure, also a consequence of compressive surface stress relief.

  15. LAPACK users` guide: Release 1.0

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, E.; Bai, Z.; Bischof, C.; Demmel, J.; Dongarra, J.; Du Croz, J.; Greenbaum, A.; Hammarling, S.; McKenney, A.; Ostrouchov, S.; Sorensen, D.

    1992-01-31

    LAPACK is a transportable library of Fortran 77 subroutines for solving the most common problems in numerical linear algebra: systems of linear equations, linear least squares problems, eigenvalue problems and singular value problems. LAPACK is designed to supersede LINPACK and EISPACK, principally by restructuring the software to achieve much greater efficiency on vector processors, high-performance ``superscalar`` workstations, and shared-memory multi-processors. LAPACK also adds extra functionality, uses some new or improved algorithms, and integrates the two sets of algorithms into a unified package. The LAPACK Users` Guide gives an informal introduction to the design of the algorithms and software, summarizes the contents of the package, describes conventions used in the software and documentation, and includes complete specifications for calling the routines. This edition of the Users` guide describes Release 1.0 of LAPACK.

  16. LAPACK users' guide: Release 1. 0

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, E.; Bai, Z.; Bischof, C.; Demmel, J.; Dongarra, J.; Du Croz, J.; Greenbaum, A.; Hammarling, S.; McKenney, A.; Ostrouchov, S.; Sorensen, D.

    1992-01-31

    LAPACK is a transportable library of Fortran 77 subroutines for solving the most common problems in numerical linear algebra: systems of linear equations, linear least squares problems, eigenvalue problems and singular value problems. LAPACK is designed to supersede LINPACK and EISPACK, principally by restructuring the software to achieve much greater efficiency on vector processors, high-performance superscalar'' workstations, and shared-memory multi-processors. LAPACK also adds extra functionality, uses some new or improved algorithms, and integrates the two sets of algorithms into a unified package. The LAPACK Users' Guide gives an informal introduction to the design of the algorithms and software, summarizes the contents of the package, describes conventions used in the software and documentation, and includes complete specifications for calling the routines. This edition of the Users' guide describes Release 1.0 of LAPACK.

  17. Virtual planets atlas 1.0 freeware

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Legrand, C.; Chevalley, P.

    2015-10-01

    Since 2002, we develop the "Virtual Moon Atlas -http://www.ap-i.net/avl/en/start" a freeware to help Moon observing and to improve interest for Moon in general public. VMA freeware has been downloaded near 900000 times all over the world and is or has been used by several professional organizations such as Kitt Peak Observatory, National Japan Observatory, Birkbeck College / University College London (K. Joy), BBC Sky at night, several French astronomy magazines and astronomy writers (P. Harrington, S. French...) . Recommended by ESA, registered as educational software by French ministry for education, it has also yet been presented at 2006 & 2007 LPSC and PCC2 in 2011 We have declined this freeware in a new tool with the same goals, but for the telluric planets and satellites, the "Virtual Planets Atlas (VPA / http://www.ap-i.net/avp/en/start") now in version 1.0.

  18. A Candidate Energy Source for the Galactic Center Nonthermal Filament G359.1-0.2, ``The Snake''

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uchida, Keven I.; Morris, Mark; Serabyn, E.; Guesten, Rolf

    1996-05-01

    We report the discovery of an H II region/molecular cloud complex toward the northern extreme of the Galactic center nonthermal filament G359. 1-0.2, also known as the "Snake." The 12CO and 13CO molecular emission, observed with the 10.4 m antenna of the Caltech Submillimeter Observatory, arises from several massive clumps situated near one end of the Snake and surrounding the H II complex. The high velocities (- 180 to - 100 km s-1) and large line widths (25-50 km s-1) of the molecular emission are characteristic of gas within the Galactic center region. Moreover, the systematically arranged velocities of the individual molecular clumps imply that they belong to a common kinematic system. Association between the cloud, the filament, and the H II region is suggested by the data. An anti- correlation between the filament and the molecular emission, where the filament is superposed on the cloud, is attributed to interaction between the two. The H79cc recombination line, observed with the 100 m Effelsberg antenna toward the H II complex, is centered at a velocity (-180 km s-1) similar to that of the surrounding molecular gas. By revealing a candidate energy source for one of the nonthermal Galactic center radio filaments, this study provides support for the hypothesis that these filaments are manifestations of strong vertical field lines (of mG strength) illuminated by the magnetohydrodynamic response to a collision with a magnetized molecular cloud. According to this hypothesis, reconnection of magnetic field lines at an ionized cloud surface is responsible for acceleration of electrons to relativistic velocities along the filament. Ionization of the cloud by a centrally located stellar source provides a copious supply of free electrons. While the requisite elements of this mechanism are in evidence at one end of G359. 1-0.2, the details of the hypothesized interaction have yet to be confirmed.

  19. GlobiPack v. 1.0

    SciTech Connect

    Bartlett, Roscoe

    2010-03-31

    GlobiPack contains a small collection of optimization globalization algorithms. These algorithms are used by optimization and various nonlinear equation solver algorithms.Used as the line-search procedure with Newton and Quasi-Newton optimization and nonlinear equation solver methods. These are standard published 1-D line search algorithms such as are described in the book Nocedal and Wright Numerical Optimization: 2nd edition, 2006. One set of algorithms were copied and refactored from the existing open-source Trilinos package MOOCHO where the linear search code is used to globalize SQP methods. This software is generic to any mathematical optimization problem where smooth derivatives exist. There is no specific connection or mention whatsoever to any specific application, period. You cannot find more general mathematical software.

  20. VISAR2KV1.0Beta

    SciTech Connect

    Trott, Wayne M.; O'hare, John J.

    2001-01-01

    The software provides a rapid and robust method for reducing fringe records obtained using eithe a line-imaging optically recording velocity interferometry system (ORVIS) or stop-motion imaging of the moving fringe field. The reduced records result in spatially resolved velocity profiles of rapidly accelerating objects. Complex, time-dependent fringe motion (corresponding to local velocity variations) can be evaluated and interpreted using this program.

  1. GreenArrow version 1.0

    SciTech Connect

    2006-03-29

    GreenArrow is a visualization program for displaying directed graphs that can use text in place of lines to represent the edges between nodes. This text can be animated to show the link direction, and allow for more text to be displayed then would normally be allowed. The text is also tapered and arced to show direction. The node labels can be wrapped around the node to avoid label crossing as well. The program is interactive, and allows the user to zoom, pan and rotate a graph, as well as manipulate the individual nodes.

  2. CYP2S1: A short review

    SciTech Connect

    Saarikoski, Sirkku T. . E-mail: sirkku.saarikoski@ktl.fi; Rivera, Steven P.; Hankinson, Oliver; Husgafvel-Pursiainen, Kirsti

    2005-09-01

    A new member of the cytochrome P450 superfamily, CYP2S1, has recently been identified in human and mouse. In this paper, we review the data currently available for CYP2S1. The human CYP2S1 gene is located in chromosome 19q13.2 within a cluster including CYP2 family members CYP2A6, CYP2A13, CYP2B6, and CYP2F1. These genes also show the highest homology to the human CYP2S1. The gene has recently been found to harbor genetic polymorphism. CYP2S1 is inducible by dioxin, the induction being mediated by the Aryl Hydrocarbon Receptor (AHR) and Aryl Hydrocarbon Nuclear Translocator (ARNT) in a manner typical for CYP1 family members. In line with this, CYP2S1 has been shown to be inducible by coal tar, an abundant source of PAHs, and it was recently reported to metabolize naphthalene. This points to the involvement of CYP2S1 in the metabolism of toxic and carcinogenic compounds, similar to other dioxin-inducible CYPs. CYP2S1 is expressed in epithelial cells of a wide variety of extrahepatic tissues. The highest expression levels have been observed in the epithelial tissues frequently exposed to xenobiotics, e.g., the respiratory, gastrointestinal, and urinary tracts, and in the skin. The observed ubiquitous tissue distribution, as well as the expression of CYP2S1 throughout embryogenesis suggest that CYP2S1 is likely to metabolize important endogenous substrates; thus far, retinoic acid has been identified. In conclusion, CYP2S1 exhibits many features of interest for human health and thus warrants further investigation.

  3. Babel 1.0 Release Criteria: A Working Document

    SciTech Connect

    Kumfert, G; Dahlgren, T; Epperly, T; Leek, J

    2004-10-19

    In keeping with the Open Source tradition, we want our Babel 1.0 release to indicate a certain level of capability, maturity, and stability. From our first release (version 0.5.0) in July of 2001 to our current (18th) release (version 0.9.6) we have continued to add capabilities in response to customer feedback, our observations in the field, and a consistent vision for interoperability. The key to our maturity is without a doubt the ever-increasing demands of our growing user base... both in terms of sheer size and sophistication with the underlying technology. Stability is a special challenge for any research project. With our 1.0 release, we will branch and maintain a stable Babel 1.0 code line for at least a full year. This means no new features and no backward incompatible changes, only bug fixes. All continuing R&D will be performed on a separate development tree. Currently, Babel has a quarterly release cycle with no guarantee for backward compatibility from one release to the next (though we certainly try to make migration as painless as possible). Now is the time where we can see a good point for a Babel 1.0 release. But, seeing that point is different from being there. This list enumerates and explains the outstanding technical issues to be resolved to minimize volatility and help ensure stability for the 1.0 line. The first draft of this document was circulated internally in June 2003. A revised draft was then presented at the July 2003 CCA meeting. A third revision was made into the current working document form & circulated for general comment on the babel-users mailing list and Babel's homepage. The working document was intended to be an open record tracking progress in subsequent Babel releases. A major revision of the document (including adding new items and promoting/demoting items) was done in October 2004, well after the 0.9.6 release.

  4. Crystal structure of 1/0-2/1-1/0 Cu-Al-Sc approximant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishimasa, Tsutomu; Hirao, Arina; Honma, Takahiro; Mihalkovič, Marek

    2011-07-01

    The new crystal structure of an orthorhombic phase formed at the alloy composition Cu48.1Al36.4Sc15.5 was analyzed by means of the Rietveld method using synchrotron radiation diffraction data. The starting model for this analysis was constructed theoretically using the so-called 'cell constrained melt-quenching technique'. The space group of the final model is Cmmm, and the unit cell includes 49.0 Cu, 39.0 Al and 16.0 Sc atoms. The lattice parameters are a = 8.337(4) Å, b = 22.02(1) Å and c = 8.305(4) Å, which are related to the six-dimensional lattice parameter, a 6D = 6.959 Å, of the corresponding Cu-Al-Sc icosahedral quasicrystal as 1/0, 2/1 and 1/0 approximations, respectively. The characteristics of the structure can be understood as a framework consisting of Sc atoms, which is regarded as a tiling of five local structural units; the largest is an icosahedron similar to that included in the Tsai-type quasicrystal. The second exhibits structural similarity to a Mg2Zn11-type crystal and the third is an octahedron.

  5. Wind-US 1.0 Released by NPARC Alliance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Towne, Charles E.

    2005-01-01

    The NPARC (National Project for Application-oriented Research in CFD) Alliance has released Version 1.0 of Wind-US, the latest in its line of general-purpose, multizone, compressible-flow Navier-Stokes solvers. The NPARC Alliance is a formal partnership between the NASA Glenn Research Center and the Air Force Arnold Engineering Development Center, with additional significant involvement by the Boeing Company s Phantom Works Group, whose mission is to provide an applications-oriented computational fluid dynamics (CFD) system primarily for aerospace flow simulation. The alliance is committed to the long-range maintenance and improvement of this capability, with teams focused on user support, code development, and validation.

  6. Green Bank Telescope Zpectrometer CO(1-0) Observations of the Strongly Lensed Submillimeter Galaxies from the Herschel ATLAS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frayer, D. T.; Harris, A. I.; Baker, A. J.; Ivison, R. J.; Smail, Ian; Negrello, M.; Maddalena, R.; Aretxaga, I.; Baes, M.; Birkinshaw, M.; Bonfield, D. G.; Burgarella, D.; Buttiglione, S.; Cava, A.; Clements, D. L.; Cooray, A.; Dannerbauer, H.; Dariush, A.; De Zotti, G.; Dunlop, J. S.; Dunne, L.; Dye, S.; Eales, S.; Fritz, J.; Gonzalez-Nuevo, J.; Herranz, D.; Hopwood, R.; Hughes, D. H.; Ibar, E.; Jarvis, M. J.; Lagache, G.; Leeuw, L. L.; Lopez-Caniego, M.; Maddox, S.; Michałowski, M. J.; Omont, A.; Pohlen, M.; Rigby, E.; Rodighiero, G.; Scott, D.; Serjeant, S.; Smith, D. J. B.; Swinbank, A. M.; Temi, P.; Thompson, M. A.; Valtchanov, I.; van der Werf, P. P.; Verma, A.

    2011-01-01

    The Herschel Astrophysical Terahertz Large Area Survey (H-ATLAS) has uncovered a population of strongly lensed submillimeter galaxies (SMGs). The Zpectrometer instrument on the Green Bank Telescope (GBT) was used to measure the redshifts and constrain the masses of the cold molecular gas reservoirs for two candidate high-redshift lensed sources. We derive CO(1-0) redshifts of z = 3.042 ± 0.001 and z = 2.625 ± 0.001, and measure molecular gas masses of (1-3) ×1010 M sun, corrected for lens amplification and assuming a conversion factor of α = 0.8 M sun( K km s-1 pc2)-1. We find typical L(IR)/L'(CO) ratios of 120 ± 40 and 140 ± 50 L sun( K km s-1 pc2)-1, which are consistent with those found for local ultraluminous infrared galaxies (ULIRGs) and other high-redshift SMGs. From analysis of published data, we find no evidence for enhanced L(IR)/L'(CO(1-0)) ratios for the SMG population in comparison to local ULIRGs. The GBT results highlight the power of using the CO lines to derive blind redshifts, which is challenging for the SMGs at optical wavelengths given their high obscuration.

  7. Lines

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mires, Peter B.

    2006-01-01

    National Geography Standards for the middle school years generally stress the teaching of latitude and longitude. There are many creative ways to explain the great grid that encircles our planet, but the author has found that students in his college-level geography courses especially enjoy human-interest stories associated with lines of latitude…

  8. Network Centric Operations Conceptual Framework Version 1.0

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2003-11-01

    Network Centric Operations Conceptual Framework Version 1.0 Prepared for: John Garstka Office of Force Transformation Prepared by...COVERED 00-11-2003 to 00-11-2003 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Network Centric Operations Conceptual Framework Version 1.0 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT... Conceptual Framework Version 1.0 Table of Contents 1.0 Introduction and Background

  9. Molecular hydrogen line ratios in four regions of shock-excited gas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burton, M. G.; Brand, P. W. J. L.; Geballe, T. R.; Webster, A. S.

    1989-01-01

    Five emission lines of molecular hydrogen, with wavelengths in the ranges of 2.10-2.25 and 3.80-3.85 microns, have been observed in four objects of different type in which the line emission is believed to be excited by shocks. The relative intensities of the lines 1 - 0 S(1):1 - 0 S(O):2 - 1 S(1) are approximately 10.5:2.5:1.0 in all four objects. The 0 - 0 S(13):1 - 0 O(7) line ratio, however, varies from 1.05 in OMC-1 to about 2.3 in the Herbig-Haro object HH 7. The excitation temperature derived from the S(13) and O(7) lines is higher than that derived from the 1 - 0 and 2 - 1 S(1) lines in all four objects, so the shocked gas in these objects cannot be characterized by a single temperature. The constancy of the (1-0)/(2-1) S(1) line ratio between sources suggests that the post-shock gas is 'thermalized' in each source. The S(13)/O(7) ratio is particularly sensitive to the density and temperature conditions in the gas.

  10. Highly selective and potent agonists of sphingosine-1-phosphate 1 (S1P1) receptor.

    PubMed

    Vachal, Petr; Toth, Leslie M; Hale, Jeffrey J; Yan, Lin; Mills, Sander G; Chrebet, Gary L; Koehane, Carol A; Hajdu, Richard; Milligan, James A; Rosenbach, Mark J; Mandala, Suzanne

    2006-07-15

    Novel series of sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) receptor agonists were developed through a systematic SAR aimed to achieve high selectivity for a single member of the S1P family of receptors, S1P1. The optimized structure represents a highly S1P1-selective and efficacious agonist: S1P1/S1P2, S1P1/S1P3, S1P1/S1P4>10,000-fold, S1P1/S1P5>600-fold, while EC50 (S1P1) <0.2 nM. In vivo experiments are consistent with S1P1 receptor agonism alone being sufficient for achieving desired lymphocyte-lowering effect.

  11. Newly Installed S-1 Truss

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    Launched October 7, 2002 aboard the Space Shuttle Orbiter Atlantis, the STS-112 mission lasted 11 days and performed three sessions of Extra Vehicular Activity (EVA). Its primary mission was to install the Starboard (S1) Integrated Truss Structure and Equipment Translation Aid (CETA) Cart to the International Space Station (ISS). The S1 truss provides structural support for the orbiting research facility's radiator panels, which use ammonia to cool the Station's complex power system. The S1 truss, attached to the S0 (S Zero) truss installed by the previous STS-110 mission, flows 637 pounds of anhydrous ammonia through three heat rejection radiators. The truss is 45-feet long, 15-feet wide, 10-feet tall, and weighs approximately 32,000 pounds. The CETA is the first of two human-powered carts that will ride along the International Space Station's railway providing a mobile work platform for future extravehicular activities by astronauts. This is a view of the newly installed S1 Truss as photographed during the mission's first scheduled EVA. The Station's Canadarm2 is in the foreground. Visible are astronauts Piers J. Sellers (lower left) and David A. Wolf (upper right), both STS-112 mission specialists.

  12. Combination of CN(1-0), HCN(1-0), and HNC(1-0): A possible indicator for a high-mass star formation sequence in the Milky Way

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, X. H.; Zhou, J. J.; Wang, J. Z.; Esimbek, J.; Zhang, J. S.; Wang, N.

    2015-04-01

    Context. CN, HCN, and HNC have been used to discuss the star formation sequence in galaxies, but recent studies of large samples involving these lines did not yet provide convincing results. Aims: We intend to determine whether the global line ratios CN/HCN, CN/HNC, and HCN/HNC can be used to trace the high-mass star formation sequence in the Milky Way. Methods: We performed map observations of CN(1-0), HCN(1-0), and HNC(1-0) toward 38 high-mass star-forming regions, which includes high-mass starless cores (HMSC), high-mass protostars (HMPO), UCHII (ultra-compact HII) and normal HII regions. We identified the molecular clumps associated with them, and removed the clumps that were affected by environment. We averaged all the detected emission from each clump to obtain global line ratios and investigated their variations with the evolutionary stages of high-mass star-forming clumps. Results: The global line ratios of ICN/IHNC and IHCN/IHNC for HMSC clumps (HMSCCs), HMPO clumps (HMPOCs), UCHII region clumps (UCHIICs), and HII region clumps display an increasing trend. We tentatively divide the star-forming regions into two types. Type 1 sources include HMSCCs and HMPOCs that are not associated with external 20 cm continuum emission. Type 2 sources include all UCHIICs and HIICs. Our analysis shows that the ICN/IHNC and IHCN/IHNC line ratios can trace the evolution from type 1 to type 2 well. The same method may be used to study the evolution of external galaxies. Conclusions: ICN/IHNC and IHCN/IHNC appear to be good tracers for the evolution of high-mass star-forming regions in the Milky Way. Appendices are available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.org

  13. Current Development of Anti-Cancer Drug S-1

    PubMed Central

    Giri, Anil; Shakya, Suraj; Shakya, Sujana; Sapkota, Binaya; Pramod, KC

    2016-01-01

    S-1 is a novel oral fluoropyrimidine derivative, widely used for treating gastric, pancreatic, lung, head, neck and breast carcinomas. It is designed to enhance the clinical utility of an oral fluoropyrimidine and is associated with low gastrointestinal toxicity. S-1 consists of three pharmacological agents (at a molar ratio of 1:0.4:1)-Tegafur (FT), a prodrug of 5-Fluorouracil (5-FU), 5-Chloro-2-4-Dihydroxypyridine (CDHP), which inhibits the activity of Dihydropyrimidine Dehydrogenase (DPD) and Oxonic Acid (Oxo), which reduces Gastrointestinal (GI) toxicity of 5-FU. The present article reviews the current development of clinical study of S-1. PMID:28050491

  14. Cloud-cloud collision in the Galactic center 50 km s-1 molecular cloud

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsuboi, Masato; Miyazaki, Atsushi; Uehara, Kenta

    2015-12-01

    We performed a search of star-forming sites influenced by external factors, such as SNRs, H II regions, and cloud-cloud collisions (CCCs), to understand the star-forming activity in the Galactic center region using the NRO Galactic Center Survey in SiO v = 0, J = 2-1, H13CO+J = 1-0, and CS J = 1-0 emission lines obtained with the Nobeyama 45 m telescope. We found a half-shell-like feature (HSF) with a high integrated line intensity ratio of ∫TB(SiO v = 0, J = 2-1)dv/∫TB(H13CO+J = 1-0)dv ˜ 6-8 in the 50 km s-1 molecular cloud; the HSF is a most conspicuous molecular cloud in the region and harbors an active star-forming site where several compact H II regions can be seen. The high ratio in the HSF indicates that the cloud contains huge shocked molecular gas. The HSF can be also seen as a half-shell feature in the position-velocity diagram. A hypothesis explaining the chemical and kinetic properties of the HSF is that the feature originates from a CCC. We analyzed the CS J = 1-0 emission line data obtained with the Nobeyama Millimeter Array to reveal the relation between the HSF and the molecular cloud cores in the cloud. We made a cumulative core mass function (CMF) of the molecular cloud cores within the HSF. The CMF in the CCC region is not truncated at least up to ˜2500 M⊙, although the CMF of the non-CCC region reaches the upper limit of ˜1500 M⊙. Most massive molecular cores with Mgas > 750 M⊙ are located only around the ridge of the HSF and adjoin the compact H II region. These may be a sign of massive star formation induced by CCCs in the Galactic center region.

  15. The role of Triton surfactant in anisotropic etching of {1 1 0} reflective planes on (1 0 0) silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Resnik, Drago; Vrtacnik, Danilo; Aljancic, Uros; Mozek, Matej; Amon, Slavko

    2005-06-01

    Etching characteristics and properties of {1 1 0} silicon crystal planes used as 45° optical mirrors for deflecting optical beams from/to optical fibers were investigated. Fiber aligning grooves and passive mirror-like planes were realized by wet micromachining of (1 0 0) silicon in KOH IPA and TMAH IPA systems. Implementation of Triton-x-100 surfactant as an additive to 25% TMAH in anisotropic etching of {1 1 0} silicon passive mirror planes is reported and discussed. It was found that Triton-x-100 contents in the range of 10 200 ppm to the 25% TMAH water etchant significantly increase the anisotropy mostly by decreasing the {1 1 0} etch rate and retaining the {1 0 0} etch rate. It is also shown that {1 1 0} surface roughness is substantially improved compared to two other etching systems. Furthermore, efficient convex corner underetching reduction is demonstrated. The results of optical characterization of passive mirrors with 632 nm incident light show reduced scattering of reflected optical beam due to improved microroughness for mirrors made by TMAH Triton. For the reflection of the optical beam with 1.33 µm and 1.54 µm wavelengths, sputtered layer of gold is used as reflective coating on silicon mirrors thus increasing the reflected optical beam intensity by an additional 8%.

  16. Optimal Jet Finder (v1.0 C++)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chumakov, S.; Jankowski, E.; Tkachov, F. V.

    2006-10-01

    We describe a C++ implementation of the Optimal Jet Definition for identification of jets in hadronic final states of particle collisions. We explain interface subroutines and provide a usage example. The source code is available from http://www.inr.ac.ru/~ftkachov/projects/jets/. Program summaryTitle of program: Optimal Jet Finder (v1.0 C++) Catalogue identifier: ADSB_v2_0 Program summary URL:http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/ADSB_v2_0 Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen's University of Belfast, N. Ireland Computer: any computer with a standard C++ compiler Tested with:GNU gcc 3.4.2, Linux Fedora Core 3, Intel i686; Forte Developer 7 C++ 5.4, SunOS 5.9, UltraSPARC III+; Microsoft Visual C++ Toolkit 2003 (compiler 13.10.3077, linker 7.10.30777, option /EHsc), Windows XP, Intel i686. Programming language used: C++ Memory required:˜1 MB (or more, depending on the settings) No. of lines in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 3047 No. of bytes in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 17 884 Distribution format: tar.gz Nature of physical problem: Analysis of hadronic final states in high energy particle collision experiments often involves identification of hadronic jets. A large number of hadrons detected in the calorimeter is reduced to a few jets by means of a jet finding algorithm. The jets are used in further analysis which would be difficult or impossible when applied directly to the hadrons. Grigoriev et al. [D.Yu. Grigoriev, E. Jankowski, F.V. Tkachov, Phys. Rev. Lett. 91 (2003) 061801] provide brief introduction to the subject of jet finding algorithms and a general review of the physics of jets can be found in [R. Barlow, Rep. Prog. Phys. 36 (1993) 1067]. Method of solution: The software we provide is an implementation of the so-called Optimal Jet Definition (OJD). The theory of OJD was developed in [F.V. Tkachov, Phys. Rev. Lett. 73 (1994) 2405; Erratum, Phys. Rev. Lett. 74 (1995) 2618; F.V. Tkachov, Int. J. Modern Phys

  17. Data-driven Radiative Hydrodynamic Modeling of the 2014 March 29 X1.0 Solar Flare

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rubio da Costa, Fatima; Kleint, Lucia; Petrosian, Vahé; Liu, Wei; Allred, Joel C.

    2016-08-01

    Spectroscopic observations of solar flares provide critical diagnostics of the physical conditions in the flaring atmosphere. Some key features in observed spectra have not yet been accounted for in existing flare models. Here we report a data-driven simulation of the well-observed X1.0 flare on 2014 March 29 that can reconcile some well-known spectral discrepancies. We analyzed spectra of the flaring region from the Interface Region Imaging Spectrograph (IRIS) in Mg ii h&k, the Interferometric BIdimensional Spectropolarimeter at the Dunn Solar Telescope (DST/IBIS) in Hα 6563 Å and Ca ii 8542 Å, and the Reuven Ramaty High Energy Solar Spectroscope Imager (RHESSI) in hard X-rays. We constructed a multithreaded flare loop model and used the electron flux inferred from RHESSI data as the input to the radiative hydrodynamic code RADYN to simulate the atmospheric response. We then synthesized various chromospheric emission lines and compared them with the IRIS and IBIS observations. In general, the synthetic intensities agree with the observed ones, especially near the northern footpoint of the flare. The simulated Mg ii line profile has narrower wings than the observed one. This discrepancy can be reduced by using a higher microturbulent velocity (27 km s-1) in a narrow chromospheric layer. In addition, we found that an increase of electron density in the upper chromosphere within a narrow height range of ≈800 km below the transition region can turn the simulated Mg ii line core into emission and thus reproduce the single peaked profile, which is a common feature in all IRIS flares.

  18. Enhancement of Spatial Thinking with Virtual Spaces 1.0

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hauptman, Hanoch

    2010-01-01

    Developing a software environment to enhance 3D geometric proficiency demands the consideration of theoretical views of the learning process. Simultaneously, this effort requires taking into account the range of tools that technology offers, as well as their limitations. In this paper, we report on the design of Virtual Spaces 1.0 software, a…

  19. IDC Use Case Model Survey Version 1.0.

    SciTech Connect

    Carr, Dorthe B.; Harris, James M.

    2014-12-01

    This document contains the brief descriptions for the actors and use cases contained in the IDC Use Case Model Survey. REVISIONS Version Date Author/Team Revision Description Authorized by V1.0 12/2014 IDC Re- engineering Project Team Initial delivery M. Harris

  20. Scout 2008 Version 1.0 User Guide

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Scout 2008 version 1.0 software package provides a wide variety of classical and robust statistical methods that are not typically available in other commercial software packages. A major part of Scout deals with classical, robust, and resistant univariate and multivariate ou...

  1. Quick Overview Scout 2008 Version 1.0

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Scout 2008 version 1.0 statistical software package has been updated from past DOS and Windows versions to provide classical and robust univariate and multivariate graphical and statistical methods that are not typically available in commercial or freeware statistical softwar...

  2. Naval Aviation Integrated Logistics: Technical users guide version 1. 0

    SciTech Connect

    DeLozier, R.C.; Holder, D.A.

    1987-06-01

    This document summarizes the operational and analytical functions of version 1.0 of the Naval Aviation Integrated Logistic (NAIL) package. NAIL, a logistics management and analysis system, creates standardized reports and performs several categories of statistical operations in support of NAVAIR logistic analytic functions.

  3. MULTIPLE PROJECTIONS SYSTEM (MPS) - USER'S MANUAL VERSION 1.0

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report is a user's manual for version 1.0 of the Multiple Projections Systems (MPS), a computer system that can perform "what if" scenario analysis and report the final results (i.e., Rate of Further Progress - ROP - inventories) to EPA (i.e., the Aerometric Information Retri...

  4. High Resolution Cavity Ring Down Spectroscopy of the 3^{1}_{0} and 3^{1}_{0} 4^{1}_{0} Bands of the ˜{A}^2E^'' State of NO_3 Radical

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roudjane, Mourad; Codd, Terrance J.; Miller, Terry A.

    2013-06-01

    The NO_3 radical is expected to exhibit a Jahn-Teller (JT) effect in its degenerate ˜{A}^2E^'' electronic state. In the ˜{A} state there are two JT active modes, ν_3 and ν_4 (e^' stretch and in-plane bend respectively). Theoretical work has predicted that the JT effect in the ˜{A} state should be quite strong and approach the static case where the molecule is permanently distorted to a lower symmetry geometry. A more comprehensive understanding of its structure can be achieved using high resolution rotationally resolved absorption spectroscopy of its different vibronic bands. The high resolution absorption spectra of 3^{1}_{0} and 3^{1}_{0} 4^{1}_{0} vibronic bands of the ˜{A} ^2E^'' excited state of NO_3 have been successfully recorded for the first time using our jet cooled cavity ring down apparatus. These parallel bands are vibronically allowed transitions and shows the same contour. An oblate symmetric top model Hamiltonian including both centrifugal distortion and spin rotation terms is used to analyze the spectrum. The rotational analysis of this band, supported by combination differences, demonstrate the existence of doubled lines as were observed for 4^{n}_{0} (n=1,3) bands. E. Hirota, T. Ishiwata, K. Kawaguchi, M. Fujitake, N. Ohashi, and I. Tanaka, J. Chem. Phys., {107}, 2829, 1997. Roudjane, M. et al. 67{^{th}} OSU International Symposium on Molecular Spectroscopy, The Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio, 2011, talk TI-03.

  5. DPA Cross Section Library FermiDPA 1.0

    SciTech Connect

    Pronskikh, V. S.; Mokhov, N. V.

    2013-06-05

    DPA cross section library FermiDPA 1.0 based on the industry standard NRT model calculations is described. The library contains DPA cross sections for neutrons in the energy range 10$^{-5}$ eV 20 (150) MeV. Calculations used neutron-induced reaction cross sections from ENDFB-VII database of evaluated nuclear data. The NJOY99 nuclear data processing system's module HEATR was applied to calculate NRT model radiation damage cross sections. The FermiDPA 1.0 library is a database of 395 text files (for 395 known isotopes) with DPA cross sections. It is code-independent and can be implemented in any transport code.

  6. Visual Sample Plan Version 1.0 User's Guide

    SciTech Connect

    Davidson, James R.; Hassig, Nancy L.; Wilson, John E.; Gilbert, Richard O.

    2001-04-13

    This user's guide describes Visual Sample Plan (VSP) Version 1.0 and provides instructions for using the software. VSP selects the appropriate number and location of environmental samples to ensure that the results of statistical tests performed to provide input to environmental decisions have the required confidence and performance. VSP Version 1.0 provides sample-size equations or algorithms needed by specific statistical tests appropriate for specific environmental sampling objectives. The easy-to-use program is highly visual and graphic. VSP runs on personal computers with Microsoft Windows operating systems (95, 98, Millenium Edition, 2000, and Windows NT). Designed primarily for project managers and users without expertise in statistics, VSP is applicable to any two-dimensional geographical population to be sampled (e.g., surface soil, a defined layer of subsurface soil, building surfaces, water bodies, and other similar applications) for studies of environmental quality.

  7. Gompertz type dechanneling functions for protons in <1 0 0>, <1 1 0> and <1 1 1> Si crystal channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrović, S.; Erić, M.; Kokkoris, M.; Nešković, N.

    2007-03-01

    In this work the energy dependences of the Gompertz type sigmoidal dechanneling function parameters for protons in <1 0 0>, <1 1 0> and <1 1 1> Si crystal channels is investigated theoretically. The proton energy range considered is between 1 and 10 MeV. The original dechanneling functions are generated using a realistic Monte Carlo computer simulation code. We show that the Gompertz type dechanneling function, having two parameters, lc and k, representing the dechanneling range and rate, respectively, approximate accurately the original dechanneling function. It is also shown that the energy dependences of parameters lc and k can be approximated by a linear function and a sum of two exponential functions, respectively. The results obtained can be used for accurate reproduction of experimental proton channeling spectra recorded in the backscattering geometry.

  8. VO2@RER1.0: a novel submaximal cardiopulmonary exercise index.

    PubMed

    Chin, Clifford; Kazmucha, Jeffrey; Kim, Nancy; Suryani, Reny; Olson, Inger

    2010-01-01

    Maximal oxygen consumption (VO2max) is the "gold standard" by which to assess functional capacity; however, it is effort dependent. VO2@RER1.0 is defined when VO2 = VCO2. Between December 22, 1997 and November 9, 2004, 305 pediatric subjects underwent cycle ergometer cardiopulmonary exercise testing, exercised to exhaustion, and reached a peak respiratory exchange ratio > or = 1.10. Group 1 subjects achieved a peak VO2 > or = 80% of predicted VO2max; group 2 subjects achieved a peak VO2 < or = 60% of predicted VO2max; and group 3 subjects achieved a peak VO2 between 61 and 79% of predicted VO2max. Linear regression analysis was performed for VO2@RER1.0 as a function of predicted VO2 for group 1 subjects. A -2 SD regression line and equation was created. VO2@RER1.0 data from groups 2 and 3 were plotted onto the normative graph. Contingency table and relative-risk analysis showed that an abnormal VO2@RER1.0 predicted an abnormal peak VO2(positive-predictive value 83%, negative-predictive value 85%, sensitivity 84%, and specificity 84%). VO2@RER1.0 is a highly sensitive, specific, and predictive submaximal index of functional capacity. This submaximal index is easy to identify without subjectivity. This index may aid in the evaluation of subjects who cannot exercise to maximal parameters.

  9. SSEL1.0. Sandia Scalable Encryption Software

    SciTech Connect

    Tarman, T.D.

    1996-08-29

    Sandia Scalable Encryption Library (SSEL) Version 1.0 is a library of functions that implement Sandia`s scalable encryption algorithm. This algorithm is used to encrypt Asynchronous Transfer Mode (ATM) data traffic, and is capable of operating on an arbitrary number of bits at a time (which permits scaling via parallel implementations), while being interoperable with differently scaled versions of this algorithm. The routines in this library implement 8 bit and 32 bit versions of a non-linear mixer which is compatible with Sandia`s hardware-based ATM encryptor.

  10. Over 1.0 mm-long boron nitride nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Hua; Chen, Ying; Liu, Yun; Fu, Lan; Huang, Cheng; Llewellyn, David

    2008-09-01

    Over 1.0 mm boron nitride nanotubes (BNNTs) were successfully synthesized by an optimized ball milling and annealing method. The annealing temperature of 1100 °C is crucial for the growth of the long BNNTs because at this temperature there is a fast nitrogen dissolution rate in Fe and the B/N ratio in Fe is 1. Such long BNNTs enable a reliable single tube configuration for electrical property characterization and consequently the average resistivity of the long BNNTs is determined to be 7.1 ± 0.9 × 10 4 Ω cm. Therefore, these BNNTs are promising insulators for three dimensional microelectromechanical system.

  11. AAgAtlas 1.0: a human autoantigen database

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Dan; Yang, Liuhui; Zhang, Ping; LaBaer, Joshua; Hermjakob, Henning; Li, Dong; Yu, Xiaobo

    2017-01-01

    Autoantibodies refer to antibodies that target self-antigens, which can play pivotal roles in maintaining homeostasis, distinguishing normal from tumor tissue and trigger autoimmune diseases. In the last three decades, tremendous efforts have been devoted to elucidate the generation, evolution and functions of autoantibodies, as well as their target autoantigens. However, reports of these countless previously identified autoantigens are randomly dispersed in the literature. Here, we constructed an AAgAtlas database 1.0 using text-mining and manual curation. We extracted 45 830 autoantigen-related abstracts and 94 313 sentences from PubMed using the keywords of either ‘autoantigen’ or ‘autoantibody’ or their lexical variants, which were further refined to 25 520 abstracts, 43 253 sentences and 3984 candidates by our bio-entity recognizer based on the Protein Ontology. Finally, we identified 1126 genes as human autoantigens and 1071 related human diseases, with which we constructed a human autoantigen database (AAgAtlas database 1.0). The database provides a user-friendly interface to conveniently browse, retrieve and download human autoantigens as well as their associated diseases. The database is freely accessible at http://biokb.ncpsb.org/aagatlas/. We believe this database will be a valuable resource to track and understand human autoantigens as well as to investigate their functions in basic and translational research. PMID:27924021

  12. Characterization of AGIPD1.0: The full scale chip

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mezza, D.; Allahgholi, A.; Arino-Estrada, G.; Bianco, L.; Delfs, A.; Dinapoli, R.; Goettlicher, P.; Graafsma, H.; Greiffenberg, D.; Hirsemann, H.; Jack, S.; Klanner, R.; Klyuev, A.; Krueger, H.; Marras, A.; Mozzanica, A.; Poehlsen, J.; Schmitt, B.; Schwandt, J.; Sheviakov, I.; Shi, X.; Trunk, U.; Xia, Q.; Zhang, J.; Zimmer, M.

    2016-12-01

    The AGIPD (adaptive gain integrating pixel detector) detector is a high frame rate (4.5 MHz) and high dynamic range (up to 104 ·12.4 keV photons) detector with single photon resolution (down to 4 keV taking 5σ as limit and lowest noise settings) developed for the European XFEL (XFEL.EU). This work is focused on the characterization of AGIPD1.0, which is the first full scale version of the chip. The chip is 64×64 pixels and each pixel has a size of 200×200 μm2. Each pixel can store up to 352 images at a rate of 4.5 MHz (corresponding to 220 ns). A detailed characterization of the AGIPD1.0 chip has been performed in order to assess the main performance of the ASIC in terms of gain, noise, speed and dynamic range. From the measurements presented in this paper a good uniformity of the gain, a noise around 320 e- (rms) in standard mode and around 240 e- (rms) in high gain mode has been measured. Furthermore a detailed discussion about the non-linear behavior after the gain switching is presented with both experimental results and simulations.

  13. CHEETAH 1.0 user`s manual

    SciTech Connect

    Fried, L.E.

    1994-06-24

    CHEETAH is an effort to bring the TIGER thermochemical code into the 1990s. A wide variety of improvements have been made in Version 1.0, and a host of others will be implemented in the future. In CHEETAH 1.0 I have improved the robustness and ease of use of TIGER. All of TIGER`s solvers have been replaced by new algorithms. I find that CHEETAH solves a wider variety of problems with no user intervention (e.g. no guesses for the C-J state) than TIGER did. CHEETAH has been made simpler to use than TIGER; typical use of the code occurs with the new standard run command. I hope that CHEETAH makes the use of thermochemical codes more attractive to practical explosive formulators. In the future I plan to improve the underlying science in CHEETAH. More accurate equations of state will be used in the gas and the condensed phase. A kinetics capability will be added to the code that will predict reaction zone thickness. CHEETAH is currently a numerical implementation of C-J theory. It will,become an implementation of ZND theory. Further ease of use features will eventually be added; an automatic formulator that adjusts concentrations to match desired properties is planned.

  14. Velocity profiles of high-excitation molecular hydrogen lines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moorhouse, A.; Brand, P. W. J. L.; Geballe, T. R.; Burton, M. G.

    1990-01-01

    Profiles of three lines of molecular hydrogen near 2.2 microns, originating from widely spaced energy levels, have been measured at a resolution of 32 km/s at Peak 1 in the Orion molecular outflow. The three lines, 1 - 0 S(1), 2 - 1 S(1), and 3 - 2 S(3), are found to have identical profiles. This result rules out any significant contribution to the population of the higher energy levels of molecular hydrogen at Peak 1 by fluorescence, and is generally consistent with emission from multiple J-type shocks.

  15. NIMS Radiance Point Spectra of Gaspra V1.0

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Granahan, J. C.

    2014-10-01

    This data volume contains radiometrically corrected point spectra of asteroid 951 as acquired by the Galileo spacecraft Near Infrared Mapping Spectrometer (NIMS) on October 29, 1991. They record the spectra collected as the Galileo spacecraft approached the target asteroid. These data are products of the calibration of the raw data number files gap015tn.qub, gap035tn.qub, gap036tn.qub, gap037tn.qub, and gap038tn.qub (DATA SET ID ='GO-A-NIMS-3 TUBE-V1.0') with calibration factors acquired during the first Earth/Moon encounter of the Galileo mission. These raw data .qub files are archived in the Imaging Node of the NASA Planetary Data System (PDS). The calibrated spectra consist of radiance measurements for wavelengths between 0.7 - 5.2 micrometers.

  16. Verification and validation of RADMODL Version 1.0

    SciTech Connect

    Kimball, K.D.

    1993-03-01

    RADMODL is a system of linked computer codes designed to calculate the radiation environment following an accident in which nuclear materials are released. The RADMODL code and the corresponding Verification and Validation (V&V) calculations (Appendix A), were developed for Westinghouse Savannah River Company (WSRC) by EGS Corporation (EGS). Each module of RADMODL is an independent code and was verified separately. The full system was validated by comparing the output of the various modules with the corresponding output of a previously verified version of the modules. The results of the verification and validation tests show that RADMODL correctly calculates the transport of radionuclides and radiation doses. As a result of this verification and validation effort, RADMODL Version 1.0 is certified for use in calculating the radiation environment following an accident.

  17. Land-Use Portfolio Modeler, Version 1.0

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Taketa, Richard; Hong, Makiko

    2010-01-01

    -on-investment. The portfolio model, now known as the Land-Use Portfolio Model (LUPM), provided the framework for the development of the Land-Use Portfolio Modeler, Version 1.0 software (LUPM v1.0). The software provides a geographic information system (GIS)-based modeling tool for evaluating alternative risk-reduction mitigation strategies for specific natural-hazard events. The modeler uses information about a specific natural-hazard event and the features exposed to that event within the targeted study region to derive a measure of a given mitigation strategy`s effectiveness. Harnessing the spatial capabilities of a GIS enables the tool to provide a rich, interactive mapping environment in which users can create, analyze, visualize, and compare different

  18. S1P control of endothelial integrity.

    PubMed

    Xiong, Yuquan; Hla, Timothy

    2014-01-01

    Sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P), a lipid mediator produced by sphingolipid metabolism, promotes endothelial cell spreading, vascular maturation/stabilization, and barrier function. S1P is present at high concentrations in the circulatory system, whereas in tissues its levels are low. This so-called vascular S1P gradient is essential for S1P to regulate much physiological and pathophysiological progress such as the modulation of vascular permeability. Cellular sources of S1P in blood has only recently begun to be identified. In this review, we summarize the current understanding of S1P in regulating vascular integrity. In particular, we discuss the recent discovery of the endothelium-protective functions of HDL-bound S1P which is chaperoned by apolipoprotein M.

  19. iGeoT v1.0

    SciTech Connect

    Spycher, Nicolas; Finsterle, Stefan

    2016-11-01

    iGeoT v1.0 automates into a stand-alone computer program the multicomponent chemical geothermometry code GeoT v2.1 and the numerical optimization engine of iTOUGH2. iGeoT allows for optimizations of GeoT runs using multiple water chemical analyses. The underlying geothermometry method is that previously developed by Reed and Spycher (1984) using the computed saturation indices of multiple minerals. GeoT automatically reconstitutes deep fluid compositions and estimates reservoir temperature from statistical evaluation of computed mineral saturation indices. The output include estimated temperatures following various statistical methods and their range of uncertainty. The computer program also outputs temperatures predicted using classical geothermometers. Input parameters include water composition and, optionally, gas composition, fraction of gas discharge, dilution/evaporation factor (in case of boiling or mixing with dilute waters), and end-member water composition (in case of mixing with other non-dilute waters). The dilution/evaporation factor, fraction of gas discharge, and concentration of various aqueous and gas species can be automatically estimated by numerical optimization. This program was designed for geothermal applications.

  20. Computerized Risk and Bioaccumulation System (Version 1. 0)

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, H.; Winsor, M.; Pelletier, J.; Randall, R.; Bertling, J.

    1991-11-01

    The Computerized Risk And Bioaccumulation System (CRABS, Version 1.0) is an expert system that predicts tissue residues of fifteen neutral organic pollutants in sediment-dwelling organisms and the human cancer risk from consumption of the contaminated shellfish. Bioaccumulation from bedded sediment can be predicted from the thermodynamic partitioning, first-order kinetic, or toxicokinetic model. All the models can predict steady-state tissue residues while the two kinetic models can predict non-steady-state uptake or elimination. CRABS then predicts the lifetime human cancer risk from consumption of clams and other non-mobile sediment-dwelling organisms containing the predicted (or measured) tissue residue. The linearized multistage model is used to predict cancer risk for a single pollutant from a single species diet. The program guides the user in estimating shellfish consumption rates if no site-specific rates are available. CRABS is designed to promote thorough documentation of the assumptions and data as well as to error check the entered values.

  1. EOS7C-ECBM Version 1.0

    SciTech Connect

    2012-11-14

    EOS7C is an equation of state module for the TOUGH2 program for CO2 or N2 in Methane (CH4) Reservoirs. In the present work, additions have been made to the EOS7C Version 1.0 module to include the Enhanced Coal Bed Methane (ECBM) modifications developed by Webb (2003). In addition, the Dusty Gas Model for gas-phase diffusion (Webb 2001) has been included. The ECBM modification to the EOS7C equation of state incorporate the extended Langmuir isothem for sorbing gases, including the change in porosity associated with the sorbed gas mass. Comparison to hand calculations for pure gas and binary mixture shows very good agreement. Application to a CO2 well injection problem by Law et al. (2002). The Dusty Model modification add options to calculate gas diffusion using the Dusty-Gas Model including separate and coupled approaches. Comparison to low-permeability pure gas diffusion data shows excellent agreement. The results from the DGM are compared to the Fick's Law behavior for diffusion across a capillary fringe. The differences between the models are small due to the relatively high permeability (10-11 m2) of the problem.

  2. NAS Parallel Benchmark Results 11-96. 1.0

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bailey, David H.; Bailey, David; Chancellor, Marisa K. (Technical Monitor)

    1997-01-01

    The NAS Parallel Benchmarks have been developed at NASA Ames Research Center to study the performance of parallel supercomputers. The eight benchmark problems are specified in a "pencil and paper" fashion. In other words, the complete details of the problem to be solved are given in a technical document, and except for a few restrictions, benchmarkers are free to select the language constructs and implementation techniques best suited for a particular system. These results represent the best results that have been reported to us by the vendors for the specific 3 systems listed. In this report, we present new NPB (Version 1.0) performance results for the following systems: DEC Alpha Server 8400 5/440, Fujitsu VPP Series (VX, VPP300, and VPP700), HP/Convex Exemplar SPP2000, IBM RS/6000 SP P2SC node (120 MHz), NEC SX-4/32, SGI/CRAY T3E, SGI Origin200, and SGI Origin2000. We also report High Performance Fortran (HPF) based NPB results for IBM SP2 Wide Nodes, HP/Convex Exemplar SPP2000, and SGI/CRAY T3D. These results have been submitted by Applied Parallel Research (APR) and Portland Group Inc. (PGI). We also present sustained performance per dollar for Class B LU, SP and BT benchmarks.

  3. The RAND 36-Item Health Survey 1.0.

    PubMed

    Hays, R D; Sherbourne, C D; Mazel, R M

    1993-10-01

    Recently, Ware and Sherbourne published a new short-form health survey, the MOS 36-Item Short-Form Health Survey (SF-36), consisting of 36 items included in long-form measures developed for the Medical Outcomes Study. The SF-36 taps eight health concepts: physical functioning, bodily pain, role limitations due to physical health problems, role limitations due to personal or emotional problems, general mental health, social functioning, energy/fatigue, and general health perceptions. It also includes a single item that provides an indication of perceived change in health. The SF-36 items and scoring rules are distributed by MOS Trust, Inc. Strict adherence to item wording and scoring recommendations is required in order to use the SF-36 trademark. The RAND 36-Item Health Survey 1.0 (distributed by RAND) includes the same items as those in the SF-36, but the recommended scoring algorithm is somewhat different from that of the SF-36. Scoring differences are discussed here and new T-scores are presented for the 8 multi-item scales and two factor analytically-derived physical and mental health composite scores.

  4. SLR-PLUS version 1.0 user's manual

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hill, J. M.

    1982-11-01

    Version 1.0 of Solar Load Ratio heating plus cooling (SLR-PLUS), developed as an advanced passive solar system design and evaluation tool, is discussed. SLR-PLUS maintains the friendly user interface structure developed for the active solar system FCHART program. Users familiar with the FCHART programs and the FCHART/SLR program will find the operation of the SLR-PLUS program very familiar SLR-PLUS differs significantly from its parent program in three major ways. First, SLR-PLUS is strictly for the evaluation of passive solar energy systems. Second, the latest correlations from the Los Alamos National Laboratory serve as the basis to the passive heating analysis used by SLR-PLUS. Finally, SLR-PLUS includes cooling loads imposed by passive systems in the form of an annual cooling load for the building modelled and for the individual passive systems. The present version was developed on an Hewlett-Packard 1000 minicomputer using an RTE-IVB operating system. The present version requires approximately 22K 16-bit words of core with overlays to run. The FORTRAN source code will compile with minor changes on any FORTRAN 77 compiler.

  5. User's Manual for FEMOM3DR. Version 1.0

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reddy, C. J.

    1998-01-01

    FEMoM3DR is a computer code written in FORTRAN 77 to compute radiation characteristics of antennas on 3D body using combined Finite Element Method (FEM)/Method of Moments (MoM) technique. The code is written to handle different feeding structures like coaxial line, rectangular waveguide, and circular waveguide. This code uses the tetrahedral elements, with vector edge basis functions for FEM and triangular elements with roof-top basis functions for MoM. By virtue of FEM, this code can handle any arbitrary shaped three dimensional bodies with inhomogeneous lossy materials; and due to MoM the computational domain can be terminated in any arbitrary shape. The User's Manual is written to make the user acquainted with the operation of the code. The user is assumed to be familiar with the FORTRAN 77 language and the operating environment of the computers on which the code is intended to run.

  6. Describing Simple Data Access Services Version 1.0

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plante, Raymond; Delago, Jesus; Harrison, Paul; Tody, Doug; IVOA Registry Working Group; Plante, Raymond

    2013-11-01

    An application that queries or consumes descriptions of VO resources must be able to recognize a resource's support for standard IVOA protocols. This specification describes how to describe a service that supports any of the four fundamental data access protocols Simple Cone Search (SCS), Simple Image Access (SIA), Simple Spectral Access (SSA), Simple Line Access (SLA) using the VOResource XML encoding standard. A key part of this specification is the set of VOResource XML extension schemas that define new metadata that are specific to those protocols. This document describes in particular rules for describing such services within the context of IVOA Registries and data discovery as well as the VO Standard Interface (VOSI) and service selfdescription. In particular, this document spells out the essential markup needed to identify support for a standard protocol and the base URL required to access the interface that supports that protocol.

  7. Sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P)/S1P receptor 1 signaling regulates receptor activator of NF-{kappa}B ligand (RANKL) expression in rheumatoid arthritis

    SciTech Connect

    Takeshita, Harunori; Kitano, Masayasu; Iwasaki, Tsuyoshi; Kitano, Sachie; Tsunemi, Sachi; Sato, Chieri; Sekiguchi, Masahiro; Azuma, Naoto; Miyazawa, Keiji; Hla, Timothy; Sano, Hajime

    2012-03-09

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer MH7A cells and CD4{sup +} T cells expressed S1P1 and RANKL. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer S1P increased RANKL expression in MH7A cells and CD4{sup +} T cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The effect of S1P in MH7A cells was inhibited by specific Gi/Go inhibitors. -- Abstract: Sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P)/S1P receptor 1 (S1P1) signaling plays an important role in synovial cell proliferation and inflammatory gene expression by rheumatoid arthritis (RA) synoviocytes. The purpose of this study is to clarify the role of S1P/S1P1 signaling in the expression of receptor activator of NF-{kappa}B ligand (RANKL) in RA synoviocytes and CD4{sup +} T cells. We demonstrated MH7A cells, a human RA synovial cell line, and CD4{sup +} T cells expressed S1P1 and RANKL. Surprisingly, S1P increased RANKL expression in MH7A cells and CD4{sup +} T cells in a dose-dependent manner. Moreover, S1P enhanced RANKL expression induced by stimulation with TNF-{alpha} in MH7A cells and CD4{sup +} T cells. These effects of S1P in MH7A cells were inhibited by pretreatment with PTX, a specific Gi/Go inhibitor. These findings suggest that S1P/S1P1 signaling may play an important role in RANKL expression by MH7A cells and CD4{sup +} T cells. S1P/S1P1 signaling of RA synoviocytes is closely connected with synovial hyperplasia, inflammation, and RANKL-induced osteoclastogenesis in RA. Thus, regulation of S1P/S1P1 signaling may become a novel therapeutic target for RA.

  8. Reaction of methyl formate with VC(1 0 0) and TiC(1 0 0) surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frantz, Peter; Kim, Hyun I.; Didziulis, Stephen V.; Li, Shuang; Chen, Zhiying; Perry, Scott S.

    2005-12-01

    The chemistry of the (1 0 0) surface of the tribologically important materials vanadium carbide (VC) and titanium carbide (TiC) with methyl formate (CH 3OCHO) has been studied with X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), high resolution electron energy loss spectroscopy (HREELS), and temperature programmed desorption (TPD). The molecule reacts with each surface at temperatures below 150 K, although the extent of reaction is greater on the TiC surface. XPS and HREELS results indicate that the first step in this chemistry is the cleavage of the CH 3O-CHO bond, generating surface methoxy groups (CH 3O-) and either carbon monoxide on VC or a formyl (CHO) group on TiC. The methoxy group reacts further on both surfaces via pathways expected based on previous methanol adsorption studies, primarily decomposing through a formyl intermediate on VC to generate formaldehyde and evolving methanol on TiC. The formyl group formed directly from methyl formate on TiC enables the production and evolution of formaldehyde, and also appears to break down further to the elements. These results indicate a propensity for these carbides to react with esters, leading potentially to the beneficial formation of friction lowering surface films or the deleterious degradation of ester-based lubricants.

  9. What sort of standard candle is Orion for studying molecular hydrogen line emission in galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burton, Michael; Puxley, Phil J.

    1990-01-01

    The total shocked and fluorescent molecular hydrogen 1-0 S(1) line luminosities from Orion have been measured to be about 2.5 solar luminosity and about 2.0 solar luminosity, respectively. The implications for using Orion to study the interstellar medium in galaxies is discussed.

  10. Sandia Compact Sensor Node (SCSN) v. 1.0

    SciTech Connect

    HARRINGTON, JOHN

    2009-01-07

    The SCSN communication protocol is implemented in software and incorporates elements of Frequency Division Multiple Access (FDMA), Time Division Multiple Access (TDMA), and Carrier Sense Multiple Access (CSMA) to reduce radio message collisions, latency, and power consumption. Alarm messages are expeditiously routed to a central node as a 'star' network with minimum overhead. Other messages can be routed along network links between any two nodes so that peer-to-peer communication is possible. Broadcast messages can be composed that flood the entire network or just specific portions with minimal radio traffic and latency. Two-way communication with sensor nodes, which sleep most of the time to conserve battery life, can occur at seven second intervals. SCSN software also incorporates special algorithms to minimize superfluous radio traffic that can result from excessive intrusion alarm messages. A built-in seismic detector is implemented with a geophone and software that distinguishes between pedestrian and vehicular targets. Other external sensors can be attached to a SCSN using supervised interface lines that are controlled by software. All software is written in the ANSI C language for ease of development, maintenance, and portability.

  11. Safety assessment for the S-1 Spheromak

    SciTech Connect

    Ellis, R. Jr.; Stencel, J.R.

    1984-02-01

    The S-1 machine is part of the Magnetic Fusion Program. The goal of the Magnetic Fusion Program is to develop and demonstrate the practical application of fusion. S-1 is an experimental device which will provide an essential link in the research effort aiming at the realization of fusion power.

  12. Phase II multi-institutional prospective randomised trial comparing S-1+paclitaxel with S-1+cisplatin in patients with unresectable and/or recurrent advanced gastric cancer

    PubMed Central

    Mochiki, E; Ogata, K; Ohno, T; Toyomasu, Y; Haga, N; Fukai, Y; Aihara, R; Ando, H; Uchida, N; Asao, T; Kuwano, H

    2012-01-01

    Background: A combination of S-1 and cisplatin has been shown to be effective with acceptable safety for the first-line treatment of far-advanced gastric cancer in Japan. This is the first randomised phase II trial to compare S-1+paclitaxel with S-1+cisplatin in this setting. Methods: Patients with unresectable and/or recurrent advanced gastric cancer were randomly assigned to receive one of the two regimens: S-1 (40 mg m−2 twice daily) on days 1–14 plus paclitaxel (60 mg m−2) on days 1, 8, and 15 of a 4-week cycle (S-1+paclitaxel) or S-1 (40 mg m−2 twice daily) on days 1–21 plus cisplatin (60 mg m−2) on day 8 of a 5-week cycle (S-1+cisplatin). The primary end point was the response rate (RR). Secondary end points included progression-free survival (PFS), overall survival (OS), and safety. Results: A total of 83 patients were eligible for safety and efficacy analyses. In the S-1+paclitaxel and S-1+cisplatin groups, RRs (52.3% vs 48.7% P=0.74) and median PFS (9 vs 6 months; P=0.50) were similar. The median OS was similar in the S-1+paclitaxel and S-1+cisplatin groups (16 vs 17 months; P=0.84). The incidence of grade 3 or higher haematological toxicity was 19.0% with S-1+paclitaxel and 19.5% with S-1+cisplatin. The incidence of grade 3 or higher non-haematological toxicity was 14.2% with S-1+paclitaxel and 17.1% with S-1+cisplatin. Conclusion: S-1+paclitaxel was suggested to be a feasible and effective non-platinum-based regimen for chemotherapy in patients with advanced gastric cancer. Our results should be confirmed in multicenter, phase III-controlled clinical trials. PMID:22617130

  13. Investigation of the 1-0 pressure-induced vibrational absorption spectrum of hydrogen at temperatures below ambient

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goorvitch, D.; Silvaggio, P. M.; Boese, R. W.

    1981-01-01

    A theoretical fit has been made to laboratory measurements of the 1-0 collisionally induced H2 absorption band over a temperature range of 100-273 K and for densities up to 22 amagats. Both the Birnbaum-Cohen and the MacTaggert-Hunt line shape profiles were used. In addition, an intermolecular potential of either a Lennard-Jones 6-12 or a Morse-spline-van der Waals has been used for each line shape. The best fit resulted in a chi-square of 5%. Line widths have also been derived as a function of temperature. The lifetimes of the states were calculated.

  14. The Global S$_1$ Ocean Tide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ray, Richard D.; Egbert, G. D.

    2003-01-01

    The small S$_1$ ocean tide is caused primarily by diurnal atmospheric pressure loading. Its excitation is therefore unlike any other diurnal tide. The global character of $S-1$ is here determined by numerical modeling and by analysis of Topex/Poseidon satellite altimeter data. The two approaches yield reasonably consistent results, and large ( $ greater than $l\\cm) amplitudes in several regions are further confirmed by comparison with coastal tide gauges. Notwithstanding their excitation differences, S$-1$ and other diurnal tides are found to share several common features, such as relatively large amplitudes in the Arabian Sea, the Sea of Okhotsk, and the Gulf of Alaska. The most noticeable difference is the lack of an S$-1$ Antarctic Kelvin wave. These similarities and differences can be explained in terms of the coherences between near-diurnal oceanic normal modes and the underlying tidal forcings. While gravitational diurnal tidal forces excite primarily a 28-hour Antarctic-Pacific mode, the S$_1$ air tide excites several other near-diurnal modes, none of which has large amplitudes near Antarctica.

  15. MsSpec-1.0: A multiple scattering package for electron spectroscopies in material science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sébilleau, Didier; Natoli, Calogero; Gavaza, George M.; Zhao, Haifeng; Da Pieve, Fabiana; Hatada, Keisuke

    2011-12-01

    We present a multiple scattering package to calculate the cross-section of various spectroscopies namely photoelectron diffraction (PED), Auger electron diffraction (AED), X-ray absorption (XAS), low-energy electron diffraction (LEED) and Auger photoelectron coincidence spectroscopy (APECS). This package is composed of three main codes, computing respectively the cluster, the potential and the cross-section. In the latter case, in order to cover a range of energies as wide as possible, three different algorithms are provided to perform the multiple scattering calculation: full matrix inversion, series expansion or correlation expansion of the multiple scattering matrix. Numerous other small Fortran codes or bash/csh shell scripts are also provided to perform specific tasks. The cross-section code is built by the user from a library of subroutines using a makefile. Program summaryProgram title: MsSpec-1.0 Catalogue identifier: AEJT_v1_0 Program summary URL:http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/AEJT_v1_0.html Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen's University, Belfast, N. Ireland Licensing provisions: Standard CPC licence, http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/licence/licence.html No. of lines in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 504 438 No. of bytes in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 14 448 180 Distribution format: tar.gz Programming language: Fortran 77 Computer: Any Operating system: Linux, MacOs RAM: Bytes Classification: 7.2 External routines: Lapack ( http://www.netlib.org/lapack/) Nature of problem: Calculation of the cross-section of various spectroscopies. Solution method: Multiple scattering. Running time: The test runs provided only take a few seconds to run.

  16. Sphingosine-1-phosphate promotes extravillous trophoblast cell invasion by activating MEK/ERK/MMP-2 signaling pathways via S1P/S1PR1 axis activation.

    PubMed

    Yang, Weiwei; Li, Qinghua; Pan, Zhifang

    2014-01-01

    Successful placentation depends on the proper invasion of extravillous trophoblast (EVT) cells into maternal tissues. Previous reports demonstrated that S1P receptors are expressed in the EVT cells and S1P could regulate migration and function of trophoblast cells via S1P receptors. However, little is known about roles of S1P in the invasion of EVT cells. Our study was performed to investigate S1P effect on the invasion of EVT cells. We used the extravillous trophoblast cell line HTR8/SVneo cells to evaluate the effect. In vitro invasion assay was employed to determine the invasion of HTR8/SVneo cells induced by S1P. MMP-2 enzyme activity and relative level in the supernatants of HTR8/SVneo was assessed by gelatin zymography and western blot. Based on the above, siRNA and specific inhibitors were used for the intervention and study of potential signal pathways, and Real-time qPCR and western blot were used to test the mRNA and protein level of potential signal targets. We found that S1P could promote HTR8/SVneo cell invasion and upregulates activity and level of MMP-2. The promotion requires activation of MEK-ERK and is dependent on the axis of S1P/S1PR1. Our investigation of S1P may provide new insights into the molecular mechanisms of EVT invasion.

  17. CO EMISSION IN OPTICALLY OBSCURED (TYPE-2) QUASARS AT REDSHIFTS z Almost-Equal-To 0.1-0.4

    SciTech Connect

    Krips, M.; Neri, R.; Cox, P. E-mail: neri@iram.fr

    2012-07-10

    We present a search for CO emission in a sample of 10 type-2 quasar host galaxies with redshifts of z Almost-Equal-To 0.1-0.4. We detect CO(J = 1-0) line emission with {>=}5{sigma} in the velocity integrated intensity maps of five sources. A sixth source shows a tentative detection at the {approx}4.5{sigma} level of its CO(J = 1-0) line emission. The CO emission of all six sources is spatially coincident with the position at optical, infrared, or radio wavelengths. The spectroscopic redshifts derived from the CO(J = 1-0) line are very close to the photometric ones for all five detections except for the tentative detection for which we find a much larger discrepancy. We derive gas masses of {approx}(2-16) Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 9} M{sub Sun} for the CO emission in the six detected sources, while we constrain the gas masses to upper limits of M{sub gas} {<=} 8 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 9} M{sub Sun} for the four non-detections. These values are of the order or slightly lower than those derived for type-1 quasars. The line profiles of the CO(J = 1-0) emission are rather narrow ({approx}<300 km s{sup -1}) and single peaked, unveiling no typical signatures for current or recent merger activity, and are comparable to that of type-1 quasars. However, at least one of the observed sources shows a tidal-tail-like emission in the optical that is indicative of an ongoing or past merging event. We also address the problem of detecting spurious {approx}5{sigma} emission peaks within the field of view.

  18. Discovery of an Energetic Pulsar Associated with SNR G76.9+1.0

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arzoumanian, Zaven; Gotthelf, E. V.; Ransom, S. M.; Safi-Harb, S.; Kothes, R.; Landecker, T. L.

    2012-01-01

    We report the discovery of PSR J2022-<-3842, a 24 ms radio and X-ray pulsar in the supernova remnant G76.9+i.0, in observations with the Chandra X-ray telescope, the Robert C. Byrd Green Bank Radio Telescope, and the Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer (RXTE). The pulsar's spin-down rate implies a rotation-powered luminosity E = 1.2 X 10(exp 38) erg/s, a surface dipole magnetic field strength B(sub S), = 1.0 X 10(exp 12) G, and a characteristic age of 8.9 kyr. PSR J2022+3842 is thus the second-most energetic Galactic pulsar known, after the Crab, as well as the most rapidly-rotating young, radio-bright pulsar known. The radio pulsations are highly dispersed and broadened by interstellar scattering, and we find that a large (delta f/f approximates 1.9 x 10(exp -6)) spin glitch must have occurred between our discovery and confirmation observations. The X-ray pulses are narrow (0.06 cycles FWHM) and visible up to 20 keV, consistent with magnetospheric emission from a rotation-powered pulsar. The Chandra X-ray image identifies the pulsar with a hard, unresolved source at the midpoint of the double-lobed radio morphology of G76.9+ 1.0 and embedded within faint, compact X-ray nebulosity. The spatial relationship of the X-ray and radio emissions is remarkably similar to extended structure seen around the Vela pulsar. The combined Chandra and RXTE pulsar spectrum is well-fitted by an absorbed power-law model with column density N(sub H) = (1.7 +/- 0.3) x 10(exp 22) / sq cm and photon index Gamma = 1.0 +/- 0.2; it implies that the Chandra point-source flux is virtually 100% pulsed. For a distance of 10 kpc, the X-ray luminosity of PSR J2022+3842 is L(sub x){2-1O keV) = 7.0 x 10(exp 33) erg/s. Despite being extraordinarily energetic, PSR J2022+3842 lacks a bright X-ray wind nebula and has an unusually low conversion efficiency of spin-down power to X-ray luminosity, Lx/E = 5.9 X 10(exp-5).

  19. Defective transient endogenous spleen colony formation in S1/S1d mice.

    PubMed

    Wiktor-Jedrzejczak, W; Ahmed, A; Sharkis, S J; McKee, A; Sell, K W

    1979-04-01

    WCB6F1 mice of the genotype S1/S1d did not form transient 5-day endogenous spleen colonies following midlethal irradiation, either spontaneously or in response to postirradiation bleeding. Their hematologically normal (+/+) littermates produced colonies equivalent in number and morphologic type to a normal strain (D2B6F1), as evaluated by both macroscopic and microscopic criteria. Bone marrow cells from S1/S1d mice, when transplanted into lethally irradiated +/+ mice, were able to generate equivalent numbers of transient endogenous spleen colonies (TE-CFUs), as compared to that obtained when syngeneic +/+ marrow cells were injected into lethally irradiated +/+ recipients. A defective growth of an early class of hematopoietic progenitor cells, resulting in the clinical course of the S1/S1d anemia is suggested and confirms previous reports on the microenvironmental nature of this abnormality.

  20. REARRANGEMENT OF CARBONIUM IONS AND FREE RADICALS IN THE BICYCLO(3.1.0)HEXYL SYSTEM.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    toluenesulfonylhydrozon es of bicyclo(3.1.0)hexanone and 2-bicyclo(3.1.0)hexanone. Free radical addition of methanethiol to bicyclo(3.1.0)hexene-2...oxalyl chloride, generate exclusively 2- and 3-bicyclo(3.1.0)hexyl radical intermediates, which behave in a completely analogous fashion to the thiomethoxy radicals generated in methanethiol addition. (Author)

  1. 28 MHz swept source at 1.0 μm for ultrafast quantitative phase imaging

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Xiaoming; Lau, Andy K. S.; Xu, Yiqing; Tsia, Kevin K.; Wong, Kenneth K. Y.

    2015-01-01

    Emerging high-throughput optical imaging modalities, in particular those providing phase information, necessitate a demanding speed regime (e.g. megahertz sweep rate) for those conventional swept sources; while an effective solution is yet to be demonstrated. We demonstrate a stable breathing laser as inertia-free swept source (BLISS) operating at a wavelength sweep rate of 28 MHz, particularly for the ultrafast interferometric imaging modality at 1.0 μm. Leveraging a tunable dispersion compensation element inside the laser cavity, the wavelength sweep range of BLISS can be tuned from ~10 nm to ~63 nm. It exhibits a good intensity stability, which is quantified by the ratio of standard deviation to the mean of the pulse intensity, i.e. 1.6%. Its excellent wavelength repeatability, <0.05% per sweep, enables the single-shot imaging at an ultrafast line-scan rate without averaging. To showcase its potential applications, it is applied to the ultrafast (28-MHz line-scan rate) interferometric time-stretch (iTS) microscope to provide quantitative morphological information on a biological specimen at a lateral resolution of 1.2 μm. This fiber-based inertia-free swept source is demonstrated to be robust and broadband, and can be applied to other established imaging modalities, such as optical coherence tomography (OCT), of which an axial resolution better than 12 μm can be achieved. PMID:26504636

  2. Oncogenic S1P signalling in EBV-associated nasopharyngeal carcinoma activates AKT and promotes cell migration through S1P receptor 3.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hui Min; Lo, Kwok-Wai; Wei, Wenbin; Tsao, Sai Wah; Chung, Grace Tin Yun; Ibrahim, Maha Hafez; Dawson, Christopher W; Murray, Paul G; Paterson, Ian C; Yap, Lee Fah

    2017-02-27

    Undifferentiated nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) is a cancer with high metastatic potential that is consistently associated with Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) infection. In this study, we have investigated the functional contribution of sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) signalling to the pathogenesis of NPC. We show that EBV infection or ectopic expression of the EBV-encoded latent genes (EBNA1, LMP1 and LMP2A) can up-regulate sphingosine kinase 1 (SPHK1), the key enzyme that produces S1P, in NPC cell lines. Exogenous addition of S1P promotes the migration of NPC cells through the activation of AKT; shRNA knockdown of SPHK1 resulted in a reduction in the levels of activated AKT and inhibition of cell migration. We also show that S1P receptor 3 (S1PR3) mRNA is over-expressed in EBV-positive NPC patient-derived xenografts and a subset of primary NPC tissues, and that knockdown of S1PR3 suppressed the activation of AKT and the S1P-induced migration of NPC cells. Taken together, our data point to a central role for EBV in mediating the oncogenic effects of S1P in NPC and identify S1P signalling as a potential therapeutic target in this disease.

