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Sample records for 1-2 affects arabidopsis

  1. Eukaryotic release factor 1-2 affects Arabidopsis responses to glucose and phytohormones during germination and early seedling development

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Xiangjun; Cooke, Peter; Li, Li

    2010-01-01

    Germination and early seedling development are coordinately regulated by glucose and phytohormones such as ABA, GA, and ethylene. However, the molecules that affect plant responses to glucose and phytohormones remain to be fully elucidated. Eukaryotic release factor 1 (eRF1) is responsible for the recognition of the stop codons in mRNAs during protein synthesis. Accumulating evidence indicates that eRF1 functions in other processes in addition to translation termination. The physiological role of eRF1-2, a member of the eRF1 family, in Arabidopsis was examined here. The eRF1-2 gene was found to be specifically induced by glucose. Arabidopsis plants overexpressing eRF1-2 were hypersensitive to glucose during germination and early seedling development. Such hypersensitivity to glucose was accompanied by a dramatic reduction of the expression of glucose-regulated genes, chlorophyll a/b binding protein and plastocyanin. The hypersensitive response was not due to the enhanced accumulation of ABA. In addition, the eRF1-2 overexpressing plants showed increased sensitivity to paclobutrazol, an inhibitor of GA biosynthesis, and exogenous GA restored their normal growth. By contrast, the loss-of-function erf1-2 mutant exhibited resistance to paclobutrazol, suggesting that eRF1-2 may exert a negative effect on the GA signalling pathway. Collectively, these data provide evidence in support of a novel role of eRF1-2 in affecting glucose and phytohormone responses in modulating plant growth and development. PMID:19939886

  2. HY5 regulates Nitrite Reductase 1 (NIR1) and Ammonium Transporter1;2 (AMT1;2) in Arabidopsis seedlings

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Lifen; Zhang, Hongcheng; Zhang, Huiyong; Deng, Xing Wang; Wei, Ning

    2016-01-01

    HY5 (Long Hypocotyles 5) is a key transcription factor in Arabidopsis thaliana that has a pivotal role in seedling development. Soil nitrogen is an essential macronutrient, and its uptake, assimilation and metabolism are influenced by nutrient availability and by lights. To understand the role of HY5 in nitrogen assimilation pathways, we examined the phenotype as well as the expression of selected nitrogen assimilation-related genes in hy5 mutant grown under various nitrogen limiting and nitrogen sufficient conditions, or different light conditions. We report that HY5 positively regulates nitrite reductase gene NIR1 and negatively regulates the ammonium transporter gene AMT1;2 under all nitrogen and light conditions tested, while it affects several other genes in a nitrogen supply-dependent manner. HY5 is not required for light induction of NIR1, AMT1;2 and NIA genes, but it is necessary for high level expression of NIR1 and NIA under optimal nutrient and light conditions. In addition, nitrogen deficiency exacerbates the abnormal root system of hy5. Together, our results suggest that HY5 exhibits the growth-promoting activity only when sufficient nutrients, including lights, are provided, and that HY5 has a complex involvement in nitrogen acquisition and metabolism in Arabidopsis seedlings. PMID:26259199

  3. Manipulation of hemoglobin expression affects Arabidopsis shoot organogenesis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yaping; Elhiti, Mohamed; Hebelstrup, Kim H; Hill, Robert D; Stasolla, Claudio

    2011-10-01

    Over the past few years non-symbiotic plant hemoglobins have been described in a variety of plant species where they fulfill several functions ranging from detoxification processes to basic aspects of plant growth and post-embryonic development. To date no information is available on the role of hemoglobins during in vitro morphogenesis. Shoot organogenesis was induced in Arabidopsis lines constitutively expressing class 1, 2 and 3 hemoglobins (GLB1, 2 and 3) and lines in which the respective genes were either downregulated by RNAi (GLB1) or knocked out (GLB2 and GLB3). The process was executed by culturing root explants on an initial auxin-rich callus induction medium (CIM) followed by a transfer onto a cytokinin-containing shoot induction medium (SIM). While the repression of GLB2 inhibited organogenesis the over-expression of GLB1 or GLB2 enhanced the number of shoots produced in culture, and altered the transcript levels of genes participating in cytokinin perception and signalling. The up-regulation of GLB1 or GLB2 activated CKI1 and AHK3, genes encoding cytokinin receptors and affected the transcript levels of cytokinin responsive regulators (ARRs). The expression of Type-A ARRs (ARR4, 5, 7, 15, and 16), feed-back repressors of the cytokinin pathway, was repressed in both hemoglobin over-expressors whereas that of several Type-B ARRs (ARR2, 12, and 13), transcription activators of cytokinin-responsive genes, was induced. Such changes enhanced the sensitivity of the root explants to cytokinin allowing the 35S::GLB1 and 35S::GLB2 lines to produce shoots at low cytokinin concentrations which did not promote organogenesis in the WT line. These results show that manipulation of hemoglobin can modify shoot organogenesis in Arabidopsis and possibly in those systems partially or completely unresponsive to applications of exogenous cytokinins.

  4. Arabidopsis AIP1-2 restricted by WER-mediated patterning modulates planar polarity

    PubMed Central

    Kiefer, Christian S.; Claes, Andrea R.; Nzayisenga, Jean-Claude; Pietra, Stefano; Stanislas, Thomas; Hüser, Anke; Ikeda, Yoshihisa; Grebe, Markus

    2015-01-01

    The coordination of cell polarity within the plane of the tissue layer (planar polarity) is crucial for the development of diverse multicellular organisms. Small Rac/Rho-family GTPases and the actin cytoskeleton contribute to planar polarity formation at sites of polarity establishment in animals and plants. Yet, upstream pathways coordinating planar polarity differ strikingly between kingdoms. In the root of Arabidopsis thaliana, a concentration gradient of the phytohormone auxin coordinates polar recruitment of Rho-of-plant (ROP) to sites of polar epidermal hair initiation. However, little is known about cytoskeletal components and interactions that contribute to this planar polarity or about their relation to the patterning machinery. Here, we show that ACTIN7 (ACT7) represents a main actin isoform required for planar polarity of root hair positioning, interacting with the negative modulator ACTIN-INTERACTING PROTEIN1-2 (AIP1-2). ACT7, AIP1-2 and their genetic interaction are required for coordinated planar polarity of ROP downstream of ethylene signalling. Strikingly, AIP1-2 displays hair cell file-enriched expression, restricted by WEREWOLF (WER)-dependent patterning and modified by ethylene and auxin action. Hence, our findings reveal AIP1-2, expressed under control of the WER-dependent patterning machinery and the ethylene signalling pathway, as a modulator of actin-mediated planar polarity. PMID:25428588

  5. Arabidopsis AIP1-2 restricted by WER-mediated patterning modulates planar polarity.

    PubMed

    Kiefer, Christian S; Claes, Andrea R; Nzayisenga, Jean-Claude; Pietra, Stefano; Stanislas, Thomas; Hüser, Anke; Ikeda, Yoshihisa; Grebe, Markus

    2015-01-01

    The coordination of cell polarity within the plane of the tissue layer (planar polarity) is crucial for the development of diverse multicellular organisms. Small Rac/Rho-family GTPases and the actin cytoskeleton contribute to planar polarity formation at sites of polarity establishment in animals and plants. Yet, upstream pathways coordinating planar polarity differ strikingly between kingdoms. In the root of Arabidopsis thaliana, a concentration gradient of the phytohormone auxin coordinates polar recruitment of Rho-of-plant (ROP) to sites of polar epidermal hair initiation. However, little is known about cytoskeletal components and interactions that contribute to this planar polarity or about their relation to the patterning machinery. Here, we show that ACTIN7 (ACT7) represents a main actin isoform required for planar polarity of root hair positioning, interacting with the negative modulator ACTIN-INTERACTING PROTEIN1-2 (AIP1-2). ACT7, AIP1-2 and their genetic interaction are required for coordinated planar polarity of ROP downstream of ethylene signalling. Strikingly, AIP1-2 displays hair cell file-enriched expression, restricted by WEREWOLF (WER)-dependent patterning and modified by ethylene and auxin action. Hence, our findings reveal AIP1-2, expressed under control of the WER-dependent patterning machinery and the ethylene signalling pathway, as a modulator of actin-mediated planar polarity.

  6. A Nitrogen-Regulated Glutamine Amidotransferase (GAT1_2.1) Represses Shoot Branching in Arabidopsis[C][W

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Huifen; Kranz, Robert G.

    2012-01-01

    Shoot branching in plants is regulated by many environmental cues and by specific hormones such as strigolactone (SL). We show that the GAT1_2.1 gene (At1g15040) is repressed over 50-fold by nitrogen stress, and is also involved in branching control. At1g15040 is predicted to encode a class I glutamine amidotransferase (GAT1), a superfamily for which Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) has 30 potential members. Most members can be categorized into known biosynthetic pathways, for the amidation of known acceptor molecules (e.g. CTP synthesis). Some members, like GAT1_2.1, are of unknown function, likely involved in amidation of unknown acceptors. A gat1_2.1 mutant exhibits a significant increase in shoot branching, similar to mutants in SL biosynthesis. The results suggest that GAT1_2.1 is not involved in SL biosynthesis since exogenously applied GR24 (a synthetic SL) does not correct the mutant phenotype. The subfamily of GATs (GATase1_2), with At1g15040 as the founding member, appears to be present in all plants (including mosses), but not other organisms. This suggests a plant-specific function such as branching control. We discuss the possibility that the GAT1_2.1 enzyme may activate SLs (e.g. GR24) by amidation, or more likely could embody a new pathway for repression of branching. PMID:22885937

  7. Flavonol-induced changes in PIN2 polarity and auxin transport in the Arabidopsis thaliana rol1-2 mutant require phosphatase activity

    PubMed Central

    Kuhn, Benjamin M.; Nodzyński, Tomasz; Errafi, Sanae; Bucher, Rahel; Gupta, Shibu; Aryal, Bibek; Dobrev, Petre; Bigler, Laurent; Geisler, Markus; Zažímalová, Eva; Friml, Jiří; Ringli, Christoph

    2017-01-01

    The phytohormone auxin is a major determinant and regulatory component important for plant development. Auxin transport between cells is mediated by a complex system of transporters such as AUX1/LAX, PIN, and ABCB proteins, and their localization and activity is thought to be influenced by phosphatases and kinases. Flavonols have been shown to alter auxin transport activity and changes in flavonol accumulation in the Arabidopsis thaliana rol1-2 mutant cause defects in auxin transport and seedling development. A new mutation in ROOTS CURL IN NPA 1 (RCN1), encoding a regulatory subunit of the phosphatase PP2A, was found to suppress the growth defects of rol1-2 without changing the flavonol content. rol1-2 rcn1-3 double mutants show wild type-like auxin transport activity while levels of free auxin are not affected by rcn1-3. In the rol1-2 mutant, PIN2 shows a flavonol-induced basal-to-apical shift in polar localization which is reversed in the rol1-2 rcn1-3 to basal localization. In vivo analysis of PINOID action, a kinase known to influence PIN protein localization in a PP2A-antagonistic manner, revealed a negative impact of flavonols on PINOID activity. Together, these data suggest that flavonols affect auxin transport by modifying the antagonistic kinase/phosphatase equilibrium. PMID:28165500

  8. Flavonol-induced changes in PIN2 polarity and auxin transport in the Arabidopsis thaliana rol1-2 mutant require phosphatase activity.

