Science.gov

Sample records for 1-10 mg kg-1

  1. Electrodeposition of hydroxyapatite coating on Mg-4.0Zn-1.0Ca-0.6Zr alloy and in vitro evaluation of degradation, hemolysis, and cytotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Guan, Ren-Guo; Johnson, Ian; Cui, Tong; Zhao, Tong; Zhao, Zhan-Yong; Li, Xue; Liu, Huinan

    2012-04-01

    A novel biodegradable Mg-4.0Zn-1.0Ca-0.6Zr (wt %) alloy was successfully produced using a series of metallurgical processes; including melting, casting, rolling, and heat treatment. The hardness and ultimate tensile strength of the alloy sheets increased to 71.2HV and 320 MPa after rolling and then aging for 12 h at 175°C. These mechanical properties were sufficient for load-bearing orthopedic implants. A hydroxyapatite (HA) coating was deposited on the Mg-4.0Zn-1.0Ca-0.6Zr (wt %) alloy using a novel coating process combining alkali heat pretreatment, electrodeposition, and alkali heat posttreatment. The microstructure, composition, and phases of the Mg-4.0Zn-1.0Ca-0.6Zr (wt %) alloy and HA coating were characterized using scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS), and X-ray diffraction (XRD). The degradation, hemolysis, and cytocompatibility of the HA-coated and uncoated Mg-4.0Zn-1.0Ca-0.6Zr (wt %) alloy were studied in vitro. The corrosion potential (E(corr)) of Mg-4.0Zn-1.0Ca-0.6Zr alloy (-1.72 V) was higher than Mg (-1.95 V), Mg-0.6Ca alloy (-1.91 V) and Mg-1.0Ca alloy (-1.97 V), indicating the Mg-Zn-Ca-Zr alloy would be more corrosion resistant. The initial corrosion potential of the HA-coated Mg alloy sample (-1.51 V) was higher than the uncoated sample (-1.72 V). The hemolysis rates of the HA-coated and uncoated Mg-4.0Zn-1.0Ca-0.6Zr (wt %) alloy samples were both <5%, which met the requirements for implant materials. The HA-coated and uncoated Mg-4.0Zn-1.0Ca-0.6Zr (wt %) alloy samples demonstrated the same cytotoxicity score as the negative control. The HA-coated samples showed a slightly greater relative growth rate (RGR%) of fibroblasts than the uncoated samples. Both the HA-coated and uncoated Mg-4.0Zn-1.0Ca-0.6Zr (wt %) alloy provided evidence of acceptable cytocompatibility for medical applications.

  2. Efficacy of fipronil (1.0 mg/kg) against Rhipicephalus (Boophilus) microplus strains resistant to ivermectin (0.63 mg/kg).

    PubMed

    Lopes, Welber Daniel Zanetti; Cruz, Breno Cayeiro; Teixeira, Weslen Fabrício Pires; Felippelli, Gustavo; Maciel, Willian Giquelin; Buzzulini, Carolina; Gomes, Lucas V Costa; Favero, Flávia; Soares, Vando Edésio; Bichuette, Murilo A; de Oliveira, Gilson Pereira; da Costa, Alvimar José

    2014-08-01

    The present study aimed to evaluate the efficacy of fipronil (1 mg/kg) against three strains of ivermectin-resistant Rhipicephalus (Boophilus) microplus (R. (B.) microplus), naturally infesting cattle from different states of Brazil. Three rural properties with a history of macrocyclic lactones ineffectiveness against the cattle tick, and low frequency use of fipronil in the herd, were selected for the study. The animals were randomized according to the mean tick counts, performed on days -3, -2 and -1, into three groups with 10 animals each: T01, control (saline solution); T02, subcutaneous ivermectin (0.63 mg/kg) and T03, topical fipronil (1 mg/kg). Treatment was performed on day 0. Counts of partially engorged female ticks were performed on days 3, 7 and 14 post-treatment (DPT), and then every 7 days until the 49th DPT. In all three experiments, it was possible to diagnose resistance of R. (B.) microplus to ivermectin (0.63 mg/kg). The maximum efficacy (arithmetic mean) obtained for ivermectin was 64% in experiment II. On the other hand, the formulation containing fipronil (1 mg/kg) reached high efficacy values (≥97%) in all three experiments. The results from all experiments in this study demonstrate the high efficacy of 1mg/kg fipronil, administered pour-on in naturally infested cattle, against strains of R. (B.) microplus that are resistant to 630 mcg/kg ivermectin. PMID:24853051

  3. In vitro degradation of MAO/PLA coating on Mg-1.21Li-1.12Ca-1.0Y alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeng, Rong-Chang; Qi, Wei-Chen; Song, Ying-Wei; He, Qin-Kun; Cui, Hong-Zhi; Han, En-Hou

    2014-12-01

    Magnesium and its alloys are promising biomaterials due to their biocompatibility and osteoinduction. The plasticity and corrosion resistance of commercial magnesium alloys cannot meet the requirements for degradable biomaterials completely at present. Particularly, the alkalinity in the microenvironment surrounding the implants, resulting from the degradation, arouses a major concern. Micro-arc oxidation (MAO) and poly(lactic acid) (PLA) composite (MAO/PLA) coating on biomedical Mg-1.21Li-1.12Ca-1.0Y alloy was prepared to manipulate the pH variation in an appropriate range. Surface morphologies were discerned using SEM and EMPA. And corrosion resistance was evaluated via electrochemical polarization and impedance and hydrogen volumetric method. The results demonstrated that the MAO coating predominantly consisted of MgO, Mg2SiO4 and Y2O3. The composite coating markedly improved the corrosion resistance of the alloy. The rise in solution pH for the MAO/PLA coating was tailored to a favorable range of 7.5-7.8. The neutralization caused by the alkalinity of MAO and Mg substrate and acidification of PLA was probed. The result designates that MAO/PLA composite coating on Mg-1.21Li-1.12Ca-1.0Y alloys may be a promising biomedical coating.

  4. Comparison of acute alprazolam (0.25, 0.50 and 1.0 mg) effects versus those of lorazepam 2 mg and placebo on memory in healthy volunteers using laboratory and telephone tests.

    PubMed

    Vermeeren, A; Jackson, J L; Muntjewerff, N D; Quint, P J; Harrison, E M; O'Hanlon, J F

    1995-03-01

    This study was designed to confirm the hypothetical dose-dependent effect of alprazolam on memory and to compare its effects on tests measuring different aspects of cognitive and psychomotor functioning. A secondary purpose was to compare the sensitivity of newly developed telephone tests with a standard laboratory test of memory. Twenty healthy male volunteers (aged 18-35 years) participated in a five-way double-blind crossover design. Treatments were single oral doses of alprazolam (0.25, 0.5 and 1.0 mg), placebo and lorazepam 2.0 mg. The latter was included as an internal control for demonstrating sensitivity of the method. Lorazepam significantly impaired all performance measures except two: verbal fluency and accuracy of music recognition were insensitive to drug effects. Alprazolam had clear dose-dependent effects on different aspects of memory: 0.25 mg did not affect any parameter; 0.5 mg impaired performance in a Word Learning Test and a Spatial Memory Test and also psychomotor performance; 1.0 mg additionally impaired Syntactic Reasoning, Semantic Verification, and Critical Flicker Fusion performance. Alprazolam's effects were not selective for any of the cognitive functions as measured in this study. The telephone tests were clearly less sensitive than the standard test, though sufficient for showing significant effects of alprazolam 1 mg and lorazepam 2 mg.

  5. Formation process of micro arc oxidation coatings obtained in a sodium phytate containing solution with and without CaCO3 on binary Mg-1.0Ca alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, R. F.; Zhang, Y. Q.; Zhang, S. F.; B. Qu; Guo, S. B.; Xiang, J. H.

    2015-01-01

    Micro arc oxidation (MAO) is an effective method to improve the corrosion resistance of magnesium alloys. In order to reveal the influence of alloying element Ca and CaCO3 electrolyte on the formation process and chemical compositions of MAO coatings on binary Mg-1.0Ca alloy, anodic coatings after different anodizing times were prepared on binary Mg-1.0Ca alloy in a base solution containing 3 g/L sodium hydroxide and 15 g/L sodium phytate with and without addition of CaCO3. The coating formation was studied by using scanning electron microscope (SEM), energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) and X-ray diffraction (XRD). The results show that Mg-1.0Ca alloy is composed of two phases, the Mg phase and Mg2Ca phase. After treating for 5 s, the coating began to develop and was preferentially formed on the area nearby Mg2Ca phase, which may be resulted from the intrinsic electronegative potential of the Mg phase than that of Mg2Ca phase. Anodic coatings unevenly covered the total surface after 20 s. After 80 s, the coatings were uniformly developed on Mg-1.0Ca alloy with micro pores. During MAO process, some sodium phytate molecules are hydrolyzed into inorganic phosphate. CaCO3 has minor influence on the calcium content of the obtained MAO coatings.

  6. Measurements of proton induced γ-ray emission cross-sections on Mg from 1.0 to 3.0 MeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharifzadeh, N.; Kakuee, O.; Mohammadi, S.

    2016-04-01

    Differential cross-section of proton induced γ-ray emission from the reactions 24Mg(p,p‧γ)24Mg (Eγ = 1369 keV), 25Mg(p,p‧γ)25Mg (Eγ = 390, 585, 975 keV) and 26Mg(p,γ)27Al (Eγ = 1014 keV) were measured for proton energies from 1 to 3 MeV using a 60 μg/cm2 Mg target evaporated on a 40 μg/cm2 Ag thin film. The γ-rays were collected by a 50% relative efficiency HPGe detector placed at an angle of 90° with respect to the beam direction, while the backscattered protons were collected by an ion implanted Si detector placed at a scattering angle of 165°. Simultaneous collection of γ-ray and RBS spectra is a great advantage of this approach which makes differential cross-section measurements independent on the collected beam charge. Measured cross-section values were compared with the previously reported data in the literature. Absolute γ-ray differential cross-sections were obtained with an overall systematic uncertainty of about ±6% and statistical uncertainty of less than ±5% for proton energies higher than 2.24 MeV.

  7. Peri-implant tissue response and biodegradation performance of a Mg-1.0Ca-0.5Sr alloy in rat tibia.

    PubMed

    Berglund, Ida S; Jacobs, Brittany Y; Allen, Kyle D; Kim, Stanley E; Pozzi, Antonio; Allen, Josephine B; Manuel, Michele V

    2016-05-01

    Biodegradable magnesium (Mg) alloys combine the advantages of traditional metallic implants and biodegradable polymers, having high strength, low density, and a stiffness ideal for bone fracture fixation. A recently developed Mg-Ca-Sr alloy potentially possesses advantageous characteristics over other Mg alloys, such as slower degradation rates and minimal toxicity. In this study, the biocompatibility of this Mg-Ca-Sr alloy was investigated in a rat pin-placement model. Cylindrical pins were inserted in the proximal tibial metaphyses in pre-drilled holes orthogonal to the tibial axis. Implant and bone morphologies were investigated using μCT at 1, 3, and 6 weeks after implant placement. At the same time points, the surrounding tissue was evaluated using H&E, TRAP and Goldner's trichrome staining. Although gas bubbles were observed around the degrading implant at early time points, the bone remained intact with no evidence of microfracture. Principle findings also include new bone formation in the area of the implant, suggesting that the alloy is a promising candidate for biodegradable orthopedic implants. PMID:26952400

  8. Bacterial treatment of alkaline cement kiln dust using Bacillus halodurans strain KG1

    PubMed Central

    Kunal; Rajor, Anita; Siddique, Rafat

    2016-01-01

    This study was conducted to isolate an acid-producing, alkaliphilic bacterium to reduce the alkalinity of cement industry waste (cement kiln dust). Gram-positive isolate KG1 grew well at pH values of 6–12, temperatures of 28–50 °C, and NaCl concentrations of 0–16% and thus was further screened for its potential to reduce the pH of an alkaline medium. Phenotypic characteristics of the KG1 isolate were consistent with those of the genus Bacillus, and the highest level of 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity was found with Bacillus halodurans strain DSM 497 (94.7%). On the basis of its phenotypic characteristics and genotypic distinctiveness from other phylogenetic neighbors belonging to alkaliphilic Bacillus species, the isolated strain was designated B. halodurans strain KG1, with GenBank accession number JQ307184 (= NCIM 5439). Isolate KG1 reduced the alkalinity (by 83.64%) and the chloride content (by 86.96%) of cement kiln dust and showed a potential to be used in the cement industry for a variety of applications. PMID:26887220

  9. Bacterial treatment of alkaline cement kiln dust using Bacillus halodurans strain KG1.

    PubMed

    Kunal; Rajor, Anita; Siddique, Rafat

    2016-01-01

    This study was conducted to isolate an acid-producing, alkaliphilic bacterium to reduce the alkalinity of cement industry waste (cement kiln dust). Gram-positive isolate KG1 grew well at pH values of 6-12, temperatures of 28-50°C, and NaCl concentrations of 0-16% and thus was further screened for its potential to reduce the pH of an alkaline medium. Phenotypic characteristics of the KG1 isolate were consistent with those of the genus Bacillus, and the highest level of 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity was found with Bacillus halodurans strain DSM 497 (94.7%). On the basis of its phenotypic characteristics and genotypic distinctiveness from other phylogenetic neighbors belonging to alkaliphilic Bacillus species, the isolated strain was designated B. halodurans strain KG1, with GenBank accession number JQ307184 (= NCIM 5439). Isolate KG1 reduced the alkalinity (by 83.64%) and the chloride content (by 86.96%) of cement kiln dust and showed a potential to be used in the cement industry for a variety of applications.

  10. Bacterial treatment of alkaline cement kiln dust using Bacillus halodurans strain KG1.

    PubMed

    Kunal; Rajor, Anita; Siddique, Rafat

    2016-01-01

    This study was conducted to isolate an acid-producing, alkaliphilic bacterium to reduce the alkalinity of cement industry waste (cement kiln dust). Gram-positive isolate KG1 grew well at pH values of 6-12, temperatures of 28-50°C, and NaCl concentrations of 0-16% and thus was further screened for its potential to reduce the pH of an alkaline medium. Phenotypic characteristics of the KG1 isolate were consistent with those of the genus Bacillus, and the highest level of 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity was found with Bacillus halodurans strain DSM 497 (94.7%). On the basis of its phenotypic characteristics and genotypic distinctiveness from other phylogenetic neighbors belonging to alkaliphilic Bacillus species, the isolated strain was designated B. halodurans strain KG1, with GenBank accession number JQ307184 (= NCIM 5439). Isolate KG1 reduced the alkalinity (by 83.64%) and the chloride content (by 86.96%) of cement kiln dust and showed a potential to be used in the cement industry for a variety of applications. PMID:26887220

  11. Augmented sensitivity to methotrexate by curcumin induced overexpression of folate receptor in KG-1 cells.

    PubMed

    Dhanasekaran, Sugapriya; Biswal, Bijesh K; Sumantran, Venil N; Verma, Rama S

    2013-08-01

    Folate receptors are targets of various strategies aimed at efficient delivery of anti-cancer drugs. Folate receptors also play a role in the uptake of antifolate drugs which are used for therapeutic intervention in leukemia. Therefore, it is important to identify compounds which regulate expression of folate receptors in leukemic cells. The present study examined if curcumin could modulate the uptake and cytotoxicity of the antifolate drug methotrexate, in KG-1 leukemic cells. This is the first report to show that curcumin (10-50 μM) causes a significant, dose-dependent, 2-3 fold increase in uptake of radiolabelled folic acid and methotrexate into KG-1 cells both at 24 h and 48 h of treatment. Interestingly, pre-treatment of KG-1 leukemic cells with curcumin (10 μM and 25 μM) also caused a statistically significant enhancement in the cytotoxicity of methotrexate. We performed Real Time Quantitative RT-PCR to confirm the upregulation of FRβ mRNA in curcumin treated cells. Immunocytochemistry and Western blotting showed that curcumin caused increased expression of folate receptor βin KG-1 cells. Our data show that the mechanism of curcumin action involves up-regulation of folate receptor β mRNA and protein in KG-1 cells. Therefore, combination of non-toxic concentrations of curcumin and methotrexate, may be a viable strategy for therapeutic intervention for leukemias using a folate receptor-targeted drug delivery system. PMID:23624207

  12. Effects of the combination of decitabine and homoharringtonine in SKM-1 and Kg-1a cells.

    PubMed

    Geng, Suxia; Yao, Han; Weng, Jianyu; Tong, Jiaqi; Huang, Xin; Wu, Ping; Deng, Chengxin; Li, Minming; Lu, Zesheng; Du, Xin

    2016-05-01

    The methylation inhibitor decitabine (DAC) has great therapeutic value for myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) and acute myeloid leukemia (AML). However, DAC monotherapy is associated with relatively low rates of overall response and complete remission. Previous studies have shown promising results for combination treatment regimens including DAC. Homoharringtonine (HHT), an alkaloid from Chinese natural plants and Cephalotaxus, has demonstrated potential for leukemia treatment. Our studies have suggested that the combination of DAC and HHT has synergistic effects for inhibiting the viability of SKM-1 and Kg-1a cells. This combination leads to enhanced inhibition of colony formation and apoptosis induction compared with DAC alone in SKM-1 but not Kg-1a cells. Only high-dose DAC and HHT significantly up-regulate caspase-3 and caspase-9 and inhibit BCL-XL in the SKM-1 cell line. The combined effects of DAC plus HHT on apoptosis may not only depend on regulation of the apoptosis-related genes we examined but others as well. HHT had no demethylation effects, and HHT in combination with DAC had no enhanced effects on hypomethylation and DNMT1, DNMT3A and DNMT3B mRNA expression in SKM-1 cells. Overall, these results suggest that DAC used in combination with HHT may have clinical potential for MDS treatment.

  13. Indico 1.0

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonzalez Lopez, J. B.; Avilés, A.; Baron, T.; Ferreira, P.; Kolobara, B.; Pugh, M. A.; Resco, A.; Trzaskoma, J. P.

    2014-06-01

    Indico has evolved into the main event organization software, room booking tool and collaboration hub for CERN. The growth in its usage has only accelerated during the past 9 years, and today Indico holds more that 215,000 events and 1,100,000 files. The growth was also substantial in terms of functionalities and improvements. In the last year alone, Indico has matured considerably in 3 key areas: enhanced usability, optimized performance and additional features, especially those related to meeting collaboration. Along the course of 2012, much activity has centred around consolidating all this effort and investment into "version 1.0", recently released in 2013.Version 1.0 brings along new features, such as the Microsoft Exchange calendar synchronization for participants, many new and clean interfaces (badges and poster generation, list of contributions, abstracts, etc) and so forth. But most importantly, it brings a message: Indico is now stable, consolidated and mature after more than 10 years of non-stop development. This message is addressed not only to CERN users but also to the many organisations, in or outside HEP, which have already installed the software, and to others who might soon join this community. In this document, we describe the current state of the art of Indico, and how it was built. This does not mean that the Indico software is complete, far from it! We have plenty of new ideas and projects that we are working on and which we have shared during CHEP 2013.

  14. Salinomycin overcomes ABC transporter-mediated multidrug and apoptosis resistance in human leukemia stem cell-like KG-1a cells

    SciTech Connect

    Fuchs, Dominik; Daniel, Volker; Sadeghi, Mahmoud; Opelz, Gerhard; Naujokat, Cord

    2010-04-16

    Leukemia stem cells are known to exhibit multidrug resistance by expression of ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters which constitute transmembrane proteins capable of exporting a wide variety of chemotherapeutic drugs from the cytosol. We show here that human promyeloblastic leukemia KG-1a cells exposed to the histone deacetylase inhibitor phenylbutyrate resemble many characteristics of leukemia stem cells, including expression of functional ABC transporters such as P-glycoprotein, BCRP and MRP8. Consequently, KG-1a cells display resistance to the induction of apoptosis by various chemotherapeutic drugs. Resistance to apoptosis induction by chemotherapeutic drugs can be reversed by cyclosporine A, which effectively inhibits the activity of P-glycoprotein and BCRP, thus demonstrating ABC transporter-mediated drug resistance in KG-1a cells. However, KG-1a are highly sensitive to apoptosis induction by salinomycin, a polyether ionophore antibiotic that has recently been shown to kill human breast cancer stem cell-like cells and to induce apoptosis in human cancer cells displaying multiple mechanisms of drug and apoptosis resistance. Whereas KG-1a cells can be adapted to proliferate in the presence of apoptosis-inducing concentrations of bortezomib and doxorubicin, salinomycin does not permit long-term adaptation of the cells to apoptosis-inducing concentrations. Thus, salinomycin should be regarded as a novel and effective agent for the elimination of leukemia stem cells and other tumor cells exhibiting ABC transporter-mediated multidrug resistance.

  15. CCAIN, Version 1.0

    2005-05-26

    CCAIN, Version 1.0 Date: 06/15/2005 This software is an instantiation of Common Component Architecture (CCA) framework written in C. The framework is used to compose (create, register, destroy) C, C++, and Fortran components into a running CCA application. Language bindings are provided for F90 and F03 to allow codes in these languages to interface with the framework.

  16. Consequences of combining siRNA-mediated DNA methyltransferase 1 depletion with 5-aza-2′-deoxycytidine in human leukemic KG1 cells

    PubMed Central

    Vispé, Stéphane; Deroide, Arthur; Davoine, Emeline; Desjobert, Cécile; Lestienne, Fabrice; Fournier, Lucie; Novosad, Natacha; Bréand, Sophie; Besse, Jérôme; Busato, Florence; Tost, Jörg; De Vries, Luc; Cussac, Didier; Riond, Joëlle; Arimondo, Paola B.

    2015-01-01

    5-azacytidine and 5-aza-2′-deoxycytidine are clinically used to treat patients with blood neoplasia. Their antileukemic property is mediated by the trapping and the subsequent degradation of a family of proteins, the DNA methyltransferases (DNMT1, DNMT3A, and DNMT3B) leading to DNA demethylation, tumor suppressor gene re-expression and DNA damage. Here we studied the respective role of each DNMT in the human leukemia KG1 cell line using a RNA interference approach. In addition we addressed the role of DNA damage formation in DNA demethylation by 5-aza-2′-deoxycytidine. Our data show that DNMT1 is the main DNMT involved in DNA methylation maintenance in KG1 cells and in mediating DNA damage formation upon exposure to 5-aza-2′-deoxycytidine. Moreover, KG1 cells express the DNMT1 protein at a level above the one required to ensure DNA methylation maintenance, and we identified a threshold for DNMT1 depletion that needs to be exceeded to achieve DNA demethylation. Most interestingly, by combining DNMT1 siRNA and treatment with low dose of 5-aza-2′-deoxycytidine, it is possible to uncouple DNA damage formation from DNA demethylation. This work strongly suggests that a direct pharmacological inhibition of DNMT1, unlike the use of 5-aza-2′-deoxycytidine, should lead to tumor suppressor gene hypomethylation and re-expression without inducing major DNA damage in leukemia. PMID:25948775

  17. Transfer Partial Molar Isentropic Compressibilities of ( l-Alanine/ l-Glutamine/Glycylglycine) from Water to 0.512 {mol} \\cdot {kg}^{-1} Aqueous {KNO}3/0.512 {mol} \\cdot {kg}^{-1} Aqueous {K}2{SO}4 Solutions Between 298.15 K and 323.15 K

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riyazuddeen; Gazal, Umaima

    2013-03-01

    Speeds of sound of ( l-alanine/ l-glutamine/glycylglycine + 0.512 {mol}\\cdot {kg}^{-1} aqueous {KNO}3/0.512 {mol}\\cdot {kg}^{-1} aqueous {K}2{SO}4) systems have been measured for several molal concentrations of amino acid/peptide at different temperatures: T = (298.15 to 323.15) K. Using the speed-of-sound and density data, the parameters, partial molar isentropic compressibilities φ _{kappa }0 and transfer partial molar isentropic compressibilities Δ _{tr} φ _{kappa }0, have been computed. The trends of variation of φ _{kappa }0 and Δ _{tr} φ _{kappa }0 with changes in molal concentration of the solute and temperature have been discussed in terms of zwitterion-ion, zwitterion-water dipole, ion-water dipole, and ion-ion interactions operative in the systems.

  18. 31 CFR 1.10 - Oral information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Oral information. 1.10 Section 1.10... Disclosure Provisions § 1.10 Oral information. (a) Officers and employees of the Department may, in response to requests, orally provide information contained in records of the Department that are determined...

  19. 7 CFR 1.10 - Search services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Search services. 1.10 Section 1.10 Agriculture Office of the Secretary of Agriculture ADMINISTRATIVE REGULATIONS Official Records § 1.10 Search services. Search services are services of agency personnel—clerical or professional—used in trying to find...

  20. 7 CFR 1.10 - Search services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

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  1. 7 CFR 1.10 - Search services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Search services. 1.10 Section 1.10 Agriculture Office of the Secretary of Agriculture ADMINISTRATIVE REGULATIONS Official Records § 1.10 Search services. Search services are services of agency personnel—clerical or professional—used in trying to find...

  2. 7 CFR 1.10 - Search services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

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  3. 7 CFR 1.10 - Search services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

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  4. Final report on key comparison CCQM-K73: Amount content of H+ in hydrochloric acid (0.1 mol kg-1)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pratt, Kenneth W.; Ortiz-Aparicio, Jose Luis; Matehuala-Sanchez, Francisco Javier; Pawlina, Monika; Kozlowski, Wladyslaw; Borges, Paulo P.; da Silva Junior, Wiler B.; Borinsky, Mónica B.; Hernandez-Mabel Puelles, Ana; Hatamleh, Nadia; Acosta, Osvaldo; Nunes, João; Guiomar Lito, M. J.; Camões, M. Filomena; Filipe, Eduarda; Hwang, Euijin; Lim, Youngran; Bing, Wu; Qian, Wang; Chao, Wei; Hioki, Akiharu; Asakai, Toshiaki; Máriássy, Michal; Hanková, Zuzana; Nagibin, Sergey; Manska, Olexandra; Gavrilkin, Vladimir

    2013-01-01

    This key comparison (KC), CCQM-K73, was performed to demonstrate the capability of the participating National Metrology Institutes (NMIs) to measure the amount content of H+, νH+, in an HCl solution with a nominal νH+ of 0.1 mol kg-1. The comparison was a joint activity of the Electrochemical Working Group (EAWG) and Inorganic Analysis Working Group (IAWG) of the CCQM and was coordinated by NIST (USA) and CENAM (Mexico). The agreement of the results was not commensurate with the claimed uncertainties of the subset of participants that claimed small uncertainties for this determination. A workshop on technical issues relating to the CCQM-K73 measurements was conducted at the joint IAWG-EAWG meeting at the Bureau International des Poids et Mesures (BIPM), Paris (Sèvres) in April 2010. Several possible sources of bias were investigated, but none could explain the observed dispersion among the participants' results. In the absence of a specific cause for the dispersion, the IAWG and EAWG decided to assign a Key Comparison Reference Value, KCRV, and standard uncertainty of the KCRV, uKCRV, based on the DerSimonian-Laird statistical estimator. The uKCRV is dominated by the between-laboratory scatter of results in CCQM-K73. The uncertainty estimates from the participants with the lowest reported uncertainties remain unsupported by this KC. Main text. To reach the main text of this paper, click on Final Report. Note that this text is that which appears in Appendix B of the BIPM key comparison database kcdb.bipm.org/. The final report has been peer-reviewed and approved for publication by the CCQM, according to the provisions of the CIPM Mutual Recognition Arrangement (CIPM MRA).

  5. The hydrolysis and precipitation of Pd(II) in 0.6 mol kg-1 NaCl: A potentiometric, spectrophotometric, and EXAFS study

    SciTech Connect

    Boily, Jean F.; Seward, Terry M.; Charnock, John M.

    2007-10-15

    The hydrolysis of palladium was investigated in 0.6 mol•kg-1 NaCl at 298.2 K. Potentiometric titrations of solutions at various total concentrations of palladium(II) revealed that dilute (millimolar) conditions can be used to monitor the proton release due to hydrolysis reactions up to 2 protons per palladium(II) as long as the equilibration time is kept small. Spectrophotometric titrations were used to corroborate the homogeneous changes in speciation for the PdCl3OH2- species and to extract its correlative molar absorption coefficients in the 210-320 nm range. The molar absorption coefficients are similar to those of PdCl42- but exhibit a broader distribution of excitation energies resulting from the blue shift of the dominant charge transfer bands due to the presence of OH-. The longer-term potentiometric titrations systematically yielded, on the other hand, precipitates which matured over a period of 6 weeks and resulted in a more extensive release of protons to the solution. Precipitation experiments at six different total palladium(II) concentrations in the 3-11 pH range showed the dominant precipitating phase as Pd(OH)1.72Cl0.28. The coordination environment of Pd in this solid was investigated by extended X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy (EXAFS) and yielded an average 1.75 O and 0.25 Cl per Pd atoms with a Pd-O distance of 2.0 Å and Pd-Cl of 2.1 Å. Finally, the precipitation experiments showed the final products to be of larger solubility than a literature Pd(OH)2 solubility study in which the KCl media induced a solid phase transformation to Pd(OH)1.72Cl0.28. Polynuclear complexes Pdq(OH)r2q-r with q=r=[3,9] explain the combined precipitation and hydrolysis data and may represent subsets of [Pd(OH)2]n and/or [Pd(OH)1.72Cl0.28]n chains coiled into nanometer-sized spheroids previously described in the literature.

  6. 36 CFR 1.10 - Symbolic signs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Symbolic signs. 1.10 Section... PROVISIONS § 1.10 Symbolic signs. (a) The signs pictured below provide general information and regulatory guidance in park areas. Certain of the signs designate activities that are either allowed or...

  7. 36 CFR 1.10 - Symbolic signs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Symbolic signs. 1.10 Section... PROVISIONS § 1.10 Symbolic signs. (a) The signs pictured below provide general information and regulatory guidance in park areas. Certain of the signs designate activities that are either allowed or...

  8. 36 CFR 1.10 - Symbolic signs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Symbolic signs. 1.10 Section... PROVISIONS § 1.10 Symbolic signs. (a) The signs pictured below provide general information and regulatory guidance in park areas. Certain of the signs designate activities that are either allowed or...

  9. 36 CFR 1.10 - Symbolic signs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Symbolic signs. 1.10 Section... PROVISIONS § 1.10 Symbolic signs. (a) The signs pictured below provide general information and regulatory guidance in park areas. Certain of the signs designate activities that are either allowed or...

  10. 36 CFR 1.10 - Symbolic signs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Symbolic signs. 1.10 Section... PROVISIONS § 1.10 Symbolic signs. (a) The signs pictured below provide general information and regulatory guidance in park areas. Certain of the signs designate activities that are either allowed or...

  11. Insider Alert 1.0 Beta Version

    2004-02-01

    Insider Alert 1.0 Beta Version supports interactive selection and graphical display of data generated by the Sandia Cognitive Framework, which simulates the examination of security data by experts of various specialties. Insider Alert also encompasses the configuration and data files input to the Cognitive Framework for this application. Insider Alert 1.0 Beta Version is a computer program for analyzing data indicative of possible espionage or improper handling of data by employees at Sandia National Laboratoriesmore » (or other facilities with comparable policies and procedures for managing sensitive information) It prioritizes and displays information for review by security analysts.« less

  12. The LITHO1.0 Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pasyanos, M.; Masters, G.; Laske, G.; Ma, Z.

    2014-12-01

    We have developed LITHO1.0, a 1 degree model of the crust and uppermost mantle of the Earth which extends into the upper mantle to include the lithospheric lid and underlying asthenosphere. A description of the model and details of its construction were recently published in JGR (Pasyanos et al., 2014). The model is parameterized laterally by tessellated nodes and vertically as a series of geophysically identified layers, such as water, ice, sediments, crystalline crust, lithospheric lid, and asthenosphere. Model profiles are created by constructing an appropriate starting model and perturbing it to fit high-resolution surface wave dispersion maps (Love and Rayleigh, group and phase) over a wide frequency band (5-40 mHz). We will review the constructed model and compare it to a number of select studies at regional and global scales. We will also discuss avenues for future improvements if time and funding permit. The model and access tools are available to download at http://igppweb.ucsd.edu/~gabi/litho1.0.html. Pasyanos, M.E., T.G. Masters, G. Laske, and Z. Ma (2014). LITHO1.0: An updated crust and lithospheric model of the earth, J. Geophys. Res., 119, doi:10.1002/2013JB010626.

  13. Amesos 1.0 reference guide.

    SciTech Connect

    Sala, Marzio; Stanley, Ken D.

    2004-05-01

    This document describes the main functionalities of the Amesos package, version 1.0. Amesos, available as part of Trilinos 4.0, provides an object-oriented interface to several serial and parallel sparse direct solvers libraries, for the solution of the linear systems of equations A X = B where A is a real sparse, distributed matrix, defined as an EpetraRowMatrix object, and X and B are defined as EpetraMultiVector objects. Amesos provides a common look-and-feel to several direct solvers, insulating the user from each package's details, such as matrix and vector formats, and data distribution.

  14. TSA RPM Simulator 1.0

    2009-12-02

    The software listed here is a simulator for TSA Radiation Portal Monitors with version 1.10.1A firmware. The simulator provides messages similar to those provided by this piece of equipment.To facilitate testing of the Second Line of Defense systems and similar software products from commercial software vendors, this software simulation application has been developed that simulate the TSA Radiation Portal Monitor that Second Line of Defense communications software systems must interface with. The primary use ofmore » this simulator is for testing of both Sandia developed and DOE contractor developed software.« less

  15. LAPACK users` guide: Release 1.0

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, E.; Bai, Z.; Bischof, C.; Demmel, J.; Dongarra, J.; Du Croz, J.; Greenbaum, A.; Hammarling, S.; McKenney, A.; Ostrouchov, S.; Sorensen, D.

    1992-01-31

    LAPACK is a transportable library of Fortran 77 subroutines for solving the most common problems in numerical linear algebra: systems of linear equations, linear least squares problems, eigenvalue problems and singular value problems. LAPACK is designed to supersede LINPACK and EISPACK, principally by restructuring the software to achieve much greater efficiency on vector processors, high-performance ``superscalar`` workstations, and shared-memory multi-processors. LAPACK also adds extra functionality, uses some new or improved algorithms, and integrates the two sets of algorithms into a unified package. The LAPACK Users` Guide gives an informal introduction to the design of the algorithms and software, summarizes the contents of the package, describes conventions used in the software and documentation, and includes complete specifications for calling the routines. This edition of the Users` guide describes Release 1.0 of LAPACK.

  16. Virtual planets atlas 1.0 freeware

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Legrand, C.; Chevalley, P.

    2015-10-01

    Since 2002, we develop the "Virtual Moon Atlas -http://www.ap-i.net/avl/en/start" a freeware to help Moon observing and to improve interest for Moon in general public. VMA freeware has been downloaded near 900000 times all over the world and is or has been used by several professional organizations such as Kitt Peak Observatory, National Japan Observatory, Birkbeck College / University College London (K. Joy), BBC Sky at night, several French astronomy magazines and astronomy writers (P. Harrington, S. French...) . Recommended by ESA, registered as educational software by French ministry for education, it has also yet been presented at 2006 & 2007 LPSC and PCC2 in 2011 We have declined this freeware in a new tool with the same goals, but for the telluric planets and satellites, the "Virtual Planets Atlas (VPA / http://www.ap-i.net/avp/en/start") now in version 1.0.

  17. 41 CFR 60-1.10 - Foreign government practices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Foreign government practices. 60-1.10 Section 60-1.10 Public Contracts and Property Management Other Provisions Relating to... OF LABOR 1-OBLIGATIONS OF CONTRACTORS AND SUBCONTRACTORS Preliminary Matters; Equal...

  18. 16 CFR 1.10 - Advance notice of proposed rulemaking.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... addition to publication of the advance notice, use such additional mechanisms as it considers useful to... 16 Commercial Practices 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Advance notice of proposed rulemaking. 1.10... GENERAL PROCEDURES Rules and Rulemaking Under Section 18(a)(1)(B) of the FTC Act § 1.10 Advance notice...

  19. 16 CFR 1.10 - Advance notice of proposed rulemaking.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... addition to publication of the advance notice, use such additional mechanisms as it considers useful to... 16 Commercial Practices 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Advance notice of proposed rulemaking. 1.10... GENERAL PROCEDURES Rules and Rulemaking Under Section 18(a)(1)(B) of the FTC Act § 1.10 Advance notice...

  20. 16 CFR 1.10 - Advance notice of proposed rulemaking.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... addition to publication of the advance notice, use such additional mechanisms as it considers useful to... 16 Commercial Practices 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Advance notice of proposed rulemaking. 1.10... GENERAL PROCEDURES Rules and Rulemaking Under Section 18(a)(1)(B) of the FTC Act § 1.10 Advance notice...

  1. 16 CFR 1.10 - Advance notice of proposed rulemaking.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... addition to publication of the advance notice, use such additional mechanisms as it considers useful to... 16 Commercial Practices 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Advance notice of proposed rulemaking. 1.10... GENERAL PROCEDURES Rules and Rulemaking Under Section 18(a)(1)(B) of the FTC Act § 1.10 Advance notice...

  2. 16 CFR 1.10 - Advance notice of proposed rulemaking.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... addition to publication of the advance notice, use such additional mechanisms as it considers useful to... 16 Commercial Practices 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Advance notice of proposed rulemaking. 1.10... GENERAL PROCEDURES Rules and Rulemaking Under Section 18(a)(1)(B) of the FTC Act § 1.10 Advance notice...

  3. Matrix Description of (1,0) Theories in six dimensions

    SciTech Connect

    Aharony, Ofer; Berkooz, Micha; Kachru, Shamit; Silverstein, Eva.

    1997-10-01

    We propose descriptions of interacting (1,0) supersymmetric theories without gravity in six dimensions in the infinite momentum frame. They are based on the large N limit of quantum mechanics or 1+1 dimensional field theories with SO(N) gauge group and four supercharges. We argue that this formulation allows for a concrete description of the chirality-changing phase transitions which connect (1,0) theories with different numbers of tensor multiplets.

  4. IDC Use Case Model Survey Version 1.0.

    SciTech Connect

    Carr, Dorthe B.; Harris, James M.

    2014-12-01

    This document contains the brief descriptions for the actors and use cases contained in the IDC Use Case Model Survey. REVISIONS Version Date Author/Team Revision Description Authorized by V1.0 12/2014 IDC Re- engineering Project Team Initial delivery M. Harris

  5. Enhancement of Spatial Thinking with Virtual Spaces 1.0

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hauptman, Hanoch

    2010-01-01

    Developing a software environment to enhance 3D geometric proficiency demands the consideration of theoretical views of the learning process. Simultaneously, this effort requires taking into account the range of tools that technology offers, as well as their limitations. In this paper, we report on the design of Virtual Spaces 1.0 software, a…

  6. MULTIPLE PROJECTIONS SYSTEM (MPS) - USER'S MANUAL VERSION 1.0

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report is a user's manual for version 1.0 of the Multiple Projections Systems (MPS), a computer system that can perform "what if" scenario analysis and report the final results (i.e., Rate of Further Progress - ROP - inventories) to EPA (i.e., the Aerometric Information Retri...

  7. Quick Overview Scout 2008 Version 1.0

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Scout 2008 version 1.0 statistical software package has been updated from past DOS and Windows versions to provide classical and robust univariate and multivariate graphical and statistical methods that are not typically available in commercial or freeware statistical softwar...

  8. Scout 2008 Version 1.0 User Guide

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Scout 2008 version 1.0 software package provides a wide variety of classical and robust statistical methods that are not typically available in other commercial software packages. A major part of Scout deals with classical, robust, and resistant univariate and multivariate ou...

  9. mer-Triaqua­(1,10-phenanthroline-κ2 N,N′)(sulfato-κO)magnesium(II)

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Ling; Huang, Jing; Han, Si-Ying; An, Zhe

    2008-01-01

    In the title compound, [Mg(SO4)(C12H8N2)(H2O)3], the MgII centre exhibits a slightly distorted octa­hedral coordination environment defined by two N atoms from a 1,10-phenanthroline mol­ecule, one O atom from a sulfate dianion and three meridionally arranged O atoms from coordinated water mol­ecules. The crystal structure involves intra- and intermolecular O—H⋯O hydrogen bonds. PMID:21202220

  10. Geometric structure of Be(10{bar 1}0)

    SciTech Connect

    Hofmann, P. |; Pohl, K. |; Stumpf, R.; Plummer, E.W. |

    1996-05-01

    The structure of clean Be(10{bar 1}0) was determined by low-energy electron-diffraction (LEED) {ital I}({ital V}) analysis and the result compared to first-principles calculations. Both theory and experiment indicate that from the two possible terminations of the truncated bulk, the one with the shorter first-interlayer spacing is realized. The values for the multilayer relaxations obtained by LEED essentially coincide with the theoretical prediction. Although the magnitude of the first- to second-layer relaxation fits well into the trend observed on other simple metal surfaces, the driving force is probably different for beryllium. {copyright} {ital 1996 The American Physical Society.}

  11. geophylobuilder 1.0: an arcgis extension for creating 'geophylogenies'.

    PubMed

    Kidd, David M; Liu, Xianhua

    2008-01-01

    Evolution is inherently a spatiotemporal process; however, despite this, phylogenetic and geographical data and models remain largely isolated from one another. Geographical information systems provide a ready-made spatial modelling, analysis and dissemination environment within which phylogenetic models can be explicitly linked with their associated spatial data and subsequently integrated with other georeferenced data sets describing the biotic and abiotic environment. geophylobuilder 1.0 is an extension for the arcgis geographical information system that builds a 'geophylogenetic' data model from a phylogenetic tree and associated geographical data. Geophylogenetic database objects can subsequently be queried, spatially analysed and visualized in both 2D and 3D within a geographical information systems.

  12. Hydrogen File Capture v1.0.DLL

    2006-03-28

    Postprocessor for the use with GoldSim commercial software. The program is intended as a DLL for use with a GoldSim model simulation to copy input/output files created during the simulation to a central location on a local LAN. The software is used as part of a modeling package that consists of GoldSim.exe and other external codes linked and executed during a GoldSim model simulation. The FileCapture_v1.0.DLL is used to run Monte Carlo analyses with amore » GoldSim simulation that is executed using the distributed processing module. When distributed processing (i.e., multi-processor run) is used for a GoldSim Model simulation that is comprised of one or more codes linked with the GoldSim.exe, it is sometimes necessary to capture the default input and/or output files generated by the external codes linked with the GoldSim.exe program. Using the input file "FileCapture.In' to list the filenames and path, FileCapture_v1.0.DLL copies the files listed in 'FileCapture.in' from each node on the LAN to a folder called 'FCAP Files' created in the location gie as the path. The DLL will execute for each realization and append 00xxx a number indication which realization the file was generated from.« less

  13. CHEETAH 1.0 user`s manual

    SciTech Connect

    Fried, L.E.

    1994-06-24

    CHEETAH is an effort to bring the TIGER thermochemical code into the 1990s. A wide variety of improvements have been made in Version 1.0, and a host of others will be implemented in the future. In CHEETAH 1.0 I have improved the robustness and ease of use of TIGER. All of TIGER`s solvers have been replaced by new algorithms. I find that CHEETAH solves a wider variety of problems with no user intervention (e.g. no guesses for the C-J state) than TIGER did. CHEETAH has been made simpler to use than TIGER; typical use of the code occurs with the new standard run command. I hope that CHEETAH makes the use of thermochemical codes more attractive to practical explosive formulators. In the future I plan to improve the underlying science in CHEETAH. More accurate equations of state will be used in the gas and the condensed phase. A kinetics capability will be added to the code that will predict reaction zone thickness. CHEETAH is currently a numerical implementation of C-J theory. It will,become an implementation of ZND theory. Further ease of use features will eventually be added; an automatic formulator that adjusts concentrations to match desired properties is planned.

  14. AREST-CT V1.0 software verification

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Y.; Engel, D.W.; McGrail, B.P.; Lessor, K.S.

    1995-07-01

    The Analyzer for Radionuclide Source-Term with Chemical Transport (AREST-CT) is a scientific computer code designed for performance assessments of engineered barrier system (EBS) concepts for the underground storage of nuclear waste, including high-level, intermediate, and low-level wastes. The AREST-CT code has features for analyzing the degradation of and release of radionuclides from the waste form, chemical reactions that depend on time and space, and transport of the waste and other products through the EBS. This document provides a description of the verification testing that has been performed on the initial version of ARESTCT (V1.0). Software verification is the process of confirming that the models and algorithms have been correctly implemented into a computer code. Software verification for V1.0 consisted of testing the individual modules (unit tests) and a test of the fully-coupled model (integration testing). The integration test was done by comparing the results from AREST-CT with the results from the reactive transport code CIRF.A. The test problem consisted of a 1-D analysis of the release, transport, and precipitation of {sup 99}{Tc} in an idealized LLW disposal system. All verification tests showed that AREST-CT works properly and in accordance with design specifications.

  15. Verification and validation of RADMODL Version 1.0

    SciTech Connect

    Kimball, K.D.

    1993-03-01

    RADMODL is a system of linked computer codes designed to calculate the radiation environment following an accident in which nuclear materials are released. The RADMODL code and the corresponding Verification and Validation (V&V) calculations (Appendix A), were developed for Westinghouse Savannah River Company (WSRC) by EGS Corporation (EGS). Each module of RADMODL is an independent code and was verified separately. The full system was validated by comparing the output of the various modules with the corresponding output of a previously verified version of the modules. The results of the verification and validation tests show that RADMODL correctly calculates the transport of radionuclides and radiation doses. As a result of this verification and validation effort, RADMODL Version 1.0 is certified for use in calculating the radiation environment following an accident.

  16. NIMS Radiance Point Spectra of Gaspra V1.0

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Granahan, J. C.

    2014-10-01

    This data volume contains radiometrically corrected point spectra of asteroid 951 as acquired by the Galileo spacecraft Near Infrared Mapping Spectrometer (NIMS) on October 29, 1991. They record the spectra collected as the Galileo spacecraft approached the target asteroid. These data are products of the calibration of the raw data number files gap015tn.qub, gap035tn.qub, gap036tn.qub, gap037tn.qub, and gap038tn.qub (DATA SET ID ='GO-A-NIMS-3 TUBE-V1.0') with calibration factors acquired during the first Earth/Moon encounter of the Galileo mission. These raw data .qub files are archived in the Imaging Node of the NASA Planetary Data System (PDS). The calibrated spectra consist of radiance measurements for wavelengths between 0.7 - 5.2 micrometers.

  17. VIPAR - Vortex Inflation PARachute Code Ver. 1.0

    SciTech Connect

    Strickland, James; Homicz, Greg; Porter, Vicki; Burns, Shawn; Gassler, Albert

    2001-11-01

    VIPAR is a 3-D fluid mechanics code for predicting flow past bluff bodies whose surfaces can be assumed to be made up of shell elements that are simply connected. Version 1.0 of the code contains several first order algorithms, which we are already in the process of replacing with higher order ones. These enhancements will appear in the next version of VIPAR. The present code contains a motion generator, which can be used to produce large class of rigid body motions. The present code has also been fully coupled to a structural dynamics code in which the geometry undergoes large time dependent deformations. Initial surface geometry is generated from triangular shell elements using a code such as Patran and is written into an Exodusll data base file for subsequent input into VIPAR. Surface and wake variable information is output into two Exodusll files which can be processed and viewed using software such as EnSight.

  18. CONTROLITE 1.0. Lighting Control Energy Savings

    SciTech Connect

    Rubinstein, F.

    1985-11-01

    CONTROLITE 1.0 is a lighting energy analysis program designed to calculate the energy savings and cost benefits obtainable using lighting controls in buildings. The program can compute the lighting energy reductions that result from using daylighting, scheduling, and other control strategies. When modeling daylight control systems, the program uses QUICKLITE to compute the daylight illuminances at specified points 5 times a day, 12 days a year (the 21st of each month), and for two sky conditions (clear and overcast skies). Fourier series techniques are used to fit a continuous curve through the computed illuminance points. The energy use for each of the 12 days is then computed given user-specified power-in/light-out characteristics of the modeled control system. The monthly and annual energy usage for overcast and clear conditions are found separately by fitting two long-term Fourier series curves to the energy use computed for each of the 12 days. Finally, the monthly energy use is calculated by taking a weighted average for the monthly energy use computed for the overcast and clear sky conditions. The program only treats the energy use directly attributable to lighting. The impact of lighting control strategies on building thermal loads is not computed. The program allows input of different control schedules (i.e., on/off times for the lighting system) for each day of the week, but every week of the year is treated the same; thus, holidays cannot be modeled explicitly. When used for daylighting purposes, CONTROLITE1.0 understands only clear and overcast conditions. User-supplied values for the proportion of clear and overcast hours for each month of the year are required to accommodate different climatic conditions.

  19. Land-Use Portfolio Modeler, Version 1.0

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Taketa, Richard; Hong, Makiko

    2010-01-01

    Natural hazards pose significant threats to the public safety and economic health of many communities throughout the world. Community leaders and decision-makers continually face the challenges of planning and allocating limited resources to invest in protecting their communities against catastrophic losses from natural-hazard events. Public efforts to assess community vulnerability and encourage loss-reduction measures through mitigation often focused on either aggregating site-specific estimates or adopting standards based upon broad assumptions about regional risks. The site-specific method usually provided the most accurate estimates, but was prohibitively expensive, whereas regional risk assessments were often too general to be of practical use. Policy makers lacked a systematic and quantitative method for conducting a regional-scale risk assessment of natural hazards. In response, Bernknopf and others developed the portfolio model, an intermediate-scale approach to assessing natural-hazard risks and mitigation policy alternatives. The basis for the portfolio-model approach was inspired by financial portfolio theory, which prescribes a method of optimizing return on investment while reducing risk by diversifying investments in different security types. In this context, a security type represents a unique combination of features and hazard-risk level, while financial return is defined as the reduction in losses resulting from an investment in mitigation of chosen securities. Features are selected for mitigation and are modeled like investment portfolios. Earth-science and economic data for the features are combined and processed in order to analyze each of the portfolios, which are then used to evaluate the benefits of mitigating the risk in selected locations. Ultimately, the decision maker seeks to choose a portfolio representing a mitigation policy that maximizes the expected return-on-investment, while minimizing the uncertainty associated with that return-on-investment. The portfolio model, now known as the Land-Use Portfolio Model (LUPM), provided the framework for the development of the Land-Use Portfolio Modeler, Version 1.0 software (LUPM v1.0). The software provides a geographic information system (GIS)-based modeling tool for evaluating alternative risk-reduction mitigation strategies for specific natural-hazard events. The modeler uses information about a specific natural-hazard event and the features exposed to that event within the targeted study region to derive a measure of a given mitigation strategy`s effectiveness. Harnessing the spatial capabilities of a GIS enables the tool to provide a rich, interactive mapping environment in which users can create, analyze, visualize, and compare different

  20. EOS7C-ECBM Version 1.0

    2012-11-14

    EOS7C is an equation of state module for the TOUGH2 program for CO2 or N2 in Methane (CH4) Reservoirs. In the present work, additions have been made to the EOS7C Version 1.0 module to include the Enhanced Coal Bed Methane (ECBM) modifications developed by Webb (2003). In addition, the Dusty Gas Model for gas-phase diffusion (Webb 2001) has been included. The ECBM modification to the EOS7C equation of state incorporate the extended Langmuir isothem formore » sorbing gases, including the change in porosity associated with the sorbed gas mass. Comparison to hand calculations for pure gas and binary mixture shows very good agreement. Application to a CO2 well injection problem by Law et al. (2002). The Dusty Model modification add options to calculate gas diffusion using the Dusty-Gas Model including separate and coupled approaches. Comparison to low-permeability pure gas diffusion data shows excellent agreement. The results from the DGM are compared to the Fick's Law behavior for diffusion across a capillary fringe. The differences between the models are small due to the relatively high permeability (10-11 m2) of the problem.« less

  1. NAS Parallel Benchmark Results 11-96. 1.0

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bailey, David H.; Bailey, David; Chancellor, Marisa K. (Technical Monitor)

    1997-01-01

    The NAS Parallel Benchmarks have been developed at NASA Ames Research Center to study the performance of parallel supercomputers. The eight benchmark problems are specified in a "pencil and paper" fashion. In other words, the complete details of the problem to be solved are given in a technical document, and except for a few restrictions, benchmarkers are free to select the language constructs and implementation techniques best suited for a particular system. These results represent the best results that have been reported to us by the vendors for the specific 3 systems listed. In this report, we present new NPB (Version 1.0) performance results for the following systems: DEC Alpha Server 8400 5/440, Fujitsu VPP Series (VX, VPP300, and VPP700), HP/Convex Exemplar SPP2000, IBM RS/6000 SP P2SC node (120 MHz), NEC SX-4/32, SGI/CRAY T3E, SGI Origin200, and SGI Origin2000. We also report High Performance Fortran (HPF) based NPB results for IBM SP2 Wide Nodes, HP/Convex Exemplar SPP2000, and SGI/CRAY T3D. These results have been submitted by Applied Parallel Research (APR) and Portland Group Inc. (PGI). We also present sustained performance per dollar for Class B LU, SP and BT benchmarks.

  2. EOS7C-ECBM Version 1.0

    SciTech Connect

    2012-11-14

    EOS7C is an equation of state module for the TOUGH2 program for CO2 or N2 in Methane (CH4) Reservoirs. In the present work, additions have been made to the EOS7C Version 1.0 module to include the Enhanced Coal Bed Methane (ECBM) modifications developed by Webb (2003). In addition, the Dusty Gas Model for gas-phase diffusion (Webb 2001) has been included. The ECBM modification to the EOS7C equation of state incorporate the extended Langmuir isothem for sorbing gases, including the change in porosity associated with the sorbed gas mass. Comparison to hand calculations for pure gas and binary mixture shows very good agreement. Application to a CO2 well injection problem by Law et al. (2002). The Dusty Model modification add options to calculate gas diffusion using the Dusty-Gas Model including separate and coupled approaches. Comparison to low-permeability pure gas diffusion data shows excellent agreement. The results from the DGM are compared to the Fick's Law behavior for diffusion across a capillary fringe. The differences between the models are small due to the relatively high permeability (10-11 m2) of the problem.

  3. VIPAR - Vortex Inflation PARachute Code Ver. 1.0

    2001-11-01

    VIPAR is a 3-D fluid mechanics code for predicting flow past bluff bodies whose surfaces can be assumed to be made up of shell elements that are simply connected. Version 1.0 of the code contains several first order algorithms, which we are already in the process of replacing with higher order ones. These enhancements will appear in the next version of VIPAR. The present code contains a motion generator, which can be used to producemore » large class of rigid body motions. The present code has also been fully coupled to a structural dynamics code in which the geometry undergoes large time dependent deformations. Initial surface geometry is generated from triangular shell elements using a code such as Patran and is written into an Exodusll data base file for subsequent input into VIPAR. Surface and wake variable information is output into two Exodusll files which can be processed and viewed using software such as EnSight.« less

  4. Data Acquisition Backbone Core DABC release v1.0

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adamczewski-Musch, J.; Essel, H. G.; Kurz, N.; Linev, S.

    2010-04-01

    The Data Acquisition Backbone Core (DABC) is a general purpose software framework designed for the implementation of a wide-range of data acquisition systems - from various small detector test beds to high performance systems. DABC consists of a compact data-flow kernel and a number of plug-ins for various functional components like data inputs, device drivers, user functional modules and applications. DABC provides configurable components for implementing event building over fast networks like InfiniBand or Gigabit Ethernet. A generic Java GUI provides the dynamic control and visualization of control parameters and commands, provided by DIM servers. A first set of application plug-ins has been implemented to use DABC as event builder for the front-end components of the GSI standard DAQ system MBS (Multi Branch System). Another application covers the connection to DAQ readout chains from detector front-end boards (N-XYTER) linked to read-out controller boards (ROC) over UDP into DABC for event building, archiving and data serving. This was applied for data taking in the September 2008 test beamtime for the CBM experiment at GSI. DABC version 1.0 is released and available from the website.

  5. Benzene-Water (BZWn (n = 1 - 10)) Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prakash, M.; Samy, K. Gopal; Subramanian, V.

    2009-11-01

    The gas-phase geometries, binding energies (BEs), infrared spectra and electron density parameters of benzene (BZ)-water (W) clusters (BZWn, where n = 1-10) have been calculated using Truhlar's meta hybrid functional, M05-2X, employing 6-31+G** basis set. Both basis set superposition error (BSSE) and zero point energy corrected BEs are in close agreement with the previously reported high level ab initio and experimental values. Among all of the BZWn clusters, the same with inverted book conformer of water hexamer has the highest BE when compared to all other water clusters. The Bader's theory of atoms in molecule (AIM) provides evidence for the presence of O-H···π interactions in all of these clusters. In addition, the roles of C-H···O and lone pair···π (lp···π) interactions in the stabilization of BZWn clusters are also evident from the AIM analysis. The trend in the electron density at the hydrogen bond critical points varies as O-H···π < lp···π < C-H···O. Spectral signatures of these clusters further reinforce the existence of weak H-bond between BZ and Wn clusters. The red shift in all of these clusters ranges from 13 to 95 cm-1. The results clearly show that the presence of π-cloud does not affect the H-bonded network of water clusters except in the case of W6 ring.

  6. The relationship between household income and dietary intakes of 1-10 year old urban Malaysian

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Khor Geok; Sariman, Sarina; Lee, Huang Soo; Siew, Chin Yit; Mohd Yusof, Barakatun Nisak; Mun, Chan Yoke; Mohamad, Maznorila

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND/OBJECTIVES Diet plays an important role in growth and development of children. However, dietary intakes of children living in either rural or urban areas can be influenced by household income. This cross-sectional study examined energy, nutrient and food group intakes of 749 urban children (1-10 years old) by household income status. SUBJECTS/METHODS Children's dietary intakes were obtained using food recall and record for two days. Diet adequacy was assessed based on recommended intakes of energy and nutrients and food group servings. RESULTS For toddlers, all nutrients except dietary fiber (5.5 g) exceeded recommended intakes. Among older children (preschoolers and school children), calcium (548 mg, 435 mg) and dietary fiber (7.4 g, 9.4 g) did not meet recommendations while percentage of energy from total fat and saturated fats exceeded 30% and 10%, respectively. The mean sodium intakes of preschoolers (1,684 mg) and school children (2,000 mg) were relatively high. Toddlers in all income groups had similar energy and nutrient intakes and percentages meeting the recommended intakes. However, low income older children had lowest intakes of energy (P < 0.05) and most nutrients (P < 0.05) and highest proportions that did not meet recommended energy and nutrient intakes. For all food groups, except milk and dairy products, all age groups had mean intakes below the recommended servings. Compared to middle and high income groups, low income preschoolers had the lowest mean intake of fruits (0.07 serving), meat/poultry (0.78 serving) and milk/dairy products (1.14 serving) while low income toddlers and school children had the least mean intake of fruits (0.09 serving) and milk/dairy products (0.54 serving), respectively. CONCLUSION Low socioeconomic status, as indicated by low household income, could limit access to adequate diets, particularly for older children. Parents and caregivers may need dietary guidance to ensure adequate quantity and quality of home

  7. Observations and Light Curve Solutions of the Eclipsing Binaries USNO-B1.0 1395-0370184 and USNO-B1.0 1395-0370731

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kjurkchieva, D.; Popov, V. A.; Vasileva, D.; Petrov, N.

    2016-07-01

    We present follow-up photometric observations in Sloan filters g', i' of the newly discovered eclipsing stars USNO-B1.0 1395-0370184 and USNO-B1.0 1395-0370731. Our data revealed that their orbital periods are considerably bigger than the previous values. This result changed the classification of USNO-B1.0 1395-0370184 from ultrashort-period binary (P=0.197 d) to short-period system (P=0.251 d). The light curve solutions of our observations revealed that USNO-B1.0 1395-0370184 and USNO-B1.0 1395-0370731 are overcontact binaries in which components are K dwarfs, close in masses and radii. The light curve distortions were reproduced by cool spots with angular radius of around 20°.

  8. 33 CFR 1.10-5 - Public availability of records and documents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... and documents. 1.10-5 Section 1.10-5 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY GENERAL GENERAL PROVISIONS Public Availability of Information § 1.10-5 Public..., 2100 2nd St. SW., Stop 7101, Washington, DC 20593-7101. (b) Each person desiring to inspect a record...

  9. 30 CFR 57.22236 - Actions at 1.0 percent methane (VI mines).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Actions at 1.0 percent methane (VI mines). 57... MINES Safety Standards for Methane in Metal and Nonmetal Mines Ventilation § 57.22236 Actions at 1.0 percent methane (VI mines). If methane reaches 1.0 percent in the mine atmosphere, all persons other...

  10. 30 CFR 57.22236 - Actions at 1.0 percent methane (VI mines).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Actions at 1.0 percent methane (VI mines). 57... MINES Safety Standards for Methane in Metal and Nonmetal Mines Ventilation § 57.22236 Actions at 1.0 percent methane (VI mines). If methane reaches 1.0 percent in the mine atmosphere, all persons other...

  11. 30 CFR 57.22236 - Actions at 1.0 percent methane (VI mines).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Actions at 1.0 percent methane (VI mines). 57... MINES Safety Standards for Methane in Metal and Nonmetal Mines Ventilation § 57.22236 Actions at 1.0 percent methane (VI mines). If methane reaches 1.0 percent in the mine atmosphere, all persons other...

  12. On the quantum corrections to two-dimensional (1,0)-supersymmetric Abelian gauge models

    SciTech Connect

    Almeida, C.A.S.; De Oliveira, M.W. ); Kneipp, M.A.C. )

    1991-05-30

    In this paper the machinery of (1,0)-supergravity is employed to evaluate 1-loop corrections to the effective action and chiral symmetry supercurrent in the framework of an (1,0)-supersymmetric Abelian gauge model. As a by-product, a dynamically-generated mass is found out for the gauge (1,0)-superconductions.

  13. The metalloprotease inhibitor 1,10-phenanthroline affects Schistosoma mansoni motor activity, egg laying and viability.

    PubMed

    Day, T A; Chen, G Z

    1998-04-01

    The Zn(2+)-chelating metalloprotease inhibitor 1,10-phenanthroline (phenanthroline, 5-150 microM) elicited dose-dependent contraction of the longitudinal and circular (transverse) musculature of adult male schistosomes. At the same concentrations, phenanthroline did not cause contraction of dispersed individual muscle fibres. The phenanthroline-induced contractions were reduced by the inclusion of 100 or 300 microM Zn2+ in the extracellular medium. Phenanthroline (0.5-150 microM) also inhibited the egg production of adult worm pairs in vitro, with a 98% reduction at 50 microM. When worm pairs were exposed to phenanthroline, the males detached from the dish and released the females, resulting in unpaired worms. At the higher concentrations (50 and 150 microM), the worms were killed in vitro. Worm burdens were reduced by over 50% in infected mice injected with phenanthroline (20 mg/kg/day for 4 days), but twice the dose resulted in only a 25% reduction. Phenanthroline injections also induced an hepatic shift and an unpairing of adult worms in infected mice, and the female worms appeared degenerate and lacked gut pigmentation. Mice fed a diet containing 0.3% phenanthroline received significant protection from infection when challenged with schistosome cercaria, where phenanthroline-fed mice had 94% fewer adult worms than control mice. The broad range of phenanthroline effects on schistosomes suggests broad and important functions for metalloproteases in these worms. PMID:9585934

  14. Excitation Mechanisms for HCN (1-0) and HCO+ (1-0) in Galaxies from the Great Observatories All-sky LIRG Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Privon, G. C.; Herrero-Illana, R.; Evans, A. S.; Iwasawa, K.; Perez-Torres, M. A.; Armus, L.; Díaz-Santos, T.; Murphy, E. J.; Stierwalt, S.; Aalto, S.; Mazzarella, J. M.; Barcos-Muñoz, L.; Borish, H. J.; Inami, H.; Kim, D.-C.; Treister, E.; Surace, J. A.; Lord, S.; Conway, J.; Frayer, D. T.; Alberdi, A.

    2015-11-01

    We present new Institut de Radioastronomie Millimétrique (IRAM) 30 m spectroscopic observations of the ˜88 GHz band, including emission from the {CCH}(N=1\\to 0) multiplet, HCN (J=1\\to 0), {{HCO}}+(J=1\\to 0), and {HNC}(J=1\\to 0), for a sample of 58 local luminous and ultraluminous infrared galaxies from the Great Observatories All-sky LIRG Survey (GOALS). By combining our new IRAM data with literature data and Spitzer/IRS spectroscopy, we study the correspondence between these putative tracers of dense gas and the relative contribution of active galactic nuclei (AGNs) and star formation to the mid-infrared luminosity of each system. We find the HCN (1-0) emission to be enhanced in AGN-dominated systems (< {L}{HCN(1-0)}\\prime /{L}{{HCO}+(1-0)}\\prime > =1.84), compared to composite and starburst-dominated systems (< {L}{HCN(1-0)}\\prime /{L}{{HCO}+(1-0)}\\prime > =1.14, and 0.88, respectively). However, some composite and starburst systems have {L}{HCN(1-0)}\\prime /{L}{{HCO}+(1-0)}\\prime ratios comparable to those of AGNs, indicating that enhanced HCN emission is not uniquely associated with energetically dominant AGNs. After removing AGN-dominated systems from the sample, we find a linear relationship (within the uncertainties) between log10({L}{HCN(1-0)}\\prime ) and log10(LIR), consistent with most previous findings. {L}{HCN(1-0)}\\prime /LIR, typically interpreted as the dense-gas depletion time, appears to have no systematic trend with LIR for our sample of luminous and ultraluminous infrared galaxies, and has significant scatter. The galaxy-integrated {L}{HCN(1-0)}\\prime and {L}{{HCO}+(1-0)}\\prime emission do not appear to have a simple interpretation in terms of the AGN dominance or the star formation rate, and are likely determined by multiple processes, including density and radiative effects. Based on observations carried out with the IRAM 30 m Telescope. IRAM is supported by INSU/CNRS (France), MPG (Germany), and IGN (Spain).

  15. Ionic composition of submicron particles (PM1.0) during the long-lasting haze period in January 2013 in Wuhan, central China.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Hairong; Gong, Wei; Wang, Zuwu; Zhang, Fan; Wang, Xinming; Lv, Xiaopu; Liu, Jia; Fu, Xiaoxin; Zhang, Gan

    2014-04-01

    In January 2013, a long-lasting severe haze episode occurred in Northern and Central China; at its maximum, it covered a land area of approximately 1.4 million km(2). In Wuhan, the largest city in Central China, this event was the most severe haze episode in the 21st century. Aerosol samples of submicron particles (PM1.0) were collected during the long-lasting haze episode at an urban site and a suburban site in Wuhan to investigate the ion characteristics of PM1.0 in this area. The mass concentrations of PM1.0 and its water-soluble inorganic ions (WSIIs) were almost at the same levels at two sites, which indicates that PM1.0 pollution occurs on a regional scale in Wuhan. WSIIs (Na(+), NH4(+), K(+), Mg(2+), Ca(2+), Cl(-), NO3(-) and SO4(2-)) were the dominant chemical species and constituted up to 48.4% and 47.4% of PM1.0 at WD and TH, respectively. The concentrations of PM1.0 and WSIIs on haze days were approximately two times higher than on normal days. The ion balance calculations indicate that the particles were more acidic on haze days than on normal days. The results of the back trajectory analysis imply that the high concentrations of PM1.0 and its water-soluble inorganic ions may be caused by stagnant weather conditions in Wuhan.

  16. Role of Mg interlayers in Fe/Mg/MgO/Fe and Fe/Mg/MgO/Mg/Fe magnetic tunnel junctions

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Y.; Zhang, J.; Zhang, Xiaoguang; Cheng, Hai-Ping; Han, Prof. X. F.

    2010-01-01

    -Fe(001)/Mg/MgO/Fe- and -Fe(001)/Mg/MgO/Mg/Fe- magnetic tunnel junctions (MTJs) with Mg interlayers are studied by first-principles calculation. An important role of the Mg interlayer is identified to be preserving the preferential transmission of the majority-spin states with \\Delta_1 symmetry, which dominate the spin-dependent electron transport of MTJs with MgO barrier. One layer of Mg at the electrode/barrier interface does not decrease the tunneling magnetoresistance (TMR) ratio nearly as much as one layer of oxide. At certain Mg thickness case the TMR could be strongly influenced by the resonance tunneling states in minority-spin channel, these states are mainly raised from the quantum-well states formed in the Mg interlayer and coupled with interfacial resonance states which are very sensitive to the interface structures.

  17. Inhalation administration of the sesquiterpenoid aristolen-1(10)-en-9-ol from Nardostachys chinensis has a sedative effect via the GABAergic system.

    PubMed

    Takemoto, Hiroaki; Ito, Michiho; Asada, Yoshihisa; Kobayashi, Yoshinori

    2015-03-01

    Spikenard, the dried roots of Nardostachys chinensis, contains sesquiterpenoids and is widely used as an herbal tranquilizer. We previously demonstrated that spikenard vapor showed a sedative effect when administered by inhalation, and we identified hydrocarbon sesquiterpenoids as active components. Here we investigated the other components that contribute to the effects of spikenard. Six oxygenated sesquiterpenoids, including aristolane- and guaiane-types, were isolated from an acetone extract of spikenard. We evaluated the sedative activities of these oxygenated compounds using an inhalation administration method in a caffeine-treated excitatory mouse model. We identified aristolen-1(10)-en-9-ol and patchouli alcohol as highly effective sedative components. These compounds inhibited locomotion in mice by approximately 60% at a dose of 300 µg/cage. In addition, aristolen-1(10)-en-9-ol prolonged pentobarbital-induced sleep to the same extent as 1 mg/kg diazepam. This effect completely disappeared with the administration of the GABAA-benzodiazepine receptor antagonist flumazenil (3 mg/kg), suggesting that the sedative effect of aristolen-1(10)-en-9-ol is expressed via the GABAergic system. Furthermore, differently from diazepam, inhalation of aristolen-1(10)-en-9-ol for 1 h did not affect the motor coordination in the rota-rod test. In the present study, we identified active components and provided evidence supporting the traditional sedative use of spikenard. Our research suggests that aristolen-1(10)-en-9-ol may be an effective aromatherapy, providing mild sedation.

  18. Inhalation administration of the sesquiterpenoid aristolen-1(10)-en-9-ol from Nardostachys chinensis has a sedative effect via the GABAergic system.

    PubMed

    Takemoto, Hiroaki; Ito, Michiho; Asada, Yoshihisa; Kobayashi, Yoshinori

    2015-03-01

    Spikenard, the dried roots of Nardostachys chinensis, contains sesquiterpenoids and is widely used as an herbal tranquilizer. We previously demonstrated that spikenard vapor showed a sedative effect when administered by inhalation, and we identified hydrocarbon sesquiterpenoids as active components. Here we investigated the other components that contribute to the effects of spikenard. Six oxygenated sesquiterpenoids, including aristolane- and guaiane-types, were isolated from an acetone extract of spikenard. We evaluated the sedative activities of these oxygenated compounds using an inhalation administration method in a caffeine-treated excitatory mouse model. We identified aristolen-1(10)-en-9-ol and patchouli alcohol as highly effective sedative components. These compounds inhibited locomotion in mice by approximately 60% at a dose of 300 µg/cage. In addition, aristolen-1(10)-en-9-ol prolonged pentobarbital-induced sleep to the same extent as 1 mg/kg diazepam. This effect completely disappeared with the administration of the GABAA-benzodiazepine receptor antagonist flumazenil (3 mg/kg), suggesting that the sedative effect of aristolen-1(10)-en-9-ol is expressed via the GABAergic system. Furthermore, differently from diazepam, inhalation of aristolen-1(10)-en-9-ol for 1 h did not affect the motor coordination in the rota-rod test. In the present study, we identified active components and provided evidence supporting the traditional sedative use of spikenard. Our research suggests that aristolen-1(10)-en-9-ol may be an effective aromatherapy, providing mild sedation. PMID:25798643

  19. Boron isotope effect in superconducting MgB2.

    PubMed

    Bud'ko, S L; Lapertot, G; Petrovic, C; Cunningham, C E; Anderson, N; Canfield, P C

    2001-02-26

    We report the preparation method of and boron isotope effect for MgB2, a new binary intermetallic superconductor with a remarkably high superconducting transition temperature T(c)(10B) = 40.2 K. Measurements of both temperature dependent magnetization and specific heat reveal a 1.0 K shift in T(c) between Mg11B2 and Mg10B2. Whereas such a high transition temperature might imply exotic coupling mechanisms, the boron isotope effect in MgB2 is consistent with the material being a phonon-mediated BCS superconductor.

  20. Global dissolution effects on planktonic foraminiferal Mg/Ca ratios controlled by the calcite-saturation state of bottom waters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Regenberg, Marcus; Regenberg, Anke; Garbe-Schönberg, Dieter; Lea, David W.

    2014-03-01

    Mg/Ca ratios of planktonic foraminiferal tests are important tools for reconstructing past ocean temperatures at different levels of the upper water column. Yet numerous studies suggest a significant influence of calcite dissolution on Mg/Ca ratios lowering their initial signal recorded within a planktonic foraminiferal habitat. To determine the effect of dissolution, this study presents Mg/Ca ratios of eight planktonic foraminiferal species from the South China Sea sediment surface. Continuously decreasing with increasing water depth, the Mg/Ca ratios also decrease with calcite-saturation states close to and below saturation (bottom water Δ[CO3 2-]<30 μmol kg-1) but are stable in well calcite-supersaturated bottom waters (>40 μmol kg-1). This preservation pattern compares well with examples of Mg/Ca dissolution from the tropical Atlantic Ocean and is independent of the foraminiferal species. Merging a global data set by separate normalization of 79 Mg/Ca data sets from the Pacific, Atlantic, and Indian Oceans, which removes thermal differences between the ocean regions and foraminiferal species, enabled us to quantify a global decrease in planktonic foraminiferal Mg/Ca ratios of 0.054 ±0.019 μmol mol-1 per μmol kg-1 below a critical threshold for dissolution of 21.3 ±6.6 μmol kg-1. The absolute decline in Mg/Ca ratios, which is similar for all species, affects temperature estimates from (sub-)thermocline species more strongly than those from shallow dwellers. The water depth of this critical threshold in the global oceans shoals from >3.5 km in the North Atlantic to <0.5 km in the North Pacific based on calculations of the global calcite-saturation state from 6321 hydrographic stations. Above this critical threshold Mg/Ca ratios are well preserved, and paleotemperature estimates are broadly unaffected by dissolution.

  1. The MG Composite

    PubMed Central

    Burns, Ted M.; Conaway, Mark; Sanders, Donald B.

