Science.gov

Sample records for 1-10 nm range

  1. Size distribution of radon decay products in the range 0.1-10 nm.

    PubMed

    Zhukovsky, Michael; Rogozina, Marina; Suponkina, Anna

    2014-07-01

    Information about the size distribution of radioactive aerosols in nanometre range is essential for the purposes of air contamination monitoring, dose assessment to respiratory tract and planning of protective measures. The diffusion battery, which allows capturing particles in the size range of 0.1-10 nm, has developed. Interpreting data obtained from diffusion battery is very complex. The method of expectation maximisation by Maher and Laird was chosen for indirect inversion data. The experiments were performed in the box with equivalent equilibrium concentration of radon in the range of 7000-10,000 Bq m(-3). The three modes of size distribution of radon decay products aerosols were obtained: activity median thermodynamic diameter (AMTD) 0.3, 1.5 and 5 nm. These modes can be identified as: AMTD 0.3 nm--atoms of radon progeny (218Po in general); AMTD 1.5 nm--clusters of radon progeny atoms and non-radioactive atoms in the atmosphere; AMTD 5 nm--particles formed by coagulation of previous mode clusters with existing aerosol particles or nucleation of condensation nuclei containing atoms of radon progeny.

  2. TCSPC FLIM in the wavelength range from 800 nm to 1700 nm (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Becker, Wolfgang; Shcheslavsky, Vladislav

    2016-03-01

    Excitation and detection in the wavelength range above 800nm is a convenient and relatively inexpensive way to increase the penetration depth in optical microscopy. Moreover, detection at long wavelength avoids the problem that tissue autofluorescence contaminates the signals from endogenous fluorescence probes. FLIM at NIR wavelength may therefore be complementary to multiphoton microscopy, especially if the lifetimes of NIR fluorophores report biological parameters of the tissue structures they are bound to. Unfortunately, neither the excitation sources nor the detectors of standard confocal and multiphoton laser scanning systems are directly suitable for excitation and detection of NIR fluorescence. Most of these problems can be solved, however, by using ps diode lasers or Ti:Sapphire lasers at their fundamental wavelength, and NIR-sensitive detectors. With NIR-sensitive PMTs the detection wavelength range can be extended up to 900 nm, with InGaAs SPAD detectors up to 1700 nm. Here, we demonstrate the use of a combination of laser scanning, multi-dimensional TCSPC, and advanced excitation sources and detectors for FLIM at up to 1700 nm. The performance was tested at tissue samples incubated with NIR dyes. The fluorescence lifetimes generally get shorter with increasing absorption and emission wavelengths of the dyes. For the cyanine dye IR1061, absorbing around 1060 nm, the lifetime was found to be as short as 70 ps. Nevertheless the fluorescence decay could still be clearly detected. Almost all dyes showed clear lifetime changes depending on the binding to different tissue constituents.

  3. Stationary radiator in the 130 - 190 nm range based on a water vapour plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Shuaibov, Aleksandr K; Dashchenko, Arkadii I; Shevera, Igor V

    2001-06-30

    The characteristics of a continuous radiation source pumped by a longitudinal glow He - H{sub 2}O mixture discharge are presented. For a water vapour pressure of {approx}50 - 300 Pa and helium pressure of 1.0 - 8.0 kPa, the discharge under study was shown to emit radiation primarily in the 130 - 190 nm range. The optimal water vapour pressure lies in the range from 50 Pa to 150 Pa and the optimal partial helium pressure is 1.0 kPa. In the 3-50 mA range of the discharge current, the brightness of the main emission bands was observed to increase linearly with current. (laser applications and other topics in quantum electronics)

  4. Photon Counting Detectors for the 1.0 - 2.0 Micron Wavelength Range

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krainak, Michael A.

    2004-01-01

    We describe results on the development of greater than 200 micron diameter, single-element photon-counting detectors for the 1-2 micron wavelength range. The technical goals include quantum efficiency in the range 10-70%; detector diameter greater than 200 microns; dark count rate below 100 kilo counts-per-second (cps), and maximum count rate above 10 Mcps.

  5. CCPR-S1 Supplementary comparison for spectral radiance in the range of 220 nm to 2500 nm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khlevnoy, Boris; Sapritsky, Victor; Rougie, Bernard; Gibson, Charles; Yoon, Howard; Gaertner, Arnold; Taubert, Dieter; Hartmann, Juergen

    2009-08-01

    In 1997, the Consultative Committee for Photometry and Radiometry (CCPR) initiated a supplementary comparison of spectral radiance in the wavelength range from 220 nm to 2500 nm (CCPR-S1) using tungsten strip-filament lamps as transfer standards. Five national metrology institutes (NMIs) took part in the comparison: BNM/INM (France), NIST (USA), NRC (Canada), PTB (Germany) and VNIIOFI (Russia), with VNIIOFI as the pilot laboratory. Each NMI provided the transfer lamps that were used to transfer their measurements to the pilot laboratory. The intercomparison sequence began with the participant measurements, then the pilot measurements, followed by a second set of measurements by the participant laboratory. The measurements were carried out from 1998 to 2002, with the final report completed in 2008. This paper presents the descriptions of measurement facilities and uncertainties of the participants, as well as the comparison results that were analysed in accordance with the Guidelines for CCPR Comparisons Report Preparation, and a re-evaluation of the results taking into account the instability of some of the transfer lamps. Excluding a few wavelengths, all participants agree with each other within ±1.5%. The disagreement decreases to approximately ±1.0% when the anomalous data are excluded from the analysis.

  6. MaRIE 1.0: A briefing to Katherine Richardson-McDaniel, Staff Member for U. S. Senator Martin Heinrich (D-NM)

    SciTech Connect

    Barnes, Cris William

    2015-02-24

    At the request of Katherine Richardson-McDaniel, Staff Member to U.S. Senator Martin Heinrich (D-NM), a high-level briefing was requested about MaRIE 1.0, the Matter-Radiation Interactions in Extremes effort at Los Alamos National Laboratory. What it would be, the mission need motivation, the scientific challenge, and the current favorable impact on both programs and people are shown in viewgraph form.

  7. Syllabic (~2-5 Hz) and fluctuation (~1-10 Hz) ranges in speech and auditory processing

    PubMed Central

    Edwards, Erik; Chang, Edward F.

    2013-01-01

    Given recent interest in syllabic rates (~2-5 Hz) for speech processing, we review the perception of “fluctuation” range (~1-10 Hz) modulations during listening to speech and technical auditory stimuli (AM and FM tones and noises, and ripple sounds). We find evidence that the temporal modulation transfer function (TMTF) of human auditory perception is not simply low-pass in nature, but rather exhibits a peak in sensitivity in the syllabic range (~2-5 Hz). We also address human and animal neurophysiological evidence, and argue that this bandpass tuning arises at the thalamocortical level and is more associated with non-primary regions than primary regions of cortex. The bandpass rather than low-pass TMTF has implications for modeling auditory central physiology and speech processing: this implicates temporal contrast rather than simple temporal integration, with contrast enhancement for dynamic stimuli in the fluctuation range. PMID:24035819

  8. A radiochromic folm dosimeter for gamma radiation in the absorbed-dose range 0.1-10 kGy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khan, Hasan M.; Farahani, Mahnaz; William L., McLaughlin

    A commercially available leuco-dye film (FWT-63-02), having a thickness of 0.55 mm, has been investigated spectrophotometrically for its characteristics as a radiochromic dosimeter and for its potential use in food-irradiation applications. The γ-ray irradiation of the nearly colorless, transparent film induces blue color with an absorption maximum at 600 nm. The increase in absorbance at 600 nm per unit thickness of film (Δ A mm -1) is linear with dose in the dose range up to 8 kGy, with a slope of 0.91 mm -1·kGy -1. After a modest additional increase during the first day following irradiation, the radiation-induced color is stable when stored at room temperature at least for 5 weeks. The response slope is 16% higher when stored at 60°C, however, after the initial 1-day increase it is stable for several weeks when stored at that temperature. The response of the dosimeter is independent of dose rate in the range 0.5-170 Gy min -1.

  9. Laser enhancements for Lunar Laser Ranging at 532 nm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martinot-Lagarde, G.; Aimar, M.; Albanèse, D.; Courde, C.; Exertier, P.; Fienga, A.; Mariey, H.; Métris, G.; Rigard-Cerison, R.; Samain, E.; Torre, J.-M.; Viot, H.

    This article exposes how we improved (by more than a factor of four) the green Lunar Laser Ranging instrumental sensitivity of the French telemetric station of the "Observatoire de la Côte d'Azur" in 2012. The primary reason for this success is the doubling of the pulse energy of our green Nd:YAG laser, reaching now 200 mJ at 10 Hz. This first gain is due to the replacement (inside our oscillator cavity) of the dye cell with a CR4+:YAG crystal saturable absorber. Complementary spatial beam profile improvements are also described, regarding polarisation, flashlamp geometry and specific lens arrangements (to exclude ghosts from focusing on the 8 m long amplification chain). Those combined laser enhancements pave the way to future science breakthrough linked to quasi-millimetric determination of the Earth-Moon dynamics (Murphy, 2013). Jointly, we propose an empirical thermal lensing model, varying with the cycle ratio of the flashlamps. Our model connects Koechner's (1970) continuous pumping to our intermittent pumping case, with a "normalised heating coefficient" equalling 0.05 only if the electrical lamp input power is equal to 6 kW and scaling as this [electrical input power into the lamps] to the power of [half the pumping cycle ratio].

  10. 750 nm 1.5 W frequency-doubled semiconductor disk laser with a 44 nm tuning range.

    PubMed

    Saarinen, Esa J; Lyytikäinen, Jari; Ranta, Sanna; Rantamäki, Antti; Sirbu, Alexei; Iakovlev, Vladimir; Kapon, Eli; Okhotnikov, Oleg G

    2015-10-01

    We demonstrate 1.5 W of output power at the wavelength of 750 nm by intracavity frequency doubling a wafer-fused semiconductor disk laser diode-pumped at 980 nm. An optical-to-optical efficiency of 8.3% was achieved using a bismuth borate crystal. The wavelength of the doubled emission could be tuned from 720 to 764 nm with an intracavity birefringent plate. The beam quality parameter M2 of the laser output was measured to be below 1.5 at all pump powers. The laser is a promising tool for biomedical applications that can take advantage of the large penetration depth of light in tissue in the 700-800 nm spectral range.

  11. 750 nm 1.5 W frequency-doubled semiconductor disk laser with a 44 nm tuning range.

    PubMed

    Saarinen, Esa J; Lyytikäinen, Jari; Ranta, Sanna; Rantamäki, Antti; Sirbu, Alexei; Iakovlev, Vladimir; Kapon, Eli; Okhotnikov, Oleg G

    2015-10-01

    We demonstrate 1.5 W of output power at the wavelength of 750 nm by intracavity frequency doubling a wafer-fused semiconductor disk laser diode-pumped at 980 nm. An optical-to-optical efficiency of 8.3% was achieved using a bismuth borate crystal. The wavelength of the doubled emission could be tuned from 720 to 764 nm with an intracavity birefringent plate. The beam quality parameter M2 of the laser output was measured to be below 1.5 at all pump powers. The laser is a promising tool for biomedical applications that can take advantage of the large penetration depth of light in tissue in the 700-800 nm spectral range. PMID:26421536

  12. Single mode operation with mid-IR hollow fibers in the range 5.1-10.5 µm.

    PubMed

    Sampaolo, Angelo; Patimisco, Pietro; Kriesel, Jason M; Tittel, Frank K; Scamarcio, Gaetano; Spagnolo, Vincenzo

    2015-01-12

    Single mode beam delivery in the mid-infrared spectral range 5.1-10.5 μm employing flexible hollow glass waveguides of 15 cm and 50 cm lengths, with metallic/dielectric internal layers and a bore diameter of 200 μm were demonstrated. Three quantum cascade lasers were coupled with the hollow core fibers. For a fiber length of 15 cm, we measured losses down to 1.55 dB at 5.4 μm and 0.9 dB at 10.5 μm. The influence of the launch conditions in the fiber on the propagation losses and on the beam profile at the waveguide exit was analyzed. At 10.5 µm laser wavelength we found near perfect agreement between measured and theoretical losses, while at ~5 µm and ~6 µm wavelengths the losses were higher than expected. This discrepancy can be explained considering an additional scattering loss effect, which scales as 1/λ(2) and is due to surface roughness of the metallic layer used to form the high-reflective internal layer structure of the hollow core waveguide. PMID:25835666

  13. Megahertz FDML laser with up to 143nm sweep range for ultrahigh resolution OCT at 1050nm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolb, Jan Philip; Klein, Thomas; Eibl, Matthias; Pfeiffer, Tom; Wieser, Wolfgang; Huber, Robert

    2016-03-01

    We present a new design of a Fourier Domain Mode Locked laser (FDML laser), which provides a new record in sweep range at ~1μm center wavelength: At the fundamental sweep rate of 2x417 kHz we reach 143nm bandwidth and 120nm with 4x buffering at 1.67MHz sweep rate. The latter configuration of our system is characterized: The FWHM of the point spread function (PSF) of a mirror is 5.6μm (in tissue). Human in vivo retinal imaging is performed with the MHz laser showing more details in vascular structures. Here we could measure an axial resolution of 6.0μm by determining the FWHM of specular reflex in the image. Additionally, challenges related to such a high sweep bandwidth such as water absorption are investigated.

  14. Articular cartilage optical properties in the spectral range 300--850 nm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ebert, Daniel W.; Roberts, Cynthia J.; Farrar, Stuart K.; Johnston, William M.; Litsky, Alan S.; Bertone, Alicia L.

    1998-07-01

    Measurements of absolute total reflectance were recorded from weight-bearing (n equals 9) and nonweight-bearing (n equals 9) equine articular cartilage specimens from 300 to 850 nm using a spectrophotometer with integrating sphere attachment. Following correction of measured spectra for interfacial reflections and edge losses, Kubelka-Munk theory was applied to estimate absorption and scattering coefficient, 1D light intensity distribution, and light penetration depth. Kubelka-Munk absorption coefficients ranged from approximately 7 cm-1 at 330 nm to approximately 1 cm-1 at 850 nm. A localized absorption peak was noted at approximately 340 nm. Above 510 nm, weight-bearing cartilage demonstrated significantly higher absorption coefficients than nonweight-bearing tissue (paired t-test, p < 0.05). Kubelka-Munk scattering coefficients ranged from approximately 40 cm-1 at 360 nm to approximately 6 cm-1 at 850 nm. No statistical differences in scattering coefficient were noted between weight-bearing and nonweight-bearing tissue. Penetration depths predicted by Kubelka-Munk theory ranged from 0.6 mm at 350 nm to over 3 mm at 850 nm. Stronger absorption in weight-bearing cartilage compared to nonweight-bearing tissue resulted in lower light penetration depths in weight-bearing cartilage at all wavelengths longer than 510 nm.

  15. Absolute absorption cross sections of ozone in the 185- to 350-nm wavelength range

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Molina, L. T.; Molina, M. J.

    1986-01-01

    The absorption cross sections of ozone have been measured in the wavelength range 185-350 nm and in the temperature range 225-298 K. The absolute ozone concentrations were established by measuring the pressure of pure gaseous samples in the 0.08to 300-torr range, and the UV spectra were recorded under conditions where less than 1 percent of the sample decomposed. The temperature dependence is significant for wavelengths longer than about 280 nm. The absorption cross-section values around 210 nm were found to be about 10 percent larger than the previously accepted values.

  16. Achromatic circular polarizer in the 482-535 nm range based on polypropylene films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muravsky, Al. A.; Murauski, An. A.; Agabekov, V. E.; Chuvasheva, O. O.; Ivanova, N. A.

    2012-11-01

    We present a design for an achromatic circular polarizer based on polypropylene films. The circular polarizer, having eccentricity ≥0.92 in the 482-535 nm range and ideally circular for the wavelength of ~505 nm, is obtained by combining BOPP C2-25 and BOPP C2-35 films of thickness 23 m and 33 μm.

  17. Research of the Additional Losses Occurring in Optical Fiber at its Multiple Bends in the Range Waves 1310nm, 1550nm and 1625nm Long

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yurchenko, A. V.; Gorlov, N. I.; Alkina, A. D.; Mekhtiev, A. D.; Kovtun, A. A.

    2016-01-01

    Article is devoted to research of the additional losses occurring in the optical fiber at its multiple bends in the range waves of 1310 nanometers, 1550 nanometers and 1625 nanometers long. Article is directed on creation of the external factors methods which allow to estimate and eliminate negative influence. The automated way of calculation of losses at a bend is developed. Results of scientific researches are used by engineers of “Kazaktelekom” AS for practical definition of losses service conditions. For modeling the Wolfram|Alpha environment — the knowledge base and a set of computing algorithms was chosen. The greatest losses are noted on wavelength 1310nm and 1625nm. All dependences are nonlinear. Losses with each following excess are multiplicative.

  18. A Sounding Rocket Mission Concept to Acquire High-Resolution Radiometric Spectra Spanning the 9 nm - 31 nm Wavelength Range

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krause, L. Habash; Cirtain, Jonathan; McGuirck, Michael; Pavelitz, Steven; Weber, Ed.; Winebarger, Amy

    2012-01-01

    When studying Solar Extreme Ultraviolet (EUV) emissions, both single-wavelength, two- dimensional (2D) spectroheliograms and multi-wavelength, one-dimensional (1D) line spectra are important, especially for a thorough understanding of the complex processes in the solar magnetized plasma from the base of the chromosphere through the corona. 2D image data are required for a detailed study of spatial structures, whereas radiometric (i.e., spectral) data provide information on relevant atomic excitation/ionization state densities (and thus temperature). Using both imaging and radiometric techniques, several satellite missions presently study solar dynamics in the EUV, including the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO), Hinode, and the Solar-Terrestrial Relations Observatory (STEREO). The EUV wavelengths of interest typically span 9 nm to 31 nm, with the shorter wavelengths being associated with the hottest features (e.g., intense flares and bright points) and the longer wavelengths associated with cooler features (e.g., coronal holes and filaments). Because the optical components of satellite instruments degrade over time, it is not uncommon to conduct sounding rocket underflights for calibration purposes. The authors have designed a radiometric sounding rocket payload that could serve as both a calibration underflight for and a complementary scientific mission to the upcoming Solar Ultraviolet Imager (SUVI) mission aboard the GOES-R satellite (scheduled for a 2015 launch). The challenge to provide quality radiometric line spectra over the 9-31 nm range covered by SUVI was driven by the multilayer coatings required to make the optical components, including mirrors and gratings, reflective over the entire range. Typically, these multilayers provide useful EUV reflectances over bandwidths of a few nm. Our solution to this problem was to employ a three-telescope system in which the optical components were coated with multilayers that spanned three wavelength ranges to cover

  19. Double Brillouin frequency spaced multiwavelength Brillouin-erbium fiber laser with 50 nm tuning range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, J. F.; Liao, T. Q.; Zhang, C.; Zhang, R. X.; Miao, C. Y.; Tong, Z. R.

    2012-09-01

    A 50 nm tuning range multiwavelength Brillouin-erbium fiber laser (MWBEFL) with double Brillouin frequency spacing is presented. Two separated gain blocks with symmetrical architecture, consisted by erbium-doped fiber amplifiers (EDFAs) and Brillouin gain media, are used to generate double Brillouin frequency spacing. The wider tuning range is realized by eliminating the self-lasing cavity modes existing in conventional MWBEFLs because of the absence of the physical mirrors at the ends of the linear cavity. The Brillouin pump (BP) is preamplified by the EDFA before entering the single-mode fiber (SMF), which leads to the reduction of threshold power and the generation enhancement of Brillouin Stokes (BS) signals. Four channels with 0.176 nm spacing are achieved at 2 mW BP power and 280 mW 980 nm pump power which can be tuned from 1525 to 1575 nm.

  20. Refractivities of H2, He, O2, CO, and Kr for 168-288 nm wavelength range

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, P. L.; Parkinson, W. H.; Huber, M. C. E.

    1976-01-01

    Precision measurements of the refractivities of H2, He, O2, CO, and Kr were made in the wavelength range 168-288 nm. By using a 1.2-m-long test cell and by keeping the test gas at accurately determined conditions near atmospheric pressure and room temperature, accuracies (90% confidence limit) were achieved for the absolute refractivities that ranged from plus or minus 0.1% to plus or minus 1.0% depending upon the gas and wavelength range. For a given gas, the ratio of refractivities at any two wavelengths has a smaller uncertainty. For H2, CO, and O2, results are for wavelengths shorter than those of previous measurements and, for He and Kr, the uncertainties are less than those of other measurements. For He refractivities agree with the theoretical ones, but in the case of H2 results are about 1% larger than the theoretical values. At the upper end of the wavelength range studied, the data are in agreement with previous measurements on H2, CO, and Kr. For O2 results indicate that the hitherto available data are too large by amounts ranging from 0.8% to 10%.

  1. Optical properties of human colon tissues in the 350 – 2500 nm spectral range

    SciTech Connect

    Bashkatov, A N; Genina, E A; Kochubey, V I; Kolesnikova, E A; Tuchin, V V; Rubtsov, V S

    2014-08-31

    We present the optical characteristics of the mucosa and submucosa of human colon tissue. The experiments are performed in vitro using a LAMBDA 950 spectrophotometer in the 350 – 2500 nm spectral range. The absorption and scattering coefficients and the scattering anisotropy factor are calculated based on the measured diffuse reflectance and total and collimated transmittance spectra using the inverse Monte Carlo method. (laser biophotonics)

  2. Stable Gain-Switched Thulium Fiber Laser With 140-nm Tuning Range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Fengqiu; Meng, Yafei; Kelleher, Edmund; Guo, Guoxiang; Li, Yao; Xu, Yongbing; Zhu, Shining

    2016-06-01

    We demonstrate a gain-switched thulium fiber laser that can be continuously tuned over 140 nm, while maintaining stable nanosecond single-pulse operation. To the best of our knowledge, this system represents the broadest tuning range for a gain-switched fiber laser. The system simplicity and wideband wavelength tunability combined with the ability to control the temporal characteristics of the gain-switched pulses mean this is a versatile source highly suited to a wide range of applications in the eye-safe region of the infrared, including spectroscopy, sensing and material processing, as well as being a practical seed source for pumping nonlinear processes.

  3. Source model for strong ground motion generation in the frequency range 0.1-10 Hz during the 2011 Tohoku earthquake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asano, Kimiyuki; Iwata, Tomotaka

    2012-12-01

    The source model of the 2011 Tohoku earthquake, which is composed of four strong motion generation areas (SMGAs), is estimated based on the broadband strong ground motion simulations in the frequency range 0.1-10 Hz using the empirical Green's function method. Two strong motion generation areas are identified in the Miyagi-oki region west of the hypocenter. Another two strong motion generation areas are located in the Fukushima-oki region southwest of the hypocenter. The strong ground motions in the frequency range 0.1-10 Hz along the Pacific coast are mainly controlled by these SMGAs. All the strong motion generation areas exist in the deeper portion of the source fault plane. The stress drops of the four SMGAs range from 6.6 to 27.8 MPa, which are similar to estimations for past M 7-class events occurring in this region. Compared with the slip models and aftershock distributions of past interplate earthquakes in the Miyagi-oki and Fukushima-oki regions since the 1930s, the SMGAs of the 2011 Tohoku earthquake spatially correspond to the asperities of M 7-class events in 1930s. In terms of broadband strong ground motions, the 2011 Tohoku earthquake is not only a tsunamigenic event with a huge coseismic slip near the trench but is also a complex event simultaneously rupturing pre-existing asperities.

  4. Broadband semiconductor optical amplifiers of the spectral range 750 – 1100 nm

    SciTech Connect

    Andreeva, E V; Il'chenko, S N; Lobintsov, A A; Shramenko, M V; Ladugin, M A; Marmalyuk, A A; Yakubovich, S D

    2013-11-30

    A line of travelling-wave semiconductor optical amplifiers (SOAs) based on heterostructures used for production of broadband superluminescent diodes is developed. The pure small-signal gains of the developed SOA modules are about 25 dB, while the gain bandwidths at a level of –10 dB reach 50 – 100 nm. As a whole, the SOA modules cover the IR spectral range from 750 to 1100 nm. The SOAs demonstrate a high reliability at a single-mode fibre-coupled cw output power up to 50 mW. Examples of application of two of the developed SOA modules as active elements of broadband fast-tunable lasers are presented. (lasers)

  5. Eye safe high power laser diode in the 1410-1550nm range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boucart, Julien; de Largy, Brian; Kearley, Mark; Lichtenstein, Norbert

    2010-02-01

    The demand for high power lasers emitting in the 14xx-15xxnm range is growing for applications in fields such as medical or homeland security. We demonstrate high power laser diodes with emission at 1430, 1470 and 1560 nm. Single multimode emitters at 1470nm emit about 3.5W in CW operation. Power conversion efficiency can reach values as high as 38.5%. With this base material, single and multi-emitter fiber coupled modules are built. Additionally, bars on passive and microchannel coolers are fabricated that deliver 25W and 38W respectively in CW mode, while obtaining more than 80 W in pulsed mode. All reliability tests show an outstanding stability of the material with no signs of wearout after 3750 hrs under strong acceleration conditions.

  6. Metrological characterization of nm-range dynamic etalons using a heterodyne interferometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kazieva, T. V.; Kuznetsov, A. P.; Ponarina, M. V.; Gubskiy, K. L.; Reshetov, V. N.

    2016-09-01

    Test structures used for calibration of scanning probe microscopes have certain limitations. They are short-lived, their work surface becomes coated with microparticles over time, and it gradually wears out by contact with the measuring probe, resulting in the etalon geometry deformation. Dynamic etalons allow calibrating SPMs in ranges from pm to nm. In this article we present the results of dynamic etalon metrological characteristics research using an SPM equipped with tree-coordinate heterodyne laser interferometer. Obtained data indicates stability of piezoelectric modulus and absence of piezoelectric hysteresis phenomena in the etalon samples used.

  7. Stronger Limits on Hypothetical Yukawa Interactions in the 30-8000 nm Range.

    PubMed

    Chen, Y-J; Tham, W K; Krause, D E; López, D; Fischbach, E; Decca, R S

    2016-06-01

    We report the results of new differential force measurements between a test mass and rotating source masses of gold and silicon to search for forces beyond Newtonian gravity at short separations. The technique employed subtracts the otherwise dominant Casimir force at the outset and, when combined with a lock-in amplification technique, leads to a significant improvement (up to a factor of 10^{3}) over existing limits on the strength (relative to gravity) of a putative force in the 40-8000 nm interaction range. PMID:27314709

  8. Stronger Limits on Hypothetical Yukawa Interactions in the 30-8000 nm Range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Y.-J.; Tham, W. K.; Krause, D. E.; López, D.; Fischbach, E.; Decca, R. S.

    2016-06-01

    We report the results of new differential force measurements between a test mass and rotating source masses of gold and silicon to search for forces beyond Newtonian gravity at short separations. The technique employed subtracts the otherwise dominant Casimir force at the outset and, when combined with a lock-in amplification technique, leads to a significant improvement (up to a factor of 103 ) over existing limits on the strength (relative to gravity) of a putative force in the 40-8000 nm interaction range.

  9. High-power cw laser bars of the 750 - 790-nm wavelength range

    SciTech Connect

    Degtyareva, N S; Kondakov, S A; Mikayelyan, G T; Gorlachuk, P V; Ladugin, M A; Marmalyuk, Aleksandr A; Ryaboshtan, Yu L; Yarotskaya, I V

    2013-06-30

    We have developed the effective design of semiconductor heterostructures, which allow one to fabricate cw laser diodes emitting in the 750 - 790-nm spectral range. The optimal conditions for fabrication of GaAsP/AlGaInP/GaAs heterostructures by MOCVD have been determined. It is shown that the use of quantum wells with a precisely defined quantity mismatch reduces the threshold current density and increases the external differential efficiency. The results of studies of characteristics of diode laser bars fabricated from these heterostructures are presented. (lasers)

  10. Ocular aberrations up to the infrared range: from 632.8 to 1070 nm.

    PubMed

    Fernández, Enrique J; Artal, Pablo

    2008-12-22

    Ocular aberrations were measured by using a Hartmann-Shack wavefront sensor in the visible and infrared portions of the spectrum. In the latter, wavelengths 1030, 1050 and 1070 nm were used for the first time for the study of the optical quality of the eye. In this spectral range the retinal photoreceptors barely respond, so the radiation is virtually invisible for the subject. The results were confronted with those obtained by the same system at 780 and 632.8 nm. Monochromatic aberrations were found to be similar from the visible to the infrared. Longitudinal chromatic aberration was experimentally obtained, being approximately 1 D from 632.8 to 1070 nm. The feasibility of using the infrared for studying the eye was demonstrated. The employment of the infrared has an enormous potential for the better understanding of the impact and influence of the aberrations in vision with adaptive optics. It allows for measuring and controlling aberrations whilst the subject might eventually perform visual tests, with no interference from the beacon light.

  11. 21-nm-range wavelength-tunable L-band Er-doped fiber linear-cavity laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Shiquan; Zhao, Chunliu; Li, Zhaohui; Ding, Lei; Yuan, Shuzhong; Dong, Xiaoyi

    2001-10-01

    A novel method, which utilizes amplified spontaneous emission (ASE) as a secondary pump source, is presented for implanting a linear cavity erbium-doped fiber laser operating in L-Band. The output wavelength tuned from 1566 nm to 1587 nm, about 21 nm tuning range, was obtained in the experiment and the stability of the laser is very good.

  12. Boron Nitride Nanotube Mat as a Low- k Dielectric Material with Relative Dielectric Constant Ranging from 1.0 to 1.1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong, Xinghua; Wang, Daojun; Chung, D. D. L.

    2016-01-01

    This paper reports that a boron nitride nanotube (BNNT) mat containing air and 1.4 vol.% BNNTs is a low- k dielectric material for microelectronic packaging, exhibiting relative dielectric constant of 1.0 to 1.1 (50 Hz to 2 MHz) and elastic modulus of 10 MPa. The mat is prepared by compacting BNNTs at 5.8 kPa. This paper also presents measurements of the dielectric properties of BNNTs (mostly multiwalled). The relative dielectric constant of the BNNT solid in the mat decreases with increasing frequency, with attractively low values ranging from 3.0 to 6.2; the alternating-current (AC) electrical conductivity increases with increasing frequency, with attractively low values ranging from 10-10 S/m to 10-6 S/m and an approximately linear relationship between log conductivity and log frequency. The specific contact capacitance of the interface between BNNTs and the electrical contact decreases with increasing frequency, with attractively high values ranging from 1.6 μF/m2 to 2.3 μF/m2. The AC electrical resistivity of the BNNT-contact interface decreases with increasing frequency, with high values ranging from 0.14 MΩ cm2 to 440 MΩ cm2.

  13. IC design of low power, wide tuning range VCO in 90 nm CMOS technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Li; Zhigong, Wang; Zhiqun, Li; Qin, Li; Faen, Liu

    2014-12-01

    A low power VCO with a wide tuning range and low phase noise has been designed and realized in a standard 90 nm CMOS technology. A newly proposed current-reuse cross-connected pair is utilized as a negative conductance generator to compensate the energy loss of the resonator. The supply current is reduced by half compared to that of the conventional LC-VCO. An improved inversion-mode MOSFET (IMOS) varactor is introduced to extend the capacitance tuning range from 32.8% to 66%. A detailed analysis of the proposed varactor is provided. The VCO achieves a tuning range of 27-32.5 GHz, exhibiting a frequency tuning range (FTR) of 18.4% and a phase noise of -101.38 dBc/Hz at 1 MHz offset from a 30 GHz carrier, and shows an excellent FOM of -185 dBc/Hz. With the voltage supply of 1.5 V, the core circuit of VCO draws only 2.1 mA DC current.

  14. Investigation of Facsimile Camera-spectrometer Capability in the 1.0 to 2.7 Micron Spectral Range. [using computer techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kelly, W. L., IV

    1975-01-01

    The capability of the facsimile camera augmented with a filter-spectrometer to provide scientifically valuable information in the 1.0 to 2.7 microns spectral range was investigated for a future planetary lander mission to Mars. A computer model was used to evaluate tradeoffs between signal-to-noise ratio, spatial and spectral resolution, and the number of spectral channels. Spectral absorption features resulting from water and chemical variations found in pyroxenes were used to represent scientific information of interest to biologists and geologists. Expected output data from a filter-spectrometer is illustrated which indicates that important information pertaining to water content and chemical composition can be obtained using six to eight spectral channels with 0.3 degree spatial resolution.

  15. Optical properties of apple skin and flesh in the wavelength range from 350 to 2200 nm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saeys, Wouter; Velazco-Roa, Maria A.; Thennadil, Suresh N.; Ramon, Herman; Nicolaï, Bart M.

    2008-03-01

    Optical measurement of fruit quality is challenging due to the presence of a skin around the fruit flesh and the multiple scattering by the structured tissues. To gain insight in the light-tissue interaction, the optical properties of apple skin and flesh tissue are estimated in the 350-2200 nm range for three cultivars. For this purpose, single integrating sphere measurements are combined with inverse adding-doubling. The observed absorption coefficient spectra are dominated by water in the near infrared and by pigments and chlorophyll in the visible region, whose concentrations are much higher in skin tissue. The scattering coefficient spectra show the monotonic decrease with increasing wavelength typical for biological tissues with skin tissue being approximately three times more scattering than flesh tissue. Comparison to the values from time-resolved spectroscopy reported in literature showed comparable profiles for the optical properties, but overestimation of the absorption coefficient values, due to light losses.

  16. Absolute frequency measurement for the emission transitions of molecular iodine in the 982 - 985 nm range

    SciTech Connect

    Matyugin, Yu A; Ignatovich, S M; Kuznetsov, Sergei A; Nesterenko, M I; Okhapkin, M V; Pivtsov, V S; Skvortsov, Mikhail N; Bagaev, Sergei N

    2012-03-31

    We report high-precision frequency measurements of the separate hyperfine structure (HFS) components of the emission B - X system transitions of {sup 127}I{sub 2} molecules in the 982 - 985 nm range. To resolve the HFS of the emission lines, advantage was taken of the method of three-level laser spectroscopy. The function of exciting radiation was fulfilled by the second harmonic of a cw Nd : YAG laser, and the probe radiation in the 968 - 998 nm range was generated by an external-cavity diode laser. The output Nd : YAG laser frequency was locked to an HFS component of the absorption transition and the probing laser radiation to the emission transition component. When both frequencies were locked to HFS components with a common upper level, the output diode laser frequency was precisely equal to the emission transition frequency. The output frequency of the thus stabilised diode laser was measured with the help of a femtosecond optical frequency synthesiser based on a Ti : sapphire laser. We present the results of the absolute frequency measurements of 20 HFS components belonging to six vibrational - rotational transitions of the B - X system of iodine [R56(32 - 48)a1, P58(32 - 48)a1, P85(33 - 48)a1, R87(33 - 48a1, R88(33 - 48)a10] and all 15 components of the R86(33 - 48) line. The relative measurement uncertainty is equal to 7 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -10} and is determined by the frequency instability of the diode laser radiation.

  17. A grating-coupled external cavity InAs/InP quantum dot laser with 85-nm tuning range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Heng; Jin, Peng; Luo, Shuai; Ji, Hai-Ming; Yang, Tao; Li, Xin-Kun; Wu, Jian; An, Qi; Wu, Yan-Hua; Chen, Hong-Mei; Wang, Fei-Fei; Wu, Ju; Wang, Zhan-Guo

    2013-09-01

    The optical performance of a grating-coupled external cavity laser based on InAs/InP quantum dots is investigated. Continuous tuning from 1391 nm to 1468 nm is realized at an injection current of 1900 mA. With the injection current increasing to 2300 mA, the tuning is blue shifted to some extent to the range from 1383 nm to 1461 nm. By combining the effect of the injection current with the grating tuning, the total tuning bandwidth of the external cavity quantum-dot laser can reach up to 85 nm. The dependence of the threshold current on the tuning wavelength is also presented.

  18. Final report on the key comparison CCPR-K2.c-2003: Spectral responsivity in the range of 200 nm to 400 nm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Werner, Lutz

    2014-01-01

    The CCPR K2.c key comparison of spectral power responsivity of detectors in the ultraviolet spectral range from 200 nm to 400 nm was carried out in the framework of the CIPM Mutual Recognition Arrangement by 14 participating national metrology institutes. The key comparison was piloted by the Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt (PTB). The comparison was carried out through the calibration of sets of transfer detectors. Three types of transfer detectors based on two types of photodiodes have been used to handle probable changes of the spectral responsivity of the detectors in the ultraviolet spectral range. The results of the key comparison in the wavelength range from 200 nm to 240 nm are based on single-element windowless PtSi/n-Si Schottky photodiodes while in the range from 250 nm to 400 nm the results are based on single-element photodiode detectors and three-element reflection trap detectors, both made up of windowless Si pn junction photodiodes. The comparison was organized in a star pattern and conducted in three groups of participants. The report describes the measurements made by the pilot laboratory, summarizes the reports submitted by the participants and describes the data analysis carried out to determine the key comparison reference values and degrees of equivalence. Main text. To reach the main text of this paper, click on Final Report. Note that this text is that which appears in Appendix B of the BIPM key comparison database kcdb.bipm.org/. The final report has been peer-reviewed and approved for publication by the CCPR, according to the provisions of the CIPM Mutual Recognition Arrangement (CIPM MRA).

  19. 780nm-range VCSEL array for laser printer system and other applications at Ricoh

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jikutani, Naoto; Itoh, Akihiro; Harasaka, Kazuhiro; Sasaki, Toshihide; Sato, Shunichi

    2016-03-01

    A 780 nm-range 40 channels vertical-cavity surface-emitting laser (VCSEL) array was developed as a writing light source for printers. A 15° off missoriented GaAs substrate, an aluminum-free GaInAsP/GaInP compressively-strained multiple quantum well and an anisotropic-shape transverse-mode filter were employed to control polarization characteristics. The anisotropic-shape transverse-mode filter also suppressed higher transverse-mode and enabled high-power single-mode operation. Thus, orthogonal-polarization suppression-ratio (OPSR) of over 22 dB and side-mode suppression-ratio (SMSR) of 30 dB were obtained at operation power of 3mW at same time for wide oxide-aperture range below 50 μm2. Moreover, a thermal resistance was reduced for 38% by increasing a thickness of high thermal conductivity layer (3λ/4-AlAs layer) near a cavity. By this structure, a peak-power increased to 1.3 times. Moreover, a power-fall caused by self-heating at pulse-rise was decreased to 10% and the one caused by a thermal-crosstalk between channels was decreased to 46%. The VCSEL array was mounted in a ceramic package with a tilted seal glass to prevent optical-crosstalk caused by other channels. Thus, we achieved stable-output and high-quality beam characteristics for long-duration pulse drive.

  20. The optical absorption of triatomic carbon C3 for the wavelength range 260 to 560 nm

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, J. J.

    1978-01-01

    The spectral absorption properties of C3 have been measured in a shock tube containing a test gas mixture of acetylene diluted with argon. The absorption of a pulsed xenon light source was measured by means of eight photomultiplier channels to a spectrograph and an accompanying drum camera. The postshock test gas temperature and pressure were varied over the range 3240 to 4300 K and 37 to 229 kPa, respectively. The results showed appreciable absorption by C3 for the wavelength range 300 to 540 nm. The various reported measurements of the heat of formation of C3 which are available in the open literature were reviewed, and a value of 198 kcal/mol is recommended. This value, along with best available values for other species, was used to calculate the number density of C3 for the conditions of the present experiments in order to compute absorption cross section or electronic oscillator strength. The computed electronic oscillator strength varied from a high of 0.062 at 3300 K to a low of 0.036 at 3900 K.

  1. Long-range pulselength scaling of 351nm laser damage thresholds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foltyn, S. R.; Jolin, L. J.

    1986-12-01

    In a series of experiments incorporating 351nm pulselength of 9, 26, 54, and 625ns, it was found that laser damage thresholds increased as (pulselength)/sup x/, and that the exponent averaged 0.36 and ranged, for different samples, from 0.23 to 0.48. Similar results were obtained when only catastrophic damage was considered. Samples included Al2O3/SiO2 in both AR and HR multilayers, HR's of Sc2O3/SiO2 and HfO2/SiO2, and Al-on-pyrex mirror; 9ns thresholds were between 0.2 to 5.6 J/sq cm. When these data were compared with a wide range of other results - for wavelengths from 0.25 to 10.6 microns and pulselengths down to 4ps - a remarkably consistent picture emerged. Damage thresholds, on average, increase approximately as the cube-root of pulselength from picoseconds to nearly a microsecond, and do so regardless of wavelength or material under test.

  2. High power laser diodes at 14xx nm wavelength range for industrial and medical applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Telkkälä, Jarkko; Boucart, Julien; Krejci, Martin; Crum, Trevor; Lichtenstein, Norbert

    2014-03-01

    We report on the development of the latest generation of high power laser diodes at 14xx nm wavelength range suitable for industrial applications such as plastics welding and medical applications including acne treatment, skin rejuvenation and surgery. The paper presents the newest chip generation developed at II-VI Laser Enterprise, increasing the output power and the power conversion efficiency while retaining the reliability of the initial design. At an emission wavelength around 1440 nm we applied the improved design to a variety of assemblies exhibiting maximum power values as high as 7 W for broad-area single emitters. For 1 cm wide bars on conductive coolers and for bars on active micro channel coolers we have obtained 50 W and 72 W in continuous wave (cw) operation respectively. The maximum power measured for a 1 cm bar operated with 50 μs pulse width and 0.01% duty cycle was 184 W, demonstrating the potential of the chip design for optimized cooling. Power conversion efficiency values as high as 50% for a single emitter device and over 40% for mounted bars have been demonstrated, reducing the required power budget to operate the devices. Both active and conductive bar assembly configurations show polarization purity greater than 98%. Life testing has been conducted at 95 A, 50% duty cycle and 0.5 Hz hard pulsed operation for bars which were soldered to conductive copper CS mounts using our hard solder technology. The results after 5500 h, or 10 million "on-off" cycles show stable operation.

  3. Spectrophotometry of Jupiter in the Wavelength Range 320-1100 nm: Long-Term Observations of Variations over the Disk

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vdovichenko, V. D.; Kirienko, G. A.; Nosova, T. P.

    2003-07-01

    Based on long-term spectrophotometric observations of Jupiter in the wavelength range 320-1100 nm, we investigate the variations of aerosol extinction (at λ 320-600 nm) and methane-ammonia absorption (at λ 600-1100 nm) over Jupiter's disk. We give estimates of the optical parameters for the upper cloud layer of the planet, the overlying stratospheric haze, and a Rayleigh atmosphere.

  4. Mitigating Phototoxicity during Multiphoton Microscopy of Live Drosophila Embryos in the 1.0–1.2 µm Wavelength Range

    PubMed Central

    Débarre, Delphine; Olivier, Nicolas; Supatto, Willy; Beaurepaire, Emmanuel

    2014-01-01

    Light-induced toxicity is a fundamental bottleneck in microscopic imaging of live embryos. In this article, after a review of photodamage mechanisms in cells and tissues, we assess photo-perturbation under illumination conditions relevant for point-scanning multiphoton imaging of live Drosophila embryos. We use third-harmonic generation (THG) imaging of developmental processes in embryos excited by pulsed near-infrared light in the 1.0–1.2 µm range. We study the influence of imaging rate, wavelength, and pulse duration on the short-term and long-term perturbation of development and define criteria for safe imaging. We show that under illumination conditions typical for multiphoton imaging, photodamage in this system arises through 2- and/or 3-photon absorption processes and in a cumulative manner. Based on this analysis, we derive general guidelines for improving the signal-to-damage ratio in two-photon (2PEF/SHG) or THG imaging by adjusting the pulse duration and/or the imaging rate. Finally, we report label-free time-lapse 3D THG imaging of gastrulating Drosophila embryos with sampling appropriate for the visualisation of morphogenetic movements in wild-type and mutant embryos, and long-term multiharmonic (THG-SHG) imaging of development until hatching. PMID:25111506

  5. The Secondary Organic Aerosol Processor (SOAP v1.0) model: a unified model with different ranges of complexity based on the molecular surrogate approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Couvidat, F.; Sartelet, K.

    2014-01-01

    The Secondary Organic Aerosol Processor (SOAP v1.0) model is presented. This model is designed to be modular with different user options depending on the computing time and the complexity required by the user. This model is based on the molecular surrogate approach, in which each surrogate compound is associated with a molecular structure to estimate some properties and parameters (hygroscopicity, absorption on the aqueous phase of particles, activity coefficients, phase separation). Each surrogate can be hydrophilic (condenses only on the aqueous phase of particles), hydrophobic (condenses only on the organic phase of particles) or both (condenses on both the aqueous and the organic phases of particles). Activity coefficients are computed with the UNIFAC thermodynamic model for short-range interactions and with the AIOMFAC parameterization for medium and long-range interactions between electrolytes and organic compounds. Phase separation is determined by Gibbs energy minimization. The user can choose between an equilibrium and a dynamic representation of the organic aerosol. In the equilibrium representation, compounds in the particle phase are assumed to be at equilibrium with the gas phase. However, recent studies show that the organic aerosol (OA) is not at equilibrium with the gas phase because the organic phase could be semi-solid (very viscous liquid phase). The condensation or evaporation of organic compounds could then be limited by the diffusion in the organic phase due to the high viscosity. A dynamic representation of secondary organic aerosols (SOA) is used with OA divided into layers, the first layer at the center of the particle (slowly reaches equilibrium) and the final layer near the interface with the gas phase (quickly reaches equilibrium).

  6. Spectral irradiance model for tungsten halogen lamps in 340-850 nm wavelength range.

    PubMed

    Ojanen, Maija; Kärhä, Petri; Ikonen, Erkki

    2010-02-10

    We have developed a physical model for the spectral irradiance of 1 kW tungsten halogen incandescent lamps for the wavelength range 340-850 nm. The model consists of the Planck's radiation law, published values for the emissivity of tungsten, and a residual spectral correction function taking into account unknown factors of the lamp. The correction function was determined by measuring the spectra of a 1000 W, quartz-halogen, tungsten coiled filament (FEL) lamp at different temperatures. The new model was tested with lamps of types FEL and 1000 W, 120 V quartz halogen (DXW). Comparisons with measurements of two national standards laboratories indicate that the model can account for the spectral irradiance values of lamps with an agreement better than 1% throughout the spectral region studied. We further demonstrate that the spectral irradiance of a lamp can be predicted with an expanded uncertainty of 2.6% if the color temperature and illuminance values for the lamp are known with expanded uncertainties of 20 K and 2%, respectively. In addition, it is suggested that the spectral irradiance may be derived from resistance measurements of the filament with lamp on and off.

  7. Spectral irradiance model for tungsten halogen lamps in 340-850 nm wavelength range

    SciTech Connect

    Ojanen, Maija; Kaerhae, Petri; Ikonen, Erkki

    2010-02-10

    We have developed a physical model for the spectral irradiance of 1 kW tungsten halogen incandescent lamps for the wavelength range 340-850 nm. The model consists of the Planck's radiation law, published values for the emissivity of tungsten, and a residual spectral correction function taking into account unknown factors of the lamp. The correction function was determined by measuring the spectra of a 1000 W, quartz-halogen, tungsten coiled filament (FEL) lamp at different temperatures. The new model was tested with lamps of types FEL and 1000 W, 120 V quartz halogen (DXW). Comparisons with measurements of two national standards laboratories indicate that the model can account for the spectral irradiance values of lamps with an agreement better than 1% throughout the spectral region studied. We further demonstrate that the spectral irradiance of a lamp can be predicted with an expanded uncertainty of 2.6% if the color temperature and illuminance values for the lamp are known with expanded uncertainties of 20 K and 2%, respectively. In addition, it is suggested that the spectral irradiance may be derived from resistance measurements of the filament with lamp on and off.

  8. Power and efficiency scaling of diode pumped Cr:LiSAF lasers: 770-1110 nm tuning range and frequency doubling to 387-463 nm.

    PubMed

    Demirbas, Umit; Baali, Ilyes

    2015-10-15

    We report significant average power and efficiency scaling of diode-pumped Cr:LiSAF lasers in continuous-wave (cw), cw frequency-doubled, and mode-locked regimes. Four single-emitter broad-area laser diodes around 660 nm were used as the pump source, which provided a total pump power of 7.2 W. To minimize thermal effects, a 20 mm long Cr:LiSAF sample with a relatively low Cr-concentration (0.8%) was used as the gain medium. In cw laser experiments, 2.4 W of output power, a slope efficiency of 50%, and a tuning range covering the 770-1110 nm region were achieved. Intracavity frequency doubling with beta-barium borate (BBO) crystals generated up to 1160 mW of blue power and a record tuning range in the 387-463 nm region. When mode locked with a saturable absorber mirror, the laser produced 195 fs pulses with 580 mW of average power around 820 nm at a 100.3 MHz repetition rate. The optical-to-optical conversion efficiency of the system was 33% in cw, 16% in cw frequency-doubled, and 8% in cw mode-locked regimes.

  9. The Secondary Organic Aerosol Processor (SOAP v1.0) model: a unified model with different ranges of complexity based on the molecular surrogate approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Couvidat, F.; Sartelet, K.

    2015-04-01

    In this paper the Secondary Organic Aerosol Processor (SOAP v1.0) model is presented. This model determines the partitioning of organic compounds between the gas and particle phases. It is designed to be modular with different user options depending on the computation time and the complexity required by the user. This model is based on the molecular surrogate approach, in which each surrogate compound is associated with a molecular structure to estimate some properties and parameters (hygroscopicity, absorption into the aqueous phase of particles, activity coefficients and phase separation). Each surrogate can be hydrophilic (condenses only into the aqueous phase of particles), hydrophobic (condenses only into the organic phases of particles) or both (condenses into both the aqueous and the organic phases of particles). Activity coefficients are computed with the UNIFAC (UNIversal Functional group Activity Coefficient; Fredenslund et al., 1975) thermodynamic model for short-range interactions and with the Aerosol Inorganic-Organic Mixtures Functional groups Activity Coefficients (AIOMFAC) parameterization for medium- and long-range interactions between electrolytes and organic compounds. Phase separation is determined by Gibbs energy minimization. The user can choose between an equilibrium representation and a dynamic representation of organic aerosols (OAs). In the equilibrium representation, compounds in the particle phase are assumed to be at equilibrium with the gas phase. However, recent studies show that the organic aerosol is not at equilibrium with the gas phase because the organic phases could be semi-solid (very viscous liquid phase). The condensation-evaporation of organic compounds could then be limited by the diffusion in the organic phases due to the high viscosity. An implicit dynamic representation of secondary organic aerosols (SOAs) is available in SOAP with OAs divided into layers, the first layer being at the center of the particle (slowly

  10. Spectral emission properties of a LPP light source in the sub-200nm range for wafer inspection applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gambino, Nadia; Rollinger, Bob; Hudgins, Duane; Abhari, Reza; Abreau, F.

    2015-03-01

    In this work, the spectral emission proprieties of a droplet-based laser-produced plasma are investigated in the VUV range. These studies are performed with a spectrograph operating from 30 nm to 180 nm at a spectral resolution of 0.1 nm. The emission spectra are recorded for different droplet-based metal fuels such as tin, indium and gallium in the presence of different background gas pressure levels. The experimental results are relevant for alternative light sources that would be needed for future wafer inspection tools. In addition, the experimental results help to determine the Out- Of-Band (OOB) radiation emission of the EUV source. By tuning the type of fuel, the laser energies and the background gas, the LPP light source shows good capabilities to be operated as a tunable light source that covers a spectral emission range from the EUV to the sub-200 nm range.

  11. The use of hyperspectral imaging in the VNIR (400-1000nm) and SWIR range (1000-2500nm) for detecting counterfeit drugs with identical API composition.

    PubMed

    Wilczyński, Sławomir; Koprowski, Robert; Marmion, Mathieu; Duda, Piotr; Błońska-Fajfrowska, Barbara

    2016-11-01

    The risk of death from taking counterfeit drugs is now greater than the probability of dying from malaria and AIDS combined (at least half a million deaths each year). At the same time, counterfeit medicines are falsified more and more "skillfully". According to WHO about 10% of counterfeit drugs are copies of original products. The methods of hyperspectral imaging and image analysis and processing were used to detect counterfeit drugs. Original Viagra® (Pfizer) and counterfeit tablets were compared. Hyperspectral imaging was used to acquire hyperspectral data cubes from both original and counterfeit tablets in the spectral range of 400-2500nm. Spectral parameters for both the original Viagra® and counterfeit drugs were compared. Grey-Level Co-Occurrence Matrix (GLCM) analysis and Principal Component Analysis (PCA) were performed. Hyperspectral analysis of the surface of the original Viagra® and counterfeit tablets demonstrates significant differences in reflectance (maximum difference for 1619.75nm). The GLCM contrast for the falsified drug is on average higher than for the original one 16±4%. GLCM contrast analysis enables to quantify homogeneity of distribution of tablet ingredients and enables to distinguish tablets with identical chemical composition. SWIR (1000-2500nm) hyperspectral imaging has a definite advantage over imaging in VNIR (400-1000nm) - higher wavelength is less sensitive to non-uniform illumination.

  12. The use of hyperspectral imaging in the VNIR (400-1000nm) and SWIR range (1000-2500nm) for detecting counterfeit drugs with identical API composition.

    PubMed

    Wilczyński, Sławomir; Koprowski, Robert; Marmion, Mathieu; Duda, Piotr; Błońska-Fajfrowska, Barbara

    2016-11-01

    The risk of death from taking counterfeit drugs is now greater than the probability of dying from malaria and AIDS combined (at least half a million deaths each year). At the same time, counterfeit medicines are falsified more and more "skillfully". According to WHO about 10% of counterfeit drugs are copies of original products. The methods of hyperspectral imaging and image analysis and processing were used to detect counterfeit drugs. Original Viagra® (Pfizer) and counterfeit tablets were compared. Hyperspectral imaging was used to acquire hyperspectral data cubes from both original and counterfeit tablets in the spectral range of 400-2500nm. Spectral parameters for both the original Viagra® and counterfeit drugs were compared. Grey-Level Co-Occurrence Matrix (GLCM) analysis and Principal Component Analysis (PCA) were performed. Hyperspectral analysis of the surface of the original Viagra® and counterfeit tablets demonstrates significant differences in reflectance (maximum difference for 1619.75nm). The GLCM contrast for the falsified drug is on average higher than for the original one 16±4%. GLCM contrast analysis enables to quantify homogeneity of distribution of tablet ingredients and enables to distinguish tablets with identical chemical composition. SWIR (1000-2500nm) hyperspectral imaging has a definite advantage over imaging in VNIR (400-1000nm) - higher wavelength is less sensitive to non-uniform illumination. PMID:27591580

  13. Satellite laser ranging using superconducting nanowire single-photon detectors at 1064  nm wavelength.

    PubMed

    Xue, Li; Li, Zhulian; Zhang, Labao; Zhai, Dongsheng; Li, Yuqiang; Zhang, Sen; Li, Ming; Kang, Lin; Chen, Jian; Wu, Peiheng; Xiong, Yaoheng

    2016-08-15

    Satellite laser ranging operating at 1064 nm wavelength using superconducting nanowire single-photon detectors (SNSPDs) is successfully demonstrated. A SNSPD with an intrinsic quantum efficiency of 80% and a dark count rate of 100 cps at 1064 nm wavelength is developed and introduced to Yunnan Observatory in China. With improved closed-loop telescope systems (field of view of about 26''), satellites including Cryosat, Ajisai, and Glonass with ranges of 1600 km, 3100 km, and 19,500 km, respectively, are experimentally ranged with mean echo rates of 1200/min, 4200/min, and 320/min, respectively. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first demonstration of laser ranging for satellites using SNSPDs at 1064 nm wavelength. Theoretical analysis of the detection efficiency and the mean echo rate for typical satellites indicate that it is possible for a SNSPD to range satellites from low Earth orbit to geostationary Earth orbit. PMID:27519105

  14. Optical Properties of Sodium Chloride Solution Within the Spectral Range from 300 to 2500 nm at Room Temperature.

    PubMed

    Li, Xingcan; Liu, Linhua; Zhao, Junming; Tan, Jianyu

    2015-05-01

    The optical properties of sodium chloride (NaCl) solution were experimentally determined by double optical pathlength transmission method in the spectral range from 300 to 2500 nm at the NaCl concentration range from 0 to 360 g/L. The results show that the refractive index of NaCl solution increases with NaCl concentrations and correlates nonlinearly with the concentration of NaCl solution. The absorption index of NaCl solution increases with NaCl concentrations in the visible spectral range of 300-700 nm, but varies little in the near-infrared spectral range of 700-2500 nm at room temperature. For the sake of applications, the fitted formulae of the refractive index and absorption index of NaCl solution as a function of wavelength and NaCl concentration are presented.

  15. Four-wavelength time-resolved optical mammography in the 680-980-nm range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pifferi, Antonio; Taroni, Paola; Torricelli, Alessandro; Messina, Fabrizio; Cubeddu, Rinaldo; Danesini, Gianmaria

    2003-07-01

    What is to our knowledge the first instrument for time-resolved optical mammography operating at wavelengths longer than 900 nm has been developed. It is a scanning system that relies on the acquisition of time-resolved transmittance curves at 683, 785, 912, and 975 nm, with a total measurement time of ~5 min for an entire image. Breast structures and lesions can be discriminated based on the different absorption and scattering properties at the four wavelengths, which reflect different contributions of oxyhemoglobin, deoxyhemoglobin, water, and lipids, as well as distinct structures. The system is currently used in a European clinical trial.

  16. Fabrication of Fiber-Optic Tilted Bragg Grating Filter in 40 nm Range with A Single Phase Mask

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grant, Joseph; Wang, Y.; Sharma, A.; Burdine, Robert V. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Fiber-optic Bragg grating filters are fabricated with a range of Bragg wavelength between 1296 and 1336 nm, using a single phase mask. 30 mW of continuous-wave light at 244 nm is used from a frequency-doubled argon-ion laser having an intracavity etalon. Gratings are fabricated by tilting the photosensitive fiber with respect to the phase mask up to an angle of 15 degrees. The variation of Bragg wavelength with the fiber-tilt is explained with a simple formula. High spatial coherence of 244 nm light makes it possible to displace the fiber as much as 6 mm in front of the phase mask and tilt the fiber by as much as 15 degrees. This results in nearly constant band-width and near 100% reflectively for all gratings throughout the 40 nm range.

  17. Ytterbium-doped fibre laser tunable in the range 1017 - 1040 nm with second-harmonic generation

    SciTech Connect

    Dontsova, E I; Kablukov, S I; Babin, Sergei A

    2013-05-31

    A cladding-pumped ytterbium-doped fibre laser has been tuned to shorter emission wavelengths (from 1040 to 1017 nm). The laser output power obtained has been compared to calculation results. We have studied frequency doubling of the laser in a KTiOPO{sub 4} (KTP) crystal with type II phase matching in the XY plane and demonstrated wavelength tuning in the range 510 - 520 nm. (lasers)

  18. Extended femtosecond laser wavelength range to 330 nm in a high power LBO based optical parametric oscillator.

    PubMed

    Fan, Jintao; Gu, Chenglin; Wang, Chingyue; Hu, Minglie

    2016-06-13

    We experimentally demonstrate a compact tunable, high average power femtosecond laser source in the ultraviolet (UV) regime. The laser source is based on intra-cavity frequency doubling of a temperature-tuned lithium tribotate (LBO) optical parametric oscillator (OPO), synchronously pumped at 520 nm by a frequency-doubled, Yb-fiber femtosecond laser amplifier system. By adjusting crystal temperature, the OPO can provide tunable visible to near-infrared (NIR) signal pulse, which have a wide spectral tuning range from 660 to 884 nm. Using a β-barium borate (BBO) crystal for intra-cavity frequency doubling, tunable femtosecond UV pulse are generated across 330~442 nm with up to 364 mW at 402 nm.

  19. Extended femtosecond laser wavelength range to 330 nm in a high power LBO based optical parametric oscillator.

    PubMed

    Fan, Jintao; Gu, Chenglin; Wang, Chingyue; Hu, Minglie

    2016-06-13

    We experimentally demonstrate a compact tunable, high average power femtosecond laser source in the ultraviolet (UV) regime. The laser source is based on intra-cavity frequency doubling of a temperature-tuned lithium tribotate (LBO) optical parametric oscillator (OPO), synchronously pumped at 520 nm by a frequency-doubled, Yb-fiber femtosecond laser amplifier system. By adjusting crystal temperature, the OPO can provide tunable visible to near-infrared (NIR) signal pulse, which have a wide spectral tuning range from 660 to 884 nm. Using a β-barium borate (BBO) crystal for intra-cavity frequency doubling, tunable femtosecond UV pulse are generated across 330~442 nm with up to 364 mW at 402 nm. PMID:27410342

  20. Tunable semiconductor laser at 1025-1095 nm range for OCT applications with an extended imaging depth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shramenko, Mikhail V.; Chamorovskiy, Alexander; Lyu, Hong-Chou; Lobintsov, Andrei A.; Karnowski, Karol; Yakubovich, Sergei D.; Wojtkowski, Maciej

    2015-03-01

    Tunable semiconductor laser for 1025-1095 nm spectral range is developed based on the InGaAs semiconductor optical amplifier and a narrow band-pass acousto-optic tunable filter in a fiber ring cavity. Mode-hop-free sweeping with tuning speeds of up to 104 nm/s was demonstrated. Instantaneous linewidth is in the range of 0.06-0.15 nm, side-mode suppression is up to 50 dB and polarization extinction ratio exceeds 18 dB. Optical power in output single mode fiber reaches 20 mW. The laser was used in OCT system for imaging a contact lens immersed in a 0.5% intra-lipid solution. The cross-section image provided the imaging depth of more than 5mm.

  1. Mobility of Chromophores Absorbing Light in the 320-420 nm Range in Transparent and Cataract Lens Tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Halets-Bui, I. V.; Sukhodol, A. A.; Shcharbin, D. G.

    2014-11-01

    We have analyzed the spectral and kinetic characteristics of phosphorescence at room temperature on a millisecond time scale for transparent and cataract lens tissues. We have studied the nature of the change (with age and with cataract development in the lens tissues) in the molecular mobility of the products absorbing light in the 320-420 nm range.

  2. Ion generation and CPC detection efficiency studies in sub 3-nm size range

    SciTech Connect

    Kangasluoma, J.; Junninen, H.; Sipilae, M.; Kulmala, M.; Petaejae, T.; Lehtipalo, K.; Mikkilae, J.; Vanhanen, J.; Attoui, M.; Worsnop, D.

    2013-05-24

    We studied the chemical composition of commonly used condensation particle counter calibration ions with a mass spectrometer and found that in our calibration setup the negatively charged ammonium sulphate, sodium chloride and tungsten oxide are the least contaminated whereas silver on both positive and negative and the three mentioned earlier in positive mode are contaminated with organics. We report cut-off diameters for Airmodus Particle Size Magnifier (PSM) 1.1, 1.3, 1.4, 1.6 and 1.6-1.8 nm for negative sodium chloride, ammonium sulphate, tungsten oxide, silver and positive organics, respectively. To study the effect of sample relative humidity on detection efficiency of the PSM we used different humidities in the differential mobility analyzer sheath flow and found that with increasing relative humidity also the detection efficiency of the PSM increases.

  3. Study of transitions in thulium atoms in the 410-420-nm range for laser cooling

    SciTech Connect

    Akimov, A V; Chebakov, K Yu; Tolstikhina, I Yu; Sokolov, A V; Rodionov, P B; Kanorsky, S I; Sorokin, V N; Kolachevsky, N N

    2008-10-31

    The possibility of laser cooling of thulium atoms is considered. The hyperfine structure of almost cyclic 4f{sup 13}6s{sup 2} (J{sub g} = 7/2) {r_reversible} 4f{sup 12}5d{sub 3/2}6s{sup 2} (J{sub e} = 9/2) and 4f{sup 13}6s{sup 2} (J{sub g} = 7/2) {r_reversible} 4f{sup 12}5d{sub 5/2}6s{sup 2} (J{sub e} = 9/2) transitions at 410.6 and 420.4 nm, respectively, is studied by the method of sub-Doppler saturation spectroscopy in counterpropagating laser beams. The hyperfine splitting of excited levels involved in these transitions is measured and the natural linewidths of these transitions are determined. The structure of the neighbouring 4f{sup 13}6s6p (J{sub e} = 5/2) and 4f{sup 12}5d{sub 5/2}6s{sup 2} (J{sub e} = 7/2) levels is studied for the first time by this method. The decay probabilities of the J{sub e} = 9/2 levels via channels removing atoms from the cooling cycle are calculated. It is found that the branching ratio for the strong transition at 410.6 nm (A = 6x10{sup 7} s{sup -1}) is smaller than 2x10{sup -5}, which makes this transition most promising for laser cooling. The laser cooling of atoms in a Zeeman cooler at this transition is simulated. The possibility of using a laser-cooled cloud of thulium atoms to study the metrological transition at 1.14 {mu}m is discussed. (laser cooling of atoms)

  4. A new bismuth-doped fibre laser, emitting in the range 1625 – 1775 nm

    SciTech Connect

    Dianov, E M; Firstov, S V; Alyshev, S V; Riumkin, K E; Shubin, A V; Medvedkov, O I; Mel'kumov, M A; Khopin, V F; Gur'yanov, A N

    2014-06-30

    CW lasing of a Bi-doped germanosilicate fibre in a wavelength range that covers the spectral region between the emission bands of Er and Tm fibre lasers has been demonstrated for the first time. (letters)

  5. Fabrication and performance of tuneable single-mode VCSELs emitting in the 750- to 1000-nm range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grabherr, Martin; Wiedenmann, Dieter; Jaeger, Roland; King, Roger

    2005-03-01

    The growing demand on low cost high spectral purity laser sources at specific wavelengths for applications like tuneable diode laser absorption spectroscopy (TDLAS) and optical pumping of atomic clocks can be met by sophisticated single-mode VCSELs in the 760 to 980 nm wavelength range. Equipped with micro thermo electrical cooler (TEC) and thermistor inside a small standard TO46 package, the resulting wavelength tuning range is larger than +/- 2.5 nm. U-L-M photonics presents manufacturing aspects, device performance and reliability data on tuneable single-mode VCSELs at 760, 780, 794, 852, and 948 nm lately introduced to the market. According applications are O2 sensing, Rb pumping, Cs pumping, and moisture sensing, respectively. The first part of the paper dealing with manufacturing aspects focuses on control of resonance wavelength during epitaxial growth and process control during selective oxidation for current confinement. Acceptable resonance wavelength tolerance is as small as +/- 1nm and typical aperture size of oxide confined single-mode VCSELs is 3 &mum with only few hundred nm tolerance. Both of these major production steps significantly contribute to yield on wafer values. Key performance data for the presented single-mode VCSELs are: >0.5 mW of optical output power, >30 dB side mode suppression ratio, and extrapolated 10E7 h MTTF at room temperature based on several millions of real test hours. Finally, appropriate fiber coupling solutions will be presented and discussed.

  6. The spectral opacity of triatomic carbon measured in a graphite tube furnace over the 280 to 600 nm wavelength range

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Snow, W. L.; Wells, W. L.

    1980-01-01

    The opacity of linear triatomic carbon (C3) was measured in a graphite tube furnace from 280 to 600 nm to supplement the earlier measurements of Brewer and Engelke. The spectral cross section was estimated from the opacities using temperature profiles determined pyrometrically and a revised heat of formation delta H = 198 kcal/mole). The cross section was found to be nonnegligible over the range 300 to 500 nm and the electronic oscillator strength based on the total cross section estimate was 0.02.