  3. Observations and Light Curve Solutions of the Eclipsing Binaries USNO-B1.0 1395-0370184 and USNO-B1.0 1395-0370731

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kjurkchieva, D.; Popov, V. A.; Vasileva, D.; Petrov, N.

    2016-12-01

    We present follow-up photometric observations in Sloan filters g', i' of the newly discovered eclipsing stars USNO-B1.0 1395-0370184 and USNO-B1.0 1395-0370731. Our data revealed that their orbital periods are considerably bigger than the previous values. This result changed the classification of USNO-B1.0 1395-0370184 from ultrashort-period binary (P=0.197 d) to short-period system (P=0.251 d). The light curve solutions of our observations revealed that USNO-B1.0 1395-0370184 and USNO-B1.0 1395-0370731 are overcontact binaries in which components are K dwarfs, close in masses and radii. The light curve distortions were reproduced by cool spots with angular radius of around 20°.

  4. High dispersion spectroscopy of Venus at 1.0 μm using WINERED at Koyama Astronomical Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sagawa, Hideo; Hamano, Satoshi; Kawakita, Hideyo; Ikeda, Yuji; Otsubo, Shogo; Lee, Yeon Joo

    2016-10-01

    We obtained high dispersion near-infrared (NIR) spectra from the sunlit dayside hemisphere of Venus using a NIR high resolution spectrograph, WINERED, attached to the 1.3-m Araki telescope at Koyama Astronomical Observatory. The observation was carried out on 3 October 2015, and the cross-dispersed spectra cover the wavelength range of 0.9 - 1.1 μm with sperctral resolution of λ/Δλ ~50,000. Absorption lines of Venusian 12CO2 from the triad of (ν1, ν2, ν3) = (2,0,3), (1,2,3), and (0,4,3) bands are observed at 1.038, 1.051, and 1.065 μm, respectively. In addition, the hot band lines of (1,3,1) - (0,1,0) are also clearly seen in the measured spectra.Assuming the equivalent width of a CO2 line varies with respect to some power of the line intensity, we can derive the rotational temperature from the curve of growth. The derived rotational temperature from the 1.051 μm band is ~246 K, which agrees with early ground-based studies reported in 1970's. We present the detailed analysis of these high dispersion CO2 lines with the use of a radiative transfer model developed for the Venusian atmosphere.

  5. S1P differentially regulates migration of human ovarian cancer and human ovarian surface epithelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Dongmei; Zhao, Zhenwen; Caperell-Grant, Andrea; Yang, Gong; Mok, Samuel C.; Liu, Jinsong; Bigsby, Robert M.; Xu, Yan

    2009-01-01

    Epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC) arises from the epithelial layer covering the surface of ovaries and intra-peritoneal metastasis is commonly observed at diagnosis. Sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P), a bioactive lipid signaling molecule, is potentially involved in EOC tumorigenesis. We have found that S1P is elevated in human EOC ascites. We show that physiologically relevant concentrations of S1P stimulate migration and invasion of EOC cells, but inhibit migration of human ovarian surface epithelial (HOSE) cells. In addition, S1P inhibits lysophosphatidic acid (LPA)-induced cell migration in HOSE, but not in EOC cells. We have provided the first line of evidence that the expression levels of S1P receptor subtypes are not the only determinants for how cells respond to S1P. Even though S1P1 is expressed and functional in HOSE cells, the inhibitory effect mediated by S1P2 is dominant in those cells. The cellular pre-existing stress fibers are also important determinants for the migratory response to S1P. Differential S1P-induced morphology changes are noted in EOC and HOSE cells. Pre-existing stress fibers in HOSE cells are further enhanced by S1P treatment, resulting in the negative migratory response to S1P. By contrast, EOC cells lost stress fibers and S1P treatment induces filopodium-like structures at cell edges, which correlates with increased cell motility. In addition, inhibition of the protein kinase C pathway is likely to be involved in the inhibitory effect of S1P on LPA-induced cell migration in HOSE cells. These findings are important for the development of new therapeutics targeting S1P and LPA in EOC. PMID:18645009

  6. Origins of Scatter in the Relationship between HCN 1-0 and Dense Gas Mass in the Galactic Center

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mills, Elisabeth A. C.; Battersby, Cara

    2017-01-01

    We investigate the correlation of HCN 1-0 with gas mass in the central 300 pc of the Galaxy. We find that on the ∼10 pc size scale of individual cloud cores, HCN 1-0 is well correlated with dense gas mass when plotted as a log–log relationship. There is ∼0.75 dex of scatter in this relationship from clouds like Sgr B2, which has an integrated HCN 1-0 intensity of a cloud less than half its mass, and others that have HCN 1-0 enhanced by a factor of 2–3 relative to clouds of comparable mass. We identify the two primary sources of scatter to be self-absorption and variations in HCN abundance. We also find that the extended HCN 1-0 emission is more intense per unit mass than in individual cloud cores. In fact the majority (80%) of HCN 1-0 emission comes from extended gas with column densities below 7 × 1022 cm‑2, accounting for 68% of the total mass. We find variations in the brightness of HCN 1-0 would only yield a ∼10% error in the dense gas mass inferred from this line in the Galactic center. However, the observed order of magnitude HCN abundance variations, and the systematic nature of these variations, warn of potential biases in the use of HCN as dense gas mass tracer in more extreme environments such as an active galactic nucleus and shock-dominated regions. We also investigate other 3 mm tracers, finding that HNCO is better correlated with mass than HCN, and might be a better tracer of cloud mass in this environment.

  7. Evaluation of the change in sphingolipids in the human multiple myeloma cell line U266 and gastric cancer cell line MGC-803 treated with arsenic trioxide.

    PubMed

    Zou, Jianhua; Ma, Xiaoqiong; Zhang, Guangji; Shen, Li; Zhou, Liting; Yu, Yu; Zhu, Fanfan; Chen, Zhe

    2015-11-01

    Arsenic trioxide (As2O3) has been found to display anticancer activity against many types of tumors and has been developed into an anticancer drug in clinical treatments. Sphingolipids are membrane lipids that participate in many signal transduction pathways. In this paper, the changes in sphingolipids of the human multiple myeloma cell line U266 and the gastric cancer cell line MGC-803 treated with arsenic trioxide were investigated using an HPLC-ESI-MS/MS method. Analytes were separated by an XBridge BEH C8 column used for Cer, HexCer, LacCer and SM chromatographic separation, and a Capcell PAK MG II C18 column was used for Sph, dhSph, S1P and dhS1P chromatographic separation and gradient elution with acetonitrile-water containing 0.1% formic acid as a mobile phase. A tandem mass spectrometer QTrap in SRM mode was employed in combination with RPLC as a detector for quantitative analysis. The ceramide/sphingolipid internal standard (IS) mixture was used to quantify the levels of sphingolipids. The distributions of sphingolipids were found to be different in the human multiple myeloma cell line U266 and the gastric cancer cell line MGC-803. Ceramide (Cer), hexosylceramide (HexCer) and dihexosylceramide (Hex2Cer) levels in U266 cell line are higher than those in MGC-803 cell line. Additionally, sphingomyelin (SM), sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) and sphinganine-1-phosphate (dhS1P) levels in the MGC-803 cell line are higher than those in the U266 cell line. When treated with arsenic trioxide (1-5μM iAs(III)(As(III) ions)), the levels of Hex2Cer in the human multiple myeloma cell line U266 decreased, and the levels of S1P and dhS1P in the human gastric cancer cell line MGC-803 decreased. The decrease of Hex2Cer, S1P and dhS1P in the human multiple myeloma cell line U266 and gastric cancer cell line MGC-803 were observed when the concentration of iAs(III) is 1.0μM. Therefore, arsenic trioxide exhibits anti-cancer activity by altering the sphingolipid pathway in the

  8. Infrared reflection absorption spectroscopic studies on the adsorption structures of dimethyl sulfide and methyl ethyl sulfide on Ag(1 1 0) and Cu(1 1 0)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kasahara, T.; Shinohara, H.; Oshima, Y.; Kadokura, K.; Uriu, Y.; Ohe, C.; Itoh, K.

    2004-06-01

    Infrared reflection absorption (IRA) spectra were measured for dimethyl sulfide (CH 3SCH 3, DMS) and methyl ethyl sulfide (CH 3SCH 2CH 3, MES) with increasing exposure to metal substrates, Ag(1 1 0) and Cu(1 1 0), at 80 K. The spectral simulations performed by using the DFT calculation at the B3LYP/6-311++G** level indicated that (i) DMS adsorbs on the substrates with the CSC plane appreciably tilted from the surface normal, the tilt angle being about 80° for the adsorbate on Ag(1 1 0) and about 60° for the adsorbate on Cu(1 1 0), (ii) MES on Ag(1 1 0) at a submonolayer coverage state takes on the trans form with the molecular plane tilted from the surface normal by about 60°, and (iii) MES on Cu(1 1 0) takes the gauche form with the CSC plane almost perpendicular to the surface. The tilting of DMS is contrasted to dimethyl ether (DME) adsorbs on Ag(1 1 0) and Cu(1 1 0), where the molecular plane is perpendicular to the substrate surfaces [J. Phys. Chem. B 106 (2002) 3469]. The adsorption structures of DMS and DME are mainly determined by the coordination of the sulfur and oxygen atoms, the sulfur atom tending to coordinate to the Ag and Cu atoms through one of the 3p lone pairs (atop coordination) and the oxygen atom to the metal atoms through both of the 2p lone pairs (bridging coordination). It has been known that methyl ethyl ether (MEE) on Ag(1 1 0) takes on the trans form with the molecular plane tilted by about 45° and MEE on Cu(1 1 0) the gauche form with the COC plane almost perpendicular to the surface [J. Phys. Chem. B 107 (2003) 5008]. These results suggest that an attractive van der Waals interaction between the ethyl group of the adsorbates and the substrate surfaces play an important role in addition to the coordination of the sulfur and oxygen atoms in determining the rotational isomerism and orientation of MES and MEE on Ag(1 1 0) and Cu(1 1 0).

  9. Restless legs syndrome mimicking S1 radiculopathy.

    PubMed

    Zambelis, Th; Wolgamuth, B R; Papoutsi, S N; Economou, N T

    2016-01-01

    Α case of a chronic idiopathic form of a severe type of Restless Legs Syndrome (RLS), which developed during pregnancy and persisted after this, misdiagnosed for 34 years as radiculopathy S1, is reported. In spite of the thorough clinical and laboratory investigation, in addition to constant changes of the therapeutic approach, the diagnosis of S1 radiculopathy could not be confirmed, resulting in a chronic clinical course; the latter was characterized by relapses and remissions not attributed or linked in any way to the treatment (various types of). In fact, it was due to a routine workup in a sleep clinic, where the patient was referred because of a coincident chronic insomnia (Restless Legs Syndrome is a known and important cause of insomnia/chronic insomnia), which resulted in a proper diagnosis and treatment of this case. With the use of Restless Legs Syndrome appropriate treatment (Pramipexole 0.18 mg taken at bedtime, a dopaminergic agent and Level A recommended drug for Restless Legs Syndrome) an excellent response and immediate elimination of symptoms was achieved. Restless Legs Syndrome may present with a variety of symptoms (with the most prominent shortly being reported with the acronym URGE: Urge to move the legs usually associated with unpleasant leg sensations, Rest induces symptoms, Getting active brings relief, Evening and night deteriorate symptoms); given the fact that Restless Legs Syndrome presents with a great variety and heterogeneity of symptoms (mostly pain, dysesthesia and paresthesia), which may occur in several other diseases (the so called "RLS mimics"), proper diagnosis of Restless Legs Syndrome usually fails. Restless Legs Syndrome misinterpreted as S1 radiculopathy, to the best of our knowledge, has not been reported yet in the literature. Here, case history, clinical course and common RLS mimics are presented. Different forms of Restless Legs Syndrome manifestations, which are commonly -as in this case- misinterpreted due to their

  10. Adsorption of water on TiN (1 0 0), (1 1 0) and (1 1 1) surfaces: A first-principles study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanyal, Suchismita; Waghmare, Umesh V.; Ruud, James A.

    2011-05-01

    We use first-principles density functional theory-based calculations in the analysis of the interaction of H 2O with (1 0 0), (1 1 0) and (1 1 1) surfaces of TiN, and develop understanding in terms of surface energies, polarity of the surface and chemistry of the cation, through comparison with H 2O adsorption on ZrN. While water molecule physisorbs preferentially at Ti site of (1 0 0) and (1 1 1) surfaces, it adsorbs dissociatively on (1 1 0) surface of TiN with binding stronger than almost 1.32 eV/molecule. Our analysis reveals the following general trends: (a) surfaces with higher energies typically lead to stronger adsorption, (b) dissociative adsorption of H 2O necessarily occurs on a charge neutral high energy surface and (c) lower symmetry of the (1 1 0) plane results in many configurations of comparable stability, as opposed to the higher symmetry (1 0 0) and (1 1 1) surfaces, which also consistently explain the results of H 2O adsorption on MgO available in literature. Finally, weaker adsorption of H 2O on TiN than on ZrN can be rationalized in terms of greater chemical stability of Ti arising from its ability to be in mixed valence.

  11. [Interpretation of the updates of NCCN 2017 version 1.0 guideline for colorectal cancer].

    PubMed

    Chen, Gong

    2017-01-25

    The NCCN has recently released its 2017 version 1.0 guideline for colorectal cancer. There are several updates from this new version guideline which are believed to change the current clinical practice. Update one, low-dose aspirin is recommended for patients with colorectal cancer after colectomy for secondary chemoprevention. Update two, biological agents are removed from the neoadjuvant treatment regimen for resectable metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC). This update is based on lack of evidence to support benefits of biological agents including bevacizumab and cetuximab in the neoadjuvant setting. Both technical criteria and prognostic information should be considered for decision-making. Currently biological agents may not be excluded from the neoadjuvant setting for patients with resectable but poor prognostic disease. Update three, panitumumab and cetuximab combination therapy is only recommended for left-sided tumors in the first line therapy. The location of the primary tumor can be both prognostic and predictive in response to EGFR inhibitors in metastatic colorectal cancer. Cetuximab and panitumumab confer little benefit to patients with metastatic colorectal cancer in the primary tumor originated on the right side. On the other hand, EGFR inhibitors provide significant benefit compared with bevacizumab-containing therapy or chemotherapy alone for patients with left primary tumor. Update four, PD-1 immune checkpoint inhibitors including pembrolizumab or nivolumab are recommended as treatment options in patients with metastatic deficient mismatch repair (dMMR) colorectal cancer in second- or third-line therapy. dMMR tumors contain thousands of mutations, which can encode mutant proteins with the potential to be recognized and targeted by the immune system. It has therefore been hypothesized that dMMR tumors may be sensitive to PD-1 inhibitors.

  12. 30 CFR 57.22236 - Actions at 1.0 percent methane (VI mines).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Actions at 1.0 percent methane (VI mines). 57... MINES Safety Standards for Methane in Metal and Nonmetal Mines Ventilation § 57.22236 Actions at 1.0 percent methane (VI mines). If methane reaches 1.0 percent in the mine atmosphere, all persons other...

  13. 30 CFR 57.22236 - Actions at 1.0 percent methane (VI mines).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Actions at 1.0 percent methane (VI mines). 57... MINES Safety Standards for Methane in Metal and Nonmetal Mines Ventilation § 57.22236 Actions at 1.0 percent methane (VI mines). If methane reaches 1.0 percent in the mine atmosphere, all persons other...

  14. Sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) displays sustained S1P1 receptor agonism and signaling through S1P lyase-dependent receptor recycling.

    PubMed

    Gatfield, John; Monnier, Lucile; Studer, Rolf; Bolli, Martin H; Steiner, Beat; Nayler, Oliver

    2014-07-01

    The sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) type 1 receptor (S1P1R) is a novel therapeutic target in lymphocyte-mediated autoimmune diseases. S1P1 receptor desensitization caused by synthetic S1P1 receptor agonists prevents T-lymphocyte egress from secondary lymphoid organs into the circulation. The selective S1P1 receptor agonist ponesimod, which is in development for the treatment of autoimmune diseases, efficiently reduces peripheral lymphocyte counts and displays efficacy in animal models of autoimmune disease. Using ponesimod and the natural ligand S1P, we investigated the molecular mechanisms leading to different signaling, desensitization and trafficking behavior of S1P1 receptors. In recombinant S1P1 receptor-expressing cells, ponesimod and S1P triggered Gαi protein-mediated signaling and β-arrestin recruitment with comparable potency and efficiency, but only ponesimod efficiently induced intracellular receptor accumulation. In human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC), ponesimod and S1P triggered translocation of the endogenous S1P1 receptor to the Golgi compartment. However, only ponesimod treatment caused efficient surface receptor depletion, receptor accumulation in the Golgi and degradation. Impedance measurements in HUVEC showed that ponesimod induced only short-lived Gαi protein-mediated signaling followed by resistance to further stimulation, whereas S1P induced sustained Gαi protein-mediated signaling without desensitization. Inhibition of S1P lyase activity in HUVEC rendered S1P an efficient S1P1 receptor internalizing compound and abrogated S1P-mediated sustained signaling. This suggests that S1P lyase - by facilitating S1P1 receptor recycling - is essential for S1P-mediated sustained signaling, and that synthetic agonists are functional antagonists because they are not S1P lyase substrates.

  15. The functional roles of S1P in immunity.

    PubMed

    Hisano, Yu; Nishi, Tsuyoshi; Kawahara, Atsuo

    2012-10-01

    The lipid mediator sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) is generated within cells from sphingosine by two sphingosine kinases (SPHK1 and SPHK2). Intracellularly synthesized S1P is released into the extracellular fluid by S1P transporters, including SPNS2. Released S1P binds specifically to the G protein-coupled S1P receptors (S1PR1/S1P(1)-S1PR5/S1P(5)), which activate a diverse range of downstream signalling pathways. Recent studies have proposed that one of the central physiological functions of intercellular S1P signalling is in lymphocyte trafficking in vivo because genetic disruption of SPHK1/2, SPNS2 or S1PR1/S1P(1) in mice induces a lymphopenia phenotype. In this review, we discuss the current understanding of intercellular S1P signalling in the context of immunity.

  16. 12CO(1-0) observation of isolated late-type galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sauty, S.; Casoli, F.; Boselli, A.; Gerin, M.; Lequeux, J.; Braine, J.; Gavazzi, G.; Dickey, J.; Kazès, I.; Fouqué, P.

    2003-12-01

    We present 12CO(J=1-0) line observations of 99 galaxies obtained with the SEST 15 m, the Kitt Peak 12 m and the IRAM 30 m telescopes. The target galaxies were selected from the catalogue of isolated galaxies of Karachentseva (\\cite{Karachentseva73}). These data are thus representative of the CO properties of isolated late-type galaxies. All objects were observed in their central position, those with large angular sizes were mapped. These new measurements are used to estimate the molecular gas mass of the target galaxies. The molecular gas is on average ~ 18% of the atomic gas mass. Tables 1 and 2 are also available in electronic form at the CDS via anonymous ftp to cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsweb.u-strasbg.fr/cgi-bin/qcat?J/A+A/411/381 Based on observations made with the 12-m National Radio Astronomical Observatory, Kitt Peak, Arizona, with the Swedish-ESO Submillimetre telescope SEST, La Silla, Chile, with the IRAM 30 m radiotelescope, Pico Veleta, Granada, Spain.

  17. Hyperfine structure in the J = 1-0 transitions of DCO^+, DNC, and HN13C: astronomical observations and quantum-chemical calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van der Tak, F. F. S.; Müller, H. S. P.; Harding, M. E.; Gauss, J.

    2009-11-01

    Context: Knowledge of the hyperfine structure of molecular lines is useful for estimating reliable column densities from observed emission, and essential for the derivation of kinematic information from line profiles. Aims: Deuterium bearing molecules are especially useful in this regard, because they are good probes of the physical and chemical structure of molecular cloud cores on the verge of star formation. However, the necessary spectroscopic data are often missing, especially for molecules which are too unstable for laboratory study. Methods: We have observed the ground-state (J = 1{-}0) rotational transitions of DCO^+, HN13C and DNC with the IRAM 30 m telescope toward the dark cloud LDN 1512 which has exceptionally narrow lines permitting hyperfine splitting to be resolved in part. The measured splittings of 50-300 kHz are used to derive nuclear quadrupole and spin-rotation parameters for these species. The measurements are supplemented by high-level quantum-chemical calculations using coupled-cluster techniques and large atomic-orbital basis sets. Results: We find eQq = + 151.12 (400) kHz and CI = -1.12 (43) kHz for DCO^+, eQq = 272.5 (51) kHz for HN13C, and eQq(D) =265.9 (83) kHz and eQq(N) = 288.2 (71) kHz for DNC. The numbers for DNC are consistent with previous laboratory data, while our constants for DCO+ are somewhat smaller than previous results based on astronomical data. For both DCO+ and DNC, our results are more accurate than previous determinations. Our results are in good agreement with the corresponding best theoretical estimates, which amount to eQq = 156.0 kHz and CI = -0.69 kHz for DCO^+, eQq = 279.5 kHz for HN13C, and eQq(D) = 257.6 kHz and eQq(N) = 309.6 kHz for DNC. We also derive updated rotational constants for HN13C: B = 43 545.6000 (47) MHz and D = 93.7 (20) kHz. Conclusions: The hyperfine splittings of the DCO^+, DNC and HN13C J = 1{-}0 lines range over 0.47-1.28 km s-1, which is comparable to typical line widths in pre

  18. BADGER v1.0: A Fortran equation of state library

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heltemes, T. A.; Moses, G. A.

    2012-12-01

    The BADGER equation of state library was developed to enable inertial confinement fusion plasma codes to more accurately model plasmas in the high-density, low-temperature regime. The code had the capability to calculate 1- and 2-T plasmas using the Thomas-Fermi model and an individual electron accounting model. Ion equation of state data can be calculated using an ideal gas model or via a quotidian equation of state with scaled binding energies. Electron equation of state data can be calculated via the ideal gas model or with an adaptation of the screened hydrogenic model with ℓ-splitting. The ionization and equation of state calculations can be done in local thermodynamic equilibrium or in a non-LTE mode using a variant of the Busquet equivalent temperature method. The code was written as a stand-alone Fortran library for ease of implementation by external codes. EOS results for aluminum are presented that show good agreement with the SESAME library and ionization calculations show good agreement with the FLYCHK code. Program summaryProgram title: BADGERLIB v1.0 Catalogue identifier: AEND_v1_0 Program summary URL:http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/AEND_v1_0.html Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen's University, Belfast, N. Ireland Licensing provisions: Standard CPC licence, http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/licence/licence.html No. of lines in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 41 480 No. of bytes in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 2 904 451 Distribution format: tar.gz Programming language: Fortran 90. Computer: 32- or 64-bit PC, or Mac. Operating system: Windows, Linux, MacOS X. RAM: 249.496 kB plus 195.630 kB per isotope record in memory Classification: 19.1, 19.7. Nature of problem: Equation of State (EOS) calculations are necessary for the accurate simulation of high energy density plasmas. Historically, most EOS codes used in these simulations have relied on an ideal gas model. This model is inadequate for low

  19. Combined gemcitabine and S-1 chemotherapy for treating unresectable hilar cholangiocarcinoma: a randomized open-label clinical trial

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Zun-Qiang; Guan, Jiao; Tong, Da-Nian; Zhou, Guang-Wen

    2016-01-01

    Although the combination of cisplatin and gemcitabine (GEM) is considered the standard first-line chemotherapy against unresectable hilar cholangiocarcinoma (HC), its efficacy is discouraging. The present randomized open-label clinical trial aimed to evaluate the efficacy and safety of the GEM plus S-1 (GEM-S-1) combination against unresectable HC. Twenty-five patients per group were randomly assigned to receive GEM, S-1 or GEM-S-1. Neutropenia (56%) and leukopenia (40%) were the most common chemotherapy-related toxicities in the GEM-S-1 group. Median overall survival (OS) in the GEM-S-1, GEM and S-1 groups was 11, 10 and 6 months, respectively. GEM plus S-1 significantly improved OS compared to S-1 monotherapy (OR=0.68; 95%CI, 0.50–0.90; P=0.008). Median progression-free survival (PFS) times in the GEM-S-1, GEM and S-1 groups were 4.90, 3.70 and 1.60 months, respectively. GEM plus S-1 significantly improved PFS compared to S-1 monotherapy (OR=0.50; 95%CI, 0.27–0.91; P=0.024). Response rates were 36%, 24% and 8% in the GEM-S-1, GEM and S-1 groups, respectively. A statistically significant difference was found in response rates between the gemcitabine-S-1 and S-1 groups (36% vs 8%, P=0.017). Patients with CA19-9<466 U/ml were more responsive to chemotherapeutic agents than those with CA19-9≥571 U/ml (88.9% vs 0%, P<0.001). We conclude that the combination of GEM plus S-1 provides a better OS, PFS and response rate than S-1 monotherapy, but it did not significantly differ from GEM monotherapy. (ChiCTR-TRC-14004733). PMID:27058753

  20. EUV resolution enhancement techniques (RETs) for k1 0.4 and below

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsu, Stephen; Howell, Rafael; Jia, Jianjun; Liu, Hua-Yu; Gronlund, Keith; Hansen, Steve; Zimmermann, Jörg

    2015-03-01

    Due to the exponential growth of mobile wireless devices, low-power logic chips continue to drive device scaling. To enable sub-10 nm device scaling at an affordable cost, there is a strong need for single exposure advanced lithography. Extreme ultraviolet lithography (EUVL) is one of the most promising candidates to support the design rules for sub-10 nm. The aggressive mobile device design rules continue to push the critical dimension (CD) and pitch and put very stringent demands on the lithography performance such as pattern placement control, image contrast, critical dimension uniformity (CDU), and line width roughness (LWR). In this paper we report the latest advances in resolution enhancement techniques to address low k1 challenges in EUV lithography, specifically: minimizing the pattern placement error, enhancing the through-focus contrast, and reducing the impact of stochastic effects. We have developed an innovative source-mask optimization (SMO) method to significantly reduce edge placement errors (EPE) [1] [2]. Aggressive design rules using the state-of-the-art NA of 0.33 of the NXE:3300B and its successor tools can have imaging below k1 = 0.4, which can extend the current process capabilities for single exposure high volume manufacturing (HVM). Burkhardt et al. reported in a previous study that inserting a sub-resolution assist feature (SRAF) within semi-isolated features introduces strong Bossung tilts and best focus shifts, and a general solution for random pitches is not apparent [3]. Kang observed the same issues and proposed to introduce spherical aberrations to correct these effects while having a global impact on the full-chip [4]. In this work we introduce a new methodology to apply SRAFs to improve contrast, reduce best focus shift, and improve process window. Finally, the lower number of photons of EUV and the small feature size brings serious issue of the stochastic effect that causes the line-edge-roughness (LER) and local CD uniformity

  1. Moreton and EUV Waves Associated with an X1.0 Flare and CME Ejection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Francile, Carlos; López, Fernando M.; Cremades, Hebe; Mandrini, Cristina H.; Luoni, María Luisa; Long, David M.

    2016-11-01

    A Moreton wave was detected in active region (AR) 12017 on 29 March 2014 with very high cadence with the H-Alpha Solar Telescope for Argentina (HASTA) in association with an X1.0 flare (SOL2014-03-29T17:48). Several other phenomena took place in connection with this event, such as low-coronal waves and a coronal mass ejection (CME). We analyze the association between the Moreton wave and the EUV signatures observed with the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly onboard the Solar Dynamics Observatory. These include their low-coronal surface-imprint, and the signatures of the full wave and shock dome propagating outward in the corona. We also study their relation to the white-light CME. We perform a kinematic analysis by tracking the wavefronts in several directions. This analysis reveals a high-directional dependence of accelerations and speeds determined from data at various wavelengths. We speculate that a region of open magnetic field lines northward of our defined radiant point sets favorable conditions for the propagation of a coronal magnetohydrodynamic shock in this direction. The hypothesis that the Moreton wavefront is produced by a coronal shock-wave that pushes the chromosphere downward is supported by the high compression ratio in that region. Furthermore, we propose a 3D geometrical model to explain the observed wavefronts as the chromospheric and low-coronal traces of an expanding and outward-traveling bubble intersecting the Sun. The results of the model are in agreement with the coronal shock-wave being generated by a 3D piston that expands at the speed of the associated rising filament. The piston is attributed to the fast ejection of the filament-CME ensemble, which is also consistent with the good match between the speed profiles of the low-coronal and white-light shock waves.

  2. Acceleration phenomena of high-speed wind observed at 0.1-0.3 AU with interplanetary scintillation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kojima, M.; Misawa, H.; Watanabe, H.; Yamauchi, Y.

    1995-01-01

    The radial distance dependence of solar wind speeds, which were measured by interplanetary scintillation method, has been studied especially for a high-speed solar wind, and large increase of the IPS speeds (300 km/s) was observed at the distance range of 0.1 - 0.3 AU. When the streams are mapped back onto the source surface, they distribute in polar coronal holes or their boundaries. Since the IPS measurement can be biased by several effects such as of line-of-sight integration, strong scattering and random velocities, we examined these biasing effects and have found difficulty to explain the large IPS speed increase with the biasing effects.

  3. Roles of sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) receptors in malignant behavior of glioma cells. Differential effects of S1P{sub 2} on cell migration and invasiveness

    SciTech Connect

    Young, Nicholas; Van Brocklyn, James R. . E-mail: james.vanbrocklyn@osumc.edu

    2007-05-01

    Sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) is a bioactive lipid that signals through a family of five G-protein-coupled receptors, termed S1P{sub 1-5}. S1P stimulates growth and invasiveness of glioma cells, and high expression levels of the enzyme that forms S1P, sphingosine kinase-1, correlate with short survival of glioma patients. In this study we examined the mechanism of S1P stimulation of glioma cell proliferation and invasion by either overexpressing or knocking down, by RNA interference, S1P receptor expression in glioma cell lines. S1P{sub 1}, S1P{sub 2} and S1P{sub 3} all contribute positively to S1P-stimulated glioma cell proliferation, with S1P{sub 1} being the major contributor. Stimulation of glioma cell proliferation by these receptors correlated with activation of ERK MAP kinase. S1P{sub 5} blocks glioma cell proliferation, and inhibits ERK activation. S1P{sub 1} and S1P{sub 3} enhance glioma cell migration and invasion. S1P{sub 2} inhibits migration through Rho activation, Rho kinase signaling and stress fiber formation, but unexpectedly, enhances glioma cell invasiveness by stimulating cell adhesion. S1P{sub 2} also potently enhances expression of the matricellular protein CCN1/Cyr61, which has been implicated in tumor cell adhesion, and invasion as well as tumor angiogenesis. A neutralizing antibody to CCN1 blocked S1P{sub 2}-stimulated glioma invasion. Thus, while S1P{sub 2} decreases glioma cell motility, it may enhance invasion through induction of proteins that modulate glioma cell interaction with the extracellular matrix.

  4. Galaxy Zoo: Are Bars Responsible for the Feeding of Active Galactic Nuclei at 0.2 < z < 1.0?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheung, Edmond; Trump, Jonathan; Athanassoula, Lia; Bamford, Steven; Bell, Eric F.; Bosma, Albert; Cardamone, Carolin N.; Casteels, Kevin; Faber, Sandra M.; Fang, Jerome J.; Fortson, Lucy; Kocevski, Dale; Koo, David C.; Laine, Seppo J.; Lintott, Chris; Masters, Karen; Melvin, Tom; Nichol, Robert; Schawinski, Kevin; Simmons, Brooke D.; Smethurst, Rebecca; Willett, Kyle; Galaxy Zoo, Aegis, Cosmos, Goods

    2015-01-01

    We present a new study investigating whether active galactic nuclei (AGN) beyond the local universe are preferentially fed via large-scale bars. Our investigation combines data from Chandra and Galaxy Zoo: Hubble (GZH) in the AEGIS, COSMOS, and GOODS-S surveys to create samples of face-on, disk galaxies at 0.2 < z < 1.0. We use a novel method to robustly compare a sample of 120 AGN host galaxies, defined to have 1042 erg s-1 < LX < 1044erg s-1, with inactive control galaxies matched in stellar mass, rest-frame color, size, Sérsic index, and redshift. Using the GZH bar classifications of each sample, we demonstrate that AGN hosts show no statistically significant enhancement in bar fraction or average bar likelihood compared to closely-matched inactive galaxies. In detail, we find that the AGN bar fraction cannot be enhanced above the bar fraction in the control sample by more than a factor of two, at 99.7% confidence. We similarly find no significant difference in the AGN fraction among barred and non-barred galaxies. Thus we find no compelling evidence that large-scale bars directly fuel AGN at 0.2 < z < 1.0. This result, coupled with previous results at z = 0, implies that moderate-luminosity AGN have not been preferentially fed by large-scale bars since z = 1. Furthermore, given the low bar fractions at z > 1, our findings suggest that large-scale bars have likely never directly been a dominant fueling mechanism for supermassive black hole growth.

  5. Galaxy Zoo: Are bars responsible for the feeding of active galactic nuclei at 0.2 < z < 1.0?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheung, Edmond; Trump, Jonathan R.; Athanassoula, E.; Bamford, Steven P.; Bell, Eric F.; Bosma, A.; Cardamone, Carolin N.; Casteels, Kevin R. V.; Faber, S. M.; Fang, Jerome J.; Fortson, Lucy F.; Kocevski, Dale D.; Koo, David C.; Laine, Seppo; Lintott, Chris; Masters, Karen L.; Melvin, Thomas; Nichol, Robert C.; Schawinski, Kevin; Simmons, Brooke; Smethurst, Rebecca; Willett, Kyle W.

    2015-02-01

    We present a new study investigating whether active galactic nuclei (AGN) beyond the local universe are preferentially fed via large-scale bars. Our investigation combines data from Chandra and Galaxy Zoo: Hubble (GZH) in the AEGIS (All-wavelength Extended Groth strip International Survey), COSMOS (Cosmological Evolution Survey), and (Great Observatories Origins Deep Survey-South) GOODS-S surveys to create samples of face-on, disc galaxies at 0.2 < z < 1.0. We use a novel method to robustly compare a sample of 120 AGN host galaxies, defined to have 1042 erg s-1 < LX < 1044 erg s-1, with inactive control galaxies matched in stellar mass, rest-frame colour, size, Sérsic index, and redshift. Using the GZH bar classifications of each sample, we demonstrate that AGN hosts show no statistically significant enhancement in bar fraction or average bar likelihood compared to closely-matched inactive galaxies. In detail, we find that the AGN bar fraction cannot be enhanced above the control bar fraction by more than a factor of 2, at 99.7 per cent confidence. We similarly find no significant difference in the AGN fraction among barred and non-barred galaxies. Thus we find no compelling evidence that large-scale bars directly fuel AGN at 0.2 < z < 1.0. This result, coupled with previous results at z = 0, implies that moderate-luminosity AGN have not been preferentially fed by large-scale bars since z = 1. Furthermore, given the low bar fractions at z > 1, our findings suggest that large-scale bars have likely never directly been a dominant fuelling mechanism for supermassive black hole growth.

  6. 32 CFR 1636.4 - Basis for classification in Class 1-0.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 6 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Basis for classification in Class 1-0. 1636.4 Section 1636.4 National Defense Other Regulations Relating to National Defense SELECTIVE SERVICE SYSTEM CLASSIFICATION OF CONSCIENTIOUS OBJECTORS § 1636.4 Basis for classification in Class 1-0. (a) A registrant...

  7. Anomaly of strings of 6d {N}=(1,0) theories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shimizu, Hiroyuki; Tachikawa, Yuji

    2016-11-01

    We obtain the anomaly polynomial of strings of general 6d {N}=(1,0) theories in terms of anomaly inflow. Our computation sheds some light on the reason why the simplest 6d {N}=(1,0) theory has E 8 flavor symmetry, and also partially explains a curious numerology in F-theory.

  8. The linker histone H1.0 generates epigenetic and functional intratumor heterogeneity*

    PubMed Central

    Burney, Matthew J.; Patel, Harshil; Henser-Brownhill, Tristan; Cohen, Ayelet-Hashahar Shapira; Li, Yilong; Ben-Hamo, Rotem; Nye, Emma; Spencer-Dene, Bradley; Chakravarty, Probir; Efroni, Sol; Matthews, Nik; Misteli, Tom; Meshorer, Eran; Scaffidi, Paola

    2016-01-01

    Tumors comprise functionally diverse subpopulations of cells with distinct proliferative potential. Here, we show that dynamic epigenetic states defined by the linker histone H1.0 determine which cells within a tumor can sustain the long-term cancer growth. Numerous cancer types exhibit high inter- and intratumor heterogeneity of H1.0, with H1.0 levels correlating with tumor differentiation status, patient survival and, at the single-cell level, cancer stem cell markers. Silencing of H1.0 promotes maintenance of self-renewing cells by inducing de-repression of megabase-sized gene domains harboring downstream effectors of oncogenic pathways. Self-renewing epigenetic states are not stable and re-expression of H1.0 in subsets of tumor cells establishes transcriptional programs that restrict cancer cell long-term proliferative potential and drive their differentiation. Our results uncover epigenetic determinants of tumor-maintaining cells. PMID:27708074

  9. To stay or to leave: Stem cells and progenitor cells navigating the S1P gradient.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jingjing; Hsu, Andrew; Lee, Jen-Fu; Cramer, Daniel E; Lee, Menq-Jer

    2011-01-26

    Most hematopoietic stem progenitor cells (HSPCs) reside in bone marrow (BM), but a small amount of HSPCs have been found to circulate between BM and tissues through blood and lymph. Several lines of evidence suggest that sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) gradient triggers HSPC egression to blood circulation after mobilization from BM stem cell niches. Stem cells also visit certain tissues. After a temporary 36 h short stay in local tissues, HSPCs go to lymph in response to S1P gradient between lymph and tissue and eventually enter the blood circulation. S1P also has a role in the guidance of the primitive HSPCs homing to BM in vivo, as S1P analogue FTY720 treatment can improve HSPC BM homing and engraftment. In stress conditions, various stem cells or progenitor cells can be attracted to local injured tissues and participate in local tissue cell differentiation and tissue rebuilding through modulation the expression level of S1P(1), S1P(2) or S1P(3) receptors. Hence, S1P is important for stem cells circulation in blood system to accomplish its role in body surveillance and injury recovery.

  10. Collinear Two-Color Saturation Spectroscopy in CN A-X (1-0) and (2-0) Bands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forthomme, Damien; McRaven, C.; Sears, Trevor; Hall, Gregory

    2014-06-01

    Hyperfine-resolved saturation spectra were measured for a selection of low and medium J rotational lines in the A^2Π-X^2Σ^+ system of CN using two copropagating laser beams tuned to transitions in the (2-0) and (1-0) bands. A bleach laser was amplitude modulated and fixed in frequency near the center of a rotational line of the (2-0) vibrational band, while a probe laser was frequency-modulated and scanned across selected lines of the (1-0) vibrational band, sharing a common lower state with the bleach laser. Locking the probe laser with a tunable radio frequency offset to a cavity that tracks the slowly drifting bleach laser greatly improved the quality of the double-resonance saturation signals, by stabilizing the relative frequency of the two beams. The sub-Doppler resonances were fit with Lorentzian line shapes having a typical full-width at half maximum of 2-3 MHz. The hyperfine spectra observed depend on the hyperfine structure within both rovibronic transitions excited, permitting the determination of hyperfine molecular constants in the ν = 2 state and the refinement of previously published values in the ν = 1 state. Four nuclear magnetic dipole and two electric quadrupole hyperfine constants were determined for each of the upper states from a fit with a weighted root mean squared error of 0.5 MHz. The vibrational dependence of these constants is weak or negligible. Acknowledgements: Work at Brookhaven National Laboratory was carried out under contract No. DE-AC02-98CH10886 with the U.S. Department of Energy and supported by its Office of Basic Energy Sciences, Division of Chemical Sciences, Geosciences and Biosciences.

  11. Distance and Evolutionary State of the Supernova Remnant 3C 397 (G41.1-0.3)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leahy, D. A.; Ranasinghe, S.

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we analyze 1420 MHz continuum and H i observations of the supernova remnant (SNR) 3C 397 (G41.1-0.3). The H i absorption spectra show clear absorption up to the tangent point velocity and also the absence of absorption at 50-60 km s-1. This yields lower and upper limits to the distances of 6.3 ± 0.1 and 9.7 ± 0.3 kpc, which are better and more robust than previous estimates. We apply generalized SNR models to 3C 397, including the ejecta-dominated phase and the transition-to-Sedov phase. Using emission measures from the X-ray and mean gas density from the infrared, we show that the hard X-ray component has the dominant filling factor and the soft X-ray component has a very small filling factor. The models are required to be consistent with 3C 397's measured properties, including the observed shock temperatures and shock radii. Consistent models are found if 3C 397 has a distance in the range of ≃8-9.7 kpc. For an 8 kpc distance, the estimated age is ≃1350 years and the explosion energy is 1.0 × 1051 erg, while for 9.7 kpc, the the most probable age is ≃1750 years and the energy 1.5 × 1051 erg.

  12. Detection of the 267 GHz J = 1-0 rotational transition of PH3 in Saturn with a new Fourier transform spectrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weisstein, Eric W.; Serabyn, E.

    1994-01-01

    In recent observations at the Caltech Submillimeter Observatory, the highly pressure-broadened (FWHM = 11.2 GHz) J = 1-0 rotational transition of PH3 (phosphine) was detected on Saturn. By modeling the Saturnian atmosphere with a radiative transfer code, the observed line profile was consistent with a constant PH3 mole fraction of 3.0 plus or minus 1.0 ppm in the upper troposphere. A best-fit to the depth of the line implies a cutoff at high altitudes, with no PH3 present at pressures approximately less than 100 mbar. The observed line depth, combined with the lack of a detectable emission core, implies that a cutoff in the PH3 abundance occurs at a pressure between 13 and 140 mbar. PH3 in Jupiter was not detected, nor any other molecular lines between 195 and 295 GHz (1.54 mm and 1.02 mm, respectively) in either Jupiter or Saturn.

  13. A High Resolution Spectroscopic Study of the Nu2 Band of Hydrogen Sulfide and the 1-0 Band of Hydrogen Iodide. Ph.D. Thesis - Maryland Univ.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Strow, L. L.

    1981-01-01

    A tunable diode laser spectrometer was constructed and used to study: (1) the effects of centrifugal distortion on the transition frequencies and strengths of the nu sub 2 band of H2S, and (2) nuclear quadrupole hyperfine structure in the 1-0 band of HI. A total of 126 line frequencies and 94 line strengths in the nu sub 2 band of H2S were measured. The average accuracy of the line frequency measurements was + or - 0.0016 cm. The line strengths were measured to an average accuracy of about 3 percent. The effect of the finite spectral width of the diode laser on the measurement of line strengths is discussed. The observed H2S line frequencies were fit to Watson's AS and NS reduced Hamiltonian in both the Ir and IIIr coordinate representations in order to determine the best set of rotation distortion constants for the upper state of the nu sub 2 band. Comparisons of the observed line strengths in this band to rigid rotor line strengths are also presented. Nuclear quadrupole hyperfine structure in the low J lines of the 1-0 band of HI was observed. The upper vibrational state nuclear quadrupole coupling constant, determined from the observed splittings, was -1850 MHz + or - 12 MHz or 1.2 percent + or - 0.7 percent larger than the ground state coupling constant.

  14. Decorin in human oral cancer: A promising predictive biomarker of S-1 neoadjuvant chemosensitivity

    SciTech Connect

    Kasamatsu, Atsushi; Uzawa, Katsuhiro; Minakawa, Yasuyuki; Ishige, Shunsaku; Kasama, Hiroki; Endo-Sakamoto, Yosuke; Ogawara, Katsunori; Shiiba, Masashi; Takiguchi, Yuichi; Tanzawa, Hideki

    2015-01-30

    Highlights: • DCN is significantly up-regulated in chemoresistant cancer cell lines. • DCN is a key regulator for chemoresistant mechanisms in vitro and in vivo. • DCN predicts the clinical responses to S-1 NAC for patients with oral cancer. - Abstract: We reported previously that decorin (DCN) is significantly up-regulated in chemoresistant cancer cell lines. DCN is a small leucine-rich proteoglycan that exists and functions in stromal and epithelial cells. Accumulating evidence suggests that DCN affects the biology of several types of cancer by directly/indirectly targeting the signaling molecules involved in cell growth, survival, metastasis, and angiogenesis, however, the molecular mechanisms of DCN in chemoresistance and its clinical relevance are still unknown. Here we assumed that DCN silencing cells increase chemosusceptibility to S-1, consisted of tegafur, prodrug of 5-fluorouracil. We first established DCN knockdown transfectants derived from oral cancer cells for following experiments including chemosusceptibility assay to S-1. In addition to the in vitro data, DCN knockdown zenografting tumors in nude mice demonstrate decreasing cell proliferation and increasing apoptosis with dephosphorylation of AKT after S-1 chemotherapy. We also investigated whether DCN expression predicts the clinical responses of neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NAC) using S-1 (S-1 NAC) for oral cancer patients. Immunohistochemistry data in the preoperative biopsy samples was analyzed to determine the cut-off point for status of DCN expression by receiver operating curve analysis. Interestingly, low DCN expression was observed in five (83%) of six cases with complete responses to S-1 NAC, and in one (10%) case of 10 cases with stable/progressive disease, indicating that S-1 chemosensitivity is dramatically effective in oral cancer patients with low DCN expression compared with high DCN expression. Our findings suggest that DCN is a key regulator for chemoresistant mechanisms, and

  15. Exit Strategies: S1P Signaling and T Cell Migration.

    PubMed

    Baeyens, Audrey; Fang, Victoria; Chen, Cynthia; Schwab, Susan R

    2015-12-01

    Whereas the role of sphingosine 1-phosphate receptor 1 (S1PR1) in T cell egress and the regulation of S1P gradients between lymphoid organs and circulatory fluids in homeostasis are increasingly well understood, much remains to be learned about S1P signaling and distribution during an immune response. Recent data suggest that the role of S1PR1 in directing cells from tissues into circulatory fluids is reprised again and again, particularly in guiding activated T cells from non-lymphoid tissues into lymphatics. Conversely, S1P receptor 2 (S1PR2), which antagonizes migration towards chemokines, confines cells within tissues. Here we review the current understanding of the roles of S1P signaling in activated T cell migration. In this context, we outline open questions, particularly regarding the shape of S1P gradients in different tissues in homeostasis and inflammation, and discuss recent strategies to measure S1P.

  16. Optical Positions of ICRF Sources from CTIO 1.0M Data

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT As part of the USNO radio-optical reference frame link project, data were taken with the CTIO 1.0 m telescope in 2009. First position...ABSTRACT As part of the USNO radio-optical reference frame link project, data were taken with the CTIO 1.0 m telescope in 2009. First position...Yale 1.0 meter telescope and Y4K camera which were used for this study. TABLE 1. INSTRUMENT PROPERTIES aperture 1000 mm focal ratio f/10 Cass. filters

  17. Exogenous S1P Exposure Potentiates Ischemic Stroke Damage That Is Reduced Possibly by Inhibiting S1P Receptor Signaling.

    PubMed

    Moon, Eunjung; Han, Jeong Eun; Jeon, Sejin; Ryu, Jong Hoon; Choi, Ji Woong; Chun, Jerold

    2015-01-01

    Initial and recurrent stroke produces central nervous system (CNS) damage, involving neuroinflammation. Receptor-mediated S1P signaling can influence neuroinflammation and has been implicated in cerebral ischemia through effects on the immune system. However, S1P-mediated events also occur within the brain itself where its roles during stroke have been less well studied. Here we investigated the involvement of S1P signaling in initial and recurrent stroke by using a transient middle cerebral artery occlusion/reperfusion (M/R) model combined with analyses of S1P signaling. Gene expression for S1P receptors and involved enzymes was altered during M/R, supporting changes in S1P signaling. Direct S1P microinjection into the normal CNS induced neuroglial activation, implicating S1P-initiated neuroinflammatory responses that resembled CNS changes seen during initial M/R challenge. Moreover, S1P microinjection combined with M/R potentiated brain damage, approximating a model for recurrent stroke dependent on S1P and suggesting that reduction in S1P signaling could ameliorate stroke damage. Delivery of FTY720 that removes S1P signaling with chronic exposure reduced damage in both initial and S1P-potentiated M/R-challenged brain, while reducing stroke markers like TNF-α. These results implicate direct S1P CNS signaling in the etiology of initial and recurrent stroke that can be therapeutically accessed by S1P modulators acting within the brain.

  18. Initial clinical experience with a radiation oncology dedicated open 1.0T MR-simulation.

    PubMed

    Glide-Hurst, Carri K; Wen, Ning; Hearshen, David; Kim, Joshua; Pantelic, Milan; Zhao, Bo; Mancell, Tina; Levin, Kenneth; Movsas, Benjamin; Chetty, Indrin J; Siddiqui, M Salim

    2015-03-08

    The purpose of this study was to describe our experience with 1.0T MR-SIM including characterization, quality assurance (QA) program, and features necessary for treatment planning. Staffing, safety, and patient screening procedures were developed. Utilization of an external laser positioning system (ELPS) and MR-compatible couchtop were illustrated. Spatial and volumetric analyses were conducted between CT-SIM and MR-SIM using a stereotactic QA phantom with known landmarks and volumes. Magnetic field inhomogeneity was determined using phase difference analysis. System-related, in-plane distortion was evaluated and temporal changes were assessed. 3D distortion was characterized for regions of interest (ROIs) 5-20 cm away from isocenter. American College of Radiology (ACR) recommended tests and impact of ELPS on image quality were analyzed. Combined ultrashort echotime Dixon (UTE/Dixon) sequence was evaluated. Amplitude-triggered 4D MRI was implemented using a motion phantom (2-10 phases, ~ 2 cm excursion, 3-5 s periods) and a liver cancer patient. Duty cycle, acquisition time, and excursion were evaluated between maximum intensity projection (MIP) datasets. Less than 2% difference from expected was obtained between CT-SIM and MR-SIM volumes, with a mean distance of < 0.2 mm between landmarks. Magnetic field inhomogeneity was < 2 ppm. 2D distortion was < 2 mm over 28.6-33.6 mm of isocenter. Within 5 cm radius of isocenter, mean 3D geometric distortion was 0.59 ± 0.32 mm (maximum = 1.65 mm) and increased 10-15 cm from isocenter (mean = 1.57 ± 1.06 mm, maximum = 6.26 mm). ELPS interference was within the operating frequency of the scanner and was characterized by line patterns and a reduction in signal-to-noise ratio (4.6-12.6% for TE = 50-150 ms). Image quality checks were within ACR recommendations. UTE/Dixon sequences yielded detectability between bone and air. For 4D MRI, faster breathing periods had higher duty cycles than slow (50.4% (3 s) and 39.4% (5 s), p

  19. S1-equivariant Chern-Weil constructions on loop space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCauley, Thomas

    2017-02-01

    We study the existence of S1-equivariant characteristic classes on certain natural infinite rank bundles over the loop space LM of a manifold M. We discuss the different S1-equivariant cohomology theories in the literature and clarify their relationships. We attempt to use S1-equivariant Chern-Weil techniques to construct S1-equivariant characteristic classes. The main result is the construction of a sequence of S1-equivariant characteristic classes on the total space of the bundles, but these classes do not descend to the base LM. Nevertheless, we conclude by identifying a class of bundles for which the S1-equivariant first Chern class does descend to LM.

  20. Blocking S1P interaction with S1P{sub 1} receptor by a novel competitive S1P{sub 1}-selective antagonist inhibits angiogenesis

    SciTech Connect

    Fujii, Yasuyuki; Ueda, Yasuji; Ohtake, Hidenori; Ono, Naoya; Takayama, Tetsuo; Nakazawa, Kiyoshi; Igarashi, Yasuyuki; Goitsuka, Ryo

    2012-03-23

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The effect of a newly developed S1P{sub 1}-selective antagonist on angiogenic responses. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer S1P{sub 1} is a critical component of VEGF-related angiogenic responses. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer S1P{sub 1}-selective antagonist showed in vitro activity to inhibit angiogenesis. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer S1P{sub 1}-selective antagonist showed in vivo activity to inhibit angiogenesis. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The efficacy of S1P{sub 1}-selective antagonist for anti-cancer therapies. -- Abstract: Sphingosine 1-phosphate receptor type 1 (S1P{sub 1}) was shown to be essential for vascular maturation during embryonic development and it has been demonstrated that substantial crosstalk exists between S1P{sub 1} and other pro-angiogenic growth factors, such as vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and basic fibroblast growth factor. We developed a novel S1P{sub 1}-selective antagonist, TASP0277308, which is structurally unrelated to S1P as well as previously described S1P{sub 1} antagonists. TASP0277308 inhibited S1P- as well as VEGF-induced cellular responses, including migration and proliferation of human umbilical vein endothelial cells. Furthermore, TASP0277308 effectively blocked a VEGF-induced tube formation in vitro and significantly suppressed tumor cell-induced angiogenesis in vivo. These findings revealed that S1P{sub 1} is a critical component of VEGF-related angiogenic responses and also provide evidence for the efficacy of TASP0277308 for anti-cancer therapies.

  1. Tier I Rice Model - Version 1.0 - Guidance for Estimating Pesticide Concentrations in Rice Paddies

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Describes a Tier I Rice Model (Version 1.0) for estimating surface water exposure from the use of pesticides in rice paddies. The concentration calculated can be used for aquatic ecological risk and drinking water exposure assessments.

  2. 40 CFR 721.10447 - 17-Oxabicyclo[14.1.0]heptadec-8-ene.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... filter including disposable cartridge), (a)(5)(vii), (b) (concentration set at 1.0 percent), and (c). (ii) Release to water. Requirement as specified in § 721.90(a)(4), (b)(4), and (c)(4) (N=1). (b)...

  3. Indoor Semi-volatile Organic Compounds (i-SVOC) Version 1.0

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    i-SVOC Version 1.0 is a general-purpose software application for dynamic modeling of the emission, transport, sorption, and distribution of semi-volatile organic compounds (SVOCs) in indoor environments.

  4. 32 CFR 1636.5 - Exclusion from Class 1-A-0 and Class 1-0.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... CLASSIFICATION OF CONSCIENTIOUS OBJECTORS § 1636.5 Exclusion from Class 1-A-0 and Class 1-0. A registrant shall... any form (a selective objection). If a registrant objects to war in any form, but also believes in...

  5. 30 CFR 57.22236 - Actions at 1.0 percent methane (VI mines).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... percent methane (VI mines). If methane reaches 1.0 percent in the mine atmosphere, all persons other than competent persons necessary to make ventilation changes shall be withdrawn from affected areas until...

  6. 30 CFR 57.22236 - Actions at 1.0 percent methane (VI mines).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... percent methane (VI mines). If methane reaches 1.0 percent in the mine atmosphere, all persons other than competent persons necessary to make ventilation changes shall be withdrawn from affected areas until...

  7. 30 CFR 57.22236 - Actions at 1.0 percent methane (VI mines).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... percent methane (VI mines). If methane reaches 1.0 percent in the mine atmosphere, all persons other than competent persons necessary to make ventilation changes shall be withdrawn from affected areas until...

  8. 32 CFR 1636.5 - Exclusion from Class 1-A-0 and Class 1-0.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... be excluded from Class 1-A-0 or Class 1-0: (a) Who asserts beliefs which are of a religious, moral or... participation in war does not rest at all upon moral, ethical, or religious principle, but instead rests...

  9. UT40 STARS Reuse Concept. Volume 1. Conceptual Framework for Reuse Process Version 1.0

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-02-12

    1 TASK: UT40 UT40- CDRL:040402/14/92 AD-A247 267 STARS Reuse Concept 24 t i Vol u me I - Conceptual Framework for Reuse Process Version 1.0 Informal...3For The SOFTWARE TECHNOLOGY FOR ADAPTABLE, RELIABLE SYSTEMS 3 (STARS) STARS Reuse Concepts Volume I - Conceptual Framework for Reuse Process -ccesion...STARS Reuse Concepts Volume I - Conceptual Framework for Reuse Processes I Version 1.0 Approvals: Boeing Reuse Technical Lead Margaret Davis Date IBM

  10. G54. 1 + 0. 3 - a new Crab-like supernova remnant

    SciTech Connect

    Velusamy, T.; Becker, R.H.

    1988-04-01

    High-resolution multifrequency observations with the VLA and OSRT of the small-diameter flat-spectrum radio source G54.1 + 0.3 are presented. The filled-center brightness distribution, strong polarization at 6 cm, and flat radio spectrum (alpha of about -0.13) from 0.327 to 5 GHz confirm that G54.1 + 0.3 is a Crab-like supernova remnant. 22 references.

  11. Computer simulation of sputtering at the low index (1 0 0), (1 1 0) and (1 1 1) surfaces of Ni3Al in a STEM

    SciTech Connect

    Lai, Wenshen; Yu, J. J.; Gao, Fei; Bacon, David J.

    2009-09-15

    The present study is relevant to the preferential Al sputtering and/or enhancement of the Ni/Al ratio in Ni3Al observed by the scanning transmission electron microscopy fitted with a field emission gun (FEG STEM). Atomic recoil events at the low index (1 0 0), (1 1 0) and (1 1 1) surfaces of Ni3Al through elastic collisions between electrons and atoms are simulated using molecular dynamics (MD) methods. The threshold energy for sputtering, Esp, and adatom creation, Ead, are determined as a function of recoil direction. Based on the MD determined Esp, the sputtering cross-sections for Ni and Al atoms in these surfaces are calculated with the previous proposed model. It is found that the sputtering cross-section for Al atoms is about 7–8 times higher than that for Ni, indicating the preferential sputtering of Al in Ni3Al, in good agreement with experiments. It is also found that the sputtering cross-sections for Ni atoms are almost the same in these three surfaces, suggesting that they are independent of surface orientation. Thus, the sputtering process is almost independent of the surface orientation in Ni3Al, as it is controlled by the sputtering of Ni atoms with a lower sputtering rate.

  12. Fundamental linewidth in solitary, ultranarrow output PbS(1-x)Se(x) diode lasers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Freed, C.; Bielinski, J. W.; Lo, W.

    1983-01-01

    The fundamental, quantum phase noise limited Lorentzian linewidth was directly measured from the beat-note spectra generated by heterodyning PbS(1-x)Se(x) diode lasers with a stable CO gas laser. The experimental results were matched by calculated theoretical line profiles. Linewidths as narrow as 22 kHz full width at half-maximum power were observed.

  13. Are Narrow Line Seyfert 1 Galaxies Viewed Pole-on?

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-04-01

    0.2’’ respectively. Figure 1 displays the position of each slit over a Barbosa et al. (2009) GMOS IFU image of the [S III] flux (which originates...C. Winge, H. Schmitt: Gemini/ GMOS IFU gas velocity ’tomography’ of the narrow line region of nearby active galaxies, MNRAS, 396 (2009) 2. [2] D...1995) 81. 4 P o S ( N L S 1 ) 0 5 0 Are NLS1s Pole-on? Travis C. Fischer 5 Figure 1: NGC 4051 GMOS IFU image showing integrated [SIII] flux

  14. Conformationally Constrained, Stable, Triplet Ground State (S = 1) Nitroxide Diradicals. Antiferromagnetic Chains of S = 1 Diradicals

    SciTech Connect

    Rajca, Andrzej; Takahashi, Masahiro; Pink, Maren; Spagnol, Gaelle; Rajca, Suchada

    2008-06-30

    Nitroxide diradicals, in which nitroxides are annelated to m-phenylene forming tricyclic benzobisoxazine-like structures, have been synthesized and characterized by X-ray crystallography, magnetic resonance (EPR and {sup 1}H NMR) spectroscopy, as well as magnetic studies in solution and in solid state. For the octamethyl derivative of benzobisoxazine nitroxide diradical, the conformationally constrained nitroxide moieties are coplanar with the m-phenylene, leading to large values of 2J (2J/k > 200 K in solution and 2J/k >> 300 K in the solid state). For the diradical, in which all ortho and para positions of the m-phenylene are sterically shielded, distortion of the nitroxide moieties from coplanarity is moderate, such that the singlet-triplet gaps remain large in both solution (2J/k > 200 K) and the solid state (2J/k {approx} 400-800 K), though an onset of thermal depopulation of the triplet ground state is detectable near room temperature. These diradicals have robust triplet ground states with strong ferromagnetic coupling and good stability at ambient conditions. Magnetic behavior of the nitroxide diradicals at low temperature is best fit to the model of one-dimensional S = 1 Heisenberg chains with intrachain antiferromagnetic coupling. The antiferromagnetic coupling between the S = 1 diradicals may be associated with the methyl nitroxide C-H {hor_ellipsis} O contacts, including nonclassical hydrogen bonds. These unprecedented organic S = 1 antiferromagnetic chains are highly isotropic, compared to those of the extensively studied Ni(II)-based chains.

  15. S1P in HDL promotes interaction between SR-BI and S1PR1 and activates S1PR1-mediated biological functions: calcium flux and S1PR1 internalization.

    PubMed

    Lee, Mi-Hye; Appleton, Kathryn M; El-Shewy, Hesham M; Sorci-Thomas, Mary G; Thomas, Michael J; Lopes-Virella, Maria F; Luttrell, Louis M; Hammad, Samar M; Klein, Richard L

    2017-02-01

    HDL normally transports about 50-70% of plasma sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P), and the S1P in HDL reportedly mediates several HDL-associated biological effects and signaling pathways. The HDL receptor, SR-BI, as well as the cell surface receptors for S1P (S1PRs) may be involved partially and/or completely in these HDL-induced processes. Here we investigate the nature of the HDL-stimulated interaction between the HDL receptor, SR-BI, and S1PR1 using a protein-fragment complementation assay and confocal microscopy. In both primary rat aortic vascular smooth muscle cells and HEK293 cells, the S1P content in HDL particles increased intracellular calcium concentration, which was mediated by S1PR1. Mechanistic studies performed in HEK293 cells showed that incubation of cells with HDL led to an increase in the physical interaction between the SR-BI and S1PR1 receptors that mainly occurred on the plasma membrane. Model recombinant HDL (rHDL) particles formed in vitro with S1P incorporated into the particle initiated the internalization of S1PR1, whereas rHDL without supplemented S1P did not, suggesting that S1P transported in HDL can selectively activate S1PR1. In conclusion, these data suggest that S1P in HDL stimulates the transient interaction between SR-BI and S1PRs that can activate S1PRs and induce an elevation in intracellular calcium concentration.

  16. Chemical and genetic tools to explore S1P biology.

    PubMed

    Cahalan, Stuart M

    2014-01-01

    The zwitterionic lysophospholipid Sphingosine 1-Phosphate (S1P) is a pleiotropic mediator of physiology and pathology. The synthesis, transport, and degradation of S1P are tightly regulated to ensure that S1P is present in the proper concentrations in the proper location. The binding of S1P to five G protein-coupled S1P receptors regulates many physiological systems, particularly the immune and vascular systems. Our understanding of the functions of S1P has been aided by the tractability of the system to both chemical and genetic manipulation. Chemical modulators have been generated to affect most of the known components of S1P biology, including agonists of S1P receptors and inhibitors of enzymes regulating S1P production and degradation. Genetic knockouts and manipulations have been similarly engineered to disrupt the functions of individual S1P receptors or enzymes involved in S1P metabolism. This chapter will focus on the development and utilization of these chemical and genetic tools to explore the complex biology surrounding S1P and its receptors, with particular attention paid to the in vivo findings that these tools have allowed for.

  17. 26 CFR 1.414(s)-1 - Definition of compensation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 5 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Definition of compensation. 1.414(s)-1 Section 1.414(s)-1 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) INCOME TAX (CONTINUED) INCOME TAXES Pension, Profit-Sharing, Stock Bonus Plans, Etc. § 1.414(s)-1 Definition...

  18. Sphingosine-1-Phosphate (S1P) Lyase Inhibition Causes Increased Cardiac S1P Levels and Bradycardia in Rats.

    PubMed

    Harris, Christopher M; Mittelstadt, Scott; Banfor, Patricia; Bousquet, Peter; Duignan, David B; Gintant, Gary; Hart, Michelle; Kim, Youngjae; Segreti, Jason

    2016-10-01

    Inhibition of the sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P)-catabolizing enzyme S1P lyase (S1PL) elevates the native ligand of S1P receptors and provides an alternative mechanism for immune suppression to synthetic S1P receptor agonists. S1PL inhibition is reported to preferentially elevate S1P in lymphoid organs. Tissue selectivity could potentially differentiate S1PL inhibitors from S1P receptor agonists, the use of which also results in bradycardia, atrioventricular block, and hypertension. But it is unknown if S1PL inhibition would also modulate cardiac S1P levels or cardiovascular function. The S1PL inhibitor 6-[(2R)-4-(4-benzyl-7-chlorophthalazin-1-yl)-2-methylpiperazin-1-yl]pyridine-3-carbonitrile was used to determine the relationship in rats between drug concentration, S1P levels in select tissues, and circulating lymphocytes. Repeated oral doses of the S1PL inhibitor fully depleted circulating lymphocytes after 3 to 4 days of treatment in rats. Full lymphopenia corresponded to increased levels of S1P of 100- to 1000-fold in lymph nodes, 3-fold in blood (but with no change in plasma), and 9-fold in cardiac tissue. Repeated oral dosing of the S1PL inhibitor in telemeterized, conscious rats resulted in significant bradycardia within 48 hours of drug treatment, comparable in magnitude to the bradycardia induced by 3 mg/kg fingolimod. These results suggest that S1PL inhibition modulates cardiac function and does not provide immune suppression with an improved cardiovascular safety profile over fingolimod in rats.

  19. CHROMOSPHERIC EVAPORATION IN AN X1.0 FLARE ON 2014 MARCH 29 OBSERVED WITH IRIS AND EIS

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Y.; Ding, M. D.; Qiu, J.; Cheng, J. X.

    2015-09-20

    Chromospheric evaporation refers to dynamic mass motions in flare loops as a result of rapid energy deposition in the chromosphere. These motions have been observed as blueshifts in X-ray and extreme-ultraviolet (EUV) spectral lines corresponding to upward motions at a few tens to a few hundreds of km s{sup −1}. Past spectroscopic observations have also revealed a dominant stationary component, in addition to the blueshifted component, in emission lines formed at high temperatures (∼10 MK). This is contradictory to evaporation models predicting predominant blueshifts in hot lines. The recently launched Interface Region Imaging Spectrograph (IRIS) provides high-resolution imaging and spectroscopic observations that focus on the chromosphere and transition region in the UV passband. Using the new IRIS observations, combined with coordinated observations from the EUV Imaging Spectrometer, we study the chromospheric evaporation process from the upper chromosphere to the corona during an X1.0 flare on 2014 March 29. We find evident evaporation signatures, characterized by Doppler shifts and line broadening, at two flare ribbons that are separating from each other, suggesting that chromospheric evaporation takes place in successively formed flaring loops throughout the flare. More importantly, we detect dominant blueshifts in the high-temperature Fe xxi line (∼10 MK), in agreement with theoretical predictions. We also find that, in this flare, gentle evaporation occurs at some locations in the rise phase of the flare, while explosive evaporation is detected at some other locations near the peak of the flare. There is a conversion from gentle to explosive evaporation as the flare evolves.

  20. A Sensitive CO(1-0) Survey in Pegasus-Pisces; Reducing the Dark Gas Inventory the Old-Fashioned Way

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Magnani, Loris A.; Donate, Emmanuel

    2016-06-01

    The idea that substantial molecular gas is present in the ISM but is not detectable by the CO(1-0) emission line at 115 GHz has become fairly prevalent in the last decade. This component has come to be known as “dark gas” in the sense that it is hard to trace using the standard spectral line tracers. It is usually identified by gamma-ray or infrared emission, or via the C+ spectral line at 158 microns. However, in determining the dark gas component and comparing it to the molecular gas traced by the CO(1-0) line, existing CO surveys of varying sensitivity are employed. Even the most sensitive CO surveys typically employed in this fashion have at best 1-sigma rms values of about 0.1 K in antenna temperature. We surveyed a small region in the vicinity of the high-latitude molecular cloud MBM 55 in the CO(1-0) line using the Arizona Radio Observatory 12-meter telescope. The 1-sigma rms of our survey (0.02 - 0.03 K) was significantly better than that of typical CO surveys. We detected more CO emission than previous work had found and increased the known H2 in the region by nearly 80%, thereby reducing significantly the contribution from dark gas.

  1. EMPOWER-1.0: an Efficient Model of Planktonic ecOsystems WrittEn in R

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, T. R.; Gentleman, W. C.; Yool, A.

    2015-01-01

    Modelling marine ecosystems requires insight and judgement when it comes to deciding upon appropriate model structure, equations and parameterisation. Many processes are relatively poorly understood and tough decisions must be made as to how to mathematically simplify the real world. Here, we present an efficient plankton modelling testbed, EMPOWER-1.0, coded in the freely available language R. The testbed uses simple two-layer "slab" physics whereby a seasonally varying mixed layer which contains the planktonic marine ecosystem is positioned above a deep layer that contains only nutrient. As such, EMPOWER-1.0 provides a readily available and easy to use tool for evaluating model structure, formulations and parameterisation. The code is transparent and modular such that modifications and changes to model formulation are easily implemented allowing users to investigate and familiarise themselves with the inner workings of their models. It can be used either for preliminary model testing to set the stage for further work, e.g., coupling the ecosystem model to 1-D or 3-D physics, or for undertaking front line research in its own right. EMPOWER-1.0 also serves as an ideal teaching tool. In order to demonstrate the utility of EMPOWER-1.0, we carried out both a parameter tuning exercise and structural sensitivity analysis. Parameter tuning was demonstrated for four contrasting ocean sites, focusing on Station India in the North Atlantic (60° N, 20° W), highlighting both the utility of undertaking a planned sensitivity analysis for this purpose, yet also the subjectivity which nevertheless surrounds the choice of which parameters to tune. Structural sensitivity tests were then performed comparing different equations for calculating daily depth-integrated photosynthesis, as well as mortality terms for both phytoplankton and zooplankton. Regarding the calculation of daily photosynthesis, for example, results indicated that the model was relatively insensitive to the

  2. EMPOWER-1.0: an Efficient Model of Planktonic ecOsystems WrittEn in R

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, T. R.; Gentleman, W. C.; Yool, A.