    PubMed

    Kuhn, Benjamin M; Nodzyński, Tomasz; Errafi, Sanae; Bucher, Rahel; Gupta, Shibu; Aryal, Bibek; Dobrev, Petre; Bigler, Laurent; Geisler, Markus; Zažímalová, Eva; Friml, Jiří; Ringli, Christoph

    2017-02-06

    The phytohormone auxin is a major determinant and regulatory component important for plant development. Auxin transport between cells is mediated by a complex system of transporters such as AUX1/LAX, PIN, and ABCB proteins, and their localization and activity is thought to be influenced by phosphatases and kinases. Flavonols have been shown to alter auxin transport activity and changes in flavonol accumulation in the Arabidopsis thaliana rol1-2 mutant cause defects in auxin transport and seedling development. A new mutation in ROOTS CURL IN NPA 1 (RCN1), encoding a regulatory subunit of the phosphatase PP2A, was found to suppress the growth defects of rol1-2 without changing the flavonol content. rol1-2 rcn1-3 double mutants show wild type-like auxin transport activity while levels of free auxin are not affected by rcn1-3. In the rol1-2 mutant, PIN2 shows a flavonol-induced basal-to-apical shift in polar localization which is reversed in the rol1-2 rcn1-3 to basal localization. In vivo analysis of PINOID action, a kinase known to influence PIN protein localization in a PP2A-antagonistic manner, revealed a negative impact of flavonols on PINOID activity. Together, these data suggest that flavonols affect auxin transport by modifying the antagonistic kinase/phosphatase equilibrium.

  9. Competitive ability not kinship affects growth of Arabidopsis thaliana accessions.

    PubMed

    Masclaux, Frédéric; Hammond, Robert L; Meunier, Joël; Gouhier-Darimont, Caroline; Keller, Laurent; Reymond, Philippe

    2010-01-01

    In many organisms, individuals behave more altruistically towards relatives than towards unrelated individuals. Here, we conducted a study to determine if the performance of Arabidopsis thaliana is influenced by whether individuals are in competition with kin or non-kin. We selected seven pairs of genetically distinct accessions that originated from local populations throughout Europe. We measured the biomass of one focal plant surrounded by six kin or non-kin neighbours in in vitro growth experiments and counted the number of siliques produced per pot by one focal plant surrounded by four kin or non-kin neighbours. The biomass and number of siliques of a focal plant were not affected by the relatedness of the neighbour. Depending on the accession, a plant performed better or worse in a pure stand than when surrounded by non-kin plants. In addition, whole-genome microarray analyses revealed that there were no genes differentially expressed between kin and non-kin conditions. In conclusion, our study does not provide any evidence for a differential response to kin vs non-kin in A. thaliana. Rather, the outcome of the interaction between kin and non-kin seems to depend on the strength of the competitive abilities of the accessions.

  10. Phytochrome B and REVEILLE1/2-mediated signalling controls seed dormancy and germination in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Zhimin; Xu, Gang; Jing, Yanjun; Tang, Weijiang; Lin, Rongcheng

    2016-01-01

    Seeds maintain a dormant state to withstand adverse conditions and germinate when conditions become favourable to give rise to a new generation of flowering plants. Seed dormancy and germination are tightly controlled by internal and external signals. Although phytochrome photoreceptors are proposed to regulate primary seed dormancy, the underlying molecular mechanism remains elusive. Here we show that the REVEILLE1 (RVE1) and RVE2 transcription factors promote primary seed dormancy and repress red/far-red-light-reversible germination downstream of phytochrome B (phyB) in Arabidopsis thaliana. RVE1 and RVE2 expression is downregulated after imbibition and by phyB. RVE1 directly binds to the promoter of GIBBERELLIN 3-OXIDASE 2, inhibits its transcription and thus suppresses the biosynthesis of bioactive gibberellins. In addition, DELAY OF GERMINATION 1 also acts downstream of phyB. This study identifies a signalling pathway that integrates environmental light input with internal factors to control both seed dormancy and germination. PMID:27506149

  11. SA-inducible Arabidopsis glutaredoxin interacts with TGA factors and suppresses JA-responsive PDF1.2 transcription.

    PubMed

    Ndamukong, Ivan; Abdallat, Ayed Al; Thurow, Corinna; Fode, Benjamin; Zander, Mark; Weigel, Ralf; Gatz, Christiane

    2007-04-01

    Salicylic acid (SA) is a plant signaling molecule that mediates the induction of defense responses upon attack by a variety of pathogens. Moreover, it antagonizes gene induction by the stress signaling molecule jasmonic acid (JA). Several SA-responsive genes are regulated by basic/leucine zipper-type transcription factors of the TGA family. TGA factors interact with NPR1, a central regulator of many SA-induced defense responses including SA/JA antagonism. In order to identify further regulatory proteins of SA-dependent signaling pathways, a yeast protein interaction screen with tobacco TGA2.2 as bait and an Arabidopsis thaliana cDNA prey library was performed and led to the identification of a member of the glutaredoxin family (GRX480, encoded by At1g28480). Glutaredoxins are candidates for mediating redox regulation of proteins because of their capacity to catalyze disulfide transitions. This agrees with previous findings that the redox state of both TGA1 and NPR1 changes under inducing conditions. Transgenic Arabidopsis plants ectopically expressing GRX480 show near wild-type expression of standard marker genes for SA- and xenobiotic-inducible responses. In contrast, transcription of the JA-dependent defensin gene PDF1.2 was antagonized by transgenic GRX480. This, together with the observation that GRX480 transcription is SA-inducible and requires NPR1, suggests a role of GRX480 in SA/JA cross-talk. Suppression of PDF1.2 by GRX480 depends on the presence of TGA factors, indicating that the GRX480/TGA interaction is effective in planta.

  12. Vascular plant one-zinc-finger protein 1/2 transcription factors regulate abiotic and biotic stress responses in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Nakai, Yusuke; Nakahira, Yoichi; Sumida, Hiroki; Takebayashi, Kosuke; Nagasawa, Yumiko; Yamasaki, Kanako; Akiyama, Masako; Ohme-Takagi, Masaru; Fujiwara, Sumire; Shiina, Takashi; Mitsuda, Nobutaka; Fukusaki, Eiichiro; Kubo, Yasuyuki; Sato, Masa H

    2013-03-01

    Plants adapt to abiotic and biotic stresses by activating abscisic acid-mediated (ABA) abiotic stress-responsive and salicylic acid-(SA) or jasmonic acid-mediated (JA) biotic stress-responsive pathways, respectively. Although the abiotic stress-responsive pathway interacts antagonistically with the biotic stress-responsive pathways, the mechanisms that regulate these pathways remain largely unknown. In this study, we provide insight into the function of vascular plant one-zinc-finger proteins (VOZs) that modulate various stress responses in Arabidopsis. The expression of many stress-responsive genes was changed in the voz1voz2 double mutant under normal growth conditions. Consistent with altered stress-responsive gene expression, freezing- and drought-stress tolerances were increased in the voz1voz2 double mutant. In contrast, resistance to a fungal pathogen, Colletotrichum higginsianum, and to a bacterial pathogen, Pseudomonas syringae, was severely impaired. Thus, impairing VOZ function simultaneously conferred increased abiotic tolerance and biotic stress susceptibility. In a chilling stress condition, both the VOZ1 and VOZ2 mRNA expression levels and the VOZ2 protein level gradually decreased. VOZ2 degradation during cold exposure was completely inhibited by the addition of the 26S proteasome inhibitor, MG132, a finding that suggested that VOZ2 degradation is dependent on the ubiquitin/26S proteasome system. In voz1voz2, ABA-inducible transcription factor CBF4 expression was enhanced significantly even under normal growth conditions, despite an unchanged endogenous ABA content. A finding that suggested that VOZs negatively affect CBF4 expression in an ABA-independent manner. These results suggest that VOZs function as both negative and positive regulators of the abiotic and biotic stress-responsive pathways, and control Arabidopsis adaptation to various stress conditions. © 2012 The Authors The Plant Journal © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  13. Rhizobacterial volatiles affect the growth of fungi and Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Vespermann, Anja; Kai, Marco; Piechulla, Birgit

    2007-09-01

    Volatiles of Stenotrophomonas, Serratia, and Bacillus species inhibited mycelial growth of many fungi and Arabidopsis thaliana (40 to 98%), and volatiles of Pseudomonas species and Burkholderia cepacia retarded the growth to lesser extents. Aspergillus niger and Fusarium species were resistant, and B. cepacia and Staphylococcus epidermidis promoted the growth of Rhizoctonia solani and A. thaliana. Bacterial volatiles provide a new source of compounds with antibiotic and growth-promoting features.

  14. Physical map-based sizes of the centromeric regions of Arabidopsis thaliana chromosomes 1, 2, and 3.

    PubMed

    Hosouchi, Tsutomu; Kumekawa, Norikazu; Tsuruoka, Hisano; Kotani, Hirokazu

    2002-08-31

    The sizes of the centromeric regions of Arabidopsis thaliana chromosomes 1, 2, and 3 were determined by construction of their physical maps on the basis of restriction analysis. As the reported centromeric regions contain large gaps in the middle due to highly repetitive sequences, appropriate probes for Southern hybridization were prepared from the sequences reported for the flanking regions and from the sequences of BAC and YAC clones newly isolated in this work, and restriction analysis was performed using DNA of a hypomethylated strain (ddm1). The sizes of the genetically defined centromeric regions were deduced to be 9 megabases (Mb), 4.2 Mb and 4.1 Mb, respectively (chromosome 1, from markers T22C23-t7 to T3P8-sp6; chromosome 2, from F5J15-sp6 to T15D9; chromosome 3, from T9G9-sp6 to T15M14; G. P. Copenhaver et al. Science, 286, 2468-2479, 1999). By combining the sizes of the centromeric regions previously estimated for chromosomes 4 and 5 and the sequence data reported for the A. thaliana genome, the total genome size of A. thaliana was estimated to be approximately 146.0 Mb.

  15. Zinc Oxide Nanoparticles Affect Biomass Accumulation and Photosynthesis in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xiaoping; Yang, Xiyu; Chen, Siyu; Li, Qianqian; Wang, Wei; Hou, Chunjiang; Gao, Xiao; Wang, Li; Wang, Shucai

    2016-01-01

    Dramatic increase in the use of nanoparticles (NPs) in a variety of applications greatly increased the likelihood of the release of NPs into the environment. Zinc oxide nanoparticles (ZnO NPs) are among the most commonly used NPs, and it has been shown that ZnO NPs were harmful to several different plants. We report here the effects of ZnO NPs exposure on biomass accumulation and photosynthesis in Arabidopsis. We found that 200 and 300 mg/L ZnO NPs treatments reduced Arabidopsis growth by ∼20 and 80%, respectively, in comparison to the control. Pigments measurement showed that Chlorophyll a and b contents were reduced more than 50%, whereas carotenoid contents remain largely unaffected in 300 mg/L ZnO NPs treated Arabidopsis plants. Consistent with this, net rate of photosynthesis, leaf stomatal conductance, intercellular CO2 concentration and transpiration rate were all reduced more than 50% in 300 mg/L ZnO NPs treated plants. Quantitative RT-PCR results showed that expression levels of chlorophyll synthesis genes including CHLOROPHYLL A OXYGENASE (CAO), CHLOROPHYLL SYNTHASE (CHLG), COPPER RESPONSE DEFECT 1 (CRD1), MAGNESIUM-PROTOPORPHYRIN IX METHYLTRANSFERASE (CHLM) and MG-CHELATASE SUBUNIT D (CHLD), and photosystem structure gene PHOTOSYSTEM I SUBUNIT D-2 (PSAD2), PHOTOSYSTEM I SUBUNIT E-2 (PSAE2), PHOTOSYSTEM I SUBUNIT K (PSAK) and PHOTOSYSTEM I SUBUNIT K (PSAN) were reduced about five folds in 300 mg/L ZnO NPs treated plants. On the other hand, elevated expression, though to different degrees, of several carotenoids synthesis genes including GERANYLGERANYL PYROPHOSPHATE SYNTHASE 6 (GGPS6), PHYTOENE SYNTHASE (PSY) PHYTOENE DESATURASE (PDS), and ZETA-CAROTENE DESATURASE (ZDS) were observed in ZnO NPs treated plants. Taken together, these results suggest that toxicity effects of ZnO NPs observed in Arabidopsis was likely due to the inhibition of the expression of chlorophyll synthesis genes and photosystem structure genes, which results in the inhibition of

  16. Caesium-affected gene expression in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Sahr, Tobias; Voigt, Gabriele; Paretzke, Herwig G; Schramel, Peter; Ernst, Dieter

    2005-03-01

    * Excessive caesium can be toxic to plants. Here we investigated Cs uptake and caesium-induced gene expression in Arabidopsis thaliana. * Accumulation was measured in plants grown for 5 wk on agar supplemented with nontoxic and up to toxic levels of Cs. Caesium-induced gene expression was studied by suppression-subtractive hybridization (SSH) and RT-PCR. * Caesium accumulated in leaf rosettes dependent upon the external concentration in the growth media, whereas the potassium concentration decreased in rosettes. At a concentration of 850 microM, Cs plants showed reduced development, and withered with an increase in concentration to 1 mM Cs. SSH resulted in the isolation of 73 clones that were differentially expressed at a Cs concentration of 150 microM. Most of the genes identified belong to groups of genes encoding proteins in stress defence, detoxification, transport, homeostasis and general metabolism, and proteins controlling transcription and translation. * The present study identified a number of marker genes for Cs in Arabidopsis grown under nontoxic Cs concentrations, indicating that Cs acts as an abiotic stress factor.