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To study the concurrent and construct validity and test-retest reliability in the practice setting of an outcome measure for myasthenia gravis (MG). Methods: Eleven centers participated in the validation study of the Myasthenia Gravis Composite (MGC) scale. Patients with MG were evaluated at 2 consecutive visits. Concurrent and construct validities of the MGC were assessed by evaluating MGC scores in the context of other MG-specific outcome measures. We used numerous potential indicators of clinical improvement to assess the sensitivity and specificity of the MGC for detecting clinical improvement. Test-retest reliability was performed on patients at the University of Virginia. Results: A total of 175 patients with MG were enrolled at 11 sites from July 1, 2008, to January 31, 2009. A total of 151 patients were seen in follow-up. Total MGC scores showed excellent concurrent validity with other MG-specific scales. Analyses of sensitivities and specificities of the MGC revealed that a 3-point improvement in total MGC score was optimal for signifying clinical improvement. A 3-point improvement in the MGC also appears to represent a meaningful improvement to most patients, as indicated by improved 15-item myasthenia gravis quality of life scale (MG-QOL15) scores. The psychometric properties were no better for an individualized subscore made up of the 2 functional domains that the patient identified as most important to treat. The test-retest reliability coefficient of the MGC was 98%, with a lower 95% confidence interval of 97%, indicating excellent test-retest reliability. Conclusions: The Myasthenia Gravis Composite is a reliable and valid instrument for measuring clinical status of patients with myasthenia gravis in the practice setting and in clinical trials. PMID:20439845

  2. Structural properties of platinum(II) biphenyl complexes containing 1,10-phenanthroline derivatives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rillema, D. Paul; Cruz, Arvin J.; Tasset, Brandon J.; Moore, Curtis; Siam, Khamis; Huang, Wei

    2013-06-01

    Seven platinum(II) complexes formulated as Pt(bph)L, where bph is the 2,2'-biphenyl dianion and L = 4-methyl-1,10-phenanthroline (4-Mephen), 5-methyl-1,10-phenanthroline (5-Mephen), 5-chloro-1,10-phenanthroline (5-Clphen), 5,6-dimethyl-1,10-phenanthroline (5,6-Me2phen), 4,7-dimethyl-1,10-phenanthroline (4,7-Me2phen), 4,7-diphenyl-1,10-phenanthroline (4,7-Ph2phen) and 3,4,7,8-tetramethyl-1,10-phenanthroline (3,4,7,8-Me4phen) are reported. Protons attached to the phen ligand resonate downfield from those attached to the bph ligand and two proton signals are split by interaction with 195Pt. Pt(bph)(3,4,7,8-Me4phen), Pt(bph)(4,7-Me2phen), Pt(bph)(5,6-Me2phen), Pt(bph)(4,7-Ph2phen) and Pt(bph)(5-Mephen) crystallize in the space groups Pna21, P21/n, P21/c, P - 1 and Pca21, respectively. The structures of the complexes deviate from true planarity and divide themselves into two groups where the bph and phen ligands cross in an X configuration or bow out in a butterfly (B) configuration. Circular dichroism revealed two different spectra with respect to the X and B configurations.

  3. Excitation Mechanisms for HCN (1-0) and HCO+ (1-0) in Galaxies from the Great Observatories All-sky LIRG Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Privon, George; Herrero-Illana, Ruben; Evans, Aaron; Iwasawa, Kazushi; Perez-Torres, Miguel; Armus, Lee; Diaz-Santos, Tanio; Murphy, Eric; Stierwalt, Sabrina; Aalto, Susanne; Mazzarella, Joe; Barcos-Muñoz, Loreto; Borish, Jake; Inami, Hanae; Kim, Dongchan; Treister, Ezequiel; Surace, Jason; Lord, Steven; Conway, John; Frayer, David; Alberdi, Antonio

    2015-08-01

    We will present new IRAM 30m observations of the HCN (1-0) and HCO+ (1-0) emission in a sample of Luminous and Ultraluminous Infrared Galaxies from the Great Observatories All-sky LIRG Survey. These new measurements are compared with mid-infrared AGN diagnostics to ascertain if enhanced HCN emission (relative to HCO+) correlates with increased AGN dominance. I will also compare consider the global relationships of these dense gas tracers with the infrared luminosity, to investigate the relationship between the HCN and HCO+ luminosities and the ongoing star formation. These comparisons suggest the HCN and HCO+ emission depend on both density and radiative effects (XDRs, mid-infrared pumping), obstructing a simple interpretation of the HCN/HCO+ ratio.

  4. High-Temperature CO2 Sorption on Hydrotalcite Having a High Mg/Al Molar Ratio.

    PubMed

    Kim, Suji; Jeon, Sang Goo; Lee, Ki Bong

    2016-03-01

    Hydrotalcites having a Mg/Al molar ratio between 3 and 30 have been synthesized as promising high-temperature CO2 sorbents. The existence of NaNO3 in the hydrotalcite structure, which originates from excess magnesium nitrate in the precursor, markedly increases CO2 sorption uptake by hydrotalcite up to the record high value of 9.27 mol kg(-1) at 240 °C and 1 atm CO2.

  5. Mutagenicity of the nuclease activity of 1,10-phenanthroline-copper ion

    SciTech Connect

    Feig, A.L.; Thederahn, T.; Sigman, D.S.

    1988-08-30

    The nuclease activity of 1,10-phenanthroline-copper functions intracellularly. This was shown by its mutagenicity in the Ames Test using the tester strain TA 102 and the in vivo nicking of plasmids derived from this strain. In vivo DNA strand scission requires all the components essential for the in vitro activity: 1,10-phenanthroline, cupric ion, thiol and hydrogen peroxide. Although /sup 60/Co gamma radiation potentiates the nuclease activity of 1,10-phenanthroline-copper ion in vitro via a superoxide dependent pathway, it does not promote significant mutagenesis in vivo at exposure levels below cytotoxicity.

  6. Extracellular vesicles shed by melanoma cells contain a modified form of H1.0 linker histone and H1.0 mRNA-binding proteins

    PubMed Central

    Schiera, Gabriella; Di Liegro, Carlo Maria; Puleo, Veronica; Colletta, Oriana; Fricano, Anna; Cancemi, Patrizia; Di Cara, Gianluca; Di Liegro, Italia

    2016-01-01

    Extracellular vesicles (EVs) are now recognized as a fundamental way for cell-to-cell horizontal transfer of properties, in both physiological and pathological conditions. Most of EV-mediated cross-talk among cells depend on the exchange of proteins, and nucleic acids, among which mRNAs, and non-coding RNAs such as different species of miRNAs. Cancer cells, in particular, use EVs to discard molecules which could be dangerous to them (for example differentiation-inducing proteins such as histone H1.0, or antitumor drugs), to transfer molecules which, after entering the surrounding cells, are able to transform their phenotype, and even to secrete factors, which allow escaping from immune surveillance. Herein we report that melanoma cells not only secrete EVs which contain a modified form of H1.0 histone, but also transport the corresponding mRNA. Given the already known role in tumorigenesis of some RNA binding proteins (RBPs), we also searched for proteins of this class in EVs. This study revealed the presence in A375 melanoma cells of at least three RBPs, with apparent MW of about 65, 45 and 38 kDa, which are able to bind H1.0 mRNA. Moreover, we purified one of these proteins, which by MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry was identified as the already known transcription factor MYEF2. PMID:27633859

  7. 32 CFR 1636.5 - Exclusion from Class 1-A-0 and Class 1-0.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... be excluded from Class 1-A-0 or Class 1-0: (a) Who asserts beliefs which are of a religious, moral or... participation in war does not rest at all upon moral, ethical, or religious principle, but instead rests...

  8. Structural and magnetic properties of L1(0)/A1, FePt nanocomposites

    SciTech Connect

    Giannopoulos, G; Speliotis, T; Li, WF; Hadjipanayis, G; Niarchos, D

    2013-01-01

    In this work structural and magnetic properties of (L1(0)-FePt/A1-FePt) exchange coupled nanocomposites are presented. Semi spherical "dome-like" nanocomposites with L1(0) FePt isolated nanoparticles and A1 FePt (fcc) cap layers were obtained by depositing A1-FePt on type L1(0) FePt nanoparticles in order to understand the influence of the soft magnetic layer thickness on the magnetic properties of the system. Epitaxial growth is confirmed by X-ray diffraction and TEM, while the coercivity decreases dramatically for the L1(0)/A1-FePt system when the thickness of the A1-FePt cap layers is increased. This result can be used to realize ultrahigh magnetic recording media with tunable coercivity, suitable for conventional write heads. (C) 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Results of 1.0-L sample bottle pressurization tests for the pit burst experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Veirs, K.D.; Prenger, F.C.; Harradine, D.M.; McFarlan, J.T.

    1997-02-01

    Pressurization tests were performed on a 1.0-L sample bottle to verify operational aspects of the pit burst experimental test apparatus. The 1.0-L sample bottle was selected because of its known geometry, certified performance and ready availability. Redundant strain gage instrumentation was installed on the test sample enabling evaluation of the repeatability and consistency of data acquisition. Test results were compared with analytical model predictions to evaluate instrumentation accuracy.

  10. DEVELOPMENTAL EXPOSURE TO 1.0 OR 2.5 MG/KG DIBUTYLTIN DICHLORIDE DOES NOT IMPAIR IMMUNE FUNCTION IN SPRAGUE-DAWLEY RATS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Organotins are used commercially as pesticides, antifouling agents and stabilizers for polyvinyl chloride (PVC) pipe. Mono- and di-substituted methyl and butyltins, used in PVC pipe production, are of concern to the U.S. EPA as they leach from supply pipes into drinking water an...

  11. Ethyl glucuronide concentrations in oral fluid, blood, and urine after volunteers drank 0.5 and 1.0 g/kg doses of ethanol.

    PubMed

    Høiseth, Gudrun; Yttredal, Borghild; Karinen, Ritva; Gjerde, Hallvard; Mørland, Jørg; Christophersen, Asbjørg

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the concentrations of ethyl glucuronide (EtG) in oral fluid, blood, and urine after healthy volunteers drank two doses of ethanol, 0.5 (n = 11) and 1.0 g/kg (n = 10), after an overnight fast. Samples of oral fluid, blood, and urine were collected before drinking started and at 1.5, 3.5, 5.5, 8.5, 11.5, and 24 h post-dosing. Following ingestion of low dose of ethanol, the Cmax for EtG was 0.36 mg/L (range 0.28-0.41 mg/L) in blood and 69.8 mg/L (range 47.1-96.5 mg/L) in urine. In oral fluid, the concentrations were < 1% of those in blood, and only three subjects exceeded the limit of quantification for EtG in oral fluid. After ingestion of the high dose of ethanol, the Cmax for EtG was 1.06 mg/L (range 0.8-1.22 mg/L) in blood, 159.9 mg/L (range 97.2-225.5 mg/L) in urine, and 0.032 mg/L (range 0.013-0.059 mg/L) in oral fluid. The median oral fluid/blood ratio was 0.029 (range 0.012-0.054) for EtG. The detection time for EtG was median 11.5 h (range 3.5-11.5 h) in oral fluid. According to this, the detection time for EtG in oral fluid is therefore only a few hours longer than for ethanol itself and represents limited additional value. PMID:20663284

  12. Data-driven Radiative Hydrodynamic Modeling of the 2014 March 29 X1.0 Solar Flare

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rubio da Costa, Fatima; Kleint, Lucia; Petrosian, Vahé; Liu, Wei; Allred, Joel C.

    2016-08-01

    Spectroscopic observations of solar flares provide critical diagnostics of the physical conditions in the flaring atmosphere. Some key features in observed spectra have not yet been accounted for in existing flare models. Here we report a data-driven simulation of the well-observed X1.0 flare on 2014 March 29 that can reconcile some well-known spectral discrepancies. We analyzed spectra of the flaring region from the Interface Region Imaging Spectrograph (IRIS) in Mg ii h&k, the Interferometric BIdimensional Spectropolarimeter at the Dunn Solar Telescope (DST/IBIS) in Hα 6563 Å and Ca ii 8542 Å, and the Reuven Ramaty High Energy Solar Spectroscope Imager (RHESSI) in hard X-rays. We constructed a multithreaded flare loop model and used the electron flux inferred from RHESSI data as the input to the radiative hydrodynamic code RADYN to simulate the atmospheric response. We then synthesized various chromospheric emission lines and compared them with the IRIS and IBIS observations. In general, the synthetic intensities agree with the observed ones, especially near the northern footpoint of the flare. The simulated Mg ii line profile has narrower wings than the observed one. This discrepancy can be reduced by using a higher microturbulent velocity (27 km s-1) in a narrow chromospheric layer. In addition, we found that an increase of electron density in the upper chromosphere within a narrow height range of ≈800 km below the transition region can turn the simulated Mg ii line core into emission and thus reproduce the single peaked profile, which is a common feature in all IRIS flares.

  13. Effect of Ca addition on the microstructure and mechanical properties of as-cast Mg-Sm alloys.

    PubMed

    Luo, Xiaoping; Fang, Daqing; Chai, Yuesheng; Yang, Bin

    2016-08-01

    This study investigated the effect of Ca addition on the microstructure and mechanical properties of as-cast Mg-4Sm alloys. The addition of 1.0 wt% Ca led to a significant grain refinement of Mg-4.0Sm alloys owing to the formation of rod-like Mg2Ca phases that acted as active nucleates for the Mg matrix. The as-cast Mg-4.0Sm-1.0Ca alloy showed the smallest grain size at 45 μm. Furthermore, the Mg-4.0Sm-1.0Ca alloy exhibited greater hardness, higher tensile strength, and higher yield tensile strength and elongation than the other two alloys with different Ca contents. These results were attributed to the grain refinement and precipitation strengthening of the Mg2Ca and Mg41Sm5 phases. Microsc. Res. Tech. 79:707-711, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. Spacesuit Portable Life Support System Breadboard (PLSS 1.0) Development and Test Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vogel, Matt R.; Watts, Carly

    2011-01-01

    A multi-year effort has been carried out at NASA-JSC to develop an advanced Extravehicular Activity (EVA) PLSS design intended to further the current state of the art by increasing operational flexibility, reducing consumables, and increasing robustness. Previous efforts have focused on modeling and analyzing the advanced PLSS architecture, as well as developing key enabling technologies. Like the current International Space Station (ISS) Extravehicular Mobility Unit (EMU) PLSS, the advanced PLSS comprises of three subsystems required to sustain the crew during EVA including the Thermal, Ventilation, and Oxygen Subsystems. This multi-year effort has culminated in the construction and operation of PLSS 1.0, a test rig that simulates full functionality of the advanced PLSS design. PLSS 1.0 integrates commercial off the shelf hardware with prototype technology development components, including the primary and secondary oxygen regulators, ventilation loop fan, Rapid Cycle Amine (RCA) swingbed, and Spacesuit Water Membrane Evaporator (SWME). Testing accumulated 239 hours over 45 days, while executing 172 test points. Specific PLSS 1.0 test objectives assessed during this testing include: confirming key individual components perform in a system level test as they have performed during component level testing; identifying unexpected system-level interactions; operating PLSS 1.0 in nominal steady-state EVA modes to baseline subsystem performance with respect to metabolic rate, ventilation loop pressure and flow rate, and environmental conditions; simulating nominal transient EVA operational scenarios; simulating contingency EVA operational scenarios; and further evaluating individual technology development components. Successful testing of the PLSS 1.0 provided a large database of test results that characterize system level and component performance. With the exception of several minor anomalies, the PLSS 1.0 test rig performed as expected; furthermore, many system responses trended in accordance with pre-test predictions.

  15. A Bayesian, multivariate calibration for Globigerinoides ruber Mg/Ca

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khider, D.; Huerta, G.; Jackson, C.; Stott, L. D.; Emile-Geay, J.

    2015-09-01

    The use of Mg/Ca in marine carbonates as a paleothermometer has been challenged by observations that implicate salinity as a contributing influence on Mg incorporation into biotic calcite and that dissolution at the sea-floor alters the original Mg/Ca. Yet, these factors have not yet been incorporated into a single calibration model. We introduce a new Bayesian calibration for Globigerinoides ruber Mg/Ca based on 186 globally distributed core top samples, which explicitly takes into account the effect of temperature, salinity, and dissolution on this proxy. Our reported temperature, salinity, and dissolution (here expressed as deep-water ΔCO32-) sensitivities are (±2σ) 8.7±0.9%/°C, 3.9±1.2%/psu, and 3.3±1.3%/μmol.kg-1 below a critical threshold of 21 μmol/kg in good agreement with previous culturing and core-top studies. We then perform a sensitivity experiment on a published record from the western tropical Pacific to investigate the bias introduced by these secondary influences on the interpretation of past temperature variability. This experiment highlights the potential for misinterpretations of past oceanographic changes when the secondary influences of salinity and dissolution are not accounted for. Multiproxy approaches could potentially help deconvolve the contributing influences but this awaits better characterization of the spatio-temporal relationship between salinity and δ18Osw over millennial and orbital timescales.

  16. Spacesuit Portable Life Support System Breadboard (PLSS 1.0) Development and Test Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Watts, Carly A.; Vogel, Matt

    2012-01-01

    A multi-year effort has been carried out at the Johnson Space Center to develop an advanced EVA PLSS design intended to further the current state of the art by increasing operational flexibility, reducing consumables, and increasing robustness. This multi-year effort has culminated in the construction and operation of PLSS 1.0, a test rig that simulates full functionality of the advanced PLSS design. PLSS 1.0 integrates commercial off-the-shelf hardware with prototype technology development components, including the primary and secondary oxygen regulators, ventilation loop fan, Rapid Cycle Amine (RCA) swingbed, and Spacesuit Water Membrane Evaporator (SWME). PLSS 1.0 was tested from June 17th through September 30th, 2011. Testing accumulated 233 hours over 45 days, while executing 119 test points. An additional 164 hours of operational time were accrued during the test series, bringing the total operational time for PLSS 1.0 testing to 397 hours. Specific PLSS 1.0 test objectives assessed during this testing include: (1) Confirming prototype components perform in a system level test as they have performed during component level testing, (2) Identifying unexpected system-level interactions (3) Operating PLSS 1.0 in nominal steady-state EVA modes to baseline subsystem performance with respect to metabolic rate, ventilation loop pressure and flow rate, and environmental conditions (4) Simulating nominal transient EVA operational scenarios (5) Simulating contingency EVA operational scenarios (6) Further evaluating prototype technology development components Successful testing of the PLSS 1.0 provided a large database of test results that characterize system level and component performance. With the exception of several minor anomalies, the PLSS 1.0 test rig performed as expected. Documented anomalies and observations include: (1) Ventilation loop fan controller issues at high fan speeds (near 70,000 rpm, whereas the fan speed during nominal operations would be closer to 35,000 rpm) (2) RCA performance at boundary conditions, including carbon dioxide and water vapor saturation events, as well as reduced vacuum quality (3) SWME valve anomalies (4 documented cases where the SWME failed to respond to a control signal or physically jammed, preventing SWME control) (4) Reduction of SWME hollow fiber hydrophobicity and significant reduction of the SWME degassing capability after significant accumulated test time.

  17. Porous Mg thin films for Mg-air batteries.

    PubMed

    Xin, Gongbiao; Wang, Xiaojuan; Wang, Chongyun; Zheng, Jie; Li, Xingguo

    2013-12-28

    An alkaline primary Mg-air battery made from a porous Mg thin film displayed superior discharge performances, including a flat discharge plateau, a high open-circuit voltage of 1.41 V and a large discharge capacity of 821 mAh g(-1), suggesting that the electrochemical performances of Mg-air batteries can be improved by controlling the Mg anode morphology. PMID:24158667

  18. LABCORE post release 1.0 development system project management plan

    SciTech Connect

    Rich, H.S.

    1994-09-29

    The LABCORE post release 1.0 development system project management plan (SPMP) is the primary planning document governing the development of specific enhancements to the LABCORE project. The mission of the Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC) laboratories is changing from supporting the 200 Area chemical processing plants for process control, waste management, and effluent monitoring to supporting environmental restoration and regulatory compliance commitments. The LABCORE program was implemented as the key element for meeting the commitments by upgrading the laboratories through the implementation of an Automated Data Processing improvement program in January 1994. Scope for LABCORE release 1.0 consisted of hardware and software implementation required to support a minimum number of analyses (Single-Shell Tank [SST] analysis at 222S Laboratory and Performance Evaluation samples at the Waste Sampling Characterization Facility laboratory) using manual entry of data, and to support routine laboratory functions, common to all laboratories. LABCORE post release 1.0 enhancements will expand the functionality presented to the laboratory. Post release 1.0 enhancements will also address the integration of a database for Analytical Services Program Integration, budgeting, and scheduling offices into LABCORE.

  19. 33 CFR 1.10-5 - Public availability of records and documents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... written request to the Chief, Office of Information Management (CG-61), U.S. Coast Guard Headquarters... of Information Management (CG-61), at the address in paragraph (a) of this section. ... HOMELAND SECURITY GENERAL GENERAL PROVISIONS Public Availability of Information § 1.10-5...

  20. Conformation of bicyclo[ n.1.0] derivatives . Part 4. bicycloalkenes and bicyclic methylenecyclopropanes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Favini, Giorgio; Sottocornola, Manuela; Todeschini, Roberto

    The conformational geometries and possible conformational equilibria of some bicyclo[ n.1.0] alkenes and bicyclic methylenecyclopropanes have been studied by molecular mechanics method. The theoretical results are in agreement with the equilibrium ratios determined in kinetics experiments and with the interpretation of electron diffraction patterns or high resolution PMR spectra.

  1. Interaction of neocuproine, 1,10-phenanthroline and 2,2'-dipyridyl with human ceruloplasmin.

    PubMed

    Løvstad, R A

    1988-01-01

    1. Neocuproine binding to ceruloplasmin markedly increases the chlorpromazine-ceruloplasmin-catalyzed oxidation of NADH. 2. 1,10-Phenanthroline and 2,2'-dipyridyl inhibit neocuproine activation in a competitive manner. 3. The order of enzyme chelator complex stability was: phenanthroline greater than dipyridyl greater than neocuproine.

  2. 17 CFR 1.10 - Financial reports of futures commission merchants and introducing brokers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... provide a compilation report of financial statements of warehousemen for purposes of Uniform Grain Storage... of a financial report prepared by a grain commission firm which has been authorized by the Deputy....) Editorial Note: For Federal Register citations affecting § 1.10, see the List of CFR Sections...

  3. A Review of DIMPACK Version 1.0: Conditional Covariance-Based Test Dimensionality Analysis Package

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Deng, Nina; Han, Kyung T.; Hambleton, Ronald K.

    2013-01-01

    DIMPACK Version 1.0 for assessing test dimensionality based on a nonparametric conditional covariance approach is reviewed. This software was originally distributed by Assessment Systems Corporation and now can be freely accessed online. The software consists of Windows-based interfaces of three components: DIMTEST, DETECT, and CCPROX/HAC, which…

  4. Optical positions of ICRF sources from CTIO 1.0m data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zacharias, M. I.; Berghea, C.; Dieck, C.; Dudik, R.; Hennessy, G.; Veillette, D.; Zacharias, N.

    2015-10-01

    As part of the USNO radio-optical reference frame link project, data were taken with the CTIO 1.0 m telescope in 2009. First position results of 5 ICRF sources are presented as part of this primarily photometric investigation of optical counterparts.

  5. SAGE FOR MACINTOSH (MSAGE) VERSION 1.0 SOLVENT ALTERNATIVES GUIDE - USER'S GUIDE

    EPA Science Inventory

    The guide provides instructions for using the Solvent Alternatives Guide (SAGE) for Macintosh, version 1.0. The guide assumes that the user is familiar with the fundamentals of operating a
    Macintosh personal computer under the System 7.0 (or higher) operating system. SAGE for ...

  6. SAGE FOR WINDOWS (WSAGE) VERSION 1.0 SOLVENT ALTERNATIVES GUIDE - USER'S GUIDE

    EPA Science Inventory

    The guide provides instructions for using the Solvent Alternatives Guide (SAGE) for Windows, version 1.0. The guide assumes that the user is familiar with the fundamentals of operating Windows 3.1 (or higher) on a personal computer under the DOS 5.0 (or higher) operating system. ...

  7. VizieR Online Data Catalog: VCC 2062 CO(1-0) data cubes (Lisenfeld+, 2016)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lisenfeld, U.; Braine, J.; Duc, P. A.; Boquien, M.; Brinks, E.; Bournaud, F.; Lelli, F.; Charmandaris, V.

    2016-04-01

    The two fits files contain the data cube of CO(1-0) observed with Plateau de Bure Interferometer. Both cubes were obtained with natural weighting and with different taperings. The velocity resolution is 1.8km/s. More details about the data acquisition and reduction are in the paper. (2 data files).

  8. STATE ACID RAIN RESEARCH AND SCREENING SYSTEM - VERSION 1.0 USER'S MANUAL

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report is a user's manual that describes Version 1.0 of EPA's STate Acid Rain Research and Screening System (STARRSS), developed to assist utility regulatory commissions in reviewing utility acid rain compliance plans. It is a screening tool that is based on scenario analysis...

  9. 32 CFR 1636.5 - Exclusion from Class 1-A-0 and Class 1-0.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... participation in war does not rest at all upon moral, ethical, or religious principle, but instead rests solely... be excluded from Class 1-A-0 or Class 1-0: (a) Who asserts beliefs which are of a religious, moral or...) Whose objection to participation in war is directed against a particular war rather than against war...

  10. 32 CFR 1636.5 - Exclusion from Class 1-A-0 and Class 1-0.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... participation in war does not rest at all upon moral, ethical, or religious principle, but instead rests solely... be excluded from Class 1-A-0 or Class 1-0: (a) Who asserts beliefs which are of a religious, moral or...) Whose objection to participation in war is directed against a particular war rather than against war...

  11. 32 CFR 1636.5 - Exclusion from Class 1-A-0 and Class 1-0.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... participation in war does not rest at all upon moral, ethical, or religious principle, but instead rests solely... be excluded from Class 1-A-0 or Class 1-0: (a) Who asserts beliefs which are of a religious, moral or...) Whose objection to participation in war is directed against a particular war rather than against war...

  12. 32 CFR 1636.5 - Exclusion from Class 1-A-0 and Class 1-0.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... participation in war does not rest at all upon moral, ethical, or religious principle, but instead rests solely... be excluded from Class 1-A-0 or Class 1-0: (a) Who asserts beliefs which are of a religious, moral or...) Whose objection to participation in war is directed against a particular war rather than against war...

  13. Kinomer v. 1.0: a database of systematically classified eukaryotic protein kinases.

    PubMed

    Martin, David M A; Miranda-Saavedra, Diego; Barton, Geoffrey J

    2009-01-01

    The regulation of protein function through reversible phosphorylation by protein kinases and phosphatases is a general mechanism controlling virtually every cellular activity. Eukaryotic protein kinases can be classified into distinct, well-characterized groups based on amino acid sequence similarity and function. We recently reported a highly sensitive and accurate hidden Markov model-based method for the automatic detection and classification of protein kinases into these specific groups. The Kinomer v. 1.0 database presented here contains annotated classifications for the protein kinase complements of 43 eukaryotic genomes. These span the taxonomic range and include fungi (16 species), plants (6), diatoms (1), amoebas (2), protists (1) and animals (17). The kinomes are stored in a relational database and are accessible through a web interface on the basis of species, kinase group or a combination of both. In addition, the Kinomer v. 1.0 HMM library is made available for users to perform classification on arbitrary sequences. The Kinomer v. 1.0 database is a continually updated resource where direct comparison of kinase sequences across kinase groups and across species can give insights into kinase function and evolution. Kinomer v. 1.0 is available at http://www.compbio.dundee.ac.uk/kinomer/.

  14. 33 CFR 1.10-5 - Public availability of records and documents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... written request to the Chief, Office of Information Management (CG-61), U.S. Coast Guard Headquarters... of Information Management (CG-61), at the address in paragraph (a) of this section. ... HOMELAND SECURITY GENERAL GENERAL PROVISIONS Public Availability of Information § 1.10-5...

  15. 33 CFR 1.10-5 - Public availability of records and documents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... written request to the Chief, Office of Information Management (CG-61), U.S. Coast Guard Headquarters... of Information Management (CG-61), at the address in paragraph (a) of this section. ... HOMELAND SECURITY GENERAL GENERAL PROVISIONS Public Availability of Information § 1.10-5...

  16. 33 CFR 1.10-5 - Public availability of records and documents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... written request to the Chief, Office of Information Management (CG-61), U.S. Coast Guard Headquarters... of Information Management (CG-61), at the address in paragraph (a) of this section. ... HOMELAND SECURITY GENERAL GENERAL PROVISIONS Public Availability of Information § 1.10-5...

  17. Microstructure and magnetic properties of (001) textured L1(0) FePt films on amorphous glass substrate

    SciTech Connect

    Speliotis, T; Varvaro, G; Testa, AM; Giannopoulos, G; Agostinelli, E; Li, W; Hadjipanayis, G; Niarchos, D

    2015-05-15

    L1(0) FePt thin films with an island-like morphology and magnetic perpendicular anisotropy were grown at low temperature (300 < T-dep< 375 degrees C) by magnetron sputtering on Hoya glass substrates using a 30-nm thick Cr (2 0 0) underlayer. An MgO buffer layer with a thickness of 2 nm was used to inhibit the diffusion from the Cr underlayer and promote the growth of (0 0 1) oriented L1(0) FePt films by inducing an in-plane lattice distortion. By varying the substrate temperature and the Ar sputter pressure (3.5 < P-Ar< 15 mTorr) during the deposition, the degree of chemical order, the microstructure and the magnetic properties were tuned and the best properties in term of squareness ratio (M-r/M-s similar to 0.95) and coercive field (H-c similar to 14 kOe) were observed for films deposited at T-dep = 350 degrees C and P-Ar= 5 mTorr, due to the appearance of a tensile strain, which favors the perpendicular anisotropy. The analysis of the angular dependence of remanent magnetization curves on the optimized sample suggests that the magnetization reversal is highly incoherent due to the inter-island interactions. Our results provide useful information on the low temperature growth of FePt films with perpendicular anisotropy onto glass substrates, which are relevant for a variety of technological applications, such as magnetic recording and spintronic devices. (C) 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Space Suit Portable Life Support System Test Bed (PLSS 1.0) Development and Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Watts, Carly; Campbell, Colin; Vogel, Matthew; Conger, Bruce

    2012-01-01

    A multi-year effort has been carried out at NASA-JSC to develop an advanced extra-vehicular activity Portable Life Support System (PLSS) design intended to further the current state of the art by increasing operational flexibility, reducing consumables, and increasing robustness. Previous efforts have focused on modeling and analyzing the advanced PLSS architecture, as well as developing key enabling technologies. Like the current International Space Station Extra-vehicular Mobility Unit PLSS, the advanced PLSS comprises three subsystems required to sustain the crew during extra-vehicular activity including the Thermal, Ventilation, and Oxygen Subsystems. This multi-year effort has culminated in the construction and operation of PLSS 1.0, a test bed that simulates full functionality of the advanced PLSS design. PLSS 1.0 integrates commercial off the shelf hardware with prototype technology development components, including the primary and secondary oxygen regulators, Ventilation Subsystem fan, Rapid Cycle Amine swingbed carbon dioxide and water vapor removal device, and Spacesuit Water Membrane Evaporator heat rejection device. The overall PLSS 1.0 test objective was to demonstrate the capability of the Advanced PLSS to provide key life support functions including suit pressure regulation, carbon dioxide and water vapor removal, thermal control and contingency purge operations. Supplying oxygen was not one of the specific life support functions because the PLSS 1.0 test was not oxygen rated. Nitrogen was used for the working gas. Additional test objectives were to confirm PLSS technology development components performance within an integrated test bed, identify unexpected system level interactions, and map the PLSS 1.0 performance with respect to key variables such as crewmember metabolic rate and suit pressure. Successful PLSS 1.0 testing completed 168 test points over 44 days of testing and produced a large database of test results that characterize system level and component performance. With the exception of several minor anomalies, the PLSS 1.0 test rig performed as expected; furthermore, many system responses trended in accordance with pre-test predictions.

  19. Observations of Local Interstellar Mg I and Mg II

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bruhweiler, F. C.; Oegerle, W.; Weiler, E.; Stencel, R. E.; Kondo, Y.

    1984-01-01

    Copernicus and IUE observations of 5 stars within 50 pc of the Sun were combined to study the ionization of magnesium in the local interstellar medium (LISM). The high resolution Copernicus spectrometer was used to detect interstellar MG I 2852 in the spectra of alpha Gru, alpha Eri, and alpha Lyr, while placing upper limits on Mg I in the spectra of alpha CMa and alpha PsA. Observations of Mg II 2795, 2802 for these stars were also obtained with IUE and Copernicus. The column densities of Mg I and Mg II are used to place constraints on the temperature of the LISM.

  20. Mesoporous carbon stabilized MgO nanoparticles synthesized by pyrolysis of MgCl2 preloaded waste biomass for highly efficient CO2 capture.

    PubMed

    Liu, Wu-Jun; Jiang, Hong; Tian, Ke; Ding, Yan-Wei; Yu, Han-Qing

    2013-08-20

    Anthropogenic CO2 emission makes significant contribution to global climate change and CO2 capture and storage is a currently a preferred technology to change the trajectory toward irreversible global warming. In this work, we reported a new strategy that the inexhaustible MgCl2 in seawater and the abundantly available biomass waste can be utilized to prepare mesoporous carbon stabilized MgO nanoparticles (mPC-MgO) for CO2 capture. The mPC-MgO showed excellent performance in the CO2 capture process with the maximum capacity of 5.45 mol kg(-1), much higher than many other MgO based CO2 trappers. The CO2 capture capacity of the mPC-MgO material kept almost unchanged in 19-run cyclic reuse, and can be regenerated at low temperature. The mechanism for the CO2 capture by the mPC-MgO was investigated by FTIR and XPS, and the results indicated that the high CO2 capture capacity and the favorable selectivity of the as-prepared materials were mainly attributed to their special structure (i.e., surface area, functional groups, and the MgO NPs). This work would open up a new pathway to slow down global warming as well as resolve the pollution of waste biomass.

  1. RGUI 1.0, New Graphical User Interface for RELAP5-3D

    SciTech Connect

    Mesina, George Lee; Galbraith, James Andrew

    1999-04-01

    With the advent of three-dimensional modeling in nuclear safety analysis codes, the need has arisen for a new display methodology. Currently, analysts either sort through voluminous numerical displays of data at points in a region, or view color coded interpretations of the data on a two-dimensional rendition of the plant. RGUI 1.0 provides 3D capability for displaying data. The 3D isometric hydrodynamic image is built automatically from the input deck without additional input from the user. Standard view change features allow the user to focus on only the important data. Familiar features that are standard to the nuclear industry, such as run, interact, and monitor, are included. RGUI 1.0 reduces the difficulty of analyzing complex three dimensional plants.

  2. RGUI 1.0, New Graphical User Interface for RELAP5-3D

    SciTech Connect

    G. L. Mesina; J. Galbraith

    1999-04-01

    With the advent of three-dimensional modeling in nuclear safety analysis codes, the need has arisen for a new display methodology. Currently, analysts either sort through voluminous numerical displays of data at points in a region, or view color coded interpretations of the data on a two-dimensional rendition of the plant. RGUI 1.0 provides 3D capability for displaying data. The 3D isometric hydrodynamic image is built automatically from the input deck without additional input from the user. Standard view change features allow the user to focus on only the important data. Familiar features that are standard to the nuclear industry, such as run, interact, and monitor, are included. RGUI 1.0 reduces the difficulty of analyzing complex three-dimensional plants.

  3. The Titan -1:0 Nodal Bending Wave in Saturn's Ring C.

    PubMed

    Rosen, P A; Lissauer, J J

    1988-08-01

    The most prominent oscillatory feature observed in the Voyager 1 radio occultation of Saturn's rings is identified as a one-armed spiral bending wave excited by Titan's -1:0 nodal inner vertical resonance. Ring partides in a bending wave move in coherently inclined orbits, warping the local mean plane of the rings. The Titan -1:0 wave is the only known bending wave that propagates outward, away from Saturn, and the only spiral wave yet observed in which the wave pattern rotates opposite to the orbital direction of the ring particles. It is also the first bending wave identified in ring C. Modeling the observed feature with existing bending wave theory gives a surface mass density of approximately 0.4 g/cm(2) outside the wave region and a local ring thickness of [unknown]5 meters, and suggests that surface mass density is not constant in the wave region.

  4. Building the Fire Energetics and Emissions Research (FEER) Smoke Emissions Inventory Version 1.0

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ellison, Luke; Ichoku, Charles; Zhang, Feng; Wang, Jun

    2014-01-01

    The Fire Energetics and Emissions Research (FEER) group's new coefficient of emission global gridded product at 1x1 resolution that directly relates fire readiative energy (FRE) to smoke aerosol release, FEERv1.0 Ce, made its public debut in August 2013. Since then, steps have been taken to generate corresponding maps and totals of total particulate matter (PM) emissions using different sources of FRE, and subsequently to simulate the resulting PM(sub 2.5) in the WRF-Chem 3.5 model using emission rates from FEERv1.0 as well as other standard biomass burning emission inventories. An flowchart of the FEER algorithm to calculate Ce is outlined here along with a display of the resulting emissions of total PM globally and also regionally. The modeling results from the WRF-Chem3.5 simulations are also shown.

  5. ISIS++ reference guide (Iterative Scalable Implicit Solver in C++) version 1.0

    SciTech Connect

    Clay, R.L.; Williams, A.B.; Mish, K.D.

    1997-09-01

    ISIS++ (Iterative Scalable Implicit Solver in C++) Version 1.0 is a portable, object-oriented framework for solving sparse linear systems of equations. It includes a collection of Krylov solution methods and preconditioners, as well as both uni-processor (serial) and multi-processor (scalable) matrix and vector classes. Though it was developed to solve systems of equations originating from large-scale, 3-D, finite element analyses, it has applications in many other fields. This document defines the v1.0 interface specification, and includes the necessary instructions for building and running ISIS++ on Unix platforms. The interface is presented in annotated header format, along with background on design and implementation considerations. A finite difference modeling example problem is included to demonstrate the overall setup and use.

  6. Frequency measurement of the J = 1-0 rotational transition of HD

    SciTech Connect

    Evenson, K.M.; Jennings, D.A.; Brown, J.M.; Zink, L.R.; Leopold, K.R.

    1988-07-01

    The frequency of the astronomically important J = 1-0 rotational transition of HD at 2.7 THz (90/cm) has been measured with tunable FIR radiation with an accuracy of 150 kHz. This frequency is now known to sufficient accuracy for use in future astrophysical heterodyne observations of HD in planetary atmospheres (reported by Bezard et al., 1986) and in the interstellar medium (reported by Bussoletti et al., 1975). 14 references.

  7. Poblano v1.0 : a Matlab toolbox for gradient-based optimization.

    SciTech Connect

    Dunlavy, Daniel M.; Acar, Evrim; Kolda, Tamara Gibson

    2010-03-01

    We present Poblano v1.0, a Matlab toolbox for solving gradient-based unconstrained optimization problems. Poblano implements three optimization methods (nonlinear conjugate gradients, limited-memory BFGS, and truncated Newton) that require only first order derivative information. In this paper, we describe the Poblano methods, provide numerous examples on how to use Poblano, and present results of Poblano used in solving problems from a standard test collection of unconstrained optimization problems.

  8. RealGasBrine v1.0 option of TOUGH+ v1.5

    SciTech Connect

    Moridis, George

    2015-02-27

    RealGasBrine v1.0 is a numerical code that for the simulation of the behavior of gas-bearing porous and/fractured geologic media. It is an option of TOUGH+ v1.5 [Moridis, 2014], a successor to the TOUGH2 [Pruess et al., 1999; 2012] family of codes for multi-component, multiphase ?uid and heat ?ow developed at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. RealGasBrine v1.0 needs the TOUGH+ v1.5 core code in order to compile and execute. It is written in standard FORTRAN 95/2003, and can be run on any computational platform (workstation, PC, Macintosh) for which such compilers are available. RealGasBrine v1.0 describes the non-isothermal two- (for pure water) or three-phase (for brine) flow of an aqueous phase and a real gas mixture in a gas-bearing medium, with a particular focus in ultra-tight (such as tight-sand and shale gas) systems. Up to 12 individual real gases can be tracked, and salt can precipitate as solid halite. The capabilities of the code include coupled flow and thermal effects, real gas behavior, Darcy and non-Darcy flow, several isotherm options of gas sorption onto the grains of the porous media, complex fracture descriptions, gas solubility into water, and geomechanical effects on flow properties. RealGasBrine v1.0 allows the study of flow and transport of fluids and heat over a wide range of time frames and spatial scales not only in gas reservoirs, but also in any problem involving the flow of gases in geologic media, including the geologic storage of greenhouse gas mixtures, the behavior of geothermal reservoirs with multi-component condensable (H2O and CO2) and non-condensable gas mixtures, the transport of water and released H2 in nuclear waste storage applications, etc.

  9. Slab1.0: A three-dimensional model of global subduction zone geometries

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hayes, G.P.; Wald, D.J.; Johnson, R.L.

    2012-01-01

    We describe and present a new model of global subduction zone geometries, called Slab1.0. An extension of previous efforts to constrain the two-dimensional non-planar geometry of subduction zones around the focus of large earthquakes, Slab1.0 describes the detailed, non-planar, three-dimensional geometry of approximately 85% of subduction zones worldwide. While the model focuses on the detailed form of each slab from their trenches through the seismogenic zone, where it combines data sets from active source and passive seismology, it also continues to the limits of their seismic extent in the upper-mid mantle, providing a uniform approach to the definition of the entire seismically active slab geometry. Examples are shown for two well-constrained global locations; models for many other regions are available and can be freely downloaded in several formats from our new Slab1.0 website, http://on.doi.gov/ d9ARbS. We describe improvements in our two-dimensional geometry constraint inversion, including the use of average active source seismic data profiles in the shallow trench regions where data are otherwise lacking, derived from the interpolation between other active source seismic data along-strike in the same subduction zone. We include several analyses of the uncertainty and robustness of our three-dimensional interpolation methods. In addition, we use the filtered, subduction-related earthquake data sets compiled to build Slab1.0 in a reassessment of previous analyses of the deep limit of the thrust interface seismogenic zone for all subduction zones included in our global model thus far, concluding that the width of these seismogenic zones is on average 30% larger than previous studies have suggested. Copyright 2011 by the American Geophysical Union.

  10. Tris(1,10-phenanthroline)cobalt(II) bis-(trichloro-acetate).

    PubMed

    Li, Li-Min; Li, Yu-Feng; Liu, Li; Zhang, Zeng-Hui

    2011-07-01

    In the title complex, [Co(C(12)H(8)N(2))(3)](C(2)Cl(3)O(2))(2), the Co(II) ion lies on a twofold rotation axis and is coordinated by six N atoms from three bis-chelating 1,10-phenanthroline ligands in a distorted octa-hedral environment. The crystal structure is stabilized by weak inter-molecular C-H⋯O hydrogen bonds.

  11. Transferable Output ASCII Data (TOAD) gateway: Version 1.0 user's guide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bingel, Bradford D.

    1991-01-01

    The Transferable Output ASCII Data (TOAD) Gateway, release 1.0 is described. This is a software tool for converting tabular data from one format into another via the TOAD format. This initial release of the Gateway allows free data interchange among the following file formats: TOAD; Standard Interface File (SIF); Program to Optimize Simulated Trajectories (POST) input; Comma Separated Value (TSV); and a general free-form file format. As required, additional formats can be accommodated quickly and easily.

  12. Syntheses of photo-active lead(ii) - 1,10 - phenanthrolinematerials

    SciTech Connect

    Glatfelter, Alicia; Dybowski, Cecil; Bai, Shi; Perry, Dale L.

    2006-10-15

    A facile synthetic technique for the formation ofhigh-purity, stoichiometric 1:1 and 1:2 molecular ratio photo-activematerials of lead(II) bromide and lead(II) iodide with1,10-phenanthroline is described. The method results in the formation ofanalytically high-purity crystalline materials which are light-sensitivebut air-stable. Elemental analyses and X-ray powder diffraction were usedto characterize the materials.

  13. Intrinsic magnetic properties of L1(0) FeNi obtained from meteorite NWA 6259

    SciTech Connect

    Poirier, E; Pinkerton, FE; Kubic, R; Mishra, RK; Bordeaux, N; Mubarok, A; Lewis, LH; Goldstein, JI; Skomski, R; Barmak, K

    2015-05-07

    FeNi having the tetragonal L1(0) crystal structure is a promising new rare-earth-free permanent magnet material. Laboratory synthesis is challenging, however, tetragonal L1(0) FeNi-the mineral "tetrataenite"-has been characterized using specimens found in nickel-iron meteorites. Most notably, the meteorite NWA 6259 recovered from Northwest Africa is 95 vol.% tetrataenite with a composition of 43 at.% Ni. Hysteresis loops were measured as a function of sample orientation on a specimen cut from NWA 6259 in order to rigorously deduce the intrinsic hard magnetic properties of its L1(0) phase. Electron backscatter diffraction showed that NWA 6259 is strongly textured, containing L1(0) grains oriented along any one of the three equivalent cubic directions of the parent fcc structure. The magnetic structure was modeled as a superposition of the three orthonormal uniaxial variants. By simultaneously fitting first-quadrant magnetization data for 13 different orientations of the sample with respect to the applied field direction, the intrinsic magnetic properties were estimated to be saturation magnetization 4 pi M-s = 14.7 kG and anisotropy field H-a = 14.4 kOe. The anisotropy constant K = 0.84 MJ/m(3) is somewhat smaller than the value K = 1.3 MJ/m(3) obtained by earlier researchers from nominally equiatomic FeNi prepared by neutron irradiation accompanied by annealing in a magnetic field, suggesting that higher Ni content (fewer Fe antisite defects) may improve the anisotropy. The fit also indicated that NWA 6259 contains one dominant variant (62% by volume), the remainder of the sample being a second variant, and the third variant being absent altogether. (C) 2015 AIP Publishing LLC.

  14. RoboNet-1.0: A Prototype Global Network of Large Robotic Telescopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bode, M. F.; Cardiff U. Collaboration; U. Hertfordshire Collaboration; U. Leicester Collaboration; St Andrews U. Collaboration; Queens U., Belfast Collaboration; Mullard Space Science Lab. Collaboration; U. Exeter Collaboration; U. Southampton Collaboration; U. Manchester Collaboration

    2004-12-01

    Involving a consortium of 10 UK universities, RoboNet-1.0 comprises the Liverpool Telescope (LT, La Palma), plus specially allocated time on the Faulkes Telescope North (FTN, Maui) and Faulkes Telescope South (FTS, Siding Spring, Australia). All three are essentially identical 2m telescopes equipped for both optical photometry and spectroscopy and operated from a common centre in Liverpool. The LT is primarily for research use whereas the FTs are mainly dedicated to education. Software developed by the eSTAR GRID project is being applied and enhanced to enable efficient and effective operation of the network. The primary scientific projects being addressed by RoboNet-1.0 are (a) rapid follow-up of Gamma Ray Burst sources detected by missions such as Swift, and (b) the detection of extra-solar planets via microlensing. Observations with the network began in August 2004. This is a pre-cursor project to the establishment of the full RoboNet global network of six dedicated telescopes which would greatly enhance work in several important branches of time domain astrophysics. Operation of the Liverpool Telescope and RoboNet-1.0 are funded by the UK Particle Physics and Astronomy Research Council. The Faulkes Telescopes are funded by the Dill Faulkes Educational Trust.

  15. Transition metal ion capture using functional mesoporous carbon made with 1,10-phenanthroline

    SciTech Connect

    Chouyyok, Wilaiwan; Yantasee, Wassana; Shin, Yongsoon; Grudzien, Rafal M.; Fryxell, Glen E.

    2009-11-01

    Functional mesoporous carbon has been built using 1,10-phenanthroline as the fundamental building block, resulting in a nanoporous, high surface area sorbent capable of selectively binding transition metal ions. This material had a specific surface area of 870 m2/g, an average pore size of about 30Å, and contained as much as 8.2 weight percent N. Under acidic conditions, where the 1,10-phenanthroline ligand is protonated, this material was found to be an effective anion exchange material for transition metal anions like PdCl4-2 and H2VO4-1. 1,10-phenanthroline functionalized mesoporous carbon (“Phen-FMC”) was found to have a high affinity for Cu(II), even down to a pH of 1. At pHs above 5, Phen-FMC was found to bind a variety of transition metal cations (e.g. Co(II), Ni(II), Zn(II), etc.) from filtered ground water, river water and seawater. Phen-FMC displayed rapid sorption kinetics with Co(II) in filtered river water, reaching equilibrium in less than an hour, and easily lowering the [Co(II)] to sub-ppb levels. Phen-FMC was found to be more effective for transition metal ion capture than ion exchange resin or activated carbon.

  16. Transition metal ion capture using functional mesoporous carbon made with 1,10-phenanthroline☆

    PubMed Central

    Chouyyok, Wilaiwan; Yantasee, Wassana; Shin, Yongsoon; Grudzien, Rafal M.; Fryxell, Glen E.

    2012-01-01

    Functional mesoporous carbon has been built using 1,10-phenanthroline as the fundamental building block, resulting in a nanoporous, high surface area sorbent capable of selectively binding transition metal ions. This material had a specific surface area of 870 m2/g, an average pore size of about 30 Å, and contained as much as 8.2 wt% N. Under acidic conditions, where the 1,10-phenanthroline ligand is protonated, this material was found to be an effective anion exchange material for transition metal anions like PdCl42- and H2VO41-. 1,10-Phenanthroline functionalized mesoporous carbon (“Phen-FMC”) was found to have a high affinity for Cu(II), even down to a pH of 1. At pHs above 5, Phen-FMC was found to bind a variety of transition metal cations (e.g. Co(II), Ni(II), Zn(II), etc.) from filtered ground water, river water and seawater. Phen-FMC displayed rapid sorption kinetics with Co(II) in filtered river water, reaching equilibrium in less than an hour, and easily lowering the [Co(II)] to sub-ppb levels. Phen-FMC was found to be more effective for transition metal ion capture than ion-exchange resin or activated carbon. PMID:23762013

  17. Pantheon 1.0, a manually verified dataset of globally famous biographies.

    PubMed

    Yu, Amy Zhao; Ronen, Shahar; Hu, Kevin; Lu, Tiffany; Hidalgo, César A

    2016-01-05

    We present the Pantheon 1.0 dataset: a manually verified dataset of individuals that have transcended linguistic, temporal, and geographic boundaries. The Pantheon 1.0 dataset includes the 11,341 biographies present in more than 25 languages in Wikipedia and is enriched with: (i) manually verified demographic information (place and date of birth, gender) (ii) a taxonomy of occupations classifying each biography at three levels of aggregation and (iii) two measures of global popularity including the number of languages in which a biography is present in Wikipedia (L), and the Historical Popularity Index (HPI) a metric that combines information on L, time since birth, and page-views (2008-2013). We compare the Pantheon 1.0 dataset to data from the 2003 book, Human Accomplishments, and also to external measures of accomplishment in individual games and sports: Tennis, Swimming, Car Racing, and Chess. In all of these cases we find that measures of popularity (L and HPI) correlate highly with individual accomplishment, suggesting that measures of global popularity proxy the historical impact of individuals.

  18. Pantheon 1.0, a manually verified dataset of globally famous biographies

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Amy Zhao; Ronen, Shahar; Hu, Kevin; Lu, Tiffany; Hidalgo, César A.

    2016-01-01

    We present the Pantheon 1.0 dataset: a manually verified dataset of individuals that have transcended linguistic, temporal, and geographic boundaries. The Pantheon 1.0 dataset includes the 11,341 biographies present in more than 25 languages in Wikipedia and is enriched with: (i) manually verified demographic information (place and date of birth, gender) (ii) a taxonomy of occupations classifying each biography at three levels of aggregation and (iii) two measures of global popularity including the number of languages in which a biography is present in Wikipedia (L), and the Historical Popularity Index (HPI) a metric that combines information on L, time since birth, and page-views (2008–2013). We compare the Pantheon 1.0 dataset to data from the 2003 book, Human Accomplishments, and also to external measures of accomplishment in individual games and sports: Tennis, Swimming, Car Racing, and Chess. In all of these cases we find that measures of popularity (L and HPI) correlate highly with individual accomplishment, suggesting that measures of global popularity proxy the historical impact of individuals. PMID:26731133

  19. Pantheon 1.0, a manually verified dataset of globally famous biographies.

    PubMed

    Yu, Amy Zhao; Ronen, Shahar; Hu, Kevin; Lu, Tiffany; Hidalgo, César A

    2016-01-01

    We present the Pantheon 1.0 dataset: a manually verified dataset of individuals that have transcended linguistic, temporal, and geographic boundaries. The Pantheon 1.0 dataset includes the 11,341 biographies present in more than 25 languages in Wikipedia and is enriched with: (i) manually verified demographic information (place and date of birth, gender) (ii) a taxonomy of occupations classifying each biography at three levels of aggregation and (iii) two measures of global popularity including the number of languages in which a biography is present in Wikipedia (L), and the Historical Popularity Index (HPI) a metric that combines information on L, time since birth, and page-views (2008-2013). We compare the Pantheon 1.0 dataset to data from the 2003 book, Human Accomplishments, and also to external measures of accomplishment in individual games and sports: Tennis, Swimming, Car Racing, and Chess. In all of these cases we find that measures of popularity (L and HPI) correlate highly with individual accomplishment, suggesting that measures of global popularity proxy the historical impact of individuals. PMID:26731133

  20. Seasonal changes, identification and source apportionment of PAH in PM1.0

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agudelo-Castañeda, Dayana Milena; Teixeira, Elba Calesso

    2014-10-01

    The objective of this research was to evaluate the seasonal variation of PAHs in PM1.0, as well as to identify and quantify the contributions of each source profile using the PMF receptor model. PM1.0 samples were collected on PTFE filters from August 2011 to July 2013 in the Metropolitan Area of Porto Alegre, Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil. The samples were extracted using the EPA method TO-13A and 16 Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons (PAHs) were analyzed using a gaseous chromatograph coupled with a mass spectrometer (GC-MS). Also, the data discussed in this study were analyzed to identify the relations of the PAHs concentrations with NOx, NO, O3 and meteorological parameters (temperature, solar radiation, wind speed, relative humidity). The results showed that in winter, concentrations of total PAHs were significantly higher than in summer, thus showing their seasonal variation. The identification of emission sources by applying diagnostic ratios confirmed that PAHs in the study area originate from mobile sources, especially, from diesel and gasoline emissions. The analysis by PMF receptor model showed the contribution of these two main sources of emissions, too, followed by coal combustion, incomplete combustion/unburned petroleum and wood combustion. The toxic equivalent factors were calculated to characterize the risk of cancer from PAH exposure to PM1.0 samples, and BaP and DahA dominated BaPeq levels.

  1. 28 CFR 1.10 - Procedures applicable to prisoners under a sentence of death imposed by a United States District...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Procedures applicable to prisoners under a sentence of death imposed by a United States District Court. 1.10 Section 1.10 Judicial Administration DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE EXECUTIVE CLEMENCY § 1.10 Procedures applicable to prisoners under a sentence of death imposed by a United States...

  2. 11 CFR 1.10 - Disclosure of record to person other than the individual to whom it pertains.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 11 Federal Elections 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Disclosure of record to person other than the individual to whom it pertains. 1.10 Section 1.10 Federal Elections FEDERAL ELECTION COMMISSION PRIVACY ACT § 1.10 Disclosure of record to person other than the individual to whom it pertains. (a)...

  3. 11 CFR 1.10 - Disclosure of record to person other than the individual to whom it pertains.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 11 Federal Elections 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Disclosure of record to person other than the individual to whom it pertains. 1.10 Section 1.10 Federal Elections FEDERAL ELECTION COMMISSION PRIVACY ACT § 1.10 Disclosure of record to person other than the individual to whom it pertains. (a)...

  4. Improving properties of Mg with Al–Cu additions

    SciTech Connect

    Rashad, Muhammad; Pan, Fusheng; Asif, Muhammad; Hussain, Shahid; Saleem, Muhammad

    2014-09-15

    The present work reports improvement in tensile properties of the Mg matrix reinforced with micron-sized copper–aluminum particulate hybrids. The Al–Cu particulate hybrids were incorporated into the Mg matrix through powder metallurgy method. The synthesized alloys exhibited homogeneously dispersed Mg{sub 2}Cu particles in the matrix, therefore leading to a 110% increase in yield strength (221 MPa) and a 72% enhancement in ultimate tensile strength (284 MPa) by addition of 1.0 wt.%Al–0.6 wt.%Cu particle hybrids. Optical microscopy, scanning election microscopy, transmission electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction were used to investigate the microstructure and intermetallic phases of the synthesized alloys. - Highlights: • Mg matrix is reinforced with Al–Cu particulate hybrids. • Powder metallurgic method is used to fabricate the alloys. • Tensile strength and ductility were increased simultaneously.

  5. Update on CRUST1.0 - A 1-degree Global Model of Earth's Crust

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laske, Gabi; Masters, Guy; Ma, Zhitu; Pasyanos, Mike

    2013-04-01

    Our new 1-by-1 degree global crustal model, CRUST1.0, was introduced last year and serves as starting model in a comprehensive effort to compile a global model of Earth's crust and lithosphere, LITHO1.0 (Pasyanos et al., 2012). The Moho depth in CRUST1.0 is based on 1-degree averages of a recently updated database of crustal thickness data from active source seismic studies as well as from receiver function studies. In areas where such constraints are still missing, for example in Antarctica, crustal thicknesses are estimated using gravity constraints. The compilation of the new crustal model initially followed the philosophy of the widely used crustal model CRUST2.0 (Bassin et al., 2000; http://igppweb.ucsd.edu/~gabi/crust2.html) to assign elastic properties in the crystalline crust according to basement age or tectonic setting (loosely following an updated map by Artemieva and Mooney (2001; http://www.lithosphere.info). For cells with no local seismic or gravity constraints, statistical averages of crustal properties, including crustal thickness, were extrapolated. However, in places with constraints the depth to basement and mantle are given explicitly and no longer assigned by crustal type. This allows for much smaller errors in both. In each 1-degree cell, boundary depth, compressional and shear velocity as well as density is given for 8 layers: water, ice, 3 sediment layers and upper, middle and lower crystalline crust. Topography, bathymetry and ice cover are taken from ETOPO1. The sediment cover is based on our sediment model (Laske and Masters, 1997; http://igppweb.ucsd.edu/~sediment.html), with some near-coastal updates. In an initial step toward LITHO1.0, the model is then validated against new global surface wave disperison maps and adjusted in areas of extreme misfit. This poster presents the next validation step: compare the new Moho depths with in-situ active source and receiver function results. We also present comparisons with CRUST2.0. CRUST1.0 is available for download. References: Pasyanos, M.E., Masters, G., Laske, G. and Ma, Z., LITHO1.0 - An Updated Crust and Lithospheric Model of the Earth Developed Using Multiple Data Constraints, Abstract T11D-09 presented at 2012 Fall Meeting, AGU, San Francisco, Calif., 3-7 Dec, 2012. Artemieva, I.M. and Mooney, W.D., Thermal thickness and evolution of Precambrian lithosphere: A global study, J. Geophys. Res., 106, 16,387-16,414, 2001. Bassin, C., Laske, G. and Masters, G., The Current Limits of Resolution for Surface Wave Tomography in North America, EOS Trans AGU, 81, F897, 2000. Laske, G. and Masters, G., A Global Digital Map of Sediment Thickness, EOS Trans. AGU, 78, F483, 1997. URL: http://igppweb.ucsd.edu/~gabi/crust1.html

  6. Sub-Doppler Stark Spectroscopy in the A−X (1,0) Band of CN

    SciTech Connect

    Hall, G.E.; Hause, M.L.; Sears, T.J.

    2009-11-26

    The effect of external electric fields has been measured in hyperfine-resolved sub-Doppler transitions in the A {sup 2}{Pi}-X {sup 2}{Sigma} (1,0) band of the CN radical near 10900 cm{sup -1}. Static electric fields less than 1 kV/cm are sufficient to mix the most closely spaced {Lambda}-dpublets in the A state, leading to Stark spectra with both new and shifted resonances. Simulations of the saturation-dip Stark spectral line profiles allow extraction of the A-state permanent electric dipole moment with a magnitude of 0.06 {+-} 0.02 D.

  7. Measurement of velocity deficit at the downstream of a 1:10 axial hydrokinetic turbine model

    SciTech Connect

    Gunawan, Budi; Neary, Vincent S; Hill, Craig; Chamorro, Leonardo

    2012-01-01

    Wake recovery constrains the downstream spacing and density of turbines that can be deployed in turbine farms and limits the amount of energy that can be produced at a hydrokinetic energy site. This study investigates the wake recovery at the downstream of a 1:10 axial flow turbine model using a pulse-to-pulse coherent Acoustic Doppler Profiler (ADP). In addition, turbine inflow and outflow velocities were measured for calculating the thrust on the turbine. The result shows that the depth-averaged longitudinal velocity recovers to 97% of the inflow velocity at 35 turbine diameter (D) downstream of the turbine.

  8. A miniature Rotary Compressor with a 1:10 compression ratio

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dmitriev, Olly; Tabota, Eugene; Arbon EurIng, Ian; FIMechE, CEng

    2015-08-01

    Micro compressors have applications in medical devices, robotics and “nanosatellites”. The problem of active cooling for photo detectors in “nano-satellites” becomes more important because the majority of space missions target Earth observation, and passive cooling does not provide the required temperatures to achieve the desired SNR levels. Reciprocating compressors used in cryocoolers cause vibrations. VERT Rotors has built an ultralow-vibration rotary compressor with 40mm-long screws, and our prototype delivered 1:10 compression ratio. This “nano” compressor is a non-conventional conical type consisting of an Inner conical screw rotor revolving inside an Outer screw rotor.

  9. Roentgenstructural analysis of Cristalline Cobalt II with 1,10- fenatrolin and tiosemicarbazid acetic acid.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kon, Aviv Yu.

    The author has reported his long years research in the area of structure and Roentgen analysis of Cristalls. The talk concerns Roentgen analysis, Its first steps in Kishinev during the finish of 40-th and the beginning of 50-th. Some concerns was given to prof. T.I. Malinovskij,a graduated from the Yassy University one of the first Assistants Proff. at the Kishinev State Pedagogical Institute and later a leading scientist in the area of cristalls research in the Soviet Moldavia. Particularly, the actual talk was dedicated to interaction of acids with cristals of 1,10 fenatrolin.

  10. Observation of J = 1-0 emission from H/N-15/C. [in radio astronomy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, R. D.; Godfrey, P. D.; Gunn, H. I.; Blackman, G. L.; Storey, J. W. V.

    1977-01-01

    Emission from the J = 1-0 transition of H(N-15)C has been detected in the direction of DR21(OH). The transition frequency of 88,865.69 MHz was measured in the laboratory by microwave absorption spectroscopy. The computed N-15/C-13 isotopic abundance ratio of 1.01 for DR21(OH) is larger than those calculated from isotopes of HCN in other interstellar clouds, perhaps implying a localized enrichment in N-15 in DR21(OH).

  11. Structural homogeneity of nanocrystalline VT1-0 titanium. Low-temperature micromechanical properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rusakova, A. V.; Lubenets, S. V.; Fomenko, L. S.; Moskalenko, V. A.

    2012-10-01

    The microhardness of samples of VT1-0 titanium with grain sizes ranging from 35 nm to 10 μm is measured at temperatures of 77-300 K. Nanocrystalline samples produced by rolling at low temperatures are found to be quite homogeneous, and their structure is stable with respect to thermal and mechanical interactions. The interrelationship between microhardness and grain size is well described by the Hall-Petch relationship, the parameters of which depend on temperature. Data on the temperature dependence of the microhardness and the Hall-Petch coefficient indicate that the microplastic deformation is of a thermally activated, dislocation character, regardless of grain size.

  12. The SeaFlux Turbulent Flux Dataset Version 1.0 Documentation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clayson, Carol Anne; Roberts, J. Brent; Bogdanoff, Alec S.

    2012-01-01

    Under the auspices of the World Climate Research Programme (WCRP) Global Energy and Water cycle EXperiment (GEWEX) Data and Assessment Panel (GDAP), the SeaFlux Project was created to investigate producing a high-resolution satellite-based dataset of surface turbulent fluxes over the global oceans. The most current release of the SeaFlux product is Version 1.0; this represents the initial release of turbulent surface heat fluxes, associated near-surface variables including a diurnally varying sea surface temperature.

  13. Data appendix: F-number=1.0 EMR with a flexible back electrode

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mihora, D. J.

    1984-01-01

    A 12.5 micron Tedlar low f-number electrostatic membrane reflector was tested. The antenna reflector was designed to achieve a spherical reflector surface with a focal length to diameter ratio f(sub n) of one and a potential accuracy of 1.0 over its 4.88 m diameter. The configuration required the cutting and joining of twelve pie-shaped panels to form the reflector surface. Electrostatic forces are used to tension this preformed membrane reflector. The test data is spare-only three sets of measurements were taken due to lack of funds.

  14. RealGasBrine v1.0 option of TOUGH+ v1.5

    2015-02-27

    RealGasBrine v1.0 is a numerical code that for the simulation of the behavior of gas-bearing porous and/fractured geologic media. It is an option of TOUGH+ v1.5 [Moridis, 2014], a successor to the TOUGH2 [Pruess et al., 1999; 2012] family of codes for multi-component, multiphase ?uid and heat ?ow developed at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. RealGasBrine v1.0 needs the TOUGH+ v1.5 core code in order to compile and execute. It is written in standard FORTRANmore » 95/2003, and can be run on any computational platform (workstation, PC, Macintosh) for which such compilers are available. RealGasBrine v1.0 describes the non-isothermal two- (for pure water) or three-phase (for brine) flow of an aqueous phase and a real gas mixture in a gas-bearing medium, with a particular focus in ultra-tight (such as tight-sand and shale gas) systems. Up to 12 individual real gases can be tracked, and salt can precipitate as solid halite. The capabilities of the code include coupled flow and thermal effects, real gas behavior, Darcy and non-Darcy flow, several isotherm options of gas sorption onto the grains of the porous media, complex fracture descriptions, gas solubility into water, and geomechanical effects on flow properties. RealGasBrine v1.0 allows the study of flow and transport of fluids and heat over a wide range of time frames and spatial scales not only in gas reservoirs, but also in any problem involving the flow of gases in geologic media, including the geologic storage of greenhouse gas mixtures, the behavior of geothermal reservoirs with multi-component condensable (H2O and CO2) and non-condensable gas mixtures, the transport of water and released H2 in nuclear waste storage applications, etc.« less

  15. Substitution of Mn for Mg in MgB_2*

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fitzpatrick, Michael D.; Johnston, David C.; Miller, Lance L.; Hill, Julienne M.

    2002-03-01

    The study of solid solutions in which the Mg in MgB2 is partially replaced by magnetic 3d or 4f atoms can potentially reveal important information on the superconducting state of MgB_2. As an end-member of the hypothetical Mg_1-xMn_xB2 system, MnB2 is isostructural with MgB2 and is an antiferromagnet below TN = 760 K which becomes canted at 157 K. A previous study by Moritomo et al.[1] examined the structure and properties of multi-phase samples with 0.01<= x<= 0.15. We attempted to obtain single-phase samples with x<= 0.25 by reacting the constituent elements in sealed Ta tubes and/or using prereacted MnBx synthesized using an arc furnace. The results of x-ray diffraction and magnetization measurements on those samples will be presented. * Supported by the USDOE under contract no. W-7405-Eng-82. [1] "Mn-substitution effects on MgB2 superconductor", Y.Moritomo et al. J. Phys. Soc. Japan b70, 1889 (2001).; “Effects of transition metal doping in MgB2 superconductor", Y. Moritomo at al. arXiv:cond-mat/0104568.

  16. Coulomb excitation of 31Mg

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seidlitz, M.; Mücher, D.; Reiter, P.; Bildstein, V.; Blazhev, A.; Bree, N.; Bruyneel, B.; Cederkäll, J.; Clement, E.; Davinson, T.; Van Duppen, P.; Ekström, A.; Finke, F.; Fraile, L. M.; Geibel, K.; Gernhäuser, R.; Hess, H.; Holler, A.; Huyse, M.; Ivanov, O.; Jolie, J.; Kalkühler, M.; Kotthaus, T.; Krücken, R.; Lutter, R.; Piselli, E.; Scheit, H.; Stefanescu, I.; Van de Walle, J.; Voulot, D.; Warr, N.; Wenander, F.; Wiens, A.

    2011-06-01

    The ground state properties of 31Mg indicate a change of nuclear shape at N = 19 with a deformed Jπ = 1 /2+ intruder state as a ground state, implying that 31Mg is part of the "island of inversion". The collective properties of excited states were the subject of a Coulomb excitation experiment at REX-ISOLDE, CERN, employing a radioactive 31Mg beam. De-excitation γ-rays were detected by the MINIBALL γ-spectrometer in coincidence with scattered particles in a segmented Si-detector. The level scheme of 31Mg was extended. Spin and parity assignment of the 945 keV state yielded 5 /2+ and its de-excitation is dominated by a strong collective M1 transition. Comparison of the transition probabilities of 30,31,32Mg establishes that for the N = 19 magnesium isotope not only the ground state but also excited states are largely dominated by a deformed pf intruder configuration.

  17. Characterization of toll-like receptors 1-10 in spotted hyenas

    PubMed Central

    Flies, Andrew S.; Maksimoski, Matthew; Mansfield, Linda S.; Weldele, Mary L.; Holekamp, Kay E.

    2014-01-01

    Previous research has shown that spotted hyenas (Crocuta crocuta) regularly survive exposure to deadly pathogens such as rabies, canine distemper virus, and anthrax, suggesting that they have robust immune defenses. Toll-like receptors (TLRs) recognize conserved molecular patterns and initiate a wide range of innate and adaptive immune responses. TLR genes are evolutionarily conserved, and assessing TLR expression in various tissues can provide insight into overall immunological organization and function. Studies of the hyena immune system have been minimal thus far due to the logistical and ethical challenges of sampling and preserving the immunological tissues of this and other long-lived, wild species. Tissue samples were opportunistically collected from captive hyenas humanely euthanized for a separate study. We developed primers to amplify partial sequences for TLRs 1-10, sequenced the amplicons, compared sequence identity to those in other mammals, and quantified TLR expression in lymph nodes, spleens, lungs, and pancreases. Results show that hyena TLR DNA and protein sequences are similar to TLRs in other mammals, and that TLRs 1-10 were expressed in all tissues tested. This information will be useful in the development of new assays to understand the interactions among the hyena immune system, pathogens, and the microbial communities that inhabit hyenas. PMID:24488231

  18. Geoacoustic inversion techniques (GAIT) Version 1.0 global search (GS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neumann, Peter; Muncill, Gregory

    2003-04-01

    Geoacoustic Inversion Techniques (GAIT) Version 1.0 is a PEO (C4I and Space) PMW 155 funded product that accepts measured acoustic data and produces an optimized estimate of the bottom environment that produced the observed acoustic data. The Global Search (GS) segment of GAIT pairs the Adaptive Simulated Annealing (ASA) algorithm with a variety of Navy standard propagation loss models (PE, ASTRAL and Nautilus) and an active sonar performance prediction model (ASPM). The goal of the GS segment of GAIT is to provide a best estimate of the geoacoustic properties of the ocean bottom that, when paired with a selected model, result in the observed acoustic data. An overview of the GS segment of GAIT 1.0 will be presented with details on the ASA algorithm, component models, cost functions and geoacoustic parametrizations. Inversion results will be shown for synthetic test cases from the Inversion Technique Workshop (ITW) held in May 2001 and from both narrowband and broadband measured data test cases. [Work supported by PEO (C4I and Space) PMW 155 and uses the products of a Phase I and II SBIR from the ONR (Code 321US).

  19. Characterization of Toll-like receptors 1-10 in spotted hyenas.

    PubMed

    Flies, Andrew S; Maksimoski, Matthew T; Mansfield, Linda S; Weldele, Mary L; Holekamp, Kay E

    2014-06-01

    Previous research has shown that spotted hyenas (Crocuta crocuta) regularly survive exposure to deadly pathogens such as rabies, canine distemper virus, and anthrax, suggesting that they have robust immune defenses. Toll-like receptors (TLRs) recognize conserved molecular patterns and initiate a wide range of innate and adaptive immune responses. TLR genes are evolutionarily conserved, and assessing TLR expression in various tissues can provide insight into overall immunological organization and function. Studies of the hyena immune system have been minimal thus far due to the logistical and ethical challenges of sampling and preserving the immunological tissues of this and other long-lived, wild species. Tissue samples were opportunistically collected from captive hyenas humanely euthanized for a separate study. We developed primers to amplify partial sequences for TLRs 1-10, sequenced the amplicons, compared sequence identity to those in other mammals, and quantified TLR expression in lymph nodes, spleens, lungs, and pancreases. Results show that hyena TLR DNA and protein sequences are similar to TLRs in other mammals, and that TLRs 1-10 were expressed in all tissues tested. This information will be useful in the development of new assays to understand the interactions among the hyena immune system, pathogens, and the microbial communities that inhabit hyenas. PMID:24488231

  20. A ROSAT HRI observation of the supernova remnant G109.1 - 1.0

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hurford, Alan P.; Fesen, Robert A.

    1995-11-01

    We present results of a search using ROSAT HRI data for X-ray spatial substructures in the galactic supernova remnant G109.1 - 1.0 which might indicate a connection between the remnant's bright X-ray blob and its X-ray pulsar, 1E2259+586. A 0.1-2.4 keV HRI image, created by combining separate 28- and 22-ks pointings, reveals the presence of a few small-scale X-ray features, including a NE-SW emission ridge in the remnant's X-ray blob. Two diffuse knots in the X-ray blob, previously suggested as being aligned with the X-ray pulsar, appear to be statistical fluctuations in the Einstein HRI data. We find no morphological evidence in the X-ray spatial substructures of G109.1 - 1.0 to support a pulsar jet origin for the X-ray blob as proposed by Gregory & Fahlman.

  1. Ultrasonic micro-motor using miniature piezoelectric tube with diameter of 1.0 mm.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hui; Dong, Shu-xiang; Zhang, Shu-yi; Wang, Tian-hua; Zhang, Zhong-ning; Fan, Li

    2006-12-22

    At the present moment, the smallest piezoelectric ultrasonic micro-motors utilizing miniature PZT piezoelectric ceramic tubes were developed. The motor consists of a PZT-metal composite tube stator, two steel rotors and a thin shaft that keeps the two rotors pressing on both ends of the stator elastically. The dimensions of the PZT tube are 1.0 mm in outer diameter, 0.6 mm in inner diameter and 5.0 mm in length. The diameter and total length of the assembled micro-motor is 1.0 mm and 8 mm (including an adjusting spring), respectively. The tube-type micro-motor is driven by two pairs of alternative voltages with phase shift 90 degrees between the adjacent electrodes and operated in the first circular-bending vibration mode of the stator with the resonance frequency about 58 kHz. The experimental results show that the tube-type micro-motors have perfect performances: (i) high rotation frequency over 3000 rpm and (ii) large starting torque over 7.8 microN m under the conditions of the input voltage of 110 V(p-p) and the resonance frequency. The micro-motor is well suitable for operating in micro-spaces, such as in intravascular, micro-robots and micro-craft applications.

  2. Design and performance of a 4He-evaporator at <1.0 K

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, N. K.; Pradhan, J.; Naser, Md. Z. A.; Roy, A.; Mandal, B. Ch.; Mallik, C.; Bhandari, R. K.

    2012-12-01

    A helium evaporator for obtaining 1 K temperature has been built and tested in laboratory. This will function primarily as the precooling stage for the circulating helium isotopic gas mixture. This works on evaporative cooling by way of pumping out the vapour from the top of the pot. A precision needle valve is used initially to fill up the pot and subsequently a permanent flow impedance maintains the helium flow from the bath into the pot to replenish the evaporative loss of helium. Considering the cooling power of 10 mW @1.0 K, a 99.0 cm3 helium evaporator was designed, fabricated from OFE copper and tested in the laboratory. A pumping station comprising of a roots pump backed by a dry pump was used for evacuation. The calibrated RuO thermometer and kapton film heater were used for measuring the temperature and cooling power of the system respectively. The continuously filled 1 K bath is tested in the laboratory and found to offer a temperature less than 1.0 K by withdrawing vapour from the evaporator. In order to minimize the heat load and to prevent film creep across the pumping tube, size optimization of the pumping line and pump-out port has been performed. The results of test run along with relevant analysis, mechanical fabrication of flow impedance are presented here.