    2015-07-01

    Modelling marine ecosystems requires insight and judgement when it comes to deciding upon appropriate model structure, equations and parameterisation. Many processes are relatively poorly understood and tough decisions must be made as to how to mathematically simplify the real world. Here, we present an efficient plankton modelling testbed, EMPOWER-1.0 (Efficient Model of Planktonic ecOsystems WrittEn in R), coded in the freely available language R. The testbed uses simple two-layer "slab" physics whereby a seasonally varying mixed layer which contains the planktonic marine ecosystem is positioned above a deep layer that contains only nutrient. As such, EMPOWER-1.0 provides a readily available and easy to use tool for evaluating model structure, formulations and parameterisation. The code is transparent and modular such that modifications and changes to model formulation are easily implemented allowing users to investigate and familiarise themselves with the inner workings of their models. It can be used either for preliminary model testing to set the stage for further work, e.g. coupling the ecosystem model to 1-D or 3-D physics, or for undertaking front line research in its own right. EMPOWER-1.0 also serves as an ideal teaching tool. In order to demonstrate the utility of EMPOWER-1.0, we implemented a simple nutrient-phytoplankton-zooplankton-detritus (NPZD) ecosystem model and carried out both a parameter tuning exercise and structural sensitivity analysis. Parameter tuning was demonstrated for four contrasting ocean sites, focusing on station BIOTRANS in the North Atlantic (47° N, 20° W), highlighting both the utility of undertaking a planned sensitivity analysis for this purpose, yet also the subjectivity which nevertheless surrounds the choice of which parameters to tune. Structural sensitivity tests were then performed comparing different equations for calculating daily depth-integrated photosynthesis, as well as mortality terms for both phytoplankton and

  3. Pan-STARRS 1 observations of the unusual active Centaur P/2011 S1(Gibbs)

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, H. W.; Ip, W. H.; Chen, W. P.; Chen, Y. T.; Lacerda, P.; Holman, M.; Protopapas, P.; Burgett, W. S.; Chambers, K. C.; Flewelling, H.; Huber, M. E.; Jedicke, R.; Kaiser, N.; Magnier, E. A.; Metcalfe, N.; Price, P. A.

    2014-05-01

    P/2011 S1 (Gibbs) is an outer solar system comet or active Centaur with a similar orbit to that of the famous 29P/Schwassmann-Wachmann 1. P/2011 S1 (Gibbs) has been observed by the Pan-STARRS 1 (PS1) sky survey from 2010 to 2012. The resulting data allow us to perform multi-color studies of the nucleus and coma of the comet. Analysis of PS1 images reveals that P/2011 S1 (Gibbs) has a small nucleus <4 km radius, with colors g {sub P1} – r {sub P1} = 0.5 ± 0.02, r {sub P1} – i {sub P1} = 0.12 ± 0.02, and i {sub P1} – z {sub P1} = 0.46 ± 0.03. The comet remained active from 2010 to 2012, with a model-dependent mass-loss rate of ∼100 kg s{sup –1}. The mass-loss rate per unit surface area of P/2011 S1 (Gibbs) is as high as that of 29P/Schwassmann-Wachmann 1, making it one of the most active Centaurs. The mass-loss rate also varies with time from ∼40 kg s{sup –1} to 150 kg s{sup –1}. Due to its rather circular orbit, we propose that P/2011 S1 (Gibbs) has 29P/Schwassmann-Wachmann 1-like outbursts that control the outgassing rate. The results indicate that it may have a similar surface composition to that of 29P/Schwassmann-Wachmann 1. Our numerical simulations show that the future orbital evolution of P/2011 S1 (Gibbs) is more similar to that of the main population of Centaurs than to that of 29P/Schwassmann-Wachmann 1. The results also demonstrate that P/2011 S1 (Gibbs) is dynamically unstable and can only remain near its current orbit for roughly a thousand years.

  4. The structure of the Pd(1 1 0)(2×1)-CO surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kittel, M.; Terborg, R.; Polcik, M.; Bradshaw, A. M.; Toomes, R. L.; Woodruff, D. P.; Rotenberg, E.

    2002-06-01

    The structure of the Pd(1 1 0)(2×1)-CO ordered adsorption phase has been determined by scanned-energy mode photoelectron diffraction. The CO molecules are adsorbed close to short-bridge sites with alternating tilts along the close-packed <1 1 0> surface rows. This local geometry is consistent with that found in previous theoretical total energy calculations and an earlier X-ray photoelectron diffraction study, but is in direct contradiction to the results of an earlier quantitative low energy electron diffraction investigation. While the best-fit model structure involves some twist of the CO molecules out of the <1 0 0> mirror planes of the surface creating a surface phase of p1g1 symmetry, the more symmetric p2mg falls within the estimated limits of precision of the analysis.

  5. Matrix Diffusion Toolkit. User’s Manual. Version 1.0

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-09-01

    derived from Domenico and Schwartz, 1990). Clay: 1.0 - 2.4 Loess : 0.75 - 1.6 Sands-ne: 1.6 - 2.68 Shale: 1.54 - 3.17 Limes-ne: 1.74 - 2.79...Domenico and Schwartz, 1990): Clay: 1.0 - 2.4 Loess : 0.75 - 1.6 Sandstone: 1.6 - 2.68 Shale: 1.54 - 3.17 Limestone: 1.74 - 2.79 Granite: 2.24...Gravel 0.1 - 0.25 (-) Sandy Clay 0.03 - 0.2 (-) Loess 0.15 - 0.35 (-) Peat 0.3 - 0.5 (-) Silt 0.01 - 0.3 (-) Gravely Sand 0.2 - 0.35 (-) Fine

  6. Targeting sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P) levels and S1P receptor functions for therapeutic immune interventions.

    PubMed

    Gräler, Markus H

    2010-01-01

    Sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P) is an important regulator of many different immune functions including lymphocyte circulation, antigen presentation, and T cell development. It stimulates five G protein-coupled receptors designated S1P(1-5), which are also expressed by immune cells. S1P receptors couple to different heterotrimeric G proteins including G alpha i, q, and 12/13, and elicit cellular signalling events by activating the small GTPases Rac and Rho and protein kinases Akt, ERK, and JNK, and by inducing cellular calcium flux and inhibiting cAMP accumulation, amongst others. S1P is the exit signal for lymphocytes leaving lymphoid organs and present in blood and lymph at high nanomolar concentrations due to the S1P-producing activity of sphingosine kinases (SK). The S1P-degrading enzyme S1P-lyase maintains low amounts of S1P in lymphoid organs. Disrupting this concentration difference by S1P receptor agonists and antagonists like FTY720, SEW2871, and VPC23019, by an anti-S1P antibody, or by inhibiting the S1P-lyase has therapeutic potential for autoimmune diseases like multiple sclerosis (MS) and rheumatoid arthritis and for many other disorders like cancer, fibrosis, inflammation, macular degeneration, diabetic retinopathy, and glaucoma. This report aims to provide a brief overview of concepts, approaches, pharmaceutical compounds, and targets that are currently used to modulate S1P-driven immune functions.

  7. Spacesuit Portable Life Support System Breadboard (PLSS 1.0) Development and Test Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vogel, Matt R.; Watts, Carly

    2011-01-01

    A multi-year effort has been carried out at NASA-JSC to develop an advanced Extravehicular Activity (EVA) PLSS design intended to further the current state of the art by increasing operational flexibility, reducing consumables, and increasing robustness. Previous efforts have focused on modeling and analyzing the advanced PLSS architecture, as well as developing key enabling technologies. Like the current International Space Station (ISS) Extravehicular Mobility Unit (EMU) PLSS, the advanced PLSS comprises of three subsystems required to sustain the crew during EVA including the Thermal, Ventilation, and Oxygen Subsystems. This multi-year effort has culminated in the construction and operation of PLSS 1.0, a test rig that simulates full functionality of the advanced PLSS design. PLSS 1.0 integrates commercial off the shelf hardware with prototype technology development components, including the primary and secondary oxygen regulators, ventilation loop fan, Rapid Cycle Amine (RCA) swingbed, and Spacesuit Water Membrane Evaporator (SWME). Testing accumulated 239 hours over 45 days, while executing 172 test points. Specific PLSS 1.0 test objectives assessed during this testing include: confirming key individual components perform in a system level test as they have performed during component level testing; identifying unexpected system-level interactions; operating PLSS 1.0 in nominal steady-state EVA modes to baseline subsystem performance with respect to metabolic rate, ventilation loop pressure and flow rate, and environmental conditions; simulating nominal transient EVA operational scenarios; simulating contingency EVA operational scenarios; and further evaluating individual technology development components. Successful testing of the PLSS 1.0 provided a large database of test results that characterize system level and component performance. With the exception of several minor anomalies, the PLSS 1.0 test rig performed as expected; furthermore, many system

  8. Heterodiffusion of Ag adatoms on imperfect Au(1 1 0) surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El koraychy, E.; Sbiaai, K.; Mazroui, M.; Ferrando, R.; Boughaleb, Y.

    2017-02-01

    The hetero-diffusion of Ag adatoms on imperfect Au(1 1 0) surfaces is studied using Molecular Dynamics (MD) simulations. The atomic interactions are described by an Embedded Atom Method (EAM) potential. Static activation energies governing various diffusion processes (jumps and exchanges) are calculated by quenched MD, finding that activation energies for interlayer mobility at straight step edges are somewhat larger than those on the flat surface in the cross-channel [1 0 0]-direction, while interlayer barriers at kinks are considerably lower. Dynamic activation energies are calculated at high temperature from the Arrhenius plots of different diffusion mechanisms and compared to static barriers.

  9. Spacesuit Portable Life Support System Breadboard (PLSS 1.0) Development and Test Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Watts, Carly A.; Vogel, Matt

    2012-01-01

    A multi-year effort has been carried out at the Johnson Space Center to develop an advanced EVA PLSS design intended to further the current state of the art by increasing operational flexibility, reducing consumables, and increasing robustness. This multi-year effort has culminated in the construction and operation of PLSS 1.0, a test rig that simulates full functionality of the advanced PLSS design. PLSS 1.0 integrates commercial off-the-shelf hardware with prototype technology development components, including the primary and secondary oxygen regulators, ventilation loop fan, Rapid Cycle Amine (RCA) swingbed, and Spacesuit Water Membrane Evaporator (SWME). PLSS 1.0 was tested from June 17th through September 30th, 2011. Testing accumulated 233 hours over 45 days, while executing 119 test points. An additional 164 hours of operational time were accrued during the test series, bringing the total operational time for PLSS 1.0 testing to 397 hours. Specific PLSS 1.0 test objectives assessed during this testing include: (1) Confirming prototype components perform in a system level test as they have performed during component level testing, (2) Identifying unexpected system-level interactions (3) Operating PLSS 1.0 in nominal steady-state EVA modes to baseline subsystem performance with respect to metabolic rate, ventilation loop pressure and flow rate, and environmental conditions (4) Simulating nominal transient EVA operational scenarios (5) Simulating contingency EVA operational scenarios (6) Further evaluating prototype technology development components Successful testing of the PLSS 1.0 provided a large database of test results that characterize system level and component performance. With the exception of several minor anomalies, the PLSS 1.0 test rig performed as expected. Documented anomalies and observations include: (1) Ventilation loop fan controller issues at high fan speeds (near 70,000 rpm, whereas the fan speed during nominal operations would be closer

  10. Naval Sea Systems Command Acquisition Strategy Guide v1.0

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-04-01

    Strategy Guide v1.0 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) 5d. PROJECT NUMBER 5e. TASK NUMBER 5f. WORK UNIT...FINAL REPORT 20 NAVSEA Acquisition Strategy Guide v1.0 TABLE OF CONTENTS Page 3 Title Page LIST OF TABLES AND FIGURES Table 1...Final Report B-1 APPENDIX C - Acquisition Strategy Suggested Routing Sequence C-1 APPENDIX D – References D-1 APPENDIX E – Acronym List

  11. LITHO1.0: An Updated Crust and Lithosphere Model of the Earth (Postprint)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-03-22

    AFRL-RV-PS- AFRL-RV-PS- TP-2012-0048 TP-2012-0048 LITHO1.0: AN UPDATED CRUST AND LITHOSPHERE MODEL OF THE EARTH (POSTPRINT...01 Sep 2010 to 21 Mar 2012 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE LITHO1.0: AN UPDATED CRUST AND LITHOSPHERE MODEL OF THE EARTH (POSTPRINT) An 5a...sets of longer period phase data that help to constrain deep lithosphere properties. To model these data, a starting model for the crust at a nominal

  12. LITHO1.0: An Updated Crust and Lithosphere Model of the Earth

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-09-01

    REPRINT 3. DATES COVERED (From • To) TITLE AND SUBTITLE -llTHOLO: AN UPDATED CRUST AND LITHOSPHERE MODEL OF THE EARTH J 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER FA8718-09...developing LITHO1.0: an updated crust and lithosphere model of the Earth. The overall plan is to take the popular CRUST2.0 model—a global model of crustal... lithospheric structure. The new model. LITHO 1.0, will be constrained by many different datasets, including extremely large new datasets of relatively

  13. Sphingosine-1-Phosphate (S1P) and S1P Signaling Pathway: Therapeutic Targets in Autoimmunity and Inflammation.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Hsing-Chuan; Han, May H

    2016-07-01

    Sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) and S1P receptors (S1PR) are ubiquitously expressed. S1P-S1PR signaling has been well characterized in immune trafficking and activation in innate and adaptive immune systems. However, the full extent of its involvement in the pathogenesis of autoimmune diseases is not well understood. FTY720 (fingolimod), a non-selective S1PR modulator, significantly decreased annualized relapse rates in relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis (MS). FTY720, which primarily targets S1P receptor 1 as a functional antagonist, arrests lymphocyte egress from secondary lymphoid tissues and reduces neuroinflammation in the central nervous system (CNS). Recent studies suggest that FTY720 also decreases astrogliosis and promotes oligodendrocyte differentiation within the CNS and may have therapeutic benefit to prevent brain atrophy. Since S1P signaling is involved in multiple immune functions, therapies targeting S1P axis may be applicable to treat autoimmune diseases other than MS. Currently, over a dozen selective S1PR and S1P pathway modulators with potentially superior therapeutic efficacy and better side-effect profiles are in the pipeline of drug development. Furthermore, newly characterized molecules such as apolipoprotein M (ApoM) (S1P chaperon) and SPNS2 (S1P transporter) are also potential targets for treatment of autoimmune diseases. Finally, the application of therapies targeting S1P and S1P signaling pathways may be expanded to treat several other immune-mediated disorders (such as post-infectious diseases, post-stroke and post-stroke dementia) and inflammatory conditions beyond their application in primary autoimmune diseases.

  14. High-Dispersion Spectroscopic Observations of Comet C/2012 S1 (ISON) with the Subaru Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shinnaka, Yoshiharu; Kawakita, Hideyo; Nagashima, Masayoshi; Hitomi, Kobayashi; Decock, Alice; Jehin, Emmanuel; Boice, Daniel C.

    2014-11-01

    Comet C/2012 S1 (ISON) was one of the Oort cloud comets and dynamically new. This comet was broken at its perihelion passage on UT 2013 November 28.1 (at Rh ~ 17 solar radius). We observed the comet C/2012 S1 (ISON) on UT 2013 November 15 with the High Dispersion Spectrograph (HDS) mounted on the Subaru Telescope atop Mauna Kea, Hawaii. Its heliocentric and geocentric distances were 0.601 and 0.898 AU, respectively. We selected the slit size of 0”.5 x 9”.0 on the sky to achieve the spectral resolution of R = 72,000 from 550 to 830 nm. The total exposure time of comet C/2012 S1 (ISON) was 1200 seconds. We detected many emission lines caused from radicals (e.g., CN, C2, NH2), ions (H2O+), atoms ([OI] and Na I) and also many unidentified lines in the spectra. We report the (1) the ortho-to-para abundance ratios (OPRs) of water and ammonia estimated from the high-dispersion spectra of H2O+ and NH2, (2) the green-to-red line ratio of forbidden oxygen emissions, (3) the isotopic ratios of C2 (the carbon isotopic ratio from Swan band) and CN (the carbon and nitrogen isotopic ratios from red band), (4) the sodium-to-continuum ratio of comet C/2012 S1 (ISON).

  15. Doubled haploid versus S1 family recurrent selection for testcross performance in a maize population.

    PubMed

    Bordes, J; Charmet, G; de Vaulx, R Dumas; Pollacsek, M; Beckert, M; Gallais, A

    2006-04-01

    Theoretically, in a recurrent selection program, the use of doubled haploids (DH) can increase genetic advance per unit of time. To evaluate the efficiency expected from the use of DH for the improvement of grain yield in a maize (Zea mays L.) population, two recurrent selection programs for testcross performance were initiated using testcross progenies from DH lines and S1 families. In 4 years one selection cycle using DH and two selection cycles using S1 families were carried out with the same selection intensity for both methods. As expected, testcross genetic variance was twice as high among DH lines as among S1 families. The predicted genetic gain was 8.2% for the DH selection cycle, and 10.6% for the two S1 selection cycles, giving a per year advantage of 29% for the S1 family method over the DH method with a cycle of 4 years. With a 3-year cycle for the DH method, both methods were expected to be equivalent. Using a tester related to the one used for selection, the genetic gains obtained were equivalent for both methods: 6.6% for the DH cycle and 7.0% for the two S1 cycles. With a 3-year cycle for the DH method, the advantage would have been in favor of DH method. Furthermore, the DH method has the advantage of simultaneously producing lines that are directly usable as parents of a hybrid. Thus, if the genetic advance per unit of time is evaluated at the level of developed varieties even with the same or with a lower genetic advance in population improvement, the DH method appears to be the most efficient.

  16. GREEN BANK TELESCOPE ZPECTROMETER CO(1-0) OBSERVATIONS OF THE STRONGLY LENSED SUBMILLIMETER GALAXIES FROM THE HERSCHEL ATLAS

    SciTech Connect

    Frayer, D. T.; Maddalena, R.; Harris, A. I.; Baker, A. J.; Ivison, R. J.; Smail, Ian; Negrello, M.; Aretxaga, I.; Baes, M.; Birkinshaw, M.; Bonfield, D. G.; Burgarella, D.; Buttiglione, S.; Cava, A.; Cooray, A.; Dannerbauer, H.

    2011-01-10

    The Herschel Astrophysical Terahertz Large Area Survey (H-ATLAS) has uncovered a population of strongly lensed submillimeter galaxies (SMGs). The Zpectrometer instrument on the Green Bank Telescope (GBT) was used to measure the redshifts and constrain the masses of the cold molecular gas reservoirs for two candidate high-redshift lensed sources. We derive CO(1-0) redshifts of z = 3.042 {+-} 0.001 and z = 2.625 {+-} 0.001, and measure molecular gas masses of (1-3) x10{sup 10} M{sub sun}, corrected for lens amplification and assuming a conversion factor of {alpha} = 0.8 M{sub sun}( K km s{sup -1} pc{sup 2}){sup -1}. We find typical L(IR)/L'(CO) ratios of 120 {+-} 40 and 140 {+-} 50 L{sub sun}( K km s{sup -1} pc{sup 2}){sup -1}, which are consistent with those found for local ultraluminous infrared galaxies (ULIRGs) and other high-redshift SMGs. From analysis of published data, we find no evidence for enhanced L(IR)/L'(CO(1-0)) ratios for the SMG population in comparison to local ULIRGs. The GBT results highlight the power of using the CO lines to derive blind redshifts, which is challenging for the SMGs at optical wavelengths given their high obscuration.

  17. STATE ACID RAIN RESEARCH AND SCREENING SYSTEM - VERSION 1.0 USER'S MANUAL

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report is a user's manual that describes Version 1.0 of EPA's STate Acid Rain Research and Screening System (STARRSS), developed to assist utility regulatory commissions in reviewing utility acid rain compliance plans. It is a screening tool that is based on scenario analysis...

  18. LABCORE post release 1.0 development system project management plan

    SciTech Connect

    Rich, H.S.

    1994-09-29

    The LABCORE post release 1.0 development system project management plan (SPMP) is the primary planning document governing the development of specific enhancements to the LABCORE project. The mission of the Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC) laboratories is changing from supporting the 200 Area chemical processing plants for process control, waste management, and effluent monitoring to supporting environmental restoration and regulatory compliance commitments. The LABCORE program was implemented as the key element for meeting the commitments by upgrading the laboratories through the implementation of an Automated Data Processing improvement program in January 1994. Scope for LABCORE release 1.0 consisted of hardware and software implementation required to support a minimum number of analyses (Single-Shell Tank [SST] analysis at 222S Laboratory and Performance Evaluation samples at the Waste Sampling Characterization Facility laboratory) using manual entry of data, and to support routine laboratory functions, common to all laboratories. LABCORE post release 1.0 enhancements will expand the functionality presented to the laboratory. Post release 1.0 enhancements will also address the integration of a database for Analytical Services Program Integration, budgeting, and scheduling offices into LABCORE.

  19. 32 CFR 1636.5 - Exclusion from Class 1-A-0 and Class 1-0.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... be excluded from Class 1-A-0 or Class 1-0: (a) Who asserts beliefs which are of a religious, moral or... participation in war does not rest at all upon moral, ethical, or religious principle, but instead rests solely... theocratic, spiritual war between the forces of good and evil, he may not by reason of that belief alone...

  20. Safe Surgery Trainer Project Management Plan (PMP), Version 1.0

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-05-30

    Methodology including SCRUM (see http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Scrum_(management) for more info). Although this Safe Surgery Trainer - PMP Version 1.0 5...Agile method similar to Scrum . The internal development team works on a minor iteration cycle that begins/ends on Wednesday. At the beginning of

  1. STARS Conceptual Framework for Reuse Processes (CFRP). Volume 2: application Version 1.0

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-09-30

    This document, STARS Conceptual Framework for Reuse Processes (CFRP), Volume II: Application, Version 1.0, is Volume II of the two-volume STARS CFRP...document set. It provides initial guidance in how to apply the STARS CFRP, as defined in the companion volume, STARS Conceptual Framework for Reuse Processes (CFRP), Volume I: Definition, Version 3.0

  2. SAGE FOR WINDOWS (WSAGE) VERSION 1.0 SOLVENT ALTERNATIVES GUIDE - USER'S GUIDE

    EPA Science Inventory

    The guide provides instructions for using the Solvent Alternatives Guide (SAGE) for Windows, version 1.0. The guide assumes that the user is familiar with the fundamentals of operating Windows 3.1 (or higher) on a personal computer under the DOS 5.0 (or higher) operating system. ...

  3. SAGE FOR MACINTOSH (MSAGE) VERSION 1.0 SOLVENT ALTERNATIVES GUIDE - USER'S GUIDE

    EPA Science Inventory

    The guide provides instructions for using the Solvent Alternatives Guide (SAGE) for Macintosh, version 1.0. The guide assumes that the user is familiar with the fundamentals of operating a
    Macintosh personal computer under the System 7.0 (or higher) operating system. SAGE for ...

  4. Developing iCare v.1.0: an academic electronic health record.

    PubMed

    Wyatt, Tami H; Li, Xueping; Indranoi, Chayawat; Bell, Matthew

    2012-06-01

    An electronic health record application, iCare v.1.0, was developed and tested that allows data input and retrieval while tracking student performance over time. The development and usability testing of iCare v.1.0 followed a rapid prototyping software development and testing model. Once the functionality was tested by engineers, the usability and feasibility testing began with a convenience sample of focus group members including undergraduate and graduate students and faculty. Three focus groups were created, and four subjects participated in each focus group (n = 12). Nielsen's usability heuristics and methods of evaluation were used to evaluate data captured from each focus group. Overall, users wanted a full-featured electronic health record with features that coached or guided users. The earliest versions of iCare v.1.0 did not provide help features and prompts to guide students but were later added. Future versions will incorporate a full-featured help section. The interface and design of iCare v.1.0 are similar to professional electronic health record applications. As a result of this usability study, future versions of iCare will include more robust help features along with advanced reporting and elements specific to specialty populations such as pediatrics and mental health services.

  5. A Review of DIMPACK Version 1.0: Conditional Covariance-Based Test Dimensionality Analysis Package

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Deng, Nina; Han, Kyung T.; Hambleton, Ronald K.

    2013-01-01

    DIMPACK Version 1.0 for assessing test dimensionality based on a nonparametric conditional covariance approach is reviewed. This software was originally distributed by Assessment Systems Corporation and now can be freely accessed online. The software consists of Windows-based interfaces of three components: DIMTEST, DETECT, and CCPROX/HAC, which…

  6. Patriot Script 1.0.13 User Guide for PEM 1.3.2

    SciTech Connect

    Cleland, Timothy James; Kubicek, Deborah Ann; Stroud, Phillip David; Cuellar-Hengartner, Leticia; Mathis, Mark

    2015-11-02

    This document provides an updated user guide for Patriot Script Version 1.0.13, for release with PEM 1.3.1 (LAUR-1422817) that adds description and instructions for the new excursion capability (see section 4.5.1).

  7. 1.0 Mm Maps and Radial Density Distributions of Southern Hii/molecular Cloud Complexes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cheung, L. H.; Frogel, J. A.; Gezar, D. Y.; Hauser, M. G.

    1980-01-01

    Several 1.0 continuum mapping observations were made of seven southern hemisphere h12/molecular cloud complexes with 65 arcsec resolution. The radial density distribution of the clouds with central luminosity sources was determined observationally. Strong similarities in morphology and general physical conditions were found to exist among all of the southern clouds in the sample.

  8. Space Suit Portable Life Support System Test Bed (PLSS 1.0) Development and Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Watts, Carly; Campbell, Colin; Vogel, Matthew; Conger, Bruce

    2012-01-01

    A multi-year effort has been carried out at NASA-JSC to develop an advanced extra-vehicular activity Portable Life Support System (PLSS) design intended to further the current state of the art by increasing operational flexibility, reducing consumables, and increasing robustness. Previous efforts have focused on modeling and analyzing the advanced PLSS architecture, as well as developing key enabling technologies. Like the current International Space Station Extra-vehicular Mobility Unit PLSS, the advanced PLSS comprises three subsystems required to sustain the crew during extra-vehicular activity including the Thermal, Ventilation, and Oxygen Subsystems. This multi-year effort has culminated in the construction and operation of PLSS 1.0, a test bed that simulates full functionality of the advanced PLSS design. PLSS 1.0 integrates commercial off the shelf hardware with prototype technology development components, including the primary and secondary oxygen regulators, Ventilation Subsystem fan, Rapid Cycle Amine swingbed carbon dioxide and water vapor removal device, and Spacesuit Water Membrane Evaporator heat rejection device. The overall PLSS 1.0 test objective was to demonstrate the capability of the Advanced PLSS to provide key life support functions including suit pressure regulation, carbon dioxide and water vapor removal, thermal control and contingency purge operations. Supplying oxygen was not one of the specific life support functions because the PLSS 1.0 test was not oxygen rated. Nitrogen was used for the working gas. Additional test objectives were to confirm PLSS technology development components performance within an integrated test bed, identify unexpected system level interactions, and map the PLSS 1.0 performance with respect to key variables such as crewmember metabolic rate and suit pressure. Successful PLSS 1.0 testing completed 168 test points over 44 days of testing and produced a large database of test results that characterize system level

  9. caGrid 1.0: An Enterprise Grid Infrastructure for Biomedical Research

    PubMed Central

    Oster, Scott; Langella, Stephen; Hastings, Shannon; Ervin, David; Madduri, Ravi; Phillips, Joshua; Kurc, Tahsin; Siebenlist, Frank; Covitz, Peter; Shanbhag, Krishnakant; Foster, Ian; Saltz, Joel

    2008-01-01

    Objective To develop software infrastructure that will provide support for discovery, characterization, integrated access, and management of diverse and disparate collections of information sources, analysis methods, and applications in biomedical research. Design An enterprise Grid software infrastructure, called caGrid version 1.0 (caGrid 1.0), has been developed as the core Grid architecture of the NCI-sponsored cancer Biomedical Informatics Grid (caBIG™) program. It is designed to support a wide range of use cases in basic, translational, and clinical research, including 1) discovery, 2) integrated and large-scale data analysis, and 3) coordinated study. Measurements The caGrid is built as a Grid software infrastructure and leverages Grid computing technologies and the Web Services Resource Framework standards. It provides a set of core services, toolkits for the development and deployment of new community provided services, and application programming interfaces for building client applications. Results The caGrid 1.0 was released to the caBIG community in December 2006. It is built on open source components and caGrid source code is publicly and freely available under a liberal open source license. The core software, associated tools, and documentation can be downloaded from the following URL: https://cabig.nci.nih.gov/workspaces/Architecture/caGrid. Conclusions While caGrid 1.0 is designed to address use cases in cancer research, the requirements associated with discovery, analysis and integration of large scale data, and coordinated studies are common in other biomedical fields. In this respect, caGrid 1.0 is the realization of a framework that can benefit the entire biomedical community. PMID:18096909

  10. Radiation hardness assessment of the charge-integrating hybrid pixel detector JUNGFRAU 1.0 for photon science

    SciTech Connect

    Jungmann-Smith, J. H. Bergamaschi, A.; Brückner, M.; Dinapoli, R.; Greiffenberg, D.; Jaggi, A.; Maliakal, D.; Mayilyan, D.; Mezza, D.; Mozzanica, A.; Ramilli, M.; Ruder, Ch.; Schädler, L.; Schmitt, B.; Shi, X.; Tinti, G.; Cartier, S.; Medjoubi, K.

    2015-12-15

    JUNGFRAU (adJUstiNg Gain detector FoR the Aramis User station) is a two-dimensional hybrid pixel detector for photon science applications in free electron lasers, particularly SwissFEL, and synchrotron light sources. JUNGFRAU is an automatic gain switching, charge-integrating detector which covers a dynamic range of more than 10{sup 4} photons of an energy of 12 keV with a good linearity, uniformity of response, and spatial resolving power. The JUNGFRAU 1.0 application-specific integrated circuit (ASIC) features a 256 × 256 pixel matrix of 75 × 75 μm{sup 2} pixels and is bump-bonded to a 320 μm thick Si sensor. Modules of 2 × 4 chips cover an area of about 4 × 8 cm{sup 2}. Readout rates in excess of 2 kHz enable linear count rate capabilities of 20 MHz (at 12 keV) and 50 MHz (at 5 keV). The tolerance of JUNGFRAU to radiation is a key issue to guarantee several years of operation at free electron lasers and synchrotrons. The radiation hardness of JUNGFRAU 1.0 is tested with synchrotron radiation up to 10 MGy of delivered dose. The effect of radiation-induced changes on the noise, baseline, gain, and gain switching is evaluated post-irradiation for both the ASIC and the hybridized assembly. The bare JUNGFRAU 1.0 chip can withstand doses as high as 10 MGy with minor changes to its noise and a reduction in the preamplifier gain. The hybridized assembly, in particular the sensor, is affected by the photon irradiation which mainly shows as an increase in the leakage current. Self-healing of the system is investigated during a period of 11 weeks after the delivery of the radiation dose. Annealing radiation-induced changes by bake-out at 100 °C is investigated. It is concluded that the JUNGFRAU 1.0 pixel is sufficiently radiation-hard for its envisioned applications at SwissFEL and synchrotron beam lines.

  11. Radiation hardness assessment of the charge-integrating hybrid pixel detector JUNGFRAU 1.0 for photon science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jungmann-Smith, J. H.; Bergamaschi, A.; Brückner, M.; Cartier, S.; Dinapoli, R.; Greiffenberg, D.; Jaggi, A.; Maliakal, D.; Mayilyan, D.; Medjoubi, K.; Mezza, D.; Mozzanica, A.; Ramilli, M.; Ruder, Ch.; Schädler, L.; Schmitt, B.; Shi, X.; Tinti, G.

    2015-12-01

    JUNGFRAU (adJUstiNg Gain detector FoR the Aramis User station) is a two-dimensional hybrid pixel detector for photon science applications in free electron lasers, particularly SwissFEL, and synchrotron light sources. JUNGFRAU is an automatic gain switching, charge-integrating detector which covers a dynamic range of more than 104 photons of an energy of 12 keV with a good linearity, uniformity of response, and spatial resolving power. The JUNGFRAU 1.0 application-specific integrated circuit (ASIC) features a 256 × 256 pixel matrix of 75 × 75 μm2 pixels and is bump-bonded to a 320 μm thick Si sensor. Modules of 2 × 4 chips cover an area of about 4 × 8 cm2. Readout rates in excess of 2 kHz enable linear count rate capabilities of 20 MHz (at 12 keV) and 50 MHz (at 5 keV). The tolerance of JUNGFRAU to radiation is a key issue to guarantee several years of operation at free electron lasers and synchrotrons. The radiation hardness of JUNGFRAU 1.0 is tested with synchrotron radiation up to 10 MGy of delivered dose. The effect of radiation-induced changes on the noise, baseline, gain, and gain switching is evaluated post-irradiation for both the ASIC and the hybridized assembly. The bare JUNGFRAU 1.0 chip can withstand doses as high as 10 MGy with minor changes to its noise and a reduction in the preamplifier gain. The hybridized assembly, in particular the sensor, is affected by the photon irradiation which mainly shows as an increase in the leakage current. Self-healing of the system is investigated during a period of 11 weeks after the delivery of the radiation dose. Annealing radiation-induced changes by bake-out at 100 °C is investigated. It is concluded that the JUNGFRAU 1.0 pixel is sufficiently radiation-hard for its envisioned applications at SwissFEL and synchrotron beam lines.

  12. Radiation hardness assessment of the charge-integrating hybrid pixel detector JUNGFRAU 1.0 for photon science.

    PubMed

    Jungmann-Smith, J H; Bergamaschi, A; Brückner, M; Cartier, S; Dinapoli, R; Greiffenberg, D; Jaggi, A; Maliakal, D; Mayilyan, D; Medjoubi, K; Mezza, D; Mozzanica, A; Ramilli, M; Ruder, Ch; Schädler, L; Schmitt, B; Shi, X; Tinti, G

    2015-12-01

    JUNGFRAU (adJUstiNg Gain detector FoR the Aramis User station) is a two-dimensional hybrid pixel detector for photon science applications in free electron lasers, particularly SwissFEL, and synchrotron light sources. JUNGFRAU is an automatic gain switching, charge-integrating detector which covers a dynamic range of more than 10(4) photons of an energy of 12 keV with a good linearity, uniformity of response, and spatial resolving power. The JUNGFRAU 1.0 application-specific integrated circuit (ASIC) features a 256 × 256 pixel matrix of 75 × 75 μm(2) pixels and is bump-bonded to a 320 μm thick Si sensor. Modules of 2 × 4 chips cover an area of about 4 × 8 cm(2). Readout rates in excess of 2 kHz enable linear count rate capabilities of 20 MHz (at 12 keV) and 50 MHz (at 5 keV). The tolerance of JUNGFRAU to radiation is a key issue to guarantee several years of operation at free electron lasers and synchrotrons. The radiation hardness of JUNGFRAU 1.0 is tested with synchrotron radiation up to 10 MGy of delivered dose. The effect of radiation-induced changes on the noise, baseline, gain, and gain switching is evaluated post-irradiation for both the ASIC and the hybridized assembly. The bare JUNGFRAU 1.0 chip can withstand doses as high as 10 MGy with minor changes to its noise and a reduction in the preamplifier gain. The hybridized assembly, in particular the sensor, is affected by the photon irradiation which mainly shows as an increase in the leakage current. Self-healing of the system is investigated during a period of 11 weeks after the delivery of the radiation dose. Annealing radiation-induced changes by bake-out at 100 °C is investigated. It is concluded that the JUNGFRAU 1.0 pixel is sufficiently radiation-hard for its envisioned applications at SwissFEL and synchrotron beam lines.

  13. S1P and the birth of platelets.

    PubMed

    Hla, Timothy; Galvani, Sylvain; Rafii, Shahin; Nachman, Ralph

    2012-11-19

    Recent work has highlighted the multitude of biological functions of sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P), which include roles in hematopoietic cell trafficking, organization of immune organs, vascular development, and neuroinflammation. Indeed, a functional antagonist of S1P(1) receptor, FTY720/Gilenya, has entered the clinic as a novel therapeutic for multiple sclerosis. In this issue of the JEM, Zhang et al. highlight yet another function of this lipid mediator: thrombopoiesis. The S1P(1) receptor is required for the growth of proplatelet strings in the bloodstream and the shedding of platelets into the circulation. Notably, the sharp gradient of S1P between blood and the interstitial fluids seems to be essential to ensure the production of platelets, and S1P appears to cooperate with the CXCL12-CXCR4 axis. Pharmacologic modulation of the S1P(1) receptor altered circulating platelet numbers acutely, suggesting a potential therapeutic strategy for controlling thrombocytopenic states. However, the S1P(4) receptor may also regulate thrombopoiesis during stress-induced accelerated platelet production. This work reveals a novel physiological action of the S1P/S1P(1) duet that could potentially be harnessed for clinical translation.

  14. Effect of combined treatment with micelle-incorporated cisplatin (NC-6004) and S-1 on human gastric cancer xenografts

    PubMed Central

    Kudo, Masahisa; Yamamoto, Yoshiyuki; Koga, Yoshikatsu; Hamaguchi, Tetsuya; Akimoto, Tetsuo; Yasunaga, Masahiro; Matsumura, Yasuhiro

    2016-01-01

    Combination therapy with S-1 and cisplatin (CDDP) is the standard chemotherapy for advanced gastric cancer in Japan; however, its administration requires hospitalization for hydration to prevent nephrotoxicity from CDDP. By contrast, NC-6004 appears to reduce the renal toxicity of CDDP and may be used on an outpatient basis. Thus, the effects of combined treatment with S-1 and NC-6004 were compared with those of S-1 and CDDP in a human gastric cancer model. In vitro cytotoxic effects were investigated in 44As3Luc, MKN45 and MKN74 human gastric cancer cell lines. The effects of NC-6004 and 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) were compared with the effects of CDDP and 5-FU using the combination index method. The in vivo antitumor effects of S-1/NC-6004 and S-1/CDDP were evaluated in mice bearing 44As3Luc xenografts. Both combinations exhibited synergistic activity in MKN45 and MKN74 cells and additive effects in 44As3Luc cells. Moreover, the in vivo antitumor effects did not differ between the S-1/NC-6004 and S-1/CDDP treatment groups. However, a significantly lower body weight loss was observed in S-1/NC-6004-treated mice compared with the S-1/CDDP-treated mice. Our data warrant a clinical evaluation of S-1/NC-6004 combination therapy. PMID:28101359

  15. Assay to measure the secretion of sphingosine-1-phosphate from cells induced by S1P lyase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Loetscher, Erika; Schneider, Karolina; Beerli, Christian; Billich, Andreas

    2013-04-12

    Inhibitors of the sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) degrading enzyme S1P lyase (SPL) may be useful in the therapy of inflammatory diseases by preventing lymphocyte recruitment to diseased tissues. Here we describe a cellular assay for such inhibitors, which takes advantage of the observation that a fraction of the intracellular S1P accumulated in the presence of SPL inhibitors is secreted into the medium of cultured cells. The secreted S1P is then quantified using an S1P-sensitive reporter cell line. In the routine assay protocol, human HEK293T cells are treated with SPL inhibitors in the presence of phosphatase inhibitors and sphingosine; while the phosphatase inhibitors are included to prevent the degradation of S1P secreted from the cells, sphingosine is added as source for intracellular S1P that is prone to SPL degradation. The secreted S1P in the supernatant of the cell cultures is then quantified by measuring calcium flux induced in CHO-K1 cells expressing the human S1P3 receptor. Using this method SPL inhibitors were shown to induce a concentration-dependent increase of extracellular S1P under the conditions used; thus, the assay allows for the ranking of SPL inhibitors according to their potency on living cells.

  16. Effect of combined treatment with micelle-incorporated cisplatin (NC-6004) and S-1 on human gastric cancer xenografts.

    PubMed

    Kudo, Masahisa; Yamamoto, Yoshiyuki; Koga, Yoshikatsu; Hamaguchi, Tetsuya; Akimoto, Tetsuo; Yasunaga, Masahiro; Matsumura, Yasuhiro

    2016-12-01

    Combination therapy with S-1 and cisplatin (CDDP) is the standard chemotherapy for advanced gastric cancer in Japan; however, its administration requires hospitalization for hydration to prevent nephrotoxicity from CDDP. By contrast, NC-6004 appears to reduce the renal toxicity of CDDP and may be used on an outpatient basis. Thus, the effects of combined treatment with S-1 and NC-6004 were compared with those of S-1 and CDDP in a human gastric cancer model. In vitro cytotoxic effects were investigated in 44As3Luc, MKN45 and MKN74 human gastric cancer cell lines. The effects of NC-6004 and 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) were compared with the effects of CDDP and 5-FU using the combination index method. The in vivo antitumor effects of S-1/NC-6004 and S-1/CDDP were evaluated in mice bearing 44As3Luc xenografts. Both combinations exhibited synergistic activity in MKN45 and MKN74 cells and additive effects in 44As3Luc cells. Moreover, the in vivo antitumor effects did not differ between the S-1/NC-6004 and S-1/CDDP treatment groups. However, a significantly lower body weight loss was observed in S-1/NC-6004-treated mice compared with the S-1/CDDP-treated mice. Our data warrant a clinical evaluation of S-1/NC-6004 combination therapy.

  17. Discovery of a pre-existing molecular filament associated with supernova remnant G127.1+0.5

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, Xin; Yang, Ji; Fang, Min; Su, Yang

    2014-08-20

    We performed millimeter observations in CO lines toward the supernova remnant (SNR) G127.1+0.5. We found a molecular filament at 4-13 km s{sup –1} consisting of two distinct parts: a straight part coming out of the remnant region and a curved part in the remnant region. The curved part is coincides well with the bright SNR shell detected in 1420 MHz radio continuum and mid-infrared observations in the northeastern region. In addition, redshifted line wing broadening is found only in the curved part of the molecular filament, which indicates a physical interaction. These provide strong evidences, for the first time, to confirm the association between an SNR and a pre-existing long molecular filament. Multi-band observations in the northeastern remnant shell could be explained by the interaction between the remnant shock and the dense molecular filament. RADEX radiative transfer modeling of the quiet and shocked components yield physical conditions consistent with the passage of a non-dissociative J-type shock. We argue that the curved part of the filament is fully engulfed by the remnant's forward shock. A spatial correlation between aggregated young stellar objects (YSOs) and the adjacent molecular filament close to the SNR is also found, which could be related to the progenitor's activity.

  18. RGUI 1.0, New Graphical User Interface for RELAP5-3D

    SciTech Connect

    Mesina, George Lee; Galbraith, James Andrew

    1999-04-01

    With the advent of three-dimensional modeling in nuclear safety analysis codes, the need has arisen for a new display methodology. Currently, analysts either sort through voluminous numerical displays of data at points in a region, or view color coded interpretations of the data on a two-dimensional rendition of the plant. RGUI 1.0 provides 3D capability for displaying data. The 3D isometric hydrodynamic image is built automatically from the input deck without additional input from the user. Standard view change features allow the user to focus on only the important data. Familiar features that are standard to the nuclear industry, such as run, interact, and monitor, are included. RGUI 1.0 reduces the difficulty of analyzing complex three dimensional plants.

  19. RGUI 1.0, New Graphical User Interface for RELAP5-3D

    SciTech Connect

    G. L. Mesina; J. Galbraith

    1999-04-01

    With the advent of three-dimensional modeling in nuclear safety analysis codes, the need has arisen for a new display methodology. Currently, analysts either sort through voluminous numerical displays of data at points in a region, or view color coded interpretations of the data on a two-dimensional rendition of the plant. RGUI 1.0 provides 3D capability for displaying data. The 3D isometric hydrodynamic image is built automatically from the input deck without additional input from the user. Standard view change features allow the user to focus on only the important data. Familiar features that are standard to the nuclear industry, such as run, interact, and monitor, are included. RGUI 1.0 reduces the difficulty of analyzing complex three-dimensional plants.

  20. C Fe chains due to segregated carbon impurities on Fe(1 0 0)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujii, Jun; Panaccione, Giancarlo; Vobornik, Ivana; Rossi, Giorgio; Trimarchi, Giancarlo; Binggeli, Nadia

    2006-09-01

    Bulk carbon impurities segregate at the Fe(1 0 0) surface and, upon thermal annealing, can form metastable surface phases with local and long range order and peculiar electronic properties. We present a surface science study of C-segregated Fe(1 0 0) with scanning tunneling microscopy, angle resolved photoemission, and ab initio calculations of the surface structure and electron states. In particular the c(3√2 × √2) structure, observed for 0.67 atomic layers of C segregated at the iron surface, is found to be due to self-organized carbon stripes made of zig-zag chains. The strong hybridization between C and Fe was observed in ARPES spectra.

  1. Building the Fire Energetics and Emissions Research (FEER) Smoke Emissions Inventory Version 1.0

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ellison, Luke; Ichoku, Charles; Zhang, Feng; Wang, Jun

    2014-01-01

    The Fire Energetics and Emissions Research (FEER) group's new coefficient of emission global gridded product at 1x1 resolution that directly relates fire readiative energy (FRE) to smoke aerosol release, FEERv1.0 Ce, made its public debut in August 2013. Since then, steps have been taken to generate corresponding maps and totals of total particulate matter (PM) emissions using different sources of FRE, and subsequently to simulate the resulting PM(sub 2.5) in the WRF-Chem 3.5 model using emission rates from FEERv1.0 as well as other standard biomass burning emission inventories. An flowchart of the FEER algorithm to calculate Ce is outlined here along with a display of the resulting emissions of total PM globally and also regionally. The modeling results from the WRF-Chem3.5 simulations are also shown.

  2. Electrochemical properties of palladium adlayers on Pt(1 0 0) substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Álvarez, B.; Berná, A.; Rodes, A.; Feliu, J. M.

    2004-12-01

    The formation of submonolayers of palladium on well-defined Pt(1 0 0) electrodes is described. It has been found that the adsorption of NO at open circuit and its further reductive stripping enable the possibility to prepare Pt(1 0 0) electrodes fully covered by the first palladium layer, without contributions coming from palladium in the subsequent layers. This method enables a better characterization of the palladium islands formed in the submonolayer range. The CO displacement method points out that hydrogen and anion adsorption play a role in the charge transfer processes involved in the voltammetric profile. The analysis of the charge-potential curves is used to determine the values of the potentials of zero total charge (pztc) of the different adelectrodes. The pztc diminishes almost linearly with palladium coverage, this shift being related to increasing anion adsorption at low potentials. Adsorbed palladium does not electrocatalyze the oxidation of adsorbed CO.

  3. Medusa-1.0: a new intermediate complexity plankton ecosystem model for the global domain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yool, A.; Popova, E. E.; Anderson, T. R.

    2011-05-01

    The ongoing, anthropogenically-driven changes to the global ocean are expected to have significant consequences for plankton ecosystems in the future. Because of the role that plankton play in the ocean's "biological pump", changes in abundance, distribution and productivity will likely have additional consequences for the wider carbon cycle. Just as in the terrestrial biosphere, marine ecosystems exhibit marked diversity in species and functional types of organisms. Predicting potential change in plankton ecosystems therefore requires the use of models that are suited to this diversity, but whose parameterisation also permits robust and realistic functional behaviour. In the past decade, advances in model sophistication have attempted to address diversity, but have been criticised for doing so inaccurately or ahead of a requisite understanding of underlying processes. Here we introduce MEDUSA-1.0 (Model of Ecosystem Dynamics, nutrient Utilisation, Sequestration and Acidification), a new "intermediate complexity" plankton ecosystem model that expands on traditional nutrient-phytoplankton-zooplankton-detritus (NPZD) models, and remains amenable to global-scale evaluation. MEDUSA-1.0 includes the biogeochemical cycles of nitrogen, silicon and iron, broadly structured into "small" and "large" plankton size classes, of which the "large" phytoplankton class is representative of a key phytoplankton group, the diatoms. A full description of MEDUSA-1.0's state variables, differential equations, functional forms and parameter values is included, with particular attention focused on the submodel describing the export of organic carbon from the surface to the deep ocean. MEDUSA-1.0 is used here in a multi-decadal hindcast simulation, and its biogeochemical performance evaluated at the global scale.

  4. CERT Resilience Management Model - Mail-Specific Process Areas: Mail Revenue Assurance (Version 1.0)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-08-01

    also be affixed to mailpieces. 1 Presort is the process by which a mailer prepares mail so that it is sorted to at least the finest extent required by...CERT Resilience Management Model— Mail -Specific Process Areas: Mail Revenue Assurance (Version 1.0) Julia H. Allen Gregory Crabb (United...of Carnegie Mellon University. DM-0001550 Table of Contents Abstract iii Introduction 1 Mail Revenue Assurance 3 Purpose 3 Outline

  5. Which Best Practices Are Best For Me? Version 1.0

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2004-01-01

    can choose: ISO 17799 (International Organization for Standardization) CoBiT (Control Objectives for Information & Related Technology) NIST 800...supports the security requirements of an information asset or system. © 2004 by Carnegie Mellon University Version 1.0 page 5 Information Security...The owner of the asset 4. A list of stakeholders (e.g. consumers) 5 . Asset security requirements 6. A valuation © 2004 by Carnegie Mellon University

  6. Intrinsic magnetic properties of L1(0) FeNi obtained from meteorite NWA 6259

    SciTech Connect

    Poirier, E; Pinkerton, FE; Kubic, R; Mishra, RK; Bordeaux, N; Mubarok, A; Lewis, LH; Goldstein, JI; Skomski, R; Barmak, K

    2015-05-07

    FeNi having the tetragonal L1(0) crystal structure is a promising new rare-earth-free permanent magnet material. Laboratory synthesis is challenging, however, tetragonal L1(0) FeNi-the mineral "tetrataenite"-has been characterized using specimens found in nickel-iron meteorites. Most notably, the meteorite NWA 6259 recovered from Northwest Africa is 95 vol.% tetrataenite with a composition of 43 at.% Ni. Hysteresis loops were measured as a function of sample orientation on a specimen cut from NWA 6259 in order to rigorously deduce the intrinsic hard magnetic properties of its L1(0) phase. Electron backscatter diffraction showed that NWA 6259 is strongly textured, containing L1(0) grains oriented along any one of the three equivalent cubic directions of the parent fcc structure. The magnetic structure was modeled as a superposition of the three orthonormal uniaxial variants. By simultaneously fitting first-quadrant magnetization data for 13 different orientations of the sample with respect to the applied field direction, the intrinsic magnetic properties were estimated to be saturation magnetization 4 pi M-s = 14.7 kG and anisotropy field H-a = 14.4 kOe. The anisotropy constant K = 0.84 MJ/m(3) is somewhat smaller than the value K = 1.3 MJ/m(3) obtained by earlier researchers from nominally equiatomic FeNi prepared by neutron irradiation accompanied by annealing in a magnetic field, suggesting that higher Ni content (fewer Fe antisite defects) may improve the anisotropy. The fit also indicated that NWA 6259 contains one dominant variant (62% by volume), the remainder of the sample being a second variant, and the third variant being absent altogether. (C) 2015 AIP Publishing LLC.

  7. Transferable Output ASCII Data (TOAD) gateway: Version 1.0 user's guide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bingel, Bradford D.

    1991-01-01

    The Transferable Output ASCII Data (TOAD) Gateway, release 1.0 is described. This is a software tool for converting tabular data from one format into another via the TOAD format. This initial release of the Gateway allows free data interchange among the following file formats: TOAD; Standard Interface File (SIF); Program to Optimize Simulated Trajectories (POST) input; Comma Separated Value (TSV); and a general free-form file format. As required, additional formats can be accommodated quickly and easily.

  8. Poblano v1.0 : a Matlab toolbox for gradient-based optimization.

    SciTech Connect

    Dunlavy, Daniel M.; Acar, Evrim; Kolda, Tamara Gibson

    2010-03-01

    We present Poblano v1.0, a Matlab toolbox for solving gradient-based unconstrained optimization problems. Poblano implements three optimization methods (nonlinear conjugate gradients, limited-memory BFGS, and truncated Newton) that require only first order derivative information. In this paper, we describe the Poblano methods, provide numerous examples on how to use Poblano, and present results of Poblano used in solving problems from a standard test collection of unconstrained optimization problems.

  9. SMC Orbital/Sub-Orbital Debris Mitigation User’s Handbook, Version 1.0

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2002-07-01

    SUBTITLE SMC Orbital/Sub- Orbital Debris Mitigation User’s Handbook Version 1.0 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6... Orbital Debris ..................................................................... A-6 4.1 Design Considerations...orbital (or space) debris and sub- orbital debris . Space debris is defined as any non-functioning man-made object orbiting the Earth. This definition

  10. Slab1.0: A three-dimensional model of global subduction zone geometries

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hayes, G.P.; Wald, D.J.; Johnson, R.L.

    2012-01-01

    We describe and present a new model of global subduction zone geometries, called Slab1.0. An extension of previous efforts to constrain the two-dimensional non-planar geometry of subduction zones around the focus of large earthquakes, Slab1.0 describes the detailed, non-planar, three-dimensional geometry of approximately 85% of subduction zones worldwide. While the model focuses on the detailed form of each slab from their trenches through the seismogenic zone, where it combines data sets from active source and passive seismology, it also continues to the limits of their seismic extent in the upper-mid mantle, providing a uniform approach to the definition of the entire seismically active slab geometry. Examples are shown for two well-constrained global locations; models for many other regions are available and can be freely downloaded in several formats from our new Slab1.0 website, http://on.doi.gov/ d9ARbS. We describe improvements in our two-dimensional geometry constraint inversion, including the use of average active source seismic data profiles in the shallow trench regions where data are otherwise lacking, derived from the interpolation between other active source seismic data along-strike in the same subduction zone. We include several analyses of the uncertainty and robustness of our three-dimensional interpolation methods. In addition, we use the filtered, subduction-related earthquake data sets compiled to build Slab1.0 in a reassessment of previous analyses of the deep limit of the thrust interface seismogenic zone for all subduction zones included in our global model thus far, concluding that the width of these seismogenic zones is on average 30% larger than previous studies have suggested. Copyright 2011 by the American Geophysical Union.

  11. Defense Security Enterprise Architecture (DSEA) Product Reference Guide. Revision 1.0

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-06-01

    Product Reference Guide Revision 1.0 June 2016 Closing Information Sharing and Security Gaps for the Department of Defense i CONTENTS 1...KEYSTONE (DSEA SERVICE AVAILABLE FOR TRANSITION) 20 7.9 PHYSICAL SECURITY INTEGRATION FRAMEWORK (PSIF) – (ENDPOINT DATA SHARING SYSTEM) 20 8...AND NAVAL WARFARE SYSTEMS CENTER PACIFIC (SSC PACIFC) – XM (TRANSITION MANAGER) 22 9. TRANSITION AND TECHNICAL INTEGRATION PARTNERS 23 9.1 DTRA

  12. RealGasBrine v1.0 option of TOUGH+ v1.5

    SciTech Connect

    Moridis, George

    2015-02-27

    RealGasBrine v1.0 is a numerical code that for the simulation of the behavior of gas-bearing porous and/fractured geologic media. It is an option of TOUGH+ v1.5 [Moridis, 2014], a successor to the TOUGH2 [Pruess et al., 1999; 2012] family of codes for multi-component, multiphase ?uid and heat ?ow developed at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. RealGasBrine v1.0 needs the TOUGH+ v1.5 core code in order to compile and execute. It is written in standard FORTRAN 95/2003, and can be run on any computational platform (workstation, PC, Macintosh) for which such compilers are available. RealGasBrine v1.0 describes the non-isothermal two- (for pure water) or three-phase (for brine) flow of an aqueous phase and a real gas mixture in a gas-bearing medium, with a particular focus in ultra-tight (such as tight-sand and shale gas) systems. Up to 12 individual real gases can be tracked, and salt can precipitate as solid halite. The capabilities of the code include coupled flow and thermal effects, real gas behavior, Darcy and non-Darcy flow, several isotherm options of gas sorption onto the grains of the porous media, complex fracture descriptions, gas solubility into water, and geomechanical effects on flow properties. RealGasBrine v1.0 allows the study of flow and transport of fluids and heat over a wide range of time frames and spatial scales not only in gas reservoirs, but also in any problem involving the flow of gases in geologic media, including the geologic storage of greenhouse gas mixtures, the behavior of geothermal reservoirs with multi-component condensable (H2O and CO2) and non-condensable gas mixtures, the transport of water and released H2 in nuclear waste storage applications, etc.

  13. Guide for Integrating Systems Engineering into DoD Acquisition Contracts Version 1.0

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-12-11

    Acquisition Contracts Version 1.0 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) 5d. PROJECT NUMBER 5e. TASK NUMBER...38 List of Figures UFigure 1-1 Simplified Government Acquisition ProcessU...Development ATL-ED@osd.mil ii List of Tables UTable 1-1 Summary of Contracting Activities and SE and PM RolesU

  14. Extending the global coverage of Slab1.0 3D subduction zone models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seidman, L.; Hayes, G. P.

    2013-12-01

    Slab1.0 is a three-dimensional model of subduction zone geometries that covers approximately 85% of global slabs by area. It is built from an automated interpolation of a combined dataset made up from subduction-related earthquakes, moment tensors, interpretations of active source seismic data, and models of bathymetry and sediment thickness. Those subduction zones that are missing from the model are difficult to characterize with this automated approach because of sparse teleseismically located, interplate seismicity (e.g., Cascadia, Hikurangi), complex geometry (e.g., Halmahera, southern Philippine Sea), or some combination of these issues (e.g., Caribbean). Here we attempt to solve this problem with a straightforward modification of the Slab1.0 approach. Instead of constructing a series of automated spline fits to our geophysical data in two-dimensional cross sections, we produce hand-contoured two-dimensional fits; under the assumption that where seismicity is sparse or geometry complex, a human guided by tectonic knowledge can produce a better fit to geometry than can a computer algorithm. These manual 2D sections are then interpolated into a 3D surface in the same way automated 2D fits are processed for Slab1.0. Following this approach, we produce models for slabs in the Caribbean, the Makran, the Manila Trench, the Halmahera Plate, and the Hellenic Arc. We also address regions of current models (e.g., Peru) that were poorly characterized by the original automated approach. These new models thus provide valuable information on subduction zone structure from the trench and into the mantle in regions previously missing from Slab1.0, and help to make existing models more accurate, and thus more useful, than was previously possible. In turn, the models can be used to better characterize associated seismic hazards.

  15. RoboNet-1.0: A Prototype Global Network of Large Robotic Telescopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bode, M. F.; Cardiff U. Collaboration; U. Hertfordshire Collaboration; U. Leicester Collaboration; St Andrews U. Collaboration; Queens U., Belfast Collaboration; Mullard Space Science Lab. Collaboration; U. Exeter Collaboration; U. Southampton Collaboration; U. Manchester Collaboration

    2004-12-01

    Involving a consortium of 10 UK universities, RoboNet-1.0 comprises the Liverpool Telescope (LT, La Palma), plus specially allocated time on the Faulkes Telescope North (FTN, Maui) and Faulkes Telescope South (FTS, Siding Spring, Australia). All three are essentially identical 2m telescopes equipped for both optical photometry and spectroscopy and operated from a common centre in Liverpool. The LT is primarily for research use whereas the FTs are mainly dedicated to education. Software developed by the eSTAR GRID project is being applied and enhanced to enable efficient and effective operation of the network. The primary scientific projects being addressed by RoboNet-1.0 are (a) rapid follow-up of Gamma Ray Burst sources detected by missions such as Swift, and (b) the detection of extra-solar planets via microlensing. Observations with the network began in August 2004. This is a pre-cursor project to the establishment of the full RoboNet global network of six dedicated telescopes which would greatly enhance work in several important branches of time domain astrophysics. Operation of the Liverpool Telescope and RoboNet-1.0 are funded by the UK Particle Physics and Astronomy Research Council. The Faulkes Telescopes are funded by the Dill Faulkes Educational Trust.

  16. caGrid 1.0 : an enterprise Grid infrastructure for biomedical research.

    SciTech Connect

    Oster, S.; Langella, S.; Hastings, S.; Ervin, D.; Madduri, R.; Phillips, J.; Kurc, T.; Siebenlist, F.; Covitz, P.; Shanbhag, K.; Foster, I.; Saltz, J.; Mathematics and Computer Science; The Ohio State Univ.; National Cancer Inst. Centerfor Bioinformatics; SemanticBits

    2008-03-01

    To develop software infrastructure that will provide support for discovery, characterization, integrated access, and management of diverse and disparate collections of information sources, analysis methods, and applications in biomedical research. Design: An enterprise Grid software infrastructure, called caGrid version 1.0 (caGrid 1.0), has been developed as the core Grid architecture of the NCI-sponsored cancer Biomedical Informatics Grid (caBIG{trademark}) program. It is designed to support a wide range of use cases in basic, translational, and clinical research, including (1) discovery, (2) integrated and large-scale data analysis, and (3) coordinated study. Measurements: The caGrid is built as a Grid software infrastructure and leverages Grid computing technologies and the Web Services Resource Framework standards. It provides a set of core services, toolkits for the development and deployment of new community provided services, and application programming interfaces for building client applications. Results: The caGrid 1.0 was released to the caBIG community in December 2006. It is built on open source components and caGrid source code is publicly and freely available under a liberal open source license. The core software, associated tools, and documentation can be downloaded from the following URL: .

  17. Seasonal changes, identification and source apportionment of PAH in PM1.0

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agudelo-Castañeda, Dayana Milena; Teixeira, Elba Calesso

    2014-10-01

    The objective of this research was to evaluate the seasonal variation of PAHs in PM1.0, as well as to identify and quantify the contributions of each source profile using the PMF receptor model. PM1.0 samples were collected on PTFE filters from August 2011 to July 2013 in the Metropolitan Area of Porto Alegre, Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil. The samples were extracted using the EPA method TO-13A and 16 Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons (PAHs) were analyzed using a gaseous chromatograph coupled with a mass spectrometer (GC-MS). Also, the data discussed in this study were analyzed to identify the relations of the PAHs concentrations with NOx, NO, O3 and meteorological parameters (temperature, solar radiation, wind speed, relative humidity). The results showed that in winter, concentrations of total PAHs were significantly higher than in summer, thus showing their seasonal variation. The identification of emission sources by applying diagnostic ratios confirmed that PAHs in the study area originate from mobile sources, especially, from diesel and gasoline emissions. The analysis by PMF receptor model showed the contribution of these two main sources of emissions, too, followed by coal combustion, incomplete combustion/unburned petroleum and wood combustion. The toxic equivalent factors were calculated to characterize the risk of cancer from PAH exposure to PM1.0 samples, and BaP and DahA dominated BaPeq levels.

  18. Reaction of trimethylphosphate with TiC and VC( 1 0 0 ) surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Hyun I.; Frantz, Peter; Didziulis, Stephen V.; Fernandez-Torres, Luis C.; Perry, Scott S.

    2003-10-01

    We have investigated trimethylphosphate [(CH 3O) 3PO] (TMP) chemistry on the TiC(1 0 0) and VC(1 0 0) surfaces as a function of temperature to understand the adsorption and reaction of this model lubricant additive on hard ceramic materials. High resolution electron energy loss spectroscopy (HREELS), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), and temperature programmed desorption (TPD) have been used to determine that TMP adsorbs molecularly on both surfaces at low temperature. At room temperature and above, the molecule decomposes on TiC, forming strong Ti-O-P chemical bonds while breaking C-O bonds in the process. The reaction products that persist on the surface after heating up to 873 K are determined to be phosphate-like (PO x) and carbonaceous species. This reaction, however, has been determined to be influenced by the initial coverage of molecular TMP at the cryogenic dosing temperature; when the monolayer coverage was substantially lower, phosphate-like species were chemically reduced at high temperature. Identical experiments on VC(1 0 0) indicated much less decomposition of TMP, even with large exposures, and the presence of a chemically reduced form of phosphorous and -O-C species on the surface at high temperatures.

  19. Pantheon 1.0, a manually verified dataset of globally famous biographies

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Amy Zhao; Ronen, Shahar; Hu, Kevin; Lu, Tiffany; Hidalgo, César A.

    2016-01-01

    We present the Pantheon 1.0 dataset: a manually verified dataset of individuals that have transcended linguistic, temporal, and geographic boundaries. The Pantheon 1.0 dataset includes the 11,341 biographies present in more than 25 languages in Wikipedia and is enriched with: (i) manually verified demographic information (place and date of birth, gender) (ii) a taxonomy of occupations classifying each biography at three levels of aggregation and (iii) two measures of global popularity including the number of languages in which a biography is present in Wikipedia (L), and the Historical Popularity Index (HPI) a metric that combines information on L, time since birth, and page-views (2008–2013). We compare the Pantheon 1.0 dataset to data from the 2003 book, Human Accomplishments, and also to external measures of accomplishment in individual games and sports: Tennis, Swimming, Car Racing, and Chess. In all of these cases we find that measures of popularity (L and HPI) correlate highly with individual accomplishment, suggesting that measures of global popularity proxy the historical impact of individuals. PMID:26731133

  20. Pantheon 1.0, a manually verified dataset of globally famous biographies.

    PubMed

    Yu, Amy Zhao; Ronen, Shahar; Hu, Kevin; Lu, Tiffany; Hidalgo, César A

    2016-01-05

    We present the Pantheon 1.0 dataset: a manually verified dataset of individuals that have transcended linguistic, temporal, and geographic boundaries. The Pantheon 1.0 dataset includes the 11,341 biographies present in more than 25 languages in Wikipedia and is enriched with: (i) manually verified demographic information (place and date of birth, gender) (ii) a taxonomy of occupations classifying each biography at three levels of aggregation and (iii) two measures of global popularity including the number of languages in which a biography is present in Wikipedia (L), and the Historical Popularity Index (HPI) a metric that combines information on L, time since birth, and page-views (2008-2013). We compare the Pantheon 1.0 dataset to data from the 2003 book, Human Accomplishments, and also to external measures of accomplishment in individual games and sports: Tennis, Swimming, Car Racing, and Chess. In all of these cases we find that measures of popularity (L and HPI) correlate highly with individual accomplishment, suggesting that measures of global popularity proxy the historical impact of individuals.

  1. Ring-strain-enabled reaction discovery: new heterocycles from bicyclo[1.1.0]butanes.

    PubMed

    Walczak, Maciej A A; Krainz, Tanja; Wipf, Peter

    2015-04-21

    Mechanistically as well as synthetically, bicyclo[1.1.0]butanes represent one of the most fascinating classes of organic compounds. They offer a unique blend of compact size (four carbon atoms), high reactivity (strain energy of 66 kcal/mol), and mechanistic pathway diversity that can be harvested for the rapid assembly of complex scaffolds. The C(1)-C(3) bond combines the electronic features of both σ and π bonds with facile homolytic and heterolytic bond dissociation properties and thereby readily engages pericyclic, transition-metal-mediated, nucleophilic, and electrophilic pathways as well as radical acceptor and donor substrates. Despite this multifaceted reaction profile and recent advances in the preparation of bicylo[1.1.0]butanes, the current portfolio of synthetic applications is still limited compared with those of cyclopropanes and cyclobutanes. In this Account, we describe our work over the past decade on the exploration of substituent effects on the ring strain and the reactivity of bicyclo[1.1.0]butanes, particularly in the context of metal-mediated processes. We first describe Rh(I)-catalyzed cycloisomerization reactions of N-allyl amines to give pyrrolidine and azepine heterocycles. The regioselectivity of the C,C-bond insertion/ring-opening step in these reactions is controlled by the phosphine ligand. After metal carbene formation, an intramolecular cyclopropanation adds a second fused ring system. A proposed mechanism rationalizes why rhodium(I) complexes with monodentate ligands favor five-membered heterocycles, as opposed to Rh(I)-bidentate ligand catalysts, which rearrange N-allyl amines to seven-membered heterocycles. The scope of Rh(I)-catalyzed cycloisomerization reactions was extended to allyl ethers, which provide a mixture of five- and seven-membered cyclic ethers regardless of the nature of the phosphine additive and Rh(I) precatalyst. The chemical diversity of these cycloisomerization products was further expanded by a consecutive

  2. Raman spectrum of bacteriochlorophyll a in the S1 state

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishizawa, Ei-ichi; Hashimoto, Hideki; Koyama, Yasushi

    1991-07-01

    The S 1 Raman spectrum of bacteriochlorophyll a is reported for the first time. A one-color experiment using the 351 nm picosecond pulses (duration 50 ps and repetition 1 kHz) for tetrahydrofuran solution detected a transient species, which showed distinct Raman lines at 1567, 1409 and 1320 cm -1 and weak profiles around 1169, 1092, 1051 and 794 cm -1. The other one-color experiment using the 355 nm nanosecond pulses (duration 12 ns and repetition 10 Hz) detected the T 1 species reported previously showing Raman lines at 1578 and 1330 cm -1. Thus, the newly identified transient species, which was pumped and probed within 50 ps, is assigned to S 1.

  3. Physical Contact between the +20 km s-1 Cloud and the Galactic Circumnuclear Disk

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takekawa, Shunya; Oka, Tomoharu; Tanaka, Kunihiko

    2017-01-01

    We report the discovery of physical contact between the Galactic circumnuclear disk (CND) and an adjacent giant molecular cloud. The central 10 pc of our Galaxy has been imaged in molecular lines at millimeter wavelength using the Nobeyama Radio Observatory 45 m radio telescope. In the position-velocity maps of several high-density probe lines, we have found an emission ``bridge'' connecting the +20 km s-1 cloud (M-0.13-0.08) and the negative longitude extension of the CND. The collision between the +20 km s-1 cloud and the CND may be responsible for the formation of the bridge. This event can promote mass accretion onto the CND and/or into the inner cavity.

  4. Ada Compiler Validation Summary Report: Certificate Number: 910918S1.11217, NEC Corporation, NEC Ada Compiler System for EWS-UX/V to V70/RX-UX832, Version 1.0 EWS 4800/60 = MV4000

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-01-01

    C355 /2A C35702B B41308B C43004A C45114A C45346A C45612A C45612B C45612C C45651A C46022A B49008A B49008B A74006A C74308A B83022B B83022H B83025B B83025D...O Tests 0 e) Non-Processed Floating-Point Precision Tests 0 f) Total Number of Inapplicable Tests 284 (c+d+e) g) Total Number of Tests for ACVC 1.11...8217) $BIGINTLIT (1..V-3 => ’ 0 ’) & 藺" $BIGREALLIT (1..V-5 => ’ 0 ’) & 螂.0" $BIGSTRINGI ’"’ & (I..V/2 => ’A’) & I"’ $BIGSTRING2 ’"’ &

  5. Effects of S1P on skeletal muscle repair/regeneration during eccentric contraction.

    PubMed

    Sassoli, Chiara; Formigli, Lucia; Bini, Francesca; Tani, Alessia; Squecco, Roberta; Battistini, Chiara; Zecchi-Orlandini, Sandra; Francini, Fabio; Meacci, Elisabetta

    2011-11-01

    Skeletal muscle regeneration is severely compromised in the case of extended damage. The current challenge is to find factors capable of limiting muscle degeneration and/or potentiating the inherent regenerative program mediated by a specific type of myoblastic cells, the satellite cells. Recent studies from our groups and others have shown that the bioactive lipid, sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P), promotes myoblast differentiation and exerts a trophic action on denervated skeletal muscle fibres. In the present study, we examined the effects of S1P on eccentric contraction (EC)-injured extensor digitorum longus muscle fibres and resident satellite cells. After EC, skeletal muscle showed evidence of structural and biochemical damage along with significant electrophysiological changes, i.e. reduced plasma membrane resistance and resting membrane potential and altered Na(+) and Ca(2+) current amplitude and kinetics. Treatment with exogenous S1P attenuated the EC-induced tissue damage, protecting skeletal muscle fibre from apoptosis, preserving satellite cell viability and affecting extracellular matrix remodelling, through the up-regulation of matrix metalloproteinase 9 (MMP-9) expression. S1P also promoted satellite cell renewal and differentiation in the damaged muscle. Notably, EC was associated with the activation of sphingosine kinase 1 (SphK1) and with increased endogenous S1P synthesis, further stressing the relevance of S1P in skeletal muscle protection and repair/regeneration. In line with this, the treatment with a selective SphK1 inhibitor during EC, caused an exacerbation of the muscle damage and attenuated MMP-9 expression. Together, these findings are in favour for a role of S1P in skeletal muscle healing and offer new clues for the identification of novel therapeutic approaches to counteract skeletal muscle damage and disease.