  17. Small changes in ambient temperature affect alternative splicing in Arabidopsis thaliana

    PubMed Central

    Streitner, Corinna; Simpson, Craig G.; Shaw, Paul; Danisman, Selahattin; Brown, John W.S.; Staiger, Dorothee

    2013-01-01

    Alternative splicing (AS) gives rise to multiple mRNA isoforms from the same gene, providing possibilities to regulate gene expression beyond the level of transcription. In a recent paper in Nucleic Acids Research we used a high resolution RT-PCR based panel to study changes in AS patterns in plants with altered levels of an hnRNP-like RNA-binding protein in Arabidopsis thaliana. Furthermore, we detected significant changes in AS patterns between different Arabidopsis ecotypes. Here we investigated how small changes in ambient temperature affect AS. We found significant changes in AS for 12 of 28 investigated events (43%) upon transfer of Arabidopsis plants from 20°C to 16°C and for 6 of the 28 investigated events (21%) upon transfer from 20°C to 24°C. PMID:23656882

  18. Allyl isothiocyanate affects the cell cycle of Arabidopsis thaliana

    PubMed Central

    Åsberg, Signe E.; Bones, Atle M.; Øverby, Anders

    2015-01-01

    Isothiocyanates (ITCs) are degradation products of glucosinolates present in members of the Brassicaceae family acting as herbivore repellents and antimicrobial compounds. Recent results indicate that allyl ITC (AITC) has a role in defense responses such as glutathione depletion, ROS generation and stomatal closure. In this study we show that exposure to non-lethal concentrations of AITC causes a shift in the cell cycle distribution of Arabidopsis thaliana leading to accumulation of cells in S-phases and a reduced number of cells in non-replicating phases. Furthermore, transcriptional analysis revealed an AITC-induced up-regulation of the gene encoding cyclin-dependent kinase A while several genes encoding mitotic proteins were down-regulated, suggesting an inhibition of mitotic processes. Interestingly, visualization of DNA synthesis indicated that exposure to AITC reduced the rate of DNA replication. Taken together, these results indicate that non-lethal concentrations of AITC induce cells of A. thaliana to enter the cell cycle and accumulate in S-phases, presumably as a part of a defensive response. Thus, this study suggests that AITC has several roles in plant defense and add evidence to the growing data supporting a multifunctional role of glucosinolates and their degradation products in plants. PMID:26042144

  19. Post-Synthetic Defucosylation of AGP by Aspergillus nidulans α-1,2-Fucosidase Expressed in Arabidopsis Apoplast Induces Compensatory Upregulation of α-1,2-Fucosyltransferases

    PubMed Central

    Pogorelko, Gennady V.; Reem, Nathan T.; Young, Zachary T.; Chambers, Lauran; Zabotina, Olga A.

    2016-01-01

    Cell walls are essential components of plant cells which perform a variety of important functions for the different cell types, tissues and organs of a plant. Besides mechanical function providing cell shape, cell walls participate in intercellular communication, defense during plant-microbe interactions, and plant growth. The plant cell wall consists predominantly of polysaccharides with the addition of structural glycoproteins, phenolic esters, minerals, lignin, and associated enzymes. Alterations in the cell wall composition created through either changes in biosynthesis of specific constituents or their post-synthetic modifications in the apoplast compromise cell wall integrity and frequently induce plant compensatory responses as a result of these alterations. Here we report that post-synthetic removal of fucose residues specifically from arabinogalactan proteins in the Arabidopsis plant cell wall induces differential expression of fucosyltransferases and leads to the root and hypocotyl elongation changes. These results demonstrate that the post-synthetic modification of cell wall components presents a valuable approach to investigate the potential signaling pathways induced during plant responses to such modifications that usually occur during plant development and stress responses. PMID:27448235

  20. Gibberellins inhibit adventitious rooting in hybrid aspen and Arabidopsis by affecting auxin transport.

    PubMed

    Mauriat, Mélanie; Petterle, Anna; Bellini, Catherine; Moritz, Thomas

    2014-05-01

    Knowledge of processes involved in adventitious rooting is important to improve both fundamental understanding of plant physiology and the propagation of numerous plants. Hybrid aspen (Populus tremula × tremuloïdes) plants overexpressing a key gibberellin (GA) biosynthesis gene (AtGA20ox1) grow rapidly but have poor rooting efficiency, which restricts their clonal propagation. Therefore, we investigated the molecular basis of adventitious rooting in Populus and the model plant Arabidopsis. The production of adventitious roots (ARs) in tree cuttings is initiated from the basal stem region, and involves the interplay of several endogenous and exogenous factors. The roles of several hormones in this process have been characterized, but the effects of GAs have not been fully investigated. Here, we show that a GA treatment negatively affects the numbers of ARs produced by wild-type hybrid aspen cuttings. Furthermore, both hybrid aspen plants and intact Arabidopsis seedlings overexpressing AtGA20ox1, PttGID1.1 or PttGID1.3 genes (with a 35S promoter) produce few ARs, although ARs develop from the basal stem region of hybrid aspen and the hypocotyl of Arabidopsis. In Arabidopsis, auxin and strigolactones are known to affect AR formation. Our data show that the inhibitory effect of GA treatment on adventitious rooting is not mediated by perturbation of the auxin signalling pathway, or of the strigolactone biosynthetic and signalling pathways. Instead, GAs appear to act by perturbing polar auxin transport, in particular auxin efflux in hybrid aspen, and both efflux and influx in Arabidopsis.

  1. atBRX1-1 and atBRX1-2 are involved in an alternative rRNA processing pathway in Arabidopsis thaliana

    PubMed Central

    Weis, Benjamin L.; Palm, Denise; Missbach, Sandra; Bohnsack, Markus T.

    2015-01-01

    Ribosome biogenesis is an essential process in all organisms. In eukaryotes, multiple ribosome biogenesis factors (RBFs) act in the processing of ribosomal (r)RNAs, assembly of ribosomal subunits and their export to the cytoplasm. We characterized two genes in Arabidopsis thaliana coding for orthologs of yeast BRX1, a protein involved in maturation of the large ribosomal subunit. Both atBRX1 proteins, encoded by AT3G15460 and AT1G52930, respectively, are mainly localized in the nucleolus and are ubiquitously expressed throughout plant development and in various tissues. Mutant plant lines for both factors show a delay in development and pointed leaves can be observed in the brx1-2 mutant, implying a link between ribosome biogenesis and plant development. In addition, the pre-rRNA processing is affected in both mutants. Analysis of the pre-rRNA intermediates revealed that early processing steps can occur either in the 5′ external transcribed spacer (ETS) or internal transcribed spacer 1 (ITS1). Interestingly, we also find that in xrn2 mutants, early processing events can be bypassed and removal of the 5′ ETS is initiated by cleavage at the P′ processing site. While the pathways of pre-rRNA processing are comparable to those of yeast and mammalian cells, the balance between the two processing pathways is different in plants. Furthermore, plant-specific steps such as an additional processing site in the 5′ ETS, likely post-transcriptional processing of the early cleavage sites and accumulation of a 5′ extended 5.8S rRNA not observed in other eukaryotes can be detected. PMID:25605960

  2. Light-Dependent Degradation of PIF3 by SCF(EBF1/2) Promotes a Photomorphogenic Response in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Dong, Jie; Ni, Weimin; Yu, Renbo; Deng, Xing Wang; Chen, Haodong; Wei, Ning

    2017-08-21

    Plant seedlings emerging from darkness into the light environment undergo photomorphogenesis, which enables autotrophic growth with optimized morphology and physiology. During this transition, plants must rapidly remove photomorphogenic repressors accumulated in the dark. Among them is PHYTOCHROME-INTERACTING FACTOR 3 (PIF3), a key transcription factor promoting hypocotyl growth. Here we report that, in response to light activation of phytochrome photoreceptors, EIN3-BINDING F BOX PROTEINs (EBFs) 1 and 2 mediate PIF3 protein degradation in a manner dependent on light-induced phosphorylation of PIF3. Whereas PIF3 binds EBFs independent of light, the recruitment of PIF3-EBFs to the core SKP1-CUL1-F box protein (SCF) scaffold is facilitated by light signals or PIF3 phosphorylation. We also found that previously identified LIGHT-RESPONSE BRIC-A-BRACK/TRAMTRACK/BROAD (LRB) E3 ubiquitin ligases target phytochrome B (phyB) and PIF3 primarily under high-light conditions, whereas EBF1/2 vigorously target PIF3 degradation under wide ranges of light intensity without affecting the abundance of phyB. Both genetic and molecular data support that SCF(EBF1/2) function as photomorphogenic E3s during seedling development. Copyright © 2017 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  3. A Role for the GCC-Box in Jasmonate-Mediated Activation of the PDF1.2 Gene of Arabidopsis1

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Rebecca L.; Kazan, Kemal; McGrath, Ken C.; Maclean, Don J.; Manners, John M.

    2003-01-01

    The PDF1.2 gene of Arabidopsis encoding a plant defensin is commonly used as a marker for characterization of the jasmonate-dependent defense responses. Here, using PDF1.2 promoter-deletion lines linked to the β-glucoronidase-reporter gene, we examined putative promoter elements associated with jasmonate-responsive expression of this gene. Using stably transformed plants, we first characterized the extended promoter region that positively regulates basal expression from the PDF1.2 promoter. Second, using promoter deletion constructs including one from which the GCC-box region was deleted, we observed a substantially lower response to jasmonate than lines carrying this motif. In addition, point mutations introduced into the core GCC-box sequence substantially reduced jasmonate responsiveness, whereas addition of a 20-nucleotide-long promoter element carrying the core GCC-box and flanking nucleotides provided jasmonate responsiveness to a 35S minimal promoter. Taken together, these results indicated that the GCC-box plays a key role in conferring jasmonate responsiveness to the PDF1.2 promoter. However, deletion or specific mutations introduced into the core GCC-box did not completely abolish the jasmonate responsiveness of the promoter, suggesting that the other promoter elements lying downstream from the GCC-box region may also contribute to jasmonate responsiveness. In other experiments, we identified a jasmonate- and pathogen-responsive ethylene response factor transcription factor, AtERF2, which when overexpressed in transgenic Arabidopsis plants activated transcription from the PDF1.2, Thi2.1, and PR4 (basic chitinase) genes, all of which contain a GCC-box sequence in their promoters. Our results suggest that in addition to their roles in regulating ethylene-mediated gene expression, ethylene response factors also appear to play important roles in regulating jasmonate-responsive gene expression, possibly via interaction with the GCC-box. PMID:12805630

  4. Unequal functional redundancy between the two Arabidopsis thaliana high-affinity sulphate transporters SULTR1;1 and SULTR1;2.