  7. Investigation of the lithium 670.7 nm wavelength range in the solar spectrum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caffau, Elisabetta; Mott, Alessandro; Harutyunyan, Gohar; Malherbe, Jean-Marie; Steffen, Matthias

    2016-07-01

    Lithium is a key chemical element, with a chemical evolution that is different from that of most other elements. It is also very fragile, as it is destroyed by nuclear reactions with protons at temperatures higher than about 2.5 million K. According to standard Big Bang nucleosynthesis, only the isotope 7Li is produced in significant amounts, while the primordial abundance of the lighter isotope 6Li is negligible. Lithium is not produced by nucleosynthesis in normal stars, except in peculiar phases of stellar evolution (e.g. in AGB stars and Novae). Lithium may also be formed as a result of flares in the atmospheres of young, active stars. To investigate the history of Li production and depletion in the Galaxy, it is necessary to analyse stars of all ages, including those at solar metallicity. In this case, the spectroscopic determination of the Li abundance is complicated by the presence of other spectral lines overlapping with the Li doublet at 670.7 nm. The correct identification and knowledge of the atomic parameters of these blend lines is critical, especially if the 6LI/7Li isotopic ratio is to be derived. In this investigation, we consider several line lists of the blending components available in the literature and use them to compute synthetic spectra, performing the line formation computations both for the classical 1D Holweger-Mueller model and a CO5BOLD 3D hydrodynamical simulation of the solar atmosphere. The synthetic spectra are then compared to the solar spectrum observed at different limb angles. This allows us to check the quality of existing line lists, to find potentially misidentified blend lines, and to construct an optimized line list for solar-type stars.

  8. Preparation of aqueous colloidal mesostructured and mesoporous silica nanoparticles with controlled particle size in a very wide range from 20 nm to 700 nm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamada, Hironori; Urata, Chihiro; Ujiie, Hiroto; Yamauchi, Yusuke; Kuroda, Kazuyuki

    2013-06-01

    Particle size control of colloidal mesoporous silica nanoparticles (CMPS) in a very wide range is quite significant for the design of CMPS toward various applications, such as catalysis and drug delivery. Various types of CMPS and their precursors (colloidal mesostructured silica nanoparticles (CMSS)) with different particle sizes (ca. 20-700 nm) were newly prepared from tetraalkoxysilanes with different alkoxy groups (Si(OR)4, R = Me, Et, Pr, and Bu) in the presence of alcohols (R'OH, R' = Me, Et, Pr, and Bu) as additives. CMSS with larger particle size were obtained by using tetrabutoxysilane (TBOS) and by increasing the amount of BuOH, which is explained by both the difference in the hydrolysis rates of tetraalkoxysilanes themselves and the effect of added alcohols on the hydrolysis rates of tetraalkoxysilanes. Larger amounts of alcohols with longer alkyl chains decrease the hydrolysis rates of tetraalkoxysilanes and the subsequent formation rates of silica species. Thus, the preferential particle growth of CMSS to nucleation occurs, and larger CMSS are formed. Highly dispersed CMPS were prepared by the removal of surfactants of CMSS by dialysis which can lead to the preparation of CMPS without aggregation. Therefore, the particle size control through the tuning of the hydrolysis rate of tetraalkoxysilanes can be conducted by a one-pot and easy approach. Even larger CMPS (ca. 700 nm in size) show relatively high dispersibility. This dispersibility will surely contribute to the design of materials both retaining nanoscale characteristics and avoiding various nanorisks.Particle size control of colloidal mesoporous silica nanoparticles (CMPS) in a very wide range is quite significant for the design of CMPS toward various applications, such as catalysis and drug delivery. Various types of CMPS and their precursors (colloidal mesostructured silica nanoparticles (CMSS)) with different particle sizes (ca. 20-700 nm) were newly prepared from tetraalkoxysilanes with

  9. ABSORPTION CROSS SECTION OF GASEOUS ACETYLENE AT 85 K IN THE WAVELENGTH RANGE 110-155 nm

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng, Bing-Ming; Chen, Hui-Fen; Lu, Hsiao-Chi; Chen, Hong-Kai; Alam, M. S.; Chou, Sheng-Lung; Lin, Meng-Yeh

    2011-09-01

    Absorption spectra and absorption cross sections of gaseous acetylene, C{sub 2}H{sub 2}, at 298 and 85 K were measured in the wavelength range 110-155 nm with a slit-jet system coupled to a synchrotron as a source of vacuum ultraviolet light. Using published spectral parameters of C{sub 2}H{sub 2}, we simulated the absorption profile for the Rydberg transition to state 4R{sub 0} in the range 124.6-125.1 nm, according to which the temperature of the jet-expanded sample at stagnation pressure 200 Torr is 85 {+-} 5 K. Our cross sections of C{sub 2}H{sub 2} are applicable for determining properties sensitive to temperature for diagnostic work on Saturn and Titan.

  10. 45 nm wavelength tuning range of an InP/InGaAsP photonic integrated tunable receiver

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jan, Yu-Heng; Heimbuch, Mark E.; Coldren, Larry A.; DenBaars, Steven P.

    1996-11-01

    An integrated widely tunable photonic receiver including a semiconductor optical preamplifier, a two-section grating-assisted co-directional coupler optical filter, and a waveguide photodetector has been produced in the InP/InGaAsP materials system. Although sidelobes and bandwidth are still higher than desired, this integrated receiver can be continuously tuned for a record-wide 45 nm wavelength range.

  11. Photoluminescence quantum yields of PbSe and PbS QDs in the range of 1000 nm to 2000 nm (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beard, Matthew C.; Semonin, Octavi E.; Johnson, Justin C.; Marshall, Ashley; Zhang, Jianbing; Chernomordik, Boris D.

    2016-03-01

    PbS and PbSe quantum dots (QDs) are promising strong infrared emitters. We have developed several synthetic routes to producing PbS and PbSe QDs with a variety of sizes such that the bandgap can be continuously tuned from 2000 to 1000 nm. We provide a simple and accurate synthetic route to reproducibly produce PbS QDs with a narrow size-distribution and high chemical yield. The different synthetic routes lead to differences in their surface chemistry and to differences in their air stability and photoluminescence quantum yields (PLQY). To characterize the PLQY we directly measured the PLQY IR-26 (a standard IR emitting organic dye) at a range of concentrations as well as the PLQY of PbS and PbSe QDs for a range of sizes. We find that the PLQY of IR-26 has a weak concentration dependence due to reabsorption, with a PLQY of 0:048_0:002% for low concentrations, lower than previous reports by a full order of magnitude. We also find a dramatic size dependence for both PbS and PbSe QDs, with the smallest dots exhibiting a PLQY in excess of 60% while larger dots fall below 3%. A model, including nonradiative transition between electronic states and energy transfer to ligand vibrations, appears to explain this size dependence. These findings provide both a better characterization of photoluminescence for near infrared emitters. Halogen surface passivation provides both a larger PLQY (~ 30% improvement) as well as increased air stability.

  12. Graphene mode-locked femtosecond Cr2+:ZnS laser with ~300 nm tuning range.

    PubMed

    Cho, Won Bae; Choi, Sun Young; Zhu, Chunhui; Kim, Mi Hye; Kim, Jun Wan; Kim, Jin Sun; Park, Hyung Ju; Shin, Dong Ho; Jung, Moon Youn; Wang, Fengqiu; Rotermund, Fabian

    2016-09-01

    Graphene has proved to be an excellent broadband saturable absorber for mode-locked operation of ultrafast lasers. However, for the mid-infrared (mid-IR) range where broadly tunable sources are in great needs, graphene-based broadly tunable ultrafast mid-IR lasers have not been demonstrated so far. Here, we report on passive mode-locking of a mid-IR Cr:ZnS laser by utilizing a transmission-type monolayer graphene saturable absorber and broad spectral tunability between 2120 nm and 2408 nm, which is the broadest tuning bandwidth ever reported for graphene mode-locked mid-IR solid-state lasers. The recovery time of the saturable absorber is measured to be ~2.4 ps by pump-probe technique at a wavelength of 2350 nm. Stably mode-locked Cr:ZnS laser delivers Fourier transform-limited 220-fs pulses with a pulse energy of up to 7.8 nJ. PMID:27607680

  13. Background UV in the 300 to 400 nm region affecting the extended range detection of radioactive material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    West, William Carey

    The desire to find alternative methods for the detection of radioactive material at extended ranges has resulted in an increased interest in the detection of the air fluorescence resulting from the alpha or beta radioactive particle's interaction with molecules of air. Air fluorescence photons travel further than the radioactive particles, allowing for detections at longer distances. However, any detection of the ultraviolet (UV) air fluorescence is dependant on overcoming natural and man-made background UV to achieve favorable signal to noise ratios. This research describes laboratory and field experiments conducted to determine the background UV in the 300 to 400 nm region of the electromagnetic spectrum for certain detection scenarios, and number of UV air fluorescence photons required to achieve detections with a certain confidence limit. The reflective, scintillation, and transmissive UV characteristics of some common materials are discussed and their contribution to a successful detection explored. Additionally, the contributions to the UV background from natural and man-made light sources are investigated. The successful outside optical detection of alpha and beta radioactive isotopes in the 300 to 400 nm region is possible in the lower part of the spectral region (i.e., near 316 nm), when there is no UV light from man-made sources in that band and only natural light exists. Alpha sources (i.e., 241Am) equal to or larger than 1.017 curies, theoretically can be detected with 95% confidence during nighttime scenarios with moonless overcast skies at a distances of 20 meters at 316 nm with the optical system assumed for these calculations. Additionally, where scintillators are available that can be employed near 90Sr radioactive sources, the detectable activities can be reduced by factors as high as 250. This allows for detections of sources in the millicuries. Tests results are presented for several common materials (e.g., polypropylene, high density

  14. High-accuracy reference standards for two-photon absorption in the 680-1050 nm wavelength range.

    PubMed

    de Reguardati, Sophie; Pahapill, Juri; Mikhailov, Alexander; Stepanenko, Yuriy; Rebane, Aleksander

    2016-04-18

    Degenerate two-photon absorption (2PA) of a series of organic fluorophores is measured using femtosecond fluorescence excitation method in the wavelength range, λ2PA = 680-1050 nm, and ~100 MHz pulse repetition rate. The function of relative 2PA spectral shape is obtained with estimated accuracy 5%, and the absolute 2PA cross section is measured at selected wavelengths with the accuracy 8%. Significant improvement of the accuracy is achieved by means of rigorous evaluation of the quadratic dependence of the fluorescence signal on the incident photon flux in the whole wavelength range, by comparing results obtained from two independent experiments, as well as due to meticulous evaluation of critical experimental parameters, including the excitation spatial- and temporal pulse shape, laser power and sample geometry. Application of the reference standards in nonlinear transmittance measurements is discussed.

  15. Distinct Short-Range Order Is Inherent to Small Amorphous Calcium Carbonate Clusters (<2 nm).

    PubMed

    Sun, Shengtong; Chevrier, Daniel M; Zhang, Peng; Gebauer, Denis; Cölfen, Helmut

    2016-09-26

    Amorphous intermediate phases are vital precursors in the crystallization of many biogenic minerals. While inherent short-range orders have been found in amorphous calcium carbonates (ACCs) relating to different crystalline forms, it has never been clarified experimentally whether such orders already exist in very small clusters less than 2 nm in size. Here, we studied the stability and structure of 10,12-pentacosadiynoic acid (PCDA) protected ACC clusters with a core size of ca. 1.4 nm consisting of only seven CaCO3 units. Ligand concentration and structure are shown to be key factors in stabilizing the ACC clusters. More importantly, even in such small CaCO3 entities, a proto-calcite short-range order can be identified but with a relatively high degree of disorder that arises from the very small size of the CaCO3 core. Our findings support the notion of a structural link between prenucleation clusters, amorphous intermediates, and final crystalline polymorphs, which appears central to the understanding of polymorph selection. PMID:27611501

  16. Design concepts of monolithic metamorphic vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers for the 1300–1550 nm spectral range

    SciTech Connect

    Egorov, A. Yu. Karachinsky, L. Ya.; Novikov, I. I.; Babichev, A. V.; Nevedomskiy, V. N.; Bugrov, V. E.

    2015-11-15

    Possible design concepts for long-wavelength vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers for the 1300–1550 nm spectral range on GaAs substrates are suggested. It is shown that a metamorphic GaAs–InGaAs heterostructure with a thin buffer layer providing rapid transition from the lattice constant of GaAs to that of In{sub x}Ga{sub 1–x}As with an indium fraction of x < 0.3 can be formed by molecular-beam epitaxy. Analysis by transmission electron microscopy demonstrated the effective localization of mismatch dislocations in the thin buffer layer and full suppression of their penetration into the overlying InGaAs metamorphic layer.

  17. Full anterior segment biometry with extended imaging range spectral domain optical coherence tomography at 1340 nm

    PubMed Central

    Li, Peng; Johnstone, Murray; Wang, Ruikang K.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract. We demonstrate an extended-imaging-range anterior-segment optical coherence tomography (eAS-OCT) system for the biometric assessment of full AS in human eye. This newly developed eAS-OCT operating at 1340-nm wavelength band is simultaneously capable of an imaging speed of 120 kHz A-line scan rate, an axial resolution of 7.2 μm, and an extended imaging range of up to 16 mm in air. Imaging results from three healthy subjects and one subject with a narrow-angle demonstrate the instrument’s utility. With this system, it can provide anatomical dimensions of AS, including central corneal thickness, anterior chamber width, anterior chamber depth, crystalline lens vault, crystalline lens thickness, angle opening distance (AOD500/AOD750), and the area described by the trabecular-iris space (TISA500/TISA750) at 500/750  μm. We also use eAS-OCT to image and quantify dynamic functional changes of the AS in response to a light stimulus that induces physiological pupillary changes as well as accommodative efforts that induce lens changes. The results show that the described eAS-OCT is able to provide full anatomical biometry for AS and is useful for the studies where the dynamic response of AS compartment to certain stimulus is required. PMID:24752381

  18. Optical properties of dental restorative materials in the wavelength range 400 to 700 nm for the simulation of color perception.

    PubMed

    Friebel, Moritz; Povel, Kirsten; Cappius, Hans-Joachim; Helfmann, Jürgen; Meinke, Martina

    2009-01-01

    Aesthetic restorations require dental restorative materials to have optical properties very similar to those of the teeth. A method is developed to this end to determine the optical parameters absorption coefficient mu(a), scattering coefficient mu(s), anisotropy factor g, and effective scattering coefficient mu(s) (') of dental restorative materials. The method includes sample preparation and measurements of transmittance and reflectance in an integrating sphere spectrometer followed by inverse Monte Carlo simulations. Using this method the intrinsic optical parameters are determined for shade B2 of the light-activated composites TPH((R)) Spectrum, Esthet-X, and the Ormocer Definite in the wavelength range 400 to 700 nm. By using the determined parameters mu(a), mu(s), and g together with an appropriate phase function, the reflectance of samples with 1-mm layer thickness and shade B2 could be predicted with a very high degree of accuracy using a forward Monte Carlo simulation. The color perception was calculated from the simulated reflectance according to the CIELAB system. We initiate the compilation of a data pool of optical parameters that in the future will enable calculation models to be used as a basis for optimization of the optical approximation of the natural tooth, and the composition of new materials and their production process.

  19. Optical properties of dental restorative materials in the wavelength range 400 to 700 nm for the simulation of color perception

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Friebel, Moritz; Povel, Kirsten; Cappius, Hans-Joachim; Helfmann, Jürgen; Meinke, Martina

    2009-09-01

    Aesthetic restorations require dental restorative materials to have optical properties very similar to those of the teeth. A method is developed to this end to determine the optical parameters absorption coefficient μa, scattering coefficient μs, anisotropy factor g, and effective scattering coefficient μs' of dental restorative materials. The method includes sample preparation and measurements of transmittance and reflectance in an integrating sphere spectrometer followed by inverse Monte Carlo simulations. Using this method the intrinsic optical parameters are determined for shade B2 of the light-activated composites TPH® Spectrum®, Esthet-X®, and the Ormocer® Definite® in the wavelength range 400 to 700 nm. By using the determined parameters μa, μs, and g together with an appropriate phase function, the reflectance of samples with 1-mm layer thickness and shade B2 could be predicted with a very high degree of accuracy using a forward Monte Carlo simulation. The color perception was calculated from the simulated reflectance according to the CIELAB system. We initiate the compilation of a data pool of optical parameters that in the future will enable calculation models to be used as a basis for optimization of the optical approximation of the natural tooth, and the composition of new materials and their production process.

  20. Indico 1.0

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonzalez Lopez, J. B.; Avilés, A.; Baron, T.; Ferreira, P.; Kolobara, B.; Pugh, M. A.; Resco, A.; Trzaskoma, J. P.

    2014-06-01

    Indico has evolved into the main event organization software, room booking tool and collaboration hub for CERN. The growth in its usage has only accelerated during the past 9 years, and today Indico holds more that 215,000 events and 1,100,000 files. The growth was also substantial in terms of functionalities and improvements. In the last year alone, Indico has matured considerably in 3 key areas: enhanced usability, optimized performance and additional features, especially those related to meeting collaboration. Along the course of 2012, much activity has centred around consolidating all this effort and investment into "version 1.0", recently released in 2013.Version 1.0 brings along new features, such as the Microsoft Exchange calendar synchronization for participants, many new and clean interfaces (badges and poster generation, list of contributions, abstracts, etc) and so forth. But most importantly, it brings a message: Indico is now stable, consolidated and mature after more than 10 years of non-stop development. This message is addressed not only to CERN users but also to the many organisations, in or outside HEP, which have already installed the software, and to others who might soon join this community. In this document, we describe the current state of the art of Indico, and how it was built. This does not mean that the Indico software is complete, far from it! We have plenty of new ideas and projects that we are working on and which we have shared during CHEP 2013.

  1. SALINAS1.0

    SciTech Connect

    Reese, Garth; Bhardwaj, Manoj; Pierson, Kendall; Walsh, Tim; Day, David

    2002-10-01

    Salinas isa general purpose finite element package for structural dynamics analysis, written pecifically for distributed memory computers. It has been used for the analysis of structures ranging MEMs, to weapons components to aircraft carriers. The package provides eigenanalysis, and implicit linear and nonlinear transient and static analysis of structures, and incorporates sensitivity analysis. A full range of structural elements is provided.

  2. Influence of oxygen saturation on the optical scattering properties of human red blood cells in the spectral range 250 to 2,000 nm.

    PubMed

    Friebel, Moritz; Helfmann, Jürgen; Netz, Uwe; Meinke, Martina

    2009-01-01

    The intrinsic optical parameters absorption coefficient mu(a), scattering coefficient micros, anisotropy factor g, and effective scattering coefficient micros were determined for human red blood cell (RBC) suspensions of hematocrit 33.2% dependent on the oxygen saturation (SAT O(2)) in the wavelength range 250 to 2,000 nm, including the range above 1,100 nm, about which there are no data available in the literature. Integrating sphere measurements of light transmittance and reflectance in combination with inverse Monte Carlo simulation were carried out for SAT O(2) levels of 100 and 0%. In the wavelength range up to 1,200 nm, the absorption behavior is determined by the hemoglobin absorption. The spectral range above the cells' absorption shows no dependence on SAT O(2) and approximates the absorption of water with values 20 to 30% below the respective values for water. Parameters micros and g are significantly influenced by the SAT O(2)-induced absorption changes. Above 600 nm, micros decreases continuously from values of 85 mm(-1) to values of 30 mm(-1) at 2,000 nm. The anisotropy factor shows a slight decrease with wavelengths above 600 nm. In the spectral regions of 1,450 and 1,900 nm where water has local absorption maxima, g shows a significant decrease down to 0.85, whereas micros increases. PMID:19566295

  3. Stimulated Raman scattering cascade spanning the wavelength range of 523 to 1750 nm using a graded-index multimode optical fiber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pourbeyram, Hamed; Agrawal, Govind P.; Mafi, Arash

    2013-05-01

    We report on the generation of a Raman cascade spanning the wavelength range of 523 to 1750 nm wavelength range in a standard telecommunication graded-index multimode optical fiber. Despite the highly multimode nature of the pump, the Raman peaks are generated in specific modes of the fiber, confirming substantial beam cleanup during the stimulated Raman scattering process.

  4. Size-controlled synthesis of near-monodisperse gold nanoparticles in the 1-4 nm range using polymeric stabilizers.

    PubMed

    Hussain, Irshad; Graham, Susan; Wang, Zhenxin; Tan, Bien; Sherrington, David C; Rannard, Steven P; Cooper, Andrew I; Brust, Mathias

    2005-11-30

    We report here a simple one-step protocol for the preparation of near-monodisperse gold hydrosols in the small size regime (<5 nm). The particle size can be controlled by varying the concentration of the stabilizing polymer, which can be readily displaced by thiol ligands to yield monolayer protected clusters of the usual type.

  5. Diode pumped Yb:CN laser at 1082 nm and intracavity doubling to the green spectral range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, B.; Li, Y. L.; Jiang, H. L.

    2011-08-01

    A diode pumped Yb:CaNb2O6 (Yb:CN) laser at 1082 nm with a maximum output of 1.35 W at 13.3 W pump power has been demonstrated. The slope efficiency was 12.4%. Moreover, intracavity second-harmonic generation (SHG) has also been achieved with a maximum green power of 374 mW by using a LiB3O5 (LBO) nonlinear crystal. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report on continuous wave (CW) green generation by intracavity frequency doubling Yb:CN laser.

  6. Nearly lattice-matched n, i, and p layers for InGaN p-i-n photodiodes in the 365-500 nm spectral range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berkman, E. A.; El-Masry, N. A.; Emara, A.; Bedair, S. M.

    2008-03-01

    We report on nearly lattice-matched grown InGaN based p-i-n photodiodes detecting in the 365-500nm range with tunable peak responsivity tailored by the i-layer properties. The growth of lattice matched i- and n-InGaN layer leads to improvement in the device performance. This approach produced photodiodes with zero-bias responsivities up to 0.037A /W at 426nm, corresponding to 15.5% internal quantum efficiency. The peak responsivity wavelength ranged between 416 and 466nm, the longest reported for III-N photodiodes. The effects of InN content and i-layer thickness on photodiode properties and performance are discussed.

  7. Metamorphic distributed Bragg reflectors for the 1440–1600 nm spectral range: Epitaxy, formation, and regrowth of mesa structures

    SciTech Connect

    Egorov, A. Yu. Karachinsky, L. Ya.; Novikov, I. I.; Babichev, A. V.; Berezovskaya, T. N.; Nevedomskiy, V. N.

    2015-10-15

    It is shown that metamorphic In{sub 0.3}Ga{sub 0.7}As/In{sub 0.3}Al{sub 0.7}As distributed Bragg reflectors (DBRs) with a reflection band at 1440–1600 nm and a reflectance of no less than 0.999 can be fabricated by molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) on a GaAs substrate. It is demonstrated that mesa structures formed from metamorphic DBRs on a GaAs substrate can be regrown by MBE and microcavities can be locally formed in two separate epitaxial processes. The results obtained can find wide application in the fabrication of vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers (VCSELs) with a buried tunnel junction.

  8. Accurate electron inelastic cross sections and stopping powers for liquid water over the 0.1-10 keV range based on an improved dielectric description of the Bethe surface.

    PubMed

    Emfietzoglou, D; Nikjoo, H

    2007-01-01

    Electron inelastic cross sections and stopping powers for liquid water over the 0.1-10 keV range are presented based on a recently developed dielectric response model for liquid water (D. Emfietzoglou, F. Cucinotta and H. Nikjoo, Radiat. Res. 164, 202-211, 2005) that is consistent with the experimental data over the whole energy-momentum plane. Both exchange and second-order Born corrections are included in a material-specific way using the dielectric functions of liquid water. The numerical results are fitted by simple analytic functions to facilitate their further use. Compared to previous studies, differential cross sections are shifted toward smaller energy losses resulting in smaller inelastic and stopping cross sections with differences reaching, on average, the approximately 20% and approximately 50% level, respectively. Contrary to higher energies, it is shown that the dispersion model for the momentum dependence of the dielectric functions (Bethe ridge) is as important as the optical model used. Within the accuracy of the experimental data (a few percent) upon which our dielectric model is based, the calculations are "exact" to first order, while the uncertainty of the results beyond first order is estimated at the 5-10% level. The present work overcomes the limitations of Bethe's theory at low energies by a self-consistent account of inner-shell effects and may serve to extend the ICRU electron stopping power database for liquid water down to 100 eV with a level of uncertainty similar to that for the higher-energy values.

  9. Multilayer metal-dielectric planar waveguides for subwavelength guiding of long-range hybrid plasmon polaritons at 1550 nm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bian, Yusheng; Gong, Qihuang

    2014-01-01

    The characteristics of long-range hybrid plasmonic modes guided by multilayer metal-dielectric planar waveguides are investigated at the telecom wavelength. These multilayer structures are formed by sandwiching thin metallic stripes into horizontal silicon slot-like waveguides. Comprehensive numerical studies regarding the geometric parameters’ effects on the modal properties reveal that, by properly choosing the dimensions of the metal stripe and the low-index gaps between the stripe and the silicon layers, the symmetric hybrid modes supported by the structures could feature simultaneously ultra-long propagation distance (several centimeters) and subwavelength mode size. Consideration of possible fabrication imperfections shows that the optical performances of the waveguides are quite robust and highly tolerant to these errors. The presented multilayer plasmonic structures greatly extend the capabilities of conventional long-range surface plasmon polariton waveguides by successfully confining light into a subwavelength scale while maintaining the key advantage of enabling ultra-low-loss propagation, which could facilitate potential applications in ultra-long-range plasmon waveguiding and realizations of compact, high-performance photonic components, as well as building optically integrated circuits with complex functionalities.

  10. A new method to calculate the threshold temperature of a perfect blackbody to protect cornea and lens in the range of 780-3,000 nm.

    PubMed

    Madjidi, Faramarz; Mohammadi, Jamshid

    2015-01-01

    Exposure to IR-A and IR-B radiation, in the wavelength region of 780 nm to 3,000 nm, may lead to the development of cataractogenesis. Estimation of the exposure levels is the first step in controlling adverse health effects. In the present study, the irradiance of a hot blackbody emitter is replaced by its temperature in the exposure limit values for cornea and lens in the range of 780-3,000 nm. This paper explains the development and implementation of a computer code to predict a temperature, defined as Threshold Temperature, which satisfies the exposure limits already proposed by the ICNIRP. To this end, first an infinite series was created for the calculation of spectral radiance by integration with Planck's law. For calculation of irradiance, the initial terms of this infinite series were selected, and integration was performed in the wavelength region of 780 nm to 3,000 nm. Finally, using a computer code, an unknown source temperature that can emit the same irradiance was found. Exposure duration, source area, and observer distance from the hot source were entered as input data in this proposed code. Consequently, it is possible only by measurement of a Planckian emitter temperature and taking into account the distance from source and exposure time for an observer to decide whether the exposure to IR radiation in the range of 780 to 3,000 nm is permissible or not. It seems that the substitution of irradiance by the source temperature is an easier and more convenient way for hygienists to evaluate IR exposures. PMID:25437515

  11. Tuning range and output power optimization of an external-cavity GaN diode laser at 455  nm.

    PubMed

    Chi, Mingjun; Jensen, Ole Bjarlin; Petersen, Paul Michael

    2016-03-20

    In this paper we discuss how different feedback gratings affect the tuning range and the output power of external feedback diode laser systems. A tunable high-power narrow-spectrum external-cavity diode laser system around 455 nm is investigated. The laser system is based on a high-power GaN diode laser in a Littrow external-cavity. Both a holographic diffraction grating and a ruled diffraction grating are used as feedback elements in the external cavity. The output power, spectral bandwidth, and tunable range of the external cavity diode laser system are measured and compared with the two gratings at different injected currents. When the holographic grating is used, the laser system can be tuned over a range of 1.4 nm with an output power around 530 mW. When the ruled grating is used, the laser system can be tuned over a range of 6.0 nm with an output power around 80 mW. The results can be used as a guide for selecting gratings for external-cavity diode lasers for different requirements. PMID:27140561

  12. Tuning range and output power optimization of an external-cavity GaN diode laser at 455  nm.

    PubMed

    Chi, Mingjun; Jensen, Ole Bjarlin; Petersen, Paul Michael

    2016-03-20

    In this paper we discuss how different feedback gratings affect the tuning range and the output power of external feedback diode laser systems. A tunable high-power narrow-spectrum external-cavity diode laser system around 455 nm is investigated. The laser system is based on a high-power GaN diode laser in a Littrow external-cavity. Both a holographic diffraction grating and a ruled diffraction grating are used as feedback elements in the external cavity. The output power, spectral bandwidth, and tunable range of the external cavity diode laser system are measured and compared with the two gratings at different injected currents. When the holographic grating is used, the laser system can be tuned over a range of 1.4 nm with an output power around 530 mW. When the ruled grating is used, the laser system can be tuned over a range of 6.0 nm with an output power around 80 mW. The results can be used as a guide for selecting gratings for external-cavity diode lasers for different requirements.

  13. Multispectral measurement of contrast in tissue-mimicking phantoms in near-infrared spectral range of 650 to 1600 nm

    PubMed Central

    Salo, Daniel; Zhang, Hairong; Kim, David M.; Berezin, Mikhail Y.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract. In order to identify the optimal imaging conditions for the highest spatial contrast in biological tissue, we explored the properties of a tissue-mimicking phantom as a function of the wavelengths in a broad range of near-infrared spectra (650 to 1600 nm). Our customized multispectral hardware, which featured a scanning transmission microscope and imaging spectrographs equipped with silicon and InGaAs charge-coupled diode array detectors, allowed for direct comparison of the Michelson contrast obtained from a phantom composed of a honeycomb grid, Intralipid, and India ink. The measured contrast depended on the size of the grid, luminance, and the wavelength of measurements. We demonstrated that at low thickness of the phantom, a reasonable contrast of the objects can be achieved at any wavelength between 700 and 1400 nm and between 1500 and 1600 nm. At larger thicknesses, such contrast can be achieved mostly between 1200 and 1350 nm. These results suggest that distinguishing biological features in deep tissue and developing contrast agents for in vivo may benefit from imaging in this spectral range. PMID:25104414

  14. Chemical analyses of soil samples collected from the Sandia National Laboratories/NM, Tonopah Test Range environs, 1994-2005.

    SciTech Connect

    Deola, Regina Anne; Oldewage, Hans D.; Herrera, Heidi M.; Miller, Mark Laverne

    2006-05-01

    From 1994 through 2005, the Environmental Management Department of Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) at the Tonopah Test Range (TTR), NV, has collected soil samples at numerous locations on-site, on the perimeter, and off-site for the purpose of determining potential impacts to the environs from operations at TTR. These samples were submitted to an analytical laboratory of metal-in-soil analyses. Intercomparisons of these results were then made to determine if there was any statistical difference between on-site, perimeter, and off-site samples, or if there were increasing or decreasing trends which indicated that further investigation may be warranted. This work provided the SNL Environmental Management Department with a sound baseline data reference against which to compare future operational impacts. In addition, it demonstrates the commitment that the Laboratories have to go beyond mere compliance to achieve excellence in its operations. This data is presented in graphical format with narrative commentaries on particular items of interest.

  15. Spectral emission properties of a laser-produced plasma light source in the sub-200 nm range for wafer inspection applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gambino, Nadia; Rollinger, Bob; Hudgins, Duane; Abhari, Reza S.

    2015-07-01

    The spectral emission properties of a droplet-based laser-produced plasma are investigated in the vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) range. Measurements are performed with a spectrograph that operates from 30 to 180 nm with a spectral resolution of 0.1 nm. The emission spectra are recorded for different metal droplet targets, namely tin, indium, and gallium. Measurements were performed at different pressure levels of the background gas. Several characteristic emission lines are observed. The spectra are also calibrated in intensity in terms of spectral radiance to allow absolute emission power estimations from the light source in the VUV region. The presented experimental results are relevant for alternative light sources that would be needed for future wafer inspection tools. In addition, the experimental results help to determine the out-of-band radiation emission of a tin-based extreme ultraviolet (EUV) source. By tuning the type of fuel, the laser energies, and the background gas, the laser-produced plasma light source shows good capabilities to be operated as a light source that covers a spectral emission range from the EUV to the sub-200 nm range.

  16. Kayenta v. 1.0

    2009-06-09

    The Kayenta material model (previously named the Sandia GeoModel, see The Sandia GeoModel Theory and User's Guide, by A.F. Fossum and R.M. Brannon, Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, NM, 2004, SAND2004-3226) is a unified general-purpose constitutive model that can predict material response over a wide range of material properties and strain rates. The model strikes a balance between first-principles micro-mechanics and phenomenological, homogenized, and semi-empirical modeling strategies. Being a unified theory, the model can simultaneously modelmore » multiple failure mechanisms, or it can duplicate simpler idealized yield models such as classic Von Mises plasticity and Mohr-Coulomb failure. Since publication of the GeoModel Theory and User's Guide the model has been extended to support material softening and failure, as well as thermodynamic effects. These extensions have generalized the application space of the model, and it is now capable of accurately modeling metals and metal-like materials in addition to rocks and rock-like materials.« less

  17. A wide range ultra-low power Phase-Locked Loop with automatic frequency setting in 130 nm CMOS technology for data serialisation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Firlej, M.; Fiutowski, T.; Idzik, M.; Moroń, J.; Świentek, K.

    2015-12-01

    The design and measurements results of a wide frequency range ultra-low power Phase-Locked Loop (PLL) for applications in readout systems of particle physics detectors are presented. The PLL was fabricated in a 130 nm CMOS technology. To allow the implementation of different data serialisation schemes multiple division factors (6, 8, 10, 16) were implemented in the PLL feedback loop. The main PLL block—VCO works in 16 frequency ranges/modes, switched either manually or automatically. A dedicated automatic frequency mode switching circuit was developed to allow simple frequency tuning. Although the PLL was designed and simulated for a frequency range of 30 MHz-3 GHz, due to the SLVS interface limits, the measurements were done only up to 1.3 GHz. The full PLL functionality was experimentally verified, confirming a very low and frequency scalable power consumption (0.7 mW at 1 GHz).

  18. Simulation of laser propagation through a three-layer human skin model in the spectral range from 1000 to 1900 nm.

    PubMed

    Nasouri, Babak; Murphy, Thomas E; Berberoglu, Halil

    2014-01-01

    For understanding the mechanisms of low-level laser/light therapy (LLLT), accurate knowledge of light interaction with tissue is necessary. We present a three-dimensional, multilayer reduced-variance Monte Carlo simulation tool for studying light penetration and absorption in human skin. Local profiles of light penetration and volumetric absorption were calculated for uniform as well as Gaussian profile beams with different spreads over the spectral range from 1000 to 1900 nm. The results showed that lasers within this wavelength range could be used to effectively and safely deliver energy to specific skin layers as well as achieve large penetration depths for treating deep tissues, without causing skin damage. In addition, by changing the beam profile from uniform to Gaussian, the local volumetric dosage could increase as much as three times for otherwise similar lasers. We expect that this tool along with the results presented will aid researchers in selecting wavelength and laser power in LLLT.

  19. Simulation of laser propagation through a three-layer human skin model in the spectral range from 1000 to 1900 nm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nasouri, Babak; Murphy, Thomas E.; Berberoglu, Halil

    2014-07-01

    For understanding the mechanisms of low-level laser/light therapy (LLLT), accurate knowledge of light interaction with tissue is necessary. We present a three-dimensional, multilayer reduced-variance Monte Carlo simulation tool for studying light penetration and absorption in human skin. Local profiles of light penetration and volumetric absorption were calculated for uniform as well as Gaussian profile beams with different spreads over the spectral range from 1000 to 1900 nm. The results showed that lasers within this wavelength range could be used to effectively and safely deliver energy to specific skin layers as well as achieve large penetration depths for treating deep tissues, without causing skin damage. In addition, by changing the beam profile from uniform to Gaussian, the local volumetric dosage could increase as much as three times for otherwise similar lasers. We expect that this tool along with the results presented will aid researchers in selecting wavelength and laser power in LLLT.

  20. Seed-Mediated Synthesis of Ag Nanocubes with Controllable Edge Lengths in the Range of 30–200 nm and Comparison of Their Optical Properties

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Qiang; Li, Weiyang; Moran, Christine; Zeng, Jie; Chen, Jingyi; Wen, Long-Ping; Xia, Younan

    2010-01-01

    Silver nanocubes with edge lengths controllable in the range of 30–200 nm were synthesized using an approach based on seeded growth. The key to the success of this synthesis is the use of single-crystal Ag seeds to direct the growth and the use of AgNO3 as a precursor to elemental Ag where the by-product HNO3 can block both the homogeneous nucleation and evolution of single-crystal seeds into twinned nanoparticles. Either spherical (in the shape of cubooctahedron) or cubic seeds could be employed for this growth process. The edge length of resultant Ag nanocubes can be readily controlled by varying the amount of Ag seeds used, the amount of AgNO3 added, or both. For the first time, we could obtain Ag nanocubes with uniform edge lengths controllable in the range of 30–200 nm and then compare their localized surface plasmon resonance and surface-enhanced Raman scattering properties. PMID:20698704

  1. Thermal coagulation-induced changes of the optical properties of normal and adenomatous human colon tissues in vitro in the spectral range 400 1100 nm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ao, Huilan; Xing, Da; Wei, Huajiang; Gu, Huaimin; Wu, Guoyong; Lu, Jianjun

    2008-04-01

    The absorption coefficients, the reduced scattering coefficients and the optical penetration depths for native and coagulated human normal and adenomatous colon tissues in vitro were determined over the range of 400-1100 nm using a spectrophotometer with an internal integrating sphere system, and the inverse adding-doubling method was applied to calculate the tissue optical properties from diffuse reflectance and total transmittance measurements. The experimental results showed that in the range of 400-1100 nm there were larger absorption coefficients (P < 0.01) and smaller reduced scattering coefficients (P < 0.01) for adenomatous colon tissues than for normal colon tissues, and there were smaller optical penetration depths for adenomatous colon tissues than for normal colon tissues, especially in the near-infrared wavelength. Thermal coagulation induced significant increase of the absorption coefficients and reduced scattering coefficients for the normal and adenomatous colon tissues, and significantly reduced decrease of the optical penetration depths for the normal and adenomatous colon tissues. The smaller optical penetration depth for coagulated adenomatous colon tissues is a disadvantage for laser-induced thermotherapy (LITT) and photodynamic therapy (PDT). It is necessary to adjust the application parameters of lasers to achieve optimal therapy.

  2. CCAIN, Version 1.0

    2005-05-26

    CCAIN, Version 1.0 Date: 06/15/2005 This software is an instantiation of Common Component Architecture (CCA) framework written in C. The framework is used to compose (create, register, destroy) C, C++, and Fortran components into a running CCA application. Language bindings are provided for F90 and F03 to allow codes in these languages to interface with the framework.

  3. Influence of polymer packaging films on hyperspectral imaging data in the visible-near-infrared (450-950 nm) wavelength range.

    PubMed

    Gowen, A A; O'Donnell, C P; Esquerre, C; Downey, G

    2010-03-01

    Hyperspectral imaging (HSI) has recently emerged as a useful tool for quality analysis of consumer goods (e.g., food and pharmaceutical products). These products are typically packaged in polymeric film prior to distribution; however, HSI experiments are typically carried out on such samples ex-packaging (either prior to or after removal from packaging). This research examines the effects of polymer packaging films (polyvinyl chloride (PVC) and polyethylene terephthalate (PET)) on spectral and spatial features of HSI data in order to investigate the potential of HSI for quality evaluation of packaged goods. The effects of packaging film were studied for hyperspectral images of samples obtained in the visible-near-infrared (Vis-NIR, i.e., 450-950 nm) wavelength range, which is relevant to many food, agricultural, and pharmaceutical products. The dominant influence of the films tested in this wavelength range could be attributed to light scattering. Relative position of the light source, film, and detector were shown to be highly influential on the scattering effects observed. Detection of features on samples imaged through film was shown to be possible after some data preprocessing. This suggests that quality analysis of products packaged in polymer film is feasible using HSI. These findings would be useful in the development of quality monitoring tools for consumer products post-packaging using HSI.

  4. Optical properties measurement of laser coagulated tissues with double integrating sphere and inverse Monte Carlo technique in the wavelength range from 350 to 2100 nm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Honda, Norihiro; Nanjo, Takuya; Ishii, Katsunori; Awazu, Kunio

    2012-03-01

    In laser medicine, the accurate knowledge about the optical properties (absorption coefficient; μa, scattering coefficient; μs, anisotropy factor; g) of laser irradiated tissues is important for the prediction of light propagation in tissues, since the efficacy of laser treatment depends on the photon propagation within the irradiated tissues. Thus, it is likely that the optical properties of tissues at near-ultraviolet, visible and near-infrared wavelengths will be more important due to more biomedical applications of lasers will be developed. For improvement of the laser induced thermotherapy, the optical property change during laser treatment should be considered in the wide wavelength range. For estimation of the optical properties of the biological tissues, the optical properties measurement system with a double integrating sphere setup and an inverse Monte Carlo technique was developed. The optical properties of chicken muscle tissue were measured in the native state and after laser coagulation using the optical properties measurement system in the wavelength range from 350 to 2100 nm. A CO2 laser was used for laser coagulation. After laser coagulation, the reduced scattering coefficient of the tissue increased. And, the optical penetration depth decreased. For improvement of the treatment depth during laser coagulation, a quantitative procedure using the treated tissue optical properties for determination of the irradiation power density following light penetration decrease might be important in clinic.

  5. Ultrahigh wavelength range (300nm-2μm) polarization-independent 500gs/s single-shot pulse, all-optical real time oscilloscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gleyze, Jean-François; Hocquet, Steve; Monnier Bourdin, Dominique; Le Boudec, Patrice; Arnaud, Romain; Chassagne, Bruno; Jolly, Alain; Penninckx, Denis

    2014-03-01

    The development of ultra-broadband oscilloscopes is mainly governed by the needs of future telecom networks. But other applications are requesting the availability of true real-time acquisition oscilloscopes. Systems able to be used in single-shot operation are of prime interest for Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) and for the related R&D for plasma physics. We previously demonstrate a single-shot, 100GHz design of an all-optical sampling oscilloscope at 1μm (MULO). This laboratory system has been improved in stability and compactness to make an all-in-one box prototype. More, by the addition of an opto-electro-optics (OEO) sub-system at the input, we developed the ability to use this oscilloscope to analyze an electrical input signal up to 60GHz. This new integrated subset also increases the range of wavelength for optical input signal, from 300nm up to 2μm. Furthermore, it allows the use of inexpensive opto-electronic components at telecom wavelength for this system regardless of the signal to be analysed. In parallel with these improvements, by optimizing the heart of the system, we get a very high sampling rate, up to 500Gs/s and more; this allows considering much higher bandwidths in the future. In this talk, we will present latest developments and integration of this system. It will also allow us to give more details on the innovative OEO sub-system.

  6. Ultrafast laser with an average power of 120 W at 515 nm and a highly dynamic repetition rate in the MHz range for novel applications in micromachining

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harth, F.; Piontek, M. C.; Herrmann, T.; L'huillier, J. A.

    2016-03-01

    A new generation of resonant scanners in the kHz-range shows ultra-high deflection speeds of more than 1000m/s but suffer from an inherent nonlinear mirror oscillation. If this oscillation is not compensated, a typical bitmap, written point by point, would be strongly distorted because of the decreasing spot distance at the turning point of the scanning mirror. However, this can be avoided by a dynamic adaption of the repetition rate (RR) of the ultrafast laser. Since resonant scanners are operated in the 10 kHz-range, this means that the RR has to be continuously swept up to several 10 000 times per second between e.g. 5MHz and 10 MHz. High-speed continuous adaption of the RR could also optimize laser micromachining of narrow curved geometries, where nowadays a time consuming approximation with numerous vectors is required. We present a laser system, which is capable of sweeping the RR more than 32 000 times per second between 5MHz and 10MHz at an average output power of more than 120W at 515nm with a pulse duration of about 40 ps. The laser consists of a semiconductor oscillator, a 3-stage fiber pre-amplifier, a solid state InnoSlab power amplifier and a SHG stage. We systematically analyzed the dynamic of the laser system as well as the spectral and temporal behavior of the optical pulses. Switching the repetition rate typically causes a varying pulse energy, which could affect the machining quality over one scanning line. This effect will be analyzed and discussed. Possible techniques to compensate or avoid this effect will be considered.

  7. Gibraltar v 1.0

    2009-11-18

    Gibraltar is a library and associated test suite which performs Reed-Solomon coding and decoding of data buffers using graphics processing units which support NVIDIA's CUDA technology. This library is used to generate redundant data allowing for recovery of lost information. For example, a user can generate m new blocks of data from n original blocks, distributing those pieces over n+m devices. If any m devices fail, the contents of those devices can be recovered frommore » the contents of the other n devices, even if some of the original blocks are lost. This is a generalized description of RAID, a technique for increasing data storage speed and size.« less

  8. White light tunable emissions from ZnS: Eu3+ nanophosphors over 330-465 nm excitation range for white LED applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahemen, I.; De, D. K.; Dejene, F. B.; Viana, B.

    2016-04-01

    (ZnS: Eu3+ - CMC) nanophosphors of cubic (zinc blende) structure were synthesized using a precipitation technique with doping concentrations of Eu3+ ions 1 mol% and 5 mol%. The crystal sizes were 2.56 nm and 2.91 nm respectively. Annealing at 300 °C in a sulfur-rich atmosphere altered the crystal size to 4.35 nm and 3.65 nm respectively and the band gap from 4.2 eV to 3.76 eV and 3.81 eV respectively. The as-synthesized samples gave pure orange-red emission when excited at wavelengths of 394 nm and 465 nm. After thermal annealing of the samples, a broad emission band in the blue-green region assigned to defect related states emerged or were enhanced. Also enhanced were the emission lines of Eu3+ ions in the orange-red region. A combination of these two transitions gave white light of different shades (recorded on the CIE 1931 chromaticity diagram) from cool white through day-light to warm white light, depending on Eu3+ concentration and the excitation wavelengths (UV-330 to blue 465 nm), thus showing great potential of these nano-phosphors in the generation of high quality white light.

  9. Generation of high-power femtosecond supercontinua in the near-IR spectral range using broadband parametric frequency conversion in LBO and DCDA crystals pumped at λ = 620 nm

    SciTech Connect

    Podshivalov, A A; Sidorov-Biryukov, D A; Potemkin, F V

    2014-09-30

    The pump wavelength of parametric amplifiers based on CLBO, DCDA and LBO crystals and pumped by the second harmonic of a femtosecond Cr : forsterite laser (620 nm) is close to optimal for broadband amplification because of the proximity of group velocities of interacting pulses. Injection of a broadband continuum into the range of the signal-wave gain in LBO and DCDA parametric amplifiers, pumped at λ = 620 nm, leads to generation of broadband femtosecond pulses with a spectrum ranging from 1050 to 1600 nm and peak powers up to 20 MW. (nonlinear optical phenomena)

  10. Wavelength-resolved optical extinction measurements of aerosols using broad-band cavity-enhanced absorption spectroscopy over the spectral range of 445-480 nm.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Weixiong; Dong, Meili; Chen, Weidong; Gu, Xuejun; Hu, Changjin; Gao, Xiaoming; Huang, Wei; Zhang, Weijun

    2013-02-19

    Despite the significant progress in the measurements of aerosol extinction and absorption using spectroscopy approaches such as cavity ring-down spectroscopy (CRDS) and photoacoustic spectroscopy (PAS), the widely used single-wavelength instruments may suffer from the interferences of gases absorption present in the real environment. A second instrument for simultaneous measurement of absorbing gases is required to characterize the effect of light extinction resulted from gases absorption. We present in this paper the development of a blue light-emitting diode (LED)-based incoherent broad-band cavity-enhanced spectroscopy (IBBCEAS) approach for broad-band measurements of wavelength-resolved aerosol extinction over the spectral range of 445-480 nm. This method also allows for simultaneous measurement of trace gases absorption present in the air sample using the same instrument. On the basis of the measured wavelength-dependent aerosol extinction cross section, the real part of the refractive index (RI) can be directly retrieved in a case where the RI does not vary strongly with the wavelength over the relevant spectral region. Laboratory-generated monodispersed aerosols, polystyrene latex spheres (PSL) and ammonium sulfate (AS), were employed for validation of the RI determination by IBBCEAS measurements. On the basis of a Mie scattering model, the real parts of the aerosol RI were retrieved from the measured wavelength-resolved extinction cross sections for both aerosol samples, which are in good agreement with the reported values. The developed IBBCEAS instrument was deployed for simultaneous measurements of aerosol extinction coefficient and NO(2) concentration in ambient air in a suburban site during two representative days. PMID:23320530

  11. Effect of GaAsP barrier layers on the parameters of InGaAs/AlGaAs laser diodes emitting in the 1050-1100-nm spectral range

    SciTech Connect

    Duraev, V P; Marmalyuk, Aleksandr A; Padalitsa, A A; Petrovskii, A V; Ryaboshtan, Yu L; Sumarokov, M A; Sukharev, A V

    2005-10-31

    To improve the parameters of laser diodes emitting in the 1000-1070-nm spectral range and develop highly efficient laser diodes emitting in the 1070-1100-nm range, it is proposed to introduce GaAsP barrier layers into the active region of the quantum-well InGaAs/AlGaAs heterostructure, which compensate for enhanced mechanical stresses. This considerably improves the luminescence characteristics of heterostructures and changes conditions for generating misfit dislocations. The long-wavelength lasing at 1100 nm becomes possible due to an increase in the thickness of quantum wells and in the molar fraction of InAs in them. The manufactured laser diodes emitting in the 1095-1100-nm range have low threshold currents, the high output power and high reliability. (lasers)

  12. Poblano v 1.0

    2009-12-11

    Poblano is a Matlab toolbox of large-scale algorithms for nonlinear optimization. The algorithms in Poblano require only first-order derivative information (e.g., gradients for scalar-valued objective functions), and therefore can scale to very large problems [6].Poblano is a set of general purpose methods for solving unconstrained nonlinear optimization methods. It has been applied to standard test problems covering a range of application areas. The driving application for Poblano development has been tensor decompositions in data analysismore » applications (bibliometric analysis, social network analysis, chemometrics, etc.) [1].« less

  13. UV spectroscopy of Titan's atmosphere, planetary organic chemistry and prebiological synthesis. II - Interpretation of new IUE observations in the 220-335 nm range

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Courtin, Regis; Wagener, Richard; Mckay, Christopher P.; Caldwell, John; Fricke, Karl-Heinrich

    1991-01-01

    The theoretical model developed by McKay et al. (1989) to characterize the size distribution, thermal structure, and chemical composition of the stratospheric haze of Titan is applied to new 220-335-nm albedo measurements obtained with the long-wavelength prime camera of the IUE during August 1987. Data and model predictions are presented in extensive graphs and discussed in detail. It is shown that a simple model with particles of one size at a given altitude does not accurately reproduce the observed features in all spectral regions, but that good general agreement is obtained using a model with a uniformly mixed layer at 150-600 km and a bimodal distribution of small 'polymer' haze particles (radius less than 20 nm) and larger haze particles (radius 100-500 nm). The number densities implied by this model require, however, a mechanism such as electrostatic charging or reaction kinetics to inhibit coagulation of the smaller particles.

  14. 31 CFR 1.10 - Oral information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Oral information. 1.10 Section 1.10... Disclosure Provisions § 1.10 Oral information. (a) Officers and employees of the Department may, in response to requests, orally provide information contained in records of the Department that are determined...

  15. 7 CFR 1.10 - Search services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Search services. 1.10 Section 1.10 Agriculture Office of the Secretary of Agriculture ADMINISTRATIVE REGULATIONS Official Records § 1.10 Search services. Search services are services of agency personnel—clerical or professional—used in trying to find...

  16. 7 CFR 1.10 - Search services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Search services. 1.10 Section 1.10 Agriculture Office of the Secretary of Agriculture ADMINISTRATIVE REGULATIONS Official Records § 1.10 Search services. Search services are services of agency personnel—clerical or professional—used in trying to find...

  17. 7 CFR 1.10 - Search services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Search services. 1.10 Section 1.10 Agriculture Office of the Secretary of Agriculture ADMINISTRATIVE REGULATIONS Official Records § 1.10 Search services. Search services are services of agency personnel—clerical or professional—used in trying to find...

  18. 7 CFR 1.10 - Search services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Search services. 1.10 Section 1.10 Agriculture Office of the Secretary of Agriculture ADMINISTRATIVE REGULATIONS Official Records § 1.10 Search services. Search services are services of agency personnel—clerical or professional—used in trying to find...

  19. 7 CFR 1.10 - Search services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Search services. 1.10 Section 1.10 Agriculture Office of the Secretary of Agriculture ADMINISTRATIVE REGULATIONS Official Records § 1.10 Search services. Search services are services of agency personnel—clerical or professional—used in trying to find...

  20. Photodissociation of van der Waals clusters of isoprene with oxygen, C5H8-O2, in the wavelength range 213-277 nm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vidma, Konstantin V.; Frederix, Pim W. J. M.; Parker, David H.; Baklanov, Alexey V.

    2012-08-01

    The speed and angular distribution of O atoms arising from the photofragmentation of C5H8-O2, the isoprene-oxygen van der Waals complex, in the wavelength region of 213-277 nm has been studied with the use of a two-color dissociation-probe method and the velocity map imaging technique. Dramatic enhancement in the O atoms photo-generation cross section in comparison with the photodissociation of individual O2 molecules has been observed. Velocity map images of these "enhanced" O atoms consisted of five channels, different in their kinetic energy, angular distribution, and wavelength dependence. Three channels are deduced to be due to the one-quantum excitation of the C5H8-O2 complex into the perturbed Herzberg III state (3Δu) of O2. This excitation results in the prompt dissociation of the complex giving rise to products C5H8+O+O when the energy of exciting quantum is higher than the complex photodissociation threshold, which is found to be 41740 ± 200 cm-1 (239.6±1.2 nm). This last threshold corresponds to the photodissociation giving rise to an unexcited isoprene molecule. The second channel, with threshold shifted to the blue by 1480 ± 280 cm-1, corresponds to dissociation with formation of rovibrationally excited isoprene. A third channel was observed at wavelengths up to 243 nm with excitation below the upper photodissociation threshold. This channel is attributed to dissociation with the formation of a bound O atom C5H8-O2 + hv → C5H8-O2(3Δu) → C5H8O + O and/or to dissociation of O2 with borrowing of the lacking energy from incompletely cooled complex internal degrees of freedom C5H8*-O2 + hv → C5H8*-O2(3Δu) → C5H8 + O + O. The kinetic energy of the O atoms arising in two other observed channels corresponds to O atoms produced by photodissociation of molecular oxygen in the excited a 1Δg and b ^1 Σ _g^ + singlet states as the precursors. This indicates the formation of singlet oxygen O2(a 1Δg) and O2({b }^1 Σ _g^ +) after excitation of the C5

  1. Structural homogeneity of nanocrystalline VT1-0 titanium. Low-temperature micromechanical properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rusakova, A. V.; Lubenets, S. V.; Fomenko, L. S.; Moskalenko, V. A.

    2012-10-01

    The microhardness of samples of VT1-0 titanium with grain sizes ranging from 35 nm to 10 μm is measured at temperatures of 77-300 K. Nanocrystalline samples produced by rolling at low temperatures are found to be quite homogeneous, and their structure is stable with respect to thermal and mechanical interactions. The interrelationship between microhardness and grain size is well described by the Hall-Petch relationship, the parameters of which depend on temperature. Data on the temperature dependence of the microhardness and the Hall-Petch coefficient indicate that the microplastic deformation is of a thermally activated, dislocation character, regardless of grain size.

  2. Repair of non-dimer DNA damages in ICB 2A frog cells exposed to solar-ultraviolet radiation in the UVB (290-320 nm) range

    SciTech Connect

    Chao, C.C.K.

    1985-01-01

    The purpose of the research described in this dissertation was to investigate the repair and cellular consequences of non-dimer DNA damages induced by solar-UV irradiation of cultured I CR 2A (Rana pipiens) frog cells. Because this cell line is proficient in enzymatic photoreactivation, it was possible to induce a relatively pure population of non-dimer DNA photoproducts by exposure of cells to the Mylar-filtered solar-UV wavelengths produced by a fluorescent sunlamp followed by treatment with photoreactivating light. With a modification of bromodeoxyuridine photolysis assay, it was found that the solar-UV-induced non-dimer DNA damages were repaired by a short-patch repair mechanism in which less than 20 nucleotides were inserted into a repaired region. Similar results were also obtained for ..gamma..-irradiated cells. In contrast, excision repair of 254 nm-induced dimers was accomplished by a long-patch process in which an average of about 180 nucleotides were inserted into the repaired sites. A mutant cell line, DRP 36, hypersensitive to non-dimer DNA damages, was isolated from I CR 2A cells. It was found that the DRP 36 cells performed a significantly lower level of excision repair following the induction of non-dimer DNA damages. The results are consistent with the conclusion that the DRP 36 cells are deficient in the repair of at least one type of solar-UV-induced non-dimer DNA lesion. These experiments indicate that solar-UV-induced non-dimer DNA photoproducts behave more like the photoproducts of ..gamma..-rays than those of far-UV radiation, which are primarily pyrimidine dimers.

  3. 36 CFR 1.10 - Symbolic signs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Symbolic signs. 1.10 Section... PROVISIONS § 1.10 Symbolic signs. (a) The signs pictured below provide general information and regulatory guidance in park areas. Certain of the signs designate activities that are either allowed or...

  4. 36 CFR 1.10 - Symbolic signs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Symbolic signs. 1.10 Section... PROVISIONS § 1.10 Symbolic signs. (a) The signs pictured below provide general information and regulatory guidance in park areas. Certain of the signs designate activities that are either allowed or...

  5. 36 CFR 1.10 - Symbolic signs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Symbolic signs. 1.10 Section... PROVISIONS § 1.10 Symbolic signs. (a) The signs pictured below provide general information and regulatory guidance in park areas. Certain of the signs designate activities that are either allowed or...

  6. 36 CFR 1.10 - Symbolic signs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Symbolic signs. 1.10 Section... PROVISIONS § 1.10 Symbolic signs. (a) The signs pictured below provide general information and regulatory guidance in park areas. Certain of the signs designate activities that are either allowed or...

  7. 36 CFR 1.10 - Symbolic signs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Symbolic signs. 1.10 Section... PROVISIONS § 1.10 Symbolic signs. (a) The signs pictured below provide general information and regulatory guidance in park areas. Certain of the signs designate activities that are either allowed or...

  8. Linear and nonlinear transmission of Fe{sup 2+}-doped ZnSe crystals at a wavelength of 2940 nm in the temperature range 20–220 °C

    SciTech Connect

    Il'ichev, N N; Pashinin, P P; Gulyamova, E S; Bufetova, G A; Shapkin, P V; Nasibov, A S

    2014-03-28

    The linear and nonlinear transmission of Fe{sup 2+}:ZnSe crystals is measured at a wavelength of 2940 nm in the temperature range 20 – 220 °C. It is found that, with increasing temperature from 20 °C to 150 – 220 °C, the transmission of Fe{sup 2+}:ZnSe crystals decreases in the case of incident radiation with an intensity of ∼5.5 MW cm{sup -2} and increases in the case of radiation with an intensity of 28 kW cm{sup -2}. At a temperature of 220 °C, the linear transmission almost coincides with the nonlinear transmission. The transmission spectra of Fe{sup 2+}:ZnSe crystals at temperatures of 22 and 220 °C in the wavelength range 500 – 7000 nm are presented. (active media)

  9. Enhancement of Spatial Thinking with Virtual Spaces 1.0

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hauptman, Hanoch

    2010-01-01

    Developing a software environment to enhance 3D geometric proficiency demands the consideration of theoretical views of the learning process. Simultaneously, this effort requires taking into account the range of tools that technology offers, as well as their limitations. In this paper, we report on the design of Virtual Spaces 1.0 software, a…

  10. Insider Alert 1.0 Beta Version

    2004-02-01

    Insider Alert 1.0 Beta Version supports interactive selection and graphical display of data generated by the Sandia Cognitive Framework, which simulates the examination of security data by experts of various specialties. Insider Alert also encompasses the configuration and data files input to the Cognitive Framework for this application. Insider Alert 1.0 Beta Version is a computer program for analyzing data indicative of possible espionage or improper handling of data by employees at Sandia National Laboratoriesmore » (or other facilities with comparable policies and procedures for managing sensitive information) It prioritizes and displays information for review by security analysts.« less

  11. L1(0)-FePd nanocluster wires by template-directed thermal decomposition and subsequent hydrogen reduction

    SciTech Connect

    Cui, BZ; Marinescu, M; Liu, JF

    2013-12-14

    This paper reports the nanostructure, formation mechanism, and magnetic properties of tetragonal L1(0)-type Fe55Pd45 (at. %) nanocluster wires (NCWs) fabricated by thermal decomposition of metal nitrates and subsequent hydrogen reduction in nanoporous anodized aluminum oxide templates. The as-synthesized NCWs have diameters in the range of 80-300 nm, and lengths in the range of 0.5-10 mu m. The NCWs are composed of roughly round-shaped nanoclusters in the range of 3-30 nm in size and a weighted average size of 10 nm with a mixture of single-crystal and poly-crystalline structures. The obtained intrinsic coercivity H-i(c) of 3.32 kOe at room temperature for the tetragonal Fe55Pd45 NCWs is higher than those of electrodeposited Fe-Pd solid nanowires while among the highest values reported so far for L1(0)-type FePd nanoparticles. (C) 2013 AIP Publishing LLC.

  12. Design of a self-aligned, wide temperature range (300 mK-300 K) atomic force microscope/magnetic force microscope with 10 nm magnetic force microscope resolution

    SciTech Connect

    Karcı, Özgür; Dede, Münir

    2014-10-01

    We describe the design of a wide temperature range (300 mK-300 K) atomic force microscope/magnetic force microscope with a self-aligned fibre-cantilever mechanism. An alignment chip with alignment groves and a special mechanical design are used to eliminate tedious and time consuming fibre-cantilever alignment procedure for the entire temperature range. A low noise, Michelson fibre interferometer was integrated into the system for measuring deflection of the cantilever. The spectral noise density of the system was measured to be ~12 fm/√Hz at 4.2 K at 3 mW incident optical power. Abrikosov vortices in BSCCO(2212) single crystal sample and a high density hard disk sample were imaged at 10 nm resolution to demonstrate the performance of the system.

  13. Design of a self-aligned, wide temperature range (300 mK-300 K) atomic force microscope/magnetic force microscope with 10 nm magnetic force microscope resolution.

    PubMed

    Karcı, Özgür; Dede, Münir; Oral, Ahmet

    2014-10-01

    We describe the design of a wide temperature range (300 mK-300 K) atomic force microscope/magnetic force microscope with a self-aligned fibre-cantilever mechanism. An alignment chip with alignment groves and a special mechanical design are used to eliminate tedious and time consuming fibre-cantilever alignment procedure for the entire temperature range. A low noise, Michelson fibre interferometer was integrated into the system for measuring deflection of the cantilever. The spectral noise density of the system was measured to be ∼12 fm/√Hz at 4.2 K at 3 mW incident optical power. Abrikosov vortices in BSCCO(2212) single crystal sample and a high density hard disk sample were imaged at 10 nm resolution to demonstrate the performance of the system. PMID:25362401

  14. The LITHO1.0 Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pasyanos, M.; Masters, G.; Laske, G.; Ma, Z.

    2014-12-01

    We have developed LITHO1.0, a 1 degree model of the crust and uppermost mantle of the Earth which extends into the upper mantle to include the lithospheric lid and underlying asthenosphere. A description of the model and details of its construction were recently published in JGR (Pasyanos et al., 2014). The model is parameterized laterally by tessellated nodes and vertically as a series of geophysically identified layers, such as water, ice, sediments, crystalline crust, lithospheric lid, and asthenosphere. Model profiles are created by constructing an appropriate starting model and perturbing it to fit high-resolution surface wave dispersion maps (Love and Rayleigh, group and phase) over a wide frequency band (5-40 mHz). We will review the constructed model and compare it to a number of select studies at regional and global scales. We will also discuss avenues for future improvements if time and funding permit. The model and access tools are available to download at http://igppweb.ucsd.edu/~gabi/litho1.0.html. Pasyanos, M.E., T.G. Masters, G. Laske, and Z. Ma (2014). LITHO1.0: An updated crust and lithospheric model of the earth, J. Geophys. Res., 119, doi:10.1002/2013JB010626.

  15. Amesos 1.0 reference guide.

    SciTech Connect

    Sala, Marzio; Stanley, Ken D.

    2004-05-01

    This document describes the main functionalities of the Amesos package, version 1.0. Amesos, available as part of Trilinos 4.0, provides an object-oriented interface to several serial and parallel sparse direct solvers libraries, for the solution of the linear systems of equations A X = B where A is a real sparse, distributed matrix, defined as an EpetraRowMatrix object, and X and B are defined as EpetraMultiVector objects. Amesos provides a common look-and-feel to several direct solvers, insulating the user from each package's details, such as matrix and vector formats, and data distribution.

  16. TSA RPM Simulator 1.0

    2009-12-02

    The software listed here is a simulator for TSA Radiation Portal Monitors with version 1.10.1A firmware. The simulator provides messages similar to those provided by this piece of equipment.To facilitate testing of the Second Line of Defense systems and similar software products from commercial software vendors, this software simulation application has been developed that simulate the TSA Radiation Portal Monitor that Second Line of Defense communications software systems must interface with. The primary use ofmore » this simulator is for testing of both Sandia developed and DOE contractor developed software.« less

  17. LAPACK users` guide: Release 1.0

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, E.; Bai, Z.; Bischof, C.; Demmel, J.; Dongarra, J.; Du Croz, J.; Greenbaum, A.; Hammarling, S.; McKenney, A.; Ostrouchov, S.; Sorensen, D.

    1992-01-31

    LAPACK is a transportable library of Fortran 77 subroutines for solving the most common problems in numerical linear algebra: systems of linear equations, linear least squares problems, eigenvalue problems and singular value problems. LAPACK is designed to supersede LINPACK and EISPACK, principally by restructuring the software to achieve much greater efficiency on vector processors, high-performance ``superscalar`` workstations, and shared-memory multi-processors. LAPACK also adds extra functionality, uses some new or improved algorithms, and integrates the two sets of algorithms into a unified package. The LAPACK Users` Guide gives an informal introduction to the design of the algorithms and software, summarizes the contents of the package, describes conventions used in the software and documentation, and includes complete specifications for calling the routines. This edition of the Users` guide describes Release 1.0 of LAPACK.

  18. Virtual planets atlas 1.0 freeware

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Legrand, C.; Chevalley, P.

    2015-10-01

    Since 2002, we develop the "Virtual Moon Atlas -http://www.ap-i.net/avl/en/start" a freeware to help Moon observing and to improve interest for Moon in general public. VMA freeware has been downloaded near 900000 times all over the world and is or has been used by several professional organizations such as Kitt Peak Observatory, National Japan Observatory, Birkbeck College / University College London (K. Joy), BBC Sky at night, several French astronomy magazines and astronomy writers (P. Harrington, S. French...) . Recommended by ESA, registered as educational software by French ministry for education, it has also yet been presented at 2006 & 2007 LPSC and PCC2 in 2011 We have declined this freeware in a new tool with the same goals, but for the telluric planets and satellites, the "Virtual Planets Atlas (VPA / http://www.ap-i.net/avp/en/start") now in version 1.0.