  6. NetCGlyc 1.0: prediction of mammalian C-mannosylation sites.

    PubMed

    Julenius, Karin

    2007-08-01

    C-mannosylation is the attachment of an alpha-mannopyranose to a tryptophan via a C-C linkage. The sequence WXXW, in which the first Trp becomes mannosylated, has been suggested as a consensus motif for the modification, but only two-thirds of known sites follow this rule. We have gathered a data set of 69 experimentally verified C-mannosylation sites from the literature. We analyzed these for sequence context and found that apart from Trp in position +3, Cys is accepted in the same position. We also find a clear preference in position +1, where a small and/or polar residue (Ser, Ala, Gly, and Thr) is preferred and a Phe or a Leu residue discriminated against. The Protein Data Bank was searched for structural information, and five structures of C-mannosylated proteins were obtained. We showed that modified tryptophan residues are at least partly solvent exposed. A method predicting the location of C-mannosylation sites in proteins was developed using a neural network approach. The best overall network used a 21-residue sequence input window and information on the presence/absence of the WXXW motif. NetCGlyc 1.0 correctly predicts 93% of both positive and negative C-mannosylation sites. This is a significant improvement over the WXXW consensus motif itself, which only identifies 67% of positive sites. NetCGlyc 1.0 is available at http://www.cbs.dtu.dk/services/NetCGlyc/. Using NetCGlyc 1.0, we scanned the human genome and found 2573 exported or transmembrane transcripts with at least one predicted C-mannosylation site.

  7. A Massive Shell of Supernova-formed Dust in SNR G54.1+0.3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Temim, Tea; Dwek, Eli; Arendt, Richard G.; Borkowski, Kazimierz J.; Reynolds, Stephen P.; Slane, Patrick; Gelfand, Joseph D.; Raymond, John C.

    2017-02-01

    While theoretical models of dust condensation predict that most refractory elements produced in core-collapse supernovae (SNe) efficiently condense into dust, a large quantity of dust has so far only been observed in SN 1987A. We present an analysis of observations from the Spitzer Space Telescope, Herschel Space Observatory, Stratospheric Observatory for Infrared Astronomy, and AKARI of the infrared shell surrounding the pulsar wind nebula in the supernova remnant G54.1+0.3. We attribute a distinctive spectral feature at 21 μm to a magnesium silicate grain species that has been invoked in modeling the ejecta-condensed dust in Cas A, which exhibits the same spectral signature. If this species is responsible for producing the observed spectral feature and accounts for a significant fraction of the observed infrared continuum, we find that it would be the dominant constituent of the dust in G54.1+0.3, with possible secondary contributions from other compositions, such as carbon, silicate, or alumina grains. The total mass of SN-formed dust required by this model is at least 0.3 M ⊙. We discuss how these results may be affected by varying dust grain properties and self-consistent grain heating models. The spatial distribution of the dust mass and temperature in G54.1+0.3 confirms the scenario in which the SN-formed dust has not yet been processed by the SN reverse shock and is being heated by stars belonging to a cluster in which the SN progenitor exploded. The dust mass and composition suggest a progenitor mass of 16–27 M ⊙ and imply a high dust condensation efficiency, similar to that found for Cas A and SN 1987A. The study provides another example of significant dust formation in a Type IIP SN explosion and sheds light on the properties of pristine SN-condensed dust.

  8. Pd diffusion on MgO(1 0 0): The role of defects and small cluster mobility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Lijun; Henkelman, Graeme; Campbell, Charles T.; Jónsson, Hannes

    2006-03-01

    Density functional theory is used to explore the energy landscape of Pd atoms adsorbed on the terrace of MgO(1 0 0) and at oxygen vacancy sites. Saddle point finding methods reveal that small Pd clusters diffuse on the terrace in interesting ways. The monomer and dimer diffuse via single atom hops between oxygen sites with barriers of 0.34 eV and 0.43 eV respectively. The trimer and tetramer, however, form 3D clusters by overcoming a 2D-3D transition barrier of less than 60 meV. The trimer diffuses along the surface either by a walking or flipping motion, with comparable barriers of ca. 0.5 eV. The tetramer rolls along the terrace with a lower barrier of 0.42 eV. Soft rotational modes at the saddle point lead to an anomalously high prefactor of 1.3 × 10 14 s -1 for tetramer diffusion. This prefactor is two order of magnitude higher than for monomer diffusion, making the tetramer the fastest diffusing species on the terrace at all temperatures for which diffusion is active (above 200 K). Neutral oxygen vacancy sites are found to bind Pd monomers with a 2.63 eV stronger binding energy than the terrace. A second Pd atom, however, binds to this trapped monomer with a smaller energy of 0.56 eV, so that dimers at defects dissociate on a time scale of milliseconds at room temperature. Larger clusters bind more strongly at defects. Trimers and tetramers dissociate from monomer-bound-defects at elevated temperatures of ca. 600 K. These species are also mobile on the terrace, suggesting they are important for the ripening observed at ⩾600 K during Pd vapor deposition on MgO(1 0 0) by Haas et al. [G. Haas, A. Menck, H. Brune, J.V. Barth, J.A. Venables, K. Kern, Phys. Rev. B 61 (2000) 11105].

  9. Orbit Analysis Tools Software (Version 1.0) User’s Manual

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-04-15

    Naval Research Laboratory Washington. DC 20375-5320 AD-A265 012 NRL/MR/8103--93-73071111111111111 ilIl I! f111t l11,!If Orbit Analysis Tools Software ...DATES COVERED April 13, 1993 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE 6. FUNDING NUMBERS Orbit Analysis Tools Software (Version 1.0) Users Manual 6. AUTHOR(S) Alan S. Hope...fhbxiWn 200 word) A program to perform satellite mission and coverage analysis has been written. The Orbit Analysis Tools Software (OATS) program uses

  10. Order disorder phase transition on the Pb-adsorbed Si(1 1 0) surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Y. K.; Ahn, J. R.; Cho, E. S.; An, K.-S.; Yeom, H. W.; Koh, H.; Rotenberg, E.; Park, C. Y.

    2005-12-01

    A new reversible temperature-dependent phase transition on Pb/Si(1 1 0) was found by photoemission spectroscopy and low energy electron diffraction. The room temperature 1 × 1 surface was found to transit into low temperature 4 × 2 with a transition temperature of roughly 200 K. The phase transition does not induce a temperature-dependent variation in both the energy bands and the Si 2p and Pb 5d spectra. This indicates that the phase transition is close to an order-disorder one.

  11. Data appendix: F-number=1.0 EMR with a flexible back electrode

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mihora, D. J.

    1984-01-01

    A 12.5 micron Tedlar low f-number electrostatic membrane reflector was tested. The antenna reflector was designed to achieve a spherical reflector surface with a focal length to diameter ratio f(sub n) of one and a potential accuracy of 1.0 over its 4.88 m diameter. The configuration required the cutting and joining of twelve pie-shaped panels to form the reflector surface. Electrostatic forces are used to tension this preformed membrane reflector. The test data is spare-only three sets of measurements were taken due to lack of funds.

  12. Isotope Shifts in the TiO B- X (1-0) Band

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amiot, C.; Luc, P.; Vetter, R.

    2002-08-01

    The absorption spectrum of the B3Π- X3Δ (1-0) band of the TiO molecule has been studied at sub-Doppler resolution by crossing an effusive beam of TiO with a cw tunable laser beam and by collecting the induced fluorescence light. The five bands involving the 46Ti, 47Ti, 48Ti, 49Ti, and 50Ti isotopic species have been observed and interpreted. A simultaneous analysis of the five isotopic data leads to accurate molecular constants and energy levels for the B3Π electronic state.

  13. Comments on the CASIA version 1.0 iris data set.

    PubMed

    Phillips, P Jonathon; Bowyer, Kevin W; Flynn, Patrick J

    2007-10-01

    We note that the images in the CASIA version 1.0 iris dataset have been edited so that the pupil area is replaced by a circular region of uniform intensity. We recommend that this dataset is no longer used in iris biometrics research, unless there this a compelling reason that takes into account the nature of the images. In addition, based on our experience with the Iris Challenge Evaluation (ICE) 2005 technology development project, we make recommendations for reporting results of iris recognition experiments.

  14. Periodic DFT study of Ti deposition on defective Si(1 0 0) surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Añez, Rafael; Sierraalta, Anibal; Díaz, Lenin; Bastardo, Anelisse; Coll, David

    2015-04-01

    Defective Si(1 0 0) surfaces have been used with the aim to explore from a theoretical point of view, the effect of the defects in the Ti/Si interface formation when Ti is deposited on a clean Si surface at room temperature. Results indicate that a complex mechanism occurs where the Si surface stability is an important point to take into account to obtain titanium silicides species of different thickness and Si concentration. Even at room temperature, the thickness of the Ti/Si interface depends not only of the Ti diffusion on the Si surface but also of the Si diffusion on the Ti slab deposited on the Si surface.

  15. Structural homogeneity of nanocrystalline VT1-0 titanium. Low-temperature micromechanical properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rusakova, A. V.; Lubenets, S. V.; Fomenko, L. S.; Moskalenko, V. A.

    2012-10-01

    The microhardness of samples of VT1-0 titanium with grain sizes ranging from 35 nm to 10 μm is measured at temperatures of 77-300 K. Nanocrystalline samples produced by rolling at low temperatures are found to be quite homogeneous, and their structure is stable with respect to thermal and mechanical interactions. The interrelationship between microhardness and grain size is well described by the Hall-Petch relationship, the parameters of which depend on temperature. Data on the temperature dependence of the microhardness and the Hall-Petch coefficient indicate that the microplastic deformation is of a thermally activated, dislocation character, regardless of grain size.

  16. Doping dependence of electronic charge transfer on Si(1 0 0)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vaquila, I.; Rabalais, J. W.; Wolfgang, J.; Nordlander, P.

    2001-08-01

    The ion fractions of 4 keV Ne + scattered from intrinsic and heavily n-doped and p-doped Si(1 0 0)-(2×1) surfaces have been measured using time-of-flight scattering and recoiling spectrometry. The ion fractions depend strongly on azimuthal angle, varying from 28-36% for n-doped and 36-44% for p-doped. The pronounced dependency on substrate doping is correlated with surface electronic structure and ion neutralization probability. The observed behavior can be explained by the difference in band bending on intrinsic and n- and p-doped semiconductor surfaces.

  17. Magnetic properties of iron adatoms and small iron clusters on Ag(1 0 0)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lazarovits, B.; Szunyogh, L.; Weinberger, P.

    2002-02-01

    A Green's function embedding technique based on the fully relativistic spin-polarized Screened Korringa-Kohn-Rostoker method is used to calculate the electronic and magnetic properties of magnetic nanostructures. Strongly enhanced spin and orbital moments are obtained for an Fe adatom and for small clusters of Fe on a Ag(1 0 0) surface. As a consequence, for an Fe adatom a magnetic anisotropy energy is found that is about 10 times larger than for an Fe monolayer. Furthermore, the exchange coupling energy between two Fe adatoms is calculated in terms of the force theorem, showing a very rapid decay with increasing distance.

  18. Synthesis of new pyrazolyl-1,3-diazabicyclo[3.1.0]hexe-3-ene derivatives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiyani, Hamzeh; Albooyeh, Fereshteh; Fallahnezhad, Saied

    2015-07-01

    A series of new of photochromic 1,3-diazabicyclo[3.1.0]hex-3-ene derivatives based on the skeleton of five-membered pyrazole moiety have been synthesized and characterized by spectral techniques, as well as their photochromic properties were examined under UV light irradiation in various solutions. All these newly synthesized compounds showed good photochromic properties in the both solution and solid states. The UV-Visible spectral analysis of the corresponding pyrazolyl bicyclic aziridines established structure-photochromic behavior relationships.

  19. The SeaFlux Turbulent Flux Dataset Version 1.0 Documentation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clayson, Carol Anne; Roberts, J. Brent; Bogdanoff, Alec S.

    2012-01-01

    Under the auspices of the World Climate Research Programme (WCRP) Global Energy and Water cycle EXperiment (GEWEX) Data and Assessment Panel (GDAP), the SeaFlux Project was created to investigate producing a high-resolution satellite-based dataset of surface turbulent fluxes over the global oceans. The most current release of the SeaFlux product is Version 1.0; this represents the initial release of turbulent surface heat fluxes, associated near-surface variables including a diurnally varying sea surface temperature.

  20. Multibet 1.0: A Proposal for an ASCII Translation and a Set of Names for Extended IPA Notation, and Unibet 1.0: A Proposal for a Single-Character Translation of IPA for English.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    MacWhinney, Brian; Marengo, Kathy

    1986-01-01

    Two articles propose two systems for American Standard Code for Information Interchange (ASCII) translations of the International Phonetic Alphabet (IPA): Multibet 1.0 and Unibet 1.0. Multibet 1.0 consists of a set of names and a set of ASCII translations for the letters and diacritics of the 1979 version of the "Principles of the…

  1. Electron states and the spin density wave phase diagram in Cr(1 1 0) films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rotenberg, Eli; Freelon, B. K.; Koh, H.; Bostwick, A.; Rossnagel, K.; Schmid, Andreas; Kevan, S. D.

    2005-04-01

    Chromium films offer an excellent system to study the impact of dimensional confinement on physical properties associated with the spin-density-wave (SDW) ground state observed in bulk materials. These properties are also of some technological importance since chromium is a common component of thin film magnetic structures. We prepared chromium (1 1 0) films of high crystalline quality on a W(1 1 0) substrate with a wedge-shaped thickness profile so that the impact of confinement can be systematically studied. We have characterized these films using a combination of low-energy electron diffraction and microscopy as well as high-resolution angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy. We have probed the Fermi surface and the nesting vectors therein that are relevant to the SDW ground state. We find these to predict accurately the observed bulk SDW periodicity. We have also characterized the SDW periodicity in the film directly by measuring the splitting between backfolded bands, and we find that this periodicity deviates markedly from the bulk periodicity for thinner films at higher temperatures. We have systematically mapped the SDW incommensurability and phase diagram as a function of both film thickness and temperature. We find commensurate and incommensurate phases that are separated by nearly continuous transitions. Our results suggest a simple model to explain the delicate interplay between commensurate and incommensurate phases that involves a balance between SDW stabilization energy and surface and interface energetics.

  2. Ultrasonic micro-motor using miniature piezoelectric tube with diameter of 1.0 mm.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hui; Dong, Shu-xiang; Zhang, Shu-yi; Wang, Tian-hua; Zhang, Zhong-ning; Fan, Li

    2006-12-22

    At the present moment, the smallest piezoelectric ultrasonic micro-motors utilizing miniature PZT piezoelectric ceramic tubes were developed. The motor consists of a PZT-metal composite tube stator, two steel rotors and a thin shaft that keeps the two rotors pressing on both ends of the stator elastically. The dimensions of the PZT tube are 1.0 mm in outer diameter, 0.6 mm in inner diameter and 5.0 mm in length. The diameter and total length of the assembled micro-motor is 1.0 mm and 8 mm (including an adjusting spring), respectively. The tube-type micro-motor is driven by two pairs of alternative voltages with phase shift 90 degrees between the adjacent electrodes and operated in the first circular-bending vibration mode of the stator with the resonance frequency about 58 kHz. The experimental results show that the tube-type micro-motors have perfect performances: (i) high rotation frequency over 3000 rpm and (ii) large starting torque over 7.8 microN m under the conditions of the input voltage of 110 V(p-p) and the resonance frequency. The micro-motor is well suitable for operating in micro-spaces, such as in intravascular, micro-robots and micro-craft applications.

  3. Intrinsic Properties of Fe-Substituted L1(0) Magnets

    SciTech Connect

    Manchanda, P; Kumar, P; Kashyap, A; Lucis, MJ; Shield, JE; Mubarok, A; Goldstein, JI; Constantinides, S; Barmak, K; Lewis, LH; Sellmyer, DJ; Skomski, R

    2013-10-01

    First-principle supercell calculations are used to determine how 3d elemental additions, especially Fe additions, modify the magnetization, exchange and anisotropy of L1(0)-ordered ferromagnets. Calculations are performed using the VASP code and partially involve configurational averaging over site disorder. Three isostructural systems are investigated: Fe-Co-Pt, Mn-Al-Fe, and transition metal-doped Fe-Ni. In all three systems the iron strongly influences the magnetic properties of these compounds, but the specific effect depends on the host. In CoPt(Fe) iron enhances the magnetization, with subtle changes in the magnetic moments that depend on the distribution of the Fe and Co atoms. The addition of Fe to MnAl is detrimental to the magnetization, because it creates antiferromagnetic exchange interactions, but it enhances the magnetic anisotropy. The replacement of 50% of Mn by Fe in MnFeAl2 enhances the anisotropy from 1.77 to 2.5 MJ/m(3). Further, the substitution of light 3d elements such as Ti, V, Cr into L1(0)-ordered FeNi is shown to substantially reduce the magnetization.

  4. An automated system for evaluation of the potential functionome: MAPLE version 2.1.0

    PubMed Central

    Takami, Hideto; Taniguchi, Takeaki; Arai, Wataru; Takemoto, Kazuhiro; Moriya, Yuki; Goto, Susumu

    2016-01-01

    Metabolic and physiological potential evaluator (MAPLE) is an automatic system that can perform a series of steps used in the evaluation of potential comprehensive functions (functionome) harboured in the genome and metagenome. MAPLE first assigns KEGG Orthology (KO) to the query gene, maps the KO-assigned genes to the Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG) functional modules, and then calculates the module completion ratio (MCR) of each functional module to characterize the potential functionome in the user’s own genomic and metagenomic data. In this study, we added two more useful functions to calculate module abundance and Q-value, which indicate the functional abundance and statistical significance of the MCR results, respectively, to the new version of MAPLE for more detailed comparative genomic and metagenomic analyses. Consequently, MAPLE version 2.1.0 reported significant differences in the potential functionome, functional abundance, and diversity of contributors to each function among four metagenomic datasets generated by the global ocean sampling expedition, one of the most popular environmental samples to use with this system. MAPLE version 2.1.0 is now available through the web interface (http://www.genome.jp/tools/maple/) 17 June 2016, date last accessed. PMID:27374611

  5. Low-thermal surface preparation, HCl etch and Si/SiGe selective epitaxy on (1 1 0) silicon surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Destefanis, V.; Hartmann, J. M.; Hopstaken, M.; Delaye, V.; Bensahel, D.

    2008-10-01

    We have first investigated the influence of the in situ H2 bake temperature (between 750 °C and 850 °C) on (1 0 0) and (1 1 0) fullsheet surface preparations (after 'HF-last' wet cleaning). A strong increase of the (1 1 0) surface roughness occurred when baking between 750 and 775 °C, with high C and O contamination peaks at the Si substrate/Si overlayer interface. A high H2 bake temperature (>=800 °C) is thus mandatory for both (1 0 0) and (1 1 0) Si surfaces. We have also studied the 750 °C-950 °C, high HCl partial pressure etch of blanket Si wafers. HCl etch rates are roughly four times higher on (1 1 0) than on (1 0 0). Etch rate activation energies are however quite close to each other (57 kcal mol-1 on (1 0 0) ⇔ 59 kcal mol-1 on (1 0 0)), suggesting similar etch-limiting mechanisms. We have then investigated the low-temperature growth of high Ge content (10-37%) SiGe layers on blanket Si wafers with dichlorosilane + germane chemistry (selective versus SiO2 on patterned wafers). The SiGe growth rate on (1 1 0) bows downwards from linearity and then saturates when increasing the germane mass flow. In contrast, it almost linearly increases on (1 0 0) surfaces, reaching values more than three times higher than on (1 1 0). A parabolic relationship between experimental Ge concentrations and the F(GeH4)/F(SiH2Cl2) mass-flow ratio has been evidenced on (1 0 0). In contrast, a linear relationship links the (1 1 0) Ge concentration to the F(GeH4)/F(SiH2Cl2) mass-flow ratio. Finally, 63 and 65 kcal mol-1 activation energies are associated with the fullsheet Si growth rate increase with the inverse absolute temperature on (1 0 0) and (1 1 0) (dichlorosilane chemistry). The GR(1 1 0)/GR(1 0 0) Si growth rate ratio, ≈0.74, is close to the dangling bond surface density (DBSD) ratio (DBSD(1 1 0)/DBSD(1 0 0) ≈ 0.71). Such growth rate discrepancies are thus justified by these DBSD differences. Results obtained on fullsheet wafers have been used to selectively grow

  6. Discovery of oxazole and triazole derivatives as potent and selective S1P(1) agonists through pharmacophore-guided design.

    PubMed

    Tian, Yulin; Jin, Jing; Wang, Xiaojian; Hu, Jinping; Xiao, Qiong; Zhou, Wanqi; Chen, Xiaoguang; Yin, Dali

    2014-10-06

    We have discovered a series of triazole/oxazole-containing 2-substituted 2-aminopropane-1,3-diol derivatives as potent and selective S1P1 agonists (prodrugs) based on pharmacophore-guided rational design. Most compounds showed high affinity and selectivity for S1P1 receptor. Compounds 19b, 19d and 19p displayed clear dose responsiveness in the lymphocyte reduction model when administered orally at doses of 0.3, 1.0, 3.0 mg/kg with reduced effect on heart rate. These three compounds were also identified to have favorable pharmacokinetic properties.

  7. EPIC Study of Two Enigmatic Sources: The Mouse and SNR 359.1-0.5

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pavlov, George

    2004-01-01

    The objective of the original proposal was to observe the Mouse pulsar wind nebula (associated with PSR J1744-2958) and the nearby supernova remnant G359.1-0.5, where the pulsar was probably born, with the XMM-Newton observatory to study the properties of these objects. SNR G359.1-0.5 was accepted as a Category C target and has not been observed. The Mouse was observed on April 27,2003 for 52 ks. The image analysis has shown that the Mouse is extended in the East-West direction, possibly along the direction of the pulsar's proper motion. The spectrum of this pulsar wind nebula can be described as an absorbed power law with the photon index GAMMA = 1.9 plus or minus 0.1, effective hydrogen column density n(sub H) = (2.6 plus or minus 0.1) x 10(exp 22) per square centimeter, and flux F = 1.8 x 10(exp -11) erg per square centimeter per second in the 1-10 keV energy range. Based on the n(sub H) value, the distance to the source is about 5 kpc, which results in the luminosity 3.7 x 10(exp 34) erg per second. We conclude that PSR J1744-2958 and the Mouse are not physically associated with G359.1-0.5, which lies at a larger distance. In addition to the Mouse, we also detected two Low-Mass X-ray Binaries, SLX 1744-299 and 1744-300, in the EPIC MOS and PN fields of view. The latter of these objects showed a Type I X-ray burst during our observation, with a rise time of 5 s and decay time of 60 s. A very strong pileup during the burst made the analysis of the burst properties unreliable. The spectral analysis of the persistent radiation from SLX 1744-299 and 1744-300 yields the hydrogen column densities of 3.2 plus or minus 0.1 and (3.6 plus or minus 0.2) x 10(exp 22) per square centimeter, respectively, which suggests that the sources are close to the Galactic center (d = 8-9 kpc). The spectra can be reasonably well fitted with a blackbody plus thin disk model, with the blackbody temperatures of 1.7 plus or minus 0.2 and 1.8 plus or minus 0.2 keV, respectively.

  8. 7S(1/2) ? 9S(1/2) two-photon spectroscopy of trapped francium.

    PubMed

    Simsarian, J E; Shi, W; Orozco, L A; Sprouse, G D; Zhao, W Z

    1996-12-01

    We report on the spectroscopic measurement of the (210)Fr 9S(1/2) energy obtained by two-photon excitation of atoms confined and cooled in a magneto-optic trap. The resonant intermediate level 7P(3/2) is the upper state of the trapping transition. We have measured the energy difference between the 9S(1/2) state and the 7S(1/2) ground state to be 25 671.021 +/- 0.006 cm(-1).

  9. Galactic Conformity from z=0.2-1.0 with PRIMUS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berti, Angela; Coil, Alison L.

    2016-06-01

    We test for galactic conformity from z=0.2-1.0 to a projected distance of 5 Mpc using spectroscopic redshifts from the PRism MUlti-object Survey (PRIMUS). Our sample consists of ~60,000 galaxies in five separate fields covering a total of ~5.5 square degrees, which allows us to account for cosmic variance. Dividing our sample into star-forming and quiescent galaxies using a cut in specific star formation rate, we identify star-forming and quiescent “isolated primary” galaxies. We match the redshift and stellar mass distributions of these samples, to control for correlations between quiescent fraction and redshift and stellar mass. We detect a significant conformity signal (>3 sigma) of ~5% on scales of 0-1 Mpc and a 2.5-sigma signal of ~1% on scales of 1-3 Mpc. We also test for redshift and stellar mass dependence of the conformity signal within our sample.

  10. LANDSAT multispectral scanner computer-compatible tape format, version 1.0

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1982-01-01

    Unlike previous LANDSAT computer compatible tape (CCT) formats, the standard format of CCT's now includes a comprehensive field location and data description information superstructure composed of four records. The volume descriptor record, the text record, and the file pointer record reside in a volume directory file, which generally describes the data configuration and provides pointers to each data file. The file descriptor record for each data file describes the data structure within the file and provides pointers to certain fields within the file. These superstructure records primarily supply information about the data on the CCT as opposed to carrying the data themselves. The EROS Data Center's LANDSAT CCT version 1.0 product is presented which conforms to the concepts of the standard format as much as is possible with existing EDC systems.

  11. Global Deployment of Geothermal Energy Using a New Characterization in GCAM 1.0

    SciTech Connect

    Hannam, Phil; Kyle, G. Page; Smith, Steven J.

    2009-09-01

    This report documents modeling of geothermal energy in GCAM 1.0 (formerly MiniCAM) from FY2008 to FY2009, from the inputs to the U.S. Climate Change Technology Program report (Clarke et al., 2008a) to the present representation, which will be used in future work. To demonstrate the newest representation, we describe the procedure and outcome of six model runs that illustrate the potential role of geothermal energy in the U.S. and global regions through different futures climate policy, development and deployment of engineered, or enhanced, geothermal systems (EGS), and availability of other low-cost, low-carbon electricity generation technologies such as nuclear energy and carbon capture and storage (CCS).

  12. Power, Avionics and Software - Phase 1.0:. [Subsystem Integration Test Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ivancic, William D.; Sands, Obed S.; Bakula, Casey J.; Oldham, Daniel R.; Wright, Ted; Bradish, Martin A.; Klebau, Joseph M.

    2014-01-01

    This report describes Power, Avionics and Software (PAS) 1.0 subsystem integration testing and test results that occurred in August and September of 2013. This report covers the capabilities of each PAS assembly to meet integration test objectives for non-safety critical, non-flight, non-human-rated hardware and software development. This test report is the outcome of the first integration of the PAS subsystem and is meant to provide data for subsequent designs, development and testing of the future PAS subsystems. The two main objectives were to assess the ability of the PAS assemblies to exchange messages and to perform audio testing of both inbound and outbound channels. This report describes each test performed, defines the test, the data, and provides conclusions and recommendations.

  13. The structural transformation of the Pt( 1 1 0 ) electrode during the Cu underpotential deposition process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Endo, O.; Ikemiya, N.; Ito, M.

    2002-08-01

    The underpotential deposition (UPD) of copper on the Pt(1 1 0) electrode in 0.5 M H 2SO 4 was studied by in situ scanning tunneling microscopy and IRAS. It was revealed that UPD copper produces the (1×1) structure as long as the sample potential is kept below 670 mV (vs. standard hydrogen electrode, SHE). After potential cycles over 60 min at the range of 220-1070 mV (vs. SHE), the surface is irreversibly transformed into the (1× n) reconstructed structure. The UPD copper traces the substrate (1× n). The irregular band shift of the SO 4 stretching mode observed by IRAS is also discussed.

  14. Selective electrochemical gold deposition onto p-Si (1 0 0) surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santinacci, L.; Djenizian, T.; Schwaller, P.; Suter, T.; Etcheberry, A.; Schmuki, P.

    2008-09-01

    In this paper, we report selective electrochemical gold deposition onto p-type Si (1 0 0) into nanoscratches produced through a thin oxide layer using an atomic force microscope. A detailed description of the substrate engraving process is presented. The influence of the main scratching parameters such as the normal applied force, the number of scans and the scanning velocity are investigated as well as the mechanical properties of the substrate. Gold deposition is carried out in a KAu(CN)2 + KCN solution by applying cathodic voltages for various durations. The gold deposition process is investigated by cyclic voltammetry. Reactivity enhancement at the scratched locations was studied by comparing the electrochemical behaviour of intact and engraved surfaces using a micro-electrochemical setup. Selective electrochemical gold deposition is achieved: metallic patterns with a sub-500 nm lateral resolution are obtained demonstrating, therefore, the bearing potential of this patterning technique.

  15. Comparative study of Sr and Ba adsorption on Si(1 0 0)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Xiaoming; Yu, Z.; Curless, J. A.; Droopad, R.; Eisenbeiser, K.; Edwards, J. L.; Ooms, W. J.; Sarid, D.

    2001-09-01

    The adsorption of submonolayers and monolayers of strontium and barium on Si(1 0 0) are reported using low energy electron diffraction (LEED) and Auger electron spectroscopy (AES). The samples were prepared by deposition at room temperature followed by annealing at elevated temperatures, and by deposition with the silicon held at a high temperature. The adsorbate phases were observed using LEED and the surface coverage calibration using AES and ultrahigh vacuum scanning tunneling microscopy (UHV-STM). Marked differences between the adsorption properties of the strontium and barium adsorbates have been found, shedding light on their prospective role as templates for the growth of perovskites used as high dielectric constants for electronic device applications.

  16. 5-2-1-0 Activity and Nutrition Challenge for Elementary Students.

    PubMed

    Lovell, Cynthia Miller

    2017-01-01

    Obesity prevention in youth is a health priority, and teaching healthy habits toward this end is one of a school nurse's many responsibilities. A school nurse developed and implemented a school-wide, 2-week-long Activity and Nutrition Challenge (ANC) using the evidence-based 5-2-1-0 initiative to prevent and fight childhood obesity. Despite minimal promotion, nearly half of the students at two elementary schools participated and earned points by following the guidelines in the ANC. The amount of chocolate milk consumed by students dropped significantly during the ANC, showing that the healthy behavior of choosing beverages without added sugar had been positively impacted. Anecdotal evidence suggested positive changes in other healthy behaviors as well. This ANC was a new way for a school nurse to teach healthy habits to a large group of children in a short period of time, with limited extra work, and with promising results.

  17. Interoperability with Moby 1.0--it's better than sharing your toothbrush!

    PubMed

    Wilkinson, Mark D; Senger, Martin; Kawas, Edward; Bruskiewich, Richard; Gouzy, Jerome; Noirot, Celine; Bardou, Philippe; Ng, Ambrose; Haase, Dirk; Saiz, Enrique de Andres; Wang, Dennis; Gibbons, Frank; Gordon, Paul M K; Sensen, Christoph W; Carrasco, Jose Manuel Rodriguez; Fernández, José M; Shen, Lixin; Links, Matthew; Ng, Michael; Opushneva, Nina; Neerincx, Pieter B T; Leunissen, Jack A M; Ernst, Rebecca; Twigger, Simon; Usadel, Bjorn; Good, Benjamin; Wong, Yan; Stein, Lincoln; Crosby, William; Karlsson, Johan; Royo, Romina; Párraga, Iván; Ramírez, Sergio; Gelpi, Josep Lluis; Trelles, Oswaldo; Pisano, David G; Jimenez, Natalia; Kerhornou, Arnaud; Rosset, Roman; Zamacola, Leire; Tarraga, Joaquin; Huerta-Cepas, Jaime; Carazo, Jose María; Dopazo, Joaquin; Guigo, Roderic; Navarro, Arcadi; Orozco, Modesto; Valencia, Alfonso; Claros, M Gonzalo; Pérez, Antonio J; Aldana, Jose; Rojano, M Mar; Fernandez-Santa Cruz, Raul; Navas, Ismael; Schiltz, Gary; Farmer, Andrew; Gessler, Damian; Schoof, Heiko; Groscurth, Andreas

    2008-05-01

    The BioMoby project was initiated in 2001 from within the model organism database community. It aimed to standardize methodologies to facilitate information exchange and access to analytical resources, using a consensus driven approach. Six years later, the BioMoby development community is pleased to announce the release of the 1.0 version of the interoperability framework, registry Application Programming Interface and supporting Perl and Java code-bases. Together, these provide interoperable access to over 1400 bioinformatics resources worldwide through the BioMoby platform, and this number continues to grow. Here we highlight and discuss the features of BioMoby that make it distinct from other Semantic Web Service and interoperability initiatives, and that have been instrumental to its deployment and use by a wide community of bioinformatics service providers. The standard, client software, and supporting code libraries are all freely available at http://www.biomoby.org/.

  18. Hardening of the surface layers of commercial pure titanium VT1-0 under combined treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bashchenko, Lyudmila P.; Gromov, Viktor E.; Budovskikh, Evgenii A.; Ivanov, Yurii F.; Soskova, Nina A.

    2015-10-01

    The treatment of VT1-0 titanium samples was carried out by concentrated energy fluxes. The combined treatment included surface carburizing with the joint use of powder samples of compounds with high physical and mechanical properties (namely, titanium diboride TiB2, silicon carbide SiC and zirconium oxide ZrO2) and subsequent electron beam treatment of surface layers formed in electroexplosive treatment. The combined treatment of surface layers resulted in the multifold increase in microhardness, which reduces depending on the depth of hardening zone. After electron-beam treatment, the depth of hardening zone is increased. During electron-beam treatment, the two-layer hardening zone forms.

  19. DFT study of reaction processes of methane combustion on PdO(1 0 0)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dianat, Arezoo; Seriani, Nicola; Ciacchi, Lucio Colombi; Bobeth, Manfred; Cuniberti, Gianaurelio

    2014-10-01

    The complex reaction mechanism of methane combustion on the PdO(1 0 0) surface is investigated within the framework of density functional theory. Driving forces and activation energies for the dissociative adsorption of methane and for the successive dehydrogenation of adsorbed hydrocarbons are calculated. Energy barriers of some of the dehydrogenation reactions are comparable to the barrier for the dissociative adsorption of methane, contrary to what is often assumed. Moreover, we find that reaction barriers for the early formation of C-O bonds are much lower than those for the complete dehydrogenation of CH4. In particular, reaction of oxygen molecules from the gas phase with suitable configurations of adsorbed H and CH3 can efficiently produce water and CH2O as oxidation products. Along this reaction path, the highest barrier is indeed given by the first dehydrogenation reaction.

  20. GridLAB-D Technical Support Document: Residential End-Use Module Version 1.0

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor, Zachary T.; Gowri, Krishnan; Katipamula, Srinivas

    2008-07-31

    1.0 Introduction The residential module implements the following end uses and characteristics to simulate the power demand in a single family home: • Water heater • Lights • Dishwasher • Range • Microwave • Refrigerator • Internal gains (plug loads) • House (heating/cooling loads) The house model considers the following four major heat gains/losses that contribute to the building heating/cooling load: 1. Conduction through exterior walls, roof and fenestration (based on envelope UA) 2. Air infiltration (based on specified air change rate) 3. Solar radiation (based on CLTD model and using tmy data) 4. Internal gains from lighting, people, equipment and other end use objects. The Equivalent Thermal Parameter (ETP) approach is used to model the residential loads and energy consumption. The following sections describe the modeling assumptions for each of the above end uses and the details of power demand calculations in the residential module.

  1. Physics of the Be(10{bar 1} 0) Surface Core Level Spectrum

    SciTech Connect

    Lizzit, S.; Pohl, K. |; Baraldi, A.; Comelli, G.; Fritzsche, V.; Plummer, E.W. |; Stumpf, R.; Hofmann, P. ||

    1998-10-01

    Photoelectron diffraction has been utilized to confirm the theoretical prediction that the surface core level shifts observed for Be(10{bar 1}0) have been improperly assigned. The original assignment based upon the relative intensity of the shifted components was intuitively obvious: the peak with the largest shift of {minus}0.7 eV with respect to the bulk was associated with the surface plane, the next peak shifted by {minus}0.5 eV stems from the second layer, and the third peak at {minus}0.22 eV from the third and fourth layers. First-principles theory and our experimental data show that the largest shift is associated with the second plane, not the first plane. {copyright} {ital 1998} {ital The American Physical Society }

  2. ESMO - Magnitude of Clinical Benefit Scale V.1.0 questions and answers

    PubMed Central

    Cherny, N I; Sullivan, R; Dafni, U; Kerst, J M; Sobrero, A; Zielinski, C; Piccart, M J; Bogaerts, J; Tabernero, J; Latino, N J; de Vries, E G E

    2016-01-01

    The ESMO Magnitude of Clinical Benefit Scale (ESMO-MCBS) is a standardised, generic, validated tool to stratify the magnitude of clinical benefit that can be anticipated from anticancer therapies. The ESMO-MCBS is intended to both assist oncologists in explaining the likely benefits of a particular treatment to their patients as well as to aid public health decision makers' prioritise therapies for reimbursement. From its inception the ESMO-MCBS Working Group has invited questions and critiques to promote understanding and to address misunderstandings regarding the nuanced use of the scale, and to identify shortcomings in the scale to be addressed in future planned revisions and updates. The ESMO-MCBS V.1.0 has attracted many questions regarding its development, structure and potential applications. These questions, together with responses from the ESMO-MCBS Working Group, have been edited and collated, and are herein presented as a supplementary resource. PMID:27900206

  3. Hardening of the surface layers of commercial pure titanium VT1-0 under combined treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Bashchenko, Lyudmila P. Gromov, Viktor E. Budovskikh, Evgenii A. Soskova, Nina A.; Ivanov, Yurii F.

    2015-10-27

    The treatment of VT1-0 titanium samples was carried out by concentrated energy fluxes. The combined treatment included surface carburizing with the joint use of powder samples of compounds with high physical and mechanical properties (namely, titanium diboride TiB{sub 2}, silicon carbide SiC and zirconium oxide ZrO{sub 2}) and subsequent electron beam treatment of surface layers formed in electroexplosive treatment. The combined treatment of surface layers resulted in the multifold increase in microhardness, which reduces depending on the depth of hardening zone. After electron-beam treatment, the depth of hardening zone is increased. During electron-beam treatment, the two-layer hardening zone forms.

  4. Spacecraft Orbit Design and Analysis (SODA), version 1.0 user's guide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stallcup, Scott S.; Davis, John S.

    1989-01-01

    The Spacecraft Orbit Design and Analysis (SODA) computer program, Version 1.0 is described. SODA is a spaceflight mission planning system which consists of five program modules integrated around a common database and user interface. SODA runs on a VAX/VMS computer with an EVANS & SUTHERLAND PS300 graphics workstation. BOEING RIM-Version 7 relational database management system performs transparent database services. In the current version three program modules produce an interactive three dimensional (3D) animation of one or more satellites in planetary orbit. Satellite visibility and sensor coverage capabilities are also provided. One module produces an interactive 3D animation of the solar system. Another module calculates cumulative satellite sensor coverage and revisit time for one or more satellites. Currently Earth, Moon, and Mars systems are supported for all modules except the solar system module.

  5. HyRAM (Hydrogen Risk Assessment Models) v. 1.0 (alpha)

    SciTech Connect

    Groth, Katrina M.; Hecht, Ethan; Reynolds, John T.; Ekoto, Isaac W.; Walkup, Gregory W.

    2014-12-19

    HyRAM is a software toolkit that integrates data and methods relevant to assessing the safety of hydrogen fueling and storage infrastructure. The HyRAM toolkit integrates deterministic and probabilistic models for quantifying accident scenarios, predicting physical effects, and characterizing the impact of hydrogen hazards (thermal effects from jet fires, thermal pressure effects from deflagrations) on people and structures. HyRAM incorporates generic probabilities for equipment failures for nine types of components, and probabilistic models for the impact of heat flux on humans and structures, with computationally and experimentally validated models of hydrogen release and flame physics. Version 1.0.0.280 can be used to quantify the likelihood and thermal consequences associated with gaseous hydrogen releases from user-defined hydrogen installations.

  6. The interaction of Fe on MgO(1 0 0) surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fetzer, Cs.; Dézsi, I.; Szűcs, I.; Tanczikó, F.; Balogh, A. G.

    2009-10-01

    The atomic interaction and magnetic properties of ultrathin Fe films grown on cleaved and polished MgO(1 0 0) surfaces were studied by conversion electron Mössbauer spectroscopy (CEMS). 57Fe layers were deposited as probe atoms in different layer positions in 10 ML thick Fe films. Fe layers of different thicknesses were formed on polished and cleaved substrate surfaces at RT deposition. The analysis of the spectra showed no Fe-O interaction in MgO/Fe interface. FeO phase formation was excluded. The Mössbauer spectrum of 5 ML 57Fe sample showed enhanced internal magnetic field at 80 K. No interdiffusion of 57Fe and 56Fe atoms was observed between the layers at room temperature.

  7. Solidification of the Undercooled Al-Si Alloy Containing 1.0 PctRE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dang, Bo; Jian, Zengyun; Xu, Junfeng; Yan, Junhui

    2017-02-01

    Al-80 pctSi-1.0 pctRE alloy was levitated and melted using the electromagnetic levitation facility in combination with a laser heating unit. The growth morphologies of primary silicon were observed using a high-speed video, and the microstructure was analyzed by the scanning electron microscopy. The morphologies of primary silicon at low, intermediate, and high undercooling are dendrites, fragmented bulks and granular grains, and equiaxed grains, respectively. In addition, the growth velocities of primary silicon were measured, which were consistent with the theoretical prediction. The microstructure refinements of primary silicon played a dominant role in its large microhardness, which increased with the increase of undercooling. Moreover, the hardening effect of dendritic structure was stronger than that of equiaxed grain.

  8. Exchange coupling and noncollinear magnetic states in Ni/Fen/Ni(1 0 0) multilayers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malonda-Boungou, B. R.; Stojić, N.; Binggeli, N.; M'Passi-Mabiala, B.

    2015-01-01

    The Ni interlayer exchange coupling (IEC) and the atomic-scale magnetic configurations in fcc Ni /Fen /Ni (1 0 0) multilayers, with ultrathin Fe spacers, are investigated using first-principles density-functional theory including the noncollinear spin formalism. The trends with changing Fe thickness (n) between 3 and 5 monolayers (MLs) are examined. For n = 3 and 4 MLs, we find the ground state to display antiferromagnetic IEC between the Ni films, while for the 5-ML Fe spacer, the IEC changes into ferromagnetic. Upon reversal of the magnetization alignment, from antiparallel to parallel, between the Ni films with 3- and 4-ML thick Fe spacer, we find noncollinear magnetic configurations in the Fe layer as the lowest-energy states, which are related to the magnetic instability towards noncollinear solutions in bulk γ -Fe.

  9. Design document for the Surface Currents Data Base (SCDB) Management System (SCDBMS), version 1.0

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krisnnamagaru, Ramesh; Cesario, Cheryl; Foster, M. S.; Das, Vishnumohan

    1994-01-01

    The Surface Currents Database Management System (SCDBMS) provides access to the Surface Currents Data Base (SCDB) which is maintained by the Naval Oceanographic Office (NAVOCEANO). The SCDBMS incorporates database technology in providing seamless access to surface current data. The SCDBMS is an interactive software application with a graphical user interface (GUI) that supports user control of SCDBMS functional capabilities. The purpose of this document is to define and describe the structural framework and logistical design of the software components/units which are integrated into the major computer software configuration item (CSCI) identified as the SCDBMS, Version 1.0. The preliminary design is based on functional specifications and requirements identified in the governing Statement of Work prepared by the Naval Oceanographic Office (NAVOCEANO) and distributed as a request for proposal by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA).

  10. Design document for the MOODS Data Management System (MDMS), version 1.0

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    The MOODS Data Management System (MDMS) provides access to the Master Oceanographic Observation Data Set (MOODS) which is maintained by the Naval Oceanographic Office (NAVOCEANO). The MDMS incorporates database technology in providing seamless access to parameter (temperature, salinity, soundspeed) vs. depth observational profile data. The MDMS is an interactive software application with a graphical user interface (GUI) that supports user control of MDMS functional capabilities. The purpose of this document is to define and describe the structural framework and logical design of the software components/units which are integrated into the major computer software configuration item (CSCI) identified as MDMS, Version 1.0. The preliminary design is based on functional specifications and requirements identified in the governing Statement of Work prepared by the Naval Oceanographic Office (NAVOCEANO) and distributed as a request for proposal by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA).

  11. Theoretical study of SO2 adsorption on goethite (1 1 0) surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zubieta, Carolina E.; Fortunato, Leandro F.; Belelli, Patricia G.; Ferullo, Ricardo M.

    2014-09-01

    Adsorption of SO2 on fully hydrated and partially dehydrated (1 1 0) surface of goethite (α-FeOOH) has been investigated using density functional theory (DFT) and periodic conditions. Different degrees of dehydration were modeled by eliminating one or two water molecules from the fully hydrated surface. Calculations indicate that SO2 shows preference to adsorb on dehydrated surface and the transformation to surface sulfite, bisulfite and sulfate was observed. In particular, surface sulfite can be formed over a variety of different dehydrated surfaces as monodentate and bidentate complexes. Theoretical vibrational frequencies of all the species have also been computed. Taking into account all the structures, we found frequency values within the 650-1030 cm-1 region due to Ssbnd OFe stretching, and between 1010 and 1190 cm-1 due to Ssbnd O stretching. Furthermore, monodentate mononuclear and bidentate binuclear sulfite complexes present distinctive features at low frequencies (600-700 cm-1).

  12. Solid waste projection model: Model version 1. 0 technical reference manual

    SciTech Connect

    Wilkins, M.L.; Crow, V.L.; Buska, D.E. ); Ouderkirk, S.J. )

    1990-11-01

    The Solid Waste Projection Model (SWPM) system is an analytical tool developed by Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) for Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC). The SWPM system provides a modeling and analysis environment that supports decisions in the process of evaluating various solid waste management alternatives. This document, one of a series describing the SWPM system, contains detailed information regarding the software utilized in developing Version 1.0 of the modeling unit of SWPM. This document is intended for use by experienced software engineers and supports programming, code maintenance, and model enhancement. Those interested in using SWPM should refer to the SWPM Model User's Guide. This document is available from either the PNL project manager (D. L. Stiles, 509-376-4154) or the WHC program monitor (B. C. Anderson, 509-373-2796). 8 figs.

  13. The Zeeman effect and hyperfine interactions in J = 1-0 transitions of CH+ and its isotopologues.

    PubMed

    Amano, T

    2010-12-28

    The J = 1-0 transitions of (12)CH(+), (13)CH(+), and (12)CD(+) in the ground X(1)Σ(+) state have been unambiguously identified by using an extended negative glow discharge as an ion source. Unexpectedly large Zeeman splittings have been observed, and the (13)CH(+) line exhibits nuclear spin-rotation hyperfine splitting in addition to the Zeeman effect. The nuclear spin-rotation coupling constant was determined to be 1.087(50) MHz for the (13)C species. The rotational g-factor is found to be -7.65(29), in terms of the nuclear magneton for the J = 1 and v = 0 state, more than an order of magnitude larger than values for typical diamagnetic closed shell molecules. These larger than usual magnetic interactions for a (1)Σ molecule are caused by the large rotational energy and relatively small excitation energy of the excited A(1)Π state. The effective g-factor and the spin-rotation coupling constant obtained by ab initio calculations agree very well with the experimentally determined values.

  14. Measurement and Analysis Infrastructure Diagnostic (MAID) Evaluation Criteria, Version 1.0

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-02-01

    model is developed (e.g., linear regression ), confidence intervals are calculated and displayed to illustrate the uncertainty associated with the...fitted regression line (the average dependent variable values). 3.10 When a statistical model is used (e.g., linear regression ) for prediction, a... Regression Diagnostics: An Introduction. Sage, 1991. [Frees 1996] Frees, Edward W. Data Analysis Using Regression Models . Prentice Hall, 1996

  15. Satellite Data Processing System (SDPS) users manual V1.0

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Caruso, Michael; Dunn, Chris

    1989-01-01

    SDPS is a menu driven interactive program designed to facilitate the display and output of image and line-based data sets common to telemetry, modeling and remote sensing. This program can be used to display up to four separate raster images and overlay line-based data such as coastlines, ship tracks and velocity vectors. The program uses multiple windows to communicate information with the user. At any given time, the program may have up to four image display windows as well as auxiliary windows containing information about each image displayed. SDPS is not a commercial program. It does not contain complete type checking or error diagnostics which may allow the program to crash. Known anomalies will be mentioned in the appropriate section as notes or cautions. SDPS was designed to be used on Sun Microsystems Workstations running SunView1 (Sun Visual/Integrated Environment for Workstations). It was primarily designed to be used on workstations equipped with color monitors, but most of the line-based functions and several of the raster-based functions can be used with monochrome monitors. The program currently runs on Sun 3 series workstations running Sun OS 4.0 and should port easily to Sun 4 and Sun 386 series workstations with SunView1. Users should also be familiar with UNIX, Sun workstations and the SunView window system.

  16. Advanced modelling of the multiphase DMS chemistry with the CAPRAM DMS module 1.0

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoffmann, Erik Hans; Tilgner, Andreas; Schrödner, Roland; Wolke, Ralf; Herrmann, Hartmut

    2016-04-01

    Oceans are the general emitter of dimethyl sulphide (DMS), the major natural sulphur source (Andreae, 1990), and cover approximately 70 % of earth's surface. The main DMS oxidation products are SO2, H2SO4 and methyl sulfonic acid (MSA). Hence, DMS is very important for formation of non-sea salt sulphate (nss SO42-) aerosols and secondary particulate matter and thus global climate. Despite many previous model studies, there are still important knowledge gaps, especially in aqueous phase DMS chemistry, of its atmospheric fate (Barnes et al., 2006). Therefore, a comprehensive multiphase DMS chemistry mechanism, the CAPRAM DMS module 1.0 (DM1.0), has been developed. The DM1.0 includes 103 gas phase reactions, 5 phase transfers and 54 aqueous phase reactions. It was coupled with the multiphase chemistry mechanism MCMv3.2/CAPRAM4.0α (Rickard et al., 2015; Bräuer et al., 2016) and the extended CAPRAM halogen module 2.1 (HM2.1, Bräuer et al., 2013) for investigation of multiphase DMS oxidation in the marine boundary layer. Then, a pristine ocean scenario was simulated using the air parcel model SPACCIM (Wolke et al., 2005) including 8 non-permanent cloud passages - 4 at noon and 4 at midnight. This allows the investigation of the influence of deliquesced particles and clouds on multiphase DMS chemistry during both daytime and nighttime conditions as well as under cloud formation and evaporation. To test the influence of various subsystems on multiphase DMS chemistry different sensitivity runs were performed. Investigations of multiphase chemistry of DMS and its important oxidation products were done using concentration-time profiles and detailed time-resolved reaction flux analyses. The model studies revealed the importance of aqueous phase chemistry for DMS and its oxidation products. Overall about 7.0% of DMS is effectively oxidised by O3 in the aqueous phase of clouds. The simulations revealed the importance of halogen and aqueous phase chemistry for DMS and its

  17. [Evaluation of Drug Interaction between S-1 and Warfarin].

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Kaori; Suzuki, Shinya; Ikegawa, Kiwako; Nomura, Hisanaga; Fuse, Nozomu; Saito, Shinichiro

    2016-01-01

    Prolonged prothrombin time is observed in patients taking warfarin (WF) with a fluoropyrimidine, such as S-1. When WF is combined with S-1, the prothrombin time-international normalized ratio (PT-INR) and dose adjustment of WF should be closely monitored. To date, no clinical data have been reported in terms of the relation between temporal variation of PT-INR and its therapeutic range. In this study, we retrospectively collected patients' clinical data including PT-INR. We identified 21 patients receiving WF therapy before the start of S-1 treatment. Patient characteristics were male/female: 18/3, median age: 69 (range 48-81) years old, cancer of gastric/lung/pancreatic/other: 8/5/4/4, and history of deep vein thrombosis (DVT)/atrial fibrillation (AF)/cerebral infarction (CI)/other: 11/6/2/2. The PT-INR of 16 patients exceeded normal upper limits after taking S-1 with WF. The median time to exceed the PT-INR upper therapeutic range is 25 (range 3-77) days. Patients receiving WF anticoagulant therapy concomitant with S-1 should have their PT-INR closely monitored and WF doses adjusted accordingly.

  18. Meta-analysis Exploring the Effectiveness of S-1-Based Chemotherapy for Advanced Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer.

    PubMed

    Sun, Xin; Sun, Li; Zhang, Shu-Ling; Xiong, Zhi-Cheng; Ma, Jie-Tao; Han, Cheng-Bo

    2017-01-01

    S-1 is a new oral fluoropyrimidine formulation that comprises tegafur, 5-chloro-2,4-dihydroxypyridine, and potassium oxonate. S-1 is designed to enhance antitumor activity and to reduce gastrointestinal toxicity. Several studies have demonstrated that both S-1 monotherapy and S-1 combination regimens showed encouraging efficacies and mild toxicities in the treatment of lung squamous cell carcinoma and adenocarcinoma. However, it is unclear whether S-1 can be used as standard care in advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). The purpose of this meta-analysis was to assess the efficacy and safety of S-1-based chemotherapy, compared with standard chemotherapy, in patients with locally advanced or metastatic NSCLC. Thirteen randomized controlled trials (RCTs) involving 2,134 patients with a similar ratio of different pathological types were included. In first-line or second-line chemotherapy, compared with standard chemotherapy, S-1-based chemotherapy showed similar efficacy in terms of median overall survival (mOS), median progression free survival (mPFS), and objective response rate (ORR) (all P > 0.1), and significantly reduced the incidence of grade ≥ 3 hematological toxicities. In patients with locally advanced NSCLC receiving concurrent chemoradiotherapy, compared with standard chemoradiotherapy, significantly improved survival in the S-1-based chemotherapy was noted in terms of mOS and mPFS (risk radio [RR] = 1.289, P = 0.009; RR = 1.289, P = 0.000, respectively) with lower incidence of grade ≥ 3 neutropenia (RR = 0.453, P = 0.000). The present meta-analysis demonstrates that S-1-based chemotherapy shows similar benefits in advanced NSCLC and improves survival in locally advanced NSCLC, compared with standard treatment.

  19. V-SUIT Model Validation Using PLSS 1.0 Test Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Olthoff, Claas

    2015-01-01

    The dynamic portable life support system (PLSS) simulation software Virtual Space Suit (V-SUIT) has been under development at the Technische Universitat Munchen since 2011 as a spin-off from the Virtual Habitat (V-HAB) project. The MATLAB(trademark)-based V-SUIT simulates space suit portable life support systems and their interaction with a detailed and also dynamic human model, as well as the dynamic external environment of a space suit moving on a planetary surface. To demonstrate the feasibility of a large, system level simulation like V-SUIT, a model of NASA's PLSS 1.0 prototype was created. This prototype was run through an extensive series of tests in 2011. Since the test setup was heavily instrumented, it produced a wealth of data making it ideal for model validation. The implemented model includes all components of the PLSS in both the ventilation and thermal loops. The major components are modeled in greater detail, while smaller and ancillary components are low fidelity black box models. The major components include the Rapid Cycle Amine (RCA) CO2 removal system, the Primary and Secondary Oxygen Assembly (POS/SOA), the Pressure Garment System Volume Simulator (PGSVS), the Human Metabolic Simulator (HMS), the heat exchanger between the ventilation and thermal loops, the Space Suit Water Membrane Evaporator (SWME) and finally the Liquid Cooling Garment Simulator (LCGS). Using the created model, dynamic simulations were performed using same test points also used during PLSS 1.0 testing. The results of the simulation were then compared to the test data with special focus on absolute values during the steady state phases and dynamic behavior during the transition between test points. Quantified simulation results are presented that demonstrate which areas of the V-SUIT model are in need of further refinement and those that are sufficiently close to the test results. Finally, lessons learned from the modelling and validation process are given in combination

  20. PScan 1.0: flexible software framework for polygon based multiphoton microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yongxiao; Lee, Woei Ming

    2016-12-01

    Multiphoton laser scanning microscopes exhibit highly localized nonlinear optical excitation and are powerful instruments for in-vivo deep tissue imaging. Customized multiphoton microscopy has a significantly superior performance for in-vivo imaging because of precise control over the scanning and detection system. To date, there have been several flexible software platforms catered to custom built microscopy systems i.e. ScanImage, HelioScan, MicroManager, that perform at imaging speeds of 30-100fps. In this paper, we describe a flexible software framework for high speed imaging systems capable of operating from 5 fps to 1600 fps. The software is based on the MATLAB image processing toolbox. It has the capability to communicate directly with a high performing imaging card (Matrox Solios eA/XA), thus retaining high speed acquisition. The program is also designed to communicate with LabVIEW and Fiji for instrument control and image processing. Pscan 1.0 can handle high imaging rates and contains sufficient flexibility for users to adapt to their high speed imaging systems.

  1. Independent validation testing of the FLAME computer code, Version 1. 0

    SciTech Connect

    Martian, P.; Chung, J.N. . Dept. of Mechanical and Materials Engineering)

    1992-07-01

    Independent testing of the FLAME computer code, Version 1.0, was conducted to determine if the code is ready for use in hydrological and environmental studies at Department of Energy sites. This report describes the technical basis, approach, and results of this testing. Validation tests, (i.e., tests which compare field data to the computer generated solutions) were used to determine the operational status of the FLAME computer code and were done on a qualitative basis through graphical comparisons of the experimental and numerical data. These tests were specifically designed to check: (1) correctness of the FORTRAN coding, (2) computational accuracy, and (3) suitability to simulating actual hydrologic conditions. This testing was performed using a structured evaluation protocol which consisted of: (1) independent applications, and (2) graduated difficulty of test cases. Three tests ranging in complexity from simple one-dimensional steady-state flow field problems under near-saturated conditions to two-dimensional transient flow problems with very dry initial conditions.

  2. FR database 1.0: a resource focused on fruit development and ripening

    PubMed Central

    Yue, Junyang; Ma, Xiaojing; Ban, Rongjun; Huang, Qianli; Wang, Wenjie; Liu, Jia; Liu, Yongsheng

    2015-01-01

    Fruits form unique growing period in the life cycle of higher plants. They provide essential nutrients and have beneficial effects on human health. Characterizing the genes involved in fruit development and ripening is fundamental to understanding the biological process and improving horticultural crops. Although, numerous genes that have been characterized are participated in regulating fruit development and ripening at different stages, no dedicated bioinformatic resource for fruit development and ripening is available. In this study, we have developed such a database, FR database 1.0, using manual curation from 38 423 articles published before 1 April 2014, and integrating protein interactomes and several transcriptome datasets. It provides detailed information for 904 genes derived from 53 organisms reported to participate in fleshy fruit development and ripening. Genes from climacteric and non-climacteric fruits are also annotated, with several interesting Gene Ontology (GO) terms being enriched for these two gene sets and seven ethylene-related GO terms found only in the climacteric fruit group. Furthermore, protein–protein interaction analysis by integrating information from FR database presents the possible function network that affects fleshy fruit size formation. Collectively, FR database will be a valuable platform for comprehensive understanding and future experiments in fruit biology. Database URL: http://www.fruitech.org/ PMID:25725058

  3. Thickness dependence on thermal stability of sputtered Ag nanolayer on Ti/Si(1 0 0)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akhavan, O.; Moshfegh, A. Z.

    2007-11-01

    Thermal stability of Ag layer on Ti coated Si substrate for different thicknesses of the Ag layer have been studied. To do this, after sputter-deposition of a 10 nm Ti buffer layer on the Si(1 0 0) substrate, an Ag layer with different thicknesses (150-5 nm) was sputtered on the buffer layer. Post annealing process of the samples was performed in an N 2 ambient at a flow rate of 200 ml/min in a temperature range from 500 to 700 °C for 30 min. The electrical property of the heat-treated multilayer with the different thicknesses of Ag layer was examined by four-point-probe sheet resistance measurement at the room temperature. Phase formation and crystallographic orientation of the silver layers were studied by θ-2 θ X-ray diffraction analysis. The surface topography and morphology of the heat-treated films were determined by atomic force microscopy, and also, scanning electron microscopy. Four-point- probe electrical measurement showed no considerable variation of sheet resistance by reducing the thickness of the annealed Ag films down to 25 nm. Surface roughness of the Ag films with (1 1 1) preferred crystallographic orientation was much smaller than the film thickness, which is a necessary condition for nanometric contact layers. Therefore, we have shown that the Ag layers with suitable nano-thicknesses sputtered on 10 nm Ti buffer layer were thermally stable up to 700 °C.

  4. Deposition of PTFE thin films by RF plasma sputtering on <1 0 0> silicon substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bodas, Dhananjay S.; Mandale, A. B.; Gangal, S. A.

    2005-05-01

    Polymers have been studied extensively due to the wonderful array of properties presented by them. Polymer materials can be coated/deposited by various techniques like sputtering (magnetron, ion beam, RF or dc), plasma polymerization, etc. and can be used in coatings, paint industries, etc. The present study deals with the RF sputter deposition of poly(tetrafluoro ethylene) (PTFE), commonly known as Teflon. Depositions were carried out on mirror polished silicon <1 0 0> substrates at different powers in the range of 100-200 W. The deposition time was kept constant at 60 min. The sputtered film shows lower contact angle of 50° with water and 44° with diiodomethane, a lower interfacial tension value of 0.76 dyne/cm, indicating hydrophilicity and good adhesion of the film with the substrate. FTIR indicates presence of C sbnd F, C sbnd F 2 bonding groups in the deposited film. Further, XPS study shows presence of CF 3 (292.2 eV), CF 2 (290.8 eV), C-F (288.0 eV) and C sbnd CF (286.4 eV) moieties indicating deposition of PTFE films at higher power levels of plasma.

  5. Distributed Energy Resources Customer Adoption Model Plus (DER-CAM+), Version 1.0.0

    SciTech Connect

    Stadler, Michael; Cardorso, Goncalo; Mashayekh, Salman; DeForest, Nicholas

    2016-03-24

    DER-CAM+ v1.0.0 is internally referred to as DER-CAM v5.0.0. Due to fundamental changes from previous versions, a new name (DER-CAM+) will be used for DER-CAM version 5.0.0 and above. DER-CAM+ is a Decision Support Tool for Decentralized Energy Systems that has been tailored for microgrid applications, and now explicitly considers electrical and thermal networks within a microgrid, ancillary services, and operating reserve. DER-CAM was initially created as an exclusively economic energy model, able to find the cost minimizing combination and operation profile of a set of DER technologies that meet energy loads of a building or microgrid for a typical test year. The previous versions of DER-CAM were formulated without modeling the electrical/thermal networks within the microgrid, and hence, used aggregate single-node approaches. Furthermore, they were not able to consider operating reserve constraints, and microgrid revenue streams from participating in ancillary services markets. This new version DER-CAM+ considers these issues by including electrical power flow and thermal flow equations and constraints in the microgrid, revenues from various ancillary services markets, and operating reserve constraints.

  6. Photon-counting 1.0 GHz-phase-modulation fluorometer

    SciTech Connect

    Mizuno, T.; Nakao, S.; Mizutani, Y.; Iwata, T.

    2015-04-15

    We have constructed an improved version of a photon-counting phase-modulation fluorometer (PC-PMF) with a maximum modulation frequency of 1.0 GHz, where a phase domain measurement is conducted with a time-correlated single-photon-counting electronics. While the basic concept of the PC-PMF has been reported previously by one of the authors, little attention has been paid to its significance, other than its weak fluorescence measurement capability. Recently, we have recognized the importance of the PC-PMF and its potential for fluorescence lifetime measurements. One important aspect of the PC-PMF is that it enables us to perform high-speed measurements that exceed the frequency bandwidths of the photomultiplier tubes that are commonly used as fluorescence detectors. We describe the advantages of the PC-PMF and demonstrate its usefulness based on fundamental performance tests. In our new version of the PC-PMF, we have used a laser diode (LD) as an excitation light source rather than the light-emitting diode that was used in the primary version. We have also designed a simple and stable LD driver to modulate the device. Additionally, we have obtained a sinusoidal histogram waveform that has multiple cycles within a time span to be measured, which is indispensable for precise phase measurements. With focus on the fluorescence intensity and the resolution time, we have compared the performance of the PC-PMF with that of a conventional PMF using the analogue light detection method.

  7. Systematic comparisons between PRISM version 1.0.0, BAP, and CSMIP ground-motion processing

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kalkan, Erol; Stephens, Christopher

    2017-02-23

    A series of benchmark tests was run by comparing results of the Processing and Review Interface for Strong Motion data (PRISM) software version 1.0.0 to Basic Strong-Motion Accelerogram Processing Software (BAP; Converse and Brady, 1992), and to California Strong Motion Instrumentation Program (CSMIP) processing (Shakal and others, 2003, 2004). These tests were performed by using the MatLAB implementation of PRISM, which is equivalent to its public release version in Java language. Systematic comparisons were made in time and frequency domains of records processed in PRISM and BAP, and in CSMIP, by using a set of representative input motions with varying resolutions, frequency content, and amplitudes. Although the details of strong-motion records vary among the processing procedures, there are only minor differences among the waveforms for each component and within the frequency passband common to these procedures. A comprehensive statistical evaluation considering more than 1,800 ground-motion components demonstrates that differences in peak amplitudes of acceleration, velocity, and displacement time series obtained from PRISM and CSMIP processing are equal to or less than 4 percent for 99 percent of the data, and equal to or less than 2 percent for 96 percent of the data. Other statistical measures, including the Euclidian distance (L2 norm) and the windowed root mean square level of processed time series, also indicate that both processing schemes produce statistically similar products.

  8. Aspects of native oxides etching on n-GaSb(1 0 0) surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cotirlan, C.; Ghita, R. V.; Negrila, C. C.; Logofatu, C.; Frumosu, F.; Lungu, G. A.

    2016-02-01

    Gallium antimonide (GaSb) is the basis of the most photovoltaic and thermophotovoltaic (TPV) systems and its innovative technological aspects based on modern ultra-high vacuum techniques are in trend for device achievement. The real surface of GaSb is modified by technological processes that can conduce to problems related to the reproducible control of its surface properties. The GaSb surface is reactive in atmosphere due to oxygen presence and exhibits a native oxide layer. The evolution of native oxides during the ion sputtering, chemical etching and thermal annealing processes for preparing the surface is presented in detailed way. Ratios of surface constituents are obtained by Angle Resolved X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (ARXPS). Moreover, Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM), Energy Dispersive X-ray Spectroscopy (EDS), Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) and Low-Energy Electron Diffraction (LEED) are used for characterization. The surface stoichiometry is changed using a specific etchant (e.g. citric acid) at different etching time and is analyzed by ARXPS, SEM, EDS and AFM methods. The experimental results provide useful information regarding surface native oxides characteristics on n-GaSb(1 0 0) to be taken into account for development of low resistance contacts for TPV devices based on GaSb alloy.

  9. NIMS Radiance Point Spectra of Ida and Dactyl V1.0

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Granahan, J. C.

    2013-08-01

    This data volume contains radiometrically corrected point spectra of asteroid 243 Ida and a spectrum of the asteroid satellite Dactyl (Ida I) as acquired by the Galileo spacecraft Near Infrared Mapping Spectrometer (NIMS) on August 28, 1993. They record the spectra collected as the Galileo spacecraft approached the 243 Ida system. These data are products of the calibration of the raw data number files idu002tn.qub, idu005tn.qub, idu006tn.qub, idu007tn.qub, idu019tn.qub, idu020tn.qub, idu022tn.qub, idu028tn.qub, idu032tn.qub, idu033tn.qub, and idu035tn.qub (DATA SET ID ='GO-A-NIMS-3-TUBE-V1.0') with calibration factors acquired during the Jovian tour of the Galileo mission. These raw data .qub files are archived in the Imaging Node of the NASA Planetary Data System (PDS). The calibrated spectra consist of radiance and incidence/flux measurements for wavelengths between 0.7 - 5.2 micrometers.

  10. Safety assessment comparison methodology for toxic and radioactive wastes (SACO version 1.0)

    SciTech Connect

    Torres, C.; Simon, I.; Agueero, A.; Little, R.H.; Smith, G.M.

    1993-12-31

    As part of a research contract jointly funded by the Commission of the European Communities (CEC) and Empresa Nacional de Residuos Radiactivos S.A. (Enresa, Spain), the Instituto de Medioambiente of the CIEMAT Research Centre and Intera (UK) are developing and testing a general methodology (SACO) to assess the post-disposal environmental impact produced by waste disposal practices. The scope of the methodology includes toxic, radioactive and mixed hazardous wastes. The term toxic is interpreted broadly to include any kind of liquid or solid non-radioactive waste which could give rise to some detrimental environmental effects post-disposal. Radioactive wastes considered include the full range from low to high level solid wastes arising inside and outside the nuclear power industry. Mixed hazardous waste is taken to be waste presenting both radioactive and other toxic hazard potential. In this paper SACO version 1.0 methodology is presented and it is applied to the assessment of the impact of shallow and deep disposal of waste.

  11. VALDRIFT 1.0: A valley atmospheric dispersion model with deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Allwine, K.J.; Bian, X.; Whiteman, C.D.

    1995-05-01

    VALDRIFT version 1.0 is an atmospheric transport and diffusion model for use in well-defined mountain valleys. It is designed to determine the extent of ddft from aedal pesticide spraying activities, but can also be applied to estimate the transport and diffusion of various air pollutants in valleys. The model is phenomenological -- that is, the dominant meteorological processes goveming the behavior of the valley atmosphere are formulated explicitly in the model, albeit in a highly parameterized fashion. The key meteorological processes treated are: (1) nonsteady and nonhomogeneous along-valley winds and turbulent diffusivities, (2) convective boundary layer growth, (3) inversion descent, (4) noctumal temperature inversion breakup, and (5) subsidence. The model is applicable under relatively cloud-free, undisturbed synoptic conditions and is configured to operate through one diumal cycle for a single valley. The inputs required are the valley topographical characteristics, pesticide release rate as a function of time and space, along-valley wind speed as a function of time and space, temperature inversion characteristics at sunrise, and sensible heat flux as a function of time following sunrise. Default values are provided for certain inputs in the absence of detailed observations. The outputs are three-dimensional air concentration and ground-level deposition fields as a function of time.

  12. CaveMan Enterprise version 1.0 Software Validation and Verification.

    SciTech Connect

    Hart, David

    2014-10-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy Strategic Petroleum Reserve stores crude oil in caverns solution-mined in salt domes along the Gulf Coast of Louisiana and Texas. The CaveMan software program has been used since the late 1990s as one tool to analyze pressure mea- surements monitored at each cavern. The purpose of this monitoring is to catch potential cavern integrity issues as soon as possible. The CaveMan software was written in Microsoft Visual Basic, and embedded in a Microsoft Excel workbook; this method of running the CaveMan software is no longer sustainable. As such, a new version called CaveMan Enter- prise has been developed. CaveMan Enterprise version 1.0 does not have any changes to the CaveMan numerical models. CaveMan Enterprise represents, instead, a change from desktop-managed work- books to an enterprise framework, moving data management into coordinated databases and porting the numerical modeling codes into the Python programming language. This document provides a report of the code validation and verification testing.

  13. Motivation and Design of the Sirocco Storage System Version 1.0.

    SciTech Connect

    Curry, Matthew Leon; Ward, H. Lee; Danielson, Geoffrey Charles

    2015-07-01

    Sirocco is a massively parallel, high performance storage system for the exascale era. It emphasizes client-to-client coordination, low server-side coupling, and free data movement to improve resilience and performance. Its architecture is inspired by peer-to-peer and victim- cache architectures. By leveraging these ideas, Sirocco natively supports several media types, including RAM, flash, disk, and archival storage, with automatic migration between levels. Sirocco also includes storage interfaces and support that are more advanced than typical block storage. Sirocco enables clients to efficiently use key-value storage or block-based storage with the same interface. It also provides several levels of transactional data updates within a single storage command, including full ACID-compliant updates. This transaction support extends to updating several objects within a single transaction. Further support is provided for con- currency control, enabling greater performance for workloads while providing safe concurrent modification. By pioneering these and other technologies and techniques in the storage system, Sirocco is poised to fulfill a need for a massively scalable, write-optimized storage system for exascale systems. This is version 1.0 of a document reflecting the current and planned state of Sirocco. Further versions of this document will be accessible at http://www.cs.sandia.gov/Scalable_IO/ sirocco .