    PubMed

    Barberon, Marie; Berthomieu, Pierre; Clairotte, Michael; Shibagaki, Nakako; Davidian, Jean-Claude; Gosti, Françoise

    2008-01-01

    * In Arabidopsis, SULTR1;1 and SULTR1;2 are two genes proposed to be involved in high-affinity sulphate uptake from the soil solution. We address here the specific issue of their functional redundancy for the uptake of sulphate and for the accumulation of its toxic analogue selenate with regard to plant growth and selenate tolerance. * Using the complete set of genotypes, including the wild-type, each one of the single sultr1;1 and sultr1;2 mutants and the resulting double sultr1;1-sultr1;2 mutant, we performed a detailed phenotypic analysis of root length, shoot biomass, sulphate uptake, sulphate and selenate accumulation and selenate tolerance. * The results all ordered the four different genotypes according to the same functional hierarchy. Wild-type and sultr1;1 mutant plants displayed similar phenotypes. By contrast, sultr1;1-sultr1;2 double-mutant plants showed the most extreme phenotype and the sultr1;2 mutant displayed intermediate performances. Additionally, the degree of selenate tolerance was directly related to the seedling selenate content according to a single sigmoid regression curve common to all the genotypes. * The SULTR1;1 and SULTR1;2 genes display unequal functional redundancy, which leaves open for SULTR1;1 the possibility of displaying an additional function besides its role in sulphate membrane transport.

  5. An Arabidopsis Stomatin-Like Protein Affects Mitochondrial Respiratory Supercomplex Organization1[C][W][OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Gehl, Bernadette; Lee, Chun Pong; Bota, Pedro; Blatt, Michael R.; Sweetlove, Lee J.

    2014-01-01

    Stomatins belong to the band-7 protein family, a diverse group of conserved eukaryotic and prokaryotic membrane proteins involved in the formation of large protein complexes as protein-lipid scaffolds. The Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) genome contains two paralogous genes encoding stomatin-like proteins (SLPs; AtSLP1 and AtSLP2) that are phylogenetically related to human SLP2, a protein involved in mitochondrial fusion and protein complex formation in the mitochondrial inner membrane. We used reverse genetics in combination with biochemical methods to investigate the function of AtSLPs. We demonstrate that both SLPs localize to mitochondrial membranes. SLP1 migrates as a large (approximately 3 MDa) complex in blue-native gel electrophoresis. Remarkably, slp1 knockout mutants have reduced protein and activity levels of complex I and supercomplexes, indicating that SLP affects the assembly and/or stability of these complexes. These findings point to a role for SLP1 in the organization of respiratory supercomplexes in Arabidopsis. PMID:24424325

  6. Gamma-aminobutyric acid depletion affects stomata closure and drought tolerance of Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Mekonnen, Dereje Worku; Flügge, Ulf-Ingo; Ludewig, Frank

    2016-04-01

    A rapid accumulation of γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) during biotic and abiotic stresses is well documented. However, the specificity of the response and the primary role of GABA under such stress conditions are hardly understood. To address these questions, we investigated the response of the GABA-depleted gad1/2 mutant to drought stress. GABA is primarily synthesized from the decarboxylation of glutamate by glutamate decarboxylase (GAD) which exists in five copies in the genome of Arabidopsis thaliana. However, only GAD1 and GAD2 are abundantly expressed, and knockout of these two copies dramatically reduced the GABA content. Phenotypic analysis revealed a reduced shoot growth of the gad1/2 mutant. Furthermore, the gad1/2 mutant was wilted earlier than the wild type following a prolonged drought stress treatment. The early-wilting phenotype was due to an increase in stomata aperture and a defect in stomata closure. The increase in stomata aperture contributed to higher stomatal conductance. The drought oversensitive phenotype of the gad1/2 mutant was reversed by functional complementation that increases GABA level in leaves. The functionally complemented gad1/2 x pop2 triple mutant contained more GABA than the wild type. Our findings suggest that GABA accumulation during drought is a stress-specific response and its accumulation induces the regulation of stomatal opening thereby prevents loss of water.

  7. Arabidopsis AtADF1 is functionally affected by mutations on actin binding sites.

    PubMed

    Dong, Chun-Hai; Tang, Wei-Ping; Liu, Jia-Yao

    2013-03-01

    The plant actin depolymerizing factor (ADF) binds to both monomeric and filamentous actin, and is directly involved in the depolymerization of actin filaments. To better understand the actin binding sites of the Arabidopsis thaliana L. AtADF1, we generated mutants of AtADF1 and investigated their functions in vitro and in vivo. Analysis of mutants harboring amino acid substitutions revealed that charged residues (Arg98 and Lys100) located at the α-helix 3 and forming an actin binding site together with the N-terminus are essential for both G- and F-actin binding. The basic residues on the β-strand 5 (K82/A) and the α-helix 4 (R135/A, R137/A) form another actin binding site that is important for F-actin binding. Using transient expression of CFP-tagged AtADF1 mutant proteins in onion (Allium cepa) peel epidermal cells and transgenic Arabidopsis thaliana L. plants overexpressing these mutants, we analyzed how these mutant proteins regulate actin organization and affect seedling growth. Our results show that the ADF mutants with a lower affinity for actin filament binding can still be functional, unless the affinity for actin monomers is also affected. The G-actin binding activity of the ADF plays an essential role in actin binding, depolymerization of actin polymers, and therefore in the control of actin organization. © 2012 Institute of Botany, Chinese Academy of Sciences.

  8. Arabidopsis protein arginine methyltransferase 3 is required for ribosome biogenesis by affecting precursor ribosomal RNA processing

    PubMed Central

    Hang, Runlai; Liu, Chunyan; Ahmad, Ayaz; Zhang, Yong; Lu, Falong; Cao, Xiaofeng

    2014-01-01

    Ribosome biogenesis is a fundamental and tightly regulated cellular process, including synthesis, processing, and assembly of rRNAs with ribosomal proteins. Protein arginine methyltransferases (PRMTs) have been implicated in many important biological processes, such as ribosome biogenesis. Two alternative precursor rRNA (pre-rRNA) processing pathways coexist in yeast and mammals; however, how PRMT affects ribosome biogenesis remains largely unknown. Here we show that Arabidopsis PRMT3 (AtPRMT3) is required for ribosome biogenesis by affecting pre-rRNA processing. Disruption of AtPRMT3 results in pleiotropic developmental defects, imbalanced polyribosome profiles, and aberrant pre-rRNA processing. We further identify an alternative pre-rRNA processing pathway in Arabidopsis and demonstrate that AtPRMT3 is required for the balance of these two pathways to promote normal growth and development. Our work uncovers a previously unidentified function of PRMT in posttranscriptional regulation of rRNA, revealing an extra layer of complexity in the regulation of ribosome biogenesis. PMID:25352672

  9. Removal of the local geomagnetic field affects reproductive growth in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Xu, Chunxiao; Wei, Shufeng; Lu, Yan; Zhang, Yuxia; Chen, Chuanfang; Song, Tao

    2013-09-01

    The influence of the geomagnetic field-removed environment on Arabidopsis growth was investigated by cultivation of the plants in a near-null magnetic field and local geomagnetic field (45 µT) for the whole growth period under laboratory conditions. The biomass accumulation of plants in the near-null magnetic field was significantly suppressed at the time when plants were switching from vegetative growth to reproductive growth compared with that of plants grown in the local geomagnetic field, which was caused by a delay in the flowering of plants in the near-null magnetic field. At the early or later growth stage, no significant difference was shown in the biomass accumulation between the plants in the near-null magnetic field and local geomagnetic field. The average number of siliques and the production of seeds per plant in the near-null magnetic field was significantly lower by about 22% and 19%, respectively, than those of control plants. These resulted in a significant reduction of about 20% in the harvest index of plants in the near-null magnetic field compared with that of the controls. These results suggest that the removal of the local geomagnetic field negatively affects the reproductive growth of Arabidopsis, which thus affects the yield and harvest index.

  10. Two novel herbicide candidates affect Arabidopsis thaliana growth by inhibiting nitrogen and phosphate absorption.

    PubMed

    Sun, Chongchong; Jin, Yujian; He, Haifeng; Wang, Wei; He, Hongwu; Fu, Zhengwei; Qian, Haifeng

    2015-09-01

    Both 2-[(2,4-dichlorophenoxy)acetoxy](methy)lmethyl-5,5-dimethyl-1,3,2-dioxaphosphinan-2-one (termed as IIa) and 2-[(4-chloro-2-methyl-phenoxy)-acetoxy](methyl)methyl-5,5-dimethyl-1,3,2-dioxaphosphinan-2-one (termed as IIr) are novel herbicide candidates that positively affect herbicidal activity via the introduction of a phosphorus-containing heterocyclic ring. This report investigated the mechanism of IIa and IIr on weed control in the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana at physiological, ultrastructural and molecular levels. IIa and IIr significantly inhibited the growth of A. thaliana and altered its root structure by inhibiting energy metabolism and lipid or protein biosynthesis. These compounds also significantly affected the absorption of nitrogen and phosphorus by down-regulating the transcripts of nitrate transporter-related genes, ammonium transporter-related genes and phosphorus transporter-related genes.

  11. Natural Variation in Epigenetic Pathways Affects the Specification of Female Gamete Precursors in Arabidopsis[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Rodríguez-Leal, Daniel; León-Martínez, Gloria; Abad-Vivero, Ursula; Vielle-Calzada, Jean-Philippe

    2015-01-01

    In angiosperms, the transition to the female gametophytic phase relies on the specification of premeiotic gamete precursors from sporophytic cells in the ovule. In Arabidopsis thaliana, a single diploid cell is specified as the premeiotic female gamete precursor. Here, we show that ecotypes of Arabidopsis exhibit differences in megasporogenesis leading to phenotypes reminiscent of defects in dominant mutations that epigenetically affect the specification of female gamete precursors. Intraspecific hybridization and polyploidy exacerbate these defects, which segregate quantitatively in F2 populations derived from ecotypic hybrids, suggesting that multiple loci control cell specification at the onset of female meiosis. This variation in cell differentiation is influenced by the activity of ARGONAUTE9 (AGO9) and RNA-DEPENDENT RNA POLYMERASE6 (RDR6), two genes involved in epigenetic silencing that control the specification of female gamete precursors. The pattern of transcriptional regulation and localization of AGO9 varies among ecotypes, and abnormal gamete precursors in ovules defective for RDR6 share identity with ectopic gamete precursors found in selected ecotypes. Our results indicate that differences in the epigenetic control of cell specification lead to natural phenotypic variation during megasporogenesis. We propose that this mechanism could be implicated in the emergence and evolution of the reproductive alternatives that prevail in flowering plants. PMID:25829442

  12. CacyBP/SIP binds ERK1/2 and affects transcriptional activity of Elk-1

    SciTech Connect

    Kilanczyk, Ewa; Filipek, Slawomir; Jastrzebska, Beata; Filipek, Anna

    2009-02-27

    In this work we showed for the first time that mouse CacyBP/SIP interacts with extracellular signal regulated kinases 1 and 2 (ERK1/2). We also established that a calcium binding protein, S100A6, competes for this interaction. Moreover, the E217K mutant of CacyBP/SIP does not bind significantly to ERK1/2 although it retains the ability to interact with S100A6. Molecular modeling shows that the E217K mutation in the 189-219 CacyBP/SIP fragment markedly changes its electrostatic potential, suggesting that the binding with ERK1/2 might have an electrostatic character. We also demonstrate that CacyBP/SIP-ERK1/2 interaction inhibits phosphorylation of the Elk-1 transcription factor in vitro and in the nuclear fraction of NB2a cells. Altogether, our data suggest that the binding of CacyBP/SIP with ERK1/2 might regulate Elk-1 phosphorylation/transcriptional activity and that S100A6 might further modulate this effect via Ca{sup 2+}-dependent interaction with CacyBP/SIP and competition with ERK1/2.