  3. Characterization of Toll-like receptors 1-10 in spotted hyenas.

    PubMed

    Flies, Andrew S; Maksimoski, Matthew T; Mansfield, Linda S; Weldele, Mary L; Holekamp, Kay E

    2014-06-01

    Previous research has shown that spotted hyenas (Crocuta crocuta) regularly survive exposure to deadly pathogens such as rabies, canine distemper virus, and anthrax, suggesting that they have robust immune defenses. Toll-like receptors (TLRs) recognize conserved molecular patterns and initiate a wide range of innate and adaptive immune responses. TLR genes are evolutionarily conserved, and assessing TLR expression in various tissues can provide insight into overall immunological organization and function. Studies of the hyena immune system have been minimal thus far due to the logistical and ethical challenges of sampling and preserving the immunological tissues of this and other long-lived, wild species. Tissue samples were opportunistically collected from captive hyenas humanely euthanized for a separate study. We developed primers to amplify partial sequences for TLRs 1-10, sequenced the amplicons, compared sequence identity to those in other mammals, and quantified TLR expression in lymph nodes, spleens, lungs, and pancreases. Results show that hyena TLR DNA and protein sequences are similar to TLRs in other mammals, and that TLRs 1-10 were expressed in all tissues tested. This information will be useful in the development of new assays to understand the interactions among the hyena immune system, pathogens, and the microbial communities that inhabit hyenas.

  4. Exoplanet detection via microlensing with RoboNet-1.0

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burgdorf, M. J.; Bramich, D. M.; Dominik, M.; Bode, M. F.; Horne, K. D.; Steele, I. A.; Rattenbury, N.; Tsapras, Y.

    2007-04-01

    RoboNet-1.0 is a prototype global network of three two-meter robotic telescopes, placed in La Palma (Canary Islands), Maui (Hawaii), and Siding Spring (Australia). In April 2004, funding for RoboNet-1.0 until July 2007 was approved by PPARC's Science Committee, and the project commenced in earnest in August 2004. The search for cool extra-solar planets by optimised robotic monitoring of Galactic microlensing events is one of the two core elements of its scientific programme - observations of gamma-ray bursts is the other. During the 2005 observing season, light curves of more than 60 microlensing events have been sampled at regular intervals. One particular event, OGLE-2005-BLG-71, showed an anomaly caused by an extrasolar planet, which constituted the second detection of a planet by microlensing. As a by-product, our dense monitoring during caustic crossing events can resolve the brightness profile of observed source stars, providing an observational test of stellar atmosphere models. Current development work uses e-science to create a fully automated chain linking event monitoring to the detection of anomalies in the microlensing lightcurves that could be indications of planetary companions and on to the triggering of follow-up observations. In order to fully exploit the potential of such a network for detecting exoplanets, it will be necessary to complement the existing RoboNet with additional telescopes in the southern hemisphere.

  5. Intrinsic Properties of Fe-Substituted L1(0) Magnets

    SciTech Connect

    Manchanda, P; Kumar, P; Kashyap, A; Lucis, MJ; Shield, JE; Mubarok, A; Goldstein, JI; Constantinides, S; Barmak, K; Lewis, LH; Sellmyer, DJ; Skomski, R

    2013-10-01

    First-principle supercell calculations are used to determine how 3d elemental additions, especially Fe additions, modify the magnetization, exchange and anisotropy of L1(0)-ordered ferromagnets. Calculations are performed using the VASP code and partially involve configurational averaging over site disorder. Three isostructural systems are investigated: Fe-Co-Pt, Mn-Al-Fe, and transition metal-doped Fe-Ni. In all three systems the iron strongly influences the magnetic properties of these compounds, but the specific effect depends on the host. In CoPt(Fe) iron enhances the magnetization, with subtle changes in the magnetic moments that depend on the distribution of the Fe and Co atoms. The addition of Fe to MnAl is detrimental to the magnetization, because it creates antiferromagnetic exchange interactions, but it enhances the magnetic anisotropy. The replacement of 50% of Mn by Fe in MnFeAl2 enhances the anisotropy from 1.77 to 2.5 MJ/m(3). Further, the substitution of light 3d elements such as Ti, V, Cr into L1(0)-ordered FeNi is shown to substantially reduce the magnetization.

  6. The MASH 1.0 code system: Utilization of morse in the adjoint mode

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, J.O.; Santoro, R.T.

    1993-06-01

    The Monte Carlo Adjoint Shielding Code System -- MASH 1.0, principally developed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), represents an advanced method of calculating neutron and gamma-ray environments and radiation protection factors for complex shielding configurations by coupling a forward discrete ordinates radiation environment (i.e. air-over-ground) transport calculation with an adjoint Monte Carlo treatment of the shielding geometry. The primary application to date has been to determine the radiation shielding characteristics of armored vehicles exposed to prompt radiation from a nuclear weapon detonation. Other potential applications include analyses of the mission equipment associated with space exploration, the civilian airline industry, and other problems associated with an external neutron and gamma-ray radiation environment. This paper will provide an overview of the MASH 1.0 code system, including the verification, validation, and application to {open_quotes}benchmark{close_quotes} experimental data. Attention will be given to the adjoint Monte Carlo calculation, the use of {open_quotes}in-group{close_quotes} biasing to control the weights of the adjoint particles, and the coupling of a new graphics package for the diagnosis of combinatorial geometry descriptions and visualization of radiation transport results.

  7. Clinical efficacy assessment in photodamaged skin of 0.5% and 1.0% idebenone.

    PubMed

    McDaniel, D H; Neudecker, B A; DiNardo, J C; Lewis, J A; Maibach, H I

    2005-09-01

    Idebenone is an antioxidant lower molecular weight analogue of coenzyme Q10. Previously, idebenone was shown to be a very effective antioxidant in its ability to protect against cell damage from oxidative stress in a variety of biochemical, cell biological, and in vivo methods, including its ability to suppress sunburn cell (SBC) formation in living skin. However, no clinical studies have been previously conducted to establish the efficacy of idebenone in a topical skincare formulation for the treatment of photodamaged skin. In this nonvehicle control study, 0.5% and 1.0% idebenone commercial formulations were evaluated in a clinical trial for topical safety and efficacy in photodamaged skin. Forty-one female subjects, aged 30-65, with moderate photodamaged skin were randomized to use a blind labelled (either 0.5% or 1.0% idebenone in otherwise identical lotion bases) skincare preparation twice daily for six weeks. Blinded expert grader assessments for skin roughness/dryness, fine lines/wrinkles, and global improvement in photodamage were performed at baseline, three weeks and six weeks. Electrical conductance readings for skin surface hydration and 35 mm digital photography were made at baseline after six weeks. Punch biopsies were taken from randomly selected subjects, baseline and after six weeks, and stained for certain antibodies (interleukin IL-6, interleukin IL-1b, matrixmetalloproteinase MMP-1, collagen I) using immunofluorescence microscopy. After six weeks' use of the 1.0% idebenone formula, a 26% reduction in skin roughness/dryness was observed, a 37% increase in skin hydration, a 29% reduction in fine lines/wrinkles, and a 33% improvement in overall global assessment of photodamaged skin. For the 0.5% idebenone formulation, a 23% reduction in skin roughness/dryness was observed, a 37% increase in skin hydration, a 27% reduction in fine lines/wrinkles, and a 30% improvement in overall global assessment of photodamaged skin. The immunofluorescence staining revealed a decrease in IL-1b, IL-6, and MMP-1 and an increase in collagen I for both concentrations.

  8. Eddy-resolving 1/10° model of the World Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ibrayev, R. A.; Khabeev, R. N.; Ushakov, K. V.

    2012-02-01

    The first results on simulating the intra-annual variability of the World Ocean circulation by use of the eddy-resolving model are considered. For this purpose, a model of the World Ocean with a 1/10° horizontal resolution and 49 vertical levels was developed (a 1/10 × 1/10 × 49 model of the World Ocean). This model is based on the traditional system of three-dimensional equations of the large-scale dynamics of the ocean and boundary conditions with an explicit allowance for water fluxes on the free surface of the ocean. The equations are written in the tripolar coordinate system. The numerical method is based on the separation of the barotropic and baroclinic components of the solution. Discretization in time is implemented using explicit schemes allowing effective parallelization for a large number of processors. The model uses the sub-models of the boundary layer of the atmosphere and the submodel of sea-ice thermodynamics. The model of the World Ocean was developed at the Institute of Numerical Mathematics of the Russian Academy of Sciences (INM RAS) and the P.P. Shirshov Institute of Oceanogy (IO RAS). The formulation of the problem of simulating the intra-annual variability of thermohydrodynamic processes of the World Ocean and the parameterizations that were used are considered. In the numerical experiment, the temporal evolution of the atmospheric effect is determined by the normal annual cycle according to the conditions of the international Coordinated Ocean-Ice Reference Experiment (CORE-I). The calculation was carried out on a multiprocessor computer with distributed memory; 1601 computational cores were used. The presented analysis demonstrates that the obtained results are quite satisfactory when compared to the results that were obtained by other eddy-resolving models of the global ocean. The analysis of the model solution is, to a larger extent, of a descriptive character. A detailed analysis of the results is to be presented in following works

  9. Simulating supersymmetry with ISAJET 7.0/ISASUSY 1.0

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baer, H.; Paige, F. E.; Protopopescu, S. D.; Tata, X.

    1993-04-01

    This document reviews the physics assumptions and input embedded in ISAJET 7.0/ISASUSY 1.0 which is relevant for simulating fundamental processes within the framework of the Minimal Supersymmetric Model (MSSM) at p(bar p) and pp colliders. After a brief discussion of the underlying MSSM framework, the authors discuss event simulation and list the particle production processes and decay modes that have been incorporated into the calculations. They then describe how to set up and run an ISAJET/ISASUSY job, as well as the user input and output formats. The ISAJET program is sufficiently flexible that some non-miminal supersymmetry scenarios may be simulated as well. Finally, plans for future upgrades which include the extension to e(sup +)e(sup -) collisions are listed.

  10. The Mars Analysis Correction Data Assimilation (MACDA) Dataset V1.0

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montabone, L.; Marsh, K.; Lewis, S. R.; Read, P. L.; Smith, M. D.; Holmes, J.; Spiga, A.; Lowe, D.; Pamment, A.

    2014-06-01

    The Mars Analysis Correction Data Assimilation (MACDA) dataset version 1.0 contains the reanalysis of fundamental atmospheric and surface variables for the planet Mars covering a period of about three Martian years (a Martian year is about 1.88 terrestrial years). This has been produced by data assimilation of observations from NASA's Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) spacecraft during its science mapping phase (February 1999-August 2004). In particular, we have used retrieved thermal profiles and total dust optical depths from the Thermal Emission Spectrometer (TES) on board MGS. Data have been assimilated into a Mars global climate model (MGCM) using the Analysis Correction scheme developed at the UK Meteorological Office. The MGCM used is the UK spectral version of the Laboratoire de Météorologie Dynamique (LMD, Paris, France) MGCM. MACDA is a joint project of the University of Oxford and The Open University in the UK.

  11. Preparation of octahydro- and tetrahydro-[1,10]phenanthroline zirconium and hafnium complexes for olefin polymerization.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Eun Yeong; Park, Geun Ho; Lee, Chun Sun; Kang, Yi Young; Lee, Junseong; Lee, Bun Yeoul

    2015-02-28

    Post-metallocenes were constructed for olefin polymerization using 1,2,3,4,7,8,9,10-octahydro[1,10]phenanthroline and 1,2,3,4-tetrahydro[1,10]phenanthroline derivatives. A series of zirconium complexes - LZrCl2(NHMe2)2 [L = 2,9-H2-C12H12N2 (4), 2,9-Me2-C12H12N2 (5), 2,9-nBu2-C12H12N2 (6), and 2,9-iPr2-C12H12N2 (7)] - and hafnium complexes - LHfCl2(NHMe2)2 [L = 2,9-H2-C12H12N2 (8), 2,9-Me2-C12H12N2 (9), 2,9-nBu2-C12H12N2 (10), and 2,9-iPr2-C12H12N2 (11)] - were synthesized via the reaction of octahydro[1,10]phenanthrolines (2,9-R2-C12H12(NH)2) with (Me2N)2MCl2 (DME). The reaction of 2,9-R2-C12H12(NH)2 with (PhCH2)2ZrCl2 in the presence of a small amount of THF afforded a series of THF adduct analogs, i.e., LZrCl2(THF)2 [L = 2,9-H2-C12H12N2 (12), 2,9-Me2-C12H12N2 (13), 2,9-nBu2-C12H12N2 (14), and 2,9-iPr2-C12H12N2 (15)]. The treatment of 12 and 13 with excess Me3Al resulted in the formation of unexpected complexes, i.e., (η(4)-LAlMe2)ZrCl2(Me) [L = 2,9-H2-C12H12N2 (16) and 2,9-Me2-C12H12N2 (17)], in which the Me2Al unit forms a five-membered ring through binding with the two nitrogen donors and the MeCl2Zr unit slips to an η(4)-binding mode containing the N-C-C-N fragment. The treatment of tetrahydro[1,10]phenanthrolines [2,9-R2-C12NH9(NH)] with M(CH2Ph)4 afforded tribenzyl zirconium complexes LZr(CH2Ph)3 - [L = 2,9-Me2-C12NH9N (18) and 2,9-nBu2-C12NH9N (19)] - and hafnium complexes - LHf(CH2Ph)3 [L = 2,9-Me2-C12NH9N (20), 2,9-nBu2-C12NH9N (21), and 2,9-iPr2-C12NH9N (22)]. The structures of 4, 5, 12, 17, and 22 were elucidated by X-ray crystallography. The newly prepared complexes were screened for ethylene/1-octene copolymerization activity: 12 and 16 were potent catalysts (activities of 74 × 10(6) g mol-Zr h(-1) at ∼120 °C under 30 bar ethylene) for the production of wax-like low-molecular weight polyethylene (Mn: ∼5000), which is widely used in industry.

  12. Hardening of the surface layers of commercial pure titanium VT1-0 under combined treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Bashchenko, Lyudmila P. Gromov, Viktor E. Budovskikh, Evgenii A. Soskova, Nina A.; Ivanov, Yurii F.

    2015-10-27

    The treatment of VT1-0 titanium samples was carried out by concentrated energy fluxes. The combined treatment included surface carburizing with the joint use of powder samples of compounds with high physical and mechanical properties (namely, titanium diboride TiB{sub 2}, silicon carbide SiC and zirconium oxide ZrO{sub 2}) and subsequent electron beam treatment of surface layers formed in electroexplosive treatment. The combined treatment of surface layers resulted in the multifold increase in microhardness, which reduces depending on the depth of hardening zone. After electron-beam treatment, the depth of hardening zone is increased. During electron-beam treatment, the two-layer hardening zone forms.

  13. Hyperon vector coupling f{sub 1}(0) from 2+1 flavor lattice QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Sasaki, Shoichi

    2011-10-21

    We present results for the hyperon vector form factor f{sub 1} for {Xi}{sup 0}{yields}{Sigma}{sup +}l{nu}-bar and {Sigma}{sup -}{yields}nl{nu}-bar semileptonic decays from dynamical lattice QCD with domain-wall quarks. Simulations are performed on the 2+1 flavor gauge configurations generated by the RBC and UKQCD Collaborations with a lattice cutoff of a{sup -1} = 1.7 GeV. Our preliminary results, which are calculated at the lightest sea quark mass (pion mass down to approximately 330 MeV), show that a sign of the second-order correction of SU(3) breaking on hyperon vector coupling f{sub 1}(0) is likely negative.

  14. Spacecraft Orbit Design and Analysis (SODA), version 1.0 user's guide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stallcup, Scott S.; Davis, John S.

    1989-01-01

    The Spacecraft Orbit Design and Analysis (SODA) computer program, Version 1.0 is described. SODA is a spaceflight mission planning system which consists of five program modules integrated around a common database and user interface. SODA runs on a VAX/VMS computer with an EVANS & SUTHERLAND PS300 graphics workstation. BOEING RIM-Version 7 relational database management system performs transparent database services. In the current version three program modules produce an interactive three dimensional (3D) animation of one or more satellites in planetary orbit. Satellite visibility and sensor coverage capabilities are also provided. One module produces an interactive 3D animation of the solar system. Another module calculates cumulative satellite sensor coverage and revisit time for one or more satellites. Currently Earth, Moon, and Mars systems are supported for all modules except the solar system module.

  15. Damage formation during 1.0 MeV Si self-implantation at low temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, M.B.; Mitchell, I.V.

    1999-04-01

    The effect of substrate temperature and ion flux on lattice damage in silicon induced by 1.0 MeV Si ion implantation has been investigated using Rutherford backscattering channeling (RBSC) and Raman spectroscopy. Over the temperature range of 77--323K, the temperature dependence of near-surface damage is found to be different from that of end-of-range damage. This may suggest that different mechanisms for damage growth are dominant along the ion path. The flux effect on damage accumulation varies with substrate temperatures. Around liquid nitrogen temperature (77K), the near-surface damage decreases with increasing flux, contrary to the case around room temperature (300K). In the temperature range of {approximately}120--250K, damage is almost independent of implant flux. Possible causes of the observed phenomena are discussed.

  16. Design document for the MOODS Data Management System (MDMS), version 1.0

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    The MOODS Data Management System (MDMS) provides access to the Master Oceanographic Observation Data Set (MOODS) which is maintained by the Naval Oceanographic Office (NAVOCEANO). The MDMS incorporates database technology in providing seamless access to parameter (temperature, salinity, soundspeed) vs. depth observational profile data. The MDMS is an interactive software application with a graphical user interface (GUI) that supports user control of MDMS functional capabilities. The purpose of this document is to define and describe the structural framework and logical design of the software components/units which are integrated into the major computer software configuration item (CSCI) identified as MDMS, Version 1.0. The preliminary design is based on functional specifications and requirements identified in the governing Statement of Work prepared by the Naval Oceanographic Office (NAVOCEANO) and distributed as a request for proposal by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA).

  17. Design document for the Surface Currents Data Base (SCDB) Management System (SCDBMS), version 1.0

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krisnnamagaru, Ramesh; Cesario, Cheryl; Foster, M. S.; Das, Vishnumohan

    1994-01-01

    The Surface Currents Database Management System (SCDBMS) provides access to the Surface Currents Data Base (SCDB) which is maintained by the Naval Oceanographic Office (NAVOCEANO). The SCDBMS incorporates database technology in providing seamless access to surface current data. The SCDBMS is an interactive software application with a graphical user interface (GUI) that supports user control of SCDBMS functional capabilities. The purpose of this document is to define and describe the structural framework and logistical design of the software components/units which are integrated into the major computer software configuration item (CSCI) identified as the SCDBMS, Version 1.0. The preliminary design is based on functional specifications and requirements identified in the governing Statement of Work prepared by the Naval Oceanographic Office (NAVOCEANO) and distributed as a request for proposal by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA).

  18. Synthesis and characterization of a new photoluminescent material, tris-[1-10 phenanthroline] aluminium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Rahul; Dvivedi, Avanish; Bhargava, Parag

    2016-05-01

    A new photoluminescent material namely tris-[1-10 Phenanthroline] Aluminium Al(Phen)3 has been synthesized and characterized. This material was characterized by fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR),nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR),mass spectroscopy, thermal gravimetric analysis (TGA),ultraviolet-visible spectroscopy(UV) and photoluminescence (PL). This material shows thermal stability up to 300°C. This material showed absorption maxima at 352nm which may be attributed to the moderate energy (π-π*) transition. Photoluminescence spectra for this material showed the most intense peak at 423 nm and the time resolved photoluminescence spectra showed two life time components. The decay times of the first and second component were 1.4ns and 4.8 ns respectively.

  19. Hardening of the surface layers of commercial pure titanium VT1-0 under combined treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bashchenko, Lyudmila P.; Gromov, Viktor E.; Budovskikh, Evgenii A.; Ivanov, Yurii F.; Soskova, Nina A.

    2015-10-01

    The treatment of VT1-0 titanium samples was carried out by concentrated energy fluxes. The combined treatment included surface carburizing with the joint use of powder samples of compounds with high physical and mechanical properties (namely, titanium diboride TiB2, silicon carbide SiC and zirconium oxide ZrO2) and subsequent electron beam treatment of surface layers formed in electroexplosive treatment. The combined treatment of surface layers resulted in the multifold increase in microhardness, which reduces depending on the depth of hardening zone. After electron-beam treatment, the depth of hardening zone is increased. During electron-beam treatment, the two-layer hardening zone forms.

  20. Global Deployment of Geothermal Energy Using a New Characterization in GCAM 1.0

    SciTech Connect

    Hannam, Phil; Kyle, G. Page; Smith, Steven J.

    2009-09-01

    This report documents modeling of geothermal energy in GCAM 1.0 (formerly MiniCAM) from FY2008 to FY2009, from the inputs to the U.S. Climate Change Technology Program report (Clarke et al., 2008a) to the present representation, which will be used in future work. To demonstrate the newest representation, we describe the procedure and outcome of six model runs that illustrate the potential role of geothermal energy in the U.S. and global regions through different futures climate policy, development and deployment of engineered, or enhanced, geothermal systems (EGS), and availability of other low-cost, low-carbon electricity generation technologies such as nuclear energy and carbon capture and storage (CCS).

  1. Bis(imidazo[4,5-f][1,10]phenanthroline)dinitratolead(II)

    PubMed Central

    Li, Chun-Xiang; Zha, Xiao-Lin; Liu, Chun-Bo; Li, Xiu-Ying; Che, Guang-Bo

    2009-01-01

    In the title compound, [Pb(NO3)2(C13H8N4)2], the PbII atom (site symmetry 2) is hexa­coordinated by four N atoms from two N,N′-bidentate imidazo[4,5-f][1,10]phenanthroline (L) ligands and two O atoms from two weakly coordinated nitrate ions [Pb—O = 2.872 (5) Å] in an irregular arrangement, which may be ascribed to the stereochemically active lone pair of electrons on the metal ion. In the crystal, inter­molecular bifurcated N—H⋯(O,O) hydrogen bonds connect the mol­ecules into chains propagating along [100]. Adjacent chains inter­act by strong aromatic π–π stacking inter­actions, with a centroid–centroid distance of 3.483 (2) Å. PMID:21581524

  2. HI-SIMv1.0--towards the virtual reality of hearing impairments.

    PubMed

    Körkkö, P; Huttunen, K; Sorri, M

    2001-01-01

    The virtual reality of hearing impairments has obvious practical applications in areas such as audiology, speech therapy and hearing aid technology and serves as an informational tool for the family members of the hearing impaired. To simulate hearing impairment, a CD-ROM with filtered speech material accessible through a graphical user-interface was produced; the user-interface was created with standard multimedia tools. The CD-ROM, HI-SIMv1.0, intended as an interactive educational tool, offers a virtual experience of the effects of a selection of common types of hearing impairment. The options available in this simulation include grade of hearing impairment, audiometric configuration and the type and level of background noise. Word recognition scores can be computed for standard Finnish audiometric material.

  3. Power, Avionics and Software - Phase 1.0:. [Subsystem Integration Test Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ivancic, William D.; Sands, Obed S.; Bakula, Casey J.; Oldham, Daniel R.; Wright, Ted; Bradish, Martin A.; Klebau, Joseph M.

    2014-01-01

    This report describes Power, Avionics and Software (PAS) 1.0 subsystem integration testing and test results that occurred in August and September of 2013. This report covers the capabilities of each PAS assembly to meet integration test objectives for non-safety critical, non-flight, non-human-rated hardware and software development. This test report is the outcome of the first integration of the PAS subsystem and is meant to provide data for subsequent designs, development and testing of the future PAS subsystems. The two main objectives were to assess the ability of the PAS assemblies to exchange messages and to perform audio testing of both inbound and outbound channels. This report describes each test performed, defines the test, the data, and provides conclusions and recommendations.

  4. Supporting And Figuring Of SOFIA F/1.0 Thin Zerodur Meniscus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knohl, E.-D.

    1988-04-01

    The SOFIA telescope concept was discussed with respect to the ambitious NASA specification. Comparisons were drawn between SOFIA and other Zeiss optics like 3.5 m Telescope MPIA and ESO NTT. Recently developed technologies in producing ZERODUR blanks were presented. A distribution of tolerances for the optical system SOFIA was made. The axial mirror support in the telescope was optimized and the lateral support was calculated accordingly. Results for a radial backface support with correcting moment were given. For the SOFIA primary the deformation modes with lowest plate stiffness were calculated and load tolerances were derived. Fast flexible tools for figuring a F/1.0 asphere were discussed - developed in the ROFT program - that could be adapted to the SOFIA thin meniscus. Also a fast interferometric metrology was presented.

  5. Transition-metal and metalloid substitutions in L1(0)-ordered FeNi

    SciTech Connect

    Manchanda, P; Skomski, R; Bordeaux, N; Lewis, LH; Kashyap, A

    2014-05-07

    The effect of atomic substitutions on the magnetization, exchange, and magnetocrystalline anisotropy energy of L1(0)-ordered FeNi (tetrataenite) is computationally investigated. The compound naturally occurs in meteorites but has attracted renewed attention as a potential material for permanent magnets, and elemental additives will likely be necessary to facilitate the phase formation. Our density functional theory calculations use the Vienna ab-initio simulation package, applied to 4-atom unit cells of Fe2XNi and 32-atom supercells (X = Al, P, S, Ti, V, Cr, Mn, Fe, Co). While it is found that most additives deteriorate the magnetic properties, there are exceptions: excess substitutional Fe and Co additions improve the magnetization, whereas Cr, S, and interstitial B additions improve the magnetocrystalline anisotropy. (C) 2014 AIP Publishing LLC.

  6. ADS: A FORTRAN program for automated design synthesis: Version 1.10

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vanderplaats, G. N.

    1985-01-01

    A new general-purpose optimization program for engineering design is described. ADS (Automated Design Synthesis - Version 1.10) is a FORTRAN program for solution of nonlinear constrained optimization problems. The program is segmented into three levels: strategy, optimizer, and one-dimensional search. At each level, several options are available so that a total of over 100 possible combinations can be created. Examples of available strategies are sequential unconstrained minimization, the Augmented Lagrange Multiplier method, and Sequential Linear Programming. Available optimizers include variable metric methods and the Method of Feasible Directions as examples, and one-dimensional search options include polynomial interpolation and the Golden Section method as examples. Emphasis is placed on ease of use of the program. All information is transferred via a single parameter list. Default values are provided for all internal program parameters such as convergence criteria, and the user is given a simple means to over-ride these, if desired.

  7. 1,10-Phenanthroline as an accelerator for Ag nanoparticle-catalysed electroless copper deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Chia-Ru; Chou, Nan-Kuang; Li, Cheng-Hsing; Chen, Ho-Rei; Lee, Chien-Liang

    2014-10-01

    1,10-Phenanthroline (phen) can be successfully used as an accelerator for Ag-catalysed electroless copper deposition (ECD) processes. Electrochemical quartz crystal microbalance analyses indicate that the mass activity in terms of thickness of deposited Cu layer and average ECD rate within a deposition time of 110 s for Ag nanoparticles activated by phen are 7.86 × 10-3 μm μg-1 and 1.43 × 10-4 μm μg-1 s-1, respectively, whereas Ag nanoparticles without phen cannot catalyse the reaction. Furthermore, Tafel and cyclic voltammetric results show that the addition of phen to the ECD bath significantly enhances the ability of the Ag nanoparticles to catalyse the oxidation of HCHO and suppresses the formation of CuO.

  8. GridLAB-D Technical Support Document: Residential End-Use Module Version 1.0

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor, Zachary T.; Gowri, Krishnan; Katipamula, Srinivas

    2008-07-31

    1.0 Introduction The residential module implements the following end uses and characteristics to simulate the power demand in a single family home: • Water heater • Lights • Dishwasher • Range • Microwave • Refrigerator • Internal gains (plug loads) • House (heating/cooling loads) The house model considers the following four major heat gains/losses that contribute to the building heating/cooling load: 1. Conduction through exterior walls, roof and fenestration (based on envelope UA) 2. Air infiltration (based on specified air change rate) 3. Solar radiation (based on CLTD model and using tmy data) 4. Internal gains from lighting, people, equipment and other end use objects. The Equivalent Thermal Parameter (ETP) approach is used to model the residential loads and energy consumption. The following sections describe the modeling assumptions for each of the above end uses and the details of power demand calculations in the residential module.

  9. LANDSAT multispectral scanner computer-compatible tape format, version 1.0

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1982-01-01

    Unlike previous LANDSAT computer compatible tape (CCT) formats, the standard format of CCT's now includes a comprehensive field location and data description information superstructure composed of four records. The volume descriptor record, the text record, and the file pointer record reside in a volume directory file, which generally describes the data configuration and provides pointers to each data file. The file descriptor record for each data file describes the data structure within the file and provides pointers to certain fields within the file. These superstructure records primarily supply information about the data on the CCT as opposed to carrying the data themselves. The EROS Data Center's LANDSAT CCT version 1.0 product is presented which conforms to the concepts of the standard format as much as is possible with existing EDC systems.

  10. The gravitational resolving power of global seismic networks in the 0.1-10 Hz band

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mulargia, Francesco; Kamenshchik, Alexander

    2016-04-01

    Among the first attempts to detect gravitational waves, the seismic approach pre-dates the digital era. Major advances in computational power, seismic instrumentation and in the knowledge of seismic noise suggest to reappraise its potential. Using the whole earth as a detector, with the thousands of digital seismometers of seismic global networks as a single phased array, more than two decades of continuous seismic noise data are available and can be readily sifted at the only cost of (a pretty gigantic) computation. Using a subset of data, we show that absolute strains h ≲10-17 on burst gravitational pulses and h ≲10-21 on periodic signals may be feasibly resolved in the frequency range 0.1-10 Hz, only marginally covered by current advanced LIGO and future eLISA. However, theoretical predictions for the largest cosmic gravitational emissions at these frequencies are a few orders of magnitude lower.

  11. On the Incidence and Kinematics of Strong Mg II Absorbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prochter, Gabriel E.; Prochaska, Jason X.; Burles, Scott M.

    2006-03-01

    We present the results of two complementary investigations into the nature of strong (rest equivalent width, Wr>1.0 Å) Mg II absorption systems at high redshift. The first line of questioning examines the complete Sloan Digital Sky Survey Data Release 3 set of quasar spectra to determine the evolution of the incidence of strong Mg II absorption. This search resulted in 7421 confirmed Mg II systems of Wr>1.0 Å, yielding a >95% complete statistical sample of 4835 absorbers (systems detected in S/N>7 spectral regions) spanning a redshift range 0.35Mg(X), is characterized by a roughly constant value at z>0.8, indicating that the product of the number density and gas cross section of halos hosting strong Mg II is unevolving at these redshifts. In contrast, one observes a decline in lMg(X) at z<0.8, which we interpret as a decrease in the gas cross section to strong Mg II absorption and therefore a decline in the physical processes relevant to strong Mg II absorption. Perhaps uncoincidentally, this evolution roughly tracks the global evolution of the star formation rate density. Dividing the systems in Wr subsamples, the lMg(X) curves show similar shape with lower normalization at higher Wr values and a more pronounced decrease in lMg(X) at z<0.8 for larger Wr systems. We also present the results of a search for strong Mg II absorption in a set of 91 high-resolution quasar spectra collected on the ESI and HIRES spectrographs. These data allow us to investigate the kinematics of such systems at 0.81.0 Å were discovered. These systems are characterized by the presence of numerous components spread over an average velocity width of Δv~200 km s-1. Also, absorption due to more highly ionized species (e.g., Al III, C IV, Si IV) tends to display kinematic profiles similar to the corresponding Mg II and Fe II absorption. We consider all of these

  12. A Fluorescent Hypochlorite Probe Built on 1,10-Phenanthroline Scaffold and its Ion Recognition Features.

    PubMed

    Algi, Melek Pamuk

    2016-03-01

    In this study, the synthesis of 7-((Hydroxyimino)methyl)-1,10-phenanthroline-4-carbaldehyde oxime (1) in two steps starting from 4,7-dimethyl-1,10-phenanthroline (2) is reported. It is found that compound 1 can be used as a fluorogenic probe for the detection of hypochlorite ion in aqueous solution. NMR and mass spectral analysis indicate that probe 1 undergoes a chemical transformation through its oxime units upon treatment with hypochlorite, which results in a remarkable enhancement of the emission intensity. Also, metal ion recognition properties of probe 1 is investigated. It is noted that compound 1 is responsive to Zn(2+), Cd(2+), Ni(2+) and Cu(2+) metal ions, which reduced the emission intensity under identical conditions. Graphical Abstract The design, synthesis and properties of a new fluorescent hypochlorite probe is described. It is found that probe 1 immediately undergoes an oxidation reaction with NaClO through its oxime units in 0.1 M Na2CO3-NaHCO3 buffer containing DMF (pH = 9.0, 30:1 v/v) at room temperature, which resulted in a remarkable enhancement of the emission intensity. It is noteworthy that this novel probe 1 is highly selective to hypochlorite ion when compared to some other ROS and anions. On the other hand, probe 1 also induces turn-off fluorogenic responses to metal ions such as Zn(2+), Cd(2+), Ni(2+) and Cu(2+) ions under identical conditions. PMID:26670687

  13. Differential Conductance Measurements of MgB2/I/Pb Heterojunctions and all-MgB2 Junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cusick, David; Eckhardt, Matthew; Dai, Wenqing; Li, Qi; Chen, Ke; Cunnane, Daniel; Zhuang, C. G.; Xi, X. X.; Naito, Michio; Ramos, Roberto

    2015-03-01

    We present our work characterizing several types of Magnesium Diboride Josephson junctions, including MgB2/I/Pb heterojunctions and all-MgB2 junctions. We will report on the I-V and dI/dV-V data collected at various temperatures using both a cryocooler-based experimental platform between 2 and 20 Kelvin and using a 3He probe platform between 0.3 and 1.0 Kelvin. These were both developed by undergraduates in a liberal arts university. Using high-sampling rates with a 24-bit data acquisition card and access to a broad of range of temperatures, we track and report energy gap distributions and temperature-dependent features of dI/dV peaks of MgB2, comparing these with theoretical predictions. R.C.R. acknowledges support from National Science Foundation Grant # DMR-1206561.

  14. 38 CFR 1.10 - Eligibility for and disposition of the United States flag for burial purposes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Eligibility for and disposition of the United States flag for burial purposes. 1.10 Section 1.10 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans... the service of the Armed Forces of the United States pursuant to the military order of the...

  15. BADGER v1.0: A Fortran equation of state library

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heltemes, T. A.; Moses, G. A.

    2012-12-01

    The BADGER equation of state library was developed to enable inertial confinement fusion plasma codes to more accurately model plasmas in the high-density, low-temperature regime. The code had the capability to calculate 1- and 2-T plasmas using the Thomas-Fermi model and an individual electron accounting model. Ion equation of state data can be calculated using an ideal gas model or via a quotidian equation of state with scaled binding energies. Electron equation of state data can be calculated via the ideal gas model or with an adaptation of the screened hydrogenic model with ℓ-splitting. The ionization and equation of state calculations can be done in local thermodynamic equilibrium or in a non-LTE mode using a variant of the Busquet equivalent temperature method. The code was written as a stand-alone Fortran library for ease of implementation by external codes. EOS results for aluminum are presented that show good agreement with the SESAME library and ionization calculations show good agreement with the FLYCHK code. Program summaryProgram title: BADGERLIB v1.0 Catalogue identifier: AEND_v1_0 Program summary URL:http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/AEND_v1_0.html Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen's University, Belfast, N. Ireland Licensing provisions: Standard CPC licence, http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/licence/licence.html No. of lines in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 41 480 No. of bytes in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 2 904 451 Distribution format: tar.gz Programming language: Fortran 90. Computer: 32- or 64-bit PC, or Mac. Operating system: Windows, Linux, MacOS X. RAM: 249.496 kB plus 195.630 kB per isotope record in memory Classification: 19.1, 19.7. Nature of problem: Equation of State (EOS) calculations are necessary for the accurate simulation of high energy density plasmas. Historically, most EOS codes used in these simulations have relied on an ideal gas model. This model is inadequate for low-temperature, high-density plasma conditions; the gaseous and liquid phases; and the solid phase. The BADGER code was developed to give more realistic EOS data in these regimes. Solution method: BADGER has multiple, user-selectable models to treat the ions, average-atom ionization state and electrons. Ion models are ideal gas and quotidian equation of state (QEOS), ionization models are Thomas-Fermi and individual accounting method (IEM) formulation of the screened hydrogenic model (SHM) with l-splitting, electron ionization models are ideal gas and a Helmholtz free energy minimization method derived from the SHM. The default equation of state and ionization models are appropriate for plasmas in local thermodynamic equilibrium (LTE). The code can calculate non-LTE equation of state (EOS) and ionization data using a simplified form of the Busquet equivalent-temperature method. Restrictions: Physical data are only provided for elements Z=1 to Z=86. Multiple solid phases are not currently supported. Liquid, gas and plasma phases are combined into a generalized "fluid" phase. Unusual features: BADGER divorces the calculation of average-atom ionization from the electron equation of state model, allowing the user to select ionization and electron EOS models that are most appropriate to the simulation. The included ion ideal gas model uses ground-state nuclear spin data to differentiate between isotopes of a given element. Running time: Example provided only takes a few seconds to run.

  16. Advanced modelling of the multiphase DMS chemistry with the CAPRAM DMS module 1.0

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoffmann, Erik Hans; Tilgner, Andreas; Schrödner, Roland; Wolke, Ralf; Herrmann, Hartmut

    2016-04-01

    Oceans are the general emitter of dimethyl sulphide (DMS), the major natural sulphur source (Andreae, 1990), and cover approximately 70 % of earth's surface. The main DMS oxidation products are SO2, H2SO4 and methyl sulfonic acid (MSA). Hence, DMS is very important for formation of non-sea salt sulphate (nss SO42-) aerosols and secondary particulate matter and thus global climate. Despite many previous model studies, there are still important knowledge gaps, especially in aqueous phase DMS chemistry, of its atmospheric fate (Barnes et al., 2006). Therefore, a comprehensive multiphase DMS chemistry mechanism, the CAPRAM DMS module 1.0 (DM1.0), has been developed. The DM1.0 includes 103 gas phase reactions, 5 phase transfers and 54 aqueous phase reactions. It was coupled with the multiphase chemistry mechanism MCMv3.2/CAPRAM4.0α (Rickard et al., 2015; Bräuer et al., 2016) and the extended CAPRAM halogen module 2.1 (HM2.1, Bräuer et al., 2013) for investigation of multiphase DMS oxidation in the marine boundary layer. Then, a pristine ocean scenario was simulated using the air parcel model SPACCIM (Wolke et al., 2005) including 8 non-permanent cloud passages - 4 at noon and 4 at midnight. This allows the investigation of the influence of deliquesced particles and clouds on multiphase DMS chemistry during both daytime and nighttime conditions as well as under cloud formation and evaporation. To test the influence of various subsystems on multiphase DMS chemistry different sensitivity runs were performed. Investigations of multiphase chemistry of DMS and its important oxidation products were done using concentration-time profiles and detailed time-resolved reaction flux analyses. The model studies revealed the importance of aqueous phase chemistry for DMS and its oxidation products. Overall about 7.0% of DMS is effectively oxidised by O3 in the aqueous phase of clouds. The simulations revealed the importance of halogen and aqueous phase chemistry for DMS and its oxidation products. Overall halogen compounds contribute with 71% to DMS oxidation with gaseous Cl (23.6%) and BrO (46.1%) as main oxidants. The conversion efficiency of DMS to SO2 in the gas phase was simulated between 0.2, 0.27 and 0.6 for the full pristine ocean scenario run, a simulation without considered halogen chemistry and a simulation without treated aqueous phase DMS chemistry, respectively. Furthermore, the studies indicate that the conversion efficiency of DMS to MSA is strongly related to DMS oxidation by BrO and treating of aqueous-phase DMS chemistry. The MSA yield for different sensitivity runs was simulated between 0.01 and 0.47. The lowest yield is reached treating only gas phase chemistry of DMS. Moreover, the simulation with the whole mechanism indicate that multiphase DMS oxidation produce as much MSA as sulphate leading to strong implications for nss-SO42- aerosol formation, activation to cloud condensation nuclei and cloud albedo. Andreae, M. O., Mar. Chem., 30, 1-29, 1990. Barnes, I., et al., Chem. Rev., 106, 940-975, 2006. Bräuer, P., et al., Atmos. Chem. Phys. Discuss., in preparation, 2016. Bräuer, P., et al., J. Atmos. Chem., 70, 19-52, 2013. Rickard, A., et al., The Master Chemical Mechanism Version MCM v3.2, available at: http://mcm.leeds.ac.uk/MCMv3.2/ (last access: 05 Mai 2015)„ 2015. Wolke, R., et al., Atmos. Environ., 39, 4375-4388, 2005.

  17. 28SiO v = 0 J = 1-0 emission from evolved stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Vicente, P.; Bujarrabal, V.; Díaz-Pulido, A.; Albo, C.; Alcolea, J.; Barcia, A.; Barbas, L.; Bolaño, R.; Colomer, F.; Diez, M. C.; Gallego, J. D.; Gómez-González, J.; López-Fernández, I.; López-Fernández, J. A.; López-Pérez, J. A.; Malo, I.; Moreno, A.; Patino, M.; Serna, J. M.; Tercero, F.; Vaquero, B.

    2016-05-01

    Aims: Observations of 28SiO v = 0J = 1-0 line emission (7-mm wavelength) from asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stars show in some cases peculiar profiles, composed of a central intense component plus a wider plateau. Very similar profiles have been observed in CO lines from some AGB stars and most post-AGB nebulae and, in these cases, they are clearly associated with the presence of conspicuous axial symmetry and bipolar dynamics. We aim to systematically study the profile shape of 28SiO v = 0J = 1-0 lines in evolved stars and to discuss the origin of the composite profile structure. Methods: We present observations of 28SiO v = 0J = 1-0 emission in 28 evolved stars, including O-rich, C-rich, and S-type Mira-type variables, OH/IR stars, semiregular long-period variables, red supergiants and one yellow hypergiant. Most objects were observed in several epochs, over a total period of time of one and a half years. The observations were performed with the 40 m radio telescope of the Instituto Geográfico Nacional (IGN) in Yebes, Spain. Results: We find that the composite core plus plateau profiles are systematically present in O-rich Miras, OH/IR stars, and red supergiants. They are also found in one S-type Mira (χ Cyg) and in two semiregular variables (X Her and RS Cnc) that are known to show axial symmetry. In the other objects, the profiles are simpler and similar to those observed in other molecular lines. The composite structure appears in the objects in which SiO emission is thought to come from the very inner circumstellar layers, prior to dust formation. The central spectral feature is found to be systematically composed of a number of narrow spikes, except for X Her and RS Cnc, in which it shows a smooth shape that is very similar to that observed in CO emission. These spikes show a significant (and mostly chaotic) time variation, while in all cases the smooth components remain constant within the uncertainties. The profile shape could come from the superposition of standard wide profiles and a group of weak maser spikes confined to the central spectral regions because of tangential amplification. Alternatively, we speculate that the very similar profiles detected in objects that are known to be conspicuously axisymmetric, such as X Her and RS Cnc, and in O-rich Mira-type stars, such as IK Tau and TX Cam, may be indicative of the systematic presence of a significant axial symmetry in the very inner circumstellar shells around AGB stars; such symmetry would be independent of the presence of weak maser effects in the central spikes.

  18. Advanced modelling of the multiphase DMS chemistry with the CAPRAM DMS module 1.0

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoffmann, Erik Hans; Tilgner, Andreas; Schrödner, Roland; Wolke, Ralf; Herrmann, Hartmut

    2016-04-01

    Oceans are the general emitter of dimethyl sulphide (DMS), the major natural sulphur source (Andreae, 1990), and cover approximately 70 % of earth's surface. The main DMS oxidation products are SO2, H2SO4 and methyl sulfonic acid (MSA). Hence, DMS is very important for formation of non-sea salt sulphate (nss SO42-) aerosols and secondary particulate matter and thus global climate. Despite many previous model studies, there are still important knowledge gaps, especially in aqueous phase DMS chemistry, of its atmospheric fate (Barnes et al., 2006). Therefore, a comprehensive multiphase DMS chemistry mechanism, the CAPRAM DMS module 1.0 (DM1.0), has been developed. The DM1.0 includes 103 gas phase reactions, 5 phase transfers and 54 aqueous phase reactions. It was coupled with the multiphase chemistry mechanism MCMv3.2/CAPRAM4.0α (Rickard et al., 2015; Bräuer et al., 2016) and the extended CAPRAM halogen module 2.1 (HM2.1, Bräuer et al., 2013) for investigation of multiphase DMS oxidation in the marine boundary layer. Then, a pristine ocean scenario was simulated using the air parcel model SPACCIM (Wolke et al., 2005) including 8 non-permanent cloud passages - 4 at noon and 4 at midnight. This allows the investigation of the influence of deliquesced particles and clouds on multiphase DMS chemistry during both daytime and nighttime conditions as well as under cloud formation and evaporation. To test the influence of various subsystems on multiphase DMS chemistry different sensitivity runs were performed. Investigations of multiphase chemistry of DMS and its important oxidation products were done using concentration-time profiles and detailed time-resolved reaction flux analyses. The model studies revealed the importance of aqueous phase chemistry for DMS and its oxidation products. Overall about 7.0% of DMS is effectively oxidised by O3 in the aqueous phase of clouds. The simulations revealed the importance of halogen and aqueous phase chemistry for DMS and its oxidation products. Overall halogen compounds contribute with 71% to DMS oxidation with gaseous Cl (23.6%) and BrO (46.1%) as main oxidants. The conversion efficiency of DMS to SO2 in the gas phase was simulated between 0.2, 0.27 and 0.6 for the full pristine ocean scenario run, a simulation without considered halogen chemistry and a simulation without treated aqueous phase DMS chemistry, respectively. Furthermore, the studies indicate that the conversion efficiency of DMS to MSA is strongly related to DMS oxidation by BrO and treating of aqueous-phase DMS chemistry. The MSA yield for different sensitivity runs was simulated between 0.01 and 0.47. The lowest yield is reached treating only gas phase chemistry of DMS. Moreover, the simulation with the whole mechanism indicate that multiphase DMS oxidation produce as much MSA as sulphate leading to strong implications for nss-SO42‑ aerosol formation, activation to cloud condensation nuclei and cloud albedo. Andreae, M. O., Mar. Chem., 30, 1-29, 1990. Barnes, I., et al., Chem. Rev., 106, 940-975, 2006. Bräuer, P., et al., Atmos. Chem. Phys. Discuss., in preparation, 2016. Bräuer, P., et al., J. Atmos. Chem., 70, 19-52, 2013. Rickard, A., et al., The Master Chemical Mechanism Version MCM v3.2, available at: http://mcm.leeds.ac.uk/MCMv3.2/ (last access: 05 Mai 2015)„ 2015. Wolke, R., et al., Atmos. Environ., 39, 4375-4388, 2005.

  19. Modification of Mg{sub 2}Si in Mg–Si alloys with gadolinium

    SciTech Connect

    Ye, Lingying; Hu, Jilong Tang, Changping; Zhang, Xinming; Deng, Yunlai; Liu, Zhaoyang; Zhou, Zhile

    2013-05-15

    The modification effect of gadolinium (Gd) on Mg{sub 2}Si in the hypereutectic Mg–3 wt.% Si alloy has been investigated using optical microscope, scanning electron microscope, X-ray diffraction and hardness measurements. The results indicate that the morphology of the primary Mg{sub 2}Si is changed from coarse dendrite into fine polygon with the increasing Gd content. The average size of the primary Mg{sub 2}Si significantly decreases with increasing Gd content up to 1.0 wt.%, and then slowly increases. Interestingly, when the Gd content is increased to 4.0 and 8.0 wt.%, the primary and eutectic Mg{sub 2}Si evidently decrease and even disappear. The modification and refinement of the primary Mg{sub 2}Si is mainly attributed to the poisoning effect. The GdMg{sub 2} phase in the primary Mg{sub 2}Si is obviously coarsened as the Gd content exceeds 2.0 wt.%. While the decrease and disappearance of the primary and eutectic Mg{sub 2}Si are ascribed to the formation of vast GdSi compound. Therefore, it is reasonable to conclude that proper Gd (1.0 wt.%) addition can effectively modify and refine the primary Mg{sub 2}Si. - Highlights: ► Proper Gd (1.0 wt.%) addition can effectively modify and refine the primary Mg{sub 2}Si. ► We studied the reaction feasibility between Mg and Si, Gd and Si in Mg–Gd–Si system. ► We explored the modification mechanism of Gd modifier on Mg{sub 2}Si.

  20. V-SUIT Model Validation Using PLSS 1.0 Test Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Olthoff, Claas

    2015-01-01

    The dynamic portable life support system (PLSS) simulation software Virtual Space Suit (V-SUIT) has been under development at the Technische Universitat Munchen since 2011 as a spin-off from the Virtual Habitat (V-HAB) project. The MATLAB(trademark)-based V-SUIT simulates space suit portable life support systems and their interaction with a detailed and also dynamic human model, as well as the dynamic external environment of a space suit moving on a planetary surface. To demonstrate the feasibility of a large, system level simulation like V-SUIT, a model of NASA's PLSS 1.0 prototype was created. This prototype was run through an extensive series of tests in 2011. Since the test setup was heavily instrumented, it produced a wealth of data making it ideal for model validation. The implemented model includes all components of the PLSS in both the ventilation and thermal loops. The major components are modeled in greater detail, while smaller and ancillary components are low fidelity black box models. The major components include the Rapid Cycle Amine (RCA) CO2 removal system, the Primary and Secondary Oxygen Assembly (POS/SOA), the Pressure Garment System Volume Simulator (PGSVS), the Human Metabolic Simulator (HMS), the heat exchanger between the ventilation and thermal loops, the Space Suit Water Membrane Evaporator (SWME) and finally the Liquid Cooling Garment Simulator (LCGS). Using the created model, dynamic simulations were performed using same test points also used during PLSS 1.0 testing. The results of the simulation were then compared to the test data with special focus on absolute values during the steady state phases and dynamic behavior during the transition between test points. Quantified simulation results are presented that demonstrate which areas of the V-SUIT model are in need of further refinement and those that are sufficiently close to the test results. Finally, lessons learned from the modelling and validation process are given in combination with implications for the future development of other PLSS models in V-SUIT.

  1. Fabrication of Fully Epitaxial CoFe/MgO/CoFe Magnetic Tunnel Junctions on Ge(001) Substrates via a MgO Interlayer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Gui-fang; Taira, Tomoyuki; Liu, Hong-xi; Matsuda, Ken-ichi; Uemura, Tetsuya; Yamamoto, Masafumi

    2012-09-01

    Fully epitaxial magnetic tunnel junctions (MTJs) with Co50Fe50 (CoFe) electrodes and a MgO barrier were fabricated on Ge(001) single-crystal substrates via a MgO interlayer. Microfabricated CoFe/MgO/CoFe MTJs with a 10-nm-thick MgO interlayer showed a high tunnel magnetoresistance (TMR) ratio of 218% at 293 K, which is encouraging for monolithic integration of MTJs and Ge field-effect transistors for constructing future-generation nonvolatile logic circuits featuring ultralow-power consumption. Furthermore, MTJs with even a decreased MgO interlayer thickness of 1.0 nm showed a relatively high TMR ratio of 110% at 293 K, suggesting the promise of heterostructures consisting of MTJ/MgO interlayer/Ge(001) as a key device structure for spin injection into a Ge channel from an MTJ.

  2. Flavanol and procyanidin content (by degree of polymerization 1-10) of chocolate, cocoa liquors, cocoa powders, and cocoa extracts: first action 2012.24.

    PubMed

    Robbins, Rebecca J; Leonczak, Jadwiga; Li, Julia; Johnson, J Christopher; Collins, Tom; Kwik-Uribe, Catherine; Schmitz, Harold H

    2013-01-01

    An international collaborative study was conducted on an HPLC method with fluorescent detection for the determination of flavanols and procyanidins in chocolate and cocoa-containing materials. The sum of the oligomeric fractions with degree of polymerization 1-10 was the determined content value. Sample materials included dark and milk chocolates, cocoa powder, cocoa liquors, and cocoa extracts. The content ranged from approximately 2 to 500 mg/g (defatted basis). Thirteen laboratories--representing commercial, industrial, and academic institutions in six countries--participated in this interlaboratory study. Fourteen samples were sent as blind duplicates to the collaborators. Results for 12 laboratories yielded repeatability RSD (RSDr) values below 10% for all materials analyzed, ranging from 4.17 to 9.61%. Reproducibility RSD (RSDR) values ranged from 5.03 to 12.9% for samples containing 8.07 to 484.7 mg/g material analyzed. In one sample containing a low content of flavanols and procyanidins (approximately 2 mg/g), the RSDR was 17.68%. PMID:24000740

  3. NIMS Radiance Point Spectra of Ida and Dactyl V1.0

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Granahan, J. C.

    2013-08-01

    This data volume contains radiometrically corrected point spectra of asteroid 243 Ida and a spectrum of the asteroid satellite Dactyl (Ida I) as acquired by the Galileo spacecraft Near Infrared Mapping Spectrometer (NIMS) on August 28, 1993. They record the spectra collected as the Galileo spacecraft approached the 243 Ida system. These data are products of the calibration of the raw data number files idu002tn.qub, idu005tn.qub, idu006tn.qub, idu007tn.qub, idu019tn.qub, idu020tn.qub, idu022tn.qub, idu028tn.qub, idu032tn.qub, idu033tn.qub, and idu035tn.qub (DATA SET ID ='GO-A-NIMS-3-TUBE-V1.0') with calibration factors acquired during the Jovian tour of the Galileo mission. These raw data .qub files are archived in the Imaging Node of the NASA Planetary Data System (PDS). The calibrated spectra consist of radiance and incidence/flux measurements for wavelengths between 0.7 - 5.2 micrometers.

  4. The mGA1.0: A common LISP implementation of a messy genetic algorithm

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldberg, David E.; Kerzic, Travis

    1990-01-01

    Genetic algorithms (GAs) are finding increased application in difficult search, optimization, and machine learning problems in science and engineering. Increasing demands are being placed on algorithm performance, and the remaining challenges of genetic algorithm theory and practice are becoming increasingly unavoidable. Perhaps the most difficult of these challenges is the so-called linkage problem. Messy GAs were created to overcome the linkage problem of simple genetic algorithms by combining variable-length strings, gene expression, messy operators, and a nonhomogeneous phasing of evolutionary processing. Results on a number of difficult deceptive test functions are encouraging with the mGA always finding global optima in a polynomial number of function evaluations. Theoretical and empirical studies are continuing, and a first version of a messy GA is ready for testing by others. A Common LISP implementation called mGA1.0 is documented and related to the basic principles and operators developed by Goldberg et. al. (1989, 1990). Although the code was prepared with care, it is not a general-purpose code, only a research version. Important data structures and global variations are described. Thereafter brief function descriptions are given, and sample input data are presented together with sample program output. A source listing with comments is also included.

  5. FR database 1.0: a resource focused on fruit development and ripening.

    PubMed

    Yue, Junyang; Ma, Xiaojing; Ban, Rongjun; Huang, Qianli; Wang, Wenjie; Liu, Jia; Liu, Yongsheng

    2015-01-01

    Fruits form unique growing period in the life cycle of higher plants. They provide essential nutrients and have beneficial effects on human health. Characterizing the genes involved in fruit development and ripening is fundamental to understanding the biological process and improving horticultural crops. Although, numerous genes that have been characterized are participated in regulating fruit development and ripening at different stages, no dedicated bioinformatic resource for fruit development and ripening is available. In this study, we have developed such a database, FR database 1.0, using manual curation from 38 423 articles published before 1 April 2014, and integrating protein interactomes and several transcriptome datasets. It provides detailed information for 904 genes derived from 53 organisms reported to participate in fleshy fruit development and ripening. Genes from climacteric and non-climacteric fruits are also annotated, with several interesting Gene Ontology (GO) terms being enriched for these two gene sets and seven ethylene-related GO terms found only in the climacteric fruit group. Furthermore, protein-protein interaction analysis by integrating information from FR database presents the possible function network that affects fleshy fruit size formation. Collectively, FR database will be a valuable platform for comprehensive understanding and future experiments in fruit biology. Database URL: http://www.fruitech.org/

  6. Structural/aerodynamic Blade Analyzer (SAB) User's Guide, Version 1.0

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morel, M. R.

    1994-01-01

    The structural/aerodynamic blade (SAB) analyzer provides an automated tool for the static-deflection analysis of turbomachinery blades with aerodynamic and rotational loads. A structural code calculates a deflected blade shape using aerodynamic loads input. An aerodynamic solver computes aerodynamic loads using deflected blade shape input. The two programs are iterated automatically until deflections converge. Currently, SAB version 1.0 is interfaced with MSC/NASTRAN to perform the structural analysis and PROP3D to perform the aerodynamic analysis. This document serves as a guide for the operation of the SAB system with specific emphasis on its use at NASA Lewis Research Center (LeRC). This guide consists of six chapters: an introduction which gives a summary of SAB; SAB's methodology, component files, links, and interfaces; input/output file structure; setup and execution of the SAB files on the Cray computers; hints and tips to advise the user; and an example problem demonstrating the SAB process. In addition, four appendices are presented to define the different computer programs used within the SAB analyzer and describe the required input decks.

  7. FR database 1.0: a resource focused on fruit development and ripening

    PubMed Central

    Yue, Junyang; Ma, Xiaojing; Ban, Rongjun; Huang, Qianli; Wang, Wenjie; Liu, Jia; Liu, Yongsheng

    2015-01-01

    Fruits form unique growing period in the life cycle of higher plants. They provide essential nutrients and have beneficial effects on human health. Characterizing the genes involved in fruit development and ripening is fundamental to understanding the biological process and improving horticultural crops. Although, numerous genes that have been characterized are participated in regulating fruit development and ripening at different stages, no dedicated bioinformatic resource for fruit development and ripening is available. In this study, we have developed such a database, FR database 1.0, using manual curation from 38 423 articles published before 1 April 2014, and integrating protein interactomes and several transcriptome datasets. It provides detailed information for 904 genes derived from 53 organisms reported to participate in fleshy fruit development and ripening. Genes from climacteric and non-climacteric fruits are also annotated, with several interesting Gene Ontology (GO) terms being enriched for these two gene sets and seven ethylene-related GO terms found only in the climacteric fruit group. Furthermore, protein–protein interaction analysis by integrating information from FR database presents the possible function network that affects fleshy fruit size formation. Collectively, FR database will be a valuable platform for comprehensive understanding and future experiments in fruit biology. Database URL: http://www.fruitech.org/ PMID:25725058

  8. 28 MHz swept source at 1.0 μm for ultrafast quantitative phase imaging

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Xiaoming; Lau, Andy K. S.; Xu, Yiqing; Tsia, Kevin K.; Wong, Kenneth K. Y.

    2015-01-01

    Emerging high-throughput optical imaging modalities, in particular those providing phase information, necessitate a demanding speed regime (e.g. megahertz sweep rate) for those conventional swept sources; while an effective solution is yet to be demonstrated. We demonstrate a stable breathing laser as inertia-free swept source (BLISS) operating at a wavelength sweep rate of 28 MHz, particularly for the ultrafast interferometric imaging modality at 1.0 μm. Leveraging a tunable dispersion compensation element inside the laser cavity, the wavelength sweep range of BLISS can be tuned from ~10 nm to ~63 nm. It exhibits a good intensity stability, which is quantified by the ratio of standard deviation to the mean of the pulse intensity, i.e. 1.6%. Its excellent wavelength repeatability, <0.05% per sweep, enables the single-shot imaging at an ultrafast line-scan rate without averaging. To showcase its potential applications, it is applied to the ultrafast (28-MHz line-scan rate) interferometric time-stretch (iTS) microscope to provide quantitative morphological information on a biological specimen at a lateral resolution of 1.2 μm. This fiber-based inertia-free swept source is demonstrated to be robust and broadband, and can be applied to other established imaging modalities, such as optical coherence tomography (OCT), of which an axial resolution better than 12 μm can be achieved. PMID:26504636

  9. VALDRIFT 1.0: A valley atmospheric dispersion model with deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Allwine, K.J.; Bian, X.; Whiteman, C.D.

    1995-05-01

    VALDRIFT version 1.0 is an atmospheric transport and diffusion model for use in well-defined mountain valleys. It is designed to determine the extent of ddft from aedal pesticide spraying activities, but can also be applied to estimate the transport and diffusion of various air pollutants in valleys. The model is phenomenological -- that is, the dominant meteorological processes goveming the behavior of the valley atmosphere are formulated explicitly in the model, albeit in a highly parameterized fashion. The key meteorological processes treated are: (1) nonsteady and nonhomogeneous along-valley winds and turbulent diffusivities, (2) convective boundary layer growth, (3) inversion descent, (4) noctumal temperature inversion breakup, and (5) subsidence. The model is applicable under relatively cloud-free, undisturbed synoptic conditions and is configured to operate through one diumal cycle for a single valley. The inputs required are the valley topographical characteristics, pesticide release rate as a function of time and space, along-valley wind speed as a function of time and space, temperature inversion characteristics at sunrise, and sensible heat flux as a function of time following sunrise. Default values are provided for certain inputs in the absence of detailed observations. The outputs are three-dimensional air concentration and ground-level deposition fields as a function of time.

  10. A 3-D Vortex Code for Parachute Flow Predictions: VIPAR Version 1.0

    SciTech Connect

    STRICKLAND, JAMES H.; HOMICZ, GREGORY F.; PORTER, VICKI L.; GOSSLER, ALBERT A.

    2002-07-01

    This report describes a 3-D fluid mechanics code for predicting flow past bluff bodies whose surfaces can be assumed to be made up of shell elements that are simply connected. Version 1.0 of the VIPAR code (Vortex Inflation PARachute code) is described herein. This version contains several first order algorithms that we are in the process of replacing with higher order ones. These enhancements will appear in the next version of VIPAR. The present code contains a motion generator that can be used to produce a large class of rigid body motions. The present code has also been fully coupled to a structural dynamics code in which the geometry undergoes large time dependent deformations. Initial surface geometry is generated from triangular shell elements using a code such as Patran and is written into an ExodusII database file for subsequent input into VIPAR. Surface and wake variable information is output into two ExodusII files that can be post processed and viewed using software such as EnSight{trademark}.

  11. Early Solar System hydrothermal activity in chondritic asteroids on 1-10-year timescales.

    PubMed

    Dyl, Kathryn A; Bischoff, Addi; Ziegler, Karen; Young, Edward D; Wimmer, Karl; Bland, Phil A

    2012-11-01

    Chondritic meteorites are considered the most primitive remnants of planetesimals from the early Solar System. As undifferentiated objects, they also display widespread evidence of water-rock interaction on the parent body. Understanding this history has implications for the formation of planetary bodies, the delivery of water to the inner Solar System, and the formation of prebiotic molecules. The timescales of water-rock reactions in these early objects, however, are largely unknown. Here, we report evidence for short-lived water-rock reactions in the highly metamorphosed ordinary chondrite breccia Villalbeto de la Peña (L6). An exotic clast (d = 2cm) has coexisting variations in feldspar composition and oxygen isotope ratios that can only result from hydrothermal conditions. The profiles were modeled at T = 800 °C and P(H(2)O) = 1 bar using modified grain-boundary diffusion parameters for oxygen self-diffusion and reaction rates of NaSiCa(-1)Al(-1) exchange in a fumarole. The geochemical data are consistent with hydrothermal activity on the parent body lasting only 1-10 y. This result has wide-ranging implications for the geological history of chondritic asteroids.

  12. Ditching Investigation of a 1/10-Scale Model of the North American F-86 Airplane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fisher, Lloyd J.; McBride, Ellis E.

    1954-01-01

    An investigation was made of a 1/10-scale dynamically similar model of the North American F-86 airplane to study its behavior when ditched. The model was landed in calm water at the Langley tank no. 2 monorail. Various landing attitudes, speeds, and conditions of damage were simulated. The behavior of the model was determined from visual observations, acceleration records, and motion-picture records of the ditchings. Data are presented in tabular form, sequence photographs, and time-history acceleration curves. From the results of the investigation it was concluded that the airplane should be ditched at the nose-high, 14 deg attitude to avoid the violent dive which occurs at the 4 deg attitude. The flaps and leading-edge slats should be fully extended to obtain the lowest possible landing speed. The wing tanks should be jettisoned to avoid the undesirable behavior which occurs with the tanks attached. In a calm-water ditching under these conditions the airplane will run smoothly for about 600 feet. Maximum longitudinal and vertical decelerations of about 3g will be encountered.

  13. Geometric engineering, mirror symmetry and 6{d}_{(1,0)}to 4{d}_{(N=2)}

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Del Zotto, Michele; Vafa, Cumrun; Xie, Dan

    2015-11-01

    We study compactification of 6 dimensional (1,0) theories on T 2. We use geometric engineering of these theories via F-theory and employ mirror symmetry technology to solve for the effective 4d N=2 geometry for a large number of the (1 ,0) theories including those associated with conformal matter. Using this we show that for a given 6d theory we can obtain many inequivalent 4d N=2 SCFTs. Some of these respect the global symmetries of the 6d theory while others exhibit SL(2 , ℤ) duality symmetry inherited from global diffeomorphisms of the T 2. This construction also explains the 6d origin of moduli space of 4d affine ADE quiver theories as flat ADE connections on T 2. Among the resulting 4 d N=2 CFTs we find theories whose vacuum geometry is captured by an LG theory (as opposed to a curve or a local CY geometry). We obtain arbitrary genus curves of class S with punctures from toroidal compactification of (1 , 0) SCFTs where the curve of the class S theory emerges through mirror symmetry. We also show that toroidal compactification of the little string version of these theories can lead to class S theories with no punctures on arbitrary genus Riemann surface.

  14. GBL-2D Version 1.0: a 2D geometry boolean library.

    SciTech Connect

    McBride, Cory L. (Elemental Technologies, American Fort, UT); Schmidt, Rodney Cannon; Yarberry, Victor R.; Meyers, Ray J.

    2006-11-01

    This report describes version 1.0 of GBL-2D, a geometric Boolean library for 2D objects. The library is written in C++ and consists of a set of classes and routines. The classes primarily represent geometric data and relationships. Classes are provided for 2D points, lines, arcs, edge uses, loops, surfaces and mask sets. The routines contain algorithms for geometric Boolean operations and utility functions. Routines are provided that incorporate the Boolean operations: Union(OR), XOR, Intersection and Difference. A variety of additional analytical geometry routines and routines for importing and exporting the data in various file formats are also provided. The GBL-2D library was originally developed as a geometric modeling engine for use with a separate software tool, called SummitView [1], that manipulates the 2D mask sets created by designers of Micro-Electro-Mechanical Systems (MEMS). However, many other practical applications for this type of software can be envisioned because the need to perform 2D Boolean operations can arise in many contexts.

  15. Size distribution of radon decay products in the range 0.1-10 nm.

    PubMed

    Zhukovsky, Michael; Rogozina, Marina; Suponkina, Anna

    2014-07-01

    Information about the size distribution of radioactive aerosols in nanometre range is essential for the purposes of air contamination monitoring, dose assessment to respiratory tract and planning of protective measures. The diffusion battery, which allows capturing particles in the size range of 0.1-10 nm, has developed. Interpreting data obtained from diffusion battery is very complex. The method of expectation maximisation by Maher and Laird was chosen for indirect inversion data. The experiments were performed in the box with equivalent equilibrium concentration of radon in the range of 7000-10,000 Bq m(-3). The three modes of size distribution of radon decay products aerosols were obtained: activity median thermodynamic diameter (AMTD) 0.3, 1.5 and 5 nm. These modes can be identified as: AMTD 0.3 nm--atoms of radon progeny (218Po in general); AMTD 1.5 nm--clusters of radon progeny atoms and non-radioactive atoms in the atmosphere; AMTD 5 nm--particles formed by coagulation of previous mode clusters with existing aerosol particles or nucleation of condensation nuclei containing atoms of radon progeny.

  16. FPLUME-1.0: An integrated volcanic plume model accounting for ash aggregation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Folch, A.; Costa, A.; Macedonio, G.

    2015-09-01

    Eruption Source Parameters (ESP) characterizing volcanic eruption plumes are crucial inputs for atmospheric tephra dispersal models, used for hazard assessment and risk mitigation. We present FPLUME-1.0, a steady-state 1-D cross-section averaged eruption column model based on the Buoyant Plume Theory (BPT). The model accounts for plume bent over by wind, entrainment of ambient moisture, effects of water phase changes, particle fallout and re-entrainment, a new parameterization for the air entrainment coefficients and a model for wet aggregation of ash particles in presence of liquid water or ice. In the occurrence of wet aggregation, the model predicts an "effective" grain size distribution depleted in fines with respect to that erupted at the vent. Given a wind profile, the model can be used to determine the column height from the eruption mass flow rate or vice-versa. The ultimate goal is to improve ash cloud dispersal forecasts by better constraining the ESP (column height, eruption rate and vertical distribution of mass) and the "effective" particle grain size distribution resulting from eventual wet aggregation within the plume. As test cases we apply the model to the eruptive phase-B of the 4 April 1982 El Chichón volcano eruption (México) and the 6 May 2010 Eyjafjallajökull eruption phase (Iceland).

  17. Operation of a 1/10 scale mixed water incinerator air pollution control system

    SciTech Connect

    Burns, D.B.; Wong, A.; Walker, W.

    1996-08-01

    The Consolidated Incineration Facility (CIF) at the Savannah River Site is designed to treat solid and liquid RCRA hazardous and mixed wastes generated by site operations and clean-up activities. The technologies selected for use in the CIF air pollution control system (APCS) were based on reviews of existing commercial and DOE incinerators, on-site air pollution control experience, and recommendations from contracted consultants. In order to study the CIF APCS prior to operation, a 1/10 scale pilot facility, known as the Offgas Components Test Facility (OCTF) was constructed and has been in operation since late 1994. Its current mission is to demonstrate the design integrity of the CIF APCS and optimize equipment/instrument performance of the full scale production facility. Due to the nature of the wastes to be incinerated at the CIF, High Efficiency Particulate Air (HEPA) filters are used to remove hazardous and radioactive particulates from the exhaust gas stream before being released into the atmosphere. The HEPA filter change-out frequency has been a potential issue and was the first technical issue to be studied at the OCTF. Tests were conducted to evaluate the performance of HEPA filters under different operating conditions. These tests included evaluating the impact on HEPA life of scrubber operating parameters and the type of HEPA prefilter used. This pilot-scale testing demonstrated satisfactory HEPA filter life when using cleanable metal prefilters and high flows of steam and water in the offgas scrubber.

  18. Assembly of three novel metal (II) complexes based on polycarboxylate and 1,10-phenanthroline ligands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Xiaoli; Qiao, Yali; Gao, Loujun; Cui, Huali; Zhang, Meili; Lv, Junfang

    2013-04-01

    With the principles of crystal engineering, three novel metal(II) complexes, [Cu2(betd)(phen)4].15H2O (1), [Cd4(betd)2(phen)8]ṡ28H2O (2) and {[Co2(betd)(phen)2(H2O)2]·2H2O}n (3) (H4betd = bicyclo[2.2.2]oct-7-ene-2,3,5,6-tetracarboxylic acid, phen = 1,10-phenanthroline) were synthesized and structurally characterized by elemental analyses, IR spectroscopy, single-crystal X-ray diffraction analyses, TGA, powder XRD and fluorescent measurements. Complex 1 is a binuclear structure, novel water tapes are observed to be encapsulated in the 3D open supramolecular architecture by hydrogen bond interactions. In 2, two pairs of CdII ions joined with two (betd)4- ions to form a cyclic tetranuclear structure. The neighboring tetranuclear units are linked into 2D network through π⋯π stacking interactions. Interestingly, the lattice H2O molecules are joined by strong hydrogen bond interactions generating a wavy water layer, which contacts the 2D network to form 3D supramolecular structure. 3 shows a 2D (4, 4) grid network, which are assembled in an ABAB sequence to 3D supramolecular structures via π⋯π stacking interactions between two central phen ligands from two adjacent sheets and hydrogen bond interactions.

  19. Safety assessment comparison methodology for toxic and radioactive wastes (SACO version 1.0)

    SciTech Connect

    Torres, C.; Simon, I.; Agueero, A.; Little, R.H.; Smith, G.M.

    1993-12-31

    As part of a research contract jointly funded by the Commission of the European Communities (CEC) and Empresa Nacional de Residuos Radiactivos S.A. (Enresa, Spain), the Instituto de Medioambiente of the CIEMAT Research Centre and Intera (UK) are developing and testing a general methodology (SACO) to assess the post-disposal environmental impact produced by waste disposal practices. The scope of the methodology includes toxic, radioactive and mixed hazardous wastes. The term toxic is interpreted broadly to include any kind of liquid or solid non-radioactive waste which could give rise to some detrimental environmental effects post-disposal. Radioactive wastes considered include the full range from low to high level solid wastes arising inside and outside the nuclear power industry. Mixed hazardous waste is taken to be waste presenting both radioactive and other toxic hazard potential. In this paper SACO version 1.0 methodology is presented and it is applied to the assessment of the impact of shallow and deep disposal of waste.

  20. CaveMan Enterprise version 1.0 Software Validation and Verification.

    SciTech Connect

    Hart, David

    2014-10-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy Strategic Petroleum Reserve stores crude oil in caverns solution-mined in salt domes along the Gulf Coast of Louisiana and Texas. The CaveMan software program has been used since the late 1990s as one tool to analyze pressure mea- surements monitored at each cavern. The purpose of this monitoring is to catch potential cavern integrity issues as soon as possible. The CaveMan software was written in Microsoft Visual Basic, and embedded in a Microsoft Excel workbook; this method of running the CaveMan software is no longer sustainable. As such, a new version called CaveMan Enter- prise has been developed. CaveMan Enterprise version 1.0 does not have any changes to the CaveMan numerical models. CaveMan Enterprise represents, instead, a change from desktop-managed work- books to an enterprise framework, moving data management into coordinated databases and porting the numerical modeling codes into the Python programming language. This document provides a report of the code validation and verification testing.

  1. Photon-counting 1.0 GHz-phase-modulation fluorometer

    SciTech Connect

    Mizuno, T.; Nakao, S.; Mizutani, Y.; Iwata, T.

    2015-04-15

    We have constructed an improved version of a photon-counting phase-modulation fluorometer (PC-PMF) with a maximum modulation frequency of 1.0 GHz, where a phase domain measurement is conducted with a time-correlated single-photon-counting electronics. While the basic concept of the PC-PMF has been reported previously by one of the authors, little attention has been paid to its significance, other than its weak fluorescence measurement capability. Recently, we have recognized the importance of the PC-PMF and its potential for fluorescence lifetime measurements. One important aspect of the PC-PMF is that it enables us to perform high-speed measurements that exceed the frequency bandwidths of the photomultiplier tubes that are commonly used as fluorescence detectors. We describe the advantages of the PC-PMF and demonstrate its usefulness based on fundamental performance tests. In our new version of the PC-PMF, we have used a laser diode (LD) as an excitation light source rather than the light-emitting diode that was used in the primary version. We have also designed a simple and stable LD driver to modulate the device. Additionally, we have obtained a sinusoidal histogram waveform that has multiple cycles within a time span to be measured, which is indispensable for precise phase measurements. With focus on the fluorescence intensity and the resolution time, we have compared the performance of the PC-PMF with that of a conventional PMF using the analogue light detection method.