  14. Segregation of Sn and Sb in a ternary Cu(1 0 0)SnSb alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asante, J. K. O.; Terblans, J. J.; Roos, W. D.

    2005-12-01

    Surface segregation studies of Sn and Sb in Cu(1 0 0)-0.14 at.% Sn-0.12 at.% Sb ternary alloy, have been done by making use of Auger Electron Spectroscopy. The method of Linear Temperature Ramp (LTR) was employed, whereby the sample was heated and cooled linearly at a constant rate. The positive heating rate showed both a kinetic segregation profile, as well as a narrow equilibrium segregation region, at higher temperatures. The equilibrium segregation profile was extended by cooling the sample. Sn was first to segregate to the surface due to its higher diffusion coefficient, mainly from a smaller activation energy ESn. Sb, due to its higher segregation energy, eventually replaced Sn from the surface. The modified Darken model was used to simulate the profile yielding the following segregation parameters: Do(Sn) = 6.3 × 10 -6 m 2/s, Do(Sb) = 2.8 × 10 -5 m 2/s; ESn = 175.4 kJ/mol, ESb = 186.3 kJ/mol; ΔGSn°=64.2 kJ/mol, ΔGSb°=84.3 kJ/mol; ΩCu-Sn = 3.4 kJ/mol, ΩCu-Sb = 15.9 kJ/mol and ΩSn-Sb = -5.4 kJ/mol.

  15. The mGA1.0: A common LISP implementation of a messy genetic algorithm

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldberg, David E.; Kerzic, Travis

    1990-01-01

    Genetic algorithms (GAs) are finding increased application in difficult search, optimization, and machine learning problems in science and engineering. Increasing demands are being placed on algorithm performance, and the remaining challenges of genetic algorithm theory and practice are becoming increasingly unavoidable. Perhaps the most difficult of these challenges is the so-called linkage problem. Messy GAs were created to overcome the linkage problem of simple genetic algorithms by combining variable-length strings, gene expression, messy operators, and a nonhomogeneous phasing of evolutionary processing. Results on a number of difficult deceptive test functions are encouraging with the mGA always finding global optima in a polynomial number of function evaluations. Theoretical and empirical studies are continuing, and a first version of a messy GA is ready for testing by others. A Common LISP implementation called mGA1.0 is documented and related to the basic principles and operators developed by Goldberg et. al. (1989, 1990). Although the code was prepared with care, it is not a general-purpose code, only a research version. Important data structures and global variations are described. Thereafter brief function descriptions are given, and sample input data are presented together with sample program output. A source listing with comments is also included.

  16. Structural/aerodynamic Blade Analyzer (SAB) User's Guide, Version 1.0

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morel, M. R.

    1994-01-01

    The structural/aerodynamic blade (SAB) analyzer provides an automated tool for the static-deflection analysis of turbomachinery blades with aerodynamic and rotational loads. A structural code calculates a deflected blade shape using aerodynamic loads input. An aerodynamic solver computes aerodynamic loads using deflected blade shape input. The two programs are iterated automatically until deflections converge. Currently, SAB version 1.0 is interfaced with MSC/NASTRAN to perform the structural analysis and PROP3D to perform the aerodynamic analysis. This document serves as a guide for the operation of the SAB system with specific emphasis on its use at NASA Lewis Research Center (LeRC). This guide consists of six chapters: an introduction which gives a summary of SAB; SAB's methodology, component files, links, and interfaces; input/output file structure; setup and execution of the SAB files on the Cray computers; hints and tips to advise the user; and an example problem demonstrating the SAB process. In addition, four appendices are presented to define the different computer programs used within the SAB analyzer and describe the required input decks.

  17. Interaction of gaseous hydrogen atoms with oxygen covered Cu(1 0 0) surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolovos-Vellianitis, D.; Kammler, Th; Küppers, J.

    2001-06-01

    The interaction of H atoms with O precovered Cu(1 0 0) surfaces was studied with thermal desorption and Auger electron spectroscopies between 90 and 300 K. Gaseous product formation was monitored during H admission to the surface and allowed to elucidate the role of elementary reaction steps. Adsorbed and gaseous water were formed as reaction products, their kinetics and yields depending on the reaction temperature. Three elementary reaction steps were identified, two of which involve gaseous H: hydrogenation of adsorbed O towards adsorbed OH, hydrogenation of adsorbed OH towards adsorbed and gaseous water. As third reaction, recombination of adsorbed OH and H was observed. Below 120 K two sequential hydrogenation steps lead to gaseous and adsorbed water, rate determined by OH hydrogenation. Between 130 and 180 K isothermal desorption of water occurs. Above 190 K recombination of OH and H affects the kinetics. The various mechanisms lead to a complicated temperature dependence of the kinetics of gaseous water formation. At any temperature the reactions lead to a complete hydrogenation of oxygen to water. Abstraction of H from adsorbed water was not observed in accordance with the reaction energetics.

  18. HyRAM (Hydrogen Risk Assessment Models) v. 1.0

    SciTech Connect

    Groth, Katrina M.; Hecht, Ethan S.; Reynolds, John T.; Blaylock, Myra L.; Ekoto, Isaac W.; Walkup, Gregory W.

    2016-02-17

    HyRAM is a software toolkit for conducting quantitative risk assessment (QRA) and consequence modeling for hydrogen infrastructure and transportation systems. HyRAM contains validated, simplified hydrogen behavior models, a standardized QRA approach, and engineering models and generic data relevant to hydrogen installations. HyRAM 1.0 was developed by Sandia National Laboratories for the U. S. Department of Energy to increase access to technical data about hydrogen and to enable the use of that data to support development and revision of national and international codes and standards with risk assessment and consequence modeling. The HyRAM toolkit integrates analytical and probabilistic models for quantifying accident scenarios, predicting physical effects, and characterizing the impact of hydrogen hazards (including thermal effects from jet fires and overpressure effects from deflagrations in confined areas) on people and structures. HyRAM incorporates generic probabilities for equipment failures for nine types of components, and probabilistic models for the impact of heat flux on humans and structures, with computationally and experimentally validated analytical first order models of hydrogen release and flame physics. Version 1 can be used to quantify the risk and consequences associated with gaseous hydrogen releases from user-defined hydrogen installations.

  19. Nano-pits on GaAs (1 0 0) surface: Preferential sputtering and diffusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Tanuj; Panchal, Vandana; Kumar, Ashish; Kanjilal, D.

    2016-07-01

    Self organized nano-structure array on the surfaces of semiconductors have potential applications in photonics, magnetic devices, photovoltaics, and surface-wetting tailoring etc. Therefore, the control over their dimensions is gaining scientific interest in last couple of decades. In this work, fabrication of pits of nano-dimensions is carried out on the GaAs (1 0 0) surface using 50 keV Ar+ at normal incidence. Variation in fluence from 3 × 1017 ions/cm2 to 5 × 1018 ions/cm2 does not make a remarkable variation in the dimension of pits such as size and depth, which is confirmed by atomic force microscopy (AFM) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). However the simultaneous dots formation is observed along with the pits at higher fluences. Average size of pits is found to be of 22 nm with depth of 1-5 nm for the used fluences. The importance of preferential sputtering of 'As' as compared to 'Ga' is estimated using energy dispersive X-ray analysis (EDX). The observed alteration in near surface composition shows the Ga enrichment of surface, which is not being much affected by variation in fluence. The growth evolution of pits and dots for the used experimental conditions is explained on the basis of ion beam induced preferential sputtering and surface diffusion.

  20. GRIDGEN Version 1.0: a computer program for generating unstructured finite-volume grids

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lien, Jyh-Ming; Liu, Gaisheng; Langevin, Christian D.

    2015-01-01

    GRIDGEN is a computer program for creating layered quadtree grids for use with numerical models, such as the MODFLOW–USG program for simulation of groundwater flow. The program begins by reading a three-dimensional base grid, which can have variable row and column widths and spatially variable cell top and bottom elevations. From this base grid, GRIDGEN will continuously divide into four any cell intersecting user-provided refinement features (points, lines, and polygons) until the desired level of refinement is reached. GRIDGEN will then smooth, or balance, the grid so that no two adjacent cells, including overlying and underlying cells, differ by more than a user-specified level tolerance. Once these gridding processes are completed, GRIDGEN saves a tree structure file so that the layered quadtree grid can be quickly reconstructed as needed. Once a tree structure file has been created, GRIDGEN can then be used to (1) export the layered quadtree grid as a shapefile, (2) export grid connectivity and cell information as ASCII text files for use with MODFLOW–USG or other numerical models, and (3) intersect the grid with shapefiles of points, lines, or polygons, and save intersection output as ASCII text files and shapefiles. The GRIDGEN program is demonstrated by creating a layered quadtree grid for the Biscayne aquifer in Miami-Dade County, Florida, using hydrologic features to control where refinement is added.

  1. Warm and Hot Gases in and around Cluster Galaxies at Z=0.1-0.2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Q.

    2013-10-01

    We propose a joint HST/XMM-Newton observing program to study both warm and hot gases in two optically-selected galaxy clusters at z=0.117-0.2108. Each cluster has a UV-bright background QSO projected within the expected strong accretion shock {< 2r_200}. We will observe UV absorption lines of the O VI doublet, HI Ly-alpha and Ly-beta, and other ion transitions in the rest frame of the clusters, using the HST/COS G130M grating. These absorption lines are sensitive to the thermal, kinetic, and chemical properties of warm {T < 10^6 K} gas, associated with the halos of individual galaxies and the intracluster medium. Chandra/ACIS observations will be used to measure the luminosity, temperature, and morphology of the hot gas component of the clusters, especially in their core regions. This joint study will thus allow us for the first time to characterize the heating/cooling and dynamic processes of these multiple gas phases in the clusters. The understanding of these processes is essential for understanding cluster galaxy evolution, the correct interpretation of X-ray and Sunyaev-Zeldovich effect measurements, and the use of clusters as cosmology probes.

  2. The S=1 Underscreened Anderson Lattice model for Uranium compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, C.; Simões, A. S. R.; Iglesias, J. R.; Lacroix, C.; Perkins, N. B.; Coqblin, B.

    2011-01-01

    Magnetic properties of uranium and neptunium compounds showing coexistence of the Kondo effect and ferromagnetic order are investigated within the degenerate Anderson Lattice Hamiltonian, describing a 5f2 electronic configuration with S = 1 spins. Through the Schrieffer-Wolff transformation, both an exchange Kondo interaction for the S = 1 f-spins and an effective f-band term are obtained, allowing to describe the coexistence of Kondo effect and ferromagnetic ordering and a weak delocalization of the 5f-electrons. We calculate the Kondo and Curie temperatures and we can account for the pressure dependence of the Curie temperature of UTe.

  3. The toluene-Ar complex: S0 and S1 van der Waals modes, changes to methyl rotation, and torsion-van der Waals vibration coupling.

    PubMed

    Gascooke, Jason R; Lawrance, Warren D

    2013-02-28

    The methyl rotor and van der Waals vibrational levels in the S1 and S0 states of toluene-Ar have been investigated by the technique of two-dimensional laser induced fluorescence (2D-LIF). The S0 van der Waals and methyl rotor levels are reported for the first time, while improved S1 values are presented. The correlations seen in the 2D-LIF images between the S0 and S1 states lead to a reassignment of key features in the S1 ← S0 excitation spectrum. This reassignment reveals that there are significant changes in the methyl rotor levels in the complex compared with those in bare toluene, particularly at low m. The observed rotor energies are explained by the introduction of a three-fold, V3, term in the torsion potential (this term is zero in toluene) and a reduction in the height of the six-fold, V6, barriers in S0 and S1 from their values in bare toluene. The V3 term is larger in magnitude than the V6 term in both S0 and S1. The constants determined are ∣V3(S1)∣ = 33.4 ± 1.0 cm(-1), ∣V3(S0)∣ = 20.0 ± 1.0 cm(-1), V6(S1) = -10.7 ± 1.0 cm(-1), and V6(S0) = -1.7 ± 1.0 cm(-1). The methyl rotor is also found to couple with van der Waals vibration; specifically, the m(") = 2 rotor state couples with the combination level involving one quantum of the long axis bend and m(") = 1. The coupling constant is determined to be 1.9 cm(-1), which is small compared with the values typically reported for torsion-vibration coupling involving ring modes.

  4. NEAR-INFRARED SPECTROSCOPY OF INFRARED-EXCESS STELLAR OBJECTS IN THE YOUNG SUPERNOVA REMNANT G54.1+0.3

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Hyun-Jeong; Koo, Bon-Chul; Moon, Dae-Sik E-mail: koo@astro.snu.ac.kr

    2013-09-01

    We present the results of broadband near-infrared spectroscopic observations of the recently discovered mysterious stellar objects in the young supernova remnant G54.1+0.3. These objects, which show significant mid-infrared-excess emission, are embedded in a diffuse loop structure of {approx}1' in radius. Their near-infrared spectra reveal characteristics of late O- or early B-type stars with numerous H and He I absorption lines, and we classify their spectral types to be between O9 and B2 based on an empirical relation derived here between the equivalent widths of the H lines and stellar photospheric temperatures. The spectral types, combined with the results of spectral energy distribution fits, constrain the distance to the objects to be 6.0 {+-} 0.4 kpc. The photometric spectral types of the objects are consistent with those from the spectroscopic analyses, and the extinction distributions indicate a local enhancement of matter in the western part of the loop. If these objects originate via triggered formation by the progenitor star of G54.1+0.3, then their formations likely began during the later evolutionary stages of the progenitor, although a rather earlier formation may still be possible. If the objects and the progenitor belong to the same cluster of stars, then our results constrain the progenitor mass of G54.1+0.3 to be between 18 and {approx}35 M{sub Sun} and suggest that G54.1+0.3 was either a Type IIP supernova or, with a relatively lower possibility, Type Ib/c from a binary system.

  5. L5 – S1 Segmental Kinematics After Facet Arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Voronov, Leonard I.; Havey, Robert M.; Rosler, David M.; Sjovold, Simon G.; Rogers, Susan L.; Carandang, Gerard; Ochoa, Jorge A.; Yuan, Hansen; Webb, Scott

    2009-01-01

    Background Facet arthroplasty is a motion restoring procedure. It is normally suggested as an alternative to rigid fixation after destabilizing decompression procedures in the posterior lumbar spine. While previous studies have reported successful results in reproducing normal spine kinematics after facet replacement at L4-5 and L3-4, there are no data on the viability of facet replacement at the lumbosacral joint. The anatomy of posterior elements and the resulting kinematics at L5-S1 are distinctly different from those at superior levels, making the task of facet replacement at the lumbosacral level challenging. This study evaluated the kinematics of facet replacement at L5-S1. Methods Six human cadaveric lumbar spines (L1-S1, 46.7 ± 13.0 years) were tested in the following sequence: (1) intact (L1-S1), (2) complete laminectomy and bilateral facetectomy at L5-S1, and (3) implantation of TFAS-LS (Lumbosacral Total Facet Arthroplasty System, Archus Orthopedics, Redmond, Washington) at L5-S1 using pedicle screws. Specimens were tested in flexion (8Nm), extension (6Nm), lateral bending (LB, ± 6Nm), and axial rotation (AR, ± 5Nm). The level of significance was α = .017 after Bonferroni correction for three comparisons: (1) intact vs. destabilized, (2) destabilized vs. reconstructed, and (3) intact vs. reconstructed. Results Laminectomy-facetectomy at L5-S1 increased the L5-S1 angular range of motion (ROM) in all directions. Flexion-extension (F-E) ROM increased from 15.3 ± 2.9 to 18.7 ± 3.5 degrees (P < .017), LB from 8.2 ± 1.8 to 9.3 ± 1.6 degrees (P < .017), and AR from 3.7 ± 2.0 to 5.9 ± 1.8 degrees (P < .017). The facet arthroplasty system decreased ROM compared to the laminectomy-facetectomy condition in all tested directions (P < .017). The facet arthroplasty system restored the L5-S1 ROM to its intact levels in LB and AR (P > .017). F-E ROM after the facet arthroplasty system implantation was smaller than the intact value (10.1 ± 2.2 vs. 15.3 ± 2

  6. CO(J = 1-0) Imaging of M51 with CARMA and the Nobeyama 45 m Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koda, Jin; Sawada, Tsuyoshi; Wright, Melvyn C. H.; Teuben, Peter; Corder, Stuartt A.; Patience, Jenny; Scoville, Nick; Donovan Meyer, Jennifer; Egusa, Fumi

    2011-03-01

    We report the CO(J = 1-0) observations of the Whirlpool Galaxy M51 using both the Combined Array for Research in Millimeter Astronomy (CARMA) and the Nobeyama 45 m telescope (NRO45). We describe a procedure for the combination of interferometer and single-dish data. In particular, we discuss (1) the joint imaging and deconvolution of heterogeneous data, (2) the weighting scheme based on the root-mean-square (rms) noise in the maps, (3) the sensitivity and uv coverage requirements, and (4) the flux recovery of a combined map. We generate visibilities from the single-dish map and calculate the noise of each visibility based on the rms noise. Our weighting scheme, though it is applied to discrete visibilities in this paper, should be applicable to grids in uv space, and this scheme may advance in future software development. For a realistic amount of observing time, the sensitivities of the NRO45 and CARMA visibility data sets are best matched by using the single-dish baselines only up to 4-6 kλ (about 1/4-1/3 of the dish diameter). The synthesized beam size is determined to conserve the flux between the synthesized beam and convolution beam. The superior uv coverage provided by the combination of CARMA long baseline data with 15 antennas and NRO45 short spacing data results in the high image fidelity, which is evidenced by the excellent overlap between even the faint CO emission and dust lanes in an optical Hubble Space Telescope image and polycyclicaromatichydrocarbon emission in a Spitzer 8 μm image. The total molecular gas masses of NGC 5194 and 5195 (d = 8.2 Mpc) are 4.9 × 109 M sun and 7.8 × 107 M sun, respectively, assuming the CO-to-H2 conversion factor of X CO = 1.8 × 1020 cm-2(K km s-1)-1. The presented images are an indication of the millimeter-wave images that will become standard in the next decade with CARMA and NRO45, and the Atacama Large Millimeter/Submillimeter Array.

  7. The structure of CO2 hydrate between 0.7 and 1.0 GPa

    DOE PAGES

    Tulk, Chris A.; Machida, Shinichi; Klug, Dennis D.; ...

    2014-11-05

    A deuterated sample of CO2 structure I (sI) clathrate hydrate (CO2 ∙ 8.3 D2O) has been formed and neutron diffraction experiments up to 1.0 GPa at 240 K were performed. The sI CO2 hydrate transformed at 0.7 GPa into the high pressure phase that had been observed previously by Hirai, et al. (J. Phys. Chem. 133, 124511 (2010)) and O. Bollengier et al. (Geochim. Cosmochim. AC. 119, 322 (2013)), but which had not been structurally identified. The current neutron diffraction data were successfully fitted to a filled ice structure with CO2 molecules filling the water channels. This CO2+water system hasmore » also been investigated using classical molecular dynamics and density functional ab initio methods to provide additional characterization of the high pressure structure. Both models indicate the water network adapts an MH-III ‘like’ filled ice structure with considerable disorder of the orientations of the CO2molecule. Furthermore, the disorder appears be a direct result of the level of proton disorder in the water network. In contrast to the conclusions of Bollengier et al. our neutron diffraction data shows that the filled ice phase can be recovered to ambient pressure (0.1 MPa) at 96 K, and recrystallization to sI hydrate occurs upon subsequent heating to 150 K, possibly by first forming low density amorphous ice. Unlike other clathrate hydrate systems, which transform from the sI or sII structure to the hexagonal structure (sH) then to the filled ice structure, CO2 hydrate transforms directly from the sI form to the filled ice structure.« less

  8. FPLUME-1.0: An integral volcanic plume model accounting for ash aggregation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Folch, A.; Costa, A.; Macedonio, G.

    2016-02-01

    Eruption source parameters (ESP) characterizing volcanic eruption plumes are crucial inputs for atmospheric tephra dispersal models, used for hazard assessment and risk mitigation. We present FPLUME-1.0, a steady-state 1-D (one-dimensional) cross-section-averaged eruption column model based on the buoyant plume theory (BPT). The model accounts for plume bending by wind, entrainment of ambient moisture, effects of water phase changes, particle fallout and re-entrainment, a new parameterization for the air entrainment coefficients and a model for wet aggregation of ash particles in the presence of liquid water or ice. In the occurrence of wet aggregation, the model predicts an effective grain size distribution depleted in fines with respect to that erupted at the vent. Given a wind profile, the model can be used to determine the column height from the eruption mass flow rate or vice versa. The ultimate goal is to improve ash cloud dispersal forecasts by better constraining the ESP (column height, eruption rate and vertical distribution of mass) and the effective particle grain size distribution resulting from eventual wet aggregation within the plume. As test cases we apply the model to the eruptive phase-B of the 4 April 1982 El Chichón volcano eruption (México) and the 6 May 2010 Eyjafjallajökull eruption phase (Iceland). The modular structure of the code facilitates the implementation in the future code versions of more quantitative ash aggregation parameterization as further observations and experiment data will be available for better constraining ash aggregation processes.

  9. FPLUME-1.0: An integral volcanic plume model accounting for ash aggregation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Folch, Arnau; Costa, Antonio; Macedonio, Giovanni

    2016-04-01

    Eruption Source Parameters (ESP) characterizing volcanic eruption plumes are crucial inputs for atmospheric tephra dispersal models, used for hazard assessment and risk mitigation. We present FPLUME-1.0, a steady-state 1D cross-section averaged eruption column model based on the Buoyant Plume Theory (BPT). The model accounts for plume bending by wind, entrainment of ambient moisture, effects of water phase changes, particle fallout and re-entrainment, a new parameterization for the air entrainment coefficients and a model for wet aggregation of ash particles in presence of liquid water or ice. In the occurrence of wet aggregation, the model predicts an "effective" grain size distribution depleted in fines with respect to that erupted at the vent. Given a wind profile, the model can be used to determine the column height from the eruption mass flow rate or vice-versa. The ultimate goal is to improve ash cloud dispersal forecasts by better constraining the ESP (column height, eruption rate and vertical distribution of mass) and the "effective" particle grain size distribution resulting from eventual wet aggregation within the plume. As test cases we apply the model to the eruptive phase-B of the 4 April 1982 El Chichón volcano eruption (México) and the 6 May 2010 Eyjafjallajökull eruption phase (Iceland). The modular structure of the code facilitates the implementation in the future code versions of more quantitative ash aggregation parameterization as further observations and experiments data will be available for better constraining ash aggregation processes.

  10. The temperature dependence of the interaction of NO + CO on Pt{1 0 0}

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miners, J. H.; Gardner, P.; Woodruff, D. P.

    2003-12-01

    Infrared reflection absorption spectroscopy together with mass spectrometry has been used to investigate the interaction of NO and CO on Pt{1 0 0}, initially prepared in the reconstructed 'hex' phase, under ambient pressures of these gases, in the temperature range 300-500 K. The results allow the local and total coverages of adsorbed CO and NO to be related to the rate of reaction to produce gas phase CO 2, and provide insight into the species present on the surface during the so-called low temperature oscillatory reaction regime of this process. At temperatures below that at which NO dissociation occurs (approximately 390-400 K) adsorption is controlled by the non-reactive displacement of NO by CO and results in a CO-poisoned surface. Above 400 K when significant CO 2 production occurs, the NO coverage increases to produce a surface with NO and CO fully intermixed; the increase in NO coverage is attributed to the higher rate of NO arrival from the gas phase (with a partial pressure ratio of PNO: PCO>1) at free surface sites created by NO dissociation and subsequent reaction with CO. The competition between these two processes of non-reactive NO displacement by CO and reactive displacement of CO by NO is proposed to determine the parameter space of the low temperature oscillatory regime. Rapid equilibration between bridged and atop CO species leads to them appearing to exhibit identical reaction behaviour. Particularly at the lowest reaction temperatures (around 400 K), islands of pure CO may coexist on the surface but not participate in the reaction. Under conditions corresponding to the high temperature oscillatory regime, small quantities of absorbed CO, but no NO, are seen on the surface.

  11. The structure of CO₂ hydrate between 0.7 and 1.0 GPa.

    PubMed

    Tulk, C A; Machida, S; Klug, D D; Lu, H; Guthrie, M; Molaison, J J

    2014-11-07

    A deuterated sample of CO2 structure I (sI) clathrate hydrate (CO2·8.3 D2O) has been formed and neutron diffraction experiments up to 1.0 GPa at 240 K were performed. The sI CO2 hydrate transformed at 0.7 GPa into the high pressure phase that had been observed previously by Hirai et al. [J. Phys. Chem. 133, 124511 (2010)] and Bollengier et al. [Geochim. Cosmochim. Acta 119, 322 (2013)], but which had not been structurally identified. The current neutron diffraction data were successfully fitted to a filled ice structure with CO2 molecules filling the water channels. This CO2+water system has also been investigated using classical molecular dynamics and density functional ab initio methods to provide additional characterization of the high pressure structure. Both models indicate the water network adapts a MH-III "like" filled ice structure with considerable disorder of the orientations of the CO2 molecule. Furthermore, the disorder appears to be a direct result of the level of proton disorder in the water network. In contrast to the conclusions of Bollengier et al., our neutron diffraction data show that the filled ice phase can be recovered to ambient pressure (0.1 MPa) at 96 K, and recrystallization to sI hydrate occurs upon subsequent heating to 150 K, possibly by first forming low density amorphous ice. Unlike other clathrate hydrate systems, which transform from the sI or sII structure to the hexagonal structure (sH) then to the filled ice structure, CO2 hydrate transforms directly from the sI form to the filled ice structure.

  12. The structure of CO2 hydrate between 0.7 and 1.0 GPa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tulk, C. A.; Machida, S.; Klug, D. D.; Lu, H.; Guthrie, M.; Molaison, J. J.

    2014-11-01

    A deuterated sample of CO2 structure I (sI) clathrate hydrate (CO2.8.3 D2O) has been formed and neutron diffraction experiments up to 1.0 GPa at 240 K were performed. The sI CO2 hydrate transformed at 0.7 GPa into the high pressure phase that had been observed previously by Hirai et al. [J. Phys. Chem. 133, 124511 (2010)] and Bollengier et al. [Geochim. Cosmochim. Acta 119, 322 (2013)], but which had not been structurally identified. The current neutron diffraction data were successfully fitted to a filled ice structure with CO2 molecules filling the water channels. This CO2+water system has also been investigated using classical molecular dynamics and density functional ab initio methods to provide additional characterization of the high pressure structure. Both models indicate the water network adapts a MH-III "like" filled ice structure with considerable disorder of the orientations of the CO2 molecule. Furthermore, the disorder appears to be a direct result of the level of proton disorder in the water network. In contrast to the conclusions of Bollengier et al., our neutron diffraction data show that the filled ice phase can be recovered to ambient pressure (0.1 MPa) at 96 K, and recrystallization to sI hydrate occurs upon subsequent heating to 150 K, possibly by first forming low density amorphous ice. Unlike other clathrate hydrate systems, which transform from the sI or sII structure to the hexagonal structure (sH) then to the filled ice structure, CO2 hydrate transforms directly from the sI form to the filled ice structure.

  13. Efficacy and safety of oxaliplatin, bevacizumab and oral S-1 for advanced recurrent colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Shuji; Shimazaki, Jiro; Morishita, Keiichi; Koike, Nobusada; Harada, Nobuhiko; Hayashi, Tsuneo; Suzuki, Mamoru

    2016-10-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy and safety of co-administration of oral S-1 and oxaliplatin (SOX) in combination with bevacizumab (bev) in patients with advanced recurrent colorectal cancer. A retrospective study of 36 patients with advanced recurrent colorectal cancer was performed, of whom 27 received first-line and 9 received second-line SOX+bev chemotherapy between 2010 and 2013 at the Hachioji Digestive Disease Hospital (Hachioji, Japan). The SOX+bev regimen consisted of administration of intravenous oxaliplatin (85 mg/m(2)) on days 1 and 14, bevacizumab (5 mg/kg) on day 1, and co-administration of oral S-1 twice daily on days 1-14. The drug regimen was repeated every 4 weeks. SOX+bev treatment was associated with a response rate of 45.2%, a disease control rate of 71%, and a median progression-free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS) of 9.9 and 21.9 months, respectively. Patients who received first-line chemotherapy benefited from treatment in terms of prolonged PFS (13.8 months) and OS (28.2 months). Grade 3/4 adverse events were infrequent and included anaemia, thrombocytopenia, anorexia, diarrhea, sensory neuropathy, increased aspartate aminotransferase level and skin rash. In conclusion, SOX+bev therapy was found to be feasible and safe for patients with advanced and recurrent colorectal cancer.

  14. Transferable Output ASCII Data (TOAD) editor version 1.0 user's guide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bingel, Bradford D.; Shea, Anne L.; Hofler, Alicia S.

    1991-01-01

    The Transferable Output ASCII Data (TOAD) editor is an interactive software tool for manipulating the contents of TOAD files. The TOAD editor is specifically designed to work with tabular data. Selected subsets of data may be displayed to the user's screen, sorted, exchanged, duplicated, removed, replaced, inserted, or transferred to and from external files. It also offers a number of useful features including on-line help, macros, a command history, an 'undo' option, variables, and a full compliment of mathematical functions and conversion factors. Written in ANSI FORTRAN 77 and completely self-contained, the TOAD editor is very portable and has already been installed on SUN, SGI/IRIS, and CONVEX hosts.

  15. Pipe Axial Flaw Failure Criteria (PAFFC): Version 1.0 user`s manual and software

    SciTech Connect

    Leis, B.N.; Ghadiali, N.D.

    1994-05-04

    This topical report is the technical manual and basis for delivery of the software tided Pipe Axial Flaw Failure Criterion. This criterion was developed under SI Task 1. 13 for the Line Pipe Research Supervisory Committee of the Pipeline Research Committee. This software has been given the acronym PAFFC, which follows from the underlined letters in the title for this code. The purpose of PAFFC is to determine the failure conditions associated with a single external axial flaw in a gas transmission pipeline. Failure is determined concurrently in terms of two independent failure processes - fracture and/or net-section (plastic) collapse of the ligament between the flaw and the inside surface of the pipe.

  16. SHARP pre-release v1.0 - Current Status and Documentation

    SciTech Connect

    Mahadevan, Vijay S.; Rahaman, Ronald O.

    2015-09-30

    The NEAMS Reactor Product Line effort aims to develop an integrated multiphysics simulation capability for the design and analysis of future generations of nuclear power plants. The Reactor Product Line code suite’s multi-resolution hierarchy is being designed to ultimately span the full range of length and time scales present in relevant reactor design and safety analyses, as well as scale from desktop to petaflop computing platforms. In this report, building on a several previous report issued in September 2014, we describe our continued efforts to integrate thermal/hydraulics, neutronics, and structural mechanics modeling codes to perform coupled analysis of a representative fast sodium-cooled reactor core in preparation for a unified release of the toolkit. The work reported in the current document covers the software engineering aspects of managing the entire stack of components in the SHARP toolkit and the continuous integration efforts ongoing to prepare a release candidate for interested reactor analysis users. Here we report on the continued integration effort of PROTEUS/Nek5000 and Diablo into the NEAMS framework and the software processes that enable users to utilize the capabilities without losing scientific productivity. Due to the complexity of the individual modules and their necessary/optional dependency library chain, we focus on the configuration and build aspects for the SHARP toolkit, which includes capability to autodownload dependencies and configure/install with optimal flags in an architecture-aware fashion. Such complexity is untenable without strong software engineering processes such as source management, source control, change reviews, unit tests, integration tests and continuous test suites. Details on these processes are provided in the report as a building step for a SHARP user guide that will accompany the first release, expected by Mar 2016.

  17. Excitation of nutation by the global radiational S1 tide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schindelegger, M.; Salstein, D. A.; Einspigel, D.; Boehm, J.

    2014-12-01

    Cyclic mass redistributions in the atmosphere and oceans related to the global radiational S1 tide elicit seasonal perturbations of Earth's nutation at a level of 0.1 mas (milliarcseconds). The present study provides an up-to-date assessment of these excitation effects on the basis of 10-year surface and isobaric level data from three, previously unavailable global atmospheric reanalysis systems. We retrieve numerical values of in- and out-of-phase nutation corrections for seasonally modulated S1 variations and indicate how model improvements, specifically in terms of the representation of tidal oscillations, lead to different estimates with respect to earlier reanalyses. Motion term signals in nutation display a close agreement across all probed datasets, whereas larger disparities remain among mass term excitation estimates due to their dependency on small-scale diurnal surface pressure oscillations. A simple time-stepping model for barotropic ocean dynamics, based on the shallow water equations and driven by air pressure tide climatologies, represents an appropriate means to determine global S1 estimates of sea level heights and currents that are consistent with the respective forcing fields from each reanalysis. We address the intricacies of constructing such a model and compare our preliminary oceanic angular momentum solutions to those from more established hydrodynamic forward integrations. The combined influence of the S1 tide on Earth's nutation, associated with both atmosphere and ocean dynamics, is found to yield a rough agreement with observations from geodetic VLBI (Very Long Baseline Interferometry) measurements.

  18. VizieR Online Data Catalog: NGC3627S and NGC3627N CO(1-0) data cubes (Beuther+, 2017)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beuther, H.; Meidt, S.; Schinnerer, E.; Paladino, R.; Leroy, A.

    2016-09-01

    Paladino et al. (2008A&A...485..679P) present the PdBI for the first time, however, they focus on the CO(1-0) observations and do not complement the data with short spacing information. The PdBI observations were carried out on March 20, 2005 with 6 antennas in the C configuration. At that time, 1.3 and 2.6mm data could be taken simultaneously, and the observations targeted the CO(1-0) and (2-1) lines, respectively. The two frequencies were centered at 114.997 and 229.88GHz which are the transition rest frequencies at an assumed vlsr of ~712.6km/s. With four overlapping 160MHz spectral units, the correlator covered 580MHz for each line (corresponding to 1512 and 756km/s for the (1-0) and (2-1) lines, respectively). Bandpass and flux calibration were conducted with 1055+018 and MWC349, and the gains were calibrated with regular observations of 1116+128. To complement the PdBI CO(2-1) data with the missing short spacing information, we used the IRAM 30m single-dish observations from the HERACLES survey (Leroy et al., 2009AJ....137.4670L). These data are available for download at www.mpia.de/HERACLES. The HERACLES CO(2-1) data were further processed in GILDAS/CLASS and finally combined and imaged with the PdBI data within the mapping part of the GILDAS package. (2 data files).

  19. The Nobeyama 45 m 12CO(J=1-0) Survey of local Luminous Infrared Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamashita, Takuji; Komugi, Shinya; Matsuhara, Hideo; Armus, Lee; Inami, Hanae; Ueda, Junko; Iono, Daisuke; Kohno, Kotaro; Stierwalt, Sabrina; Arimatsu, Ko; Evans, Aaron

    2015-08-01

    Cold molecular gas and star formation in local Luminous Infrared Galaxies (LIRGs) are studied along the stage of the galaxy merger sequence. Most local LIRGs are starbursting and are involved with galaxy-galaxy interactions or mergers. The evolution and the direct trigger of the merger-driven starbursts are not clear observationally, although there are several theoretical explanations. In order to address these issues, information of the molecular gas, which is traced by a 12CO(J=1-0) emission line, of an unbiased LIRG sample is required. To this end, a CO survey of 79 galaxies in 62 LIRG systems were conducted with the Nobeyama 45 m telescope. A method is developed to estimate the extent of CO gas in galaxies using combinations of two single-aperture telescopes with different beam sizes. The majority of the sources have the CO radius of less than ~ 4 kpc. The CO extent is found to possibly decrease from the early stage to the late stage of the merger. The molecular gas mass in the central several kilo-parsecs is constant throughout the merger sequence. These results statistically support a theoretically predicted scenario where the global gas inflow towards the galaxy center is common in merging LIRGs. The star formation efficiencies (SFE) in the central regions are derived and are high compared to disk star-forming galaxies as is well known. The SFE are found to be fairly independent of the merger stage. The star formation of merging LIRGs may be controlled by a common relation from gas to stars regardless of the merger stage, where SFR and resultant IR luminosity are determined by the amount of the molecular gas supplied by global inflow.

  20. Triggering Process of the X1.0 Three-ribbon Flare in the Great Active Region NOAA 12192

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bamba, Yumi; Inoue, Satoshi; Kusano, Kanya; Shiota, Daikou

    2017-04-01

    The solar magnetic field in a flare-producing active region (AR) is much more complicated than theoretical models, which assume a very simple magnetic field structure. The X1.0 flare, which occurred in AR 12192 on 2014 October 25, showed a complicated three-ribbon structure. To clarify the trigger process of the flare and to evaluate the applicability of a simple theoretical model, we analyzed the data from Hinode/Solar Optical Telescope and the Solar Dynamics Observatory/Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager, Atmospheric Imaging Assembly. We investigated the spatio-temporal correlation between the magnetic field structures, especially the non-potentiality of the horizontal field, and the bright structures in the solar atmosphere. As a result, we determined that the western side of the positive polarity, which is intruding on a negative polarity region, is the location where the flare was triggered. This is due to the fact that the sign of the magnetic shear in that region was opposite that of the major shear of the AR, and the significant brightenings were observed over the polarity inversion line (PIL) in that region before flare onset. These features are consistent with the recently proposed flare-trigger model that suggests that small reversed shear (RS) magnetic disturbances can trigger solar flares. Moreover, we found that the RS field was located slightly off the flaring PIL, contrary to the theoretical prediction. We discuss the possibility of an extension of the RS model based on an extra numerical simulation. Our result suggests that the RS field has a certain flexibility for displacement from a highly sheared PIL, and that the RS field triggers more flares than we expected.

  1. Index theorem for topological excitations on R3 × S1 and Chern-Simons theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poppitz, Erich; Ünsal, Mithat

    2009-03-01

    We derive an index theorem for the Dirac operator in the background of various topological excitations on an R3 × S1 geometry. The index theorem provides more refined data than the APS index for an instanton on R4 and reproduces it in decompactification limit. In the R3 limit, it reduces to the Callias index theorem. The index is expressed in terms of topological charge and the η-invariant associated with the boundary Dirac operator. Neither topological charge nor η-invariant is typically an integer, however, the non-integer parts cancel to give an integer-valued index. Our derivation is based on axial current non-conservation — an exact operator identity valid on any four-manifold — and on the existence of a center symmetric, or approximately center symmetric, boundary holonomy (Wilson line). We expect the index theorem to usefully apply to many physical systems of interest, such as low temperature (large S1, confined) phases of gauge theories, center stabilized Yang-Mills theories with vector-like or chiral matter (at S1 of any size), and supersymmetric gauge theories with supersymmetry-preserving boundary conditions (also at any S1). In QCD-like and chiral gauge theories, the index theorem should shed light into the nature of topological excitations responsible for chiral symmetry breaking and the generation of mass gap in the gauge sector. We also show that imposing chirally-twisted boundary condition in gauge theories with fermions induces a Chern-Simons term in the infrared. This suggests that some QCD-like gauge theories should possess components with a topological Chern-Simons phase in the small S1 regime.

  2. Late-stage optimization of a tercyclic class of S1P3-sparing, S1P1 receptor agonists.

    PubMed

    Horan, Joshua C; Kuzmich, Daniel; Liu, Pingrong; DiSalvo, Darren; Lord, John; Mao, Can; Hopkins, Tamara D; Yu, Hui; Harcken, Christian; Betageri, Raj; Hill-Drzewi, Melissa; Patenaude, Lori; Patel, Monica; Fletcher, Kimberly; Terenzzio, Donna; Linehan, Brian; Xia, Heather; Patel, Mita; Studwell, Debbie; Miller, Craig; Hickey, Eugene; Levin, Jeremy I; Smith, Dustin; Kemper, Raymond A; Modis, Louise K; Bannen, Lynne C; Chan, Diva S; Mac, Morrison B; Ng, Stephanie; Wang, Yong; Xu, Wei; Lemieux, René M

    2016-01-15

    Poor solubility and cationic amphiphilic drug-likeness were liabilities identified for a lead series of S1P3-sparing, S1P1 agonists originally developed from a high-throughput screening campaign. This work describes the subsequent optimization of these leads by balancing potency, selectivity, solubility and overall molecular charge. Focused SAR studies revealed favorable structural modifications that, when combined, produced compounds with overall balanced profiles. The low brain exposure observed in rat suggests that these compounds would be best suited for the potential treatment of peripheral autoimmune disorders.

  3. The effect of S1P receptor signaling pathway on the survival and drug resistance in multiple myeloma cells.

    PubMed

    Fu, Di; Li, Yingchun; Li, Jia; Shi, Xiaoyan; Yang, Ronghui; Zhong, Yuan; Wang, Huihan; Liao, Aijun

    2017-01-01

    Multiple myeloma (MM) remains incurable by conventional chemotherapy. Sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) receptor-mediated signaling has been recently demonstrated to have critical roles in cell survival and drug resistance in a number of hematological malignancies. To dissect the roles of S1P receptor pathway in MM, we systematically examined cell viability and protein expression associated with cell survival and drug resistance in MM cell lines upon treatment with either pathway activator (S1P) or inhibitor (FTY720). Our results reveal that FTY720 inhibits cell proliferation by downregulating expression of target genes, while S1P has an opposite effect. Knocking down of S1P receptor S1P5R results in a reduction of cell survival-related gene expression; however, it does not have impacts on expression of drug resistance genes. These results suggest that S1P signaling plays a role in cell proliferation and drug resistance in MM, and targeting this pathway will provide a new therapeutic direction for MM management.

  4. TEJAS - TELEROBOTICS/EVA JOINT ANALYSIS SYSTEM VERSION 1.0

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Drews, M. L.

    1994-01-01

    The primary objective of space telerobotics as a research discipline is the augmentation and/or support of extravehicular activity (EVA) with telerobotic activity; this allows increased emplacement of on-orbit assets while providing for their "in situ" management. Development of the requisite telerobot work system requires a well-understood correspondence between EVA and telerobotics that to date has been only partially established. The Telerobotics/EVA Joint Analysis Systems (TEJAS) hypermedia information system uses object-oriented programming to bridge the gap between crew-EVA and telerobotics activities. TEJAS Version 1.0 contains twenty HyperCard stacks that use a visual, customizable interface of icon buttons, pop-up menus, and relational commands to store, link, and standardize related information about the primitives, technologies, tasks, assumptions, and open issues involved in space telerobot or crew EVA tasks. These stacks are meant to be interactive and can be used with any database system running on a Macintosh, including spreadsheets, relational databases, word-processed documents, and hypermedia utilities. The software provides a means for managing volumes of data and for communicating complex ideas, relationships, and processes inherent to task planning. The stack system contains 3MB of data and utilities to aid referencing, discussion, communication, and analysis within the EVA and telerobotics communities. The six baseline analysis stacks (EVATasks, EVAAssume, EVAIssues, TeleTasks, TeleAssume, and TeleIssues) work interactively to manage and relate basic information which you enter about the crew-EVA and telerobot tasks you wish to analyze in depth. Analysis stacks draw on information in the Reference stacks as part of a rapid point-and-click utility for building scripts of specific task primitives or for any EVA or telerobotics task. Any or all of these stacks can be completely incorporated within other hypermedia applications, or they can be

  5. The reaction of propene with oxygen-covered Pd(1 0 0)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Altman, E. I.

    2003-12-01

    The effect of oxygen coverage and surface structure on the total oxidation of propene over Pd(1 0 0) was studied using temperature-programmed reaction (TPR), isothermal kinetic measurements, low energy electron diffraction (LEED), and scanning tunneling microscopy (STM). TPR revealed CO 2 production peaks at 430 and 550 K. When the surface was covered by chemisorbed oxygen in (2 × 2) structures the 550 K peak dominated, while only the 430 K peak was seen at low propene doses and high oxygen coverages (˜0.8 ML) where a ( 5× 5) R27° reconstruction covered the surface. Regardless of the oxygen coverage, water desorbed at 430 K indicating that the 550 K CO 2 peak was due to oxidation of C deposited by propene dissociation. The initial propene sticking coefficient at 330 K was a factor of five greater for (2 × 2)-O surfaces than for the ( 5× 5) R27°-O surface, thus the lower activation energy pathway favored at high oxygen coverages did not necessarily translate into higher reaction rates. Above 450 K, the isothermal kinetic measurements showed that the reaction rate increases with decreasing oxygen coverage until the reaction becomes starved for oxygen. LEED measurements showed that the rate increases as the ( 5× 5) R27° structure is replaced by the (2 × 2) structures. At lower temperatures, however, the oxidation rate of C deposited on the surface by propene dissociation at low oxygen coverages is slow and so higher rates were seen at high oxygen coverages. At room temperature, STM images showed that propene initially slowly randomly adsorbs atop the ( 5× 5) R27° surface. As the propene coverage increased, however, adsorbates tended to cluster together forming disordered regions; as the surface disordered the adsorption rate increased. At 550 K, STM movies recorded during propene exposure to oxygen-covered surfaces showed the slow removal of ( 5× 5) R27° domains followed by rapid dissolution of islands formed during oxygen adsorption. The results

  6. The Titan -1:0 bending wave in Saturn's C ring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nicholson, Philip D.; Hedman, Matthew M.

    2015-05-01

    In 1988 Rosen & Lissauer identified an unusual wavelike feature in Saturn's inner C ring as a bending wave driven by a nodal resonance with Titan (Science 241, 690) This is sometimes referred to as the -1:0 resonance since it occurs where the local nodal regression rate is approximately equal to -n_T, where n_T = 22.577 deg/day is Titan's orbital mean motion. We have used a series of 44 stellar occultation profiles of this wave observed by the Cassini VIMS instrument to test their hypothesis. We find that, as predicted, this wave is an outward-propagating m=1 spiral with a leading orientation and a retrograde pattern speed equal to -n_T. Applying the standard linear dispersion relation (Shu 1984), we find a mean background surface mass density of 0.7 g/cm^2, similar to previous estimates for the inner C ring.But the most intriguing feature of the wave is a narrow, incomplete gap which lies ~7 km outside the resonance. This gap varies noticeably in width and is seen in roughly 3/4 of the occultation profiles, appearing to rotate with the wave in a retrograde direction. We have developed a simple, kinematical model which accounts for the observations and consists of a continuous but very narrow gap (radial width = 0.5 km), the edges of which are vertically distorted by the propagating bending wave as it crosses the region. Differences in viewing geometry then largely account for the apparent width variations. We find a vertical amplitude of 3.8 km for the inner edge and 1.2 km for the outer edge, with nodes misaligned by ~110 deg. Moreover, both edges of the gap are slightly eccentric, with pericenters aligned with Titan, suggesting that the eccentricities are forced by the nearby Titan apsidal resonance. We hypothesize that the gap forms because the local slope of the ring becomes so great that nonlinear effects result in the physical disruption of the ring within the first wavelength of the bending wave. However, the vertical relief on the gap edges is ~10 times

  7. Technical documentation and user's guide for City-County Allocation Model (CCAM). Version 1. 0

    SciTech Connect

    Clark, L.T. Jr.; Scott, M.J.; Hammer, P.

    1986-05-01

    The City-County Allocation Model (CCAM) was developed as part of the Monitored Retrievable Storage (MRS) Program. The CCAM model was designed to allocate population changes forecasted by the MASTER model to specific local communities within commuting distance of the MRS facility. The CCAM model was designed to then forecast the potential changes in demand for key community services such as housing, police protection, and utilities for these communities. The CCAM model uses a flexible on-line data base on demand for community services that is based on a combination of local service levels and state and national service standards. The CCAM model can be used to quickly forecast the potential community service consequence of economic development for local communities anywhere in the country. The remainder of this document is organized as follows. The purpose of this manual is to assist the user in understanding and operating the City-County Allocation Model (CCAM). The annual explains the data sources for the model and code modifications as well as the operational procedures.

  8. Increased mRNA Levels of Sphingosine Kinases and S1P Lyase and Reduced Levels of S1P Were Observed in Hepatocellular Carcinoma in Association with Poorer Differentiation and Earlier Recurrence.

    PubMed

    Uranbileg, Baasanjav; Ikeda, Hitoshi; Kurano, Makoto; Enooku, Kenichiro; Sato, Masaya; Saigusa, Daisuke; Aoki, Junken; Ishizawa, Takeaki; Hasegawa, Kiyoshi; Kokudo, Norihiro; Yatomi, Yutaka

    2016-01-01

    Although sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P) has been reported to play an important role in cancer pathophysiology, little is known about S1P and hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). To clarify the relationship between S1P and HCC, 77 patients with HCC who underwent surgical treatment were consecutively enrolled in this study. In addition, S1P and its metabolites were quantitated by LC-MS/MS. The mRNA levels of sphingosine kinases (SKs), which phosphorylate sphingosine to generate S1P, were increased in HCC tissues compared with adjacent non-HCC tissues. Higher mRNA levels of SKs in HCC were associated with poorer differentiation and microvascular invasion, whereas a higher level of SK2 mRNA was a risk factor for intra- and extra-hepatic recurrence. S1P levels, however, were unexpectedly reduced in HCC compared with non-HCC tissues, and increased mRNA levels of S1P lyase (SPL), which degrades S1P, were observed in HCC compared with non-HCC tissues. Higher SPL mRNA levels in HCC were associated with poorer differentiation. Finally, in HCC cell lines, inhibition of the expression of SKs or SPL by siRNA led to reduced proliferation, invasion and migration, whereas overexpression of SKs or SPL enhanced proliferation. In conclusion, increased SK and SPL mRNA expression along with reduced S1P levels were more commonly observed in HCC tissues compared with adjacent non-HCC tissues and were associated with poor differentiation and early recurrence. SPL as well as SKs may be therapeutic targets for HCC treatment.

  9. 76 FR 23630 - Office of New Reactors; Proposed Revision 2 to Standard Review Plan, Section 1.0 on Introduction...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-04-27

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION Office of New Reactors; Proposed Revision 2 to Standard Review Plan, Section 1.0 on Introduction...), Section 1.0, ``Introduction and Interfaces'' (Agencywide Documents Access and Management System...

  10. 78 FR 14095 - Determination That GEREF (Sermorelin Acetate) Injection, 0.5 Milligrams Base/Vial and 1.0...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-03-04

    ... (Sermorelin Acetate) ] injection, 0.5 milligrams (mg) base/vial and 1.0 mg base/vial, and GEREF (Sermorelin Acetate) injection, 0.05 mg base/amp, were not withdrawn from sale for reasons of safety or effectiveness... (Sermorelin Acetate) injection, 0.5 mg base/vial and 1.0 mg base/vial, and GEREF (Sermorelin...

  11. SPLICER - A GENETIC ALGORITHM TOOL FOR SEARCH AND OPTIMIZATION, VERSION 1.0 (MACINTOSH VERSION)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, L.

    1994-01-01

    SPLICER is a genetic algorithm tool which can be used to solve search and optimization problems. Genetic algorithms are adaptive search procedures (i.e. problem solving methods) based loosely on the processes of natural selection and Darwinian "survival of the fittest." SPLICER provides the underlying framework and structure for building a genetic algorithm application. These algorithms apply genetically-inspired operators to populations of potential solutions in an iterative fashion, creating new populations while searching for an optimal or near-optimal solution to the problem at hand. SPLICER 1.0 was created using a modular architecture that includes a Genetic Algorithm Kernel, interchangeable Representation Libraries, Fitness Modules and User Interface Libraries, and well-defined interfaces between these components. The architecture supports portability, flexibility, and extensibility. SPLICER comes with all source code and several examples. For instance, a "traveling salesperson" example searches for the minimum distance through a number of cities visiting each city only once. Stand-alone SPLICER applications can be used without any programming knowledge. However, to fully utilize SPLICER within new problem domains, familiarity with C language programming is essential. SPLICER's genetic algorithm (GA) kernel was developed independent of representation (i.e. problem encoding), fitness function or user interface type. The GA kernel comprises all functions necessary for the manipulation of populations. These functions include the creation of populations and population members, the iterative population model, fitness scaling, parent selection and sampling, and the generation of population statistics. In addition, miscellaneous functions are included in the kernel (e.g., random number generators). Different problem-encoding schemes and functions are defined and stored in interchangeable representation libraries. This allows the GA kernel to be used with any

  12. Beam Simulation Tools for GEANT4 (BT-V1.0). User's Guide

    SciTech Connect

    Elvira, V. Daniel; Lebrum, P.; Spentzouris, P.

    2002-12-02

    Geant4 is a tool kit developed by a collaboration of physicists and computer professionals in the high energy physics field for simulation of the passage of particles through matter. The motivation for the development of the Beam Tools is to extend the Geant4 applications to accelerator physics. The Beam Tools are a set of C++ classes designed to facilitate the simulation of accelerator elements: r.f. cavities, magnets, absorbers, etc. These elements are constructed from Geant4 solid volumes like boxes, tubes, trapezoids, or spheers. There are many computer programs for beam physics simulations, but Geant4 is ideal to model a beam through a material or to integrate a beam line with a complex detector. There are many such examples in the current international High Energy Physics programs. For instance, an essential part of the R&D associated with the Neutrino Source/Muon Collider accelerator is the ionization cooling channel, which is a section of the system aimed to reduce the size of the muon beam in phase space. The ionization cooling technique uses a combination of linacs and light absorbers to reduce the transverse momentum and size of the beam, while keeping the longitudinal momentum constant. The MuCool/MICE (muon cooling) experiments need accurate simulations of the beam transport through the cooling channel in addition to a detailed simulation of the detectors designed to measure the size of the beam. The accuracy of the models for physics processes associated with muon ionization and multiple scattering is critical in this type of applications. Another example is the simulation of the interaction region in future accelerators. The high luminosity and background environments expected in the Next Linear Collider (NLC) and the Very Large Hadron Collider (VLHC) pose great demand on the detectors, which may be optimized by means of a simulation of the detector-accelerator interface.

  13. Redshifted and Blueshifted Broad Lines in Luminous Quasars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McIntosh, D. H.; Rix, H.-W.; Rieke, M. J.; Foltz, C. B.

    1999-06-01

    We have observed a sample of 22 luminous quasars, in the range 2.0<~z<~2.5, at 1.6 μm with the near-infrared (NIR) spectrograph FSPEC on the Multiple Mirror Telescope. Our sample contains 13 radio-loud and nine radio-quiet objects. We have measured the systemic redshifts zsys directly from the strong [O III] λ5007 line emitted from the narrow-line region. From the same spectra, we have found that the nonresonance broad Hβ lines have a systematic mean redward shift of 520+/-80 km s-1 with respect to systemic. Such a shift was not found in our identical analysis of the low-redshift sample of Boroson & Green. The amplitude of this redshift is comparable to half the expected gravitational redshift and transverse Doppler effects and is consistent with a correlation between redshift differences and quasar luminosity. From data in the literature, we confirm that the high-ionization rest-frame ultraviolet broad lines are blueshifted ~550-1050 km s-1 from systemic and that these velocity shifts systematically increase with ionization potential. Our results allow us to quantify the known bias in estimating the ionizing flux from the intergalactic medium JIGMν via the proximity effect. Using redshift measurements commonly determined from strong broad-line species, like Lyα or C IV λ1549, results in an overestimation of JIGMν by factors of ~1.9-2.3. Similarly, corresponding lower limits on the density of baryons Ωb will be overestimated by factors of ~1.4-1.5. However, the low-ionization Mg II λ2798 broad line is within ~50 km s-1 of systemic and thus would be the line of choice for determining the true redshift of 1.03.1 objects using NIR spectroscopy. Observations reported here were obtained at the Multiple Mirror Telescope Observatory, a facility operated jointly by the University of Arizona and the Smithsonian Institution.

  14. The Global S_1 Tide in Earth's Nutation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schindelegger, Michael; Einšpigel, David; Salstein, David; Böhm, Johannes

    2016-05-01

    Diurnal S_1 tidal oscillations in the coupled atmosphere-ocean system induce small perturbations of Earth's prograde annual nutation, but matching geophysical model estimates of this Sun-synchronous rotation signal with the observed effect in geodetic Very Long Baseline Interferometry (VLBI) data has thus far been elusive. The present study assesses the problem from a geophysical model perspective, using four modern-day atmospheric assimilation systems and a consistently forced barotropic ocean model that dissipates its energy excess in the global abyssal ocean through a parameterized tidal conversion scheme. The use of contemporary meteorological data does, however, not guarantee accurate nutation estimates per se; two of the probed datasets produce atmosphere-ocean-driven S_1 terms that deviate by more than 30 μ as (microarcseconds) from the VLBI-observed harmonic of -16.2+i113.4 μ as. Partial deficiencies of these models in the diurnal band are also borne out by a validation of the air pressure tide against barometric in situ estimates as well as comparisons of simulated sea surface elevations with a global network of S_1 tide gauge determinations. Credence is lent to the global S_1 tide derived from the Modern-Era Retrospective Analysis for Research and Applications (MERRA) and the operational model of the European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts (ECMWF). When averaged over a temporal range of 2004 to 2013, their nutation contributions are estimated to be -8.0+i106.0 μ as (MERRA) and -9.4+i121.8 μ as (ECMWF operational), thus being virtually equivalent with the VLBI estimate. This remarkably close agreement will likely aid forthcoming nutation theories in their unambiguous a priori account of Earth's prograde annual celestial motion.

  15. Modulation of cellular S1P levels with a novel, potent and specific inhibitor of sphingosine kinase-1.

    PubMed

    Schnute, Mark E; McReynolds, Matthew D; Kasten, Tom; Yates, Matthew; Jerome, Gina; Rains, John W; Hall, Troii; Chrencik, Jill; Kraus, Michelle; Cronin, Ciaran N; Saabye, Matthew; Highkin, Maureen K; Broadus, Richard; Ogawa, Shinji; Cukyne, Kristin; Zawadzke, Laura E; Peterkin, Vincent; Iyanar, Kaliapan; Scholten, Jeffrey A; Wendling, Jay; Fujiwara, Hideji; Nemirovskiy, Olga; Wittwer, Arthur J; Nagiec, Marek M

    2012-05-15

    SphK (sphingosine kinase) is the major source of the bioactive lipid and GPCR (G-protein-coupled receptor) agonist S1P (sphingosine 1-phosphate). S1P promotes cell growth, survival and migration, and is a key regulator of lymphocyte trafficking. Inhibition of S1P signalling has been proposed as a strategy for treatment of inflammatory diseases and cancer. In the present paper we describe the discovery and characterization of PF-543, a novel cell-permeant inhibitor of SphK1. PF-543 inhibits SphK1 with a K(i) of 3.6 nM, is sphingosine-competitive and is more than 100-fold selective for SphK1 over the SphK2 isoform. In 1483 head and neck carcinoma cells, which are characterized by high levels of SphK1 expression and an unusually high rate of S1P production, PF-543 decreased the level of endogenous S1P 10-fold with a proportional increase in the level of sphingosine. In contrast with past reports that show that the growth of many cancer cell lines is SphK1-dependent, specific inhibition of SphK1 had no effect on the proliferation and survival of 1483 cells, despite a dramatic change in the cellular S1P/sphingosine ratio. PF-543 was effective as a potent inhibitor of S1P formation in whole blood, indicating that the SphK1 isoform of sphingosine kinase is the major source of S1P in human blood. PF-543 is the most potent inhibitor of SphK1 described to date and it will be useful for dissecting specific roles of SphK1-driven S1P signalling.

  16. The global S1 tide and Earth's nutation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schindelegger, M.; Böhm, J.; Salstein, D. A.

    2015-08-01

    Diurnal S1 tidal atmospheric oscillations induced by the cyclic heating of air masses through solar radiation elicit a small contribution to Earth's prograde annual nutation at a level of 100 μas (microarcseconds). Previously published estimates of this Sun-synchronous perturbation based on angular momentum series from global geophysical fluid models have however diverged, and within the present conventional nutation theory, the effect has been instead accounted for in an empirical manner based on analyzing residual spectra of observed celestial pole offsets. This study constitutes a first, tentative reassessment of the S1 signal in nutation by resorting to modern-day atmospheric reanalyses as well as available hydrodynamic solutions for diurnal oceanic angular momentum changes that are driven by daily air pressure variations at the water surface. We elucidate the global character of the S1 tide with particular regard to Earth rotation variations and investigate to which extent atmospheric and oceanic excitation terms from various sources can be superimposed. The combined influence of the principal diurnal tide on Earth's nutation, associated with both atmosphere and ocean dynamics, is found to yield a sound agreement with its observational evidence from geodetic VLBI (Very Long Baseline Interferometry) measurements.

  17. Angular momentum budget of the radiational S1 ocean tide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schindelegger, Michael; Dobslaw, Henryk; Poropat, Lea; Salstein, David; Böhm, Johannes

    2016-04-01

    The balance of diurnal S1 oceanic angular momentum (OAM) variations through torques at the sea surface and the bottom topography is validated using both a barotropic and a baroclinic numerical tide model. This analysis discloses the extent to which atmosphere-driven S1 forward simulations are reliable for use in studies of high-frequency polar motion and changes in length-of-day. Viscous and dissipative torques associated with wind stress, bottom friction, as well as internal tidal energy conversion are shown to be small, and they are overshadowed by gravitational and pressure-related interaction forces. In particular, the zonal OAM variability of S1 is almost completely balanced by the water pressure torque on the local bathymetry, whereas in the prograde equatorial case also the air pressure torque on the seafloor as well as ellipsoidal contributions from the non-spherical atmosphere and solid Earth must be taken into account. Overall, the OAM budget is well closed in both the axial and the equatorial directions, thus allowing for an identification of the main diurnal angular momentum sinks in the ocean. The physical interaction forces are found to be largest at shelf breaks and continental slopes in low latitudes, with the most dominant contribution coming from the Indonesian archipelago.

  18. Search for ammonia in comet C/2012 S1 (ISON)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faggi, S.; Codella, C.; Tozzi, G. P.; Comoretto, G.; Crovisier, J.; Nesti, R.; Panella, D.; Boissier, J.; Brucato, J. R.; Bolli, P.; Massi, F.; Tofani, G.

    2015-12-01

    Comets are uniquely pristine bodies providing unique insights about the formation of our Solar System. In this work, we focus on a dynamically new comet as it enters the inner Solar System for the first time after residing for billion of years in the Oort Cloud. Such comets are particularly important because they are thought to be not differentiated by solar radiation and they are supposed to have a large quantity of organic matter close to the surface. Here we report the results of a search for NH3(1,1) emission at 23.7 GHz towards comet C/2012 S1 (ISON) using a new dual-feed K band receiver mounted on the Medicina 32-m antenna. We observed the comet close to its perihelion, from 25 to 29 November 2013, when its heliocentric distance changed from 0.25 AU to 0.03 AU. We derive an upper limit of Q(NH3) of about 2.5×1029 mol s-1 on 26 November, that is consistent with the last peak of water production rate of ∼2×1030 mol s-1 within the last few days before the perihelion.

  19. Osmo-, Thermo- and Ethanol- Tolerances of Saccharomyces cerevisiae S1

    PubMed Central

    Balakumar, Sandrasegarampillai; Arasaratnam, Vasanthy

    2012-01-01

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae S1, which is a locally isolated and improved strain showed viability at 40, 45 and 50°C and produced ethanol at 40, 43 and 45°C. When the cells were given heat shock at 45°C for 30min and grown at 40°C, 100% viability was observed for 60h, and addition of 200gL−1 ethanol has led to complete cell death at 30h. Heat shock given at 45°C (for 30min) has improved the tolerance to temperature induced ethanol shock leading to 37% viability at 30h. When the cells were subjected to ethanol (200gL−1 for 30 min) and osmotic shock (sorbitol 300gL−1), trehalose contents in the cells were increased. The heat shocked cells showed better viability in presence of added ethanol. Soy flour supplementation has improved the viability of S. cerevisiae S1 to 80% in presence of 100gL−1 added ethanol and to 60% in presence of 300gL−1sorbitol. In presence of sorbitol (200gL−1) and ethanol (50gL−1) at 40°C, 46% viability was retained by S. cerevisiae S1 at 48h and it was improved to 80% by soy flour supplementation. PMID:24031814

  20. A Unified Geodetic Vertical Velocity Field (UGVVF), Version 1.0

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmalzle, G.; Wdowinski, S.

    2014-12-01

    become available. A database and scripts to access the database will be available through the University of Miami (http://www.geodesy.miami.edu) website. Figure 1. Vertical velocity comparisons between processing groups (blue dots). Red line indicates equal velocities. Weighted Root Mean Square (WRMS) is shown.

  1. Interaction of integrin β4 with S1P receptors in S1P- and HGF-induced endothelial barrier enhancement.

    PubMed

    Ni, Xiuqin; Epshtein, Yulia; Chen, Weiguo; Zhou, Tingting; Xie, Lishi; Garcia, Joe G N; Jacobson, Jeffrey R

    2014-06-01

    We previously reported sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P) and hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) augment endothelial cell (EC) barrier function and attenuate murine acute lung inury (ALI). While the mechanisms underlying these effects are not fully understood, S1P and HGF both transactivate the S1P receptor, S1PR1 and integrin β4 (ITGB4) at membrane caveolin-enriched microdomains (CEMs). In the current study, we investigated the roles of S1PR2 and S1PR3 in S1P/HGF-mediated EC signaling and their associations with ITGB4. Our studies confirmed ITGB4 and S1PR2/3 are recruited to CEMs in human lung EC in response to either S1P (1 µM, 5 min) or HGF (25 ng/ml, 5 min). Co-immunoprecipitation experiments identified an S1P/HGF-mediated interaction of ITGB4 with both S1PR2 and S1PR3. We then employed an in situ proximity ligation assay (PLA) to confirm a direct ITGB4-S1PR3 association induced by S1P/HGF although a direct association was not detectable between S1PR2 and ITGB4. S1PR1 knockdown (siRNA), however, abrogated S1P/HGF-induced ITGB4-S1PR2 associations while there was no effect on ITGB4-S1PR3 associations. Moreover, PLA confirmed a direct association between S1PR1 and S1PR2 induced by S1P and HGF. Finally, silencing of S1PR2 significantly attenuated S1P/HGF-induced EC barrier enhancement as measured by transendothelial resistance while silencing of S1PR3 significantly augmented S1P/HGF-induced barrier enhancement. These results confirm an important role for S1PR2 and S1PR3 in S1P/HGF-mediated EC barrier responses that are associated with their complex formation with ITGB4. Our findings elucidate novel mechanisms of EC barrier regulation that may ultimately lead to new therapeutic targets for disorders characterized by increased vascular permeability including ALI.

  2. Dynamics of S 1 acetone studied with single rotorvibronic level resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bitto, H.

    1994-08-01

    The spectroscopy and dynamics of selected vibronic bands of the S 1(nπ *) ← S 0 transition of acetone and acetone- d6 were studied with single rotational-torsional-vibronic (rotorvibronic) level resolution in a jet up to an S 1 excess energy of 1300 cm -1. Using clean coherent excitation with Fourier transform-limited nanosecond laser pulses quantum beats were observed in the time-resolved fluorescence and were attributed to coherently excited siglet-triplet eigenstates as identified by their magnetic properties. In the 8 123 0- and the 8 1 23 0+I(2,1) state of acetone, and the 7 1I(1,0) state of aceton- d6, lifetimes increase with the rotational quantum number of the excited state N due to a breakdown of K selection rules for the spin-orbit interaction in this very asymmetric rotor. In the 8 123 0- state, the rotorvibronic levels of the methyl torsion tunnelling component with G symmetry exhibit the longest lifetimes among the tunnelling components. Vibrational coupling of G torsional levels in the triplet manifold favoured by symmetry is proposed to selectively increase the density of coupling triplet states and, hence, the lifetime of the eigenstates.

  3. Hypoxia augments outgrowth endothelial cell (OEC) sprouting and directed migration in response to sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P).

    PubMed

    Williams, Priscilla A; Stilhano, Roberta S; To, Vivian P; Tran, Lyndon; Wong, Kevin; Silva, Eduardo A

    2015-01-01

    Therapeutic angiogenesis provides a promising approach to treat ischemic cardiovascular diseases through the delivery of proangiogenic cells and/or molecules. Outgrowth endothelial cells (OECs) are vascular progenitor cells that are especially suited for therapeutic strategies given their ease of noninvasive isolation from umbilical cord or adult peripheral blood and their potent ability to enhance tissue neovascularization. These cells are recruited to sites of vascular injury or tissue ischemia and directly incorporate within native vascular endothelium to participate in neovessel formation. A better understanding of how OEC activity may be boosted under hypoxia with external stimulation by proangiogenic molecules remains a challenge to improving their therapeutic potential. While vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) is widely established as a critical factor for initiating angiogenesis, sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P), a bioactive lysophospholipid, has recently gained great enthusiasm as a potential mediator in neovascularization strategies. This study tests the hypothesis that hypoxia and the presence of VEGF impact the angiogenic response of OECs to S1P stimulation in vitro. We found that hypoxia altered the dynamically regulated S1P receptor 1 (S1PR1) expression on OECs in the presence of S1P (1.0 μM) and/or VEGF (1.3 nM). The combined stimuli of S1P and VEGF together promoted OEC angiogenic activity as assessed by proliferation, wound healing, 3D sprouting, and directed migration under both normoxia and hypoxia. Hypoxia substantially augmented the response to S1P alone, resulting in ~6.5-fold and ~25-fold increases in sprouting and directed migration, respectively. Overall, this report highlights the importance of establishing hypoxic conditions in vitro when studying ischemia-related angiogenic strategies employing vascular progenitor cells.

  4. Hybrid maize breeding with doubled haploids: V. Selection strategies for testcross performance with variable sizes of crosses and S(1) families.

    PubMed

    Wegenast, Thilo; Utz, H Friedrich; Longin, C Friedrich H; Maurer, Hans Peter; Dhillon, Baldev S; Melchinger, Albrecht E

    2010-02-01

    In hybrid maize (Zea mays L.) breeding, doubled haploids (DH) are increasingly replacing inbreds developed by recurrent selfing. Doubled haploids may be developed directly from S(0) plants in the parental cross or via S(1) families. In both these breeding schemes, we examined 2 two-stage selecting strategies, i.e., considering or ignoring cross and family structure while selection among and within parental crosses and S(1) families. We examined the optimum allocation of resources to maximize the selection gain DeltaG and the probability P(q) of identifying the q% best genotypes. Our specific objectives were to (1) determine the optimum number and size of crosses and S(1) families, as well as the optimum number of test environments and (2) identify the superior selection strategy. Selection was based on the evaluation of testcross progenies of (1) DH lines in both stages (DHTC) and (2) S(1) families in the first stage and of DH lines within S(1) families in the second stage (S(1)TC-DHTC) with uniform and variable sizes of crosses and S(1) families. We developed and employed simulation programs for selection with variable sizes of crosses and S(1) families within crosses. The breeding schemes and selection strategies showed similar relative efficiency for both optimization criteria DeltaG and P (0.1%). As compared with DHTC, S(1)TC-DHTC had larger DeltaG and P (0.1%), but a higher standard deviation of DeltaG. The superiority of S(1)TC-DHTC was increased when the selection was done among all DH lines ignoring their cross and family structure and using variable sizes of crosses and S(1) families. In DHTC, the best selection strategy was to ignore cross structures and use uniform size of crosses.