  13. CacyBP/SIP binds ERK1/2 and affects transcriptional activity of Elk-1.

    PubMed

    Kilanczyk, Ewa; Filipek, Slawomir; Jastrzebska, Beata; Filipek, Anna

    2009-02-27

    In this work we showed for the first time that mouse CacyBP/SIP interacts with extracellular signal regulated kinases 1 and 2 (ERK1/2). We also established that a calcium binding protein, S100A6, competes for this interaction. Moreover, the E217K mutant of CacyBP/SIP does not bind significantly to ERK1/2 although it retains the ability to interact with S100A6. Molecular modeling shows that the E217K mutation in the 189-219 CacyBP/SIP fragment markedly changes its electrostatic potential, suggesting that the binding with ERK1/2 might have an electrostatic character. We also demonstrate that CacyBP/SIP-ERK1/2 interaction inhibits phosphorylation of the Elk-1 transcription factor in vitro and in the nuclear fraction of NB2a cells. Altogether, our data suggest that the binding of CacyBP/SIP with ERK1/2 might regulate Elk-1 phosphorylation/transcriptional activity and that S100A6 might further modulate this effect via Ca(2+)-dependent interaction with CacyBP/SIP and competition with ERK1/2.

  14. Aberrant gene expression in the Arabidopsis SULTR1;2 mutants suggests a possible regulatory role for this sulfate transporter in response to sulfur nutrient status.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Bo; Pasini, Rita; Dan, Hanbin; Joshi, Naveen; Zhao, Yihong; Leustek, Thomas; Zheng, Zhi-Liang

    2014-01-01

    Sulfur is required for the biosynthesis of cysteine, methionine and numerous other metabolites, and thus is critical for cellular metabolism and various growth and developmental processes. Plants are able to sense their physiological state with respect to sulfur availability, but the sensor remains to be identified. Here we report the isolation and characterization of two novel allelic mutants of Arabidopsis thaliana, sel1-15 and sel1-16, which show increased expression of a sulfur deficiency-activated gene β-glucosidase 28 (BGLU28). The mutants, which represent two different missense alleles of SULTR1;2, which encodes a high-affinity sulfate transporter, are defective in sulfate transport and as a result have a lower cellular sulfate level. However, when treated with a very high dose of sulfate, sel1-15 and sel1-16 accumulated similar amounts of internal sulfate and its metabolite glutathione (GSH) to wild-type, but showed higher expression of BGLU28 and other sulfur deficiency-activated genes than wild-type. Reduced sensitivity to inhibition of gene expression was also observed in the sel1 mutants when fed with the sulfate metabolites Cys and GSH. In addition, a SULTR1;2 knockout allele also exhibits reduced inhibition in response to sulfate, Cys and GSH, consistent with the phenotype of sel1-15 and sel1-16. Taken together, the genetic evidence suggests that, in addition to its known function as a high-affinity sulfate transporter, SULTR1;2 may have a regulatory role in response to sulfur nutrient status. The possibility that SULTR1;2 may function as a sensor of sulfur status or a component of a sulfur sensory mechanism is discussed.

  15. Inactivation of the ELIP1 and ELIP2 genes affects Arabidopsis seed germination.

    PubMed

    Rizza, Annalisa; Boccaccini, Alessandra; Lopez-Vidriero, Irene; Costantino, Paolo; Vittorioso, Paola

    2011-06-01

    Light regulates Arabidopsis seed germination through the phyB/PIL5 (PHYTOCHROME INTERACTING FACTOR 3-LIKE 5) transduction pathway, and we have previously shown that the Dof transcription factor DOF AFFECTING GERMINATION1 (DAG1) is a component of this pathway. By means of microarray analysis of dag1 and wild type developing siliques, we identified the EARLY LIGHT-INDUCED PROTEIN1 and 2 (ELIP1 and ELIP2) genes among those deregulated in the loss-of-function dag1 mutant. We analysed seed germination of elip single and double mutants, of elip dag1 double mutants as well as of elip1 elip2 dag1 triple mutant under different environmental conditions. We show that ELIP1 and ELIP2 are involved in opposite ways in the control of this developmental process, in particular under abiotic (light, temperature, salt) stress conditions. © 2011 The Authors. New Phytologist © 2011 New Phytologist Trust.

  16. CUL4 associates with DDB1 and DET1 and its downregulation affects diverse aspects of development in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Bernhardt, Anne; Lechner, Esther; Hano, Perdita; Schade, Verena; Dieterle, Monika; Anders, Marco; Dubin, Manu Jody; Benvenuto, Giovanna; Bowler, Chris; Genschik, Pascal; Hellmann, Hanjo

    2006-08-01

    Cullins are central scaffolding subunits in eukaryotic E3 ligases that facilitate the ubiquitination of target proteins. Arabidopsis contains at least 11 cullin proteins but only a few of them have been assigned biological roles. In this work Arabidopsis cullin 4 is shown to assemble with DDB1, RBX1, DET1 and DDB2 in vitro and in planta. In addition, by using T-DNA insertion and CUL4 antisense lines we demonstrate that corresponding mutants are severely affected in different aspects of development. Reduced CUL4 expression leads to a reduced number of lateral roots, and to abnormal vascular tissue and stomatal development. Furthermore, cul4 mutants display a weak constitutive photomorphogenic phenotype. These results therefore assign an important function to CUL4 during plant development and provide strong evidence that CUL4 assembles together with RBX1 and DDB1 proteins to form a functional E3 ligase in Arabidopsis.

  17. Preschool-Aged Children with Iron Deficiency Anemia Show Altered Affect and Behavior1,2

    PubMed Central

    Lozoff, Betsy; Corapci, Feyza; Burden, Matthew J.; Kaciroti, Niko; Angulo-Barroso, Rosa; Sazawal, Sunil; Black, Maureen

    2012-01-01

    This study compared social looking and response to novelty in preschool-aged children (47–68 mo) with or without iron deficiency anemia (IDA). Iron status of the participants from a low-income community in New Delhi, India, was based on venous hemoglobin, mean corpuscular volume, and red cell distribution width. Children’s social looking toward adults, affect, and wary or hesitant behavior in response to novelty were assessed in a semistructured paradigm during an in-home play observation. Affect and behavior were compared as a function of iron status: IDA (n = 74) vs. nonanemic (n = 164). Compared with nonanemic preschoolers, preschoolers with IDA displayed less social looking toward their mothers, moved close to their mothers more quickly, and were slower to display positive affect and touch novel toys for the first time. These results indicate that IDA in the preschool period has affective and behavioral effects similar to those reported for IDA in infancy. PMID:17311960

  18. Cold stress affects H(+)-ATPase and phospholipase D activity in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Muzi, Carlo; Camoni, Lorenzo; Visconti, Sabina; Aducci, Patrizia

    2016-11-01

    Low temperature is an environmental stress that greatly influences plant performance and distribution. Plants exposed to cold stress exhibit modifications of plasma membrane physical properties that can affect their functionality. Here it is reported the effect of low temperature exposure of Arabidopsis plants on the activity of phospholipase D and H(+)-ATPase, the master enzyme located at the plasma membrane. The H(+)-ATPase activity was differently affected, depending on the length of cold stress imposed. In particular, an exposure to 4 °C for 6 h determined the strong inhibition of the H(+)-ATPase activity, that correlates with a reduced association with the regulatory 14-3-3 proteins. A longer exposure first caused the full recovery of the enzymatic activity followed by a significant activation, in accordance with both the increased association with 14-3-3 proteins and induction of H(+)-ATPase gene transcription. Different time lengths of cold stress treatment were also shown to strongly stimulate the phospholipase D activity and affect the phosphatidic acid levels of the plasma membranes. Our results suggest a functional correlation between the activity of phospholipase D and H(+)-ATPase mediated by phosphatidic acid release during the cold stress response. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  19. Herbivory and abiotic factors affect population dynamics of Arabidopsis thaliana in a sand dune area.

    PubMed

    Arany, A Mosleh; de Jong, T J; van der Meijden, E

    2005-09-01

    Population dynamics of the annual plant Arabidopsis thaliana (L.) Heynh. were studied in a natural habitat of this species on the coastal dunes of the Netherlands. The main objective was to elucidate factors controlling population dynamics and the relative importance of factors affecting final population density. Permanent plots were established and plants were mapped to obtain data on survival and reproductive performance of each individual, with special attention to herbivore damage. In experimental plots we studied how watering, addition of nutrients, artificial disturbance, and natural herbivores affected survival and growth. Mortality was low during autumn and early winter and high at the time of stem elongation, between February and April. A key factor analysis showed a high correlation between mortality from February to April and total mortality. The specialist weevils Ceutorhyncus atomus and C. contractus (Curculionidae) were identified as the major insect herbivores on A. thaliana, reducing seed production by more than 40 %. These herbivores acted in a plant size-dependent manner, attacking a greater fraction of the fruits on large plants. While mortality rates were not affected by density, fecundity decreased with density, although the effect was small. Adding water reduced mortality in rosette and flowering plant stages. Soil disturbance did not increase seed germination, but did have a significant positive effect on survival of rosette and flowering plants. Seed production of A. thaliana populations varied greatly between years, leading to population fluctuations, with a small role for density-dependent fecundity and plant size-dependent herbivory.

  20. Lignin biosynthesis perturbations affect secondary cell wall composition and saccharification yield in Arabidopsis thaliana

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Second-generation biofuels are generally produced from the polysaccharides in the lignocellulosic plant biomass, mainly cellulose. However, because cellulose is embedded in a matrix of other polysaccharides and lignin, its hydrolysis into the fermentable glucose is hampered. The senesced inflorescence stems of a set of 20 Arabidopsis thaliana mutants in 10 different genes of the lignin biosynthetic pathway were analyzed for cell wall composition and saccharification yield. Saccharification models were built to elucidate which cell wall parameters played a role in cell wall recalcitrance. Results Although lignin is a key polymer providing the strength necessary for the plant’s ability to grow upward, a reduction in lignin content down to 64% of the wild-type level in Arabidopsis was tolerated without any obvious growth penalty. In contrast to common perception, we found that a reduction in lignin was not compensated for by an increase in cellulose, but rather by an increase in matrix polysaccharides. In most lignin mutants, the saccharification yield was improved by up to 88% cellulose conversion for the cinnamoyl-coenzyme A reductase1 mutants under pretreatment conditions, whereas the wild-type cellulose conversion only reached 18%. The saccharification models and Pearson correlation matrix revealed that the lignin content was the main factor determining the saccharification yield. However, also lignin composition, matrix polysaccharide content and composition, and, especially, the xylose, galactose, and arabinose contents influenced the saccharification yield. Strikingly, cellulose content did not significantly affect saccharification yield. Conclusions Although the lignin content had the main effect on saccharification, also other cell wall factors could be engineered to potentially increase the cell wall processability, such as the galactose content. Our results contribute to a better understanding of the effect of lignin perturbations on plant cell

  1. Casein kinase II α subunits affect multiple developmental and stress-responsive pathways in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Mulekar, Jidnyasa Jayant; Bu, Qingyun; Chen, Fulu; Huq, Enamul

    2012-01-01

    Casein kinase II (formerly known as CK2), a ubiquitous Ser/Thr kinase, plays critical roles in all higher organisms including plants. The CK2 holoenzyme consists of two catalytic α subunits and two regulatory β subunits. The Arabidopsis genome has four α subunit and four β subunit genes, and members of both the α and β subunit families have been shown to be localized in the cytoplasm, nucleus and also in chloroplasts. However, the biological roles of CK2 subunits have not been fully characterized yet. Here we identified T-DNA insertion mutants in three α subunit genes (α1, α2 and α3) and made double and triple mutants. The CK2 α1α2α3 triple mutants displayed reduced CK2 activity compared with wild-type seedlings. Phenotypic characterization showed that CK2 α1α2α3 triple mutants are late flowering under both long- and short-day conditions. Genes encoding floral integrators are differentially regulated in the triple mutant compared with the wild-type plants. CK2 α1α2α3 triple mutants also displayed reduced hypocotyl growth, smaller cotyledon size and a reduced number of lateral roots compared with wild-type seedlings under light. Abscisic acid-induced blockage of seed germination and cotyledon greening is reduced in CK2 α subunit mutants in an additive manner. Moreover, CK2 α subunit mutants are also hyposensitive to a NaCl-induced blockage of seed germination. Taken together, these data suggest that CK2 α subunits affect diverse developmental and stress responsive pathways in Arabidopsis. © 2011 The Authors. The Plant Journal © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  2. The CTRB1/2 Locus Affects Diabetes Susceptibility and Treatment via the Incretin Pathway