  2. spads 1.0: a toolbox to perform spatial analyses on DNA sequence data sets.

    PubMed

    Dellicour, Simon; Mardulyn, Patrick

    2014-05-01

    SPADS 1.0 (for 'Spatial and Population Analysis of DNA Sequences') is a population genetic toolbox for characterizing genetic variability within and among populations from DNA sequences. In view of the drastic increase in genetic information available through sequencing methods, spads was specifically designed to deal with multilocus data sets of DNA sequences. It computes several summary statistics from populations or groups of populations, performs input file conversions for other population genetic programs and implements locus-by-locus and multilocus versions of two clustering algorithms to study the genetic structure of populations. The toolbox also includes two MATLAB and r functions, GDISPAL and GDIVPAL, to display differentiation and diversity patterns across landscapes. These functions aim to generate interpolating surfaces based on multilocus distance and diversity indices. In the case of multiple loci, such surfaces can represent a useful alternative to multiple pie charts maps traditionally used in phylogeography to represent the spatial distribution of genetic diversity. These coloured surfaces can also be used to compare different data sets or different diversity and/or distance measures estimated on the same data set.

  3. Motivation and Design of the Sirocco Storage System Version 1.0.

    SciTech Connect

    Curry, Matthew Leon; Ward, H. Lee; Danielson, Geoffrey Charles

    2015-07-01

    Sirocco is a massively parallel, high performance storage system for the exascale era. It emphasizes client-to-client coordination, low server-side coupling, and free data movement to improve resilience and performance. Its architecture is inspired by peer-to-peer and victim- cache architectures. By leveraging these ideas, Sirocco natively supports several media types, including RAM, flash, disk, and archival storage, with automatic migration between levels. Sirocco also includes storage interfaces and support that are more advanced than typical block storage. Sirocco enables clients to efficiently use key-value storage or block-based storage with the same interface. It also provides several levels of transactional data updates within a single storage command, including full ACID-compliant updates. This transaction support extends to updating several objects within a single transaction. Further support is provided for con- currency control, enabling greater performance for workloads while providing safe concurrent modification. By pioneering these and other technologies and techniques in the storage system, Sirocco is poised to fulfill a need for a massively scalable, write-optimized storage system for exascale systems. This is version 1.0 of a document reflecting the current and planned state of Sirocco. Further versions of this document will be accessible at http://www.cs.sandia.gov/Scalable_IO/ sirocco .

  4. 28 MHz swept source at 1.0 μm for ultrafast quantitative phase imaging.

    PubMed

    Wei, Xiaoming; Lau, Andy K S; Xu, Yiqing; Tsia, Kevin K; Wong, Kenneth K Y

    2015-10-01

    Emerging high-throughput optical imaging modalities, in particular those providing phase information, necessitate a demanding speed regime (e.g. megahertz sweep rate) for those conventional swept sources; while an effective solution is yet to be demonstrated. We demonstrate a stable breathing laser as inertia-free swept source (BLISS) operating at a wavelength sweep rate of 28 MHz, particularly for the ultrafast interferometric imaging modality at 1.0 μm. Leveraging a tunable dispersion compensation element inside the laser cavity, the wavelength sweep range of BLISS can be tuned from ~10 nm to ~63 nm. It exhibits a good intensity stability, which is quantified by the ratio of standard deviation to the mean of the pulse intensity, i.e. 1.6%. Its excellent wavelength repeatability, <0.05% per sweep, enables the single-shot imaging at an ultrafast line-scan rate without averaging. To showcase its potential applications, it is applied to the ultrafast (28-MHz line-scan rate) interferometric time-stretch (iTS) microscope to provide quantitative morphological information on a biological specimen at a lateral resolution of 1.2 μm. This fiber-based inertia-free swept source is demonstrated to be robust and broadband, and can be applied to other established imaging modalities, such as optical coherence tomography (OCT), of which an axial resolution better than 12 μm can be achieved. PMID:26504636

  5. Aerobic oxidation of primary alcohols catalyzed by copper complexes of 1,10-phenanthroline-derived ligands.

    PubMed

    Das, Oindrila; Paine, Tapan Kanti

    2012-10-01

    Five copper complexes [(L(1))(2)Cu(H(2)O)](ClO(4))(2) (1), [(L(1))Cu(H(2)O)(3)](ClO(4))(2) (1a), [(L(3))(2)Cu(H(2)O)](ClO(4))(2) (2), [(L(5))(2)Cu(H(2)O)](ClO(4))(2) (3) and [(L(6))(2)Cu](ClO(4)) (4) (where L(1) = 1,10-phenanthroline, L(3) = 1,10-phenanthroline-5,6-dione, L(5) = 1,10-phenanthrolinefuroxan and L(6) = 2,9-dimethyl-1,10-phenanthrolinefuroxan), and in situ prepared copper complexes of 2,9-dimethyl-1,10-phenanthroline (L(2)) or 2,9-dimethyl-1,10-phenanthrolinedione (L(4)) were used for aerial oxidation of primary alcohols to the corresponding aldehydes under ambient conditions. The copper catalysts have been found to catalyze a series of primary alcohols including one secondary alcohol with moderate turnover numbers and selectivity towards primary alcohols. Copper(II) complexes 1 (or 1a) and 2 were found to be the better catalysts among all other systems explored in this study. A copper(II)-superoxo species is implicated to initiate the oxidation reaction. Structural and electronic factors of 1,10-phenanthroline-based ligands affecting the catalytic results for aerial oxidation of alcohols are discussed.

  6. Evolution and magnetic topology of the M 1.0 flare of October 22, 2002

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berlicki, A.; Schmieder, B.; Vilmer, N.; Aulanier, G.; Del Zanna, G.

    2004-09-01

    In this paper we analyse an M 1.0 confined flare observed mainly during its gradual phase. We use the data taken during a coordinated observational campaign between ground based instruments (THEMIS and VTT) and space observatories (SoHO/CDS and MDI, TRACE and RHESSI). We use these multi-wavelength observations to study the morphology and evolution of the flare, to analyse its gradual phase and to understand the role of various heating mechanisms. During the flare, RHESSI observed emission only within the 3-25 keV spectral range. The RHESSI spectra indicate that the emission of the flare was mainly of thermal origin with a small non-thermal component observed between 10 and 20 keV. Nevertheless, the energy contained in the non-thermal electrons is negligible compared to the thermal energy of the flaring plasma. The temperature of plasma obtained from the fitting of the RHESSI X-ray spectra was between 8.5 and 14 MK. The lower temperature limit is typical for a plasma contained in post flare loops observed in X-rays. Higher temperatures were observed during a secondary peak of emission corresponding to a small impulsive event. The SoHO/CDS observations performed in EUV Fe XIX line also confirm the presence of a hot plasma at temperatures similar to those obtained from RHESSI spectra. The EUV structures were located at the same place as RHESSI X-ray emission. The magnetic topology analysis of the AR coming from a linear force-free field extrapolation explains the observed features of the gradual phase of the flare i.e. the asymmetry of the ribbons and their fast propagation. The combination of the multi-wavelength observations with the magnetic model further suggests that the onset of the flare would be due to the reconnection of an emerging flux in a sheared magnetic configuration.

  7. Moreton and EUV Waves Associated with an X1.0 Flare and CME Ejection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Francile, Carlos; López, Fernando M.; Cremades, Hebe; Mandrini, Cristina H.; Luoni, María Luisa; Long, David M.

    2016-09-01

    A Moreton wave was detected in active region (AR) 12017 on 29 March 2014 with very high cadence with the H-Alpha Solar Telescope for Argentina (HASTA) in association with an X1.0 flare (SOL2014-03-29T17:48). Several other phenomena took place in connection with this event, such as low-coronal waves and a coronal mass ejection (CME). We analyze the association between the Moreton wave and the EUV signatures observed with the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly onboard the Solar Dynamics Observatory. These include their low-coronal surface-imprint, and the signatures of the full wave and shock dome propagating outward in the corona. We also study their relation to the white-light CME. We perform a kinematic analysis by tracking the wavefronts in several directions. This analysis reveals a high-directional dependence of accelerations and speeds determined from data at various wavelengths. We speculate that a region of open magnetic field lines northward of our defined radiant point sets favorable conditions for the propagation of a coronal magnetohydrodynamic shock in this direction. The hypothesis that the Moreton wavefront is produced by a coronal shock-wave that pushes the chromosphere downward is supported by the high compression ratio in that region. Furthermore, we propose a 3D geometrical model to explain the observed wavefronts as the chromospheric and low-coronal traces of an expanding and outward-traveling bubble intersecting the Sun. The results of the model are in agreement with the coronal shock-wave being generated by a 3D piston that expands at the speed of the associated rising filament. The piston is attributed to the fast ejection of the filament-CME ensemble, which is also consistent with the good match between the speed profiles of the low-coronal and white-light shock waves.

  8. Photon-counting 1.0 GHz-phase-modulation fluorometer.

    PubMed

    Mizuno, T; Nakao, S; Mizutani, Y; Iwata, T

    2015-04-01

    We have constructed an improved version of a photon-counting phase-modulation fluorometer (PC-PMF) with a maximum modulation frequency of 1.0 GHz, where a phase domain measurement is conducted with a time-correlated single-photon-counting electronics. While the basic concept of the PC-PMF has been reported previously by one of the authors, little attention has been paid to its significance, other than its weak fluorescence measurement capability. Recently, we have recognized the importance of the PC-PMF and its potential for fluorescence lifetime measurements. One important aspect of the PC-PMF is that it enables us to perform high-speed measurements that exceed the frequency bandwidths of the photomultiplier tubes that are commonly used as fluorescence detectors. We describe the advantages of the PC-PMF and demonstrate its usefulness based on fundamental performance tests. In our new version of the PC-PMF, we have used a laser diode (LD) as an excitation light source rather than the light-emitting diode that was used in the primary version. We have also designed a simple and stable LD driver to modulate the device. Additionally, we have obtained a sinusoidal histogram waveform that has multiple cycles within a time span to be measured, which is indispensable for precise phase measurements. With focus on the fluorescence intensity and the resolution time, we have compared the performance of the PC-PMF with that of a conventional PMF using the analogue light detection method. PMID:25933844

  9. Application of the MASH v1.0 Code System to radiological warfare radiation threats

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, J.O.; Santoro, R.T.; Smith, M.S.

    1994-03-01

    Nuclear hardening capabilities of US and foreign ground force systems is a primary concern of the Department of Defense (DoD) and US Army. The Monte Carlo Adjoint Shielding Code System -- MASH v1.0 was developed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) to analyze these capabilities, i.e. the shielding effectiveness, for prompt radiation from a nuclear weapon detonation. Rapidly changing world events and the proliferation of nuclear weapons related technology have increased the kinds of nuclear threats to include intentionally dispersed radiation sources and fallout from tactical nuclear weapons used in the modern AirLand battlefield scenario. Consequently, a DoD area of increasing interest focuses on determining the shielding effectiveness of foreign and US armored vehicles to radiological warfare and fallout radiation threats. To demonstrate the applicability of MASH for analyzing dispersed radiation source problems, calculations have been completed for two distributed sources; a dispersed radiation environment simulated by a uniformly distributed {sup 60}Co source, and a {sup 235}U fission weapon fallout source. Fluence and dose assessments were performed for the free-field, the inside of a steel-walled two-meter box, in a phantom standing in the free-field, and in a phantom standing in the two-meter box. The results indicate substantial radiation protection factors for the {sup 60}Co dispersed radiation source and the fallout source compared to the prompt radiation protection factors. The dose protection factors ranged from 40 to 95 for the two-meter box and from 55 to 123 for the mid-gut position of the phantom standing in the box. The results further indicate that a {sup 60}Co source might be a good first order approximation for a tactical fission weapon fallout protection factor analysis.

  10. 1,10-Phenanthrolines with tunable luminescence upon protonation: a spectroscopic and computational study.

    PubMed

    Listorti, Andrea; Esposti, Alessandra Degli; Kishore, Ravuri S K; Kalsani, Venkateshwarlu; Schmittel, Michael; Armaroli, Nicola

    2007-08-16

    We have synthesized nine 2,9-aryl-substituted 1,10-phenanthrolines (1-9) with the aim of rationalizing their electronic absorption and luminescence properties in both the basic and acid form. The latter are generated upon addition of trifluoroacetic acid to CH2Cl2 solutions of 1-9 and their formation is unambiguously evidenced by UV-vis absorption and 1H NMR spectroscopy. 1-9 can be subdivided into three groups, depending on their chemical structure and luminescence behavior. 1-3 are symmetrically substituted p-dianisylphenanthrolines which exhibit relatively intense violet fluorescence in CH2Cl2 (lambda(max) ca. 400 nm, Phi(fl) = 0.12-0.33) and are strongly quenched and substantially red-shifted upon protonation (lambda(max) ca. 550 nm, Phi(fl) = 0.010-0.045). 4-5 are 2,6-dimethoxyphenylphenanthrolines with faint luminescence in both the basic and acid form. 6-9 are various unsymmetric aryl-substituted-phenanthrolines and their relatively strong fluorescence (lambda(max) ca. 400 nm, Phi(fl) = 0.08-0.24) is red-shifted and substantially enhanced following protonation (lambda(max) ca. 475 nm, Phi(fl) = 0.16-0.50). The markedly different trends in the electronic absorption and fluorescence spectra are rationalized by means of both time-dependent Hartree-Fock and density functional theory by using hybrid functionals to assign the excited states. Interestingly, protonation of 1-9 also occurs in spin-coated films simply exposed to vapors of acid, and the reaction can be signaled by the color tuning of the emission signal (vapoluminescence). This observation makes substituted phenanthrolines potential candidates as proton sensors also in the solid phase. PMID:17645318

  11. The structure of CO2 hydrate between 0.7 and 1.0 GPa

    DOE PAGES

    Tulk, Chris A.; Machida, Shinichi; Klug, Dennis D.; Lu, H.; Guthrie, Malcolm; Molaison, Jamie J.

    2014-11-05

    A deuterated sample of CO2 structure I (sI) clathrate hydrate (CO2 ∙ 8.3 D2O) has been formed and neutron diffraction experiments up to 1.0 GPa at 240 K were performed. The sI CO2 hydrate transformed at 0.7 GPa into the high pressure phase that had been observed previously by Hirai, et al. (J. Phys. Chem. 133, 124511 (2010)) and O. Bollengier et al. (Geochim. Cosmochim. AC. 119, 322 (2013)), but which had not been structurally identified. The current neutron diffraction data were successfully fitted to a filled ice structure with CO2 molecules filling the water channels. This CO2+water system hasmore » also been investigated using classical molecular dynamics and density functional ab initio methods to provide additional characterization of the high pressure structure. Both models indicate the water network adapts an MH-III ‘like’ filled ice structure with considerable disorder of the orientations of the CO2molecule. Furthermore, the disorder appears be a direct result of the level of proton disorder in the water network. In contrast to the conclusions of Bollengier et al. our neutron diffraction data shows that the filled ice phase can be recovered to ambient pressure (0.1 MPa) at 96 K, and recrystallization to sI hydrate occurs upon subsequent heating to 150 K, possibly by first forming low density amorphous ice. Unlike other clathrate hydrate systems, which transform from the sI or sII structure to the hexagonal structure (sH) then to the filled ice structure, CO2 hydrate transforms directly from the sI form to the filled ice structure.« less

  12. FPLUME-1.0: An integral volcanic plume model accounting for ash aggregation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Folch, A.; Costa, A.; Macedonio, G.

    2016-02-01

    Eruption source parameters (ESP) characterizing volcanic eruption plumes are crucial inputs for atmospheric tephra dispersal models, used for hazard assessment and risk mitigation. We present FPLUME-1.0, a steady-state 1-D (one-dimensional) cross-section-averaged eruption column model based on the buoyant plume theory (BPT). The model accounts for plume bending by wind, entrainment of ambient moisture, effects of water phase changes, particle fallout and re-entrainment, a new parameterization for the air entrainment coefficients and a model for wet aggregation of ash particles in the presence of liquid water or ice. In the occurrence of wet aggregation, the model predicts an effective grain size distribution depleted in fines with respect to that erupted at the vent. Given a wind profile, the model can be used to determine the column height from the eruption mass flow rate or vice versa. The ultimate goal is to improve ash cloud dispersal forecasts by better constraining the ESP (column height, eruption rate and vertical distribution of mass) and the effective particle grain size distribution resulting from eventual wet aggregation within the plume. As test cases we apply the model to the eruptive phase-B of the 4 April 1982 El Chichón volcano eruption (México) and the 6 May 2010 Eyjafjallajökull eruption phase (Iceland). The modular structure of the code facilitates the implementation in the future code versions of more quantitative ash aggregation parameterization as further observations and experiment data will be available for better constraining ash aggregation processes.

  13. The 1.0 Megaparsec Galaxy Pair Sample in Low-Density Regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nordgren, Tyler E.; Chengalur, Jayaram N.; Salpeter, E. E.; Terzian, Yervant

    2000-11-01

    Using complete redshift catalogs, we have compiled a list of galaxy pairs based solely on a pair's projected separation, rp, and velocity difference, ΔV. We have made high-velocity precision H I observations of each galaxy in the sample and have reported these in the literature. Due to the nature of the redshift catalogs, we are able to quantitatively evaluate the effects of isolation and number density of surrounding galaxies on each pair in the sample. For the close galaxy pairs (rp<100 kpc), the degree of isolation (a measure of the number of near neighbors) has little effect on the median ΔV. This median is about 55 km s-1 for the 25 close pairs (if medium-density close pairs are omitted ΔV is even smaller, but the difference is not statistically significant). The effect of isolation is strong for the entire sample of galaxy pairs with separations as large as 1.0 Mpc. For these larger separation pairs, relaxation of strict isolation requirements introduces small groups into the sample, which dramatically increases the median ΔV. We find little evidence of an increase in the median ΔV with decreasing rp, nor with increasing total luminosity. For our isolated pairs in low-density regions, the overall median ΔV is only 30 km s-1. For similar separations and isolation criteria, galaxy satellites with larger luminosity ratios (i.e., less dynamical friction) in higher density regions have ΔV approximately twice as large. We conjecture that our orbits are highly eccentric, so that the indirect effect of dynamical friction leads to predominantly small ΔV. However, the halos of our galaxies may also be of low density (although highly extended).

  14. (12)CO (3-2) & (1-0) emission line observations of nearby starburst galaxy nuclei

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Devereux, Nicholas; Taniguchi, Yoshiaki; Sanders, D. B.; Nakai, N.; Young, J. S.

    1994-01-01

    New measurements of the (12)CO (1-0) and (12)CO (3-2) line emission are presented for the nuclei of seven nearby starburst galaxies selected from a complete sample of 21 nearby starburst galaxies for which the nuclear star formation rates are measured to be comparable to the archetype starburst galaxies M82 and NGC 253. The new observations capitalize on the coincidence between the beam size of the 45 m Nobeyama telescope at 115 GHz and that of the 15 m James Clerk Maxwell Telescope at 345 GHz to measure the value of the (12)CO (3-2)/(1-0) emission line ratio in a 15 sec (less than or equal to 2.5 kpc) diameter region centered on the nuclear starburst. In principle, the (12)CO (3-2)/(1-0) emission line ratio provides a measure of temperature and optical depth for the (12)CO gas. The error weighted mean value of the (12)CO (3-2)/(1-0) emission line ratio measured for the seven starburst galaxy nuclei is -0.64 +/- 0.06. The (12)CO (3-2)/(1-0) emission line ratio measured for the starburst galaxy nuclei is significantly higher than the average value measured for molecular gas in the disk of the Galaxy, implying warmer temperatures for the molecular gas in starburst galaxy nuclei. On the other hand, the (12)CO (3-2)/(1-0) emission line ratio measured for the starburst galaxy nuclei is not as high as would be expected if the molecular gas were hot, greater than 20 K, and optically thin, tau much less than 1. The total mass of molecular gas contained within the central 1.2-2.8 kpc diameter region of the starburst galaxy nuclei ranges from 10(exp 8) to 10(exp 9) solar mass. While substantial, the molecular gas mass represents only a small percentage, approximately 9%-16%, of the dynamical mass in the same region.

  15. FPLUME-1.0: An integral volcanic plume model accounting for ash aggregation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Folch, Arnau; Costa, Antonio; Macedonio, Giovanni

    2016-04-01

    Eruption Source Parameters (ESP) characterizing volcanic eruption plumes are crucial inputs for atmospheric tephra dispersal models, used for hazard assessment and risk mitigation. We present FPLUME-1.0, a steady-state 1D cross-section averaged eruption column model based on the Buoyant Plume Theory (BPT). The model accounts for plume bending by wind, entrainment of ambient moisture, effects of water phase changes, particle fallout and re-entrainment, a new parameterization for the air entrainment coefficients and a model for wet aggregation of ash particles in presence of liquid water or ice. In the occurrence of wet aggregation, the model predicts an "effective" grain size distribution depleted in fines with respect to that erupted at the vent. Given a wind profile, the model can be used to determine the column height from the eruption mass flow rate or vice-versa. The ultimate goal is to improve ash cloud dispersal forecasts by better constraining the ESP (column height, eruption rate and vertical distribution of mass) and the "effective" particle grain size distribution resulting from eventual wet aggregation within the plume. As test cases we apply the model to the eruptive phase-B of the 4 April 1982 El Chichón volcano eruption (México) and the 6 May 2010 Eyjafjallajökull eruption phase (Iceland). The modular structure of the code facilitates the implementation in the future code versions of more quantitative ash aggregation parameterization as further observations and experiments data will be available for better constraining ash aggregation processes.

  16. Spin assignments of 22Mg states through a 24Mg(p,t)22Mg measurement

    SciTech Connect

    Chae, K. Y.; Jones, K. L.; Moazen, Brian; Pittman, S. T.; Bardayan, Daniel W; Blackmon, Jeff C; Liang, J Felix; Smith, Michael Scott; Chipps, K.; Hatarik, Robert; O'Malley, Patrick; Pain, Steven D; Kozub, R. L.; Matei, Catalin; Nesaraja, Caroline D

    2009-01-01

    The {sup 18}Ne({alpha},p){sup 21}Na reaction plays a crucial role in the ({alpha},p) process, which leads to the rapid proton capture process in X-ray bursts. The reaction rate depends upon properties of {sup 22}Mg levels above the {alpha} threshold at 8.14 MeV. Despite recent studies of these levels, only the excitation energies are known for most with no constraints on the spins. We have studied the {sup 24}Mg(p,t){sup 22}Mg reaction at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Holifield Radioactive Ion Beam Facility (HRIBF), and by measuring the angular distributions of outgoing tritons, we provide the first experimental constraints on the spins of astrophysically-important {sup 18}Ne({alpha},p){sup 21}Na resonances.

  17. The characteristics of PM1.0 for aircraft measurement case study using ToF-AMS for pre-campaign KORUS-AQ

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soo, C. J.

    2015-12-01

    Jinsoo Choi, Jinsoo Park, Joonyoung Ahn, Sangdeok Lee, Hyunjae Kim, Jun Oh, Youdeog Hong, Jihyung Hong, TaeHyeng Lee1Air Quality Division, National Institute of Environmental Research, Korea1Department of Environmental Science, Hankuk University of Foreign Studies, KoreaFor the Pre-KORUS-AQ Campaign during the period from May 18 to June 13 2015, aircraft observations were conducted: four times over the Yellow Sea and three times above Seoul Metropolitan Area (SMA). Aerosol (PM1.0) chemical composition and particles size distribution from 50 to 1000 nm were measured and analyzed using ToF-AMS installed the airplane (Kingair-C90GT, USA) in semi-real time. Concentrations of CO and the number of particles were measured as well. To analyze the aerosol's spatial and vertical characteristics, 5 flight paths were designed and the main paths were a cross over above SMA and spatial and vertical profile paths over the Yellow Sea. The flight distance varied from 600 to 900km and the velocity was kept at around 200 to 250 km/hr. On June 13 2015, the sky in SMA was densely fogged and the PM concentrations were relatively higher than usual. As for concentrations of main fine particles, Sulfate was 6.1 mg/m3, Organic 20.7 mg/m3, Ammonium 2.9 mg/m3 and Nitrate 2.9 mg/m3. Group of organic components consisted of 38.3% CxHy, 30.4% CxHyO1, 27.4% CxHyO2, 2.9% CxHyNp and 1.0% CxHyOzNp, and the proportion of oxidation group was 57.9%. As for CxHyO1 and CxHyO2 groups that are generated from decomposition process of oxidized organic compounds and closely related to SOA, the concentrations were 1.5 times higher than CxHy group's that is related with POA; it is considered that the high concentration on the 13th was highly affected by SOA. In the morning of the same day, aircraft measurements were conducted at the altitude between 600 and 2,700m above the Yellow Sea level, which revealed measurements of Sulfate 4.8 mg/m3, Organic 35.8 mg/m3, Ammonium 3.0 mg/m3 and Nitrate 3.7 mg/m3; these are

  18. TEJAS - TELEROBOTICS/EVA JOINT ANALYSIS SYSTEM VERSION 1.0

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Drews, M. L.

    1994-01-01

    The primary objective of space telerobotics as a research discipline is the augmentation and/or support of extravehicular activity (EVA) with telerobotic activity; this allows increased emplacement of on-orbit assets while providing for their "in situ" management. Development of the requisite telerobot work system requires a well-understood correspondence between EVA and telerobotics that to date has been only partially established. The Telerobotics/EVA Joint Analysis Systems (TEJAS) hypermedia information system uses object-oriented programming to bridge the gap between crew-EVA and telerobotics activities. TEJAS Version 1.0 contains twenty HyperCard stacks that use a visual, customizable interface of icon buttons, pop-up menus, and relational commands to store, link, and standardize related information about the primitives, technologies, tasks, assumptions, and open issues involved in space telerobot or crew EVA tasks. These stacks are meant to be interactive and can be used with any database system running on a Macintosh, including spreadsheets, relational databases, word-processed documents, and hypermedia utilities. The software provides a means for managing volumes of data and for communicating complex ideas, relationships, and processes inherent to task planning. The stack system contains 3MB of data and utilities to aid referencing, discussion, communication, and analysis within the EVA and telerobotics communities. The six baseline analysis stacks (EVATasks, EVAAssume, EVAIssues, TeleTasks, TeleAssume, and TeleIssues) work interactively to manage and relate basic information which you enter about the crew-EVA and telerobot tasks you wish to analyze in depth. Analysis stacks draw on information in the Reference stacks as part of a rapid point-and-click utility for building scripts of specific task primitives or for any EVA or telerobotics task. Any or all of these stacks can be completely incorporated within other hypermedia applications, or they can be referenced as is, without requiring data to be transferred into any other database. TEJAS is simple to use and requires no formal training. Some knowledge of HyperCard is helpful, but not essential. All Help cards printed in the TEJAS User's Guide are part of the TEJAS Help Stack and are available from a pop-up menu any time you are using TEJAS. Specific stacks created in TEJAS can be exchanged between groups, divisions, companies, or centers for complete communication of fundamental information that forms the basis for further analyses. TEJAS runs on any Apple Macintosh personal computer with at least one megabyte of RAM, a hard disk, and HyperCard 1.21, or later version. TEJAS is a copyrighted work with all copyright vested in NASA. HyperCard and Macintosh are registered trademarks of Apple Computer, Inc.

  19. SPLICER - A GENETIC ALGORITHM TOOL FOR SEARCH AND OPTIMIZATION, VERSION 1.0 (MACINTOSH VERSION)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, L.

    1994-01-01

    SPLICER is a genetic algorithm tool which can be used to solve search and optimization problems. Genetic algorithms are adaptive search procedures (i.e. problem solving methods) based loosely on the processes of natural selection and Darwinian "survival of the fittest." SPLICER provides the underlying framework and structure for building a genetic algorithm application. These algorithms apply genetically-inspired operators to populations of potential solutions in an iterative fashion, creating new populations while searching for an optimal or near-optimal solution to the problem at hand. SPLICER 1.0 was created using a modular architecture that includes a Genetic Algorithm Kernel, interchangeable Representation Libraries, Fitness Modules and User Interface Libraries, and well-defined interfaces between these components. The architecture supports portability, flexibility, and extensibility. SPLICER comes with all source code and several examples. For instance, a "traveling salesperson" example searches for the minimum distance through a number of cities visiting each city only once. Stand-alone SPLICER applications can be used without any programming knowledge. However, to fully utilize SPLICER within new problem domains, familiarity with C language programming is essential. SPLICER's genetic algorithm (GA) kernel was developed independent of representation (i.e. problem encoding), fitness function or user interface type. The GA kernel comprises all functions necessary for the manipulation of populations. These functions include the creation of populations and population members, the iterative population model, fitness scaling, parent selection and sampling, and the generation of population statistics. In addition, miscellaneous functions are included in the kernel (e.g., random number generators). Different problem-encoding schemes and functions are defined and stored in interchangeable representation libraries. This allows the GA kernel to be used with any representation scheme. The SPLICER tool provides representation libraries for binary strings and for permutations. These libraries contain functions for the definition, creation, and decoding of genetic strings, as well as multiple crossover and mutation operators. Furthermore, the SPLICER tool defines the appropriate interfaces to allow users to create new representation libraries. Fitness modules are the only component of the SPLICER system a user will normally need to create or alter to solve a particular problem. Fitness functions are defined and stored in interchangeable fitness modules which must be created using C language. Within a fitness module, a user can create a fitness (or scoring) function, set the initial values for various SPLICER control parameters (e.g., population size), create a function which graphically displays the best solutions as they are found, and provide descriptive information about the problem. The tool comes with several example fitness modules, while the process of developing a fitness module is fully discussed in the accompanying documentation. The user interface is event-driven and provides graphic output in windows. SPLICER is written in Think C for Apple Macintosh computers running System 6.0.3 or later and Sun series workstations running SunOS. The UNIX version is easily ported to other UNIX platforms and requires MIT's X Window System, Version 11 Revision 4 or 5, MIT's Athena Widget Set, and the Xw Widget Set. Example executables and source code are included for each machine version. The standard distribution media for the Macintosh version is a set of three 3.5 inch Macintosh format diskettes. The standard distribution medium for the UNIX version is a .25 inch streaming magnetic tape cartridge in UNIX tar format. For the UNIX version, alternate distribution media and formats are available upon request. SPLICER was developed in 1991.

  20. MOLECULAR CO(1-0) GAS IN THE z {approx} 2 RADIO GALAXY MRC 0152-209

    SciTech Connect

    Emonts, B. H. C.; Feain, I.; Mao, M. Y.; Norris, R. P.; Ekers, R. D.; Rees, G.; Stevens, J. B.; Miley, G.; Roettgering, H. J. A.; Villar-Martin, M.; Sadler, E. M.; Morganti, R.; Oosterloo, T. A.; Saikia, D. J.; Tadhunter, C. N.

    2011-06-10

    We report the detection of molecular CO(1-0) gas in the high-z radio galaxy MRC 0152-209 (z = 1.92) with the Australia Telescope Compact Array Broadband Backend (ATCA/CABB). This is the third known detection of CO(1-0) in a high-z radio galaxy to date. CO(1-0) is the most robust tracer of the overall molecular gas content (including the widespread, low-density, and sub-thermally excited component), hence observations of CO(1-0) are crucial for studying galaxy evolution in the early universe. We derive L'{sub CO} = 6.6 {+-} 2.0 x 10{sup 10} K km s{sup -1} pc{sup 2} for MRC 0152-209, which is comparable to that derived from CO(1-0) observations of several high-z submillimeter and star-forming BzK galaxies. The CO(1-0) traces a total molecular hydrogen mass of M{sub H{sub 2}} = 5 x 10{sup 10} ({alpha}{sub x}/0.8) M{sub sun}. MRC 0152-209 is an infrared bright radio galaxy, in which a large reservoir of cold molecular gas has not (yet) been depleted by star formation or radio source feedback. Its compact radio source is reliably detected at 40 GHz and has a steep spectral index of {alpha} = -1.3 between 1.4 and 40 GHz (4-115 GHz in the galaxy's rest frame). MRC 0152-209 is part of an ongoing systematic ATCA/CABB survey of CO(1-0) in high-z radio galaxies between 1.7 < z < 3.

  1. Study on interaction between a new fluorescent probe 2-methylbenzo[b][1,10]phenanthrolin-7(12H)-one and BSA.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Bin; Guo, Longhua; Chen, Mingluan; Lin, Zhenyu; Chen, Guonan

    2011-03-01

    A new fluorescence reagent, 2-methylbenzo[b][1,10]phenanthrolin-7(12H)-one (mBPO), synthesized in our laboratory was used as the probe for protein and its interaction with Bovine Serum Albumin (BSA) was investigated in detail in this paper. It was found that BSA had the ability to quench the fluorescence of mBPO at 411 nm (λ(ex) = 286 nm), and the quenched intensity of fluorescence was proportional to the concentration of BSA. Based on this fact, mBPO has been used as a fluorescence probe for the detection of BSA. Under the optimal conditions, the calibration graph is linear up to 0.5 mg L(-1) for BSA and the limit of detection (LOD) was 0.06 mg L(-1). The regression equation is y = 1048.8x + 7.2093 with R(2) = 0.9913. The mechanism for the interaction of mBPO with BSA was also studied, while the binding constant and the number of binding sites were calculated. According to the thermodynamics parameter, the binding mode between mBPO and BSA was deduced. The results suggested the interaction between mBPO and BSA to be hydrophobic force in nature. It also proved that the fluorescence quenching reaction was affected by the tryptophan residue of BSA. For there are two tryptophan (Trp) residues, in site 134 and site 212 of BSA, and mBPO maybe has interaction with them respectively.

  2. High pressure phase diagram of MgO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    French, Martin; Cebulla, Daniel; Redmer, Ronald

    2015-06-01

    In order to improve the understanding of the interior of super-Earths (planets in the range of 1-10 Earth masses) and other exoplanets, ab inito calculations for the planetary materials and the equation of state (EOS) and phase diagram of planetary materials are needed. A typical representative is MgO, which is an abundant material in the Earth's mantle and is also expected to be important for the mantle of exoplanets as well as for the rocky cores of gas giants such as Jupiter. Using ab initio molecular dynamic simulations, we have determined the phase diagram for MgO up to 20000 K and 1.5 TPa. In particular, the transition from the solid to the molten salt has been studied using diffusion analyses and pair distribution functions. The transition from the B1 to the B2 structure in solid MgO is determined by calculating the respective free enthalpies. The phase diagram of MgO is constructed based on accurate EOS data. We compare with results from (decaying) shock and ramp compression experiments and theoretical calculations for the B1-B2 and the liquid-solid transition line.

  3. 2,9-Dimethyl-1,10-phenanthroline (neocuproine): a potent, copper-dependent cytotoxin with anti-tumor activity.

    PubMed

    Mohindru, A; Fisher, J M; Rabinovitz, M

    1983-12-01

    2,9-Dimethyl-1,10-phenanthroline (2,9-DMP), a copper-specific chelator, was a potent cytotoxin against L1210 cells in vitro; its activity was dependent upon available Cu2+ in the medium. Other divalent ions, Fe2+ and Zn2+, were ineffective as promoters of growth inhibition. As the copper chelate, a 4 microM solution produced a 4 log kill after a 1-hr incubation. This was in marked contrast to 1,10-phenanthroline, whose inhibition of cell growth was overcome by added Cu2+, Fe2+ and Zn2+. Cellular uptake of labeled 2,9-dimethyl-1,10-phenanthroline also required added Cu2+ in the medium. This transport was energy dependent, and the drug was concentrated over 200-fold by the cells. In preliminary evaluations, copper-2,9-DMP showed significant chemotherapeutic activity against the P388 murine lymphoma in vivo.

  4. The Arabidopsis Mg Transporter, MRS2-4, is Essential for Mg Homeostasis Under Both Low and High Mg Conditions.

    PubMed

    Oda, Koshiro; Kamiya, Takehiro; Shikanai, Yusuke; Shigenobu, Shuji; Yamaguchi, Katsushi; Fujiwara, Toru

    2016-04-01

    Magnesium (Mg) is an essential macronutrient, functioning as both a cofactor of many enzymes and as a component of Chl. Mg is abundant in plants; however, further investigation of the Mg transporters involved in Mg uptake and distribution is needed. Here, we isolated an Arabidopsis thaliana mutant sensitive to high calcium (Ca) conditions without Mg supplementation. The causal gene of the mutant encodes MRS2-4, an Mg transporter.MRS2-4 single mutants exhibited growth defects under low Mg conditions, whereas an MRS2-4 and MRS2-7 double mutant exhibited growth defects even under normal Mg concentrations. Under normal Mg conditions, the Mg concentration of the MRS2-4 mutant was lower than that of the wild type. The transcriptome profiles of mrs2-4-1 mutants under normal conditions were similar to those of wild-type plants grown under low Mg conditions. In addition, both mrs2-4 and mrs2-7 mutants were sensitive to high levels of Mg. These results indicate that both MRS2-4 and MRS2-7 are essential for Mg homeostasis, even under normal and high Mg conditions. MRS2-4-green fluorescent protein (GFP) was mainly detected in the endoplasmic reticulum. These results indicate that these two MRS2 transporter genes are essential for the ability to adapt to a wide range of environmental Mg concentrations. PMID:26748081

  5. A national FFQ for the Netherlands (the FFQ-NL 1.0): validation of a comprehensive FFQ for adults.

    PubMed

    Sluik, Diewertje; Geelen, Anouk; de Vries, Jeanne H M; Eussen, Simone J P M; Brants, Henny A M; Meijboom, Saskia; van Dongen, Martien C J M; Bueno-de-Mesquita, H Bas; Wijckmans-Duysens, Nicole E G; van 't Veer, Pieter; Dagnelie, Pieter C; Ocké, Marga C; Feskens, Edith J M

    2016-09-01

    A standardised, national, 160-item FFQ, the FFQ-NL 1.0, was recently developed for Dutch epidemiological studies. The objective was to validate the FFQ-NL 1.0 against multiple 24-h recalls (24hR) and recovery and concentration biomarkers. The FFQ-NL 1.0 was filled out by 383 participants (25-69 years) from the Nutrition Questionnaires plus study. For each participant, one to two urinary and blood samples and one to five (mean 2·7) telephone-based 24hR were available. Group-level bias, correlation coefficients, attenuation factors, de-attenuated correlation coefficients and ranking agreement were assessed. Compared with the 24hR, the FFQ-NL 1.0 estimated the intake of energy and macronutrients well. However, it underestimated intakes of SFA and trans-fatty acids and alcohol and overestimated intakes of most vitamins by >5 %. The median correlation coefficient was 0·39 for energy and macronutrients, 0·30 for micronutrients and 0·30 for food groups. The FFQ underestimated protein intake by an average of 16 % and K by 5 %, relative to their urinary recovery biomarkers. Attenuation factors were 0·44 and 0·46 for protein and K, respectively. Correlation coefficients were 0·43-0·47 between (fatty) fish intake and plasma EPA and DHA and 0·24-0·43 between fruit and vegetable intakes and plasma carotenoids. In conclusion, the overall validity of the newly developed FFQ-NL 1.0 was acceptable to good. The FFQ-NL 1.0 is well suited for future use within Dutch cohort studies among adults. PMID:27452894

  6. Solwnd: A 3D Compressible MHD Code for Solar Wind Studies. Version 1.0: Cartesian Coordinates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deane, Anil E.

    1996-01-01

    Solwnd 1.0 is a three-dimensional compressible MHD code written in Fortran for studying the solar wind. Time-dependent boundary conditions are available. The computational algorithm is based on Flux Corrected Transport and the code is based on the existing code of Zalesak and Spicer. The flow considered is that of shear flow with incoming flow that perturbs this base flow. Several test cases corresponding to pressure balanced magnetic structures with velocity shear flow and various inflows including Alfven waves are presented. Version 1.0 of solwnd considers a rectangular Cartesian geometry. Future versions of solwnd will consider a spherical geometry. Some discussions of this issue is presented.

  7. Phase transformation of Mg-Fe alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Yoneda, Yasuhiro; Abe, Hiroshi; Ohshima, Takeshi; Uchida, Hirohisa

    2010-05-15

    An Mg-Fe alloy system prepared through mechanical alloying (MA) was structurally analyzed. MA can produce single-phase bcc alloys using Mg concentrations up to about 15 mol %. Use of conventional average structure analysis and x-ray pair-distribution function method enabled the long-range and short-range order structures of the Mg-Fe alloys to be bridged. The substituted Mg atoms were randomly arranged in the low-Mg composition but started to have an order structure. The partially ordered Mg-Fe alloy undergoes an austenitic (cubic) to martensitic (orthorhombic) phase change, as increasing Mg composition.

  8. 76 FR 23630 - Office of New Reactors; Proposed Revision 2 to Standard Review Plan, Section 1.0 on Introduction...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-04-27

    ...), Section 1.0, ``Introduction and Interfaces'' (Agencywide Documents Access and Management System (ADAMS... as shown in the description of changes. This update also incorporates into the guidance previously issued Interim Staff Guidance on Post-Combined License Commitments (ESP/DC/COL-ISG-015, see...

  9. 1?10 kW Stationary Combined Heat and Power Systems Status and Technical Potential: Independent Review

    SciTech Connect

    Maru, H. C.; Singhal, S. C.; Stone, C.; Wheeler, D.

    2010-11-01

    This independent review examines the status and technical potential of 1-10 kW stationary combined heat and power fuel cell systems and analyzes the achievability of the DOE cost, efficiency, and durability targets for 2012, 2015, and 2020.

  10. VizieR Online Data Catalog: J=1-0 transitions of argonium (ArH+) (Bizzocchi+,

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bizzocchi, L.; Dore, L.; Degli Esposti, C.; Tamassia, F.

    2016-06-01

    The J=1-0 pure rotational transition of the argonium ion was observed in absorption with a frequency-modulated millimeter-wave spectrometer equipped with a negative glow discharge cell. See section 2 for the experimental details. (1 data file).

  11. 76 FR 77025 - Office of New Reactors; Notice of Availability of the Final Staff Guidance Section 1.0, Revision...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-09

    ... Review of Safety Analysis Reports for Nuclear Power Plants: LWR Edition,'' Section 1.0, Revision 2 on... Advanced Reactors and Rulemaking, Office of New Reactors, U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Washington... Nuclear Regulatory Commission. Amy E. Cubbage, Chief, Policy Branch, Division of Advanced Reactors...

  12. Time-motion analysis of basketball players: a reliability assessment of Video Manual Motion Tracker 1.0 software.

    PubMed

    Hulka, Karel; Cuberek, Roman; Svoboda, Zdenek

    2014-01-01

    This study assessed the measurement error of a monitoring system, the Video Manual Motion Tracker 1.0 (VMMT1.0), during time-motion analysis of basketball players. In this study, four reliability parameters were used to assess the measurement error of the system: the systematic bias, the inter-observer reliability, the intra-observer reliability and the absolute reliability. A basketball game video was used for the analysis. To assess the inter-observer reliability, two observers analysed a player's covered distance for 50 different periods of the game. To assess the relative and absolute reliability of the covered distance, the chosen players were monitored three times by 41 qualified observers. The findings did not indicate a significant systematic bias in the measurement error using the VMMT1.0 (one-way ANOVA, P > 0.05). The intra-observer reliability of the monitoring system was rated as very high (intraclass correlation, ICC = 0.999), similar to its inter-observer reliability (Pearson product-moment correlation, r = 0.994). The absolute reliability does not appear to be significant (standard error of measurement, SEM = 0.34 m). The results showed that the measurement error of the VMMT1.0 is acceptable and comparable with that of other time-motion analysis techniques.

  13. Study of Different Al/Mg Powders in Hydroreactive Fuel Propellant Used for Water Ramjet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Hai-Tao; Zou, Mei-Shuai; Guo, Xiao-Yan; Yang, Rong-Jie; Li, Yun-Kai; Jiang, En-Zhou; Li, Zhong-Shan

    2014-05-01

    Experiments were conducted to study the effect of magnesium-aluminum alloy on the combustion performance of hydroreactive fuel propellants. The raw metal powders added to the propellants were ball-milled magnesium-50% aluminum alloy (m-AM), magnesium-50% aluminum alloy (AM), and Al and magnesium (Mg) powders, which were characterized using scanning electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction (XRD), and simultaneous thermogravimetric analysis (TGA). A high-pressure combustor and a metal/steam reactor were used to simulate the two-stage combustion of hydroreactive propellants used for a water ramjet. The combustion performance of the metal powders in propellant was studied experimentally, and the efficiency of the Al reaction in the propellants during the two-stage combustion was calculated. TGA traces in air indicated that the oxidation onset temperature of AM powders is much lower than for both Mg and Al powders. The XRD patterns for the AM and m-AM alloys exhibited Al12Mg17 diffraction peaks. The hydroreactive fuel propellant systems with added m-AM powder exhibited good performance in terms of burning rate, combustion heat, and the Al reaction efficiency, which was better than that for the propellants containing AM, Mg, and Al powders. At the pressure studied (3.0 MPa), the burning rate of the m-AM-containing propellant was found to be 15 mm s-1, and the heat of primary combustion was 6,878.1 kJ kg-1.

  14. Predicting microRNA modulation in human prostate cancer using a simple String IDentifier (SID1.0).

    PubMed

    Albertini, Maria C; Olivieri, Fabiola; Lazzarini, Raffaella; Pilolli, Francesca; Galli, Francesco; Spada, Giorgio; Accorsi, Augusto; Rippo, Maria R; Procopio, Antonio D

    2011-08-01

    To make faster and efficient the identification of mRNA targets common to more than one miRNA, and to identify new miRNAs modulated in specific pathways, a computer program identified as SID1.0 (simple String IDentifier) was developed and successfully applied in the identification of deregulated miRNAs in prostate cancer cells. This computationally inexpensive Fortran program is based on the strategy of exhaustive search and specifically designed to screen shared data (target genes, miRNAs and pathways) available from PicTar and DIANA-MicroT 3.0 databases. As far as we know this is the first software designed to filter data retrieved from available miRNA databases. SID1.0 takes advantage of the standard Fortran intrinsic functions for manipulating text strings and requires ASCII input files. In order to demonstrate SID1.0 applicability, some miRNAs expected from the literature to associate with cancerogenesis (miR-125b, miR-148a and miR-141), were randomly identified as main entries for SID1.0 to explore matching sequences of mRNA targets and also to explore KEGG pathways for the presence of ID codes of targeted genes. Besides genes and pathways already described in the literature, SID1.0 has proven to useful for predicting other genes involved in prostate carcinoma. These latter were used to identify new deregulated miRNAs: miR-141, miR-148a, miR-19a and miR-19b. Prediction data were preliminary confirmed by expression analysis of the identified miRNAs in androgen-dependent (LNCaP) and independent (PC3) prostate carcinoma cell lines and in normal prostatic epithelial cells (PrEC). PMID:21334455

  15. CO J = 1-0 SPECTROSCOPY OF FOUR SUBMILLIMETER GALAXIES WITH THE ZPECTROMETER ON THE GREEN BANK TELESCOPE

    SciTech Connect

    Harris, A. I.; Zonak, S. G.; Rauch, K.; Baker, A. J.; Sharon, C. E.; Genzel, R.; Watts, G.; Creager, R. E-mail: szonak@astro.umd.ed E-mail: ajbaker@physics.rutgers.ed E-mail: genzel@mpe.mpg.d E-mail: rcreager@nrao.ed

    2010-11-10

    We report detections of three z {approx} 2.5 submillimeter-selected galaxies (SMGs; SMM J14011+0252, SMM J14009+0252, SMM J04431+0210) in the lowest rotational transition of the carbon monoxide molecule (CO J = 1-0) and one nondetection (SMM J04433+0210). For the three galaxies we detected, we find a line-integrated brightness temperature ratio of the J = 3-2 and 1-0 lines of 0.68 {+-} 0.08; the 1-0 line is stronger than predicted by the frequent assumption of equal brightnesses in the two lines and by most single-component models. The observed ratio suggests that mass estimates for SMGs based on J = 3-2 observations and J = 1-0 column density or mass conversion factors are low by a factor of 1.5. Comparison of the 1-0 line intensities with intensities of higher-J transitions indicates that single-component models for the interstellar media in SMGs are incomplete. The small dispersion in the ratio, along with published detections of CO lines with J{sub upper}>3 in most of the sources, indicates that the emission is from multi-component interstellar media with physical structures common to many classes of galaxies. This result tends to rule out the lowest scaling factors between CO luminosity and molecular gas mass, and further increases molecular mass estimates calibrated against observations of galaxies in the local universe. We also describe and demonstrate a statistically sound method for finding weak lines in broadband spectra that will find application in searches for molecular lines from sources at unknown redshifts.

  16. First-principles study of Mg(0001)/MgO(1-11) interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Hong-Quan; Zhao, Ming; Li, Jian-Guo

    2016-06-01

    By means of first-principles density-functional calculations, we studied the surface energy of a nonstoichiometric MgO(1-11) slab, the interfacial energy and interfacial bonding characteristics of Mg-terminated and O-terminated Mg/MgO(1-11) interfaces with three stacking-site (TOP, HCP and FCC sites) models, and the effect of the thickness of Mg films on the O-terminated MgO(1-11) surface. The results indicate that the surface energies of the nonstoichiometric MgO(1-11) slab and interfacial energies of Mg/Mg(1-11) interface depend on Mg chemical potential. We found that the Mg-terminated MgO(1-11) surface is more stable than the O-terminated MgO(1-11) surface at high Mg chemical potential, and Mg/MgO(1-11) with FCC stacking-site model is the most stable configuration in the Mg/MgO(1-11) interfaces. The results of the electronic structure reveals that the interfacial bonding of Mg-terminated interface with FCC site model mainly consists of metallic bond and of the O-terminated interface with FCC site model is mainly ionic with a small degree of σ-type covalent bond. Although the interfacial energy of Mg-terminated Mg/MgO interface with FCC stacking-site model is slightly higher than that of O-terminated Mg/MgO interface, the molten Mg would epitaxially grow on the FCC sites of the Mg-terminated MgO(1-11) surface because of the high evaporation pressure of Mg at high temperature.

  17. Mg2+ is an essential activator of hydrolytic activity of membrane-bound pyrophosphatase of Rhodospirillum rubrum.

    PubMed Central

    Sosa, A; Ordaz, H; Romero, I; Celis, H

    1992-01-01

    The substrate for the hydrolytic activity of membrane-bound pyrophosphatase is the PP(i)-Mg2+ complex. The enzyme has no activity when the free Mg2+ concentration is lower than 10 microM (at 0.5 mM-PP(i)-Mg2+), and therefore free Mg2+ is an essential activator of the hydrolytic activity. The Km for the substrate changes in response to variation in free Mg2+ concentration, from 10.25 to 0.6 mM when free Mg2+ is increased from 0.03 to 1.0 mM respectively. The Km for Mg2+ depends on the substrate concentration: the Km decreases from 0.52 to 0.14 mM from 0.25 to 0.75 mM-PP(i)-Mg2+ respectively. The extrapolated Km for Mg2+ in the absence of the substrate is 0.73 mM. Imidodiphosphate-Mg2+ and free Ca2+ were used as competitive inhibitors of substrate and activator respectively. The equilibrium binding kinetics suggest an ordered mechanism for the activator and the substrate: Mg2+ ions bind the enzyme before PP(i)-Mg2+ in the formation of the catalytic complex, membrane-bound pyrophosphatase-(Mg2+)-(PP(i)-Mg2+). PMID:1315519

  18. Highly (100) oriented MgO growth on thin Mg layer in MTJ structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jimbo, K.; Nakagawa, S.

    2011-01-01

    In order to apply Stress Assisted Magnetization Reversal (SAMR) method to perpendicular magnetoresistive random access memory (p-MRAM) with magnetic tunnel junction (MTJ) using MgO (001) oriented barrier layer, multilayer of Ta/ Terfenol-D/ Mg/ MgO and Ta/ Terfenol-D/ MgO were prepared. While the MgO layer, deposited directly on the Terfenol-D layer, did not show (100) orientatin, very thin metallic Mg layer, deposited prior to the MgO deposition, was effective to attain MgO (100) orientation. The crystalline orientation was very weak without Mg, however, the multilayer with Mg showed very strong MgO(100) peak and the MgO orientation was shifted depending on the Mg thickness.

  19. Comparison of T{sub z} = +-1->0 GT Transitions Studied in beta--decay and CE Reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Molina, F.; Rubio, B.; Fujita, Y.; Gelletly, W.

    2010-04-26

    Gamow-Teller (GT) transitions can be studied in both beta- decay and charge exchange(CE) reactions. If isospin is a good quantum number, then the T{sub z} = -1->0 and T{sub z} = +1->0 GT mirror transitions, are identical. Therefore, a comparison of the results from studies of beta decay and CE should shed light on this assumption. Accordingly we have studied the beta decay of the T{sub z} = -1 fp-shell nuclei, {sup 54}Ni, {sup 50}Fe, {sup 46}Cr, and {sup 42}Ti, produced in fragmentation and we have compared our results with the spectra from (3He, t) measurements on the mirror T{sub z} = +1 target nuclei studied in high resolution at RCNP, Osaka. The experiments were performed as part of the STOPPED beam RISING campaign at GSI.

  20. Corrosion Inhibition of Mild Steel in 1.0 M HCl by Amino Compound: Electrochemical and DFT Studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Musa, Ahmed Y.; Mohamad, Abu Bakar; Kadhum, Abdul Amir H.; Takriff, Mohd Sobri

    2012-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the inhibitory effect of 4-amino-5-methyl-4H-1, 2, 4-triazole-3-thiol (AMTT) on the corrosion of mild steel in 1.0 M HCl solution using weight loss, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS), and potentiodynamic polarization. The results indicate that AMTT performed as a good mixed-type inhibitor for mild steel corrosion in a 1.0 M HCl solution, and the inhibition efficiencies increased and tend to saturate with inhibitor concentration. Potentiodynamic polarization results showed that AMTT is a mixed-type inhibitor. Adsorption of AMTT molecules is a spontaneous process, and its adsorption behavior obeys Langmuir's adsorption isotherm model. The reactivity of AMTT was analyzed through theoretical calculations based on density functional theory. Results showed that the reactive sites were located on the nitrogen and sulfur (N1, N2, and S) atoms.

  1. Corrosion Inhibition of Mild Steel in 1.0 M HCl by Amino Compound: Electrochemical and DFT Studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Musa, Ahmed Y.; Mohamad, Abu Bakar; Kadhum, Abdul Amir H.; Takriff, Mohd Sobri

    2012-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the inhibitory effect of 4-amino-5-methyl-4H-1, 2, 4-triazole-3-thiol (AMTT) on the corrosion of mild steel in 1.0 M HCl solution using weight loss, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS), and potentiodynamic polarization. The results indicate that AMTT performed as a good mixed-type inhibitor for mild steel corrosion in a 1.0 M HCl solution, and the inhibition efficiencies increased and tend to saturate with inhibitor concentration. Potentiodynamic polarization results showed that AMTT is a mixed-type inhibitor. Adsorption of AMTT molecules is a spontaneous process, and its adsorption behavior obeys Langmuir's adsorption isotherm model. The reactivity of AMTT was analyzed through theoretical calculations based on density functional theory. Results showed that the reactive sites were located on the nitrogen and sulfur (N1, N2, and S) atoms.

  2. Chemiluminescence determination of chlorpheniramine using tris(1,10-phenanthroline)-ruthenium(II) peroxydisulphate system and sequential injection analysis.

    PubMed

    Suliman, Fakhr Eldin O; Al-Hinai, Mohammed M; Al-Kindy, Salma M Z; Salama, Salama B

    2009-01-01

    A sequential injection (SI) method was developed for the determination of chlorpheniramine (CPA), based on the reaction of this drug with tris(1,10-phenanthroline)-ruthenium(II) [Ru(phen)(3)(2+)] and peroxydisulphate (S(2)O(8)(2-)) in the presence of light. The instrumental set-up utilized a syringe pump and a multiposition valve to aspirate the reagents [Ru(phen)(3)(2+) and S(2)O(8)(2-)] and a peristaltic pump to propel the sample. The experimental conditions affecting the chemiluminescence reaction were systematically optimized, using the univariate approach. Under the optimum conditions linear calibration curves of 0.1-10 microg/ml were obtained. The detection limit was 0.04 microg/ml and the relative standard deviation (RSD) was always < 5%. The procedure was applied to the analysis of CPA in pharmaceutical products and was found to be free from interferences from concomitants usually present in these preparations.

  3. DCPT v1.0 - New particle tracker for modeling transport in dual-continuum - User's Manual

    SciTech Connect

    Pan, Lehua; Liu, Hui Hai; Cushey, Mark; Bodvarsson, Gudmundur

    2001-04-01

    DCPT (Dual-Continuum Particle Tracker) V1.0 is a new software for simulating solute transport in the subsurface. It is based on the random-walk method for modeling transport processes such as advection, dispersion/diffusion, linear sorption, radioactive decay, and fracture-matrix mass exchange (in fractured porous media). The user shall provide flow-field and other parameters in the form of input files. In Comparison to several analytical and numerical solutions for a number of test cases, DCPT shows excellent performance in both accuracy and efficiency. This report serves as a user's manual of DCPT V1.0. It includes theoretical basis, numerical methods, software structure, input/output description, and examples.

  4. The implementation of NEMS GFS Aerosol Component (NGAC) Version 1.0 for global dust forecasting at NOAA/NCEP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Cheng-Hsuan; da Silva, Arlindo; Wang, Jun; Moorthi, Shrinivas; Chin, Mian; Colarco, Peter; Tang, Youhua; Bhattacharjee, Partha S.; Chen, Shen-Po; Chuang, Hui-Ya; Juang, Hann-Ming Henry; McQueen, Jeffery; Iredell, Mark

    2016-05-01

    The NOAA National Centers for Environmental Prediction (NCEP) implemented the NOAA Environmental Modeling System (NEMS) Global Forecast System (GFS) Aerosol Component (NGAC) for global dust forecasting in collaboration with NASA Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC). NGAC Version 1.0 has been providing 5-day dust forecasts at 1° × 1° resolution on a global scale, once per day at 00:00 Coordinated Universal Time (UTC), since September 2012. This is the first global system capable of interactive atmosphere aerosol forecasting at NCEP. The implementation of NGAC V1.0 reflects an effective and efficient transitioning of NASA research advances to NCEP operations, paving the way for NCEP to provide global aerosol products serving a wide range of stakeholders, as well as to allow the effects of aerosols on weather forecasts and climate prediction to be considered.

  5. Effect of Yttrium on the Fracture Strength of the Sn-1.0Ag-0.5Cu Solder Joints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Hyelim; Kaplan, Wayne D.; Choe, Heeman

    2016-07-01

    This is a preliminary investigation on the mechanical properties of Pb-free Sn-1.0Ag-0.5Cu solder joints containing 0.02 wt.% to 0.1 wt.% Y under a range of thermal aging and reflow conditions. Despite the significantly thicker intermetallic compound (IMC) formed at the solder joint, the 0.1 wt.% Y-doped joint exhibited a higher fracture strength than its baseline Sn-1.0Ag-0.5Cu counterpart under most aging and reflow conditions. This may be associated with the formation of Y-Cu IMCs formed at the interface between the solder and the Cu substrate, because the Y-Cu IMCs have recently been referred to as relatively `ductile' IMCs.

  6. Structural and electronic properties of an ordered grain boundary formed by separated (1,0) dislocations in graphene.

    PubMed

    Ma, Chuanxu; Sun, Haifeng; Du, Hongjian; Wang, Jufeng; Zhao, Aidi; Li, Qunxiang; Wang, Bing; Hou, J G

    2015-02-21

    We present an investigation of the structural and electronic properties of an ordered grain boundary (GB) formed by separated pentagon-heptagon pairs in single-layer graphene/SiO2 using scanning tunneling microscopy/spectroscopy (STM/STS), coupled with density functional theory (DFT) calculations. It is observed that the pentagon-heptagon pairs, i.e., (1,0) dislocations, form a periodic quasi-one-dimensional chain. The (1,0) dislocations are separated by 8 transverse rows of carbon rings, with a period of ∼2.1 nm. The protruded feature of each dislocation shown in the STM images reflects its out-of-plane buckling structure, which is supported by the DFT simulations. The STS spectra recorded along the small-angle GB show obvious differential-conductance peaks, the positions of which qualitatively accord with the van Hove singularities from the DFT calculations. PMID:25603956

  7. Fabrication and superconducting properties of internal Mg diffusion processed MgB2 wires using MgB4 precursors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Da; Wang, Dongliang; Yao, Chao; Zhang, Xianping; Ma, Yanwei; Oguro, Hidetoshi; Awaji, Satoshi; Watanabe, Kazuo

    2016-10-01

    Monofilament MgB2/Nb/Monel wires were fabricated using three different MgB4 precursors by an internal Mg diffusion (IMD) process. The wire geometry and heat-treatment conditions were optimized in order to improve the critical current density (J c) of the MgB2 wire. The influences of the quality of MgB4 powders, such as the particle size and MgO impurity, on the microstructure and superconducting properties of the wires were discussed. Although there were small amounts of voids, unreacted MgB4 particles and MgO impurity existed in the superconducting layers, and the transport layer J c of the wire with the MgB4 precursor reached 3.0 × 104 A cm-2 at 4.2 K and 10 T, which was comparable to that of IMD-processed wires fabricated using boron precursors. Both the non-barrier J c and engineering J c of MgB2 wire made using a MgB4 precursor were enhanced due to the improved grain connectivity and the enlarged fill factor.

  8. Differential expression of secretory aspartyl proteinase genes (SAP1-10) in oral Candida albicans isolates with distinct karyotypes.

    PubMed

    Tavanti, Arianna; Pardini, Giacomo; Campa, Daniele; Davini, Paola; Lupetti, Antonella; Senesi, Sonia

    2004-10-01

    Two karyotypes of oral Candida albicans isolates, named b and c, constituted >80% of a collection from healthy carriers (22 b and 16 c isolates) and oral candidiasis patients who were either infected (31 b and 16 c isolates) or uninfected (13 b and 38 c isolates) with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). The prevalence of the b and c karyotypes within HIV-positive and HIV-negative patients, respectively, who were suffering from oral candidiasis (P < or = 0.0001) suggested that these two types possessed different virulence potentials. Since C. albicans proteinases (Saps) are virulence factors in oral candidiasis, we evaluated whether the b and c karyotypes secreted different levels of Saps and expressed different patterns of Sap-encoding genes (SAP1-10). We found that the mean value of Sap activity was significantly lower (P = 0.003) in the commensal type than in the infectious b karyotype, whereas Sap activity in the commensal c type was as high as that registered for the infectious c strains. Marked differences in SAP mRNA expression were observed in commensal strains under non-Sap-inducing conditions, with all SAP genes being expressed only by strains with the c karyotype; interestingly, none of the commensal b strains expressed SAP2. In addition, while all of the SAP1-10 genes were detectable under Sap-inducing conditions, the timing of their expression during growth differed significantly, with mRNAs of SAP1-10 genes detected at 8 and 24 h postinoculation in c and b commensal strains, respectively. This provides the first evidence that commensal oral C. albicans isolates with distinct karyotypes are characterized by different patterns of SAP1-10 gene expression and different levels of Sap secretion.

  9. PS1-10bzj: A Fast, Hydrogen-poor Superluminous Supernova in a Metal-poor Host Galaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lunnan, R.; Chornock, R.; Berger, E.; Milisavljevic, D.; Drout, M.; Sanders, N. E.; Challis, P. M.; Czekala, I.; Foley, R. J.; Fong, W.; Huber, M. E.; Kirshner, R. P.; Leibler, C.; Marion, G. H.; McCrum, M.; Narayan, G.; Rest, A.; Roth, K. C.; Scolnic, D.; Smartt, S. J.; Smith, K.; Soderberg, A. M.; Stubbs, C. W.; Tonry, J. L.; Burgett, W. S.; Chambers, K. C.; Kudritzki, R.-P.; Magnier, E. A.; Price, P. A.

    2013-07-01

    We present observations and analysis of PS1-10bzj, a superluminous supernova (SLSN) discovered in the Pan-STARRS Medium Deep Survey at a redshift z = 0.650. Spectroscopically, PS1-10bzj is similar to the hydrogen-poor SLSNe 2005ap and SCP 06F6, though with a steeper rise and lower peak luminosity (M bol ~= -21.4 mag) than previous events. We construct a bolometric light curve, and show that while PS1-10bzj's energetics were less extreme than previous events, its luminosity still cannot be explained by radioactive nickel decay alone. We explore both a magnetar spin-down and circumstellar interaction scenario and find that either can fit the data. PS1-10bzj is located in the Extended Chandra Deep Field South and the host galaxy is imaged in a number of surveys, including with the Hubble Space Telescope. The host is a compact dwarf galaxy (MB ≈ -18 mag, diameter <~ 800 pc), with a low stellar mass (M * ≈ 2.4 × 107 M ⊙), young stellar population (τ* ≈ 5 Myr), and a star formation rate of ~2-3 M ⊙ yr-1. The specific star formation rate is the highest seen in an SLSN host so far (~100 Gyr-1). We detect the [O III] λ4363 line, and find a low metallicity: 12 + (O/H) = 7.8 ± 0.2 (sime 0.1 Z ⊙). Together, this indicates that at least some of the progenitors of SLSNe come from young, low-metallicity populations.

  10. PS1-10bzj: A FAST, HYDROGEN-POOR SUPERLUMINOUS SUPERNOVA IN A METAL-POOR HOST GALAXY

    SciTech Connect

    Lunnan, R.; Chornock, R.; Berger, E.; Milisavljevic, D.; Drout, M.; Sanders, N. E.; Challis, P. M.; Czekala, I.; Foley, R. J.; Fong, W.; Kirshner, R. P.; Leibler, C.; Marion, G. H.; Narayan, G.; Huber, M. E.; McCrum, M.; Smartt, S. J.; Rest, A.; Roth, K. C.; Scolnic, D.; and others

    2013-07-10

    We present observations and analysis of PS1-10bzj, a superluminous supernova (SLSN) discovered in the Pan-STARRS Medium Deep Survey at a redshift z = 0.650. Spectroscopically, PS1-10bzj is similar to the hydrogen-poor SLSNe 2005ap and SCP 06F6, though with a steeper rise and lower peak luminosity (M{sub bol} {approx_equal} -21.4 mag) than previous events. We construct a bolometric light curve, and show that while PS1-10bzj's energetics were less extreme than previous events, its luminosity still cannot be explained by radioactive nickel decay alone. We explore both a magnetar spin-down and circumstellar interaction scenario and find that either can fit the data. PS1-10bzj is located in the Extended Chandra Deep Field South and the host galaxy is imaged in a number of surveys, including with the Hubble Space Telescope. The host is a compact dwarf galaxy (M{sub B} Almost-Equal-To -18 mag, diameter {approx}< 800 pc), with a low stellar mass (M{sub *} Almost-Equal-To 2.4 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 7} M{sub Sun }), young stellar population ({tau}{sub *} Almost-Equal-To 5 Myr), and a star formation rate of {approx}2-3 M{sub Sun} yr{sup -1}. The specific star formation rate is the highest seen in an SLSN host so far ({approx}100 Gyr{sup -1}). We detect the [O III] {lambda}4363 line, and find a low metallicity: 12 + (O/H) = 7.8 {+-} 0.2 ({approx_equal} 0.1 Z{sub Sun }). Together, this indicates that at least some of the progenitors of SLSNe come from young, low-metallicity populations.

  11. OPACOS: OVRO POST-AGB CO (1-0) EMISSION SURVEY. I. DATA AND DERIVED NEBULAR PARAMETERS

    SciTech Connect

    Sanchez Contreras, C.; Sahai, R.

    2012-11-15

    We have performed interferometric observations of the {sup 12}CO (J = 1-0) emission in a sample of 27 objects spanning different evolutionary stages from the late asymptotic giant branch (late-AGB), through the post-AGB (pAGB) phase, and to the planetary nebula (PN) stage, but dominated by pAGB objects and young PNs ({>=}81%). In this paper (the first in a series) we present our maps and main nebular properties derived for the whole sample. Observations were performed with the Caltech Millimeter Array at the Owens Valley Radio Observatory. The angular resolution obtained in our survey ranges between 2.''3 and 10.''7. The {sup 13}CO and C{sup 18}O (J = 1-0) transitions as well as the 2.6 mm continuum emission have also been observed in several objects. The detection statistics in the {sup 12}CO, {sup 13}CO, C{sup 18}O transitions and 2.6 mm continuum are 89%, 83%, 0%, and 37%, respectively. We report first detections of {sup 12}CO (J = 1-0) emission in 13 targets and confirm emission from several previous marginal detections. The molecular envelope probed by {sup 12}CO (J = 1-0) emission is extended for 18 (out of 24) sources; envelope asymmetries and/or velocity gradients are found in most extended objects. Our data have been used to derive accurate target coordinates and systemic velocities and to characterize the envelope size, morphology, and kinematics. We also provide an estimate of the total molecular mass and the fraction of it contained in fast flows, lower limits to the linear momentum and to the isotopic {sup 12}C/{sup 13}C ratio, as well as the AGB mass-loss rate and timescale for sources with extended CO emission.

  12. DENSIFYV1.0

    2000-02-02

    This code is for the prediction of microstructural evolution during solid state sintering. The mechanism simulated in this code are curvature-driven grain growth, pore migration by surface diffusion, vacancy formation, grain boundary migration of vacancies and vacancy annihilation.

  13. MAUIV1.0

    2002-04-01

    MAUI is a software system that allows design analysts to access computational services through a graphical user interface. Services that may be made accessible through MAUI could include tools for design space exploration and optimization. Additionally, existing simulation codes may be integrated into the MAUI system such that input to the simulation code would be entered through the graphical user interface, and the input data would be propagated to the simulation code on a localmore » or remote machine. MAUI automatically produces a graphical user interface from an XML description of both the graphical user interface formatting, and the input data objects required by the underlying software service. This allows for simple generation of a common look-and-feel interface to a variety of simulation and analysis software. The graphical user interface is generated from Java Swing components.« less

  14. CABRAKAN1.0

    2007-05-15

    Cabrakan is a software framework designed for cognitive modeling, machine learning, and pattern recognition. This software has a graphical user interface that can be used to visualize graphical structures and build models graphically. Cabrakan models are created using with a collection of application-specific modules, which can be reused from previous applications or designed for a particular algorithm to incorporate.

  15. CLAROV1.0

    2004-06-01

    CLARO is a highly customizable graphical user interface package built on QT and Python. It has basic functions useful for the generation, display and manipulation of geometry and mesh data. This includes picking and CAD-like graphics and rotations. The menus presented to the user can be quickly customized and modules that use CLARO dynamically loaded at runtime.

  16. SALINAS1.0

    SciTech Connect

    Reese, Garth; Bhardwaj, Manoj; Pierson, Kendall; Walsh, Tim; Day, David

    2002-10-01

    Salinas isa general purpose finite element package for structural dynamics analysis, written pecifically for distributed memory computers. It has been used for the analysis of structures ranging MEMs, to weapons components to aircraft carriers. The package provides eigenanalysis, and implicit linear and nonlinear transient and static analysis of structures, and incorporates sensitivity analysis. A full range of structural elements is provided.

  17. GOSOV1.0

    2000-08-16

    The Genetic Optimization Software Object is a 32-bit object. It is delivered as a Dynamic Link Library (DLL) and runs under all 32-bit versions of Microsoft Windows. Genetic Optimization refers to an optimization scheme used to solve large combinatorial problems using "genetic" algorithms. The DLL is a software object, which means that it must be instantiated by a host application before it's properties and methods can be used. to perform an optimization analysis, the hostmore » application must also include a user-supplied process model.« less

  18. BABELV1.0

    2001-11-26

    Babel reads binary data representing a wave-propagation signal in a drill pipe generated by the Sandia National Laboratories, Acoustic Telemetry Tool. Babel then processes that data to extract, display, and store the information modulated on that signal.

  19. CHARICE1.0

    2007-10-25

    CHARICE analyzes velcity waveform data from ramp-wave experiments to determine a sample material's quasi-isentropic loading response in stress and density. A graphical interface handles all user interaction. CHARICE uses a generalized ASCII file format for input waveform data, obviating the need for pre-processing of these data. Capabilities include calculation of uncertainty bounds, correction for non-uniform baseplate thickness, and user-provided ramp-wave loading response for interferometer window materials. Output consists of particle velocity, lagrangian wave speed, density,more » and stress along the loading quasi-isentrope, as well as in-situ time istory for any of these variables at the front or back surface of each sample.« less

  20. GBS 1.0

    SciTech Connect

    2010-09-30

    The Umbra gbs (Graph-Based Search) library provides implementations of graph-based search/planning algorithms that can be applied to legacy graph data structures. Unlike some other graph algorithm libraries, this one does not require your graph class to inherit from a specific base class. Implementations of Dijkstra's Algorithm and A-Star search are included and can be used with graphs that are lazily-constructed.

  1. Si-Ge-Sn alloys with 1.0 eV gap for CPV multijunction solar cells

    SciTech Connect

    Roucka, Radek Clark, Andrew; Landini, Barbara

    2015-09-28

    Si-Ge-Sn ternary group IV alloys offer an alternative to currently used 1.0 eV gap materials utilized in multijunction solar cells. The advantage of Si-Ge-Sn is the ability to vary both the bandgap and lattice parameter independently. We present current development in fabrication of Si-Ge-Sn alloys with gaps in the 1.0 eV range. Produced material exhibits excellent structural properties, which allow for integration with existing III-V photovoltaic cell concepts. Time dependent room temperature photoluminescence data demonstrate that these materials have long carrier lifetimes. Absorption tunable by compositional changes is observed. As a prototype device set utilizing the 1 eV Si-Ge-Sn junction, single junction Si-Ge-Sn device and triple junction device with Si-Ge-Sn subcell have been fabricated. The resulting I-V and external quantum efficiency data show that the Si-Ge-Sn junction is fully functional and the performance is comparable to other 1.0 eV gap materials currently used.

  2. FTIR analysis and evaluation of carcinogenic and mutagenic risks of nitro-polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in PM1.0.

    PubMed

    Schneider, Ismael Luís; Teixeira, Elba Calesso; Agudelo-Castañeda, Dayana Milena; Silva e Silva, Gabriel; Balzaretti, Naira; Braga, Marcel Ferreira; Oliveira, Luís Felipe Silva

    2016-01-15

    Nitro-polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (NPAHs) represent a group of organic compounds of significant interest due to their presence in airborne particulates of urban centers, wide distribution in the environment, and mutagenic and carcinogenic properties. These compounds, associated with atmospheric particles of size < 1 μm, have been reported as a major risk to human health. This study aims at identifying the spectral features of NPAHs (1-nitropyrene, 2-nitrofluorene, and 6-nitrochrysene) in emissivity and transmittance spectra of samples of particulate matter < 1 μm (PM1.0) using infrared spectrometry. Carcinogenic and mutagenic risks of the studied NPAHs associated with PM1.0 samples were also determined for two sampling sites: Canoas and Sapucaia do Sul. The results showed that NPAH standard spectra can effectively identify NPAHs in PM1.0 samples. The transmittance and emissivity sample spectra showed broader bands and lower relative intensity than the standard NPAH spectra. The carcinogenic risk and the total mutagenic risk were calculated using the toxic equivalent factors and mutagenic potency factors, respectively. Canoas showed the highest total carcinogenic risk, while Sapucaia do Sul had the highest mutagenic risk. The seasonal analysis suggested that in the study area the ambient air is more toxic during the cold periods. These findings might of significant importance for the decision and policy making authorities.

  3. Transverse momentum distribution of primary charged particles in the p-Pb interactions using HIJING 1.0

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tabassam, U.; Ali, Y.; Suleymanov, M.; Bhatti, A. S.; Butt, J. B.; Amjad, M. S.