  5. Low star formation efficiencies in z=1.62 star-forming proto-cluster galaxies as seen in CO(1-0).

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rudnick, Gregory

    2017-01-01

    I will present JVLA CO imaging in the 1-0 transition of a z=1.62 galaxy cluster located in the UKIDSS/UDS and covered by the 3D-HST data. These are the deepest existing data in CO(1-0), corresponding to nearly 100 hours of JVLA observations, and are giving us the powerful ability to study the molecular gas contents of massive cluster galaxies when they were in the last throes of their star formation. The 3D-HST data are crucial to this endeavor as they 1) give us accurate redshifts with which to confirm membership, 2) give us the ability to reject cluster interlopers, and 3) serve as a strong redshift prior to search for weak CO lines. We securely detect two cluster members in CO(1-0) at the expected frequency given the grism redshifts. This nearly doubles the number of published CO(1-0) detections of normal star-forming galaxies at high redshift. These two galaxies are massive, with log(Mstar~11) and extremely gas rich (Mgas/Mbaryon~0.5-0.6). Despite their very large gas reservoirs they are forming stars at a sedate pace for their stellar mass and lie on or below the main star formation sequence. I will discuss potential reasons for the apparent high CO luminosities (and correspondingly low star formation efficiencies) of these objects, e.g. stablization of the gas by a compact stellar configuration or abnormally low conversion factors from CO to molecular hydrogen. I will also comment on the implications of this interesting finding for understanding the truncation of gas accretion onto distant cluster galaxies.

  6. Odin observations of ammonia in the Sgr A +50 km s-1 cloud and circumnuclear disk

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sandqvist, Aa.; Hjalmarson, Å.; Frisk, U.; Lundin, S.; Nordh, L.; Olberg, M.; Olofsson, G.

    2017-03-01

    Context. The Odin satellite is now into its sixteenth year of operation, much surpassing its design life of two years. One of the sources which Odin has observed in great detail is the Sgr A complex in the centre of the Milky Way. Aims: To study the presence of NH3 in the Galactic centre and spiral arms. Methods: Recently, Odin has made complementary observations of the 572 GHz NH3 line towards the Sgr A +50 km s-1 cloud and circumnuclear disk (CND). Results: Significant NH3 emission has been observed in both the +50 km s-1 cloud and the CND. Clear NH3 absorption has also been detected in many of the spiral arm features along the line of sight from the Sun to the core of our Galaxy. Conclusions: The very large velocity width (80 km s-1) of the NH3 emission associated with the shock region in the southwestern part of the CND may suggest a formation/desorption scenario similar to that of gas-phase H2O in shocks/outflows. Odin is a Swedish-led satellite project funded jointly by the Swedish National Space Board (SNSB), the Canadian Space Agency (CSA), the National Technology Agency of Finland (Tekes), the Centre National d'Études Spatiales (CNES), France, and the European Space Agency (ESA). The former Space division of the Swedish Space Corporation, today OHB Sweden, is the prime contractor, also responsible for Odin operations.The reduced spectra are only available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (http://130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/599/A135

  7. Lama glama αS1-casein: Identification of new polymorphisms in the CSN1S1 gene.

    PubMed

    Pauciullo, A; Gauly, M; Cosenza, G; Wagner, H; Erhardt, G

    2017-02-01

    South American camelids have been poorly genetically investigated and little information is available in llamas (Lama glama) regarding the diversity of the caseins at the protein and gene level. Exon skipping and duplication events previously reported in the αS1-casein gene (CSN1S1) led us to investigate the genetic variability at this locus. Seventy-two positive clones for the αS1-casein transcripts were analyzed and randomly sequenced. The comparative analysis of the sequences revealed 2 transitions, c.366A>G and c.690T>C, at the 10th nucleotide of exon 12 and 94 bp of exon 19, respectively. These SNP are responsible for 2 amino acid changes, Ile→Val in position 86 and Tyr→His in position 194 of the mature protein. Both polymorphisms clarify the genetic events behind the protein variants A and B. This result was confirmed by isoelectric focusing analysis of llama milk samples. Quick methods based on PCR-RFLP and allele-specific PCR were set up for allelic discrimination in a population of 128 animals. Based on genotyping results, 4 haplotypes were observed and the estimated frequencies indicated B as the most common haplotype (0.629) in the investigated population. These data add knowledge to the genetic variability of a species little investigated, and open opportunity for new investigation in the field of milk protein for South American camelids, including the possibility, in the future, to select alleles with favorable characteristics.

  8. Massive star formation in the GMC G345.5+1.0: spatial distribution of the dust emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    López, C.; Bronfman, L.; Nyman, L.-Å.; May, J.; Garay, G.

    2011-10-01

    Context. Massive condensations in giant molecular clouds (GMCs) are linked to the formation of high mass stars, which are the principal source of heavy elements and UV radiation, playing an important role in the evolution of galaxies. Aims: We attemp to make a complete census of massive-star formation within all of GMC G345.5+1.0. This cloud is located one degree above the Galactic plane and at 1.8 kpc from the Sun, thus there is little superposition of dust along the line-of-sight, minimizing confusion effects in identifying individual clumps. Methods: We observed the 1.2 mm continuum emission across the whole GMC using the Swedish-ESO Submillimetre Telescope (SEST) Imaging Bolometer Array (SIMBA) mounted on the SEST. Observations have a spatial resolution of 0.2 pc and cover 1.8° × 2.2° in the sky with a noise of 20 mJy beam-1. Results: We identify 201 clumps with diameters between 0.2 and 0.6 pc, masses between 3.0 and 1.3 × 103 M⊙, and densities between 5 × 103 and 4 × 105 cm-3. The total mass of the clumps is 1.2 × 104 M⊙, thus the efficiency in forming these clumps, estimated as the ratio of the total clump mass to the total GMC mass, is ~0.02. The clump mass distribution for masses between 10 and 103 M⊙ is well-fitted by a power law dN/dM ∝ M - α, with a spectral mass index α of 1.7 ± 0.1. Given their mass distribution, clumps do not appear to be the direct progenitors of single stars. Comparing the 1.2 mm continuum emission with infrared images taken by the Midcourse Space Experiment (MSX) and by the Spitzer satellite, we find that at least ~20% of the clumps are forming stars, and at most ~80% are starless. Six massive-star forming regions (MSFRs) embedded in clumps and associated with IRAS point sources have mean densities of ~105 cm-3, luminosities >103 L⊙, and spectral energy distributions that can be modeled with two dust components at different mean temperatures of 28 ± 5 and 200 ± 10 K. Table 5 is available in electronic form at

  9. Surface charging at the (1 0 0) surface of Cu doped and undoped Li2B4O7

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, Jie; Lozova, N.; Losovyj, Ya. B.; Wooten, D.; Ketsman, I.; Swinney, M. W.; Petrosky, J.; McClory, J.; Burak, Ya. V.; Adamiv, V. T.; Brant, A. T.; Dowben, P. A.

    2011-02-01

    We have compared the photovoltaic charging of the (1 0 0) surface termination for Cu doped and undoped Li2B4O7. While the surface charging at the (1 0 0) surface of Li2B4O7 is significantly greater than observed at (1 1 0) surface, the Cu doping plays a role in reducing the surface photovoltage effects. With Cu doping of Li2B4O7, the surface photovoltaic charging is much diminished at the (1 0 0) surface. The density of states observed with combined photoemission and inverse photoemission remains similar to that observed for the undoped material, except in the vicinity of the conduction band edge.

  10. KABAM Version 1.0 User's Guide and Technical Documentation - Appendix H - Methods for Estimating Metabolism Rate Constant

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Appendix H of KABAM Version 1.0 documentation related to estimating the metabolism rate constant. KABAM is a simulation model used to predict pesticide concentrations in aquatic regions for use in exposure assessments.

  11. Multinational Experiment 7. Outcome 4: Methodology to Understand Inter-Domain Dependencies and Vulnerabilities Guide v. 1.0

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-01-31

    Motion Video FoN Freedom of Navigation GBS Global Broadcast Service GPS Global Positioning System UNCLASSIFIED Outcome 4 Guide V1.0 Page 8...System UFO UHF Follow-On UHF Ultra-high Frequency WGS Wideband Global SATCOM UNCLASSIFIED Outcome 4 Guide V1.0 Page 10 of 87 UNCLASSIFIED...dissemination of all ISR-collected data (SAR, Imagery, Full Motion Video ) and would thereby degrade dynamic targeting as well as situational

  12. Affymetrix Whole-Transcript Human Gene 1.0 ST array is highly concordant with standard 3' expression arrays.

    PubMed

    Pradervand, Sylvain; Paillusson, Alexandra; Thomas, Jérôme; Weber, Johann; Wirapati, Pratyaksha; Hagenbüchle, Otto; Harshman, Keith

    2008-05-01

    The recently released Affymetrix Human Gene 1.0 ST array has two major differences compared with standard 3' based arrays: (i) it interrogates the entire mRNA transcript, and (ii) it uses DNA targets. To assess the impact of these differences on array performance, we performed a series of comparative hybridizations between the Human Gene 1.0 ST and the Affymetrix HG-U133 Plus 2.0 and the Illumina HumanRef-8 BeadChip arrays. Additionally, both RNA and DNA targets were hybridized on HG-U133 Plus 2.0 arrays. The results show that the overall reproducibility of the Gene 1.0 ST array is best. When looking only at the high intensity probes, the reproducibility of the Gene 1.0 ST array and the Illumina BeadChip array is equally good. Concordance of array results was assessed using different inter-platform mappings. Agreements are best between the two labeling protocols using HG-U133 Plus 2.0 array. The Gene 1.0 ST array is most concordant with the HG-U133 array hybridized with cDNA targets. This may reflect the impact of the target type. Overall, the high degree of correspondence provides strong evidence for the reliability of the Gene 1.0 ST array.

  13. Complete genome sequence of Rhodospirillum rubrum type strain (S1).

    PubMed

    Munk, A Christine; Copeland, Alex; Lucas, Susan; Lapidus, Alla; Del Rio, Tijana Glavina; Barry, Kerrie; Detter, John C; Hammon, Nancy; Israni, Sanjay; Pitluck, Sam; Brettin, Thomas; Bruce, David; Han, Cliff; Tapia, Roxanne; Gilna, Paul; Schmutz, Jeremy; Larimer, Frank; Land, Miriam; Kyrpides, Nikos C; Mavromatis, Konstantinos; Richardson, Paul; Rohde, Manfred; Göker, Markus; Klenk, Hans-Peter; Zhang, Yaoping; Roberts, Gary P; Reslewic, Susan; Schwartz, David C

    2011-07-01

    Rhodospirillum rubrum (Esmarch 1887) Molisch 1907 is the type species of the genus Rhodospirillum, which is the type genus of the family Rhodospirillaceae in the class Alphaproteobacteria. The species is of special interest because it is an anoxygenic phototroph that produces extracellular elemental sulfur (instead of oxygen) while harvesting light. It contains one of the most simple photosynthetic systems currently known, lacking light harvesting complex 2. Strain S1(T) can grow on carbon monoxide as sole energy source. With currently over 1,750 PubMed entries, R. rubrum is one of the most intensively studied microbial species, in particular for physiological and genetic studies. Next to R. centenum strain SW, the genome sequence of strain S1(T) is only the second genome of a member of the genus Rhodospirillum to be published, but the first type strain genome from the genus. The 4,352,825 bp long chromosome and 53,732 bp plasmid with a total of 3,850 protein-coding and 83 RNA genes were sequenced as part of the DOE Joint Genome Institute Program DOEM 2002.

  14. The CO-12 and CO-13 J=2-1 and J=1-0 observations of hot and cold galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Xie, Shuding; Schloerb, F. Peter; Young, Judith

    1990-01-01

    Researchers observed the nuclear regions of the galaxies NGC 2146 and IC 342 in CO-12 and CO-13 J=1-0 and J=2-1 lines using the Five College Radio Astronomy Observatory (FCRAO) 14m telescope. NGC 2146 is a peculiar Sab spiral galaxy. Its complex optical morphology and strong nuclear radio continuum emission suggest that it is experiencing a phase of violent activity and could have a polar ring which may have resulted from an interaction. IC 342 is a nearby luminous Scd spiral galaxy. Strong CO, infrared and radio continuum emission from the nuclear region of IC 342 indicate enhanced star-forming activity, and interferometric CO-12 J=1-0 observations reveal a bar-like structure centered on the nucleus, along the dark lane in the NS direction. These two galaxies are selected based on their different dust temperatures and star formation efficiencies (SFE) as derived from the Infrared Astronomy Satellite (IRAS) S sub 60 mu/S sub 100 mu flux density ratio and L sub IR/M(H2), respectively, with a relatively high SFE and dust temperature of 45 K in NGC 2146 and a relatively low SFE and dust temperature of 35 K in IC 342. The data from the different CO-12 and CO-13 lines are used to study the physical conditions in the molecular clouds in the galaxies. Researchers also consider the radiative transfer to determine whether a warm and optically thin gas component exists in these galaxies, as has been suggested in the case of M82 (Knapp et al. 1980), and whether the warm gas is related to the dust properties. Since optically thin CO-12 gas is rarely detected in our own Galaxy (except in outflow sources), to confirm its existence in external galaxies is very important in understanding the molecular content of external galaxies and its relationship to star formation activity. The present CO-12 J=2-1 and CO-13 J=2-1 and J=1-0 data for NGC 2146 are the first detections of this galaxy to our knowledge. The CO-12 J=1-0 distribution in NGC 2146 has been measured as part of the FCRAO

  15. Overlapping resonances interference-induced transparency: the S0 → S2/S1 photoexcitation spectrum of pyrazine.

    PubMed

    Grinev, Timur; Shapiro, Moshe; Brumer, Paul

    2012-09-07

    The phenomenon of "overlapping resonances interference-induced transparency" (ORIT) is introduced and studied in detail for the S(0) → S(2)/S(1) photoexcitation of cold pyrazine (C(4)H(4)N(2)). In ORIT, a molecule becomes transparent at specific wavelengths due to interferences between envelopes of spectral lines displaying overlapping resonances. An example is the S(2) ↔ S(1) internal conversion in pyrazine where destructive interference between overlapping resonances causes the S(0) → S(2)/S(1) light absorption to disappear at certain wavelengths. ORIT may be of practical importance in multi-component mixtures where it would allow for the selective excitation of some molecules in preference to others. Interference-induced cross section enhancement is also shown.

  16. Potential of MuS1 Transgenic Tobacco for Phytoremediation of the Urban Soils Contaminated with Cadmium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, K. H.; Kim, Y. N.; Kim, S. H.

    2010-05-01

    Urban soils are prone to contamination by trace elements such as Cd, Cu, Pb and Zn. Phytoremediation is one of the attractive remediation methods for soils contaminated with trace elements due to its non-destructive and environmentally-friendly characteristic. Scientists have tried to find hyper-accumulator plants in nature or to develop transgenic plant through genetic engineering. This study was carried out to identify a potential of MuS1 transgenic tobacco for phytoremediation of the urban soils contaminated with Cd. MuS1 is known as a multiple stress related gene with several lines. The previous study using RT-PCR showed that the expression of MuS1 gene in tobacco plant induced tolerance to Cd stress. For this study, MuS1 transgenic tobacco and wild-type tobacco (control) were cultivated in a hydroponic system treated with Cd (0, 50, 100 and 200μM Cd) for 3 weeks. At harvest, both tobacco and nutrient solution were collected and were analyzed for Cd. Effect of Cd treatment on morphological change of the tobacco leaves was also observed by variable-pressure scanning electron microscopy (VP-SEM). The tolerance of MuS1 transgenic tobacco to Cd stress was better than that of wild-type tobacco at all Cd levels. Especially, wild-type tobacco showed chlorosis and withering with 200μM Cd treatment, whereas MuS1 transgenic tobacco gradually recovered from Cd damage. Wild-type tobacco accumulated more Cd (4.65mg per plant) than MuS1 transgenic tobacco (2.37mg per plant) with 200μM Cd treatment. Cd translocation rate from root to leaves was 81.8 % for wild-type tobacco compared to 37.1 % for MuS1 transgenic tobacco. Result of VP-SEM showed that the number of trichome in the leaves for wild-type tobacco increased in comparison with that for untreated samples after 3 weeks, while that for MuS1 transgenic tobacco was not changed by Cd treatment. Results showed that the mechanism of the recovery of the MuS1 tobacco plant was not by high level of Cd uptake and accumulation

  17. Rice_Phospho 1.0: a new rice-specific SVM predictor for protein phosphorylation sites

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Shoukai; Song, Qi; Tao, Huan; Wang, Wei; Wan, Weifeng; Huang, Jian; Xu, Chaoqun; Chebii, Vivien; Kitony, Justine; Que, Shufu; Harrison, Andrew; He, Huaqin

    2015-01-01

    Experimentally-determined or computationally-predicted protein phosphorylation sites for distinctive species are becoming increasingly common. In this paper, we compare the predictive performance of a novel classification algorithm with different encoding schemes to develop a rice-specific protein phosphorylation site predictor. Our results imply that the combination of Amino acid occurrence Frequency with Composition of K-Spaced Amino Acid Pairs (AF-CKSAAP) provides the best description of relevant sequence features that surround a phosphorylation site. A support vector machine (SVM) using AF-CKSAAP achieves the best performance in classifying rice protein phophorylation sites when compared to the other algorithms. We have used SVM with AF-CKSAAP to construct a rice-specific protein phosphorylation sites predictor, Rice_Phospho 1.0 (http://bioinformatics.fafu.edu.cn/rice_phospho1.0). We measure the Accuracy (ACC) and Matthews Correlation Coefficient (MCC) of Rice_Phospho 1.0 to be 82.0% and 0.64, significantly higher than those measures for other predictors such as Scansite, Musite, PlantPhos and PhosphoRice. Rice_Phospho 1.0 also successfully predicted the experimentally identified phosphorylation sites in LOC_Os03g51600.1, a protein sequence which did not appear in the training dataset. In summary, Rice_phospho 1.0 outputs reliable predictions of protein phosphorylation sites in rice, and will serve as a useful tool to the community. PMID:26149854

  18. Synthesis and spectroscopic characterization of water-soluble Mn-doped ZnO(x)S(1-x) quantum dots.

    PubMed

    Xue, Fangfang; Liang, Jiangong; Han, Heyou

    2011-12-01

    A non-cadmium and water-soluble Mn-doped ZnO(x)S(1-x) QDs was synthesized with denatured bovine serum albumin (dBSA) as stabilizer under nitrogen atmosphere, and the as-prepared products were characterized by X-ray powder diffraction (XRD), UV-vis absorption spectroscopy, fluorescence (FL) emission spectroscopy, high resolution transmission electronmicroscopy (HRTEM) and Raman spectrum. XRD patterns indicate that the Mn-doped ZnO(x)S(1-x) QDs have a zinc-blende structure, and that manganese emerges in the form of divalent manganese (Mn(2+)) and trivalent manganese (Mn(3+)) (the intermediate of the reaction). The size of Mn-doped ZnO(x)S(1-x) QDs is about 3.2±0.7 nm according to HRTEM imaging. The FL spectra reveal that the Mn-doped ZnO(x)S(1-x) QDs have two distinct emission bands: the defect-related emission and the Mn(2+)-related emission, which exhibit a competing process. A good FL signal of the transition of Mn(2+) ((4)T(1)-(6)A(1)) is observed when the doping amounts are 1.0% and 20% respectively, and the as-prepared solutions are stable for more than 6 months at 4°C. This method has the advantages of good stability and environment-friendly stabilizer, for involving no heavy metal ions or toxic reagents.

  19. Effect of anisotropy in the S=1 underscreened Kondo lattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, Christopher; da Rosa Simões, Acirete S.; Lacroix, Claudine; Iglesias, José Roberto; Coqblin, Bernard

    2014-12-01

    We study the effect of crystal field anisotropy in the underscreened S=1 Kondo lattice model. Starting from the two orbital Anderson lattice model and including a local anisotropy term, we show, through Schrieffer-Wolff transformation, that local anisotropy is equivalent to an anisotropic Kondo interaction (J∥≠J⊥). The competition and coexistence between ferromagnetism and Kondo effect in this effective model is studied within a generalized mean-field approximation. Several regimes are obtained, depending on the parameters, exhibiting or not coexistence of magnetic order and Kondo effect. Particularly, we show that a re-entrant Kondo phase at low temperature can be obtained. We are also able to describe phases where the Kondo temperature is smaller than the Curie temperature (TK

  20. Confinement and power balance in the S-1 spheromak

    SciTech Connect

    Levinton, F.M.; Meyerhofer, D.D.; Mayo, R.M.; Janos, A.C.; Ono, Y.; Ueda, Y.; Yamada, M.

    1989-07-01

    The confinement and scaling features of the S-1 spheromak have been investigated using magnetic, spectroscopic, and Thomson scattering data in conjunction with numerical modeling. Results from the multipoint Thomson scattering diagnostic shows that the central beta remains constant (/beta//sub to/ /approximately/ 5%) as the plasma current density increases from 0.68--2.1 MA/m/sup 2/. The density is observed to increase slowly over this range, while the central electron temperature increases much more rapidly. Analysis of the global plasma parameters shows a decrease in the volume average beta and energy confinement as the total current is increased. The power balance has been modeled numerically with a 0-D non-equilibrium time-dependent coronal model and is consistent with the experimental observations. 20 refs., 12 figs., 2 tabs.

  1. Transitive Lie groups on S^1\\times S^{2m}

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorbatsevich, Vladimir V.

    2007-10-01

    The structure of Lie groups acting transitively on the direct product of a circle and an even-dimensional sphere is described. For products of two spheres of dimension >1 a similar problem has already been solved by other authors. The minimal transitive Lie groups on S^1 and S^{2m} are also indicated. As an application of these results, the structure of the automorphism group of one class of geometric structures, generalized quadrangles (a special case of Tits buildings) is considered. A conjecture put forward by Kramer is proved: the automorphism group of a connected generalized quadrangle of type (1,2m) always contains a transitive subgroup that is the direct product of a compact simple Lie group and a one-dimensional Lie group. Bibliography: 16 titles.

  2. Magnetoelectric Behavior from S =1 /2 Asymmetric Square Cupolas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kato, Yasuyuki; Kimura, Kenta; Miyake, Atsushi; Tokunaga, Masashi; Matsuo, Akira; Kindo, Koichi; Akaki, Mitsuru; Hagiwara, Masayuki; Sera, Masakazu; Kimura, Tsuyoshi; Motome, Yukitoshi

    2017-03-01

    Magnetoelectric properties are studied by a combined experimental and theoretical study of a quasi-two-dimensional material composed of square cupolas, Ba(TiO )Cu4(PO4 ) 4 . The magnetization is measured up to the field above the saturation, and several anomalies are observed depending on the field directions. We propose a S =1 /2 spin model with Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya interactions, which reproduces the full magnetization curves well. Elaborating the phase diagram of the model, we show that the anomalies are explained by magnetoelectric phase transitions. Our theory also accounts for the scaling of the dielectric anomaly observed in the experiments. The results elucidate the crucial role of the in-plane component of Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya interactions, which is induced by the noncoplanar buckling of a square cupola. We also predict a "hidden" phase and another magnetoelectric response, both of which appear in a nonzero magnetic field.

  3. Comparisons of absolute gravimeters (COOMET.M.G-S1)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vinnichenko, Mr Alexander; Germak, Alessandro, Dr

    2017-01-01

    This report describes the results of the RMO supplementary comparison COOMET.M.G-S1 (also known as bilateral comparison COOMET 634/UA/14). The comparison measurements between the two participants NSC 'IM' (pilot laboratory) and INRIM were started in December 2015 and finished in January 2016. Participants of comparisons were conducted at their national standards the measurements of the free fall acceleration in gravimetric point laboratory of absolute gravimetry of INRIM named INRiM.2. Absolute measurements of gravimetric acceleration were conducted by ballistic gravimeters. The agreement between the two participants is good. Main text To reach the main text of this paper, click on Final Report. Note that this text is that which appears in Appendix B of the BIPM key comparison database kcdb.bipm.org/. The final report has been peer-reviewed and approved for publication by the CCM, according to the provisions of the CIPM Mutual Recognition Arrangement (CIPM MRA).

  4. Sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P) induces COX-2 expression and PGE2 formation via S1P receptor 2 in renal mesangial cells.

    PubMed

    Völzke, Anja; Koch, Alexander; Meyer Zu Heringdorf, Dagmar; Huwiler, Andrea; Pfeilschifter, Josef

    2014-01-01

    Understanding the mechanisms of sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P)-induced cyclooxygenase (COX)-2 expression and prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) formation in renal mesangial cells may provide potential therapeutic targets to treat inflammatory glomerular diseases. Thus, we evaluated the S1P-dependent signaling mechanisms which are responsible for enhanced COX-2 expression and PGE2 formation in rat mesangial cells under basal conditions. Furthermore, we investigated whether these mechanisms are operative in the presence of angiotensin II (Ang II) and of the pro-inflammatory cytokine interleukin-1β (IL-1β). Treatment of rat and human mesangial cells with S1P led to concentration-dependent enhanced expression of COX-2. Pharmacological and molecular biology approaches revealed that the S1P-dependent increase of COX-2 mRNA and protein expression was mediated via activation of S1P receptor 2 (S1P2). Further, inhibition of Gi and p42/p44 MAPK signaling, both downstream of S1P2, abolished the S1P-induced COX-2 expression. In addition, S1P/S1P2-dependent upregulation of COX-2 led to significantly elevated PGE2 levels, which were further potentiated in the presence of Ang II and IL-1β. A functional consequence downstream of S1P/S1P2 signaling is mesangial cell migration that is stimulated by S1P. Interestingly, inhibition of COX-2 by celecoxib and SC-236 completely abolished the migratory response. Overall, our results demonstrate that extracellular S1P induces COX-2 expression via activation of S1P2 and subsequent Gi and p42/p44 MAPK-dependent signaling in renal mesangial cells leading to enhanced PGE2 formation and cell migration that essentially requires COX-2. Thus, targeting S1P/S1P2 signaling pathways might be a novel strategy to treat renal inflammatory diseases.

  5. Selective coupling of the S1P3 receptor subtype to S1P-mediated RhoA activation and cardioprotection.

    PubMed

    Yung, Bryan S; Brand, Cameron S; Xiang, Sunny Y; Gray, Charles B B; Means, Christopher K; Rosen, Hugh; Chun, Jerold; Purcell, Nicole H; Brown, Joan Heller; Miyamoto, Shigeki

    2017-02-01

    Sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P), a bioactive lysophospholipid, is generated and released at sites of tissue injury in the heart and can act on S1P1, S1P2, and S1P3 receptor subtypes to affect cardiovascular responses. We established that S1P causes little phosphoinositide hydrolysis and does not induce hypertrophy indicating that it does not cause receptor coupling to Gq. We previously demonstrated that S1P confers cardioprotection against ischemia/reperfusion by activating RhoA and its downstream effector PKD. The S1P receptor subtypes and G proteins that regulate RhoA activation and downstream responses in the heart have not been determined. Using siRNA or pertussis toxin to inhibit different G proteins in NRVMs we established that S1P regulates RhoA activation through Gα13 but not Gα12, Gαq, or Gαi. Knockdown of the three major S1P receptors using siRNA demonstrated a requirement for S1P3 in RhoA activation and subsequent phosphorylation of PKD, and this was confirmed in studies using isolated hearts from S1P3 knockout (KO) mice. S1P treatment reduced infarct size induced by ischemia/reperfusion in Langendorff perfused wild-type (WT) hearts and this protection was abolished in the S1P3 KO mouse heart. CYM-51736, an S1P3-specific agonist, also decreased infarct size after ischemia/reperfusion to a degree similar to that achieved by S1P. The finding that S1P3 receptor- and Gα13-mediated RhoA activation is responsible for protection against ischemia/reperfusion suggests that selective targeting of S1P3 receptors could provide therapeutic benefits in ischemic heart disease.

  6. Regulation of human cerebro-microvascular endothelial baso-lateral adhesion and barrier function by S1P through dual involvement of S1P1 and S1P2 receptors.

    PubMed

    Wiltshire, Rachael; Nelson, Vicky; Kho, Dan Ting; Angel, Catherine E; O'Carroll, Simon J; Graham, E Scott

    2016-01-27

    Herein we show that S1P rapidly and acutely reduces the focal adhesion strength and barrier tightness of brain endothelial cells. xCELLigence biosensor technology was used to measure focal adhesion, which was reduced by S1P acutely and this response was mediated through both S1P1 and S1P2 receptors. S1P increased secretion of several pro-inflammatory mediators from brain endothelial cells. However, the magnitude of this response was small in comparison to that mediated by TNFα or IL-1β. Furthermore, S1P did not significantly increase cell-surface expression of any key cell adhesion molecules involved in leukocyte recruitment, included ICAM-1 and VCAM-1. Finally, we reveal that S1P acutely and dynamically regulates microvascular endothelial barrier tightness in a manner consistent with regulated rapid opening followed by closing and strengthening of the barrier. We hypothesise that the role of the S1P receptors in this process is not to cause barrier dysfunction, but is related to controlled opening of the endothelial junctions. This was revealed using real-time measurement of barrier integrity using ECIS ZΘ TEER technology and endothelial viability using xCELLigence technology. Finally, we show that these responses do not occur simply though the pharmacology of a single S1P receptor but involves coordinated action of S1P1 and S1P2 receptors.

  7. Regulation of human cerebro-microvascular endothelial baso-lateral adhesion and barrier function by S1P through dual involvement of S1P1 and S1P2 receptors

    PubMed Central

    Wiltshire, Rachael; Nelson, Vicky; Kho, Dan Ting; Angel, Catherine E.; O’Carroll, Simon J.; Graham, E. Scott

    2016-01-01

    Herein we show that S1P rapidly and acutely reduces the focal adhesion strength and barrier tightness of brain endothelial cells. xCELLigence biosensor technology was used to measure focal adhesion, which was reduced by S1P acutely and this response was mediated through both S1P1 and S1P2 receptors. S1P increased secretion of several pro-inflammatory mediators from brain endothelial cells. However, the magnitude of this response was small in comparison to that mediated by TNFα or IL-1β. Furthermore, S1P did not significantly increase cell-surface expression of any key cell adhesion molecules involved in leukocyte recruitment, included ICAM-1 and VCAM-1. Finally, we reveal that S1P acutely and dynamically regulates microvascular endothelial barrier tightness in a manner consistent with regulated rapid opening followed by closing and strengthening of the barrier. We hypothesise that the role of the S1P receptors in this process is not to cause barrier dysfunction, but is related to controlled opening of the endothelial junctions. This was revealed using real-time measurement of barrier integrity using ECIS ZΘ TEER technology and endothelial viability using xCELLigence technology. Finally, we show that these responses do not occur simply though the pharmacology of a single S1P receptor but involves coordinated action of S1P1 and S1P2 receptors. PMID:26813587

  8. Self-absorption theory applied to rocket measurements of the nitric oxide (1, 0) gamma band in the daytime thermosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eparvier, F. G.; Barth, C. A.

    1992-01-01

    Observations of the UV fluorescent emissions of the NO (1, 0) and (0, 1) gamma bands in the lower-thermospheric dayglow, made with a sounding rocket launched on March 7, 1989 from Poker Flat, Alaska, were analyzed. The resonant (1, 0) gamma band was found to be attenuated below an altitude of about 120 km. A self-absorption model based on Holstein transmission functions was developed for the resonant (1, 0) gamma band under varying conditions of slant column density and temperature and was applied for the conditions of the rocket flight. The results of the model agreed with the measured attenuation of the band, indicating the necessity of including self-absorption theory in the analysis of satellite and rocket limb data of NO.

  9. GBS 1.0

    SciTech Connect

    2010-09-30

    The Umbra gbs (Graph-Based Search) library provides implementations of graph-based search/planning algorithms that can be applied to legacy graph data structures. Unlike some other graph algorithm libraries, this one does not require your graph class to inherit from a specific base class. Implementations of Dijkstra's Algorithm and A-Star search are included and can be used with graphs that are lazily-constructed.

  10. 5' (1 - 0

    Center for Drug Evaluation (CDER)

    ... ( :g J: ~ RP :P $c' -G p ~ .p ~.~ R ~ p ~ P ~ P ~ , ;n. ~ . l". :p. R . ~ . Pc ÆP ~ .p ~ p .p ;n ~~ P ~ l; ¥ ~~ g 2)Pc ~ ~ G p PP l; .;p ~") l; ¥ P. :l:t :; "" . ... (f g g- ...

  11. Density relative change and interface zone mutual diffusion of BiFeO3 films prepared on Si (1 0 0), SiO2 and SiO2/Si (1 0 0)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, RenZheng; Wang, ZeSong; Yuan, XianBao; Zhou, JianJun; Mao, ZhangLiang; Su, HuaShan; Li, Bo; Fu, DeJun

    2016-10-01

    The mutual diffusion taken place in the interface zone between BiFeO3 (BFO) films and substrates (Si (1 0 0), SiO2 and SiO2/Si (1 0 0)) has been revealed by energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) and Rutherford Backscattering Spectrometry (RBS). RBS spectra provide the relative atomic concentrations of Bi, Fe, Si, and O elements changed with the samples' depth as analyzed by RBS spectra fitting SIMNRA software. A certain width of the intermixing layer is probably formed between BFO films and individual substrate which is attributed to mutual diffusion in the interface zone during annealing process. The mechanism of concerted exchange component can explain the interface zone mutual diffusion phenomenon between BFO films and substrates. The width of the interface zone between BFO film and Si (1 0 0), SiO2, and SiO2/Si (1 0 0) substrate is about 1.94 × 1017, 2.01 × 1017 and 3.05 × 1017 atoms/cm2, respectively, which are equivalent to 30.9, 36.7, and 52.9 nm, respectively. It has been declared that the effect on density relative to BFO film is loosen or attenuation is presented in the interface zone, which can be interpreted as a migration or diffusion of various atoms during the annealing. This can also provide an evidence of atomic dynamics and defect engineering on interface diffusion.

  12. A comparative study of the CO chemisorption on Ti 2O 3(1 0 1¯ 2) and V 2O 3(1 0 1¯ 2) non-polar surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Casarin, Maurizio; Nardi, Marco; Vittadini, Andrea

    2004-09-01

    Density functional molecular cluster calculations have been used to investigate the coordination of CO to Lewis acid sites ( Lsa) available on Ti 2O 3(1 0 1¯ 2) and V 2O 3(1 0 1¯ 2) non-polar surfaces. The electronic structure of the clean substrates, the adsorbate geometry and chemisorption enthalpies are computed and discussed. Properties of the clean surfaces are well described by the chosen cluster models. Moreover, the Lsa-CO bonding is found to be very similar to that holding for transition metal carbonyls: i.e., a two-way electron flow implying a σ donation from the CO 5σ HOMO into empty Lsa AOs, assisted by a π backdonation from Lsa occupied orbitals into the CO 2π LUMO. Both the electronic and molecular structure of the adsorbate are significantly perturbed upon chemisorption and, consistently with experimental data, the C-O bond results strongly weakened. The chemisorption enthalpy of CO on V 2O 3(1 0 1¯ 2) (˜-30 kcal/mol) is about twice that computed for CO on Ti 2O 3(1 0 1¯ 2) (˜-16 kcal/mol).

  13. A national FFQ for the Netherlands (the FFQ-NL 1.0): validation of a comprehensive FFQ for adults.

    PubMed

    Sluik, Diewertje; Geelen, Anouk; de Vries, Jeanne H M; Eussen, Simone J P M; Brants, Henny A M; Meijboom, Saskia; van Dongen, Martien C J M; Bueno-de-Mesquita, H Bas; Wijckmans-Duysens, Nicole E G; van 't Veer, Pieter; Dagnelie, Pieter C; Ocké, Marga C; Feskens, Edith J M

    2016-09-01

    A standardised, national, 160-item FFQ, the FFQ-NL 1.0, was recently developed for Dutch epidemiological studies. The objective was to validate the FFQ-NL 1.0 against multiple 24-h recalls (24hR) and recovery and concentration biomarkers. The FFQ-NL 1.0 was filled out by 383 participants (25-69 years) from the Nutrition Questionnaires plus study. For each participant, one to two urinary and blood samples and one to five (mean 2·7) telephone-based 24hR were available. Group-level bias, correlation coefficients, attenuation factors, de-attenuated correlation coefficients and ranking agreement were assessed. Compared with the 24hR, the FFQ-NL 1.0 estimated the intake of energy and macronutrients well. However, it underestimated intakes of SFA and trans-fatty acids and alcohol and overestimated intakes of most vitamins by >5 %. The median correlation coefficient was 0·39 for energy and macronutrients, 0·30 for micronutrients and 0·30 for food groups. The FFQ underestimated protein intake by an average of 16 % and K by 5 %, relative to their urinary recovery biomarkers. Attenuation factors were 0·44 and 0·46 for protein and K, respectively. Correlation coefficients were 0·43-0·47 between (fatty) fish intake and plasma EPA and DHA and 0·24-0·43 between fruit and vegetable intakes and plasma carotenoids. In conclusion, the overall validity of the newly developed FFQ-NL 1.0 was acceptable to good. The FFQ-NL 1.0 is well suited for future use within Dutch cohort studies among adults.

  14. SpS1-Gas in protoplanetary disks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goto, Miwa

    2010-11-01

    High resolution infrared spectroscopy is the key technique to look at the inner regions of protoplanetary disks. As molecular hydrogen is an inefficient emitter, CO gas is the single most important molecular probe of the disk. The energy gaps of the vibrationally excited levels (ΔE > 3000 K) and the critical density required to keep the molecules in the excited state (nc ~ 1010cm-3) match well to the physical condition of the inner regions of protoplanetary disks. In order to resolve the vibrational lines of different rotational states, a spectral resolving power of λ/Δλ > 10000 is necessary; or even higher (> 30000 -100000), if we would like to fully resolve the gas kinematics. Scoville et al. (1980) provided the fundamentals of the excitation mechanisms, which is essential for the interpretation of the vibrational transitions of CO, and pioneered the study of the circumstellar environment with infrared CO lines in the observation of BN (Scoville et al. (1983)). The bandhead emission of CO at 2.3 μm from young stars was unambiguously attributed to the circumstellar disks by Carr (1989) and Najita et al. (1996), because the gas kinematics matches well to what is expected from Keplerian rotation. Since then, the gas kinematics have been extensively used to shed light on peculiar disk structures, such as the inner truncation (Brittain et al. 2003), the outer truncation (Najita et al. 2008), and the gap (van der Plas et al. 2008; though this is an oxygen forbidden line).

  15. Solwnd: A 3D Compressible MHD Code for Solar Wind Studies. Version 1.0: Cartesian Coordinates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deane, Anil E.

    1996-01-01

    Solwnd 1.0 is a three-dimensional compressible MHD code written in Fortran for studying the solar wind. Time-dependent boundary conditions are available. The computational algorithm is based on Flux Corrected Transport and the code is based on the existing code of Zalesak and Spicer. The flow considered is that of shear flow with incoming flow that perturbs this base flow. Several test cases corresponding to pressure balanced magnetic structures with velocity shear flow and various inflows including Alfven waves are presented. Version 1.0 of solwnd considers a rectangular Cartesian geometry. Future versions of solwnd will consider a spherical geometry. Some discussions of this issue is presented.

  16. Non-singlet Q-deformed N = (1 , 0) and N = (1 , 1 / 2) U(1) actions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Castro, A.; Quevedo, L.

    2006-08-01

    In this Letter we construct N = (1 , 0) and N = (1 , 1 / 2) non-singlet Q-deformed supersymmetric U (1) actions in components. We obtain an exact expression for the enhanced supersymmetry action by turning off particular degrees of freedom of the deformation tensor. We analyze the behavior of the action upon restoring weekly some of the deformation parameters, obtaining a non-trivial interaction term between a scalar and the gauge field, breaking the supersymmetry down to N = (1 , 0). Additionally, we present the corresponding set of unbroken supersymmetry transformations. We work in harmonic superspace in four Euclidean dimensions.

  17. S1P lyase in thymic perivascular spaces promotes egress of mature thymocytes via up-regulation of S1P receptor 1.

    PubMed

    Maeda, Yasuhiro; Yagi, Hideki; Takemoto, Kana; Utsumi, Hiroyuki; Fukunari, Atsushi; Sugahara, Kunio; Masuko, Takashi; Chiba, Kenji

    2014-05-01

    Sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P) and S1P receptor 1 (S1P1) play an important role in the egress of mature CD4 or CD8 single-positive (SP) thymocytes from the thymus. Fingolimod hydrochloride (FTY720), an S1P1 functional antagonist, induced significant accumulation of CD62L(high)CD69(low) mature SP thymocytes in the thymic medulla. Immunohistochemical staining using anti-S1P1 antibody revealed that S1P1 is predominantly expressed on thymocytes in the thymic medulla and is strongly down-regulated even at 3h after FTY720 administration. 2-Acetyl-4-tetrahydroxybutylimidazole (THI), an S1P lyase inhibitor, also induced accumulation of mature SP thymocytes in the thymic medulla with an enlargement of the perivascular spaces (PVS). At 6h after THI administration, S1P1-expressing thymocytes reduced partially as if to form clusters and hardly existed in the proximity of CD31-expressing blood vessels in the thymic medulla, suggesting S1P lyase expression in the cells constructing thymic medullary PVS. To determine the cells expressing S1P lyase in the thymus, we newly established a mAb (YK19-2) specific for mouse S1P lyase. Immunohistochemical staining with YK19-2 revealed that S1P lyase is predominantly expressed in non-lymphoid thymic stromal cells in the thymic medulla. In the thymic medullary PVS, S1P lyase was expressed in ER-TR7-positive cells (reticular fibroblasts and pericytes) and CD31-positive vascular endothelial cells. Our findings suggest that S1P lyase expressed in the thymic medullary PVS keeps the tissue S1P concentration low around the vessels and promotes thymic egress via up-regulation of S1P1.

  18. A self-consistent combined radiative transfer hydrodynamic and particle acceleration model for the X1.0 class flare on March 29, 2014

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rubio da Costa, F.; Kleint, L.; Sainz Dalda, A.; Petrosian, V.; Liu, W.

    2015-12-01

    The X1.0 flare on March 29, 2014 was well observed, covering its emission at several wavelengths from the photosphere to the corona. The RHESSI spectra images allow us to estimate the temporal variation of the electron spectra using regularized inversion techniques. Using this as input for a combined particle acceleration and transport (Stanford-Flare) and radiative transfer hydrodynamic (Radyn) code, we calculate the response of the atmosphere to the electron heating. We will present the evolution of the thermal continuum and several line emissions. Comparing them with GOES soft X-ray and high resolution observations from IRIS, SDO and DST/IBIS allows us to test the basic mechanism(s) of acceleration and to constrain its characteristics. We will also present perspectives on how to apply this methodology and related diagnostics to other flares.

  19. A laser frequency comb that enables radial velocity measurements with a precision of 1 cm s(-1).

    PubMed

    Li, Chih-Hao; Benedick, Andrew J; Fendel, Peter; Glenday, Alexander G; Kärtner, Franz X; Phillips, David F; Sasselov, Dimitar; Szentgyorgyi, Andrew; Walsworth, Ronald L

    2008-04-03

    Searches for extrasolar planets using the periodic Doppler shift of stellar spectral lines have recently achieved a precision of 60 cm s(-1) (ref. 1), which is sufficient to find a 5-Earth-mass planet in a Mercury-like orbit around a Sun-like star. To find a 1-Earth-mass planet in an Earth-like orbit, a precision of approximately 5 cm s(-1) is necessary. The combination of a laser frequency comb with a Fabry-Pérot filtering cavity has been suggested as a promising approach to achieve such Doppler shift resolution via improved spectrograph wavelength calibration, with recent encouraging results. Here we report the fabrication of such a filtered laser comb with up to 40-GHz (approximately 1-A) line spacing, generated from a 1-GHz repetition-rate source, without compromising long-term stability, reproducibility or spectral resolution. This wide-line-spacing comb, or 'astro-comb', is well matched to the resolving power of high-resolution astrophysical spectrographs. The astro-comb should allow a precision as high as 1 cm s(-1) in astronomical radial velocity measurements.

  20. Sphingosine 1-phosphate receptor 1 (S1P(1)) upregulation and amelioration of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis by an S1P(1) antagonist.

    PubMed

    Cahalan, Stuart M; Gonzalez-Cabrera, Pedro J; Nguyen, Nhan; Guerrero, Miguel; Cisar, Elizabeth A George; Leaf, Nora B; Brown, Steven J; Roberts, Edward; Rosen, Hugh

    2013-02-01

    Sphingosine 1-phosphate receptor 1 (S1P(1)) is a G protein-coupled receptor that is critical for proper lymphocyte development and recirculation. Agonists to S1P(1) are currently in use clinically for the treatment of multiple sclerosis, and these drugs may act on both S1P(1) expressed on lymphocytes and S1P(1) expressed within the central nervous system. Agonists to S1P(1) and deficiency in S1P(1) both cause lymphocyte sequestration in the lymph nodes. In the present study, we show that S1P(1) antagonism induces lymphocyte sequestration in the lymph nodes similar to that observed with S1P(1) agonists while upregulating S1P(1) on lymphocytes and endothelial cells. Additionally, we show that S1P(1) antagonism reverses experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis in mice without acting on S1P(1) expressed within the central nervous system, demonstrating that lymphocyte sequestration via S1P(1) antagonism is sufficient to alleviate autoimmune pathology.

  1. THE BOLOCAM GALACTIC PLANE SURVEY. XII. DISTANCE CATALOG EXPANSION USING KINEMATIC ISOLATION OF DENSE MOLECULAR CLOUD STRUCTURES WITH {sup 13}CO(1-0)

    SciTech Connect

    Ellsworth-Bowers, Timothy P.; Glenn, Jason; Rosolowsky, Erik; Ginsburg, Adam; Evans II, Neal J.; Battersby, Cara; Shirley, Yancy L.; Svoboda, Brian

    2015-01-20

    We present an expanded distance catalog for 1710 molecular cloud structures identified in the Bolocam Galactic Plane Survey (BGPS) version 2, representing a nearly threefold increase over the previous BGPS distance catalog. We additionally present a new method for incorporating extant data sets into our Bayesian distance probability density function (DPDF) methodology. To augment the dense-gas tracers (e.g., HCO{sup +}(3-2), NH{sub 3}(1,1)) used to derive line-of-sight velocities for kinematic distances, we utilize the Galactic Ring Survey (GRS) {sup 13}CO(1-0) data to morphologically extract velocities for BGPS sources. The outline of a BGPS source is used to select a region of the GRS {sup 13}CO data, along with a reference region to subtract enveloping diffuse emission, to produce a line profile of {sup 13}CO matched to the BGPS source. For objects with a HCO{sup +}(3-2) velocity, ≈95% of the new {sup 13}CO(1-0) velocities agree with that of the dense gas. A new prior DPDF for kinematic distance ambiguity (KDA) resolution, based on a validated formalism for associating molecular cloud structures with known objects from the literature, is presented. We demonstrate this prior using catalogs of masers with trigonometric parallaxes and H II regions with robust KDA resolutions. The distance catalog presented here contains well-constrained distance estimates for 20% of BGPS V2 sources, with typical distance uncertainties ≲ 0.5 kpc. Approximately 75% of the well-constrained sources lie within 6 kpc of the Sun, concentrated in the Scutum-Centaurus arm. Galactocentric positions of objects additionally trace out portions of the Sagittarius, Perseus, and Outer arms in the first and second Galactic quadrants, and we also find evidence for significant regions of interarm dense gas.

  2. Hyperoxia-induced p47phox activation and ROS generation is mediated through S1P transporter Spns2, and S1P/S1P1&2 signaling axis in lung endothelium.

    PubMed

    Harijith, Anantha; Pendyala, Srikanth; Ebenezer, David L; Ha, Alison W; Fu, Panfeng; Wang, Yue-Ting; Ma, Ke; Toth, Peter T; Berdyshev, Evgeny V; Kanteti, Prasad; Natarajan, Viswanathan

    2016-08-01

    Hyperoxia-induced lung injury adversely affects ICU patients and neonates on ventilator assisted breathing. The underlying culprit appears to be reactive oxygen species (ROS)-induced lung damage. The major contributor of hyperoxia-induced ROS is activation of the multiprotein enzyme complex NADPH oxidase. Sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) signaling is known to be involved in hyperoxia-mediated ROS generation; however, the mechanism(s) of S1P-induced NADPH oxidase activation is unclear. Here, we investigated various steps in the S1P signaling pathway mediating ROS production in response to hyperoxia in lung endothelium. Of the two closely related sphingosine kinases (SphKs)1 and 2, which synthesize S1P from sphingosine, only Sphk1(-/-) mice conferred protection against hyperoxia-induced lung injury. S1P is metabolized predominantly by S1P lyase and partial deletion of Sgpl1 (Sgpl1(+/-)) in mice accentuated lung injury. Hyperoxia stimulated S1P accumulation in human lung microvascular endothelial cells (HLMVECs), and downregulation of S1P transporter spinster homolog 2 (Spns2) or S1P receptors S1P1&2, but not S1P3, using specific siRNA attenuated hyperoxia-induced p47(phox) translocation to cell periphery and ROS generation in HLMVECs. These results suggest a role for Spns2 and S1P1&2 in hyperoxia-mediated ROS generation. In addition, p47(phox) (phox:phagocyte oxidase) activation and ROS generation was also reduced by PF543, a specific SphK1 inhibitor in HLMVECs. Our data indicate a novel role for Spns2 and S1P1&2 in the activation of p47(phox) and production of ROS involved in hyperoxia-mediated lung injury in neonatal and adult mice.

  3. Possible Dust Models for C/2012 S1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yanamandra-Fisher, P. A.

    2014-12-01

    Comet C/2012 S1 (ISON) provided a great opportunity to study a dynamically new Oort-cloud comet on its initial and only passage through the inner solar system. Contrary to expectations, the comet's activity fluctuated from high through a quiescent phase, and a major outburst days before its perihelion passage, ending in a dramatic race to complete disintegration on perihelion day, 28 November 2013. Amateur observations to professional ground-based, sub-orbital telescopes indicate the various changes of visible factors such as Afrho, a proxy for dust activity, and the measured production rates for water, consistent with the disintegration of the nucleus. Hines et al. (2013; ApJ Lett. 780) detected positive polarization in the inner coma and negative polarization in the outer coma, indicative of a jet, independently confirmed by Li et al. (2013, ApJ Lett., 779). Thermal emission observations of the comet pre-perihelion from NAOJ/Subaru/COMICS, a mid-infrared spectrometer, indicated a body with an equivalent brightness temperature of 265K (Ootsubo et al., 2013, ACM, Helsinki,FI); thermal observations acquired at the NASA/Infrared Telescope Facility (IRTF) with The Aerospace Corporation spectrometer (BASS, PI. R. Russell), before and after the November 12, 2013 outburst observed by the CIOC_ISON amateur network, indicates a brightness temperature of 330K and the presence, albeit weak, of the 11.3-micron crystalline silicate feature (Sitko et al., 2014, LPI abstract 1537). A Monte Carlo comet dust tail model, applied to extract the dust environment parameters of comet C/2012 S1 (ISON) from both Earth-based and Solar and Heliospheric Observatory (SOHO) calibrated observations, performed from about 6 AU (inbound), to right after perihelion passage, when just a small portion of the original comet nucleus survived in the form of a cloud of tiny particles, indicates that particles underwent disintegration and fragmentation (Moreno et al., 2014, ApJ Lett., 791). Ongoing work

  4. Targeted Proteomics-Driven Computational Modeling of Macrophage S1P Chemosensing.

    PubMed

    Manes, Nathan P; Angermann, Bastian R; Koppenol-Raab, Marijke; An, Eunkyung; Sjoelund, Virginie H; Sun, Jing; Ishii, Masaru; Germain, Ronald N; Meier-Schellersheim, Martin; Nita-Lazar, Aleksandra

    2015-10-01

    Osteoclasts are monocyte-derived multinuclear cells that directly attach to and resorb bone. Sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P)(1) regulates bone resorption by functioning as both a chemoattractant and chemorepellent of osteoclast precursors through two G-protein coupled receptors that antagonize each other in an S1P-concentration-dependent manner. To quantitatively explore the behavior of this chemosensing pathway, we applied targeted proteomics, transcriptomics, and rule-based pathway modeling using the Simmune toolset. RAW264.7 cells (a mouse monocyte/macrophage cell line) were used as model osteoclast precursors, RNA-seq was used to identify expressed target proteins, and selected reaction monitoring (SRM) mass spectrometry using internal peptide standards was used to perform absolute abundance measurements of pathway proteins. The resulting transcript and protein abundance values were strongly correlated. Measured protein abundance values, used as simulation input parameters, led to in silico pathway behavior matching in vitro measurements. Moreover, once model parameters were established, even simulated responses toward stimuli that were not used for parameterization were consistent with experimental findings. These findings demonstrate the feasibility and value of combining targeted mass spectrometry with pathway modeling for advancing biological insight.

  5. Targeted Proteomics-Driven Computational Modeling of Macrophage S1P Chemosensing*

    PubMed Central

    Manes, Nathan P.; Angermann, Bastian R.; Koppenol-Raab, Marijke; An, Eunkyung; Sjoelund, Virginie H.; Sun, Jing; Ishii, Masaru; Germain, Ronald N.; Meier-Schellersheim, Martin; Nita-Lazar, Aleksandra

    2015-01-01

    Osteoclasts are monocyte-derived multinuclear cells that directly attach to and resorb bone. Sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P)1 regulates bone resorption by functioning as both a chemoattractant and chemorepellent of osteoclast precursors through two G-protein coupled receptors that antagonize each other in an S1P-concentration-dependent manner. To quantitatively explore the behavior of this chemosensing pathway, we applied targeted proteomics, transcriptomics, and rule-based pathway modeling using the Simmune toolset. RAW264.7 cells (a mouse monocyte/macrophage cell line) were used as model osteoclast precursors, RNA-seq was used to identify expressed target proteins, and selected reaction monitoring (SRM) mass spectrometry using internal peptide standards was used to perform absolute abundance measurements of pathway proteins. The resulting transcript and protein abundance values were strongly correlated. Measured protein abundance values, used as simulation input parameters, led to in silico pathway behavior matching in vitro measurements. Moreover, once model parameters were established, even simulated responses toward stimuli that were not used for parameterization were consistent with experimental findings. These findings demonstrate the feasibility and value of combining targeted mass spectrometry with pathway modeling for advancing biological insight. PMID:26199343

  6. Risk Knowledge in Relapsing Multiple Sclerosis (RIKNO 1.0) - Development of an Outcome Instrument for Educational Interventions

    PubMed Central

    Heesen, C.; Kasper, J.; Fischer, K.; Köpke, S.; Rahn, A.; Backhus, I.; Poettgen, J.; Vahter, L.; Drulovic, J.; Van Nunen, A.; Beckmann, Y.; Liethmann, K.; Giordano, A.; Solari, A.

    2015-01-01

    Background Adequate risk knowledge of patients is a prerequisite for shared decision making but few attempts have been made to develop assessment tools. Multiple Sclerosis (MS) is a chronic inflammatory disease of young adults with an increasing number of partially effective immunotherapies and therefore a paradigmatic disease to study patient involvement. Objective/methods Based on an item bank of MS risk knowledge items and patient feedback including perceived relevance we developed a risk knowledge questionnaire for relapsing remitting (RR) MS (RIKNO 1.0) which was a primary outcome measure in a patient education trial (192 early RRMS patients). Results Fourteen of the RIKNO 1.0 multiple-choice items were selected based on patient perceived relevance and item difficulty indices, and five on expert opinion. Mean item difficulty was 0.58, ranging from 0.14 to 0.79. Mean RIKNO 1.0 score increased after the educational intervention from 10.6 to 12.4 (p = 0.0003). Selected items were particularly difficult (e.g. those on absolute risk reductions of having a second relapse) and were answered correctly in only 30% of the patients, even after the intervention. Conclusion Despite its high difficulty, RIKNO 1.0 is a responsive instrument to assess risk knowledge in RRMS patients participating in educational interventions. PMID:26430887

  7. Evaluation of Tafel-Volmer kinetic parameters for the hydrogen oxidation reaction on Pt(1 1 0) electrodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mann, R. F.; Thurgood, C. P.

    2011-05-01

    Modelling of PEM fuel cells has long been an active research area to improve understanding of cell and stack operation, facilitate design improvements and support simulation studies. The prediction of activation polarization in most PEM models has concentrated on the cathode losses since anode losses are commonly much smaller and tend to be ignored. Further development of the anode activation polarization term is being undertaken to broaden the application and usefulness of PEM models in general. Published work on the kinetics of the hydrogen oxidation reaction (HOR) using Pt(h k l) electrodes in dilute H2SO4 has been recently reassessed and published. Correlations for diffusion-free exchange current densities were developed and empirical predictive equations for the anode activation polarization were proposed for the experimental conditions of the previously published work: Pt(1 0 0), Pt(1 1 0) and Pt(1 1 1) electrodes, pH2 of 1 atm, and temperatures of 1, 30 and 60 °C. It was concluded that the HOR on Pt(1 1 0) electrodes followed a Tafel-Volmer reaction sequence. The aim of the present paper is to generalize these Tafel-Volmer correlations, apply them to published data for Pt(1 1 0) electrodes and further develop the modelling of anode activation polarization over the range of operating conditions found in PEMFC operation.

  8. 76 FR 77025 - Office of New Reactors; Notice of Availability of the Final Staff Guidance Section 1.0, Revision...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-09

    ... on Introduction and Interfaces AGENCY: Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). ACTION: Notice of... ``Introduction and Interfaces'' (Agencywide Documents Access and Management System (ADAMS) Accession No..., 2011, the NRC staff issued the proposed Revision 2 on SRP Section 1.0 on ``Introduction and...

  9. Reactivity of persulfides toward strained bicyclo[6.1.0]nonyne derivatives: relevance to chemical tagging of proteins.

    PubMed

    Galardon, Erwan; Padovani, Dominique

    2015-06-17

    Persulfides are an emerging class of cysteine oxidative post-translational modification. They react with the bioconjugation reagents bicyclo[6.1.0]nonynes (BCNs) to engender thioethers and/or disulfides. This new reactivity of BCNs with a biologically important redox-signaling species efficiently interferes with the recent usage of strained cycloalkynes to specifically trap protein sulfenic acids.

  10. Standard Operating Procedure - Manufacture of Carbon Fibre Reinforced Plastic Waveguides and Slotted Waveguide Antennas, Version 1.0

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-06-01

    aerospace grade carbon fibre reinforced plastic ( CFRP ) prepreg. RELEASE LIMITATION Approved for public release UNCLASSIFIED Report...arrays manufactured from aerospace grade carbon fibre reinforced plastic ( CFRP ) prepreg. 15. SUBJECT TERMS 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: 17. LIMITATION... CFRP ) prepreg tape and fabric. This report details Version 1.0 of a Standard Operating Procedure for this manufacture. UNCLASSIFIED

  11. Determination of metal atoms incorporated in molecular intermediates: an STM study of acetylide on Ag(1 1 0)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, X.-C.; Madix, R. J.

    2004-08-01

    Many inorganic molecular intermediates, such as imide, nitrate, and sulfite, incorporate a stoichiometric number of added metal atoms into their structures on Ag(1 1 0) or Cu(1 1 0). In this paper an example of such general behavior is illustrated with an organic molecular intermediate--acetylide (C 2) on Ag(1 1 0). Acetylide is produced by reacting acetylene with oxygen atoms on the Ag(1 1 0)- p(2 × 1)-O surface. Acetylides form row structures along the <1 1¯ 0> axis, which, as coverage increases, are compressed along the <0 0 1> axis to form nominal " p(2 × 2)", " p(2 × 3)", " p(2 × 1)", and " p(14 × 1)" structures. The final acetylide structure incorporates 0.55 ML silver atoms, which may be released upon titration with acetic acid. A buckled structure is proposed where acetylide bonds to two added silver atoms in a linear configuration in the trough along the <1 1¯ 0> axis with seven equally spaced silver atoms in a p(13 × 1) unit cell.

  12. Sphingosine kinase-1, S1P transporter spinster homolog 2 and S1P2 mRNA expressions are increased in liver with advanced fibrosis in human.

    PubMed

    Sato, Masaya; Ikeda, Hitoshi; Uranbileg, Baasanjav; Kurano, Makoto; Saigusa, Daisuke; Aoki, Junken; Maki, Harufumi; Kudo, Hiroki; Hasegawa, Kiyoshi; Kokudo, Norihiro; Yatomi, Yutaka

    2016-08-26

    The role of sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P) in liver fibrosis or inflammation was not fully examined in human. Controversy exists which S1P receptors, S1P1 and S1P3 vs S1P2, would be importantly involved in its mechanism. To clarify these matters, 80 patients who received liver resection for hepatocellular carcinoma and 9 patients for metastatic liver tumor were enrolled. S1P metabolism was analyzed in background, non-tumorous liver tissue. mRNA levels of sphingosine kinase 1 (SK1) but not SK2 were increased in livers with fibrosis stages 3-4 compared to those with 0-2 and to normal liver. However, S1P was not increased in advanced fibrotic liver, where mRNA levels of S1P transporter spinster homolog 2 (SPNS2) but not S1P-degrading enzymes were enhanced. Furthermore, mRNA levels of S1P2 but not S1P1 or S1P3 were increased in advanced fibrotic liver. These increased mRNA levels of SK1, SPNS2 and S1P2 in fibrotic liver were correlated with α-smooth muscle actin mRNA levels in liver, and with serum ALT levels. In conclusion, S1P may be actively generated, transported to outside the cells, and bind to its specific receptor in human liver to play a role in fibrosis or inflammation. Altered S1P metabolism in fibrotic liver may be their therapeutic target.

  13. Outgassing and chemical evolution of C/2012 S1 (ISON)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dello Russo, Neil; Vervack, Ronald J.; Kawakita, Hideyo; Cochran, Anita; McKay, Adam J.; Harris, Walter M.; Weaver, Harold A.; Lisse, Carey M.; DiSanti, Michael A.; Kobayashi, Hitomi; Biver, Nicolas; Bockelée-Morvan, Dominique; Crovisier, Jacques; Opitom, Cyrielle; Jehin, Emmanuel

    2015-11-01

    Volatile production rates, relative abundances, rotational temperatures, and spatial distributions in the coma were measured in C/2012 S1 (ISON) using long-slit high-dispersion (λ/Δλ ~ 25,000) infrared spectroscopy as part of a worldwide observing campaign. Spectra were obtained on UT 2013 October 26 and 28 with NIRSPEC at the W. M. Keck Observatory, and UT 2013 November 19 and 20 with CSHELL at the NASA IRTF. H2O was detected on all dates, with production rates increasing by about a factor of 40 between October 26 (Rh = 1.12 AU) and November 20 (Rh = 0.43 AU). Short-term variability of H2O was also seen as the production rate increased by nearly a factor of two during observations obtained over a period of about six hours on November 19. C2H6, CH3OH and CH4 abundances were slightly depleted relative to H2O in ISON compared to mean values for comets measured at infrared wavelengths. On the November dates, C2H2, HCN and OCS abundances relative to H2O appear to be close to the range of mean values, whereas H2CO and NH3 were significantly enhanced. We will compare derived chemical abundances in ISON to other comets measured with infrared spectroscopy.

  14. New Perspectives in the Treatment of Advanced Gastric Cancer: S-1 as a Novel Oral 5-FU Therapy in Combination with Cisplatin.

    PubMed

    Mahlberg, Rolf; Lorenzen, Sylvie; Thuss-Patience, Peter; Heinemann, Volker; Pfeiffer, Per; Möhler, Markus

    2017-01-01

    Oral fluoropyrimidines have been available for more than 10 years. Capecitabine is well established in treating solid tumors in Europe. S-1 (Teysuno®), an oral formulation containing the 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) prodrug tegafur and the two enzyme modulators gimeracil and oteracil, has not been available in non-Asia countries until recently. In Japan, S-1 in combination with cisplatin is the recommended first-line treatment in patients with gastric cancer. In Europe, the first trials with S-1 were disappointing due to high unacceptable incidences of adverse events. Pharmacokinetic studies showed differences in Asian and Caucasian patients; therefore, a new non-Asian study program was initiated, which led to the pivotal phase 3 trial First-Line Advanced Gastric Cancer Study (FLAGS). In FLAGS, 1,053 patients with advanced gastric cancer from 24 non-Asian countries were enrolled. S-1 plus cisplatin showed no overall survival (OS) benefit when compared to 5-FU plus cisplatin. The primary endpoint superior OS was not met but better tolerability was shown. A post hoc noninferiority OS and safety analysis showed that S-1 plus cisplatin has the same efficacy as 5-FU plus cisplatin but a more favorable safety profile. This led to the approval of S-1 in combination with cisplatin in gastric cancer in Europe in 2011. This article reviews the mode of action of S-1, pivotal study results from an EU point of view, and future perspectives.

  15. Downregulation of sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P) receptor 1 by dexamethasone inhibits S1P-induced mesangial cell migration.

    PubMed

    Koch, Alexander; Jäger, Manuel; Völzke, Anja; Grammatikos, Georgios; Zu Heringdorf, Dagmar Meyer; Huwiler, Andrea; Pfeilschifter, Josef

    2015-06-01

    Sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P) is generated by sphingosine kinase (SK)-1 and -2 and acts mainly as an extracellular ligand at five specific receptors, denoted S1P1-5. After activation, S1P receptors regulate important processes in the progression of renal diseases, such as mesangial cell migration and survival. Previously, we showed that dexamethasone enhances SK-1 activity and S1P formation, which protected mesangial cells from stress-induced apoptosis. Here we demonstrate that dexamethasone treatment lowered S1P1 mRNA and protein expression levels in rat mesangial cells. This effect was abolished in the presence of the glucocorticoid receptor antagonist RU-486. In addition, in vivo studies showed that dexamethasone downregulated S1P1 expression in glomeruli isolated from mice treated with dexamethasone (10 mg/kg body weight). Functionally, we identified S1P1 as a key player mediating S1P-induced mesangial cell migration. We show that dexamethasone treatment significantly lowered S1P-induced migration of mesangial cells, which was again reversed in the presence of RU-486. In summary, we suggest that dexamethasone inhibits S1P-induced mesangial cell migration via downregulation of S1P1. Overall, these results demonstrate that dexamethasone has functional important effects on sphingolipid metabolism and action in renal mesangial cells.

  16. Epigenetic regulation of pro-inflammatory cytokine secretion by sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P) in acute lung injury: Role of S1P lyase.

    PubMed

    Ebenezer, David L; Fu, Panfeng; Suryadevara, Vidyani; Zhao, Yutong; Natarajan, Viswanathan

    2017-01-01

    Cellular level of sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P), the simplest bioactive sphingolipid, is tightly regulated by its synthesis catalyzed by sphingosine kinases (SphKs) 1 & 2 and degradation mediated by S1P phosphatases, lipid phosphate phosphatases, and S1P lyase. The pleotropic actions of S1P are attributed to its unique inside-out (extracellular) signaling via G-protein-coupled S1P1-5 receptors, and intracellular receptor independent signaling. Additionally, S1P generated in the nucleus by nuclear SphK2 modulates HDAC1/2 activity, regulates histone acetylation, and transcription of pro-inflammatory genes. Here, we present data on the role of S1P lyase mediated S1P signaling in regulating LPS-induced inflammation in lung endothelium. Blocking S1P lyase expression or activity attenuated LPS-induced histone acetylation and secretion of pro-inflammatory cytokines. Degradation of S1P by S1P lyase generates Δ2-hexadecenal and ethanolamine phosphate and the long-chain fatty aldehyde produced in the cytoplasmic compartment of the endothelial cell seems to modulate histone acetylation pattern, which is different from the nuclear SphK2/S1P signaling and inhibition of HDAC1/2. These in vitro studies suggest that S1P derived long-chain fatty aldehyde may be an epigenetic regulator of pro-inflammatory genes in sepsis-induced lung inflammation. Trapping fatty aldehydes and other short chain aldehydes such as 4-hydroxynonenal derived from S1P degradation and lipid peroxidation, respectively by cell permeable agents such as phloretin or other aldehyde trapping agents may be useful in treating sepsis-induced lung inflammation via modulation of histone acetylation. .

  17. ApoA-I/SR-BI modulates S1P/S1PR2-mediated inflammation through the PI3K/Akt signaling pathway in HUVECs.

    PubMed

    Ren, Kun; Lu, Yan-Ju; Mo, Zhong-Cheng; -Liu, Xing; Tang, Zhen-Li; Jiang, Yue; Peng, Xiao-Shan; Li, Li; Zhang, Qing-Hai; Yi, Guang-Hui

    2017-02-08

    Endothelial dysfunction plays a vital role during the initial stage of atherosclerosis. Oxidized low-density lipoprotein (ox-LDL) induces vascular endothelial injury and vessel wall inflammation. Sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) exerts numerous vasoprotective effects by binding to diverse S1P receptors (S1PRs; S1PR1-5). A number of studies have shown that in endothelial cells (ECs), S1PR2 acts as a pro-atherosclerotic mediator by stimulating vessel wall inflammation through the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K)/Akt signaling pathway. Scavenger receptor class B member I (SR-BI), a high-affinity receptor for apolipoprotein A-I (apoA-I)/high-density lipoprotein (HDL), inhibits nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) translocation and decreases the plasma levels of inflammatory mediators via the PI3K/Akt pathway. We hypothesized that the inflammatory effects of S1P/S1PR2 on ECs may be regulated by apoA-I/SR-BI. The results showed that ox-LDL, a pro-inflammatory factor, augmented the S1PR2 level in human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) in a dose- and time-dependent manner. In addition, S1P/S1PR2 signaling influenced the levels of inflammatory factors, including tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), interleukin-1β (IL-1β), and IL-10, aggravating inflammation in HUVECs. Moreover, the pro-inflammatory effects induced by S1P/S1PR2 were attenuated by SR-BI overexpression and enhanced by an SR-BI inhibitor, BLT-1. Further experiments showed that the PI3K/Akt signaling pathway was involved in this process. Taken together, these results demonstrate that apoA-I/SR-BI negatively regulates S1P/S1PR2-mediated inflammation in HUVECs by activating the PI3K/Akt signaling pathway.

  18. Sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P) receptor agonists mediate pro-fibrotic responses in normal human lung fibroblasts via S1P2 and S1P3 receptors and Smad-independent signaling.

    PubMed

    Sobel, Katrin; Menyhart, Katalin; Killer, Nina; Renault, Bérengère; Bauer, Yasmina; Studer, Rolf; Steiner, Beat; Bolli, Martin H; Nayler, Oliver; Gatfield, John

    2013-05-24

    Synthetic sphingosine 1-phosphate receptor 1 modulators constitute a new class of drugs for the treatment of autoimmune diseases. Sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P) signaling, however, is also involved in the development of fibrosis. Using normal human lung fibroblasts, we investigated the induction of fibrotic responses by the S1P receptor (S1PR) agonists S1P, FTY720-P, ponesimod, and SEW2871 and compared them with the responses induced by the known fibrotic mediator TGF-β1. In contrast to TGF-β1, S1PR agonists did not induce expression of the myofibroblast marker α-smooth muscle actin. However, TGF-β1, S1P, and FTY720-P caused robust stimulation of extracellular matrix (ECM) synthesis and increased pro-fibrotic marker gene expression including connective tissue growth factor. Ponesimod showed limited and SEW2871 showed no pro-fibrotic potential in these readouts. Analysis of pro-fibrotic signaling pathways showed that in contrast to TGF-β1, S1PR agonists did not activate Smad2/3 signaling but rather activated PI3K/Akt and ERK1/2 signaling to induce ECM synthesis. The strong induction of ECM synthesis by the nonselective agonists S1P and FTY720-P was due to the stimulation of S1P2 and S1P3 receptors, whereas the weaker induction of ECM synthesis at high concentrations of ponesimod was due to a low potency activation of S1P3 receptors. Finally, in normal human lung fibroblast-derived myofibroblasts that were generated by TGF-β1 pretreatment, S1P and FTY720-P were effective stimulators of ECM synthesis, whereas ponesimod was inactive, because of the down-regulation of S1P3R expression in myofibroblasts. These data demonstrate that S1PR agonists are pro-fibrotic via S1P2R and S1P3R stimulation using Smad-independent pathways.