  19. Productions of I, I{sup *}, and C{sub 2}H{sub 5} in the A-band photodissociation of ethyl iodide in the wavelength range from 245 to 283 nm by using ion-imaging detection

    SciTech Connect

    Tang, Ying; Lee, Wei-Bin; Hu, Zhengfa; Zhang, Bing; Lin, King-Chuen

    2007-02-14

    Photodissociation dynamics of ethyl iodide in the A band has been investigated at several wavelengths between 245 and 283 nm using resonance-enhanced multiphoton ionization technique combined with velocity map ion-imaging detection. The ion images of I, I{sup *}, and C{sub 2}H{sub 5} fragments are analyzed to yield corresponding speed and angular distributions. Two photodissociation channels are found: I(5p {sup 2}P{sub 3/2})+C{sub 2}H{sub 5} (hotter internal states) and I{sup *}(5p {sup 2}P{sub 1/2})+C{sub 2}H{sub 5} (colder). In addition, a competitive ionization dissociation channel, C{sub 2}H{sub 5}I{sup +}+h{nu}{yields}C{sub 2}H{sub 5}+I{sup +}, appears at the wavelengths <266 nm. The I/I{sup *} branching of the dissociation channels may be obtained directly from the C{sub 2}H{sub 5}{sup +} images, yielding the quantum yield of I{sup *} about 0.63-0.76, comparable to the case of CH{sub 3}I. Anisotropy parameters ({beta}) determined for the I{sup *} channel remain at 1.9{+-}0.1 over the wavelength range studied, indicating that the I{sup *} production should originate from the {sup 3}Q{sub 0} state. In contrast, the {beta}(I) values become smaller above 266 nm, comprising two components, direct excitation of {sup 3}Q{sub 1} and nonadiabatic transition between the {sup 3}Q{sub 0} and {sup 1}Q{sub 1} states. The curve crossing probabilities are determined to be 0.24-0.36, increasing with the wavelength. A heavier branched ethyl group does not significantly enhance the I(5p {sup 2}P{sub 3/2}) production from the nonadiabatic contribution, as compared to the case of CH{sub 3}I.

  20. Cpp Utility - Version 1.0

    SciTech Connect

    III, FredOppel; Rigdon, J. Brian

    2014-09-08

    A collection of general Umbra modules that are reused by other Umbra libraries. These capabilities include line segments, file utilities, color utilities, string utilities (for std::string), list utilities (for std ::vector ), bounding box intersections, range limiters, simple filters, cubic roots solvers and a few other utilities.

  1. Cpp Utility - Version 1.0

    2014-09-08

    A collection of general Umbra modules that are reused by other Umbra libraries. These capabilities include line segments, file utilities, color utilities, string utilities (for std::string), list utilities (for std ::vector ), bounding box intersections, range limiters, simple filters, cubic roots solvers and a few other utilities.

  2. Spectral domain optical coherence tomography of multi-MHz A-scan rates at 1310 nm range and real-time 4D-display up to 41 volumes/second

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Dong-hak; Hiro-Oka, Hideaki; Shimizu, Kimiya; Ohbayashi, Kohji

    2012-01-01

    An ultrafast frequency domain optical coherence tomography system was developed at A-scan rates between 2.5 and 10 MHz, a B-scan rate of 4 or 8 kHz, and volume-rates between 12 and 41 volumes/second. In the case of the worst duty ratio of 10%, the averaged A-scan rate was 1 MHz. Two optical demultiplexers at a center wavelength of 1310 nm were used for linear-k spectral dispersion and simultaneous differential signal detection at 320 wavelengths. The depth-range, sensitivity, sensitivity roll-off by 6 dB, and axial resolution were 4 mm, 97 dB, 6 mm, and 23 μm, respectively. Using FPGAs for FFT and a GPU for volume rendering, a real-time 4D display was demonstrated at a rate up to 41 volumes/second for an image size of 256 (axial) × 128 × 128 (lateral) voxels. PMID:23243560

  3. 28 MHz swept source at 1.0 μm for ultrafast quantitative phase imaging

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Xiaoming; Lau, Andy K. S.; Xu, Yiqing; Tsia, Kevin K.; Wong, Kenneth K. Y.

    2015-01-01

    Emerging high-throughput optical imaging modalities, in particular those providing phase information, necessitate a demanding speed regime (e.g. megahertz sweep rate) for those conventional swept sources; while an effective solution is yet to be demonstrated. We demonstrate a stable breathing laser as inertia-free swept source (BLISS) operating at a wavelength sweep rate of 28 MHz, particularly for the ultrafast interferometric imaging modality at 1.0 μm. Leveraging a tunable dispersion compensation element inside the laser cavity, the wavelength sweep range of BLISS can be tuned from ~10 nm to ~63 nm. It exhibits a good intensity stability, which is quantified by the ratio of standard deviation to the mean of the pulse intensity, i.e. 1.6%. Its excellent wavelength repeatability, <0.05% per sweep, enables the single-shot imaging at an ultrafast line-scan rate without averaging. To showcase its potential applications, it is applied to the ultrafast (28-MHz line-scan rate) interferometric time-stretch (iTS) microscope to provide quantitative morphological information on a biological specimen at a lateral resolution of 1.2 μm. This fiber-based inertia-free swept source is demonstrated to be robust and broadband, and can be applied to other established imaging modalities, such as optical coherence tomography (OCT), of which an axial resolution better than 12 μm can be achieved. PMID:26504636

  4. 28 MHz swept source at 1.0 μm for ultrafast quantitative phase imaging.

    PubMed

    Wei, Xiaoming; Lau, Andy K S; Xu, Yiqing; Tsia, Kevin K; Wong, Kenneth K Y

    2015-10-01

    Emerging high-throughput optical imaging modalities, in particular those providing phase information, necessitate a demanding speed regime (e.g. megahertz sweep rate) for those conventional swept sources; while an effective solution is yet to be demonstrated. We demonstrate a stable breathing laser as inertia-free swept source (BLISS) operating at a wavelength sweep rate of 28 MHz, particularly for the ultrafast interferometric imaging modality at 1.0 μm. Leveraging a tunable dispersion compensation element inside the laser cavity, the wavelength sweep range of BLISS can be tuned from ~10 nm to ~63 nm. It exhibits a good intensity stability, which is quantified by the ratio of standard deviation to the mean of the pulse intensity, i.e. 1.6%. Its excellent wavelength repeatability, <0.05% per sweep, enables the single-shot imaging at an ultrafast line-scan rate without averaging. To showcase its potential applications, it is applied to the ultrafast (28-MHz line-scan rate) interferometric time-stretch (iTS) microscope to provide quantitative morphological information on a biological specimen at a lateral resolution of 1.2 μm. This fiber-based inertia-free swept source is demonstrated to be robust and broadband, and can be applied to other established imaging modalities, such as optical coherence tomography (OCT), of which an axial resolution better than 12 μm can be achieved. PMID:26504636

  5. EDM 1.0: electron direct methods.

    PubMed

    Kilaas, R; Marks, L D; Own, C S

    2005-02-01

    A computer program designed to provide a number of quantitative analysis tools for high-resolution imaging and electron diffraction data is described. The program includes basic image manipulation, both real space and reciprocal space image processing, Wiener-filtering, symmetry averaging, methods for quantification of electron diffraction patterns and two-dimensional direct methods. The program consists of a number of sub-programs written in a combination of C++, C and Fortran. It can be downloaded either as GNU source code or as binaries and has been compiled and verified on a wide range of platforms, both Unix based and PC's. Elements of the design philosophy as well as future possible extensions are described.

  6. Photolysis of light-transforming polymer materials on the basis of europium(III) nitrate with 1,10-phenanthroline and anthranilic acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalinovskaya, I. V.; Zadorozhnaya, A. N.

    2016-09-01

    Light-transforming polymer materials on the basis of europium(III) nitrate with 1,10-phenanthroline and anthranilic acid, having an intense luminescence in the 400-650 nm spectral range, were obtained. It is shown that the photostability of the polymer materials on the basis of the obtained compositions is higher than of polymer materials activated by europium(III) compounds. Luminescent and photochemical characteristics of the obtained polymer compositions are determined by the molar ratio of the dopants: the maximum luminescence intensity and photostability is characteristic for the polymeric material containing europium(III) nitrate with 1,10-phenanthroline and anthranilic acid at a molar ratio of 1: 2.

  7. A comparative assessment of solar thermal electric power plants in the 1-10 MWe range

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosenberg, L. S.; Revere, W. R.

    1981-01-01

    The candidate power system technologies were ranked in terms of the cost of electric energy each system produces. In all cases, it was assumed that development programs would result in mature power plant systems that could be commercially manufactured. The results of the study, a brief description of the systems examined, and the methodologies used are presented.

  8. 41 CFR 60-1.10 - Foreign government practices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Foreign government practices. 60-1.10 Section 60-1.10 Public Contracts and Property Management Other Provisions Relating to... OF LABOR 1-OBLIGATIONS OF CONTRACTORS AND SUBCONTRACTORS Preliminary Matters; Equal...

  9. 16 CFR 1.10 - Advance notice of proposed rulemaking.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... addition to publication of the advance notice, use such additional mechanisms as it considers useful to... 16 Commercial Practices 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Advance notice of proposed rulemaking. 1.10... GENERAL PROCEDURES Rules and Rulemaking Under Section 18(a)(1)(B) of the FTC Act § 1.10 Advance notice...

  10. 16 CFR 1.10 - Advance notice of proposed rulemaking.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... addition to publication of the advance notice, use such additional mechanisms as it considers useful to... 16 Commercial Practices 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Advance notice of proposed rulemaking. 1.10... GENERAL PROCEDURES Rules and Rulemaking Under Section 18(a)(1)(B) of the FTC Act § 1.10 Advance notice...

  11. 16 CFR 1.10 - Advance notice of proposed rulemaking.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... addition to publication of the advance notice, use such additional mechanisms as it considers useful to... 16 Commercial Practices 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Advance notice of proposed rulemaking. 1.10... GENERAL PROCEDURES Rules and Rulemaking Under Section 18(a)(1)(B) of the FTC Act § 1.10 Advance notice...

  12. 16 CFR 1.10 - Advance notice of proposed rulemaking.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... addition to publication of the advance notice, use such additional mechanisms as it considers useful to... 16 Commercial Practices 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Advance notice of proposed rulemaking. 1.10... GENERAL PROCEDURES Rules and Rulemaking Under Section 18(a)(1)(B) of the FTC Act § 1.10 Advance notice...

  13. 16 CFR 1.10 - Advance notice of proposed rulemaking.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... addition to publication of the advance notice, use such additional mechanisms as it considers useful to... 16 Commercial Practices 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Advance notice of proposed rulemaking. 1.10... GENERAL PROCEDURES Rules and Rulemaking Under Section 18(a)(1)(B) of the FTC Act § 1.10 Advance notice...

  14. Data Acquisition Backbone Core DABC release v1.0

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adamczewski-Musch, J.; Essel, H. G.; Kurz, N.; Linev, S.

    2010-04-01

    The Data Acquisition Backbone Core (DABC) is a general purpose software framework designed for the implementation of a wide-range of data acquisition systems - from various small detector test beds to high performance systems. DABC consists of a compact data-flow kernel and a number of plug-ins for various functional components like data inputs, device drivers, user functional modules and applications. DABC provides configurable components for implementing event building over fast networks like InfiniBand or Gigabit Ethernet. A generic Java GUI provides the dynamic control and visualization of control parameters and commands, provided by DIM servers. A first set of application plug-ins has been implemented to use DABC as event builder for the front-end components of the GSI standard DAQ system MBS (Multi Branch System). Another application covers the connection to DAQ readout chains from detector front-end boards (N-XYTER) linked to read-out controller boards (ROC) over UDP into DABC for event building, archiving and data serving. This was applied for data taking in the September 2008 test beamtime for the CBM experiment at GSI. DABC version 1.0 is released and available from the website.

  15. Sub-10 nm nanopantography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Siyuan; Donnelly, Vincent M.; Ruchhoeft, Paul; Economou, Demetre J.

    2015-11-01

    Nanopantography, a massively parallel nanopatterning method over large areas, was previously shown to be capable of printing 10 nm features in silicon, using an array of 1000 nm-diameter electrostatic lenses, fabricated on the substrate, to focus beamlets of a broad area ion beam on selected regions of the substrate. In the present study, using lens dimensional scaling optimized by computer simulation, and reduction in the ion beam image size and energy dispersion, the resolution of nanopantography was dramatically improved, allowing features as small as 3 nm to be etched into Si.

  16. Photodissociation of van der Waals clusters of isoprene with oxygen, C{sub 5}H{sub 8}-O{sub 2}, in the wavelength range 213-277 nm

    SciTech Connect

    Vidma, Konstantin V.; Frederix, Pim W. J. M.; Parker, David H.; Baklanov, Alexey V.

    2012-08-07

    The speed and angular distribution of O atoms arising from the photofragmentation of C{sub 5}H{sub 8}-O{sub 2}, the isoprene-oxygen van der Waals complex, in the wavelength region of 213-277 nm has been studied with the use of a two-color dissociation-probe method and the velocity map imaging technique. Dramatic enhancement in the O atoms photo-generation cross section in comparison with the photodissociation of individual O{sub 2} molecules has been observed. Velocity map images of these 'enhanced' O atoms consisted of five channels, different in their kinetic energy, angular distribution, and wavelength dependence. Three channels are deduced to be due to the one-quantum excitation of the C{sub 5}H{sub 8}-O{sub 2} complex into the perturbed Herzberg III state ({sup 3}{Delta}{sub u}) of O{sub 2}. This excitation results in the prompt dissociation of the complex giving rise to products C{sub 5}H{sub 8}+O+O when the energy of exciting quantum is higher than the complex photodissociation threshold, which is found to be 41740 {+-} 200 cm{sup -1} (239.6{+-}1.2 nm). This last threshold corresponds to the photodissociation giving rise to an unexcited isoprene molecule. The second channel, with threshold shifted to the blue by 1480 {+-} 280 cm{sup -1}, corresponds to dissociation with formation of rovibrationally excited isoprene. A third channel was observed at wavelengths up to 243 nm with excitation below the upper photodissociation threshold. This channel is attributed to dissociation with the formation of a bound O atom C{sub 5}H{sub 8}-O{sub 2}+hv{yields} C{sub 5}H{sub 8}-O{sub 2}({sup 3}{Delta}{sub u}) {yields} C{sub 5}H{sub 8}O + O and/or to dissociation of O{sub 2} with borrowing of the lacking energy from incompletely cooled complex internal degrees of freedom C{sub 5}H{sub 8}{sup *}-O{sub 2}+hv{yields} C{sub 5}H{sub 8}{sup *}-O{sub 2}({sup 3}{Delta}{sub u}) {yields} C{sub 5}H{sub 8}+ O + O. The kinetic energy of the O atoms arising in two other observed channels

  17. Matrix Description of (1,0) Theories in six dimensions

    SciTech Connect

    Aharony, Ofer; Berkooz, Micha; Kachru, Shamit; Silverstein, Eva.

    1997-10-01

    We propose descriptions of interacting (1,0) supersymmetric theories without gravity in six dimensions in the infinite momentum frame. They are based on the large N limit of quantum mechanics or 1+1 dimensional field theories with SO(N) gauge group and four supercharges. We argue that this formulation allows for a concrete description of the chirality-changing phase transitions which connect (1,0) theories with different numbers of tensor multiplets.

  18. Benzene-Water (BZWn (n = 1 - 10)) Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prakash, M.; Samy, K. Gopal; Subramanian, V.

    2009-11-01

    The gas-phase geometries, binding energies (BEs), infrared spectra and electron density parameters of benzene (BZ)-water (W) clusters (BZWn, where n = 1-10) have been calculated using Truhlar's meta hybrid functional, M05-2X, employing 6-31+G** basis set. Both basis set superposition error (BSSE) and zero point energy corrected BEs are in close agreement with the previously reported high level ab initio and experimental values. Among all of the BZWn clusters, the same with inverted book conformer of water hexamer has the highest BE when compared to all other water clusters. The Bader's theory of atoms in molecule (AIM) provides evidence for the presence of O-H···π interactions in all of these clusters. In addition, the roles of C-H···O and lone pair···π (lp···π) interactions in the stabilization of BZWn clusters are also evident from the AIM analysis. The trend in the electron density at the hydrogen bond critical points varies as O-H···π < lp···π < C-H···O. Spectral signatures of these clusters further reinforce the existence of weak H-bond between BZ and Wn clusters. The red shift in all of these clusters ranges from 13 to 95 cm-1. The results clearly show that the presence of π-cloud does not affect the H-bonded network of water clusters except in the case of W6 ring.

  19. Albuquerque, NM, USA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    Albuquerque, NM (35.0N, 106.5W) is situated on the edge of the Rio Grande River and flood plain which cuts across the image. The reddish brown surface of the Albuquerque Basin is a fault depression filled with ancient alluvial fan and lake bed sediments. On the slopes of the Manzano Mountains to the east of Albuquerque, juniper and other timber of the Cibola National Forest can be seen as contrasting dark tones of vegetation.

  20. IDC Use Case Model Survey Version 1.0.

    SciTech Connect

    Carr, Dorthe B.; Harris, James M.

    2014-12-01

    This document contains the brief descriptions for the actors and use cases contained in the IDC Use Case Model Survey. REVISIONS Version Date Author/Team Revision Description Authorized by V1.0 12/2014 IDC Re- engineering Project Team Initial delivery M. Harris

  1. MULTIPLE PROJECTIONS SYSTEM (MPS) - USER'S MANUAL VERSION 1.0

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report is a user's manual for version 1.0 of the Multiple Projections Systems (MPS), a computer system that can perform "what if" scenario analysis and report the final results (i.e., Rate of Further Progress - ROP - inventories) to EPA (i.e., the Aerometric Information Retri...

  2. Quick Overview Scout 2008 Version 1.0

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Scout 2008 version 1.0 statistical software package has been updated from past DOS and Windows versions to provide classical and robust univariate and multivariate graphical and statistical methods that are not typically available in commercial or freeware statistical softwar...

  3. Scout 2008 Version 1.0 User Guide

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Scout 2008 version 1.0 software package provides a wide variety of classical and robust statistical methods that are not typically available in other commercial software packages. A major part of Scout deals with classical, robust, and resistant univariate and multivariate ou...

  4. Synthesis and characterization of a new photoluminescent material, tris-[1-10 phenanthroline] aluminium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Rahul; Dvivedi, Avanish; Bhargava, Parag

    2016-05-01

    A new photoluminescent material namely tris-[1-10 Phenanthroline] Aluminium Al(Phen)3 has been synthesized and characterized. This material was characterized by fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR),nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR),mass spectroscopy, thermal gravimetric analysis (TGA),ultraviolet-visible spectroscopy(UV) and photoluminescence (PL). This material shows thermal stability up to 300°C. This material showed absorption maxima at 352nm which may be attributed to the moderate energy (π-π*) transition. Photoluminescence spectra for this material showed the most intense peak at 423 nm and the time resolved photoluminescence spectra showed two life time components. The decay times of the first and second component were 1.4ns and 4.8 ns respectively.

  5. Geometric structure of Be(10{bar 1}0)

    SciTech Connect

    Hofmann, P. |; Pohl, K. |; Stumpf, R.; Plummer, E.W. |

    1996-05-01

    The structure of clean Be(10{bar 1}0) was determined by low-energy electron-diffraction (LEED) {ital I}({ital V}) analysis and the result compared to first-principles calculations. Both theory and experiment indicate that from the two possible terminations of the truncated bulk, the one with the shorter first-interlayer spacing is realized. The values for the multilayer relaxations obtained by LEED essentially coincide with the theoretical prediction. Although the magnitude of the first- to second-layer relaxation fits well into the trend observed on other simple metal surfaces, the driving force is probably different for beryllium. {copyright} {ital 1996 The American Physical Society.}

  6. geophylobuilder 1.0: an arcgis extension for creating 'geophylogenies'.

    PubMed

    Kidd, David M; Liu, Xianhua

    2008-01-01

    Evolution is inherently a spatiotemporal process; however, despite this, phylogenetic and geographical data and models remain largely isolated from one another. Geographical information systems provide a ready-made spatial modelling, analysis and dissemination environment within which phylogenetic models can be explicitly linked with their associated spatial data and subsequently integrated with other georeferenced data sets describing the biotic and abiotic environment. geophylobuilder 1.0 is an extension for the arcgis geographical information system that builds a 'geophylogenetic' data model from a phylogenetic tree and associated geographical data. Geophylogenetic database objects can subsequently be queried, spatially analysed and visualized in both 2D and 3D within a geographical information systems.

  7. Ultrasensitive and Rapid Determination of Folic Acid Using Ag Nanoparticles Enhanced 1, 10-Phenantroline-Terbium (III) Sensitized Fluorescence.

    PubMed

    Hassanzadeh, Robab; Lotfi, Ali; Bagheri, Nafiseh; Hassanzadeh, Javad

    2016-09-01

    A novel spectrofluorimetric probe based on Ag nanoparticle (AgNPs)-enhanced terbium (III) (Tb) fluorescence was introduced for the sensitive determination of folic acid (FA). The effect of gold and silver nanoparticles in different size was investigated on the well-known Tb sensitized fluorescence emission of 1, 10-phenantroline (Phen). The greatest fluorescence intensity was observed in the presence of AgNPs with a diameter of ~6 nm maybe due to their highest surface area. Furthermore, it's discovered that FA can form Tb-Phen -FA ternary complexes and cause a notable diminution in this enhanced fluorescence system. Based on this finding, a high sensitive and selective method was developed for the determination of FA. Effects of various parameters like Ag NPs, Phen and Tb(3+) concentration and pH of media were investigated. In the optimum circumstances, the fluorescence emission of AgNPs-Phen-Tb collection was declined linearly by increasing the concentration of FA in the range of 0.5 to 110 nmol L(-1). Limits of detection and quantification were achieved to be 0.21 and 0.62 nmol  L(-1), respectively. The method has good linearity, recovery, reproducibility and sensitivity, and was adequately exploited to follow FA content in pharmaceutical, fortified flour and human urine samples.

  8. Hydrogen File Capture v1.0.DLL

    2006-03-28

    Postprocessor for the use with GoldSim commercial software. The program is intended as a DLL for use with a GoldSim model simulation to copy input/output files created during the simulation to a central location on a local LAN. The software is used as part of a modeling package that consists of GoldSim.exe and other external codes linked and executed during a GoldSim model simulation. The FileCapture_v1.0.DLL is used to run Monte Carlo analyses with amore » GoldSim simulation that is executed using the distributed processing module. When distributed processing (i.e., multi-processor run) is used for a GoldSim Model simulation that is comprised of one or more codes linked with the GoldSim.exe, it is sometimes necessary to capture the default input and/or output files generated by the external codes linked with the GoldSim.exe program. Using the input file "FileCapture.In' to list the filenames and path, FileCapture_v1.0.DLL copies the files listed in 'FileCapture.in' from each node on the LAN to a folder called 'FCAP Files' created in the location gie as the path. The DLL will execute for each realization and append 00xxx a number indication which realization the file was generated from.« less

  9. CHEETAH 1.0 user`s manual

    SciTech Connect

    Fried, L.E.

    1994-06-24

    CHEETAH is an effort to bring the TIGER thermochemical code into the 1990s. A wide variety of improvements have been made in Version 1.0, and a host of others will be implemented in the future. In CHEETAH 1.0 I have improved the robustness and ease of use of TIGER. All of TIGER`s solvers have been replaced by new algorithms. I find that CHEETAH solves a wider variety of problems with no user intervention (e.g. no guesses for the C-J state) than TIGER did. CHEETAH has been made simpler to use than TIGER; typical use of the code occurs with the new standard run command. I hope that CHEETAH makes the use of thermochemical codes more attractive to practical explosive formulators. In the future I plan to improve the underlying science in CHEETAH. More accurate equations of state will be used in the gas and the condensed phase. A kinetics capability will be added to the code that will predict reaction zone thickness. CHEETAH is currently a numerical implementation of C-J theory. It will,become an implementation of ZND theory. Further ease of use features will eventually be added; an automatic formulator that adjusts concentrations to match desired properties is planned.

  10. AREST-CT V1.0 software verification

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Y.; Engel, D.W.; McGrail, B.P.; Lessor, K.S.

    1995-07-01

    The Analyzer for Radionuclide Source-Term with Chemical Transport (AREST-CT) is a scientific computer code designed for performance assessments of engineered barrier system (EBS) concepts for the underground storage of nuclear waste, including high-level, intermediate, and low-level wastes. The AREST-CT code has features for analyzing the degradation of and release of radionuclides from the waste form, chemical reactions that depend on time and space, and transport of the waste and other products through the EBS. This document provides a description of the verification testing that has been performed on the initial version of ARESTCT (V1.0). Software verification is the process of confirming that the models and algorithms have been correctly implemented into a computer code. Software verification for V1.0 consisted of testing the individual modules (unit tests) and a test of the fully-coupled model (integration testing). The integration test was done by comparing the results from AREST-CT with the results from the reactive transport code CIRF.A. The test problem consisted of a 1-D analysis of the release, transport, and precipitation of {sup 99}{Tc} in an idealized LLW disposal system. All verification tests showed that AREST-CT works properly and in accordance with design specifications.

  11. Laser ablation efficiency during the production of Ag nanoparticles in ethanol at a low pulse repetition rate (1-10 Hz)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valverde-Alva, M. A.; García-Fernández, T.; Esparza-Alegría, E.; Villagrán-Muniz, M.; Sánchez-Aké, C.; Castañeda-Guzmán, R.; de la Mora, M. B.; Márquez-Herrera, C. E.; Sánchez Llamazares, J. L.

    2016-10-01

    We studied the effect of the repetition rate of laser pulses (RRLP) in the range from 1-10 Hz in the production of silver nanoparticles (Ag-NPs) by laser ablation in ethanol. Laser pulses with a duration of 7 ns, a wavelength of 1064 nm and an energy of 60 mJ were used to ablate a 99.99% pure silver target immersed in 10 ml of ethanol. Transmittance analysis and atomic absorption spectroscopy were used to study the silver concentration in the colloidal solutions. The ablation process was studied by measuring the transmission of the laser pulses through the colloid. It is shown that for a fixed number of laser pulses (NLP) the ablation efficiency, in terms of the ablated silver mass per laser pulse, increases with the RRLP. This result contradicts what had previously been established in the literature.

  12. Kinomer v. 1.0: a database of systematically classified eukaryotic protein kinases.

    PubMed

    Martin, David M A; Miranda-Saavedra, Diego; Barton, Geoffrey J

    2009-01-01

    The regulation of protein function through reversible phosphorylation by protein kinases and phosphatases is a general mechanism controlling virtually every cellular activity. Eukaryotic protein kinases can be classified into distinct, well-characterized groups based on amino acid sequence similarity and function. We recently reported a highly sensitive and accurate hidden Markov model-based method for the automatic detection and classification of protein kinases into these specific groups. The Kinomer v. 1.0 database presented here contains annotated classifications for the protein kinase complements of 43 eukaryotic genomes. These span the taxonomic range and include fungi (16 species), plants (6), diatoms (1), amoebas (2), protists (1) and animals (17). The kinomes are stored in a relational database and are accessible through a web interface on the basis of species, kinase group or a combination of both. In addition, the Kinomer v. 1.0 HMM library is made available for users to perform classification on arbitrary sequences. The Kinomer v. 1.0 database is a continually updated resource where direct comparison of kinase sequences across kinase groups and across species can give insights into kinase function and evolution. Kinomer v. 1.0 is available at http://www.compbio.dundee.ac.uk/kinomer/.

  13. Verification and validation of RADMODL Version 1.0

    SciTech Connect

    Kimball, K.D.

    1993-03-01

    RADMODL is a system of linked computer codes designed to calculate the radiation environment following an accident in which nuclear materials are released. The RADMODL code and the corresponding Verification and Validation (V&V) calculations (Appendix A), were developed for Westinghouse Savannah River Company (WSRC) by EGS Corporation (EGS). Each module of RADMODL is an independent code and was verified separately. The full system was validated by comparing the output of the various modules with the corresponding output of a previously verified version of the modules. The results of the verification and validation tests show that RADMODL correctly calculates the transport of radionuclides and radiation doses. As a result of this verification and validation effort, RADMODL Version 1.0 is certified for use in calculating the radiation environment following an accident.

  14. NIMS Radiance Point Spectra of Gaspra V1.0

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Granahan, J. C.

    2014-10-01

    This data volume contains radiometrically corrected point spectra of asteroid 951 as acquired by the Galileo spacecraft Near Infrared Mapping Spectrometer (NIMS) on October 29, 1991. They record the spectra collected as the Galileo spacecraft approached the target asteroid. These data are products of the calibration of the raw data number files gap015tn.qub, gap035tn.qub, gap036tn.qub, gap037tn.qub, and gap038tn.qub (DATA SET ID ='GO-A-NIMS-3 TUBE-V1.0') with calibration factors acquired during the first Earth/Moon encounter of the Galileo mission. These raw data .qub files are archived in the Imaging Node of the NASA Planetary Data System (PDS). The calibrated spectra consist of radiance measurements for wavelengths between 0.7 - 5.2 micrometers.

  15. VIPAR - Vortex Inflation PARachute Code Ver. 1.0

    SciTech Connect

    Strickland, James; Homicz, Greg; Porter, Vicki; Burns, Shawn; Gassler, Albert

    2001-11-01

    VIPAR is a 3-D fluid mechanics code for predicting flow past bluff bodies whose surfaces can be assumed to be made up of shell elements that are simply connected. Version 1.0 of the code contains several first order algorithms, which we are already in the process of replacing with higher order ones. These enhancements will appear in the next version of VIPAR. The present code contains a motion generator, which can be used to produce large class of rigid body motions. The present code has also been fully coupled to a structural dynamics code in which the geometry undergoes large time dependent deformations. Initial surface geometry is generated from triangular shell elements using a code such as Patran and is written into an Exodusll data base file for subsequent input into VIPAR. Surface and wake variable information is output into two Exodusll files which can be processed and viewed using software such as EnSight.

  16. CONTROLITE 1.0. Lighting Control Energy Savings

    SciTech Connect

    Rubinstein, F.

    1985-11-01

    CONTROLITE 1.0 is a lighting energy analysis program designed to calculate the energy savings and cost benefits obtainable using lighting controls in buildings. The program can compute the lighting energy reductions that result from using daylighting, scheduling, and other control strategies. When modeling daylight control systems, the program uses QUICKLITE to compute the daylight illuminances at specified points 5 times a day, 12 days a year (the 21st of each month), and for two sky conditions (clear and overcast skies). Fourier series techniques are used to fit a continuous curve through the computed illuminance points. The energy use for each of the 12 days is then computed given user-specified power-in/light-out characteristics of the modeled control system. The monthly and annual energy usage for overcast and clear conditions are found separately by fitting two long-term Fourier series curves to the energy use computed for each of the 12 days. Finally, the monthly energy use is calculated by taking a weighted average for the monthly energy use computed for the overcast and clear sky conditions. The program only treats the energy use directly attributable to lighting. The impact of lighting control strategies on building thermal loads is not computed. The program allows input of different control schedules (i.e., on/off times for the lighting system) for each day of the week, but every week of the year is treated the same; thus, holidays cannot be modeled explicitly. When used for daylighting purposes, CONTROLITE1.0 understands only clear and overcast conditions. User-supplied values for the proportion of clear and overcast hours for each month of the year are required to accommodate different climatic conditions.

  17. 1,10-Phenanthrolines with tunable luminescence upon protonation: a spectroscopic and computational study.

    PubMed

    Listorti, Andrea; Esposti, Alessandra Degli; Kishore, Ravuri S K; Kalsani, Venkateshwarlu; Schmittel, Michael; Armaroli, Nicola

    2007-08-16

    We have synthesized nine 2,9-aryl-substituted 1,10-phenanthrolines (1-9) with the aim of rationalizing their electronic absorption and luminescence properties in both the basic and acid form. The latter are generated upon addition of trifluoroacetic acid to CH2Cl2 solutions of 1-9 and their formation is unambiguously evidenced by UV-vis absorption and 1H NMR spectroscopy. 1-9 can be subdivided into three groups, depending on their chemical structure and luminescence behavior. 1-3 are symmetrically substituted p-dianisylphenanthrolines which exhibit relatively intense violet fluorescence in CH2Cl2 (lambda(max) ca. 400 nm, Phi(fl) = 0.12-0.33) and are strongly quenched and substantially red-shifted upon protonation (lambda(max) ca. 550 nm, Phi(fl) = 0.010-0.045). 4-5 are 2,6-dimethoxyphenylphenanthrolines with faint luminescence in both the basic and acid form. 6-9 are various unsymmetric aryl-substituted-phenanthrolines and their relatively strong fluorescence (lambda(max) ca. 400 nm, Phi(fl) = 0.08-0.24) is red-shifted and substantially enhanced following protonation (lambda(max) ca. 475 nm, Phi(fl) = 0.16-0.50). The markedly different trends in the electronic absorption and fluorescence spectra are rationalized by means of both time-dependent Hartree-Fock and density functional theory by using hybrid functionals to assign the excited states. Interestingly, protonation of 1-9 also occurs in spin-coated films simply exposed to vapors of acid, and the reaction can be signaled by the color tuning of the emission signal (vapoluminescence). This observation makes substituted phenanthrolines potential candidates as proton sensors also in the solid phase. PMID:17645318

  18. Land-Use Portfolio Modeler, Version 1.0

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Taketa, Richard; Hong, Makiko

    2010-01-01

    Natural hazards pose significant threats to the public safety and economic health of many communities throughout the world. Community leaders and decision-makers continually face the challenges of planning and allocating limited resources to invest in protecting their communities against catastrophic losses from natural-hazard events. Public efforts to assess community vulnerability and encourage loss-reduction measures through mitigation often focused on either aggregating site-specific estimates or adopting standards based upon broad assumptions about regional risks. The site-specific method usually provided the most accurate estimates, but was prohibitively expensive, whereas regional risk assessments were often too general to be of practical use. Policy makers lacked a systematic and quantitative method for conducting a regional-scale risk assessment of natural hazards. In response, Bernknopf and others developed the portfolio model, an intermediate-scale approach to assessing natural-hazard risks and mitigation policy alternatives. The basis for the portfolio-model approach was inspired by financial portfolio theory, which prescribes a method of optimizing return on investment while reducing risk by diversifying investments in different security types. In this context, a security type represents a unique combination of features and hazard-risk level, while financial return is defined as the reduction in losses resulting from an investment in mitigation of chosen securities. Features are selected for mitigation and are modeled like investment portfolios. Earth-science and economic data for the features are combined and processed in order to analyze each of the portfolios, which are then used to evaluate the benefits of mitigating the risk in selected locations. Ultimately, the decision maker seeks to choose a portfolio representing a mitigation policy that maximizes the expected return-on-investment, while minimizing the uncertainty associated with that return-on-investment. The portfolio model, now known as the Land-Use Portfolio Model (LUPM), provided the framework for the development of the Land-Use Portfolio Modeler, Version 1.0 software (LUPM v1.0). The software provides a geographic information system (GIS)-based modeling tool for evaluating alternative risk-reduction mitigation strategies for specific natural-hazard events. The modeler uses information about a specific natural-hazard event and the features exposed to that event within the targeted study region to derive a measure of a given mitigation strategy`s effectiveness. Harnessing the spatial capabilities of a GIS enables the tool to provide a rich, interactive mapping environment in which users can create, analyze, visualize, and compare different

  19. EOS7C-ECBM Version 1.0

    2012-11-14

    EOS7C is an equation of state module for the TOUGH2 program for CO2 or N2 in Methane (CH4) Reservoirs. In the present work, additions have been made to the EOS7C Version 1.0 module to include the Enhanced Coal Bed Methane (ECBM) modifications developed by Webb (2003). In addition, the Dusty Gas Model for gas-phase diffusion (Webb 2001) has been included. The ECBM modification to the EOS7C equation of state incorporate the extended Langmuir isothem formore » sorbing gases, including the change in porosity associated with the sorbed gas mass. Comparison to hand calculations for pure gas and binary mixture shows very good agreement. Application to a CO2 well injection problem by Law et al. (2002). The Dusty Model modification add options to calculate gas diffusion using the Dusty-Gas Model including separate and coupled approaches. Comparison to low-permeability pure gas diffusion data shows excellent agreement. The results from the DGM are compared to the Fick's Law behavior for diffusion across a capillary fringe. The differences between the models are small due to the relatively high permeability (10-11 m2) of the problem.« less

  20. NAS Parallel Benchmark Results 11-96. 1.0

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bailey, David H.; Bailey, David; Chancellor, Marisa K. (Technical Monitor)

    1997-01-01

    The NAS Parallel Benchmarks have been developed at NASA Ames Research Center to study the performance of parallel supercomputers. The eight benchmark problems are specified in a "pencil and paper" fashion. In other words, the complete details of the problem to be solved are given in a technical document, and except for a few restrictions, benchmarkers are free to select the language constructs and implementation techniques best suited for a particular system. These results represent the best results that have been reported to us by the vendors for the specific 3 systems listed. In this report, we present new NPB (Version 1.0) performance results for the following systems: DEC Alpha Server 8400 5/440, Fujitsu VPP Series (VX, VPP300, and VPP700), HP/Convex Exemplar SPP2000, IBM RS/6000 SP P2SC node (120 MHz), NEC SX-4/32, SGI/CRAY T3E, SGI Origin200, and SGI Origin2000. We also report High Performance Fortran (HPF) based NPB results for IBM SP2 Wide Nodes, HP/Convex Exemplar SPP2000, and SGI/CRAY T3D. These results have been submitted by Applied Parallel Research (APR) and Portland Group Inc. (PGI). We also present sustained performance per dollar for Class B LU, SP and BT benchmarks.

  1. EOS7C-ECBM Version 1.0

    SciTech Connect

    2012-11-14

    EOS7C is an equation of state module for the TOUGH2 program for CO2 or N2 in Methane (CH4) Reservoirs. In the present work, additions have been made to the EOS7C Version 1.0 module to include the Enhanced Coal Bed Methane (ECBM) modifications developed by Webb (2003). In addition, the Dusty Gas Model for gas-phase diffusion (Webb 2001) has been included. The ECBM modification to the EOS7C equation of state incorporate the extended Langmuir isothem for sorbing gases, including the change in porosity associated with the sorbed gas mass. Comparison to hand calculations for pure gas and binary mixture shows very good agreement. Application to a CO2 well injection problem by Law et al. (2002). The Dusty Model modification add options to calculate gas diffusion using the Dusty-Gas Model including separate and coupled approaches. Comparison to low-permeability pure gas diffusion data shows excellent agreement. The results from the DGM are compared to the Fick's Law behavior for diffusion across a capillary fringe. The differences between the models are small due to the relatively high permeability (10-11 m2) of the problem.

  2. VIPAR - Vortex Inflation PARachute Code Ver. 1.0

    2001-11-01

    VIPAR is a 3-D fluid mechanics code for predicting flow past bluff bodies whose surfaces can be assumed to be made up of shell elements that are simply connected. Version 1.0 of the code contains several first order algorithms, which we are already in the process of replacing with higher order ones. These enhancements will appear in the next version of VIPAR. The present code contains a motion generator, which can be used to producemore » large class of rigid body motions. The present code has also been fully coupled to a structural dynamics code in which the geometry undergoes large time dependent deformations. Initial surface geometry is generated from triangular shell elements using a code such as Patran and is written into an Exodusll data base file for subsequent input into VIPAR. Surface and wake variable information is output into two Exodusll files which can be processed and viewed using software such as EnSight.« less

  3. 1064 nm Nd:YVO4 laser intracavity pumped at 912 nm and sum-frequency mixing for an emission at 491 nm.

    PubMed

    Herault, Emilie; Balembois, François; Georges, Patrick; Georges, Thierry

    2008-07-15

    We present for the first time a Nd:YVO(4) laser emitting at 1064 nm intracavity pumped at 912 nm by a Nd:GdVO(4) laser. We carried out a model to design the system properly, and laser performance was experimentally investigated. Intracavity sum-frequency mixing at 912 and 1064 nm was then realized in a BiBO crystal to reach the blue range. We obtained a cw output power of 155 mW at 491 nm with a pump laser diode emitting 20 W at 808 nm. PMID:18628821

  4. Laser damage database at 1064 nm

    SciTech Connect

    Rainer, F.; Gonzales, R.P.; Morgan, A.J.

    1990-03-01

    In conjunction with our diversification of laser damage testing capabilities, we have expanded upon a database of threshold measurements and parameter variations at 1064 nm. This includes all tests at low pulse-repetition frequencies (PRF) ranging from single shots to 120 Hz. These tests were conducted on the Reptile laser facility since 1987 and the Variable Pulse Laser (VPL) facility since 1988. Pulse durations ranged from 1 to 16 ns. 10 refs., 14 figs.

  5. Water Network Tool for Resilience v. 1.0

    SciTech Connect

    2015-12-09

    WNTR is a python package designed to simulate and analyze resilience of water distribution networks. The software includes: - Pressure driven and demand driven hydraulic simulation - Water quality simulation to track concentration, trace, and water age - Conditional controls to simulate power outages - Models to simulate pipe breaks - A wide range of resilience metrics - Analysis and visualization tools

  6. Damage formation during 1.0 MeV Si self-implantation at low temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, M.B.; Mitchell, I.V.

    1999-04-01

    The effect of substrate temperature and ion flux on lattice damage in silicon induced by 1.0 MeV Si ion implantation has been investigated using Rutherford backscattering channeling (RBSC) and Raman spectroscopy. Over the temperature range of 77--323K, the temperature dependence of near-surface damage is found to be different from that of end-of-range damage. This may suggest that different mechanisms for damage growth are dominant along the ion path. The flux effect on damage accumulation varies with substrate temperatures. Around liquid nitrogen temperature (77K), the near-surface damage decreases with increasing flux, contrary to the case around room temperature (300K). In the temperature range of {approximately}120--250K, damage is almost independent of implant flux. Possible causes of the observed phenomena are discussed.

  7. RealGasBrine v1.0 option of TOUGH+ v1.5

    SciTech Connect

    Moridis, George

    2015-02-27

    RealGasBrine v1.0 is a numerical code that for the simulation of the behavior of gas-bearing porous and/fractured geologic media. It is an option of TOUGH+ v1.5 [Moridis, 2014], a successor to the TOUGH2 [Pruess et al., 1999; 2012] family of codes for multi-component, multiphase ?uid and heat ?ow developed at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. RealGasBrine v1.0 needs the TOUGH+ v1.5 core code in order to compile and execute. It is written in standard FORTRAN 95/2003, and can be run on any computational platform (workstation, PC, Macintosh) for which such compilers are available. RealGasBrine v1.0 describes the non-isothermal two- (for pure water) or three-phase (for brine) flow of an aqueous phase and a real gas mixture in a gas-bearing medium, with a particular focus in ultra-tight (such as tight-sand and shale gas) systems. Up to 12 individual real gases can be tracked, and salt can precipitate as solid halite. The capabilities of the code include coupled flow and thermal effects, real gas behavior, Darcy and non-Darcy flow, several isotherm options of gas sorption onto the grains of the porous media, complex fracture descriptions, gas solubility into water, and geomechanical effects on flow properties. RealGasBrine v1.0 allows the study of flow and transport of fluids and heat over a wide range of time frames and spatial scales not only in gas reservoirs, but also in any problem involving the flow of gases in geologic media, including the geologic storage of greenhouse gas mixtures, the behavior of geothermal reservoirs with multi-component condensable (H2O and CO2) and non-condensable gas mixtures, the transport of water and released H2 in nuclear waste storage applications, etc.

  8. Implementation of Rotational Raman Channel in Multiwavelength Aerosol Lidar to Improve Measurements of Particle Extinction and Backscattering at 532 NM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veselovskii, Igor; Whiteman, David N.; Korenskiy, Michael; Suvorina, A.; Perez-Ramirez, Daniel

    2016-06-01

    We describe a practical implementation of rotational Raman (RR) measurements in an existing Mie-Raman lidar to obtain measurements of aerosol extinction and backscattering at 532 nm. A 2.3 nm width interference filter was used to select a spectral range characterized by low temperature sensitivity within the anti-Stokes branch of the RR spectrum. Simulations demonstrate that the temperature dependence of the scattering cross section does not exceed 1.0% in the 230-300K range making accurate correction for this dependence quite easy. With this upgrade, the NASA/GSFC multiwavelength Raman lidar has demonstrated useful α532 measurements and was used for regular observations. Examples of lidar measurements and inversion of optical data to the particle microphysics will be given in presentation.

  9. Rotation Manager Pro Version 1.0b1

    SciTech Connect

    Moore, Thomas L.; Scotese, Christopher

    2002-02-01

    The Rotation Manager Pro Package maintains databases of instructions to replicate plate tectonic movements. The instructions are in the standard of tectonic plate rotations, including plate identification and location and angle of the rotation pole. Each database is accompanied by various metadata, including information about each rotation pole and the database itself. The package provides a range of tools to actively manage the database using methods specifically required for rotations: rotation pole addition and subtraction, viewing of a rotation chain through the rotation hierarchy, and the rotation of data points.

  10. Rotation Manager Pro Version 1.0b1

    2002-02-01

    The Rotation Manager Pro Package maintains databases of instructions to replicate plate tectonic movements. The instructions are in the standard of tectonic plate rotations, including plate identification and location and angle of the rotation pole. Each database is accompanied by various metadata, including information about each rotation pole and the database itself. The package provides a range of tools to actively manage the database using methods specifically required for rotations: rotation pole addition and subtraction,more » viewing of a rotation chain through the rotation hierarchy, and the rotation of data points.« less

  11. Chemical composition and mass size distribution of PM1.0 at an elevated site in central east China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Y. M.; Zhang, X. Y.; Sun, J. Y.; Hu, G. Y.; Shen, X. J.; Wang, Y. Q.; Wang, T. T.; Wang, D. Z.; Zhao, Y.

    2014-06-01

    Size-resolved aerosol chemical compositions were measured continuously for one and half years with an aerosol mass spectrometer (AMS) to characterize the mass and size distributions (MSDs) of each component in bulk, fresh and aged submicron particles (approximately PM1.0) at Mountain Tai, an elevated site in Central East China (CEC) from June 2010 to January 2012. The majority of the regionally-dispersed aerosols were found to be contributed from short distance mixed aerosol, mostly from its south with organics and sulfate as the major components. The annual mean mass concentrations of organics, sulfate, nitrate, ammonium and chloride were 11.2, 9.2, 7.2, 5.8 and 0.95 μg m-3, respectively, which are much lower for organics and sulfate, and slightly lower for nitrate, ammonium and chloride than those at the nearby surface rural sites. High organics were observed for all four seasons, and the relatively fresh organic aerosol (OA) containing high proportion of less-photo chemically OA, were found from long-range transported aerosol from northwest. Semi-volatile and low-volatile oxidized OAs together contributed approximately 49%, 55% in spring and 72% and 51% in winter of total OA, showing at least 50% of OA can be attributable to SOA. Seasonally, the chemical components at the elevated site showed a "winter high and autumn low" pattern, with organics, sulfate and ammonium peaking in summer. Though no obvious differences of MSDs were seen for various chemical components in the planetary boundary layer (PBL) and free troposphere (FT), the concentrations were a factor of 5-7 higher in PBL than in FT. The averaged MSDs of particles between 30-1000 nm for organics, sulfate, nitrate, and ammonium are approximately log-normal with similar mass median diameters (MMDs) of 539, 585, 542, and 545 nm, respectively, which were slightly larger than those in ground sites within North China Plain (NCP). Obvious differences in MMDs were found between fresh and aged aerosols for

  12. Sandia Particle Holography Processor v. 1.0

    SciTech Connect

    Guildenbecher, Daniel

    2015-12-09

    HoloSand is a suite of MATLAB® functions for measurement of particle properties from digital holograms. Functions to read and display digital holograms are included along with scripts to extract three-dimensional particle positions, sizes, and velocities. This software is a research tool used to process experimental data. A user of this software would first record digital holograms of a particle field and then use this software to measure the three-dimensional particle information encoded in the hologram. Applications range from basic laboratory fluids research to applied particle measurements. The software has no known military applications. The software solves the diffraction integral equation to numerically refocus digital holograms and then applies the hybrid and cross-correlation methods described in the references to extract three-dimensional particle information. User input is required to read-in the hologram and select optimum settings for image segmentation.

  13. GridLab-D version 1.0

    SciTech Connect

    Chassin, David P.

    2007-12-21

    A power system simulation that runs on all major platforms, provides open access to all functionality, and supports extended modeling of non-traditional components of the electric power system, such as buildings, distributed resources, and markets. GridLAB-D solution engine can determine the simultaneous state of millions of independent devices, each of which is described by multiple differential equations solved only locally for both state and time. The advantages of this algorithm over traditional finite difference-based simulators are: (1) it is much more accurate; (2) it can handle widely disparate time scales, ranging from sub-seconds to many years; and 3) it is easy to integrate with new modules and third-party systems. The advantage over traditional differential-based solvers is that it is not necessary to integrate all the device's behaviors into a single set of equations that must be solved.

  14. Sandia Particle Holography Processor v. 1.0

    2015-12-09

    HoloSand is a suite of MATLAB® functions for measurement of particle properties from digital holograms. Functions to read and display digital holograms are included along with scripts to extract three-dimensional particle positions, sizes, and velocities. This software is a research tool used to process experimental data. A user of this software would first record digital holograms of a particle field and then use this software to measure the three-dimensional particle information encoded in the hologram.more » Applications range from basic laboratory fluids research to applied particle measurements. The software has no known military applications. The software solves the diffraction integral equation to numerically refocus digital holograms and then applies the hybrid and cross-correlation methods described in the references to extract three-dimensional particle information. User input is required to read-in the hologram and select optimum settings for image segmentation.« less

  15. GridLab-D version 1.0

    2007-12-21

    A power system simulation that runs on all major platforms, provides open access to all functionality, and supports extended modeling of non-traditional components of the electric power system, such as buildings, distributed resources, and markets. GridLAB-D solution engine can determine the simultaneous state of millions of independent devices, each of which is described by multiple differential equations solved only locally for both state and time. The advantages of this algorithm over traditional finite difference-based simulatorsmore » are: (1) it is much more accurate; (2) it can handle widely disparate time scales, ranging from sub-seconds to many years; and 3) it is easy to integrate with new modules and third-party systems. The advantage over traditional differential-based solvers is that it is not necessary to integrate all the device's behaviors into a single set of equations that must be solved.« less

  16. Sim Track User's Manual (v 1.0)

    SciTech Connect

    Luo, Y.

    2010-01-27

    SimTrack is a simple c++ library designed for the numeric particle tracking in the high energy accelerators. It adopts the 4th order symplectic integrator for the optical transport in the magnetic elements. The 4-D and 6-D weak-strong beam-beam treatments are integrated in it for the beam-beam studies. SimTrack is written with c++ class and standard template library. It provides versatile functions to manage elements and lines. It supports a large range of types of elements. New type of element can be easily created in the library. SimTrack calculates Twiss, coupling and fits tunes, chromaticities and corrects closed orbits. AC dipole and AC multipole are available in this library. SimTrack allows change of element parameters during tracking.

  17. 469nm Fiber Laser Source

    SciTech Connect

    Drobshoff, A; Dawson, J W; Pennington, D M; Payne, S A; Beach, R

    2005-01-20

    We have demonstrated 466mW of 469nm light from a frequency doubled continuous wave fiber laser. The system consisted of a 938nm single frequency laser diode master oscillator, which was amplified in two stages to 5 Watts using cladding pumped Nd{sup 3+} fiber amplifiers and then frequency doubled in a single pass through periodically poled KTP. The 3cm long PPKTP crystal was made by Raicol Crystals Ltd. with a period of 5.9 {micro}m and had a phase match temperature of 47 degrees Centigrade. The beam was focused to a 1/e{sup 2} diameter in the crystal of 29 {micro}m. Overall conversion efficiency was 11% and the results agreed well with standard models. Our 938nm fiber amplifier design minimizes amplified spontaneous emission at 1088nm by employing an optimized core to cladding size ratio. This design allows the 3-level transition to operate at high inversion, thus making it competitive with the 1088nm 4-level transition. We have also carefully chosen the fiber coil diameter to help suppress propagation of wavelengths longer than 938 nm. At 2 Watts, the 938nm laser had an M{sup 2} of 1.1 and good polarization (correctable with a quarter and half wave plate to >10:1).

  18. Quantitative comparison of the OCT imaging depth at 1300 nm and 1600 nm

    PubMed Central

    Kodach, V. M.; Kalkman, J.; Faber, D. J.; van Leeuwen, T. G.

    2010-01-01

    One of the present challenges in optical coherence tomography (OCT) is the visualization of deeper structural morphology in biological tissues. Owing to a reduced scattering, a larger imaging depth can be achieved by using longer wavelengths. In this work, we analyze the OCT imaging depth at wavelengths around 1300 nm and 1600 nm by comparing the scattering coefficient and OCT imaging depth for a range of Intralipid concentrations at constant water content. We observe an enhanced OCT imaging depth for 1600 nm compared to 1300 nm for Intralipid concentrations larger than 4 vol.%. For higher Intralipid concentrations, the imaging depth enhancement reaches 30%. The ratio of scattering coefficients at the two wavelengths is constant over a large range of scattering coefficients and corresponds to a scattering power of 2.8 ± 0.1. Based on our results we expect for biological tissues an increase of the OCT imaging depth at 1600 nm compared to 1300 nm for samples with high scattering power and low water content. PMID:21258456

  19. Intersatellite range monitoring using optical interferometry.

    PubMed

    Pierce, R; Leitch, J; Stephens, M; Bender, P; Nerem, R

    2008-09-20

    We report on an interferometer designed to provide 1-10 nm/square root(Hz) displacement measurement resolution, in the range 0.01 Hz to 1 Hz, while in low Earth orbit. The interferometer comprises two units, each with its own laser and in separate satellites, which would be in the same orbit separated by approximately 50 km. We discuss the requirements on the interferometer subsystem and describe the optical transponder distance measurement, including a phase locking method to generate a heterodyne beat signal between the two lasers. Design, fabrication, and testing of a "flightlike" engineering model interferometer is outlined, and results from environmental and performance tests are reported. PMID:18806863

  20. Simple Line Access Protocol Version 1.0

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osuna, Pedro; Salgado, Jesus; Guainazzi, Matteo; Barbarisi, Isa; Dubernet, Marie-Lise; Tody, Doug; Osuna, Pedro; Salgado, Jesus

    2010-12-01

    The Simple Line Access Protocol (SLAP) is an IVOA Data Access protocol which defines a protocol for retrieving spectral lines coming from various Spectral Line Data Collections through a uniform interface within the VO framework. These lines can be either observed or theoretical and will be typically used to identify emission or absorption features in astronomical spectra. It makes use of the Simple Spectral Line Data Model (SSLDM [1]) to characterize spectral lines through the use of uTypes [14]. Physical quantities of units are described by using the standard Units DM [15]. SLAP services can be registered in an IVOA Registry of Resources using the VOResource [12] Extension standard, having a unique ResourceIdentifier [13] in the Registry. The SLAP interface is meant to be reasonably simple to implement by service providers. A basic query will be done in a wavelength range for the different services. The service returns a list of spectral lines formatted as a VOTable. Thus, an implementation of the service may support additional search parameters (some which may be custom to that particular service) to more finely control the selection of spectral lines. The specification also describes how the search on extra parameters has to be done, making use of the support provided by the Simple Spectral Line Data Model (SSLDM [1])

  1. Structural and electronic properties of an ordered grain boundary formed by separated (1,0) dislocations in graphene.

    PubMed

    Ma, Chuanxu; Sun, Haifeng; Du, Hongjian; Wang, Jufeng; Zhao, Aidi; Li, Qunxiang; Wang, Bing; Hou, J G

    2015-02-21

    We present an investigation of the structural and electronic properties of an ordered grain boundary (GB) formed by separated pentagon-heptagon pairs in single-layer graphene/SiO2 using scanning tunneling microscopy/spectroscopy (STM/STS), coupled with density functional theory (DFT) calculations. It is observed that the pentagon-heptagon pairs, i.e., (1,0) dislocations, form a periodic quasi-one-dimensional chain. The (1,0) dislocations are separated by 8 transverse rows of carbon rings, with a period of ∼2.1 nm. The protruded feature of each dislocation shown in the STM images reflects its out-of-plane buckling structure, which is supported by the DFT simulations. The STS spectra recorded along the small-angle GB show obvious differential-conductance peaks, the positions of which qualitatively accord with the van Hove singularities from the DFT calculations. PMID:25603956

  2. Building Restoration Operations Optimization Model Beta Version 1.0

    2007-05-31

    The Building Restoration Operations Optimization Model (BROOM), developed by Sandia National Laboratories, is a software product designed to aid in the restoration of large facilities contaminated by a biological material. BROOM’s integrated data collection, data management, and visualization software improves the efficiency of cleanup operations, minimizes facility downtime, and provides a transparent basis for reopening the facility. Secure remote access to building floor plans Floor plan drawings and knowledge of the HVAC system are criticalmore » to the design and implementation of effective sampling plans. In large facilities, access to these data may be complicated by the sheer abundance and disorganized state they are often stored in. BROOM avoids potentially costly delays by providing a means of organizing and storing mechanical and floor plan drawings in a secure remote database that is easily accessed. Sampling design tools BROOM provides an array of tools to answer the question of where to sample and how many samples to take. In addition to simple judgmental and random sampling plans, the software includes two sophisticated methods of adaptively developing a sampling strategy. Both tools strive to choose sampling locations that best satisfy a specified objective (i.e. minimizing kriging variance) but use numerically different strategies to do so. Surface samples are collected early in the restoration process to characterize the extent of contamination and then again later to verify that the facility is safe to reenter. BROOM supports sample collection using a ruggedized PDA equipped with a barcode scanner and laser range finder. The PDA displays building floor drawings, sampling plans, and electronic forms for data entry. Barcodes are placed on sample containers for the purpose of tracking the specimen and linking acquisition data (i.e. location, surface type, texture) to laboratory results. Sample location is determined by activating the integrated

  3. Building Restoration Operations Optimization Model Beta Version 1.0

    SciTech Connect

    2007-05-31

    The Building Restoration Operations Optimization Model (BROOM), developed by Sandia National Laboratories, is a software product designed to aid in the restoration of large facilities contaminated by a biological material. BROOM’s integrated data collection, data management, and visualization software improves the efficiency of cleanup operations, minimizes facility downtime, and provides a transparent basis for reopening the facility. Secure remote access to building floor plans Floor plan drawings and knowledge of the HVAC system are critical to the design and implementation of effective sampling plans. In large facilities, access to these data may be complicated by the sheer abundance and disorganized state they are often stored in. BROOM avoids potentially costly delays by providing a means of organizing and storing mechanical and floor plan drawings in a secure remote database that is easily accessed. Sampling design tools BROOM provides an array of tools to answer the question of where to sample and how many samples to take. In addition to simple judgmental and random sampling plans, the software includes two sophisticated methods of adaptively developing a sampling strategy. Both tools strive to choose sampling locations that best satisfy a specified objective (i.e. minimizing kriging variance) but use numerically different strategies to do so. Surface samples are collected early in the restoration process to characterize the extent of contamination and then again later to verify that the facility is safe to reenter. BROOM supports sample collection using a ruggedized PDA equipped with a barcode scanner and laser range finder. The PDA displays building floor drawings, sampling plans, and electronic forms for data entry. Barcodes are placed on sample containers for the purpose of tracking the specimen and linking acquisition data (i.e. location, surface type, texture) to laboratory results. Sample location is determined by activating the integrated laser

  4. Preface: phys. stat. sol. (c) 1/10

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suh, Eun-Kyung; Yoon, Euijoon; Lee, Hyung Jae

    2004-09-01

    The Fifth International Symposium on Blue Laser and Light Emitting Diodes (ISBLLED-2004) was held in Gyeongju, Korea from 15-19 March 2004. Gyeongju, the ancient capital of the thousand-year Silla kingdom (57 B.C. to 935 A.D.) provided additional pleasure to the participants as an exceptional open-air museum with antique treasures scattered all around the city.During the last decade we have witnessed remarkable developments in wide-gap semiconductors and light emitting devices in the spectral range from the visible to deep UV. The purpose of the Symposium was to provide a forum for intensive discussion on the issues and main progress especially in optoelectronic devices, material growth and characterization, and quantum structures of wide bandgap semiconductors. A total of 243 papers including 220 contributed and 23 invited ones were presented and discussed by 487 participants from 17 countries world-wide. Among them, 154 manuscripts were submitted and reviewed by the usual evaluation process of physica status solidi. Some were rejected or withdrawn, and finally 139 papers are published in the special issues of physica status solidi (a), (b), and (c). We gratefully acknowledge the referees for their careful review. The papers are grouped into 7 categories. The subheadings and the number of papers in each are as follows: Optoelectronic devices, 43; Growth and characterization, 45; Nano and quantum structures, 21; Contacts, 8; Zinc oxide, 9; Indium nitride and indium rich InGaN, 6; Others, 7. The special session of the Symposium, The LED Highlight, designed partially to meet the challenging targets of the technology, i.e., energy savings and clean environment preservation, drew much attention and is edited as a special coloured section in this issue.The next symposium is scheduled for Montpellier, France, in 2006. We wish the organizers of that symposium the best of luck and hope to see all of the ISBLLED-2004 participants again at ISBLLED-2006.ISBLLED-2004 was

  5. TARGET - TASK ANALYSIS REPORT GENERATION TOOL, VERSION 1.0

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ortiz, C. J.

    1994-01-01

    The Task Analysis Report Generation Tool, TARGET, is a graphical interface tool used to capture procedural knowledge and translate that knowledge into a hierarchical report. TARGET is based on VISTA, a knowledge acquisition tool developed by the Naval Systems Training Center. TARGET assists a programmer and/or task expert organize and understand the steps involved in accomplishing a task. The user can label individual steps in the task through a dialogue-box and get immediate graphical feedback for analysis. TARGET users can decompose tasks into basic action kernels or minimal steps to provide a clear picture of all basic actions needed to accomplish a job. This method allows the user to go back and critically examine the overall flow and makeup of the process. The user can switch between graphics (box flow diagrams) and text (task hierarchy) versions to more easily study the process being documented. As the practice of decomposition continues, tasks and their subtasks can be continually modified to more accurately reflect the user's procedures and rationale. This program is designed to help a programmer document an expert's task thus allowing the programmer to build an expert system which can help others perform the task. Flexibility is a key element of the system design and of the knowledge acquisition session. If the expert is not able to find time to work on the knowledge acquisition process with the program developer, the developer and subject matter expert may work in iterative sessions. TARGET is easy to use and is tailored to accommodate users ranging from the novice to the experienced expert systems builder. TARGET is written in C-language for IBM PC series and compatible computers running MS-DOS and Microsoft Windows version 3.0 or 3.1. No source code is supplied. The executable also requires 2Mb of RAM, a Microsoft compatible mouse, a VGA display and an 80286, 386 or 486 processor machine. The standard distribution medium for TARGET is one 5.25 inch 360K

  6. Measurement of 100 nm and 60 nm Particle Standards by Differential Mobility Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Mulholland, George W.; Donnelly, Michelle K.; Hagwood, Charles R.; Kukuck, Scott R.; Hackley, Vincent A.; Pui, David Y. H.

    2006-01-01

    The peak particle size and expanded uncertainties (95 % confidence interval) for two new particle calibration standards are measured as 101.8 nm ± 1.1 nm and 60.39 nm ± 0.63 nm. The particle samples are polystyrene spheres suspended in filtered, deionized water at a mass fraction of about 0.5 %. The size distribution measurements of aerosolized particles are made using a differential mobility analyzer (DMA) system calibrated using SRM® 1963 (100.7 nm polystyrene spheres). An electrospray aerosol generator was used for generating the 60 nm aerosol to almost eliminate the generation of multiply charged dimers and trimers and to minimize the effect of non-volatile contaminants increasing the particle size. The testing for the homogeneity of the samples and for the presence of multimers using dynamic light scattering is described. The use of the transfer function integral in the calibration of the DMA is shown to reduce the uncertainty in the measurement of the peak particle size compared to the approach based on the peak in the concentration vs. voltage distribution. A modified aerosol/sheath inlet, recirculating sheath flow, a high ratio of sheath flow to the aerosol flow, and accurate pressure, temperature, and voltage measurements have increased the resolution and accuracy of the measurements. A significant consideration in the uncertainty analysis was the correlation between the slip correction of the calibration particle and the measured particle. Including the correlation reduced the expanded uncertainty from approximately 1.8 % of the particle size to about 1.0 %. The effect of non-volatile contaminants in the polystyrene suspensions on the peak particle size and the uncertainty in the size is determined. The full size distributions for both the 60 nm and 100 nm spheres are tabulated and selected mean sizes including the number mean diameter and the dynamic light scattering mean diameter are computed. The use of these particles for calibrating DMAs and for

  7. Electrical Mobility Spectrometer Using a Diethylene Glycol Condensation Particle Counter for Measurement of Aerosol Size Distributions Down to 1 nm

    SciTech Connect

    Jiang, J.; Kuang, C.; Chen, M.; Attoui, M.; McMurry, P. H.

    2011-02-01

    We report a new scanning mobility particle spectrometer (SMPS) for measuring number size distributions of particles down to {approx}1 nm mobility diameter. This SMPS includes an aerosol charger, a TSI 3085 nano differential mobility analyzer (nanoDMA), an ultrafine condensation particle counter (UCPC) using diethylene glycol (DEG) as the working fluid, and a conventional butanol CPC (the 'booster') to detect the small droplets leaving the DEG UCPC. The response of the DEG UCPC to negatively charged sodium chloride particles with mobility diameters ranging from 1-6 nm was measured. The sensitivity of the DEG UCPC to particle composition was also studied by comparing its response to positively charged 1.47 and 1.70 nm tetra-alkyl ammonium ions, sodium chloride, and silver particles. A high resolution differential mobility analyzer was used to generate the test particles. These results show that the response of this UCPC to sub-2 nm particles is sensitive to particle composition. The applicability of the new SMPS for atmospheric measurement was demonstrated during the Nucleation and Cloud Condensation Nuclei (NCCN) field campaign (Atlanta, Georgia, summer 2009). We operated the instrument at saturator and condenser temperatures that allowed the efficient detection of sodium chloride particles but not of air ions having the same mobility. We found that particles as small as 1 nm were detected during nucleation events but not at other times. Factors affecting size distribution measurements, including aerosol charging in the 1-10 nm size range, are discussed. For the charger used in this study, bipolar charging was found to be more effective for sub-2 nm particles than unipolar charging. No ion induced nucleation inside the charger was observed during the NCCN campaign.

  8. Observations and Light Curve Solutions of the Eclipsing Binaries USNO-B1.0 1395-0370184 and USNO-B1.0 1395-0370731

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kjurkchieva, D.; Popov, V. A.; Vasileva, D.; Petrov, N.

    2016-07-01

    We present follow-up photometric observations in Sloan filters g', i' of the newly discovered eclipsing stars USNO-B1.0 1395-0370184 and USNO-B1.0 1395-0370731. Our data revealed that their orbital periods are considerably bigger than the previous values. This result changed the classification of USNO-B1.0 1395-0370184 from ultrashort-period binary (P=0.197 d) to short-period system (P=0.251 d). The light curve solutions of our observations revealed that USNO-B1.0 1395-0370184 and USNO-B1.0 1395-0370731 are overcontact binaries in which components are K dwarfs, close in masses and radii. The light curve distortions were reproduced by cool spots with angular radius of around 20°.

  9. Characterization of toll-like receptors 1-10 in spotted hyenas

    PubMed Central

    Flies, Andrew S.; Maksimoski, Matthew; Mansfield, Linda S.; Weldele, Mary L.; Holekamp, Kay E.