    2016-08-01

    The shape of the transverse momentum (pT) distribution of primary charged particles in minimum bias (nonsingle-diffractive) p-Pb collisions at sNN = 5.02TeV is studied in the pseudorapidity regions: |η| < 0.3, 0.3 < η < 0.8 and 0.8 < η < 1.3 and in the transverse momentum range 0.5 < pT < 20GeV/c using simulated data produced with the HIJING 1.0 code. These are compared with the ALICE data measured by the ALICE detector at the LHC. In the model, the central and forward η-regions differ more than in the ALICE data and due to this fact HIJING 1.0 cannot describe well the high pT region in the pT distributions. The comparison of results from simulation implies that the HIJING 1.0 considered narrower pseudorapidity distribution for the charged particles than it is in the ALICE data. It cannot take into account satisfactorily leading effect due to the asymmetric p-Pb fragmentation.

  4. FTIR analysis and evaluation of carcinogenic and mutagenic risks of nitro-polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in PM1.0.

    PubMed

    Schneider, Ismael Luís; Teixeira, Elba Calesso; Agudelo-Castañeda, Dayana Milena; Silva e Silva, Gabriel; Balzaretti, Naira; Braga, Marcel Ferreira; Oliveira, Luís Felipe Silva

    2016-01-15

    Nitro-polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (NPAHs) represent a group of organic compounds of significant interest due to their presence in airborne particulates of urban centers, wide distribution in the environment, and mutagenic and carcinogenic properties. These compounds, associated with atmospheric particles of size < 1 μm, have been reported as a major risk to human health. This study aims at identifying the spectral features of NPAHs (1-nitropyrene, 2-nitrofluorene, and 6-nitrochrysene) in emissivity and transmittance spectra of samples of particulate matter < 1 μm (PM1.0) using infrared spectrometry. Carcinogenic and mutagenic risks of the studied NPAHs associated with PM1.0 samples were also determined for two sampling sites: Canoas and Sapucaia do Sul. The results showed that NPAH standard spectra can effectively identify NPAHs in PM1.0 samples. The transmittance and emissivity sample spectra showed broader bands and lower relative intensity than the standard NPAH spectra. The carcinogenic risk and the total mutagenic risk were calculated using the toxic equivalent factors and mutagenic potency factors, respectively. Canoas showed the highest total carcinogenic risk, while Sapucaia do Sul had the highest mutagenic risk. The seasonal analysis suggested that in the study area the ambient air is more toxic during the cold periods. These findings might of significant importance for the decision and policy making authorities. PMID:26473715

  5. Magnetic properties and magnetostriction of PrxNd1-xFe1.9 (0 <= x <= 1.0) alloys at low temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yong; Tang, Shao-Long; Li, Yu-Long; Xie, Ren; Du, You-Wei

    2013-03-01

    The crystal structure, magnetic and magnetostrictive properties of high-pressure synthesized PrxNd1-xFe1.9 (0 <= x <= 1.0) alloys were studied. The alloys exhibit single cubic Laves phase with MgCu2-type structure. The initial magnetization curve reveals that Pr0.2Nd0.8Fe1.9 has a minimum magnetocrystalline anisotropy at 5 K. The magnetostriction curve at 5 K shows that Pr0.2Nd0.8Fe1.9 has a very good low-field magnetostrictive property, and the magnetostriction of the PrxNd1-xFe1.9 alloy in high magnetic field is attributable mainly to Pr. The temperature dependence of the magnetostriction (λ‖) at the field of 5 kOe shows that the substitution of Nd reduces the K1 remarkably, and the values of λ‖ of Pr0.2Nd0.8Fe1.9 and Pr0.8Nd0.2Fe1.9 alloys are nearly five times larger than that of the PrFe1.9 alloy below 50 K; the λ‖ of Pr0.8Nd0.2Fe1.9 reaches up to 1082 ppm at 100 K, which makes it a potential candidate for application in this temperature range.

  6. Effect of secular variation in oceanic Mg/Ca on calcareous biomineralization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ries, J. B.; Stanley, S. M.

    2006-12-01

    The polymorph mineralogy of simple, hypercalcifying marine organisms has generally varied in synchroneity with the polymorph mineralogy of abiotic CaCO3 precipitates (ooids, marine cements) throughout the Phanerozoic Eon. This synchroneity is caused by secular variation in the Mg/Ca ratio of seawater (SW; mMg/Ca > 2 = aragonite + high-Mg calcite; mMg/Ca < 2 = calcite), determined primarily by the mixing rate of mid-ocean-ridge/large-igneous-province hydrothermal brines and river water, driven by the global rate of ocean crust production. Here, we present experiments evaluating the effect of seawater Mg/Ca on the biomineralization and growth of extant representatives of hypercalcifying taxa that have been subjected to fluctuations in oceanic Mg/Ca in the past. Codiacean algae (arag), scleractinian corals (arag), coccolithophores (low-high Mg-calc), coralline algae (high Mg-calc), various reef-dwelling animals (echinoids, crabs, shrimp, calcareous serpulid worms; high Mg- calc), and calcifying microbial mats (arag + high-Mg calc) were grown in artificial SW formulated over the range of mMg/Ca (1.0 to 5.2) that occurred throughout each taxon's history. Codiacean algae and scleractinian corals exhibited higher rates of calcification and growth in artificial SW favoring their aragonite mineralogy and, significantly, produced a portion of their CaCO3 as calcite in the artificial calcite SW. Coccolithophores (low-high Mg calc.) showed higher calcification and growth rates and produced low-Mg calcite in the calcite SW. Likewise, coralline algae and the reef-dwelling animals (high-Mg calc) varied skeletal Mg/Ca with seawater Mg/Ca. The calcifying microbial mats grew equally well in the calcite and aragonite SW and varied their mineral polymorph commensurate with the SW (mMg/Ca<2 = low- Mg calc; mMg/Ca>2 = arag + high-Mg calc), suggesting a nearly abiotic mode of calcification. The precipitation of low-Mg calcite + aragonite by codiacean algae and scleractinian corals (arag

  7. Assessment of radionuclide databases in CAP88 mainframe version 1.0 and Windows-based version 3.0.

    PubMed

    LaBone, Elizabeth D; Farfán, Eduardo B; Lee, Patricia L; Jannik, G Timothy; Donnelly, Elizabeth H; Foley, Trevor Q

    2009-09-01

    In this study the radionuclide databases for two versions of the Clean Air Act Assessment Package-1988 (CAP88) computer model were assessed in detail. CAP88 estimates radiation dose and the risk of health effects to human populations from radionuclide emissions to air. This program is used by several U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) facilities to comply with National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants regulations. CAP88 Mainframe, referred to as version 1.0 on the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Web site (http://www.epa.gov/radiation/assessment/CAP88/), was the very first CAP88 version released in 1988. Some DOE facilities including the Savannah River Site still employ this version (1.0) while others use the more user-friendly personal computer Windows-based version 3.0 released in December 2007. Version 1.0 uses the program RADRISK based on International Commission on Radiological Protection Publication 30 as its radionuclide database. Version 3.0 uses half-life, dose, and risk factor values based on Federal Guidance Report 13. Differences in these values could cause different results for the same input exposure data (same scenario), depending on which version of CAP88 is used. Consequently, the differences between the two versions are being assessed in detail at Savannah River National Laboratory. The version 1.0 and 3.0 database files contain 496 and 838 radionuclides, respectively, and though one would expect the newer version to include all the 496 radionuclides, 35 radionuclides are listed in version 1.0 that are not included in version 3.0. The majority of these has either extremely short or long half-lives or is no longer in production; however, some of the short-lived radionuclides might produce progeny of great interest at DOE sites. In addition, 122 radionuclides were found to have different half-lives in the two versions, with 21 over 3 percent different and 12 over 10 percent different.

  8. ASSESSMENT OF RADIONUCLIDES DATABASES IN CAP88 MAINFRAME VERSION 1.0 AND WINDOWS-BASED VERSION 3.0

    SciTech Connect

    Farfan, E.; Lee, P.; Jannik, T.; Donnelly, E.

    2008-09-16

    In this study the radionuclide databases for two versions of the Clean Air Act Assessment Package-1988 (CAP88) computer model were assessed in detail. CAP88 estimates radiation dose and the risk of health effects to human populations from radionuclide emissions to air. This program is used by several Department of Energy (DOE) facilities to comply with National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants (NESHAP) regulations. CAP88 Mainframe, referred to as Version 1.0 on the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) website (http://www.epa.gov/radiation/assessment/CAP88/), was the very first CAP88 version released in 1988. Some DOE facilities including the Savannah River Site still employ this version (1.0) while others use the more user-friendly personal computer Windows-based Version 3.0 released in December 2007. Version 1.0 uses the program RADRISK based on International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) Publication 30 as its radionuclide database. Version 3.0 uses half-life, dose and risk factor values based on Federal Guidance Report 13. Differences in these values could cause different results for the same input exposure data (same scenario), depending on which version of CAP88 is used. Consequently, the differences between the two versions are being assessed in detail at Savannah River National Laboratory. The version 1.0 and 3.0 database files contain 496 and 838 radionuclides, respectively, and though one would expect the newer version to include all the 496 radionuclides, thirty-five radionuclides are listed in version 1.0 that are not included in version 3.0. The majority of these has either extremely short or long half-lives or is no longer in production; however, some of the short-lived radionuclides might produce progeny of great interest at DOE sites. In addition, one hundred and twenty-two radionuclides were found to have different half-lives in the two versions, with 21 over 3 percent different and 12 over 10 percent different.

  9. EMPOWER-1.0: an Efficient Model of Planktonic ecOsystems WrittEn in R

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, T. R.; Gentleman, W. C.; Yool, A.

    2015-01-01

    Modelling marine ecosystems requires insight and judgement when it comes to deciding upon appropriate model structure, equations and parameterisation. Many processes are relatively poorly understood and tough decisions must be made as to how to mathematically simplify the real world. Here, we present an efficient plankton modelling testbed, EMPOWER-1.0, coded in the freely available language R. The testbed uses simple two-layer "slab" physics whereby a seasonally varying mixed layer which contains the planktonic marine ecosystem is positioned above a deep layer that contains only nutrient. As such, EMPOWER-1.0 provides a readily available and easy to use tool for evaluating model structure, formulations and parameterisation. The code is transparent and modular such that modifications and changes to model formulation are easily implemented allowing users to investigate and familiarise themselves with the inner workings of their models. It can be used either for preliminary model testing to set the stage for further work, e.g., coupling the ecosystem model to 1-D or 3-D physics, or for undertaking front line research in its own right. EMPOWER-1.0 also serves as an ideal teaching tool. In order to demonstrate the utility of EMPOWER-1.0, we carried out both a parameter tuning exercise and structural sensitivity analysis. Parameter tuning was demonstrated for four contrasting ocean sites, focusing on Station India in the North Atlantic (60° N, 20° W), highlighting both the utility of undertaking a planned sensitivity analysis for this purpose, yet also the subjectivity which nevertheless surrounds the choice of which parameters to tune. Structural sensitivity tests were then performed comparing different equations for calculating daily depth-integrated photosynthesis, as well as mortality terms for both phytoplankton and zooplankton. Regarding the calculation of daily photosynthesis, for example, results indicated that the model was relatively insensitive to the choice of photosynthesis-irradiance curve, but markedly sensitive to the method of calculating light attenuation in the water column. The work highlights the utility of EMPOWER1.0, and simple models in general, as a means of comprehending, diagnosing and formulating equations for the dynamics of marine ecosystems.

  10. EMPOWER-1.0: an Efficient Model of Planktonic ecOsystems WrittEn in R

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, T. R.; Gentleman, W. C.; Yool, A.

    2015-07-01

    Modelling marine ecosystems requires insight and judgement when it comes to deciding upon appropriate model structure, equations and parameterisation. Many processes are relatively poorly understood and tough decisions must be made as to how to mathematically simplify the real world. Here, we present an efficient plankton modelling testbed, EMPOWER-1.0 (Efficient Model of Planktonic ecOsystems WrittEn in R), coded in the freely available language R. The testbed uses simple two-layer "slab" physics whereby a seasonally varying mixed layer which contains the planktonic marine ecosystem is positioned above a deep layer that contains only nutrient. As such, EMPOWER-1.0 provides a readily available and easy to use tool for evaluating model structure, formulations and parameterisation. The code is transparent and modular such that modifications and changes to model formulation are easily implemented allowing users to investigate and familiarise themselves with the inner workings of their models. It can be used either for preliminary model testing to set the stage for further work, e.g. coupling the ecosystem model to 1-D or 3-D physics, or for undertaking front line research in its own right. EMPOWER-1.0 also serves as an ideal teaching tool. In order to demonstrate the utility of EMPOWER-1.0, we implemented a simple nutrient-phytoplankton-zooplankton-detritus (NPZD) ecosystem model and carried out both a parameter tuning exercise and structural sensitivity analysis. Parameter tuning was demonstrated for four contrasting ocean sites, focusing on station BIOTRANS in the North Atlantic (47° N, 20° W), highlighting both the utility of undertaking a planned sensitivity analysis for this purpose, yet also the subjectivity which nevertheless surrounds the choice of which parameters to tune. Structural sensitivity tests were then performed comparing different equations for calculating daily depth-integrated photosynthesis, as well as mortality terms for both phytoplankton and zooplankton. Regarding the calculation of daily photosynthesis, for example, results indicated that the model was relatively insensitive to the choice of photosynthesis-irradiance curve, but markedly sensitive to the method of calculating light attenuation in the water column. The work highlights the utility of EMPOWER-1.0 as a means of comprehending, diagnosing and formulating equations for the dynamics of marine ecosystems.

  11. A Facile Approach Using MgCl2 to Formulate High Performance Mg2+ Electrolytes for Rechargeable Mg Batteries

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Tianbiao L.; Shao, Yuyan; Li, Guosheng; Gu, Meng; Hu, Jian Z.; Xu, Suochang; Nie, Zimin; Chen, Xilin; Wang, Chong M.; Liu, Jun

    2014-01-01

    Rechargeable Mg batteries have been regarded as a viable battery technology for grid scale energy storage and transportation applications. However, the limited performance of Mg2+ electrolytes has been a primary technical hurdle to develop high energy density rechargeable Mg batteries. In this study, MgCl2 is demonstrated as a non-nucleophilic and cheap Mg2+ source in combining with Al Lewis acids (AlCl3, AlPh3 and AlEtCl2) to formulate a series of Mg2+ electrolytes characteristic of high oxidation stability (up to 3.4 V vs Mg), sulfur compatibility and electrochemical reversibility (up to 100% coulombic efficiency). Three electrolyte systems (MgCl2-AlCl3, MgCl2-AlPh3, and MgCl2-AlEtCl2) were prepared free of purification and fully characterized by multinuclear NMR (27Al{1H} and 25Mg{1H}) spectroscopies, single crystal X-ray diffraction, and electrochemical analysis. The reaction mechanism of MgCl2 and the Al Lewis acids in THF is discussed to highlight the formation of the electrochemically active [(µ-Cl)3Mg2(THF)6]+ monocation in these electrolytes. We are grateful for the financial support from the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL)-Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) program for developing magnesium battery technology. The XRD and SEM data were collected at the Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory, a national scientific user facility sponsored by the DOE’s Office of Biological and Environmental Research and located at PNNL. PNNL is a multiprogram laboratory operated by Battelle Memorial Institute for the Department of Energy under Contract DE-AC05-76RL01830.

  12. Polymeric gamma-MgCl2 Nanoribbons

    SciTech Connect

    Vittadello,M.; Stallworth, P.; Alamgir, F.; Suarez, S.; Abbrent, S.; Drain, C.; Di Noto, V.; Greenbaum, S.

    2006-01-01

    {delta}-MgCl{sub 2} has relevant applications in the field of electrochemical energy storage and Ziegler-Natta catalysis. Here, we clarify the short-range structural peculiarities that make the disordered phase {delta}-MgCl{sub 2} extremely chemically active relative to the higher lattice energy phases, {alpha}-MgCl{sub 2} and {beta}-MgCl{sub 2}. X-ray diffraction (XRD), X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) results are included. These findings, demonstrate the existence of [MgCl{sub 2}]{sub n} nanoribbons and active nanosurfaces in {delta}-MgCl{sub 2} and provide new insight about the nature of the bonding in the allotropic forms of MgCl{sub 2}.

  13. Microwave plasma atomic emission spectrometric determination of Ca, K and Mg in various cheese varieties.

    PubMed

    Ozbek, Nil; Akman, Suleyman

    2016-02-01

    Microwave plasma-atomic emission spectrometry (MP-AES) was used to determine calcium, magnesium and potassium in various Turkish cheese samples. Cheese samples were dried at 100 °C for 2 days and then digested in a mixture of nitric acid/hydrogen peroxide (3:1). Good linearities (R(2) > 0.999) were obtained up to 10 μg mL(-1) of Ca, Mg and K at 445.478 nm, 285.213 nm and 766.491 nm, respectively. The analytes in a certified reference milk powder sample were determined within the uncertainty limits. Moreover, the analytes added to the cheese samples were recovered quantitatively (>90%). All determinations were performed using aqueous standards for calibration. The LOD values for Ca, Mg and K were 0.036 μg mL(-1), 0.012 μg mL(-1) and 0.190 μg mL(-1), respectively. Concentrations of Ca, K and Mg in various types of cheese samples produced in different regions of Turkey were found between 1.03-3.70, 0.242-0.784 and 0.081-0.303 g kg(-1), respectively.

  14. Microwave plasma atomic emission spectrometric determination of Ca, K and Mg in various cheese varieties.

    PubMed

    Ozbek, Nil; Akman, Suleyman

    2016-02-01

    Microwave plasma-atomic emission spectrometry (MP-AES) was used to determine calcium, magnesium and potassium in various Turkish cheese samples. Cheese samples were dried at 100 °C for 2 days and then digested in a mixture of nitric acid/hydrogen peroxide (3:1). Good linearities (R(2) > 0.999) were obtained up to 10 μg mL(-1) of Ca, Mg and K at 445.478 nm, 285.213 nm and 766.491 nm, respectively. The analytes in a certified reference milk powder sample were determined within the uncertainty limits. Moreover, the analytes added to the cheese samples were recovered quantitatively (>90%). All determinations were performed using aqueous standards for calibration. The LOD values for Ca, Mg and K were 0.036 μg mL(-1), 0.012 μg mL(-1) and 0.190 μg mL(-1), respectively. Concentrations of Ca, K and Mg in various types of cheese samples produced in different regions of Turkey were found between 1.03-3.70, 0.242-0.784 and 0.081-0.303 g kg(-1), respectively. PMID:26304350

  15. Interstellar fossil Mg-26 and its possible relationship to excess meteoritic Mg-26

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clayton, Donald D.

    1986-01-01

    A plausible scenario is advanced for explainig a linear correlation found in some solar system solids between their Mg-26/Mg-24 isotopic ratios and their Al/Mg elemental abundance ratios. This scenario involves three stages: (1) the mechanical aggregation of an average ensemble of Al-bearing dust particles that is postulated to be modestly enriched in the Al/Mg abundance ratio because the aggregated particles themselves are; (2) the extraction, perhaps but not necessarily by hot distillation, of almost all Mg, leaving an aggregate with a large Al/Mg ratio and a large Mg-26 excess; and (3) the uptake of normal ambient Mg by the resulting hot Al-rich solid as it cools in Mg-rich vapor. A linear correlation in solids between their Mg-26/Mg-24 isotopic ratio and their aluminum enrichment may be a fossil correlation inherited from interstellar dust.

  16. Transformation of Mg-bearing amorphous calcium carbonate to Mg-calcite - In situ monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Purgstaller, Bettina; Mavromatis, Vasileios; Immenhauser, Adrian; Dietzel, Martin

    2016-02-01

    The formation of Mg-bearing calcite via an amorphous precursor is a poorly understood process that is of relevance for biogenic and abiogenic carbonate precipitation. In order to gain an improved insight on the controls of Mg incorporation in calcite formed via an Mg-rich amorphous calcium carbonate (Mg-ACC) precursor, the precipitation of Mg-ACC and its transformation to Mg-calcite was monitored by in situ Raman spectroscopy. The experiments were performed at 25.0 ± 0.03 °C and pH 8.3 ± 0.1 and revealed two distinct pathways of Mg-calcite formation: (i) At initial aqueous Mg/Ca molar ratios ⩽ 1:6, Mg-calcite formation occurs via direct precipitation from solution. (ii) Conversely, at higher initial Mg/Ca molar ratios, Mg-calcite forms via an intermediate Mg-rich ACC phase. In the latter case, the final product is a calcite with up to 20 mol% Mg. This Mg content is significant higher than that of the Mg-rich ACC precursor phase. Thus, a strong net uptake of Mg ions from the solution into the crystalline precipitate throughout and also subsequent to ACC transformation is postulated. Moreover, the temporal evolution of the geochemical composition of the reactive solution and the Mg-ACC has no significant effect on the obtained "solubility product" of Mg-ACC. The enrichment of Mg in calcite throughout and subsequent to Mg-ACC transformation is likely affected by the high aqueous Mg/Ca ratio and carbonate alkalinity concentrations in the reactive solution. The experimental results have a bearing on the formation mechanism of Mg-rich calcites in marine early diagenetic environments, where high carbonate alkalinity concentrations are the rule rather than the exception, and on the insufficiently investigated inorganic component of biomineralisation pathways in many calcite secreting organisms.

  17. Mg Isotopic Compositions of Modern Marine Carbonates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krogstad, E.; Bizzarro, M.; Hemming, N.

    2003-12-01

    We have used a MC-ICP-MS to measure the isotopic composition of magnesium in a number of samples of modern marine carbonate. Due to the large mass difference between 26Mg and 24Mg (similar to that between 13C and 12C), there is potential for mass fractionation during geologic and biologic processes that may make this isotope system useful for geochemical studies. These samples are from the study of Hemming and Hanson (1992, GCA 56: 537-543). The carbonate minerals analyzed include aragonite, low-Mg calcite, and high-Mg calcite. The samples include corals, echinoderms, ooids, etc., from subtropical to Antarctic settings. Mg purification was accomplished by ion-exchange chromatography, using Bio-Rad AG50W-X12 resin on which greater than 99 percent recovery of Mg is achieved. Samples were introduced into the MC-ICP-MS (VG Axiom) using a Cetac MCN-6000 nebuliser. We use a standard-sample-standard bracketing technique, and samples are analysed at least three times. For lab standards we find that the reproducibility on the 26Mg/24Mg to be about ñ 0.12 permil (2 s.d.). We monitored our separated samples for Na and Ca, as we have found that high Ca/Mg and Na/Mg produce variable magnesium isotopic fractionation during mass spectrometry due to as yet unclear matrix effects. We have normalized our results to our measured values for seawater. We observed a d26Mg(s.w.) range of -1.4 to -2.4 permil in our modern carbonate samples relative to present day seawater. Due to the long residence time of Mg in the oceans (ca. 50 my), this must be due to kinetic or biologic effects. Our d25Mg(s.w.) variations as a function of d26Mg(s.w.) plot along the terrestrial fractionation trend. With an average d26Mg(s.w.) of ca. +0.5 permil in all samples of mantle lithologies and mantle-derived igneous rocks (Bizzarro et al., Goldschmidt abs., 2003), we can assume that the Mg isotopic composition of Earth's river water lies between ca. -2.4 and +0.5 permil (relative to seawater). The actual

  18. The STP (Solar-Terrestrial Physics) Semantic Web based on the RSS1.0 and the RDF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kubo, T.; Murata, K. T.; Kimura, E.; Ishikura, S.; Shinohara, I.; Kasaba, Y.; Watari, S.; Matsuoka, D.

    2006-12-01

    In the Solar-Terrestrial Physics (STP), it is pointed out that circulation and utilization of observation data among researchers are insufficient. To archive interdisciplinary researches, we need to overcome this circulation and utilization problems. Under such a background, authors' group has developed a world-wide database that manages meta-data of satellite and ground-based observation data files. It is noted that retrieving meta-data from the observation data and registering them to database have been carried out by hand so far. Our goal is to establish the STP Semantic Web. The Semantic Web provides a common framework that allows a variety of data shared and reused across applications, enterprises, and communities. We also expect that the secondary information related with observations, such as event information and associated news, are also shared over the networks. The most fundamental issue on the establishment is who generates, manages and provides meta-data in the Semantic Web. We developed an automatic meta-data collection system for the observation data using the RSS (RDF Site Summary) 1.0. The RSS1.0 is one of the XML-based markup languages based on the RDF (Resource Description Framework), which is designed for syndicating news and contents of news-like sites. The RSS1.0 is used to describe the STP meta-data, such as data file name, file server address and observation date. To describe the meta-data of the STP beyond RSS1.0 vocabulary, we defined original vocabularies for the STP resources using the RDF Schema. The RDF describes technical terms on the STP along with the Dublin Core Metadata Element Set, which is standard for cross-domain information resource descriptions. Researchers' information on the STP by FOAF, which is known as an RDF/XML vocabulary, creates a machine-readable metadata describing people. Using the RSS1.0 as a meta-data distribution method, the workflow from retrieving meta-data to registering them into the database is automated. This technique is applied for several database systems, such as the DARTS database system and NICT Space Weather Report Service. The DARTS is a science database managed by ISAS/JAXA in Japan. We succeeded in generating and collecting the meta-data automatically for the CDF (Common data Format) data, such as Reimei satellite data, provided by the DARTS. We also create an RDF service for space weather report and real-time global MHD simulation 3D data provided by the NICT. Our Semantic Web system works as follows: The RSS1.0 documents generated on the data sites (ISAS and NICT) are automatically collected by a meta-data collection agent. The RDF documents are registered and the agent extracts meta-data to store them in the Sesame, which is an open source RDF database with support for RDF Schema inferencing and querying. The RDF database provides advanced retrieval processing that has considered property and relation. Finally, the STP Semantic Web provides automatic processing or high level search for the data which are not only for observation data but for space weather news, physical events, technical terms and researches information related to the STP.

  19. PMMA microreactor for chemiluminescence detection of Cu (II) based on 1,10-Phenanthroline-hydrogen peroxide reaction.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xueye; Shen, Jienan; Li, Tiechuan

    2016-01-01

    A microreactor for the chemiluminescence detection of copper (II) in water samples, based on the measurement of light emitted from the copper (II) catalysed oxidation of 1,10-phenanthroline by hydrogen peroxide in basic aqueous solution, is presented. Polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) was chose as material for fabricating the microreactor with mill and hot bonding method. Optimized reagents conditions were found to be 6.3 × 10(-5)mol/L 1,10-phenanthroline, 1.5 × 10(-3)mol/L hydrogen peroxide, 7.0 × 10(-2)mol/L sodium hydroxide and 2.4 × 10(-5)mol/L Hexadecyl trimethyl ammonium Bromide (CTMAB). In the continuous flow injection mode the system can perform fully automated detection with a reagent consumption of only 3.5 μL each time. The linear range of the Cu (II) ions concentration was 1.5 × 10(-8) mol/L to 1.0 × 10(-4) mol/L, and the detection limit was 9.4 × 10(-9)mol/L with the S/N ratio of 4. The relative standard deviation was 3.0 % for 2.0 × 10(-6) mol/L Cu (II) ions (n = 10). The most obvious features of the detection method are simplicity, rapidity and easy fabrication of the microreactor. PMID:26788016

  20. Application of USNO-B1.0 towards selecting objects with displaced blue and red components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jayson, Joel S.

    2016-03-01

    We have conducted a feasibility study to determine the effectiveness of using USNO-B1.0 data to preferentially detect objects with displaced red and blue components. A procedure was developed to search catalogue entries for such objects, which include M dwarfs paired with white dwarfs or with earlier main-sequence stars, and galaxies with asymmetric colour distributions. Residual differences between red and blue and infrared and blue scanned emulsion images define vectors, which, when appropriately aligned and of sufficient length, signal potential candidates. Test sample sets were analysed to evaluate the effective discrimination of the technique. Over 91 000 USNO-B1.0 catalogue entries at points throughout the celestial sphere were then filtered for acceptable combinations of entry observations and magnitudes and the resulting total of about 17 000 entries was winnowed down to a little more than 200 objects of interest. These were screened by visual examination of photo images to a final total of 146 candidates. About one quarter of these candidates coincide with SDSS (Sloan Digital Sky Survey) data. Those constituents fall into two groups, single and paired objects. SDSS identified several galaxies in the first group. Regarding the second group, at least half of its members were tentatively identified as main-sequence pairs, the greater portion being of widely separated spectral types. Two white dwarf-main-sequence pairs were also identified. Most importantly, the vectors formed from USNO-B1.0 residuals were in alignment with corresponding SDSS pair position angles, thereby supporting this work's central thesis.

  1. TIME-RESOLVED 1-10 keV CRYSTAL SPECTROMETER FOR THE Z MACHINE AT SANDIA NATIONAL LABORATORIES

    SciTech Connect

    D. V. Morgan; S. Gardner; R. Liljestrand; M. Madlener; S. Slavin; M. Wu

    2003-06-01

    We have designed, fabricated, calibrated, and fielded a fast, time-resolved 1-10 keV crystal spectrometer to observe the evolution of wire pinch spectra at the Z machine at Sandia National Laboratories. The instrument has two convex cylindrical crystals (PET and KAP). Both crystals Bragg reflect x-rays into an array of ten silicon diodes, providing continuous spectral coverage in twenty channels from 1.0 to 10 keV. The spectral response of the instrument has been calibrated from 1.0 to 6.3 keV at beamline X8A at the National Synchrotron Light Source. The time response of the 1-mm2 silicon detectors was measured with the Pulsed X-ray Source at Bechtel Nevada's Los Alamos Operations, where 2-nanosecond full-width half-maximum (FWHM) waveforms with 700-picosecond rise times typically were observed. The spectrometer has been fielded recently on several experimental runs at the Z Machine. In this paper, we present the time-resolved spectra resulting from the implosions of double-nested tungsten wire arrays onto 5-mm diameter foam cylinders. We also show the results obtained for a double-nested stainless steel wire array with no target cylinder. The spectrometer was located at the end of a 7.1-meter beamline on line-of sight (LOS)21/22, at an angle 12{sup o} above the equatorial plane, and was protected from the debris field by a customized dual-slit fast valve. The soft detector channels below 2.0 keV recorded large signals at pinch time coinciding with signals recorded on vacuum x-ray diodes (XRDs). On experiment Z993, the spectrometer channels recorded a second pulse with a hard x-ray emission spectrum several nanoseconds after pinch time.

  2. Radiation hardness assessment of the charge-integrating hybrid pixel detector JUNGFRAU 1.0 for photon science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jungmann-Smith, J. H.; Bergamaschi, A.; Brückner, M.; Cartier, S.; Dinapoli, R.; Greiffenberg, D.; Jaggi, A.; Maliakal, D.; Mayilyan, D.; Medjoubi, K.; Mezza, D.; Mozzanica, A.; Ramilli, M.; Ruder, Ch.; Schädler, L.; Schmitt, B.; Shi, X.; Tinti, G.

    2015-12-01

    JUNGFRAU (adJUstiNg Gain detector FoR the Aramis User station) is a two-dimensional hybrid pixel detector for photon science applications in free electron lasers, particularly SwissFEL, and synchrotron light sources. JUNGFRAU is an automatic gain switching, charge-integrating detector which covers a dynamic range of more than 104 photons of an energy of 12 keV with a good linearity, uniformity of response, and spatial resolving power. The JUNGFRAU 1.0 application-specific integrated circuit (ASIC) features a 256 × 256 pixel matrix of 75 × 75 μm2 pixels and is bump-bonded to a 320 μm thick Si sensor. Modules of 2 × 4 chips cover an area of about 4 × 8 cm2. Readout rates in excess of 2 kHz enable linear count rate capabilities of 20 MHz (at 12 keV) and 50 MHz (at 5 keV). The tolerance of JUNGFRAU to radiation is a key issue to guarantee several years of operation at free electron lasers and synchrotrons. The radiation hardness of JUNGFRAU 1.0 is tested with synchrotron radiation up to 10 MGy of delivered dose. The effect of radiation-induced changes on the noise, baseline, gain, and gain switching is evaluated post-irradiation for both the ASIC and the hybridized assembly. The bare JUNGFRAU 1.0 chip can withstand doses as high as 10 MGy with minor changes to its noise and a reduction in the preamplifier gain. The hybridized assembly, in particular the sensor, is affected by the photon irradiation which mainly shows as an increase in the leakage current. Self-healing of the system is investigated during a period of 11 weeks after the delivery of the radiation dose. Annealing radiation-induced changes by bake-out at 100 °C is investigated. It is concluded that the JUNGFRAU 1.0 pixel is sufficiently radiation-hard for its envisioned applications at SwissFEL and synchrotron beam lines.

  3. Radiation hardness assessment of the charge-integrating hybrid pixel detector JUNGFRAU 1.0 for photon science.

    PubMed

    Jungmann-Smith, J H; Bergamaschi, A; Brückner, M; Cartier, S; Dinapoli, R; Greiffenberg, D; Jaggi, A; Maliakal, D; Mayilyan, D; Medjoubi, K; Mezza, D; Mozzanica, A; Ramilli, M; Ruder, Ch; Schädler, L; Schmitt, B; Shi, X; Tinti, G

    2015-12-01

    JUNGFRAU (adJUstiNg Gain detector FoR the Aramis User station) is a two-dimensional hybrid pixel detector for photon science applications in free electron lasers, particularly SwissFEL, and synchrotron light sources. JUNGFRAU is an automatic gain switching, charge-integrating detector which covers a dynamic range of more than 10(4) photons of an energy of 12 keV with a good linearity, uniformity of response, and spatial resolving power. The JUNGFRAU 1.0 application-specific integrated circuit (ASIC) features a 256 × 256 pixel matrix of 75 × 75 μm(2) pixels and is bump-bonded to a 320 μm thick Si sensor. Modules of 2 × 4 chips cover an area of about 4 × 8 cm(2). Readout rates in excess of 2 kHz enable linear count rate capabilities of 20 MHz (at 12 keV) and 50 MHz (at 5 keV). The tolerance of JUNGFRAU to radiation is a key issue to guarantee several years of operation at free electron lasers and synchrotrons. The radiation hardness of JUNGFRAU 1.0 is tested with synchrotron radiation up to 10 MGy of delivered dose. The effect of radiation-induced changes on the noise, baseline, gain, and gain switching is evaluated post-irradiation for both the ASIC and the hybridized assembly. The bare JUNGFRAU 1.0 chip can withstand doses as high as 10 MGy with minor changes to its noise and a reduction in the preamplifier gain. The hybridized assembly, in particular the sensor, is affected by the photon irradiation which mainly shows as an increase in the leakage current. Self-healing of the system is investigated during a period of 11 weeks after the delivery of the radiation dose. Annealing radiation-induced changes by bake-out at 100 °C is investigated. It is concluded that the JUNGFRAU 1.0 pixel is sufficiently radiation-hard for its envisioned applications at SwissFEL and synchrotron beam lines.

  4. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Disk galaxies at 0.1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boehm, A.; Ziegler, B. L.

    2016-06-01

    Redshifts, maximum rotation velocities, (Johnson) B-band absolute magnitudes and sizes are presented for a sample of 124 disk galaxies covering redshifts 0.1

  5. Design and Development Comparison of Rapid Cycle Amine 1.0, 2.0, and 3.0

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chullen, Cinda; Campbell, Colin; Papale, William; Murray, Sean; Wichowski, Robert; Conger, Bruce; McMillin, Summer

    2016-01-01

    The development of the Rapid Cycle Amine (RCA) swing-bed technology for carbon dioxide (CO2) removal has been in progress since favorable results were published in 1996. Shortly thereafter, a prototype was designed, developed, and tested successfully and delivered to Johnson Space Center in 1999. An improved prototype was delivered to NASA in 2006 and was notated as RCA 1.0 and sized for the extravehicular activity (EVA). The new RCA swing-bed technology is a regenerative system which employs two alternating solid-amine sorbent beds to remove CO2 and water. The two- bed design employs a chemisorption process whereby the beds alternate between adsorbtion and desorbsion. This process provides for an efficient operation of the RCA so that while one bed is in adsorb (uptake) mode, the other is in the desorb (regeneration) mode. The RCA has now progressed through several iterations of technology readiness levels. Test articles have now been designed, developed, and tested for the advanced space suit portable life support system (PLSS) including RCA 1.0, RCA 2.0, and RCA 3.0. The RCA 3.0 was the most recent RCA fabrication and was delivered to NASA-JSC in June 2015. The RCA 1.0 test article was designed with a pneumatically actuated linear motion spool valve. The RCA 2.0 and 3.0 test articles were designed with a valve assembly which allows for switching between uptake and regeneration modes while minimizing gas volume losses to the vacuum source. RCA 2.0 and 3.0 also include an embedded controller design to control RCA operation and provide the capability of interfacing with various sensors and other ventilation loop components. The RCA technology is low power, small, and has fulfilled all test requirements levied upon the technology during development testing thus far. This paper will provide an overreview of the design and development of RCA 1.0, 2.0 and 3.0 including detail differences between the design specifications of each.

  6. DFT structural investigation on Fe(1,10-phenanthroline){sub 2} (NCS){sub 2} spin crossover molecule

    SciTech Connect

    Chiş, V.; Isai, R.; Droghetti, A.; Rungger, I.; Sanvito, S.; Morari, C.

    2013-11-13

    Understanding the coupling of spin crossover molecules to metallic surfaces is a key ingredient for harnessing of their remarkable features for future spintronics applications. Here we investigate the structural and electronic properties of deformed Fe(1,10-phenanthroline){sub 2} (NCS){sub 2} molecules, mimicking the possible effects arising from the interaction with a metallic substrate. We find a relatively large structural flexibility for this molecule, accompanied by small changes in their total energy. This suggests that the spin crossover activity can be modulated by the interaction with the substrate.

  7. Design and Development Comparison of Rapid Cycle Amine 1.0, 2.0, and 3.0

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chullen, Cinda; Campbell, Colin; Papale, William; Murray, Sean; Wichowski, Robert; Conger, Bruce; McMillin, Summer

    2016-01-01

    The development of the Rapid Cycle Amine (RCA) swing-bed technology for carbon dioxide (CO2) removal has been in progress since favorable results were published in 1996. Shortly thereafter, a prototype was designed, developed, and tested successfully and delivered to Johnson Space Center in 1999. An improved prototype (RCA 1.0) was delivered to NASA in 2006 and sized for the extravehicular activity (EVA). The RCA swing-bed technology is a regenerative system which employs two alternating solid-amine sorbent beds to remove CO2 and water. The two-bed design employs a chemisorption process whereby the beds alternate between adsorption and desorption. This process provides for an efficient RCA operation that enables one bed to be in adsorb (uptake) mode, while the other is in the desorb (regeneration) mode. The RCA has progressed through several iterations of technology readiness levels. Test articles have now been designed, developed, and tested for the advanced space suit portable life support system (PLSS) including RCA 1.0, RCA 2.0, and RCA 3.0. The RCA 3.0 was the most recent RCA fabrication and was delivered to NASA-JSC in June 2015. The RCA 1.0 test article was designed with a pneumatically actuated linear motion spool valve. The RCA 2.0 and 3.0 test articles were designed with a valve assembly which allows for switching between uptake and regeneration modes while minimizing gas volume losses to the vacuum source. RCA 2.0 and 3.0 also include an embedded controller design to control RCA operation and provide the capability of interfacing with various sensors and other ventilation loop components. The RCA technology is low power, small, and has fulfilled all test requirements levied upon the technology during development testing thus far. This paper will provide an overview of the design and development of RCA 1.0, 2.0 and 3.0 including detail differences between the design specifications of each. Nomenclature.

  8. Radiation hardness assessment of the charge-integrating hybrid pixel detector JUNGFRAU 1.0 for photon science

    SciTech Connect

    Jungmann-Smith, J. H. Bergamaschi, A.; Brückner, M.; Dinapoli, R.; Greiffenberg, D.; Jaggi, A.; Maliakal, D.; Mayilyan, D.; Mezza, D.; Mozzanica, A.; Ramilli, M.; Ruder, Ch.; Schädler, L.; Schmitt, B.; Shi, X.; Tinti, G.; Cartier, S.; Medjoubi, K.

    2015-12-15

    JUNGFRAU (adJUstiNg Gain detector FoR the Aramis User station) is a two-dimensional hybrid pixel detector for photon science applications in free electron lasers, particularly SwissFEL, and synchrotron light sources. JUNGFRAU is an automatic gain switching, charge-integrating detector which covers a dynamic range of more than 10{sup 4} photons of an energy of 12 keV with a good linearity, uniformity of response, and spatial resolving power. The JUNGFRAU 1.0 application-specific integrated circuit (ASIC) features a 256 × 256 pixel matrix of 75 × 75 μm{sup 2} pixels and is bump-bonded to a 320 μm thick Si sensor. Modules of 2 × 4 chips cover an area of about 4 × 8 cm{sup 2}. Readout rates in excess of 2 kHz enable linear count rate capabilities of 20 MHz (at 12 keV) and 50 MHz (at 5 keV). The tolerance of JUNGFRAU to radiation is a key issue to guarantee several years of operation at free electron lasers and synchrotrons. The radiation hardness of JUNGFRAU 1.0 is tested with synchrotron radiation up to 10 MGy of delivered dose. The effect of radiation-induced changes on the noise, baseline, gain, and gain switching is evaluated post-irradiation for both the ASIC and the hybridized assembly. The bare JUNGFRAU 1.0 chip can withstand doses as high as 10 MGy with minor changes to its noise and a reduction in the preamplifier gain. The hybridized assembly, in particular the sensor, is affected by the photon irradiation which mainly shows as an increase in the leakage current. Self-healing of the system is investigated during a period of 11 weeks after the delivery of the radiation dose. Annealing radiation-induced changes by bake-out at 100 °C is investigated. It is concluded that the JUNGFRAU 1.0 pixel is sufficiently radiation-hard for its envisioned applications at SwissFEL and synchrotron beam lines.

  9. Sr, Mg cosubstituted HA porous macro-granules: potentialities as resorbable bone filler with antiosteoporotic functions.

    PubMed

    Landi, Elena; Uggeri, Jacopo; Medri, Valentina; Guizzardi, Stefano

    2013-09-01

    Porous macro-granules of nanostructured apatite with Ca ions partially cosubstituted with Mg and Sr ions in different ratios (SrMgHAs), were synthesized at 37°C and compared with Mg and/or Sr free apatites (MgHAs and HA). Strontium improved the Mg substitution extent in the apatite and the chemical-physical and thermal stability of the resulting cosubstituted apatite. Porous macro-granules of 400-600 micron with selected composition were tested for the ionic release in synthetic body fluid and the data were related with the results of preliminary cell investigation in vitro. As compared to the corresponding Sr-free granulate, the SrMgHA could be exploited to prolong the beneficial Mg release during the bone regeneration process. In addition the contemporary in situ supply of Sr, an antiosteoporotic and anticarie ion, could influence the quality of new hard tissues. The ionic multirelease created a more favorable environment for human osteoblasts, demonstrated by a proliferative effect for each dose tested in the range 0.1-10 mg/mL. PMID:23348958

  10. Antibacterial biodegradable Mg-Ag alloys.

    PubMed

    Tie, D; Feyerabend, F; Müller, W D; Schade, R; Liefeith, K; Kainer, K U; Willumeit, R

    2013-06-16

    The use of magnesium alloys as degradable metals for biomedical applications is a topic of ongoing research and the demand for multifunctional materials is increasing. Hence, binary Mg-Ag alloys were designed as implant materials to combine the favourable properties of magnesium with the well-known antibacterial property of silver. In this study, three Mg-Ag alloys, Mg2Ag, Mg4Ag and Mg6Ag that contain 1.87 %, 3.82 % and 6.00 % silver by weight, respectively, were cast and processed with solution (T4) and aging (T6) heat treatment. The metallurgical analysis and phase identification showed that all alloys contained Mg4Ag as the dominant β phase. After heat treatment, the mechanical properties of all Mg-Ag alloys were significantly improved and the corrosion rate was also significantly reduced, due to presence of silver. Mg(OH)₂ and MgO present the main magnesium corrosion products, while AgCl was found as the corresponding primary silver corrosion product. Immersion tests, under cell culture conditions, demonstrated that the silver content did not significantly shift the pH and magnesium ion release. In vitro tests, with both primary osteoblasts and cell lines (MG63, RAW 264.7), revealed that Mg-Ag alloys show negligible cytotoxicity and sound cytocompatibility. Antibacterial assays, performed in a dynamic bioreactor system, proved that the alloys reduce the viability of two common pathogenic bacteria, Staphylococcus aureus (DSMZ 20231) and Staphylococcus epidermidis (DSMZ 3269), and the results showed that the killing rate of the alloys against tested bacteria exceeded 90%. In summary, biodegradable Mg-Ag alloys are cytocompatible materials with adjustable mechanical and corrosion properties and show promising antibacterial activity, which indicates their potential as antibacterial biodegradable implant materials.

  11. neuTube 1.0: A New Design for Efficient Neuron Reconstruction Software Based on the SWC Format.

    PubMed

    Feng, Linqing; Zhao, Ting; Kim, Jinhyun

    2015-01-01

    Brain circuit mapping requires digital reconstruction of neuronal morphologies in complicated networks. Despite recent advances in automatic algorithms, reconstruction of neuronal structures is still a bottleneck in circuit mapping due to a lack of appropriate software for both efficient reconstruction and user-friendly editing. Here we present a new software design based on the SWC format, a standardized neuromorphometric format that has been widely used for analyzing neuronal morphologies or sharing neuron reconstructions via online archives such as NeuroMorpho.org. We have also implemented the design in our open-source software called neuTube 1.0. As specified by the design, the software is equipped with parallel 2D and 3D visualization and intuitive neuron tracing/editing functions, allowing the user to efficiently reconstruct neurons from fluorescence image data and edit standard neuron structure files produced by any other reconstruction software. We show the advantages of neuTube 1.0 by comparing it to two other software tools, namely Neuromantic and Neurostudio. The software is available for free at http://www.neutracing.com, which also hosts complete software documentation and video tutorials. PMID:26464967

  12. SOLWEIG 1.0--modelling spatial variations of 3D radiant fluxes and mean radiant temperature in complex urban settings.

    PubMed

    Lindberg, Fredrik; Holmer, Björn; Thorsson, Sofia

    2008-09-01

    The mean radiant temperature, T(mrt), which sums up all shortwave and longwave radiation fluxes (both direct and reflected) to which the human body is exposed is one of the key meteorological parameters governing human energy balance and the thermal comfort of man. In this paper, a new radiation model (SOLWEIG 1.0), which simulates spatial variations of 3D radiation fluxes and T(mrt) in complex urban settings, is presented. The T(mrt) is derived by modelling shortwave and longwave radiation fluxes in six directions (upward, downward and from the four cardinal points) and angular factors. The model requires a limited number of inputs, such as direct, diffuse and global shortwave radiation, air temperature, relative humidity, urban geometry and geographical information (latitude, longitude and elevation). The model was evaluated using 7 days of integral radiation measurements at two sites with different building geometries--a large square and a small courtyard in Göteborg, Sweden (57 degrees N)--across different seasons and in various weather conditions. The evaluation reveals good agreement between modelled and measured values of T(mrt), with an overall good correspondence of R (2) = 0.94, (p < 0.01, RMSE = 4.8 K). SOLWEIG 1.0 is still under development. Future work will incorporate a vegetation scheme, as well as an improvement of the estimation of fluxes from the four cardinal points.

  13. Complexation of Am(III) and Nd(III) by 1,10-Phenanthroline-2,9-Dicarboxylic Acid

    SciTech Connect

    Ogden, Mark D.; Sinkov, Sergey I.; Nilsson, Mikael; Lumetta, Gregg J.; Hancock, Robert D.; Nash, Ken L.

    2013-01-01

    The complexant 1,10-phenanthroline-2,9-dicarboxylic acid (PDA) is a planar tetradentate ligand that is more preorganized for metal complexation than its unconstrained analogue ethylendiiminodiacetic acid (EDDA). Furthermore, the backbone nitrogen atoms of PDA are aromatic, hence are softer than the aliphatic amines of EDDA. It has been hypothesized that PDA will selectively bond to trivalent actinides over lanthanides. In this report, the results of spectrophotometric studies of the complexation of Nd(III) and Am(III) by PDA are reported. Because the complexes are moderately stable, it was necessary to conduct these titrations using competitive equilibrium methods, competitive cation omplexing between PDA and diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid, and competition between ligand protonation and complex formation. Stability constants and ligand protonation constants were determined at 0.1 mol/L ionic strength and at 0.5 mol/L ionic strength nitrate media at 21 ± 1 C. The stability constants are lower than those predicted from first principles and speciation calculations indicate that Am(III) selectivity over Nd(III) is less than that exhibited by 1,10-phenanthroline.

  14. Disruption of a red giant star by a supermassive black hole and the case of PS1-10jh

    SciTech Connect

    Bogdanović, Tamara; Cheng, Roseanne M.; Amaro-Seoane, Pau E-mail: rcheng@gatech.edu

    2014-06-20

    The development of a new generation of theoretical models for tidal disruptions is timely, as increasingly diverse events are being captured in surveys of the transient sky. Recently, Gezari et al. reported a discovery of a new class of tidal disruption events: the disruption of a helium-rich stellar core, thought to be a remnant of a red giant (RG) star. Motivated by this discovery and in anticipation of others, we consider tidal interaction of an RG star with a supermassive black hole (SMBH) which leads to the stripping of the stellar envelope and subsequent inspiral of the compact core toward the black hole. Once the stellar envelope is removed the inspiral of the core is driven by tidal heating as well as the emission of gravitational radiation until the core either falls into the SMBH or is tidally disrupted. In the case of the tidal disruption candidate PS1-10jh, we find that there is a set of orbital solutions at high eccentricities in which the tidally stripped hydrogen envelope is accreted by the SMBH before the helium core is disrupted. This places the RG core in a portion of parameter space where strong tidal heating can lift the degeneracy of the compact remnant and disrupt it before it reaches the tidal radius. We consider how this sequence of events explains the puzzling absence of the hydrogen emission lines from the spectrum of PS1-10jh and gives rise to its other observational features.

  15. 1,10-Phenanthroline promotes copper complexes into tumor cells and induces apoptosis by inhibiting the proteasome activity.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhen; Bi, Caifeng; Schmitt, Sara M; Fan, Yuhua; Dong, Lili; Zuo, Jian; Dou, Q Ping

    2012-12-01

    Indole-3-acetic acid and indole-3-propionic acid, two potent natural plant growth hormones, have attracted attention as promising prodrugs in cancer therapy. Copper is known to be a cofactor essential for tumor angiogenesis. We have previously reported that taurine, L-glutamine, and quinoline-2-carboxaldehyde Schiff base copper complexes inhibit cell proliferation and proteasome activity in human cancer cells. In the current study, we synthesized two types of copper complexes, dinuclear complexes and ternary complexes, to investigate whether a certain structure could easily carry copper into cancer cells and consequently inhibit tumor proteasome activity and induce apoptosis. We observed that ternary complexes binding with 1,10-phenanthroline are more potent proteasome inhibitors and apoptosis inducers than dinuclear complexes in PC-3 human prostate cancer cells. Furthermore, the ternary complexes potently inhibit proteasome activity before induction of apoptosis in MDA-MB-231 human breast cancer cells, but not in nontumorigenic MCF-10A cells. Our results suggest that copper complexes binding with 1,10-phenanthroline as the third ligand could serve as potent, selective proteasome inhibitors and apoptosis inducers in tumor cells, and that the ternary complexes may be good potential anticancer drugs.

  16. Data Evaluation Acquired Talys 1.0 Code to Produce 111In from Various Accelerator-Based Reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alipoor, Zahra; Gholamzadeh, Zohreh; Sadeghi, Mahdi; Seyyedi, Solaleh; Aref, Morteza

    The Indium-111 physical-decay parameters as a β-emitter radionuclide show some potential for radiodiagnostic and radiotherapeutic purposes. Medical investigators have shown that 111In is an important radionuclide for locating and imaging certain tumors, visualization of the lymphatic system and thousands of labeling reactions have been suggested. The TALYS 1.0 code was used here to calculate excitation functions of 112/114-118Sn+p, 110Cd+3He, 109Ag+3He, 111-114Cd+p, 110/111Cd+d, 109Ag+α to produce 111In using low and medium energy accelerators. Calculations were performed up to 200 MeV. Appropriate target thicknesses have been assumed based on energy loss calculations with the SRIM code. Theoretical integral yields for all the latter reactions were calculated. The TALYS 1.0 code predicts that the production of a few curies of 111In is feasible using a target of isotopically highly enriched 112Cd and a proton energy between 12 and 25 MeV with a production rate as 248.97 MBq·μA-1 · h-1. Minimum impurities shall be produced during the proton irradiation of an enriched 111Cd target yielding a production rate for 111In of 67.52 MBq· μA-1 · h-1.

  17. Explanation of Significant Differences for the Record of Decision for the Test Area North Operable Unit 1-10

    SciTech Connect

    D. L. Eaton

    2007-01-18

    This Explanation of Significant Differences (ESD) applies to the remedial actions performed under the Final Record of Decision for Test Area North, Operable Unit 1-1 0, Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (DOE-ID 1999) as amended by the Explanation of Significant Differences for the Record of Decision for the Test Area North Operable Unit 1-10 (DOE-ID 2003), the Record of Decision Amendment for the V-Tanks (TSF-09 and TSF-18) and Explanation of Significant Differences for the PM-2A Tanks (TSF-26) and TSF-06, Area IO, at Test Area North, Operable Unit 1-1 0 (DOE-ID 2004a), and the Explanation of Significant Differences for the Record of Decision for the Test Area North Operable Unit 1-10 (DOE-ID 2005). The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Idaho Operations Office; U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), Region 10; and the Idaho Department of Health and Welfare-now identified as the Idaho Department of Environmental Quality (DEQ)-signed the Record of Decision (ROD) in December 1999, the 2003 ESD in April 2003, the ROD Amendment/ESD in February 2004, and the 2005 ESD in January 2005. The EPA and DEQ support the need for this ESD.

  18. Laminar burning velocities of lean hydrogen-air mixtures at pressures up to 1.0 MPa

    SciTech Connect

    Bradley, D.; Lawes, M.; Liu, Kexin; Woolley, R.; Verhelst, S.

    2007-04-15

    Values of laminar burning velocity, u{sub l}, and the associated strain rate Markstein number, Ma{sub sr}, of H{sub 2}-air mixtures have been obtained from measurements of flame speeds in a spherical explosion bomb with central ignition. Pressures ranged from 0.1 to 1.0 MPa, with values of equivalence ratio between 0.3 and 1.0. Many of the flames soon became unstable, with an accelerating flame speed, due to Darrieus-Landau and thermodiffusive instabilities. This effect increased with pressure. The flame wrinkling arising from the instabilities enhanced the flame speed. A method is described for allowing for this effect, based on measurements of the flame radii at which the instabilities increased the flame speed. This enabled u{sub l} and Ma{sub sr} to be obtained, devoid of the effects of instabilities. With increasing pressure, the time interval between the end of the ignition spark and the onset of flame instability, during which stable stretched flame propagation occurred, became increasingly small and very high camera speeds were necessary for accurate measurement. Eventually this time interval became so short that first Ma{sub sr} and then u{sub l} could not be measured. Such flame instabilities throw into question the utility of u{sub l} for high pressure, very unstable, flames. The measured values of u{sub l} are compared with those predicted by detailed chemical kinetic models of one-dimensional flames. (author)

  19. Disruption of a Red Giant Star by a Supermassive Black Hole and the Case of PS1-10jh

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bogdanović, Tamara; Cheng, Roseanne M.; Amaro-Seoane, Pau

    2014-06-01

    The development of a new generation of theoretical models for tidal disruptions is timely, as increasingly diverse events are being captured in surveys of the transient sky. Recently, Gezari et al. reported a discovery of a new class of tidal disruption events: the disruption of a helium-rich stellar core, thought to be a remnant of a red giant (RG) star. Motivated by this discovery and in anticipation of others, we consider tidal interaction of an RG star with a supermassive black hole (SMBH) which leads to the stripping of the stellar envelope and subsequent inspiral of the compact core toward the black hole. Once the stellar envelope is removed the inspiral of the core is driven by tidal heating as well as the emission of gravitational radiation until the core either falls into the SMBH or is tidally disrupted. In the case of the tidal disruption candidate PS1-10jh, we find that there is a set of orbital solutions at high eccentricities in which the tidally stripped hydrogen envelope is accreted by the SMBH before the helium core is disrupted. This places the RG core in a portion of parameter space where strong tidal heating can lift the degeneracy of the compact remnant and disrupt it before it reaches the tidal radius. We consider how this sequence of events explains the puzzling absence of the hydrogen emission lines from the spectrum of PS1-10jh and gives rise to its other observational features.

  20. BasinVis 1.0: A MATLAB®-based program for sedimentary basin subsidence analysis and visualization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Eun Young; Novotny, Johannes; Wagreich, Michael

    2016-06-01

    Stratigraphic and structural mapping is important to understand the internal structure of sedimentary basins. Subsidence analysis provides significant insights for basin evolution. We designed a new software package to process and visualize stratigraphic setting and subsidence evolution of sedimentary basins from well data. BasinVis 1.0 is implemented in MATLAB®, a multi-paradigm numerical computing environment, and employs two numerical methods: interpolation and subsidence analysis. Five different interpolation methods (linear, natural, cubic spline, Kriging, and thin-plate spline) are provided in this program for surface modeling. The subsidence analysis consists of decompaction and backstripping techniques. BasinVis 1.0 incorporates five main processing steps; (1) setup (study area and stratigraphic units), (2) loading well data, (3) stratigraphic setting visualization, (4) subsidence parameter input, and (5) subsidence analysis and visualization. For in-depth analysis, our software provides cross-section and dip-slip fault backstripping tools. The graphical user interface guides users through the workflow and provides tools to analyze and export the results. Interpolation and subsidence results are cached to minimize redundant computations and improve the interactivity of the program. All 2D and 3D visualizations are created by using MATLAB plotting functions, which enables users to fine-tune the results using the full range of available plot options in MATLAB. We demonstrate all functions in a case study of Miocene sediment in the central Vienna Basin.

  1. Accelerator System Model (ASM) user manual with physics and engineering model documentation. ASM version 1.0

    SciTech Connect

    1993-07-01

    The Accelerator System Model (ASM) is a computer program developed to model proton radiofrequency accelerators and to carry out system level trade studies. The ASM FORTRAN subroutines are incorporated into an intuitive graphical user interface which provides for the {open_quotes}construction{close_quotes} of the accelerator in a window on the computer screen. The interface is based on the Shell for Particle Accelerator Related Codes (SPARC) software technology written for the Macintosh operating system in the C programming language. This User Manual describes the operation and use of the ASM application within the SPARC interface. The Appendix provides a detailed description of the physics and engineering models used in ASM. ASM Version 1.0 is joint project of G. H. Gillespie Associates, Inc. and the Accelerator Technology (AT) Division of the Los Alamos National Laboratory. Neither the ASM Version 1.0 software nor this ASM Documentation may be reproduced without the expressed written consent of both the Los Alamos National Laboratory and G. H. Gillespie Associates, Inc.

  2. Synthesis and Crystal Structure of Diaqua(1,10-Phenanthroline-N,N′)(Thiosulfato-O,S)Manganese(II). Biological Properties.

    PubMed Central

    Brezeanu, Maria; Badea, Mikaela; Morgant, Georges; Viossat, Bernard; Bouttier, Sylvie; Fourniat, Jacky; Marinescu, Dana

    1998-01-01

    The synthesis of diaqua(1,10-phenanthroline-N,N′)(thiosulfato-O,S)manganese(ll) [Mn(phen)(S2O3)(H2O)2] was investigated. Its structure was determined by single crystal X-ray diffraction from 2418 reflections (I > 3 σ(I)) to a final value of R = 0.047 and Rw = 0.054. Crystal data are as follows : space group P21; a = 10.356(3), b = 7.097(3), c = 20.316(2) Å, β = 94.29(2)°, V = 1489.1(8) , Å3, Z = 2. There are two independent title compounds in the asymetric unit. Each manganese atom has a distorted octahedral Mn(SO)N2O2 geometry with the S and O atoms (from two neighbouring thiosulfate ligands) mutually trans, two N atoms from the 1,10-phenanthroline ligand and two water oxygen. The thiosulfate group behaves as a bridging ligand, connecting, through sulfur and oxygen, Mn atoms related by the binary b translation, thus forming infinite chains running parallel to this axis. Infrared and electronic spectra are reported. PMID:18475862

  3. 1,10-Phenanthroline promotes copper complexes into tumor cells and induces apoptosis by inhibiting the proteasome activity.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhen; Bi, Caifeng; Schmitt, Sara M; Fan, Yuhua; Dong, Lili; Zuo, Jian; Dou, Q Ping

    2012-12-01

    Indole-3-acetic acid and indole-3-propionic acid, two potent natural plant growth hormones, have attracted attention as promising prodrugs in cancer therapy. Copper is known to be a cofactor essential for tumor angiogenesis. We have previously reported that taurine, L-glutamine, and quinoline-2-carboxaldehyde Schiff base copper complexes inhibit cell proliferation and proteasome activity in human cancer cells. In the current study, we synthesized two types of copper complexes, dinuclear complexes and ternary complexes, to investigate whether a certain structure could easily carry copper into cancer cells and consequently inhibit tumor proteasome activity and induce apoptosis. We observed that ternary complexes binding with 1,10-phenanthroline are more potent proteasome inhibitors and apoptosis inducers than dinuclear complexes in PC-3 human prostate cancer cells. Furthermore, the ternary complexes potently inhibit proteasome activity before induction of apoptosis in MDA-MB-231 human breast cancer cells, but not in nontumorigenic MCF-10A cells. Our results suggest that copper complexes binding with 1,10-phenanthroline as the third ligand could serve as potent, selective proteasome inhibitors and apoptosis inducers in tumor cells, and that the ternary complexes may be good potential anticancer drugs. PMID:23053530

  4. A database of global reference sites to support validation of satellite surface albedo datasets (SAVS 1.0)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loew, Alexander; Bennartz, Ralf; Fell, Frank; Lattanzio, Alessio; Doutriaux-Boucher, Marie; Schulz, Jörg

    2016-09-01

    Validating the accuracy and long-term stability of terrestrial satellite data products necessitates a network of reference sites. This paper documents a global database of more than 2000 sites globally which have been characterized in terms of their spatial heterogeneity. The work was motivated by the need for potential validation sites for geostationary surface albedo data products, but the resulting database is useful also for other applications. The database (SAVS 1.0) is publicly available through the EUMETSAT website (http://savs.eumetsat.int/, doi:10.15770/EUM_SEC_CLM_1001). Sites can be filtered according to different criteria, providing a flexible way to identify potential validation sites for further studies and a traceable approach to characterize the heterogeneity of these reference sites. The present paper describes the detailed information on the generation of the SAVS 1.0 database and its characteristics.

  5. Toxicity and behavioral effects of nootkatone, 1,10-dihydronootkatone, and tetrahydronootkatone to the formosan subterranean termite (Isoptera: Rhinotermitidae).

    PubMed

    Ibrahim, Sanaa A; Henderson, Gregg; Zhu, Betty C R; Fei, Huixin; Laine, Roger A

    2004-02-01

    Toxicity and behavioral effects of nootkatone and two of its derivatives, 1,10-dihydronootkatone and tetrahydronootkatone, to Coptotermes formosanus Shiraki were investigated on workers from two different colonies by using topical application assays, repellency assays, and sand barrier assays. The acute toxicity of the nootkatones on workers from both colonies increased as the saturation of the molecule increased, but the difference was significant for only one colony. The results of the repellency assays showed a similar trend of efficiency; the threshold concentration for significant repellency was four-fold higher in nootkatone treatments (50 ppm) than in the reduced derivatives 1,10-dihydronootkatone or tetrahydronootkatone (12.5 ppm). In sand barrier assays, a concentration of 100 ppm of any of the three chemicals significantly reduced termite survival, tunnel building, and food consumption after a 12-d exposure. Termites preexposed to 100 ppm nootkatone-treated sand and placed in containers without nootkatone for 15 d continued to exhibit abnormal feeding and digging behaviors; survivorship, tunneling, and feeding activities were significantly reduced by 83.5, 63.2, and 95.4%, respectively. Termites pretreated for 12 d at concentrations of 50 and 75 ppm nootkatone and tetrahydronootkatone returned to normal digging activity after they were removed from the treatments, but their feeding activity was significantly reduced. PMID:14998133

  6. GREEN BANK TELESCOPE ZPECTROMETER CO(1-0) OBSERVATIONS OF THE STRONGLY LENSED SUBMILLIMETER GALAXIES FROM THE HERSCHEL ATLAS

    SciTech Connect

    Frayer, D. T.; Maddalena, R.; Harris, A. I.; Baker, A. J.; Ivison, R. J.; Smail, Ian; Negrello, M.; Aretxaga, I.; Baes, M.; Birkinshaw, M.; Bonfield, D. G.; Burgarella, D.; Buttiglione, S.; Cava, A.; Cooray, A.; Dannerbauer, H.

    2011-01-10

    The Herschel Astrophysical Terahertz Large Area Survey (H-ATLAS) has uncovered a population of strongly lensed submillimeter galaxies (SMGs). The Zpectrometer instrument on the Green Bank Telescope (GBT) was used to measure the redshifts and constrain the masses of the cold molecular gas reservoirs for two candidate high-redshift lensed sources. We derive CO(1-0) redshifts of z = 3.042 {+-} 0.001 and z = 2.625 {+-} 0.001, and measure molecular gas masses of (1-3) x10{sup 10} M{sub sun}, corrected for lens amplification and assuming a conversion factor of {alpha} = 0.8 M{sub sun}( K km s{sup -1} pc{sup 2}){sup -1}. We find typical L(IR)/L'(CO) ratios of 120 {+-} 40 and 140 {+-} 50 L{sub sun}( K km s{sup -1} pc{sup 2}){sup -1}, which are consistent with those found for local ultraluminous infrared galaxies (ULIRGs) and other high-redshift SMGs. From analysis of published data, we find no evidence for enhanced L(IR)/L'(CO(1-0)) ratios for the SMG population in comparison to local ULIRGs. The GBT results highlight the power of using the CO lines to derive blind redshifts, which is challenging for the SMGs at optical wavelengths given their high obscuration.

  7. neuTube 1.0: A New Design for Efficient Neuron Reconstruction Software Based on the SWC Format 123

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Linqing

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Brain circuit mapping requires digital reconstruction of neuronal morphologies in complicated networks. Despite recent advances in automatic algorithms, reconstruction of neuronal structures is still a bottleneck in circuit mapping due to a lack of appropriate software for both efficient reconstruction and user-friendly editing. Here we present a new software design based on the SWC format, a standardized neuromorphometric format that has been widely used for analyzing neuronal morphologies or sharing neuron reconstructions via online archives such as NeuroMorpho.org. We have also implemented the design in our open-source software called neuTube 1.0. As specified by the design, the software is equipped with parallel 2D and 3D visualization and intuitive neuron tracing/editing functions, allowing the user to efficiently reconstruct neurons from fluorescence image data and edit standard neuron structure files produced by any other reconstruction software. We show the advantages of neuTube 1.0 by comparing it to two other software tools, namely Neuromantic and Neurostudio. The software is available for free at http://www.neutracing.com, which also hosts complete software documentation and video tutorials. PMID:26464967

  8. L1(0)-FePd nanocluster wires by template-directed thermal decomposition and subsequent hydrogen reduction

    SciTech Connect

    Cui, BZ; Marinescu, M; Liu, JF

    2013-12-14

    This paper reports the nanostructure, formation mechanism, and magnetic properties of tetragonal L1(0)-type Fe55Pd45 (at. %) nanocluster wires (NCWs) fabricated by thermal decomposition of metal nitrates and subsequent hydrogen reduction in nanoporous anodized aluminum oxide templates. The as-synthesized NCWs have diameters in the range of 80-300 nm, and lengths in the range of 0.5-10 mu m. The NCWs are composed of roughly round-shaped nanoclusters in the range of 3-30 nm in size and a weighted average size of 10 nm with a mixture of single-crystal and poly-crystalline structures. The obtained intrinsic coercivity H-i(c) of 3.32 kOe at room temperature for the tetragonal Fe55Pd45 NCWs is higher than those of electrodeposited Fe-Pd solid nanowires while among the highest values reported so far for L1(0)-type FePd nanoparticles. (C) 2013 AIP Publishing LLC.

  9. Mg Isotopes of USGS Igneous Rock Standards

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, F.; Glessner, J. J.; Lundstrom, C. C.

    2008-12-01

    Magnesium has three stable isotopes, 24Mg, 25Mg, and 26Mg with abundances of 78.99%, 10.00%, and 11.01%, respectively. It is one of the most abundant elements in the crust and mantle. As advancements of analytical techniques using MC-ICP-MS have dramatically advanced our ability to measure isotope ratios of Mg with greater precision, Mg isotopes can now be applied to study a variety of fundamental geological processes, such as continental crust weathering, chemical diffusion, and chondrule formation. Therefore the need for well characterized Mg isotope ratios for geological materials is increasingly important. Routine measurement of readily-available USGS rock standards is a viable way for inter-lab comparison to show the quality of data. However, the Mg isotope data for USGS standards reported in the literature are limited and inconsistent. USGS standards reported by different MC-ICP-MS labs have a range of Mg isotopic data outside of the normal external error of 0.1‰ (2σ). Mg isotopes of USGS igneous rock standards (dunite, DTS-1; basalts, BCR-1, BCR-2, BHVO-1; and andesite, AGV-1) were measured by a sample-standard bracketing method using a low resolution MC-ICP- MS (Nu-Plasma HR). The method has a large tolerance of matrix bias with Na/Mg and Al/Mg > 100% only changing the δ26Mg by less than 0.1‰. Dilution effects do not cause significant error (< 0.1‰) until the concentration difference between standard and sample is greater than 25%. The isobaric interference of CN+ on 26Mg was avoided by measuring Mg signal on the low mass shoulder. Only purified samples with excellent yields (>99.5%) and acceptable concentrations of matrix (mainly Na, Al, Ca, and Fe) are included in these results. Duplicate analyses of independently processed standards yielded the following results (δ26MgDSM-3 (‰)): BCR-2 (-0.306±0.144, - 0.290±0.116, -0.283±0.048, -0.288±0.057), BCR-1 (-0.399±0.079, -0.346±0.046), AGV-1 (-0.295±0.110, -0.307±0.086, -0.339±0.068), BHVO-1

  10. [Fluorescent probes for intracellular Mg2+ measurement].

    PubMed

    Komatsu, Hirokazu; Suzuki, Yoshio; Suzuki, Koji

    2004-08-01

    Recently, fluorescent probes are widely used as tools for dynamical measurement of ion distributions and concentrations in cells. They are highly sensitive, and offer imaging by the use of fluorescent microscopy in easily and less cell damaging way. This paper discusses the selectivity and optical character of the three novel Mg(2+) fluorescent probes. KMG-20AM offers ratiometric quantative measurement of Mg(2+), KMG-104 provides high-sensitive qualitative analysis and 3-D measurement. With those improved Mg(2+) fluorescent probes, the physiological and pathological role of Mg(2+) are going to be more and more clear. PMID:15577092

  11. Coherent interface structures and intergrain Josephson coupling in dense MgO/Mg2Si/MgB2 nanocomposites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ueno, Katsuya; Nagashima, Yukihito; Seto, Yusuke; Matsumoto, Megumi; Sakurai, Takahiro; Ohta, Hitoshi; Takahashi, Kazuyuki; Uchino, Takashi

    2016-07-01

    Many efforts are under way to control the structure of heterointerfaces in nanostructured composite materials for designing functionality and engineering application. However, the fabrication of high-quality heterointerfaces is challenging because the crystal/crystal interface is usually the most defective part of the nanocomposite materials. In this work, we show that fully dense insulator (MgO)/semiconductor(Mg2Si)/superconductor(MgB2) nanocomposites with atomically smooth and continuous interfaces, including epitaxial-like MgO/Mg2Si interfaces, are obtained by solid phase reaction between metallic magnesium and a borosilicate glass. The resulting nanocomposites exhibit a semiconductor-superconducting transition at 36 K owing to the MgB2 nanograins surrounded by the MgO/Mg2Si matrix. This transition is followed by the intergrain phase-lock transition at ˜24 K due to the construction of Josephson-coupled network, eventually leading to a near-zero resistance state at 17 K. The method not only provides a simple process to fabricate dense nanocomposites with high-quality interfaces, but also enables to investigate the electric and magnetic properties of embedded superconducting nanograins with good intergrain coupling.

  12. Zn2Mg alkaline phosphatase in an early ptolemeic mummy.

    PubMed

    Kaup, Y; Baumer, U; Koller, J; Hedges, R E; Werner, H; Hartmann, H J; Etspüler, H; Weser, U

    1994-01-01

    Bone samples of a ptolemeic mummy have been employed to study the mode of conservation on the intactness of Zn2Mg alkaline phosphatase in both structure and catalytic activity. A protein of M(r) = 190 +/- 10 kDa being identical to the 200 kDa enzyme of fresh human bones was successfully isolated. Regardless of age 200 kDa protein bands and a distinct subunit at 60 kDa were seen in SDS-PAGE electrophoresis. The 200 kDa band was also monitored by activity staining. The specific activity was 120 mU/mg and 65% of the respective activity obtained in the identical preparation using fresh human tibia or rib. The enzymic activity was inhibited in the presence of 1,10-phenanthroline and L-homoarginine. Radiocarbon dating supported the assignment of the mummy to the early ptolemeic period. Among the many bactericidal and fungicidal components employed for mummification were aromatic alcohols, mono- and sesquiterpenes. Pistachio resin was the major balm resin used. The microbiological sterility of the bone surface was ascertained by independent bacterial and fungal examinations.

  13. Melatonin administration in diabetes: regulation of plasma Cr, V, and Mg in young male Zucker diabetic fatty rats.

    PubMed

    Navarro-Alarcon, Miguel; Ruiz-Ojeda, Francisco J; Blanca-Herrera, Rosa M; Kaki, Abdullah; Adem, Abdu; Agil, Ahmad

    2014-03-01

    The use of melatonin, a neurohormone present in plants, represents an exciting approach for the maintenance of optimum health conditions. Melatonin administration ameliorates glucose homeostasis in Zucker diabetic fatty (ZDF) rats. The objective of this study was to investigate the effects of melatonin in diabetes in relation to the levels and regulation of plasma chromium (Cr), vanadium (V), and magnesium (Mg) in Zucker diabetic fatty (ZDF) and Zucker lean (ZL) rats. At the age of 6 weeks, ZDF (n = 30) and ZL (n = 30) groups were each subdivided into three groups: control (C) (n = 10), vehicle-treated (V') (n = 10) and melatonin-treated (M) (10 mg kg(-1) per day; n = 10) groups for a 6 week period. After treatment, plasma mineral concentrations were measured by flame (Mg) and electrothermal (Cr and V) atomic absorption spectrometry. No significant differences were found between the C and V' groups (p > 0.05). Plasma Mg levels were significantly lower in C-ZDF vs. C-ZL rats, demonstrating the presence of hypomagnesemia in this diabetes mellitus model. Plasma V and Cr levels were significantly higher in M-ZDF vs. C-ZDF rats. Plasma Mg levels in ZDF rats were not affected by melatonin treatment (p > 0.05). Melatonin administration ameliorates the diabetic status of ZDF rats by enhancing plasma Cr and V concentrations. This appears to be the first report of a beneficial effect of melatonin treatment on plasma Cr and V regulation in ZDF rats.