  19. The turbomachine blading design using S2-S1 approach

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Luu, T. S.; Bencherif, L.; Viney, B.; Duc, J. M. Nguyen

    1991-01-01

    The boundary conditions corresponding to the design problem when the blades being simulated by the bound vorticity distribution are presented. The 3D flow is analyzed by the two steps S2 - S1 approach. In the first step, the number of blades is supposed to be infinite, the vortex distribution is transformed into an axisymmetric one, so that the flow field can be analyzed in a meridional plane. The thickness distribution of the blade producing the flow channel striction is taken into account by the modification of metric tensor in the continuity equation. Using the meridional stream function to define the flow field, the mass conservation is satisfied automatically. The governing equation is deduced from the relation between the azimuthal component of the vorticity and the meridional velocity. The value of the azimuthal component of the vorticity is provided by the hub to shroud equilibrium condition. This step leads to the determination of the axisymmetric stream sheets as well as the approximate camber surface of the blade. In the second step, the finite number of blades is taken into account, the inverse problem corresponding to the blade to blade flow confined in each stream sheet is analyzed. The momentum equation implies that the free vortex of the absolute velocity must be tangential to the stream sheet. The governing equation for the blade to blade flow stream function is deduced from this condition. At the beginning, the upper and the lower surfaces of the blades are created from the camber surface obtained from the first step with the assigned thickness distribution. The bound vorticity distribution and the penetrating flux conservation applied on the presumed blade surface constitute the boundary conditions of the inverse problem. The detection of this flux leads to the rectification of the geometry of the blades.

  20. Search for ammonia in comet C/2012 S1 (ISON)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faggi, S.; Codella, C.; Tozzi, G.; Comoretto, G.; Crovisier, J.; Nesti, R.; Panella, D.; Boissier, J.; Bolli, P.; Brucato, J.; Massi, F.; Tofani, G.

    2014-07-01

    Comets are pristine bodies of the Solar System and their studies can give precious hints on the formation of the Solar System itself. New comets, coming form the Oort Colud at their first passage close to the Sun, are particularly important, because they are not differentiated by the Solar radiation and they are supposed to have a large quantity of organic matter close to the surface. Here we report the results of a search for NH_3(1,1) emission at 23.7 GHz in comet C/2012 S1 ISON using a new dual-feed K-band receiver mounted on the Medicina 32-m antenna. We observed the comet once close to its perihelion, from 2013 Nov. 25 to Nov. 28, when its heliocentric distance changed from 0.25 au to 0.03 au. We integrated about 6 hrs per day, obtaining high-spectral-resolution (1 km/s) spectra with a typical rms noise of 10 mK. Such sensitivity allowed us to derive an upper limit of Q(NH_3) of about 2.5 ×10^{29} mol/s on November 26. This upper limit would correspond to a Q(H_2O) of about 2.5 ×10^{31} mol/s, assuming the typical Q(H_2O)/Q(NH_3) ratio of 100. These findings confirm that no significant Q(H_2O) enhancement happened near the perihelion, consistent with a definitive decrease of molecules production rate.

  1. WILL COMET ISON (C/2012 S1) SURVIVE PERIHELION?

    SciTech Connect

    Knight, Matthew M.; Walsh, Kevin J.

    2013-10-10

    On 2013 November 28 Comet ISON (C/2012 S1) will pass by the Sun with a perihelion distance of 2.7 solar radii. Understanding the possible outcomes for the comet's response to such a close passage by the Sun is important for planning observational campaigns and for inferring ISON's physical properties. We present new numerical simulations and interpret them in context with the historical track record of comet disruptions and of sungrazing comet behavior. Historical data suggest that sizes below ∼200 m are susceptible to destruction by sublimation driven mass loss, while we find that for ISON's perihelion distance, densities lower than 0.1 g cm{sup –3} are required to tidally disrupt a retrograde or non-spinning body. Such low densities are substantially below the range of the best-determined comet nucleus densities, though dynamically new comets such as ISON have few measurements of physical properties. Disruption may occur for prograde rotation at densities up to 0.7 g cm{sup –3}, with the chances of disruption increasing for lower density, faster prograde rotation, and increasing elongation of the nucleus. Given current constraints on ISON's nucleus properties and the typically determined values for these properties among all comets, we find tidal disruption to be unlikely unless other factors (e.g., spin-up via torquing) affect ISON substantially. Whether or not disruption occurs, the largest remnant must be big enough to survive subsequent mass loss due to sublimation in order for ISON to remain a viable comet well after perihelion.

  2. Argon-Induced Pressure Broadening, Shifting and Narrowing in the CN ˜{A}^2Π-˜{X}^2Σ^+ (1-0) Band

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forthomme, D.; McRaven, C. P.; Sears, T. J.; Hall, G. E.

    2013-06-01

    Selected isolated rotational transitions in the 1-0 band of the red ˜{A}^2Π-˜{X}^2Σ^+ system in CN have been recorded with transient frequency modulation spectroscopy as a function of argon pressure up to 0.2 atmospheres at room temperature. Line shapes were fit using Fourier transforms of a parameterized time correlation function, including Doppler and velocity-dependent collisional broadening, and collisional shifts. Deviations from Voigt line shapes can be equally well fit by modeling the narrowing with a speed-dependent collision model or with a velocity-changing collisional narrowing model. Pressure broadening coefficients were observed with little rotational state dependence, in the range of 0.070 - 0.075 cm^{-1} atm^{-1}. In contrast, a much stronger rotational state dependence is observed for both pressure-dependent blue shift coefficients and the narrowing parameters. No asymmetry in the pressure broadening was observed; any possible speed-dependence to the frequency shift was too small to be detected in these measurements. Acknowledgments: Work at Brookhaven National Laboratory was carried out under Contract No. DE-AC02-98CH10886 with the U.S. Department of Energy and supported by its Office of Basic Energy Sciences, Division of Chemical Sciences, Geosciences and Biosciences.

  3. Observation of an Exotic Baryon with S=+1 in Photoproduction from the Proton

    SciTech Connect

    Valery Kubarovsky; Lei Guo; Dennis Weygand; Paul Stoler; Marco Battaglieri; Raffaella De Vita; Gary Adams; Ji Li; Mina Nozar; Carlos Salgado; Pawel Ambrozewicz; Eric Anciant; Marco Anghinolfi; Burin Asavapibhop; Gerard Audit; Thierry Auger; Harutyun AVAKIAN; Hovhannes Baghdasaryan; Jacques Ball; Steve Barrow

    2004-01-01

    The reaction {gamma}p {yields} {pi}{sup +} K{sup -} K{sup +}n was studied at Jefferson Lab using a tagged photon beam with an energy range of 3-5.47 GeV. A narrow baryon state with strangeness S = +1 and mass M = 1555 {+-} 10 MeV/c{sup 2} was observed in the nK{sup +} invariant mass spectrum. The peak's width is consistent with the CLAS resolution (FWHM = 26 MeV/c{sup 2}), and its statistical significance is 7.8 {+-} 1.0 {sigma}. A baryon with positive strangeness has exotic structure and cannot be described in the framework of the naive constituent quark model. The mass of the observed state is consistent with the mass predicted by a chiral soliton model for the {Theta}{sup +} baryon. In addition, the pK{sup +} invariant mass distribution was analyzed in the reaction {gamma} p {yields} K{sup -} K{sup +}p with high statistics in search of doubly-charged exotic baryon states. No resonance structures were found in this spectrum.

  4. Grain boundary enrichment in the FePt polymorphic A1 to L1(0) phase transformation.

    PubMed

    Torres, K L; Thompson, G B

    2009-04-01

    A series of Fe(54+/-1)Pt(46+/-1) thin films have been sputter-deposited and annealed at various times and temperatures to facilitate the A1 to L1(0) polymorphic phase transformation. The annealing times span one minute to tens of minutes over temperatures of 300-800 degrees C. The films were characterized by X-ray and electron diffraction and atom probe tomography. This time-temperature regime provides 'snap-shots' into the compositional segregation evolution at the grain boundaries during the polymorphic phase transformation. The as-deposited A1 phase showed a preferential segregation of Pt to the grain boundaries. The reduction of Pt enrichment at the boundaries was observed for all L1(0) ordered films.

  5. The implementation of NEMS GFS Aerosol Component (NGAC) Version 1.0 for global dust forecasting at NOAA/NCEP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Cheng-Hsuan; da Silva, Arlindo; Wang, Jun; Moorthi, Shrinivas; Chin, Mian; Colarco, Peter; Tang, Youhua; Bhattacharjee, Partha S.; Chen, Shen-Po; Chuang, Hui-Ya; Juang, Hann-Ming Henry; McQueen, Jeffery; Iredell, Mark

    2016-05-01

    The NOAA National Centers for Environmental Prediction (NCEP) implemented the NOAA Environmental Modeling System (NEMS) Global Forecast System (GFS) Aerosol Component (NGAC) for global dust forecasting in collaboration with NASA Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC). NGAC Version 1.0 has been providing 5-day dust forecasts at 1° × 1° resolution on a global scale, once per day at 00:00 Coordinated Universal Time (UTC), since September 2012. This is the first global system capable of interactive atmosphere aerosol forecasting at NCEP. The implementation of NGAC V1.0 reflects an effective and efficient transitioning of NASA research advances to NCEP operations, paving the way for NCEP to provide global aerosol products serving a wide range of stakeholders, as well as to allow the effects of aerosols on weather forecasts and climate prediction to be considered.

  6. DCPT v1.0 - New particle tracker for modeling transport in dual-continuum - User's Manual

    SciTech Connect

    Pan, Lehua; Liu, Hui Hai; Cushey, Mark; Bodvarsson, Gudmundur

    2001-04-01

    DCPT (Dual-Continuum Particle Tracker) V1.0 is a new software for simulating solute transport in the subsurface. It is based on the random-walk method for modeling transport processes such as advection, dispersion/diffusion, linear sorption, radioactive decay, and fracture-matrix mass exchange (in fractured porous media). The user shall provide flow-field and other parameters in the form of input files. In Comparison to several analytical and numerical solutions for a number of test cases, DCPT shows excellent performance in both accuracy and efficiency. This report serves as a user's manual of DCPT V1.0. It includes theoretical basis, numerical methods, software structure, input/output description, and examples.

  7. Fatigue failure stages of VT1-0 titanium in different structural states. Study by acoustic emission method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bashkov, O. V.; Sharkeev, Yu. P.; Panin, S. V.; Kim, V. A.; Bashkova, T. I.; Popkova, A. A.; Eroshenko, A. Yu.; Tolmachev, A. I.

    2016-11-01

    The paper studies the kinetics of fatigue damage accumulation in VT1-0 titanium by the acoustic emission (AE) method. Technical grade titanium VT1-0 in various structural states was tested under cyclic bending. Submicrocrystalline Ti-specimens (SMC, with subgrain size of 200-300 nm) were fabricated by equal channel angular pressing (ECAP) from polycrystalline titanium. Ingots with ultrafine grain structure (UFG, with structure element size of 1-2 µm) and coarse grain structure (CG, with structure element size of 20-30 µm) were prepared by annealing at different temperatures. Fatigue stages were identified by analyzing the AE signal parameters with their classification by the source type (dislocations, micro-and macrocracks). It was revealed that the specimens with a smaller grain size are of higher fatigue durability, while AE signals at the stages of yielding and microcracking are detected later because of their low energy.

  8. Highly regio- and stereocontrolled formation of functionalized tricyclo[4.2.1.0(2,8)]non-3-enes.

    PubMed

    Toselli, Nicolas; Martin, David; Achard, Mathieu; Tenaglia, Alphonse; Buono, Gérard

    2009-05-15

    The electrophilic activations of bicyclo[4.2.1]nonatrienes by 4-isopropyl-1,2,4-triazolinedione, N-iodosuccinimide, or an epoxidation/acidic ring-opening sequence is reported. The subsequent in situ trappings by water, alcohols, or benzoic acids led to original tricyclo[4.2.1.0(2,8)]non-3-enes with high regio- and stereoselectivities. The synthetic potentiality of these synthons is illustrated by the straightforward access to a fused cyclopropane featuring six consecutive controlled stereocenters.

  9. ILS Element E14 Support Management and Analysis. Distribution Program and User’s Manual Version 1.0

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-04-01

    C ILS ELEMENT E14 SUPPORT MANAGEMENT AND ANALYSIS Distribution Program and User’s Manual Version 1.0 APJ 966-679 iAAA MILITAR \\SCIENTIFIC RESEARCH M...editing and typing support were most competently provided by Barbara Boren and Denise Montanez . We gratefully acknowledge the significant contributions...procedures. 1. Turn the computer and monitor on. The computer should boot-up and the hard disk drive prompt (usually C :\\) should appear on the screen

  10. A role of the sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P)-S1P receptor 2 pathway in epithelial defense against cancer (EDAC).

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Sayaka; Yako, Yuta; Fujioka, Yoichiro; Kajita, Mihoko; Kameyama, Takeshi; Kon, Shunsuke; Ishikawa, Susumu; Ohba, Yusuke; Ohno, Yusuke; Kihara, Akio; Fujita, Yasuyuki

    2016-02-01

    At the initial step of carcinogenesis, transformation occurs in single cells within epithelia, where the newly emerging transformed cells are surrounded by normal epithelial cells. A recent study revealed that normal epithelial cells have an ability to sense and actively eliminate the neighboring transformed cells, a process named epithelial defense against cancer (EDAC). However, the molecular mechanism of this tumor-suppressive activity is largely unknown. In this study, we investigated a role for the sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P)-S1P receptor 2 (S1PR2) pathway in EDAC. First, we show that addition of the S1PR2 inhibitor significantly suppresses apical extrusion of RasV12-transformed cells that are surrounded by normal cells. In addition, knockdown of S1PR2 in normal cells induces the same effect, indicating that S1PR2 in the surrounding normal cells plays a positive role in the apical elimination of the transformed cells. Of importance, not endogenous S1P but exogenous S1P is involved in this process. By using FRET analyses, we demonstrate that S1PR2 mediates Rho activation in normal cells neighboring RasV12-transformed cells, thereby promoting accumulation of filamin, a crucial regulator of EDAC. Collectively these data indicate that S1P is a key extrinsic factor that affects the outcome of cell competition between normal and transformed epithelial cells.

  11. FTIR analysis and evaluation of carcinogenic and mutagenic risks of nitro-polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in PM1.0.

    PubMed

    Schneider, Ismael Luís; Teixeira, Elba Calesso; Agudelo-Castañeda, Dayana Milena; Silva e Silva, Gabriel; Balzaretti, Naira; Braga, Marcel Ferreira; Oliveira, Luís Felipe Silva

    2016-01-15

    Nitro-polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (NPAHs) represent a group of organic compounds of significant interest due to their presence in airborne particulates of urban centers, wide distribution in the environment, and mutagenic and carcinogenic properties. These compounds, associated with atmospheric particles of size < 1 μm, have been reported as a major risk to human health. This study aims at identifying the spectral features of NPAHs (1-nitropyrene, 2-nitrofluorene, and 6-nitrochrysene) in emissivity and transmittance spectra of samples of particulate matter < 1 μm (PM1.0) using infrared spectrometry. Carcinogenic and mutagenic risks of the studied NPAHs associated with PM1.0 samples were also determined for two sampling sites: Canoas and Sapucaia do Sul. The results showed that NPAH standard spectra can effectively identify NPAHs in PM1.0 samples. The transmittance and emissivity sample spectra showed broader bands and lower relative intensity than the standard NPAH spectra. The carcinogenic risk and the total mutagenic risk were calculated using the toxic equivalent factors and mutagenic potency factors, respectively. Canoas showed the highest total carcinogenic risk, while Sapucaia do Sul had the highest mutagenic risk. The seasonal analysis suggested that in the study area the ambient air is more toxic during the cold periods. These findings might of significant importance for the decision and policy making authorities.

  12. The origin of perpendicular magneto-crystalline anisotropy in L1(0)-FeNi under tetragonal distortion.

    PubMed

    Miura, Yoshio; Ozaki, Sho; Kuwahara, Yasushi; Tsujikawa, Masahito; Abe, Kazutaka; Shirai, Masafumi

    2013-03-13

    We investigated the origin of perpendicular magneto-crystalline anisotropy (MCA) in L1(0)-ordered FeNi alloy using first-principles density-functional calculations. We found that the perpendicular MCA of L1(0)-FeNi arises predominantly from the constituent Fe atoms, which is consistent with recent measurements of the anisotropy of the Fe orbital magnetic moment of L1(0)-FeNi by means of x-ray magnetic circular dichroism. Analysis of the second-order perturbation of the spin-orbit interaction indicates that spin-flip excitations between the occupied majority-spin and unoccupied minority-spin bands make a considerable contribution to the perpendicular MCA, as does the spin-conservation term for the minority-spin bands. Furthermore, the MCA energy increases as the in-plane lattice parameter decreases (increasing the axial ratio c/a). The increase in the MCA energy can be attributed to further enhancement of the spin-flip term due to modulation of the Fe d(xy) and d(x(2) - y(2)) orbital components around the Fermi level under compressive in-plane distortion.

  13. Magnetism of epitaxial Fe xNi 1-x films on Cu 90Au 10(1 0 0)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martins, M. D.; Gastelois, P. L.; Landers, R.; Macedo, W. A. A.

    2007-03-01

    We have investigated the effect of an expansion of the lattice parameter on the magnetic properties of fcc FeNi films. Epitaxial Fe xNi 1-x ultrathin films (0.58< x<0.92) were grown on a Cu 90Au 10(1 0 0) single crystal, a substrate with lattice parameter 1.4% larger than the pure copper. The magnetism of the FeNi films was explored by using linear magnetic dichroism in the angular distribution of the photoelectrons (LMDAD). The LMDAD measurements were carried out at 160 K, using synchrotron radiation with an energy of 140 eV. Although we have observed a gradual decrease of the Fe 3p LMDAD asymmetry in the 67-80 at% Fe concentration range, as already reported for Fe xNi 1-x on Cu(1 0 0), for the Fe-rich region ( x>˜0.80) we have obtained a Fe 3p asymmetry of 6%, suggesting that the lattice expansion of the FeNi due to the epitaxy on Cu 90Au 10(1 0 0) stabilizes the high-spin ferromagnetic state up to higher Fe concentration values.

  14. AN XMM-NEWTON STUDY OF THE BRIGHT, NEARBY SUPERNOVA REMNANT G296.1-0.5

    SciTech Connect

    Castro, D.; Slane, P. O.; Patnaude, D. J.; Gaensler, B. M.; Hughes, J. P.

    2011-06-20

    We present a detailed study of the supernova remnant (SNR) G296.1-0.5, performed using observations with the European Photon Imaging Camera (EPIC) and Reflection Grating Spectrometer instruments of the XMM-Newton satellite. G296.1-0.5 is a bright remnant that displays an incomplete multiple-shell morphology in both its radio and X-ray images. We use a set of observations toward G296.1-0.5, from three distinct pointings of EPIC, in order to perform a thorough spatial and spectral analysis of this remnant, and hence determine what type of progenitor gave rise to the supernova explosion, and describe the evolutionary state of the SNR. Our XMM-Newton observations establish that the spectral characteristics are consistent across the X-ray bright regions of the object and are best described by a model of the emission from a nonequilibrium ionization collisional plasma. The study reveals that the emission from the shell is characterized by an excess of N and an underabundance of O, which is typical of wind material from red supergiant and Wolf-Rayet stars. Additionally, we have detected transient X-ray source 2XMMi J115004.8-622442 at the edge of the SNR whose properties suggest that it is the result of stellar flare, and we discuss its nature in more detail.

  15. Insights into the effect of coverage on CO adsorption and dissociation over Rh(1 0 0) surface: A theoretical study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Xiaojun; Zhang, Riguang; Ling, Lixia; Wang, Baojun

    2014-11-01

    The adsorption, dissociation and desorption of CO at different coverage over Rh(1 0 0) surface have been systematically investigated using density functional theory method together with the periodic slab model. Our results show that at the coverage less than or equal to 4/12 ML, CO favored the most stable bridge site adsorption, and the adsorption energies of CO have little difference; while at the coverage greater than or equal to 5/12 ML, the lateral repulsive interaction begins to affect the adsorption structures and the corresponding adsorption energies of adsorbed CO molecules, and the interaction will be stronger with the increasing of CO coverage, which leads to CO migration over Rh(1 0 0) surface when CO coverage is greater than or equal to 10/12 ML. The adsorption energies of these CO molecules will decrease successively until the saturated adsorption with the CO coverage of 12/12 ML. Further calculations on CO dissociation indicate that when CO coverage is greater than or equal to 3/12 ML, the dissociation of adsorbed CO molecules will be unfavorable both kinetically and thermodynamically, suggesting that only molecule CO adsorption are favored. Considering the catalytic activity of Rh(1 0 0) surface toward CO dissociation and the higher CO coverage under the continuous supply of CO in syngas conversion, it is to be expected that only molecule CO adsorption exist on Rh catalyst.

  16. Si-Ge-Sn alloys with 1.0 eV gap for CPV multijunction solar cells

    SciTech Connect

    Roucka, Radek Clark, Andrew; Landini, Barbara

    2015-09-28

    Si-Ge-Sn ternary group IV alloys offer an alternative to currently used 1.0 eV gap materials utilized in multijunction solar cells. The advantage of Si-Ge-Sn is the ability to vary both the bandgap and lattice parameter independently. We present current development in fabrication of Si-Ge-Sn alloys with gaps in the 1.0 eV range. Produced material exhibits excellent structural properties, which allow for integration with existing III-V photovoltaic cell concepts. Time dependent room temperature photoluminescence data demonstrate that these materials have long carrier lifetimes. Absorption tunable by compositional changes is observed. As a prototype device set utilizing the 1 eV Si-Ge-Sn junction, single junction Si-Ge-Sn device and triple junction device with Si-Ge-Sn subcell have been fabricated. The resulting I-V and external quantum efficiency data show that the Si-Ge-Sn junction is fully functional and the performance is comparable to other 1.0 eV gap materials currently used.

  17. Novel selective allosteric and bitopic ligands for the S1P(3) receptor.

    PubMed

    Jo, Euijung; Bhhatarai, Barun; Repetto, Emanuela; Guerrero, Miguel; Riley, Sean; Brown, Steven J; Kohno, Yasushi; Roberts, Edward; Schürer, Stephan C; Rosen, Hugh

    2012-12-21

    Sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P) is a lysophospholipid signaling molecule that regulates important biological functions, including lymphocyte trafficking and vascular development, by activating G protein-coupled receptors for S1P, namely, S1P(1) through S1P(5). Here, we map the S1P(3) binding pocket with a novel allosteric agonist (CYM-5541), an orthosteric agonist (S1P), and a novel bitopic antagonist (SPM-242). With a combination of site-directed mutagenesis, ligand competition assay, and molecular modeling, we concluded that S1P and CYM-5541 occupy different chemical spaces in the ligand binding pocket of S1P(3). CYM-5541 allowed us to identify an allosteric site where Phe263 is a key gate-keeper residue for its affinity and efficacy. This ligand lacks a polar moiety, and the novel allosteric hydrophobic pocket permits S1P(3) selectivity of CYM-5541 within the highly similar S1P receptor family. However, a novel S1P(3)-selective antagonist, SPM-242, in the S1P(3) pocket occupies the ligand binding spaces of both S1P and CYM-5541, showing its bitopic mode of binding. Therefore, our coordinated approach with biochemical data and molecular modeling, based on our recently published S1P(1) crystal structure data in a highly conserved set of related receptors with a shared ligand, provides a strong basis for the successful optimization of orthosteric, allosteric, and bitopic modulators of S1P(3).

  18. Femtochemistry of Norrish type-I reactions: II. The anomalous predissociation dynamics of cyclobutanone on the S1 surface.

    PubMed

    Diau, E W; Kötting, C; Zewail, A H

    2001-05-18

    The anomalous nonradiative dynamics for three cyclobutanone isotopomers ([D0 ]-, 3,3-[D2 ]-, and 2,2,4,4-[D4 ]cyclobutanone) have been investigated using femtosecond (fs) time-resolved mass spectrometry. We have found that the internal motions of the molecules in the S1 state above the dissociation threshold involve two time scales. The fast motion has a time constant of <50 fs, while the slow motion has a time constant of 5.0±1.0, 9.0±1.5, and 6.8±1.0 ps for the [D0 ], [D2 ], and [D4 ] species, respectively. Density functional theory and ab initio calculations have been performed to characterize the potential energy surfaces for the S0 , S1 (n,π*), and T1 (n,π*) states. The dynamic picture for bond breakage is the following: The fast motion represents the rapid dephasing of the initial wave packet out of the Franck-Condon region, whereas the slow motion reflects the α-cleavage dynamics of the Norrish type-I reaction. The redistribution of the internal energy from the initially activated out-of-plane bending modes into the in-plane ring-opening reaction coordinate defines the time scale for intramolecular vibrational energy redistribution (IVR), and the observed picosecond-scale (ps) decay gives the rate of IVR/bond cleavage across the barrier. The observed prominent isotope effect for both [D2 ] and [D4 ] isotopomers imply the significance of the ring-puckering and the CO out-of-plane wagging motions to the S1 α-cleavage dynamics. The ethylene and ketene (C2 products)-as well as CO and cyclopropane (C3 products)-product ratios can be understood by the involvement of an S0 /S1 conical intersection revealed in our calculations. This proposed dynamic picture for the photochemistry of cyclobutanone on the S1 surface can account not only for the abnormally sharp decrease in fluorescence quantum yield and lifetime but also for the dramatic change in the C3 :C2 product ratio as a function of increasing excitation energy, as reported by Lee and co-workers (J. C

  19. Assessment of radionuclide databases in CAP88 mainframe version 1.0 and Windows-based version 3.0.

    PubMed

    LaBone, Elizabeth D; Farfán, Eduardo B; Lee, Patricia L; Jannik, G Timothy; Donnelly, Elizabeth H; Foley, Trevor Q

    2009-09-01

    In this study the radionuclide databases for two versions of the Clean Air Act Assessment Package-1988 (CAP88) computer model were assessed in detail. CAP88 estimates radiation dose and the risk of health effects to human populations from radionuclide emissions to air. This program is used by several U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) facilities to comply with National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants regulations. CAP88 Mainframe, referred to as version 1.0 on the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Web site (http://www.epa.gov/radiation/assessment/CAP88/), was the very first CAP88 version released in 1988. Some DOE facilities including the Savannah River Site still employ this version (1.0) while others use the more user-friendly personal computer Windows-based version 3.0 released in December 2007. Version 1.0 uses the program RADRISK based on International Commission on Radiological Protection Publication 30 as its radionuclide database. Version 3.0 uses half-life, dose, and risk factor values based on Federal Guidance Report 13. Differences in these values could cause different results for the same input exposure data (same scenario), depending on which version of CAP88 is used. Consequently, the differences between the two versions are being assessed in detail at Savannah River National Laboratory. The version 1.0 and 3.0 database files contain 496 and 838 radionuclides, respectively, and though one would expect the newer version to include all the 496 radionuclides, 35 radionuclides are listed in version 1.0 that are not included in version 3.0. The majority of these has either extremely short or long half-lives or is no longer in production; however, some of the short-lived radionuclides might produce progeny of great interest at DOE sites. In addition, 122 radionuclides were found to have different half-lives in the two versions, with 21 over 3 percent different and 12 over 10 percent different.

  20. World lines.

    PubMed

    Waser, Jürgen; Fuchs, Raphael; Ribicić, Hrvoje; Schindler, Benjamin; Blöschl, Günther; Gröller, Eduard

    2010-01-01

    In this paper we present World Lines as a novel interactive visualization that provides complete control over multiple heterogeneous simulation runs. In many application areas, decisions can only be made by exploring alternative scenarios. The goal of the suggested approach is to support users in this decision making process. In this setting, the data domain is extended to a set of alternative worlds where only one outcome will actually happen. World Lines integrate simulation, visualization and computational steering into a single unified system that is capable of dealing with the extended solution space. World Lines represent simulation runs as causally connected tracks that share a common time axis. This setup enables users to interfere and add new information quickly. A World Line is introduced as a visual combination of user events and their effects in order to present a possible future. To quickly find the most attractive outcome, we suggest World Lines as the governing component in a system of multiple linked views and a simulation component. World Lines employ linking and brushing to enable comparative visual analysis of multiple simulations in linked views. Analysis results can be mapped to various visual variables that World Lines provide in order to highlight the most compelling solutions. To demonstrate this technique we present a flooding scenario and show the usefulness of the integrated approach to support informed decision making.

  1. Search for stopped gluinos from pp collisions at square root s = 1.96 TeV.

    PubMed

    Abazov, V M; Abbott, B; Abolins, M; Acharya, B S; Adams, M; Adams, T; Aguilo, E; Ahn, S H; Ahsan, M; Alexeev, G D; Alkhazov, G; Alton, A; Alverson, G; Alves, G A; Anastasoaie, M; Ancu, L S; Andeen, T; Anderson, S; Andrieu, B; Anzelc, M S; Arnoud, Y; Arov, M; Arthaud, M; Askew, A; Asman, B; Jesus, A C S Assis; Atramentov, O; Autermann, C; Avila, C; Ay, C; Badaud, F; Baden, A; Bagby, L; Baldin, B; Bandurin, D V; Banerjee, P; Banerjee, S; Barberis, E; Barfuss, A-F; Bargassa, P; Baringer, P; Barreto, J; Bartlett, J F; Bassler, U; Bauer, D; Beale, S; Bean, A; Begalli, M; Begel, M; Belanger-Champagne, C; Bellantoni, L; Bellavance, A; Benitez, J A; Beri, S B; Bernardi, G; Bernhard, R; Berntzon, L; Bertram, I; Besançon, M; Beuselinck, R; Bezzubov, V A; Bhat, P C; Bhatnagar, V; Biscarat, C; Blazey, G; Blekman, F; Blessing, S; Bloch, D; Bloom, K; Boehnlein, A; Boline, D; Bolton, T A; Borissov, G; Bos, K; Bose, T; Brandt, A; Brock, R; Brooijmans, G; Bross, A; Brown, D; Buchanan, N J; Buchholz, D; Buehler, M; Buescher, V; Burdin, S; Burke, S; Burnett, T H; Buszello, C P; Butler, J M; Calfayan, P; Calvet, S; Cammin, J; Caron, S; Carvalho, W; Casey, B C K; Cason, N M; Castilla-Valdez, H; Chakrabarti, S; Chakraborty, D; Chan, K; Chan, K M; Chandra, A; Charles, F; Cheu, E; Chevallier, F; Cho, D K; Choi, S; Choudhary, B; Christofek, L; Christoudias, T; Cihangir, S; Claes, D; Clément, B; Clément, C; Coadou, Y; Cooke, M; Cooper, W E; Corcoran, M; Couderc, F; Cousinou, M-C; Crépé-Renaudin, S; Cutts, D; Cwiok, M; da Motta, H; Das, A; Davies, G; De, K; de Jong, P; de Jong, S J; De La Cruz-Burelo, E; De Oliveira Martins, C; Degenhardt, J D; Déliot, F; Demarteau, M; Demina, R; Denisov, D; Denisov, S P; Desai, S; Diehl, H T; Diesburg, M; Dominguez, A; Dong, H; Dudko, L V; Duflot, L; Dugad, S R; Duggan, D; Duperrin, A; Dyer, J; Dyshkant, A; Eads, M; Edmunds, D; Ellison, J; Elvira, V D; Enari, Y; Eno, S; Ermolov, P; Evans, H; Evdokimov, A; Evdokimov, V N; Ferapontov, A V; Ferbel, T; Fiedler, F; Filthaut, F; Fisher, W; Fisk, H E; Ford, M; Fortner, M; Fox, H; Fu, S; Fuess, S; Gadfort, T; Galea, C F; Gallas, E; Galyaev, E; Garcia, C; Garcia-Bellido, A; Gavrilov, V; Gay, P; Geist, W; Gelé, D; Gerber, C E; Gershtein, Y; Gillberg, D; Ginther, G; Gollub, N; Gómez, B; Goussiou, A; Grannis, P D; Greenlee, H; Greenwood, Z D; Gregores, E M; Grenier, G; Gris, Ph; Grivaz, J-F; Grohsjean, A; Grünendahl, S; Grünewald, M W; Guo, F; Guo, J; Gutierrez, G; Gutierrez, P; Haas, A; Hadley, N J; Haefner, P; Hagopian, S; Haley, J; Hall, I; Hall, R E; Han, L; Hanagaki, K; Hansson, P; Harder, K; Harel, A; Harrington, R; Hauptman, J M; Hauser, R; Hays, J; Hebbeker, T; Hedin, D; Hegeman, J G; Heinmiller, J M; Heinson, A P; Heintz, U; Hensel, C; Herner, K; Hesketh, G; Hildreth, M D; Hirosky, R; Hobbs, J D; Hoeneisen, B; Hoeth, H; Hohlfeld, M; Hong, S J; Hooper, R; Hossain, S; Houben, P; Hu, Y; Hubacek, Z; Hynek, V; Iashvili, I; Illingworth, R; Ito, A S; Jabeen, S; Jaffré, M; Jain, S; Jakobs, K; Jarvis, C; Jesik, R; Johns, K; Johnson, C; Johnson, M; Jonckheere, A; Jonsson, P; Juste, A; Käfer, D; Kahn, S; Kajfasz, E; Kalinin, A M; Kalk, J M; Kalk, J R; Kappler, S; Karmanov, D; Kasper, J; Kasper, P; Katsanos, I; Kau, D; Kaur, R; Kaushik, V; Kehoe, R; Kermiche, S; Khalatyan, N; Khanov, A; Kharchilava, A; Kharzheev, Y M; Khatidze, D; Kim, H; Kim, T J; Kirby, M H; Kirsch, M; Klima, B; Kohli, J M; Konrath, J-P; Kopal, M; Korablev, V M; Kothari, B; Kozelov, A V; Krop, D; Kryemadhi, A; Kuhl, T; Kumar, A; Kunori, S; Kupco, A; Kurca, T; Kvita, J; Lam, D; Lammers, S; Landsberg, G; Lazoflores, J; Lebrun, P; Lee, W M; Leflat, A; Lehner, F; Lellouch, J; Lesne, V; Leveque, J; Lewis, P; Li, J; Li, L; Li, Q Z; Lietti, S M; Lima, J G R; Lincoln, D; Linnemann, J; Lipaev, V V; Lipton, R; Liu, Y; Liu, Z; Lobo, L; Lobodenko, A; Lokajicek, M; Lounis, A; Love, P; Lubatti, H J; Lyon, A L; Maciel, A K A; Mackin, D; Madaras, R J; Mättig, P; Magass, C; Magerkurth, A; Makovec, N; Mal, P K; Malbouisson, H B; Malik, S; Malyshev, V L; Mao, H S; Maravin, Y; Martin, B; McCarthy, R; Melnitchouk, A; Mendes, A; Mendoza, L; Mercadante, P G; Merkin, M; Merritt, K W; Meyer, A; Meyer, J; Michaut, M; Millet, T; Mitrevski, J; Molina, J; Mommsen, R K; Mondal, N K; Moore, R W; Moulik, T; Muanza, G S; Mulders, M; Mulhearn, M; Mundal, O; Mundim, L; Nagy, E; Naimuddin, M; Narain, M; Naumann, N A; Neal, H A; Negret, J P; Neustroev, P; Nilsen, H; Noeding, C; Nomerotski, A; Novaes, S F; Nunnemann, T; O'dell, V; O'neil, D C; Obrant, G; Ochando, C; Onoprienko, D; Oshima, N; Osta, J; Otec, R; Y Garzón, G J Otero; Owen, M; Padley, P; Pangilinan, M; Parashar, N; Park, S-J; Park, S K; Parsons, J; Partridge, R; Parua, N; Patwa, A; Pawloski, G; Perea, P M; Peters, K; Peters, Y; Pétroff, P; Petteni, M; Piegaia, R; Piper, J; Pleier, M-A; Podesta-Lerma, P L M; Podstavkov, V M; Pogorelov, Y; Pol, M-E; Pompos, A; Pope, B G; Popov, A V; Potter, C; da Silva, W L Prado; Prosper, H B; Protopopescu, S; Qian, J; Quadt, A; Quinn, B; Rakitine, A; Rangel, M S; Rani, K J; Ranjan, K; Ratoff, P N; Renkel, P; Reucroft, S; Rich, P; Rijssenbeek, M; Ripp-Baudot, I; Rizatdinova, F; Robinson, S; Rodrigues, R F; Royon, C; Rubinov, P; Ruchti, R; Safronov, G; Sajot, G; Sánchez-Hernández, A; Sanders, M P; Santoro, A; Savage, G; Sawyer, L; Scanlon, T; Schaile, D; Schamberger, R D; Scheglov, Y; Schellman, H; Schieferdecker, P; Schliephake, T; Schmitt, C; Schwanenberger, C; Schwartzman, A; Schwienhorst, R; Sekaric, J; Sengupta, S; Severini, H; Shabalina, E; Shamim, M; Shary, V; Shchukin, A A; Shivpuri, R K; Shpakov, D; Siccardi, V; Simak, V; Sirotenko, V; Skubic, P; Slattery, P; Smirnov, D; Smith, R P; Snow, G R; Snow, J; Snyder, S; Söldner-Rembold, S; Sonnenschein, L; Sopczak, A; Sosebee, M; Soustruznik, K; Souza, M; Spurlock, B; Stark, J; Steele, J; Stolin, V; Stone, A; Stoyanova, D A; Strandberg, J; Strandberg, S; Strang, M A; Strauss, M; Ströhmer, R; Strom, D; Strovink, M; Stutte, L; Sumowidagdo, S; Svoisky, P; Sznajder, A; Talby, M; Tamburello, P; Tanasijczuk, A; Taylor, W; Telford, P; Temple, J; Tiller, B; Tissandier, F; Titov, M; Tokmenin, V V; Tomoto, M; Toole, T; Torchiani, I; Trefzger, T; Tsybychev, D; Tuchming, B; Tully, C; Tuts, P M; Unalan, R; Uvarov, L; Uvarov, S; Uzunyan, S; Vachon, B; van den Berg, P J; van Eijk, B; Van Kooten, R; van Leeuwen, W M; Varelas, N; Varnes, E W; Vartapetian, A; Vasilyev, I A; Vaupel, M; Verdier, P; Vertogradov, L S; Verzocchi, M; Villeneuve-Seguier, F; Vint, P; Von Toerne, E; Voutilainen, M; Vreeswijk, M; Wagner, R; Wahl, H D; Wang, L; Wang, M H L S; Warchol, J; Watts, G; Wayne, M; Weber, G; Weber, M; Weerts, H; Wenger, A; Wermes, N; Wetstein, M; White, A; Wicke, D; Wilson, G W; Wimpenny, S J; Wobisch, M; Wood, D R; Wyatt, T R; Xie, Y; Yacoob, S; Yamada, R; Yan, M; Yasuda, T; Yatsunenko, Y A; Yip, K; Yoo, H D; Youn, S W; Yu, C; Yu, J; Yurkewicz, A; Zatserklyaniy, A; Zeitnitz, C; Zhang, D; Zhao, T; Zhou, B; Zhu, J; Zielinski, M; Zieminska, D; Zieminski, A; Zivkovic, L; Zutshi, V; Zverev, E G

    2007-09-28

    Long-lived, heavy particles are predicted in a number of models beyond the standard model of particle physics. We present the first direct search for such particles' decays, occurring up to 100 h after their production and not synchronized with an accelerator bunch crossing. We apply the analysis to the gluino (g), predicted in split supersymmetry, which after hadronization can become charged and lose enough momentum through ionization to come to rest in dense particle detectors. Approximately 410 pb(-1) of pp collisions at square root(s) = 1.96 TeV collected with the D0 detector during Run II of the Fermilab Tevatron collider are analyzed in search of such "stopped gluinos" decaying into a gluon and a neutralino (chi(1)(0)). Limits are placed on the (gluino cross section) x (probability to stop) x [BR(g --> g chi(1)(0))] as a function of the gluino and chi(1)(0) masses, for gluino lifetimes from 30 micros-100 h.

  2. Combination therapy of gemcitabine or oral S-1 with the anti-VEGF monoclonal antibody bevacizumab for pancreatic neuroendocrine carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    KASUYA, KAZUHIKO; NAGAKAWA, YUICHI; SUZUKI, MINAKO; SUZUKI, YOSHIAKI; KYO, BUNSO; SUZUKI, SATORU; MATSUDO, TAKAAKI; ITOI, TAKAO; TSUCHIDA, AKIHIKO; AOKI, TATSUYA

    2012-01-01

    We previously reported that the administration of bevacizumab for pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors inhibited angiogenesis in the host, resulting in tumor growth inhibition. In light of these results, we compared the effect of bevacizumab/gemcitabine/S-1 combination therapy vs. bevacizumab monotherapy. The QGP-1 pancreatic neuroendocrine carcinoma cell line and the BxPC-3 ductal cell carcinoma cell line were transplanted into the subcutaneous tissue of mice, and the mice were treated for 3 weeks with bevacizumab [50 mg/kg intraperitoneally (i.p.) twice weekly], gemcitabine (240 mg/kg i.p. once weekly) and S-1 (10 mg/kg orally five times weekly). The antitumor effect and side effects were evaluated by measuring the tumor volume and weight and by changes in body weight, respectively. The tumor volume became smaller (from the maximum volume) in the group treated with bevacizumab, gemcitabine and S-1 (BGS) and the group treated with bevacizumab and gemcitabine (BG). A significant difference was noted in the tumor weight between the BG group and the group treated with bevacizumab alone. A relatively significant decrease in the body weight was observed in the BGS and BG groups. We conclude that gemcitabine is appropriate as a drug used in combination with bevacizumab for pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors. PMID:22969935

  3. Combination therapy of gemcitabine or oral S-1 with the anti-VEGF monoclonal antibody bevacizumab for pancreatic neuroendocrine carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Kasuya, Kazuhiko; Nagakawa, Yuichi; Suzuki, Minako; Suzuki, Yoshiaki; Kyo, Bunso; Suzuki, Satoru; Matsudo, Takaaki; Itoi, Takao; Tsuchida, Akihiko; Aoki, Tatsuya

    2012-04-01

    We previously reported that the administration of bevacizumab for pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors inhibited angiogenesis in the host, resulting in tumor growth inhibition. In light of these results, we compared the effect of bevacizumab/gemcitabine/S-1 combination therapy vs. bevacizumab monotherapy. The QGP-1 pancreatic neuroendocrine carcinoma cell line and the BxPC-3 ductal cell carcinoma cell line were transplanted into the subcutaneous tissue of mice, and the mice were treated for 3 weeks with bevacizumab [50 mg/kg intraperitoneally (i.p.) twice weekly], gemcitabine (240 mg/kg i.p. once weekly) and S-1 (10 mg/kg orally five times weekly). The antitumor effect and side effects were evaluated by measuring the tumor volume and weight and by changes in body weight, respectively. The tumor volume became smaller (from the maximum volume) in the group treated with bevacizumab, gemcitabine and S-1 (BGS) and the group treated with bevacizumab and gemcitabine (BG). A significant difference was noted in the tumor weight between the BG group and the group treated with bevacizumab alone. A relatively significant decrease in the body weight was observed in the BGS and BG groups. We conclude that gemcitabine is appropriate as a drug used in combination with bevacizumab for pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors.

  4. Smad3 deficiency leads to mandibular condyle degradation via the sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P)/S1P3 signaling axis.

    PubMed

    Mori, Hiroki; Izawa, Takashi; Tanaka, Eiji

    2015-10-01

    Temporomandibular joint osteoarthritis is a degenerative disease that is characterized by permanent cartilage destruction. Transforming growth factor (TGF)-β is one of the most abundant cytokines in the bone matrix and is shown to regulate the migration of osteoprogenitor cells. It is hypothesized that TGF-β/Smad3 signaling affects cartilage homeostasis by influencing sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P)/S1P receptor signaling and chondrocyte migration. We therefore investigated the molecular mechanisms by which crosstalk may occur between TGF-β/Smad3 and S1P/S1P receptor signaling to maintain condylar cartilage and to prevent temporomandibular joint osteoarthritis. Abnormalities in the condylar subchondral bone, including dynamic changes in bone mineral density and microstructure, were observed in Smad3(-/-) mice by microcomputed tomography. Cell-free regions and proteoglycan loss characterized the cartilage degradation present, and increased numbers of apoptotic chondrocytes and matrix metalloproteinase 13(+) chondrocytes were also detected. Furthermore, expression of S1P receptor 3 (S1P3), but not S1P1 or S1P2, was significantly down-regulated in the condylar cartilage of Smad3(-/-) mice. By using RNA interference technology and pharmacologic tools, S1P was found to transactivate Smad3 in an S1P3/TGF-β type II receptor-dependent manner, and S1P3 was found to be required for TGF-β-induced migration of chondrocyte cells and downstream signal transduction via Rac1, RhoA, and Cdc42. Taken together, these results indicate that the Smad3/S1P3 signaling pathway plays an important role in the pathogenesis of temporomandibular joint osteoarthritis.

  5. The SphKs/S1P/S1PR1 axis in immunity and cancer: more ore to be mined.

    PubMed

    Jin, Lei; Liu, Wei-Ren; Tian, Meng-Xin; Fan, Jia; Shi, Ying-Hong

    2016-04-29

    Over the past two decades, huge amounts of research were launched to understand the functions of sphingosine. Many pathways were uncovered that convey the relative functions of biomacromolecules. In this review, we discuss the recent advances of the role of the SphKs/S1P/S1PR1 axis in immunity and cancer. Finally, we investigate the therapeutic potential of new drugs that target S1P signaling in cancer therapy.

  6. H2 line emission in three Seyfert nuclei: Evidence against UV-excitation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Geballe, T. R.

    1990-01-01

    Line emission from vibrationally excited molecular hydrogen has been detected in a considerable number of active galactic nuclei (AGNs), including those generally believed to contain compact and luminous central engines (e.g., Seyfert nuclei) and those in which the luminosity is believed to arise from massive bursts of star formation (starburst nuclei). In most of these AGNs, only the bright 1-0 S(1) line (rest wavelength 2.12 microns) has been searched for and detected to date. Line-emitting H2 can be excited directly either by energetic collisions created by shock waves or by absorption of UV radiation. Each of these excitation mechanisms has been clearly identified in galactic and extragalactic regions. In active galactic nuclei strong sources of UV and (in some case) x rays are present. If the nuclear molecular matter is quiescent (i.e., isolated from the active nucleus and not set into motion by episodes of star formation) the H2 line emission will be dominated by fluorescence, or possibly by thermal emission due to heating by x rays (Krolik, this conference). However, it is expected or indeed observed that a significant fraction of the interstellar medium in and near these nuclei is undergoing rapid motions; either generated by the central engine or by a nuclear starburst, which are capable of producing strong shock phenomena in nearby molecular gas. Thus, a priori it is not obvious which mechanism is responsible for the H2 line emission from the nucleus of an active galaxy.

  7. Aberrant expression of the S1P regulating enzymes, SPHK1 and SGPL1, contributes to a migratory phenotype in OSCC mediated through S1PR2.

    PubMed

    Patmanathan, Sathya Narayanan; Johnson, Steven P; Lai, Sook Ling; Panja Bernam, Suthashini; Lopes, Victor; Wei, Wenbin; Ibrahim, Maha Hafez; Torta, Federico; Narayanaswamy, Pradeep; Wenk, Markus R; Herr, Deron R; Murray, Paul G; Yap, Lee Fah; Paterson, Ian C

    2016-05-10

    Oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) is a lethal disease with a 5-year mortality rate of around 50%. Molecular targeted therapies are not in routine use and novel therapeutic targets are required. Our previous microarray data indicated sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P) metabolism and signalling was deregulated in OSCC. In this study, we have investigated the contribution of S1P signalling to the pathogenesis of OSCC. We show that the expression of the two major enzymes that regulate S1P levels were altered in OSCC: SPHK1 was significantly upregulated in OSCC tissues compared to normal oral mucosa and low levels of SGPL1 mRNA correlated with a worse overall survival. In in vitro studies, S1P enhanced the migration/invasion of OSCC cells and attenuated cisplatin-induced death. We also demonstrate that S1P receptor expression is deregulated in primary OSCCs and that S1PR2 is over-expressed in a subset of tumours, which in part mediates S1P-induced migration of OSCC cells. Lastly, we demonstrate that FTY720 induced significantly more apoptosis in OSCC cells compared to non-malignant cells and that FTY720 acted synergistically with cisplatin to induce cell death. Taken together, our data show that S1P signalling promotes tumour aggressiveness in OSCC and identify S1P signalling as a potential therapeutic target.

  8. Full pharmacological efficacy of a novel S1P1 agonist that does not require S1P-like head-group interactions

    PubMed Central

    Gonzalez-Cabrera, Pedro J.; Jo, Euijung; Sanna, M. Germana; Brown, Steven; Leaf, Nora; Marsolais, David; Schaeffer, Marie-Therese; Chapman, Jacqueline; Cameron, Michael; Guerrero, Miguel; Roberts, Edward; Rosen, Hugh

    2008-01-01

    Strong evidence exists for interactions of zwitterionic phosphate and amine groups in Sphingosine-1 phosphate (S1P) to conserved R and E residues present at the extracellular face of transmembrane-3 (TM3) of S1P receptors. The contribution of R120 and E121 for high affinity ligand-receptor interactions is essential, as single-point R120A or E121A S1P1 mutants neither bind S1P nor transduce S1P function. Because S1P receptors are therapeutically interesting, identifying potent selective agonists with different binding modes and in vivo efficacy is of pharmacological importance. Here we describe a modestly water-soluble highly-selective S1P1 agonist (CYM-5442) that does not require R120 or E121 residues for activating S1P1-dependent p42/p44 MAPK phosphorylation, which defines a new hydrophobic pocket in S1P1. CYM-5442 is a full agonist in vitro for S1P1 internalization, phosphorylation and ubiquitination. Importantly, CYM-5442 was a full agonist for induction and maintenance of S1P1-dependent lymphopenia, decreasing B-lymphocytes by 65% and T-lymphocytes by 85% of vehicle. Induction of CYM-5442 lymphopenia was dose and time-dependent, requiring serum concentrations in the 50 nM range. In vitro measures of S1P1 activation by CYM-5442 were non-competitively inhibited by a specific S1P1 antagonist (W146), competitive for S1P, FTY720-P and SEW2871. In addition, lymphopenia by CYM-5442 was reversed by W146 administration or upon pharmacokinetic agonist clearance. Pharmacokinetics in mice also indicated that CYM-5442 partitions significantly in central nervous tissue. These data show that CYM-5442 activates S1P1-dependent pathways in vitro and to levels of full efficacy in vivo through a hydrophobic pocket, separable from the orthosteric site of S1P binding that is headgroup dependent. PMID:18708635

  9. Hypothalamic S1P/S1PR1 axis controls energy homeostasis in Middle-Aged Rodents: the reversal effects of physical exercise

    PubMed Central

    Silva, Vagner Ramon Rodrigues; Katashima, Carlos Kiyoshi; Bueno Silva, Carla G.; Lenhare, Luciene; Micheletti, Thayana Oliveira; Camargo, Rafael Ludemann; Ghezzi, Ana Carolina; Camargo, Juliana Alves; Assis, Alexandre Moura; Tobar, Natalia; Morari, Joseane; Razolli, Daniela S.; Moura, Leandro Pereira; Pauli, José Rodrigo; Cintra, Dennys Esper; Velloso, Lício Augusto; Saad, Mario J.A; Ropelle, Eduardo Rochete

    2017-01-01

    Recently, we demonstrated that the hypothalamic S1PR1/STAT3 axis plays a critical role in the control of food consumption and energy expenditure in rodents. Here, we found that reduction of hypothalamic S1PR1 expression occurs in an age-dependent manner, and was associated with defective thermogenic signaling and weight gain. To address the physiological relevance of these findings, we investigated the effects of chronic and acute exercise on the hypothalamic S1PR1/STAT3 axis. Chronic exercise increased S1PR1 expression and STAT3 phosphorylation in the hypothalamus, restoring the anorexigenic and thermogenic signals in middle-aged mice. Acutely, exercise increased sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) levels in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) of young rats, whereas the administration of CSF from exercised young rats into the hypothalamus of middle-aged rats at rest was sufficient to reduce the food intake. Finally, the intracerebroventricular (ICV) administration of S1PR1 activators, including the bioactive lipid molecule S1P, and pharmacological S1PR1 activator, SEW2871, induced a potent STAT3 phosphorylation and anorexigenic response in middle-aged rats. Overall, these results suggest that hypothalamic S1PR1 is important for the maintenance of energy balance and provide new insights into the mechanism by which exercise controls the anorexigenic and thermogenic signals in the central nervous system during the aging process. PMID:28039439

  10. Ligand-binding pocket shape differences between S1P1 and S1P3 determine efficiency of chemical probe identification by uHTS

    PubMed Central

    Schürer, Stephan C.; Brown, Steven J.; Cabrera, Pedro Gonzales; Schaeffer, Marie-Therese; Chapman, Jacqueline; Jo, Euijung; Chase, Peter; Spicer, Tim; Hodder, Peter; Rosen, Hugh

    2008-01-01

    We have studied the Sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P) receptor system to better understand why certain molecular targets within a closely related family are much more tractable when identifying compelling chemical leads. Five medically important G protein-coupled receptors for S1P regulate heart rate, coronary artery caliber, endothelial barrier integrity, and lymphocyte trafficking. Selective S1P receptor agonist probes would be of great utility to study receptor subtype-specific function. Through systematic screening of the same libraries, we identified novel selective agonists chemotypes for each of the S1P1 and S1P3 receptors. uHTS for S1P1 was more effective than for S1P3, with many selective, low nanomolar hits of proven mechanism emerging for. Receptor structure modeling and ligand docking reveal differences between the receptor binding pockets, which are the basis for sub-type selectivity. Novel selective agonists interact primarily in the hydrophobic pocket of the receptor in the absence of head-group interactions. Chemistry-space and shape-based analysis of the screening libraries in combination with the binding models explain the observed differential hit rates and enhanced efficiency for lead discovery for S1P1 vs. S1P3 in this closely related receptor family. PMID:18590333

  11. Sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P) carrier-dependent regulation of endothelial barrier: high density lipoprotein (HDL)-S1P prolongs endothelial barrier enhancement as compared with albumin-S1P via effects on levels, trafficking, and signaling of S1P1.

    PubMed

    Wilkerson, Brent A; Grass, G Daniel; Wing, Shane B; Argraves, W Scott; Argraves, Kelley M

    2012-12-28

    Sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P) is a blood-borne lysosphingolipid that acts to promote endothelial cell (EC) barrier function. In plasma, S1P is associated with both high density lipoproteins (HDL) and albumin, but it is not known whether the carriers impart different effects on S1P signaling. Here we establish that HDL-S1P sustains EC barrier longer than albumin-S1P. We showed that the sustained barrier effects of HDL-S1P are dependent on signaling by the S1P receptor, S1P1, and involve persistent activation of Akt and endothelial NOS (eNOS), as well as activity of the downstream NO target, soluble guanylate cyclase (sGC). Total S1P1 protein levels were found to be higher in response to HDL-S1P treatment as compared with albumin-S1P, and this effect was not associated with increased S1P1 mRNA or dependent on de novo protein synthesis. Several pieces of evidence indicate that long term EC barrier enhancement activity of HDL-S1P is due to specific effects on S1P1 trafficking. First, the rate of S1P1 degradation, which is proteasome-mediated, was slower in HDL-S1P-treated cells as compared with cells treated with albumin-S1P. Second, the long term barrier-promoting effects of HDL-S1P were abrogated by treatment with the recycling blocker, monensin. Finally, cell surface levels of S1P1 and levels of S1P1 in caveolin-enriched microdomains were higher after treatment with HDL-S1P as compared with albumin-S1P. Together, the findings reveal S1P carrier-specific effects on S1P1 and point to HDL as the physiological mediator of sustained S1P1-PI3K-Akt-eNOS-sGC-dependent EC barrier function.

  12. Creep rupture behavior due to molybdenum rich M{sub 6}C carbide in 1.0Cr-1.0Mo-0.25V bainitic steel weldment

    SciTech Connect

    Oh, Y.K.; Kim, G.S.; Indacochea, J.E.

    1999-06-04

    Some reports show that Cr-Mo-V steel structures fabricated by welding has a high percent of failures in the microstructurally altered and inhomogeneous heat affected zone (HAZ). The failure usually takes place either at the coarse grain HAZ (CGHAZ) or intercritical HAZ (ICHAZ). Failure at creep condition is related to either cracking at grain boundary triple junctions or the formation of cavities (or voids) on grain boundaries that are approximately normal to the applied stress. Cavities are normally formed by grain boundary sliding causing stress concentrations at precipitates in the grain boundaries. Cavities will then develop at the precipitates whenever plastic flow or diffusion is not fast enough to prevent it. The precipitates that provide cavity nucleation sites are mostly sulfides and carbides. The carbides that provide cavity sites are usually M{sub 23}C{sub 6} and M{sub 6}C. Although considerable researchers have been carried out in the carbides that provide cavitation, the mechanism governs creep behavior during welding remains uncertain. Therefore, the objective of this study is to correlate carbide morphology and its effect on creep rupture behavior in 1.0 Cr-1.0Mo-0.25V bainitic steel weldment.

  13. Variability of Phenology and Fluxes of Water and Carbon with Observed and Simulated Soil Moisture in the Ent Terrestrial Biosphere Model (Ent TBM Version 1.0.1.0.0)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, Y.; Moorcroft, P. R.; Aleinov, Igor; Puma, M. J.; Kiang, N. Y.

    2015-01-01

    The Ent Terrestrial Biosphere Model (Ent TBM) is a mixed-canopy dynamic global vegetation model developed specifically for coupling with land surface hydrology and general circulation models (GCMs). This study describes the leaf phenology submodel implemented in the Ent TBM version 1.0.1.0.0 coupled to the carbon allocation scheme of the Ecosystem Demography (ED) model. The phenology submodel adopts a combination of responses to temperature (growing degree days and frost hardening), soil moisture (linearity of stress with relative saturation) and radiation (light length). Growth of leaves, sapwood, fine roots, stem wood and coarse roots is updated on a daily basis. We evaluate the performance in reproducing observed leaf seasonal growth as well as water and carbon fluxes for four plant functional types at five Fluxnet sites, with both observed and prognostic hydrology, and observed and prognostic seasonal leaf area index. The phenology submodel is able to capture the timing and magnitude of leaf-out and senescence for temperate broadleaf deciduous forest (Harvard Forest and Morgan- Monroe State Forest, US), C3 annual grassland (Vaira Ranch, US) and California oak savanna (Tonzi Ranch, US). For evergreen needleleaf forest (Hyytiäla, Finland), the phenology submodel captures the effect of frost hardening of photosynthetic capacity on seasonal fluxes and leaf area. We address the importance of customizing parameter sets of vegetation soil moisture stress response to the particular land surface hydrology scheme. We identify model deficiencies that reveal important dynamics and parameter needs.

  14. Iron-rich low-cost superalloys. [Cr(15)-Mn(15)-Mo(2)-C(1. 5)-Si(1. 0)-Nb(1. 0)-Fe(bal. ) and Cr(20)-Mn(10)-C(3. 4)-Fe(bal. )

    SciTech Connect

    Wayne, S.F.

    1985-01-01

    An iron-rich low-cost superalloy has been developed in conjunction with United Technologies Research Center under the NASA program, Conservation of Strategic Aerospace Materials. The alloy, when processed by conventional chill casting, has physical and mechanical properties that compare favorably with existing nickel - and cobalt-based superalloys while containing significantly lower amounts of strategic elements. The composition of the alloy is Cr(15)-Mn(15)-Mo(2)-C(1.5)-Si(1.0)-Nb(1.0)-Fe(bal.), and it can be produced with chromite ore deposits located within the United States. Studies were also made on the properties of Cr(20)-Mn(10)-C(3.4)-Fe(bal.), a eutectic alloy processed by chill casting and directional solidification (D.S.) which produced an aligned microstructure consisting of M/sub 7/C/sub 3/ fibers in an ..gamma..-Fe matrix. This good alignment vanishes when molybdenum or aluminum is added in higher concentrations. Thermal expansion of the M/sub 7/C/sub 3/ (M = Fe, Cr, Mn) carbide lattice was measured up to 800/sup 0/C and found to be highly anisotropic, with the a-axis being the predominant mode of expansion. Repetitive impact-sliding wear experiments performed with the Fe-rich eutectic alloy showed that the directionally solidified microstructure greatly improved the alloy's wear resistance as compared to the chill-cast microstructure and conventional nickel-base superalloys.

  15. Variability of phenology and fluxes of water and carbon with observed and simulated soil moisture in the Ent Terrestrial Biosphere Model (Ent TBM version 1.0.1.0.0)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Y.; Moorcroft, P. R.; Aleinov, I.; Puma, M. J.; Kiang, N. Y.

    2015-12-01

    The Ent Terrestrial Biosphere Model (Ent TBM) is a mixed-canopy dynamic global vegetation model developed specifically for coupling with land surface hydrology and general circulation models (GCMs). This study describes the leaf phenology submodel implemented in the Ent TBM version 1.0.1.0.0 coupled to the carbon allocation scheme of the Ecosystem Demography (ED) model. The phenology submodel adopts a combination of responses to temperature (growing degree days and frost hardening), soil moisture (linearity of stress with relative saturation) and radiation (light length). Growth of leaves, sapwood, fine roots, stem wood and coarse roots is updated on a daily basis. We evaluate the performance in reproducing observed leaf seasonal growth as well as water and carbon fluxes for four plant functional types at five Fluxnet sites, with both observed and prognostic hydrology, and observed and prognostic seasonal leaf area index. The phenology submodel is able to capture the timing and magnitude of leaf-out and senescence for temperate broadleaf deciduous forest (Harvard Forest and Morgan-Monroe State Forest, US), C3 annual grassland (Vaira Ranch, US) and California oak savanna (Tonzi Ranch, US). For evergreen needleleaf forest (Hyytiäla, Finland), the phenology submodel captures the effect of frost hardening of photosynthetic capacity on seasonal fluxes and leaf area. We address the importance of customizing parameter sets of vegetation soil moisture stress response to the particular land surface hydrology scheme. We identify model deficiencies that reveal important dynamics and parameter needs.

  16. The AT-LESS CO(1-0) survey of submillimetre galaxies in the Extended Chandra Deep Field South: First results on cold molecular gas in galaxies at z ˜ 2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huynh, Minh T.; Emonts, B. H. C.; Kimball, A. E.; Seymour, N.; Smail, Ian; Swinbank, A. M.; Brandt, W. N.; Casey, C. M.; Chapman, S. C.; Dannerbauer, H.; Hodge, J. A.; Ivison, R. J.; Schinnerer, E.; Thomson, A. P.; van derWerf, P.; Wardlow, J. L.

    2017-01-01

    We present the first results from our on-going Australia Telescope Compact Array survey of 12CO(1-0) in ALMA-identified submillimetre galaxies in the Extended Chandra Deep Field South. Strong detections of 12CO(1-0) emission from two submillimetre galaxies, ALESS 122.1 (z = 2.0232) and ALESS 67.1 (z = 2.1230), were obtained. We estimate gas masses of Mgas ˜ 1.3 × 1011 M⊙ and Mgas ˜ 1.0 × 1011M⊙ for ALESS 122.1 and ALESS 67.1, respectively, adopting αCO = 1.0. Dynamical mass estimates from the kinematics of the 12CO(1-0) line yields Mdynsin 2i = (2.1 ± 1.1) × 1011 M⊙ and (3.2 ± 0.9) × 1011 M⊙ for ALESS 122.1 and ALESS 67.1, respectively. This is consistent with the total baryonic mass estimates of these two systems. We examine star formation efficiency using the LFIR versus L^' }_CO(1-0) relation for samples of local ULIRGs and LIRGs, and more distant star-forming galaxies, with 12CO(1-0) detections. We find some evidence of a shallower slope for ULIRGs and SMGs compared to less luminous systems, but a larger sample is required for definite conclusions. We determine gas-to-dust ratios of 170 ± 30 and 140 ± 30 for ALESS 122.1 and ALESS 67.1, respectively, showing ALESS 122.1 has an unusually large gas reservoir. By combining the 38.1 GHz continuum detection of ALESS 122.1 with 1.4 and 5.5 GHz data, we estimate that the free-free contribution to radio emission at 38.1 GHz is 34 ± 17 μJy, yielding a star formation rate (1400 ± 700 M⊙ yr-1) consistent with that from the infrared luminosity.

  17. FIR MEASUREMENTS OF Ly{alpha} EMITTERS AT z {approx}< 1.0: DUST ATTENUATION FROM PACS-HERSCHEL

    SciTech Connect

    Oteo, I.; Bongiovanni, A.; Perez Garcia, A. M.; Cepa, J.; Ederoclite, A.; Pintos-Castro, I.; Sanchez-Portal, M.; Altieri, B.; Lutz, D.; Berta, S.; Magnelli, B.; Popesso, P.; Le Floc'h, E.; Pozzi, F.; Daddi, E.; Riguccini, L.; Aussel, H.; Elbaz, D.; Cimatti, A.

    2011-07-01

    One remaining open question regarding the physical properties of Ly{alpha} emitters (LAEs) is their dust content and evolution with redshift. The variety of results is large and with those reported by now it is difficult to establish clear relations between dust, other fundamental parameters of galaxies (star formation rate, metallicity, or age), and redshift. In this Letter, we report Herschel PACS-100 {mu}m, PACS-160 {mu}m, and Spitzer MIPS-24 {mu}m detections of a sample of spectroscopically GALEX selected LAEs at z {approx} 0.3 and {approx}1.0. Five out of ten and one out of two LAEs are detected in, at least, one PACS band at z {approx} 0.3 and {approx}1.0, respectively. These measurements have a great importance given that they allow us to quantify, for the first time, the dust content in LAEs from direct FIR observations. MIPS-24 {mu}m detections allow us to determine the IR properties of the PACS-undetected LAEs. We obtain that mid-IR/FIR-detected star-forming (SF) LAEs at z {approx} 0.3 have dust content within 0.75 {approx}< A{sub 1200{sub A}} {approx}< 2.0, with a median value of A{sub 1200{sub A}} {approx} 1.1. This range broadens up to 0.75 {approx}< A{sub 1200{sub A}} {approx}< 2.5 when considering the LAEs at z {approx} 1.0. Only one SF LAE is undetected both in MIPS-24 {mu}m and PACS, with A{sub 1200{sub A}} {approx}< 0.75. These results seem to be larger than those reported for high-redshift LAEs and, therefore, although an evolutionary trend is not clearly seen, it could point out that low-redshift LAEs are dustier than high-redshift ones. However, the diverse methods used could introduce a systematic offset in the results.

  18. Application of USNO-B1.0 towards selecting objects with displaced blue and red components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jayson, Joel S.

    2016-03-01

    We have conducted a feasibility study to determine the effectiveness of using USNO-B1.0 data to preferentially detect objects with displaced red and blue components. A procedure was developed to search catalogue entries for such objects, which include M dwarfs paired with white dwarfs or with earlier main-sequence stars, and galaxies with asymmetric colour distributions. Residual differences between red and blue and infrared and blue scanned emulsion images define vectors, which, when appropriately aligned and of sufficient length, signal potential candidates. Test sample sets were analysed to evaluate the effective discrimination of the technique. Over 91 000 USNO-B1.0 catalogue entries at points throughout the celestial sphere were then filtered for acceptable combinations of entry observations and magnitudes and the resulting total of about 17 000 entries was winnowed down to a little more than 200 objects of interest. These were screened by visual examination of photo images to a final total of 146 candidates. About one quarter of these candidates coincide with SDSS (Sloan Digital Sky Survey) data. Those constituents fall into two groups, single and paired objects. SDSS identified several galaxies in the first group. Regarding the second group, at least half of its members were tentatively identified as main-sequence pairs, the greater portion being of widely separated spectral types. Two white dwarf-main-sequence pairs were also identified. Most importantly, the vectors formed from USNO-B1.0 residuals were in alignment with corresponding SDSS pair position angles, thereby supporting this work's central thesis.

  19. Design and Development Comparison of Rapid Cycle Amine 1.0, 2.0, and 3.0

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chullen, Cinda; Campbell, Colin; Papale, William; Murray, Sean; Wichowski, Robert; Conger, Bruce; McMillin, Summer

    2016-01-01

    The development of the Rapid Cycle Amine (RCA) swing-bed technology for carbon dioxide (CO2) removal has been in progress since favorable results were published in 1996. Shortly thereafter, a prototype was designed, developed, and tested successfully and delivered to Johnson Space Center in 1999. An improved prototype was delivered to NASA in 2006 and was notated as RCA 1.0 and sized for the extravehicular activity (EVA). The new RCA swing-bed technology is a regenerative system which employs two alternating solid-amine sorbent beds to remove CO2 and water. The two- bed design employs a chemisorption process whereby the beds alternate between adsorbtion and desorbsion. This process provides for an efficient operation of the RCA so that while one bed is in adsorb (uptake) mode, the other is in the desorb (regeneration) mode. The RCA has now progressed through several iterations of technology readiness levels. Test articles have now been designed, developed, and tested for the advanced space suit portable life support system (PLSS) including RCA 1.0, RCA 2.0, and RCA 3.0. The RCA 3.0 was the most recent RCA fabrication and was delivered to NASA-JSC in June 2015. The RCA 1.0 test article was designed with a pneumatically actuated linear motion spool valve. The RCA 2.0 and 3.0 test articles were designed with a valve assembly which allows for switching between uptake and regeneration modes while minimizing gas volume losses to the vacuum source. RCA 2.0 and 3.0 also include an embedded controller design to control RCA operation and provide the capability of interfacing with various sensors and other ventilation loop components. The RCA technology is low power, small, and has fulfilled all test requirements levied upon the technology during development testing thus far. This paper will provide an overreview of the design and development of RCA 1.0, 2.0 and 3.0 including detail differences between the design specifications of each.

  20. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Disk galaxies at 0.11.0 (Boehm+, 2016)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boehm, A.; Ziegler, B. L.

    2016-06-01

    Redshifts, maximum rotation velocities, (Johnson) B-band absolute magnitudes and sizes are presented for a sample of 124 disk galaxies covering redshifts 0.11.0. The galaxies are selected from the FORS Deep Field (FDF), see Heidt et al. (2003A&A...398..49H), and the William Herschel Deep Field (WHDF), see Metcalfe et al. (2001MNRAS.323..779M). All given parameters assume a flat cosmology with H0=70km/s/Mpc, Omegamatter=0.3 and Omegalambda=0.7. (1 data file).

  1. FBG_SiMul V1.0: Fibre Bragg grating signal simulation tool for finite element method models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pereira, G.; McGugan, M.; Mikkelsen, L. P.