    2014-01-01

    Previous research has shown that spotted hyenas (Crocuta crocuta) regularly survive exposure to deadly pathogens such as rabies, canine distemper virus, and anthrax, suggesting that they have robust immune defenses. Toll-like receptors (TLRs) recognize conserved molecular patterns and initiate a wide range of innate and adaptive immune responses. TLR genes are evolutionarily conserved, and assessing TLR expression in various tissues can provide insight into overall immunological organization and function. Studies of the hyena immune system have been minimal thus far due to the logistical and ethical challenges of sampling and preserving the immunological tissues of this and other long-lived, wild species. Tissue samples were opportunistically collected from captive hyenas humanely euthanized for a separate study. We developed primers to amplify partial sequences for TLRs 1-10, sequenced the amplicons, compared sequence identity to those in other mammals, and quantified TLR expression in lymph nodes, spleens, lungs, and pancreases. Results show that hyena TLR DNA and protein sequences are similar to TLRs in other mammals, and that TLRs 1-10 were expressed in all tissues tested. This information will be useful in the development of new assays to understand the interactions among the hyena immune system, pathogens, and the microbial communities that inhabit hyenas. PMID:24488231

  10. Characterization of Toll-like receptors 1-10 in spotted hyenas.

    PubMed

    Flies, Andrew S; Maksimoski, Matthew T; Mansfield, Linda S; Weldele, Mary L; Holekamp, Kay E

    2014-06-01

    Previous research has shown that spotted hyenas (Crocuta crocuta) regularly survive exposure to deadly pathogens such as rabies, canine distemper virus, and anthrax, suggesting that they have robust immune defenses. Toll-like receptors (TLRs) recognize conserved molecular patterns and initiate a wide range of innate and adaptive immune responses. TLR genes are evolutionarily conserved, and assessing TLR expression in various tissues can provide insight into overall immunological organization and function. Studies of the hyena immune system have been minimal thus far due to the logistical and ethical challenges of sampling and preserving the immunological tissues of this and other long-lived, wild species. Tissue samples were opportunistically collected from captive hyenas humanely euthanized for a separate study. We developed primers to amplify partial sequences for TLRs 1-10, sequenced the amplicons, compared sequence identity to those in other mammals, and quantified TLR expression in lymph nodes, spleens, lungs, and pancreases. Results show that hyena TLR DNA and protein sequences are similar to TLRs in other mammals, and that TLRs 1-10 were expressed in all tissues tested. This information will be useful in the development of new assays to understand the interactions among the hyena immune system, pathogens, and the microbial communities that inhabit hyenas. PMID:24488231

  11. Characterization of Toll-like receptors 1-10 in spotted hyenas.

    PubMed

    Flies, Andrew S; Maksimoski, Matthew T; Mansfield, Linda S; Weldele, Mary L; Holekamp, Kay E

    2014-06-01

    Previous research has shown that spotted hyenas (Crocuta crocuta) regularly survive exposure to deadly pathogens such as rabies, canine distemper virus, and anthrax, suggesting that they have robust immune defenses. Toll-like receptors (TLRs) recognize conserved molecular patterns and initiate a wide range of innate and adaptive immune responses. TLR genes are evolutionarily conserved, and assessing TLR expression in various tissues can provide insight into overall immunological organization and function. Studies of the hyena immune system have been minimal thus far due to the logistical and ethical challenges of sampling and preserving the immunological tissues of this and other long-lived, wild species. Tissue samples were opportunistically collected from captive hyenas humanely euthanized for a separate study. We developed primers to amplify partial sequences for TLRs 1-10, sequenced the amplicons, compared sequence identity to those in other mammals, and quantified TLR expression in lymph nodes, spleens, lungs, and pancreases. Results show that hyena TLR DNA and protein sequences are similar to TLRs in other mammals, and that TLRs 1-10 were expressed in all tissues tested. This information will be useful in the development of new assays to understand the interactions among the hyena immune system, pathogens, and the microbial communities that inhabit hyenas.

  12. RealGasBrine v1.0 option of TOUGH+ v1.5

    2015-02-27

    RealGasBrine v1.0 is a numerical code that for the simulation of the behavior of gas-bearing porous and/fractured geologic media. It is an option of TOUGH+ v1.5 [Moridis, 2014], a successor to the TOUGH2 [Pruess et al., 1999; 2012] family of codes for multi-component, multiphase ?uid and heat ?ow developed at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. RealGasBrine v1.0 needs the TOUGH+ v1.5 core code in order to compile and execute. It is written in standard FORTRANmore » 95/2003, and can be run on any computational platform (workstation, PC, Macintosh) for which such compilers are available. RealGasBrine v1.0 describes the non-isothermal two- (for pure water) or three-phase (for brine) flow of an aqueous phase and a real gas mixture in a gas-bearing medium, with a particular focus in ultra-tight (such as tight-sand and shale gas) systems. Up to 12 individual real gases can be tracked, and salt can precipitate as solid halite. The capabilities of the code include coupled flow and thermal effects, real gas behavior, Darcy and non-Darcy flow, several isotherm options of gas sorption onto the grains of the porous media, complex fracture descriptions, gas solubility into water, and geomechanical effects on flow properties. RealGasBrine v1.0 allows the study of flow and transport of fluids and heat over a wide range of time frames and spatial scales not only in gas reservoirs, but also in any problem involving the flow of gases in geologic media, including the geologic storage of greenhouse gas mixtures, the behavior of geothermal reservoirs with multi-component condensable (H2O and CO2) and non-condensable gas mixtures, the transport of water and released H2 in nuclear waste storage applications, etc.« less

  13. GridLAB-D Technical Support Document: Residential End-Use Module Version 1.0

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor, Zachary T.; Gowri, Krishnan; Katipamula, Srinivas

    2008-07-31

    1.0 Introduction The residential module implements the following end uses and characteristics to simulate the power demand in a single family home: • Water heater • Lights • Dishwasher • Range • Microwave • Refrigerator • Internal gains (plug loads) • House (heating/cooling loads) The house model considers the following four major heat gains/losses that contribute to the building heating/cooling load: 1. Conduction through exterior walls, roof and fenestration (based on envelope UA) 2. Air infiltration (based on specified air change rate) 3. Solar radiation (based on CLTD model and using tmy data) 4. Internal gains from lighting, people, equipment and other end use objects. The Equivalent Thermal Parameter (ETP) approach is used to model the residential loads and energy consumption. The following sections describe the modeling assumptions for each of the above end uses and the details of power demand calculations in the residential module.

  14. The gravitational resolving power of global seismic networks in the 0.1-10 Hz band

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mulargia, Francesco; Kamenshchik, Alexander

    2016-04-01

    Among the first attempts to detect gravitational waves, the seismic approach pre-dates the digital era. Major advances in computational power, seismic instrumentation and in the knowledge of seismic noise suggest to reappraise its potential. Using the whole earth as a detector, with the thousands of digital seismometers of seismic global networks as a single phased array, more than two decades of continuous seismic noise data are available and can be readily sifted at the only cost of (a pretty gigantic) computation. Using a subset of data, we show that absolute strains h ≲10-17 on burst gravitational pulses and h ≲10-21 on periodic signals may be feasibly resolved in the frequency range 0.1-10 Hz, only marginally covered by current advanced LIGO and future eLISA. However, theoretical predictions for the largest cosmic gravitational emissions at these frequencies are a few orders of magnitude lower.

  15. 33 CFR 1.10-5 - Public availability of records and documents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... and documents. 1.10-5 Section 1.10-5 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY GENERAL GENERAL PROVISIONS Public Availability of Information § 1.10-5 Public..., 2100 2nd St. SW., Stop 7101, Washington, DC 20593-7101. (b) Each person desiring to inspect a record...

  16. 30 CFR 57.22236 - Actions at 1.0 percent methane (VI mines).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Actions at 1.0 percent methane (VI mines). 57... MINES Safety Standards for Methane in Metal and Nonmetal Mines Ventilation § 57.22236 Actions at 1.0 percent methane (VI mines). If methane reaches 1.0 percent in the mine atmosphere, all persons other...

  17. 30 CFR 57.22236 - Actions at 1.0 percent methane (VI mines).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Actions at 1.0 percent methane (VI mines). 57... MINES Safety Standards for Methane in Metal and Nonmetal Mines Ventilation § 57.22236 Actions at 1.0 percent methane (VI mines). If methane reaches 1.0 percent in the mine atmosphere, all persons other...

  18. 30 CFR 57.22236 - Actions at 1.0 percent methane (VI mines).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Actions at 1.0 percent methane (VI mines). 57... MINES Safety Standards for Methane in Metal and Nonmetal Mines Ventilation § 57.22236 Actions at 1.0 percent methane (VI mines). If methane reaches 1.0 percent in the mine atmosphere, all persons other...

  19. On the quantum corrections to two-dimensional (1,0)-supersymmetric Abelian gauge models

    SciTech Connect

    Almeida, C.A.S.; De Oliveira, M.W. ); Kneipp, M.A.C. )

    1991-05-30

    In this paper the machinery of (1,0)-supergravity is employed to evaluate 1-loop corrections to the effective action and chiral symmetry supercurrent in the framework of an (1,0)-supersymmetric Abelian gauge model. As a by-product, a dynamically-generated mass is found out for the gauge (1,0)-superconductions.

  20. Additive In Vitro Antiplasmodial Effect of N-Alkyl and N-Benzyl-1,10-Phenanthroline Derivatives and Cysteine Protease Inhibitor E64

    PubMed Central

    Wijayanti, Mahardika Agus; Sholikhah, Eti Nurwening; Hadanu, Ruslin; Jumina, Jumina; Supargiyono, Supargiyono; Mustofa, Mustofa

    2010-01-01

    Potential new targets for antimalarial chemotherapy include parasite proteases, which are required for several cellular functions during the Plasmodium falciparum life cycle. Four new derivatives of N-alkyl and N-benzyl-1,10-phenanthroline have been synthesized. Those are (1)-N-methyl-1,10-phenanthrolinium sulfate, (1)-N-ethyl-1,10-phenanthrolinium sulfate, (1)-N-benzyl-1,10-phenanthrolinium chloride, and (1)-N-benzyl-1,10-phenanthrolinium iodide. Those compounds had potential antiplasmodial activity with IC50 values from 260.42 to 465.38 nM. Cysteine proteinase inhibitor E64 was used to investigate the mechanism of action of N-alkyl and N-benzyl-1,10-phenanthroline derivatives. A modified fixed-ratio isobologram method was used to study the in vitro interactions between the new compounds with either E64 or chloroquine. The interaction between N-alkyl and N-benzyl-1,10-phenanthroline derivatives and E64 was additive as well as their interactions with chloroquine were also additive. Antimalarial mechanism of chloroquine is mainly on the inhibition of hemozoin formation. As the interaction of chloroquine and E64 was additive, the results indicated that these new compounds had a mechanism of action by inhibiting Plasmodium proteases. PMID:22332022

  1. Photoionization of Nitromethane at 355nm and 266nm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martínez, Denhi; Betancourt, Francisco; Poveda, Juan Carlos; Guerrero, Alfonso; Cisneros, Carmen; Álvarez, Ignacio

    2014-05-01

    Nitromethane is one of the high-yield clean liquid fuels, i.e., thanks to the oxygen contained in nitromethane, much less atmospheric oxygen is burned compared to hydrocarbons such as gasoline, making the nitromethane an important prototypical energetic material, the understanding of its chemistry is relevant in other fields such as atmospheric chemistry or biochemistry. In this work we present the study of photoionization dynamics by multiphoton absorption with 355 nm and 266 nm wavelength photons, using time of flight spectrometry in reflectron mode (R-TOF). Some of the observed ion products appear for both wavelength and other only in one of them; both results were compared with preview observations and new ions were detected. This work is supported by CONACYT grant 165410 and DGAPA-UNAM grants IN-107-912 and IN-102-613.

  2. Picosecond laser texturization of mc-silicon for photovoltaics: A comparison between 1064 nm, 532 nm and 355 nm radiation wavelengths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Binetti, Simona; Le Donne, Alessia; Rolfi, Andrea; Jäggi, Beat; Neuenschwander, Beat; Busto, Chiara; Frigeri, Cesare; Scorticati, Davide; Longoni, Luca; Pellegrino, Sergio

    2016-05-01

    Self-organized surface structures were produced by picosecond laser pulses on multi-crystalline silicon for photovoltaic applications. Three different laser wavelengths were employed (i.e. 1064 nm, 532 nm and 355 nm) and the resulting morphologies were observed to effectively reduce the reflectivity of the samples after laser irradiation. Besides, a comparative study of the laser induced subsurface damage generated by the three different wavelengths was performed by confocal micro-Raman, photoluminescence and transmission electron microscopy. The results of both the structural and optical characterization showed that the mc-Si texturing performed with the laser at 355 nm provides surface reflectivity between 11% and 8% over the spectral range from 400 nm to 1 μm, while inducing the lowest subsurface damage, located above the depletion region of the p-n junction.

  3. Magneto-optical trap for metastable helium at 389 nm

    SciTech Connect

    Koelemeij, J.C.J.; Stas, R.J.W.; Hogervorst, W.; Vassen, W.

    2003-05-01

    We have constructed a magneto-optical trap (MOT) for metastable triplet helium atoms utilizing the 2 {sup 3}S{sub 1}{yields}3 {sup 3}P{sub 2} line at 389 nm as the trapping and cooling transition. The far-red-detuned MOT (detuning {delta}=-41 MHz) typically contains few times 10{sup 7} atoms at a relatively high ({approx}10{sup 9} cm{sup -3}) density, which is a consequence of the large momentum transfer per photon at 389 nm and a small two-body loss rate coefficient (2x10{sup -10} cm{sup 3}/s<{beta}<1.0x10{sup -9} cm{sup 3}/s). The two-body loss rate is more than five times smaller than in a MOT on the commonly used 2 {sup 3}S{sub 1}{yields}2 {sup 3}P{sub 2} line at 1083 nm. Furthermore, laser cooling at 389 nm results in temperatures somewhat lower than those achieved using 1083 nm. The 389-nm MOT exhibits small losses due to two-photon ionization, which have been investigated as well.

  4. Excitation Mechanisms for HCN (1-0) and HCO+ (1-0) in Galaxies from the Great Observatories All-sky LIRG Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Privon, G. C.; Herrero-Illana, R.; Evans, A. S.; Iwasawa, K.; Perez-Torres, M. A.; Armus, L.; Díaz-Santos, T.; Murphy, E. J.; Stierwalt, S.; Aalto, S.; Mazzarella, J. M.; Barcos-Muñoz, L.; Borish, H. J.; Inami, H.; Kim, D.-C.; Treister, E.; Surace, J. A.; Lord, S.; Conway, J.; Frayer, D. T.; Alberdi, A.

    2015-11-01

    We present new Institut de Radioastronomie Millimétrique (IRAM) 30 m spectroscopic observations of the ˜88 GHz band, including emission from the {CCH}(N=1\\to 0) multiplet, HCN (J=1\\to 0), {{HCO}}+(J=1\\to 0), and {HNC}(J=1\\to 0), for a sample of 58 local luminous and ultraluminous infrared galaxies from the Great Observatories All-sky LIRG Survey (GOALS). By combining our new IRAM data with literature data and Spitzer/IRS spectroscopy, we study the correspondence between these putative tracers of dense gas and the relative contribution of active galactic nuclei (AGNs) and star formation to the mid-infrared luminosity of each system. We find the HCN (1-0) emission to be enhanced in AGN-dominated systems (< {L}{HCN(1-0)}\\prime /{L}{{HCO}+(1-0)}\\prime > =1.84), compared to composite and starburst-dominated systems (< {L}{HCN(1-0)}\\prime /{L}{{HCO}+(1-0)}\\prime > =1.14, and 0.88, respectively). However, some composite and starburst systems have {L}{HCN(1-0)}\\prime /{L}{{HCO}+(1-0)}\\prime ratios comparable to those of AGNs, indicating that enhanced HCN emission is not uniquely associated with energetically dominant AGNs. After removing AGN-dominated systems from the sample, we find a linear relationship (within the uncertainties) between log10({L}{HCN(1-0)}\\prime ) and log10(LIR), consistent with most previous findings. {L}{HCN(1-0)}\\prime /LIR, typically interpreted as the dense-gas depletion time, appears to have no systematic trend with LIR for our sample of luminous and ultraluminous infrared galaxies, and has significant scatter. The galaxy-integrated {L}{HCN(1-0)}\\prime and {L}{{HCO}+(1-0)}\\prime emission do not appear to have a simple interpretation in terms of the AGN dominance or the star formation rate, and are likely determined by multiple processes, including density and radiative effects. Based on observations carried out with the IRAM 30 m Telescope. IRAM is supported by INSU/CNRS (France), MPG (Germany), and IGN (Spain).

  5. Synthesis and Near IR Photoluminescence of Os(II) Bis(2,2'-bipyridine) (3,8-Diarylethynyl-1,10-phemanthroline) Complexes: Anomalous Behavior of the 3,8-Dinitrophenylethynyl-substituted Homologue

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yang, Jinhua; Dass, Amala; Sotiriou-Leventis, Chariklia; Tyson, Daniel S.; Leventis, Nicholas

    2005-01-01

    A large bathochromic shift (50 nm) and emission in the near infrared is observed by attaching arylethynyl groups at the 3,8-positions of the 1,10-phenanthroline ligand (phen) of [Os(bipy)2(phen)]2+ (where bipy = 2,2'-bipyridine). Thus [Os(bipy)2(3,8-di-4-methoxyphenylethynyl-1,10-phenathroline)]2+ emits at 795 nm, while [Os(bipy)2(3,8-diphenylethynyl-1,10-phenanthroline)]2+ emits at 815 nm. According to this trend it would have been expected that [Os(bipy)2(3,8-di-4-nitrophenylethynyl-1,10-phenathroline)]2+ emits farther in the near infrared. Nevertheless, this complex is not photoluminescent because of intramolecular electron transfer quenching of the MLCT excited state by the nitroaromatic group. These results set structural and redox potential standards in the design of near infrared emitters based on [Os(bipy)2(phen)]2+ type complexes.

  6. 248nm silicon photoablation: Microstructuring basics

    SciTech Connect

    Poopalan, P.; Najamudin, S. H.; Wahab, Y.; Mazalan, M.

    2015-05-15

    248nm pulses from a KrF excimer laser was used to ablate a Si wafer in order to ascertain the laser pulse and energy effects for use as a microstructuring tool for MEMS fabrication. The laser pulses were varied between two different energy levels of 8mJ and 4mJ while the number of pulses for ablation was varied. The corresponding ablated depths were found to range between 11 µm and 49 µm, depending on the demagnified beam fluence.

  7. Low temperature hydrothermal synthesis, structural investigation and functional properties of CoxMn1-xFe2O4 (0 ⩽ x ⩽ 1.0) nanoferrites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Penchal Reddy, Matli; Zhou, Xiobing; Yann, Aman; Du, Shiyu; Huang, Qing; Mohamed, Adel Mohamed Amer

    2015-05-01

    Cobalt substituted manganese nanocrystalline spinel ferrites having general formula CoxMn1-xFe2O4 (x = 0, 0.2, 0.4, 0.6, 0.8 and 1.0) was successfully synthesized using hydrothermal method. The structure, magnetic and dielectric properties of as-synthesized samples was characterized through different techniques such as XRD, FESEM, EDX, FTIR, PPMS and Dielectric spectroscopy. X-ray diffraction (XRD) studies showed that the samples have pure cubic spinel phase. The lattice parameter enhances with Co substitution. The SEM images of CoxMn1-xFe2O4 ferrite show that the grain size decreases with an increase in the Co content and the average nanocrystalline sizes were found to be less than 100 nm. Compositional stoichiometry was confirmed by energy dispersive analysis of the X-ray (EDAX) technique. The FTIR spectra reveled two prominent frequency bands in the wave number range 400-600 cm-1 which confirm the cubic spinel structure and completion of chemical reaction. As the cobalt concentration increases, the magnetization of the octahedral sites and hence the net magnetization decreases. It is also observed that the saturation magnetization (Ms), decrease while coercivity (Hc) increase with increase in cobalt substitution. Frequency dependence of dielectric constant shows dielectric dispersion due to the Maxwell-Wagner type of interfacial polarization. AC conductivity measurements suggest that the conduction is due to small polaron hopping.

  8. About the electronic and photophysical properties of iridium(III)-pyrazino[2,3-f][1,10]-phenanthroline based complexes for use in electroluminescent devices.

    PubMed

    Cortés-Arriagada, Diego; Sanhueza, Luis; González, Iván; Dreyse, Paulina; Toro-Labbé, Alejandro

    2016-01-14

    A family of cyclometalated Ir(III) complexes was studied through quantum chemistry calculations to get insights into their applicability in light electrochemical cells (LECs). The complexes are described as [Ir(R-C^N)2(ppl)](+), where ppl is the pyrazino[2,3-f][1,10]-phenanthroline ancillary ligand. The modification of the HOMO energy in all the complexes was achieved by means of different R-C^N cyclometalating ligands, with R-ppy (phenylpyridine), R-pyz (1-phenylpyrazole) or R-pypy (2,3'-bipyridine); in addition, inductive effects were taken into account by substitution with the R groups (R = H, F or CF3). Then, compounds with HOMO-LUMO energy gaps from 2.76 to 3.54 eV were obtained, in addition to emission energies in the range of 438 to 597 nm. The emission deactivation pathways confirm the presence of metal-to-ligand transitions in all the complexes, which allow the strong spin-orbit coupling effects, and then improving the luminescence performance. However, the coupling with ligand and metal centered excited states was observed for the blue-shifted emitters, which could result in a decrease of the luminescence efficiencies. Furthermore, ionization potentials, electron affinities and reorganization energies (for holes and electrons) were obtained to account for the injection and transport properties of all the complexes in electroluminescent devices. PMID:26449274

  9. Rotational level-dependent collisional broadening and line shift of the A2Sigma(+)-X2Pi (1,0) band of OH in hydrogen-air combustion gases

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kessler, W. J.; Allen, M. G.; Davis, S. J.

    1993-01-01

    Measurements of the collisional broadening and line shift of the (1,0) band of the A2Sigma(+)-X2Pi system of OH are reported in atmospheric pressure hydrogen-air combustion gases. The measurements were made using a single-mode, narrow linewidth, frequency-doubled ring dye laser operating near 283 nm. The OH was generated in the combustion gases of a flat flame H2-air burner. Collisional broadening parameters for equilibrium mixtures of H2, O2, H2O, and N2 were obtained spanning a range of fuel/air equivalence ratios from 0.6 to 1.6 and temperatures from 1500 to 2050 K. Measurements were obtained spanning rotational quantum numbers from 4.5 to 16.5. The collision induced frequency shift was determined to be 0.1 that of the collisional broadening.

  10. Measurements at 351 nm of temporal dispersion in fibers

    SciTech Connect

    Griffith, R; Milam, D; Sell, W; Thompson, C

    1998-11-04

    1. Temporal dispersion at 351-nm was measured in the following: a 35-m bundle of 19 each 50-µm-core fibers, a companion 35-m single fiber, a 100-µm-core single fiber (at 4 lengths), and a 50-µm-core single fiber (two samples, 7 lengths). The 50-µm-core fiber was from preform #24; the 100-µm-core fiber was a prototype version having a thick cladding. All of the fibers were developed and manufactured at the Vavilov State Optical Institute, St. Petersburg, Russia. 2. Dispersion measurements were made by propagating a 20-ps 351-nm pulse through the fiber under test and recording the output on an S20 streak camera. The width of the pulse transmitted by the fiber was compared to that of a fraction of the pulse that had propagated over an air path. Values of dispersion were calculated as, D = {radical}(F² - A²) , where F and A are the full widths at half maximum (FWHM) for, respectively, the fiber-path and the air-path streaks. 3. In each of the experiments, the measured dispersion increased with counts in the streak record, which in principle, are proportional to intensity in the fiber. Measured values of dispersion ranged from about 0.6 to 1.0 ps/m for the single fibers. 4. The measured FWHMs of both the fiber-path pulse and the air-path pulse increased with increase in counts in the streak record. The rate of broadening was greatest for the fiber-path pulse, and the broadening of that pulse was the primary cause for the dependence of dispersion on counts in the streak record. Pulse broadening with increase in counts is symptomatic of camera saturation, but it is difficult to understand why saturation should have effected the fiber-path pulses more strongly. 5. There were spatial anomalies in the streak records of the output pulses from some of the fibers. Emission by the bundle of a "doubled" pulse is a primary example. In streaks recorded at about 800 counts, the total duration for the pair of pulses was about 100 ps. The maxima of the pulses occurred in

  11. TUNABLE DIODE LASER MEASUREMENTS OF NO2 NEAR 670 NM AND 395 NM. (R823933)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Two single-mode diode lasers were used to record high-resolution absorption spectra of NO2 (dilute in Ar) near 670.2 and 394.5 nm over a range of temperatures (296 to 774 K) and total pressures (2.4 x 10(-2) to 1 atm). A commercial InGaAsP laser was tuned 1.3 cm(-1) at a repetiti...

  12. Pulsed blue laser at 491 nm by nonlinear cavity dumping.

    PubMed

    Herault, Emilie; Lelek, Mickaël; Balembois, François; Georges, Patrick

    2008-11-24

    A nonlinear cavity dumping process is applied for the first time to generate kW peak power pulses at 491 nm. The system is based on efficient sum-frequency mixing of 1063 nm and 912 nm radiations in a BiBO nonlinear crystal placed inside a Nd:GdVO4 laser oscillator with a high finesse cavity at 912 nm. The nonlinear cavity dumping process is triggered by high peak power nanosecond pulses from a 1063 nm Q-switched Nd:GdVO4 laser operating at 10 kHz. To reach the kW range at 491 nm a key point is to Q-switch the high finesse 912 nm cavity instead of continuous wave operation. Thus, the peak power (9.3 kW for 3 ns pulses) and the average power (280 mW) obtained at 491 nm are 14 times higher than the one obtained when the 912 nm laser operated in continuous wave. PMID:19030029

  13. 40nm tunable multi-wavelength fiber laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jia, Qingsong; Wang, Tianshu; Zhang, Peng; Dong, Keyan; Jiang, Huilin

    2014-12-01

    A Brillouin-Erbium multi-wavelength tunable fiber laser at C-band is demostrated. A 10 km long singlemode fiber(SMF), a 6 m long Erbium-doped fiber, two couplers, a wavelength division multiplexer, a isolator, an optical circulator, a 980nm pump laser and a narrow linewidth tunable laser are included in the structure. A segment of 10 km-long single-mode fiber (SMF) between the two ports of a 1×2 coupler is used as Brillouin gain. Ebiumdoped fiber amplifier (EDFA) consists of a segment of 6m er-doped fiber pumped by 980nm laser dioder . A narrow linewidth tunable laser from 1527 to 1607 nm as Brillouin bump, At the Brillouin pump power of 8mW and the 980 nm pump power of 400 mw, 16 output channels with 0.08 nm spacing and tuning range of 40 nm from 1527 nm to 1567 nm are achieved. We realize the tunable output of wavelength by adjusting the 980 nm pump power and the Brillouin pump wavelength. Stability of the multiwavelength fiber laser is also observed.

  14. 32nm overlay improvement capabilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eichelberger, Brad; Huang, Kevin; O'Brien, Kelly; Tien, David; Tsai, Frank; Minvielle, Anna; Singh, Lovejeet; Schefske, Jeffrey

    2008-03-01

    The industry is facing a major challenge looking forward on the technology roadmap with respect to overlay control. Immersion lithography has established itself as the POR for 45nm and for the next few nodes. As the gap closes between scanner capability and device requirements new methodologies need to be taken into consideration. Double patterning lithography is an approach that's being considered for 32 and below, but it creates very strict demands for overlay performance. The fact that a single layer device will need to be patterned using two sequential single processes creates a strong coupling between the 1st and 2nd exposure. The coupling effect during the double patterning process results in extremely tight tolerances for overlay error and scanner capabilities. The purpose of this paper is to explore a new modeling method to improve lithography performance for the 32nm node. Not necessarily unique for double patterning, but as a general approach to improve overlay performance regardless of which patterning process is implemented. We will achieve this by performing an in depth source of variance analysis of current scanner performance and project the anticipated improvements from our new modeling approach. Since the new modeling approach will involve 2nd and 3rd order corrections we will also provide and analysis that outlines current metrology capabilities and sampling optimizations to further expand the opportunities of an efficient implementation of such approach.

  15. Absorption spectrum of neat liquid benzene and its concentrated solutions in n-hexane from 220 to 170 nm

    SciTech Connect

    Saik, V.O.; Lipsky, S.

    1995-03-30

    The electronic absorption spectrum of benzene has been obtained by phototransmission measurements over a concentration range from 0.005 M in n-hexane to the neat liquid at 11.2 M and over a spectral range that extends down to 170 nm. Good agreement is obtained with previously reported measurements on the neat liquid. The oscillator strength of the strongly allowed A{sub 1g} {yields} E{sub 1u} transition is maintained at ca. 1.0 as the benzene concentration increases but is accompanied by extensive redistribution of the intensity such that the optical cross section at the position of the absorption maximum (which shifts from 184{sub .2} nm in dilute solution to 189{sub .5} nm in the neat liquid) reduces by a factor of 2.7. An explanation for these changes in terms of Lorentz field corrections to the complex dielectric constant is developed, and its implication to the assignment of the neat liquid absorption as a collective excitation is considered. 43 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  16. 75 FR 11194 - Notice of Filing of Plats of Survey, NM

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-10

    ..., for Group 1096 NM. The plat representing the dependent resurvey and survey, in Township 11 ] South, Range 22 East, of the New Mexico Principal Meridian, accepted January 15, 2010, for Group 1096 NM. If...

  17. Early Solar System hydrothermal activity in chondritic asteroids on 1-10-year timescales.

    PubMed

    Dyl, Kathryn A; Bischoff, Addi; Ziegler, Karen; Young, Edward D; Wimmer, Karl; Bland, Phil A

    2012-11-01

    Chondritic meteorites are considered the most primitive remnants of planetesimals from the early Solar System. As undifferentiated objects, they also display widespread evidence of water-rock interaction on the parent body. Understanding this history has implications for the formation of planetary bodies, the delivery of water to the inner Solar System, and the formation of prebiotic molecules. The timescales of water-rock reactions in these early objects, however, are largely unknown. Here, we report evidence for short-lived water-rock reactions in the highly metamorphosed ordinary chondrite breccia Villalbeto de la Peña (L6). An exotic clast (d = 2cm) has coexisting variations in feldspar composition and oxygen isotope ratios that can only result from hydrothermal conditions. The profiles were modeled at T = 800 °C and P(H(2)O) = 1 bar using modified grain-boundary diffusion parameters for oxygen self-diffusion and reaction rates of NaSiCa(-1)Al(-1) exchange in a fumarole. The geochemical data are consistent with hydrothermal activity on the parent body lasting only 1-10 y. This result has wide-ranging implications for the geological history of chondritic asteroids.

  18. Safety assessment comparison methodology for toxic and radioactive wastes (SACO version 1.0)

    SciTech Connect

    Torres, C.; Simon, I.; Agueero, A.; Little, R.H.; Smith, G.M.

    1993-12-31

    As part of a research contract jointly funded by the Commission of the European Communities (CEC) and Empresa Nacional de Residuos Radiactivos S.A. (Enresa, Spain), the Instituto de Medioambiente of the CIEMAT Research Centre and Intera (UK) are developing and testing a general methodology (SACO) to assess the post-disposal environmental impact produced by waste disposal practices. The scope of the methodology includes toxic, radioactive and mixed hazardous wastes. The term toxic is interpreted broadly to include any kind of liquid or solid non-radioactive waste which could give rise to some detrimental environmental effects post-disposal. Radioactive wastes considered include the full range from low to high level solid wastes arising inside and outside the nuclear power industry. Mixed hazardous waste is taken to be waste presenting both radioactive and other toxic hazard potential. In this paper SACO version 1.0 methodology is presented and it is applied to the assessment of the impact of shallow and deep disposal of waste.

  19. The metalloprotease inhibitor 1,10-phenanthroline affects Schistosoma mansoni motor activity, egg laying and viability.

    PubMed

    Day, T A; Chen, G Z

    1998-04-01

    The Zn(2+)-chelating metalloprotease inhibitor 1,10-phenanthroline (phenanthroline, 5-150 microM) elicited dose-dependent contraction of the longitudinal and circular (transverse) musculature of adult male schistosomes. At the same concentrations, phenanthroline did not cause contraction of dispersed individual muscle fibres. The phenanthroline-induced contractions were reduced by the inclusion of 100 or 300 microM Zn2+ in the extracellular medium. Phenanthroline (0.5-150 microM) also inhibited the egg production of adult worm pairs in vitro, with a 98% reduction at 50 microM. When worm pairs were exposed to phenanthroline, the males detached from the dish and released the females, resulting in unpaired worms. At the higher concentrations (50 and 150 microM), the worms were killed in vitro. Worm burdens were reduced by over 50% in infected mice injected with phenanthroline (20 mg/kg/day for 4 days), but twice the dose resulted in only a 25% reduction. Phenanthroline injections also induced an hepatic shift and an unpairing of adult worms in infected mice, and the female worms appeared degenerate and lacked gut pigmentation. Mice fed a diet containing 0.3% phenanthroline received significant protection from infection when challenged with schistosome cercaria, where phenanthroline-fed mice had 94% fewer adult worms than control mice. The broad range of phenanthroline effects on schistosomes suggests broad and important functions for metalloproteases in these worms. PMID:9585934

  20. The implementation of NEMS GFS Aerosol Component (NGAC) Version 1.0 for global dust forecasting at NOAA/NCEP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Cheng-Hsuan; da Silva, Arlindo; Wang, Jun; Moorthi, Shrinivas; Chin, Mian; Colarco, Peter; Tang, Youhua; Bhattacharjee, Partha S.; Chen, Shen-Po; Chuang, Hui-Ya; Juang, Hann-Ming Henry; McQueen, Jeffery; Iredell, Mark

    2016-05-01

    The NOAA National Centers for Environmental Prediction (NCEP) implemented the NOAA Environmental Modeling System (NEMS) Global Forecast System (GFS) Aerosol Component (NGAC) for global dust forecasting in collaboration with NASA Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC). NGAC Version 1.0 has been providing 5-day dust forecasts at 1° × 1° resolution on a global scale, once per day at 00:00 Coordinated Universal Time (UTC), since September 2012. This is the first global system capable of interactive atmosphere aerosol forecasting at NCEP. The implementation of NGAC V1.0 reflects an effective and efficient transitioning of NASA research advances to NCEP operations, paving the way for NCEP to provide global aerosol products serving a wide range of stakeholders, as well as to allow the effects of aerosols on weather forecasts and climate prediction to be considered.

  1. Effect of Yttrium on the Fracture Strength of the Sn-1.0Ag-0.5Cu Solder Joints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Hyelim; Kaplan, Wayne D.; Choe, Heeman

    2016-07-01

    This is a preliminary investigation on the mechanical properties of Pb-free Sn-1.0Ag-0.5Cu solder joints containing 0.02 wt.% to 0.1 wt.% Y under a range of thermal aging and reflow conditions. Despite the significantly thicker intermetallic compound (IMC) formed at the solder joint, the 0.1 wt.% Y-doped joint exhibited a higher fracture strength than its baseline Sn-1.0Ag-0.5Cu counterpart under most aging and reflow conditions. This may be associated with the formation of Y-Cu IMCs formed at the interface between the solder and the Cu substrate, because the Y-Cu IMCs have recently been referred to as relatively `ductile' IMCs.

  2. All-fibre ytterbium laser tunable within 45 nm

    SciTech Connect

    Abdullina, S R; Babin, S A; Vlasov, A A; Kablukov, S I; Shelemba, I S; Kurkov, A S

    2007-12-31

    A tunable ytterbium-doped fibre laser is fabricated. The laser is tuned by using a tunable fibre Bragg grating (FBG) as a selecting intracavity element. The laser is tunable within 45 nm (from 1063 to 1108 nm) and emits {approx}6 W in the line of width {approx}0.15 nm, the output power and linewidth being virtually invariable within the tuning range. The method is proposed for synchronous tuning the highly reflecting and output FBGs, and a tunable ytterbium all-fibre laser is built. (lasers)

  3. Microstructure and magnetic properties of (001) textured L1(0) FePt films on amorphous glass substrate

    SciTech Connect

    Speliotis, T; Varvaro, G; Testa, AM; Giannopoulos, G; Agostinelli, E; Li, W; Hadjipanayis, G; Niarchos, D

    2015-05-15

    L1(0) FePt thin films with an island-like morphology and magnetic perpendicular anisotropy were grown at low temperature (300 < T-dep< 375 degrees C) by magnetron sputtering on Hoya glass substrates using a 30-nm thick Cr (2 0 0) underlayer. An MgO buffer layer with a thickness of 2 nm was used to inhibit the diffusion from the Cr underlayer and promote the growth of (0 0 1) oriented L1(0) FePt films by inducing an in-plane lattice distortion. By varying the substrate temperature and the Ar sputter pressure (3.5 < P-Ar< 15 mTorr) during the deposition, the degree of chemical order, the microstructure and the magnetic properties were tuned and the best properties in term of squareness ratio (M-r/M-s similar to 0.95) and coercive field (H-c similar to 14 kOe) were observed for films deposited at T-dep = 350 degrees C and P-Ar= 5 mTorr, due to the appearance of a tensile strain, which favors the perpendicular anisotropy. The analysis of the angular dependence of remanent magnetization curves on the optimized sample suggests that the magnetization reversal is highly incoherent due to the inter-island interactions. Our results provide useful information on the low temperature growth of FePt films with perpendicular anisotropy onto glass substrates, which are relevant for a variety of technological applications, such as magnetic recording and spintronic devices. (C) 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. High-efficiency high-brightness diode lasers at 1470 nm/1550 nm for medical and defense applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gallup, Kendra; Ungar, Jeff; Vaissie, Laurent; Lammert, Rob; Hu, Wentao

    2012-03-01

    Diode lasers in the 1400 nm to 1600 nm regime are used in a variety of applications including pumping Er:YAG lasers, range finding, materials processing, aesthetic medical treatments and surgery. In addition to the compact size, efficiency, and low cost advantages of traditional diode lasers, high power semiconductor lasers in the eye-safe regime are becoming widely used in an effort to minimize the unintended impact of potentially hazardous scattered optical radiation from the laser source, the optical delivery system, or the target itself. In this article we describe the performance of high efficiency high brightness InP laser bars at 1470nm and 1550nm developed at QPC Lasers for applications ranging from surgery to rangefinding.

  5. Structural properties of platinum(II) biphenyl complexes containing 1,10-phenanthroline derivatives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rillema, D. Paul; Cruz, Arvin J.; Tasset, Brandon J.; Moore, Curtis; Siam, Khamis; Huang, Wei

    2013-06-01

    Seven platinum(II) complexes formulated as Pt(bph)L, where bph is the 2,2'-biphenyl dianion and L = 4-methyl-1,10-phenanthroline (4-Mephen), 5-methyl-1,10-phenanthroline (5-Mephen), 5-chloro-1,10-phenanthroline (5-Clphen), 5,6-dimethyl-1,10-phenanthroline (5,6-Me2phen), 4,7-dimethyl-1,10-phenanthroline (4,7-Me2phen), 4,7-diphenyl-1,10-phenanthroline (4,7-Ph2phen) and 3,4,7,8-tetramethyl-1,10-phenanthroline (3,4,7,8-Me4phen) are reported. Protons attached to the phen ligand resonate downfield from those attached to the bph ligand and two proton signals are split by interaction with 195Pt. Pt(bph)(3,4,7,8-Me4phen), Pt(bph)(4,7-Me2phen), Pt(bph)(5,6-Me2phen), Pt(bph)(4,7-Ph2phen) and Pt(bph)(5-Mephen) crystallize in the space groups Pna21, P21/n, P21/c, P - 1 and Pca21, respectively. The structures of the complexes deviate from true planarity and divide themselves into two groups where the bph and phen ligands cross in an X configuration or bow out in a butterfly (B) configuration. Circular dichroism revealed two different spectra with respect to the X and B configurations.

  6. All-fiber wavelength-tunable Tm/Ho-codoped laser between 1727 nm and 2030 nm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xue, Guanghui; Zhang, Bin; Yin, Ke; Yang, Weiqiang; Hou, Jing

    2015-02-01

    Lasers in the eye-safe 2 μm spectral region are attracting significant interest due to a variety of applications such as atmospheric lidar sensing and medical treatment, which require laser sources matching the absorption lines of various molecules in the 2 μm wavelength region. We demonstrate an all-fiber Tm/Ho-codoped laser operating in the 2 μm wavelength region with a wide wavelength tuning range of more than 300 nm. The Tm/Ho-codoped fiber laser (THFL) was built in a ring cavity configuration with a fiberized grating-based tunable filter to select the operating wavelength. The tunable wavelength range of the THFL was from 1727 nm to 2030 nm. To the best of our knowledge, this is the widest tuning range that has been reported for an all-fiber rare-earth-doped laser to date. Efficient short wavelength operation was also achieved. The output power of the THFL was further scaled up from 1810 nm to 2010 nm by using a stage of Tm/Ho-codoped fiber amplifier (THFA), which exhibited the maximum slope efficiency of 42.6% with output power of 408 mW at 1910 nm.

  7. Excitation Mechanisms for HCN (1-0) and HCO+ (1-0) in Galaxies from the Great Observatories All-sky LIRG Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Privon, George; Herrero-Illana, Ruben; Evans, Aaron; Iwasawa, Kazushi; Perez-Torres, Miguel; Armus, Lee; Diaz-Santos, Tanio; Murphy, Eric; Stierwalt, Sabrina; Aalto, Susanne; Mazzarella, Joe; Barcos-Muñoz, Loreto; Borish, Jake; Inami, Hanae; Kim, Dongchan; Treister, Ezequiel; Surace, Jason; Lord, Steven; Conway, John; Frayer, David; Alberdi, Antonio

    2015-08-01

    We will present new IRAM 30m observations of the HCN (1-0) and HCO+ (1-0) emission in a sample of Luminous and Ultraluminous Infrared Galaxies from the Great Observatories All-sky LIRG Survey. These new measurements are compared with mid-infrared AGN diagnostics to ascertain if enhanced HCN emission (relative to HCO+) correlates with increased AGN dominance. I will also compare consider the global relationships of these dense gas tracers with the infrared luminosity, to investigate the relationship between the HCN and HCO+ luminosities and the ongoing star formation. These comparisons suggest the HCN and HCO+ emission depend on both density and radiative effects (XDRs, mid-infrared pumping), obstructing a simple interpretation of the HCN/HCO+ ratio.

  8. Mutagenicity of the nuclease activity of 1,10-phenanthroline-copper ion

    SciTech Connect

    Feig, A.L.; Thederahn, T.; Sigman, D.S.

    1988-08-30

    The nuclease activity of 1,10-phenanthroline-copper functions intracellularly. This was shown by its mutagenicity in the Ames Test using the tester strain TA 102 and the in vivo nicking of plasmids derived from this strain. In vivo DNA strand scission requires all the components essential for the in vitro activity: 1,10-phenanthroline, cupric ion, thiol and hydrogen peroxide. Although /sup 60/Co gamma radiation potentiates the nuclease activity of 1,10-phenanthroline-copper ion in vitro via a superoxide dependent pathway, it does not promote significant mutagenesis in vivo at exposure levels below cytotoxicity.

  9. Properties of continuous-wave 1123 nm laser with diode-side-pumped Nd:YAG

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bai, F.; Wang, Q. P.; Liu, Z. J.; Zhang, X. Y.; Sun, W. J.

    2010-11-01

    Laser properties of diode-side-pumped Nd:YAG laser operating at 1123 nm are demonstrated. A 1.0 at % Nd-doped Nd:YAG rod with a size of Ø3 × 63 mm2 is used as the active medium. Both radial and tangential thermal focal lengths of this side-pumped Nd:YAG rod are determined under lasing condition. The results show that the bifocusing strength of 1123 nm laser is larger than that of 1164 nm laser, and 1123-nm thermal focal lengths are shorter than those of 1064-nm laser due to higher quantum defect. Laser output performances of 1123 nm in terms of stability, output power and beam quality influenced by pump power at different cavity lengths are also discussed with a convex-piano cavity.

  10. Rb-stabilized laser at 1572 nm for CO2 monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matthey, R.; Moreno, W.; Gruet, F.; Brochard, P.; Schilt, S.; Mileti, G.

    2016-06-01

    We have developed a compact rubidium-stabilized laser system to serve as optical frequency reference in the 1.55-μm wavelength region, in particular for CO2 monitoring at 1572 nm. The light of a fiber-pigtailed distributed feedback (DFB) laser emitting at 1560 nm is frequency-doubled and locked to a sub-Doppler rubidium transition at 780 nm using a 2-cm long vapor glass cell. Part of the DFB laser light is modulated with an electro-optical modulator enclosed in a Fabry-Perot cavity, generating an optical frequency comb with spectral coverage extending from 1540 nm to 1580 nm. A second slave DFB laser emitting at 1572 nm and offset-locked to one line of the frequency comb shows a relative frequency stability of 1.10-11 at 1 s averaging time and <4.10-12 from 1 hour up to 3 days.

  11. Generation and use of high power 213 nm and 266 nm laser radiation and tunable 210-400 nm laser radiation with BBO crystal matrix array

    DOEpatents

    Gruen, Dieter M.

    2000-01-01

    A 213 nm laser beam is capable of single photon ablative photodecomposition for the removal of a polymer or biological material substrate. Breaking the molecular bonds and displacing the molecules away from the substrate in a very short time period results in most of the laser photon energy being carried away by the displaced molecules, thus minimizing thermal damage to the substrate. The incident laser beam may be unfocussed and is preferably produced by quintupling the 1064 nm radiation from a Nd:YAG solid state laser, i.e., at 213 nm. In one application, the 213 nm laser beam is expanded in cross section and directed through a plurality of small beta barium borate (BBO) crystals for increasing the energy per photon of the laser radiation directed onto the substrate. The BBO crystals are arranged in a crystal matrix array to provide a large laser beam transmission area capable of accommodating high energy laser radiation without damaging the BBO crystals. The BBO crystal matrix array may also be used with 266 nm laser radiation for carrying out single or multi photon ablative photodecomposition. The BBO crystal matrix array may also be used in an optical parametric oscillator mode to generate high power tunable laser radiation in the range of 210-400 nm.

  12. Extracellular vesicles shed by melanoma cells contain a modified form of H1.0 linker histone and H1.0 mRNA-binding proteins

    PubMed Central

    Schiera, Gabriella; Di Liegro, Carlo Maria; Puleo, Veronica; Colletta, Oriana; Fricano, Anna; Cancemi, Patrizia; Di Cara, Gianluca; Di Liegro, Italia

    2016-01-01

    Extracellular vesicles (EVs) are now recognized as a fundamental way for cell-to-cell horizontal transfer of properties, in both physiological and pathological conditions. Most of EV-mediated cross-talk among cells depend on the exchange of proteins, and nucleic acids, among which mRNAs, and non-coding RNAs such as different species of miRNAs. Cancer cells, in particular, use EVs to discard molecules which could be dangerous to them (for example differentiation-inducing proteins such as histone H1.0, or antitumor drugs), to transfer molecules which, after entering the surrounding cells, are able to transform their phenotype, and even to secrete factors, which allow escaping from immune surveillance. Herein we report that melanoma cells not only secrete EVs which contain a modified form of H1.0 histone, but also transport the corresponding mRNA. Given the already known role in tumorigenesis of some RNA binding proteins (RBPs), we also searched for proteins of this class in EVs. This study revealed the presence in A375 melanoma cells of at least three RBPs, with apparent MW of about 65, 45 and 38 kDa, which are able to bind H1.0 mRNA. Moreover, we purified one of these proteins, which by MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry was identified as the already known transcription factor MYEF2. PMID:27633859

  13. Si-Ge-Sn alloys with 1.0 eV gap for CPV multijunction solar cells

    SciTech Connect

    Roucka, Radek Clark, Andrew; Landini, Barbara

    2015-09-28

    Si-Ge-Sn ternary group IV alloys offer an alternative to currently used 1.0 eV gap materials utilized in multijunction solar cells. The advantage of Si-Ge-Sn is the ability to vary both the bandgap and lattice parameter independently. We present current development in fabrication of Si-Ge-Sn alloys with gaps in the 1.0 eV range. Produced material exhibits excellent structural properties, which allow for integration with existing III-V photovoltaic cell concepts. Time dependent room temperature photoluminescence data demonstrate that these materials have long carrier lifetimes. Absorption tunable by compositional changes is observed. As a prototype device set utilizing the 1 eV Si-Ge-Sn junction, single junction Si-Ge-Sn device and triple junction device with Si-Ge-Sn subcell have been fabricated. The resulting I-V and external quantum efficiency data show that the Si-Ge-Sn junction is fully functional and the performance is comparable to other 1.0 eV gap materials currently used.

  14. Transverse momentum distribution of primary charged particles in the p-Pb interactions using HIJING 1.0

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tabassam, U.; Ali, Y.; Suleymanov, M.; Bhatti, A. S.; Butt, J. B.; Amjad, M. S.

    2016-08-01

    The shape of the transverse momentum (pT) distribution of primary charged particles in minimum bias (nonsingle-diffractive) p-Pb collisions at sNN = 5.02TeV is studied in the pseudorapidity regions: |η| < 0.3, 0.3 < η < 0.8 and 0.8 < η < 1.3 and in the transverse momentum range 0.5 < pT < 20GeV/c using simulated data produced with the HIJING 1.0 code. These are compared with the ALICE data measured by the ALICE detector at the LHC. In the model, the central and forward η-regions differ more than in the ALICE data and due to this fact HIJING 1.0 cannot describe well the high pT region in the pT distributions. The comparison of results from simulation implies that the HIJING 1.0 considered narrower pseudorapidity distribution for the charged particles than it is in the ALICE data. It cannot take into account satisfactorily leading effect due to the asymmetric p-Pb fragmentation.

  15. 32 CFR 1636.5 - Exclusion from Class 1-A-0 and Class 1-0.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... be excluded from Class 1-A-0 or Class 1-0: (a) Who asserts beliefs which are of a religious, moral or... participation in war does not rest at all upon moral, ethical, or religious principle, but instead rests...

  16. Structural and magnetic properties of L1(0)/A1, FePt nanocomposites

    SciTech Connect

    Giannopoulos, G; Speliotis, T; Li, WF; Hadjipanayis, G; Niarchos, D

    2013-01-01

    In this work structural and magnetic properties of (L1(0)-FePt/A1-FePt) exchange coupled nanocomposites are presented. Semi spherical "dome-like" nanocomposites with L1(0) FePt isolated nanoparticles and A1 FePt (fcc) cap layers were obtained by depositing A1-FePt on type L1(0) FePt nanoparticles in order to understand the influence of the soft magnetic layer thickness on the magnetic properties of the system. Epitaxial growth is confirmed by X-ray diffraction and TEM, while the coercivity decreases dramatically for the L1(0)/A1-FePt system when the thickness of the A1-FePt cap layers is increased. This result can be used to realize ultrahigh magnetic recording media with tunable coercivity, suitable for conventional write heads. (C) 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Iron(III) oxidized nucleophilic coupling of catechol with o-tolidine/p-toluidine followed by 1,10-phenanthroline as new and sensitivity improved spectrophotometric methods for iron present in chemicals, pharmaceutical, edible green leaves, nuts and lake water samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shyla, B.; Bhaskar, C. Vijaya; Nagendrappa, G.

    2012-02-01

    A nucleophile formed from iron(III) oxidized catechol in 0.1 M hydrochloric acid couple with o-tolidine, system 1/p-toluidine, system 2 to produce dye product, λ max 520 nm. The system 1/2 obeys Beer's law in the range 0.08-8.0 μg ml -1 with molar absorptivity, Sandell sensitivity and regression coefficient values, 4.225 × 10 3/3.140 × 10 3 l mol -1 cm -1, 0.0132/0.0178 μg cm -2 and 0.9987/0.9981. Iron(II) formed from iron(III) in system 1/2 reacts with 1,10-phenanthroline, λ max 510 nm, will constitute sensitivity improved iron determinations with values 0.08-1.6 μg ml -1, 2.4136 × 10 4/2.2511 × 10 4 l mol -1 cm -1, 0.0023/0.0025 μg cm -2 and 0.9980/0.9997 corresponding to range, molar absorptivity, Sandell sensitivity and regression coefficient. The results of the systems for iron present in chemicals, pharmaceutical, edible green leaves, nuts and lake water samples are satisfactory since they are comparable with the results of iron determined separately from 1,10-phenanthroline method.

  18. Results of 1.0-L sample bottle pressurization tests for the pit burst experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Veirs, K.D.; Prenger, F.C.; Harradine, D.M.; McFarlan, J.T.

    1997-02-01

    Pressurization tests were performed on a 1.0-L sample bottle to verify operational aspects of the pit burst experimental test apparatus. The 1.0-L sample bottle was selected because of its known geometry, certified performance and ready availability. Redundant strain gage instrumentation was installed on the test sample enabling evaluation of the repeatability and consistency of data acquisition. Test results were compared with analytical model predictions to evaluate instrumentation accuracy.

  19. OPACOS: OVRO POST-AGB CO (1-0) EMISSION SURVEY. I. DATA AND DERIVED NEBULAR PARAMETERS

    SciTech Connect

    Sanchez Contreras, C.; Sahai, R.

    2012-11-15

    We have performed interferometric observations of the {sup 12}CO (J = 1-0) emission in a sample of 27 objects spanning different evolutionary stages from the late asymptotic giant branch (late-AGB), through the post-AGB (pAGB) phase, and to the planetary nebula (PN) stage, but dominated by pAGB objects and young PNs ({>=}81%). In this paper (the first in a series) we present our maps and main nebular properties derived for the whole sample. Observations were performed with the Caltech Millimeter Array at the Owens Valley Radio Observatory. The angular resolution obtained in our survey ranges between 2.''3 and 10.''7. The {sup 13}CO and C{sup 18}O (J = 1-0) transitions as well as the 2.6 mm continuum emission have also been observed in several objects. The detection statistics in the {sup 12}CO, {sup 13}CO, C{sup 18}O transitions and 2.6 mm continuum are 89%, 83%, 0%, and 37%, respectively. We report first detections of {sup 12}CO (J = 1-0) emission in 13 targets and confirm emission from several previous marginal detections. The molecular envelope probed by {sup 12}CO (J = 1-0) emission is extended for 18 (out of 24) sources; envelope asymmetries and/or velocity gradients are found in most extended objects. Our data have been used to derive accurate target coordinates and systemic velocities and to characterize the envelope size, morphology, and kinematics. We also provide an estimate of the total molecular mass and the fraction of it contained in fast flows, lower limits to the linear momentum and to the isotopic {sup 12}C/{sup 13}C ratio, as well as the AGB mass-loss rate and timescale for sources with extended CO emission.

  20. Evolution and magnetic topology of the M 1.0 flare of October 22, 2002

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berlicki, A.; Schmieder, B.; Vilmer, N.; Aulanier, G.; Del Zanna, G.

    2004-09-01

    In this paper we analyse an M 1.0 confined flare observed mainly during its gradual phase. We use the data taken during a coordinated observational campaign between ground based instruments (THEMIS and VTT) and space observatories (SoHO/CDS and MDI, TRACE and RHESSI). We use these multi-wavelength observations to study the morphology and evolution of the flare, to analyse its gradual phase and to understand the role of various heating mechanisms. During the flare, RHESSI observed emission only within the 3-25 keV spectral range. The RHESSI spectra indicate that the emission of the flare was mainly of thermal origin with a small non-thermal component observed between 10 and 20 keV. Nevertheless, the energy contained in the non-thermal electrons is negligible compared to the thermal energy of the flaring plasma. The temperature of plasma obtained from the fitting of the RHESSI X-ray spectra was between 8.5 and 14 MK. The lower temperature limit is typical for a plasma contained in post flare loops observed in X-rays. Higher temperatures were observed during a secondary peak of emission corresponding to a small impulsive event. The SoHO/CDS observations performed in EUV Fe XIX line also confirm the presence of a hot plasma at temperatures similar to those obtained from RHESSI spectra. The EUV structures were located at the same place as RHESSI X-ray emission. The magnetic topology analysis of the AR coming from a linear force-free field extrapolation explains the observed features of the gradual phase of the flare i.e. the asymmetry of the ribbons and their fast propagation. The combination of the multi-wavelength observations with the magnetic model further suggests that the onset of the flare would be due to the reconnection of an emerging flux in a sheared magnetic configuration.

  1. Application of the MASH v1.0 Code System to radiological warfare radiation threats

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, J.O.; Santoro, R.T.; Smith, M.S.

    1994-03-01

    Nuclear hardening capabilities of US and foreign ground force systems is a primary concern of the Department of Defense (DoD) and US Army. The Monte Carlo Adjoint Shielding Code System -- MASH v1.0 was developed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) to analyze these capabilities, i.e. the shielding effectiveness, for prompt radiation from a nuclear weapon detonation. Rapidly changing world events and the proliferation of nuclear weapons related technology have increased the kinds of nuclear threats to include intentionally dispersed radiation sources and fallout from tactical nuclear weapons used in the modern AirLand battlefield scenario. Consequently, a DoD area of increasing interest focuses on determining the shielding effectiveness of foreign and US armored vehicles to radiological warfare and fallout radiation threats. To demonstrate the applicability of MASH for analyzing dispersed radiation source problems, calculations have been completed for two distributed sources; a dispersed radiation environment simulated by a uniformly distributed {sup 60}Co source, and a {sup 235}U fission weapon fallout source. Fluence and dose assessments were performed for the free-field, the inside of a steel-walled two-meter box, in a phantom standing in the free-field, and in a phantom standing in the two-meter box. The results indicate substantial radiation protection factors for the {sup 60}Co dispersed radiation source and the fallout source compared to the prompt radiation protection factors. The dose protection factors ranged from 40 to 95 for the two-meter box and from 55 to 123 for the mid-gut position of the phantom standing in the box. The results further indicate that a {sup 60}Co source might be a good first order approximation for a tactical fission weapon fallout protection factor analysis.

  2. (12)CO (3-2) & (1-0) emission line observations of nearby starburst galaxy nuclei

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Devereux, Nicholas; Taniguchi, Yoshiaki; Sanders, D. B.; Nakai, N.; Young, J. S.

    1994-01-01

    New measurements of the (12)CO (1-0) and (12)CO (3-2) line emission are presented for the nuclei of seven nearby starburst galaxies selected from a complete sample of 21 nearby starburst galaxies for which the nuclear star formation rates are measured to be comparable to the archetype starburst galaxies M82 and NGC 253. The new observations capitalize on the coincidence between the beam size of the 45 m Nobeyama telescope at 115 GHz and that of the 15 m James Clerk Maxwell Telescope at 345 GHz to measure the value of the (12)CO (3-2)/(1-0) emission line ratio in a 15 sec (less than or equal to 2.5 kpc) diameter region centered on the nuclear starburst. In principle, the (12)CO (3-2)/(1-0) emission line ratio provides a measure of temperature and optical depth for the (12)CO gas. The error weighted mean value of the (12)CO (3-2)/(1-0) emission line ratio measured for the seven starburst galaxy nuclei is -0.64 +/- 0.06. The (12)CO (3-2)/(1-0) emission line ratio measured for the starburst galaxy nuclei is significantly higher than the average value measured for molecular gas in the disk of the Galaxy, implying warmer temperatures for the molecular gas in starburst galaxy nuclei. On the other hand, the (12)CO (3-2)/(1-0) emission line ratio measured for the starburst galaxy nuclei is not as high as would be expected if the molecular gas were hot, greater than 20 K, and optically thin, tau much less than 1. The total mass of molecular gas contained within the central 1.2-2.8 kpc diameter region of the starburst galaxy nuclei ranges from 10(exp 8) to 10(exp 9) solar mass. While substantial, the molecular gas mass represents only a small percentage, approximately 9%-16%, of the dynamical mass in the same region.

  3. Analysis of multi-mode to single-mode conversion at 635 nm and 1550 nm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zamora, Vanessa; Bogatzki, Angelina; Arndt-Staufenbiel, Norbert; Hofmann, Jens; Schröder, Henning

    2016-03-01

    We propose two low-cost and robust optical fiber systems based on the photonic lantern (PL) technology for operating at 635 nm and 1550 nm. The PL is an emerging technology that couples light from a multi-mode (MM) fiber to several single-mode (SM) fibers via a low-loss adiabatic transition. This bundle of SM fibers is observed as a MM fiber system whose spatial modes are the degenerate supermodes of the bundle. The adiabatic transition allows that those supermodes evolve into the modes of the MM fiber. Simulations of the MM fiber end structure and its taper transition have been performed via functional mode solver tools in order to understand the modal evolution in PLs. The modelled design consists of 7 SM fibers inserted into a low-index capillary. The material and geometry of the PLs are chosen such that the supermodes match to the spatial modes of the desired step-index MM fiber in a moderate loss transmission. The dispersion of materials is also considered. These parameters are studied in two PL systems in order to reach a spectral transmission from 450 nm to 1600 nm. Additionally, an analysis of the geometry and losses due to the mismatching of modes is presented. PLs are typically used in the fields of astrophotonics and space photonics. Recently, they are demonstrated as mode converters in telecommunications, especially focusing on spatial division multiplexing. In this study, we show the use of PLs as a promising interconnecting tool for the development of miniaturized spectrometers operating in a broad wavelength range.

  4. Efficient laser operation of Nd3+:Lu2O3 at various wavelengths between 917 nm and 1463 nm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    von Brunn, P.; Heuer, A. M.; Fornasiero, L.; Huber, G.; Kränkel, C.

    2016-08-01

    Even though the first Nd3+-doped sesquioxide lasers have been realized more than 50 years ago, up to now no reports on efficient laser operation of Nd3+:doped sesquioxides can be found. In this work, we review the favorable spectroscopic properties of the sesquioxide Nd3+:Lu2O3 in terms of ground state absorption, stimulated emission, and excited state absorption cross sections as well as the upper level lifetime. Making use of these properties, we achieved efficient laser performance on eight different laser transitions in the wavelength range between 917 nm and 1463 nm under Ti:sapphire laser pumping using state-of-the-art HEM-grown Nd3+:Lu2O3 crystals with good optical quality. At the strongest transition around 1076 nm we determined a slope efficiency of 69%, which represents the highest efficiency ever obtained for a Nd3+-doped sesquioxide. Furthermore, we could generate watt level output powers and high slope efficiencies for seven other transitions. Lasers at 917 nm, 1053 nm, 1108 nm and 1463 nm were realized for the first time and the latter represents one of the longest laser wavelengths obtained on the 4F3/2  →  4I13/2 transition in Nd3+-doped materials.

  5. The Spectrum of Th-Ar Hollow Cathode Lamps in the 691nm to 5804nm region Database

    National Institute of Standards and Technology Data Gateway

    SRD 161 The Spectrum of Th-Ar Hollow Cathode Lamps in the 691nm to 5804nm region Database (Web, free access)   This atlas presents observations of the infra-red (IR) spectrum of a low current Th-Ar hollow cathode lamp with the 2-m Fourier transform spectrometer (FTS) at NIST. These observations establish more than 2400 lines that are suitable for use as wavelength standards in the range 691 nm to 5804 nm. The observations were made in collaboration with the European Southern Observatory (ESO), in order to provide calibration reference data for new high-resolution Echelle spectrographs, such as the Cryogenic High-Resolution IR Echelle Spectrograph ([CRIRES]), ESO's new IR spectrograph at the Very Large Telescope in Chile.

  6. Micromachining with femtosecond 250-nm laser pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, C.; Argument, Michael A.; Tsui, Ying Y.; Fedosejevs, Robert

    2000-12-01

    Laser micromachining is a flexible technique for precision patterning of surfaces in microelectronics, microelectromechanical devices and integrated optical devices. Typical applications include drilling of holes, cutting of conducting lines or shaping of micro component surfaces. The resolution, edge finish and residual damage to the surrounding and underlying structures depend on a variety of parameters including laser energy, intensity, pulse width and wavelength. Femtosecond pulses are of particular interest because the limited time of interaction limits the lateral expansion of the plasma and the inward propagation of the heat front. Thus, very small spot size can be achieved and minimal heating and damage of underlying layers can be obtained. An additional advantage of femtosecond pulses is that multiphoton absorption leads to efficient coupling of energy to many materials independent of the linear reflectivity of the surface. Thus metals and transmitting dielectrics, which are difficult to micromachine, may be machined with such pulses. The coupling is improved further by employing ultraviolet wavelength laser pulses where the linear absorption typically is much higher than for visible and infrared laser pulses. To explore these advantages, we have initiated a study of the interaction of 250nm femtosecond laser pulses with metals. The laser pulses are obtained by generating the third harmonic from a femtosecond Ti:sapphire laser operating at 750nm. The pulses are focused to various intensities in the range of 1010Wcm2 to 1015 Wcm2 using reflective and refractive microscope objectives and ablation thresholds and ablation rates have been determined for a few metals. In addition the ability to control feature size and produce submicron holes and lines have been investigated. The results are presented and compared to results obtained using infrared and visible femtosecond laser pulses.

  7. The Missing Solar Irradiance Spectrum: 1 to 7 nm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sojka, J. J.; Lewis, M.; David, M.; Schunk, R. W.; Woods, T. N.; Eparvier, F. G.; Warren, H. P.

    2015-12-01

    During large X-class flares the Earth's upper atmospheric E-region responds immediately to solar photons in the 1 to 7 nm range. The response can change the E-region density by factors approaching 10, create large changes in conductivity, and plague HF communications. GOES-XRS provide 0.1 to 0.8 nm and a 0.05 to 0.4 nm integral channels; SOHO-SEM provided a 0 to 50 nm irradiance; TIMED and SORCE-XPS diode measurements also integrated down to 0.1 nm; and most recently SDO-EVE provided a 0.1 to 7 nm irradiance. For atmospheric response to solar flares the cadence is also crucial. Both GOES and SDO provided integral measurements at 10 seconds or better. Unfortunately these measurements have failed to capture the 1 to 7 nm spectral changes that occur during flares. It is these spectral changes that create the major impact since the ionization cross-section of the dominant atmospheric species, N2 and O2, both contain step function changes in the cross-sections. Models of the solar irradiance over this critical wavelength regime have suffered from the need to model the spectral variability based on incomplete measurements. The most sophisticated empirical model FISM [Chamberlin et al., 2008] used 1 nm spectral binning and various implementations of the above integral measurements to describe the 1 to 7 nm irradiance. Since excellent solar observations exist at other wavelengths it is possible to construct an empirical model of the solar atmosphere and then use this model to infer the spectral distribution at wavelengths below 5 nm. This differential emission measure approach has been used successfully in other contexts [e.g., Warren, 2005, Chamberlin et al., 2009]. This paper contrasts the broadband versus spectrally resolved descriptions of the incoming irradiance that affects the upper atmospheric E-layer. The results provide a prescription of what wavelength resolution would be needed to adequately measure the incoming solar irradiance in the 1 to 7 nm range.

  8. Intracavity pumped sum-frequency mixing for an emission at 491.5 nm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Y.; Duanmu, Q. D.; Li, S. T.; Dong, Y.

    2013-08-01

    We present an Nd:LuVO4 laser emitting at 1066 nm intracavity pumped by a 912 nm diode-pumped Nd:GdVO4 laser. A 880 nm diode laser is used to pump the Nd:GdVO4 crystal emitting at 912 nm, and the Nd:LuVO4 laser emitting at 1066 nm intracavity pumped at 912 nm. Intracavity sum-frequency mixing at 912 and 1066 nm was realized in a lithium triborate crystal to reach the blue range. We obtained a continuous-wave output power of 2.35 W at 491.5 nm with a pump laser diode emitting 26.2 W at 880 nm. The power stability is better than 3.5% and the laser beam quality M2 factors are 1.31 and 1.23 in the horizontal and vertical dimensions respectively.