  14. Validation of GOSAT/TANSO-FTS TIR UTLS CO2 data (Version 1.0) using CONTRAIL measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saitoh, N.; Kimoto, S.; Sugimura, R.; Imasu, R.; Kawakami, S.; Shiomi, K.; Kuze, A.; Machida, T.; Sawa, Y.; Matsueda, H.

    2015-12-01

    The thermal infrared (TIR) band of the Thermal and Near Infrared Sensor for Carbon Observation (TANSO)-Fourier Transform Spectrometer (FTS) on board the Greenhouse Gases Observing Satellite (GOSAT) has been observing carbon dioxide (CO2) concentrations in several atmospheric layers since its launch. This study compared TANSO-FTS TIR V1.0 CO2 data and CO2 data obtained in the Comprehensive Observation Network for TRace gases by AIrLiner (CONTRAIL) project in the upper troposphere and lower stratosphere (UTLS), where the TIR band of TANSO-FTS is most sensitive to CO2 concentrations, to validate the quality of the TIR V1.0 UTLS CO2 data from 287 to 162 hPa. From a comparison made during flights between Tokyo and Sydney, the averages of the TIR upper atmospheric CO2 data agreed well with the averages of the data obtained by the CONTRAIL Continuous CO2 Measuring Experiment (CME) within 0.1 % for all of the seasons in the Southern Hemisphere. The results of a comparison for all of the eight airline routes showed that the agreement between the TIR and CONTRAIL CO2 data was within 0.5 % on average in the Northern Hemisphere, which was better than the agreement between a priori and CONTRAIL CO2 data. The quality of TIR lower stratospheric CO2 data depends largely on the information content, and therefore has a seasonal dependence. In high latitudes, TIR V1.0 lower stratospheric CO2 data are only valid in the summer. The magnitude of bias in the TIR upper atmospheric CO2 data did not have a clear longitudinal dependence. The comparison results for flights in northern low and middle latitudes showed that the agreement between TIR and CONTRAIL CO2 data in the upper troposphere was worse in the spring and summer than in the fall and winter. This could be attributed to a larger negative bias in the upper atmospheric a priori CO2 data in the spring and summer and a seasonal dependence of spectral bias in TANSO-FTS TIR Level 1B (L1B) radiance data. The negative bias in northern middle latitudes made the maximum of TIR CO2 concentrations lower than that of CONTRAIL CO2 concentrations, which leads to underestimate the amplitude of CO2 seasonal variation.

  15. 30 CFR 57.22235 - Actions at 1.0 percent methane (I-C, II-A, II-B, and IV mines).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Actions at 1.0 percent methane (I-C, II-A, II-B... AND NONMETAL MINES Safety Standards for Methane in Metal and Nonmetal Mines Ventilation § 57.22235 Actions at 1.0 percent methane (I-C, II-A, II-B, and IV mines). (a) If methane reaches 1.0 percent in...

  16. 30 CFR 57.22235 - Actions at 1.0 percent methane (I-C, II-A, II-B, and IV mines).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Actions at 1.0 percent methane (I-C, II-A, II-B... AND NONMETAL MINES Safety Standards for Methane in Metal and Nonmetal Mines Ventilation § 57.22235 Actions at 1.0 percent methane (I-C, II-A, II-B, and IV mines). (a) If methane reaches 1.0 percent in...

  17. 30 CFR 57.22235 - Actions at 1.0 percent methane (I-C, II-A, II-B, and IV mines).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Actions at 1.0 percent methane (I-C, II-A, II-B... AND NONMETAL MINES Safety Standards for Methane in Metal and Nonmetal Mines Ventilation § 57.22235 Actions at 1.0 percent methane (I-C, II-A, II-B, and IV mines). (a) If methane reaches 1.0 percent in...

  18. The puzzle of {sup 32}Mg

    SciTech Connect

    Fortune, H. T.

    2011-08-15

    An analysis of results of the {sup 30}Mg(t,p) {sup 32}Mg reaction demonstrates that the ground state is the normal state and the excited 0{sup +} state is the intruder, contrary to popular belief. Additional experiments are suggested.

  19. The effect of the MgO buffer layer thickness on magnetic anisotropy in MgO/Fe/Cr/MgO buffer/MgO(001)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kozioł-Rachwał, Anna; Nozaki, Takayuki; Zayets, Vadym; Kubota, Hitoshi; Fukushima, Akio; Yuasa, Shinji; Suzuki, Yoshishige

    2016-08-01

    The relationship between the magnetic properties and MgO buffer layer thickness d was studied in epitaxial MgO/Fe(t)/Cr/MgO(d) layers grown on MgO(001) substrate in which the Fe thickness t ranged from 0.4 nm to 1.1 nm. For 0.4 nm ≤ t ≤ 0.7 nm, a non-monotonic coercivity dependence on the MgO buffer thickness was shown by perpendicular magneto-optic Kerr effect magnetometry. For thicker Fe films, an increase in the buffer layer thickness resulted in a spin reorientation transition from perpendicular to the in-plane magnetization direction. Possible origins of these unusual behaviors were discussed in terms of the suppression of carbon contamination at the Fe surface and changes in the magnetoelastic anisotropy in the system. These results illustrate a method to control magnetic anisotropy in MgO/Fe/Cr/MgO(d) via an appropriate choice of MgO buffer layer thickness d.

  20. Twinning-mediated formability in Mg alloys

    PubMed Central

    Suh, Byeong-Chan; Kim, Jae H.; Hwang, Ji Hyun; Shim, Myeong-Shik; Kim, Nack J.

    2016-01-01

    Mg alloys are promising candidates for automotive applications due to their low density and high specific strength. However, their widespread applications have not been realized mainly because of poor formability at room temperature, arising from limited number of active deformation systems and strong basal texture. It has been recently shown that Mg-Zn-Ca alloys have excellent stretch formability, which has been ascribed to their weak basal texture. However, the distribution of basal poles is orthotropic, which might result in anisotropy during deformation and have adverse effect on formability. Here, we show that tension twinning is mainly responsible for enhanced formability of Mg-Zn-Ca alloys. We found that tension twinning is quite active during both uniaxial deformation and biaxial deformation of Mg-Zn-Ca alloy even under the stress conditions unfavourable for the formation of tensile twins. Our results provide new insights into the development of Mg alloys having high formability. PMID:26926655

  1. Preparation and characterization of Mg nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect

    Song Meirong; Chen Miao Zhang Zhijun

    2008-05-15

    In this paper, Mg nanoparticles were prepared in tetrahydrofuran via lithium reduction of the corresponding Mg salt. X-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscope investigations confirm the formation of hexagonal phase Mg particles with an average size of 300 nm. X-ray photoelectron spectrometer analysis indicates that the as-prepared Mg nanoparticles are covered with a protecting layer consisting of residue solvents, naphthalene and Mg(OH){sub 2}, which slows down further oxidation under ambient conditions. Thermal analysis shows that the rapid oxidation and nitridation processes of the particles take place at around 500 deg. C and 553 deg. C, respectively. Furthermore, the addition of a small amount of magnesium nanoparticles remarkably catalyzes the decomposition process of ammonium perchlorate by lowering the decomposition temperature and enhancing its heat output.

  2. Utilization of Photo-Cross-Linkable Polymer for Mild Steel Corrosion Inhibition in 1.0 M HCl Medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baskar, R.; Gopiraman, M.; Kesavan, D.; Subramanian, K.; Gopalakrishnan, S.

    2015-08-01

    Novel biphenyl-based photo-cross-linkable polymers were synthesized and characterized by nuclear magnetic resonance and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. Upon UV irradiation, the polymers were cross-linked even in the absence of photo initiator or sensitizers, and the rate of photo-cross-linking was examined and discussed. The effectiveness of both virgin and cross-linked polymers for corrosion resistance on mild steel in 1.0 M hydrochloric acid medium was investigated, using polarization studies, electrochemical impedance measurements as well as by adsorption isotherm and surface analysis. The results clearly indicated a dramatic increase in the efficiency of inhibition of corrosion on mild steel by the photo-cross-linked polymer as compared to virgin polymers.

  3. [DNAStat, version 1.0--a software package for processing a genetic profile database and for biostatistical calculations].

    PubMed

    Berent, Jarosław

    2006-01-01

    The application of DNA studies to the administration of justice has led to the necessity of developing appropriate computer programs. Such programs must address two critical problems, i.e. the broadly understood data processing and archivization, and biostatistical calculations. This paper discusses DNAStat 1.0, a program that enables its user to 1) create and process an individual database; 2) analyze biological evidence by calculating the unconditional f and conditional p(X/X) profile frequency, with the possibility of taking into account the inbreeding (coancestry) coefficient, as well as setting the minimum allele frequency; 3) analyze paternity cases by calculating the paternity index PI and probability of paternity W for full and motherless trios, with the possibility of taking into account the silent allele frequency and prior probability.

  4. The mass-luminosity relation for stars of mass 1.0 to 0.08 solar mass

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Henry, Todd J.; Mccarthy, Donald W., Jr.

    1993-01-01

    Mass-luminosity relations determined at IR wavelengths are presented for stars with masses 1.0 to 0.08 solar mass. Using IR speckle imaging techniques on a sample of nearby binaries, we have been able to concentrate on the lower main sequence, for which an accurate mass-luminosity calibration has remained problematic. In addition, the mass-visual luminosity relation for stars with 2.0-0.08 solar mass is produced by implementing new photometric relations linking V to JHK wavelengths for the nearby stars, supplemented with eclipsing binary information. These relations predict that objects with masses of about 0.08 solar mass have M(K) of about 10 and M(V) of about 18.

  5. Interfacial reaction in the synergistic extraction rate of Ni(II) with dithizone and 1,10-phenanthroline.

    PubMed

    Watarai, H; Sasaki, K; Takahashi, K; Murakami, J

    1995-11-01

    The kinetic synergistic effect of 1,10-phenanthroline (phen) on the extraction rate of Ni(II) with dithizone (HDz) into chloroform was studied by means of a high-speed stirring method combined with photodiode-array spectrophotometry. The initial extraction rate of the adduct complex NiDz(2)phen depended upon the concentrations of both HDz and phen, suggesting the formation of NiDzphen(+) as the rate-controlling step. When [HDz] < [phen], the initial extraction of NiDz(2)phen competed with the formation of an intermediate complex, which was adsorbed at the interface and assigned most probably to NiDzphen(+)(2). The intermediate complex was gradually converted to NiDz(2)phen at a later stage of the extraction. The rate constants for the formation and consumption of the intermediate were determined, and the kinetic mechanism in the synergistic extraction was discussed.

  6. WE-E-12A-01: Medical Physics 1.0 to 2.0: MRI, Displays, Informatics

    SciTech Connect

    Pickens, D; Flynn, M; Peck, D

    2014-06-15

    Medical Physics 2.0 is a bold vision for an existential transition of clinical imaging physics in face of the new realities of value-based and evidence-based medicine, comparative effectiveness, and meaningful use. It speaks to how clinical imaging physics can expand beyond traditional insular models of inspection and acceptance testing, oriented toward compliance, towards team-based models of operational engagement, prospective definition and assurance of effective use, and retrospective evaluation of clinical performance. Organized into four sessions of the AAPM, this particular session focuses on three specific modalities as outlined below. MRI 2.0: This presentation will look into the future of clinical MR imaging and what the clinical medical physicist will need to be doing as the technology of MR imaging evolves. Many of the measurement techniques used today will need to be expanded to address the advent of higher field imaging systems and dedicated imagers for specialty applications. Included will be the need to address quality assurance and testing metrics for multi-channel MR imagers and hybrid devices such as MR/PET systems. New pulse sequences and acquisition methods, increasing use of MR spectroscopy, and real-time guidance procedures will place the burden on the medical physicist to define and use new tools to properly evaluate these systems, but the clinical applications must be understood so that these tools are use correctly. Finally, new rules, clinical requirements, and regulations will mean that the medical physicist must actively work to keep her/his sites compliant and must work closely with physicians to ensure best performance of these systems. Informatics Display 1.0 to 2.0: Medical displays are an integral part of medical imaging operation. The DICOM and AAPM (TG18) efforts have led to clear definitions of performance requirements of monochrome medical displays that can be followed by medical physicists to ensure proper performance. However, effective implementation of that oversight has been challenging due to the number and extend of medical displays in use at a facility. The advent of color display and mobile displays has added additional challenges to the task of the medical physicist. This informatics display lecture first addresses the current display guidelines (the 1.0 paradigm) and further outlines the initiatives and prospects for color and mobile displays (the 2.0 paradigm). Informatics Management 1.0 to 2.0: Imaging informatics is part of every radiology practice today. Imaging informatics covers everything from the ordering of a study, through the data acquisition and processing, display and archiving, reporting of findings and the billing for the services performed. The standardization of the processes used to manage the information and methodologies to integrate these standards is being developed and advanced continuously. These developments are done in an open forum and imaging organizations and professionals all have a part in the process. In the Informatics Management presentation, the flow of information and the integration of the standards used in the processes will be reviewed. The role of radiologists and physicists in the process will be discussed. Current methods (the 1.0 paradigm) and evolving methods (the 2.0 paradigm) for validation of informatics systems function will also be discussed. Learning Objectives: Identify requirements for improving quality assurance and compliance tools for advanced and hybrid MRI systems. Identify the need for new quality assurance metrics and testing procedures for advanced systems. Identify new hardware systems and new procedures needed to evaluate MRI systems. Understand the components of current medical physics expectation for medical displays. Understand the role and prospect fo medical physics for color and mobile display devices. Understand different areas of imaging informatics and the methodology for developing informatics standards. Understand the current status of informatics standards and the role of physicists and radiologists in the process, and the current technology for validating the function of these systems.

  7. Large enhancement of magnetic moment in L1(0) ordered FePt thin films by Nd substitutional doping

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, D. B.; Sun, C J; Chen, J. S.; Heald, S M; Sanyal, B.; Rosenberg, R. A.; Zhou, T. J.; Chow, G. M.

    2015-07-01

    We studied L1(0) ordered Fe50Pt50-xNdx alloy films, which showed a large enhancement (similar to 18.4% at room temperature and similar to 11.7% at 10 K) of magnetic moment with 6 atomic % of Nd. Analysis of the x-ray magnetic circular dichroism spectra at the Fe L-3,L-2 edges and Nd M-5,M-4 edges in Fe50Pt44Nd6 films indicated a significant contribution of the Nd orbital moment. The origin of the large enhancement of magnetic moment was attributed to the effect of ferromagnetic coupling of the total magnetic moments between Fe and Nd. Density functional theory based first principles calculations supported the experimental observations of increasing moment due to Nd substitution of Pt.

  8. Development of a temperature-variable magnetic resonance imaging system using a 1.0 T yokeless permanent magnet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Terada, Y.; Tamada, D.; Kose, K.

    2011-10-01

    A temperature variable magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) system has been developed using a 1.0 T permanent magnet. A permanent magnet, gradient coils, radiofrequency coil, and shim coil were installed in a temperature variable thermostatic bath. First, the variation in the magnetic field inhomogeneity with temperature was measured. The inhomogeneity has a specific spatial symmetry, which scales linearly with temperature, and a single-channel shim coil was designed to compensate for the inhomogeneity. The inhomogeneity was drastically reduced by shimming over a wide range of temperature from -5 °C to 45 °C. MR images of an okra pod acquired at different temperatures demonstrated the high potential of the system for visualizing thermally sensitive properties.

  9. 3,4,7,8-Tetra­methyl-1,10-phenanthrolin-1-ium nitrate monohydrate

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Ke-Jie; Zhang, Yan-Fang

    2012-01-01

    In the crystal of the title compound, C16H17N2 +·NO3 −·H2O, the tetra­methyl-1,10-phenanthrolinium cations, nitrate anions and lattice water mol­ecules are all located on a mirror plane with the methyl H atoms of the cation equally disordered over two sites about the mirror plane. The cation, anion and water mol­ecule are linked by O—H⋯O and N—H⋯O hydrogen bonds into a sheet parallel to the bc plane. π–π stacking between phenanthroline ring systems is observed in the crystal structure, the centroid–centroid distance being 3.4745 (6) Å. PMID:22719684

  10. High spatial resolution observations of Orion bright bar: CS (J = 1-0) and H51. cap alpha. emission

    SciTech Connect

    Omodaka, T.; Hayashi, M.; Hasegawa, T.

    1984-07-15

    High-resolution strip maps of CS (J = 1-0) and H51..cap alpha.. line emission across the Orion bright bar are presented. The intensity of CS emission is weaker in the H II region with a rapid increase at the optical bar, while the H51 ..cap alpha.. line was detected only on the side of the H II region. The variation of the CS intensity can be reproduced by a beam-convolved step function with the position of the step coincident with the ionization front. The molecular cloud associated with the bright bar is redshifted relative to the ambient molecular cloud by about 2 km s/sup -1/. This may suggest the dynamical interactions between the molecular cloud and the H II region excited by the Trapezium stars.

  11. Syllabic (~2-5 Hz) and fluctuation (~1-10 Hz) ranges in speech and auditory processing

    PubMed Central

    Edwards, Erik; Chang, Edward F.

    2013-01-01

    Given recent interest in syllabic rates (~2-5 Hz) for speech processing, we review the perception of “fluctuation” range (~1-10 Hz) modulations during listening to speech and technical auditory stimuli (AM and FM tones and noises, and ripple sounds). We find evidence that the temporal modulation transfer function (TMTF) of human auditory perception is not simply low-pass in nature, but rather exhibits a peak in sensitivity in the syllabic range (~2-5 Hz). We also address human and animal neurophysiological evidence, and argue that this bandpass tuning arises at the thalamocortical level and is more associated with non-primary regions than primary regions of cortex. The bandpass rather than low-pass TMTF has implications for modeling auditory central physiology and speech processing: this implicates temporal contrast rather than simple temporal integration, with contrast enhancement for dynamic stimuli in the fluctuation range. PMID:24035819

  12. Response evaluation criteria for solid tumours in dogs (v1.0): a Veterinary Cooperative Oncology Group (VCOG) consensus document.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, S M; Thamm, D H; Vail, D M; London, C A

    2015-09-01

    In veterinary medical oncology, there is currently no standardized protocol for assessing response to therapy in solid tumours. The lack of such a formalized guideline makes it challenging to critically compare outcome measures across various treatment protocols. The Veterinary Cooperative Oncology Group (VCOG) membership consensus document presented here is based on the recommendations of a subcommittee of American College of Veterinary Internal Medicine (ACVIM) board-certified veterinary oncologists. This consensus paper has used the human response evaluation criteria in solid tumours (RECIST v1.1) as a framework to establish standard procedures for response assessment in canine solid tumours that is meant to be easy to use, repeatable and applicable across a variety of clinical trial structures in veterinary oncology. It is hoped that this new canine RECIST (cRECIST v1.0) will be adopted within the veterinary oncology community and thereby facilitate the comparison of current and future treatment protocols used for companion animals with cancer.

  13. Fluorescence studies, DNA binding properties and antimicrobial activity of a dysprosium(III) complex containing 1,10-phenanthroline.

    PubMed

    Khorasani-Motlagh, Mozhgan; Noroozifar, Meissam; Moodi, Asieh; Niroomand, Sona

    2013-10-01

    Luminescence and binding properties of dysprosium(III) complex containing 1,10-phenanthroline (phen), [Dy(phen)2(OH2)3Cl]Cl2⋅H2O with DNA has been studied by electronic absorption, emission spectroscopy and viscosity measurement. The thermodynamic studies suggest that the interaction process to be endothermic and entropically driven, which indicates that the dysprosium(III) complex might interact with DNA by a non intercalation binding mode. Additionally, the competitive fluorescence study with ethidium bromide and also the effect of iodide ion and salt concentration on fluorescence of the complex-DNA system is investigated. Experimental results indicate that the Dy(III) complex strongly binds to DNA, presumably via groove binding mode. Furthermore, the complex shows a potent antibacterial activity and DNA cleavage ability.

  14. Development of a temperature-variable magnetic resonance imaging system using a 1.0T yokeless permanent magnet.

    PubMed

    Terada, Y; Tamada, D; Kose, K

    2011-10-01

    A temperature variable magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) system has been developed using a 1.0 T permanent magnet. A permanent magnet, gradient coils, radiofrequency coil, and shim coil were installed in a temperature variable thermostatic bath. First, the variation in the magnetic field inhomogeneity with temperature was measured. The inhomogeneity has a specific spatial symmetry, which scales linearly with temperature, and a single-channel shim coil was designed to compensate for the inhomogeneity. The inhomogeneity was drastically reduced by shimming over a wide range of temperature from -5°C to 45°C. MR images of an okra pod acquired at different temperatures demonstrated the high potential of the system for visualizing thermally sensitive properties.

  15. A 128 x 128 InGaAs detector array for 1.0 - 1.7 microns

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Olsen, G.; Joshi, A.; Lange, M.; Woodruff, K.; Mykietyn, E.; Gay, D.; Ackley, D.; Erickson, G.; Ban, V.; Staller, C.

    1990-01-01

    A two-dimensional 128 x 128 detector array for the 1.0 - 1.7 micron spectral region has been demonstrated with indium gallium arsenide. The 30 micron square pixels had 60 micron spacing in both directions and were designed to be compatible with a 2D Reticon multiplexer. Dark currents below 100 pA, capacitance near 0.1 pF, and quantum efficiencies above 80 percent were measured. Probe maps of dark current and quantum efficiency are presented along with pixel dropout data and wafer yield which was as high as 99.89 percent (7 dropouts) in an area of 6528 pixels and 99.37 percent (103 dropouts) over an entire 128 x 128 pixel region.

  16. Palladium(II) complexes of 1,10-phenanthroline: Synthesis and X-ray crystal structure determination

    PubMed Central

    Adrian, Rafael A.; Broker, Grant A.; Tiekink, Edward R. T.

    2009-01-01

    Two palladium(II) complexes, [Pd(phen)(N≡CCH3)2][O3SCF3]2 (1) and [Pd(phen)(μ-OH)]2[O3SCF3]2·2H2O (2) (where phen= 1,10-phenanthroline), have been crystallized following the reaction of Pd(phen)Cl2 with silver triflate, Ag(O3SCF3), in acetonitrile and water, respectively. The structures of both complexes are based on a Pd(phen)2+ metal core, with two acetonitrile molecules binding in a monodentate fashion in complex 1 and two hydroxo bridges holding together two cores to form a dimer in complex 2. Additionally, both complexes present a hydrogen bonded 3-D network involving the triflate anions in 1, and water and triflate anions in 2. Both complexes have been characterized by infrared and 1H NMR spectroscopy and their crystal structures determined by X-ray crystallography. PMID:19693286

  17. Galaxy Zoo: Are bars responsible for the feeding of active galactic nuclei at 0.2 < z < 1.0?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheung, Edmond; Trump, Jonathan R.; Athanassoula, E.; Bamford, Steven P.; Bell, Eric F.; Bosma, A.; Cardamone, Carolin N.; Casteels, Kevin R. V.; Faber, S. M.; Fang, Jerome J.; Fortson, Lucy F.; Kocevski, Dale D.; Koo, David C.; Laine, Seppo; Lintott, Chris; Masters, Karen L.; Melvin, Thomas; Nichol, Robert C.; Schawinski, Kevin; Simmons, Brooke; Smethurst, Rebecca; Willett, Kyle W.

    2015-02-01

    We present a new study investigating whether active galactic nuclei (AGN) beyond the local universe are preferentially fed via large-scale bars. Our investigation combines data from Chandra and Galaxy Zoo: Hubble (GZH) in the AEGIS (All-wavelength Extended Groth strip International Survey), COSMOS (Cosmological Evolution Survey), and (Great Observatories Origins Deep Survey-South) GOODS-S surveys to create samples of face-on, disc galaxies at 0.2 < z < 1.0. We use a novel method to robustly compare a sample of 120 AGN host galaxies, defined to have 1042 erg s-1 < LX < 1044 erg s-1, with inactive control galaxies matched in stellar mass, rest-frame colour, size, Sérsic index, and redshift. Using the GZH bar classifications of each sample, we demonstrate that AGN hosts show no statistically significant enhancement in bar fraction or average bar likelihood compared to closely-matched inactive galaxies. In detail, we find that the AGN bar fraction cannot be enhanced above the control bar fraction by more than a factor of 2, at 99.7 per cent confidence. We similarly find no significant difference in the AGN fraction among barred and non-barred galaxies. Thus we find no compelling evidence that large-scale bars directly fuel AGN at 0.2 < z < 1.0. This result, coupled with previous results at z = 0, implies that moderate-luminosity AGN have not been preferentially fed by large-scale bars since z = 1. Furthermore, given the low bar fractions at z > 1, our findings suggest that large-scale bars have likely never directly been a dominant fuelling mechanism for supermassive black hole growth.

  18. PS1-10jh Continues to Follow the Fallback Accretion Rate of a Tidally Disrupted Star

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gezari, S.; Chornock, R.; Lawrence, A.; Rest, A.; Jones, D. O.; Berger, E.; Challis, P. M.; Narayan, G.

    2015-12-01

    We present late-time observations of the tidal disruption event candidate PS1-10jh. UV and optical imaging with Hubble Space Telescope/WFC3 localize the transient to be coincident with the host galaxy nucleus to an accuracy of 0.023 arcsec, corresponding to 66 pc. The UV flux in the F225W filter, measured 3.35 rest-frame years after the peak of the nuclear flare, is consistent with a decline that continues to follow a t‑5/3 power-law with no spectral evolution. Late epochs of optical spectroscopy obtained with MMT ∼ 2 and 4 years after the peak, enable a clean subtraction of the host galaxy from the early spectra, revealing broad helium emission lines on top of a hot continuum, and placing stringent upper limits on the presence of hydrogen line emission. We do not measure Balmer Hδ absorption in the host galaxy that is strong enough to be indicative of a rare, post-starburst “E+A” galaxy as reported by Arcavi et al. The light curve of PS1-10jh over a baseline of 3.5 years is best modeled by fallback accretion of a tidally disrupted star. Its strong broad helium emission relative to hydrogen (He iiλ4686/Hα > 5) could be indicative of either the hydrogen-poor chemical composition of the disrupted star, or certain conditions in the tidal debris of a solar-composition star in the presence of an optically thick, extended reprocessing envelope.

  19. Evolution of the fraction of clumpy galaxies at 0.2 < z < 1.0 in the cosmos field

    SciTech Connect

    Murata, K. L.; Kajisawa, M.; Taniguchi, Y.; Kobayashi, M. A. R.; Shioya, Y.; Capak, P.; Ilbert, O.; Koekemoer, A. M.; Salvato, M.; Scoville, N. Z.

    2014-05-01

    Using the Hubble Space Telescope/Advanced Camera for Surveys data in the COSMOS field, we systematically searched clumpy galaxies at 0.2 < z < 1.0 and investigated the fraction of clumpy galaxies and its evolution as a function of stellar mass, star formation rate (SFR), and specific SFR (SSFR). The fraction of clumpy galaxies in star-forming galaxies with M {sub star} > 10{sup 9.5} M {sub ☉} decreases with time from ∼0.35 at 0.8 < z < 1.0 to ∼0.05 at 0.2 < z < 0.4, irrespective of the stellar mass, although the fraction tends to be slightly lower for massive galaxies with M {sub star} > 10{sup 10.5} M {sub ☉} at each redshift. On the other hand, the fraction of clumpy galaxies increases with increasing both SFR and SSFR in all the redshift ranges we investigated. In particular, we found that the SSFR dependences of the fractions are similar among galaxies with different stellar masses, and the fraction at a given SSFR does not depend on the stellar mass in each redshift bin. The evolution of the fraction of clumpy galaxies from z ∼ 0.9 to z ∼ 0.3 seems to be explained by such SSFR dependence of the fraction and the evolution of SSFRs of star-forming galaxies. The fraction at a given SSFR also appears to decrease with time, but this can be due to the effect of the morphological k correction. We suggest that these results are understood by the gravitational fragmentation model for the formation of giant clumps in disk galaxies, where the gas mass fraction is a crucial parameter.

  20. PS1-10jh CONTINUES TO FOLLOW THE FALLBACK ACCRETION RATE OF A TIDALLY DISRUPTED STAR

    SciTech Connect

    Gezari, S.; Chornock, R.; Lawrence, A.; Rest, A.; Jones, D. O.; Berger, E.; Challis, P. M.; Narayan, G.

    2015-12-10

    We present late-time observations of the tidal disruption event candidate PS1-10jh. UV and optical imaging with Hubble Space Telescope/WFC3 localize the transient to be coincident with the host galaxy nucleus to an accuracy of 0.023 arcsec, corresponding to 66 pc. The UV flux in the F225W filter, measured 3.35 rest-frame years after the peak of the nuclear flare, is consistent with a decline that continues to follow a t{sup −5/3} power-law with no spectral evolution. Late epochs of optical spectroscopy obtained with MMT ∼ 2 and 4 years after the peak, enable a clean subtraction of the host galaxy from the early spectra, revealing broad helium emission lines on top of a hot continuum, and placing stringent upper limits on the presence of hydrogen line emission. We do not measure Balmer Hδ absorption in the host galaxy that is strong enough to be indicative of a rare, post-starburst “E+A” galaxy as reported by Arcavi et al. The light curve of PS1-10jh over a baseline of 3.5 years is best modeled by fallback accretion of a tidally disrupted star. Its strong broad helium emission relative to hydrogen (He iiλ4686/Hα > 5) could be indicative of either the hydrogen-poor chemical composition of the disrupted star, or certain conditions in the tidal debris of a solar-composition star in the presence of an optically thick, extended reprocessing envelope.

  1. Circadian Behavioral Study: LED vs Cool White Fluorescent - 0.1, 1, 10, 40, 80 lux. Part 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holley, Daniel C.; Syrkin, N.; Mele, G.

    2000-01-01

    Currently, the light source most commonly used in animal habitat lighting is cool white fluorescent (CWF) light. It was the objective of this study to evaluate a novel LED light source for use in animal habitat lighting by comparing its effectiveness to CWF light in producing and maintaining a normal circadian entrainment. The LED and CWF lights had similar spectral power distributions. Sprague-Dawley rats (175-350 g) were kept individually in metabolic cages, under a strict lighting control: 4 days of acclimation at 12:12 LD, 14 days of 12:12 LD, 14 days of 24:0 LD (free-run), and finally 12:12 LD. Food and water were provided ad libitum. Three behavioral parameters were monitored continuously: gross locomotor activity, drinking, and feeding. Combined mean free run periods (tau) were (mean +/- SEM): 24.6 +/- 0.1 and 24.7 +/- 0.2 at 0.1 lux, 25.5 +/- 0.1 and 25.7 +/- 0.1 at 1.0 lux, 25.3 +/- 0.2 and 25.4 +/- 0.2 at 10 lux, 25.8 +/- 0.1 and 25.9 +/- 0.1 at 40 lux, and 25.9 +/- 0.1 and 25.9 +/- 0.1 at 80 lux, CWF and LED respectively. ANOVA found a significant effect (p < 0.05) due to light level, but no difference in tau between rats exposed to constant CWF light and rats exposed to constant LED light. This study has shown that LED light can produce the same entrainment pattern as a conventional CWT light at similar intensities (0.1, 1, 10, 40, and 80 lux). LED light sources may be a suitable replacement for conventional light sources used in animal habitat lighting while providing many mechanical and economical advantages.

  2. Advanced communications technology satellite high burst rate link evaluation terminal communication protocol software user's guide, version 1.0

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reinhart, Richard C.

    1993-01-01

    The Communication Protocol Software was developed at the NASA Lewis Research Center to support the Advanced Communications Technology Satellite High Burst Rate Link Evaluation Terminal (ACTS HBR-LET). The HBR-LET is an experimenters terminal to communicate with the ACTS for various experiments by government, university, and industry agencies. The Communication Protocol Software is one segment of the Control and Performance Monitor (C&PM) Software system of the HBR-LET. The Communication Protocol Software allows users to control and configure the Intermediate Frequency Switch Matrix (IFSM) on board the ACTS to yield a desired path through the spacecraft payload. Besides IFSM control, the C&PM Software System is also responsible for instrument control during HBR-LET experiments, uplink power control of the HBR-LET to demonstrate power augmentation during signal fade events, and data display. The Communication Protocol Software User's Guide, Version 1.0 (NASA CR-189162) outlines the commands and procedures to install and operate the Communication Protocol Software. Configuration files used to control the IFSM, operator commands, and error recovery procedures are discussed. The Communication Protocol Software Maintenance Manual, Version 1.0 (NASA CR-189163, to be published) is a programmer's guide to the Communication Protocol Software. This manual details the current implementation of the software from a technical perspective. Included is an overview of the Communication Protocol Software, computer algorithms, format representations, and computer hardware configuration. The Communication Protocol Software Test Plan (NASA CR-189164, to be published) provides a step-by-step procedure to verify the operation of the software. Included in the Test Plan is command transmission, telemetry reception, error detection, and error recovery procedures.

  3. Atomic hydrogen adsorption and incipient hydrogenation of the Mg(0001) surface: a density-functional theory study.

    PubMed

    Li, Yanfang; Zhang, Ping; Sun, Bo; Yang, Yu; Wei, Yinghui

    2009-07-21

    We investigate the atomic hydrogen adsorption on Mg(0001) by using density-functional theory within the generalized gradient approximation and a supercell approach. The coverage dependence of the adsorption structures and energetics is systematically studied for a wide range of coverage Theta [from 0.11 to 2.0 monolayers (ML)] and adsorption sites. In the coverage range 0 < Theta < 1.0, the most stable among all possible adsorption sites is the on-surface fcc site followed by the hcp site, and the binding energy increases with the coverage, thus indicating the higher stability of on-surface adsorption and a tendency to the formation of H islands (clusters) when increasing the coverage within the region 0 < Theta < 1.0. The on-surface diffusion path energetics of atomic hydrogen as well as the activation barriers for hydrogen penetration from the on-surface to the subsurface sites are also presented at low coverage. At high coverage of 1.0 < Theta < or = 2.0, it is found that the coadsorption configuration with 1.0 monolayer of H residing on the surface fcc sites and the remaining (Theta-1.0) monolayer of H occupying the subsurface tetra-I sites is most energetically favorable. The resultant H-Mg-H sandwich structure for this most stable coadsorption configuration displays similar spectral features to the bulk hydride MgH(2) in the density of states. The other properties of the H/Mg(0001) system including the charge distribution, the lattice relaxation, the work function, and the electronic density of states are also studied and discussed in detail. It is pointed out that the H-Mg chemical bonding during surface hydrogenation displays a mixed ionic/covalent character.

  4. Investigation of the mechanical and degradation properties of Mg-Sr and Mg-Zn-Sr alloys for use as potential biodegradable implant materials.

    PubMed

    Brar, Harpreet S; Wong, Joey; Manuel, Michele V

    2012-03-01

    Magnesium (Mg) has garnered significant interest for its potential use as a biodegradable implant material. Of specific interest in this study is the effect of zinc (Zn) and strontium (Sr) additions on both the mechanical and degradation behaviors in Mg due to their established beneficial effect on strength and microstructural grain refinement while being biocompatible. Three binary Mg-x wt% Sr (x=0.5, 1.0, 1.5) alloys and three ternary Mg-x wt%Zn-0.5 wt% Sr (x=2.0, 4.0, 6.0) were studied to evaluate their mechanical and degradation behavior. Mechanical testing was performed at room temperature on solution-treated and peak aged alloys using microhardness and tensile tests. Degradation was studied using immersion tests in Hanks' solution. Results indicate a decrease in grain size and an increase in strength with increasing Sr and Zn content. When considering degradation behavior Mg-0.5 wt%Sr demonstrated the lowest degradation rate among binary alloys. At constant Sr content at 0.5 wt%, the addition of Zn increased the corrosion rate, with the highest rate for the Mg-6.0 wt%Zn-0.5 wt%Sr. The alloys which best optimized both mechanical and degradation behaviors were Mg-2.0 wt%Zn-0.5 wt%Sr and Mg-4.0 wt%Zn-0.5 wt%Sr. Finally, microstructure and property relationships were evaluated and discussed in reference to each alloy's potential use as a biodegradable implant material.

  5. UHV and Ambient Pressure XPS: Potentials for Mg, MgO, and Mg(OH)2 Surface Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Head, Ashley R.; Schnadt, Joachim

    2016-10-01

    The surface sensitivity of x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) has positioned the technique as a routine analysis tool for chemical and electronic structure information. Samples ranging from ideal model systems to industrial materials can be analyzed. Instrumentational developments in the past two decades have popularized ambient pressure XPS, with pressures in the tens of mbar now commonplace. Here, we briefly review the technique, including a discussion of developments that allow data collection at higher pressures. We illustrate the information XPS can provide by using examples from the literature, including MgO studies. We hope to illustrate the possibilities of ambient pressure XPS to Mg, MgO, and Mg(OH)2 systems, both in fundamental and applied studies.

  6. Diffusion of Ca and Mg in Calcite

    SciTech Connect

    Cygan, R.T.; Fisler, D.K.

    1999-02-10

    The self-diffusion of Ca and the tracer diffusion of Mg in calcite have been experimentally measured using isotopic tracers of {sup 25}Mg and {sup 44}Ca. Natural single crystals of calcite were coated with a thermally-sputtered oxide thin film and then annealed in a CO{sub 2} gas at one atmosphere total pressure and temperatures from 550 to 800 C. Diffusion coefficient values were derived from the depth profiles obtained by ion microprobe analysis. The resultant activation energies for Mg tracer diffusion and Ca self-diffusion are respectively: E{sub a}(Mg) = 284 {+-} 74 kJ/mol and E{sub a}(Ca) = 271 {+-} 80 kJ/mol. For the temperature ranges in these experiments, the diffusion of Mg is faster than Ca. The results are generally consistent in magnitude with divalent cation diffusion rates obtained in previous studies and provide a means of interpreting the thermal histories of carbonate minerals, the mechanism of dolomitization, and other diffusion-controlled processes. The results indicate that cation diffusion in calcite is relatively slow and cations are the rate-limiting diffusing species for the deformation of calcite and carbonate rocks. Application of the calcite-dolomite geothermometer to metamorphic assemblages will be constrained by cation diffusion and cooling rates. The direct measurement of Mg tracer diffusion in calcite indicates that dolomitization is unlikely to be accomplished by Mg diffusion in the solid state but by a recrystallization process.

  7. Sc(2)MgGa(2) and Y(2)MgGa(2).

    PubMed

    Sahlberg, Martin; Andersson, Yvonne

    2009-03-01

    Scandium magnesium gallide, Sc(2)MgGa(2), and yttrium magnesium gallide, Y(2)MgGa(2), were synthesized from the corresponding elements by heating under an argon atmosphere in an induction furnace. These intermetallic compounds crystallize in the tetragonal Mo(2)FeB(2)-type structure. All three crystallographically unique atoms occupy special positions and the site symmetries of (Sc/Y, Ga) and Mg are m2m and 4/m, respectively. The coordinations around Sc/Y, Mg and Ga are pentagonal (Sc/Y), tetragonal (Mg) and triangular (Ga) prisms, with four (Mg) or three (Ga) additional capping atoms leading to the coordination numbers [10], [8+4] and [6+3], respectively. The crystal structure of Sc(2)MgGa(2 )was determined from single-crystal diffraction intensities and the isostructural Y(2)MgGa(2) was identified from powder diffraction data. PMID:19265212

  8. Sc(2)MgGa(2) and Y(2)MgGa(2).

    PubMed

    Sahlberg, Martin; Andersson, Yvonne

    2009-03-01

    Scandium magnesium gallide, Sc(2)MgGa(2), and yttrium magnesium gallide, Y(2)MgGa(2), were synthesized from the corresponding elements by heating under an argon atmosphere in an induction furnace. These intermetallic compounds crystallize in the tetragonal Mo(2)FeB(2)-type structure. All three crystallographically unique atoms occupy special positions and the site symmetries of (Sc/Y, Ga) and Mg are m2m and 4/m, respectively. The coordinations around Sc/Y, Mg and Ga are pentagonal (Sc/Y), tetragonal (Mg) and triangular (Ga) prisms, with four (Mg) or three (Ga) additional capping atoms leading to the coordination numbers [10], [8+4] and [6+3], respectively. The crystal structure of Sc(2)MgGa(2 )was determined from single-crystal diffraction intensities and the isostructural Y(2)MgGa(2) was identified from powder diffraction data.

  9. Aqua-(dicyanamido-κN)(2,9-dimethyl-1,10-phenanthroline-κN,N')(nitrato-κO,O')cobalt(II)-2,9-dimethyl-1,10-phenanthroline-water (2/1/2).

    PubMed

    Cui, Feng-Hua; Zhao, Pei-Zheng

    2011-10-01

    In the title compound, 2[Co(C(2)N(3))(NO(3))(C(14)H(12)N(2))(H(2)O)]·C(14)H(12)N(2)·2H(2)O, the Co(II) ion is coordinated by a bidentate 2,9-dimethyl-1,10-phenanthroline (dmphen) ligand, a bidentate nitrate anion, a water mol-ecule and a monodentate dicyan-amide group in a distorted octa-hedral geometry. One uncoordinated dmphen mol-ecule is situated on a crystallographic twofold axis and the asymmetric unit is completed by one water mol-ecule. In the crystal, mol-ecules form a one-dimensional framework in the [001] direction through O-H⋯N and O-H⋯O hydrogen bonds. The crystal packing is further stabilized by π-π stacking inter-actions between the dmphen rings of neighboring mol-ecules, with a centroid-centroid separation of 3.5641 (8) Å and a partially overlapped arrangement of parallel dmphen rings with a distance of 3.407 (2) Å. PMID:22065101

  10. Intracomplex {pi}-{pi} stacking interaction between adjacent phenanthroline molecules in complexes with rare-earth nitrates: Crystal and molecular structures of bis(1,10-Phenanthroline)trinitratoytterbium and bis(1,10-Phenanthroline)trinitratolanthanum

    SciTech Connect

    Sadikov, G. G. Antsyshkina, A. S.; Rodnikova, M. N.; Solonina, I. A.

    2009-01-15

    Crystals of the compounds Yb(NO{sub 3}){sub 3}(Phen){sub 2} and La(NO{sub 3}){sub 3}(Phen){sub 2} (Phen = 1,10-phenanthroline) are investigated using X-ray diffraction. It is established that there exist two different crystalline modifications: the main modification (phase 1) is characteristic of all members of the isostructural series, and the second modification (phase 2) is observed only for the Eu, Er, and Yb elements. It is assumed that the stability and universality of main phase 1 are associated with the occurrence of the nonbonded {pi}-{pi} stacking interactions between the adjacent phenanthroline ligands in the complexes. The indication of the interactions is a distortion of the planar shape of the Phen molecule (the folding of the metallocycle along the N-N line with a folding angle of 11{sup o}-13{sup o} and its 'boomerang' distortion). The assumption regarding the {pi}-{pi} stacking interaction is very consistent with the shape of the ellipsoids of atomic thermal vibrations, as well as with the data obtained from thermography and IR spectroscopy. An analysis of the structures of a number of rare-earth compounds has demonstrated that the intracomplex {pi}-{pi} stacking interactions directly contribute to the formation of supramolecular associates in the crystals, such as molecular dimers, supramolecules, chain and layered ensembles, and framework systems.

  11. Comparative analysis of Mg-dependent and Mg-independent HCO3(-) ATPases.

    PubMed

    Dzneladze, S; Tsakadze, L; Leladze, M; Nozadze, E; Arutinova, N; Shioshvili, L; Chkadua, G

    2015-02-01

    The comparative analysis between two enzymes, Mg-dependent and Mg-independent HCO3(-) ATPases, were studied in synaptosomal and microsomal membrane fractions of albino rat brain, using the method of kinetic analysis of the multi-sited enzyme systems. Therefore, it can be inferred that Mg-dependent HCO3(-) ATPase belongs to the group of "P-type" transporting ATPases. Mg-independent HCO3(-) ATPase with its kinetic properties may be attributed to the group of "Ecto" ATPases.

  12. Mg Content Dependence of EML-PVD Zn-Mg Coating Adhesion on Steel Strip

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jung, Woo Sung; Lee, Chang Wook; Kim, Tae Yeob; De Cooman, Bruno C.

    2016-09-01

    The effect of coating thickness and Mg concentration on the adhesion strength of electromagnetic levitation physical vapor deposited Zn-Mg alloy coatings on steel strip was investigated. The phase fraction of Zn, Mg2Zn11, and MgZn2 was determined for a coating Mg concentration in the 0 to 15 wt pct range. Coatings with a Mg content less than 5 pct consisted of an Zn and Mg2Zn11 phase mixture. The coatings showed good adhesion strength and ductile fracture behavior. Coatings with a higher Mg concentration, which consisted of a Mg2Zn11 and MgZn2 phase mixture, had a poor adhesion strength and a brittle fracture behavior. The adhesion strength of PVD Zn-Mg alloy coatings was found to be related to the pure Zn phase fraction. The effect of coating thickness on adhesion strength was found to be negligible. The microstructure of the interface between steel and Zn-Mg alloy coatings was investigated in detail by electron microscopy, electron diffraction, and atom probe tomography.

  13. In vitro and in vivo comparison of binary Mg alloys and pure Mg.

    PubMed

    Myrissa, Anastasia; Agha, Nezha Ahmad; Lu, Yiyi; Martinelli, Elisabeth; Eichler, Johannes; Szakács, Gábor; Kleinhans, Claudia; Willumeit-Römer, Regine; Schäfer, Ute; Weinberg, Annelie-Martina

    2016-04-01

    Biodegradable materials are under investigation due to their promising properties for biomedical applications as implant material. In the present study, two binary magnesium (Mg) alloys (Mg2Ag and Mg10Gd) and pure Mg (99.99%) were used in order to compare the degradation performance of the materials in in vitro to in vivo conditions. In vitro analysis of cell distribution and viability was performed on discs of pure Mg, Mg2Ag and Mg10Gd. The results verified viable pre-osteoblast cells on all three alloys and no obvious toxic effect within the first two weeks. The degradation rates in in vitro and in vivo conditions (Sprague-Dawley® rats) showed that the degradation rates differ especially in the 1st week of the experiments. While in vitro Mg2Ag displayed the fastest degradation rate, in vivo, Mg10Gd revealed the highest degradation rate. After four weeks of in vitro immersion tests, the degradation rate of Mg2Ag was significantly reduced and approached the values of pure Mg and Mg10Gd. Interestingly, after 4 weeks the estimated in vitro degradation rates approximate in vivo values. Our systematic experiment indicates that a correlation between in vitro and in vivo observations still has some limitations that have to be considered in order to perform representative in vitro experiments that display the in vivo situation.

  14. Evaluating Land-Atmosphere-Ocean-Sea Ice Interface Processes in the Regional Arctic System Model (RASM1.0)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brunke, M.; Zeng, X.

    2015-12-01

    Earth System Models (ESMs) have problems simulating climate in the Arctic region. For instance, there continues to be a wide spread in the simulations of the interannual variability and long-term trends of sea ice in the 20th century in the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project (CMIP5) models. Thus, there is also a wide spread in the trends in sea ice decline projected for the 21st century in the CMIP5 models. Recently, the Regional Arctic System Model version 1.0 (RASM1.0) has been developed to provide improved high-resolution simulations of the Arctic atmosphere-ocean-sea ice-land system. A major baseline for the performance of RASM is its comparison with reanalysis (that provides the lateral boundary condition to drive RASM) and with the coarser-resolution ESMs. In this presentation, we will provide such a baseline with respect to the land-atmosphere-ocean-sea ice interface processes by comparing RASM with the Community Earth System Model (CESM) and three reanalysis products. First, 2-m air temperature, surface radiative and turbulent fluxes, and precipitation are compared to global datasets to assess the representation of these quantities in the models and reanalyses regionally. It is found that these quantities are generally better represented over land than over the oceans and sea ice. Then, we will further compare RASM, CESM, and reanalysis products with surface observations made at land flux towers, during northern high-latitude ship cruises over the oceans, and during the Surface Heat Budget of the Arctic Ocean (SHEBA) experiment over sea ice. In these comparisons, we will focus on both the annual and diurnal cycles. For instance, the snow versus snow-free period over land will be emphasized, because the land-atmosphere coupling mechanism differs between the two periods. The impact of radiative fluxes on the diurnal temperature errors will also be emphasized. Furthermore, our newly-developed snow depth and snow water equivalent data over several 2deg X 2deg areas will be used to evaluate RASM, CESM, and reanalyses.

  15. Aircraft routing with minimal climate impact: the REACT4C climate cost function modelling approach (V1.0)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grewe, V.; Frömming, C.; Matthes, S.; Brinkop, S.; Ponater, M.; Dietmüller, S.; Jöckel, P.; Garny, H.; Tsati, E.; Dahlmann, K.; Søvde, O. A.; Fuglestvedt, J.; Berntsen, T. K.; Shine, K. P.; Irvine, E. A.; Champougny, T.; Hullah, P.

    2014-01-01

    In addition to CO2, the climate impact of aviation is strongly influenced by non-CO2 emissions, such as nitrogen oxides, influencing ozone and methane, and water vapour, which can lead to the formation of persistent contrails in ice-supersaturated regions. Because these non-CO2 emission effects are characterised by a short lifetime, their climate impact largely depends on emission location and time; that is to say, emissions in certain locations (or times) can lead to a greater climate impact (even on the global average) than the same emission in other locations (or times). Avoiding these climate-sensitive regions might thus be beneficial to climate. Here, we describe a modelling chain for investigating this climate impact mitigation option. This modelling chain forms a multi-step modelling approach, starting with the simulation of the fate of emissions released at a certain location and time (time-region grid points). This is performed with the chemistry-climate model EMAC, extended via the two submodels AIRTRAC (V1.0) and CONTRAIL (V1.0), which describe the contribution of emissions to the composition of the atmosphere and to contrail formation, respectively. The impact of emissions from the large number of time-region grid points is efficiently calculated by applying a Lagrangian scheme. EMAC also includes the calculation of radiative impacts, which are, in a second step, the input to climate metric formulas describing the global climate impact of the emission at each time-region grid point. The result of the modelling chain comprises a four-dimensional data set in space and time, which we call climate cost functions and which describes the global climate impact of an emission at each grid point and each point in time. In a third step, these climate cost functions are used in an air traffic simulator (SAAM) coupled to an emission tool (AEM) to optimise aircraft trajectories for the North Atlantic region. Here, we describe the details of this new modelling approach and show some example results. A number of sensitivity analyses are performed to motivate the settings of individual parameters. A stepwise sanity check of the results of the modelling chain is undertaken to demonstrate the plausibility of the climate cost functions.

  16. Aircraft routing with minimal climate impact: the REACT4C climate cost function modelling approach (V1.0)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grewe, V.; Frömming, C.; Matthes, S.; Brinkop, S.; Ponater, M.; Dietmüller, S.; Jöckel, P.; Garny, H.; Tsati, E.; Søvde, O. A.; Fuglestvedt, J.; Berntsen, T. K.; Shine, K. P.; Irvine, E. A.; Champougny, T.; Hullah, P.

    2013-08-01

    In addition to CO2, the climate impact of aviation is strongly influenced by non-CO2 emissions, such as nitrogen oxides, influencing ozone and methane, and water vapour, forming contrails. Because these non-CO2 emission effects are characterised by a short lifetime, their climate impact largely depends on emission location and time, i.e. emissions in certain locations (or times) can lead to a greater climate impact (even on the global average) than the same emission in other locations (or times). Avoiding these climate sensitive regions might thus be beneficial to climate. Here, we describe a modelling chain for investigating this climate impact mitigation option. It forms a multi-step modelling approach, starting with the simulation of the fate of emissions released at a certain location and time (time-region). This is performed with the chemistry-climate model EMAC, extended by the two submodels AIRTRAC 1.0 and CONTRAIL 1.0, which describe the contribution of emissions to the composition of the atmosphere and the contrail formation. Numerous time-regions are efficiently calculated by applying a Lagrangian scheme. EMAC also includes the calculation of radiative impacts, which are, in a second step, the input to climate metric formulas describing the climate impact of the time-region emission. The result of the modelling chain comprises a four dimensional dataset in space and time, which we call climate cost functions, and which describe at each grid point and each point in time, the climate impact of an emission. In a third step, these climate cost functions are used in a traffic simulator (SAAM), coupled to an emission tool (AEM) to optimise aircraft trajectories for the North Atlantic region. Here, we describe the details of this new modelling approach and show some example results. A number of sensitivity analyses are performed to motivate the settings of individual parameters. A stepwise sanity check of the results of the modelling chain is undertaken to demonstrate the plausibility of the climate cost functions.

  17. The Mg impurity in nitride alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Zvanut, M. E.; Willoughby, W. R.; Sunay, U. R.; Koleske, D. D.; Allerman, A. A.; Wang, Ke; Araki, Tsutomu; Nanishi, Yasushi

    2014-02-21

    Although several magnetic resonance studies address the Mg acceptor in GaN, there are few reports on Mg doping in the alloys, where hole production depends strongly on the Al or In content. Our electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) measurements of the p-type alloys suggest that the Mg impurity retains the axial symmetry, characteristic of a p-type dopant in both alloys; however, In and Al produce additional, different characteristics of the acceptor. In InGaN, the behavior is consistent with a lowering of the acceptor level and increasing hole density as In concentration increases. For AlGaN, the amount of neutral Mg decreases with increasing Al content, which is attributed to different kinetics of hydrogen diffusion thought to occur in samples with higher Al mole fraction.

  18. Enhancement of critical current density of MgB2 by doping Ho2O3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, C.; Zhao, Y.

    2006-12-01

    Mg1-x(Ho2O3)xB2 alloys were prepared by in situ solid state reaction to study the effect of magnetic Ho2O3 dopant on flux pinning behavior of MgB2. Crystal structure, Tc, and Hc2 were not affected by Ho2O3 doping; however, Jc and Hirr were significantly enhanced. In 5T field, the best sample (x =3%) reached Jc of 1.0×103, 2.0×104, and 1.2×105A/cm2 at 20, 10, and 5K, respectively, much higher than those achieved by nonmagnetic impurity, such as Ti-, Zr-, and Y2O3-doped MgB2. The observed magnetic HoB4 nanoparticles were attributed to be the source for the enhanced flux pinning effects.

  19. Formation of Mg{sub 2}Ni with enhanced kinetics: Using MgH{sub 2} instead of Mg as a starting material

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao Bin; Fang Fang; Sun Dalin; Zhang Qingan; Wei Shiqiang; Cao Fenglei; Sun Huai; Ouyang Liuzhang; Zhu Min

    2012-08-15

    At a temperature over the decomposition point (375 Degree-Sign C) of MgH{sub 2}, the formation of Mg{sub 2}Ni is greatly enhanced from the 2MgH{sub 2}+Ni system, as compared to the 2Mg+Ni system. In support of this finding, in-situ observation of X-ray absorption fine structure of the two systems indicates that Mg---Ni bonds form faster in the 2MgH{sub 2}+Ni system than in the 2Mg+Ni system. Furthermore, theoretical modeling also shows that Mg atoms are readily released from MgH{sub 2} using much less energy and thus are more available to react with Ni once the dehydrogenation of MgH{sub 2} occurs, as compared to normal Mg. - Graphical Abstract: The formation of Mg{sub 2}Ni is greatly enhanced by using MgH{sub 2} instead of Mg at a temperature higher than the MgH{sub 2} decomposition point. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A new and efficient synthesis of Mg-based compounds at a reduced temperature. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Mg{sub 2}Ni formation is enhanced by using MgH{sub 2} instead of Mg as a starting material. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer XAFS results show that Mg---Ni bonds are formed faster in 4MgH{sub 2}+Ni than in 4Mg+Ni. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer DFT calculations show that Mg atoms are released from MgH{sub 2} more readily than from Mg. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Mg formed by MgH{sub 2} dehydrogenation is more available to react with Ni than normal Mg.

  20. Mg/Ca of Continental Ostracode Shells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ito, E.; Forester, R. M.; Marco-Barba, J.; Mezquita, F.

    2007-12-01

    Marine ionic chemistry is thought to remain constant. This, together with the belief that marine calcifiers partition Mg/Ca in a systematic manner as functions of temperature (and Mg/Ca) of water forms the basis of the Mg/Ca thermometer. In continental settings both of these assumptions are usually not true. Continental waters contain a wide variety of solutes in absolute and relative ion concentrations. Hence, waters with identical Mg/Ca may have very different concentrations of Mg and Ca and very different anions. Here we use two examples to focus on the effects of ion chemistry on Mg/Ca partitioning in continental ostracode shells and we ignore the complexities of solute evolution, which can change Mg/Ca over timescales of minutes to millennia. Palacios-Fest and Dettman (2001) conducted a monthly study of ,Cypridopsis vidua at El Yeso Lake in Sonora, Mexico. They established a relation between temperature and average shell Mg/Ca using regression analyses on averaged data. When their Mg/Ca-temperature relation is applied to monthly ,C. vidua data from Page Pond near Cleveland, Ohio, water temperatures of -8 to -1°C are obtained. The observed Mg/Ca ranges for El Yeso Lake (0.31 to 0.46) and Page Pond (0.33 to 0.46) are similar, as are their specific conductivities (700 to 850μS for El Yeso Lake; 400 to 600μS for Page Pond). However, [Ca] is 140-260 mg/L for El Yeso, but only 70-90 mg/L for Page Pond. Page Pond data, in fact, shows a good temperature shell Mg/Ca relation for .C. vidua, but the relation is different from that at El Yeso. Hence, shell Mg/Ca is a multi-valued, family of curves function of temperature and Mg/Ca of water that depends on the [Mg] and [Ca] values in water and perhaps other factors. Our second example comes from sites near Valencia, Spain and involves shell data for ,Cyprideis torosa, an estuarine ostracode that is tolerant of a wide range of salinity and can live in continental waters as long as the carbonate alkalinity to Ca ratio is

  1. Determination of flavanol and procyanidin (by degree of polymerization 1-10) content of chocolate, cocoa liquors, powder(s), and cocoa flavanol extracts by normal phase high-performance liquid chromatography: collaborative study.

    PubMed

    Robbins, Rebecca J; Leonczak, Jadwiga; Li, Julia; Johnson, J Christopher; Collins, Tom; Kwik-Uribe, Catherine; Schmitz, Harold H

    2012-01-01

    An international collaborative study was conducted on an HPLC method with fluorescent detection (FLD) for the determination of flavanols and procyanidins in materials containing chocolate and cocoa. The sum of the oligomeric fractions with degree of polymerization 1-10 was the determined content value. Sample materials included dark and milk chocolates, cocoa powder, cocoa liquors, and cocoa extracts. The content ranged from approximately 2 to 500 mg/g (defatted basis). Thirteen laboratories representing commercial, industrial, and academic institutions in six countries participated in the study. Fourteen samples were sent as blind duplicates to the collaborators. Results from 12 laboratories yielded repeatability relative standard deviation (RSDr) values that were below 10% for all materials analyzed, ranging from 4.17 to 9.61%. The reproducibility relative standard deviation (RSD(R)) values ranged from 5.03 to 12.9% for samples containing 8.07 to 484.7 mg/g. In one sample containing a low content of flavanols and procyanidins (approximately 2 mg/g), the RSD(R) was 17.68%. Based on these results, the method is recommended for Official First Action for the determination of flavanols and procyanidins in chocolate, cocoa liquors, powder(s), and cocoa extracts. PMID:22970585

  2. Structure and Stability of GeAu{sub n}, n = 1-10 clusters: A Density Functional Study

    SciTech Connect

    Priyanka,; Dharamvir, Keya; Sharma, Hitesh

    2011-12-12

    The structures of Germanium doped gold clusters GeAu{sub n} (n = 1-10) have been investigated using ab initio calculations based on density functional theory (DFT). We have obtained ground state geometries of GeAu{sub n} clusters and have it compared with Silicon doped gold clusters and pure gold clusters. The ground state geometries of the GeAu{sub n} clusters show patterns similar to silicon doped gold clusters except for n = 5, 6 and 9. The introduction of germanium atom increases the binding energy of gold clusters. The binding energy per atom of germanium doped cluster is smaller than the corresponding silicon doped gold cluster. The HUMO-LOMO gap for Au{sub n}Ge clusters have been found to vary between 0.46 eV-2.09 eV. The mullikan charge analysis indicates that charge of order of 0.1e always transfers from germanium atom to gold atom.

  3. 1000 Genomes Selection Browser 1.0: a genome browser dedicated to signatures of natural selection in modern humans.

    PubMed

    Pybus, Marc; Dall'Olio, Giovanni M; Luisi, Pierre; Uzkudun, Manu; Carreño-Torres, Angel; Pavlidis, Pavlos; Laayouni, Hafid; Bertranpetit, Jaume; Engelken, Johannes

    2014-01-01

    Searching for Darwinian selection in natural populations has been the focus of a multitude of studies over the last decades. Here we present the 1000 Genomes Selection Browser 1.0 (http://hsb.upf.edu) as a resource for signatures of recent natural selection in modern humans. We have implemented and applied a large number of neutrality tests as well as summary statistics informative for the action of selection such as Tajima's D, CLR, Fay and Wu's H, Fu and Li's F* and D*, XPEHH, ΔiHH, iHS, F(ST), ΔDAF and XPCLR among others to low coverage sequencing data from the 1000 genomes project (Phase 1; release April 2012). We have implemented a publicly available genome-wide browser to communicate the results from three different populations of West African, Northern European and East Asian ancestry (YRI, CEU, CHB). Information is provided in UCSC-style format to facilitate the integration with the rich UCSC browser tracks and an access page is provided with instructions and for convenient visualization. We believe that this expandable resource will facilitate the interpretation of signals of selection on different temporal, geographical and genomic scales.

  4. Subcellular site of synthesis of the N-acetylgalactosamine (alpha 1-0) serine (or threonine) linkage in rat liver

    SciTech Connect

    Abeijon, C.; Hirschberg, C.B.

    1987-03-25

    We have studied the subcellular site of synthesis of the GalNAc(alpha-1-0) Ser/Thr linkage in rat liver. The specific and total activities of polypeptide:N-acetylgalactosaminyltransferase (using apomucin as exogenous acceptor) were highly enriched in membrane fractions derived from the Golgi apparatus; virtually no activity was detected in membranes from the rough and smooth endoplasmic reticulum. Vesicles of the above organelles (which were sealed and of the same membrane topographical orientation as in vivo) were able to translocate UDP-GalNAc into their lumen in an assay in vitro; the initial translocation rate into Golgi vesicles was 4-6-fold higher than that into vesicles from the rough and smooth endoplasmic reticulum. Translocation of UDP-GalNAc into Golgi vesicles was temperature dependent and saturable with an apparent Km of 8-10 microM. UDP-GalNAc labeled with different radioisotopes in the uridine and sugar was used to determine that the intact sugar nucleotide was being translocated in a reaction coupled to the exit of luminal UMP. Following translocation of UDP-GalNAc, transfer of GalNAc into endogenous macromolecular acceptors was detected in Golgi vesicles and not in those from the rough and smooth endoplasmic reticulum. The above results together with previous studies on the O-xylosylation of the linkage region of proteoglycans strongly suggest that, in rat liver, the bulk of O-glycosylation reactions occur in the Golgi apparatus.

  5. High-resolution land surface fluxes from satellite and reanalysis data (HOLAPS v1.0): evaluation and uncertainty assessment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loew, Alexander; Peng, Jian; Borsche, Michael

    2016-07-01

    Surface water and energy fluxes are essential components of the Earth system. Surface latent heat fluxes provide major energy input to the atmosphere. Despite the importance of these fluxes, state-of-the-art data sets of surface energy and water fluxes largely differ. The present paper introduces a new framework for the estimation of surface energy and water fluxes at the land surface, which allows for temporally and spatially high-resolved flux estimates at the quasi-global scale (50° S, 50° N) (High resOlution Land Atmosphere Parameters from Space - HOLAPS v1.0). The framework makes use of existing long-term satellite and reanalysis data records and ensures internally consistent estimates of the surface radiation and water fluxes. The manuscript introduces the technical details of the developed framework and provides results of a comprehensive sensitivity and evaluation study. Overall the root mean square difference (RMSD) was found to be 51.2 (30.7) W m-2 for hourly (daily) latent heat flux, and 84 (38) W m-2 for sensible heat flux when compared against 48 FLUXNET stations worldwide. The largest uncertainties of latent heat flux and net radiation were found to result from uncertainties in the solar radiation flux obtained from satellite data products.

  6. Biochemical investigation of yttrium(III) complex containing 1,10-phenanthroline: DNA binding and antibacterial activity.

    PubMed

    Khorasani-Motlagh, Mozhgan; Noroozifar, Meissam; Moodi, Asieh; Niroomand, Sona

    2013-03-01

    Characterization of the interaction between yttrium(III) complex containing 1,10-phenanthroline as ligand, [Y(phen)2Cl(OH2)3]Cl2⋅H2O, and DNA has been carried out by UV absorption, fluorescence spectra and viscosity measurements in order to investigate binding mode. The experimental results indicate that the yttrium(III) complex binds to DNA and absorption is decreasing in charge transfer band with the increase in amount of DNA. The binding constant (Kb) at different temperatures as well as thermodynamic parameters, enthalpy change (ΔH°) and entropy change (ΔS°), were calculated according to relevant fluorescent data and Vant' Hoff equation. The results of interaction mechanism studies, suggested that groove binding plays a major role in the binding of the complex and DNA. The activity of yttrium(III) complex against some bacteria was tested and antimicrobial screening tests shown growth inhibitory activity in the presence of yttrium(III) complex.

  7. Ultrasensitive and Rapid Determination of Folic Acid Using Ag Nanoparticles Enhanced 1, 10-Phenantroline-Terbium (III) Sensitized Fluorescence.

    PubMed

    Hassanzadeh, Robab; Lotfi, Ali; Bagheri, Nafiseh; Hassanzadeh, Javad

    2016-09-01

    A novel spectrofluorimetric probe based on Ag nanoparticle (AgNPs)-enhanced terbium (III) (Tb) fluorescence was introduced for the sensitive determination of folic acid (FA). The effect of gold and silver nanoparticles in different size was investigated on the well-known Tb sensitized fluorescence emission of 1, 10-phenantroline (Phen). The greatest fluorescence intensity was observed in the presence of AgNPs with a diameter of ~6 nm maybe due to their highest surface area. Furthermore, it's discovered that FA can form Tb-Phen -FA ternary complexes and cause a notable diminution in this enhanced fluorescence system. Based on this finding, a high sensitive and selective method was developed for the determination of FA. Effects of various parameters like Ag NPs, Phen and Tb(3+) concentration and pH of media were investigated. In the optimum circumstances, the fluorescence emission of AgNPs-Phen-Tb collection was declined linearly by increasing the concentration of FA in the range of 0.5 to 110 nmol L(-1). Limits of detection and quantification were achieved to be 0.21 and 0.62 nmol  L(-1), respectively. The method has good linearity, recovery, reproducibility and sensitivity, and was adequately exploited to follow FA content in pharmaceutical, fortified flour and human urine samples.

  8. Enhancement of CO(3-2)/CO(1-0) ratios and star formation efficiencies in supergiant H II regions

    SciTech Connect

    Miura, Rie E.; Espada, Daniel; Komugi, Shinya; Nakanishi, Kouichiro; Sawada, Tsuyoshi; Fujii, Kosuke; Kawabe, Ryohei; Kohno, Kotaro; Tosaki, Tomoka; Hirota, Akihiko; Minamidani, Tetsuhiro; Okumura, Sachiko K.; Kuno, Nario; Muraoka, Kazuyuki; Onodera, Sachiko; Kaneko, Hiroyuki

    2014-06-20

    We present evidence that super giant H II regions (GHRs) and other disk regions of the nearby spiral galaxy, M33, occupy distinct locations in the correlation between molecular gas, Σ{sub H{sub 2}}, and the star formation rate surface density, Σ{sub SFR}. This result is based on wide-field and high-sensitivity CO(3-2) observations at 100 pc resolution. Star formation efficiencies (SFEs), defined as Σ{sub SFR}/Σ{sub H{sub 2}}, in GHRs are found to be ∼1 dex higher than in other disk regions. The CO(3-2)/CO(1-0) integrated intensity ratio, R {sub 3-2/1-0}, is also higher than the average over the disk. Such high SFEs and R {sub 3-2/1-0} can reach the values found in starburst galaxies, which suggests that GHRs may be the elements building up a larger-scale starburst region. Three possible contributions to high SFEs in GHRs are investigated: (1) the I {sub CO}-N(H{sub 2}) conversion factor, (2) the dense gas fraction traced by R {sub 3-2/1-0}, and (3) the initial mass function (IMF). We conclude that these starburst-like properties in GHRs can be interpreted by a combination of both a top-heavy IMF and a high dense gas fraction, but not by changes in the I {sub CO}-N(H{sub 2}) conversion factor.

  9. Biochemical investigation of yttrium(III) complex containing 1,10-phenanthroline: DNA binding and antibacterial activity.

    PubMed

    Khorasani-Motlagh, Mozhgan; Noroozifar, Meissam; Moodi, Asieh; Niroomand, Sona

    2013-03-01

    Characterization of the interaction between yttrium(III) complex containing 1,10-phenanthroline as ligand, [Y(phen)2Cl(OH2)3]Cl2⋅H2O, and DNA has been carried out by UV absorption, fluorescence spectra and viscosity measurements in order to investigate binding mode. The experimental results indicate that the yttrium(III) complex binds to DNA and absorption is decreasing in charge transfer band with the increase in amount of DNA. The binding constant (Kb) at different temperatures as well as thermodynamic parameters, enthalpy change (ΔH°) and entropy change (ΔS°), were calculated according to relevant fluorescent data and Vant' Hoff equation. The results of interaction mechanism studies, suggested that groove binding plays a major role in the binding of the complex and DNA. The activity of yttrium(III) complex against some bacteria was tested and antimicrobial screening tests shown growth inhibitory activity in the presence of yttrium(III) complex. PMID:23384614

  10. Fluorescence and DNA-binding properties of neodymium(III) and praseodymium(III) complexes containing 1,10-phenanthroline

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khorasani-Motlagh, Mozhgan; Noroozifar, Meissam; Mirkazehi-Rigi, Sohaila

    2011-09-01

    The binding of neodymium(III) and praseodymium(III) complexes containing 1,10-phenanthroline, [M(phen) 2Cl 3·OH 2] (M = Nd ( 1), Pr ( 2)), to DNA has been investigated by absorption, emission, and viscosity measurements. The complexes show absorption decreasing in charge transfer band, fluorescence decrement when bound to DNA. The binding constant Kb has been determined by absorption measurement for both complexes and found to be (6.76 ± 0.12) × 10 4 for 1 and (1.83 ± 0.15) × 10 4 M -1, for 2. The fluorescence of [M(phen) 2Cl 3·OH 2] (M = Nd ( 1), Pr ( 2)) has been studied in detail. The results of fluorescence titration reveal that DNA has the strong ability to quenching the intrinsic fluorescence of Nd(III) and Pr(III) complexes through the static quenching procedure. The binding site number n, apparent binding constant Kb and the Stern-Volmer constant kSV are determined. Thermodynamic parameters, enthalpy change (Δ H°) and entropy change (Δ S°), are calculated according to relevant fluorescent data and Van't Hoff equation. The experimental data suggest that the complexes bind to DNA by non-intercalative mode. Major groove binding is the preferred mode of interaction for [M(phen) 2Cl 3·OH 2] (M = Nd ( 1), Pr ( 2)) with DNA.

  11. Synergistic lethal effect between hydrogen peroxide and neocuproine (2,9-dimethyl 1,10-phenanthroline) in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Almeida, C E; Felício, D L; Galhardo, R S; Cabral-Neto, J B; Leitão, A C

    1999-01-26

    Despite 2,9-dimethyl 1,10-phenanthroline (NC) has been extensively used as a potential inhibitor of damage due to oxidative stress in biological systems, the incubation of E. coli cultures with the copper ion chelator NC prior to the challenge with hydrogen peroxide caused a lethal synergistic effect. The SOS response seems to be involved in the repair of the synergistic lesions through the recombination pathway. Furthermore, there is evidence for the UvrABC excinuclease participation in the repair of the synergistic lesions, and the base excision repair may also be required for bacterial survival to the synergistic effect mainly at high concentrations of H2O2, being the action of Fpg protein an important event. Incubation of lexA (Ind-) cultures with iron (II) ion chelator 2,2'-dipyridyl simultaneously with NC prevented the lethal synergistic effect. This result suggests an important role of the Fenton reaction on the phenomenon. NC treatment was able to increase the number of DNA strand breaks (DNAsb) induced by 10 mM of H2O2 in lexA (Ind-) strain and the simultaneous treatment with 2,2'-dipyridyl was able to block this effect.

  12. HEMCO v1.0: A Versatile, ESMF-Compliant Component for Calculating Emissions in Atmospheric Models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keller, C. A.; Long, M. S.; Yantosca, R. M.; Da Silva, A. M.; Pawson, S.; Jacob, D. J.

    2014-01-01

    We describe the Harvard-NASA Emission Component version 1.0 (HEMCO), a stand-alone software component for computing emissions in global atmospheric models. HEMCO determines emissions from different sources, regions, and species on a user-defined grid and can combine, overlay, and update a set of data inventories and scale factors, as specified by the user through the HEMCO configuration file. New emission inventories at any spatial and temporal resolution are readily added to HEMCO and can be accessed by the user without any preprocessing of the data files or modification of the source code. Emissions that depend on dynamic source types and local environmental variables such as wind speed or surface temperature are calculated in separate HEMCO extensions. HEMCO is fully compliant with the Earth System Modeling Framework (ESMF) environment. It is highly portable and can be deployed in a new model environment with only few adjustments at the top-level interface. So far, we have implemented HEMCO in the NASA Goddard Earth Observing System (GEOS-5) Earth system model (ESM) and in the GEOS-Chem chemical transport model (CTM). By providing a widely applicable framework for specifying constituent emissions, HEMCO is designed to ease sensitivity studies and model comparisons, as well as inverse modeling in which emissions are adjusted iteratively. The HEMCO code, extensions, and the full set of emissions data files used in GEOS-Chem are available at http: //wiki.geos-chem.org/HEMCO.

  13. Electrochemical biosensor based on glucose oxidase encapsulated within enzymatically synthesized poly(1,10-phenanthroline-5,6-dione).

    PubMed

    Ciftci, Hakan; Oztekin, Yasemin; Tamer, Ugur; Ramanaviciene, Almira; Ramanavicius, Arunas

    2014-11-01

    This study is focused on the investigation of electrocatalytic effect of glucose oxidase (GOx) immobilized on the graphite rod (GR) electrode. The enzyme modified electrode was prepared by encapsulation of immobilized GOx within enzymatically formed poly(1,10-phenanthroline-5,6-dione) (pPD) film. The electrochemical responses of such enzymatic electrode (pPD/GOx/GR) vs. different glucose concentrations were examined chronoamperometrically in acetate-phosphate buffer solution (A-PBS), pH 6.0, under aerobic or anaerobic conditions. Amperometric signals of the pPD/GOx/GR electrode exhibited well-defined hyperbolic dependence upon glucose concentration. Amperometric signals at 100mM of glucose were 41.17 and 32.27 μA under aerobic and anaerobic conditions, respectively. Amperometric signals of the pPD/GOx/GR electrode decreased by 6% within seven days. The pPD/GOx/GR electrode showed excellent selectivity in the presence of dopamine and uric acid. Furthermore it had a good reproducibility and repeatability with standard deviation of 9.4% and 8.0%, respectively. PMID:25454754

  14. Ditching Tests of a 1/10-Scale Model of the North American XFJ-1 Airplane Ted No. NACA 314

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fisher, Lloyd J.; McBride, Ellis E.