    PubMed Central

    ‘t Hart, Leen M.; Fritsche, Andreas; Nijpels, Giel; van Leeuwen, Nienke; Donnelly, Louise A.; Dekker, Jacqueline M.; Alssema, Marjan; Fadista, Joao; Carlotti, Françoise; Gjesing, Anette P.; Palmer, Colin N.A.; van Haeften, Timon W.; Herzberg-Schäfer, Silke A.; Simonis-Bik, Annemarie M.C.; Houwing-Duistermaat, Jeanine J.; Helmer, Quinta; Deelen, Joris; Guigas, Bruno; Hansen, Torben; Machicao, Fausto; Willemsen, Gonneke; Heine, Robert J.; Kramer, Mark H.H.; Holst, Jens J.; de Koning, Eelco J.P.; Häring, Hans-Ulrich; Pedersen, Oluf; Groop, Leif; de Geus, Eco J.C.; Slagboom, P. Eline; Boomsma, Dorret I.; Eekhoff, Elisabeth M.W.; Pearson, Ewan R.; Diamant, Michaela

    2013-01-01

    The incretin hormone glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1) promotes glucose homeostasis and enhances β-cell function. GLP-1 receptor agonists (GLP-1 RAs) and dipeptidyl peptidase-4 (DPP-4) inhibitors, which inhibit the physiological inactivation of endogenous GLP-1, are used for the treatment of type 2 diabetes. Using the Metabochip, we identified three novel genetic loci with large effects (30–40%) on GLP-1–stimulated insulin secretion during hyperglycemic clamps in nondiabetic Caucasian individuals (TMEM114; CHST3 and CTRB1/2; n = 232; all P ≤ 8.8 × 10−7). rs7202877 near CTRB1/2, a known diabetes risk locus, also associated with an absolute 0.51 ± 0.16% (5.6 ± 1.7 mmol/mol) lower A1C response to DPP-4 inhibitor treatment in G-allele carriers, but there was no effect on GLP-1 RA treatment in type 2 diabetic patients (n = 527). Furthermore, in pancreatic tissue, we show that rs7202877 acts as expression quantitative trait locus for CTRB1 and CTRB2, encoding chymotrypsinogen, and increases fecal chymotrypsin activity in healthy carriers. Chymotrypsin is one of the most abundant digestive enzymes in the gut where it cleaves food proteins into smaller peptide fragments. Our data identify chymotrypsin in the regulation of the incretin pathway, development of diabetes, and response to DPP-4 inhibitor treatment. PMID:23674605

  3. The Arabidopsis defense component EDM2 affects the floral transition in an FLC-dependent manner.

    PubMed

    Tsuchiya, Tokuji; Eulgem, Thomas

    2010-05-01

    Arabidopsis thaliana EDM2 was previously shown to be specifically required for disease resistance mediated by the R protein RPP7. Here we provide additional data showing that the role of EDM2 in plant immunity is limited and does not include a function in basal defense. In addition, we found that EDM2 has a promoting effect on the floral transition. We further found that the protein kinase WNK8 physically interacts with EDM2 in the nucleus. Unlike EDM2, which serves as a substrate of this kinase, WNK8 appears not to be required for RPP7-mediated defense. As reported previously, however, WNK8 does affect flowering time. Epistasis analyses suggested that EDM2 acts upstream of the floral repressor FLC (AT5G10140) and downstream of WNK8 (AT5G41990) in a regulatory module that resembles the autonomous floral promotion pathway, comprising a set of mechanisms that are known to affect the floral transition by regulating FLC transcript levels.

  4. Tubulin cytoskeleton in elongation zone of Arabidopsis root is affected by clinorotation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shevchenko, G.; Kalinina, Ya.; Kordyum, E.

    Our aim is to find out how clinorotation influences root growth For this purpose we followed the dynamics of tubulin cytoskeleton cortical and endoplasmic microtubules in cells from elongation zone of Arabidopsis roots transfected with GFP-MAP4 3 day old seedlings In distal part of elongation zone in epidermal cells mainly distinct endoplasmic microtubules were observed Prominent cortical microtubules start to be evident in cells in central elongation zone Under clinorotation clusters formed by MAP4 appear in all parts of elongation zone evidencing that microtubule arrangement is somehow distorted there Application of cytochalasin D which disrupts proper functioning of actin cytoskeleton in controls affected mainly the endoplasmic microtubules in cells with isotropic growth where MAP4 was clustered Under clinorotation disruption of actin cytoskeleton by cytochalasin D caused appearance of MAP4 clusters in cells growing anisotropically In those cells cortical microtubules are affected as well as endoplasmic Due to the fact that cortical microtubules are responsible for ordered growth of plant cell and are arranged into a robust structure change of their organization under clinorotation could impact cell growth This proves that cells in elongation zone switching their growth mode from isotropic to anisotropic are rather sensitive to altered gravity The fact that more severe distortion of cortical microtubules was noted in cells with damaged actin microfilaments proves mutually related functioning of actin and tubulin cytoskeletons under clinorotation

  5. EHB1 and AGD12, two calcium-dependent proteins affect gravitropism antagonistically in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Dümmer, Michaela; Michalski, Christian; Essen, Lars-Oliver; Rath, Magnus; Galland, Paul; Forreiter, Christoph

    2016-11-01

    The ADP-RIBOSYLATION FACTOR GTPase-ACTIVATING PROTEIN (AGD) 12, a member of the ARF-GAP protein family, affects gravitropism in Arabidopsis thaliana. A loss-of-function mutant lacking AGD12 displayed diminished gravitropism in roots and hypocotyls indicating that both organs are affected by this regulator. AGD12 is structurally related to ENHANCED BENDING (EHB) 1, previously described as a negative effector of gravitropism. In contrast to agd12 mutants, ehb1 loss-of function seedlings displayed enhanced gravitropic bending. While EHB1 and AGD12 both possess a C-terminal C2/CaLB-domain, EHB1 lacks the N-terminal ARF-GAP domain present in AGD12. Subcellular localization analysis using Brefeldin A indicated that both proteins are elements of the trans Golgi network. Physiological analyses provided evidence that gravitropic signaling might operate via an antagonistic interaction of ARF-GAP (AGD12) and EHB1 in their Ca(2+)-activated states. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  6. Five gametophytic mutations affecting pollen development and pollen tube growth in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed Central

    Procissi, A; de Laissardière, S; Férault, M; Vezon, D; Pelletier, G; Bonhomme, S

    2001-01-01

    Mutant analysis represents one of the most reliable approaches to identifying genes involved in plant development. The screening of the Versailles collection of Arabidopsis thaliana T-DNA insertion transformants has allowed us to isolate different mutations affecting male gametophytic functions and viability. Among several mutated lines, five have been extensively studied at the genetic, molecular, and cytological levels. For each mutant, several generations of selfing and outcrossing have been carried out, leading to the conclusion that all these mutations are tagged and affect only the male gametophyte. However, only one out of the five mutations is completely penetrant. A variable number of T-DNA copies has integrated in the mutant lines, although all segregate at one mutated locus. Two mutants could be defined as "early mutants": the mutated genes are presumably expressed during pollen grain maturation and their alteration leads to the production of nonfunctional pollen grains. Two other mutants could be defined as "late mutant" since their pollen is able to germinate but pollen tube growth is highly disturbed. Screening for segregation ratio distortions followed by thorough genetic analysis proved to be a powerful tool for identifying gametophytic mutations of all phases of pollen development. PMID:11514461

  7. Arabidopsis acyl-CoA-binding protein ACBP6 localizes in the phloem and affects jasmonate composition.

    PubMed

    Ye, Zi-Wei; Lung, Shiu-Cheung; Hu, Tai-Hua; Chen, Qin-Fang; Suen, Yung-Lee; Wang, Mingfu; Hoffmann-Benning, Susanne; Yeung, Edward; Chye, Mee-Len

    2016-12-01

    Arabidopsis thaliana ACYL-COA-BINDING PROTEIN6 (AtACBP6) encodes a cytosolic 10-kDa AtACBP. It confers freezing tolerance in transgenic Arabidopsis, possibly by its interaction with lipids as indicated by the binding of acyl-CoA esters and phosphatidylcholine to recombinant AtACBP6. Herein, transgenic Arabidopsis transformed with an AtACBP6 promoter-driven β-glucuronidase (GUS) construct exhibited strong GUS activity in the vascular tissues. Immunoelectron microscopy using anti-AtACBP6 antibodies showed AtACBP6 localization in the phloem especially in the companion cells and sieve elements. Also, the presence of gold grains in the plasmodesmata indicated its potential role in systemic trafficking. The AtACBP6 protein, but not its mRNA, was found in phloem exudate of wild-type Arabidopsis. Fatty acid profiling using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry revealed an increase in the jasmonic acid (JA) precursor, 12-oxo-cis,cis-10,15-phytodienoic acid (cis-OPDA), and a reduction in JA and/or its derivatives in acbp6 phloem exudates in comparison to the wild type. Quantitative real-time PCR showed down-regulation of COMATOSE (CTS) in acbp6 rosettes suggesting that AtACBP6 affects CTS function. AtACBP6 appeared to affect the content of JA and/or its derivatives in the sieve tubes, which is consistent with its role in pathogen-defense and in its wound-inducibility of AtACBP6pro::GUS. Taken together, our results suggest the involvement of AtACBP6 in JA-biosynthesis in Arabidopsis phloem tissues.

  8. cis-Jasmone induces Arabidopsis genes that affect the chemical ecology of multitrophic interactions with aphids and their parasitoids

    PubMed Central

    Bruce, Toby J. A.; Matthes, Michaela C.; Chamberlain, Keith; Woodcock, Christine M.; Mohib, Abdul; Webster, Ben; Smart, Lesley E.; Birkett, Michael A.; Pickett, John A.; Napier, Johnathan A.

    2008-01-01

    It is of adaptive value for a plant to prepare its defenses when a threat is detected, and certain plant volatiles associated with insect damage, such as cis-jasmone (CJ), are known to switch-on defense metabolism. We used aphid and aphid parasitoid responses to Arabidopsis thaliana as a model system for studying gene expression and defense chemistry and its impact at different trophic levels. Differential responses to volatiles of induced Arabidopsis occurred for specialist and generalist insects: the generalist aphid, Myzus persicae, was repelled, whereas the specialist, Lipaphis erysimi, was attracted; the generalist aphid parasitoid Aphidius ervi was attracted, but the specialist parasitoid Diaeretiella rapae was not affected. A. ervi also spent longer foraging on induced plants than on untreated ones. Transcriptomic analyses of CJ-induced Arabidopsis plants revealed that a limited number of genes, including a gene for a cytochrome P450, CYP81D11, were strongly up-regulated in the treated plants. We examined transgenic Arabidopsis lines constitutively overexpressing this gene in bioassays and found insect responses similar to those obtained for wild-type plants induced with CJ, indicating the importance of this gene in the CJ-activated defense response. Genes involved in glucosinolate biosynthesis and catabolism are unaffected by CJ and, because these genes relate to interactions with herbivores and parasitoids specific to this family of plants (Brassicaceae), this finding may explain the differences in behavioral response of specialist and generalist insects. PMID:18356298

  9. Interaction between parental environment and genotype affects plant and seed performance in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    He, Hanzi; de Souza Vidigal, Deborah; Snoek, L Basten; Schnabel, Sabine; Nijveen, Harm; Hilhorst, Henk; Bentsink, Leónie

    2014-12-01

    Seed performance after dispersal is highly dependent on parental environmental cues, especially during seed formation and maturation. Here we examine which environmental factors are the most dominant in this respect and whether their effects are dependent on the genotypes under investigation. We studied the influence of light intensity, photoperiod, temperature, nitrate, and phosphate during seed development on five plant attributes and thirteen seed attributes, using 12 Arabidopsis genotypes that have been reported to be affected in seed traits. As expected, the various environments during seed development resulted in changed plant and/or seed performances. Comparative analysis clearly indicated that, overall, temperature plays the most dominant role in both plant and seed performance, whereas light has a prominent impact on plant traits. In comparison to temperature and light, nitrate mildly affected some of the plant and seed traits while phosphate had even less influence on those traits. Moreover, clear genotype-by-environment interactions were identified. This was shown by the fact that individual genotypes responded differentially to the environmental conditions. Low temperature significantly increased seed dormancy and decreased seed longevity of NILDOG1 and cyp707a1-1, whereas low light intensity increased seed dormancy and decreased seed longevity of NILDOG3 and NILDOG6. This also indicates that different genetic and molecular pathways are involved in the plant and seed responses. By identifying environmental conditions that affect the dormancy vs longevity correlation in the same way as previously identified naturally occurring loci, we have identified selective forces that probably shaped evolution for these important seed traits.