  9. Synthesis of novel fluoropolymers for 157-nm photoresists by cyclopolymerization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kodama, Shun-ichi; Kaneko, Isamu; Takebe, Yoko; Okada, Shinji; Kawaguchi, Yasuhide; Shida, Naomi; Ishikawa, Seiichi; Toriumi, Minoru; Itani, Toshiro

    2002-07-01

    Novel fluoropolymers having partially fluorinated monocyclic (5-membered and 6-membered ring) structure have been synthesized with radical cyclo-polymerization, which have C- F bond in the polymer main chain and also possess fluorocontaining acidic alcohol group. These polymers have excellent transparency lower than 1.0 μm-1 at 157nm wave length. The number-average molecular weight (Mn) of the polymers is 4000 to 20000, the glass transition temperature (Tg) is 130 to 155 °C and the decomposition temperature (Td) is about 400 °C. Copolymerization reaction with the other monomers (ex. fluoroolefins,(meth)acrylates and vinyl esters) were also examined. The introduction of protecting group (ex. methoxylmethly, and t-butoxycarbonyl group) to alcohol units of the polymer can be applied before or after polymerization reaction. We also evaluated fundamental resist performances. These have excellent transparency of 0.5 to 1.5 μm-1, good solubility in the standard alkaline solution (0.26N N-tetramethylammonium hydroxide aqueous solution) and relatively high sensitivities below than 10mJ/cm2. The imaging results of the above fluoropolymer based positive- working resists are presented. Under 100-nm line and space pattern are delineated in 200-nm thick film by using the phase shift mask.

  10. Revisit pattern collapse for 14nm node and beyond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshimoto, Kenji; Higgins, Craig; Raghunathan, Ananthan; Hartley, John G.; Goldfarb, Dario L.; Kato, Hirokazu; Petrillo, Karen; Colburn, Matthew E.; Schefske, Jeffrey; Wood, Obert; Wallow, Thomas I.

    2011-04-01

    In this study, we have analyzed new data sets of pattern collapse obtained from 300 mm wafers which were coated with a process-of-record (POR) EUV resist and exposed by an EUV Alpha-Demo tool (ADT) and a Vistec VB300 e-beam exposure tool. In order to minimize any processing effects on pattern collapse, the same POR EUV track process was applied to both exposures. A key metric of our analysis is the critical aspect ratio of collapse (CARC)1. We found that CARC of POR EUV resist decreases monotonically with spacing, in the range of ~1.8-2.2 at ~32-54 nm space (60-80 nm pitch) for EUV, and ~1.5-2.1 at ~16-50 nm space (~46-80 nm pitch) for e-beam. We also estimated an apparent Young's modulus of POR EUV resist by fitting a collapse model2 to the CARC data. The resulting modulus ~0.30 GPa was much smaller than the modulus of typical polymer glasses (~1.0-5.0 GPa). Our findings suggest that due to a significant decrease of resist mechanical properties and a sharp increase in capillary force, it will be challenging to maintain aspect ratios above 2.0 for sub-30 nm resist spacing (sub-60 nm pitches). For patterning at these dimensions, alternate processes and materials will become increasingly necessary, e.g. surfactant-based rinse solutions3 and other approaches.

  11. A new quaternary photoluminescence enhancement system of Eu-N-(o-vanillin)-1,8-diaminonaphthalene-1,10-phenanthroline-Zn and its application in determining trace amounts of europium and zinc.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Yunshan; Ahmad, Waqar; An, Yugang; Zhang, Lijuan; Zheng, Xiaorui

    2014-08-01

    A new sensitive quaternary photoluminescence enhancement system has been successfully developed to determine trace amounts of Eu(3+) and Zn(2+). The photoluminescence intensity of Eu - N-(o-vanilin)-1,8-diaminonaphthalene systems was greatly increased by the addition of specific concentrations of 1, 10-phenanthroline and Zn(2+). The excitation and emission wavelengths were 274 and 617 nm, respectively. Under optimal system conditions, the photoluminescence intensity showed a linear response toward Eu(3+) in the range of 5.0 × 10(-6)  ~ 2.0 × 10(-5)  M with a limit of detection (= 2.2 × 10(-9)  M) and the photoluminescence intensity of the system decreased linearly by increasing the Zn(2+) concentration in the range of 5.0 × 10(-8)  ~ 1.0 × 10(-6)  M with a limit of detection (= 8.8 × 10(-11)  M). This system was successfully applied for the determination of trace amounts of Eu(3+) in a high purity La2O3 matrix and in the synthetic rare earth oxide mixture, and of Zn(2+) in a high purity Mg(NO3)2 · 6H2O matrix and in synthetic coexisting ionic matrixes. The energy transfer mechanism, photoluminescence enhancement of the system and interference of other lanthanide ions and common coexisting ions were also studied in detail.

  12. Spacesuit Portable Life Support System Breadboard (PLSS 1.0) Development and Test Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vogel, Matt R.; Watts, Carly

    2011-01-01

    A multi-year effort has been carried out at NASA-JSC to develop an advanced Extravehicular Activity (EVA) PLSS design intended to further the current state of the art by increasing operational flexibility, reducing consumables, and increasing robustness. Previous efforts have focused on modeling and analyzing the advanced PLSS architecture, as well as developing key enabling technologies. Like the current International Space Station (ISS) Extravehicular Mobility Unit (EMU) PLSS, the advanced PLSS comprises of three subsystems required to sustain the crew during EVA including the Thermal, Ventilation, and Oxygen Subsystems. This multi-year effort has culminated in the construction and operation of PLSS 1.0, a test rig that simulates full functionality of the advanced PLSS design. PLSS 1.0 integrates commercial off the shelf hardware with prototype technology development components, including the primary and secondary oxygen regulators, ventilation loop fan, Rapid Cycle Amine (RCA) swingbed, and Spacesuit Water Membrane Evaporator (SWME). Testing accumulated 239 hours over 45 days, while executing 172 test points. Specific PLSS 1.0 test objectives assessed during this testing include: confirming key individual components perform in a system level test as they have performed during component level testing; identifying unexpected system-level interactions; operating PLSS 1.0 in nominal steady-state EVA modes to baseline subsystem performance with respect to metabolic rate, ventilation loop pressure and flow rate, and environmental conditions; simulating nominal transient EVA operational scenarios; simulating contingency EVA operational scenarios; and further evaluating individual technology development components. Successful testing of the PLSS 1.0 provided a large database of test results that characterize system level and component performance. With the exception of several minor anomalies, the PLSS 1.0 test rig performed as expected; furthermore, many system responses trended in accordance with pre-test predictions.

  13. Observations of galactic cosmic-ray intensity at heliocentric radial distances of from 1.0 to 2.0 astronomical units.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Van Allen, J. A.

    1972-01-01

    From observations with the Jupiter-bound spacecraft Pioneer 10 it is found that the integral intensity of the galactic cosmic radiation (E sub p greater than 80 MeV) varied by less than 3% (either plus or minus) over the heliocentric radial range from 1.0 to 2.0 AU during the epoch 1972 March-July.

  14. Spacesuit Portable Life Support System Breadboard (PLSS 1.0) Development and Test Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Watts, Carly A.; Vogel, Matt

    2012-01-01

    A multi-year effort has been carried out at the Johnson Space Center to develop an advanced EVA PLSS design intended to further the current state of the art by increasing operational flexibility, reducing consumables, and increasing robustness. This multi-year effort has culminated in the construction and operation of PLSS 1.0, a test rig that simulates full functionality of the advanced PLSS design. PLSS 1.0 integrates commercial off-the-shelf hardware with prototype technology development components, including the primary and secondary oxygen regulators, ventilation loop fan, Rapid Cycle Amine (RCA) swingbed, and Spacesuit Water Membrane Evaporator (SWME). PLSS 1.0 was tested from June 17th through September 30th, 2011. Testing accumulated 233 hours over 45 days, while executing 119 test points. An additional 164 hours of operational time were accrued during the test series, bringing the total operational time for PLSS 1.0 testing to 397 hours. Specific PLSS 1.0 test objectives assessed during this testing include: (1) Confirming prototype components perform in a system level test as they have performed during component level testing, (2) Identifying unexpected system-level interactions (3) Operating PLSS 1.0 in nominal steady-state EVA modes to baseline subsystem performance with respect to metabolic rate, ventilation loop pressure and flow rate, and environmental conditions (4) Simulating nominal transient EVA operational scenarios (5) Simulating contingency EVA operational scenarios (6) Further evaluating prototype technology development components Successful testing of the PLSS 1.0 provided a large database of test results that characterize system level and component performance. With the exception of several minor anomalies, the PLSS 1.0 test rig performed as expected. Documented anomalies and observations include: (1) Ventilation loop fan controller issues at high fan speeds (near 70,000 rpm, whereas the fan speed during nominal operations would be closer to 35,000 rpm) (2) RCA performance at boundary conditions, including carbon dioxide and water vapor saturation events, as well as reduced vacuum quality (3) SWME valve anomalies (4 documented cases where the SWME failed to respond to a control signal or physically jammed, preventing SWME control) (4) Reduction of SWME hollow fiber hydrophobicity and significant reduction of the SWME degassing capability after significant accumulated test time.

  15. High-brightness 800nm fiber-coupled laser diodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berk, Yuri; Levy, Moshe; Rappaport, Noam; Tessler, Renana; Peleg, Ophir; Shamay, Moshe; Yanson, Dan; Klumel, Genadi; Dahan, Nir; Baskin, Ilya; Shkedi, Lior

    2014-03-01

    Fiber-coupled laser diodes have become essential sources for fiber laser pumping and direct energy applications. Single emitters offer reliable multi-watt output power from a 100 m lateral emission aperture. By their combination and fiber coupling, pump powers up to 100 W can be achieved from a low-NA fiber pigtail. Whilst in the 9xx nm spectral range the single emitter technology is very mature with <10W output per chip, at 800nm the reliable output power from a single emitter is limited to 4 W - 5 W. Consequently, commercially available fiber coupled modules only deliver 5W - 15W at around 800nm, almost an order of magnitude down from the 9xx range pumps. To bridge this gap, we report our advancement in the brightness and reliability of 800nm single emitters. By optimizing the wafer structure, laser cavity and facet passivation process we have demonstrated QCW device operation up to 19W limited by catastrophic optical damage to the 100 μm aperture. In CW operation, the devices reach 14 W output followed by a reversible thermal rollover and a complete device shutdown at high currents, with the performance fully rebounded after cooling. We also report the beam properties of our 800nm single emitters and provide a comparative analysis with the 9xx nm single emitter family. Pump modules integrating several of these emitters with a 105 μm / 0.15 NA delivery fiber reach 35W in CW at 808 nm. We discuss the key opto-mechanical parameters that will enable further brightness scaling of multi-emitter pump modules.

  16. Ruthenium Bis-diimine Complexes with a Chelating Thioether Ligand: Delineating 1,10-Phenanthrolinyl and 2,2'-Bipyridyl Ligand Substituent Effects

    SciTech Connect

    Al-Rawashdeh, Nathir A. F.; Chatterjee, Sayandev; Krause, Jeanette A.; Connick, William B.

    2014-01-06

    A new series of ruthenium(II) bis-diimine complexes with a chelating thioether donor ligand has been prepared: Ru(diimine)2(dpte)2+ (diimine=1,10-phenanthroline (phen) (1); 5-CH3-phen (2), 5-Cl-phen (3); 5-Br-phen (4); 5-NO2-phen (5); 3,4,7,8-tetramethyl-phen (6); 4,7-diphenyl-phen (7); 5,5'-dimethyl-2,2'-bipyridine (8); 4,4'-di-tert-butyl-2,2'-bipyridine (9)). Crystal structures of 2, 5, 7 and 9 show that the complexes form 2 of the 12 possible conformational/configurational isomers, adopting compact C2-symmetric structures with short intramolecular transannular interactions between the diimine ligands and dpte phenyl groups; crystals of 2 and 5 contain non-statistical distributions of geometric isomers. In keeping with the π-acidity of the dpte, the Ru(III/II) couple, E°'(Ru3+/2+), occurs at relatively high potentials (1.4-1.7 V vs Ag/AgCl), and the lowest spin-allowed MLCT absorption band occurs near 400 nm. Surprisingly, the complexes also exhibit fluid-solution luminescence originating from a lowest MLCT excited state with lifetimes in the 140-750 ns time range; in acetonitrile, compound 8 undergoes photo-induced solvolysis. Variations in the MLCT energies and redox potentials are quantitatively described using a summative Hammett parameter (σT), as well as using Lever's electrochemical parameters (EL). Recommended parameterizations for 2,2'-bipyridyl and 1,10-phenanthrolinyl ligands were derived from analysis of correlations based on 199 measurements of E°'(Ru3+/2+) for 99 homo- and heteroleptic ruthenium(II) tris-diimine complexes. Variations in E°'(Ru3+/2+) due to substituents at the 4- and 4'-positions of bipyridyl ligands and 4- and 7-positions of phenanthrolinyl ligands are significantly more strongly correlated with σp+ than either σm or σp. Substituents at the 5- and 6-positions of phenanthrolinyl ligands are best described by σm and have effects comparable to those of substituents at the 3- and 8-positions. Correlations of EL with σT for 20

  17. A 1.5-W frequency doubled semiconductor disk laser tunable over 40 nm at around 745 nm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saarinen, Esa J.; Lyytikäinen, Jari; Ranta, Sanna; Rantamäki, Antti; Saarela, Antti; Sirbu, Alexei; Iakovlev, Vladimir; Kapon, Eli; Okhotnikov, Oleg G.

    2016-03-01

    We report on a semiconductor disk laser emitting 1.5 W of output power at the wavelength of 745 nm via intracavity frequency doubling. The high power level and the < 40 nm tuning range make the laser a promising tool for medical treatments that rely on photosensitizing agents and biomarkers in the transmission window of tissue between 700 and 800 nm. The InP-based gain structure of the laser was wafer-fused with a GaAs-based bottom mirror and thermally managed with an intracavity diamond heat spreader. The structure was pumped with commercial low-cost 980 nm laser diode modules. Laser emission at 1490 nm was frequency-doubled with a bismuth borate crystal that was cut for type I critical phase matching. At the maximum output power, we achieved an optical-to-optical efficiency of 8.3% with beam quality parameter M2 below 1.5. The laser wavelength could be tuned with an intracavity birefringent plate from 720 to 764 nm.

  18. 34 nm Charge Transport through DNA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slinker, Jason; Muren, Natalie; Renfrew, Sara; Barton, Jacqueline

    2011-03-01

    Long-range charge transport through DNA has broad-reaching implications due to its inherent biological recognition capabilities and unmatched capacity to be patterned into precise, nanoscale shapes. We have observed charge transport through 34 nm DNA monolayers (100 base pairs) using DNA-mediated electrochemistry. Cyclic voltammetry of multiplexed gold electrodes modified with 100mer DNAs reveal sizable peaks from distally-bound Nile Blue redox probes for well matched duplexes but highly attenuated redox peaks from 100mer monolayers containing a single base pair mismatch, demonstrating that the charge transfer is DNA-mediated. The 100mers on the gold surface are efficiently cleaved by the restriction enzyme RsaI. The 100mers in the DNA film thus adopt conformations that are readily accessible to protein binding and restriction. The ability to assemble well-characterized DNA films with these 100mers permits the demonstration of charge transport over distances surpassing most reports of molecular wires. Supported by funding from the NIH/NIBIB.

  19. LABCORE post release 1.0 development system project management plan

    SciTech Connect

    Rich, H.S.

    1994-09-29

    The LABCORE post release 1.0 development system project management plan (SPMP) is the primary planning document governing the development of specific enhancements to the LABCORE project. The mission of the Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC) laboratories is changing from supporting the 200 Area chemical processing plants for process control, waste management, and effluent monitoring to supporting environmental restoration and regulatory compliance commitments. The LABCORE program was implemented as the key element for meeting the commitments by upgrading the laboratories through the implementation of an Automated Data Processing improvement program in January 1994. Scope for LABCORE release 1.0 consisted of hardware and software implementation required to support a minimum number of analyses (Single-Shell Tank [SST] analysis at 222S Laboratory and Performance Evaluation samples at the Waste Sampling Characterization Facility laboratory) using manual entry of data, and to support routine laboratory functions, common to all laboratories. LABCORE post release 1.0 enhancements will expand the functionality presented to the laboratory. Post release 1.0 enhancements will also address the integration of a database for Analytical Services Program Integration, budgeting, and scheduling offices into LABCORE.

  20. 33 CFR 1.10-5 - Public availability of records and documents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... written request to the Chief, Office of Information Management (CG-61), U.S. Coast Guard Headquarters... of Information Management (CG-61), at the address in paragraph (a) of this section. ... HOMELAND SECURITY GENERAL GENERAL PROVISIONS Public Availability of Information § 1.10-5...

  1. Conformation of bicyclo[ n.1.0] derivatives . Part 4. bicycloalkenes and bicyclic methylenecyclopropanes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Favini, Giorgio; Sottocornola, Manuela; Todeschini, Roberto

    The conformational geometries and possible conformational equilibria of some bicyclo[ n.1.0] alkenes and bicyclic methylenecyclopropanes have been studied by molecular mechanics method. The theoretical results are in agreement with the equilibrium ratios determined in kinetics experiments and with the interpretation of electron diffraction patterns or high resolution PMR spectra.

  2. Interaction of neocuproine, 1,10-phenanthroline and 2,2'-dipyridyl with human ceruloplasmin.

    PubMed

    Løvstad, R A

    1988-01-01

    1. Neocuproine binding to ceruloplasmin markedly increases the chlorpromazine-ceruloplasmin-catalyzed oxidation of NADH. 2. 1,10-Phenanthroline and 2,2'-dipyridyl inhibit neocuproine activation in a competitive manner. 3. The order of enzyme chelator complex stability was: phenanthroline greater than dipyridyl greater than neocuproine.

  3. 17 CFR 1.10 - Financial reports of futures commission merchants and introducing brokers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... provide a compilation report of financial statements of warehousemen for purposes of Uniform Grain Storage... of a financial report prepared by a grain commission firm which has been authorized by the Deputy....) Editorial Note: For Federal Register citations affecting § 1.10, see the List of CFR Sections...

  4. A Review of DIMPACK Version 1.0: Conditional Covariance-Based Test Dimensionality Analysis Package

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Deng, Nina; Han, Kyung T.; Hambleton, Ronald K.

    2013-01-01

    DIMPACK Version 1.0 for assessing test dimensionality based on a nonparametric conditional covariance approach is reviewed. This software was originally distributed by Assessment Systems Corporation and now can be freely accessed online. The software consists of Windows-based interfaces of three components: DIMTEST, DETECT, and CCPROX/HAC, which…

  5. Optical positions of ICRF sources from CTIO 1.0m data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zacharias, M. I.; Berghea, C.; Dieck, C.; Dudik, R.; Hennessy, G.; Veillette, D.; Zacharias, N.

    2015-10-01

    As part of the USNO radio-optical reference frame link project, data were taken with the CTIO 1.0 m telescope in 2009. First position results of 5 ICRF sources are presented as part of this primarily photometric investigation of optical counterparts.

  6. SAGE FOR MACINTOSH (MSAGE) VERSION 1.0 SOLVENT ALTERNATIVES GUIDE - USER'S GUIDE

    EPA Science Inventory

    The guide provides instructions for using the Solvent Alternatives Guide (SAGE) for Macintosh, version 1.0. The guide assumes that the user is familiar with the fundamentals of operating a
    Macintosh personal computer under the System 7.0 (or higher) operating system. SAGE for ...

  7. SAGE FOR WINDOWS (WSAGE) VERSION 1.0 SOLVENT ALTERNATIVES GUIDE - USER'S GUIDE

    EPA Science Inventory

    The guide provides instructions for using the Solvent Alternatives Guide (SAGE) for Windows, version 1.0. The guide assumes that the user is familiar with the fundamentals of operating Windows 3.1 (or higher) on a personal computer under the DOS 5.0 (or higher) operating system. ...

  8. VizieR Online Data Catalog: VCC 2062 CO(1-0) data cubes (Lisenfeld+, 2016)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lisenfeld, U.; Braine, J.; Duc, P. A.; Boquien, M.; Brinks, E.; Bournaud, F.; Lelli, F.; Charmandaris, V.

    2016-04-01

    The two fits files contain the data cube of CO(1-0) observed with Plateau de Bure Interferometer. Both cubes were obtained with natural weighting and with different taperings. The velocity resolution is 1.8km/s. More details about the data acquisition and reduction are in the paper. (2 data files).

  9. STATE ACID RAIN RESEARCH AND SCREENING SYSTEM - VERSION 1.0 USER'S MANUAL

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report is a user's manual that describes Version 1.0 of EPA's STate Acid Rain Research and Screening System (STARRSS), developed to assist utility regulatory commissions in reviewing utility acid rain compliance plans. It is a screening tool that is based on scenario analysis...

  10. 32 CFR 1636.5 - Exclusion from Class 1-A-0 and Class 1-0.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... participation in war does not rest at all upon moral, ethical, or religious principle, but instead rests solely... be excluded from Class 1-A-0 or Class 1-0: (a) Who asserts beliefs which are of a religious, moral or...) Whose objection to participation in war is directed against a particular war rather than against war...

  11. 32 CFR 1636.5 - Exclusion from Class 1-A-0 and Class 1-0.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... participation in war does not rest at all upon moral, ethical, or religious principle, but instead rests solely... be excluded from Class 1-A-0 or Class 1-0: (a) Who asserts beliefs which are of a religious, moral or...) Whose objection to participation in war is directed against a particular war rather than against war...

  12. 32 CFR 1636.5 - Exclusion from Class 1-A-0 and Class 1-0.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... participation in war does not rest at all upon moral, ethical, or religious principle, but instead rests solely... be excluded from Class 1-A-0 or Class 1-0: (a) Who asserts beliefs which are of a religious, moral or...) Whose objection to participation in war is directed against a particular war rather than against war...

  13. 32 CFR 1636.5 - Exclusion from Class 1-A-0 and Class 1-0.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... participation in war does not rest at all upon moral, ethical, or religious principle, but instead rests solely... be excluded from Class 1-A-0 or Class 1-0: (a) Who asserts beliefs which are of a religious, moral or...) Whose objection to participation in war is directed against a particular war rather than against war...

  14. 33 CFR 1.10-5 - Public availability of records and documents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... written request to the Chief, Office of Information Management (CG-61), U.S. Coast Guard Headquarters... of Information Management (CG-61), at the address in paragraph (a) of this section. ... HOMELAND SECURITY GENERAL GENERAL PROVISIONS Public Availability of Information § 1.10-5...

  15. 33 CFR 1.10-5 - Public availability of records and documents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... written request to the Chief, Office of Information Management (CG-61), U.S. Coast Guard Headquarters... of Information Management (CG-61), at the address in paragraph (a) of this section. ... HOMELAND SECURITY GENERAL GENERAL PROVISIONS Public Availability of Information § 1.10-5...

  16. 33 CFR 1.10-5 - Public availability of records and documents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... written request to the Chief, Office of Information Management (CG-61), U.S. Coast Guard Headquarters... of Information Management (CG-61), at the address in paragraph (a) of this section. ... HOMELAND SECURITY GENERAL GENERAL PROVISIONS Public Availability of Information § 1.10-5...

  17. PMMA microreactor for chemiluminescence detection of Cu (II) based on 1,10-Phenanthroline-hydrogen peroxide reaction.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xueye; Shen, Jienan; Li, Tiechuan

    2016-01-01

    A microreactor for the chemiluminescence detection of copper (II) in water samples, based on the measurement of light emitted from the copper (II) catalysed oxidation of 1,10-phenanthroline by hydrogen peroxide in basic aqueous solution, is presented. Polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) was chose as material for fabricating the microreactor with mill and hot bonding method. Optimized reagents conditions were found to be 6.3 × 10(-5)mol/L 1,10-phenanthroline, 1.5 × 10(-3)mol/L hydrogen peroxide, 7.0 × 10(-2)mol/L sodium hydroxide and 2.4 × 10(-5)mol/L Hexadecyl trimethyl ammonium Bromide (CTMAB). In the continuous flow injection mode the system can perform fully automated detection with a reagent consumption of only 3.5 μL each time. The linear range of the Cu (II) ions concentration was 1.5 × 10(-8) mol/L to 1.0 × 10(-4) mol/L, and the detection limit was 9.4 × 10(-9)mol/L with the S/N ratio of 4. The relative standard deviation was 3.0 % for 2.0 × 10(-6) mol/L Cu (II) ions (n = 10). The most obvious features of the detection method are simplicity, rapidity and easy fabrication of the microreactor. PMID:26788016

  18. Space Suit Portable Life Support System Test Bed (PLSS 1.0) Development and Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Watts, Carly; Campbell, Colin; Vogel, Matthew; Conger, Bruce

    2012-01-01

    A multi-year effort has been carried out at NASA-JSC to develop an advanced extra-vehicular activity Portable Life Support System (PLSS) design intended to further the current state of the art by increasing operational flexibility, reducing consumables, and increasing robustness. Previous efforts have focused on modeling and analyzing the advanced PLSS architecture, as well as developing key enabling technologies. Like the current International Space Station Extra-vehicular Mobility Unit PLSS, the advanced PLSS comprises three subsystems required to sustain the crew during extra-vehicular activity including the Thermal, Ventilation, and Oxygen Subsystems. This multi-year effort has culminated in the construction and operation of PLSS 1.0, a test bed that simulates full functionality of the advanced PLSS design. PLSS 1.0 integrates commercial off the shelf hardware with prototype technology development components, including the primary and secondary oxygen regulators, Ventilation Subsystem fan, Rapid Cycle Amine swingbed carbon dioxide and water vapor removal device, and Spacesuit Water Membrane Evaporator heat rejection device. The overall PLSS 1.0 test objective was to demonstrate the capability of the Advanced PLSS to provide key life support functions including suit pressure regulation, carbon dioxide and water vapor removal, thermal control and contingency purge operations. Supplying oxygen was not one of the specific life support functions because the PLSS 1.0 test was not oxygen rated. Nitrogen was used for the working gas. Additional test objectives were to confirm PLSS technology development components performance within an integrated test bed, identify unexpected system level interactions, and map the PLSS 1.0 performance with respect to key variables such as crewmember metabolic rate and suit pressure. Successful PLSS 1.0 testing completed 168 test points over 44 days of testing and produced a large database of test results that characterize system level and component performance. With the exception of several minor anomalies, the PLSS 1.0 test rig performed as expected; furthermore, many system responses trended in accordance with pre-test predictions.

  19. Measurements of Photoabsorpton Cross Sections and their Temperature Dependence for CO2 in the 170nm to 200nm Region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parkinson, W. H.; Yoshino, K.

    2001-11-01

    All the photochemical models for the predominately CO2 Martian atmosphere ar e very sensitive to the amount of CO2 and to the values and spectral details of the absorpton cross sections of CO2 in the region 170nm-200nm. Earlier we had measured and published absolute cross sections of CO2 in the region 118.0 nm-175.5 nm at 295K and 195K. We have recently extended these measurements from 170 nm to 200 nm at 300K and 1 95K. The new measurements have been carried out at high resolution with our 6.65 -m normal incidence , photoelectric spectrometer. To measure the weak photoabsorption of the CO2 bands in the wavelength region 170 --200 nm, we required a high column density of the gas. We obtained this by using a multi pass technique, a White cell. The White cell was designed to have a distance of 1.50 m between two main mirrors, and was set for four, double pas ses making a path length of 12.0 m. CO2 gas was frozen in a stainless cylinder immersed in liquid nitrogen, and t he frozen product (dryice) was pumped by the diffusion pump for purification. The CO2 was warmed up slowly and kept in the cylinder at high pressure. The CO2 pressure used in the White cell was varied from 1 to 1000 Torr depend ing on the wavelength region, and was measured with a a capacitance manometer (M KS Baratron, 10 Torr and 1000 Torr). We divided the spectral region into twenty sections of about 1.5 nm extent. At each scan range, another scan was obtained from the emission spectrum of the fourth positive bands of CO for wavelength calibration. We acknowledge funding from NASA, grant NAGS-7859 to Harvard College Observatory.

  20. Efficient diode-pumped acousto-optic Q-switched Er:Yb:GdAl(3)(BO(3))(4) pulse laser at 1522  nm.

    PubMed

    Chen, Y J; Lin, Y F; Huang, J H; Gong, X H; Luo, Z D; Huang, Y D

    2015-11-01

    End-pumped by a continuous-wave 976 nm diode laser, efficient 1522 nm laser operation was demonstrated in an Er:Yb:GdAl(3)(BO(3))(4) crystal when a sapphire crystal was used as a heat diffuser. A continuous-wave 1522 nm laser with a maximum output power of 750 mW and slope efficiency of 36% was realized at an absorbed pump power of 4.1 W. The pulse performances of an acousto-optic Q-switched laser with various repetition frequencies were investigated in detail. In a repetition frequency range of 1-10 kHz, 1522 nm pulse lasers with a slope efficiency of about 10%, peak output power at the kilowatt level, and width of about 50 ns were first obtained in an Er:Yb:GdAl(3)(BO(3))(4) crystal pumped by a continuous-wave diode laser. The results indicate that the crystal is a promising gain medium for an actively Q-switched 1.5 μm laser.

  1. Efficient diode-pumped acousto-optic Q-switched Er:Yb:GdAl(3)(BO(3))(4) pulse laser at 1522  nm.

    PubMed

    Chen, Y J; Lin, Y F; Huang, J H; Gong, X H; Luo, Z D; Huang, Y D

    2015-11-01

    End-pumped by a continuous-wave 976 nm diode laser, efficient 1522 nm laser operation was demonstrated in an Er:Yb:GdAl(3)(BO(3))(4) crystal when a sapphire crystal was used as a heat diffuser. A continuous-wave 1522 nm laser with a maximum output power of 750 mW and slope efficiency of 36% was realized at an absorbed pump power of 4.1 W. The pulse performances of an acousto-optic Q-switched laser with various repetition frequencies were investigated in detail. In a repetition frequency range of 1-10 kHz, 1522 nm pulse lasers with a slope efficiency of about 10%, peak output power at the kilowatt level, and width of about 50 ns were first obtained in an Er:Yb:GdAl(3)(BO(3))(4) crystal pumped by a continuous-wave diode laser. The results indicate that the crystal is a promising gain medium for an actively Q-switched 1.5 μm laser. PMID:26512485

  2. Self-assembled WO3-x hierarchical nanostructures for photothermal therapy with a 915 nm laser rather than the common 980 nm laser.

    PubMed

    Li, Bo; Zhang, Yuxin; Zou, Rujia; Wang, Qian; Zhang, Bingjie; An, Lei; Yin, Fei; Hua, Yingqi; Hu, Junqing

    2014-04-28

    Photothermal therapy (PTT) is limited by unsuitable photothermal agents and near-infrared (NIR) light. Herein, self-assembled PEGylated WO3-x hierarchical nanostructures, which could serve as excellent laser-cavity mirrors, were successfully prepared via a simple one-pot solvothermal route. The as-prepared WO3-x hierarchical nanostructures displayed strong near-infrared absorption. The absorption of pure water at 980 nm is 30 times higher than that at 915 nm, and the temperature of water only increased by 3.4 °C under the irradiation of a 915 nm laser with a power density of 1.0 W cm(-2) for 10 min, while the temperature of water increased as much as 15.1 °C for the 980 nm laser. With continuous excitation by 915 nm light, the photothermal conversion efficiency of these WO3-x hierarchical nanostructures was evaluated to be 28.1%. Thus, the WO3-x hierarchical nanostructures could serve as excellent laser-cavity mirrors of a 915 nm laser. The PTT study on cancer cells in vivo demonstrated that the WO3-x hierarchical nanostructures can generate enough heat for efficient photothermal therapy of cancer cells under the irradiation of a 915 nm laser with a power density of 1.2 W cm(-2) over a short period (5-10 min).

  3. Soft X-Ray (1-7 nm) Solar Spectrometer based on novel Nanowriter Electron-Beam Nanofabrication Technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Didkovsky, L. V.; Wieman, S. R.; Chao, W.

    2015-12-01

    A new soft X-ray (SXR) spectrometer combines proven detector technology demonstrated on the SOHO Solar EUV Monitor (SOHO/SEM) and SDO EUV SpectroPhotometer (SDO/EVE/ESP) instruments with novel technology for X-ray optics nanofabrication developed at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. The new spectrometer will provide solar SXR measurements of absolute irradiance in the 1.0 to 7.0 nm range spectrally resolved into bands narrower than 1 nm - measurements that are not available from existing solar-observing instruments but are important for studying and modeling coronal dynamics and the Sun-Earth's connection, e.g. the Earth's Ionosphere. For the proposed SXR spectrometer we will introduce a transmission grating based on novel Nanowriter Electron-Beam Nanofabrication technology developed at the Center for X-ray Optics (CXRO) at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. The CXRO technology has been used in the fabrication of X-ray zone plates with feature sizes as small as 25 nm in optical elements with overall sizes on the order of 1 cm. The CXRO technology has significant flexibility in terms of pattern geometry, and is thus capable of producing linear transmission gratings with aperture sizes similar to SEM and ESP but with four times the dispersion. With such dispersion, reasonable spectral resolution (< 1nm) can be obtained using commercial off-the shelf (COTS) X-ray sensitive AXUV type silicon photodiodes from the Optodiode Corp. in an instrument with overall size and mass similar to that of SEM or ESP.

  4. Laminar burning velocities of lean hydrogen-air mixtures at pressures up to 1.0 MPa

    SciTech Connect

    Bradley, D.; Lawes, M.; Liu, Kexin; Woolley, R.; Verhelst, S.

    2007-04-15

    Values of laminar burning velocity, u{sub l}, and the associated strain rate Markstein number, Ma{sub sr}, of H{sub 2}-air mixtures have been obtained from measurements of flame speeds in a spherical explosion bomb with central ignition. Pressures ranged from 0.1 to 1.0 MPa, with values of equivalence ratio between 0.3 and 1.0. Many of the flames soon became unstable, with an accelerating flame speed, due to Darrieus-Landau and thermodiffusive instabilities. This effect increased with pressure. The flame wrinkling arising from the instabilities enhanced the flame speed. A method is described for allowing for this effect, based on measurements of the flame radii at which the instabilities increased the flame speed. This enabled u{sub l} and Ma{sub sr} to be obtained, devoid of the effects of instabilities. With increasing pressure, the time interval between the end of the ignition spark and the onset of flame instability, during which stable stretched flame propagation occurred, became increasingly small and very high camera speeds were necessary for accurate measurement. Eventually this time interval became so short that first Ma{sub sr} and then u{sub l} could not be measured. Such flame instabilities throw into question the utility of u{sub l} for high pressure, very unstable, flames. The measured values of u{sub l} are compared with those predicted by detailed chemical kinetic models of one-dimensional flames. (author)

  5. BasinVis 1.0: A MATLAB®-based program for sedimentary basin subsidence analysis and visualization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Eun Young; Novotny, Johannes; Wagreich, Michael

    2016-06-01

    Stratigraphic and structural mapping is important to understand the internal structure of sedimentary basins. Subsidence analysis provides significant insights for basin evolution. We designed a new software package to process and visualize stratigraphic setting and subsidence evolution of sedimentary basins from well data. BasinVis 1.0 is implemented in MATLAB®, a multi-paradigm numerical computing environment, and employs two numerical methods: interpolation and subsidence analysis. Five different interpolation methods (linear, natural, cubic spline, Kriging, and thin-plate spline) are provided in this program for surface modeling. The subsidence analysis consists of decompaction and backstripping techniques. BasinVis 1.0 incorporates five main processing steps; (1) setup (study area and stratigraphic units), (2) loading well data, (3) stratigraphic setting visualization, (4) subsidence parameter input, and (5) subsidence analysis and visualization. For in-depth analysis, our software provides cross-section and dip-slip fault backstripping tools. The graphical user interface guides users through the workflow and provides tools to analyze and export the results. Interpolation and subsidence results are cached to minimize redundant computations and improve the interactivity of the program. All 2D and 3D visualizations are created by using MATLAB plotting functions, which enables users to fine-tune the results using the full range of available plot options in MATLAB. We demonstrate all functions in a case study of Miocene sediment in the central Vienna Basin.

  6. Radiation hardness assessment of the charge-integrating hybrid pixel detector JUNGFRAU 1.0 for photon science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jungmann-Smith, J. H.; Bergamaschi, A.; Brückner, M.; Cartier, S.; Dinapoli, R.; Greiffenberg, D.; Jaggi, A.; Maliakal, D.; Mayilyan, D.; Medjoubi, K.; Mezza, D.; Mozzanica, A.; Ramilli, M.; Ruder, Ch.; Schädler, L.; Schmitt, B.; Shi, X.; Tinti, G.

    2015-12-01

    JUNGFRAU (adJUstiNg Gain detector FoR the Aramis User station) is a two-dimensional hybrid pixel detector for photon science applications in free electron lasers, particularly SwissFEL, and synchrotron light sources. JUNGFRAU is an automatic gain switching, charge-integrating detector which covers a dynamic range of more than 104 photons of an energy of 12 keV with a good linearity, uniformity of response, and spatial resolving power. The JUNGFRAU 1.0 application-specific integrated circuit (ASIC) features a 256 × 256 pixel matrix of 75 × 75 μm2 pixels and is bump-bonded to a 320 μm thick Si sensor. Modules of 2 × 4 chips cover an area of about 4 × 8 cm2. Readout rates in excess of 2 kHz enable linear count rate capabilities of 20 MHz (at 12 keV) and 50 MHz (at 5 keV). The tolerance of JUNGFRAU to radiation is a key issue to guarantee several years of operation at free electron lasers and synchrotrons. The radiation hardness of JUNGFRAU 1.0 is tested with synchrotron radiation up to 10 MGy of delivered dose. The effect of radiation-induced changes on the noise, baseline, gain, and gain switching is evaluated post-irradiation for both the ASIC and the hybridized assembly. The bare JUNGFRAU 1.0 chip can withstand doses as high as 10 MGy with minor changes to its noise and a reduction in the preamplifier gain. The hybridized assembly, in particular the sensor, is affected by the photon irradiation which mainly shows as an increase in the leakage current. Self-healing of the system is investigated during a period of 11 weeks after the delivery of the radiation dose. Annealing radiation-induced changes by bake-out at 100 °C is investigated. It is concluded that the JUNGFRAU 1.0 pixel is sufficiently radiation-hard for its envisioned applications at SwissFEL and synchrotron beam lines.

  7. Radiation hardness assessment of the charge-integrating hybrid pixel detector JUNGFRAU 1.0 for photon science.

    PubMed

    Jungmann-Smith, J H; Bergamaschi, A; Brückner, M; Cartier, S; Dinapoli, R; Greiffenberg, D; Jaggi, A; Maliakal, D; Mayilyan, D; Medjoubi, K; Mezza, D; Mozzanica, A; Ramilli, M; Ruder, Ch; Schädler, L; Schmitt, B; Shi, X; Tinti, G

    2015-12-01

    JUNGFRAU (adJUstiNg Gain detector FoR the Aramis User station) is a two-dimensional hybrid pixel detector for photon science applications in free electron lasers, particularly SwissFEL, and synchrotron light sources. JUNGFRAU is an automatic gain switching, charge-integrating detector which covers a dynamic range of more than 10(4) photons of an energy of 12 keV with a good linearity, uniformity of response, and spatial resolving power. The JUNGFRAU 1.0 application-specific integrated circuit (ASIC) features a 256 × 256 pixel matrix of 75 × 75 μm(2) pixels and is bump-bonded to a 320 μm thick Si sensor. Modules of 2 × 4 chips cover an area of about 4 × 8 cm(2). Readout rates in excess of 2 kHz enable linear count rate capabilities of 20 MHz (at 12 keV) and 50 MHz (at 5 keV). The tolerance of JUNGFRAU to radiation is a key issue to guarantee several years of operation at free electron lasers and synchrotrons. The radiation hardness of JUNGFRAU 1.0 is tested with synchrotron radiation up to 10 MGy of delivered dose. The effect of radiation-induced changes on the noise, baseline, gain, and gain switching is evaluated post-irradiation for both the ASIC and the hybridized assembly. The bare JUNGFRAU 1.0 chip can withstand doses as high as 10 MGy with minor changes to its noise and a reduction in the preamplifier gain. The hybridized assembly, in particular the sensor, is affected by the photon irradiation which mainly shows as an increase in the leakage current. Self-healing of the system is investigated during a period of 11 weeks after the delivery of the radiation dose. Annealing radiation-induced changes by bake-out at 100 °C is investigated. It is concluded that the JUNGFRAU 1.0 pixel is sufficiently radiation-hard for its envisioned applications at SwissFEL and synchrotron beam lines.

  8. Radiation hardness assessment of the charge-integrating hybrid pixel detector JUNGFRAU 1.0 for photon science

    SciTech Connect

    Jungmann-Smith, J. H. Bergamaschi, A.; Brückner, M.; Dinapoli, R.; Greiffenberg, D.; Jaggi, A.; Maliakal, D.; Mayilyan, D.; Mezza, D.; Mozzanica, A.; Ramilli, M.; Ruder, Ch.; Schädler, L.; Schmitt, B.; Shi, X.; Tinti, G.; Cartier, S.; Medjoubi, K.

    2015-12-15

    JUNGFRAU (adJUstiNg Gain detector FoR the Aramis User station) is a two-dimensional hybrid pixel detector for photon science applications in free electron lasers, particularly SwissFEL, and synchrotron light sources. JUNGFRAU is an automatic gain switching, charge-integrating detector which covers a dynamic range of more than 10{sup 4} photons of an energy of 12 keV with a good linearity, uniformity of response, and spatial resolving power. The JUNGFRAU 1.0 application-specific integrated circuit (ASIC) features a 256 × 256 pixel matrix of 75 × 75 μm{sup 2} pixels and is bump-bonded to a 320 μm thick Si sensor. Modules of 2 × 4 chips cover an area of about 4 × 8 cm{sup 2}. Readout rates in excess of 2 kHz enable linear count rate capabilities of 20 MHz (at 12 keV) and 50 MHz (at 5 keV). The tolerance of JUNGFRAU to radiation is a key issue to guarantee several years of operation at free electron lasers and synchrotrons. The radiation hardness of JUNGFRAU 1.0 is tested with synchrotron radiation up to 10 MGy of delivered dose. The effect of radiation-induced changes on the noise, baseline, gain, and gain switching is evaluated post-irradiation for both the ASIC and the hybridized assembly. The bare JUNGFRAU 1.0 chip can withstand doses as high as 10 MGy with minor changes to its noise and a reduction in the preamplifier gain. The hybridized assembly, in particular the sensor, is affected by the photon irradiation which mainly shows as an increase in the leakage current. Self-healing of the system is investigated during a period of 11 weeks after the delivery of the radiation dose. Annealing radiation-induced changes by bake-out at 100 °C is investigated. It is concluded that the JUNGFRAU 1.0 pixel is sufficiently radiation-hard for its envisioned applications at SwissFEL and synchrotron beam lines.

  9. Segmentation of the macular choroid in OCT images acquired at 830nm and 1060nm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Sieun; Beg, Mirza F.; Sarunic, Marinko V.

    2013-06-01

    Retinal imaging with optical coherence tomography (OCT) has rapidly advanced in ophthalmic applications with the broad availability of Fourier domain (FD) technology in commercial systems. The high sensitivity afforded by FD-OCT has enabled imaging of the choroid, a layer of blood vessels serving the outer retina. Improved visualization of the choroid and the choroid-sclera boundary has been investigated using techniques such as enhanced depth imaging (EDI), and also with OCT systems operating in the 1060-nm wavelength range. We report on a comparison of imaging the macular choroid with commercial and prototype OCT systems, and present automated 3D segmentation of the choroid-scleral layer using a graph cut algorithm. The thickness of the choroid is an important measurement to investigate for possible correlation with severity, or possibly early diagnosis, of diseases such as age-related macular degeneration.

  10. Coronal Diagnostics from Narrowband Images Around 30.4 nm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andretta, V.; Telloni, D.; Del Zanna, G.

    2012-07-01

    Images taken in the band centered at 30.4 nm are routinely used to map the radiance of the He ii Ly α line on the solar disk. That line is one of the strongest, if not the strongest, line in the EUV observed in the solar spectrum, and one of the few lines in that wavelength range providing information on the upper chromosphere or lower transition region. However, when observing the off-limb corona, the contribution from the nearby Si xi 30.3 nm line can become significant. In this work we aim at estimating the relative contribution of those two lines in the solar corona around the minimum of solar activity. We combine measurements from CDS taken in August 2008 with temperature and density profiles from semiempirical models of the corona to compute the radiances of the two lines, and of other representative coronal lines ( e.g. Mg x 62.5 nm, Si xii 52.1 nm). Considering both diagnosed quantities from line ratios (temperatures and densities) and line radiances in absolute units, we obtain a good overall match between observations and models. We find that the Si xi line dominates the He ii line from just above the limb up to ≈ 2 R ⊙ in streamers, while its contribution to narrowband imaging in the 30.4 nm band is expected to become smaller, even negligible in the corona beyond ≈ 2 - 3 R ⊙, the precise value being strongly dependent on the coronal temperature profile.

  11. Development of a temperature-variable magnetic resonance imaging system using a 1.0 T yokeless permanent magnet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Terada, Y.; Tamada, D.; Kose, K.

    2011-10-01

    A temperature variable magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) system has been developed using a 1.0 T permanent magnet. A permanent magnet, gradient coils, radiofrequency coil, and shim coil were installed in a temperature variable thermostatic bath. First, the variation in the magnetic field inhomogeneity with temperature was measured. The inhomogeneity has a specific spatial symmetry, which scales linearly with temperature, and a single-channel shim coil was designed to compensate for the inhomogeneity. The inhomogeneity was drastically reduced by shimming over a wide range of temperature from -5 °C to 45 °C. MR images of an okra pod acquired at different temperatures demonstrated the high potential of the system for visualizing thermally sensitive properties.

  12. Development of a temperature-variable magnetic resonance imaging system using a 1.0T yokeless permanent magnet.

    PubMed

    Terada, Y; Tamada, D; Kose, K

    2011-10-01

    A temperature variable magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) system has been developed using a 1.0 T permanent magnet. A permanent magnet, gradient coils, radiofrequency coil, and shim coil were installed in a temperature variable thermostatic bath. First, the variation in the magnetic field inhomogeneity with temperature was measured. The inhomogeneity has a specific spatial symmetry, which scales linearly with temperature, and a single-channel shim coil was designed to compensate for the inhomogeneity. The inhomogeneity was drastically reduced by shimming over a wide range of temperature from -5°C to 45°C. MR images of an okra pod acquired at different temperatures demonstrated the high potential of the system for visualizing thermally sensitive properties.

  13. Periodic nanostructures on titanium dioxide film produced using femtosecond laser with wavelengths of 388 nm and 775 nm.

    PubMed

    Shinonaga, Togo; Tsukamoto, Masahiro; Miyaji, Godai

    2014-06-16

    Titanium dioxide (TiO2) film is an important biomaterial used to improve the biocompatibility of titanium (Ti). We have used a film coating method with an aerosol beam and femtosecond laser irradiation to form periodic structures on biomaterials for control of the cell spreading. The control of cell spreading on biomaterials is important for the development of advanced biomaterials. In this study, nanostructures with periods of 130 and 230 nm were formed on a film using a femtosecond laser with wavelengths of 388 and 775 nm, respectively. The nanostructure period on the film was 30% of the laser wavelengths. Periods produced with wavelengths of 388 and 775 nm were calculated using a surface plasmon polariton (SPP) model and the experimental results for both wavelengths were in the range of the calculated periods, which suggests that the mechanism for the formation of the periodic nanostructures on the film with a femtosecond laser was due to the excitation of SPPs.

  14. RGUI 1.0, New Graphical User Interface for RELAP5-3D

    SciTech Connect

    Mesina, George Lee; Galbraith, James Andrew

    1999-04-01

    With the advent of three-dimensional modeling in nuclear safety analysis codes, the need has arisen for a new display methodology. Currently, analysts either sort through voluminous numerical displays of data at points in a region, or view color coded interpretations of the data on a two-dimensional rendition of the plant. RGUI 1.0 provides 3D capability for displaying data. The 3D isometric hydrodynamic image is built automatically from the input deck without additional input from the user. Standard view change features allow the user to focus on only the important data. Familiar features that are standard to the nuclear industry, such as run, interact, and monitor, are included. RGUI 1.0 reduces the difficulty of analyzing complex three dimensional plants.

  15. RGUI 1.0, New Graphical User Interface for RELAP5-3D

    SciTech Connect

    G. L. Mesina; J. Galbraith

    1999-04-01

    With the advent of three-dimensional modeling in nuclear safety analysis codes, the need has arisen for a new display methodology. Currently, analysts either sort through voluminous numerical displays of data at points in a region, or view color coded interpretations of the data on a two-dimensional rendition of the plant. RGUI 1.0 provides 3D capability for displaying data. The 3D isometric hydrodynamic image is built automatically from the input deck without additional input from the user. Standard view change features allow the user to focus on only the important data. Familiar features that are standard to the nuclear industry, such as run, interact, and monitor, are included. RGUI 1.0 reduces the difficulty of analyzing complex three-dimensional plants.

  16. The Titan -1:0 Nodal Bending Wave in Saturn's Ring C.

    PubMed

    Rosen, P A; Lissauer, J J

    1988-08-01

    The most prominent oscillatory feature observed in the Voyager 1 radio occultation of Saturn's rings is identified as a one-armed spiral bending wave excited by Titan's -1:0 nodal inner vertical resonance. Ring partides in a bending wave move in coherently inclined orbits, warping the local mean plane of the rings. The Titan -1:0 wave is the only known bending wave that propagates outward, away from Saturn, and the only spiral wave yet observed in which the wave pattern rotates opposite to the orbital direction of the ring particles. It is also the first bending wave identified in ring C. Modeling the observed feature with existing bending wave theory gives a surface mass density of approximately 0.4 g/cm(2) outside the wave region and a local ring thickness of [unknown]5 meters, and suggests that surface mass density is not constant in the wave region.

  17. Building the Fire Energetics and Emissions Research (FEER) Smoke Emissions Inventory Version 1.0

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ellison, Luke; Ichoku, Charles; Zhang, Feng; Wang, Jun

    2014-01-01

    The Fire Energetics and Emissions Research (FEER) group's new coefficient of emission global gridded product at 1x1 resolution that directly relates fire readiative energy (FRE) to smoke aerosol release, FEERv1.0 Ce, made its public debut in August 2013. Since then, steps have been taken to generate corresponding maps and totals of total particulate matter (PM) emissions using different sources of FRE, and subsequently to simulate the resulting PM(sub 2.5) in the WRF-Chem 3.5 model using emission rates from FEERv1.0 as well as other standard biomass burning emission inventories. An flowchart of the FEER algorithm to calculate Ce is outlined here along with a display of the resulting emissions of total PM globally and also regionally. The modeling results from the WRF-Chem3.5 simulations are also shown.

  18. ISIS++ reference guide (Iterative Scalable Implicit Solver in C++) version 1.0

    SciTech Connect

    Clay, R.L.; Williams, A.B.; Mish, K.D.

    1997-09-01

    ISIS++ (Iterative Scalable Implicit Solver in C++) Version 1.0 is a portable, object-oriented framework for solving sparse linear systems of equations. It includes a collection of Krylov solution methods and preconditioners, as well as both uni-processor (serial) and multi-processor (scalable) matrix and vector classes. Though it was developed to solve systems of equations originating from large-scale, 3-D, finite element analyses, it has applications in many other fields. This document defines the v1.0 interface specification, and includes the necessary instructions for building and running ISIS++ on Unix platforms. The interface is presented in annotated header format, along with background on design and implementation considerations. A finite difference modeling example problem is included to demonstrate the overall setup and use.

  19. Simultaneous triple 914 nm, 1084 nm, and 1086 nm operation of a diode-pumped Nd:YVO4 laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lü, Yanfei; Xia, Jing; Liu, Huilong; Pu, Xiaoyun

    2014-10-01

    We report a diode-pumped continuous-wave (cw) triple-wavelength Nd:YVO4 laser operating at 914, 1084, and 1086 nm. A theoretical analysis has been introduced to determine the threshold conditions for simultaneous triple-wavelength laser. Using a T-shaped cavity, we realized an efficient triple-wavelength operation at 4F3/2→4I9/2 and 4F3/2→4I11/2 transitions for Nd:YVO4 crystal, simultaneously. At an absorbed pump power of 16 W (or 25 W of incident pump power), the maximum output power was 2.3 W, which included 914 nm, 1084 nm, and 1086 nm three wavelengths, and the optical conversion efficiency with respect to the absorbed pump power was 14.4%.

  20. Frequency measurement of the J = 1-0 rotational transition of HD

    SciTech Connect

    Evenson, K.M.; Jennings, D.A.; Brown, J.M.; Zink, L.R.; Leopold, K.R.

    1988-07-01

    The frequency of the astronomically important J = 1-0 rotational transition of HD at 2.7 THz (90/cm) has been measured with tunable FIR radiation with an accuracy of 150 kHz. This frequency is now known to sufficient accuracy for use in future astrophysical heterodyne observations of HD in planetary atmospheres (reported by Bezard et al., 1986) and in the interstellar medium (reported by Bussoletti et al., 1975). 14 references.

  1. Poblano v1.0 : a Matlab toolbox for gradient-based optimization.

    SciTech Connect

    Dunlavy, Daniel M.; Acar, Evrim; Kolda, Tamara Gibson

    2010-03-01

    We present Poblano v1.0, a Matlab toolbox for solving gradient-based unconstrained optimization problems. Poblano implements three optimization methods (nonlinear conjugate gradients, limited-memory BFGS, and truncated Newton) that require only first order derivative information. In this paper, we describe the Poblano methods, provide numerous examples on how to use Poblano, and present results of Poblano used in solving problems from a standard test collection of unconstrained optimization problems.

  2. Slab1.0: A three-dimensional model of global subduction zone geometries

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hayes, G.P.; Wald, D.J.; Johnson, R.L.

    2012-01-01

    We describe and present a new model of global subduction zone geometries, called Slab1.0. An extension of previous efforts to constrain the two-dimensional non-planar geometry of subduction zones around the focus of large earthquakes, Slab1.0 describes the detailed, non-planar, three-dimensional geometry of approximately 85% of subduction zones worldwide. While the model focuses on the detailed form of each slab from their trenches through the seismogenic zone, where it combines data sets from active source and passive seismology, it also continues to the limits of their seismic extent in the upper-mid mantle, providing a uniform approach to the definition of the entire seismically active slab geometry. Examples are shown for two well-constrained global locations; models for many other regions are available and can be freely downloaded in several formats from our new Slab1.0 website, http://on.doi.gov/ d9ARbS. We describe improvements in our two-dimensional geometry constraint inversion, including the use of average active source seismic data profiles in the shallow trench regions where data are otherwise lacking, derived from the interpolation between other active source seismic data along-strike in the same subduction zone. We include several analyses of the uncertainty and robustness of our three-dimensional interpolation methods. In addition, we use the filtered, subduction-related earthquake data sets compiled to build Slab1.0 in a reassessment of previous analyses of the deep limit of the thrust interface seismogenic zone for all subduction zones included in our global model thus far, concluding that the width of these seismogenic zones is on average 30% larger than previous studies have suggested. Copyright 2011 by the American Geophysical Union.

  3. Tris(1,10-phenanthroline)cobalt(II) bis-(trichloro-acetate).

    PubMed

    Li, Li-Min; Li, Yu-Feng; Liu, Li; Zhang, Zeng-Hui

    2011-07-01

    In the title complex, [Co(C(12)H(8)N(2))(3)](C(2)Cl(3)O(2))(2), the Co(II) ion lies on a twofold rotation axis and is coordinated by six N atoms from three bis-chelating 1,10-phenanthroline ligands in a distorted octa-hedral environment. The crystal structure is stabilized by weak inter-molecular C-H⋯O hydrogen bonds.

  4. Transferable Output ASCII Data (TOAD) gateway: Version 1.0 user's guide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bingel, Bradford D.

    1991-01-01

    The Transferable Output ASCII Data (TOAD) Gateway, release 1.0 is described. This is a software tool for converting tabular data from one format into another via the TOAD format. This initial release of the Gateway allows free data interchange among the following file formats: TOAD; Standard Interface File (SIF); Program to Optimize Simulated Trajectories (POST) input; Comma Separated Value (TSV); and a general free-form file format. As required, additional formats can be accommodated quickly and easily.

  5. Syntheses of photo-active lead(ii) - 1,10 - phenanthrolinematerials

    SciTech Connect

    Glatfelter, Alicia; Dybowski, Cecil; Bai, Shi; Perry, Dale L.

    2006-10-15

    A facile synthetic technique for the formation ofhigh-purity, stoichiometric 1:1 and 1:2 molecular ratio photo-activematerials of lead(II) bromide and lead(II) iodide with1,10-phenanthroline is described. The method results in the formation ofanalytically high-purity crystalline materials which are light-sensitivebut air-stable. Elemental analyses and X-ray powder diffraction were usedto characterize the materials.

  6. Intrinsic magnetic properties of L1(0) FeNi obtained from meteorite NWA 6259

    SciTech Connect

    Poirier, E; Pinkerton, FE; Kubic, R; Mishra, RK; Bordeaux, N; Mubarok, A; Lewis, LH; Goldstein, JI; Skomski, R; Barmak, K

    2015-05-07

    FeNi having the tetragonal L1(0) crystal structure is a promising new rare-earth-free permanent magnet material. Laboratory synthesis is challenging, however, tetragonal L1(0) FeNi-the mineral "tetrataenite"-has been characterized using specimens found in nickel-iron meteorites. Most notably, the meteorite NWA 6259 recovered from Northwest Africa is 95 vol.% tetrataenite with a composition of 43 at.% Ni. Hysteresis loops were measured as a function of sample orientation on a specimen cut from NWA 6259 in order to rigorously deduce the intrinsic hard magnetic properties of its L1(0) phase. Electron backscatter diffraction showed that NWA 6259 is strongly textured, containing L1(0) grains oriented along any one of the three equivalent cubic directions of the parent fcc structure. The magnetic structure was modeled as a superposition of the three orthonormal uniaxial variants. By simultaneously fitting first-quadrant magnetization data for 13 different orientations of the sample with respect to the applied field direction, the intrinsic magnetic properties were estimated to be saturation magnetization 4 pi M-s = 14.7 kG and anisotropy field H-a = 14.4 kOe. The anisotropy constant K = 0.84 MJ/m(3) is somewhat smaller than the value K = 1.3 MJ/m(3) obtained by earlier researchers from nominally equiatomic FeNi prepared by neutron irradiation accompanied by annealing in a magnetic field, suggesting that higher Ni content (fewer Fe antisite defects) may improve the anisotropy. The fit also indicated that NWA 6259 contains one dominant variant (62% by volume), the remainder of the sample being a second variant, and the third variant being absent altogether. (C) 2015 AIP Publishing LLC.

  7. RoboNet-1.0: A Prototype Global Network of Large Robotic Telescopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bode, M. F.; Cardiff U. Collaboration; U. Hertfordshire Collaboration; U. Leicester Collaboration; St Andrews U. Collaboration; Queens U., Belfast Collaboration; Mullard Space Science Lab. Collaboration; U. Exeter Collaboration; U. Southampton Collaboration; U. Manchester Collaboration

    2004-12-01

    Involving a consortium of 10 UK universities, RoboNet-1.0 comprises the Liverpool Telescope (LT, La Palma), plus specially allocated time on the Faulkes Telescope North (FTN, Maui) and Faulkes Telescope South (FTS, Siding Spring, Australia). All three are essentially identical 2m telescopes equipped for both optical photometry and spectroscopy and operated from a common centre in Liverpool. The LT is primarily for research use whereas the FTs are mainly dedicated to education. Software developed by the eSTAR GRID project is being applied and enhanced to enable efficient and effective operation of the network. The primary scientific projects being addressed by RoboNet-1.0 are (a) rapid follow-up of Gamma Ray Burst sources detected by missions such as Swift, and (b) the detection of extra-solar planets via microlensing. Observations with the network began in August 2004. This is a pre-cursor project to the establishment of the full RoboNet global network of six dedicated telescopes which would greatly enhance work in several important branches of time domain astrophysics. Operation of the Liverpool Telescope and RoboNet-1.0 are funded by the UK Particle Physics and Astronomy Research Council. The Faulkes Telescopes are funded by the Dill Faulkes Educational Trust.

  8. Transition metal ion capture using functional mesoporous carbon made with 1,10-phenanthroline

    SciTech Connect

    Chouyyok, Wilaiwan; Yantasee, Wassana; Shin, Yongsoon; Grudzien, Rafal M.; Fryxell, Glen E.

    2009-11-01

    Functional mesoporous carbon has been built using 1,10-phenanthroline as the fundamental building block, resulting in a nanoporous, high surface area sorbent capable of selectively binding transition metal ions. This material had a specific surface area of 870 m2/g, an average pore size of about 30Å, and contained as much as 8.2 weight percent N. Under acidic conditions, where the 1,10-phenanthroline ligand is protonated, this material was found to be an effective anion exchange material for transition metal anions like PdCl4-2 and H2VO4-1. 1,10-phenanthroline functionalized mesoporous carbon (“Phen-FMC”) was found to have a high affinity for Cu(II), even down to a pH of 1. At pHs above 5, Phen-FMC was found to bind a variety of transition metal cations (e.g. Co(II), Ni(II), Zn(II), etc.) from filtered ground water, river water and seawater. Phen-FMC displayed rapid sorption kinetics with Co(II) in filtered river water, reaching equilibrium in less than an hour, and easily lowering the [Co(II)] to sub-ppb levels. Phen-FMC was found to be more effective for transition metal ion capture than ion exchange resin or activated carbon.

  9. Transition metal ion capture using functional mesoporous carbon made with 1,10-phenanthroline☆

    PubMed Central

    Chouyyok, Wilaiwan; Yantasee, Wassana; Shin, Yongsoon; Grudzien, Rafal M.; Fryxell, Glen E.

    2012-01-01

    Functional mesoporous carbon has been built using 1,10-phenanthroline as the fundamental building block, resulting in a nanoporous, high surface area sorbent capable of selectively binding transition metal ions. This material had a specific surface area of 870 m2/g, an average pore size of about 30 Å, and contained as much as 8.2 wt% N. Under acidic conditions, where the 1,10-phenanthroline ligand is protonated, this material was found to be an effective anion exchange material for transition metal anions like PdCl42- and H2VO41-. 1,10-Phenanthroline functionalized mesoporous carbon (“Phen-FMC”) was found to have a high affinity for Cu(II), even down to a pH of 1. At pHs above 5, Phen-FMC was found to bind a variety of transition metal cations (e.g. Co(II), Ni(II), Zn(II), etc.) from filtered ground water, river water and seawater. Phen-FMC displayed rapid sorption kinetics with Co(II) in filtered river water, reaching equilibrium in less than an hour, and easily lowering the [Co(II)] to sub-ppb levels. Phen-FMC was found to be more effective for transition metal ion capture than ion-exchange resin or activated carbon. PMID:23762013

  10. Pantheon 1.0, a manually verified dataset of globally famous biographies.

    PubMed

    Yu, Amy Zhao; Ronen, Shahar; Hu, Kevin; Lu, Tiffany; Hidalgo, César A

    2016-01-05

    We present the Pantheon 1.0 dataset: a manually verified dataset of individuals that have transcended linguistic, temporal, and geographic boundaries. The Pantheon 1.0 dataset includes the 11,341 biographies present in more than 25 languages in Wikipedia and is enriched with: (i) manually verified demographic information (place and date of birth, gender) (ii) a taxonomy of occupations classifying each biography at three levels of aggregation and (iii) two measures of global popularity including the number of languages in which a biography is present in Wikipedia (L), and the Historical Popularity Index (HPI) a metric that combines information on L, time since birth, and page-views (2008-2013). We compare the Pantheon 1.0 dataset to data from the 2003 book, Human Accomplishments, and also to external measures of accomplishment in individual games and sports: Tennis, Swimming, Car Racing, and Chess. In all of these cases we find that measures of popularity (L and HPI) correlate highly with individual accomplishment, suggesting that measures of global popularity proxy the historical impact of individuals.

  11. Pantheon 1.0, a manually verified dataset of globally famous biographies

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Amy Zhao; Ronen, Shahar; Hu, Kevin; Lu, Tiffany; Hidalgo, César A.

    2016-01-01

    We present the Pantheon 1.0 dataset: a manually verified dataset of individuals that have transcended linguistic, temporal, and geographic boundaries. The Pantheon 1.0 dataset includes the 11,341 biographies present in more than 25 languages in Wikipedia and is enriched with: (i) manually verified demographic information (place and date of birth, gender) (ii) a taxonomy of occupations classifying each biography at three levels of aggregation and (iii) two measures of global popularity including the number of languages in which a biography is present in Wikipedia (L), and the Historical Popularity Index (HPI) a metric that combines information on L, time since birth, and page-views (2008–2013). We compare the Pantheon 1.0 dataset to data from the 2003 book, Human Accomplishments, and also to external measures of accomplishment in individual games and sports: Tennis, Swimming, Car Racing, and Chess. In all of these cases we find that measures of popularity (L and HPI) correlate highly with individual accomplishment, suggesting that measures of global popularity proxy the historical impact of individuals. PMID:26731133

  12. Pantheon 1.0, a manually verified dataset of globally famous biographies.

    PubMed

    Yu, Amy Zhao; Ronen, Shahar; Hu, Kevin; Lu, Tiffany; Hidalgo, César A

    2016-01-01

    We present the Pantheon 1.0 dataset: a manually verified dataset of individuals that have transcended linguistic, temporal, and geographic boundaries. The Pantheon 1.0 dataset includes the 11,341 biographies present in more than 25 languages in Wikipedia and is enriched with: (i) manually verified demographic information (place and date of birth, gender) (ii) a taxonomy of occupations classifying each biography at three levels of aggregation and (iii) two measures of global popularity including the number of languages in which a biography is present in Wikipedia (L), and the Historical Popularity Index (HPI) a metric that combines information on L, time since birth, and page-views (2008-2013). We compare the Pantheon 1.0 dataset to data from the 2003 book, Human Accomplishments, and also to external measures of accomplishment in individual games and sports: Tennis, Swimming, Car Racing, and Chess. In all of these cases we find that measures of popularity (L and HPI) correlate highly with individual accomplishment, suggesting that measures of global popularity proxy the historical impact of individuals. PMID:26731133

  13. Seasonal changes, identification and source apportionment of PAH in PM1.0

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agudelo-Castañeda, Dayana Milena; Teixeira, Elba Calesso

    2014-10-01

    The objective of this research was to evaluate the seasonal variation of PAHs in PM1.0, as well as to identify and quantify the contributions of each source profile using the PMF receptor model. PM1.0 samples were collected on PTFE filters from August 2011 to July 2013 in the Metropolitan Area of Porto Alegre, Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil. The samples were extracted using the EPA method TO-13A and 16 Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons (PAHs) were analyzed using a gaseous chromatograph coupled with a mass spectrometer (GC-MS). Also, the data discussed in this study were analyzed to identify the relations of the PAHs concentrations with NOx, NO, O3 and meteorological parameters (temperature, solar radiation, wind speed, relative humidity). The results showed that in winter, concentrations of total PAHs were significantly higher than in summer, thus showing their seasonal variation. The identification of emission sources by applying diagnostic ratios confirmed that PAHs in the study area originate from mobile sources, especially, from diesel and gasoline emissions. The analysis by PMF receptor model showed the contribution of these two main sources of emissions, too, followed by coal combustion, incomplete combustion/unburned petroleum and wood combustion. The toxic equivalent factors were calculated to characterize the risk of cancer from PAH exposure to PM1.0 samples, and BaP and DahA dominated BaPeq levels.