    1948-01-01

    Tests were made of a 1/10-scale dynamically similar model of the North American XFJ-1 airplane to study its behavior when ditched. The model was landed in calm water at the Langley tank no. 2 monorail. Various landing attitudes, speeds, and conditions of damage were simulated. The behavior of the model was determined from visual observations, by recording the accelerations, and by taking motion pictures of the ditchings. Data are presented in tabular form, sequence photographs, and time-history acceleration curves. From the results of the tests it was concluded that the airplane should be ditched at the near-stall, tail-down landing attitude of 12 deg. The flaps should be fully extended to obtain the lowest possible landing speed. The wing-tip tanks should be jettisoned if any appreciable load of fuel remains; if empty, they should be retained for additional buoyancy. In a calm-water ditching the airplane will probably run about 600 feet Maximum longitudinal decelerations of about 2.5g and maximum vertical acceleration of about 2g will be encountered. The nose-intake duct will be clear of the water until practically all forward motion has stopped.

  15. Evaluation of road traffic noise abatement by vegetation treatment in a 1:10 urban scale model.

    PubMed

    Jang, Hyung Suk; Lee, Sung Chan; Jeon, Jin Yong; Kang, Jian

    2015-12-01

    A 1:10 scale of a street canyon and courtyard was constructed to evaluate sound propagation when various vegetation treatments including trees, shrubs, vegetated facades, and green roofs were installed in the urban environment. Noise reductions in the street canyon and courtyard were measured for both single and combined vegetation treatments. Vegetated facades mitigated the overall noise level up to 1.6 dBA in the street canyon, and greening facades were effective to reduce low frequency noise levels below 1 kHz. Trees increased the noise level at high frequency bands to some extent in the street canyon, while the noise level over 1 kHz decreased in the courtyard after installing the street trees. This is because tree crowns diffused and reflected high frequency sounds into the street canyon. Green roofs offered significant noise abatement over 1 kHz in the courtyard, while the vegetated facade was effective to reduce noise levels at low frequencies. In terms of the integrated effects of vegetation treatments, a combined vegetation treatment was less effective than the sum of single treatments in the street canyon. The maximum noise reduction observed for all combinations of vegetation treatments provided 3.4 dBA of insertion loss in the courtyard.

  16. Prediction of Turbulence-Generated Noise in Unheated Jets. Part 2; JeNo Users' Manual (Version 1.0)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Khavaran, Abbas; Wolter, John D.; Koch, L. Danielle

    2009-01-01

    JeNo (Version 1.0) is a Fortran90 computer code that calculates the far-field sound spectral density produced by axisymmetric, unheated jets at a user specified observer location and frequency range. The user must provide a structured computational grid and a mean flow solution from a Reynolds-Averaged Navier Stokes (RANS) code as input. Turbulence kinetic energy and its dissipation rate from a k-epsilon or k-omega turbulence model must also be provided. JeNo is a research code, and as such, its development is ongoing. The goal is to create a code that is able to accurately compute far-field sound pressure levels for jets at all observer angles and all operating conditions. In order to achieve this goal, current theories must be combined with the best practices in numerical modeling, all of which must be validated by experiment. Since the acoustic predictions from JeNo are based on the mean flow solutions from a RANS code, quality predictions depend on accurate aerodynamic input.This is why acoustic source modeling, turbulence modeling, together with the development of advanced measurement systems are the leading areas of research in jet noise research at NASA Glenn Research Center.

  17. Fluorescence and DNA-binding properties of neodymium(III) and praseodymium(III) complexes containing 1,10-phenanthroline.

    PubMed

    Khorasani-Motlagh, Mozhgan; Noroozifar, Meissam; Mirkazehi-Rigi, Sohaila

    2011-09-01

    The binding of neodymium(III) and praseodymium(III) complexes containing 1,10-phenanthroline, [M(phen)2Cl3·OH2] (M=Nd (1), Pr (2)), to DNA has been investigated by absorption, emission, and viscosity measurements. The complexes show absorption decreasing in charge transfer band, fluorescence decrement when bound to DNA. The binding constant Kb has been determined by absorption measurement for both complexes and found to be (6.76±0.12)×10(4) for 1 and (1.83±0.15)×10(4)M(-1), for 2. The fluorescence of [M(phen)2Cl3·OH2] (M=Nd (1), Pr (2)) has been studied in detail. The results of fluorescence titration reveal that DNA has the strong ability to quenching the intrinsic fluorescence of Nd(III) and Pr(III) complexes through the static quenching procedure. The binding site number n, apparent binding constant Kb and the Stern-Volmer constant kSV are determined. Thermodynamic parameters, enthalpy change (ΔH°) and entropy change (ΔS°), are calculated according to relevant fluorescent data and Van't Hoff equation. The experimental data suggest that the complexes bind to DNA by non-intercalative mode. Major groove binding is the preferred mode of interaction for [M(phen)2Cl3·OH2] (M=Nd (1), Pr (2)) with DNA.

  18. PPD v1.0--an integrated, web-accessible database of experimentally determined protein pKa values.

    PubMed

    Toseland, Christopher P; McSparron, Helen; Davies, Matthew N; Flower, Darren R

    2006-01-01

    The Protein pK(a) Database (PPD) v1.0 provides a compendium of protein residue-specific ionization equilibria (pK(a) values), as collated from the primary literature, in the form of a web-accessible postgreSQL relational database. Ionizable residues play key roles in the molecular mechanisms that underlie many biological phenomena, including protein folding and enzyme catalysis. The PPD serves as a general protein pK(a) archive and as a source of data that allows for the development and improvement of pK(a) prediction systems. The database is accessed through an HTML interface, which offers two fast, efficient search methods: an amino acid-based query and a Basic Local Alignment Search Tool search. Entries also give details of experimental techniques and links to other key databases, such as National Center for Biotechnology Information and the Protein Data Bank, providing the user with considerable background information. The database can be found at the following URL: http://www.jenner.ac.uk/PPD. PMID:16381845

  19. Correlation study of theoretical and experimental results for spin tests of a 1/10 scale radio control model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bihrle, W., Jr.

    1976-01-01

    A correlation study was conducted to determine the ability of current analytical spin prediction techniques to predict the flight motions of a current fighter airplane configuration during the spin entry, the developed spin, and the spin recovery motions. The airplane math model used aerodynamics measured on an exact replica of the flight test model using conventional static and forced-oscillation wind-tunnel test techniques and a recently developed rotation-balance test apparatus capable of measuring aerodynamics under steady spinning conditions. An attempt was made to predict the flight motions measured during stall/spin flight testing of an unpowered, radio-controlled model designed to be a 1/10 scale, dynamically-scaled model of a current fighter configuration. Comparison of the predicted and measured flight motions show that while the post-stall and spin entry motions were not well-predicted, the developed spinning motion (a steady flat spin) and the initial phases of the spin recovery motion are reasonably well predicted.

  20. MarkerMiner 1.0: A new application for phylogenetic marker development using angiosperm transcriptomes1

    PubMed Central

    Chamala, Srikar; García, Nicolás; Godden, Grant T.; Krishnakumar, Vivek; Jordon-Thaden, Ingrid E.; De Smet, Riet; Barbazuk, W. Brad; Soltis, Douglas E.; Soltis, Pamela S.

    2015-01-01

    Premise of the study: Targeted sequencing using next-generation sequencing (NGS) platforms offers enormous potential for plant systematics by enabling economical acquisition of multilocus data sets that can resolve difficult phylogenetic problems. However, because discovery of single-copy nuclear (SCN) loci from NGS data requires both bioinformatics skills and access to high-performance computing resources, the application of NGS data has been limited. Methods and Results: We developed MarkerMiner 1.0, a fully automated, open-access bioinformatic workflow and application for discovery of SCN loci in angiosperms. Our new tool identified as many as 1993 SCN loci from transcriptomic data sampled as part of four independent test cases representing marker development projects at different phylogenetic scales. Conclusions: MarkerMiner is an easy-to-use and effective tool for discovery of putative SCN loci. It can be run locally or via the Web, and its tabular and alignment outputs facilitate efficient downstream assessments of phylogenetic utility, locus selection, intron-exon boundary prediction, and primer or probe development. PMID:25909041

  1. Cu(I) complexes of 3,3'-polymethylene bridged derivatives of 2,2'-bi-1,10-phenanthroline.

    PubMed

    Riesgo, Elvira C; Hu, Yi-Zhen; Thummel, Randolph P

    2003-10-20

    A series of 3,3'-polymethylene-2,2'-bi-1,10-phenanthrolines coordinate with Cu(I) to form dinuclear complexes [(CuL)(2)](2+). As the 3,3'-bridge is lengthened from two to four carbons, the ligand becomes more twisted about the 2,2'-bond, favoring dinuclear coordination. The distance between the two copper atoms varies from 2.92 A for the dimethylene-bridged system to 3.59 A for the tetramethylene bridge. Favorable pi-stacking interactions occur between opposing ligands and promote complex formation. Competition experiments indicate that self-recognition is important and only homoleptic complexes are observed. Under equilibrium conditions, formation of the tetramethylene-bridged complex appears to be the most favored while the dimethylene-bridged system is least favored. The intensity of the long wavelength metal-ligand charge-transfer absorption band decreases as the 3,3'-bridge is shortened. Interaction between the two copper centers is evidenced by a splitting of the oxidation wave, and this splitting increases as the Cu-Cu distance is decreased.

  2. The Zeeman effect and hyperfine interactions in J = 1-0 transitions of CH+ and its isotopologues.

    PubMed

    Amano, T

    2010-12-28

    The J = 1-0 transitions of (12)CH(+), (13)CH(+), and (12)CD(+) in the ground X(1)Σ(+) state have been unambiguously identified by using an extended negative glow discharge as an ion source. Unexpectedly large Zeeman splittings have been observed, and the (13)CH(+) line exhibits nuclear spin-rotation hyperfine splitting in addition to the Zeeman effect. The nuclear spin-rotation coupling constant was determined to be 1.087(50) MHz for the (13)C species. The rotational g-factor is found to be -7.65(29), in terms of the nuclear magneton for the J = 1 and v = 0 state, more than an order of magnitude larger than values for typical diamagnetic closed shell molecules. These larger than usual magnetic interactions for a (1)Σ molecule are caused by the large rotational energy and relatively small excitation energy of the excited A(1)Π state. The effective g-factor and the spin-rotation coupling constant obtained by ab initio calculations agree very well with the experimentally determined values.

  3. HEMCO v1.0: a versatile, ESMF-compliant component for calculating emissions in atmospheric models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keller, C. A.; Long, M. S.; Yantosca, R. M.; Da Silva, A. M.; Pawson, S.; Jacob, D. J.

    2014-07-01

    We describe the Harvard-NASA Emission Component version 1.0 (HEMCO), a stand-alone software component for computing emissions in global atmospheric models. HEMCO determines emissions from different sources, regions, and species on a user-defined grid and can combine, overlay, and update a set of data inventories and scale factors, as specified by the user through the HEMCO configuration file. New emission inventories at any spatial and temporal resolution are readily added to HEMCO and can be accessed by the user without any preprocessing of the data files or modification of the source code. Emissions that depend on dynamic source types and local environmental variables such as wind speed or surface temperature are calculated in separate HEMCO extensions. HEMCO is fully compliant with the Earth System Modeling Framework (ESMF) environment. It is highly portable and can be deployed in a new model environment with only few adjustments at the top-level interface. So far, we have implemented HEMCO in the NASA Goddard Earth Observing System (GEOS-5) Earth system model (ESM) and in the GEOS-Chem chemical transport model (CTM). By providing a widely applicable framework for specifying constituent emissions, HEMCO is designed to ease sensitivity studies and model comparisons, as well as inverse modeling in which emissions are adjusted iteratively. The HEMCO code, extensions, and the full set of emissions data files used in GEOS-Chem are available at http://wiki.geos-chem.org/HEMCO.

  4. HEMCO v1.0: A versatile, ESMF-compliant component for calculating emissions in atmospheric models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keller, C. A.; Long, M. S.; Yantosca, R. M.; Da Silva, A. M.; Pawson, S.; Jacob, D. J.

    2014-01-01

    We describe the Harvard-NASA Emission Component version 1.0 (HEMCO), a stand-alone software component for computing emissions in global atmospheric models. HEMCO determines emissions from different sources, regions and species on a user-specified grid and can combine, overlay, and update a set of data inventories and scale factors, selected by the user from a data library through the HEMCO configuration file. New emission inventories at any spatial and temporal resolution are readily added to HEMCO and can be accessed by the user without any pre-processing of the data files or modification of the source code. Emissions that depend on dynamic source types and local environmental variables such as wind speed or surface temperature are calculated in separate HEMCO extensions. HEMCO is fully compliant with the Earth System Modeling Framework (ESMF) environment. It is highly portable and can be deployed in a new model environment with only few adjustments at the top-level interface. So far, we have implemented HEMCO in the NASA GEOS-5 Earth System Model (ESM) and in the GEOS-Chem chemical transport model (CTM). By providing a widely applicable framework for specifying constituent emissions, HEMCO is designed to ease sensitivity studies and model comparisons, as well as inverse modeling in which emissions are adjusted iteratively. The HEMCO code, extensions, and data libraries are available at http://wiki.geos-chem.org/HEMCO.

  5. Absolute dynamic viscosity measurements of subcooled liquid oxygen from 0.15 MPa to 1.0 MPa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hilton, D. K.; Van Sciver, S. W.

    2008-01-01

    New absolute dynamic viscosity measurements of subcooled liquid oxygen are presented which were acquired in the pressure and temperature domains from 0.15 MPa to 1.0 MPa and from 55.20 K to 90.19 K, respectively. The measurements were acquired with an uncertainty of 1% at a 95% confidence level using a pressurized gravitational capillary (PGC) viscometer specifically designed for subcooled liquefied gases. The measurements are summarized by Arrhenius-Eyring plot parameters ( μ = Ae E/ RT), and interpreted with respect to the chemical reaction rate theory of viscosity by Eyring. The Arrhenius-Eyring plot parameters reproduce the dynamic viscosity measurements with only a 2% RMS error, which is remarkable considering just two parameters are involved, A, the factor which includes the weak pressure dependence of the dynamic viscosity, and E/ R, the barrier energy of the flow, where R is the universal gas constant. Although the Arrhenius-Eyring plot parameters do not have a discernible pressure dependence in the present work, the pressure coefficient versus temperature for the dynamic viscosity was determined from line plots of the dynamic viscosity versus pressure. The pressure coefficients suggest that the pressure dependence is very weak, yet positive, and increases with decreasing temperature. Measurements at pressures an order-of-magnitude higher are required to confirm this suggestion.

  6. Binding analysis of ytterbium(III) complex containing 1,10-phenanthroline with DNA and its antimicrobial activity.

    PubMed

    Moodi, Asieh; Khorasani-Motlagh, Mozhgan; Noroozifar, Meissam; Niroomand, Sona

    2013-01-01

    To evaluate the biological preference of [Yb(phen)₂(OH₂)Cl₃](H₂O)₂ (phen is 1,10-phenanthroline) for DNA, interaction of Yb(III) complex with DNA in Tris-HCl buffer is studied by various biophysical and spectroscopic techniques which reveal that the complex binds to DNA. The results of fluorescence titration reveal that [Yb(phen)₂(OH₂)Cl₃](H₂O)₂ has strongly quenched in the presence of DNA. The binding site number n, apparent binding constant K b, and the Stern-Volmer quenching constant K SV are determined. ΔH⁰, ΔS⁰, and ΔG⁰ are obtained based on the quenching constants and thermodynamic theory (ΔH⁰ > 0, ΔS⁰ > 0, and ΔG⁰ < 0). The experimental results show that the Yb(III) complex binds to DNA by non-intercalative mode. Groove binding is the preferred mode of interaction for [Yb(phen)₂(OH₂)Cl₃](H₂O)₂ to DNA. The DNA cleavage results show that in the absence of any reducing agent, Yb(III) complex can cleave DNA. The antimicrobial screening tests are also recorded and give good results in the presence of Yb(III) complex.

  7. Single mode operation with mid-IR hollow fibers in the range 5.1-10.5 µm.

    PubMed

    Sampaolo, Angelo; Patimisco, Pietro; Kriesel, Jason M; Tittel, Frank K; Scamarcio, Gaetano; Spagnolo, Vincenzo

    2015-01-12

    Single mode beam delivery in the mid-infrared spectral range 5.1-10.5 μm employing flexible hollow glass waveguides of 15 cm and 50 cm lengths, with metallic/dielectric internal layers and a bore diameter of 200 μm were demonstrated. Three quantum cascade lasers were coupled with the hollow core fibers. For a fiber length of 15 cm, we measured losses down to 1.55 dB at 5.4 μm and 0.9 dB at 10.5 μm. The influence of the launch conditions in the fiber on the propagation losses and on the beam profile at the waveguide exit was analyzed. At 10.5 µm laser wavelength we found near perfect agreement between measured and theoretical losses, while at ~5 µm and ~6 µm wavelengths the losses were higher than expected. This discrepancy can be explained considering an additional scattering loss effect, which scales as 1/λ(2) and is due to surface roughness of the metallic layer used to form the high-reflective internal layer structure of the hollow core waveguide. PMID:25835666

  8. Sequence characterization of river buffalo Toll-like receptor genes 1-10 reveals distinct relationship with cattle and sheep.

    PubMed

    Dubey, P K; Goyal, S; Kathiravan, P; Mishra, B P; Gahlawat, S K; Kataria, R S

    2013-04-01

    The present study was undertaken to characterize the full-length transcripts of Toll-like receptor (TLR) genes 1-10 of river buffalo. The conceptualized amino acid identity of bubaline TLRs ranged between 86% to 100% with ruminants, while it ranged between 45% to 91% with other vertebrate species. Simple modular architecture tool (SMART) analysis revealed the presence of TIR domains and varying numbers of leucine-rich repeat motifs in all the buffalo TLRs. With respect to TIR domains, TLRs 1, 2 and 3 of river buffalo were found to have 99.3% identity with cattle and 100% identity of TLRs 4, 6 and 10 with sheep. Phylogenetic analysis of TLRs of buffalo and different vertebrate species revealed the clustering of major TLR gene subfamilies with high bootstrap values. The evolutionary relationship between buffalo and other ruminant species was found to vary among different TLRs. In order to understand the relationship between TLRs of different ruminant species, multidimensional scaling (MDS) analysis of pairwise amino acid differences between different species within each TLR was performed. Buffalo and cattle were found to be closely related only with respect to TLRs 1, 2 and 7, while buffalo and sheep were found to be clustering together with respect to TLRs 3, 6, 8 and 10. The distinct relationship of bubaline TLRs with cattle and sheep revealed the possible differences in the pathogen recognition receptor systems in these animals and consequently the differences in their susceptibility/resistance to various invading organisms. PMID:22694123

  9. Diffusion behavior and distribution regulation of MgO in MgO-bearing pellets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Qiang-jian; Shen, Yan-song; Wei, Guo; Jiang, Xin; Shen, Feng-man

    2016-09-01

    In this paper, the diffusion behavior between MgO and Fe2O3 (the main iron oxide in pellets) is investigated using a diffusion couple method. In addition, the distribution regulation of MgO in MgO-bearing pellets is analyzed via pelletizing experiments. The results illustrate that MgO is prone to diffuse into Fe2O3 in the form of solid solution; the diffusion rate considered here is 13.64 µm·min-1. Most MgO content distributes in the iron phase instead of the slag phase. The MF phase {(Mg1-x Fex)O·Fe2O3, x ≤ 1} is generated in the MgO-bearing pellets. However, the distribution of MgO in the radial direction of the pellets is inconsistent. The solid solution portion of MgO in the MF phase is larger in the outer layer of the pellets than in the inner layer. In this work, the approximate chemical composition of the MF phase in the outer layer of the pellets is {(Mg0.35-0.77·Fe0.65-0.23) O·Fe2O3} and in the inner layer is {(Mg0.13-0.45·Fe0.87-0.55) O·Fe2O3}.

  10. Spontaneously intermixed Al-Mg barriers enable corrosion-resistant Mg/SiC multilayer coatings

    SciTech Connect

    Soufli, Regina; Fernandez-Perea, Monica; Baker, Sherry L.; Robinson, Jeff C.; Alameda, Jennifer; Walton, Christopher C.

    2012-07-24

    Magnesium/silicon carbide (Mg/SiC) has the potential to be the best-performing reflective multilayercoating in the 25–80 nm wavelength region but suffers from Mg-related corrosion, an insidious problem which completely degrades reflectance. We have elucidated the origins and mechanisms of corrosion propagation within Mg/SiC multilayers. Based on our findings, we have demonstrated an efficient and simple-to-implement corrosion barrier for Mg/SiC multilayers. In conclusion, the barrier consists of nanometer-scale Mg and Al layers that intermix spontaneously to form a partially amorphous Al-Mg layer and is shown to prevent atmospheric corrosion while maintaining the unique combination of favorable Mg/SiC reflective properties.

  11. Mg deficiency affects leaf Mg remobilization and the proteome in Brassica napus.

    PubMed

    Billard, Vincent; Maillard, Anne; Coquet, Laurent; Jouenne, Thierry; Cruz, Florence; Garcia-Mina, José-Maria; Yvin, Jean-Claude; Ourry, Alain; Etienne, Philippe

    2016-10-01

    In order to cope with variable mineral nutrient availability, higher plants have developed numerous strategies including the remobilization of nutrients from source to sink tissues. However, such processes remain relatively unknown for magnesium (Mg), which is the third most important cation in plant tissues. Using Mg depletion of Brassica napus, we have demonstrated that Mg is remobilized from old leaves to young shoot tissues. Moreover, this study showed that Mg depletion induces modification of nutrient uptake, especially Zn and Mn. Finally, comparative proteomic analysis of old leaves (source of Mg) revealed amongst other results that some proteins requiring Mg for their functionality (isocitrate dehydrogenase for example) were up-regulated. Moreover, down-regulation of proteases suggested that mobilization of Mg from old leaves was not associated with senescence. PMID:27362297

  12. A SURVEY OF Mg II ABSORPTION AT 2 < z < 6 WITH MAGELLAN/FIRE. I. SAMPLE AND EVOLUTION OF THE Mg II FREQUENCY

    SciTech Connect

    Matejek, Michael S.; Simcoe, Robert A.

    2012-12-20

    We present initial results from the first systematic survey for Mg II quasar absorption lines at z > 2.5. Using infrared spectra of 46 high-redshift quasars, we discovered 111 Mg II systems over a path covering 1.9 < z < 6.3. Five systems have z > 5, with a maximum of z = 5.33-the most distant Mg II system now known. The comoving Mg II line density for weaker systems (W{sub r} < 1.0 A) is statistically consistent with no evolution from z = 0.4 to 5.5, while that for stronger systems increases three-fold until z {approx} 3 before declining again toward higher redshifts. The equivalent width distribution, which fits an exponential, reflects this evolution by flattening as z {yields} 3 before steepening again. The rise and fall of the strong absorbers suggests a connection to the star formation rate density, as though they trace galactic outflows or other byproducts of star formation. The weaker systems' lack of evolution does not fit within this interpretation, but may be reproduced by extrapolating low redshift scaling relations between host galaxy luminosity and absorbing halo radius to earlier epochs. For the weak systems, luminosity-scaled models match the evolution better than similar models based on Mg II occupation of evolving cold dark matter halo masses, which greatly underpredict dN/dz at early times unless the absorption efficiency of small halos is significantly larger at early times. Taken together, these observations suggest that the general structure of Mg II-bearing halos was put into place early in the process of galaxy assembly. Except for a transient appearance of stronger systems near the peak epoch of cosmic star formation, the basic properties of Mg II absorbers have evolved fairly little even as the (presumably) associated galaxy population grew substantially in stellar mass and half-light radius.

  13. Fourier transform infrared emission spectra of MgH and MgD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shayesteh, A.; Appadoo, D. R. T.; Gordon, I.; Le Roy, R. J.; Bernath, P. F.

    2004-06-01

    High resolution Fourier transform infrared emission spectra of MgH and MgD have been recorded. The molecules were generated in an emission source that combines an electrical discharge with a high temperature furnace. Several vibration-rotation bands were observed for all six isotopomers in the X 2Σ+ ground electronic state: v=1→0 to 4→3 for 24MgH, v=1→0 to 3→2 for 25MgH and 26MgH, v=1→0 to 5→4 for 24MgD, v=1→0 to 4→3 for 25MgD and 26MgD. The new data were combined with the previous ground state data, obtained from diode laser vibration-rotation measurements and pure rotation spectra, and spectroscopic constants were determined for the v=0 to 4 levels of 24MgH and the v=0 to 5 levels of 24MgD. In addition, Dunham constants and Born-Oppenheimer breakdown correction parameters were obtained in a combined fit of the six isotopomers. The equilibrium vibrational constants (ωe) for 24MgH and 24MgD were found to be 1492.776(7) cm-1 and 1077.298(5) cm-1, respectively, while the equilibrium rotational constants (Be) are 5.825 523(8) cm-1 and 3.034 344(4) cm-1. The associated equilibrium bond distances (re) were determined to be 1.729 721(1) Å for 24MgH and 1.729 157(1) Å for 24MgD.

  14. AB Initio Characterization of MgCCH, MgCCH(+), and MgC2, and Pathways to their Formation in the Interstellar Medium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woon, David E.

    1996-01-01

    A study of Mg-bearing compounds has been performed in order to determine molecular properties which are critical for planning new astronomical searches and laboratory studies. The primary focus of the work is on MgCCH, MgCCH(+), and the isomers of MgC2. Only MgCCH has been identified in laboratory studies. Additional calculations have been carried out on MgH, MgNC, MgCN, and their cations in an effort to evaluate pathways to the formation of MgCCH and MgCCH(+) in the InterStellar Medium (ISM) or in circumstellar envelopes. Correlated ab initio methods and correlation-consistent basis sets have been employed. Properties including structures, rotational constants, dipole moments, and harmonic frequencies are reported. A transition state between linear MgCC and cyclic MgC2 has been characterized and was found to yield a minimal barrier (approx. 0.5 kcal/mole), indicating easy interconversion to the cyclic form. Direct reactions in the ISM between Mg or Mg(+) and HCCH are precluded by energetic considerations, but a number of ion- molecule or neutral-neutral exchange reactions between CCH and various Mg-containing species offer plausible pathways to MgCCH or MgCCH(+). Weakly bound MgH may react with CCH to form MgCCH, but MgH has not been detected. Both MgNC and MgCN have been observed, but reactions with CCH are slightly endothermic by 1-3 kcal/mole. Although MgH(+), MgNC(+), and MgCN(+) have not been detected, their reactions with CCH to form MgCCH(+) are all exothermic. With only a small barrier separating linear MgCC and cyclic MgC2, the dissociative recombination of MgCCH(+) with an electron is expected to yield cyclic MgC2, and regenerate Mg and CCH. New astronomical searches for MgCCH, MgCCH(+), cyclic MgC2, MgNC(+), and MgCN(+) will provide further insight into organo-magnesium astrochemistry.

  15. Temperature and impurity concentration effects on Mg(1-x)CoxGa2O4 photoluminescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sosman, L. P.; Tavares, A. Dias; da Fonseca, R. J. M.; Papa, A. R. R.

    2008-04-01

    Ceramic materials doped with magnetic ions that present emission in the visible and near-infrared spectral regions are very attractive due to their inherent tunability. Possible applications include their utilization as optoelectronic and display devices, as spintronic material, in signal transmission and information storage, in the fabrication of special papers, as dosimetric materials and room temperature solid state lasers. Materials doped with tetrahedrally coordinated Co2+ present wide bands originated from electronic transitions in the ionic unfilled 3d electronic shell. The Co2+ 3d electrons are outside of the ion core and therefore their optical properties are directly affected by static and dynamic properties of ligand anions. The magnesium gallate MgGa2O4 is a partially inverted spinel described as a AB2O4 material with two possible positions for A2+ and B3+ cations. Polycrystalline MgGa2O4 : Co2+ samples were produced by solid-state reactions between ultra-pure raw oxides MgO, β-Ga2O3 and the desired CoCO3 quantities. Photoluminescence data at room temperature and 77 K of MgGa2O4 polycrystalline samples doped with 0.1 and 1.0% of Co2+ are presented. The visible emission observed is attributed to the 4T1(4P) →4A2(4F) spin-allowed transition of Co2+ ions tetrahedrally coordinated by O2- ions. The photoluminescence intensity decreases with temperature, but 90% of the 77 K emission integrated intensity remains at room temperature. Moreover, from lifetime results we estimate that Co2+ emission quantum efficiency is about 1.0 at room temperature. We also observe that between 0.1 and 1.0% of Co2+ the luminescence intensity decreases. For 1.0% of Co2+ the luminescence intensity is 37% of the obtained for 0.1%. This fact is attributed to non-radiative transfer processes of impurity ion relaxation that become competitive at 1.0% of Co2+ and show that there is a strongly impurity-concentration luminescence dependence. We also observed that for the higher

  16. Additive In Vitro Antiplasmodial Effect of N-Alkyl and N-Benzyl-1,10-Phenanthroline Derivatives and Cysteine Protease Inhibitor E64

    PubMed Central

    Wijayanti, Mahardika Agus; Sholikhah, Eti Nurwening; Hadanu, Ruslin; Jumina, Jumina; Supargiyono, Supargiyono; Mustofa, Mustofa

    2010-01-01

    Potential new targets for antimalarial chemotherapy include parasite proteases, which are required for several cellular functions during the Plasmodium falciparum life cycle. Four new derivatives of N-alkyl and N-benzyl-1,10-phenanthroline have been synthesized. Those are (1)-N-methyl-1,10-phenanthrolinium sulfate, (1)-N-ethyl-1,10-phenanthrolinium sulfate, (1)-N-benzyl-1,10-phenanthrolinium chloride, and (1)-N-benzyl-1,10-phenanthrolinium iodide. Those compounds had potential antiplasmodial activity with IC50 values from 260.42 to 465.38 nM. Cysteine proteinase inhibitor E64 was used to investigate the mechanism of action of N-alkyl and N-benzyl-1,10-phenanthroline derivatives. A modified fixed-ratio isobologram method was used to study the in vitro interactions between the new compounds with either E64 or chloroquine. The interaction between N-alkyl and N-benzyl-1,10-phenanthroline derivatives and E64 was additive as well as their interactions with chloroquine were also additive. Antimalarial mechanism of chloroquine is mainly on the inhibition of hemozoin formation. As the interaction of chloroquine and E64 was additive, the results indicated that these new compounds had a mechanism of action by inhibiting Plasmodium proteases. PMID:22332022

  17. Evolution of the Fraction of Clumpy Galaxies at 0.2 < z < 1.0 in the COSMOS Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murata, K. L.; Kajisawa, M.; Taniguchi, Y.; Kobayashi, M. A. R.; Shioya, Y.; Capak, P.; Ilbert, O.; Koekemoer, A. M.; Salvato, M.; Scoville, N. Z.

    2014-05-01

    Using the Hubble Space Telescope/Advanced Camera for Surveys data in the COSMOS field, we systematically searched clumpy galaxies at 0.2 < z < 1.0 and investigated the fraction of clumpy galaxies and its evolution as a function of stellar mass, star formation rate (SFR), and specific SFR (SSFR). The fraction of clumpy galaxies in star-forming galaxies with M star > 109.5 M ⊙ decreases with time from ~0.35 at 0.8 < z < 1.0 to ~0.05 at 0.2 < z < 0.4, irrespective of the stellar mass, although the fraction tends to be slightly lower for massive galaxies with M star > 1010.5 M ⊙ at each redshift. On the other hand, the fraction of clumpy galaxies increases with increasing both SFR and SSFR in all the redshift ranges we investigated. In particular, we found that the SSFR dependences of the fractions are similar among galaxies with different stellar masses, and the fraction at a given SSFR does not depend on the stellar mass in each redshift bin. The evolution of the fraction of clumpy galaxies from z ~ 0.9 to z ~ 0.3 seems to be explained by such SSFR dependence of the fraction and the evolution of SSFRs of star-forming galaxies. The fraction at a given SSFR also appears to decrease with time, but this can be due to the effect of the morphological k correction. We suggest that these results are understood by the gravitational fragmentation model for the formation of giant clumps in disk galaxies, where the gas mass fraction is a crucial parameter. Based on observations with the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope, obtained at the Space Telescope Science Institute, which is operated by AURA, Inc., under NASA contract NAS 5-26555. Also based on observations made with the Spitzer Space Telescope, which is operated by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, under NASA contract 1407. Also based on data collected at the Subaru Telescope, which is operated by the National Astronomical Observatory of Japan; the XMM-Newton, an ESA science mission with instruments and contributions directly funded by ESA Member States and NASA; the European Southern Observatory under Large Program 175.A-0839, Chile; Kitt Peak National Observatory, Cerro Tololo Inter-American Observatory and the National Optical Astronomy Observatory, which are operated by the Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy, Inc. (AURA), under cooperative agreement with the National Science Foundation; and the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope with MegaPrime/MegaCam operated as a joint project by the CFHT Corporation, CEA/DAPNIA, the NRC and CADC of Canada, the CNRS of France, TERAPIX, and the University of Hawaii.

  18. The structure of CO{sub 2} hydrate between 0.7 and 1.0 GPa

    SciTech Connect

    Tulk, C. A.; Molaison, J. J.; Machida, S.; Klug, D. D.; Lu, H.; Guthrie, M.

    2014-11-07

    A deuterated sample of CO{sub 2} structure I (sI) clathrate hydrate (CO{sub 2}·8.3 D{sub 2}O) has been formed and neutron diffraction experiments up to 1.0 GPa at 240 K were performed. The sI CO{sub 2} hydrate transformed at 0.7 GPa into the high pressure phase that had been observed previously by Hirai et al. [J. Phys. Chem. 133, 124511 (2010)] and Bollengier et al. [Geochim. Cosmochim. Acta 119, 322 (2013)], but which had not been structurally identified. The current neutron diffraction data were successfully fitted to a filled ice structure with CO{sub 2} molecules filling the water channels. This CO{sub 2}+water system has also been investigated using classical molecular dynamics and density functional ab initio methods to provide additional characterization of the high pressure structure. Both models indicate the water network adapts a MH-III “like” filled ice structure with considerable disorder of the orientations of the CO{sub 2} molecule. Furthermore, the disorder appears to be a direct result of the level of proton disorder in the water network. In contrast to the conclusions of Bollengier et al., our neutron diffraction data show that the filled ice phase can be recovered to ambient pressure (0.1 MPa) at 96 K, and recrystallization to sI hydrate occurs upon subsequent heating to 150 K, possibly by first forming low density amorphous ice. Unlike other clathrate hydrate systems, which transform from the sI or sII structure to the hexagonal structure (sH) then to the filled ice structure, CO{sub 2} hydrate transforms directly from the sI form to the filled ice structure.

  19. CHROMOSPHERIC EVAPORATION IN AN X1.0 FLARE ON 2014 MARCH 29 OBSERVED WITH IRIS AND EIS

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Y.; Ding, M. D.; Qiu, J.; Cheng, J. X.

    2015-09-20

    Chromospheric evaporation refers to dynamic mass motions in flare loops as a result of rapid energy deposition in the chromosphere. These motions have been observed as blueshifts in X-ray and extreme-ultraviolet (EUV) spectral lines corresponding to upward motions at a few tens to a few hundreds of km s{sup −1}. Past spectroscopic observations have also revealed a dominant stationary component, in addition to the blueshifted component, in emission lines formed at high temperatures (∼10 MK). This is contradictory to evaporation models predicting predominant blueshifts in hot lines. The recently launched Interface Region Imaging Spectrograph (IRIS) provides high-resolution imaging and spectroscopic observations that focus on the chromosphere and transition region in the UV passband. Using the new IRIS observations, combined with coordinated observations from the EUV Imaging Spectrometer, we study the chromospheric evaporation process from the upper chromosphere to the corona during an X1.0 flare on 2014 March 29. We find evident evaporation signatures, characterized by Doppler shifts and line broadening, at two flare ribbons that are separating from each other, suggesting that chromospheric evaporation takes place in successively formed flaring loops throughout the flare. More importantly, we detect dominant blueshifts in the high-temperature Fe xxi line (∼10 MK), in agreement with theoretical predictions. We also find that, in this flare, gentle evaporation occurs at some locations in the rise phase of the flare, while explosive evaporation is detected at some other locations near the peak of the flare. There is a conversion from gentle to explosive evaporation as the flare evolves.

  20. Springtime variations of organic and inorganic constituents in submicron aerosols (PM1.0) from Cape Hedo, Okinawa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kunwar, Bhagawati; Torii, K.; Zhu, Chunmao; Fu, Pingqing; Kawamura, Kimitaka

    2016-04-01

    During the spring season with enhanced Asian outflow, we collected submicron aerosol (PM1.0) samples at Cape Hedo, Okinawa Island in the western North Pacific Rim. We analyzed the filter samples for diacids, oxoacids, pyruvic acid, α-dicarbonyls and fatty acids to better understand the sources and atmospheric processes in the outflow regions of Asian pollutants. Molecular distributions of diacids show a predominance of oxalic acid (C2) followed by malonic (C3) and succinic (C4) acids. Total diacids strongly correlated with secondary source tracers such as SO42- (r = 0.87), NH4+ (0.90) and methanesulfonate (MSA-) (0.84), suggesting that diacids are secondarily formed from their precursor compounds. We also found good correlations among C2, organic carbon (OC) and elemental carbon (EC) in the Okinawa aerosols, suggesting that diacids are mainly derived from anthropogenic sources. However, a weak correlation of diacids with levoglucosan, a biomass burning tracer, suggests that biomass buring is not the main source of diacids, rather diacids are secondarily formed by photochemical oxidation of organic precursors derived from fossil fuel combustion. We found a strong correlation (r = 0.98) between inorganic nitrogen (NO3-N + NH4-N) and total nitrogen (TN), to which organic nitrogen (ON) contributed 23%. Fatty acids were characterized by even carbon number predominance, suggesting that they are derived from biogenic sources. The higher abundances of short chain fatty acids (C20) further suggest that fatty acids are largely derived from marine phytoplankton during spring bloom.

  1. EDDINGTON RATIO DISTRIBUTION OF X-RAY-SELECTED BROAD-LINE AGNs AT 1.0 < z < 2.2

    SciTech Connect

    Suh, Hyewon; Hasinger, Günther; Steinhardt, Charles; Silverman, John D.; Schramm, Malte

    2015-12-20

    We investigate the Eddington ratio distribution of X-ray-selected broad-line active galactic nuclei (AGNs) in the redshift range 1.0 < z < 2.2, where the number density of AGNs peaks. Combining the optical and Subaru/Fiber Multi Object Spectrograph near-infrared spectroscopy, we estimate black hole masses for broad-line AGNs in the Chandra Deep Field South (CDF-S), Extended Chandra Deep Field South (E-CDF-S), and the XMM-Newton Lockman Hole (XMM-LH) surveys. AGNs with similar black hole masses show a broad range of AGN bolometric luminosities, which are calculated from X-ray luminosities, indicating that the accretion rate of black holes is widely distributed. We find a substantial fraction of massive black holes accreting significantly below the Eddington limit at z ≲ 2, in contrast to what is generally found for luminous AGNs at high redshift. Our analysis of observational selection biases indicates that the “AGN cosmic downsizing” phenomenon can be simply explained by the strong evolution of the comoving number density at the bright end of the AGN luminosity function, together with the corresponding selection effects. However, one might need to consider a correlation between the AGN luminosity and the accretion rate of black holes, in which luminous AGNs have higher Eddington ratios than low-luminosity AGNs, in order to understand the relatively small fraction of low-luminosity AGNs with high accretion rates in this epoch. Therefore, the observed downsizing trend could be interpreted as massive black holes with low accretion rates, which are relatively fainter than less-massive black holes with efficient accretion.

  2. RESOLVED GIANT MOLECULAR CLOUDS IN NEARBY SPIRAL GALAXIES: INSIGHTS FROM THE CANON CO (1-0) SURVEY

    SciTech Connect

    Donovan Meyer, Jennifer; Koda, Jin; Mooney, Thomas; Momose, Rieko; Egusa, Fumi; Carty, Misty; Kennicutt, Robert; Kuno, Nario; Rebolledo, David; Wong, Tony; Sawada, Tsuyoshi; Scoville, Nick

    2013-08-01

    We resolve 182 individual giant molecular clouds (GMCs) larger than 2.5 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 5} M{sub Sun} in the inner disks of 5 large nearby spiral galaxies (NGC 2403, NGC 3031, NGC 4736, NGC 4826, and NGC 6946) to create the largest such sample of extragalactic GMCs within galaxies analogous to the Milky Way. Using a conservatively chosen sample of GMCs most likely to adhere to the virial assumption, we measure cloud sizes, velocity dispersions, and {sup 12}CO (J = 1-0) luminosities and calculate cloud virial masses. The average conversion factor from CO flux to H{sub 2} mass (or X{sub CO}) for each galaxy is 1-2 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 20} cm{sup -2} (K km s{sup -1}){sup -1}, all within a factor of two of the Milky Way disk value ({approx}2 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 20} cm{sup -2} (K km s{sup -1}){sup -1}). We find GMCs to be generally consistent within our errors between the galaxies and with Milky Way disk GMCs; the intrinsic scatter between clouds is of order a factor of two. Consistent with previous studies in the Local Group, we find a linear relationship between cloud virial mass and CO luminosity, supporting the assumption that the clouds in this GMC sample are gravitationally bound. We do not detect a significant population of GMCs with elevated velocity dispersions for their sizes, as has been detected in the Galactic center. Though the range of metallicities probed in this study is narrow, the average conversion factors of these galaxies will serve to anchor the high metallicity end of metallicity-X{sub CO} trends measured using conversion factors in resolved clouds; this has been previously possible primarily with Milky Way measurements.

  3. Preparation, characterization and cytotoxicity studies of some transition metal complexes with ofloxacin and 1,10-phenanthroline mixed ligand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sadeek, S. A.; El-Hamid, S. M. Abd

    2016-10-01

    [Zn(Ofl)(Phen)(H2O)2](CH3COO)·2H2O (1), [ZrO(Ofl)(Phen)(H2O)]NO3·2H2O (2) and [UO2(Ofl)(Phen)(H2O)](CH3COO)·H2O (3) complexes of fluoroquinolone antibacterial agent ofloxacin (HOfl), containing a nitrogen donor heterocyclic ligand, 1,10-phenathroline monohydrate (Phen), were prepared and their structures were established with the help of elemental analysis, molar conductance, magnetic properties, thermal studies and different spectroscopic studies like IR, UV-Vis., 1H NMR and Mass. The IR data of HOfl and Phen ligands suggested the existing of a bidentate binding involving carboxylate O and pyridone O for HOfl ligand and two pyridine N atoms for Phen ligand. The coordination geometries and electronic structures are determined from electronic absorption spectra and magnetic moment measurements. From molar conductance studies reveals that metal complexes are electrolytes and of 1:1 type. The calculated bond length and force constant, F(Udbnd O), in the uranyl complex are 1.751 Å and 641.04 Nm-1. The thermal properties of the complexes were investigated by thermogravimetry (TGA) technique. The activation thermodynamic parameters are calculated using Coats-Redfern and Horowitz-Metzger methods. Antimicrobial activity of the compounds was evaluated against some bacteria and fungi species. The activity data show that most metal complexes have antibacterial activity than that of the parent HOfl drug. The in vitro cytotoxicities of ligands and their complexes were also evaluated against human breast and colon carcinoma cells.

  4. Development of an Exploration-Class Cascade Distillation Subsystem: Performance Testing of the Generation 1.0 Prototype

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Callahan, Michael R.; Sargusingh, Miriam J.

    2015-01-01

    The ability to recover and purify water is crucial for realizing long-term human space missions. The National Aeronautics and Space Admininstration and Honeywell co-developed a five-stage vacuum rotary distillation water recovery system referred to as the Cascade Distillation Subsystem (CDS). Over the past three years, NASA's Advanced Exploration Systems (AES) Water Recovery Project (WRP) has been working toward the development of a flight-forward CDS design. In 2012 the original CDS prototype underwent a series of incremental upgrades and tests intened to both demonstrate the feasibility of a on-orbit demonstration of the system and to collect operational and performance data to be used to inform a second generation design. The latest testing of the CDS Generation 1.0 prototype was conducted May 29 through July 2, 2014. Initial system performance was benchmarked by processing deionized water and sodium chloride. Following, the system was challenged with analogue urine waste stream solutions stabilized with an Oxone-based and the two International Space Station baseline and alternative pretreatment solutions. During testing, the system processed more than 160 kilograms of wastewater with targeted water recoveries between 75 and 85% depending on the specific waste stream tested. For all wastewater streams, contaminant removals from wastewater feed to product water distillate, were estimated at greater than 99%. The average specific energy of the system was less than 120 Watt-hours/kilogram. The following paper provides detailed information and data on the performance of the CDS as challenged per the WRP test objectives.

  5. Calculated impact of ferromagnetic substrate on the spin crossover in a Fe(1 ,10 -phenanthroline) 2(NCS) 2 molecule

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gueddida, S.; Alouani, M.

    2016-05-01

    Spin crossover in the Fe(1 ,10 -phenanthroline) 2(NCS) 2 (Fephen) molecule adsorbed on ferromagnetic cobalt (001) and (111) surfaces as well as a gold (001) surface has been studied using the projector augmented wave method in conjunction with the density functional theory within the generalized gradient approximation, including a Hubbard interaction U at the iron site and a van der Waals weak interaction between the molecule and the surface. It is shown that the energy difference between the high-spin (HS) and the low-spin (LS) states and the energy barrier of Fephen/Co(111) are significantly reduced compared to those of the adsorbed molecule on Cu(001) and Au(001). This makes the switching of the molecule from the HS to the LS state much easier than when the molecule is adsorbed on a copper or gold substrate. It is also shown that an indirect exchange mechanism is responsible for the ferromagnetic coupling between the Fe center of Fephen and the cobalt substrate and that, in the LS state, the Fephen/Co interface remains magnetically active due to small induced magnetic moments in the NCS group and iron center. This magnetic coupling between the molecule and the substrate decreases in an oscillatory fashion as a function of the number of copper layers inserted between the molecule and the cobalt substrate, in a manner similar to that of the interlayer magnetic exchange coupling. Finally, scanning tunneling microscopy images at the Fermi level show that the separation between the phen lobes is larger in the HS state than in the LS state and the work functions of cobalt, gold, and copper substrates are strongly reduced upon adsorption of the Fephen molecule.

  6. Microstructure of Hot Rolled 1.0C-1.5Cr Bearing Steel and Subsequent Spheroidization Annealing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Zhen-Xing; Li, Chang-Sheng; Zhang, Jian; Li, Bin-Zhou; Pang, Xue-Dong

    2016-07-01

    The effect of final rolling temperature and cooling process on the microstructure of 1.0C-1.5Cr bearing steel was studied, and the relationship between the microstructure parameters and subsequent spheroidization annealing was analyzed. The results indicate that the increase of water-cooling rate after hot rolling and the decrease of final cooling temperature are beneficial to reducing both the pearlite interlamellar spacing and pearlite colony size. Prior austenite grain size can be reduced by decreasing the final rolling temperature and increasing the water-cooling rate. When the final rolling temperature was controlled around 1103 K (830 °C), the subsequent cooling rate was set to 10 K/s and final cooling temperature was 953 K (680 °C), the precipitation of grain boundary cementite was suppressed effectively and lots of rod-like cementite particles were observed in the microstructure. Interrupted quenching was employed to study the dissolution behavior of cementite during the austenitizing at 1073 K (800 °C). The decrease of both pearlite interlamellar spacing and pearlite colony size could facilitate the initial dissolution and fragmentation of cementite lamellae, which could shorten the spheroidization time. The fragmentation of grain boundary cementite tends to form large-size undissolved cementite particles. With the increase of austenitizing time from 20 to 300 minutes, mean diameter of undissolved cementite particles increases, indicating the cementite particle coarsening and cementite dissolution occuring simultaneously. Mean diameter of cementite particles in the final spheroidized microstructure is proportional to the mean diameter of undissolved cementite particles formed during partial austenitizing.

  7. The structure of CO2 hydrate between 0.7 and 1.0 GPa

    SciTech Connect

    Tulk, Chris A.; Machida, Shinichi; Klug, Dennis D.; Lu, H.; Guthrie, Malcolm; Molaison, Jamie J.

    2014-11-05

    A deuterated sample of CO2 structure I (sI) clathrate hydrate (CO2 ∙ 8.3 D2O) has been formed and neutron diffraction experiments up to 1.0 GPa at 240 K were performed. The sI CO2 hydrate transformed at 0.7 GPa into the high pressure phase that had been observed previously by Hirai, et al. (J. Phys. Chem. 133, 124511 (2010)) and O. Bollengier et al. (Geochim. Cosmochim. AC. 119, 322 (2013)), but which had not been structurally identified. The current neutron diffraction data were successfully fitted to a filled ice structure with CO2 molecules filling the water channels. This CO2+water system has also been investigated using classical molecular dynamics and density functional ab initio methods to provide additional characterization of the high pressure structure. Both models indicate the water network adapts an MH-III ‘like’ filled ice structure with considerable disorder of the orientations of the CO2molecule. Furthermore, the disorder appears be a direct result of the level of proton disorder in the water network. In contrast to the conclusions of Bollengier et al. our neutron diffraction data shows that the filled ice phase can be recovered to ambient pressure (0.1 MPa) at 96 K, and recrystallization to sI hydrate occurs upon subsequent heating to 150 K, possibly by first forming low density amorphous ice. Unlike other clathrate hydrate systems, which transform from the sI or sII structure to the hexagonal structure (sH) then to the filled ice structure, CO2 hydrate transforms directly from the sI form to the filled ice structure.

  8. PS1-10jh: The disruption of a main-sequence star of near-solar composition

    SciTech Connect

    Guillochon, James; Manukian, Haik; Ramirez-Ruiz, Enrico

    2014-03-01

    When a star comes within a critical distance to a supermassive black hole (SMBH), immense tidal forces disrupt the star, resulting in a stream of debris that falls back onto the SMBH and powers a luminous flare. In this paper, we perform hydrodynamical simulations of the disruption of a main-sequence star by an SMBH to characterize the evolution of the debris stream after a tidal disruption. We demonstrate that this debris stream is confined by self-gravity in the two directions perpendicular to the original direction of the star's travel and as a consequence has a negligible surface area and makes almost no contribution to either the continuum or line emission. We therefore propose that any observed emission lines are not the result of photoionization in this unbound debris, but are produced in the region above and below the forming elliptical accretion disk, analogous to the broad-line region (BLR) in steadily accreting active galactic nuclei. As each line within a BLR is observationally linked to a particular location in the accretion disk, we suggest that the absence of a line indicates that the accretion disk does not yet extend to the distance required to produce that line. This model can be used to understand the spectral properties of the tidal disruption event PS1-10jh, for which He II lines are observed, but the Balmer series and He I are not. Using a maximum likelihood analysis, we show that the disruption of a main-sequence star of near-solar composition can reproduce this event.

  9. Very Large Array Mapping of the CO(1-0) Line in SMM J14011+0252

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharon, Chelsea E.; Baker, Andrew J.; Harris, Andrew I.; Thomson, Alasdair P.

    2013-03-01

    We present high-resolution CO(1-0) observations of the lensed submillimeter galaxy (SMG) SMM J14011+0252 at z = 2.6. Comparison to the previously detected CO(3-2) line gives an intensity ratio of r 3, 1 = 0.97 ± 0.16 in temperature units, larger than is typical for SMGs but within the range seen in the low-z ultraluminous infrared galaxy population. Combining our new data with previous mid-J CO observations, we perform a single-phase large velocity gradient (LVG) analysis to constrain the physical conditions of the molecular gas. Acceptable models have significant degeneracies between parameters, even when we rule out all models that produce optically thin emission, but we find that the bulk of the molecular gas has T kin = 20-60 K, n_H_2˜ 10^4-105 cm-3, and N CO/Δv = 1017.00 ± 0.25 cm-2 km-1 s. For our best-fit models to self-consistently recover a typical CO-to-H2 abundance and a plausible degree of virialization, the local velocity gradient in the molecular gas must be substantially larger than its galaxy-wide average. This conclusion is consistent with a scenario in which SMM J14011+0252 has a fairly face-on orientation and a molecular interstellar medium composed of many unresolved clouds. Using previous Hα observations, we find that SMM J14011+0252 has a spatially resolved star formation rate versus molecular gas surface density relation inconsistent with those of "normal" local star-forming galaxies, even if we adopt a local "disk-like" CO-to-H2 conversion factor as motivated by our LVG analysis. This discrepancy supports the inference of a star formation relation for high-z starbursts distinct from the local relation that is not solely due to differing choices of gas mass conversion factor.

  10. Measurement of vibrational energy transfer of OH (A2S+,v'=1?0) in low-pressure flames

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hartlieb, A. T.; Markus, D.; Kreutner, W.; Kohse-Höinghaus, K.

    1997-07-01

    Vibrational energy transfer (VET) and electronic quenching of OH (A2D+) was measured in a low-pressure H2/O2 flame for three rotational levels of OH (v'=1). Rate coefficients for collisions with H2O and N2 were determined. At 1600 K, kVET (N2) is (in 10-11 cm3s-1) 10.1DŽ, 6.1ǃ.8, and 3.8ǃ.3 for N'=0, 5, and 13, respectively. The kVET (H2O) is <1.1ǃ.8. The kQ (N2) is <2.4NJ for both vibrational levels. The kQ (H2O) in v'=1 is 59.1Lj.5, 54.7Lj.4, and 54.9Lj.6 for N'=0, 5, and 13, respectively, and, determined indirectly, 74.6ᆞ.4, 70.6ᆞ.3, and 63.4lj.3 for N'=0, 5, and 13 in v'=0. A multi-level model of OH population dynamics, which is being developed for the quantitative simulation of experimental LIF spectra, was extended to include VET. It was attempted to simulate state-to-state-specific VET coefficients for N2 collisions. From these simulations it appears that angular momentum conservation does not determine the N dependence of the vibrational relaxation step.

  11. Vertical Distributions of PH3 in Saturn from Observations of Its 1-0 and 3-2 Rotational Lines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Orton, G. S.; Serabyn, E.; Lee, Y. T.

    2000-01-01

    Far-infrared Fourier-transform spectrometer measurements of the 1-0 and 3-2 PH3 transitions in Saturn's disk near 267 and 800 GHz (8.9 and 26.7/cm), respectively, were analyzed simultaneously to derive a global mean profile for the PH3 vertical mixing ratio between 100 and 600 mbar total pressure. The far-infrared spectrum is relatively free from spectral interlopers, suffers minimal absorption or scattering by atmospheric particulates, and contains intrinsically weak PH3 lines that are sensitive to a range of atmospheric depths. The combined spectra are inconsistent with a uniform tropospheric mixing ratio, even with a stratospheric cut-off. They are consistent with a volume mixing ratio of PH3 that drops from 1.2 x 10(exp -5) at 645 mbar pressure to a value of 4.1 x 10(exp -7) at 150 mbar pressure, a decrease that is linear is log abundance vs log pressure. The mixing ratio could drop even more quickly at atmospheric pressures below 150 mbar and still be consistent with the data. The mixing ratio may well remain constant with depth for pressures above 630 mbar. The maximum PH3 mixing ratio in this model is consistent with a [P]/[H] ratio in the deep atmosphere that is about a factor of 10 higher than solar composition. Such a model is consistent with rapid mixing up to the radiative-convective boundary and transport by, for example, vertical waves just above this boundary. In the best fitting model, the eddy diffusion coefficient is approximately 10(exp 4) sq cm near 630 mbar, and it must increase with altitude. The predominant PH3 loss mechanisms are direct photolysis by UV radiation and scavenging by H atoms produced by the photolysis.

  12. 1,10-phenanthroline stabilizes mRNA of the carcinogen-metabolizing enzyme, cytochrome P450 1a1.

    PubMed

    Chou, Mou-Tsy; Chu, Wen-Cheng; Hong, Wei-Fu; Huang, Min-Cong; Liu, Wen-Je; Lin, Shin-Chang; Huang, See-Chang; Chen, Fei-Yun; Hsiao, Wen-Feng; Liu, Yi-Wen; Wu, Jin-Yi; Su, Jyan-Gwo J

    2010-02-01

    1,10-phenanthroline (phen), flufenamic acid, and indomethacin are inhibitors of aldo-keto reductases 1C1 (AKR1C1), but only phen decreased the benzo[a]pyrene (BaP)-induced cytochrome P450 1a1 (Cyp1a1) protein level. Therefore the decrease in the BaP-induced Cyp1a1 protein level was not due to inhibition of Akr1c1, but to phen itself. Phen decreased the BaP-induced Cyp1a1 promoter activity and protein expression, and in contrast, it increased Cyp1a1 mRNA, resulting from an increase in mRNA stability. Phen is also known as a transition metal ion-chelator. Along with the phen study, we also found that Zn(2+), Fe(2+) and Cu(2+) increased Cyp1a1 mRNA and protein stability. Our results show that phen stabilized the mRNA of Cyp1a1, although it decreased cell viability. In addition, Zn(2+) and Fe(2+) highly neutralized phen's suppression of Cyp1a1 protein expression, but they only slightly neutralized phen's promotion of mRNA stability and suppression of cell viability, and had no effect on phen's suppression of promoter activity. Phen's effect on Cyp1a1 expression was reversible, which indicates that phen is non-covalently linked to its target. This report elucidates a new role for phen of stabilizing Cyp1a1 mRNA, and provides information for further studies on mRNA stabilization.

  13. Syntheses, characterization, antimicrobial and cytotoxic activities of pyridine-2,5-dicarboxylate complexes with 1,10-phenanthroline.

    PubMed

    Colak, Alper Tolga; Oztopcu-Vatan, Pinar; Colak, Ferdag; Akduman, Demet; Kabadere, Selda; Uyar, Ruhi

    2013-10-01

    In this study, four mononuclear M(II)-pyridine-2,5-dicarboxylate (M = Co(II), Ni(II), Cu(II) and Zn(II) complexes with pyridine-2,5-dicarboxylic acid or isocinchomeronic acid, 1,10-phenanthroline (phen), [Co(Hpydc)(2)(phen)]·H(2)O (1), [Ni(pydc)(phen)(2)]·6.5H(2)O (2) [Cu(pydc)(phen)(H(2)O)(2)] (3) and [Zn(pydc)(phen)(H(2)O)(2)]·H(2)O (4) have been synthesized. Elemental, thermal and mass analyses, molar conductance, magnetic susceptibilities, IR and UV/vis spectroscopic studies have been performed to characterize the complexes. Subsequently, these ligands and complexes were tested for antimicrobial activity by disc diffusion method on Gram positive, negative bacteria and yeast. In addition, cytotoxic activity tests were performed on rat glioma (C6) cells by MTT viability assay for 24 and 48 h. Antimicrobial activity results demonstrated that when compared to the standard antibiotics, phen displayed the most effective antimicrobial effect. The effect of synthesized complexes was close to phen or less. Cytotoxic activity results showed that IC(50) value of phen was determined as 31 μM for 48 h. (1) and (2) compared to the alone ligand had less toxic activity. IC(50) values of (3) for 24 and 48 h treatments were 2.5 and 0.6 μM, respectively. IC(50) value of (4) for 48 h was 15 μM. In conclusion, phen, (3) and (4) may be useful as antibacterial and antiproliferative agents in the future. PMID:23669312

  14. Improved ENSO simulation from climate system model FGOALS-g1.0 to FGOALS-g2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Lin; Yu, Yongqiang; Zheng, Weipeng

    2016-10-01

    This study presents an overview of the improvement in the simulation of El Niño-Southern Oscillation (ENSO) in the latest generation of the Institute of Atmospheric Physics' coupled general circulation model (CGCM), the Flexible Global Ocean-Atmosphere-Land System model Grid-point Version 2 (FGOALS-g2; hereafter referred to as "g2") from its predecessor FGOALS-g1.0 (referred to as "g1"), including the more realistic amplitude, irregularity, and ENSO cycle. The changes have been analyzed quantitatively based on the Bjerknes stability index, which serves as a measure of ENSO growth rate. The improved simulation of ENSO amplitude is mainly due to the reasonable representation of the thermocline and thermodynamic feedbacks: On the one hand, the deeper mean thermocline results in a weakened thermocline response to the zonal wind stress anomaly, and the looser vertical stratification of mean temperature leads to a weakened response of anomalous subsurface temperature to anomalous thermocline depth, both of which cause the reduced thermocline feedback in g2; on the other hand, the alleviated cold bias of mean sea surface temperature leads to more reasonable thermodynamic feedback in g2. The regular oscillation of ENSO in g1 is associated with its unsuccessful representation of the role of atmospheric noise over the western-central equatorial Pacific (WCEP) in triggering ENSO events, which arises from the weak synoptic-intraseasonal variability of zonal winds over the WCEP in g1. The asymmetric transition of ENSO in g1 is attributed to the asymmetric effect of thermocline feedback, which is due to the annual cycle of mean upwelling in the eastern Pacific. This study highlights the great impact of improving the representation of mean states on the improved simulation of air-sea feedback processes and ultimately more reasonable depiction of ENSO behaviors in CGCMs.

  15. Pathways to quiescence: SHARDS view on the star formation histories of massive quiescent galaxies at 1.0 < z < 1.5

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Domínguez Sánchez, Helena; Pérez-González, Pablo G.; Esquej, Pilar; Eliche-Moral, M. Carmen; Barro, Guillermo; Cava, Antonio; Koekemoer, Anton M.; Alcalde Pampliega, Belén; Alonso Herrero, Almudena; Bruzual, Gustavo; Cardiel, Nicolás; Cenarro, Javier; Ceverino, Daniel; Charlot, Stéphane; Hernán Caballero, Antonio

    2016-04-01

    We present star formation histories (SFHs) for a sample of 104 massive (stellar mass M > 1010 M⊙) quiescent galaxies (MQGs) at z = 1.0-1.5 from the analysis of spectrophotometric data from the Survey for High-z Absorption Red and Dead Sources (SHARDS) and HST/WFC3 G102 and G141 surveys of the GOODS-North field, jointly with broad-band observations from ultraviolet (UV) to far-infrared (far-IR). The sample is constructed on the basis of rest-frame UVJ colours and specific star formation rates (sSFRs = SFR/Mass). The spectral energy distributions (SEDs) of each galaxy are compared to models assuming a delayed exponentially declining SFH. A Monte Carlo algorithm characterizes the degeneracies, which we are able to break taking advantage of the SHARDS data resolution, by measuring indices such as MgUV and D4000. The population of MQGs shows a duality in their properties. The sample is dominated (85 per cent) by galaxies with young mass-weighted ages, overline{t_M} < 2 Gyr, short star formation time-scales, <τ> ˜ 60-200 Myr, and masses log(M/M⊙) ˜ 10.5. There is an older population (15 per cent) with overline{t_M} = 2-4 Gyr, longer star formation time-scales, <τ> ˜ 400 Myr, and larger masses, log(M/M⊙) ˜ 10.7. The SFHs of our MQGs are consistent with the slope and the location of the main sequence of star-forming galaxies at z > 1.0, when our galaxies were 0.5-1.0 Gyr old. According to these SFHs, all the MQGs experienced a luminous infrared galaxy phase that lasts for ˜500 Myr, and half of them an ultraluminous infrared galaxy phase for ˜100 Myr. We find that the MQG population is almost assembled at z ˜ 1, and continues evolving passively with few additions to the population.

  16. Growth, structure and magnetic properties of FePt nanostructures on NaCl(001) and MgO(001).

    PubMed

    Liscio, F; Makarov, D; Maret, M; Doisneau-Cottignies, B; Roussel, H; Albrecht, M

    2010-02-10

    A comparison of the structural and magnetic properties of FePt nanostructures grown at different temperatures on NaCl(001) and MgO(001) substrates is presented. A strong influence of the deposition temperature on the epitaxial growth as well as on the size distribution of FePt nanostructures grown on NaCl substrates is observed. In spite of a large lattice mismatch between FePt and NaCl, a 'cube-over-cube' growth of nanostructures with a narrow size distribution was achieved at 520 K. Moreover, the growth of FePt nanostructures on NaCl(001) is not preceded by the formation of a wetting layer as observed on MgO(001). The higher degree of L1(0) chemical ordering in FePt nanostructures grown on MgO(001) accompanied by the absence of L1(0) variants with an in-plane tetragonal c-axis indicates that the tensile epitaxial stress induced by the MgO substrate is a key factor in the formation of the L1(0) phase with an out-of-plane c-axis. Superparamagnetic behavior is revealed for the FePt nanostructures grown on NaCl(001) due to their small size and relatively poor chemical order.

  17. Deformation Behavior Immediately After Indentation Load Change in Ultrafine-Grained Al-Mg Solid Solution Alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takagi, Hidenari; Fujiwara, Masami

    2016-06-01

    Instrumented indentation tests were performed to study how grain boundaries and solute atoms affect creep and instantaneous plastic deformation in ultrafine-grained (UFG) Al-Mg solid solution alloys with average grain size d = 0.3 - 1.0 μm at T = 373 K. In the results for Al-1.0 mol% Mg, the degree of instantaneous plastic displacement generated with a rapid increase in the load was smaller when the grain diameter was smaller. On the other hand, creep occurs more readily in materials with a smaller grain diameter. When the load was rapidly decreased during creep, the indenter displacement gradually decreased over time. The degree of reverse creep that occurs is greater when the grain diameter is smaller. In light of these test results and reports in the related literature, reverse creep is thought to occur because of inverted movement of piled-up dislocations near the grain boundaries. For the case of Al- xMg ( x = 0.5, 1.0, 2.0 mol%), the results show that as the solute concentration increases, the occurrence of instantaneous plastic deformation, creep, and reverse creep becomes less likely. Overall, the results indicate that the plastic deformation behavior obtained by the testing conditions of present study for UFG Al-Mg alloys could be explained based on understanding of the behavior of course-grained materials.

  18. High Spin States in ^24Mg

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwartz, J.; Lister, C. J.; Wuosmaa, A.; Betts, R. R.; Blumenthal, D.; Carpenter, M. P.; Davids, C. N.; Fischer, S. M.; Hackman, G.; Janssens, R. V. F.

    1996-05-01

    The ^12C(^16O,α)^24Mg reaction was used at 51.5MeV to populate high angular momentum states in ^24Mg. Gamma-rays de-exciting high spin states were detected in a 20 detector spectrometer (the AYE-ball) triggered by the ANL Fragment Mass Analyser (FMA). Channel selection, through detection of ^24Mg nuclei with the appropriate time of flight, was excellent. All the known decays from high spin states were seen in a few hours, with the exception of the 5.04 MeV γ-decay of the J^π=9^- state at 16.904 MeV footnote A.E.Smith et al., Phys. Lett. \\underlineB176, (1986)292. which could not be confirmed. The potential of the technique for studying the radiative decay of states with very high spin in light nuclei will be discussed.

  19. "Safe" Coulomb excitation of 30Mg.

    PubMed

    Niedermaier, O; Scheit, H; Bildstein, V; Boie, H; Fitting, J; von Hahn, R; Köck, F; Lauer, M; Pal, U K; Podlech, H; Repnow, R; Schwalm, D; Alvarez, C; Ames, F; Bollen, G; Emhofer, S; Habs, D; Kester, O; Lutter, R; Rudolph, K; Pasini, M; Thirolf, P G; Wolf, B H; Eberth, J; Gersch, G; Hess, H; Reiter, P; Thelen, O; Warr, N; Weisshaar, D; Aksouh, F; Van den Bergh, P; Van Duppen, P; Huyse, M; Ivanov, O; Mayet, P; Van de Walle, J; Aystö, J; Butler, P A; Cederkäll, J; Delahaye, P; Fynbo, H O U; Fraile, L M; Forstner, O; Franchoo, S; Köster, U; Nilsson, T; Oinonen, M; Sieber, T; Wenander, F; Pantea, M; Richter, A; Schrieder, G; Simon, H; Behrens, T; Gernhäuser, R; Kröll, T; Krücken, R; Münch, M; Davinson, T; Gerl, J; Huber, G; Hurst, A; Iwanicki, J; Jonson, B; Lieb, P; Liljeby, L; Schempp, A; Scherillo, A; Schmidt, P; Walter, G

    2005-05-01

    We report on the first radioactive beam experiment performed at the recently commissioned REX-ISOLDE facility at CERN in conjunction with the highly efficient gamma spectrometer MINIBALL. Using 30Mg ions accelerated to an energy of 2.25 MeV/u together with a thin (nat)Ni target, Coulomb excitation of the first excited 2+ states of the projectile and target nuclei well below the Coulomb barrier was observed. From the measured relative deexcitation gamma-ray yields the B(E2;0(+)gs-->2(+)1) value of 30Mg was determined to be 241(31)e2 fm4. Our result is lower than values obtained at projectile fragmentation facilities using the intermediate-energy Coulomb excitation method, and confirms the theoretical conjecture that the neutron-rich magnesium isotope 30Mg resides outside the "island of inversion."

  20. Unraveling the role of Mg(++) in osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Li, Yaqiang; Yue, Jiaji; Yang, Chunxi

    2016-02-15

    Mg(++) is widely involved in human physiological processes that may play key roles in the generation and progression of diseases. Osteoarthritis (OA) is a complex joint disorder characterized by articular cartilage degradation, abnormal mineralization and inflammation. Magnesium deficiency is considered to be a major risk factor for OA development and progression. Magnesium deficiency is active in several pathways that have been implicated in OA, including increased inflammatory mediators, cartilage damage, defective chondrocyte biosynthesis, aberrant calcification and a weakened effect of analgesics. Abundant in vitro and in vivo evidence in animal models now suggests that the nutritional supplementation or local infiltration of Mg(++) represent effective therapies for OA. The goal of this review is to summarize the current understanding of the role of Mg(++) in OA with particular emphasis on the related molecular mechanisms involved in OA progression. PMID:26800786

  1. Levomilnacipran ER 40 mg and 80 mg in patients with major depressive disorder: a phase III, randomized, double-blind, fixed-dose, placebo-controlled study

    PubMed Central

    Bakish, David; Bose, Anjana; Gommoll, Carl; Chen, Changzheng; Nunez, Rene; Greenberg, William M.; Liebowitz, Michael; Khan, Arif

    2014-01-01

    Background Major depressive disorder (MDD) is a global health concern. This study examined the efficacy, safety and tolerability of an extended-release (ER) formulation of levomilnacipran, an antidepressant approved for the treatment of MDD in adults. Methods This 10-week (1-week placebo run-in period, 8-week double-blind treatment, 1-week down-taper), multicentre, double-blind, placebo-controlled, parallel-group, fixed-dose study was conducted between June 2011 and March 2012. Adult outpatients (age 18–75 yr) with MDD were randomly assigned (1:1:1) to placebo or to levomilnacipran ER 40 mg/day or 80 mg/day. For primary efficacy, we analyzed the Montgomery–Åsberg Depression Rating Scale (MADRS) change from baseline to week 8 using a mixed-effects model for repeated-measures approach on the intent-to-treat (ITT) population. For secondary efficacy, we used the Sheehan Disability Scale (SDS), and for safety, we examined adverse events and laboratory, vital sign/physical and electrocardiography findings. Results The ITT population consisted of 185 patients in the placebo group, 185 in the levomilnacipran ER 40 mg/day group and 187 in the levomilnacipran ER 80 mg/day group. Study completion rates were similar among the groups (76%–83%). On MADRS change from baseline the least squares mean difference (LSMD) and 95% confidence interval (CI) versus placebo was significant for levomilnacipran ER 40 mg/day (–3.3 [−5.5 to −1.1], p = 0.003) and 80 mg/day (−3.1, [−5.3 to −1.0], p = 0.004). On SDS change from baseline the LSMD (and 95% CI) versus placebo was also significant for levomilnacipran ER 40 mg/day (−1.8, 95% [−3.6 to 0], p = 0.046) and 80 mg/day (−2.7 [−4.5 to −0.9], p = 0.003). More patients in the levomilnacipran ER than the placebo group prematurely exited the study owing to adverse events; common adverse events (≥ 5% and ≥ double the rate of placebo) were nausea, dry mouth, increased heart rate, constipation, dizziness

  2. Fulvestrant 500 mg versus anastrozole 1 mg for the first-line treatment of advanced breast cancer: follow-up analysis from the randomized 'FIRST' study.

    PubMed

    Robertson, John F R; Lindemann, Justin P O; Llombart-Cussac, Antonio; Rolski, Janusz; Feltl, David; Dewar, John; Emerson, Laura; Dean, Andrew; Ellis, Matthew J

    2012-11-01

    Fulvestrant fIRst-line Study comparing endocrine Treatments is a phase II, randomized, open-label study comparing fulvestrant 500 mg with anastrozole 1 mg as first-line endocrine therapy for postmenopausal women with hormone receptor-positive (HR+) advanced breast cancer. At data cut-off, only 36 % of patients had progressed and the median time to progression (TTP) had not been reached for fulvestrant. Here, we report follow-up data for TTP for fulvestrant 500 mg versus anastrozole 1 mg. Key inclusion criteria were postmenopausal women with estrogen receptor-positive and/or progesterone receptor-positive locally advanced or metastatic breast cancer and no prior endocrine therapy. Key exclusion criteria were presence of life-threatening metastases and prior treatment with a non-approved drug. Fulvestrant was administered 500 mg/month plus 500 mg on day 14 of month 1; anastrozole was administered 1 mg/day. TTP was defined by modified Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors v1.0 before data cut-off for the primary analysis, and investigator opinion after data cut-off. Best overall response to subsequent therapy and serious adverse events are also reported. In total, 205 patients received fulvestrant 500 mg (n = 102) or anastrozole (n = 103). Follow-up analysis was performed when 79.5 % of patients had discontinued study treatment. Median TTP was 23.4 months for fulvestrant versus 13.1 months for anastrozole; a 34 % reduction in risk of progression (hazard ratio 0.66; 95 % confidence interval: 0.47, 0.92; P = 0.01). Best overall response to subsequent therapy and clinical benefit rate for subsequent endocrine therapy was similar between the treatment groups. No new safety concerns for fulvestrant 500 mg were documented. These longer-term, follow-up results confirm efficacy benefit for fulvestrant 500 mg versus anastrozole as first-line endocrine therapy for HR+ advanced breast cancer in terms of TTP, and, importantly, show similar best overall response rates to

  3. Efficient hydrogen storage with the combination of lightweight Mg/MgH2 and nanostructures.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Fangyi; Tao, Zhanliang; Liang, Jing; Chen, Jun

    2012-07-28

    Efficient hydrogen storage plays a key role in realizing the incoming hydrogen economy. However, it still remains a great challenge to develop hydrogen storage media with high capacity, favourable thermodynamics, fast kinetics, controllable reversibility, long cycle life, low cost and high safety. To achieve this goal, the combination of lightweight materials and nanostructures should offer great opportunities. In this article, we review recent advances in the field of chemical hydrogen storage that couples lightweight materials and nanostructures, focusing on Mg/MgH(2)-based systems. Selective theoretical and experimental studies on Mg/MgH(2) nanostructures are overviewed, with the emphasis on illustrating the influences of nanostructures on the hydrogenation/dehydrogenation mechanisms and hydrogen storage properties such as capacity, thermodynamics and kinetics. In particular, theoretical studies have shown that the thermodynamics of Mg/MgH(2) clusters below 2 nm change more prominently as particle size decreases. PMID:22715459

  4. The millimeter-wave spectrum of the MgH and MgD radicals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ziurys, L. M.; Barclay, W. L., Jr.; Anderson, M. A.