  10. Interaction between parental environment and genotype affects plant and seed performance in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    He, Hanzi; de Souza Vidigal, Deborah; Snoek, L. Basten; Schnabel, Sabine; Nijveen, Harm; Hilhorst, Henk; Bentsink, Leónie

    2014-01-01

    Seed performance after dispersal is highly dependent on parental environmental cues, especially during seed formation and maturation. Here we examine which environmental factors are the most dominant in this respect and whether their effects are dependent on the genotypes under investigation. We studied the influence of light intensity, photoperiod, temperature, nitrate, and phosphate during seed development on five plant attributes and thirteen seed attributes, using 12 Arabidopsis genotypes that have been reported to be affected in seed traits. As expected, the various environments during seed development resulted in changed plant and/or seed performances. Comparative analysis clearly indicated that, overall, temperature plays the most dominant role in both plant and seed performance, whereas light has a prominent impact on plant traits. In comparison to temperature and light, nitrate mildly affected some of the plant and seed traits while phosphate had even less influence on those traits. Moreover, clear genotype-by-environment interactions were identified. This was shown by the fact that individual genotypes responded differentially to the environmental conditions. Low temperature significantly increased seed dormancy and decreased seed longevity of NILDOG1 and cyp707a1-1, whereas low light intensity increased seed dormancy and decreased seed longevity of NILDOG3 and NILDOG6. This also indicates that different genetic and molecular pathways are involved in the plant and seed responses. By identifying environmental conditions that affect the dormancy vs longevity correlation in the same way as previously identified naturally occurring loci, we have identified selective forces that probably shaped evolution for these important seed traits. PMID:25240065

  11. Disruption of a DNA topoisomerase I gene affects morphogenesis in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Taku; Matsuhara, Shio; Abe, Mitsutomo; Komeda, Yoshibumi

    2002-09-01

    The genesis of phyllotaxis, which often is associated with the Fibonacci series of numbers, is an old unsolved puzzle in plant morphogenesis. Here, we show that disruption of an Arabidopsis topoisomerase (topo) I gene named TOP1alpha affects phyllotaxis and plant architecture. The divergence angles and internode lengths between two successive flowers were more random in the top1alpha mutant than in the wild type. The top1alpha plants sporadically produced multiple flowers from one node, and the number of floral organ primordia often was different. The mutation also caused the twisting of inflorescences and individual flowers and the serration of leaf margins. These morphological abnormalities indicate that TOP1alpha may play a critical role in the maintenance of a regular pattern of organ initiation. The top1alpha mutant transformed with the RNA interference construct for TOP1beta, another topo I gene arrayed tandemly with TOP1alpha, was found to be lethal at young seedling stages, suggesting that topo I activity is essential in plants.

  12. Maternal environment affects the genetic basis of seed dormancy in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Postma, Froukje M; Ågren, Jon

    2015-02-01

    The genetic basis of seed dormancy, a key life history trait important for adaptive evolution in plant populations, has yet been studied only using seeds produced under controlled conditions in greenhouse environments. However, dormancy is strongly affected by maternal environmental conditions, and interactions between seed genotype and maternal environment have been reported. Consequently, the genetic basis of dormancy of seeds produced under natural field conditions remains unclear. We examined the effect of maternal environment on the genetic architecture of seed dormancy using a recombinant inbred line (RIL) population derived from a cross between two locally adapted populations of Arabidopsis thaliana from Italy and Sweden. We mapped quantitative trait loci (QTL) for dormancy of seeds produced in the greenhouse and at the native field sites of the parental genotypes. The Italian genotype produced seeds with stronger dormancy at fruit maturation than did the Swedish genotype in all three environments, and the maternal field environments induced higher dormancy levels compared to the greenhouse environment in both genotypes. Across the three maternal environments, a total of nine dormancy QTL were detected, three of which were only detected among seeds matured in the field, and six of which showed significant QTL × maternal environment interactions. One QTL had a large effect on dormancy across all three environments and colocalized with the candidate gene DOG1. Our results demonstrate the importance of studying the genetic basis of putatively adaptive traits under relevant conditions. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. Waving and skewing: how gravity and the surface of growth media affect root development in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Oliva, Michele; Dunand, Christophe

    2007-01-01

    Arabidopsis seedlings growing on inclined agar surfaces exhibit characteristic root behaviours called 'waving' and 'skewing': the former consists of a series of undulations, whereas the latter is a deviation from the direction of gravity. Even though the precise basis of these growth patterns is not well understood, both gravity and the contact between the medium and the root are considered to be the major players that result in these processes. The influence of these forces on root surface-dependent behaviours can be verified by growing seedlings at different gel pitches: plants growing on vertical plates present roots with slight waving and skewing when compared with seedlings grown on plates held at minor angles of < 90 degrees . However, other factors are thought to modulate root growth on agar; for instance, it has been demonstrated that the presence and concentration of certain compounds in the medium (such as sucrose) and of drugs able to modify the plant cell cytoskeleton also affect skewing and waving. The recent discovery of an active role of ethylene on surface-dependent root behaviour, and the finding of new mutants showing anomalous growth, pave the way for a more detailed description of these phenomena.

  14. Common gas phase molecules from fungi affect seed germination and plant health in Arabidopsis thaliana

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Fungal volatile organic compounds (VOCs) play important ecophysiological roles in mediating inter-kingdom signaling with arthropods but less is known about their interactions with plants. In this study, Arabidopsis thaliana was used as a model in order to test the physiological effects of 23 common vapor-phase fungal VOCs that included alcohols, aldehydes, ketones, and other chemical classes. After exposure to a shared atmosphere with the 23 individual VOCs for 72 hrs, seeds were assayed for rate of germination and seedling formation; vegetative plants were assayed for fresh weight and chlorophyll concentration. All but five of the VOCs tested (1-decene, 2-n-heptylfuran, nonanal, geosmin and -limonene) had a significant effect in inhibiting either germination, seedling formation or both. Seedling formation was entirely inhibited by exposure to 1-octen-3-one, 2-ethylhexanal, 3-methylbutanal, and butanal. As assayed by a combination of fresh weight and chlorophyll concentration, 2-ethylhexanal had a negative impact on two-week-old vegetative plants. Three other compounds (1-octen-3-ol, 2-ethylhexanal, and 2-heptylfuran) decreased fresh weight alone. Most of the VOCs tested did not change the fresh weight or chlorophyll concentration of vegetative plants. In summary, when tested as single compounds, fungal VOCs affected A. thaliana in positive, negative or neutral ways. PMID:25045602

  15. CIPK23 is involved in iron acquisition of Arabidopsis by affecting ferric chelate reductase activity.

    PubMed

    Tian, Qiuying; Zhang, Xinxin; Yang, An; Wang, Tianzuo; Zhang, Wen-Hao

    2016-05-01

    Iron deficiency is one of the major limiting factors affecting quality and production of crops in calcareous soils. Numerous signaling molecules and transcription factors have been demonstrated to play a regulatory role in adaptation of plants to iron deficiency. However, the mechanisms underlying the iron deficiency-induced physiological processes remain to be fully dissected. Here, we demonstrated that the protein kinase CIPK23 was involved in iron acquisition. Lesion of CIPK23 rendered Arabidopsis mutants hypersensitive to iron deficiency, as evidenced by stronger chlorosis in young leaves and lower iron concentration than wild-type plants under iron-deficient conditions by down-regulating ferric chelate reductase activity. We found that iron deficiency evoked an increase in cytosolic Ca(2+) concentration and the elevated Ca(2+) would bind to CBL1/CBL9, leading to activation of CIPK23. These novel findings highlight the involvement of calcium-dependent CBL-CIPK23 complexes in the regulation of iron acquisition. Moreover, mutation of CIPK23 led to changes in contents of mineral elements, suggesting that CBL-CIPK23 complexes could be as "nutritional sensors" to sense and regulate the mineral homeostasis in Arabisopsis.

  16. Arabidopsis FH1 Formin Affects Cotyledon Pavement Cell Shape by Modulating Cytoskeleton Dynamics.

    PubMed

    Rosero, Amparo; Oulehlová, Denisa; Stillerová, Lenka; Schiebertová, Petra; Grunt, Michal; Žárský, Viktor; Cvrčková, Fatima

    2016-03-01

    Plant cell morphogenesis involves concerted rearrangements of microtubules and actin microfilaments. We previously reported that FH1, the main Arabidopsis thaliana housekeeping Class I membrane-anchored formin, contributes to actin dynamics and microtubule stability in rhizodermis cells. Here we examine the effects of mutations affecting FH1 (At3g25500) on cell morphogenesis and above-ground organ development in seedlings, as well as on cytoskeletal organization and dynamics, using a combination of confocal and variable angle epifluorescence microscopy with a pharmacological approach. Homozygous fh1 mutants exhibited cotyledon epinasty and had larger cotyledon pavement cells with more pronounced lobes than the wild type. The pavement cell shape alterations were enhanced by expression of the fluorescent microtubule marker GFP-microtubule-associated protein 4 (MAP4). Mutant cotyledon pavement cells exhibited reduced density and increased stability of microfilament bundles, as well as enhanced dynamics of microtubules. Analogous results were also obtained upon treatments with the formin inhibitor SMIFH2 (small molecule inhibitor of formin homology 2 domains). Pavement cell shape in wild-type (wt) and fh1 plants in some situations exhibited a differential response towards anti-cytoskeletal drugs, especially the microtubule disruptor oryzalin. Our observations indicate that FH1 participates in the control of microtubule dynamics, possibly via its effects on actin, subsequently influencing cell morphogenesis and macroscopic organ development. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Japanese Society of Plant Physiologists. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  17. Genes of the most conserved WOX clade in plants affect root and flower development in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    2008-01-01

    Background The Wuschel related homeobox (WOX) family proteins are key regulators implicated in the determination of cell fate in plants by preventing cell differentiation. A recent WOX phylogeny, based on WOX homeodomains, showed that all of the Physcomitrella patens and Selaginella moellendorffii WOX proteins clustered into a single orthologous group. We hypothesized that members of this group might preferentially share a significant part of their function in phylogenetically distant organisms. Hence, we first validated the limits of the WOX13 orthologous group (WOX13 OG) using the occurrence of other clade specific signatures and conserved intron insertion sites. Secondly, a functional analysis using expression data and mutants was undertaken. Results The WOX13 OG contained the most conserved plant WOX proteins including the only WOX detected in the highly proliferating basal unicellular and photosynthetic organism Ostreococcus tauri. A large expansion of the WOX family was observed after the separation of mosses from other land plants and before monocots and dicots have arisen. In Arabidopsis thaliana, AtWOX13 was dynamically expressed during primary and lateral root initiation and development, in gynoecium and during embryo development. AtWOX13 appeared to affect the floral transition. An intriguing clade, represented by the functional AtWOX14 gene inside the WOX13 OG, was only found in the Brassicaceae. Compared to AtWOX13, the gene expression profile of AtWOX14 was restricted to the early stages of lateral root formation and specific to developing anthers. A mutational insertion upstream of the AtWOX14 homeodomain sequence led to abnormal root development, a delay in the floral transition and premature anther differentiation. Conclusion Our data provide evidence in favor of the WOX13 OG as the clade containing the most conserved WOX genes and established a functional link to organ initiation and development in Arabidopsis, most likely by preventing premature