  14. 28 CFR 1.10 - Procedures applicable to prisoners under a sentence of death imposed by a United States District...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Procedures applicable to prisoners under a sentence of death imposed by a United States District Court. 1.10 Section 1.10 Judicial Administration DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE EXECUTIVE CLEMENCY § 1.10 Procedures applicable to prisoners under a sentence of death imposed by a United States...

  15. 11 CFR 1.10 - Disclosure of record to person other than the individual to whom it pertains.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 11 Federal Elections 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Disclosure of record to person other than the individual to whom it pertains. 1.10 Section 1.10 Federal Elections FEDERAL ELECTION COMMISSION PRIVACY ACT § 1.10 Disclosure of record to person other than the individual to whom it pertains. (a)...

  16. 11 CFR 1.10 - Disclosure of record to person other than the individual to whom it pertains.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 11 Federal Elections 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Disclosure of record to person other than the individual to whom it pertains. 1.10 Section 1.10 Federal Elections FEDERAL ELECTION COMMISSION PRIVACY ACT § 1.10 Disclosure of record to person other than the individual to whom it pertains. (a)...

  17. Comparison of modeled NmE with NmE measured by the Boulder ionosonde near the spring equinox.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pavlov, Anatoli; Pavlova, Nadezhda

    We present a comparison of the E-layer peak electron number densities, NmE, measured by the Boulder ionosonde during geomagnetically quiet conditions on 10 April 1996 at low solar activity, 2 April 1993 and 9 April 1978 during moderate solar activity conditions, and 10 April 1991 at high solar activity with numerical theoretical model calculations of NmE. Based on this comparison, the modified EUVAC model solar flux is necessary to increase by a factor of 2 at moderate and high solar activity in the wavelength range of 3.2-7.0 nm. If O (+) ( (4) S), O (+) ( (2) D), O (+) ( (2) P), and N (+) ions are not calculated, the value of NmE is decreased up to a factor of 1.12 at solar minimum and up to a factor of 1.23 for the moderate and high solar activity conditions. The production of N _{2} (+) ions by photoelectron-impact ionization of N _{2} increases the value of NmE up to a factor of 1.18 at low solar activity and up to a factor of 1.33 for the moderate and high solar activity levels. The increase in NmE due to the production of O _{2} (+) ions by photoelectron-impact ionization of O _{2} does not exceed 4 percent. A difference between the calculated electron, T _{e}, and neutral, T _{n}, temperatures is less than 1, 4, 20, 70, and 145 K at 105, 110, 120, 130, and 140 km altitude, respectively. Changes in NmE caused by this difference between T _{e} and T _{n} are negligible.

  18. Sub-10 nm nanopantography

    SciTech Connect

    Tian, Siyuan Donnelly, Vincent M. E-mail: economou@uh.edu; Economou, Demetre J. E-mail: economou@uh.edu; Ruchhoeft, Paul

    2015-11-09

    Nanopantography, a massively parallel nanopatterning method over large areas, was previously shown to be capable of printing 10 nm features in silicon, using an array of 1000 nm-diameter electrostatic lenses, fabricated on the substrate, to focus beamlets of a broad area ion beam on selected regions of the substrate. In the present study, using lens dimensional scaling optimized by computer simulation, and reduction in the ion beam image size and energy dispersion, the resolution of nanopantography was dramatically improved, allowing features as small as 3 nm to be etched into Si.

  19. Fabrication of 10nm diameter carbon nanopores

    SciTech Connect

    Radenovic, Aleksandra; Trepagnier, Eliane; Csencsits, Roseann; Downing, Kenneth H; Liphardt, Jan

    2008-09-25

    The addition of carbon to samples, during imaging, presents a barrier to accurate TEM analysis, the controlled deposition of hydrocarbons by a focused electron beam can be a useful technique for local nanometer-scale sculpting of material. Here we use hydrocarbon deposition to form nanopores from larger focused ion beam (FIB) holes in silicon nitride membranes. Using this method, we close 100-200nm diameter holes to diameters of 10nm and below, with deposition rates of 0.6nm per minute. I-V characteristics of electrolytic flow through these nanopores agree quantitatively with a one dimensional model at all examined salt concentrations.

  20. Laser Damage Growth in Fused Silica with Simultaneous 351 nm and 1053 nm irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Norton, M A; Carr, A V; Carr, C W; Donohue, E E; Feit, M D; Hollingsworth, W G; Liao, Z; Negres, R A; Rubenchik, A M; Wegner, P J

    2008-10-24

    Laser-induced growth of optical damage often determines the useful lifetime of an optic in a high power laser system. We have extended our previous work on growth of laser damage in fused silica with simultaneous 351 nm and 1053 nm laser irradiation by measuring the threshold for growth with various ratios of 351 nm and 1053 nm fluence. Previously we reported that when growth occurs, the growth rate is determined by the total fluence. We now find that the threshold for growth is dependent on both the magnitude of the 351 nm fluence as well as the ratio of the 351 nm fluence to the 1053 nm fluence. Furthermore, the data suggests that under certain conditions the 1053 nm fluence does not contribute to the growth.

  1. Generation of Thermospheric OI 845 nm Emission by Bowen Fluorescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huestis, D. L.; Sharpee, B. D.; Cosby, P. C.; Slanger, T. G.

    2006-12-01

    777 and 845 nm emissions from the 3p-3s multiplets of atomic oxygen are commonly observed at non-auroral latitudes in the terrestrial nightglow. By studying the relative strengths of these emissions we can learn something about the mechanisms that produce them and what they can teach us about the atmosphere. Recently [1] we have used intensity-calibrated sky spectra from the Keck telescopes to investigate the relative strengths of a wide range of O-atom Rydberg lines and have confirmed that electron-ion radiative recombination is a primary source of excitation for both the triplet and quintet systems. Following the intensity of the 777 and 845 nm lines during the night, we find that for most of the night the quintet 777 nm line is consistently stronger than the triplet 845 nm line, with a nearly constant intensity ratio I(777)/I(845) near 2.3, although both intensities fall rapidly as the night progresses. However, late in the night the 845 nm intensity levels off, while the 777 nm intensity continues to fall, and the I(777)/I(845) ratio plunges by a factor of 5-10. We interpret these observations as indicating that the O-atom quintet states are still being excited by the same mechanism as earlier in the night, i.e. radiative recombination, but some triplet states are also being excited by an additional mechanism. Such a mechanism has been proposed before [2-6] but not previously observed directly in the terrestrial nightglow. The oxygen triplet 3d-2p transition at 102.576 nm is in close coincidence with the solar hydrogen Lyman-β line at 102.572 nm. Radiative transport in the hydrogen geocorona will deliver Lyman-β intensity into the Earth's shadow and will produce triplet O(3d 3D) high in the atmosphere, even prior to direct solar illumination. The result is observable in a radiative cascade sequence 3d-3p(1129 nm) → 3p- 3s(845 nm) → 3s-2p(130 nm). A similar effect is observed in the H-α emission, which is also excited by Lyman-β absorption. This process

  2. On the photochemistry of IONO2: absorption cross section (240-370 nm) and photolysis product yields at 248 nm.

    PubMed

    Joseph, D M; Ashworth, S H; Plane, J M C

    2007-11-01

    The absolute absorption cross section of IONO(2) was measured by the pulsed photolysis at 193 nm of a NO(2)/CF(3)I mixture, followed by time-resolved Fourier transform spectroscopy in the near-UV. The resulting cross section at a temperature of 296 K over the wavelength range from 240 to 370 nm is given by log(10)(sigma(IONO(2))/cm(2) molecule(-1)) = 170.4 - 3.773 lambda + 2.965 x 10(-2)lambda(2)- 1.139 x 10(-4)lambda(3) + 2.144 x 10(-7)lambda(4)- 1.587 x 10(-10)lambda(5), where lambda is in nm; the cross section, with 2sigma uncertainty, ranges from (6.5 +/- 1.9) x 10(-18) cm(2) at 240 nm to (5 +/- 3) x 10(-19) cm(2) at 350 nm, and is significantly lower than a previous measurement [J. C. Mössinger, D. M. Rowley and R. A. Cox, Atmos. Chem. Phys., 2002, 2, 227]. The photolysis quantum yields for IO and NO(3) production at 248 nm were measured using laser induced fluorescence of IO at 445 nm, and cavity ring-down spectroscopy of NO(3) at 662 nm, yielding phi(IO)

  3. Update on CRUST1.0 - A 1-degree Global Model of Earth's Crust

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laske, Gabi; Masters, Guy; Ma, Zhitu; Pasyanos, Mike

    2013-04-01

    Our new 1-by-1 degree global crustal model, CRUST1.0, was introduced last year and serves as starting model in a comprehensive effort to compile a global model of Earth's crust and lithosphere, LITHO1.0 (Pasyanos et al., 2012). The Moho depth in CRUST1.0 is based on 1-degree averages of a recently updated database of crustal thickness data from active source seismic studies as well as from receiver function studies. In areas where such constraints are still missing, for example in Antarctica, crustal thicknesses are estimated using gravity constraints. The compilation of the new crustal model initially followed the philosophy of the widely used crustal model CRUST2.0 (Bassin et al., 2000; http://igppweb.ucsd.edu/~gabi/crust2.html) to assign elastic properties in the crystalline crust according to basement age or tectonic setting (loosely following an updated map by Artemieva and Mooney (2001; http://www.lithosphere.info). For cells with no local seismic or gravity constraints, statistical averages of crustal properties, including crustal thickness, were extrapolated. However, in places with constraints the depth to basement and mantle are given explicitly and no longer assigned by crustal type. This allows for much smaller errors in both. In each 1-degree cell, boundary depth, compressional and shear velocity as well as density is given for 8 layers: water, ice, 3 sediment layers and upper, middle and lower crystalline crust. Topography, bathymetry and ice cover are taken from ETOPO1. The sediment cover is based on our sediment model (Laske and Masters, 1997; http://igppweb.ucsd.edu/~sediment.html), with some near-coastal updates. In an initial step toward LITHO1.0, the model is then validated against new global surface wave disperison maps and adjusted in areas of extreme misfit. This poster presents the next validation step: compare the new Moho depths with in-situ active source and receiver function results. We also present comparisons with CRUST2.0. CRUST1.0 is available for download. References: Pasyanos, M.E., Masters, G., Laske, G. and Ma, Z., LITHO1.0 - An Updated Crust and Lithospheric Model of the Earth Developed Using Multiple Data Constraints, Abstract T11D-09 presented at 2012 Fall Meeting, AGU, San Francisco, Calif., 3-7 Dec, 2012. Artemieva, I.M. and Mooney, W.D., Thermal thickness and evolution of Precambrian lithosphere: A global study, J. Geophys. Res., 106, 16,387-16,414, 2001. Bassin, C., Laske, G. and Masters, G., The Current Limits of Resolution for Surface Wave Tomography in North America, EOS Trans AGU, 81, F897, 2000. Laske, G. and Masters, G., A Global Digital Map of Sediment Thickness, EOS Trans. AGU, 78, F483, 1997. URL: http://igppweb.ucsd.edu/~gabi/crust1.html

  4. Charge-density oscillations on Be(10{bar 1}0): Screening in a non-free two-dimensional electron gas

    SciTech Connect

    Briner, B.G.; Hofmann, P. ||; Doering, M.; Rust, H.; Plummer, E.W. |; Bradshaw, A.M.

    1998-11-01

    The surface state on Be(10{bar 1}0) has been investigated using a low-temperature scanning tunneling microscope (STM). The Fermi contour of this surface state is located at one boundary of the surface Brillouin zone, and surface-state electrons provide the main part of the charge density near the Fermi energy. Be(10{bar 1}0), therefore, corresponds closely to a non-free two-dimensional electron gas. We have observed standing waves of the surface charge density on Be(10{bar 1}0) near step edges and point defects. Such wave patterns derive from the interference of incoming and scattered electrons; they demonstrate the screening characteristics of the surface state. On Be(10{bar 1}0) these waves were found to be highly anisotropic. It is shown that calculating the Fourier transforms of topographic STM images is a powerful method for determining the Fermi contour of the surface state. This method could even be applied to images that display a complex wave pattern arising from a random distribution of point scatterers. Fourier analysis also revealed that the charge density oscillations on Be(10{bar 1}0) contain multiple periods that differ by reciprocal lattice vectors. These multiperiodic oscillations relate to the non-free character of the surface-state electrons and constitute an interference pattern of Bloch states. Fourier filtering was used to separate the charge-density oscillations from the topographic corrugation and to visualize their shape and spatial range. The experimental data are qualitatively discussed using a model calculation based on the scattering of Bloch electrons from planar obstacles in a two-dimensional conductor. Experimental results and model calculations highlight how the screening characteristics on Be(10{bar 1}0) significantly deviate from the behavior expected for a free two-dimensional electron gas. {copyright} {ital 1998} {ital The American Physical Society}

  5. Sub-Doppler Stark Spectroscopy in the A−X (1,0) Band of CN

    SciTech Connect

    Hall, G.E.; Hause, M.L.; Sears, T.J.

    2009-11-26

    The effect of external electric fields has been measured in hyperfine-resolved sub-Doppler transitions in the A {sup 2}{Pi}-X {sup 2}{Sigma} (1,0) band of the CN radical near 10900 cm{sup -1}. Static electric fields less than 1 kV/cm are sufficient to mix the most closely spaced {Lambda}-dpublets in the A state, leading to Stark spectra with both new and shifted resonances. Simulations of the saturation-dip Stark spectral line profiles allow extraction of the A-state permanent electric dipole moment with a magnitude of 0.06 {+-} 0.02 D.

  6. Measurement of velocity deficit at the downstream of a 1:10 axial hydrokinetic turbine model

    SciTech Connect

    Gunawan, Budi; Neary, Vincent S; Hill, Craig; Chamorro, Leonardo

    2012-01-01

    Wake recovery constrains the downstream spacing and density of turbines that can be deployed in turbine farms and limits the amount of energy that can be produced at a hydrokinetic energy site. This study investigates the wake recovery at the downstream of a 1:10 axial flow turbine model using a pulse-to-pulse coherent Acoustic Doppler Profiler (ADP). In addition, turbine inflow and outflow velocities were measured for calculating the thrust on the turbine. The result shows that the depth-averaged longitudinal velocity recovers to 97% of the inflow velocity at 35 turbine diameter (D) downstream of the turbine.

  7. A miniature Rotary Compressor with a 1:10 compression ratio

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dmitriev, Olly; Tabota, Eugene; Arbon EurIng, Ian; FIMechE, CEng

    2015-08-01

    Micro compressors have applications in medical devices, robotics and “nanosatellites”. The problem of active cooling for photo detectors in “nano-satellites” becomes more important because the majority of space missions target Earth observation, and passive cooling does not provide the required temperatures to achieve the desired SNR levels. Reciprocating compressors used in cryocoolers cause vibrations. VERT Rotors has built an ultralow-vibration rotary compressor with 40mm-long screws, and our prototype delivered 1:10 compression ratio. This “nano” compressor is a non-conventional conical type consisting of an Inner conical screw rotor revolving inside an Outer screw rotor.

  8. Roentgenstructural analysis of Cristalline Cobalt II with 1,10- fenatrolin and tiosemicarbazid acetic acid.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kon, Aviv Yu.

    The author has reported his long years research in the area of structure and Roentgen analysis of Cristalls. The talk concerns Roentgen analysis, Its first steps in Kishinev during the finish of 40-th and the beginning of 50-th. Some concerns was given to prof. T.I. Malinovskij,a graduated from the Yassy University one of the first Assistants Proff. at the Kishinev State Pedagogical Institute and later a leading scientist in the area of cristalls research in the Soviet Moldavia. Particularly, the actual talk was dedicated to interaction of acids with cristals of 1,10 fenatrolin.

  9. Observation of J = 1-0 emission from H/N-15/C. [in radio astronomy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, R. D.; Godfrey, P. D.; Gunn, H. I.; Blackman, G. L.; Storey, J. W. V.

    1977-01-01

    Emission from the J = 1-0 transition of H(N-15)C has been detected in the direction of DR21(OH). The transition frequency of 88,865.69 MHz was measured in the laboratory by microwave absorption spectroscopy. The computed N-15/C-13 isotopic abundance ratio of 1.01 for DR21(OH) is larger than those calculated from isotopes of HCN in other interstellar clouds, perhaps implying a localized enrichment in N-15 in DR21(OH).

  10. The SeaFlux Turbulent Flux Dataset Version 1.0 Documentation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clayson, Carol Anne; Roberts, J. Brent; Bogdanoff, Alec S.

    2012-01-01

    Under the auspices of the World Climate Research Programme (WCRP) Global Energy and Water cycle EXperiment (GEWEX) Data and Assessment Panel (GDAP), the SeaFlux Project was created to investigate producing a high-resolution satellite-based dataset of surface turbulent fluxes over the global oceans. The most current release of the SeaFlux product is Version 1.0; this represents the initial release of turbulent surface heat fluxes, associated near-surface variables including a diurnally varying sea surface temperature.

  11. Data appendix: F-number=1.0 EMR with a flexible back electrode

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mihora, D. J.

    1984-01-01

    A 12.5 micron Tedlar low f-number electrostatic membrane reflector was tested. The antenna reflector was designed to achieve a spherical reflector surface with a focal length to diameter ratio f(sub n) of one and a potential accuracy of 1.0 over its 4.88 m diameter. The configuration required the cutting and joining of twelve pie-shaped panels to form the reflector surface. Electrostatic forces are used to tension this preformed membrane reflector. The test data is spare-only three sets of measurements were taken due to lack of funds.

  12. Effect of process parameters and post-deposition annealing on the microwave dielectric and optical properties of pulsed laser deposited Bi1.5Zn1.0Nb1.5O7 thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sudheendran, K.; Ghanashyam Krishna, M.; Raju, K. C. James

    2009-05-01

    Bismuth Zinc niobate (Bi1.5Zn1.0Nb1.5O7) thin films were deposited by pulsed laser deposition (PLD) method on fused silica substrates at different oxygen pressures. The structural, microwave dielectric and optical properties of these thin films were systematically studied for both the as-deposited and the annealed films at 600°C. The as-deposited films were all amorphous in nature but crystallized on annealing at 600°C in air. The surface morphology as studied by atomic force microscopy (AFM) reveals ultra-fine grains in the case of as-deposited thin films and cluster grain morphology on annealing. The as-deposited films exhibit refractive index in the range of 2.36-2.53 (at a wavelength of 750 nm) with an optical absorption edge value of 3.30-3.52 eV and a maximum dielectric constant of 11 at 12.15 GHz. On annealing the films at 600°C they crystallize to the cubic pyrochlore structure accompanied by an increase in band gap, refractive index and microwave dielectric constant.

  13. 2 nm continuously tunable 488nm micro-integrated diode-laser-based SHG light source for Raman spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Braune, M.; Maiwald, M.; Sumpf, B.; Tränkle, G.

    2016-04-01

    Raman spectroscopy in the visible spectral range is of great interest due to resonant Raman effects. Nevertheless, fluorescence and ambient light can mask the weak Raman lines. Shifted excitation Raman difference spectroscopy is a demonstrated tool to overcome this drawback. To apply this method, a light source with two alternating wavelengths is necessary. The spectral distance between these two wavelengths has to be adapted to the width of the Raman signal. According to the sample under investigation the width of the Raman signal could be in the range of 3 cm-1 - 12 cm-1. In this work, a micro-integrated light source emitting at 488 nm with a continuous wavelength tuning range up to 2 nm (83 cm-1) is presented. The pump source, a DFB laser emitting at 976 nm, and a periodically poled lithium niobate (PPLN) ridge waveguide crystal is used for the second harmonic generation (SHG). Both components are mounted on a μ-Peltier-element for temperature control. Here, a common wavelength tuning of the pump wavelength and the acceptance bandwidth of the SHG crystal via temperature is achieved. With the results the light source is suitable for portable Raman and SERDS experiments with a flexible spectral distance between both excitation wavelengths for SERDS with respect to the sample under investigation.

  14. Preparation, characterization and cytotoxicity studies of some transition metal complexes with ofloxacin and 1,10-phenanthroline mixed ligand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sadeek, S. A.; El-Hamid, S. M. Abd

    2016-10-01

    [Zn(Ofl)(Phen)(H2O)2](CH3COO)·2H2O (1), [ZrO(Ofl)(Phen)(H2O)]NO3·2H2O (2) and [UO2(Ofl)(Phen)(H2O)](CH3COO)·H2O (3) complexes of fluoroquinolone antibacterial agent ofloxacin (HOfl), containing a nitrogen donor heterocyclic ligand, 1,10-phenathroline monohydrate (Phen), were prepared and their structures were established with the help of elemental analysis, molar conductance, magnetic properties, thermal studies and different spectroscopic studies like IR, UV-Vis., 1H NMR and Mass. The IR data of HOfl and Phen ligands suggested the existing of a bidentate binding involving carboxylate O and pyridone O for HOfl ligand and two pyridine N atoms for Phen ligand. The coordination geometries and electronic structures are determined from electronic absorption spectra and magnetic moment measurements. From molar conductance studies reveals that metal complexes are electrolytes and of 1:1 type. The calculated bond length and force constant, F(Udbnd O), in the uranyl complex are 1.751 Å and 641.04 Nm-1. The thermal properties of the complexes were investigated by thermogravimetry (TGA) technique. The activation thermodynamic parameters are calculated using Coats-Redfern and Horowitz-Metzger methods. Antimicrobial activity of the compounds was evaluated against some bacteria and fungi species. The activity data show that most metal complexes have antibacterial activity than that of the parent HOfl drug. The in vitro cytotoxicities of ligands and their complexes were also evaluated against human breast and colon carcinoma cells.

  15. Evolution of the fraction of clumpy galaxies at 0.2 < z < 1.0 in the cosmos field

    SciTech Connect

    Murata, K. L.; Kajisawa, M.; Taniguchi, Y.; Kobayashi, M. A. R.; Shioya, Y.; Capak, P.; Ilbert, O.; Koekemoer, A. M.; Salvato, M.; Scoville, N. Z.

    2014-05-01

    Using the Hubble Space Telescope/Advanced Camera for Surveys data in the COSMOS field, we systematically searched clumpy galaxies at 0.2 < z < 1.0 and investigated the fraction of clumpy galaxies and its evolution as a function of stellar mass, star formation rate (SFR), and specific SFR (SSFR). The fraction of clumpy galaxies in star-forming galaxies with M {sub star} > 10{sup 9.5} M {sub ☉} decreases with time from ∼0.35 at 0.8 < z < 1.0 to ∼0.05 at 0.2 < z < 0.4, irrespective of the stellar mass, although the fraction tends to be slightly lower for massive galaxies with M {sub star} > 10{sup 10.5} M {sub ☉} at each redshift. On the other hand, the fraction of clumpy galaxies increases with increasing both SFR and SSFR in all the redshift ranges we investigated. In particular, we found that the SSFR dependences of the fractions are similar among galaxies with different stellar masses, and the fraction at a given SSFR does not depend on the stellar mass in each redshift bin. The evolution of the fraction of clumpy galaxies from z ∼ 0.9 to z ∼ 0.3 seems to be explained by such SSFR dependence of the fraction and the evolution of SSFRs of star-forming galaxies. The fraction at a given SSFR also appears to decrease with time, but this can be due to the effect of the morphological k correction. We suggest that these results are understood by the gravitational fragmentation model for the formation of giant clumps in disk galaxies, where the gas mass fraction is a crucial parameter.

  16. Imaging challenges in 20nm and 14nm logic nodes: hot spots performance in Metal1 layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Timoshkov, V.; Rio, D.; Liu, H.; Gillijns, W.; Wang, J.; Wong, P.; Van Den Heuvel, D.; Wiaux, V.; Nikolsky, P.; Finders, J.

    2013-10-01

    The 20nm Metal1 layer, based on ARM standard cells, has a 2D design with minimum pitch of 64nm. This 2D design requires a Litho-Etch-Litho-Etch (LELE) double patterning. The whole design is divided in 2 splits: Me1A and Me1B. But solution of splitting conflicts needs stitching at some locations, what requires good Critical Dimension (CD) and overlay control to provide reliable contact between 2 stitched line ends. ASML Immersion NXT tools are aimed at 20 and 14nm logic production nodes. Focus control requirements become tighter, as existing 20nm production logic layouts, based on ARM, have about 50-60nm focus latitude and tight CD Uniformity (CDU) specifications, especially for line ends. IMEC inspected 20nm production Metal1 ARM standard cells with a Negative Tone Development (NTD) process using the Process Window Qualification-like technique experimentally and by Brion Tachyon LMC by simulations. Stronger defects were found thru process variations. A calibrated Tachyon model proved a good overall predictability capability for this process. Selected defects are likely to be transferred to hard mask during etch. Further, CDU inspection was performed for these critical features. Hot spots showed worse CD uniformity than specifications. Intra-field CDU contribution is significant in overall CDU budget, where reticle has major impact due to high MEEF of hot spots. Tip-to-Tip and tip-to-line hot spots have high MEEF and its variation over the field. Best focus variation range was determined by best focus offsets between hot spots and its variation within the field.

  17. Geoacoustic inversion techniques (GAIT) Version 1.0 global search (GS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neumann, Peter; Muncill, Gregory

    2003-04-01

    Geoacoustic Inversion Techniques (GAIT) Version 1.0 is a PEO (C4I and Space) PMW 155 funded product that accepts measured acoustic data and produces an optimized estimate of the bottom environment that produced the observed acoustic data. The Global Search (GS) segment of GAIT pairs the Adaptive Simulated Annealing (ASA) algorithm with a variety of Navy standard propagation loss models (PE, ASTRAL and Nautilus) and an active sonar performance prediction model (ASPM). The goal of the GS segment of GAIT is to provide a best estimate of the geoacoustic properties of the ocean bottom that, when paired with a selected model, result in the observed acoustic data. An overview of the GS segment of GAIT 1.0 will be presented with details on the ASA algorithm, component models, cost functions and geoacoustic parametrizations. Inversion results will be shown for synthetic test cases from the Inversion Technique Workshop (ITW) held in May 2001 and from both narrowband and broadband measured data test cases. [Work supported by PEO (C4I and Space) PMW 155 and uses the products of a Phase I and II SBIR from the ONR (Code 321US).

  18. A ROSAT HRI observation of the supernova remnant G109.1 - 1.0

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hurford, Alan P.; Fesen, Robert A.

    1995-11-01

    We present results of a search using ROSAT HRI data for X-ray spatial substructures in the galactic supernova remnant G109.1 - 1.0 which might indicate a connection between the remnant's bright X-ray blob and its X-ray pulsar, 1E2259+586. A 0.1-2.4 keV HRI image, created by combining separate 28- and 22-ks pointings, reveals the presence of a few small-scale X-ray features, including a NE-SW emission ridge in the remnant's X-ray blob. Two diffuse knots in the X-ray blob, previously suggested as being aligned with the X-ray pulsar, appear to be statistical fluctuations in the Einstein HRI data. We find no morphological evidence in the X-ray spatial substructures of G109.1 - 1.0 to support a pulsar jet origin for the X-ray blob as proposed by Gregory & Fahlman.

  19. Ultrasonic micro-motor using miniature piezoelectric tube with diameter of 1.0 mm.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hui; Dong, Shu-xiang; Zhang, Shu-yi; Wang, Tian-hua; Zhang, Zhong-ning; Fan, Li

    2006-12-22

    At the present moment, the smallest piezoelectric ultrasonic micro-motors utilizing miniature PZT piezoelectric ceramic tubes were developed. The motor consists of a PZT-metal composite tube stator, two steel rotors and a thin shaft that keeps the two rotors pressing on both ends of the stator elastically. The dimensions of the PZT tube are 1.0 mm in outer diameter, 0.6 mm in inner diameter and 5.0 mm in length. The diameter and total length of the assembled micro-motor is 1.0 mm and 8 mm (including an adjusting spring), respectively. The tube-type micro-motor is driven by two pairs of alternative voltages with phase shift 90 degrees between the adjacent electrodes and operated in the first circular-bending vibration mode of the stator with the resonance frequency about 58 kHz. The experimental results show that the tube-type micro-motors have perfect performances: (i) high rotation frequency over 3000 rpm and (ii) large starting torque over 7.8 microN m under the conditions of the input voltage of 110 V(p-p) and the resonance frequency. The micro-motor is well suitable for operating in micro-spaces, such as in intravascular, micro-robots and micro-craft applications.

  20. Design and performance of a 4He-evaporator at <1.0 K

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, N. K.; Pradhan, J.; Naser, Md. Z. A.; Roy, A.; Mandal, B. Ch.; Mallik, C.; Bhandari, R. K.

    2012-12-01

    A helium evaporator for obtaining 1 K temperature has been built and tested in laboratory. This will function primarily as the precooling stage for the circulating helium isotopic gas mixture. This works on evaporative cooling by way of pumping out the vapour from the top of the pot. A precision needle valve is used initially to fill up the pot and subsequently a permanent flow impedance maintains the helium flow from the bath into the pot to replenish the evaporative loss of helium. Considering the cooling power of 10 mW @1.0 K, a 99.0 cm3 helium evaporator was designed, fabricated from OFE copper and tested in the laboratory. A pumping station comprising of a roots pump backed by a dry pump was used for evacuation. The calibrated RuO thermometer and kapton film heater were used for measuring the temperature and cooling power of the system respectively. The continuously filled 1 K bath is tested in the laboratory and found to offer a temperature less than 1.0 K by withdrawing vapour from the evaporator. In order to minimize the heat load and to prevent film creep across the pumping tube, size optimization of the pumping line and pump-out port has been performed. The results of test run along with relevant analysis, mechanical fabrication of flow impedance are presented here.

  1. Exoplanet detection via microlensing with RoboNet-1.0

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burgdorf, M. J.; Bramich, D. M.; Dominik, M.; Bode, M. F.; Horne, K. D.; Steele, I. A.; Rattenbury, N.; Tsapras, Y.

    2007-04-01

    RoboNet-1.0 is a prototype global network of three two-meter robotic telescopes, placed in La Palma (Canary Islands), Maui (Hawaii), and Siding Spring (Australia). In April 2004, funding for RoboNet-1.0 until July 2007 was approved by PPARC's Science Committee, and the project commenced in earnest in August 2004. The search for cool extra-solar planets by optimised robotic monitoring of Galactic microlensing events is one of the two core elements of its scientific programme - observations of gamma-ray bursts is the other. During the 2005 observing season, light curves of more than 60 microlensing events have been sampled at regular intervals. One particular event, OGLE-2005-BLG-71, showed an anomaly caused by an extrasolar planet, which constituted the second detection of a planet by microlensing. As a by-product, our dense monitoring during caustic crossing events can resolve the brightness profile of observed source stars, providing an observational test of stellar atmosphere models. Current development work uses e-science to create a fully automated chain linking event monitoring to the detection of anomalies in the microlensing lightcurves that could be indications of planetary companions and on to the triggering of follow-up observations. In order to fully exploit the potential of such a network for detecting exoplanets, it will be necessary to complement the existing RoboNet with additional telescopes in the southern hemisphere.

  2. Intrinsic Properties of Fe-Substituted L1(0) Magnets

    SciTech Connect

    Manchanda, P; Kumar, P; Kashyap, A; Lucis, MJ; Shield, JE; Mubarok, A; Goldstein, JI; Constantinides, S; Barmak, K; Lewis, LH; Sellmyer, DJ; Skomski, R

    2013-10-01

    First-principle supercell calculations are used to determine how 3d elemental additions, especially Fe additions, modify the magnetization, exchange and anisotropy of L1(0)-ordered ferromagnets. Calculations are performed using the VASP code and partially involve configurational averaging over site disorder. Three isostructural systems are investigated: Fe-Co-Pt, Mn-Al-Fe, and transition metal-doped Fe-Ni. In all three systems the iron strongly influences the magnetic properties of these compounds, but the specific effect depends on the host. In CoPt(Fe) iron enhances the magnetization, with subtle changes in the magnetic moments that depend on the distribution of the Fe and Co atoms. The addition of Fe to MnAl is detrimental to the magnetization, because it creates antiferromagnetic exchange interactions, but it enhances the magnetic anisotropy. The replacement of 50% of Mn by Fe in MnFeAl2 enhances the anisotropy from 1.77 to 2.5 MJ/m(3). Further, the substitution of light 3d elements such as Ti, V, Cr into L1(0)-ordered FeNi is shown to substantially reduce the magnetization.

  3. The MASH 1.0 code system: Utilization of morse in the adjoint mode

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, J.O.; Santoro, R.T.

    1993-06-01

    The Monte Carlo Adjoint Shielding Code System -- MASH 1.0, principally developed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), represents an advanced method of calculating neutron and gamma-ray environments and radiation protection factors for complex shielding configurations by coupling a forward discrete ordinates radiation environment (i.e. air-over-ground) transport calculation with an adjoint Monte Carlo treatment of the shielding geometry. The primary application to date has been to determine the radiation shielding characteristics of armored vehicles exposed to prompt radiation from a nuclear weapon detonation. Other potential applications include analyses of the mission equipment associated with space exploration, the civilian airline industry, and other problems associated with an external neutron and gamma-ray radiation environment. This paper will provide an overview of the MASH 1.0 code system, including the verification, validation, and application to {open_quotes}benchmark{close_quotes} experimental data. Attention will be given to the adjoint Monte Carlo calculation, the use of {open_quotes}in-group{close_quotes} biasing to control the weights of the adjoint particles, and the coupling of a new graphics package for the diagnosis of combinatorial geometry descriptions and visualization of radiation transport results.

  4. Observation of Quiet Limb in He I 1083.0 nm, H Paschen alpha1281.8 nm and H Brackett gamma 2166.1 nm lines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prasad Choudhary, Debi

    2016-05-01

    In this paper, we shall present the results of an observational study of the quiet solar limb in the near infrared lines using the New IR Array Camera (NAC) and the vertical spectrograph at the focal plane of McMath-Pierce telescope. The NAC, at the exit port of the spectrograph, was used to record the limb spectrum in HeI 1083.0 nm, Hydrogen Paschen 1281.8 nm and Brackett 2165.5 nm wavelength regions. The NAC is a 1024x1024 InSb Alladin III Detector operating over 1-5 micron range with high density sampling at 0.018 arc second/pixel. The all-reflective optical train minimizes number of surfaces and eliminates ghosts leading to low scatter, ghost-free optics. The close-cycle cryogenic provides a stable cooling environment over six hour period with an accuracy of 0.01K leading to low dark current. The low read out noise combined with low scattered light and dark current makes NAC an ideal detector for making high quality infrared spectral observations of solar limb. The limb spectrums were obtained by placing the spectrograph slit perpendicular to the limb at an interval of 10 degrees around the solar disk. We shall report the intensity profile, line-of-sight velocity and line width distribution around the sun derived from the spectra along the slit.

  5. Corneal injury from 1318-nm single laser pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roach, William P.; Ketzenberger, Bryan K.; Burton, Margaret B.; Johnson, Thomas E.

    2002-06-01

    Threshold, median effective dose, and the mechanism of laser-tissue interaction are not well defined at the 1318-nm wavelength for human corneal exposures. The goals of this research effort are to identify at-risk groups, characterize the lesions imposed, and establish the ED50 for single pulse 1318-nm laser exposures on the cornea. A Neodymium: Yttrium Aluminum Garnet (Nd:YAG) laser was used to deliver 1318-nm wavelength pulses to the corneas of ten female Dutch Belted rabbits (Oryctolagus cuniculus). Single pulses of 0.5-ms duration and radiant beam energy ranging from 116 to 2250 joules/per square centimeter (J/cm2) were used. Exposure sites were clinically evaluated acutely, one hour and twenty-four hours post-exposure for the presence of a lesion. Results from the twenty-four hour evaluation were used to determine the ED50. Grossly, the lesions appeared as small, circular, well-demarcated, white, opaque lesions. Histologically, the lesions appeared as conical shaped coagulative necrosis with the base of the lesion at the epithelial surface of the cornea and extending to the apex at the endothelial border of the cornea. The ED50 for 1318-nm exposures to the rabbit cornea was determined to be 383 J/cm2 for a 0.1-mm spot size as measured at 1/e2.

  6. Sequence characterization of river buffalo Toll-like receptor genes 1-10 reveals distinct relationship with cattle and sheep.

    PubMed

    Dubey, P K; Goyal, S; Kathiravan, P; Mishra, B P; Gahlawat, S K; Kataria, R S

    2013-04-01

    The present study was undertaken to characterize the full-length transcripts of Toll-like receptor (TLR) genes 1-10 of river buffalo. The conceptualized amino acid identity of bubaline TLRs ranged between 86% to 100% with ruminants, while it ranged between 45% to 91% with other vertebrate species. Simple modular architecture tool (SMART) analysis revealed the presence of TIR domains and varying numbers of leucine-rich repeat motifs in all the buffalo TLRs. With respect to TIR domains, TLRs 1, 2 and 3 of river buffalo were found to have 99.3% identity with cattle and 100% identity of TLRs 4, 6 and 10 with sheep. Phylogenetic analysis of TLRs of buffalo and different vertebrate species revealed the clustering of major TLR gene subfamilies with high bootstrap values. The evolutionary relationship between buffalo and other ruminant species was found to vary among different TLRs. In order to understand the relationship between TLRs of different ruminant species, multidimensional scaling (MDS) analysis of pairwise amino acid differences between different species within each TLR was performed. Buffalo and cattle were found to be closely related only with respect to TLRs 1, 2 and 7, while buffalo and sheep were found to be clustering together with respect to TLRs 3, 6, 8 and 10. The distinct relationship of bubaline TLRs with cattle and sheep revealed the possible differences in the pathogen recognition receptor systems in these animals and consequently the differences in their susceptibility/resistance to various invading organisms. PMID:22694123

  7. Radiation Failures in Intel 14nm Microprocessors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bossev, Dobrin P.; Duncan, Adam R.; Gadlage, Matthew J.; Roach, Austin H.; Kay, Matthew J.; Szabo, Carl; Berger, Tammy J.; York, Darin A.; Williams, Aaron; LaBel, K.; Ingalls, James D.

    2016-01-01

    In this study the 14 nm Intel Broadwell 5th generation core series 5005U-i3 and 5200U-i5 was mounted on Dell Inspiron laptops, MSI Cubi and Gigabyte Brix barebones and tested with Windows 8 and CentOS7 at idle. Heavy-ion-induced hard- and catastrophic failures do not appear to be related to the Intel 14nm Tri-Gate FinFET process. They originate from a small (9 m 140 m) area on the 32nm planar PCH die (not the CPU) as initially speculated. The hard failures seem to be due to a SEE but the exact physical mechanism has yet to be identified. Some possibilities include latch-ups, charge ion trapping or implantation, ion channels, or a combination of those (in biased conditions). The mechanism of the catastrophic failures seems related to the presence of electric power (1.05V core voltage). The 1064 nm laser mimics ionization radiation and induces soft- and hard failures as a direct result of electron-hole pair production, not heat. The 14nm FinFET processes continue to look promising for space radiation environments.

  8. 810nm, 980nm, 1470nm and 1950nm diode laser comparison: a preliminary "ex vivo" study on oral soft tissues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fornaini, Carlo; Merigo, Elisabetta; Sozzi, Michele; Selleri, Stefano; Vescovi, Paolo; Cucinotta, Annamaria

    2015-02-01

    The introduction of diode lasers in dentistry has several advantages, mainly consisting on the reduced size, reduced cost and possibility to beam delivering by optical fibers. At the moment the two diode wavelengths normally utilized in the dental field are 810 and 980 nm for soft tissues treatments. The aim of this study was to compare the efficacy of four different diode wavelengths: 810, 980, 1470 and 1950 nm diode laser for the ablation of soft tissues. Several samples of veal tongue were exposed to the four different wavelengths, at different fluences. The internal temperature of the soft tissues, in the area close to the beam, was monitored with thermocouple during the experiment. The excision quality of the exposed samples have been characterized by means of an optical microscope. Tissue damages and the cut regularity have been evaluated on the base of established criteria. The lowest thermal increase was recorded for 1950 nm laser. Best quality and speed of incision were obtained by the same wavelength. By evaluating epithelial, stromal and vascular damages for all the used wavelengths, the best result, in terms of "tissue respect", have been obtained for 1470 and 1950 nm exposures. From the obtained results 1470 and 1950 nm diode laser showed to be the best performer wavelengths among these used in this "ex vivo" study, probably due to their greatest affinity to water.

  9. Diode laser (980nm) cartilage reshaping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El Kharbotly, A.; El Tayeb, T.; Mostafa, Y.; Hesham, I.

    2011-03-01

    Loss of facial or ear cartilage due to trauma or surgery is a major challenge to the otolaryngologists and plastic surgeons as the complicated geometric contours are difficult to be animated. Diode laser (980 nm) has been proven effective in reshaping and maintaining the new geometric shape achieved by laser. This study focused on determining the optimum laser parameters needed for cartilage reshaping with a controlled water cooling system. Harvested animal cartilages were angulated with different degrees and irradiated with different diode laser powers (980nm, 4x8mm spot size). The cartilage specimens were maintained in a deformation angle for two hours after irradiation then released for another two hours. They were serially measured and photographed. High-power Diode laser irradiation with water cooling is a cheep and effective method for reshaping the cartilage needed for reconstruction of difficult situations in otorhinolaryngologic surgery. Key words: cartilage,diode laser (980nm), reshaping.

  10. Resist materials for 157-nm lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toriumi, Minoru; Ishikawa, Seiichi; Miyoshi, Seiro; Naito, Takuya; Yamazaki, Tamio; Watanabe, Manabu; Itani, Toshiro

    2001-08-01

    Fluoropolymers are key materials for single layer resists of 157nm lithography. We have been studying fluoropolymers to identify their potential for base resins of 157nm photoresist. Many fluoropolymers showed high optical transparencies, with absorption coefficients of 0.01micrometers -1 to 2micrometers -1 at 157nm, and dry- etching resistance comparable to an ArF resist, and non- swelling solubility in the standard developer. Positive- tone resists were formulated using fluoropolymers that fulfill practical resist requirements. They showed good sensitivities, from 1 mJ/cm(superscript 2 to 10 mJ/cm2, and contrast in the sensitivity curves. They were able to be patterned using a F2 laser microstepper.

  11. The dynamics of femtosecond pulsed laser removal of 20 nm Ni films from an interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schrider, Keegan J.; Torralva, Ben; Yalisove, Steven M.

    2015-09-01

    The dynamics of femtosecond laser removal of 20 nm Ni films on glass substrates was studied using time-resolved pump-probe microscopy. 20 nm thin films exhibit removal at two distinct threshold fluences, removal of the top 7 nm of Ni above 0.14 J/cm2, and removal of the entire 20 nm film above 0.36 J/cm2. Previous work shows the top 7 nm is removed through liquid spallation, after irradiation the Ni melts and rapidly expands leading to tensile stress and cavitation within the Ni film. This work shows that above 0.36 J/cm2 the 20 nm film is removed in two distinct layers, 7 nm and 13 nm thick. The top 7 nm layer reaches a speed 500% faster than the bottom 13 nm layer at the same absorbed fluence, 500-2000 m/s and 300-700 m/s in the fluence ranges studied. Significantly different velocities for the top 7 nm layer and bottom 13 nm layer indicate removal from an interface occurs by a different physical mechanism. The method of measuring film displacement from the development of Newton's rings was refined so it could be shown that the 13 nm layer separates from the substrate within 70 ps and accelerates to its final velocity within several hundred picoseconds. We propose that removal of the bottom 13 nm is consistent with heterogeneous nucleation and growth of vapor at the Ni-glass interface, but that the rapid separation and acceleration of the 13 nm layer from the Ni-glass interface requires consideration of exotic phases of Ni after excitation.

  12. Comparative study of Nd:KGW lasers pumped at 808 nm and 877 nm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Ke; Ge, Wen-Qi; Zhao, Tian-Zhuo; He, Jian-Guo; Feng, Chen-Yong; Fan, Zhong-Wei

    2015-10-01

    The laser performance and thermal analysis of Nd:KGW laser continuously pumped by 808 nm and 877 nm are comparatively investigated. Output power of 670 mW and 1587 mW, with nearly TEM00 mode, are achieved respectively at 808 nm pump and 877 nm pump. Meanwhile, a high-power passively Q-switched Nd:KGW/Cr4+:YAG laser pumped at 877 nm is demonstrated. An average output power of 1495 mW is obtained at pump power of 5.22 W while the laser is operating at repetition of 53.17 kHz. We demonstrate that 877 nm diode laser is a more potential pump source for Nd:KGW lasers.

  13. Clinical efficacy assessment in photodamaged skin of 0.5% and 1.0% idebenone.

    PubMed

    McDaniel, D H; Neudecker, B A; DiNardo, J C; Lewis, J A; Maibach, H I

    2005-09-01

    Idebenone is an antioxidant lower molecular weight analogue of coenzyme Q10. Previously, idebenone was shown to be a very effective antioxidant in its ability to protect against cell damage from oxidative stress in a variety of biochemical, cell biological, and in vivo methods, including its ability to suppress sunburn cell (SBC) formation in living skin. However, no clinical studies have been previously conducted to establish the efficacy of idebenone in a topical skincare formulation for the treatment of photodamaged skin. In this nonvehicle control study, 0.5% and 1.0% idebenone commercial formulations were evaluated in a clinical trial for topical safety and efficacy in photodamaged skin. Forty-one female subjects, aged 30-65, with moderate photodamaged skin were randomized to use a blind labelled (either 0.5% or 1.0% idebenone in otherwise identical lotion bases) skincare preparation twice daily for six weeks. Blinded expert grader assessments for skin roughness/dryness, fine lines/wrinkles, and global improvement in photodamage were performed at baseline, three weeks and six weeks. Electrical conductance readings for skin surface hydration and 35 mm digital photography were made at baseline after six weeks. Punch biopsies were taken from randomly selected subjects, baseline and after six weeks, and stained for certain antibodies (interleukin IL-6, interleukin IL-1b, matrixmetalloproteinase MMP-1, collagen I) using immunofluorescence microscopy. After six weeks' use of the 1.0% idebenone formula, a 26% reduction in skin roughness/dryness was observed, a 37% increase in skin hydration, a 29% reduction in fine lines/wrinkles, and a 33% improvement in overall global assessment of photodamaged skin. For the 0.5% idebenone formulation, a 23% reduction in skin roughness/dryness was observed, a 37% increase in skin hydration, a 27% reduction in fine lines/wrinkles, and a 30% improvement in overall global assessment of photodamaged skin. The immunofluorescence staining revealed a decrease in IL-1b, IL-6, and MMP-1 and an increase in collagen I for both concentrations.

  14. Eddy-resolving 1/10° model of the World Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ibrayev, R. A.; Khabeev, R. N.; Ushakov, K. V.

    2012-02-01

    The first results on simulating the intra-annual variability of the World Ocean circulation by use of the eddy-resolving model are considered. For this purpose, a model of the World Ocean with a 1/10° horizontal resolution and 49 vertical levels was developed (a 1/10 × 1/10 × 49 model of the World Ocean). This model is based on the traditional system of three-dimensional equations of the large-scale dynamics of the ocean and boundary conditions with an explicit allowance for water fluxes on the free surface of the ocean. The equations are written in the tripolar coordinate system. The numerical method is based on the separation of the barotropic and baroclinic components of the solution. Discretization in time is implemented using explicit schemes allowing effective parallelization for a large number of processors. The model uses the sub-models of the boundary layer of the atmosphere and the submodel of sea-ice thermodynamics. The model of the World Ocean was developed at the Institute of Numerical Mathematics of the Russian Academy of Sciences (INM RAS) and the P.P. Shirshov Institute of Oceanogy (IO RAS). The formulation of the problem of simulating the intra-annual variability of thermohydrodynamic processes of the World Ocean and the parameterizations that were used are considered. In the numerical experiment, the temporal evolution of the atmospheric effect is determined by the normal annual cycle according to the conditions of the international Coordinated Ocean-Ice Reference Experiment (CORE-I). The calculation was carried out on a multiprocessor computer with distributed memory; 1601 computational cores were used. The presented analysis demonstrates that the obtained results are quite satisfactory when compared to the results that were obtained by other eddy-resolving models of the global ocean. The analysis of the model solution is, to a larger extent, of a descriptive character. A detailed analysis of the results is to be presented in following works

  15. Simulating supersymmetry with ISAJET 7.0/ISASUSY 1.0

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baer, H.; Paige, F. E.; Protopopescu, S. D.; Tata, X.

    1993-04-01

    This document reviews the physics assumptions and input embedded in ISAJET 7.0/ISASUSY 1.0 which is relevant for simulating fundamental processes within the framework of the Minimal Supersymmetric Model (MSSM) at p(bar p) and pp colliders. After a brief discussion of the underlying MSSM framework, the authors discuss event simulation and list the particle production processes and decay modes that have been incorporated into the calculations. They then describe how to set up and run an ISAJET/ISASUSY job, as well as the user input and output formats. The ISAJET program is sufficiently flexible that some non-miminal supersymmetry scenarios may be simulated as well. Finally, plans for future upgrades which include the extension to e(sup +)e(sup -) collisions are listed.

  16. The Mars Analysis Correction Data Assimilation (MACDA) Dataset V1.0

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montabone, L.; Marsh, K.; Lewis, S. R.; Read, P. L.; Smith, M. D.; Holmes, J.; Spiga, A.; Lowe, D.; Pamment, A.

    2014-06-01

    The Mars Analysis Correction Data Assimilation (MACDA) dataset version 1.0 contains the reanalysis of fundamental atmospheric and surface variables for the planet Mars covering a period of about three Martian years (a Martian year is about 1.88 terrestrial years). This has been produced by data assimilation of observations from NASA's Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) spacecraft during its science mapping phase (February 1999-August 2004). In particular, we have used retrieved thermal profiles and total dust optical depths from the Thermal Emission Spectrometer (TES) on board MGS. Data have been assimilated into a Mars global climate model (MGCM) using the Analysis Correction scheme developed at the UK Meteorological Office. The MGCM used is the UK spectral version of the Laboratoire de Météorologie Dynamique (LMD, Paris, France) MGCM. MACDA is a joint project of the University of Oxford and The Open University in the UK.

  17. Preparation of octahydro- and tetrahydro-[1,10]phenanthroline zirconium and hafnium complexes for olefin polymerization.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Eun Yeong; Park, Geun Ho; Lee, Chun Sun; Kang, Yi Young; Lee, Junseong; Lee, Bun Yeoul

    2015-02-28

    Post-metallocenes were constructed for olefin polymerization using 1,2,3,4,7,8,9,10-octahydro[1,10]phenanthroline and 1,2,3,4-tetrahydro[1,10]phenanthroline derivatives. A series of zirconium complexes - LZrCl2(NHMe2)2 [L = 2,9-H2-C12H12N2 (4), 2,9-Me2-C12H12N2 (5), 2,9-nBu2-C12H12N2 (6), and 2,9-iPr2-C12H12N2 (7)] - and hafnium complexes - LHfCl2(NHMe2)2 [L = 2,9-H2-C12H12N2 (8), 2,9-Me2-C12H12N2 (9), 2,9-nBu2-C12H12N2 (10), and 2,9-iPr2-C12H12N2 (11)] - were synthesized via the reaction of octahydro[1,10]phenanthrolines (2,9-R2-C12H12(NH)2) with (Me2N)2MCl2 (DME). The reaction of 2,9-R2-C12H12(NH)2 with (PhCH2)2ZrCl2 in the presence of a small amount of THF afforded a series of THF adduct analogs, i.e., LZrCl2(THF)2 [L = 2,9-H2-C12H12N2 (12), 2,9-Me2-C12H12N2 (13), 2,9-nBu2-C12H12N2 (14), and 2,9-iPr2-C12H12N2 (15)]. The treatment of 12 and 13 with excess Me3Al resulted in the formation of unexpected complexes, i.e., (η(4)-LAlMe2)ZrCl2(Me) [L = 2,9-H2-C12H12N2 (16) and 2,9-Me2-C12H12N2 (17)], in which the Me2Al unit forms a five-membered ring through binding with the two nitrogen donors and the MeCl2Zr unit slips to an η(4)-binding mode containing the N-C-C-N fragment. The treatment of tetrahydro[1,10]phenanthrolines [2,9-R2-C12NH9(NH)] with M(CH2Ph)4 afforded tribenzyl zirconium complexes LZr(CH2Ph)3 - [L = 2,9-Me2-C12NH9N (18) and 2,9-nBu2-C12NH9N (19)] - and hafnium complexes - LHf(CH2Ph)3 [L = 2,9-Me2-C12NH9N (20), 2,9-nBu2-C12NH9N (21), and 2,9-iPr2-C12NH9N (22)]. The structures of 4, 5, 12, 17, and 22 were elucidated by X-ray crystallography. The newly prepared complexes were screened for ethylene/1-octene copolymerization activity: 12 and 16 were potent catalysts (activities of 74 × 10(6) g mol-Zr h(-1) at ∼120 °C under 30 bar ethylene) for the production of wax-like low-molecular weight polyethylene (Mn: ∼5000), which is widely used in industry.

  18. Hardening of the surface layers of commercial pure titanium VT1-0 under combined treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Bashchenko, Lyudmila P. Gromov, Viktor E. Budovskikh, Evgenii A. Soskova, Nina A.; Ivanov, Yurii F.

    2015-10-27

    The treatment of VT1-0 titanium samples was carried out by concentrated energy fluxes. The combined treatment included surface carburizing with the joint use of powder samples of compounds with high physical and mechanical properties (namely, titanium diboride TiB{sub 2}, silicon carbide SiC and zirconium oxide ZrO{sub 2}) and subsequent electron beam treatment of surface layers formed in electroexplosive treatment. The combined treatment of surface layers resulted in the multifold increase in microhardness, which reduces depending on the depth of hardening zone. After electron-beam treatment, the depth of hardening zone is increased. During electron-beam treatment, the two-layer hardening zone forms.

  19. Hyperon vector coupling f{sub 1}(0) from 2+1 flavor lattice QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Sasaki, Shoichi

    2011-10-21

    We present results for the hyperon vector form factor f{sub 1} for {Xi}{sup 0}{yields}{Sigma}{sup +}l{nu}-bar and {Sigma}{sup -}{yields}nl{nu}-bar semileptonic decays from dynamical lattice QCD with domain-wall quarks. Simulations are performed on the 2+1 flavor gauge configurations generated by the RBC and UKQCD Collaborations with a lattice cutoff of a{sup -1} = 1.7 GeV. Our preliminary results, which are calculated at the lightest sea quark mass (pion mass down to approximately 330 MeV), show that a sign of the second-order correction of SU(3) breaking on hyperon vector coupling f{sub 1}(0) is likely negative.

  20. Spacecraft Orbit Design and Analysis (SODA), version 1.0 user's guide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stallcup, Scott S.; Davis, John S.

    1989-01-01

    The Spacecraft Orbit Design and Analysis (SODA) computer program, Version 1.0 is described. SODA is a spaceflight mission planning system which consists of five program modules integrated around a common database and user interface. SODA runs on a VAX/VMS computer with an EVANS & SUTHERLAND PS300 graphics workstation. BOEING RIM-Version 7 relational database management system performs transparent database services. In the current version three program modules produce an interactive three dimensional (3D) animation of one or more satellites in planetary orbit. Satellite visibility and sensor coverage capabilities are also provided. One module produces an interactive 3D animation of the solar system. Another module calculates cumulative satellite sensor coverage and revisit time for one or more satellites. Currently Earth, Moon, and Mars systems are supported for all modules except the solar system module.

  1. Design document for the MOODS Data Management System (MDMS), version 1.0

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    The MOODS Data Management System (MDMS) provides access to the Master Oceanographic Observation Data Set (MOODS) which is maintained by the Naval Oceanographic Office (NAVOCEANO). The MDMS incorporates database technology in providing seamless access to parameter (temperature, salinity, soundspeed) vs. depth observational profile data. The MDMS is an interactive software application with a graphical user interface (GUI) that supports user control of MDMS functional capabilities. The purpose of this document is to define and describe the structural framework and logical design of the software components/units which are integrated into the major computer software configuration item (CSCI) identified as MDMS, Version 1.0. The preliminary design is based on functional specifications and requirements identified in the governing Statement of Work prepared by the Naval Oceanographic Office (NAVOCEANO) and distributed as a request for proposal by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA).

  2. Design document for the Surface Currents Data Base (SCDB) Management System (SCDBMS), version 1.0

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krisnnamagaru, Ramesh; Cesario, Cheryl; Foster, M. S.; Das, Vishnumohan

    1994-01-01

    The Surface Currents Database Management System (SCDBMS) provides access to the Surface Currents Data Base (SCDB) which is maintained by the Naval Oceanographic Office (NAVOCEANO). The SCDBMS incorporates database technology in providing seamless access to surface current data. The SCDBMS is an interactive software application with a graphical user interface (GUI) that supports user control of SCDBMS functional capabilities. The purpose of this document is to define and describe the structural framework and logistical design of the software components/units which are integrated into the major computer software configuration item (CSCI) identified as the SCDBMS, Version 1.0. The preliminary design is based on functional specifications and requirements identified in the governing Statement of Work prepared by the Naval Oceanographic Office (NAVOCEANO) and distributed as a request for proposal by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA).

  3. Hardening of the surface layers of commercial pure titanium VT1-0 under combined treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bashchenko, Lyudmila P.; Gromov, Viktor E.; Budovskikh, Evgenii A.; Ivanov, Yurii F.; Soskova, Nina A.

    2015-10-01

    The treatment of VT1-0 titanium samples was carried out by concentrated energy fluxes. The combined treatment included surface carburizing with the joint use of powder samples of compounds with high physical and mechanical properties (namely, titanium diboride TiB2, silicon carbide SiC and zirconium oxide ZrO2) and subsequent electron beam treatment of surface layers formed in electroexplosive treatment. The combined treatment of surface layers resulted in the multifold increase in microhardness, which reduces depending on the depth of hardening zone. After electron-beam treatment, the depth of hardening zone is increased. During electron-beam treatment, the two-layer hardening zone forms.

  4. Global Deployment of Geothermal Energy Using a New Characterization in GCAM 1.0

    SciTech Connect

    Hannam, Phil; Kyle, G. Page; Smith, Steven J.

    2009-09-01

    This report documents modeling of geothermal energy in GCAM 1.0 (formerly MiniCAM) from FY2008 to FY2009, from the inputs to the U.S. Climate Change Technology Program report (Clarke et al., 2008a) to the present representation, which will be used in future work. To demonstrate the newest representation, we describe the procedure and outcome of six model runs that illustrate the potential role of geothermal energy in the U.S. and global regions through different futures climate policy, development and deployment of engineered, or enhanced, geothermal systems (EGS), and availability of other low-cost, low-carbon electricity generation technologies such as nuclear energy and carbon capture and storage (CCS).

  5. Bis(imidazo[4,5-f][1,10]phenanthroline)dinitratolead(II)

    PubMed Central

    Li, Chun-Xiang; Zha, Xiao-Lin; Liu, Chun-Bo; Li, Xiu-Ying; Che, Guang-Bo

    2009-01-01

    In the title compound, [Pb(NO3)2(C13H8N4)2], the PbII atom (site symmetry 2) is hexa­coordinated by four N atoms from two N,N′-bidentate imidazo[4,5-f][1,10]phenanthroline (L) ligands and two O atoms from two weakly coordinated nitrate ions [Pb—O = 2.872 (5) Å] in an irregular arrangement, which may be ascribed to the stereochemically active lone pair of electrons on the metal ion. In the crystal, inter­molecular bifurcated N—H⋯(O,O) hydrogen bonds connect the mol­ecules into chains propagating along [100]. Adjacent chains inter­act by strong aromatic π–π stacking inter­actions, with a centroid–centroid distance of 3.483 (2) Å. PMID:21581524

  6. HI-SIMv1.0--towards the virtual reality of hearing impairments.

    PubMed

    Körkkö, P; Huttunen, K; Sorri, M

    2001-01-01

    The virtual reality of hearing impairments has obvious practical applications in areas such as audiology, speech therapy and hearing aid technology and serves as an informational tool for the family members of the hearing impaired. To simulate hearing impairment, a CD-ROM with filtered speech material accessible through a graphical user-interface was produced; the user-interface was created with standard multimedia tools. The CD-ROM, HI-SIMv1.0, intended as an interactive educational tool, offers a virtual experience of the effects of a selection of common types of hearing impairment. The options available in this simulation include grade of hearing impairment, audiometric configuration and the type and level of background noise. Word recognition scores can be computed for standard Finnish audiometric material.

  7. Power, Avionics and Software - Phase 1.0:. [Subsystem Integration Test Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ivancic, William D.; Sands, Obed S.; Bakula, Casey J.; Oldham, Daniel R.; Wright, Ted; Bradish, Martin A.; Klebau, Joseph M.

    2014-01-01

    This report describes Power, Avionics and Software (PAS) 1.0 subsystem integration testing and test results that occurred in August and September of 2013. This report covers the capabilities of each PAS assembly to meet integration test objectives for non-safety critical, non-flight, non-human-rated hardware and software development. This test report is the outcome of the first integration of the PAS subsystem and is meant to provide data for subsequent designs, development and testing of the future PAS subsystems. The two main objectives were to assess the ability of the PAS assemblies to exchange messages and to perform audio testing of both inbound and outbound channels. This report describes each test performed, defines the test, the data, and provides conclusions and recommendations.

  8. Supporting And Figuring Of SOFIA F/1.0 Thin Zerodur Meniscus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knohl, E.-D.

    1988-04-01

    The SOFIA telescope concept was discussed with respect to the ambitious NASA specification. Comparisons were drawn between SOFIA and other Zeiss optics like 3.5 m Telescope MPIA and ESO NTT. Recently developed technologies in producing ZERODUR blanks were presented. A distribution of tolerances for the optical system SOFIA was made. The axial mirror support in the telescope was optimized and the lateral support was calculated accordingly. Results for a radial backface support with correcting moment were given. For the SOFIA primary the deformation modes with lowest plate stiffness were calculated and load tolerances were derived. Fast flexible tools for figuring a F/1.0 asphere were discussed - developed in the ROFT program - that could be adapted to the SOFIA thin meniscus. Also a fast interferometric metrology was presented.

  9. Transition-metal and metalloid substitutions in L1(0)-ordered FeNi

    SciTech Connect

    Manchanda, P; Skomski, R; Bordeaux, N; Lewis, LH; Kashyap, A

    2014-05-07

    The effect of atomic substitutions on the magnetization, exchange, and magnetocrystalline anisotropy energy of L1(0)-ordered FeNi (tetrataenite) is computationally investigated. The compound naturally occurs in meteorites but has attracted renewed attention as a potential material for permanent magnets, and elemental additives will likely be necessary to facilitate the phase formation. Our density functional theory calculations use the Vienna ab-initio simulation package, applied to 4-atom unit cells of Fe2XNi and 32-atom supercells (X = Al, P, S, Ti, V, Cr, Mn, Fe, Co). While it is found that most additives deteriorate the magnetic properties, there are exceptions: excess substitutional Fe and Co additions improve the magnetization, whereas Cr, S, and interstitial B additions improve the magnetocrystalline anisotropy. (C) 2014 AIP Publishing LLC.

  10. ADS: A FORTRAN program for automated design synthesis: Version 1.10

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vanderplaats, G. N.

    1985-01-01

    A new general-purpose optimization program for engineering design is described. ADS (Automated Design Synthesis - Version 1.10) is a FORTRAN program for solution of nonlinear constrained optimization problems. The program is segmented into three levels: strategy, optimizer, and one-dimensional search. At each level, several options are available so that a total of over 100 possible combinations can be created. Examples of available strategies are sequential unconstrained minimization, the Augmented Lagrange Multiplier method, and Sequential Linear Programming. Available optimizers include variable metric methods and the Method of Feasible Directions as examples, and one-dimensional search options include polynomial interpolation and the Golden Section method as examples. Emphasis is placed on ease of use of the program. All information is transferred via a single parameter list. Default values are provided for all internal program parameters such as convergence criteria, and the user is given a simple means to over-ride these, if desired.

  11. 1,10-Phenanthroline as an accelerator for Ag nanoparticle-catalysed electroless copper deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Chia-Ru; Chou, Nan-Kuang; Li, Cheng-Hsing; Chen, Ho-Rei; Lee, Chien-Liang

    2014-10-01

    1,10-Phenanthroline (phen) can be successfully used as an accelerator for Ag-catalysed electroless copper deposition (ECD) processes. Electrochemical quartz crystal microbalance analyses indicate that the mass activity in terms of thickness of deposited Cu layer and average ECD rate within a deposition time of 110 s for Ag nanoparticles activated by phen are 7.86 × 10-3 μm μg-1 and 1.43 × 10-4 μm μg-1 s-1, respectively, whereas Ag nanoparticles without phen cannot catalyse the reaction. Furthermore, Tafel and cyclic voltammetric results show that the addition of phen to the ECD bath significantly enhances the ability of the Ag nanoparticles to catalyse the oxidation of HCHO and suppresses the formation of CuO.

  12. LANDSAT multispectral scanner computer-compatible tape format, version 1.0

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1982-01-01

    Unlike previous LANDSAT computer compatible tape (CCT) formats, the standard format of CCT's now includes a comprehensive field location and data description information superstructure composed of four records. The volume descriptor record, the text record, and the file pointer record reside in a volume directory file, which generally describes the data configuration and provides pointers to each data file. The file descriptor record for each data file describes the data structure within the file and provides pointers to certain fields within the file. These superstructure records primarily supply information about the data on the CCT as opposed to carrying the data themselves. The EROS Data Center's LANDSAT CCT version 1.0 product is presented which conforms to the concepts of the standard format as much as is possible with existing EDC systems.

  13. A Fluorescent Hypochlorite Probe Built on 1,10-Phenanthroline Scaffold and its Ion Recognition Features.

    PubMed

    Algi, Melek Pamuk

    2016-03-01

    In this study, the synthesis of 7-((Hydroxyimino)methyl)-1,10-phenanthroline-4-carbaldehyde oxime (1) in two steps starting from 4,7-dimethyl-1,10-phenanthroline (2) is reported. It is found that compound 1 can be used as a fluorogenic probe for the detection of hypochlorite ion in aqueous solution. NMR and mass spectral analysis indicate that probe 1 undergoes a chemical transformation through its oxime units upon treatment with hypochlorite, which results in a remarkable enhancement of the emission intensity. Also, metal ion recognition properties of probe 1 is investigated. It is noted that compound 1 is responsive to Zn(2+), Cd(2+), Ni(2+) and Cu(2+) metal ions, which reduced the emission intensity under identical conditions. Graphical Abstract The design, synthesis and properties of a new fluorescent hypochlorite probe is described. It is found that probe 1 immediately undergoes an oxidation reaction with NaClO through its oxime units in 0.1 M Na2CO3-NaHCO3 buffer containing DMF (pH = 9.0, 30:1 v/v) at room temperature, which resulted in a remarkable enhancement of the emission intensity. It is noteworthy that this novel probe 1 is highly selective to hypochlorite ion when compared to some other ROS and anions. On the other hand, probe 1 also induces turn-off fluorogenic responses to metal ions such as Zn(2+), Cd(2+), Ni(2+) and Cu(2+) ions under identical conditions. PMID:26670687

  14. Sub-10 nm carbon nanotube transistor.

    PubMed

    Franklin, Aaron D; Luisier, Mathieu; Han, Shu-Jen; Tulevski, George; Breslin, Chris M; Gignac, Lynne; Lundstrom, Mark S; Haensch, Wilfried

    2012-02-01

    Although carbon nanotube (CNT) transistors have been promoted for years as a replacement for silicon technology, there is limited theoretical work and no experimental reports on how nanotubes will perform at sub-10 nm channel lengths. In this manuscript, we demonstrate the first sub-10 nm CNT transistor, which is shown to outperform the best competing silicon devices with more than four times the diameter-normalized current density (2.41 mA/μm) at a low operating voltage of 0.5 V. The nanotube transistor exhibits an impressively small inverse subthreshold slope of 94 mV/decade-nearly half of the value expected from a previous theoretical study. Numerical simulations show the critical role of the metal-CNT contacts in determining the performance of sub-10 nm channel length transistors, signifying the need for more accurate theoretical modeling of transport between the metal and nanotube. The superior low-voltage performance of the sub-10 nm CNT transistor proves the viability of nanotubes for consideration in future aggressively scaled transistor technologies.