    1993-01-01

    The pure rotational spectrum of MgH radical (X 2 Sigma (+)) in its ground state v = 0 and v = 1 vibrational modes has been observed in the laboratory using millimeter/submillimeter direct absorption spectroscopy. The rotational spectra of two isotopically substituted species, MgD and (Mg-26)H, have been detected as well. All six hyperfine components of the N = 0 -1 transition of MgH in its v = 0 and v = 1 states have been directly measured to an accuracy of +/-50 kHz, and the five components have been observed for (Mg-26)H. The N = 0 +/-1 and N = 1 -2 transitions of MgD have also been detected. Rotational, fine structure, and hyperfine constants were determined for all species from a nonlinear least-squared fit to the data using a 2 Sigma Hamiltonian.

  5. Interdiffusion in the Mg-Al system and Intrinsic Diffusion in (Al3Mg2) Phase

    SciTech Connect

    Brennan, Sarah; Bermudez, Katrina; Kulkarni, Nagraj S; Sohn, Yong Ho

    2011-01-01

    Increasing use and development of lightweight Mg-alloys have led to the desire for more fundamental research in and understanding of Mg-based systems. As a strengthening component, Al is one of the most important and common alloying elements for Mg-alloys. In this study, solid-to-solid diffusion couple techniques were employed to examine the interdiffusion between pure Mg and Al. Diffusion anneals were carried out at 300 , 350 , and 400 C for 720, 360, and 240 hours, respectively. Optical and scanning electron microscopies (SEM) were employed to observe the formation of the intermetallics -Al12Mg17 and -Al3Mg2, but not -phase. Concentration profiles were determined using X-ray energy dispersive spectroscopy (XEDS). The growth constants and activation energies were determined for each intermetallic phase.

  6. Superconductivity in MgPtSi: An orthorhombic variant of MgB2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kudo, Kazutaka; Fujimura, Kazunori; Onari, Seiichiro; Ota, Hiromi; Nohara, Minoru

    2015-05-01

    A ternary compound, MgPtSi, was synthesized by solid-state reaction. An examination of the compound by powder x-ray diffraction revealed that it crystallizes in the orthorhombic TiNiSi-type structure with the P n m a space group. The structure comprises alternately stacked layers of Mg and PtSi honeycomb network, which is reminiscent of MgB2, and the buckling of the honeycomb network causes orthorhombic distortion. Electrical and magnetic studies revealed that MgPtSi exhibited superconductivity with a transition temperature of 2.5 K. However, its isostructural compounds, namely, MgRhSi and MgIrSi, were not found to exhibit superconductivity.

  7. Characterization of the MgO2+ dication in the gas phase: electronic states, spectroscopy and atmospheric implications.

    PubMed

    Linguerri, R; Hochlaf, M; Bacchus-Montabonel, M-C; Desouter-Lecomte, M

    2013-01-21

    Franzreb and Williams at Arizona State University detected recently the MgO(2+) molecular species in the gas phase. Here we report a very detailed theoretical investigation of the low-lying electronic states of this dication including their potentials, spin-orbit, rotational and radial couplings. Our results show that the potential energy curves of the dicationic electronic states have deep potential wells. This confirms that this dication does exist in the gas phase; it is a thermodynamically stable molecule in its ground state, and it has several excited long-lived metastable states. The potential energy curves are used then to predict a set of spectroscopic parameters for the bound states of MgO(2+). We have also incorporated these potentials, rotational and radial couplings in dynamical calculations to derive the cross sections for the charge transfer Mg(2+) + O → Mg(+) + O(+) reaction in the 1-10(3) eV collision energy domain via formation-decomposition of the MgO(2+) dication. Our work shows the role of MgO(2+) in the Earth ionosphere and more generally in atmospheric processes in solar planets, where this reaction efficiently participates in the predominance of Mg(+) cations in these media compared to Mg and Mg(2+). PMID:23202808

  8. Excited intruder states in {sup 32}Mg

    SciTech Connect

    Tripathi, Vandana; Tabor, S. L.; Bender, P.; Hoffman, C. R.; Lee, Sangjin; Pepper, K.; Perry, M.; Utsuno, Y.; Otsuka, T.; Mantica, P. F.; Pinter, J. S.; Stoker, J. B.; Cook, J. M.; Pereira, J.; Weisshaar, D.

    2008-03-15

    The low energy level structure of N=20 {sup 32}Mg obtained via {beta}-delayed {gamma} spectroscopy is reported. The level structure of {sup 32}Mg is found to be completely dominated by intruders. An inversion between the 1p-1h and 3p-3h states is observed for the negative parity states, similar to the 0p-0h and 2p-2h inversion for the positive parity states in these N{approx}20 nuclei. The intruder excited states, both positive and negative parity, are reasonably explained by Monte Carlo shell model calculations, which suggest a shrinking N=20 shell gap with decreasing Z.

  9. Demonstration of Mg2FeH6 as heat storage material at temperatures up to 550 °C

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Urbanczyk, R.; Meggouh, M.; Moury, R.; Peinecke, K.; Peil, S.; Felderhoff, M.

    2016-04-01

    The storage of heat at high temperatures, which can be used to generate electricity after sunset in concentrating solar power plants, is one of the most challenging technologies. The use of metal hydride could be one possibility to solve the problem. During the endothermic heat storage process, the metal hydride is decomposed releasing hydrogen, which then can be stored. During the exothermic reaction of the metal with the hydrogen gas, the stored heat is then released. Previous research had shown that Mg and Fe powders can be used at temperatures up to 550 °C for heat storage and shows excellent cycle stability over hundreds of cycles without any degradation. Here, we describe the results of testing of a tube storage tank that contained 211 g of Mg and Fe powders in 2:1 ratio. Twenty-three dehydrogenations (storage) and 23 hydrogenations (heat release) in the temperature range between of 395 and 515 °C and pressure range between 1.5 and 8.6 MPa were done. During the dehydrogenation, 0.41-0.42 kWhth kg-1 of heat based on material 2 Mg/Fe can be stored in the tank. After testing, mainly Mg2FeH6 was observed and small amounts of MgH2 and Fe metal can be detected in the hydride samples. This means that the heat storage capacity of the system could be further increased if only Mg2FeH6 is produced during subsequent cycles.

  10. The Interplay of Al and Mg Speciation in Advanced Mg Battery Electrolyte Solutions.

    PubMed

    See, Kimberly A; Chapman, Karena W; Zhu, Lingyang; Wiaderek, Kamila M; Borkiewicz, Olaf J; Barile, Christopher J; Chupas, Peter J; Gewirth, Andrew A

    2016-01-13

    Mg batteries are an attractive alternative to Li-based energy storage due to the possibility of higher volumetric capacities with the added advantage of using sustainable materials. A promising emerging electrolyte for Mg batteries is the magnesium aluminum chloride complex (MACC) which shows high Mg electrodeposition and stripping efficiencies and relatively high anodic stabilities. As prepared, MACC is inactive with respect to Mg deposition; however, efficient Mg electrodeposition can be achieved following an electrolytic conditioning process. Through the use of Raman spectroscopy, surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy, (27)Al and (35)Cl nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, and pair distribution function analysis, we explore the active vs inactive complexes in the MACC electrolyte and demonstrate the codependence of Al and Mg speciation. These techniques report on significant changes occurring in the bulk speciation of the conditioned electrolyte relative to the as-prepared solution. Analysis shows that the active Mg complex in conditioned MACC is very likely the [Mg2(μ-Cl)3·6THF](+) complex that is observed in the solid state structure. Additionally, conditioning creates free Cl(-) in the electrolyte solution, and we suggest the free Cl(-) adsorbs at the electrode surface to enhance Mg electrodeposition.

  11. VERY LARGE ARRAY MAPPING OF THE CO(1-0) LINE IN SMM J14011+0252

    SciTech Connect

    Sharon, Chelsea E.; Baker, Andrew J.; Harris, Andrew I.; Thomson, Alasdair P. E-mail: ajbaker@physics.rutgers.edu E-mail: at@roe.ac.uk

    2013-03-01

    We present high-resolution CO(1-0) observations of the lensed submillimeter galaxy (SMG) SMM J14011+0252 at z = 2.6. Comparison to the previously detected CO(3-2) line gives an intensity ratio of r {sub 3,1} = 0.97 {+-} 0.16 in temperature units, larger than is typical for SMGs but within the range seen in the low-z ultraluminous infrared galaxy population. Combining our new data with previous mid-J CO observations, we perform a single-phase large velocity gradient (LVG) analysis to constrain the physical conditions of the molecular gas. Acceptable models have significant degeneracies between parameters, even when we rule out all models that produce optically thin emission, but we find that the bulk of the molecular gas has T {sub kin} = 20-60 K, n{sub H{sub 2}}{approx}10{sup 4}-10{sup 5} cm{sup -3}, and N {sub CO}/{Delta}v = 10{sup 17.00{+-}0.25} cm{sup -2} km{sup -1} s. For our best-fit models to self-consistently recover a typical CO-to-H{sub 2} abundance and a plausible degree of virialization, the local velocity gradient in the molecular gas must be substantially larger than its galaxy-wide average. This conclusion is consistent with a scenario in which SMM J14011+0252 has a fairly face-on orientation and a molecular interstellar medium composed of many unresolved clouds. Using previous H{alpha} observations, we find that SMM J14011+0252 has a spatially resolved star formation rate versus molecular gas surface density relation inconsistent with those of 'normal' local star-forming galaxies, even if we adopt a local 'disk-like' CO-to-H{sub 2} conversion factor as motivated by our LVG analysis. This discrepancy supports the inference of a star formation relation for high-z starbursts distinct from the local relation that is not solely due to differing choices of gas mass conversion factor.

  12. CO(J = 1-0) IMAGING OF M51 WITH CARMA AND THE NOBEYAMA 45 m TELESCOPE

    SciTech Connect

    Koda, Jin; Donovan Meyer, Jennifer; Sawada, Tsuyoshi; Wright, Melvyn C. H.; Teuben, Peter; Corder, Stuartt A.; Patience, Jenny; Scoville, Nick; Egusa, Fumi

    2011-03-15

    We report the CO(J = 1-0) observations of the Whirlpool Galaxy M51 using both the Combined Array for Research in Millimeter Astronomy (CARMA) and the Nobeyama 45 m telescope (NRO45). We describe a procedure for the combination of interferometer and single-dish data. In particular, we discuss (1) the joint imaging and deconvolution of heterogeneous data, (2) the weighting scheme based on the root-mean-square (rms) noise in the maps, (3) the sensitivity and uv coverage requirements, and (4) the flux recovery of a combined map. We generate visibilities from the single-dish map and calculate the noise of each visibility based on the rms noise. Our weighting scheme, though it is applied to discrete visibilities in this paper, should be applicable to grids in uv space, and this scheme may advance in future software development. For a realistic amount of observing time, the sensitivities of the NRO45 and CARMA visibility data sets are best matched by using the single-dish baselines only up to 4-6 k{lambda} (about 1/4-1/3 of the dish diameter). The synthesized beam size is determined to conserve the flux between the synthesized beam and convolution beam. The superior uv coverage provided by the combination of CARMA long baseline data with 15 antennas and NRO45 short spacing data results in the high image fidelity, which is evidenced by the excellent overlap between even the faint CO emission and dust lanes in an optical Hubble Space Telescope image and polycyclicaromatichydrocarbon emission in a Spitzer 8 {mu}m image. The total molecular gas masses of NGC 5194 and 5195 (d = 8.2 Mpc) are 4.9 x 10{sup 9} M {sub sun} and 7.8 x 10{sup 7} M {sub sun}, respectively, assuming the CO-to-H{sub 2} conversion factor of X {sub CO} = 1.8 x 10{sup 20} cm{sup -2}(K km s{sup -1}){sup -1}. The presented images are an indication of the millimeter-wave images that will become standard in the next decade with CARMA and NRO45, and the Atacama Large Millimeter/Submillimeter Array.

  13. NAS Parallel Benchmark. Results 11-96: Performance Comparison of HPF and MPI Based NAS Parallel Benchmarks. 1.0

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saini, Subash; Bailey, David; Chancellor, Marisa K. (Technical Monitor)

    1997-01-01

    High Performance Fortran (HPF), the high-level language for parallel Fortran programming, is based on Fortran 90. HALF was defined by an informal standards committee known as the High Performance Fortran Forum (HPFF) in 1993, and modeled on TMC's CM Fortran language. Several HPF features have since been incorporated into the draft ANSI/ISO Fortran 95, the next formal revision of the Fortran standard. HPF allows users to write a single parallel program that can execute on a serial machine, a shared-memory parallel machine, or a distributed-memory parallel machine. HPF eliminates the complex, error-prone task of explicitly specifying how, where, and when to pass messages between processors on distributed-memory machines, or when to synchronize processors on shared-memory machines. HPF is designed in a way that allows the programmer to code an application at a high level, and then selectively optimize portions of the code by dropping into message-passing or calling tuned library routines as 'extrinsics'. Compilers supporting High Performance Fortran features first appeared in late 1994 and early 1995 from Applied Parallel Research (APR) Digital Equipment Corporation, and The Portland Group (PGI). IBM introduced an HPF compiler for the IBM RS/6000 SP/2 in April of 1996. Over the past two years, these implementations have shown steady improvement in terms of both features and performance. The performance of various hardware/ programming model (HPF and MPI (message passing interface)) combinations will be compared, based on latest NAS (NASA Advanced Supercomputing) Parallel Benchmark (NPB) results, thus providing a cross-machine and cross-model comparison. Specifically, HPF based NPB results will be compared with MPI based NPB results to provide perspective on performance currently obtainable using HPF versus MPI or versus hand-tuned implementations such as those supplied by the hardware vendors. In addition we would also present NPB (Version 1.0) performance results for the following systems: DEC Alpha Server 8400 5/440, Fujitsu VPP Series (VX, VPP300, and VPP700), HP/Convex Exemplar SPP2000, IBM RS/6000 SP P2SC node (120 MHz) NEC SX-4/32, SGI/CRAY T3E, SGI Origin2000.

  14. Chemical composition and mass size distribution of PM1.0 at an elevated site in central east China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Y. M.; Zhang, X. Y.; Sun, J. Y.; Hu, G. Y.; Shen, X. J.; Wang, Y. Q.; Wang, T. T.; Wang, D. Z.; Zhao, Y.

    2014-06-01

    Size-resolved aerosol chemical compositions were measured continuously for one and half years with an aerosol mass spectrometer (AMS) to characterize the mass and size distributions (MSDs) of each component in bulk, fresh and aged submicron particles (approximately PM1.0) at Mountain Tai, an elevated site in Central East China (CEC) from June 2010 to January 2012. The majority of the regionally-dispersed aerosols were found to be contributed from short distance mixed aerosol, mostly from its south with organics and sulfate as the major components. The annual mean mass concentrations of organics, sulfate, nitrate, ammonium and chloride were 11.2, 9.2, 7.2, 5.8 and 0.95 μg m-3, respectively, which are much lower for organics and sulfate, and slightly lower for nitrate, ammonium and chloride than those at the nearby surface rural sites. High organics were observed for all four seasons, and the relatively fresh organic aerosol (OA) containing high proportion of less-photo chemically OA, were found from long-range transported aerosol from northwest. Semi-volatile and low-volatile oxidized OAs together contributed approximately 49%, 55% in spring and 72% and 51% in winter of total OA, showing at least 50% of OA can be attributable to SOA. Seasonally, the chemical components at the elevated site showed a "winter high and autumn low" pattern, with organics, sulfate and ammonium peaking in summer. Though no obvious differences of MSDs were seen for various chemical components in the planetary boundary layer (PBL) and free troposphere (FT), the concentrations were a factor of 5-7 higher in PBL than in FT. The averaged MSDs of particles between 30-1000 nm for organics, sulfate, nitrate, and ammonium are approximately log-normal with similar mass median diameters (MMDs) of 539, 585, 542, and 545 nm, respectively, which were slightly larger than those in ground sites within North China Plain (NCP). Obvious differences in MMDs were found between fresh and aged aerosols for sulfate and ammonium, with smaller increased size-factors for the Mt. Tai aerosols than those in less polluted areas. All these exhibit the relative aged and well-mixed aerosol observed.

  15. CO(J = 1-0) Imaging of M51 with CARMA and the Nobeyama 45 m Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koda, Jin; Sawada, Tsuyoshi; Wright, Melvyn C. H.; Teuben, Peter; Corder, Stuartt A.; Patience, Jenny; Scoville, Nick; Donovan Meyer, Jennifer; Egusa, Fumi

    2011-03-01

    We report the CO(J = 1-0) observations of the Whirlpool Galaxy M51 using both the Combined Array for Research in Millimeter Astronomy (CARMA) and the Nobeyama 45 m telescope (NRO45). We describe a procedure for the combination of interferometer and single-dish data. In particular, we discuss (1) the joint imaging and deconvolution of heterogeneous data, (2) the weighting scheme based on the root-mean-square (rms) noise in the maps, (3) the sensitivity and uv coverage requirements, and (4) the flux recovery of a combined map. We generate visibilities from the single-dish map and calculate the noise of each visibility based on the rms noise. Our weighting scheme, though it is applied to discrete visibilities in this paper, should be applicable to grids in uv space, and this scheme may advance in future software development. For a realistic amount of observing time, the sensitivities of the NRO45 and CARMA visibility data sets are best matched by using the single-dish baselines only up to 4-6 kλ (about 1/4-1/3 of the dish diameter). The synthesized beam size is determined to conserve the flux between the synthesized beam and convolution beam. The superior uv coverage provided by the combination of CARMA long baseline data with 15 antennas and NRO45 short spacing data results in the high image fidelity, which is evidenced by the excellent overlap between even the faint CO emission and dust lanes in an optical Hubble Space Telescope image and polycyclicaromatichydrocarbon emission in a Spitzer 8 μm image. The total molecular gas masses of NGC 5194 and 5195 (d = 8.2 Mpc) are 4.9 × 109 M sun and 7.8 × 107 M sun, respectively, assuming the CO-to-H2 conversion factor of X CO = 1.8 × 1020 cm-2(K km s-1)-1. The presented images are an indication of the millimeter-wave images that will become standard in the next decade with CARMA and NRO45, and the Atacama Large Millimeter/Submillimeter Array.

  16. Spectrophotometric determination of copper in alkaline solutions and evaluation of some hydroxy-substituted 1,10-phenanthrolines as chromogenic reagents.

    PubMed

    Dunbar, W E; Schilt, A A

    1972-09-01

    Seven new hydroxy-substituted 1,10-phenanthroline derivatives have been evaluated as chromogenic reagents for the determination of copper in strongly alkaline solution. The most sensitive of these, 2,9-dimethyl-4,7-dihydroxy-1,10-phenanthroline, has proven to be highly effective in a simple, rapid procedure for determining trace amounts of copper in sodium hydroxide, potassium carbonate, sodium phosphate or ammonium hydroxide. PMID:18961151

  17. Spectrophotometric determination of copper in alkaline solutions and evaluation of some hydroxy-substituted 1,10-phenanthrolines as chromogenic reagents.

    PubMed

    Dunbar, W E; Schilt, A A

    1972-09-01

    Seven new hydroxy-substituted 1,10-phenanthroline derivatives have been evaluated as chromogenic reagents for the determination of copper in strongly alkaline solution. The most sensitive of these, 2,9-dimethyl-4,7-dihydroxy-1,10-phenanthroline, has proven to be highly effective in a simple, rapid procedure for determining trace amounts of copper in sodium hydroxide, potassium carbonate, sodium phosphate or ammonium hydroxide.

  18. Synthesis, crystal structures HOMO-LUMO analysis and DFT calculation of new complexes of p-substituted dibenzyltin chlorides and 1,10-phenanthroline.

    PubMed

    Chandrasekar, S; Balachandran, V; Evans, Helen-Stoeckli; Latha, A

    2015-05-15

    In the present work, the complex formation of p-substituted dibenzyltin dichlorides with 1,10-phenanthroline. The reaction of (p-MeBz)2SnCl2 with 1,10-phenanthroline results (p-MeBz)2SnCl2-1,10-phenanthroline complex, (2a). Likewise (p-ClBz)2SnCl2 with 1,10-phenanthroline results (p-ClBz)2SnCl2-1,10-phenanthroline complex, (2b), in the similar reaction conditions. The IR, (1)H NMR, (13)C NMR, (119)Sn NMR spectral analyses indicate that the formation of hexacoordinated tin(IV) complexes in 1:1 ratio. The crystal structures of complexes 2a and 2b show that the tin atom is in regular octahedral geometry with the benzyl groups in the equidirectional positions. A comparison was made with the structural data of other R2SnX2-1,10-phenathroline derivatives. Fourier transforms infrared and Raman spectral studies were performed for analyzing and assigning the vibrations and to identify the functional groups. Optimized geometrical parameters, harmonic vibrational frequencies, frontier molecular orbitals were obtained by DFT/B3LYP method combined with LanL2DZ basis set. PMID:25725209

  19. Measurement of lifetimes in 23Mg

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirsebom, O. S.; Bender, P.; Cheeseman, A.; Christian, G.; Churchman, R.; Cross, D. S.; Davids, B.; Evitts, L. J.; Fallis, J.; Galinski, N.; Garnsworthy, A. B.; Hackman, G.; Lighthall, J.; Ketelhut, S.; Machule, P.; Miller, D.; Nielsen, S. T.; Nobs, C. R.; Pearson, C. J.; Rajabali, M. M.; Radich, A. J.; Rojas, A.; Ruiz, C.; Sanetullaev, A.; Unsworth, C. D.; Wrede, C.

    2016-02-01

    Several lifetimes in 23Mg have been determined for the first time using the Doppler-shift attenuation method. A Monte Carlo simulation code has been written to model the γ -ray line shape. An upper limit of τ <12 fs at the 95% C.L. has been obtained for the astrophysically important 7787 keV state.

  20. Thermodynamic data of Mg-chloritoid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grevel, K.-D.; Navrotsky, A.; Kahl, W.-A.; Majzlan, J.; Lathe, C.

    2003-04-01

    Calorimetric and P-V-T data for synthetic Mg-chloritoid (MgAl2SiO5(OH)2) have been obtained. The enthalpy of drop-solution was measured by high-temperature oxide melt calorimetry in two laboratories (UC Davis, California, and Ruhr-University Bochum, Germany) using lead borate (2 PbO\\cdotB2O3) at T = 700 oC as solvent. The resulting values were used to calculate the enthalpy of formation from the elements; they range from -3552.7 ± 4.9 kJ mol-1 to -3555.4±6.1 kJ mol-1. Some preliminary heat capacity measurements of MgAl2SiO5(OH)2 have shown that a Berman and Brown (1985) type four-term equation based on the Neumann-Kopp rule represents the heat capacity over the entire temperature range to within the experimental uncertainty. The P-V-T behaviour of Mg-chloritoid has been determined under high pressures and high temperatures up to 8.5 GPa and 800 oC using a MAX 80 cubic anvil high-pressure apparatus. The samples were mixed with vaseline to ensure hydrostatic pressure transmitting conditions, NaCl served as an internal standard for pressure calibration. By fitting a Birch-Murnaghan EOS to the data, the bulk modulus was determined as 131.0 ± 2.4 GPa, (K' = 4), VT,0 = 456.58 Å3 exp [int(0.30±0.02) × 10-4 dT], (partialKT/partialT)P = -0.023±0.007 GPa K-1. The thermodynamic data obtained for Mg-chloritoid are consistent with phase equilibrium data reported in the literature. The best agreement was obtained with ΔfH0298 (Mg-chloritoid) = -3557.5 kJ mol-1, and S0298 (Mg-chloritoid) = 131.7 J K-1mol-1.

  1. Preliminary study of the characteristics of a high Mg containing Al-Mg-Si alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, F.; McKay, B. J.; Fan, Z.; Chen, M. F.

    2012-01-01

    An Al-20Mg-4Si high Mg containing alloy has been produced and its characteristics investigated. The as-cast alloy revealed primary Mg2Si particles evenly distributed throughout an α-Al matrix with a β-Al3Mg2 fully divorced eutectic phase observed in interdendritic regions. The Mg2Si particles displayed octahedral, truncated octahedral, and hopper morphologies. Additions of Sb, Ti and Zr had a refining influence reducing the size of the Mg2Si from 52 ± 4 μm to 25 ± 0.1 μm, 35 ± 1 μm and 34 ± 1 μm respectively. HPDC tensile test samples could be produced with a 0.6 wt.% Mn addition which prevented die soldering. Solution heating for 1 hr was found to dissolve the majority of the Al3Mg2 eutectic phase with no evidence of any effect on the primary Mg2Si. Preliminary results indicate that the heat treatment has a beneficial effect on the elongation and the UTS.

  2. Mach's principle: Exact frame-dragging via gravitomagnetism in perturbed Friedmann-Robertson-Walker universes with K=({+-}1,0)

    SciTech Connect

    Schmid, Christoph

    2009-03-15

    We show that there is exact dragging of the axis directions of local inertial frames by a weighted average of the cosmological energy currents via gravitomagnetism for all linear perturbations of all Friedmann-Robertson-Walker (FRW) universes and of Einstein's static closed universe, and for all energy-momentum-stress tensors and in the presence of a cosmological constant. This includes FRW universes arbitrarily close to the Milne Universe and the de Sitter universe. Hence the postulate formulated by Ernst Mach about the physical cause for the time-evolution of inertial axes is shown to hold in general relativity for linear perturbations of FRW universes. - The time-evolution of local inertial axes (relative to given local fiducial axes) is given experimentally by the precession angular velocity {omega}-vector{sub gyro} of local gyroscopes, which in turn gives the operational definition of the gravitomagnetic field: B-vector{sub g}{identical_to}-2{omega}-vector{sub gyro}. The gravitomagnetic field is caused by energy currents J-vector{sub {epsilon}} via the momentum constraint, Einstein's G{sup 0-}circumflex{sub i-circumflex} equation, (-{delta}+{mu}{sup 2})A-vector{sub g}=-16{pi}G{sub N}J-vector{sub {epsilon}} with B-vector{sub g}=curl A-vector{sub g}. This equation is analogous to Ampere's law, but it holds for all time-dependent situations. {delta} is the de Rham-Hodge Laplacian, and {delta}=-curl curl for the vorticity sector in Riemannian 3-space. - In the solution for an open universe the 1/r{sup 2}-force of Ampere is replaced by a Yukawa force Y{sub {mu}}(r)=(-d/dr)[(1/R)exp(-{mu}r)], form-identical for FRW backgrounds with K=(-1,0). Here r is the measured geodesic distance from the gyroscope to the cosmological source, and 2{pi}R is the measured circumference of the sphere centered at the gyroscope and going through the source point. The scale of the exponential cutoff is the H-dot radius, where H is the Hubble rate, dot is the derivative with respect to cosmic time, and {mu}{sup 2}=-4(dH/dt). Analogous results hold in closed FRW universes and in Einstein's closed static universe.--We list six fundamental tests for the principle formulated by Mach: all of them are explicitly fulfilled by our solutions.--We show that only energy currents in the toroidal vorticity sector with l=1 can affect the precession of gyroscopes. We show that the harmonic decomposition of toroidal vorticity fields in terms of vector spherical harmonics X-vector{sub lm}{sup -} has radial functions which are form-identical for the 3-sphere, the hyperbolic 3-space, and Euclidean 3-space, and are form-identical with the spherical Bessel-, Neumann-, and Hankel functions. - The Appendix gives the de Rham-Hodge Laplacian on vorticity fields in Riemannian 3-spaces by equations connecting the calculus of differential forms with the curl notation. We also give the derivation the Weitzenboeck formula for the difference between the de Rham-Hodge Laplacian {delta} and the ''rough'' Laplacian {nabla}{sup 2} on vector fields.

  3. A program for confidence interval calculations for a Poisson process with background including systematic uncertainties: POLE 1.0

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conrad, Jan

    2004-04-01

    A Fortran 77 routine has been developed to calculate confidence intervals with and without systematic uncertainties using a frequentist confidence interval construction with a Bayesian treatment of the systematic uncertainties. The routine can account for systematic uncertainties in the background prediction and signal/background efficiencies. The uncertainties may be separately parametrized by a Gauss, log-normal or flat probability density function (PDF), though since a Monte Carlo approach is chosen to perform the necessary integrals a generalization to other parameterizations is particularly simple. Full correlation between signal and background efficiency is optional. The ordering schemes for frequentist construction currently supported are the likelihood ratio ordering (also known as Feldman-Cousins) and Neyman ordering. Optionally, both schemes can be used with conditioning, meaning the probability density function is conditioned on the fact that the actual outcome of the background process can not have been larger than the number of observed events. Program summaryTitle of program: POLE version 1.0 Catalogue identifier: ADTA Program summary URL:http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/ADTA Program available from: CPC Program Library, Queen's University of Belfast, N. Ireland Licensing provisions: None Computer for which the program is designed: DELL PC 1 GB 2.0 Ghz Pentium IV Operating system under which the program has been tested: RH Linux 7.2 Kernel 2.4.7-10 Programming language used: Fortran 77 Memory required to execute with typical data: ˜1.6 Mbytes No. of bytes in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 373745 No. of lines in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 2700 Distribution format: tar gzip file Keywords: Confidence interval calculation, Systematic uncertainties Nature of the physical problem: The problem is to calculate a frequentist confidence interval on the parameter of a Poisson process with known background in presence of systematic uncertainties in experimental parameters such as signal efficiency or background prediction. Method of solution: A PDF for the confidence interval construction is constructed by folding a Poisson density function with a parametrization describing the posterior PDF of the systematic uncertainties. The construction is then performed with this new PDF according to different ordering schemes. The convolution is performed using a Monte Carlo integration method, providing greatest possible flexibility with respect to the parametrization. Restriction on the complexity of the problem: No restrictions. Typical running time: for calculation of a single confidence interval with 1000 steps in signal hypothesis space the wall clock time on a DELL PC 1 GB 2.0 Ghz Pentium IV with 4 GB swap is ca. 500 seconds. The wall clock time scales roughly linear with the number of steps in signal space. Unusual features of the program: POLE uses routines from the CERNLIB library [ http://wwwasd.web.cern.ch/wwwasd/cernlib], which have to be linked in during compilation. It should be noted that the number of steps in signal space (maximal s required divided by the step-width) should not exceed 1000, since the corresponding arrays are predimensioned. References: [1] J. Conrad, O. Botner, A. Hallgren, C. Perez de los Heros, Including systematic uncertainties in confidence interval construction for Poisson statistics, Phys. Rev. D 67 (2003) 012002, hep-ex/0202013.

  4. Air traffic simulation in chemistry-climate model EMAC 2.41: AirTraf 1.0

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamashita, Hiroshi; Grewe, Volker; Jöckel, Patrick; Linke, Florian; Schaefer, Martin; Sasaki, Daisuke

    2016-09-01

    Mobility is becoming more and more important to society and hence air transportation is expected to grow further over the next decades. Reducing anthropogenic climate impact from aviation emissions and building a climate-friendly air transportation system are required for a sustainable development of commercial aviation. A climate optimized routing, which avoids climate-sensitive regions by re-routing horizontally and vertically, is an important measure for climate impact reduction. The idea includes a number of different routing strategies (routing options) and shows a great potential for the reduction. To evaluate this, the impact of not only CO2 but also non-CO2 emissions must be considered. CO2 is a long-lived gas, while non-CO2 emissions are short-lived and are inhomogeneously distributed. This study introduces AirTraf (version 1.0) that performs global air traffic simulations, including effects of local weather conditions on the emissions. AirTraf was developed as a new submodel of the ECHAM5/MESSy Atmospheric Chemistry (EMAC) model. Air traffic information comprises Eurocontrol's Base of Aircraft Data (BADA Revision 3.9) and International Civil Aviation Organization (ICAO) engine performance data. Fuel use and emissions are calculated by the total energy model based on the BADA methodology and Deutsches Zentrum für Luft- und Raumfahrt (DLR) fuel flow method. The flight trajectory optimization is performed by a genetic algorithm (GA) with respect to a selected routing option. In the model development phase, benchmark tests were performed for the great circle and flight time routing options. The first test showed that the great circle calculations were accurate to -0.004 %, compared to those calculated by the Movable Type script. The second test showed that the optimal solution found by the algorithm sufficiently converged to the theoretical true-optimal solution. The difference in flight time between the two solutions is less than 0.01 %. The dependence of the optimal solutions on the initial set of solutions (called population) was analyzed and the influence was small (around 0.01 %). The trade-off between the accuracy of GA optimizations and computational costs is clarified and the appropriate population and generation (one iteration of GA) sizing is discussed. The results showed that a large reduction in the number of function evaluations of around 90 % can be achieved with only a small decrease in the accuracy of less than 0.1 %. Finally, AirTraf simulations are demonstrated with the great circle and the flight time routing options for a typical winter day. The 103 trans-Atlantic flight plans were used, assuming an Airbus A330-301 aircraft. The results confirmed that AirTraf simulates the air traffic properly for the two routing options. In addition, the GA successfully found the time-optimal flight trajectories for the 103 airport pairs, taking local weather conditions into account. The consistency check for the AirTraf simulations confirmed that calculated flight time, fuel consumption, NOx emission index and aircraft weights show good agreement with reference data.

  5. [Ecotoxicological effects of chlorotetracycline on earthworm in soil].

    PubMed

    Ji, Zhan-Hua; An, Jing; Xiao, Ming-Yue; Wei, Shu-He; Tai, Pei-Dong; Lu, Ze

    2014-10-01

    Eiseniafoetida was selected to investigate the ecotoxicological effects of chlorotetracycline on the earthworm in soil. The results showed that 1, 10 and 100 mg · kg(-1) chlorotetracycline had no significant effects on earthworm's body mass after a 7-d exposure, but it was significantly inhibited by 10, 100 mg · kg(-1) chlorotetracycline after 21 days. The soluble protein content of earthworm was induced by 1, 10 and 100 mg · kg(-1) chlorotetracycline, and showed a positive response as the con- centration increased. Also, the earthworm treated by 1, 10 and 100 mg · kg(-1) chlorotetracycline induced the increases of SOD, POD and CAT activities to different degrees. The gene expression in earthworm changed significantly after a 28-d exposure. It is suggested that chlorotetracycline had a chronic ecotoxicological effect on earthworm, and the body mass, soluble protein, antioxidant en- zyme and gene expression could be used as the biomarkers to estimate chlorotetracycline toxicity.

  6. Understanding In Vivo Response and Mechanical Property Variation in MgO, SrO and SiO2 doped β-TCP

    PubMed Central

    Bose, Susmita; Tarafder, Solaiman; Banerjee, Shashwat S.; Davies, Neal M.; Bandyopadhyay, Amit

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this work is to evaluate the influence of MgO, SrO and SiO2 doping on mechanical and biological properties of β-tricalcium phosphate (β-TCP) to achieve controlled resorption kinetics of β-TCP system for maxillofacial and spinal fusion application. We prepared dense TCP compacts of four different compositions, i) pure β-TCP, ii) β-TCP with 1.0 wt. % MgO + 1.0 wt. % SrO, iii) β-TCP with 1.0 wt. % SrO + 0.5 wt. % SiO2, and iv) β-TCP with 1.0 wt. % MgO + 1.0 wt. % SrO + 0.5 wt. % SiO2, by uniaxial pressing and sintering at 1250 °C. β phase stability is observed at 1250 °C sintering temperature due to MgO doping in β-TCP. In vitro mineralization in simulated body fluid (SBF) for 16 weeks shows excellent apatite growth on undoped and doped samples. Strength degradation of TCP samples in SBF is significantly influenced by both dopant chemistry and amount of dopant. Compressive strengths for all samples show degradation in SBF over the 16 week time period with varying degradation kinetics. MgO/SrO/SiO2 doped sample shows no strength loss, while undoped TCP shows the maximum strength loss from 419 ±28 MPa to 158 ±28 MPa over the 16 week study. In case of MgO/SrO doped TCP, strength loss is slow and gradual. TCP doped with 1.0 wt. % MgO and 1.0 wt. % SrO shows excellent in vivo biocompatibility when tested in male Sprague-Dawley rats for 16 weeks. Histomorphology analysis reveals that MgO/SrO doped TCP promoted osteogenesis by excellent early stage bone remodeling as compared to undoped TCP. PMID:21419884

  7. Dust in MG II Absorption Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malhotra, S.

    The dust absorption feature at 2175 AA is detected in a composite spectrum of Mg II absorbers. The composite absorber spectrum is obtained by taking the geometric mean of 92 quasar spectra after aligning them in the rest-frame of 96 absorbers. By aligning the spectra according to absorber redshifts we reinforce the spectral features of the absorbers, and smooth over possible bumps and wiggles in the emission spectra. The width of the observed absorption feature is 200-300 AA (FWHM), or 0.4-0.6 microns^{-1} and the central wavelength is 2240 AA. The Galactic dust feature has a central wavelength of 2176 AA and FWHM = 0.8-1.25 microns^{-1}. Simulations show that this discrepancy between the properties of the 2175 AA feature in Mg II absorbers and Galactic ISM can be mostly explained by the different methods used to measure them (cf. Malhotra 1997).

  8. Effects of atorvastatin 20 mg, rosuvastatin 10 mg, and atorvastatin/ezetimibe 5 mg/5 mg on lipoproteins and glucose metabolism.

    PubMed

    Her, Ae-Young; Kim, Jong-Youn; Kang, Seok-Min; Choi, Donghoon; Jang, Yangsoo; Chung, Namsik; Manabe, Ichiro; Lee, Sang-Hak

    2010-06-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the effects of 3 different statin regimens that have equivalent low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) lowering efficacy on the apolipoprotein B/A1 ratio and glucose metabolism. After a 4-week dietary lead-in, 90 hypercholeserolemic patients were randomly assigned to 1 of 3 treatment groups for 8 weeks: atorvastatin 20 mg, rosuvastatin 10 mg, or atorvastatin/ezetimibe 5 mg/5 mg. At drug treatment week 8, we compared the percentage changes in lipid parameters, apolipoprotein B/A1 ratio, hemoglobin A1c, and homeostasis model assessment-insulin resistance (HOMA-IR) from baseline. Seventy-six patients completed the study and the percentage changes in LDL-C were comparable among the groups. However, the percentage reduction in the apolipoprotein B/A1 ratio was significantly greater in the rosuvastatin group (-47% +/- 14%, P = .04) and the combination group (-46% +/- 8%, P = .05) than in the atorvastatin group (-39% +/- 11%). The percentage increase in hemoglobin A1c was small but significantly greater in the atorvastatin group compared to the combination group (3.0% +/- 5.2% and -0.4% +/- 4.0%, P = .03). The effect of rosuvastatin on hemoglobin A1c was not different from those of the other 2 regimens. The effects of 3 statin regimens were similar on HOMA-IR. In conclusion, 3 statin regimens have differential effect on apolipoprotein B/A1 and glycemic control after comparable LDL-C reduction.

  9. Microstructures, mechanical and corrosion properties and biocompatibility of as extruded Mg-Mn-Zn-Nd alloys for biomedical applications.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Ying-Long; Li, Yuncang; Luo, Dong-Mei; Ding, Yunfei; Hodgson, Peter

    2015-04-01

    Extruded Mg-1Mn-2Zn-xNd alloys (x=0.5, 1.0, 1.5 mass %) have been developed for their potential use as biomaterials. The extrusion on the alloys was performed at temperature of 623K with an extrusion ratio of 14.7 under an average extrusion speed of 4mm/s. The microstructure, mechanical property, corrosion behavior and biocompatibility of the extruded Mg-Mn-Zn-Nd alloys have been investigated in this study. The microstructure was examined using X-ray diffraction analysis and optical microscopy. The mechanical properties were determined from uniaxial tensile and compressive tests. The corrosion behavior was investigated using electrochemical measurement. The biocompatibility was evaluated using osteoblast-like SaOS2 cells. The experimental results indicate that all extruded Mg-1Mn-2Zn-xNd alloys are composed of both α phase of Mg and a compound of Mg7Zn3 with very fine microstructures, and show good ductility and much higher mechanical strength than that of cast pure Mg and natural bone. The tensile strength and elongation of the extruded alloys increase with an increase in neodymium content. Their compressive strength does not change significantly with an increase in neodymium content. The extruded alloys show good biocompatibility and much higher corrosion resistance than that of cast pure Mg. The extruded Mg-1Mn-2Zn-1.0Nd alloy shows a great potential for biomedical applications due to the combination of enhanced mechanical properties, high corrosion resistance and good biocompatibility. PMID:25686931

  10. Nanoscale precipitates strengthened lanthanum-bearing Mg-3Sn-1Mn alloys through continuous rheo-rolling

    PubMed Central

    Guan, R. G.; Shen, Y. F.; Zhao, Z. Y.; Misra, R. D. K.

    2016-01-01

    We elucidate the effect of lanthanum (La) on the microstructure and mechanical properties of Mg-3Sn-1Mn-xLa (wt.%) alloy plates processed through continuous rheo-rolling for the first time. At x = 0.2 wt.%, La dissolved completely in the α-Mg matrix. As the La content was increased to 0.6 wt.%, a new plate-shaped three-phase compound composed of La5Sn3, Mg2Sn and Mg17La2 phases was formed with an average length of 380 ± 10 nm and an average width of 110 ± 5 nm. This compound had a pinning effect on the α-Mg grain boundary and on dislocations. With further increase in La-content to 1.0 wt.%, the length of the plate-shaped compound increased to an average length of 560 ± 10 nm, while the width was reduced to 90 ± 5 nm. The particle size of Mg2Sn decreased from 100 nm to 50 nm with increase in La-content from 0.2 to 1.4 wt.%. At La content of 1.0 wt.%, the tensile strength and elongation of the alloy was maximum, with 29% and 32% increase, respectively, compared to the Mg-3Sn-1Mn (wt.%) alloy, and 37% and 89% increase, in comparison to the Mg-3Sn-1Mn-0.87 Ce (wt.%) alloy. PMID:26988533

  11. Microstructures, mechanical and corrosion properties and biocompatibility of as extruded Mg-Mn-Zn-Nd alloys for biomedical applications.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Ying-Long; Li, Yuncang; Luo, Dong-Mei; Ding, Yunfei; Hodgson, Peter

    2015-04-01

    Extruded Mg-1Mn-2Zn-xNd alloys (x=0.5, 1.0, 1.5 mass %) have been developed for their potential use as biomaterials. The extrusion on the alloys was performed at temperature of 623K with an extrusion ratio of 14.7 under an average extrusion speed of 4mm/s. The microstructure, mechanical property, corrosion behavior and biocompatibility of the extruded Mg-Mn-Zn-Nd alloys have been investigated in this study. The microstructure was examined using X-ray diffraction analysis and optical microscopy. The mechanical properties were determined from uniaxial tensile and compressive tests. The corrosion behavior was investigated using electrochemical measurement. The biocompatibility was evaluated using osteoblast-like SaOS2 cells. The experimental results indicate that all extruded Mg-1Mn-2Zn-xNd alloys are composed of both α phase of Mg and a compound of Mg7Zn3 with very fine microstructures, and show good ductility and much higher mechanical strength than that of cast pure Mg and natural bone. The tensile strength and elongation of the extruded alloys increase with an increase in neodymium content. Their compressive strength does not change significantly with an increase in neodymium content. The extruded alloys show good biocompatibility and much higher corrosion resistance than that of cast pure Mg. The extruded Mg-1Mn-2Zn-1.0Nd alloy shows a great potential for biomedical applications due to the combination of enhanced mechanical properties, high corrosion resistance and good biocompatibility.

  12. Highly Reversible Mg Insertion in Nanostructured Bi for Mg Ion Batteries

    SciTech Connect

    Shao, Yuyan; Gu, Meng; Li, Xiaolin; Nie, Zimin; Zuo, Pengjian; Li, Guosheng; Liu, Tianbiao L.; Xiao, Jie; Cheng, Yingwen; Wang, Chong M.; Zhang, Jiguang; Liu, Jun

    2014-01-08

    Rechargeable magnesium batteries have attracted wide attention for energy storage. Currently, most studies focus on Mg metal as the anode, but this approach is still limited by the properties of the electrolyte and poor control of the Mg plating/stripping processes.1,2 Here we report the synthesis and application of Bi nanotubes as a high performance anode material for rechargeable Mg ion batteries. The nanostructured Bi anode delivers a high reversible specific capacity (350 mAh/gBi, or 3430 mAh/cm3 Bi), excellent stability, and high columbic efficiency (95 % initial and very close to 100% afterwards). The good performance is attributed to the unique properties of in-situ formed, interconnected nanoporous bismuth. Such nanostructures can effectively accommodate the large volume change without losing electric contact and significantly reduce diffusion length for Mg2+. Significantly, the nanostructured Bi anode can be used with conventional electrolytes which will open new opportunities to study Mg ion battery chemistry and further improve the properties. The performance and the stability of a full cell Mg ion battery have been demonstrated with conventional electrolytes. This work suggests that other high energy density alloy compounds may also be considered for Mg-ion chemistry for high capacity electrode materials.

  13. Interstitial Fe in MgO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mølholt, T. E.; Mantovan, R.; Gunnlaugsson, H. P.; Svane, A.; Masenda, H.; Naidoo, D.; Bharuth-Ram, K.; Fanciulli, M.; Gislason, H. P.; Johnston, K.; Langouche, G.; Ólafsson, S.; Sielemann, R.; Weyer, G.

    2014-01-01

    Isolated 57Fe atoms were studied in MgO single-crystals by emission Mössbauer spectroscopy following implantation of 57Mn decaying to 57Fe. Four Mössbauer spectral components were found corresponding to different Fe lattice positions and/or charge states. Two components represent Fe atoms substituting Mg as Fe2+ and Fe3+, respectively; a third component is due to Fe in a strongly implantation-induced disturbed region. The fourth component, which is the focus of this paper, can be assigned to Fe at an interstitial site. Comparison of its measured isomer shift with ab initio calculations suggests that the interstitial Fe is located on, or close to, the face of the rock-salt MgO structure. To harmonize such an assignment with the measured near-zero quadrupole interaction a local motion process (cage motion) of the Fe has to be stipulated. The relation of such a local motion as a starting point for long range diffusion is discussed.

  14. The significance of Mg in prebiotic geochemistry

    PubMed Central

    Holm, N G

    2012-01-01

    Magnesium plays a special role in biochemistry because of its ability to coordinate six oxygen atoms efficiently in its first coordination shell. Such oxygen atoms may be part of one or two charged oxyanions, which means that Mg2+ can, for instance, tie together two different phosphate groups that are located at distance from each other in a macromolecule, and in this way be responsible for the folding of molecules like RNA. This property of Mg2+ also helps the stabilization of diphosphate and triphosphate groups of nucleotides, as well as promoting the condensation of orthophosphate to oligophosphates, like pyrophosphate and trimetaphosphate. Borates, on the other hand, are known to promote the formation of nucleobases and carbohydrates, ribose in particular, which is yet another constituent of nucleotides. The oldest borate minerals that we find on Earth today are magnesium borates. Dissolved borate stabilizes pentose sugars by forming complexes with cis-hydroxyl groups. In the furanose form of ribose, the preferential binding occurs to the 2 and 3 carbon, leaving the 5 carbon free for phosphorylation. The central role of Mg2+ in the function of ribozymes and its ‘archaic’ position in ribosomes, and the fact that magnesium generally has coordination properties different from other cations, suggests that the inorganic chemistry of magnesium had a key position in the first chemical processes leading to the origin and early evolution of life. PMID:22429303

  15. Interstitial Fe in MgO

    SciTech Connect

    Mølholt, T. E. Gislason, H. P.; Ólafsson, S.; Mantovan, R.; Gunnlaugsson, H. P.; Svane, A.; Weyer, G.; Masenda, H.; Naidoo, D.; Bharuth-Ram, K.; Fanciulli, M.; Johnston, K.; Sielemann, R.

    2014-01-14

    Isolated {sup 57}Fe atoms were studied in MgO single-crystals by emission Mössbauer spectroscopy following implantation of {sup 57}Mn decaying to {sup 57}Fe. Four Mössbauer spectral components were found corresponding to different Fe lattice positions and/or charge states. Two components represent Fe atoms substituting Mg as Fe{sup 2+} and Fe{sup 3+}, respectively; a third component is due to Fe in a strongly implantation-induced disturbed region. The fourth component, which is the focus of this paper, can be assigned to Fe at an interstitial site. Comparison of its measured isomer shift with ab initio calculations suggests that the interstitial Fe is located on, or close to, the face of the rock-salt MgO structure. To harmonize such an assignment with the measured near-zero quadrupole interaction a local motion process (cage motion) of the Fe has to be stipulated. The relation of such a local motion as a starting point for long range diffusion is discussed.

  16. Neurovascular Network Explorer 1.0: a database of 2-photon single-vessel diameter measurements with MATLAB(®) graphical user interface.

    PubMed

    Sridhar, Vishnu B; Tian, Peifang; Dale, Anders M; Devor, Anna; Saisan, Payam A

    2014-01-01

    We present a database client software-Neurovascular Network Explorer 1.0 (NNE 1.0)-that uses MATLAB(®) based Graphical User Interface (GUI) for interaction with a database of 2-photon single-vessel diameter measurements from our previous publication (Tian et al., 2010). These data are of particular interest for modeling the hemodynamic response. NNE 1.0 is downloaded by the user and then runs either as a MATLAB script or as a standalone program on a Windows platform. The GUI allows browsing the database according to parameters specified by the user, simple manipulation and visualization of the retrieved records (such as averaging and peak-normalization), and export of the results. Further, we provide NNE 1.0 source code. With this source code, the user can database their own experimental results, given the appropriate data structure and naming conventions, and thus share their data in a user-friendly format with other investigators. NNE 1.0 provides an example of seamless and low-cost solution for sharing of experimental data by a regular size neuroscience laboratory and may serve as a general template, facilitating dissemination of biological results and accelerating data-driven modeling approaches.

  17. Neurovascular Network Explorer 1.0: a database of 2-photon single-vessel diameter measurements with MATLAB(®) graphical user interface.

    PubMed

    Sridhar, Vishnu B; Tian, Peifang; Dale, Anders M; Devor, Anna; Saisan, Payam A

    2014-01-01

    We present a database client software-Neurovascular Network Explorer 1.0 (NNE 1.0)-that uses MATLAB(®) based Graphical User Interface (GUI) for interaction with a database of 2-photon single-vessel diameter measurements from our previous publication (Tian et al., 2010). These data are of particular interest for modeling the hemodynamic response. NNE 1.0 is downloaded by the user and then runs either as a MATLAB script or as a standalone program on a Windows platform. The GUI allows browsing the database according to parameters specified by the user, simple manipulation and visualization of the retrieved records (such as averaging and peak-normalization), and export of the results. Further, we provide NNE 1.0 source code. With this source code, the user can database their own experimental results, given the appropriate data structure and naming conventions, and thus share their data in a user-friendly format with other investigators. NNE 1.0 provides an example of seamless and low-cost solution for sharing of experimental data by a regular size neuroscience laboratory and may serve as a general template, facilitating dissemination of biological results and accelerating data-driven modeling approaches. PMID:24904401

  18. Neurovascular Network Explorer 1.0: a database of 2-photon single-vessel diameter measurements with MATLAB® graphical user interface

    PubMed Central

    Sridhar, Vishnu B.; Tian, Peifang; Dale, Anders M.; Devor, Anna; Saisan, Payam A.

    2014-01-01

    We present a database client software—Neurovascular Network Explorer 1.0 (NNE 1.0)—that uses MATLAB® based Graphical User Interface (GUI) for interaction with a database of 2-photon single-vessel diameter measurements from our previous publication (Tian et al., 2010). These data are of particular interest for modeling the hemodynamic response. NNE 1.0 is downloaded by the user and then runs either as a MATLAB script or as a standalone program on a Windows platform. The GUI allows browsing the database according to parameters specified by the user, simple manipulation and visualization of the retrieved records (such as averaging and peak-normalization), and export of the results. Further, we provide NNE 1.0 source code. With this source code, the user can database their own experimental results, given the appropriate data structure and naming conventions, and thus share their data in a user-friendly format with other investigators. NNE 1.0 provides an example of seamless and low-cost solution for sharing of experimental data by a regular size neuroscience laboratory and may serve as a general template, facilitating dissemination of biological results and accelerating data-driven modeling approaches. PMID:24904401

  19. Early-stage precipitation in Al-Zn-Mg-Cu alloy (7050)

    SciTech Connect

    Sha Gang; Cerezo, Alfred

    2004-09-06

    GP zone and metastable {eta}{sup '} formation during the early-stage precipitation of a 7050 Al alloy aged at 121 deg. C has been investigated using transmission electron microscopy, together with 3-dimensional atom probe analysis (of the chemistry and morphology) of individual precipitates. Small Mg-rich clusters (GPI zones) are found in the alloy after short ageing times at 121 deg. C, together with larger GPI zones (Zn/Mg=1.0). Zn-rich {eta}{sup '} platelets are seen to form mainly between 30 and 240 min ageing, coexisting with larger GPI zones. A significant fraction of <1 1 0> elongated clusters have also been observed over this period of ageing. The dominant mechanism for {eta}{sup '} formation at this stage is shown to be by transformation of small GPI zones, via these elongated clusters and not by nucleation on larger zones.

  20. Influence of Mg component and pressure on magnetic ordering of (Mg,Fe)O

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujii, A.; Kondo, T.; Taniguchi, T.

    2012-12-01

    (Mg,Fe)O is the second most abundant phase in the Earth's lower mantle. Knowing the fundamental properties of (Mg,Fe)O is important to understand the Earth's materials. The relation between rhombohedral distortion and antiferromagnetic ordering in FeO have been discussed, as an end member of (Mg,Fe)O. However, it does not fully understand for (Mg,Fe)O yet because its structural transition pressure is influenced by Mg component and stress condition [e.g. Zhuravlev et al., 2007]. We should also account compositional dependence on Néel temperature [Woods and Fine, 1969; Fujii et al., 2011] and spin glass-like behavior [Abbas and Hicks, 1990; Jing et al., 1993]. In this study, we investigated the compositional dependence of magnetic ordering at ambient pressure, and pressure dependence of Néel temperature up to 1.27 GPa. Superconducting Quantum Interference Device (SQUID, MPMS-7, Quantum design) was used for all magnetic measurements. We measured the temperature dependence of susceptibilities cooling with in zero field (ZFC) and in a field (FC) at ambient pressure and observed splitting between susceptibility of ZFC and FC. We confirmed that the smaller compositional dependence on Néel temperature in (Mg1-XFeX)O (X ≤ 0.60) [Fujii et al., 2011] may be explained by spin-glass transition. The transition temperature of (Mg0.40Fe0.60)O is 82 K and is close to 76 K that observed in (Mg0.23Fe0.77)0.92O [Abbas and Hicks, 1990]. The spin-glass like behavior does not affect on the Néel temperature of (Mg1-XFeX)O (X ≥ 0.70) suggested by previous work [Fujii et al., 2011] because spin-glass transition temperature would not exceed 82 K. We also measured the pressure dependence of Néel temperature of (Mg0.30Fe0.70)O, (Mg0.25Fe0.75)O and (Mg0.20Fe0.80)O using a piston cylinder type pressure cell. We calibrated pressure by superconducting transition of tin. Néel temperature of (Mg,Fe)O were increased with increasing pressure except for some measurements under non

  1. Real-world experiences of folic acid supplementation (5 versus 30 mg/week) with methotrexate in rheumatoid arthritis patients: a comparison study.

    PubMed

    Koh, K T; Teh, C L; Cheah, C K; Ling, G R; Yong, M C; Hong, H C; Gun, S C

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this study was to compare the tolerability of methotrexate in two different regimes of folic acid (FA) supplementation in rheumatoid arthritis (RA). We performed a multicenter, cross-sectional observational cohort study on 240 RA patients with 120 patients each in 5 mg of FA weekly and 30 mg of FA weekly supplementation. There were no significant differences for side effects (14.2 versus 22.5%, P=0.523) and discontinuation of methotrexate (3.6 versus 13.3%, P=0.085). RA patients given 5 mg of FA weekly supplementation had a lower disease activity score 28 compared to 30 mg of FA weekly supplementation [3.44 (1.10) versus 3.85 (1.40), P=0.014]. FA supplementation of 5 mg per week and 30 mg per week was associated with similar tolerability of methotrexate in RA patients. PMID:27608797

  2. Real-world experiences of folic acid supplementation (5 versus 30 mg/week) with methotrexate in rheumatoid arthritis patients: a comparison study.

    PubMed

    Koh, K T; Teh, C L; Cheah, C K; Ling, G R; Yong, M C; Hong, H C; Gun, S C

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this study was to compare the tolerability of methotrexate in two different regimes of folic acid (FA) supplementation in rheumatoid arthritis (RA). We performed a multicenter, cross-sectional observational cohort study on 240 RA patients with 120 patients each in 5 mg of FA weekly and 30 mg of FA weekly supplementation. There were no significant differences for side effects (14.2 versus 22.5%, P=0.523) and discontinuation of methotrexate (3.6 versus 13.3%, P=0.085). RA patients given 5 mg of FA weekly supplementation had a lower disease activity score 28 compared to 30 mg of FA weekly supplementation [3.44 (1.10) versus 3.85 (1.40), P=0.014]. FA supplementation of 5 mg per week and 30 mg per week was associated with similar tolerability of methotrexate in RA patients.

  3. FeMn/Fe/Co/Cu(1,1,10) films studied using the magneto-optic Kerr effect and photoemission electron microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Meng, Y.; Li, J.; Tan, A.; Park, J.; Jin, E.; Son, H.; Doran, A.; Scholl, A.; Arenholz, E.; Zhao, H. W.; Hwang, Chanyong; Qiu, Z. Q.

    2011-07-31

    FeMn/Fe/Co/Cu(1,1,10) films were grown epitaxially and investigated using the magneto-optic Kerr effect and photoemission electron microscopy. We found that FeMn/Fe/Co/Cu(1,1,10) exhibits the same properties as FeMn/Co/Cu(1,1,10) for the ferromagnetic phase of the face centered cubic (fcc) Fe film but a different property for the non-ferromagnetic phase of the fcc Fe film. This result indicates that the characteristic property reported in the literature for FeMn/Co/Cu(001) comes from the FeMn spin structure and is independent of the ferromagnetic layer.

  4. Comparison of the RECIST 1.0 and RECIST 1.1 in patients treated with targeted agents: a pooled analysis and review.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jung Han

    2016-03-22

    Patients treated with targeted agents were not included in the data warehouse when the RECIST 1.1 was revised in 2009. We conducted this pooled analysis to investigate the impact of the RECIST 1.1 on the assessment of tumor response in cancer patients treated with targeted agents. We surveyed MEDLINE, EMBASE and PubMed for articles with terms of the RECIST 1.0 or RECIST 1.1. We searched for all the references of relevant articles and reviews using the 'related articles' feature in the PubMed. There were six articles in the literature comparing the clinical impacts of the RECIST 1.0 and RECIST 1.1 in patients treated with targeted agents for advanced or metastatic cancer. A total of 322 patients were recruited from the six trials; 217 with non-small cell lung cancer, 23 with thyroid cancer, 20 with gastrointestinal stromal tumor, and 62 with renal cell carcinoma. Because of new lymph node criteria, eight patients (2.5%) had no target lesions when adopting the RECIST 1.1. The number of target lesions by the RECIST 1.1 was significantly lower than that by the RECIST 1.0 (P < 0.001). However, the RECIST 1.1 showed high concordance with the RECIST 1.0 in the assessment of best tumor responses (k = 0.908). Seventeen patients (5.6%) showed discrepancy in the best tumor response between the RECIST 1.0 and RECIST 1.1. This pooled study demonstrates that the RECIST 1.1 shows the highly concordant response assessment with the RECIST 1.0 in patients treated with targeted agents. PMID:26885610

  5. Charge-density oscillations on Be(10{bar 1}0): Screening in a non-free two-dimensional electron gas

    SciTech Connect

    Briner, B.G.; Hofmann, P. ||; Doering, M.; Rust, H.; Plummer, E.W. |; Bradshaw, A.M.

    1998-11-01

    The surface state on Be(10{bar 1}0) has been investigated using a low-temperature scanning tunneling microscope (STM). The Fermi contour of this surface state is located at one boundary of the surface Brillouin zone, and surface-state electrons provide the main part of the charge density near the Fermi energy. Be(10{bar 1}0), therefore, corresponds closely to a non-free two-dimensional electron gas. We have observed standing waves of the surface charge density on Be(10{bar 1}0) near step edges and point defects. Such wave patterns derive from the interference of incoming and scattered electrons; they demonstrate the screening characteristics of the surface state. On Be(10{bar 1}0) these waves were found to be highly anisotropic. It is shown that calculating the Fourier transforms of topographic STM images is a powerful method for determining the Fermi contour of the surface state. This method could even be applied to images that display a complex wave pattern arising from a random distribution of point scatterers. Fourier analysis also revealed that the charge density oscillations on Be(10{bar 1}0) contain multiple periods that differ by reciprocal lattice vectors. These multiperiodic oscillations relate to the non-free character of the surface-state electrons and constitute an interference pattern of Bloch states. Fourier filtering was used to separate the charge-density oscillations from the topographic corrugation and to visualize their shape and spatial range. The experimental data are qualitatively discussed using a model calculation based on the scattering of Bloch electrons from planar obstacles in a two-dimensional conductor. Experimental results and model calculations highlight how the screening characteristics on Be(10{bar 1}0) significantly deviate from the behavior expected for a free two-dimensional electron gas. {copyright} {ital 1998} {ital The American Physical Society}

  6. Comparison of the RECIST 1.0 and RECIST 1.1 in patients treated with targeted agents: a pooled analysis and review

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jung Han

    2016-01-01

    Patients treated with targeted agents were not included in the data warehouse when the RECIST 1.1 was revised in 2009. We conducted this pooled analysis to investigate the impact of the RECIST 1.1 on the assessment of tumor response in cancer patients treated with targeted agents. We surveyed MEDLINE, EMBASE and PubMed for articles with terms of the RECIST 1.0 or RECIST 1.1. We searched for all the references of relevant articles and reviews using the ‘related articles’ feature in the PubMed. There were six articles in the literature comparing the clinical impacts of the RECIST 1.0 and RECIST 1.1 in patients treated with targeted agents for advanced or metastatic cancer. A total of 322 patients were recruited from the six trials; 217 with non-small cell lung cancer, 23 with thyroid cancer, 20 with gastrointestinal stromal tumor, and 62 with renal cell carcinoma. Because of new lymph node criteria, eight patients (2.5%) had no target lesions when adopting the RECIST 1.1. The number of target lesions by the RECIST 1.1 was significantly lower than that by the RECIST 1.0 (P < 0.001). However, the RECIST 1.1 showed high concordance with the RECIST 1.0 in the assessment of best tumor responses (k = 0.908). Seventeen patients (5.6%) showed discrepancy in the best tumor response between the RECIST 1.0 and RECIST 1.1. This pooled study demonstrates that the RECIST 1.1 shows the highly concordant response assessment with the RECIST 1.0 in patients treated with targeted agents. PMID:26885610

  7. Multiparticle-multihole states in 31Mg and 33Mg: A critical evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neyens, Gerda

    2011-12-01

    The experiments that provide information about the level structure of the “island of inversion” isotopes 31Mg and 33Mg are reviewed. Since the model-independent measurement of their ground-state spins was done, much experimental data can be reinterpreted, and spins and parities can be assigned to their excited states. Both experimental level schemes are found in very good agreement with calculations based on antisymmetrized molecular dynamics combined with the generator coordinate method. These calculations predict that both ground states are dominated by 2ℏω neutron excitations (more than 85% of the wave function). In the case of 33Mg, the energy of the 1ℏω and 3ℏω levels are calculated about 400 keV too high with respect to the ground state, while in 31Mg the 1ℏω levels are calculated only 200 keV too high. New key experiments are suggested.

  8. Mg intercalation in layered and spinel host crystal structures for Mg batteries.

    PubMed

    Emly, Alexandra; Van der Ven, Anton

    2015-05-01

    We investigate electrochemical properties of Mg in layered and spinel intercalation compounds from first-principles using TiS2 as a model system. Our calculations predict that Mg(x)TiS2 in both the layered and spinel crystal structures exhibits sloping voltage profiles with steps at stoichiometric compositions due to Mg-vacancy ordering. Mg ions are predicted to occupy the octahedral sites in both layered and spinel TiS2 with diffusion mediated by hops between octahedral sites that pass through adjacent tetrahedral sites. Predicted migration barriers are substantially higher than typical Li-migration barriers in intercalation compounds. The migration barriers are shown to be very sensitive to lattice parameters of the host crystal structure. We also discuss the possible role of rehybridization between the transition metal and the anion in affecting migration barriers.

  9. GCALIGNER 1.0: an alignment program to compute a multiple sample comparison data matrix from large eco-chemical datasets obtained by GC.

    PubMed

    Dellicour, Simon; Lecocq, Thomas

    2013-10-01

    GCALIGNER 1.0 is a computer program designed to perform a preliminary data comparison matrix of chemical data obtained by GC without MS information. The alignment algorithm is based on the comparison between the retention times of each detected compound in a sample. In this paper, we test the GCALIGNER efficiency on three datasets of the chemical secretions of bumble bees. The algorithm performs the alignment with a low error rate (<3%). GCALIGNER 1.0 is a useful, simple and free program based on an algorithm that enables the alignment of table-type data from GC.

  10. Laser cooling of MgCl and MgBr in theoretical approach

    SciTech Connect

    Wan, Mingjie; Shao, Juxiang; Huang, Duohui; Yang, Junsheng; Cao, Qilong; Jin, Chengguo; Wang, Fanhou; Gao, Yufeng

    2015-07-14

    Ab initio calculations for three low-lying electronic states (X{sup 2}Σ{sup +}, A{sup 2}Π, and 2{sup 2}Π) of MgCl and MgBr molecules, including spin-orbit coupling, are performed using multi-reference configuration interaction plus Davidson correction method. The calculations involve all-electronic basis sets and Douglas–Kroll scalar relativistic correction. Spectroscopic parameters well agree with available theoretical and experimental data. Highly diagonally distributed Franck-Condon factors f{sub 00} for A{sup 2}Π{sub 3/2,1/2} (υ′ = 0) → X{sup 2}Σ{sup +}{sub 1/2} (υ″ = 0) are determined for both MgCl and MgBr molecules. Suitable radiative lifetimes τ of A{sup 2}Π{sub 3/2,1/2} (υ′ = 0) states for rapid laser cooling are also obtained. The proposed laser drives A{sup 2}Π{sub 3/2} (υ′ = 0) → X{sup 2}Σ{sup +}{sub 1/2} (υ″ = 0) transition by using three wavelengths (main pump laser λ{sub 00}; two repumping lasers λ{sub 10} and λ{sub 21}). These results indicate the probability of laser cooling MgCl and MgBr molecules.

  11. Laser cooling of MgCl and MgBr in theoretical approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wan, Mingjie; Shao, Juxiang; Gao, Yufeng; Huang, Duohui; Yang, Junsheng; Cao, Qilong; Jin, Chengguo; Wang, Fanhou

    2015-07-01

    Ab initio calculations for three low-lying electronic states (X2Σ+, A2Π, and 22Π) of MgCl and MgBr molecules, including spin-orbit coupling, are performed using multi-reference configuration interaction plus Davidson correction method. The calculations involve all-electronic basis sets and Douglas-Kroll scalar relativistic correction. Spectroscopic parameters well agree with available theoretical and experimental data. Highly diagonally distributed Franck-Condon factors f00 for A2Π3/2,1/2 (υ' = 0) → X2Σ+1/2 (υ″ = 0) are determined for both MgCl and MgBr molecules. Suitable radiative lifetimes τ of A2Π3/2,1/2 (υ' = 0) states for rapid laser cooling are also obtained. The proposed laser drives A2Π3/2 (υ' = 0) → X2Σ+1/2 (υ″ = 0) transition by using three wavelengths (main pump laser λ00; two repumping lasers λ10 and λ21). These results indicate the probability of laser cooling MgCl and MgBr molecules.

  12. On the dissociation energy of Mg2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Partridge, Harry; Bauschlicher, Charles W., Jr.; Pettersson, Lars G. M.; Mclean, A. D.; Liu, Bowen

    1990-01-01

    The bonding in the X 1Sigma(+)g state of Mg2 is investigated using near-complete valence one-particle Slater and Gaussian basis sets containing up to h functions. It is shown that the four-electron complete CI limit can be approached using a sequence of either second-order CI (SOCI) or interacting correlated fragment (ICF) calculations. At the valence level, the best estimate of the dissociation energy D(e) was 464/cm. This is a lower limit and is probably within 5/cm of the complete basis value.

  13. -MgO Melt by Super Gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Juncheng; Guo, Zhancheng; Gao, Jintao; Li, Jingwei

    2014-08-01

    Perovskite phase was successfully separated from CaO-TiO2-SiO2-Al2O3-MgO melt by super gravity. Under the hypothesis that the titanium exists in the slag in terms of TiO2, with the gravity coefficient G = 600, time t = 5 minutes, and temperature T = 1563 K (1290 °C), the mass fraction of TiO2 in the concentrate is up to 52.94 pct, while that of the tailing is just 5.88 pct. The recovery ratio of Ti in the concentrate is up to 81.28 pct by centrifugal separation.

  14. Understanding the formation of the Mg II h&k lines during solar flares

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rubio Da Costa, Fatima; Kleint, Lucia; Petrosian, Vahe'; Liu, Wei; Allred, Joel C.

    2016-05-01

    The Mg II h&k lines are useful diagnostics for physical processes in the solar chromosphere. Understanding the line formation is crucial for the correct interpretation of spectral observations and characteristics such as line asymmetries or how their central reversals in the line cores disappear and turn into emission during flares are manifestations of various physical processes.Focusing on the well-observed X1.0 flare on 2014 March 29, we carried out a joint observational and modeling study to analyze the Mg II h&k spectra observed by IRIS. We constructed a multi-threaded flare loop model and used the time-dependent electron flux inferred from the RHESSI hard X-ray data as the input to the radiative hydrodynamic code RADYN to simulate the atmospheric response. Using the RH code we conducted a detailed modeling on line shape and evolution to derive how different atmospheric parameters may affect the MgII line emission.We successfully simulated the single-peaked Mg II h&k line profiles by increasing electron density in the upper chromosphere within a narrow height range of ≈ 800 km below the transition region. To our knowledge, this is the first successful attempt in reproducing such line-profile shapes under flaring conditions. We will discuss the implications of this result for diagnosing atmospheric dynamics and energy transport in solar flares.

  15. Interaction between L-aspartate and the brucite [Mg(OH)2]-water interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Estrada, Charlene F.; Sverjensky, Dimitri A.; Pelletier, Manuel; Razafitianamaharavo, Angélina; Hazen, Robert M.

    2015-04-01

    The interaction of biomolecules at the mineral-water interface could have played a prominent role in the emergence of more complex organic species in life's origins. Serpentinite-hosted hydrothermal vents may have acted as a suitable environment for this process to occur, although little is known about biomolecule-mineral interactions in this system. We used batch adsorption experiments and surface complexation modeling to study the interaction of L-aspartate onto a thermodynamically stable product of serpentinization, brucite [Mg(OH)2], over a wide range of initial aspartate concentrations at four ionic strengths governed by [Mg2+] and [Ca2+]. We observed that up to 1.0 μmol of aspartate adsorbed per m2 of brucite at pH ∼ 10.2 and low Mg2+ concentrations (0.7 × 10-3 M), but surface adsorption decreased at high Mg2+ concentrations (5.8 × 10-3 M). At high Ca2+ concentrations (4.0 × 10-3 M), aspartate surface adsorption doubled (to 2.0 μmol m-2), with Ca2+ adsorption at 29.6 μmol m-2. We used the extended triple-layer model (ETLM) to construct a quantitative thermodynamic model of the adsorption data. We proposed three surface reactions involving the adsorption of aspartate (HAsp-) and/or Ca2+ onto brucite:

  16. Variable Stars from the MG-1 Catalog

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flurchick, K. M.; Griego, Ben; Culver, Roger B.

    2014-06-01

    This work describes the recent efforts at North Carolina A&T(NCAT) mining the MG catalogs for variable stars. NCAT is a node in both the GNAT network and the SKYNET collaboration which forms the basis of the collaboration including access to instruments. The initial data analysis to obtain the light curves (LC) for MG-1 has been performed and a number of candidate variable stars have been identified including brown dwarf stars, eclipsing binaries and long period variable stars.Many of the identified candidate variable stars are now the subject of coordinated multi-site follow-on observations to elucidate the details of the variability. The coordinated observing includes researchers in Australia, Arizona, Colorado and North Carolina. As a node in both the GNAT network and the SKYNET collaboration NCAT has access to a number of instruments. Much of the observational work is performed using the SKYNET node in Chile.For the North Carolina work reported here, the observational work and initial LC generation is performed using telescopes and applications from the SKYNET program. In this work the instrumentation, the LC analysis and status of the coordinated follow-on observations arepresented.

  17. Spectral characterization of novel ternary zinc(II) complexes containing 1,10-phenanthroline and Schiff bases derived from amino acids and salicylaldehyde-5-sulfonates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boghaei, Davar M.; Gharagozlou, Mehrnaz

    2007-07-01

    A series of new ternary zinc(II) complexes [Zn(L 1-10)(phen)], where phen is 1,10-phenanthroline and H 2L 1-10 = tridentate Schiff base ligands derived from the condensation of amino acids (glycine, L-phenylalanine, L-valine, L-alanine, and L-leucine) and salicylaldehyde-5-sulfonates (sodium salicylaldehyde-5-sulfonate and sodium 3-methoxy-salicylaldehyde-5-sulfonate), have been synthesized. The complexes were characterized by elemental analysis, IR, UV-vis, 1H NMR, and 13C NMR spectra. The IR spectra of the complexes showed large differences between νas(COO) and νs(COO), Δ ν ( νas(COO) - νs(COO)) of 191-225 cm -1, indicating a monodentate coordination of the carboxylate group. Spectral data showed that in these ternary complexes the zinc atom is coordinated with the Schiff base ligand acts as a tridentate ONO moiety, coordinating to the metal through its phenolic oxygen, imine nitrogen, and carboxyl oxygen, and also with the neutral planar chelating ligand, 1,10-phenanthroline, coordinating through nitrogens.

  18. Observations of galactic cosmic-ray intensity at heliocentric radial distances of from 1.0 to 2.0 astronomical units.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Van Allen, J. A.

    1972-01-01

    From observations with the Jupiter-bound spacecraft Pioneer 10 it is found that the integral intensity of the galactic cosmic radiation (E sub p greater than 80 MeV) varied by less than 3% (either plus or minus) over the heliocentric radial range from 1.0 to 2.0 AU during the epoch 1972 March-July.

  19. High Sibling Correlation on Methylphenidate Response but No Association with DAT1-10R Homozygosity in Dutch Sibpairs with ADHD

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    van der Meulen, Emma M.; Bakker, Steven C.; Pauls, David L.; Oteman, Nicole; Kruitwagen, Cas L. J. J.; Pearson, Peter L.; Sinke, Richard J.; Buitelaar, Jan K.

    2005-01-01

    Background: A minority of patients with attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) do not respond favorably to methylphenidate. This has been partially associated with homozygosity for the Dopamine transporter (DAT1) 10-repeat allele and the presence of one or two Dopamine D4 receptor (DRD4) 7-repeat alleles. This study examined the sibling…

  20. 30 CFR 57.22234 - Actions at 1.0 percent methane (I-A, I-B, III, V-A, and V-B mines).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... areas, except power to monitoring equipment determined by MSHA to be intrinsically safe under 30 CFR..., except power to monitoring equipment determined by MSHA to be intrinsically safe under 30 CFR part 18... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Actions at 1.0 percent methane (I-A, I-B,...