    FBG_SiMul V1.0 is a tool to study and design the implementation of fibre Bragg grating (FBG) sensors solutions in any arbitrary loaded structure or application. The software removes the need for a fibre optic expert user and makes the sensor response of a structural health monitoring solution using FBG sensors more simple and fast. The software uses a modified T-Matrix method to simulate the FBG reflected spectrum based on the stress and strain from a finite element method model. The article describes the theory and algorithm implementation, followed by an empirical validation.

  2. Diagnostic features of relief formations on the nanostructured titanium VT1-0 surface after laser shock-wave treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lytvynenko, I. V.; Lupenko, S. A.; Maruschak, P. O.; Panin, S. V.; Hats, Yu I.

    2017-02-01

    A new class of diagnostic features for conducting morphological analysis of relief formations induced by laser shock-wave treatment on the surface of the nanostructured titanium VT1-0 alloy is proposed. They are the coefficients of series expansions of statistical estimates for the orthogonal basis of Chebyshev, Laguerre, Kravchuk discrete polynomials and trigonometric functions. Based on the criterion of the minimum number of the diagnostic features in the above-mentioned bases, the Chebyshev one was selected as the most appropriate to solve this problem.

  3. Theoretical study on the initial reaction mechanisms of ansa-metallocene zirconium precursor on hydroxylated Si(1 0 0) surface.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Guangfen; Ren, Jie; Zhang, Shaowen

    2016-05-01

    The initial reaction mechanisms for depositing ZrO2 thin films using ansa-metallocene zirconium (Cp2CMe2)ZrMe2 precursor were studied by density functional theory (DFT) calculations. The (Cp2CMe2)ZrMe2 precursor could be absorbed on the hydroxylated Si(1 0 0) surface via physisorption. Possible reaction pathways of (Cp2CMe2)ZrMe2 were proposed. For each reaction, the activation energies and reaction energies were compared, and stationary points along the reaction pathways were shown. In addition, the influence of dispersion effects on the reactions was evaluated by non-local dispersion corrected DFT calculations.

  4. Structural determination of stable MoOx monolayers on O/Cu3Au(1 0 0): DFT calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valadares, George C. S.; Mendes, F. M. T.; Dionízio Moreira, M.; Leitão, A. A.; Niehus, H.; Capaz, Rodrigo B.; Achete, C. A.

    2012-10-01

    Using ab initio calculations based on density functional theory (DFT), we propose a geometrical structure for MoOx monolayers recently grown on O/Cu3Au(1 0 0) substrates. The proposed structure reproduces the p(2 × 2) symmetry found by scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) and low-energy electron diffraction (LEED), as well as the intermediate oxidation state between Mo(IV) and Mo(VI) identified by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). Simulated STM images assign the bright spots in the experimental images to oxygen 2p states.

  5. First Observation of a (1,0) Mode Frequency Shift of an Electron Plasma at Antiproton Beam Injection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuroda, N.; Mohri, A.; Torii, H. A.; Nagata, Y.; Shibata, M.

    2014-07-01

    The frequency shift of the center-of-mass oscillation, known as the (1,0) mode, of a trapped electron plasma and, furthermore, its time evolution were observed during the cooling of an injected antiproton beam for the first time. Here, antiprotons mixed with the electrons did not follow faster electron oscillations but contributed to the modification of the effective potential. The time evolution of the plasma temperature, deduced from the frequency shift of the excited (3,0) mode, suggested that there was an abnormal energy deposition of the antiproton beam in the electron plasma before thermalization.

  6. Design and Development Comparison of Rapid Cycle Amine 1.0, 2.0, and 3.0

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chullen, Cinda; Campbell, Colin; Papale, William; Murray, Sean; Wichowski, Robert; Conger, Bruce; McMillin, Summer

    2016-01-01

    The development of the Rapid Cycle Amine (RCA) swing-bed technology for carbon dioxide (CO2) removal has been in progress since favorable results were published in 1996. Shortly thereafter, a prototype was designed, developed, and tested successfully and delivered to Johnson Space Center in 1999. An improved prototype (RCA 1.0) was delivered to NASA in 2006 and sized for the extravehicular activity (EVA). The RCA swing-bed technology is a regenerative system which employs two alternating solid-amine sorbent beds to remove CO2 and water. The two-bed design employs a chemisorption process whereby the beds alternate between adsorption and desorption. This process provides for an efficient RCA operation that enables one bed to be in adsorb (uptake) mode, while the other is in the desorb (regeneration) mode. The RCA has progressed through several iterations of technology readiness levels. Test articles have now been designed, developed, and tested for the advanced space suit portable life support system (PLSS) including RCA 1.0, RCA 2.0, and RCA 3.0. The RCA 3.0 was the most recent RCA fabrication and was delivered to NASA-JSC in June 2015. The RCA 1.0 test article was designed with a pneumatically actuated linear motion spool valve. The RCA 2.0 and 3.0 test articles were designed with a valve assembly which allows for switching between uptake and regeneration modes while minimizing gas volume losses to the vacuum source. RCA 2.0 and 3.0 also include an embedded controller design to control RCA operation and provide the capability of interfacing with various sensors and other ventilation loop components. The RCA technology is low power, small, and has fulfilled all test requirements levied upon the technology during development testing thus far. This paper will provide an overview of the design and development of RCA 1.0, 2.0 and 3.0 including detail differences between the design specifications of each. Nomenclature.

  7. A Prokaryotic S1P Lyase Degrades Extracellular S1P In Vitro and In Vivo: Implication for Treating Hyperproliferative Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Huwiler, Andrea; Bourquin, Florence; Kotelevets, Nataliya; Pastukhov, Oleksandr; Capitani, Guido; Grütter, Markus G.; Zangemeister-Wittke, Uwe

    2011-01-01

    Sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) regulates a broad spectrum of fundamental cellular processes like proliferation, death, migration and cytokine production. Therefore, elevated levels of S1P may be causal to various pathologic conditions including cancer, fibrosis, inflammation, autoimmune diseases and aberrant angiogenesis. Here we report that S1P lyase from the prokaryote Symbiobacterium thermophilum (StSPL) degrades extracellular S1P in vitro and in blood. Moreover, we investigated its effect on cellular responses typical of fibrosis, cancer and aberrant angiogenesis using renal mesangial cells, endothelial cells, breast (MCF-7) and colon (HCT 116) carcinoma cells as disease models. In all cell types, wild-type StSPL, but not an inactive mutant, disrupted MAPK phosphorylation stimulated by exogenous S1P. Functionally, disruption of S1P receptor signaling by S1P depletion inhibited proliferation and expression of connective tissue growth factor in mesangial cells, proliferation, migration and VEGF expression in carcinoma cells, and proliferation and migration of endothelial cells. Upon intravenous injection of StSPL in mice, plasma S1P levels rapidly declined by 70% within 1 h and then recovered to normal 6 h after injection. Using the chicken chorioallantoic membrane model we further demonstrate that also under in vivo conditions StSPL, but not the inactive mutant, inhibited tumor cell-induced angiogenesis as an S1P-dependent process. Our data demonstrate that recombinant StSPL is active under extracellular conditions and holds promise as a new enzyme therapeutic for diseases associated with increased levels of S1P and S1P receptor signaling. PMID:21829623

  8. Genetic characterization of three qnrS1-harbouring multidrug-resistance plasmids and qnrS1-containing transposons circulating in Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam

    PubMed Central

    Le, Vien; Nhu, Nguyen Thi Khanh; Cerdeno-Tarraga, Ana; Campbell, James I.; Tuyen, Ha Thanh; Nhu, Tran Do Hoang; Tam, Pham Thi Thanh; Schultsz, Constance; Thwaites, Guy; Thomson, Nicholas R.

    2015-01-01

    Plasmid-mediated quinolone resistance (PMQR) refers to a family of closely related genes that confer decreased susceptibility to fluoroquinolones. PMQR genes are generally associated with integrons and/or plasmids that carry additional antimicrobial resistance genes active against a range of antimicrobials. In Ho Chi Minh City (HCMC), Vietnam, we have previously shown a high frequency of PMQR genes within commensal Enterobacteriaceae. However, there are limited available sequence data detailing the genetic context in which the PMQR genes reside, and a lack of understanding of how these genes spread across the Enterobacteriaceae. Here, we aimed to determine the genetic background facilitating the spread and maintenance of qnrS1, the dominant PMQR gene circulating in HCMC. We sequenced three qnrS1-carrying plasmids in their entirety to understand the genetic context of these qnrS1-embedded plasmids and also the association of qnrS1-mediated quinolone resistance with other antimicrobial resistance phenotypes. Annotation of the three qnrS1-containing plasmids revealed a qnrS1-containing transposon with a closely related structure. We screened 112 qnrS1-positive commensal Enterobacteriaceae isolated in the community and in a hospital in HCMC to detect the common transposon structure. We found the same transposon structure to be present in 71.4 % (45/63) of qnrS1-positive hospital isolates and in 36.7 % (18/49) of qnrS1-positive isolates from the community. The resulting sequence analysis of the qnrS1 environment suggested that qnrS1 genes are widely distributed and are mobilized on elements with a common genetic background. Our data add additional insight into mechanisms that facilitate resistance to multiple antimicrobials in Gram-negative bacteria in Vietnam. PMID:26272054

  9. A bio-inspired real-time capable artificial lateral line system for freestream flow measurements.

    PubMed

    Abels, C; Qualtieri, A; De Vittorio, M; Megill, W M; Rizzi, F

    2016-06-03

    To enhance today's artificial flow sensing capabilities in aerial and underwater robotics, future robots could be equipped with a large number of miniaturized sensors distributed over the surface to provide high resolution measurement of the surrounding fluid flow. In this work we show a linear array of closely separated bio-inspired micro-electro-mechanical flow sensors whose sensing mechanism is based on a piezoresistive strain-gauge along a stress-driven cantilever beam, mimicking the biological superficial neuromasts found in the lateral line organ of fishes. Aiming to improve state-of-the-art flow sensing capability in autonomously flying and swimming robots, our artificial lateral line system was designed and developed to feature multi-parameter freestream flow measurements which provide information about (1) local flow velocities as measured by the signal amplitudes from the individual cantilevers as well as (2) propagation velocity, (3) linear forward/backward direction along the cantilever beam orientation and (4) periodicity of pulses or pulse trains determined by cross-correlating sensor signals. A real-time capable cross-correlation procedure was developed which makes it possible to extract freestream flow direction and velocity information from flow fluctuations. The computed flow velocities deviate from a commercial system by 0.09 m s(-1) at 0.5 m s(-1) and 0.15 m s(-1) at 1.0 m s(-1) flow velocity for a sampling rate of 240 Hz and a sensor distance of 38 mm. Although experiments were performed in air, the presented flow sensing system can be applied to underwater vehicles as well, once the sensors are embedded in a waterproof micro-electro-mechanical systems package.

  10. Search for pair production of scalar bottom quarks in pp collisions at square root of s = 1.96 TeV.

    PubMed

    Abazov, V M; Abbott, B; Abolins, M; Acharya, B S; Adams, M; Adams, T; Agelou, M; Ahn, S H; Ahsan, M; Alexeev, G D; Alkhazov, G; Alton, A; Alverson, G; Alves, G A; Anastasoaie, M; Andeen, T; Anderson, S; Andrieu, B; Anzelc, M S; Arnoud, Y; Arov, M; Askew, A; Asman, B; Jesus, A C S Assis; Atramentov, O; Autermann, C; Avila, C; Ay, C; Badaud, F; Baden, A; Bagby, L; Baldin, B; Bandurin, D V; Banerjee, P; Banerjee, S; Barberis, E; Bargassa, P; Baringer, P; Barnes, C; Barreto, J; Bartlett, J F; Bassler, U; Bauer, D; Bean, A; Begalli, M; Begel, M; Belanger-Champagne, C; Bellantoni, L; Bellavance, A; Benitez, J A; Beri, S B; Bernardi, G; Bernhard, R; Berntzon, L; Bertram, I; Besançon, M; Beuselinck, R; Bezzubov, V A; Bhat, P C; Bhatnagar, V; Binder, M; Biscarat, C; Black, K M; Blackler, I; Blazey, G; Blekman, F; Blessing, S; Bloch, D; Bloom, K; Blumenschein, U; Boehnlein, A; Boeriu, O; Bolton, T A; Borissov, G; Bos, K; Bose, T; Brandt, A; Brock, R; Brooijmans, G; Bross, A; Brown, D; Buchanan, N J; Buchholz, D; Buehler, M; Buescher, V; Burdin, S; Burke, S; Burnett, T H; Busato, E; Buszello, C P; Butler, J M; Calfayan, P; Calvet, S; Cammin, J; Caron, S; Carvalho, W; Casey, B C K; Cason, N M; Castilla-Valdez, H; Chakraborty, D; Chan, K M; Chandra, A; Charles, F; Cheu, E; Chevallier, F; Cho, D K; Choi, S; Choudhary, B; Christofek, L; Claes, D; Clément, B; Clément, C; Coadou, Y; Cooke, M; Cooper, W E; Coppage, D; Corcoran, M; Cousinou, M-C; Cox, B; Crépé-Renaudin, S; Cutts, D; Cwiok, M; da Motta, H; Das, A; Das, M; Davies, B; Davies, G; Davis, G A; De, K; de Jong, P; de Jong, S J; De La Cruz-Burelo, E; De Oliveira Martins, C; Degenhardt, J D; Déliot, F; Demarteau, M; Demina, R; Demine, P; Denisov, D; Denisov, S P; Desai, S; Diehl, H T; Diesburg, M; Doidge, M; Dominguez, A; Dong, H; Dudko, L V; Duflot, L; Dugad, S R; Duggan, D; Duperrin, A; Dyer, J; Dyshkant, A; Eads, M; Edmunds, D; Edwards, T; Ellison, J; Elmsheuser, J; Elvira, V D; Eno, S; Ermolov, P; Evans, H; Evdokimov, A; Evdokimov, V N; Fatakia, S N; Feligioni, L; Ferapontov, A V; Ferbel, T; Fiedler, F; Filthaut, F; Fisher, W; Fisk, H E; Fleck, I; Ford, M; Fortner, M; Fox, H; Fu, S; Fuess, S; Gadfort, T; Galea, C F; Gallas, E; Galyaev, E; Garcia, C; Garcia-Bellido, A; Gardner, J; Gavrilov, V; Gay, A; Gay, P; Gelé, D; Gelhaus, R; Gerber, C E; Gershtein, Y; Gillberg, D; Ginther, G; Gollub, N; Gómez, B; Goussiou, A; Grannis, P D; Greenlee, H; Greenwood, Z D; Gregores, E M; Grenier, G; Gris, Ph; Grivaz, J-F; Grünendahl, S; Grünewald, M W; Guo, F; Guo, J; Gutierrez, G; Gutierrez, P; Haas, A; Hadley, N J; Haefner, P; Hagopian, S; Haley, J; Hall, I; Hall, R E; Han, L; Hanagaki, K; Harder, K; Harel, A; Harrington, R; Hauptman, J M; Hauser, R; Hays, J; Hebbeker, T; Hedin, D; Hegeman, J G; Heinmiller, J M; Heinson, A P; Heintz, U; Hensel, C; Herner, K; Hesketh, G; Hildreth, M D; Hirosky, R; Hobbs, J D; Hoeneisen, B; Hoeth, H; Hohlfeld, M; Hong, S J; Hooper, R; Houben, P; Hu, Y; Hubacek, Z; Hynek, V; Iashvili, I; Illingworth, R; Ito, A S; Jabeen, S; Jaffré, M; Jain, S; Jakobs, K; Jarvis, C; Jenkins, A; Jesik, R; Johns, K; Johnson, C; Johnson, M; Jonckheere, A; Jonsson, P; Juste, A; Käfer, D; Kahn, S; Kajfasz, E; Kalinin, A M; Kalk, J M; Kalk, J R; Kappler, S; Karmanov, D; Kasper, J; Kasper, P; Katsanos, I; Kau, D; Kaur, R; Kehoe, R; Kermiche, S; Khalatyan, N; Khanov, A; Kharchilava, A; Kharzheev, Y M; Khatidze, D; Kim, H; Kim, T J; Kirby, M H; Klima, B; Kohli, J M; Konrath, J-P; Kopal, M; Korablev, V M; Kotcher, J; Kothari, B; Koubarovsky, A; Kozelov, A V; Kozminski, J; Krop, D; Kryemadhi, A; Kuhl, T; Kumar, A; Kunori, S; Kupco, A; Kurca, T; Kvita, J; Lammers, S; Landsberg, G; Lazoflores, J; Le Bihan, A-C; Lebrun, P; Lee, W M; Leflat, A; Lehner, F; Lesne, V; Leveque, J; Lewis, P; Li, J; Li, Q Z; Lima, J G R; Lincoln, D; Linnemann, J; Lipaev, V V; Lipton, R; Liu, Z; Lobo, L; Lobodenko, A; Lokajicek, M; Lounis, A; Love, P; Lubatti, H J; Lynker, M; Lyon, A L; Maciel, A K A; Madaras, R J; Mättig, P; Magass, C; Magerkurth, A; Magnan, A-M; Makovec, N; Mal, P K; Malbouisson, H B; Malik, S; Malyshev, V L; Mao, H S; Maravin, Y; Martens, M; McCarthy, R; Meder, D; Melnitchouk, A; Mendes, A; Mendoza, L; Merkin, M; Merritt, K W; Meyer, A; Meyer, J; Michaut, M; Miettinen, H; Millet, T; Mitrevski, J; Molina, J; Mondal, N K; Monk, J; Moore, R W; Moulik, T; Muanza, G S; Mulders, M; Mulhearn, M; Mundim, L; Mutaf, Y D; Nagy, E; Naimuddin, M; Narain, M; Naumann, N A; Neal, H A; Negret, J P; Neustroev, P; Noeding, C; Nomerotski, A; Novaes, S F; Nunnemann, T; O'Dell, V; O'Neil, D C; Obrant, G; Oguri, V; Oliveira, N; Oshima, N; Otec, R; Y Garzón, G J Otero; Owen, M; Padley, P; Parashar, N; Park, S-J; Park, S K; Parsons, J; Partridge, R; Parua, N; Patwa, A; Pawloski, G; Perea, P M; Perez, E; Peters, K; Pétroff, P; Petteni, M; Piegaia, R; Piper, J; Pleier, M-A; Podesta-Lerma, P L M; Podstavkov, V M; Pogorelov, Y; Pol, M-E; Pompos, A; Pope, B G; Popov, A V; Potter, C; Prado da Silva, W L; Prosper, H B; Protopopescu, S; Qian, J; Quadt, A; Quinn, B; Rangel, M S; Rani, K J; Ranjan, K; Ratoff, P N; Renkel, P; Reucroft, S; Rijssenbeek, M; Ripp-Baudot, I; Rizatdinova, F; Robinson, S; Rodrigues, R F; Royon, C; Rubinov, P; Ruchti, R; Rud, V I; Sajot, G; Sánchez-Hernández, A; Sanders, M P; Santoro, A; Savage, G; Sawyer, L; Scanlon, T; Schaile, D; Schamberger, R D; Scheglov, Y; Schellman, H; Schieferdecker, P; Schmitt, C; Schwanenberger, C; Schwartzman, A; Schwienhorst, R; Sekaric, J; Sengupta, S; Severini, H; Shabalina, E; Shamim, M; Shary, V; Shchukin, A A; Shephard, W D; Shivpuri, R K; Shpakov, D; Siccardi, V; Sidwell, R A; Simak, V; Sirotenko, V; Skubic, P; Slattery, P; Smith, R P; Snow, G R; Snow, J; Snyder, S; Söldner-Rembold, S; Song, X; Sonnenschein, L; Sopczak, A; Sosebee, M; Soustruznik, K; Souza, M; Spurlock, B; Stark, J; Steele, J; Stolin, V; Stone, A; Stoyanova, D A; Strandberg, J; Strandberg, S; Strang, M A; Strauss, M; Ströhmer, R; Strom, D; Strovink, M; Stutte, L; Sumowidagdo, S; Sznajder, A; Talby, M; Tamburello, P; Taylor, W; Telford, P; Temple, J; Tiller, B; Titov, M; Tokmenin, V V; Tomoto, M; Toole, T; Torchiani, I; Towers, S; Trefzger, T; Trincaz-Duvoid, S; Tsybychev, D; Tuchming, B; Tully, C; Turcot, A S; Tuts, P M; Unalan, R; Uvarov, L; Uvarov, S; Uzunyan, S; Vachon, B; van den Berg, P J; Van Kooten, R; van Leeuwen, W M; Varelas, N; Varnes, E W; Vartapetian, A; Vasilyev, I A; Vaupel, M; Verdier, P; Vertogradov, L S; Verzocchi, M; Villeneuve-Seguier, F; Vint, P; Vlimant, J-R; Von Toerne, E; Voutilainen, M; Vreeswijk, M; Wahl, H D; Wang, L; Wang, M H L S; Warchol, J; Watts, G; Wayne, M; Weber, M; Weerts, H; Wermes, N; Wetstein, M; White, A; Wicke, D; Wilson, G W; Wimpenny, S J; Wobisch, M; Womersley, J; Wood, D R; Wyatt, T R; Xie, Y; Xuan, N; Yacoob, S; Yamada, R; Yan, M; Yasuda, T; Yatsunenko, Y A; Yip, K; Yoo, H D; Youn, S W; Yu, C; Yu, J; Yurkewicz, A; Zatserklyaniy, A; Zeitnitz, C; Zhang, D; Zhao, T; Zhou, B; Zhu, J; Zielinski, M; Zieminska, D; Zieminski, A; Zutshi, V; Zverev, E G

    2006-10-27

    A search for direct production of scalar bottom quarks (b) is performed with 310 pb(-1) of data collected by the D0 experiment in pp collisions at square root s = 1.96 TeV at the Fermilab Tevatron Collider. The topology analyzed consists of two b jets and an imbalance in transverse momentum due to undetected neutralinos (chi(1)0), with chi(1)0 assumed to be the lightest supersymmetric particle. We find the data consistent with standard model expectations, and set a 95% C.L. exclusion domain in the (m(b), m(chi(1)0)) mass plane, improving significantly upon the results from run I of the Tevatron.

  11. Creep Properties of Sn-1.0Ag-0.5Cu Lead-Free Solder with Ni Addition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Che, F. X.; Zhu, W. H.; Poh, Edith S. W.; Zhang, X. R.; Zhang, Xiaowu; Chai, T. C.; Gao, S.

    2011-03-01

    In this work, tensile creep tests for Sn-1.0Ag-0.5Cu-0.02Ni solder have been conducted at various temperatures and stress levels to determine its creep properties. The effects of stress level and temperature on creep strain rate were investigated. Creep constitutive models (such as the simple power-law model, hyperbolic sine model, double power-law model, and exponential model) have been reviewed, and the material constants of each model have been determined based on experimental results. The stress exponent and creep activation energy have been studied and compared with other researchers' results. These four creep constitutive models established in this paper were then implemented into a user-defined subroutine in the ANSYS™ finite-element analysis software to investigate the creep behavior of Sn-1.0Ag-0.5Cu-0.02Ni solder joints of thin fine-pitch ball grid array (TFBGA) packages for the purpose of model comparison and application. Similar simulation results of creep strain and creep strain energy density were achieved when using the different creep constitutive models, indicating that the creep models are consistent and accurate.

  12. Lateral displacement induced disorder in L1(0)-FePt nanostructures by ion-implantation.

    PubMed

    Gaur, N; Kundu, S; Piramanayagam, S N; Maurer, S L; Tan, H K; Wong, S K; Steen, S E; Yang, H; Bhatia, C S

    2013-01-01

    Ion implantation is a promising technique for fabricating high density bit patterned media (BPM) as it may eliminate the requirement of disk planarization. However, there has not been any notable study on the impact of implantation on BPM fabrication of FePt, particularly at nano-scale, where the lateral straggle of implanted ions may become comparable to the feature size. In this work, implantation of antimony ions in patterned and unpatterned L1(0)-FePt thin films has been investigated. Unpatterned films implanted with high fluence of antimony exhibited reduced out-of-plane coercivity and change of magnetic anisotropy from perpendicular direction to film-plane. Interestingly, for samples implanted through patterned masks, the perpendicular anisotropy in the unimplanted region was also lost. This noteworthy observation can be attributed to the displacement of Fe and Pt atoms from the implantation sites to the unimplanted areas, thereby causing a phase disorder transformation from L1(0) to A1 FePt.

  13. Structure and magnetic properties for L1 0-ordered FeNi films prepared by alternate monatomic layer deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shima, T.; Okamura, M.; Mitani, S.; Takanashi, K.

    2007-03-01

    Alternate monatomic layer (ML) deposition technique has been used to fabricate a metastable L1 0-ordered phase of FeNi alloys. The films were prepared by alternating Fe (0 0 1) and Ni (0 0 1) MLs on MgO (0 0 1) substrates at various temperatures TS in the range between 80 and 400 °C. It has been found that the degree of long-range order S evaluated by X-ray diffraction increases with TS, and it has a maximum at TS=240 °C. With further increase of TS, S shows a drastic decrease, and almost disappears at TS=280 °C. 280 °C is close to the order-disorder transformation temperature in the thermal equilibrium. The variation of Ku shows the same tendency as that of S, suggesting the formation of L1 0-ordered FeNi alloy in the range of TS=200-260 °C. Maximum values of S=0.6±0.2 and Ku=6.3×10 6 (erg/cm 3) are obtained at TS=240 °C.

  14. A further study of the molecular cloud associated with the supernova remnant G109.1-1.0

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tatematsu, Ken'ichi; Fukui, Yasuo; Iwata, Takahiro; Seward, Frederick D.; Nakano, Makoto

    1990-01-01

    The region of the semicircular SNR G109.1-1.0 is studied on the basis of CO observations with a 45-m radio telescope and X-ray data from the archive of the Einstein Observatory. By observing the J = 1-0 transition of CO at 115 GHz, the distribution of the molecular cloud associated with the remnant is investigated in detail. The resolution of the CO mapping observations is 0.6-1.2 pc and the number of the CO spectra obtained is about 2000. The molecular ridge (CO arm), which was known to show an apparent anticorrelation with the curled x-ray jetlike feature of the remnant, is resolved into two CO filaments. The hardness of the X-ray spectrum toward the CO arm is consistent with the column densities of the two CO filaments. However, the overall appearance of the remnant will not be affected very much by the absorption, because the X-ray absorption is found to be a minor effect.

  15. DISCOVERY OF VERY HIGH ENERGY {gamma}-RAY EMISSION FROM THE SNR G54.1+0.3

    SciTech Connect

    Acciari, V. A.; Benbow, W.; Aliu, E.; Boltuch, D.; Arlen, T.; Aune, T.; Bautista, M.; Beilicke, M.; Buckley, J. H.; Bugaev, V.; Dickherber, R.; Bradbury, S. M.; Butt, Y.; Byrum, K.; Cesarini, A.; Ciupik, L.; Cui, W.; Finley, J. P.; Duke, C.; Finnegan, G. E-mail: wakely@uchicago.ed

    2010-08-10

    We report the discovery of very high energy (VHE) gamma-ray emission from the direction of the SNR G54.1+0.3 using the VERITAS ground-based gamma-ray observatory. The TeV signal has an overall significance of 6.8{sigma} and appears pointlike given the resolution of the instrument. The integral flux above 1 TeV is 2.5% of the Crab Nebula flux and significant emission is measured between 250 GeV and 4 TeV, well described by a power-law energy spectrum dN/dE {approx} E {sup -{Gamma}} with a photon index {Gamma} = 2.39 {+-} 0.23{sub stat} {+-} 0.30{sub sys}. We find no evidence of time variability among observations spanning almost two years. Based on the location, the morphology, the measured spectrum, the lack of variability, and a comparison with similar systems previously detected in the TeV band, the most likely counterpart of this new VHE gamma-ray source is the pulsar wind nebula (PWN) in the SNR G54.1+0.3. The measured X-ray to VHE gamma-ray luminosity ratio is the lowest among all the nebulae supposedly driven by young rotation-powered pulsars, which could indicate a particle-dominated PWN.

  16. Global distribution of ionizing and recombining plasmas in the supernova remnant G290.1-0.8

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamitsukasa, Fumiyoshi; Koyama, Katsuji; Uchida, Hiroyuki; Nakajima, Hiroshi; Hayashida, Kiyoshi; Mori, Koji; Katsuda, Satoru; Tsunemi, Hiroshi

    2015-04-01

    We report on the Suzaku results of the mixed-morphology supernova remnant (SNR) G290.1-0.8 (MSH 11-61A). The SNR has an asymmetric structure extended to the south-east and the north-west. In the X-ray spectra of the center and the north-west regions, we discover recombining plasma features with a strong Si Lyα and radiative recombination continuum at ˜ 2.7 keV. These features are the most significant in the north-west region, and the spectra are well reproduced with a recombining plasma of kTe = 0.5 keV, whereas the spectra of other regions are expressed by an ionizing plasma of kTe = 0.6 keV. The recombining plasma has over-solar abundances, while the ionizing plasma has roughly solar abundances. Hence they are likely ejecta and of interstellar medium (ISM) origin, respectively. The recombining plasma in the north-west of G290.1-0.8 would be generated by a break-out of the supernova ejecta from a high density circumstellar medium to a low density ISM.

  17. L1(0)-FePd nanocluster wires by template-directed thermal decomposition and subsequent hydrogen reduction

    SciTech Connect

    Cui, BZ; Marinescu, M; Liu, JF

    2013-12-14

    This paper reports the nanostructure, formation mechanism, and magnetic properties of tetragonal L1(0)-type Fe55Pd45 (at. %) nanocluster wires (NCWs) fabricated by thermal decomposition of metal nitrates and subsequent hydrogen reduction in nanoporous anodized aluminum oxide templates. The as-synthesized NCWs have diameters in the range of 80-300 nm, and lengths in the range of 0.5-10 mu m. The NCWs are composed of roughly round-shaped nanoclusters in the range of 3-30 nm in size and a weighted average size of 10 nm with a mixture of single-crystal and poly-crystalline structures. The obtained intrinsic coercivity H-i(c) of 3.32 kOe at room temperature for the tetragonal Fe55Pd45 NCWs is higher than those of electrodeposited Fe-Pd solid nanowires while among the highest values reported so far for L1(0)-type FePd nanoparticles. (C) 2013 AIP Publishing LLC.

  18. Optimal Revascularization Strategy on Medina 0,1,0 Left Main Bifurcation Lesions in Type 2 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Xuwei; Peng, Hongyu; Zhao, Donghui; Ma, Qin; Fu, Kun; Chen, Guo

    2016-01-01

    Aim. Diabetes mellitus (DM) is a major risk factor for cardiovascular disease. The implications of a diagnosis of DM are as severe as the diagnosis of coronary artery disease. For many patients with complex coronary artery disease, optimal revascularization strategy selection and optimal medical therapy are equally important. In this study, we compared the hemodynamic results of different stenting techniques for Medina 0,1,0 left main bifurcation lesions. Methods. We use idealized left main bifurcation models and computational fluid dynamics analysis to evaluate hemodynamic parameters which are known to affect the risk of restenosis and thrombosis at stented bifurcation. The surface integrals of time-averaged wall shear stress (TAWSS) and oscillatory shear index (OSI) at bifurcation site were quantified. Results. Crossover stenting without final kissing balloon angioplasty provided the most favorable hemodynamic results (integrated values of TAWSS = 2.96 × 10−4 N, OSI = 4.75 × 10−6 m2) with bifurcation area subjected to OSI values >0.25, >0.35, and >0.45 calculated as 0.39 mm2, 0.06 mm2, and 0 mm2, respectively. Conclusion. Crossover stenting only offers hemodynamic advantages over other stenting techniques for Medina 0,1,0 left main bifurcation lesions and large bifurcation angle is associated with unfavorable flow profiles. PMID:27777957

  19. BasinVis 1.0: A MATLAB®-based program for sedimentary basin subsidence analysis and visualization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Eun Young; Novotny, Johannes; Wagreich, Michael

    2016-06-01

    Stratigraphic and structural mapping is important to understand the internal structure of sedimentary basins. Subsidence analysis provides significant insights for basin evolution. We designed a new software package to process and visualize stratigraphic setting and subsidence evolution of sedimentary basins from well data. BasinVis 1.0 is implemented in MATLAB®, a multi-paradigm numerical computing environment, and employs two numerical methods: interpolation and subsidence analysis. Five different interpolation methods (linear, natural, cubic spline, Kriging, and thin-plate spline) are provided in this program for surface modeling. The subsidence analysis consists of decompaction and backstripping techniques. BasinVis 1.0 incorporates five main processing steps; (1) setup (study area and stratigraphic units), (2) loading well data, (3) stratigraphic setting visualization, (4) subsidence parameter input, and (5) subsidence analysis and visualization. For in-depth analysis, our software provides cross-section and dip-slip fault backstripping tools. The graphical user interface guides users through the workflow and provides tools to analyze and export the results. Interpolation and subsidence results are cached to minimize redundant computations and improve the interactivity of the program. All 2D and 3D visualizations are created by using MATLAB plotting functions, which enables users to fine-tune the results using the full range of available plot options in MATLAB. We demonstrate all functions in a case study of Miocene sediment in the central Vienna Basin.

  20. Data Evaluation Acquired Talys 1.0 Code to Produce 111In from Various Accelerator-Based Reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alipoor, Zahra; Gholamzadeh, Zohreh; Sadeghi, Mahdi; Seyyedi, Solaleh; Aref, Morteza

    The Indium-111 physical-decay parameters as a β-emitter radionuclide show some potential for radiodiagnostic and radiotherapeutic purposes. Medical investigators have shown that 111In is an important radionuclide for locating and imaging certain tumors, visualization of the lymphatic system and thousands of labeling reactions have been suggested. The TALYS 1.0 code was used here to calculate excitation functions of 112/114-118Sn+p, 110Cd+3He, 109Ag+3He, 111-114Cd+p, 110/111Cd+d, 109Ag+α to produce 111In using low and medium energy accelerators. Calculations were performed up to 200 MeV. Appropriate target thicknesses have been assumed based on energy loss calculations with the SRIM code. Theoretical integral yields for all the latter reactions were calculated. The TALYS 1.0 code predicts that the production of a few curies of 111In is feasible using a target of isotopically highly enriched 112Cd and a proton energy between 12 and 25 MeV with a production rate as 248.97 MBq·μA-1 · h-1. Minimum impurities shall be produced during the proton irradiation of an enriched 111Cd target yielding a production rate for 111In of 67.52 MBq· μA-1 · h-1.

  1. Spatial-spectral coherent holographic integrating processor (S2-CHIP): performance analysis and 1.0 GHz experimental demonstration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Merkel, Kristian D.; Cole, Zachary; Mohan, R. Krishna; Babbitt, William R.

    2003-12-01

    The design, performance analysis and experimental demonstration for an analog, broadband, high performance electro-optical signal processor are presented. The Spatial Spectral (S2) Coherent Holographic Integrating Processor, or S2-CHIP, has been developed recently as a broadband core-component for range and mid-to-high pulse repetition frequency radar-signal processing systems, as well as for lidar and radio astronomy applications. In a range radar system, if the transmit and receive RF waveforms are modulated onto a stable optical carrier, the S2 material will perform the analog correlation of the transmit and receive signals to yield the target"s range, and also coherent integrate multiple return results to increase the signal-to-noise-ratio and provide for target velocity determination. Preliminary experimental results are shown of S2-CHIP range processing using a 1.0 Gb/s data rate with 512-bit BPSK pulses. Good range resolution is observed for delays up to 1.0 microsecond. The ability of the processor"s to handle dynamic coding on the transmit RF waveforms is demonstrated.

  2. SOLWEIG 1.0--modelling spatial variations of 3D radiant fluxes and mean radiant temperature in complex urban settings.

    PubMed

    Lindberg, Fredrik; Holmer, Björn; Thorsson, Sofia

    2008-09-01

    The mean radiant temperature, T(mrt), which sums up all shortwave and longwave radiation fluxes (both direct and reflected) to which the human body is exposed is one of the key meteorological parameters governing human energy balance and the thermal comfort of man. In this paper, a new radiation model (SOLWEIG 1.0), which simulates spatial variations of 3D radiation fluxes and T(mrt) in complex urban settings, is presented. The T(mrt) is derived by modelling shortwave and longwave radiation fluxes in six directions (upward, downward and from the four cardinal points) and angular factors. The model requires a limited number of inputs, such as direct, diffuse and global shortwave radiation, air temperature, relative humidity, urban geometry and geographical information (latitude, longitude and elevation). The model was evaluated using 7 days of integral radiation measurements at two sites with different building geometries--a large square and a small courtyard in Göteborg, Sweden (57 degrees N)--across different seasons and in various weather conditions. The evaluation reveals good agreement between modelled and measured values of T(mrt), with an overall good correspondence of R (2) = 0.94, (p < 0.01, RMSE = 4.8 K). SOLWEIG 1.0 is still under development. Future work will incorporate a vegetation scheme, as well as an improvement of the estimation of fluxes from the four cardinal points.

  3. neuTube 1.0: A New Design for Efficient Neuron Reconstruction Software Based on the SWC Format 123

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Linqing

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Brain circuit mapping requires digital reconstruction of neuronal morphologies in complicated networks. Despite recent advances in automatic algorithms, reconstruction of neuronal structures is still a bottleneck in circuit mapping due to a lack of appropriate software for both efficient reconstruction and user-friendly editing. Here we present a new software design based on the SWC format, a standardized neuromorphometric format that has been widely used for analyzing neuronal morphologies or sharing neuron reconstructions via online archives such as NeuroMorpho.org. We have also implemented the design in our open-source software called neuTube 1.0. As specified by the design, the software is equipped with parallel 2D and 3D visualization and intuitive neuron tracing/editing functions, allowing the user to efficiently reconstruct neurons from fluorescence image data and edit standard neuron structure files produced by any other reconstruction software. We show the advantages of neuTube 1.0 by comparing it to two other software tools, namely Neuromantic and Neurostudio. The software is available for free at http://www.neutracing.com, which also hosts complete software documentation and video tutorials. PMID:26464967

  4. A database of global reference sites to support validation of satellite surface albedo datasets (SAVS 1.0)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loew, Alexander; Bennartz, Ralf; Fell, Frank; Lattanzio, Alessio; Doutriaux-Boucher, Marie; Schulz, Jörg

    2016-09-01

    Validating the accuracy and long-term stability of terrestrial satellite data products necessitates a network of reference sites. This paper documents a global database of more than 2000 sites globally which have been characterized in terms of their spatial heterogeneity. The work was motivated by the need for potential validation sites for geostationary surface albedo data products, but the resulting database is useful also for other applications. The database (SAVS 1.0) is publicly available through the EUMETSAT website (http://savs.eumetsat.int/, doi:10.15770/EUM_SEC_CLM_1001). Sites can be filtered according to different criteria, providing a flexible way to identify potential validation sites for further studies and a traceable approach to characterize the heterogeneity of these reference sites. The present paper describes the detailed information on the generation of the SAVS 1.0 database and its characteristics.

  5. Adsorption and reactions of dimethyl and diethyl ethers on Mo 2C/Mo(1 0 0)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farkas, A. P.; Solymosi, F.

    2008-04-01

    The adsorption, desorption and dissociation of dimethyl ether and diethyl ether on Mo 2C/Mo(1 0 0) have been investigated by work function, thermal desorption (TPD) and high resolution electron energy loss spectroscopy (HREELS). The adsorption of both molecules at 100 K caused a significant decrease in the work function of the Mo 2C/Mo(1 0 0) surface. In the case of dimethyl ether almost 90% of the adsorbed monolayer desorbed intact with a Tp = 286 K. Another part decomposed to CO ( Tp = 330 and 960 K) and H 2 ( Tp = 330 and 400 K). The desorption of diethyl ether at monolayer occurred with Tp = 256 and 340 K. Another fraction underwent decomposition as indicated by the release of CO ( Tp = 336 and 436 K) and H 2 ( Tp = 400 K). In addition, the formation of ethylene ( Tp = 342 K) and a very small amount of methane ( Tp = 380 K) was also observed. HREEL spectra of both ethers confirmed their molecular adsorption at 100 K. From the spectral changes occurred upon increasing the exposures and in off-specular direction some conclusions were drawn on the bonding of the adsorbed molecules. Analysis of the HREEL spectra of the annealed layers suggested that in the primary steps the adsorbed ethers dissociate to methyl and methoxy (dimethyl ether), and to ethyl and ethoxy (diethyl ether) species, which react further to yield the desorption products.

  6. neuTube 1.0: A New Design for Efficient Neuron Reconstruction Software Based on the SWC Format.

    PubMed

    Feng, Linqing; Zhao, Ting; Kim, Jinhyun

    2015-01-01

    Brain circuit mapping requires digital reconstruction of neuronal morphologies in complicated networks. Despite recent advances in automatic algorithms, reconstruction of neuronal structures is still a bottleneck in circuit mapping due to a lack of appropriate software for both efficient reconstruction and user-friendly editing. Here we present a new software design based on the SWC format, a standardized neuromorphometric format that has been widely used for analyzing neuronal morphologies or sharing neuron reconstructions via online archives such as NeuroMorpho.org. We have also implemented the design in our open-source software called neuTube 1.0. As specified by the design, the software is equipped with parallel 2D and 3D visualization and intuitive neuron tracing/editing functions, allowing the user to efficiently reconstruct neurons from fluorescence image data and edit standard neuron structure files produced by any other reconstruction software. We show the advantages of neuTube 1.0 by comparing it to two other software tools, namely Neuromantic and Neurostudio. The software is available for free at http://www.neutracing.com, which also hosts complete software documentation and video tutorials.

  7. Accelerator System Model (ASM) user manual with physics and engineering model documentation. ASM version 1.0

    SciTech Connect

    1993-07-01

    The Accelerator System Model (ASM) is a computer program developed to model proton radiofrequency accelerators and to carry out system level trade studies. The ASM FORTRAN subroutines are incorporated into an intuitive graphical user interface which provides for the {open_quotes}construction{close_quotes} of the accelerator in a window on the computer screen. The interface is based on the Shell for Particle Accelerator Related Codes (SPARC) software technology written for the Macintosh operating system in the C programming language. This User Manual describes the operation and use of the ASM application within the SPARC interface. The Appendix provides a detailed description of the physics and engineering models used in ASM. ASM Version 1.0 is joint project of G. H. Gillespie Associates, Inc. and the Accelerator Technology (AT) Division of the Los Alamos National Laboratory. Neither the ASM Version 1.0 software nor this ASM Documentation may be reproduced without the expressed written consent of both the Los Alamos National Laboratory and G. H. Gillespie Associates, Inc.

  8. Laminar burning velocities of lean hydrogen-air mixtures at pressures up to 1.0 MPa

    SciTech Connect

    Bradley, D.; Lawes, M.; Liu, Kexin; Woolley, R.; Verhelst, S.

    2007-04-15

    Values of laminar burning velocity, u{sub l}, and the associated strain rate Markstein number, Ma{sub sr}, of H{sub 2}-air mixtures have been obtained from measurements of flame speeds in a spherical explosion bomb with central ignition. Pressures ranged from 0.1 to 1.0 MPa, with values of equivalence ratio between 0.3 and 1.0. Many of the flames soon became unstable, with an accelerating flame speed, due to Darrieus-Landau and thermodiffusive instabilities. This effect increased with pressure. The flame wrinkling arising from the instabilities enhanced the flame speed. A method is described for allowing for this effect, based on measurements of the flame radii at which the instabilities increased the flame speed. This enabled u{sub l} and Ma{sub sr} to be obtained, devoid of the effects of instabilities. With increasing pressure, the time interval between the end of the ignition spark and the onset of flame instability, during which stable stretched flame propagation occurred, became increasingly small and very high camera speeds were necessary for accurate measurement. Eventually this time interval became so short that first Ma{sub sr} and then u{sub l} could not be measured. Such flame instabilities throw into question the utility of u{sub l} for high pressure, very unstable, flames. The measured values of u{sub l} are compared with those predicted by detailed chemical kinetic models of one-dimensional flames. (author)

  9. High expression of sphingosine kinase 1 and S1P receptors in chemotherapy-resistant prostate cancer PC3 cells and their camptothecin-induced up-regulation

    SciTech Connect

    Akao, Yukihiro . E-mail: yakao@giib.or.jp; Banno, Yoshiko; Nakagawa, Yoshihito; Hasegawa, Nobuko; Kim, Tack-Joong; Murate, Takashi; Igarashi, Yasuyuki; Nozawa, Yoshinori

    2006-04-21

    Although most of pharmacological therapies for cancer utilize the apoptotic machinery of the cells, the available anti-cancer drugs are limited due to the ability of prostate cancer cells to escape from the anti-cancer drug-induced apoptosis. A human prostate cancer cell line PC3 is resistant to camptothecin (CPT). To elucidate the mechanism of this resistance, we have examined the involvement of sphingosine kinase (SPHK) and sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P) receptor in CPT-resistant PC3 and -sensitive LNCaP cells. PC3 cells exhibited higher activity accompanied with higher expression levels of protein and mRNA of SPHK1, and also elevated expression of S1P receptors, S1P{sub 1} and S1P{sub 3}, as compared with those of LNCaP cells. The knockdown of SPHK1 by small interfering RNA and inhibition of S1P receptor signaling by pertussis toxin in PC3 cells induced significant inhibition of cell growth, suggesting implication of SPHK1 and S1P receptors in cell proliferation in PC3 cells. Furthermore, the treatment of PC3 cells with CPT was found to induce up-regulation of the SPHK1/S1P signaling by induction of both SPHK1 enzyme and S1P{sub 1}/S1P{sub 3} receptors. These findings strongly suggest that high expression and up-regulation of SPHK1 and S1P receptors protect PC3 cells from the apoptosis induced by CPT.

  10. CYP2S1 depletion enhances colorectal cell proliferation is associated with PGE2-mediated activation of β-catenin signaling

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Chao; Li, Changyuan; Li, Minle; Tong, Xuemei; Hu, Xiaowen; Yang, Xuhan; Yan, Xiaomei; He, Lin; Wan, Chunling

    2015-02-15

    Colorectal epithelial cancer is one of the most common cancers in the world and its 5-year survival rate is still relatively low. Cytochrome P450 (CYP) enzymes in epithelial cells lining the alimentary tract play an important role in the oxidative metabolism of a wide range of xenobiotics, including (pro-)carcinogens and endogenous compounds. Although CYP2S1, a member of CYP family, strongly expressed in many extrahepatic tissues, the role of CYP2S1 in cancer remains unclear. To investigate whether CYP2S1 involves in colorectal carcinogenesis, cell proliferation was analyzed in HCT116 cells depleted of CYP2S1 using small hairpin interfering RNA. Our data show that CYP2S1 knockdown promotes cell proliferation through increasing the level of endogenous prostaglandin E2(PGE2). PGE2, in turn, reduces phosphorylation of β-catenin and activates β-catenin signaling, which contributes to the cell proliferation. Furthermore, CYP2S1 knockdown increase tumor growth in xenograft mouse model. In brief, these results demonstrate that CYP2S1 regulates colorectal cancer growth through associated with PGE2-mediated activation of β-catenin signaling. - Highlights: • Knockdown of CYP2S1 expression improve HCT116 cell proliferation in vitro and in vivo. • Elevate PGE2 production in CYP2S1 knockdown cell is associated with its proliferation. • Elevate PGE2 level in CYP2S1 knockdown cells enhance β-catenin accumulation. • β-catenin activate TCF/LEF and target gene expression thus promote cell proliferation.

  11. HDL-S1P: cardiovascular functions, disease-associated alterations, and therapeutic applications.

    PubMed

    Levkau, Bodo

    2015-01-01

    Sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) is a bioactive sphingolipid contained in High-density lipoproteins (HDL) and has drawn considerable attention in the lipoprotein field as numerous studies have demonstrated its contribution to several functions inherent to HDL. Some of them are partly and some entirely due to the S1P contained in HDL (HDL-S1P). Despite the presence of over 1000 different lipids in HDL, S1P stands out as it possesses its own cell surface receptors through which it exercises key physiological functions. Most of the S1P in human plasma is associated with HDL, and the amount of HDL-S1P influences the quality and quantity of HDL-dependent functions. The main binding partner of S1P in HDL is apolipoprotein M but others may also exist particularly under conditions of acute S1P elevations. HDL not only exercise functions through their S1P content but have also an impact on genuine S1P signaling by influencing S1P bioactivity and receptor presentation. HDL-S1P content is altered in human diseases such as atherosclerosis, coronary artery disease, myocardial infarction, renal insufficiency and diabetes mellitus. Low HDL-S1P has also been linked to impaired HDL functions associated with these disorders. Although the pathophysiological and molecular reasons for such disease-associated shifts in HDL-S1P are little understood, there have been successful approaches to circumvent their adverse implications by pharmacologically increasing HDL-S1P as means to improve HDL function. This mini-review will cover the current understanding of the contribution of HDL-S1P to physiological HDL function, its alteration in disease and ways for its restoration to correct HDL dysfunction.

  12. Moesin Controls Clathrin-Mediated S1PR1 Internalization in T Cells

    PubMed Central

    Nomachi, Akira; Yoshinaga, Masanori; Liu, Jaron; Kanchanawong, Pakorn; Tohyama, Kiyoshi; Thumkeo, Dean; Watanabe, Takeshi; Narumiya, Shuh; Hirata, Takako

    2013-01-01

    The lipid mediator sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P) regulates a wide range of cellular activities, including vascular maturation, angiogenesis, and immune-cell trafficking. Among the five known receptors for S1P (S1PR1-S1PR5), S1PR1 is a critical regulator of lymphocyte trafficking: its signaling is required for lymphocyte egress from lymphoid organs, while its down-modulation by agonist-induced internalization is a prerequisite for lymphocyte entry into lymphoid organs from the bloodstream. Despite the importance of S1PR1 down-regulation in determining lymphocyte behavior, the molecular mechanism of its internalization in lymphocytes has not been defined. Here we show that agonist-induced S1PR1 internalization in T cells occurs via clathrin-mediated endocytosis and is regulated by moesin, an ezrin-radixin-moesin (ERM) family member. In S1P-stimulated T cells, S1PR1 relocalized within clathrin-coated vesicles (CCVs) and early endosomes, and S1PR1 internalization was blocked when clathrin was pharmacologically inhibited. Stimulating moesin-deficient T cells with S1P failed to induce S1PR1 internalization and CCV formation. Furthermore, treating moesin-deficient mice with FTY720, an S1P receptor agonist known to internalize S1PR1, caused delayed lymphopenia, and lymphocytes isolated from FTY720-treated moesin-deficient mice still responded to S1P ex vivo in chemotaxis assays. These results reveal a novel role for moesin in regulating clathrin-dependent S1PR1 internalization through CCV formation. PMID:24358210

  13. 26 CFR 31.3121(s)-1 - Concurrent employment by related corporations with common paymaster.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... with common paymaster. 31.3121(s)-1 Section 31.3121(s)-1 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE... Revenue Code of 1954) General Provisions § 31.3121(s)-1 Concurrent employment by related corporations with... this section. Section 3121(s) and this section apply only to remuneration disbursed in the form...

  14. Response evaluation criteria for solid tumours in dogs (v1.0): a Veterinary Cooperative Oncology Group (VCOG) consensus document.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, S M; Thamm, D H; Vail, D M; London, C A

    2015-09-01

    In veterinary medical oncology, there is currently no standardized protocol for assessing response to therapy in solid tumours. The lack of such a formalized guideline makes it challenging to critically compare outcome measures across various treatment protocols. The Veterinary Cooperative Oncology Group (VCOG) membership consensus document presented here is based on the recommendations of a subcommittee of American College of Veterinary Internal Medicine (ACVIM) board-certified veterinary oncologists. This consensus paper has used the human response evaluation criteria in solid tumours (RECIST v1.1) as a framework to establish standard procedures for response assessment in canine solid tumours that is meant to be easy to use, repeatable and applicable across a variety of clinical trial structures in veterinary oncology. It is hoped that this new canine RECIST (cRECIST v1.0) will be adopted within the veterinary oncology community and thereby facilitate the comparison of current and future treatment protocols used for companion animals with cancer.

  15. A NEXAFS study of the bonding of corrosion inhibitors on ZnO(1 0 1 bar 0)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walsh, J. F.; Dhariwal, H. S.; Gutiérrez-Sosa, A.; Lindsay, R.; Thornton, G.; Oldman, R. J.

    1995-05-01

    The orientation of benzotriazole and related molecules on ZnO (1 0 1 bar 0) has been studied using C and N K-edge near-edge X-ray absorption fine structure (NEXAFS). At sub-monolayer coverage, benzotriazole is found to adsorb in an upright geometry with the molecular plane within 35° of perpendicular to the substrate, as indicated by the polarization dependence of the π* resonances. Seven slightly different models of the bond geometry are consistent with the data. Indazole (C7H6N2), another corrosion inhibitor is found to bond in a similar manner. Related molecules, benzimidazole (C7H6N2) and 1-methyl benzotriazole (C7H7N3) are found not to be oriented at sub-monolayer coverage. In conjunction with multilayer data, this suggests a specific first-bonding-layer origin for the corrosion inhibition properties of benzotriazole.

  16. An Ab Initio Study of the Structures, Vibrational Spectra, and Energetics of AlSHX (X = -1, 0, +1)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guha, Sujata; Francisco, Joseph S.

    2007-12-01

    The ground state of aluminum hydrosulfide, AlSHX (where X=-1,0,+1), has been examined using high-level ab initio electronic structure calculations at the CCSD(T) level with an augmented correlation-consistent basis set. The geometries have been optimized up through the aug-cc-pV5Z level and vibrational frequencies calculated using the aug-cc-pV5Z basis set. The energetic properties of AlSH are also examined. The adiabatic ionization potential and electron affinity of AlSH are calculated to be 198.5 and 7.7 kcal mol-1, respectively. Dissociation of AlSH into AlS+H will require 78.2 kcal mol-1 of energy, and the Al-S bond energy is 91.1 kcal mol-1. Structural and energetic properties of the cation and anion of AlSH are reported for the first time.

  17. Room-temperature InGaAs detector arrays for 1.0 - 1.7 microns spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Olsen, G. H.; Joshi, A. M.; Mykietyn, E.; Colosi, J.; Woodruff, K. M.

    1989-01-01

    Linear arrays of 256 element InGaAs detectors with 100 x 30 micron pixels were mounted in multiplexer packages and tested in an optical multichannel analyzer (OMA). Typical performance characteristics include dark current (-5V) of 400 picoamps and responsivities of 0.75 A/W (1.3 microns) and 0.14 A/W (0.85 microns). The 256 element exhibited a mean room-temperature dark current of under 400 picoamps when mounted in the OMA and a dynamic range over 11 bits (2000:1). Future applications, including room-temperature detector arrays for 2.5 microns and avalanche photodiode arrays for 1.0-1.7 microns, are discussed.

  18. Properties of high k gate dielectric gadolinium oxide deposited on Si (1 0 0) by dual ion beam deposition (DIBD)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Jian-Ping; Chai, Chun-Lin; Yang, Shao-Yan; Liu, Zhi-Kai; Song, Shu-Lin; Li, Yan-Li; Chen, Nuo-Fu

    2004-09-01

    Gadolinium oxide thin films have been prepared on silicon (1 0 0) substrates with a low-energy dual ion-beam epitaxial technique. Substrate temperature was an important factor to affect the crystal structures and textures in an ion energy range of 100-500 eV. The films had a monoclinic Gd2O3 structure with preferred orientation (4 bar 0 2) at low substrate temperatures. When the substrate temperature was increased, the orientation turned to (2 0 2), and finally, the cubic structure appeared at the substrate temperature of 700 °C, which disagreed with the previous report because of the ion energy. The AES studies found that Gadolinium oxide shared Gd2O3 structures, although there were a lot of oxygen deficiencies in the films, and the XPS results confirmed this. AFM was also used to investigate the surface images of the samples. Finally, the electrical properties were presented.

  19. Statistical analysis of Stromboli VLP tremor in the band [0.1-0.5] Hz: some consequences for vibrating structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Lauro, E.; de Martino, S.; Falanga, M.; Palo, M.

    2006-08-01

    We analyze time series of Strombolian volcanic tremor, focusing our attention on the frequency band [0.1-0.5] Hz (very long period (VLP) tremor). Although this frequency band is largely affected by noise, we evidence two significant components by using Independent Component Analysis with the frequencies, respectively, of ~0.2 and ~0.4 Hz. We show that these components display wavefield features similar to those of the high frequency Strombolian signals (>0.5 Hz). In fact, they are radially polarised and located within the crater area. This characterization is lost when an enhancement of energy appears. In this case, the presence of microseismic noise becomes relevant. Investigating the entire large data set available, we determine how microseismic noise influences the signals. We ascribe the microseismic noise source to Scirocco wind. Moreover, our analysis allows one to evidence that the Strombolian conduit vibrates like the asymmetric cavity associated with musical instruments generating self-sustained tones.

  20. WE-E-12A-01: Medical Physics 1.0 to 2.0: MRI, Displays, Informatics

    SciTech Connect

    Pickens, D; Flynn, M; Peck, D

    2014-06-15

    Medical Physics 2.0 is a bold vision for an existential transition of clinical imaging physics in face of the new realities of value-based and evidence-based medicine, comparative effectiveness, and meaningful use. It speaks to how clinical imaging physics can expand beyond traditional insular models of inspection and acceptance testing, oriented toward compliance, towards team-based models of operational engagement, prospective definition and assurance of effective use, and retrospective evaluation of clinical performance. Organized into four sessions of the AAPM, this particular session focuses on three specific modalities as outlined below. MRI 2.0: This presentation will look into the future of clinical MR imaging and what the clinical medical physicist will need to be doing as the technology of MR imaging evolves. Many of the measurement techniques used today will need to be expanded to address the advent of higher field imaging systems and dedicated imagers for specialty applications. Included will be the need to address quality assurance and testing metrics for multi-channel MR imagers and hybrid devices such as MR/PET systems. New pulse sequences and acquisition methods, increasing use of MR spectroscopy, and real-time guidance procedures will place the burden on the medical physicist to define and use new tools to properly evaluate these systems, but the clinical applications must be understood so that these tools are use correctly. Finally, new rules, clinical requirements, and regulations will mean that the medical physicist must actively work to keep her/his sites compliant and must work closely with physicians to ensure best performance of these systems. Informatics Display 1.0 to 2.0: Medical displays are an integral part of medical imaging operation. The DICOM and AAPM (TG18) efforts have led to clear definitions of performance requirements of monochrome medical displays that can be followed by medical physicists to ensure proper performance. However

  1. Development of a temperature-variable magnetic resonance imaging system using a 1.0 T yokeless permanent magnet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Terada, Y.; Tamada, D.; Kose, K.

    2011-10-01

    A temperature variable magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) system has been developed using a 1.0 T permanent magnet. A permanent magnet, gradient coils, radiofrequency coil, and shim coil were installed in a temperature variable thermostatic bath. First, the variation in the magnetic field inhomogeneity with temperature was measured. The inhomogeneity has a specific spatial symmetry, which scales linearly with temperature, and a single-channel shim coil was designed to compensate for the inhomogeneity. The inhomogeneity was drastically reduced by shimming over a wide range of temperature from -5 °C to 45 °C. MR images of an okra pod acquired at different temperatures demonstrated the high potential of the system for visualizing thermally sensitive properties.

  2. High resolution rotational analysis of the B 3Π-X 3Δ (1,0) band of titanium monoxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amiot, Claude; Azaroual, El Mehdi; Luc, Paul; Vetter, Raymond

    1995-03-01

    The B 3Π-X 3Δ (1,0) band of titanium monoxide has been studied at sub-Doppler resolution (0.002 cm-1) by crossing a beam of TiO molecules with a cw tunable laser beam and by collecting the laser-induced fluorescence. The rotational structure of 42 branches belonging to the 3Π-3Δ transition has been analyzed up to rotational quantum numbers equal to 94. Spectroscopic data have been reduced to a set of 24 molecular constants, using a case (a) effective Hamiltonian. The rotational, spin-orbit and Λ-doubling constants are discussed in terms of the leading configurations which give rise to the X 3Δ and B 3Π electronic states. It is shown that for the B state, existing ab initio calculations are not able to reproduce the second order spin-orbit effect and the Λ doubling effect.

  3. Absolute doubly differential cross sections for ionization of adenine by 1.0-MeV protons

    SciTech Connect

    Iriki, Y.; Kikuchi, Y.; Imai, M.; Itoh, A.

    2011-09-15

    Double-differential ionization cross sections of adenine (C{sub 5}H{sub 5}N{sub 5}) by 1.0-MeV protons have been measured using a vapor-phase adenine target. Ejected electrons were analyzed by a 45 deg. parallel-plate electrostatic spectrometer in an electron energy range from 1 to 1000 eV at electron emission angles from 15 deg. to 165 deg. The effective target thickness of adenine was determined by a Rutherford forward scattering method and a vapor deposition method. Present data are in good agreement with recent calculations. Comparisons were made with other data on various hydrocarbon molecules. It was found that the ionization cross sections of these molecules can be scaled fairly well in terms of the total number of valence electrons.

  4. Development of a temperature-variable magnetic resonance imaging system using a 1.0T yokeless permanent magnet.

    PubMed

    Terada, Y; Tamada, D; Kose, K

    2011-10-01

    A temperature variable magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) system has been developed using a 1.0 T permanent magnet. A permanent magnet, gradient coils, radiofrequency coil, and shim coil were installed in a temperature variable thermostatic bath. First, the variation in the magnetic field inhomogeneity with temperature was measured. The inhomogeneity has a specific spatial symmetry, which scales linearly with temperature, and a single-channel shim coil was designed to compensate for the inhomogeneity. The inhomogeneity was drastically reduced by shimming over a wide range of temperature from -5°C to 45°C. MR images of an okra pod acquired at different temperatures demonstrated the high potential of the system for visualizing thermally sensitive properties.

  5. Temperature-Dependent Sellmeier Equation for Refractive Index of 1.0 mol % Mg-Doped Stoichiometric Lithium Tantalate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lim, Hwan Hong; Kurimura, Sunao; Katagai, Toshio; Shoji, Ichiro

    2013-03-01

    Mg-doped stoichiometric lithium tantalate (SLT) is a promising material in high power generation, due to its high thermal conductivity. The accuracy of the temperature-dependent Sellmeier equation for Mg-doped SLT is important for designing high-power-frequency converters. We propose a temperature-dependent Sellmeier equation for the extraordinary refractive index of 1.0 mol % Mg-doped SLT. The equation is fitted with measured data in the first-order quasi-phase-matched (QPM) second harmonic generation (SHG) and optical parametric oscillation (OPO) with the fundamental and pump wavelengths being both 1.064 µm and previously published data [Jpn. J. Appl. Phys. 41 (2002) 465] of SLT. The equation allows us to predict accurate QPM periods in the range of 0.5-4 µm wavelength and in temperature range of 30-170 °C.

  6. A 128 x 128 InGaAs detector array for 1.0 - 1.7 microns

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Olsen, G.; Joshi, A.; Lange, M.; Woodruff, K.; Mykietyn, E.; Gay, D.; Ackley, D.; Erickson, G.; Ban, V.; Staller, C.

    1990-01-01

    A two-dimensional 128 x 128 detector array for the 1.0 - 1.7 micron spectral region has been demonstrated with indium gallium arsenide. The 30 micron square pixels had 60 micron spacing in both directions and were designed to be compatible with a 2D Reticon multiplexer. Dark currents below 100 pA, capacitance near 0.1 pF, and quantum efficiencies above 80 percent were measured. Probe maps of dark current and quantum efficiency are presented along with pixel dropout data and wafer yield which was as high as 99.89 percent (7 dropouts) in an area of 6528 pixels and 99.37 percent (103 dropouts) over an entire 128 x 128 pixel region.

  7. Study on the corrosion residual strength of the 1.0 wt.% Ce modified AZ91 magnesium alloy

    SciTech Connect

    Li Chunfang; Liu Yaohui; Wang Qiang; Zhang Lina; Zhang Dawei

    2010-01-15

    The effect of corrosion on the tensile behaviour of the 1.0 wt.% Ce modified AZ91 magnesium alloy was investigated by the immersion of the test bar in 3.5 wt.% NaCl aqueous solution for 0, 12, 40, 108, 204, 372 and 468 h with the subsequent tensile tests in this paper. The fractography was analyzed by scanning electron microscopy. The results show that pitting corrosion should be responsible for the drop of the corrosion residual strength within the testing time. The depth of the corrosion pits was statistically and quantitatively obtained by an optical microscopy and the maximal value was recorded as the extreme depth of the corrosion pit. Furthermore, the corrosion residual strength is linearly dependent on the extreme depth of the corrosion pit, which can be attributed to the loss of cross-sectional area and the emergence of stress concentration caused by the initiation and development of corrosion pits.

  8. MR-Guided Laser Ablation of Osteoid Osteoma in an Open High-Field System (1.0 T)

    SciTech Connect

    Streitparth, F. Gebauer, B.; Melcher, I. Schaser, K.; Philipp, C.; Rump, J. Hamm, B. Teichgraeber, U.

    2009-03-15

    Computed tomography is the standard imaging modality to minimize the extent of surgical or ablative treatment in osteoid osteomas. In the last 15 years, since a description of thermal ablation of osteoid osteomas was first published, this technique has become a treatment of choice for this tumor. We report the case of a 20-year-old man with an osteoid osteoma treated with laser ablation in an open high-field magnetic resonance imaging scanner (1.0 T). The tumor, located in the right fibula, was safely and effectively ablated under online monitoring. We describe the steps of this interventional procedure and discuss related innovative guidance and monitoring features and potential benefits compared with computed tomographic guidance.

  9. A Magellan MIKE and Spitzer MIPS Study of 1.5-1.0 M sun Stars in Scorpius-Centaurus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Christine H.; Mamajek, Eric E.; Bitner, Martin A.; Pecaut, Mark; Su, Kate Y. L.; Weinberger, Alycia J.

    2011-09-01

    We obtained Spitzer Space Telescope Multiband Imaging Photometer for Spitzer (MIPS) 24 μm and 70 μm observations of 182 nearby, Hipparcos F- and G-type common proper motion single and binary systems in the nearest OB association, Scorpius-Centaurus. We also obtained Magellan/MIKE R ~ 50,000 visual spectra at 3500-10500 Å for 181 candidate ScoCen stars in single and binary systems. Combining our MIPS observations with those of other ScoCen stars in the literature, we estimate 24 μm F+G-type disk fractions of 9/27 (33% ± 11%), 21/67 (31% ± 7%), and 25/71 (35% ± 7%) for Upper Scorpius (~10 Myr), Upper Centaurus Lupus (~15 Myr), and Lower Centaurus Crux (~17 Myr), respectively. We confirm previous IRAS and MIPS excess detections and present new discoveries of 41 protoplanetary and debris disk systems, with fractional infrared luminosities ranging from L IR/L * = 10-5 to 10-2 and grain temperatures ranging from T gr = 40-300 K. We searched for an increase in 24 μm excess at an age of 15-20 Myr, consistent with the onset of debris production predicted by coagulation N-body simulations of outer planetary systems. We found such an increase around 1.5 M sun stars but discovered a decrease in the 24 μm excess around 1.0 M sun stars. We additionally discovered that the 24 μm excess around 1.0 M sun stars is larger than predicted by self-stirred models. Finally, we found a weak anti-correlation between fractional infrared luminosity (L IR/L *) and chromospheric activity (R'HK), that may be the result of differences in stellar properties, such as mass, luminosity, and/or winds.

  10. Advanced communications technology satellite high burst rate link evaluation terminal communication protocol software user's guide, version 1.0

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reinhart, Richard C.

    1993-01-01

    The Communication Protocol Software was developed at the NASA Lewis Research Center to support the Advanced Communications Technology Satellite High Burst Rate Link Evaluation Terminal (ACTS HBR-LET). The HBR-LET is an experimenters terminal to communicate with the ACTS for various experiments by government, university, and industry agencies. The Communication Protocol Software is one segment of the Control and Performance Monitor (C&PM) Software system of the HBR-LET. The Communication Protocol Software allows users to control and configure the Intermediate Frequency Switch Matrix (IFSM) on board the ACTS to yield a desired path through the spacecraft payload. Besides IFSM control, the C&PM Software System is also responsible for instrument control during HBR-LET experiments, uplink power control of the HBR-LET to demonstrate power augmentation during signal fade events, and data display. The Communication Protocol Software User's Guide, Version 1.0 (NASA CR-189162) outlines the commands and procedures to install and operate the Communication Protocol Software. Configuration files used to control the IFSM, operator commands, and error recovery procedures are discussed. The Communication Protocol Software Maintenance Manual, Version 1.0 (NASA CR-189163, to be published) is a programmer's guide to the Communication Protocol Software. This manual details the current implementation of the software from a technical perspective. Included is an overview of the Communication Protocol Software, computer algorithms, format representations, and computer hardware configuration. The Communication Protocol Software Test Plan (NASA CR-189164, to be published) provides a step-by-step procedure to verify the operation of the software. Included in the Test Plan is command transmission, telemetry reception, error detection, and error recovery procedures.

  11. DISTANCE AND EVOLUTIONARY STATE OF THE SUPERNOVA REMNANT 3C 397 (G41.1-0.3)

    SciTech Connect

    Leahy, D. A.; Ranasinghe, S.

    2016-01-20

    In this paper, we analyze 1420 MHz continuum and H i observations of the supernova remnant (SNR) 3C 397 (G41.1-0.3). The H i absorption spectra show clear absorption up to the tangent point velocity and also the absence of absorption at 50–60 km s{sup −1}. This yields lower and upper limits to the distances of 6.3 ± 0.1 and 9.7 ± 0.3 kpc, which are better and more robust than previous estimates. We apply generalized SNR models to 3C 397, including the ejecta-dominated phase and the transition-to-Sedov phase. Using emission measures from the X-ray and mean gas density from the infrared, we show that the hard X-ray component has the dominant filling factor and the soft X-ray component has a very small filling factor. The models are required to be consistent with 3C 397's measured properties, including the observed shock temperatures and shock radii. Consistent models are found if 3C 397 has a distance in the range of ≃8–9.7 kpc. For an 8 kpc distance, the estimated age is ≃1350 years and the explosion energy is 1.0 × 10{sup 51} erg, while for 9.7 kpc, the the most probable age is ≃1750 years and the energy 1.5 × 10{sup 51} erg.

  12. Probing Supernova Ejecta Dust with Stellar Lightbulbs: MID-IR Imaging of G54.1+0.3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borkowski, Kazimierz

    2015-10-01

    Stellar explosions govern the interstellar dust lifecycle. In the early Universe, supernovae (SN) injected the first heavy elements into the interstellar medium (ISM). A significant fraction of ejecta was dust, but most of it might have been destroyed in supernova remnant's (SNR) reverse shocks. Our current understanding of both formation of dust in SNe and destruction of dust in shock waves is poor. We propose to observe young SNR G54.1+0.3 with the SOFIA telescope in order to advance our knowledge of dust formation in SNe. Progenitor of SN that produced G54.1+0.3 exploded in a stellar cluster containing a number of hot O and B stars. These stars heat ejecta dust to high temperatures, providing us with a unique opportunity to study its properties prior to arrival of a reverse shock and to shed light on formation of dust in SNe. Ejecta dust heated by the stellar ultraviolet radiation in the vicinity of hot stars emits most efficiently in the infrared spectral window accessible only to SOFIA. The proposed observations will provide spectral and spatial information crucial for understanding of ejecta dust properties such as its temperature, composition, and spatial distribution. We propose to do multi-band imaging observations with FORCAST in four filters to learn about spectral and spatial distribution of ejecta dust in the vicinity of hot stars. The high spatial resolution of SOFIA is crucial to our investigation, and only SOFIA can observe this dust at wavelengths where it emits radiation most efficiently. High-spatial resolution FORCAST images