  15. Radiation Tolerance of 65nm CMOS Transistors

    DOE PAGES

    Krohn, M.; Bentele, B.; Christian, D. C.; Cumalat, J. P.; Deptuch, G.; Fahim, F.; Hoff, J.; Shenai, A.; Wagner, S. R.

    2015-12-11

    We report on the effects of ionizing radiation on 65 nm CMOS transistors held at approximately -20°C during irradiation. The pattern of damage observed after a total dose of 1 Grad is similar to damage reported in room temperature exposures, but we observe less damage than was observed at room temperature.

  16. White Sands, Carrizozo Lava Beds, NM

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1973-01-01

    A truly remarkable view of White Sands and the nearby Carrizozo Lava Beds in southeast NM (33.5N, 106.5W). White Sands, site of the WW II atomic bomb development and testing facility and later post war nuclear weapons testing that can still be seen in the cleared circular patterns on the ground.

  17. Negative-tone 193-nm resists

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, Sungseo; Vander Heyden, Anthony; Byers, Jeff D.; Willson, C. Grant

    2000-06-01

    A great deal of progress has been made in the design of single layer positive tone resists for 193 nm lithography. Commercial samples of such materials are now available from many vendors. The patterning of certain levels of devices profits from the use of negative tone resists. There have been several reports of work directed toward the design of negative tones resists for 193 nm exposure but, none have performed as well as the positive tone systems. Polymers with alicyclic structures in the backbone have emerged as excellent platforms from which to design positive tone resists for 193 nm exposure. We now report the adaptation of this class of polymers to the design of high performance negative tone 193 nm resists. New systems have been prepared that are based on a polarity switch mechanism for modulation of the dissolution rate. The systems are based on a polar, alicyclic polymer backbone that includes a monomer bearing a glycol pendant group that undergoes the acid catalyzed pinacol rearrangement upon exposure and bake to produce the corresponding less polar ketone. This monomer was copolymerized with maleic anhydride and a norbornene bearing a bis-trifluoromethylcarbinol. The rearrangement of the copolymer was monitored by FT-IR as a function of temperature. The synthesis of the norbornene monomers will be presented together with characterization of copolymers of these monomers with maleic anhydride. The lithographic performance of the new resist system will also be presented.

  18. MEPHISTO spectromicroscope reaches 20 nm lateral resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Stasio, Gelsomina; Perfetti, Luca; Gilbert, B.; Fauchoux, O.; Capozi, M.; Perfetti, P.; Margaritondo, G.; Tonner, B. P.

    1999-03-01

    The recently described tests of the synchrotron imaging photoelectron spectromicroscope MEPHISTO (Microscope à Emission de PHotoélectrons par Illumination Synchrotronique de Type Onduleur) were complemented by further resolution improvements and tests, which brought the lateral resolution down to 20 nm. Images and line plot profiles demonstrate such performance.

  19. 1541nm GmAPD LADAR system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kutteruf, Mary R.; Lebow, Paul

    2014-06-01

    The single photon sensitivity of Geiger-mode avalanche photo diodes (GmAPDs) has facilitated the development of LADAR systems that operate at longer stand-off distances, require lower laser pulse powers and are capable of imaging through a partial obscuration. In this paper, we describe a GmAPD LADAR system which operates at the eye-safe wavelength of 1541 nm. The longer wavelength should enhance system covertness and improve haze penetration compared to systems using 1064 nm lasers. The system is comprised of a COTS 1541 nm erbium fiber laser producing 4 ns pulses at 80 kHz to 450 kHz and a COTS camera with a focal plane of 32x32 InGaAs GmAPDs band-gap optimized for 1550 nm. Laboratory characterization methodology and results are discussed. We show that accurate modeling of the system response, allows us to achieve a depth resolution which is limited by the width of the camera's time bin (.25 ns or 1.5 inches) rather than by the duration of the laser pulse (4 ns or 2 ft.). In the presence of obscuration, the depth discrimination is degraded to 6 inches but is still significantly better than that dictated by the laser pulse duration. We conclude with a discussion of future work.

  20. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Thorium spectrum from 250nm to 5500nm (Redman+, 2014)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Redman, S. L.; Nave, G.; Sansonetti, C. J.

    2014-04-01

    We observed the spectrum of a commercial sealed Th/Ar HCL running at 25mA for almost 15hr starting on 2011 November 2. The region of observation was limited to between 8500/cm and 28000/cm (360nm and 1200nm) by the sensitivity of the silicon photodiode detector. (5 data files).

  1. Ambient Observations of Sub-1.0 Hygroscopic Growth Factor and f(RH) Values: Case Studies from Surface and Airborne Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ortega, A. M.; Shingler, T.; Crosbie, E.; Wonaschutz, A.; Froyd, K. D.; Adler, G.; Gao, R. S.; Schwarz, J. P.; Perring, A. E.; Brock, C. A.; Beyersdorf, A. J.; Ziemba, L. D.; Jimenez, J. L.; Campuzano Jost, P.; Wisthaler, A.; Sorooshian, A.

    2015-12-01

    Hygroscopic growth occurs when particles take up water vapor and grow when exposed to elevated relative humidity (RH), and is controlled largely by chemical composition. Previous laboratory studies of biomass burning and combustion particles observed particle size shrinkage as soot aerosols, especially those with coatings, were exposed to increasing RH levels, which resulted in sub-1.0 hygroscopicity parameter values (i.e., ratio of humidified-to-dry diameter g(RH) and ratio of humidified-to-dry scattering coefficients f(RH)). To investigate the potential for sub-1.0 hygroscopicity in ambient aerosol, we utilized data from (i) a ship-board HTDMA during E-PEACE 2011, (ii) multiple instruments on the DC8 during SEAC4RS-2013, as well as (iii) the DASH-SP during measurement intensives in Summer 2014 and Winter 2015 in Tucson, Arizona. Suppressed hygroscopicity, including sub-1.0 g(RH), was observed during smoke-influenced periods in SEAC4RS, episodic events in the winter season in Arizona, and smoke-influenced air during E-PEACE. Across the range of RH investigated (75-95%), sub-1.0 g(RH) was lowest at the highest RH values probed (~95%). These sub-1.0 g(RH) observations are consistent with elevated black carbon and organic aerosol concentration in both E-PEACE and SEAC4RS. Collocated measurements during SEAC4RS indicate elevated spikes in black carbon concentrations are coincident with both sub-1.0 f(RH) and g(RH) observations, as well as elevated organic aerosol- and gas-phase fire tracers such as AMS f60 and PTR-MS acetonitrile concentration. This is the first set of ambient observations of sub-1.0 hygroscopicity factors g(RH) and f(RH), with consistency across different instruments, regions, and platforms. Although particle restructuring has been demonstrated in laboratory experiments, field observations are complex as soot coating, secondary chemistry, and heterogeneous processing can occur on the same time scale as measurements. This work motivates continued

  2. 120 nm resolution and 55 nm structure size in STED-lithography.

    PubMed

    Wollhofen, Richard; Katzmann, Julia; Hrelescu, Calin; Jacak, Jaroslaw; Klar, Thomas A

    2013-05-01

    Two-photon direct laser writing (DLW) lithography is limited in the achievable structure size as well as in structure resolution. Adding stimulated emission depletion (STED) to DLW allowed overcoming both restrictions. We now push both to new limits. Using visible light for two-photon DLW (780 nm) and STED (532 nm), we obtain lateral structure sizes of 55 nm, a Sparrow limit of around 100 nm and we present two clearly separated lines spaced only 120 nm apart. The photo-resist used in these experiments is a mixture of tri- and tetra-acrylates and 7-Diethylamino-3-thenoylcoumarin as a photo-starter which can be readily quenched via STED.

  3. 38 CFR 1.10 - Eligibility for and disposition of the United States flag for burial purposes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Eligibility for and disposition of the United States flag for burial purposes. 1.10 Section 1.10 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans... the service of the Armed Forces of the United States pursuant to the military order of the...

  4. BADGER v1.0: A Fortran equation of state library

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heltemes, T. A.; Moses, G. A.

    2012-12-01

    The BADGER equation of state library was developed to enable inertial confinement fusion plasma codes to more accurately model plasmas in the high-density, low-temperature regime. The code had the capability to calculate 1- and 2-T plasmas using the Thomas-Fermi model and an individual electron accounting model. Ion equation of state data can be calculated using an ideal gas model or via a quotidian equation of state with scaled binding energies. Electron equation of state data can be calculated via the ideal gas model or with an adaptation of the screened hydrogenic model with ℓ-splitting. The ionization and equation of state calculations can be done in local thermodynamic equilibrium or in a non-LTE mode using a variant of the Busquet equivalent temperature method. The code was written as a stand-alone Fortran library for ease of implementation by external codes. EOS results for aluminum are presented that show good agreement with the SESAME library and ionization calculations show good agreement with the FLYCHK code. Program summaryProgram title: BADGERLIB v1.0 Catalogue identifier: AEND_v1_0 Program summary URL:http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/AEND_v1_0.html Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen's University, Belfast, N. Ireland Licensing provisions: Standard CPC licence, http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/licence/licence.html No. of lines in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 41 480 No. of bytes in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 2 904 451 Distribution format: tar.gz Programming language: Fortran 90. Computer: 32- or 64-bit PC, or Mac. Operating system: Windows, Linux, MacOS X. RAM: 249.496 kB plus 195.630 kB per isotope record in memory Classification: 19.1, 19.7. Nature of problem: Equation of State (EOS) calculations are necessary for the accurate simulation of high energy density plasmas. Historically, most EOS codes used in these simulations have relied on an ideal gas model. This model is inadequate for low-temperature, high-density plasma conditions; the gaseous and liquid phases; and the solid phase. The BADGER code was developed to give more realistic EOS data in these regimes. Solution method: BADGER has multiple, user-selectable models to treat the ions, average-atom ionization state and electrons. Ion models are ideal gas and quotidian equation of state (QEOS), ionization models are Thomas-Fermi and individual accounting method (IEM) formulation of the screened hydrogenic model (SHM) with l-splitting, electron ionization models are ideal gas and a Helmholtz free energy minimization method derived from the SHM. The default equation of state and ionization models are appropriate for plasmas in local thermodynamic equilibrium (LTE). The code can calculate non-LTE equation of state (EOS) and ionization data using a simplified form of the Busquet equivalent-temperature method. Restrictions: Physical data are only provided for elements Z=1 to Z=86. Multiple solid phases are not currently supported. Liquid, gas and plasma phases are combined into a generalized "fluid" phase. Unusual features: BADGER divorces the calculation of average-atom ionization from the electron equation of state model, allowing the user to select ionization and electron EOS models that are most appropriate to the simulation. The included ion ideal gas model uses ground-state nuclear spin data to differentiate between isotopes of a given element. Running time: Example provided only takes a few seconds to run.

  5. Advanced modelling of the multiphase DMS chemistry with the CAPRAM DMS module 1.0

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoffmann, Erik Hans; Tilgner, Andreas; Schrödner, Roland; Wolke, Ralf; Herrmann, Hartmut

    2016-04-01

    Oceans are the general emitter of dimethyl sulphide (DMS), the major natural sulphur source (Andreae, 1990), and cover approximately 70 % of earth's surface. The main DMS oxidation products are SO2, H2SO4 and methyl sulfonic acid (MSA). Hence, DMS is very important for formation of non-sea salt sulphate (nss SO42-) aerosols and secondary particulate matter and thus global climate. Despite many previous model studies, there are still important knowledge gaps, especially in aqueous phase DMS chemistry, of its atmospheric fate (Barnes et al., 2006). Therefore, a comprehensive multiphase DMS chemistry mechanism, the CAPRAM DMS module 1.0 (DM1.0), has been developed. The DM1.0 includes 103 gas phase reactions, 5 phase transfers and 54 aqueous phase reactions. It was coupled with the multiphase chemistry mechanism MCMv3.2/CAPRAM4.0α (Rickard et al., 2015; Bräuer et al., 2016) and the extended CAPRAM halogen module 2.1 (HM2.1, Bräuer et al., 2013) for investigation of multiphase DMS oxidation in the marine boundary layer. Then, a pristine ocean scenario was simulated using the air parcel model SPACCIM (Wolke et al., 2005) including 8 non-permanent cloud passages - 4 at noon and 4 at midnight. This allows the investigation of the influence of deliquesced particles and clouds on multiphase DMS chemistry during both daytime and nighttime conditions as well as under cloud formation and evaporation. To test the influence of various subsystems on multiphase DMS chemistry different sensitivity runs were performed. Investigations of multiphase chemistry of DMS and its important oxidation products were done using concentration-time profiles and detailed time-resolved reaction flux analyses. The model studies revealed the importance of aqueous phase chemistry for DMS and its oxidation products. Overall about 7.0% of DMS is effectively oxidised by O3 in the aqueous phase of clouds. The simulations revealed the importance of halogen and aqueous phase chemistry for DMS and its oxidation products. Overall halogen compounds contribute with 71% to DMS oxidation with gaseous Cl (23.6%) and BrO (46.1%) as main oxidants. The conversion efficiency of DMS to SO2 in the gas phase was simulated between 0.2, 0.27 and 0.6 for the full pristine ocean scenario run, a simulation without considered halogen chemistry and a simulation without treated aqueous phase DMS chemistry, respectively. Furthermore, the studies indicate that the conversion efficiency of DMS to MSA is strongly related to DMS oxidation by BrO and treating of aqueous-phase DMS chemistry. The MSA yield for different sensitivity runs was simulated between 0.01 and 0.47. The lowest yield is reached treating only gas phase chemistry of DMS. Moreover, the simulation with the whole mechanism indicate that multiphase DMS oxidation produce as much MSA as sulphate leading to strong implications for nss-SO42- aerosol formation, activation to cloud condensation nuclei and cloud albedo. Andreae, M. O., Mar. Chem., 30, 1-29, 1990. Barnes, I., et al., Chem. Rev., 106, 940-975, 2006. Bräuer, P., et al., Atmos. Chem. Phys. Discuss., in preparation, 2016. Bräuer, P., et al., J. Atmos. Chem., 70, 19-52, 2013. Rickard, A., et al., The Master Chemical Mechanism Version MCM v3.2, available at: http://mcm.leeds.ac.uk/MCMv3.2/ (last access: 05 Mai 2015)„ 2015. Wolke, R., et al., Atmos. Environ., 39, 4375-4388, 2005.

  6. 28SiO v = 0 J = 1-0 emission from evolved stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Vicente, P.; Bujarrabal, V.; Díaz-Pulido, A.; Albo, C.; Alcolea, J.; Barcia, A.; Barbas, L.; Bolaño, R.; Colomer, F.; Diez, M. C.; Gallego, J. D.; Gómez-González, J.; López-Fernández, I.; López-Fernández, J. A.; López-Pérez, J. A.; Malo, I.; Moreno, A.; Patino, M.; Serna, J. M.; Tercero, F.; Vaquero, B.

    2016-05-01

    Aims: Observations of 28SiO v = 0J = 1-0 line emission (7-mm wavelength) from asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stars show in some cases peculiar profiles, composed of a central intense component plus a wider plateau. Very similar profiles have been observed in CO lines from some AGB stars and most post-AGB nebulae and, in these cases, they are clearly associated with the presence of conspicuous axial symmetry and bipolar dynamics. We aim to systematically study the profile shape of 28SiO v = 0J = 1-0 lines in evolved stars and to discuss the origin of the composite profile structure. Methods: We present observations of 28SiO v = 0J = 1-0 emission in 28 evolved stars, including O-rich, C-rich, and S-type Mira-type variables, OH/IR stars, semiregular long-period variables, red supergiants and one yellow hypergiant. Most objects were observed in several epochs, over a total period of time of one and a half years. The observations were performed with the 40 m radio telescope of the Instituto Geográfico Nacional (IGN) in Yebes, Spain. Results: We find that the composite core plus plateau profiles are systematically present in O-rich Miras, OH/IR stars, and red supergiants. They are also found in one S-type Mira (χ Cyg) and in two semiregular variables (X Her and RS Cnc) that are known to show axial symmetry. In the other objects, the profiles are simpler and similar to those observed in other molecular lines. The composite structure appears in the objects in which SiO emission is thought to come from the very inner circumstellar layers, prior to dust formation. The central spectral feature is found to be systematically composed of a number of narrow spikes, except for X Her and RS Cnc, in which it shows a smooth shape that is very similar to that observed in CO emission. These spikes show a significant (and mostly chaotic) time variation, while in all cases the smooth components remain constant within the uncertainties. The profile shape could come from the superposition of standard wide profiles and a group of weak maser spikes confined to the central spectral regions because of tangential amplification. Alternatively, we speculate that the very similar profiles detected in objects that are known to be conspicuously axisymmetric, such as X Her and RS Cnc, and in O-rich Mira-type stars, such as IK Tau and TX Cam, may be indicative of the systematic presence of a significant axial symmetry in the very inner circumstellar shells around AGB stars; such symmetry would be independent of the presence of weak maser effects in the central spikes.

  7. Advanced modelling of the multiphase DMS chemistry with the CAPRAM DMS module 1.0

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoffmann, Erik Hans; Tilgner, Andreas; Schrödner, Roland; Wolke, Ralf; Herrmann, Hartmut

    2016-04-01

    Oceans are the general emitter of dimethyl sulphide (DMS), the major natural sulphur source (Andreae, 1990), and cover approximately 70 % of earth's surface. The main DMS oxidation products are SO2, H2SO4 and methyl sulfonic acid (MSA). Hence, DMS is very important for formation of non-sea salt sulphate (nss SO42-) aerosols and secondary particulate matter and thus global climate. Despite many previous model studies, there are still important knowledge gaps, especially in aqueous phase DMS chemistry, of its atmospheric fate (Barnes et al., 2006). Therefore, a comprehensive multiphase DMS chemistry mechanism, the CAPRAM DMS module 1.0 (DM1.0), has been developed. The DM1.0 includes 103 gas phase reactions, 5 phase transfers and 54 aqueous phase reactions. It was coupled with the multiphase chemistry mechanism MCMv3.2/CAPRAM4.0α (Rickard et al., 2015; Bräuer et al., 2016) and the extended CAPRAM halogen module 2.1 (HM2.1, Bräuer et al., 2013) for investigation of multiphase DMS oxidation in the marine boundary layer. Then, a pristine ocean scenario was simulated using the air parcel model SPACCIM (Wolke et al., 2005) including 8 non-permanent cloud passages - 4 at noon and 4 at midnight. This allows the investigation of the influence of deliquesced particles and clouds on multiphase DMS chemistry during both daytime and nighttime conditions as well as under cloud formation and evaporation. To test the influence of various subsystems on multiphase DMS chemistry different sensitivity runs were performed. Investigations of multiphase chemistry of DMS and its important oxidation products were done using concentration-time profiles and detailed time-resolved reaction flux analyses. The model studies revealed the importance of aqueous phase chemistry for DMS and its oxidation products. Overall about 7.0% of DMS is effectively oxidised by O3 in the aqueous phase of clouds. The simulations revealed the importance of halogen and aqueous phase chemistry for DMS and its oxidation products. Overall halogen compounds contribute with 71% to DMS oxidation with gaseous Cl (23.6%) and BrO (46.1%) as main oxidants. The conversion efficiency of DMS to SO2 in the gas phase was simulated between 0.2, 0.27 and 0.6 for the full pristine ocean scenario run, a simulation without considered halogen chemistry and a simulation without treated aqueous phase DMS chemistry, respectively. Furthermore, the studies indicate that the conversion efficiency of DMS to MSA is strongly related to DMS oxidation by BrO and treating of aqueous-phase DMS chemistry. The MSA yield for different sensitivity runs was simulated between 0.01 and 0.47. The lowest yield is reached treating only gas phase chemistry of DMS. Moreover, the simulation with the whole mechanism indicate that multiphase DMS oxidation produce as much MSA as sulphate leading to strong implications for nss-SO42‑ aerosol formation, activation to cloud condensation nuclei and cloud albedo. Andreae, M. O., Mar. Chem., 30, 1-29, 1990. Barnes, I., et al., Chem. Rev., 106, 940-975, 2006. Bräuer, P., et al., Atmos. Chem. Phys. Discuss., in preparation, 2016. Bräuer, P., et al., J. Atmos. Chem., 70, 19-52, 2013. Rickard, A., et al., The Master Chemical Mechanism Version MCM v3.2, available at: http://mcm.leeds.ac.uk/MCMv3.2/ (last access: 05 Mai 2015)„ 2015. Wolke, R., et al., Atmos. Environ., 39, 4375-4388, 2005.

  8. Development of a high dynamic range spectroscopic system for observation of neutral hydrogen atom density distribution in Large Helical Device core plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Fujii, K. Atsumi, S.; Watanabe, S.; Shikama, T.; Hasuo, M.; Goto, M.; Morita, S.

    2014-02-15

    We report development of a high dynamic range spectroscopic system comprising a spectrometer with 30% throughput and a camera with a low-noise fast-readout complementary metal-oxide semiconductor sensor. The system achieves a 10{sup 6} dynamic range (∼20 bit resolution) and an instrumental function approximated by a Voigt profile with Gauss and Lorentz widths of 31 and 0.31 pm, respectively, for 656 nm light. The application of the system for line profile observations of the Balmer-α emissions from high temperature plasmas generated in the Large Helical Device is also presented. In the observed line profiles, emissions are detected in far wings more than 1.0 nm away from the line center, equivalent to neutral hydrogen atom kinetic energies above 1 keV. We evaluate atom density distributions in the core plasma by analyzing the line profiles.

  9. Photoresist outgassing at 157 nm exposure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hien, Stefan; Angood, Steve; Ashworth, Dominic; Basset, Steve; Bloomstein, Theodore M.; Dean, Kim R.; Kunz, Roderick R.; Miller, Daniel A.; Patel, Shashikant; Rich, Georgia K.

    2001-08-01

    Contamination of optical elements during photoresist exposure is a serious issue in optical lithography. The outgassing of photoresist has been identified as a problem at 248nm and 193nm in production because the organic films that can be formed on an exposure lens can cause transmission loss and sever image distortion. At these exposure energies, the excitation of the photo acid generator, formation of acid, and cleavage of the protecting group are highly selective processes. At 157nm, the exposure energy is much higher (7.9 eV compared to 6.4 eV at 193nm) and it is known from laser ablation experiments that direct laser cleavage of sigma bonds occurs. The fragments formed during this irradiation can be considered as effective laser deposition precursors even in the mid ppb level. In this study, methods to quantify photoresist outgassing at 157 nm are discussed. Three criteria have been set up at International SEMATECH to protect lens contamination and to determine the severity of photoresist outgassing. First, we measured film thickness loss as a function of exposure dose for a variety of materials. In a second test we studied the molecular composition of the outgassing fragments with an exposure chamber coupled to a gas chromatograph and a mass spectrometer detector. Our third method was a deposition test of outgassing vapors on a CaF2 proof plate followed by analysis using VUV and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopies (XPS). With this technique we found deposits for many different resists. Our main focus is on F- and Si- containing resists. Both material classes form deposits especially if these atoms are bound to the polymer side chains. Whereas the F-containing films can be cleaned off under 157nm irradiation, cleaning of Si-containing films mainly produces SiO2. Our cleaning studies of plasma deposited F-containing organic films on SiO2 did not indicate damage of this surface by the possible formation of HF. Despite that we strongly recommend engineering

  10. Prediction of Turbulence-Generated Noise in Unheated Jets. Part 2; JeNo Users' Manual (Version 1.0)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Khavaran, Abbas; Wolter, John D.; Koch, L. Danielle

    2009-01-01

    JeNo (Version 1.0) is a Fortran90 computer code that calculates the far-field sound spectral density produced by axisymmetric, unheated jets at a user specified observer location and frequency range. The user must provide a structured computational grid and a mean flow solution from a Reynolds-Averaged Navier Stokes (RANS) code as input. Turbulence kinetic energy and its dissipation rate from a k-epsilon or k-omega turbulence model must also be provided. JeNo is a research code, and as such, its development is ongoing. The goal is to create a code that is able to accurately compute far-field sound pressure levels for jets at all observer angles and all operating conditions. In order to achieve this goal, current theories must be combined with the best practices in numerical modeling, all of which must be validated by experiment. Since the acoustic predictions from JeNo are based on the mean flow solutions from a RANS code, quality predictions depend on accurate aerodynamic input.This is why acoustic source modeling, turbulence modeling, together with the development of advanced measurement systems are the leading areas of research in jet noise research at NASA Glenn Research Center.

  11. Static and dynamic magnetic characteristics of BaCo 0.5Mn 0.5Ti 1.0Fe 10O 19

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choopani, Saeed; Keyhan, Neda; Ghasemi, Ali; Sharbathi, Ali; Maghsoudi, Iman; Eghbali, Mohammad

    2009-07-01

    The effect of Mn 2+Co 2+Ti 4+ substitution on microwave absorption has been studied for BaCo 0.5Mn 0.5Ti 1.0Fe 10O 19 ferrite-acrylic resin composites in frequency range from 12 to 20 GHz. X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscope (SEM), vibrating sample magnetometer, AC susceptometer and vector network analyzer were used to analyze the structural, magnetic and microwave absorption properties. The results showed that the magnetoplumbite structures for all samples have been formed. Based on microwave measurement on reflectivity, BaCo 0.5Mn 0.5Ti 1.0Fe 10O 19 may be a good candidate for electromagnetic compatibility and other practical applications at high frequency.

  12. V-SUIT Model Validation Using PLSS 1.0 Test Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Olthoff, Claas

    2015-01-01

    The dynamic portable life support system (PLSS) simulation software Virtual Space Suit (V-SUIT) has been under development at the Technische Universitat Munchen since 2011 as a spin-off from the Virtual Habitat (V-HAB) project. The MATLAB(trademark)-based V-SUIT simulates space suit portable life support systems and their interaction with a detailed and also dynamic human model, as well as the dynamic external environment of a space suit moving on a planetary surface. To demonstrate the feasibility of a large, system level simulation like V-SUIT, a model of NASA's PLSS 1.0 prototype was created. This prototype was run through an extensive series of tests in 2011. Since the test setup was heavily instrumented, it produced a wealth of data making it ideal for model validation. The implemented model includes all components of the PLSS in both the ventilation and thermal loops. The major components are modeled in greater detail, while smaller and ancillary components are low fidelity black box models. The major components include the Rapid Cycle Amine (RCA) CO2 removal system, the Primary and Secondary Oxygen Assembly (POS/SOA), the Pressure Garment System Volume Simulator (PGSVS), the Human Metabolic Simulator (HMS), the heat exchanger between the ventilation and thermal loops, the Space Suit Water Membrane Evaporator (SWME) and finally the Liquid Cooling Garment Simulator (LCGS). Using the created model, dynamic simulations were performed using same test points also used during PLSS 1.0 testing. The results of the simulation were then compared to the test data with special focus on absolute values during the steady state phases and dynamic behavior during the transition between test points. Quantified simulation results are presented that demonstrate which areas of the V-SUIT model are in need of further refinement and those that are sufficiently close to the test results. Finally, lessons learned from the modelling and validation process are given in combination with implications for the future development of other PLSS models in V-SUIT.

  13. EDDINGTON RATIO DISTRIBUTION OF X-RAY-SELECTED BROAD-LINE AGNs AT 1.0 < z < 2.2

    SciTech Connect

    Suh, Hyewon; Hasinger, Günther; Steinhardt, Charles; Silverman, John D.; Schramm, Malte

    2015-12-20

    We investigate the Eddington ratio distribution of X-ray-selected broad-line active galactic nuclei (AGNs) in the redshift range 1.0 < z < 2.2, where the number density of AGNs peaks. Combining the optical and Subaru/Fiber Multi Object Spectrograph near-infrared spectroscopy, we estimate black hole masses for broad-line AGNs in the Chandra Deep Field South (CDF-S), Extended Chandra Deep Field South (E-CDF-S), and the XMM-Newton Lockman Hole (XMM-LH) surveys. AGNs with similar black hole masses show a broad range of AGN bolometric luminosities, which are calculated from X-ray luminosities, indicating that the accretion rate of black holes is widely distributed. We find a substantial fraction of massive black holes accreting significantly below the Eddington limit at z ≲ 2, in contrast to what is generally found for luminous AGNs at high redshift. Our analysis of observational selection biases indicates that the “AGN cosmic downsizing” phenomenon can be simply explained by the strong evolution of the comoving number density at the bright end of the AGN luminosity function, together with the corresponding selection effects. However, one might need to consider a correlation between the AGN luminosity and the accretion rate of black holes, in which luminous AGNs have higher Eddington ratios than low-luminosity AGNs, in order to understand the relatively small fraction of low-luminosity AGNs with high accretion rates in this epoch. Therefore, the observed downsizing trend could be interpreted as massive black holes with low accretion rates, which are relatively fainter than less-massive black holes with efficient accretion.

  14. Radiation Status of Sub-65 nm Electronics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pellish, Jonathan A.

    2011-01-01

    Ultra-scaled complementary metal oxide semiconductor (CMOS) includes commercial foundry capabilities at and below the 65 nm technology node Radiation evaluations take place using standard products and test characterization vehicles (memories, logic/latch chains, etc.) NEPP focus is two-fold: (1) Conduct early radiation evaluations to ascertain viability for future NASA missions (i.e. leverage commercial technology development). (2) Uncover gaps in current testing methodologies and mechanism comprehension -- early risk mitigation.

  15. NIMS Radiance Point Spectra of Ida and Dactyl V1.0

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Granahan, J. C.

    2013-08-01

    This data volume contains radiometrically corrected point spectra of asteroid 243 Ida and a spectrum of the asteroid satellite Dactyl (Ida I) as acquired by the Galileo spacecraft Near Infrared Mapping Spectrometer (NIMS) on August 28, 1993. They record the spectra collected as the Galileo spacecraft approached the 243 Ida system. These data are products of the calibration of the raw data number files idu002tn.qub, idu005tn.qub, idu006tn.qub, idu007tn.qub, idu019tn.qub, idu020tn.qub, idu022tn.qub, idu028tn.qub, idu032tn.qub, idu033tn.qub, and idu035tn.qub (DATA SET ID ='GO-A-NIMS-3-TUBE-V1.0') with calibration factors acquired during the Jovian tour of the Galileo mission. These raw data .qub files are archived in the Imaging Node of the NASA Planetary Data System (PDS). The calibrated spectra consist of radiance and incidence/flux measurements for wavelengths between 0.7 - 5.2 micrometers.

  16. The mGA1.0: A common LISP implementation of a messy genetic algorithm

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldberg, David E.; Kerzic, Travis

    1990-01-01

    Genetic algorithms (GAs) are finding increased application in difficult search, optimization, and machine learning problems in science and engineering. Increasing demands are being placed on algorithm performance, and the remaining challenges of genetic algorithm theory and practice are becoming increasingly unavoidable. Perhaps the most difficult of these challenges is the so-called linkage problem. Messy GAs were created to overcome the linkage problem of simple genetic algorithms by combining variable-length strings, gene expression, messy operators, and a nonhomogeneous phasing of evolutionary processing. Results on a number of difficult deceptive test functions are encouraging with the mGA always finding global optima in a polynomial number of function evaluations. Theoretical and empirical studies are continuing, and a first version of a messy GA is ready for testing by others. A Common LISP implementation called mGA1.0 is documented and related to the basic principles and operators developed by Goldberg et. al. (1989, 1990). Although the code was prepared with care, it is not a general-purpose code, only a research version. Important data structures and global variations are described. Thereafter brief function descriptions are given, and sample input data are presented together with sample program output. A source listing with comments is also included.

  17. FR database 1.0: a resource focused on fruit development and ripening.

    PubMed

    Yue, Junyang; Ma, Xiaojing; Ban, Rongjun; Huang, Qianli; Wang, Wenjie; Liu, Jia; Liu, Yongsheng

    2015-01-01

    Fruits form unique growing period in the life cycle of higher plants. They provide essential nutrients and have beneficial effects on human health. Characterizing the genes involved in fruit development and ripening is fundamental to understanding the biological process and improving horticultural crops. Although, numerous genes that have been characterized are participated in regulating fruit development and ripening at different stages, no dedicated bioinformatic resource for fruit development and ripening is available. In this study, we have developed such a database, FR database 1.0, using manual curation from 38 423 articles published before 1 April 2014, and integrating protein interactomes and several transcriptome datasets. It provides detailed information for 904 genes derived from 53 organisms reported to participate in fleshy fruit development and ripening. Genes from climacteric and non-climacteric fruits are also annotated, with several interesting Gene Ontology (GO) terms being enriched for these two gene sets and seven ethylene-related GO terms found only in the climacteric fruit group. Furthermore, protein-protein interaction analysis by integrating information from FR database presents the possible function network that affects fleshy fruit size formation. Collectively, FR database will be a valuable platform for comprehensive understanding and future experiments in fruit biology. Database URL: http://www.fruitech.org/

  18. Structural/aerodynamic Blade Analyzer (SAB) User's Guide, Version 1.0

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morel, M. R.

    1994-01-01

    The structural/aerodynamic blade (SAB) analyzer provides an automated tool for the static-deflection analysis of turbomachinery blades with aerodynamic and rotational loads. A structural code calculates a deflected blade shape using aerodynamic loads input. An aerodynamic solver computes aerodynamic loads using deflected blade shape input. The two programs are iterated automatically until deflections converge. Currently, SAB version 1.0 is interfaced with MSC/NASTRAN to perform the structural analysis and PROP3D to perform the aerodynamic analysis. This document serves as a guide for the operation of the SAB system with specific emphasis on its use at NASA Lewis Research Center (LeRC). This guide consists of six chapters: an introduction which gives a summary of SAB; SAB's methodology, component files, links, and interfaces; input/output file structure; setup and execution of the SAB files on the Cray computers; hints and tips to advise the user; and an example problem demonstrating the SAB process. In addition, four appendices are presented to define the different computer programs used within the SAB analyzer and describe the required input decks.

  19. FR database 1.0: a resource focused on fruit development and ripening

    PubMed Central

    Yue, Junyang; Ma, Xiaojing; Ban, Rongjun; Huang, Qianli; Wang, Wenjie; Liu, Jia; Liu, Yongsheng

    2015-01-01

    Fruits form unique growing period in the life cycle of higher plants. They provide essential nutrients and have beneficial effects on human health. Characterizing the genes involved in fruit development and ripening is fundamental to understanding the biological process and improving horticultural crops. Although, numerous genes that have been characterized are participated in regulating fruit development and ripening at different stages, no dedicated bioinformatic resource for fruit development and ripening is available. In this study, we have developed such a database, FR database 1.0, using manual curation from 38 423 articles published before 1 April 2014, and integrating protein interactomes and several transcriptome datasets. It provides detailed information for 904 genes derived from 53 organisms reported to participate in fleshy fruit development and ripening. Genes from climacteric and non-climacteric fruits are also annotated, with several interesting Gene Ontology (GO) terms being enriched for these two gene sets and seven ethylene-related GO terms found only in the climacteric fruit group. Furthermore, protein–protein interaction analysis by integrating information from FR database presents the possible function network that affects fleshy fruit size formation. Collectively, FR database will be a valuable platform for comprehensive understanding and future experiments in fruit biology. Database URL: http://www.fruitech.org/ PMID:25725058

  20. VALDRIFT 1.0: A valley atmospheric dispersion model with deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Allwine, K.J.; Bian, X.; Whiteman, C.D.

    1995-05-01

    VALDRIFT version 1.0 is an atmospheric transport and diffusion model for use in well-defined mountain valleys. It is designed to determine the extent of ddft from aedal pesticide spraying activities, but can also be applied to estimate the transport and diffusion of various air pollutants in valleys. The model is phenomenological -- that is, the dominant meteorological processes goveming the behavior of the valley atmosphere are formulated explicitly in the model, albeit in a highly parameterized fashion. The key meteorological processes treated are: (1) nonsteady and nonhomogeneous along-valley winds and turbulent diffusivities, (2) convective boundary layer growth, (3) inversion descent, (4) noctumal temperature inversion breakup, and (5) subsidence. The model is applicable under relatively cloud-free, undisturbed synoptic conditions and is configured to operate through one diumal cycle for a single valley. The inputs required are the valley topographical characteristics, pesticide release rate as a function of time and space, along-valley wind speed as a function of time and space, temperature inversion characteristics at sunrise, and sensible heat flux as a function of time following sunrise. Default values are provided for certain inputs in the absence of detailed observations. The outputs are three-dimensional air concentration and ground-level deposition fields as a function of time.

  1. A 3-D Vortex Code for Parachute Flow Predictions: VIPAR Version 1.0

    SciTech Connect

    STRICKLAND, JAMES H.; HOMICZ, GREGORY F.; PORTER, VICKI L.; GOSSLER, ALBERT A.

    2002-07-01

    This report describes a 3-D fluid mechanics code for predicting flow past bluff bodies whose surfaces can be assumed to be made up of shell elements that are simply connected. Version 1.0 of the VIPAR code (Vortex Inflation PARachute code) is described herein. This version contains several first order algorithms that we are in the process of replacing with higher order ones. These enhancements will appear in the next version of VIPAR. The present code contains a motion generator that can be used to produce a large class of rigid body motions. The present code has also been fully coupled to a structural dynamics code in which the geometry undergoes large time dependent deformations. Initial surface geometry is generated from triangular shell elements using a code such as Patran and is written into an ExodusII database file for subsequent input into VIPAR. Surface and wake variable information is output into two ExodusII files that can be post processed and viewed using software such as EnSight{trademark}.

  2. Ditching Investigation of a 1/10-Scale Model of the North American F-86 Airplane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fisher, Lloyd J.; McBride, Ellis E.

    1954-01-01

    An investigation was made of a 1/10-scale dynamically similar model of the North American F-86 airplane to study its behavior when ditched. The model was landed in calm water at the Langley tank no. 2 monorail. Various landing attitudes, speeds, and conditions of damage were simulated. The behavior of the model was determined from visual observations, acceleration records, and motion-picture records of the ditchings. Data are presented in tabular form, sequence photographs, and time-history acceleration curves. From the results of the investigation it was concluded that the airplane should be ditched at the nose-high, 14 deg attitude to avoid the violent dive which occurs at the 4 deg attitude. The flaps and leading-edge slats should be fully extended to obtain the lowest possible landing speed. The wing tanks should be jettisoned to avoid the undesirable behavior which occurs with the tanks attached. In a calm-water ditching under these conditions the airplane will run smoothly for about 600 feet. Maximum longitudinal and vertical decelerations of about 3g will be encountered.

  3. Geometric engineering, mirror symmetry and 6{d}_{(1,0)}to 4{d}_{(N=2)}

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Del Zotto, Michele; Vafa, Cumrun; Xie, Dan

    2015-11-01

    We study compactification of 6 dimensional (1,0) theories on T 2. We use geometric engineering of these theories via F-theory and employ mirror symmetry technology to solve for the effective 4d N=2 geometry for a large number of the (1 ,0) theories including those associated with conformal matter. Using this we show that for a given 6d theory we can obtain many inequivalent 4d N=2 SCFTs. Some of these respect the global symmetries of the 6d theory while others exhibit SL(2 , ℤ) duality symmetry inherited from global diffeomorphisms of the T 2. This construction also explains the 6d origin of moduli space of 4d affine ADE quiver theories as flat ADE connections on T 2. Among the resulting 4 d N=2 CFTs we find theories whose vacuum geometry is captured by an LG theory (as opposed to a curve or a local CY geometry). We obtain arbitrary genus curves of class S with punctures from toroidal compactification of (1 , 0) SCFTs where the curve of the class S theory emerges through mirror symmetry. We also show that toroidal compactification of the little string version of these theories can lead to class S theories with no punctures on arbitrary genus Riemann surface.

  4. GBL-2D Version 1.0: a 2D geometry boolean library.

    SciTech Connect

    McBride, Cory L. (Elemental Technologies, American Fort, UT); Schmidt, Rodney Cannon; Yarberry, Victor R.; Meyers, Ray J.

    2006-11-01

    This report describes version 1.0 of GBL-2D, a geometric Boolean library for 2D objects. The library is written in C++ and consists of a set of classes and routines. The classes primarily represent geometric data and relationships. Classes are provided for 2D points, lines, arcs, edge uses, loops, surfaces and mask sets. The routines contain algorithms for geometric Boolean operations and utility functions. Routines are provided that incorporate the Boolean operations: Union(OR), XOR, Intersection and Difference. A variety of additional analytical geometry routines and routines for importing and exporting the data in various file formats are also provided. The GBL-2D library was originally developed as a geometric modeling engine for use with a separate software tool, called SummitView [1], that manipulates the 2D mask sets created by designers of Micro-Electro-Mechanical Systems (MEMS). However, many other practical applications for this type of software can be envisioned because the need to perform 2D Boolean operations can arise in many contexts.

  5. FPLUME-1.0: An integrated volcanic plume model accounting for ash aggregation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Folch, A.; Costa, A.; Macedonio, G.

    2015-09-01

    Eruption Source Parameters (ESP) characterizing volcanic eruption plumes are crucial inputs for atmospheric tephra dispersal models, used for hazard assessment and risk mitigation. We present FPLUME-1.0, a steady-state 1-D cross-section averaged eruption column model based on the Buoyant Plume Theory (BPT). The model accounts for plume bent over by wind, entrainment of ambient moisture, effects of water phase changes, particle fallout and re-entrainment, a new parameterization for the air entrainment coefficients and a model for wet aggregation of ash particles in presence of liquid water or ice. In the occurrence of wet aggregation, the model predicts an "effective" grain size distribution depleted in fines with respect to that erupted at the vent. Given a wind profile, the model can be used to determine the column height from the eruption mass flow rate or vice-versa. The ultimate goal is to improve ash cloud dispersal forecasts by better constraining the ESP (column height, eruption rate and vertical distribution of mass) and the "effective" particle grain size distribution resulting from eventual wet aggregation within the plume. As test cases we apply the model to the eruptive phase-B of the 4 April 1982 El Chichón volcano eruption (México) and the 6 May 2010 Eyjafjallajökull eruption phase (Iceland).

  6. Operation of a 1/10 scale mixed water incinerator air pollution control system

    SciTech Connect

    Burns, D.B.; Wong, A.; Walker, W.

    1996-08-01

    The Consolidated Incineration Facility (CIF) at the Savannah River Site is designed to treat solid and liquid RCRA hazardous and mixed wastes generated by site operations and clean-up activities. The technologies selected for use in the CIF air pollution control system (APCS) were based on reviews of existing commercial and DOE incinerators, on-site air pollution control experience, and recommendations from contracted consultants. In order to study the CIF APCS prior to operation, a 1/10 scale pilot facility, known as the Offgas Components Test Facility (OCTF) was constructed and has been in operation since late 1994. Its current mission is to demonstrate the design integrity of the CIF APCS and optimize equipment/instrument performance of the full scale production facility. Due to the nature of the wastes to be incinerated at the CIF, High Efficiency Particulate Air (HEPA) filters are used to remove hazardous and radioactive particulates from the exhaust gas stream before being released into the atmosphere. The HEPA filter change-out frequency has been a potential issue and was the first technical issue to be studied at the OCTF. Tests were conducted to evaluate the performance of HEPA filters under different operating conditions. These tests included evaluating the impact on HEPA life of scrubber operating parameters and the type of HEPA prefilter used. This pilot-scale testing demonstrated satisfactory HEPA filter life when using cleanable metal prefilters and high flows of steam and water in the offgas scrubber.

  7. Assembly of three novel metal (II) complexes based on polycarboxylate and 1,10-phenanthroline ligands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Xiaoli; Qiao, Yali; Gao, Loujun; Cui, Huali; Zhang, Meili; Lv, Junfang

    2013-04-01

    With the principles of crystal engineering, three novel metal(II) complexes, [Cu2(betd)(phen)4].15H2O (1), [Cd4(betd)2(phen)8]ṡ28H2O (2) and {[Co2(betd)(phen)2(H2O)2]·2H2O}n (3) (H4betd = bicyclo[2.2.2]oct-7-ene-2,3,5,6-tetracarboxylic acid, phen = 1,10-phenanthroline) were synthesized and structurally characterized by elemental analyses, IR spectroscopy, single-crystal X-ray diffraction analyses, TGA, powder XRD and fluorescent measurements. Complex 1 is a binuclear structure, novel water tapes are observed to be encapsulated in the 3D open supramolecular architecture by hydrogen bond interactions. In 2, two pairs of CdII ions joined with two (betd)4- ions to form a cyclic tetranuclear structure. The neighboring tetranuclear units are linked into 2D network through π⋯π stacking interactions. Interestingly, the lattice H2O molecules are joined by strong hydrogen bond interactions generating a wavy water layer, which contacts the 2D network to form 3D supramolecular structure. 3 shows a 2D (4, 4) grid network, which are assembled in an ABAB sequence to 3D supramolecular structures via π⋯π stacking interactions between two central phen ligands from two adjacent sheets and hydrogen bond interactions.

  8. CaveMan Enterprise version 1.0 Software Validation and Verification.

    SciTech Connect

    Hart, David

    2014-10-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy Strategic Petroleum Reserve stores crude oil in caverns solution-mined in salt domes along the Gulf Coast of Louisiana and Texas. The CaveMan software program has been used since the late 1990s as one tool to analyze pressure mea- surements monitored at each cavern. The purpose of this monitoring is to catch potential cavern integrity issues as soon as possible. The CaveMan software was written in Microsoft Visual Basic, and embedded in a Microsoft Excel workbook; this method of running the CaveMan software is no longer sustainable. As such, a new version called CaveMan Enter- prise has been developed. CaveMan Enterprise version 1.0 does not have any changes to the CaveMan numerical models. CaveMan Enterprise represents, instead, a change from desktop-managed work- books to an enterprise framework, moving data management into coordinated databases and porting the numerical modeling codes into the Python programming language. This document provides a report of the code validation and verification testing.

  9. Photon-counting 1.0 GHz-phase-modulation fluorometer

    SciTech Connect

    Mizuno, T.; Nakao, S.; Mizutani, Y.; Iwata, T.

    2015-04-15

    We have constructed an improved version of a photon-counting phase-modulation fluorometer (PC-PMF) with a maximum modulation frequency of 1.0 GHz, where a phase domain measurement is conducted with a time-correlated single-photon-counting electronics. While the basic concept of the PC-PMF has been reported previously by one of the authors, little attention has been paid to its significance, other than its weak fluorescence measurement capability. Recently, we have recognized the importance of the PC-PMF and its potential for fluorescence lifetime measurements. One important aspect of the PC-PMF is that it enables us to perform high-speed measurements that exceed the frequency bandwidths of the photomultiplier tubes that are commonly used as fluorescence detectors. We describe the advantages of the PC-PMF and demonstrate its usefulness based on fundamental performance tests. In our new version of the PC-PMF, we have used a laser diode (LD) as an excitation light source rather than the light-emitting diode that was used in the primary version. We have also designed a simple and stable LD driver to modulate the device. Additionally, we have obtained a sinusoidal histogram waveform that has multiple cycles within a time span to be measured, which is indispensable for precise phase measurements. With focus on the fluorescence intensity and the resolution time, we have compared the performance of the PC-PMF with that of a conventional PMF using the analogue light detection method.

  10. spads 1.0: a toolbox to perform spatial analyses on DNA sequence data sets.

    PubMed

    Dellicour, Simon; Mardulyn, Patrick

    2014-05-01

    SPADS 1.0 (for 'Spatial and Population Analysis of DNA Sequences') is a population genetic toolbox for characterizing genetic variability within and among populations from DNA sequences. In view of the drastic increase in genetic information available through sequencing methods, spads was specifically designed to deal with multilocus data sets of DNA sequences. It computes several summary statistics from populations or groups of populations, performs input file conversions for other population genetic programs and implements locus-by-locus and multilocus versions of two clustering algorithms to study the genetic structure of populations. The toolbox also includes two MATLAB and r functions, GDISPAL and GDIVPAL, to display differentiation and diversity patterns across landscapes. These functions aim to generate interpolating surfaces based on multilocus distance and diversity indices. In the case of multiple loci, such surfaces can represent a useful alternative to multiple pie charts maps traditionally used in phylogeography to represent the spatial distribution of genetic diversity. These coloured surfaces can also be used to compare different data sets or different diversity and/or distance measures estimated on the same data set.

  11. Motivation and Design of the Sirocco Storage System Version 1.0.

    SciTech Connect

    Curry, Matthew Leon; Ward, H. Lee; Danielson, Geoffrey Charles

    2015-07-01

    Sirocco is a massively parallel, high performance storage system for the exascale era. It emphasizes client-to-client coordination, low server-side coupling, and free data movement to improve resilience and performance. Its architecture is inspired by peer-to-peer and victim- cache architectures. By leveraging these ideas, Sirocco natively supports several media types, including RAM, flash, disk, and archival storage, with automatic migration between levels. Sirocco also includes storage interfaces and support that are more advanced than typical block storage. Sirocco enables clients to efficiently use key-value storage or block-based storage with the same interface. It also provides several levels of transactional data updates within a single storage command, including full ACID-compliant updates. This transaction support extends to updating several objects within a single transaction. Further support is provided for con- currency control, enabling greater performance for workloads while providing safe concurrent modification. By pioneering these and other technologies and techniques in the storage system, Sirocco is poised to fulfill a need for a massively scalable, write-optimized storage system for exascale systems. This is version 1.0 of a document reflecting the current and planned state of Sirocco. Further versions of this document will be accessible at http://www.cs.sandia.gov/Scalable_IO/ sirocco .

  12. Absolute measurements of nonlinear absorption near LIDT at 193 nm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blaschke, Holger; Ristau, Detlev; Welsch, Eberhard; Apel, Oliver

    2001-04-01

    Previous investigations indicate that oxide coatings exhibit non-linear absorption phenomena below 200 nm. Hereby, absorption data of Al2O3 thin film coatings has been determined absolutely by laser calorimetry (LCA) at 193 nm in the low fluence regime. As an alternative, on the basis of the pulsed surface thermal lens technique (STL), photothermal measurements allow to determine the absorption relatively at fluence levels both in the subdamage fluence range far from the damage onset and close to the LIDT. By combining the two measurement techniques, the absolute determination of linear as well as multiphoton absorption can be achieved also in the vicinity of the laser damage fluences. This is of crucial interest because the initiation of damage onset can be observed immediately. Absolute absorption data of Al2O3 coatings at different laser fluences stating of some mJoule/cm2 will be presented for the wavelength 193 nm. Thus, the correlation between the increase of absorption and the onset of breakdown can be illustrated impressively. The evaluation and discussion of the experimental results are focused on the degree of non-linearity of the investigated absorption behavior of oxide single layers initiating the optical breakdown of UV oxide coatings.

  13. Brain lesion induced by 1319nm laser radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Zaifu; Chen, Hongxia; Wang, Jiarui; Chen, Peng; Ma, Ping; Qian, Huanwen

    2010-11-01

    The laser-tissue interaction has not been well defined at the 1319 nm wavelength for brain exposure. The goal of this research effort was to identify the behavioral and histological changes of brain lesion induced by 1319 nm laser. The experiment was performed on China Kunming mice. Unilateral brain lesions were created with a continuous-wave Nd:YAG laser (1319nm). The brain lesions were identified through behavioral observation and histological haematoxylin and eosin (H&E) staining method. The behavior change was observed for a radiant exposure range of 97~773 J/cm2. The histology of the recovery process was identified for radiant exposure of 580 J/cm2. Subjects were sacrificed 1 hour, 1 week, 2 weeks, 3 months, 7 months and 13 months after laser irradiation. Results showed that after laser exposure, behavioral deficits, including kyphosis, tail entasia, or whole body paralysis could be noted right after the animals recovered from anesthesia while gradually disappeared within several days and never recurred again. Histologically, the laser lesion showed a typical architecture dependent on the interval following laser treatment. The central zone of coagulation necrosis is not apparent right after exposure but becomes obvious within several days. The nerotic tissue though may persist for a long time, will finally be completely resorbed. No carbonization granules formed under our exposure condition.

  14. Pattern generation requirements for mask making beyond 130 nm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abboud, Frank E.; Gesley, Mark A.; Maldonado, Juan R.

    1998-06-01

    It is commonly accepted in the semiconductor industry that optical lithography will be the most cost-effective solution for 150 nm and 130 nm device generations. Some selected layers at the 130 nm device generation may be produced using electron-beam direct-write or x-ray during the development phase. However, for the production phase, it is expected that 193 nm optical lithography with reticle enhancement techniques such as optical proximity correction (OPC) and phase shift masks (PSM) will be the technology of choice. What about post 193 nm. The range of solutions is more diverse and a clear winner has not yet emerged. The topic, however, is becoming more visible and has taken a prominent place in technical conferences in the past year. The five leading potential alternatives to optical lithography are proximity x-ray, e-beam projection (EBP), extended UV (EUV), ion projection lithography (IPL), and e-beam direct write. The search for the right answer will most likely continue for a few years, and possibly more than one alternative will emerge as an effective solution at and below 100 nm. All of the alternatives, with the exception of e-beam direct write, have one thing in common, the mask. Except for proximity x- ray, all solutions at present envision a 4x reduction of the mask-to-wafer image plane. Instead of chrome-coated quartz, a silicon wafer substrate is used. Aside from patterning, mask fabrication varies depending on the lithography absorbing substrate, and EUV requires a reflective multilayer stack. Most key lithography requirements needed to pattern the imaging layer are common to all of the candidates, at least for the reduction methods. For x-ray lithography, the requirements are significantly more stringent but at a smaller field. This paper will consolidate the requirements of the various types of masks from a pattern generation point of view and will focus on the pattern generation tool requirements to meet those mask requirements. In addition, it

  15. Aerobic oxidation of primary alcohols catalyzed by copper complexes of 1,10-phenanthroline-derived ligands.

    PubMed

    Das, Oindrila; Paine, Tapan Kanti

    2012-10-01

    Five copper complexes [(L(1))(2)Cu(H(2)O)](ClO(4))(2) (1), [(L(1))Cu(H(2)O)(3)](ClO(4))(2) (1a), [(L(3))(2)Cu(H(2)O)](ClO(4))(2) (2), [(L(5))(2)Cu(H(2)O)](ClO(4))(2) (3) and [(L(6))(2)Cu](ClO(4)) (4) (where L(1) = 1,10-phenanthroline, L(3) = 1,10-phenanthroline-5,6-dione, L(5) = 1,10-phenanthrolinefuroxan and L(6) = 2,9-dimethyl-1,10-phenanthrolinefuroxan), and in situ prepared copper complexes of 2,9-dimethyl-1,10-phenanthroline (L(2)) or 2,9-dimethyl-1,10-phenanthrolinedione (L(4)) were used for aerial oxidation of primary alcohols to the corresponding aldehydes under ambient conditions. The copper catalysts have been found to catalyze a series of primary alcohols including one secondary alcohol with moderate turnover numbers and selectivity towards primary alcohols. Copper(II) complexes 1 (or 1a) and 2 were found to be the better catalysts among all other systems explored in this study. A copper(II)-superoxo species is implicated to initiate the oxidation reaction. Structural and electronic factors of 1,10-phenanthroline-based ligands affecting the catalytic results for aerial oxidation of alcohols are discussed.

  16. Linearly polarized, single-frequency, widely tunable Er:Yb bulk laser at around 1550 nm wavelength

    SciTech Connect

    Taccheo, S.; Laporta, P.; Svelto, O.

    1996-11-01

    We report on a 36 nm tunable, single-frequency, linearly polarized Er:Yb:glass laser. A tuning range from 1528 to 1564 nm, with output power ranging from 1 to 8 mW, is achieved. Wavelength tuning and linearly polarized output are simultaneously obtained by using a special polarizing etalon with anisotropic absorption losses. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

  17. Moreton and EUV Waves Associated with an X1.0 Flare and CME Ejection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Francile, Carlos; López, Fernando M.; Cremades, Hebe; Mandrini, Cristina H.; Luoni, María Luisa; Long, David M.

    2016-09-01

    A Moreton wave was detected in active region (AR) 12017 on 29 March 2014 with very high cadence with the H-Alpha Solar Telescope for Argentina (HASTA) in association with an X1.0 flare (SOL2014-03-29T17:48). Several other phenomena took place in connection with this event, such as low-coronal waves and a coronal mass ejection (CME). We analyze the association between the Moreton wave and the EUV signatures observed with the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly onboard the Solar Dynamics Observatory. These include their low-coronal surface-imprint, and the signatures of the full wave and shock dome propagating outward in the corona. We also study their relation to the white-light CME. We perform a kinematic analysis by tracking the wavefronts in several directions. This analysis reveals a high-directional dependence of accelerations and speeds determined from data at various wavelengths. We speculate that a region of open magnetic field lines northward of our defined radiant point sets favorable conditions for the propagation of a coronal magnetohydrodynamic shock in this direction. The hypothesis that the Moreton wavefront is produced by a coronal shock-wave that pushes the chromosphere downward is supported by the high compression ratio in that region. Furthermore, we propose a 3D geometrical model to explain the observed wavefronts as the chromospheric and low-coronal traces of an expanding and outward-traveling bubble intersecting the Sun. The results of the model are in agreement with the coronal shock-wave being generated by a 3D piston that expands at the speed of the associated rising filament. The piston is attributed to the fast ejection of the filament-CME ensemble, which is also consistent with the good match between the speed profiles of the low-coronal and white-light shock waves.

  18. Photon-counting 1.0 GHz-phase-modulation fluorometer.

    PubMed

    Mizuno, T; Nakao, S; Mizutani, Y; Iwata, T

    2015-04-01

    We have constructed an improved version of a photon-counting phase-modulation fluorometer (PC-PMF) with a maximum modulation frequency of 1.0 GHz, where a phase domain measurement is conducted with a time-correlated single-photon-counting electronics. While the basic concept of the PC-PMF has been reported previously by one of the authors, little attention has been paid to its significance, other than its weak fluorescence measurement capability. Recently, we have recognized the importance of the PC-PMF and its potential for fluorescence lifetime measurements. One important aspect of the PC-PMF is that it enables us to perform high-speed measurements that exceed the frequency bandwidths of the photomultiplier tubes that are commonly used as fluorescence detectors. We describe the advantages of the PC-PMF and demonstrate its usefulness based on fundamental performance tests. In our new version of the PC-PMF, we have used a laser diode (LD) as an excitation light source rather than the light-emitting diode that was used in the primary version. We have also designed a simple and stable LD driver to modulate the device. Additionally, we have obtained a sinusoidal histogram waveform that has multiple cycles within a time span to be measured, which is indispensable for precise phase measurements. With focus on the fluorescence intensity and the resolution time, we have compared the performance of the PC-PMF with that of a conventional PMF using the analogue light detection method. PMID:25933844

  19. The structure of CO2 hydrate between 0.7 and 1.0 GPa

    DOE PAGES

    Tulk, Chris A.; Machida, Shinichi; Klug, Dennis D.; Lu, H.; Guthrie, Malcolm; Molaison, Jamie J.

    2014-11-05

    A deuterated sample of CO2 structure I (sI) clathrate hydrate (CO2 ∙ 8.3 D2O) has been formed and neutron diffraction experiments up to 1.0 GPa at 240 K were performed. The sI CO2 hydrate transformed at 0.7 GPa into the high pressure phase that had been observed previously by Hirai, et al. (J. Phys. Chem. 133, 124511 (2010)) and O. Bollengier et al. (Geochim. Cosmochim. AC. 119, 322 (2013)), but which had not been structurally identified. The current neutron diffraction data were successfully fitted to a filled ice structure with CO2 molecules filling the water channels. This CO2+water system hasmore » also been investigated using classical molecular dynamics and density functional ab initio methods to provide additional characterization of the high pressure structure. Both models indicate the water network adapts an MH-III ‘like’ filled ice structure with considerable disorder of the orientations of the CO2molecule. Furthermore, the disorder appears be a direct result of the level of proton disorder in the water network. In contrast to the conclusions of Bollengier et al. our neutron diffraction data shows that the filled ice phase can be recovered to ambient pressure (0.1 MPa) at 96 K, and recrystallization to sI hydrate occurs upon subsequent heating to 150 K, possibly by first forming low density amorphous ice. Unlike other clathrate hydrate systems, which transform from the sI or sII structure to the hexagonal structure (sH) then to the filled ice structure, CO2 hydrate transforms directly from the sI form to the filled ice structure.« less

  20. FPLUME-1.0: An integral volcanic plume model accounting for ash aggregation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Folch, A.; Costa, A.; Macedonio, G.

    2016-02-01

    Eruption source parameters (ESP) characterizing volcanic eruption plumes are crucial inputs for atmospheric tephra dispersal models, used for hazard assessment and risk mitigation. We present FPLUME-1.0, a steady-state 1-D (one-dimensional) cross-section-averaged eruption column model based on the buoyant plume theory (BPT). The model accounts for plume bending by wind, entrainment of ambient moisture, effects of water phase changes, particle fallout and re-entrainment, a new parameterization for the air entrainment coefficients and a model for wet aggregation of ash particles in the presence of liquid water or ice. In the occurrence of wet aggregation, the model predicts an effective grain size distribution depleted in fines with respect to that erupted at the vent. Given a wind profile, the model can be used to determine the column height from the eruption mass flow rate or vice versa. The ultimate goal is to improve ash cloud dispersal forecasts by better constraining the ESP (column height, eruption rate and vertical distribution of mass) and the effective particle grain size distribution resulting from eventual wet aggregation within the plume. As test cases we apply the model to the eruptive phase-B of the 4 April 1982 El Chichón volcano eruption (México) and the 6 May 2010 Eyjafjallajökull eruption phase (Iceland). The modular structure of the code facilitates the implementation in the future code versions of more quantitative ash aggregation parameterization as further observations and experiment data will be available for better constraining ash aggregation processes.

  1. The 1.0 Megaparsec Galaxy Pair Sample in Low-Density Regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nordgren, Tyler E.; Chengalur, Jayaram N.; Salpeter, E. E.; Terzian, Yervant

    2000-11-01

    Using complete redshift catalogs, we have compiled a list of galaxy pairs based solely on a pair's projected separation, rp, and velocity difference, ΔV. We have made high-velocity precision H I observations of each galaxy in the sample and have reported these in the literature. Due to the nature of the redshift catalogs, we are able to quantitatively evaluate the effects of isolation and number density of surrounding galaxies on each pair in the sample. For the close galaxy pairs (rp<100 kpc), the degree of isolation (a measure of the number of near neighbors) has little effect on the median ΔV. This median is about 55 km s-1 for the 25 close pairs (if medium-density close pairs are omitted ΔV is even smaller, but the difference is not statistically significant). The effect of isolation is strong for the entire sample of galaxy pairs with separations as large as 1.0 Mpc. For these larger separation pairs, relaxation of strict isolation requirements introduces small groups into the sample, which dramatically increases the median ΔV. We find little evidence of an increase in the median ΔV with decreasing rp, nor with increasing total luminosity. For our isolated pairs in low-density regions, the overall median ΔV is only 30 km s-1. For similar separations and isolation criteria, galaxy satellites with larger luminosity ratios (i.e., less dynamical friction) in higher density regions have ΔV approximately twice as large. We conjecture that our orbits are highly eccentric, so that the indirect effect of dynamical friction leads to predominantly small ΔV. However, the halos of our galaxies may also be of low density (although highly extended).

  2. FPLUME-1.0: An integral volcanic plume model accounting for ash aggregation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Folch, Arnau; Costa, Antonio; Macedonio, Giovanni

    2016-04-01

    Eruption Source Parameters (ESP) characterizing volcanic eruption plumes are crucial inputs for atmospheric tephra dispersal models, used for hazard assessment and risk mitigation. We present FPLUME-1.0, a steady-state 1D cross-section averaged eruption column model based on the Buoyant Plume Theory (BPT). The model accounts for plume bending by wind, entrainment of ambient moisture, effects of water phase changes, particle fallout and re-entrainment, a new parameterization for the air entrainment coefficients and a model for wet aggregation of ash particles in presence of liquid water or ice. In the occurrence of wet aggregation, the model predicts an "effective" grain size distribution depleted in fines with respect to that erupted at the vent. Given a wind profile, the model can be used to determine the column height from the eruption mass flow rate or vice-versa. The ultimate goal is to improve ash cloud dispersal forecasts by better constraining the ESP (column height, eruption rate and vertical distribution of mass) and the "effective" particle grain size distribution resulting from eventual wet aggregation within the plume. As test cases we apply the model to the eruptive phase-B of the 4 April 1982 El Chichón volcano eruption (México) and the 6 May 2010 Eyjafjallajökull eruption phase (Iceland). The modular structure of the code facilitates the implementation in the future code versions of more quantitative ash aggregation parameterization as further observations and experiments data will be available for better constraining ash aggregation processes.

  3. Patterning polymeric structures with 2 nm resolution at 3 nm half pitch in ambient conditions.

    PubMed

    Martínez, R V; Losilla, N S; Martinez, J; Huttel, Y; Garcia, R

    2007-07-01

    The miniaturization limits of electronic and mechanical devices depend on the minimum pattern periodicity that is stable in ambient conditions. Here we demonstrate an atomic force microscopy lithography that enables the patterning of 2 nm organic structures with 6 nm periodicities in air. We also demonstrate that the lithography can be up-scaled for parallel patterning. The method is based on the formation of a nanoscale octane meniscus between a sharp conductive protrusion and a silicon (100) surface. The application of a high electrical field ( approximately 10 V/nm) produces the polymerization and cross-linking of the octane molecules within the meniscus followed by their deposition. The resulting pattern periodicities are very close to the ultimate theoretical limits achievable in air ( approximately 3 nm). The chemical composition of the patterns has been characterized by photoemission spectroscopy.

  4. Study on interaction between a new fluorescent probe 2-methylbenzo[b][1,10]phenanthrolin-7(12H)-one and BSA.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Bin; Guo, Longhua; Chen, Mingluan; Lin, Zhenyu; Chen, Guonan

    2011-03-01

    A new fluorescence reagent, 2-methylbenzo[b][1,10]phenanthrolin-7(12H)-one (mBPO), synthesized in our laboratory was used as the probe for protein and its interaction with Bovine Serum Albumin (BSA) was investigated in detail in this paper. It was found that BSA had the ability to quench the fluorescence of mBPO at 411 nm (λ(ex) = 286 nm), and the quenched intensity of fluorescence was proportional to the concentration of BSA. Based on this fact, mBPO has been used as a fluorescence probe for the detection of BSA. Under the optimal conditions, the calibration graph is linear up to 0.5 mg L(-1) for BSA and the limit of detection (LOD) was 0.06 mg L(-1). The regression equation is y = 1048.8x + 7.2093 with R(2) = 0.9913. The mechanism for the interaction of mBPO with BSA was also studied, while the binding constant and the number of binding sites were calculated. According to the thermodynamics parameter, the binding mode between mBPO and BSA was deduced. The results suggested the interaction between mBPO and BSA to be hydrophobic force in nature. It also proved that the fluorescence quenching reaction was affected by the tryptophan residue of BSA. For there are two tryptophan (Trp) residues, in site 134 and site 212 of BSA, and mBPO maybe has interaction with them respectively.

  5. 981 nm Yb:KYW laser intracavity pumped at 912 nm and frequency-doubling for an emission at 490.5 nm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lü, Y. F.; Zhang, X. H.; Xia, J.; Chen, R.; Jin, G. Y.; Wang, J. G.; Li, C. L.; Ma, Z. Y.

    2010-05-01

    We present an Yb:KY(WO4)2 (Yb:KYW) laser emitting at 981 nm intracavity pumped by a 912 nm diode-pumped Nd:GdVO4 laser. A 808 nm diode laser is used to pump the Nd:GdVO4 crystal emitting at 912 nm, and the Yb:KYW laser emitting at 981 nm intracavity pumped at 912 nm. This configuration enabled us to indirectly diode-pump this ytterbium doped crystal, and to obtain 1.12 W output power at 981 nm for 19.6 W of incident pump power at 808 nm. Furthermore, intracavity second harmonic generation has also been demonstrated with a power of 106 mW at 490.5 nm by using a LBO nonlinear crystal.

  6. Activationless charge transport across 4.5 to 22 nm in molecular electronic junctions

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Haijun; Bergren, Adam Johan; McCreery, Richard; Della Rocca, Maria Luisa; Martin, Pascal; Lafarge, Philippe; Lacroix, Jean Christophe

    2013-01-01

    In this work, we bridge the gap between short-range tunneling in molecular junctions and activated hopping in bulk organic films, and greatly extend the distance range of charge transport in molecular electronic devices. Three distinct transport mechanisms were observed for 4.5–22-nm-thick oligo(thiophene) layers between carbon contacts, with tunneling operative when d < 8 nm, activated hopping when d > 16 nm for high temperatures and low bias, and a third mechanism consistent with field-induced ionization of highest occupied molecular orbitals or interface states to generate charge carriers when d = 8–22 nm. Transport in the 8–22-nm range is weakly temperature dependent, with a field-dependent activation barrier that becomes negligible at moderate bias. We thus report here a unique, activationless transport mechanism, operative over 8–22-nm distances without involving hopping, which severely limits carrier mobility and device lifetime in organic semiconductors. Charge transport in molecular electronic junctions can thus be effective for transport distances significantly greater than the 1–5 nm associated with quantum-mechanical tunneling. PMID:23509271

  7. Activationless charge transport across 4.5 to 22 nm in molecular electronic junctions.

    PubMed

    Yan, Haijun; Bergren, Adam Johan; McCreery, Richard; Della Rocca, Maria Luisa; Martin, Pascal; Lafarge, Philippe; Lacroix, Jean Christophe

    2013-04-01

    In this work, we bridge the gap between short-range tunneling in molecular junctions and activated hopping in bulk organic films, and greatly extend the distance range of charge transport in molecular electronic devices. Three distinct transport mechanisms were observed for 4.5-22-nm-thick oligo(thiophene) layers between carbon contacts, with tunneling operative when d < 8 nm, activated hopping when d > 16 nm for high temperatures and low bias, and a third mechanism consistent with field-induced ionization of highest occupied molecular orbitals or interface states to generate charge carriers when d = 8-22 nm. Transport in the 8-22-nm range is weakly temperature dependent, with a field-dependent activation barrier that becomes negligible at moderate bias. We thus report here a unique, activationless transport mechanism, operative over 8-22-nm distances without involving hopping, which severely limits carrier mobility and device lifetime in organic semiconductors. Charge transport in molecular electronic junctions can thus be effective for transport distances significantly greater than the 1-5 nm associated with quantum-mechanical tunneling.

  8. Deep ultraviolet (254 nm) focal plane array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cicek, Erdem; Vashaei, Zahra; McClintock, Ryan; Razeghi, Manijeh

    2011-10-01

    We report the synthesis, fabrication and testing of a 320 × 256 focal plane array (FPA) of back-illuminated, solarblind, p-i-n, AlxGa1-xN-based detectors, fully realized within our research laboratory. We implemented a novel pulsed atomic layer deposition technique for the metalorganic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD) growth of crackfree, thick, and high Al composition AlxGa1-xN layers. Following the growth, the wafer was processed into a 320 × 256 array of 25 μm × 25 μm pixels on a 30 μm pixel-pitch and surrounding mini-arrays. A diagnostic mini-array was hybridized to a silicon fan-out chip to allow the study of electrical and optical characteristics of discrete pixels of the FPA. At a reverse bias of 1 V, an average photodetector exhibited a low dark current density of 1.12×10-8 A/cm2. Solar-blind operation is observed throughout the array with peak detection occurring at wavelengths of 256 nm and lower and falling off three orders of magnitude by 285 nm. After indium bump deposition and dicing, the FPA is hybridized to a matching ISC 9809 readout integrated circuit (ROIC). By developing a novel masking technology, we significantly reduced the visible response of the ROIC and thus the need for external filtering to achieve solar- and visible-blind operation is eliminated. This allowed the FPA to achieve high external quantum efficiency (EQE): at 254 nm, average pixels showed unbiased peak responsivity of 75 mA/W, which corresponds to an EQE of ~37%. Finally, the uniformity of the FPA and imaging properties are investigated.

  9. What Works Clearinghouse Evidence Standards for Reviewing Studies, Version 1.0. Revised

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    What Works Clearinghouse, 2008

    2008-01-01

    The Institute of Education Sciences (IES) and the What Works Clearinghouse (WWC) have identified topic areas that present a wide range of this nation's most pressing issues in education (e.g., middle school math, beginning reading, and character education). Within each selected topic area, the WWC collects studies of interventions (i.e., programs,…

  10. Photolysis of formic acid at 355 nm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martinez, Denhi; Bautista, Teonanacatl; Guerrero, Alfonso; Alvarez, Ignacio; Cisneros, Carmen

    2015-05-01

    Formic acid is well known as a food additive and recently an application on fuel cell technology has emerged. In this work we have studied the dissociative ionization process by multiphoton absorption of formic acid molecules at 355nm wavelength photons, using TOF spectrometry in reflectron mode (R-TOF). Some of the most abundant ionic fragments produced are studied at different settings of the laser harmonic generator. The dependence of the products on these conditions is reported. This work was supported by CONACYT Project 165410 and PAPIIT IN102613 and IN101215.

  11. Low-intensity LED (625 and 405 nm) and laser (805 nm) killing of Propionibacterium acnes and Staphylococcus epidermidis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tuchina, Elena S.; Tuchin, Valery V.

    2009-02-01

    In the present work we have investigated in vitro sensitivity of microorganisms P. acnes and S. epidermidis to action of red (625 nm and 405 nm) and infrared (805 nm) radiations in combination with photosensitizes Methylene Blue and Indocyanine Green.

  12. TEJAS - TELEROBOTICS/EVA JOINT ANALYSIS SYSTEM VERSION 1.0

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Drews, M. L.

    1994-01-01

    The primary objective of space telerobotics as a research discipline is the augmentation and/or support of extravehicular activity (EVA) with telerobotic activity; this allows increased emplacement of on-orbit assets while providing for their "in situ" management. Development of the requisite telerobot work system requires a well-understood correspondence between EVA and telerobotics that to date has been only partially established. The Telerobotics/EVA Joint Analysis Systems (TEJAS) hypermedia information system uses object-oriented programming to bridge the gap between crew-EVA and telerobotics activities. TEJAS Version 1.0 contains twenty HyperCard stacks that use a visual, customizable interface of icon buttons, pop-up menus, and relational commands to store, link, and standardize related information about the primitives, technologies, tasks, assumptions, and open issues involved in space telerobot or crew EVA tasks. These stacks are meant to be interactive and can be used with any database system running on a Macintosh, including spreadsheets, relational databases, word-processed documents, and hypermedia utilities. The software provides a means for managing volumes of data and for communicating complex ideas, relationships, and processes inherent to task planning. The stack system contains 3MB of data and utilities to aid referencing, discussion, communication, and analysis within the EVA and telerobotics communities. The six baseline analysis stacks (EVATasks, EVAAssume, EVAIssues, TeleTasks, TeleAssume, and TeleIssues) work interactively to manage and relate basic information which you enter about the crew-EVA and telerobot tasks you wish to analyze in depth. Analysis stacks draw on information in the Reference stacks as part of a rapid point-and-click utility for building scripts of specific task primitives or for any EVA or telerobotics task. Any or all of these stacks can be completely incorporated within other hypermedia applications, or they can be referenced as is, without requiring data to be transferred into any other database. TEJAS is simple to use and requires no formal training. Some knowledge of HyperCard is helpful, but not essential. All Help cards printed in the TEJAS User's Guide are part of the TEJAS Help Stack and are available from a pop-up menu any time you are using TEJAS. Specific stacks created in TEJAS can be exchanged between groups, divisions, companies, or centers for complete communication of fundamental information that forms the basis for further analyses. TEJAS runs on any Apple Macintosh personal computer with at least one megabyte of RAM, a hard disk, and HyperCard 1.21, or later version. TEJAS is a copyrighted work with all copyright vested in NASA. HyperCard and Macintosh are registered trademarks of Apple Computer, Inc.

  13. The relationship between household income and dietary intakes of 1-10 year old urban Malaysian

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Khor Geok; Sariman, Sarina; Lee, Huang Soo; Siew, Chin Yit; Mohd Yusof, Barakatun Nisak; Mun, Chan Yoke; Mohamad, Maznorila

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND/OBJECTIVES Diet plays an important role in growth and development of children. However, dietary intakes of children living in either rural or urban areas can be influenced by household income. This cross-sectional study examined energy, nutrient and food group intakes of 749 urban children (1-10 years old) by household income status. SUBJECTS/METHODS Children's dietary intakes were obtained using food recall and record for two days. Diet adequacy was assessed based on recommended intakes of energy and nutrients and food group servings. RESULTS For toddlers, all nutrients except dietary fiber (5.5 g) exceeded recommended intakes. Among older children (preschoolers and school children), calcium (548 mg, 435 mg) and dietary fiber (7.4 g, 9.4 g) did not meet recommendations while percentage of energy from total fat and saturated fats exceeded 30% and 10%, respectively. The mean sodium intakes of preschoolers (1,684 mg) and school children (2,000 mg) were relatively high. Toddlers in all income groups had similar energy and nutrient intakes and percentages meeting the recommended intakes. However, low income older children had lowest intakes of energy (P < 0.05) and most nutrients (P < 0.05) and highest proportions that did not meet recommended energy and nutrient intakes. For all food groups, except milk and dairy products, all age groups had mean intakes below the recommended servings. Compared to middle and high income groups, low income preschoolers had the lowest mean intake of fruits (0.07 serving), meat/poultry (0.78 serving) and milk/dairy products (1.14 serving) while low income toddlers and school children had the least mean intake of fruits (0.09 serving) and milk/dairy products (0.54 serving), respectively. CONCLUSION Low socioeconomic status, as indicated by low household income, could limit access to adequate diets, particularly for older children. Parents and caregivers may need dietary guidance to ensure adequate quantity and quality of home

  14. Comparative ranking of 0. 1-10 MW/sub e/ solar thermal electric power systems. Volume II. Supporting data. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Thornton, J.P.; Brown, K.C.; Finegold, J.G.; Gresham, J.B.; Herlevich, F.A.; Kriz, T.A.

    1980-07-01

    This report is part of a two-volume set summarizing the results of a comparative ranking of generic solar thermal concepts designed specifically for electric power generation. The original objective of the study was to project the mid-1990 cost and performance of selected generic solar thermal electric power systems for utility applications and to rank these systems by criteria that reflect their future commercial acceptance. This study considered plants with rated capacities of 1-10 MW/sub e/, operating over a range of capacity factors from the no-storage case to 0.7 and above. Later, the study was extended to include systems with capacities from 0.1 to 1 MW/sub e/, a range that is attractive to industrial and other nonutility applications. Volume I summarizes the results for the full range of capacities from 0.1 to 1.0 MW/sub e/. Volume II presents data on the performance and cost and ranking methodology.

  15. The evaluation of hyperspectral imaging for the detection of person-borne threat objects over the 400nm to 1700nm spectral region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cooksey, Catherine C.; Neira, Jorge E.; Allen, David W.

    2012-06-01

    The detection of person-borne threat objects, such as improvised explosive devices, at a safe distance is an ongoing challenge. While much attention has been given to other parts of the electromagnetic spectrum, very little is known about what potential exists to detect clothing obscured threats over the ultraviolet through the shortwave-infrared spectral region. Hyperspectral imaging may provide a greater ability to discriminate between target and non-target by using the full spectrum. This study investigates this potential by the collection and analysis of hyperspectral images of obscured proxy threat objects. The results of this study indicate a consistent ability to detect the presence of concealed objects. The study included the use of VNIR (400 nm to 1000 nm) and SWIR (1000 nm to 1700 nm), as defined here, hyperspectral imagers. Both spectral ranges provided comparable results, however, potential advantages of the SWIR spectral region are discussed.

  16. Electrically-pumped 850-nm micromirror VECSELs.

    SciTech Connect

    Geib, Kent Martin; Peake, Gregory Merwin; Serkland, Darwin Keith; Keeler, Gordon Arthur; Mar, Alan

    2005-02-01

    Vertical-external-cavity surface-emitting lasers (VECSELs) combine high optical power and good beam quality in a device with surface-normal output. In this paper, we describe the design and operating characteristics of an electrically-pumped VECSEL that employs a wafer-scale fabrication process and operates at 850 nm. A curved micromirror output coupler is heterogeneously integrated with AlGaAs-based semiconductor material to form a compact and robust device. The structure relies on flip-chip bonding the processed epitaxial material to an aluminum nitride mount; this heatsink both dissipates thermal energy and permits high frequency modulation using coplanar traces that lead to the VECSEL mesa. Backside emission is employed, and laser operation at 850 nm is made possible by removing the entire GaAs substrate through selective wet etching. While substrate removal eliminates absorptive losses, it simultaneously compromises laser performance by increasing series resistance and degrading the spatial uniformity of current injection. Several aspects of the VECSEL design help to mitigate these issues, including the use of a novel current-spreading n type distributed Bragg reflector (DBR). Additionally, VECSEL performance is improved through the use of a p-type DBR that is modified for low thermal resistance.

  17. DNA charge transport over 34 nm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slinker, Jason D.; Muren, Natalie B.; Renfrew, Sara E.; Barton, Jacqueline K.

    2011-03-01

    Molecular wires show promise in nanoscale electronics, but the synthesis of uniform, long conductive molecules is a significant challenge. Deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) of precise length, by contrast, is synthesized easily, but its conductivity over the distances required for nanoscale devices has not been explored. Here we demonstrate DNA charge transport (CT) over 34 nm in 100-mer monolayers on gold. Multiplexed gold electrodes modified with 100-mer DNA yield sizable electrochemical signals from a distal, covalent Nile Blue redox probe. Significant signal attenuation upon incorporation of a single base-pair mismatch demonstrates that CT is DNA-mediated. Efficient cleavage of these 100-mers by a restriction enzyme indicates that the DNA adopts a native conformation accessible to protein binding. Similar electron-transfer rates measured through 100-mer and 17-mer monolayers are consistent with rate-limiting electron tunnelling through the saturated carbon linker. This DNA-mediated CT distance of 34 nm surpasses that of most reports of molecular wires.

  18. Photodissociation of Methyl Iodide at 193 NM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Hong; Pratt, Stephen

    2014-05-01

    A new measurement of the photodissociation of CH3I at 193 nm is reported in which we use a combination of vacuum ultraviolet photoionization and velocity map ion imaging. The iodine photofragments are probed by single-photon ionization at photon energies above and below the photoionization threshold of I(2P3/2) . The relative I(2P3/2) and I*(2P1/2) photoionization cross sections are determined at these wavelengths by using the known branching fractions for the photodissociation at 266 nm. Velocity map ion images indicate that the branching fraction for I(2P3/2) atoms is non-zero, and yield a value of 0.07 +/- 0.01. Interestingly, the translational energy distribution extracted from the image shows that the translational energy of the I(2P3/2) fragments is significantly smaller than that of the I*(2P1/2) atoms. This observation indicates the internal rotational/vibrational energy of the CH3 co-fragment is very high in the I(2P3/2) channel. The results can be interpreted in a manner consistent with the previous measurements, and provide a more complete picture of the dissociation dynamics of this prototypical molecule. This work was supported by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, Office of Basic Energy Sciences, Division of Chemical Sciences, Geosciences, and Biosciences under contract No. DE-AC02-06CH11357.

  19. THE PPMXL CATALOG OF POSITIONS AND PROPER MOTIONS ON THE ICRS. COMBINING USNO-B1.0 AND THE TWO MICRON ALL SKY SURVEY (2MASS)

    SciTech Connect

    Roeser, S.; Demleitner, M.; Schilbach, E.

    2010-06-15

    USNO-B1.0 and the Two Micron All Sky Survey (2MASS) are the most widely used all-sky surveys. However, 2MASS has no proper motions at all, and USNO-B1.0 published only relative, not absolute (i.e., on the International Celestial Reference Frame (ICRS), proper motions. We performed a new determination of mean positions and proper motions on the ICRS system by combining USNO-B1.0 and 2MASS astrometry. This catalog is called PPMXL (VO access to the catalog is possible via http://vo.uni-hd.de/ppmxl), and it aims to be completed from the brightest stars down to about V {approx} 20 all sky. PPMXL contains about 900 million objects, some 410 million with 2MASS photometry, and is the largest collection of ICRS proper motions at present. As representative for the ICRS, we chose PPMX. The recently released UCAC3 could not be used because we found plate-dependent distortions in its proper motion system north of -20{sup 0} declination. UCAC3 served as an intermediate system for {delta} {<=} -20{sup 0}. The resulting typical individual mean errors of the proper motions range from 4 mas yr{sup -1} to more than 10 mas yr{sup -1} depending on observational history. The mean errors of positions at epoch 2000.0 are 80-120 mas, if 2MASS astrometry could be used, 150-300 mas else. We also give correction tables to convert USNO-B1.0 observations of, e.g., minor planets to the ICRS system.

  20. RESOLVED GIANT MOLECULAR CLOUDS IN NEARBY SPIRAL GALAXIES: INSIGHTS FROM THE CANON CO (1-0) SURVEY

    SciTech Connect

    Donovan Meyer, Jennifer; Koda, Jin; Mooney, Thomas; Momose, Rieko; Egusa, Fumi; Carty, Misty; Kennicutt, Robert; Kuno, Nario; Rebolledo, David; Wong, Tony; Sawada, Tsuyoshi; Scoville, Nick

    2013-08-01

    We resolve 182 individual giant molecular clouds (GMCs) larger than 2.5 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 5} M{sub Sun} in the inner disks of 5 large nearby spiral galaxies (NGC 2403, NGC 3031, NGC 4736, NGC 4826, and NGC 6946) to create the largest such sample of extragalactic GMCs within galaxies analogous to the Milky Way. Using a conservatively chosen sample of GMCs most likely to adhere to the virial assumption, we measure cloud sizes, velocity dispersions, and {sup 12}CO (J = 1-0) luminosities and calculate cloud virial masses. The average conversion factor from CO flux to H{sub 2} mass (or X{sub CO}) for each galaxy is 1-2 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 20} cm{sup -2} (K km s{sup -1}){sup -1}, all within a factor of two of the Milky Way disk value ({approx}2 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 20} cm{sup -2} (K km s{sup -1}){sup -1}). We find GMCs to be generally consistent within our errors between the galaxies and with Milky Way disk GMCs; the intrinsic scatter between clouds is of order a factor of two. Consistent with previous studies in the Local Group, we find a linear relationship between cloud virial mass and CO luminosity, supporting the assumption that the clouds in this GMC sample are gravitationally bound. We do not detect a significant population of GMCs with elevated velocity dispersions for their sizes, as has been detected in the Galactic center. Though the range of metallicities probed in this study is narrow, the average conversion factors of these galaxies will serve to anchor the high metallicity end of metallicity-X{sub CO} trends measured using conversion factors in resolved clouds; this has been previously possible primarily with Milky Way measurements.

  1. Data-driven Radiative Hydrodynamic Modeling of the 2014 March 29 X1.0 Solar Flare

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rubio da Costa, Fatima; Kleint, Lucia; Petrosian, Vahé; Liu, Wei; Allred, Joel C.

    2016-08-01

    Spectroscopic observations of solar flares provide critical diagnostics of the physical conditions in the flaring atmosphere. Some key features in observed spectra have not yet been accounted for in existing flare models. Here we report a data-driven simulation of the well-observed X1.0 flare on 2014 March 29 that can reconcile some well-known spectral discrepancies. We analyzed spectra of the flaring region from the Interface Region Imaging Spectrograph (IRIS) in Mg ii h&k, the Interferometric BIdimensional Spectropolarimeter at the Dunn Solar Telescope (DST/IBIS) in Hα 6563 Å and Ca ii 8542 Å, and the Reuven Ramaty High Energy Solar Spectroscope Imager (RHESSI) in hard X-rays. We constructed a multithreaded flare loop model and used the electron flux inferred from RHESSI data as the input to the radiative hydrodynamic code RADYN to simulate the atmospheric response. We then synthesized various chromospheric emission lines and compared them with the IRIS and IBIS observations. In general, the synthetic intensities agree with the observed ones, especially near the northern footpoint of the flare. The simulated Mg ii line profile has narrower wings than the observed one. This discrepancy can be reduced by using a higher microturbulent velocity (27 km s-1) in a narrow chromospheric layer. In addition, we found that an increase of electron density in the upper chromosphere within a narrow height range of ≈800 km below the transition region can turn the simulated Mg ii line core into emission and thus reproduce the single peaked profile, which is a common feature in all IRIS flares.

  2. Very Large Array Mapping of the CO(1-0) Line in SMM J14011+0252

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharon, Chelsea E.; Baker, Andrew J.; Harris, Andrew I.; Thomson, Alasdair P.

    2013-03-01

    We present high-resolution CO(1-0) observations of the lensed submillimeter galaxy (SMG) SMM J14011+0252 at z = 2.6. Comparison to the previously detected CO(3-2) line gives an intensity ratio of r 3, 1 = 0.97 ± 0.16 in temperature units, larger than is typical for SMGs but within the range seen in the low-z ultraluminous infrared galaxy population. Combining our new data with previous mid-J CO observations, we perform a single-phase large velocity gradient (LVG) analysis to constrain the physical conditions of the molecular gas. Acceptable models have significant degeneracies between parameters, even when we rule out all models that produce optically thin emission, but we find that the bulk of the molecular gas has T kin = 20-60 K, n_H_2˜ 10^4-105 cm-3, and N CO/Δv = 1017.00 ± 0.25 cm-2 km-1 s. For our best-fit models to self-consistently recover a typical CO-to-H2 abundance and a plausible degree of virialization, the local velocity gradient in the molecular gas must be substantially larger than its galaxy-wide average. This conclusion is consistent with a scenario in which SMM J14011+0252 has a fairly face-on orientation and a molecular interstellar medium composed of many unresolved clouds. Using previous Hα observations, we find that SMM J14011+0252 has a spatially resolved star formation rate versus molecular gas surface density relation inconsistent with those of "normal" local star-forming galaxies, even if we adopt a local "disk-like" CO-to-H2 conversion factor as motivated by our LVG analysis. This discrepancy supports the inference of a star formation relation for high-z starbursts distinct from the local relation that is not solely due to differing choices of gas mass conversion factor.

  3. Vertical Distributions of PH3 in Saturn from Observations of Its 1-0 and 3-2 Rotational Lines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Orton, G. S.; Serabyn, E.; Lee, Y. T.

    2000-01-01

    Far-infrared Fourier-transform spectrometer measurements of the 1-0 and 3-2 PH3 transitions in Saturn's disk near 267 and 800 GHz (8.9 and 26.7/cm), respectively, were analyzed simultaneously to derive a global mean profile for the PH3 vertical mixing ratio between 100 and 600 mbar total pressure. The far-infrared spectrum is relatively free from spectral interlopers, suffers minimal absorption or scattering by atmospheric particulates, and contains intrinsically weak PH3 lines that are sensitive to a range of atmospheric depths. The combined spectra are inconsistent with a uniform tropospheric mixing ratio, even with a stratospheric cut-off. They are consistent with a volume mixing ratio of PH3 that drops from 1.2 x 10(exp -5) at 645 mbar pressure to a value of 4.1 x 10(exp -7) at 150 mbar pressure, a decrease that is linear is log abundance vs log pressure. The mixing ratio could drop even more quickly at atmospheric pressures below 150 mbar and still be consistent with the data. The mixing ratio may well remain constant with depth for pressures above 630 mbar. The maximum PH3 mixing ratio in this model is consistent with a [P]/[H] ratio in the deep atmosphere that is about a factor of 10 higher than solar composition. Such a model is consistent with rapid mixing up to the radiative-convective boundary and transport by, for example, vertical waves just above this boundary. In the best fitting model, the eddy diffusion coefficient is approximately 10(exp 4) sq cm near 630 mbar, and it must increase with altitude. The predominant PH3 loss mechanisms are direct photolysis by UV radiation and scavenging by H atoms produced by the photolysis.

  4. Linewidth characteristics of Raman-shifted dye laser output at 720 and 940 nm

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grossmann, B. E.; Higdon, N. S.; Higdon, N. S.; Higdon, N. S.; Higdon, N. S.; Higdon, N. S.; Higdon, N. S.

    1986-01-01

    Existing DIAL systems for water vapor measurements in the troposphere operate at wavelengths near 720 nm. The use of stronger water vapor absorption lines in the range 930 to 960 nm will significantly improve DIAL measurements in the upper troposphere and lower stratosphere where water vapor concentrations are low. The generation of light at 940 nm using a frequency doubled Nd:YAG pumped dye laser is inefficient due to the small absorption if infrared dyes at the pump wavelength. However, 940 nm generation utilizing stimulated Raman scattering of dye lasers is attractive because of a potentially high conversion efficiency plus the possibility of retaining the narrow linewidth available from some dye lasers. The Raman conversion efficiency and line broadening are presented for first Stokes operation at 720 and 940 nm using hydrogen and deuterium as the Raman media.

  5. Attaining 186-nm light generation in cooled beta-BaB(2)O(4) crystal.

    PubMed

    Kouta, H; Kuwano, Y

    1999-09-01

    The transparency range of beta-BaB(2)O(4) (BBO) was expanded by means of cooling, and the resulting absorption coefficient at 193.4 nm was reduced to 0.29cm(-1) at 91 K from 1.39cm(-1) at 295 K. Further, generation of light at 186.0 nm (the measurement limit in air) by type I sum-frequency generation (SFG) based on fundamental (744-nm) and third-harmonic (248-nm) light from a Ti:sapphire laser was confirmed for cooled BBO. Calculations based on observed data for SFG wavelengths and phase-matching angles indicate a potential for cooled BBO to generate wavelengths as low as 181.7 nm.

  6. Wavelength tunable integrated add-drop filter with 10.6 nm bandwidth adjustability.

    PubMed

    Boroojerdi, M T; Ménard, M; Kirk, A G

    2016-09-19

    We present the design and characterization of a silicon-on-insulator based bandwidth and wavelength-tunable add-drop filter. The tunability of the device is achieved by independently controlling the central wavelength of two cascaded contra-directional grating assisted couplers. The device was fabricated using e-beam lithography and the tuning is demonstrated using the thermo-optic effect, which was obtained with metal heaters fabricated by a lift-off process. It is experimentally demonstrated that within the wavelength range of 1555 nm to 1573 nm the transmission bandwidth of the device can be tuned from 1.1 nm to 11.7 nm. Moreover, more than 4 nm of central wavelength tuning is demonstrated. The tunability of the central wavelength is limited by the breakdown current of the metal heaters. PMID:27661939

  7. Proposed SLR Optical Bench Required to Track Debris Using 1550 nm Lasers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shappirio, M.; Coyle, D. B.; McGarry, J. F.; Bufton, J.; Cheek, J. W.; Clarke, G.; Hull, S. M.; Skillman, D. R.; Stysley, P. R.; Sun, X.; Young, R. P.; Zagwodzki, T.

    2015-01-01

    A previous study has indicated that by using approx.1550 nm wavelengths a laser ranging system can track debris objects in an "eye safe" manner, while increasing the expected return rate by a factor of approx. 2/unit area of the telescope. In this presentation we develop the optical bench required to use approx.1550nm lasers, and integration with a 532nm system. We will use the optical bench configuration for NGSLR as the baseline, and indicate a possible injection point for the 1550 nm laser. The presentation will include what elements may need to be changed for transmitting the required power on the approx.1550nm wavelength, supporting the alignment of the laser to the telescope, and possible concerns for the telescope optics.

  8. Characteristics and Applications of Tapered Fiber Optical Sensors for 1310 nm Wavelength

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hwang, Thunter; Cheng, Wood-Hi; Su, Yan-Kuin

    2013-06-01

    Optical sensors for displacement measurement and fluorescence probes were designed and experimentally studied. This is the first time we used photonic sensors for displacement measurement and fluorescence probes at the same time using a long-wavelength (1310 nm) photon beam in the reflective mode. A tapered fiber sensor was chosen to increase the dynamic range for fluorescence probes. The results showed that the tapered fiber sensor exhibited a high resolution of 12 nm and a better dynamic range of 2 mm in our system. The relationship between resolution and dynamic range was experimentally found to vary with tapered fiber tilt angle. The precise diameter of the fiber microlens was measured. These were the characteristics considered in the manufacturing of our chosen device. Moreover, these novel 1310-nm-wavelength tapered fiber sensors with high resolution, good dynamic range, better reliability, and low cost may provide multipurpose applications, such as those in telecommunication systems, commercial measurements, and military inspection.

  9. On the Stark Widths and Shifts of Ar II 472.68 nm Spectral Line

    SciTech Connect

    Mijatovic, Z.; Gajo, T.; Vujicic, B.; Djurovic, S.; Kobilarov, R.

    2008-10-22

    Stark widths and shifts of Ar II 472.68 nm spectral line were measured from T-tube plasmas. Plasma electron density ranged 1.8-2.210{sup 17} cm{sup -3}, while temperature ranged 20000-43000 K. Obtained results of widths and shifts were compared with measured results of other authors.

  10. Spectroscopy of Pluto at six longitudes, 380-930 nm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cruikshank, Dale P.; Pinilla-Alonso, Noemi; Lorenzi, Vania; Grundy, Will M.; Licandro, Javier; Binzel, Richard P.

    2014-11-01

    We have obtained spectra of the Pluto-Charon pair (unresolved) in the wavelength range 380-930 nm with resolution ~450 at six roughly equally spaced longitudes. The data were taken in May and June, 2014, with the 4.2-m Isaac Newton Telescope at Roque de Los Muchachos Observatory in the Canary Islands, using the ACAM (auxiliary-port camera) in spectrometer mode, and using two solar analog stars. The new spectra clearly show absorption bands of solid CH4 at 620, 728, and 850-910 nm, which were known from earlier work. The 620-nm CH4 band is intrinsically very weak, and its appearance indicates a long optical pathlength through the ice. This is especially true if it arises from CH4 dissolved in N2 ice. Earlier work (Owen et al. Science 261, 745, 1993) on the near-infrared spectrum of Pluto (1-2.5 µm) has shown that the CH4 bands are shifted to shorter wavelengths because the CH4 occurs as a solute in beta-phase crystalline N2. The optical pathlength through the N2 crystals must be on the order of several cm to produce the N2 band observed at 2.15 µm. The new spectra exhibit a pronounced red slope across the entire wavelength range; the slope is variable with longitude, and differs in a small but significant way from that measured at comparable longitudes by Grundy & Fink (Icarus 124, 329, 1996) in their 15-year study of Pluto’s spectrum (500-1000 nm). The new spectra will provide an independent means for calibrating the color filter bands on the Multispectral Visible Imaging Camera (MVIC) (Reuter et al. Space Sci. Rev. 140, 129, 2008) on the New Horizons spacecraft, which will encounter the Pluto-Charon system in mid-2015. They will also form the basis of modeling the spectrum of Pluto at different longitudes to help establish the nature of the non-ice component(s) of Pluto’s surface. It is presumed that the non-ice component is the source of the yellow-red coloration of Pluto, which is known to be variable across the surface.

  11. Spectroscopy of Pluto, 380-930 Nm at Six Longitudes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cruikshank, D. P.; Pinilla-Alonso, N.; Lorenzi, V.; Grundy, William; Licandro, J.; Binzel, R. P.

    2014-01-01

    We have obtained spectra of the Pluto-Charon pair (unresolved) in the wavelength range 380-930 nm with resolution approx..450 at six roughly equally spaced longitudes. The data were taken in May and June, 2014, with the 4.2-m Isaac Newton Telescope at Roque de Los Muchachos Observatory in the Canary Islands, using the ACAM (auxiliary-port camera) in spectrometer mode, and using two solar analog stars. The new spectra clearly show absorption bands of solid CH4 at 620, 728, and 850-910 nm, which were known from earlier work. The 620-nm CH4 band is intrinsically very weak, and its appearance indicates a long optical path-length through the ice. This is especially true if it arises from CH4 dissolved in N2 ice. Earlier work (Owen et al. Science 261, 745, 1993) on the near-infrared spectrum of Pluto (1-2.5 microns) has shown that the CH4 bands are shifted to shorter wavelengths because the CH4 occurs as a solute in beta-phase crystalline N2. The optical path-length through the N2 crystals must be on the order of several cm to produce the N2 band observed at 2.15 microns. The new spectra exhibit a pronounced red slope across the entire wavelength range; the slope is variable with longitude, and differs in a small but significant way from that measured at comparable longitudes by Grundy & Fink (Icarus 124, 329, 1996) in their 15-year study of Pluto's spectrum (500-1000 nm). The new spectra will provide an independent means for calibrating the color filter bands on the Multispectral Visible Imaging Camera (MVIC) (Reuter et al. Space Sci. Rev. 140, 129, 2008) on the New Horizons spacecraft, which will encounter the Pluto-Charon system in mid-2015. They will also form the basis of modeling the spectrum of Pluto at different longitudes to help establish the nature of the non-ice component(s) of Pluto's surface. It is presumed that the non-ice component is the source of the yellow-red coloration of Pluto, which is known to be variable across the surface.

  12. Comparison of 980-nm and 1070-nm in endovenous laser treatment (EVLT)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Topaloglu, Nermin; Tabakoglu, Ozgur; Ergenoglu, Mehmet U.; Gülsoy, Murat

    2009-07-01

    The use of endovenous laser treatment for varicose veins has been increasing in recent years. It is a safer technique than surgical vein stripping. Its complications (e.g. bruising, pain) are less than the complications of surgical vein stripping. But best parameters such as optimum wavelength, power, and application duration are still under investigation to clarify uncertainties about this technique. To prevent its complications and improve its clinical outcomes, the exact mechanism of it has to be known. The aim of this study is to investigate the effect of different laser wavelengths on endovenous laser therapy. In this study 980-nm diode laser and 1070-nm fiber laser were used. Human veins were irradiated with 980-nm and 1070-nm lasers at 8 W and 10 W to find the optimal power and wavelength. After laser application, remarkable shrinkage was observed. Inner and outer diameters of the veins also narrowed for both of the laser types. 10 W of 980-nm laser application led to better shrinkage results.

  13. Dual illumination OCT at 1050nm and 840nm for whole eye segment imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Shanhui; Qin, Lin; Dai, Cuixia; Zhou, Chuanqing

    2014-11-01

    We presented an improved dual channel dual focus spectral domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT) with two illuminations at 840 nm and 1050 nm for whole eye segment imaging and biometry in vivo. The two light beams were coupled and optically optimized to scan the anterior and posterior segment of the eye simultaneously. This configuration with dichroic mirrors integrated in the sample arm enables us to acquire images from the anterior segment and retina effectively with minimum loss of sample signal. In addition, the full resolved complex (FRC) method was applied to double the imaging depth for the whole anterior segment imaging by eliminating the mirror image. The axial resolution for 1050 nm and 840 nm OCT was 14 μm and 8 μm in air, respectively. Finally, the system was successfully tested in imaging the unaccommodated and accommodated eyes. The preliminary results demonstrated the significant improvements comparing with our previous dual channel SD-OCT configuration in which the two probing beams had the same central wavelength of 840 nm.

  14. SPLICER - A GENETIC ALGORITHM TOOL FOR SEARCH AND OPTIMIZATION, VERSION 1.0 (MACINTOSH VERSION)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, L.

    1994-01-01

    SPLICER is a genetic algorithm tool which can be used to solve search and optimization problems. Genetic algorithms are adaptive search procedures (i.e. problem solving methods) based loosely on the processes of natural selection and Darwinian "survival of the fittest." SPLICER provides the underlying framework and structure for building a genetic algorithm application. These algorithms apply genetically-inspired operators to populations of potential solutions in an iterative fashion, creating new populations while searching for an optimal or near-optimal solution to the problem at hand. SPLICER 1.0 was created using a modular architecture that includes a Genetic Algorithm Kernel, interchangeable Representation Libraries, Fitness Modules and User Interface Libraries, and well-defined interfaces between these components. The architecture supports portability, flexibility, and extensibility. SPLICER comes with all source code and several examples. For instance, a "traveling salesperson" example searches for the minimum distance through a number of cities visiting each city only once. Stand-alone SPLICER applications can be used without any programming knowledge. However, to fully utilize SPLICER within new problem domains, familiarity with C language programming is essential. SPLICER's genetic algorithm (GA) kernel was developed independent of representation (i.e. problem encoding), fitness function or user interface type. The GA kernel comprises all functions necessary for the manipulation of populations. These functions include the creation of populations and population members, the iterative population model, fitness scaling, parent selection and sampling, and the generation of population statistics. In addition, miscellaneous functions are included in the kernel (e.g., random number generators). Different problem-encoding schemes and functions are defined and stored in interchangeable representation libraries. This allows the GA kernel to be used with any representation scheme. The SPLICER tool provides representation libraries for binary strings and for permutations. These libraries contain functions for the definition, creation, and decoding of genetic strings, as well as multiple crossover and mutation operators. Furthermore, the SPLICER tool defines the appropriate interfaces to allow users to create new representation libraries. Fitness modules are the only component of the SPLICER system a user will normally need to create or alter to solve a particular problem. Fitness functions are defined and stored in interchangeable fitness modules which must be created using C language. Within a fitness module, a user can create a fitness (or scoring) function, set the initial values for various SPLICER control parameters (e.g., population size), create a function which graphically displays the best solutions as they are found, and provide descriptive information about the problem. The tool comes with several example fitness modules, while the process of developing a fitness module is fully discussed in the accompanying documentation. The user interface is event-driven and provides graphic output in windows. SPLICER is written in Think C for Apple Macintosh computers running System 6.0.3 or later and Sun series workstations running SunOS. The UNIX version is easily ported to other UNIX platforms and requires MIT's X Window System, Version 11 Revision 4 or 5, MIT's Athena Widget Set, and the Xw Widget Set. Example executables and source code are included for each machine version. The standard distribution media for the Macintosh version is a set of three 3.5 inch Macintosh format diskettes. The standard distribution medium for the UNIX version is a .25 inch streaming magnetic tape cartridge in UNIX tar format. For the UNIX version, alternate distribution media and formats are available upon request. SPLICER was developed in 1991.

  15. T3PS v1.0: Tool for Parallel Processing in Parameter Scans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maurer, Vinzenz

    2016-01-01

    T3PS is a program that can be used to quickly design and perform parameter scans while easily taking advantage of the multi-core architecture of current processors. It takes an easy to read and write parameter scan definition file format as input. Based on the parameter ranges and other options contained therein, it distributes the calculation of the parameter space over multiple processes and possibly computers. The derived data is saved in a plain text file format readable by most plotting software. The supported scanning strategies include: grid scan, random scan, Markov Chain Monte Carlo, numerical optimization. Several example parameter scans are shown and compared with results in the literature.

  16. DPAL pump system exceeding 3kW at 766nm and 30 GHz bandwidth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koenning, Tobias; McCormick, Dan; Irwin, David; Stapleton, Dean; Guiney, Tina; Patterson, Steve

    2016-03-01

    Due to their low quantum defect, diode pumped alkali metal vapor lasers (DPALs) offer the promise of scalability to very high average power levels while maintaining excellent beam quality. Research on DPALs has progressed to ever increasing power levels across multiple gain media species over the last years, necessitating pump power in the kW range. Each material requires a specific pump wavelength: near 852nm for cesium, 780nm for rubidium, 766nm for potassium, and 670nm for lithium atoms. The shorter pump wavelength below 800nm are outside the typical wavelength range for pump diodes developed for diode pumped solid state lasers (DPSS). The biggest challenge in pumping these materials efficiently is the need for maintaining the narrow gain media absorption band of approximately 0.01nm while greatly increasing power. Typical high power diode lasers achieve spectral widths around 3nm (FWHM) in the near infrared spectrum, but optical gratings may be used internal or external to the cavity to reduce the spectral width. Recently, experimental results have shown yet narrower line widths ranging from picometers at very low power levels to sub-100 picometers for water cooled stacks around 1kW of output power. The focus of this work is the development of a fiber-based pump system for potassium DPAL. The individual tasks are the development of high power 766nm chip material, a fiber-coupled module as a building block, and a scalable system design to address power requirements from hundreds of watts to tens of kilowatts. Results for a 3kW system achieving ~30GHz bandwidth at 766nm will be shown. Approaches for power-scaling and size reduction will be discussed.

  17. 308-nm excimer laser in endodontics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liesenhoff, Tim

    1992-06-01

    Root canal preparation was performed on 20 extracted human teeth. After opening the coronal pulp, the root canals were prepared by 308 nm excimer laser only. All root canals were investigated under SEM after separation in the axial direction. By sagittal separation of the mandibles of freshly slaughtered cows, it was possible to get access to the tissues and irradiate under optical control. Under irradiation of excimer laser light, tissue starts to fluoresce. It was possible to demonstrate that each tissue (dentin, enamel, bone, pulpal, and connective tissue) has a characteristic spectral pattern. The SEM analyses showed that it is well possible to prepare root canals safely. All organic soft tissue has been removed by excimer laser irradiation. There was no case of via falsa. The simultaneous spectroscopic identification of the irradiated tissue provides a safe protection from overinstrumentation. First clinical trials on 20 patients suffering of chronical apical parodontitis have been carried out successfully.

  18. 1064-nm Nd:YAG laser nucleotomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vari, Sandor G.; Pergadia, Vani R.; Shi, Wei-Qiang; Snyder, Wendy J.; Fishbein, Michael C.; Grundfest, Warren S.

    1993-07-01

    The high incidence of patients with clinical and neurological symptoms of lumbar disc herniation has spurred the development of less invasive and more cost efficient methods to treat patients. In this study we evaluated pulsed and continuous wave (cw) 1064 nm Nd:YAG laser ablation and induced thermal damage in sheep intervertebral disc. We used the Heraeus LaserSonics Hercules 5040 (Nd:YAG) laser system and 400 micrometers bare and 600 micrometers ball-tipped fibers in cw and pulsed mode. For the laser parameters and fibers used in this study, ablation of the intervertebral disc was successful and thermal damage did not exceed 0.5 mm. Varying beam diameters and focusing abilities (i.e., bare and ball) did not produce any difference in the coagulation thermal effect.

  19. MOLECULAR CO(1-0) GAS IN THE z {approx} 2 RADIO GALAXY MRC 0152-209

    SciTech Connect

    Emonts, B. H. C.; Feain, I.; Mao, M. Y.; Norris, R. P.; Ekers, R. D.; Rees, G.; Stevens, J. B.; Miley, G.; Roettgering, H. J. A.; Villar-Martin, M.; Sadler, E. M.; Morganti, R.; Oosterloo, T. A.; Saikia, D. J.; Tadhunter, C. N.

    2011-06-10

    We report the detection of molecular CO(1-0) gas in the high-z radio galaxy MRC 0152-209 (z = 1.92) with the Australia Telescope Compact Array Broadband Backend (ATCA/CABB). This is the third known detection of CO(1-0) in a high-z radio galaxy to date. CO(1-0) is the most robust tracer of the overall molecular gas content (including the widespread, low-density, and sub-thermally excited component), hence observations of CO(1-0) are crucial for studying galaxy evolution in the early universe. We derive L'{sub CO} = 6.6 {+-} 2.0 x 10{sup 10} K km s{sup -1} pc{sup 2} for MRC 0152-209, which is comparable to that derived from CO(1-0) observations of several high-z submillimeter and star-forming BzK galaxies. The CO(1-0) traces a total molecular hydrogen mass of M{sub H{sub 2}} = 5 x 10{sup 10} ({alpha}{sub x}/0.8) M{sub sun}. MRC 0152-209 is an infrared bright radio galaxy, in which a large reservoir of cold molecular gas has not (yet) been depleted by star formation or radio source feedback. Its compact radio source is reliably detected at 40 GHz and has a steep spectral index of {alpha} = -1.3 between 1.4 and 40 GHz (4-115 GHz in the galaxy's rest frame). MRC 0152-209 is part of an ongoing systematic ATCA/CABB survey of CO(1-0) in high-z radio galaxies between 1.7 < z < 3.

  20. Femtosecond laser nanostructuring in porous glass with sub-50 nm feature sizes.

    PubMed

    Liao, Yang; Shen, Yinglong; Qiao, Lingling; Chen, Danping; Cheng, Ya; Sugioka, Koji; Midorikawa, Katsumi

    2013-01-15

    We report on controllable production of nanostructures embedded in a porous glass by femtosecond laser direct writing. We show that a hollow nanovoid with a lateral size of ~40 nm and an axial size of ~1500 nm can be achieved by manipulating the peak intensity and polarization of the writing laser beam. Our finding enables applications ranging from direct construction of 3D nanofluidics in glass to clean stealth dicing of transparent plates.

  1. DFB lasers between 760 nm and 16 μm for sensing applications.

    PubMed

    Zeller, Wolfgang; Naehle, Lars; Fuchs, Peter; Gerschuetz, Florian; Hildebrandt, Lars; Koeth, Johannes

    2010-01-01

    Recent years have shown the importance of tunable semiconductor lasers in optical sensing. We describe the status quo concerning DFB laser diodes between 760 nm and 3,000 nm as well as new developments aiming for up to 80 nm tuning range in this spectral region. Furthermore we report on QCL between 3 μm and 16 μm and present new developments. An overview of the most interesting applications using such devices is given at the end of this paper.

  2. DFB Lasers Between 760 nm and 16 μm for Sensing Applications

    PubMed Central

    Zeller, Wolfgang; Naehle, Lars; Fuchs, Peter; Gerschuetz, Florian; Hildebrandt, Lars; Koeth, Johannes

    2010-01-01

    Recent years have shown the importance of tunable semiconductor lasers in optical sensing. We describe the status quo concerning DFB laser diodes between 760 nm and 3,000 nm as well as new developments aiming for up to 80 nm tuning range in this spectral region. Furthermore we report on QCL between 3 μm and 16 μm and present new developments. An overview of the most interesting applications using such devices is given at the end of this paper. PMID:22319259

  3. Inline detection of Chrome degradation on binary 193nm photomasks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dufaye, Félix; Sippel, Astrid; Wylie, Mark; García-Berríos, Edgardo; Crawford, Charles; Hess, Carl; Sartelli, Luca; Pogliani, Carlo; Miyashita, Hiroyuki; Gough, Stuart; Sundermann, Frank; Brochard, Christophe

    2013-09-01

    mm wafers exposed and the cleaning brought it back almost to its original state after manufacture. Wafer CD, photomask CD and iCDU results can be compared, before and after a standard mask shop cleaning. Measurement points have be chosen in logic areas and SRAM areas, so that their respective behaviours can be studied separately. Transmitted maps before and after cleaning were analysed in terms of CD shift and CDU degradation. The delta map shows a nice correlation with photomask CD shift. iCDU demonstrated the capability to detect a reliable CD range degradation of 5nm on photomask by a comparison between a reference inspection and the current inspection. Die to die inspection mode provides also valuable data, highlighting the degraded chrome sidewalls, more in the photomask centre than on the edges. Ultimately, these results would enable to trigger the preventive cleanings rather than on predefined thresholds. The expected gains for wafer fabs are cost savings (adapted cleanings frequency), increased photomask availability for production, longer photomask lifetime, no additional SEM time neither for photomask nor on wafer.

  4. 1.86 W cw single-frequency 1319 nm ring laser pumped at 885 nm.

    PubMed

    Li, M L; Zhao, W F; Zhang, S B; Guo, L; Hou, W; Li, J M; Lin, X C

    2012-03-20

    A 1.86 W cw single-frequency 1319 nm laser was produced by using an 885 nm-pumped Nd:YAG crystal with a compact four-mirror ring cavity, for the first time to our knowledge. The Nd:YAG produced a slope efficiency of 21% and an optical-to-optical efficiency of 18% with respect to the absorbed diode pump power. A near-diffraction-limited beam with M(2)=1.2 was achieved under the maximum output power. PMID:22441467

  5. The Doubling of 846 nm Light to Produce 423 nm Light for use in Atom Interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Archibald, James; Birrell, Jeremey; Tang, Rebecca; Erickson, Chris; Goggins, Landon; Durfee, Dallin

    2009-10-01

    We present progress on a 423 nm fluorescence probe/cooling laser for use in our neutral calcium atom interferometer. The finished system will include an 846 nm diode laser that is coupled to a tapered amplifier. This light will be sent to a buildup cavity where we will achieve second-harmonic generation (SHG) using either a BBO non-linear crystal or a periodically-poled KTP crystal. We will discuss the theoretical considerations relating to the doubling of light in a crystal and the construction of our buildup cavity. We will also discuss its proposed application for use in atom interferometry.

  6. Absorption Measurements of Periodically Poled Potassium Titanyl Phosphate (PPKTP) at 775 nm and 1550 nm

    PubMed Central

    Steinlechner, Jessica; Ast, Stefan; Krüger, Christoph; Singh, Amrit Pal; Eberle, Tobias; Händchen, Vitus; Schnabel, Roman

    2013-01-01

    The efficient generation of second-harmonic light and squeezed light requires non-linear crystals that have low absorption at the fundamental and harmonic wavelengths. In this work the photo-thermal self-phase modulation technique is exploited to measure the absorption coefficient of periodically poled potassium titanyl phosphate (PPKTP) at 1,550 nm and 775 nm. The measurement results are (84±40) ppm/cm and (127±24) ppm/cm, respectively. We conclude that the performance of state-of-the-art frequency doubling and squeezed light generation in PPKTP is not limited by absorption. PMID:23291574

  7. Evolution of the Fraction of Clumpy Galaxies at 0.2 < z < 1.0 in the COSMOS Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murata, K. L.; Kajisawa, M.; Taniguchi, Y.; Kobayashi, M. A. R.; Shioya, Y.; Capak, P.; Ilbert, O.; Koekemoer, A. M.; Salvato, M.; Scoville, N. Z.

    2014-05-01

    Using the Hubble Space Telescope/Advanced Camera for Surveys data in the COSMOS field, we systematically searched clumpy galaxies at 0.2 < z < 1.0 and investigated the fraction of clumpy galaxies and its evolution as a function of stellar mass, star formation rate (SFR), and specific SFR (SSFR). The fraction of clumpy galaxies in star-forming galaxies with M star > 109.5 M ⊙ decreases with time from ~0.35 at 0.8 < z < 1.0 to ~0.05 at 0.2 < z < 0.4, irrespective of the stellar mass, although the fraction tends to be slightly lower for massive galaxies with M star > 1010.5 M ⊙ at each redshift. On the other hand, the fraction of clumpy galaxies increases with increasing both SFR and SSFR in all the redshift ranges we investigated. In particular, we found that the SSFR dependences of the fractions are similar among galaxies with different stellar masses, and the fraction at a given SSFR does not depend on the stellar mass in each redshift bin. The evolution of the fraction of clumpy galaxies from z ~ 0.9 to z ~ 0.3 seems to be explained by such SSFR dependence of the fraction and the evolution of SSFRs of star-forming galaxies. The fraction at a given SSFR also appears to decrease with time, but this can be due to the effect of the morphological k correction. We suggest that these results are understood by the gravitational fragmentation model for the formation of giant clumps in disk galaxies, where the gas mass fraction is a crucial parameter. Based on observations with the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope, obtained at the Space Telescope Science Institute, which is operated by AURA, Inc., under NASA contract NAS 5-26555. Also based on observations made with the Spitzer Space Telescope, which is operated by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, under NASA contract 1407. Also based on data collected at the Subaru Telescope, which is operated by the National Astronomical Observatory of Japan; the XMM-Newton, an ESA science mission with

  8. Electrical characterization of electron beam induced damage on sub-10 nm n-channel MOS transistors using nano-probing technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Jonghyuk; Lee, Sungho; Choi, Byoungdeog

    2016-11-01

    Electron beam induced damage on sub-10 nm n-channel MOS transistors was evaluated using an atomic force microscopy-based nano-probing technique. After electron beam irradiation, all the device parameters shifted including threshold voltage (V th), saturation current, sub-threshold slope and transistor leakage current. A negative shift in V th occurred at low electron beam acceleration voltage (V acc) because of the increase in oxide trapped holes generated by excited plasmons. At high V acc, however, a positive V th shift was observed because of an increased contribution of interface trap generation caused by the deeper electron penetration depth. In addition, interface trap generation not only degraded the sub-threshold slope due to the additional capacitance from the generated interface traps, but also increased transistor leakage current due to changes in junction characteristics. Our studies show that it is critical to avoid electron beam exposure before electrical characterization on sub-10 nm devices even in the range of less than 1.0 kV of V acc using nano-probe systems.

  9. Transcanalicular laser dacryocystorhinostomy using low energy 810 nm diode laser

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Sanjiv K.; Kumar, Ajai; Agarwal, Swati; Pandey, Paritosh

    2012-01-01

    Background: Hypertrophic scarring may be a cause of failure after transcanalicular laser dacryocystorhinostomy (DCR) surgery. This hypertrophic scarring results from tissue charring and excessive coagulation, which may be caused by the high laser energy. We have evaluated the use of low energy settings to prevent hypertrophic scarring, for a successful outcome. Aims: To perform and evaluate transcanalicular laser DCR using low energy 810 nm diode laser. Design: Interventional, non-comparative, case series. Materials and Methods: Patients with nasolacrimal duct obstruction and chronic dacryocystitis, who needed DCR, and were fit for surgery under local anesthesia, were recruited to undergo transcanalicular laser DCR using a 810 nm diode laser. The outcome was measured by the patency of the lacrimal passage, as indicated by the relief in the symptoms and the patency on syringing at the last follow-up. The surgical time and surgical complications were noted. Statistical Analysis Used: Descriptive analysis. Results: The study included 94 patients. The average age was 30.1 years (range 15 - 69 years). Seventy (74.4%) patients were female. Eight patients had failed external DCR. Per-operative patency of the passage was obtained in all the patients. Average surgical time was seven minutes (5 – 18 minutes). At the end of the study period of one year, a successful outcome was seen in 85 patients (90.5%). There were eight patients of previous failed DCR surgeries, and six of them achieved a cure at the end of follow-up. Conclusions: Transcanalicular Laser DCR can be safely performed using a low power 810 nm diode laser. The surgery is elegant, minimally invasive, allows fast rehabilitation, and has an excellent success rate. PMID:23439888

  10. Spud 1.0: generalising and automating the user interfaces of scientific computer models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ham, D. A.; Farrell, P. E.; Gorman, G. J.; Maddison, J. R.; Wilson, C. R.; Kramer, S. C.; Shipton, J.; Collins, G. S.; Cotter, C. J.; Piggott, M. D.

    2009-03-01

    The interfaces by which users specify the scenarios to be simulated by scientific computer models are frequently primitive, under-documented and ad-hoc text files which make using the model in question difficult and error-prone and significantly increase the development cost of the model. In this paper, we present a model-independent system, Spud, which formalises the specification of model input formats in terms of formal grammars. This is combined with an automated graphical user interface which guides users to create valid model inputs based on the grammar provided, and a generic options reading module, libspud, which minimises the development cost of adding model options. Together, this provides a user friendly, well documented, self validating user interface which is applicable to a wide range of scientific models and which minimises the developer input required to maintain and extend the model interface.

  11. Spud 1.0: generalising and automating the user interfaces of scientific computer models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ham, D. A.; Farrell, P. E.; Gorman, G. J.; Maddison, J. R.; Wilson, C. R.; Kramer, S. C.; Shipton, J.; Collins, G. S.; Cotter, C. J.; Piggott, M. D.

    2008-07-01

    The interfaces by which users specify the scenarios to be simulated by scientific computer models are frequently primitive, under-documented and ad-hoc text files which make using the model in question difficult and error-prone and significantly increase the development cost of the model. In this paper, we present a model-independent system, Spud, which formalises the specification of model input formats in terms of formal grammars. This is combined with an automated graphical user interface which guides users to create valid model inputs based on the grammar provided, and a generic options reading module which minimises the development cost of adding model options. Together, this provides a user friendly, well documented, self validating user interface which is applicable to a wide range of scientific models and which minimises the developer input required to maintain and extend the model interface.

  12. Space Telecommunications Radio Systems (STRS) Hardware Architecture Standard: Release 1.0 Hardware Section

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reinhart, Richard C.; Kacpura, Thomas J.; Smith, Carl R.; Liebetreu, John; Hill, Gary; Mortensen, Dale J.; Andro, Monty; Scardelletti, Maximilian C.; Farrington, Allen

    2008-01-01

    This report defines a hardware architecture approach for software-defined radios to enable commonality among NASA space missions. The architecture accommodates a range of reconfigurable processing technologies including general-purpose processors, digital signal processors, field programmable gate arrays, and application-specific integrated circuits (ASICs) in addition to flexible and tunable radiofrequency front ends to satisfy varying mission requirements. The hardware architecture consists of modules, radio functions, and interfaces. The modules are a logical division of common radio functions that compose a typical communication radio. This report describes the architecture details, the module definitions, the typical functions on each module, and the module interfaces. Tradeoffs between component-based, custom architecture and a functional-based, open architecture are described. The architecture does not specify a physical implementation internally on each module, nor does the architecture mandate the standards or ratings of the hardware used to construct the radios.

  13. Physics of the Inner Heliosphere 1-10 Rs: Plasma Diagnostics and Models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Habbal, Shadia R.

    1998-01-01

    While the mechanisms responsible for the solar corona and the high-speed solar wind streams are still unknown, model computations offer means of predicting the properties of such mechanisms in light of the empirical constraints currently available. Modeling and data analysis efforts were aimed at understanding the plasma properties of the acceleration of the solar wind, its filamentary nature, and the conditions needed to account for a rapidly accelerating solar wind, reaching its terminal speed within 10 R(sub s). A sequence of models ranging from steady one-fluid descriptions of the solar wind to multi-fluid time-dependent models were developed. Plasma diagnostics evolved from the analysis of data acquired from Skylab to SOHO, and complemented by ground-based observations.

  14. An Automated Force Field Topology Builder (ATB) and Repository: Version 1.0.

    PubMed

    Malde, Alpeshkumar K; Zuo, Le; Breeze, Matthew; Stroet, Martin; Poger, David; Nair, Pramod C; Oostenbrink, Chris; Mark, Alan E

    2011-12-13

    The Automated force field Topology Builder (ATB, http://compbio.biosci.uq.edu.au/atb ) is a Web-accessible server that can provide topologies and parameters for a wide range of molecules appropriate for use in molecular simulations, computational drug design, and X-ray refinement. The ATB has three primary functions: (1) to act as a repository for molecules that have been parametrized as part of the GROMOS family of force fields, (2) to act as a repository for pre-equilibrated systems for use as starting configurations in molecular dynamics simulations (solvent mixtures, lipid systems pre-equilibrated to adopt a specific phase, etc.), and (3) to generate force field descriptions of novel molecules compatible with the GROMOS family of force fields in a variety of formats (GROMOS, GROMACS, and CNS). Force field descriptions of novel molecules are derived using a multistep process in which results from quantum mechanical (QM) calculations are combined with a knowledge-based approach to ensure compatibility (as far as possible) with a specific parameter set of the GROMOS force field. The ATB has several unique features: (1) It requires that the user stipulate the protonation and tautomeric states of the molecule. (2) The symmetry of the molecule is analyzed to ensure that equivalent atoms are assigned identical parameters. (3) Charge groups are assigned automatically. (4) Where the assignment of a given parameter is ambiguous, a range of possible alternatives is provided. The ATB also provides several validation tools to assist the user to assess the degree to which the topology generated may be appropriate for a given task. In addition to detailing the steps involved in generating a force field topology compatible with a specific GROMOS parameter set (GROMOS 53A6), the challenges involved in the automatic generation of force field parameters for atomic simulations in general are discussed.

  15. In vitro degradation of MAO/PLA coating on Mg-1.21Li-1.12Ca-1.0Y alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeng, Rong-Chang; Qi, Wei-Chen; Song, Ying-Wei; He, Qin-Kun; Cui, Hong-Zhi; Han, En-Hou

    2014-12-01

    Magnesium and its alloys are promising biomaterials due to their biocompatibility and osteoinduction. The plasticity and corrosion resistance of commercial magnesium alloys cannot meet the requirements for degradable biomaterials completely at present. Particularly, the alkalinity in the microenvironment surrounding the implants, resulting from the degradation, arouses a major concern. Micro-arc oxidation (MAO) and poly(lactic acid) (PLA) composite (MAO/PLA) coating on biomedical Mg-1.21Li-1.12Ca-1.0Y alloy was prepared to manipulate the pH variation in an appropriate range. Surface morphologies were discerned using SEM and EMPA. And corrosion resistance was evaluated via electrochemical polarization and impedance and hydrogen volumetric method. The results demonstrated that the MAO coating predominantly consisted of MgO, Mg2SiO4 and Y2O3. The composite coating markedly improved the corrosion resistance of the alloy. The rise in solution pH for the MAO/PLA coating was tailored to a favorable range of 7.5-7.8. The neutralization caused by the alkalinity of MAO and Mg substrate and acidification of PLA was probed. The result designates that MAO/PLA composite coating on Mg-1.21Li-1.12Ca-1.0Y alloys may be a promising biomedical coating.

  16. Narrowband filters for the FUV range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodríguez-de Marcos, Luis; Larruquert, Juan I.; Méndez, José A.; Aznárez, José A.; Fu, Liping

    2015-05-01

    We address the design, fabrication, and characterization of transmittance filters for the Ionosphere Photometer instrument (IP), developed by the Center for Space Science and Applied Research (CSSAR). IP, a payload of Feng-Yun 3D meteorological satellite, to be launched on 2016, is aimed to perform photometry measurements of Earth's ionosphere by the analysis of the OI (135.6 nm) spectral line and N2 Lyman-Birge-Hopfield (LBH, 140-180 nm) band, both of them in the far ultraviolet (FUV) range. The most convenient procedure to isolate a spectral band is the use of tunable transmittance filters. In many applications the intensity of the ultraviolet, visible and infrared background is higher than the intensity of the target FUV lines; therefore one of the most important requirements for transmittance filters is to reject (by reflecting and/or by absorbing) as efficiently as possible the visible and close ranges. In the FUV range, (Al/MgF2)n transmittance filters are the most common, and they are suitable to reject the visible and adjacent ranges. These materials present unique properties in this range: MgF2 is transparent down to ˜115 nm and Al has a very low refractive index in the FUV that contrasts well with MgF2. Narrowband tunable filters with very low transmittance at long wavelengths are achievable. The main data on the preparation and characterization of IP filters by Grupo de Óptica de Láminas Delgadas (GOLD) is detailed. In this proceeding we present (Al/MgF2)3 filters peaked at either 135.6 nm or at the center of the LBH band (˜160 nm). Filters were characterized in the 125-800 nm range (143-800 nm range for the LBH filter). After some storage in a desiccator, both coatings kept a transmittance of ~0.14 at their target wavelengths, with visible-to-peak transmittance ratios of 1.2·10-4 (OI filter) and 1.3·10-4 (LBH filter). One filter tuned at each target wavelength was exposed to ~300 Gy 60Co gamma dose, with no significant transmittance change.

  17. 650 nm Laser stimulated dating from Side Antique Theatre, Turkey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doğan, M.; Meriç, N.

    2014-03-01

    Samples were taken from the archeological excavation site, which was at the backs of the Side Antique Theatre. Samples were taken from under the base rock in this area. Polymineral fine grains were examined to determine the ages of the sediments. Samples gathered from the Side Antique Theatre were investigated through using the SAR method. Firstly, one part of the samples were evaluated by using conventional IRSL reading head model of (ELSEC-9010) which is infrared (880±80 nm) stimulation source with Schott BG39 filter. The IRSL age dating with feldspar minerals, gives a number of overestimated or underestimated age values as a result. A new reading head was proposed with the following configuration attachments for overestimation of equivalent dose rates. Measurements were done with this newly designed red laser stimulating reading head which works with Elsec 9010 OSL age dating system. SAR measurements were performed by (650±10 nm) red laser light source with two Schott BG3 filters. With usage of the new designed reading head; closer results were obtained in comparision with the Antique Theatre's expected age range. Fading rates were taken into consideration and these corrections were also handled for true age results.

  18. Comparison of 1470nm laser and 1470nm laser heat head for ex-vivo kidney tissue cutting: a preliminary study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Zhentian; Zhang, Lupeng; Liu, Jiafeng; Shun, Zhi; Li, Wenzhi; Liu, Zhuwen; Liang, Zhiyuan

    2014-11-01

    Purpose: Compare of the efficiency of 1470nm laser and 1470nm laser heat head for tissue cutting in vitro porcine kidney tissue . Method: We designed a laser heat head that convert laser energy into thermal energy by the absorbing materials. Fresh kidney tissue was harvested from a porcine and then placed on a turntable with constant speed . The same power of 1470nm laser and 1470nm laser heat head was used to cutting tissue, respectively .The cutting results and the range of thermal damage was compared after cutting . Result: Compared with 1470nm laser, 1470nm laser heat head's cutting traces is more smooth and the thermal damage area is very regular ,so it has smaller damage to deep tissue . Conclusion: The efficiency of laser heat head for tissue cutting was better. This study indicate that we might be able to make laser which the tissue have a low absorption coefficient about it to obtain good results for tissue cutting through the laser point heat source.

  19. Amplifications in the S-, C- and L-bands using RE-ion doped short tellurite fibres with 980 nm and 800 nm excitation sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jha, Animesh; Shen, Shaoxiong; Joshi, P.

    2006-02-01

    We report the results of emission and amplification in Tm 3+- and Er 3+-fibres for signal gain in the 1420 nm to 1600 nm wavelength range, which covers S-, C- and L-bands of silica fibre optical communication networks. The paper explains the mechanism for alleviating the pump excited state absorption (ESA) in Er-doped tellurite fibres for maximizing the pump inversion efficiency at 980 nm using the Ce-ions as a co-dopant and via the structural modification of TeO II glass using B IIO 3. The spectroscopic data and gain bandwidth of Er-doped fibres are reported in the C- and L-bands. Methods for enhancing gain in the S-band using the co-dopants (Tb 3+, Yb 3+) with 800 nm and 980 nm pumping schemes are also explained. The measured maximum relative gain in short fibres of 5 to 10 cm in length in C- and L-bands are: 30 dB and 15 dB, respectively. By comparison the internal gain in a 20 cm long Tm/Yb ion co-doped fibre pumped with a 980 nm source was 7 dB.

  20. Photodissociation of the Propargyl (C3D3) Radicals at 248 nm and 193 nm

    SciTech Connect

    Neumark., D.M.; Crider, P.E.; Castiglioni, L.; Kautzman, K.K.

    2009-01-21

    The photodissociation of perdeuterated propargyl (D{sub 2}CCCD) and propynyl (D{sub 3}CCC) radicals was investigated using fast beam photofragment translational spectroscopy. Radicals were produced from their respective anions by photodetachment at 540 nm and 450 nm (below and above the electron affinity of propynyl). The radicals were then photodissociated by 248 nm or 193 nm light. The recoiling photofragments were detected in coincidence with a time- and position-sensitive detector. Three channels were observed: D{sub 2} loss, CD + C{sub 2}D{sub 2}, and CD{sub 3} + C{sub 2}. Obervation of the D loss channel was incompatible with this experiment and was not attempted. Our translational energy distributions for D{sub 2} loss peaked at nonzero translational energy, consistent with ground state dissociation over small (< 1 eV) exit barriers with respect to separated products. Translational energy distributions for the two heavy channels peaked near zero kinetic energy, indicating dissociation on the ground state in the absence of exit barriers.