  18. Two ancestral APETALA3 homologs from the basal angiosperm Magnolia wufengensis (Magnoliaceae) can affect flower development of Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Jing, Danlong; Liu, Zhixiong; Zhang, Bo; Ma, Jiang; Han, Yiyang; Chen, Faju

    2014-03-01

    APETALA3 (AP3) homologs are involved in specifying petal and stamen identities in core eudicot model organisms. In order to investigate the functional conservation of AP3 homologs between core eudicots and basal angiosperm, we isolated and identified two AP3 homologs from Magnolia wufengensis, a woody basal angiosperm belonging to the family Magnoliaceae. Sequence and phylogenetic analyses revealed that both genes are clade members of the paleoAP3 lineage. Moreover, a highly conserved motif of paleoAP3 is found in the C-terminal regions of MAwuAP3_1/2 proteins, but the PI-derived motif, usually present in AP3/DEF-like lineage members, is missing. Semi-quantitative and real time PCR analyses showed that the expression of MAwuAP3_1/2 was restricted to tepals and stamens. However, the MAwuAP3_1 expression was maintained at a high level during the rapid increased in size of tepals and stamens, while MAwuAP3_2 mRNA was only detected at the early stage of tepal and stamen development. Furthermore, the expression of MAwuAP3_1/2 in transgenic Arabidopsis causes phenotypic changes which partly resemble those caused by ectopic expressions of the endogenous AP3 gene. Moreover, the 35S::MAwuAP3_1/2 transgenic Arabidopsis can be used partially to rescue the loss-of-function ap3 mutant (ap3-3) of Arabidopsis. These findings call for a more comprehensive understanding of the B-functional evolution from basal angiosperm to core eudicot clades.

  19. Light, genotype, and abscisic acid affect chloroplast positioning in guard cells of Arabidopsis thaliana leaves in distinct ways.

    PubMed

    Königer, Martina; Jessen, Brita; Yang, Rui; Sittler, Dorothea; Harris, Gary C

    2010-09-01

    The goal of this study was to investigate the effects of light intensity, genotype, and various chemical treatments on chloroplast movement in guard cells of Arabidopsis thaliana leaves. After treatment at various light intensities (dark, low, and high light), leaf discs were fixed with glutaraldehyde, and imaged using confocal laser microscopy. Each chloroplast was assigned a horizontal (close to pore, center, or epidermal side) and vertical (outer, middle, inner) position. White light had a distinct effect on chloroplast positioning, most notably under high light (HL) when chloroplasts on the upper leaf surface of wild-type (WT) moved from epidermal and center positions toward the pore. This was not the case for phot1-5/phot2-1 or phot2-1 plants, thus phototropins are essential for chloroplast positioning in guard cells. In npq1-2 mutants, fewer chloroplasts moved to the pore position under HL than in WT plants, indicating that white light can affect chloroplast positioning also in a zeaxanthin-dependent way. Cytochalasin B inhibited the movement of chloroplasts to the pore under HL, while oryzalin did not, supporting the idea that actin plays a role in the movement. The movement along actin cables is dependent on CHUP1 since chloroplast positioning in chup1 was significantly altered. Abscisic acid (ABA) caused most chloroplasts in WT and phot1-5/phot2-1 to be localized in the center, middle part of the guard cells irrespective of light treatment. This indicates that not only light but also water stress influences chloroplast positioning.

  20. Cytonuclear interactions affect adaptive traits of the annual plant Arabidopsis thaliana in the field

    PubMed Central

    Roux, Fabrice; Mary-Huard, Tristan; Barillot, Elise; Wenes, Estelle; Botran, Lucy; Durand, Stéphanie; Villoutreix, Romain; Martin-Magniette, Marie-Laure; Camilleri, Christine; Budar, Françoise

    2016-01-01

    Although the contribution of cytonuclear interactions to plant fitness variation is relatively well documented at the interspecific level, the prevalence of cytonuclear interactions at the intraspecific level remains poorly investigated. In this study, we set up a field experiment to explore the range of effects that cytonuclear interactions have on fitness-related traits in Arabidopsis thaliana. To do so, we created a unique series of 56 cytolines resulting from cytoplasmic substitutions among eight natural accessions reflecting within-species genetic diversity. An assessment of these cytolines and their parental lines scored for 28 adaptive whole-organism phenotypes showed that a large proportion of phenotypic traits (23 of 28) were affected by cytonuclear interactions. The effects of these interactions varied from slight but frequent across cytolines to strong in some specific parental pairs. Two parental pairs accounted for half of the significant pairwise interactions. In one parental pair, Ct-1/Sha, we observed symmetrical phenotypic responses between the two nuclear backgrounds when combined with specific cytoplasms, suggesting nuclear differentiation at loci involved in cytonuclear epistasis. In contrast, asymmetrical phenotypic responses were observed in another parental pair, Cvi-0/Sha. In the Cvi-0 nuclear background, fecundity and phenology-related traits were strongly affected by the Sha cytoplasm, leading to a modified reproductive strategy without penalizing total seed production. These results indicate that natural variation in cytoplasmic and nuclear genomes interact to shape integrative traits that contribute to adaptation, thereby suggesting that cytonuclear interactions can play a major role in the evolutionary dynamics of A. thaliana. PMID:26979961

  1. Seed tolerance to deterioration in arabidopsis is affected by virus infection.

    PubMed

    Bueso, Eduardo; Serrano, Ramón; Pallás, Vicente; Sánchez-Navarro, Jesús A

    2017-07-01

    Seed longevity is the period during which the plant seed is able to germinate. This property is strongly influenced by environment conditions experienced by seeds during their formation and storage. In the present study we have analyzed how the biotic stress derived from the infection of Cauliflower mosaic virus (CaMV), Turnip mosaic virus (TuMV), Cucumber mosaic virus (CMV) and Alfalfa mosaic virus (AMV) affects seed tolerance to deterioration measuring germination rates after an accelerated aging treatment. Arabidopsis wild type plants infected with AMV and CMV rendered seeds with improved tolerance to deterioration when compared to the non-inoculated plants. On the other hand, CaMV infection generated seeds more sensitive to deterioration. No seeds were obtained from TuMV infected plants. Similar pattern of viral effects was observed in the double mutant athb22 athb25, which is more sensitive to accelerated seed aging than wild type. However, we observed a significant reduction of the seed germination for CMV (65% vs 55%) and healthy (50% vs 30%) plants in these mutants. The seed quality differences were overcomed using the A. thaliana athb25-1D dominant mutant, which over accumulated gibberellic acid (GA), except for TuMV which generated some siliques with low seed tolerance to deterioration. For AMV and TuMV (in athb25-1D), the seed quality correlated with the accumulation of the messengers of the gibberellin 3-oxidase family, the mucilage of the seed and the GA1. For CMV and CaMV it was not a good correlation suggesting that other factors are affecting seed viability. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  2. Leaf biomechanical properties in Arabidopsis thaliana polysaccharide mutants affect drought survival.

    PubMed

    Balsamo, Ronald; Boak, Merewyn; Nagle, Kayla; Peethambaran, Bela; Layton, Bradley

    2015-11-26

    Individual sugars are the building blocks of cell wall polysaccharides, which in turn comprise a plant׳s overall architectural structure. But which sugars play the most prominent role in maintaining a plant׳s mechanical stability during large cellular deformations induced by drought? We investigated the individual contributions of several genes that are involved in the synthesis of monosaccharides which are important for cell wall structure. We then measured drought tolerance and mechanical integrity during simulated drought in Arabidopsis thaliana. To assess mechanical properties, we designed a small-scale tensile tester for measuring failure strain, ultimate tensile stress, work to failure, toughness, and elastic modulus of 6-week-old leaves in both hydrated and drought-simulated states. Col-0 mutants used in this study include those deficient in lignin, cellulose, components of hemicellulose such as xylose and fucose, the pectic components arabinose and rhamnose, as well as mutants with enhanced arabinose and total pectin content. We found that drought tolerance is correlated to the mechanical and architectural stability of leaves as they experience dehydration. Of the mutants, S096418 with mutations for reduced xylose and galactose was the least drought tolerant, while the arabinose-altered CS8578 mutants were the least affected by water loss. There were also notable correlations between drought tolerance and mechanical properties in the diminished rhamnose mutant, CS8575 and the dehydrogenase-disrupted S120106. Our findings suggest that components of hemicellulose and pectins affect leaf biomechanical properties and may play an important role in the ability of this model system to survive drought.

  3. Suppression of Arabidopsis flowering by near-null magnetic field is affected by light.

    PubMed

    Xu, Chunxiao; Li, Yue; Yu, Yang; Zhang, Yuxia; Wei, Shufeng

    2015-09-01

    We previously reported that a near-null magnetic field suppressed Arabidopsis flowering in white light, which might be related to the function modification of cryptochrome (CRY). To further demonstrate that the effect of near-null magnetic field on Arabidopsis flowering is associated with CRY, Arabidopsis wild type and CRY mutant plants were grown in the near-null magnetic field under blue or red light with different light cycle and photosynthetic photon flux density. We found that Arabidopsis flowering was significantly suppressed by near-null magnetic field in blue light with lower intensity (10 µmol/m(2) /s) and shorter cycle (12 h period: 6 h light/6 h dark). However, flowering time of CRY1/CRY2 mutants did not show any difference between plants grown in near-null magnetic field and in local geomagnetic field under detected light conditions. In red light, no significant difference was shown in Arabidopsis flowering between plants in near-null magnetic field and local geomagnetic field under detected light cycles and intensities. These results suggest that changes of blue light cycle and intensity alter the effect of near-null magnetic field on Arabidopsis flowering, which is mediated by CRY.

  4. Functional Dissection of Sugar Signals Affecting Gene Expression in Arabidopsis thaliana

    PubMed Central

    Kunz, Sabine; Pesquet, Edouard; Kleczkowski, Leszek A.

    2014-01-01

    Background Sugars modulate expression of hundreds of genes in plants. Previous studies on sugar signaling, using intact plants or plant tissues, were hampered by tissue heterogeneity, uneven sugar transport and/or inter-conversions of the applied sugars. This, in turn, could obscure the identity of a specific sugar that acts as a signal affecting expression of given gene in a given tissue or cell-type. Methodology/Principal Findings To bypass those biases, we have developed a novel biological system, based on stem-cell-like Arabidopsis suspension culture. The cells were grown in a hormone-free medium and were sustained on xylose as the only carbon source. Using functional genomics we have identified 290 sugar responsive genes, responding rapidly (within 1 h) and specifically to low concentration (1 mM) of glucose, fructose and/or sucrose. For selected genes, the true nature of the signaling sugar molecules and sites of sugar perception were further clarified using non-metabolizable sugar analogues. Using both transgenic and wild-type A. thaliana seedlings, it was shown that the expression of selected sugar-responsive genes was not restricted to a specific tissue or cell type and responded to photoperiod-related changes in sugar availability. This suggested that sugar-responsiveness of genes identified in the cell culture system was not biased toward heterotrophic background and resembled that in whole plants. Conclusions Altogether, our research strategy, using a combination of cell culture and whole plants, has provided an unequivocal evidence for the identity of sugar-responsive genes and the identity of the sugar signaling molecules, independently from their inter-conversions or use for energy metabolism. PMID:24950222

  5. Functional dissection of sugar signals affecting gene expression in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Kunz, Sabine; Pesquet, Edouard; Kleczkowski, Leszek A

    2014-01-01

    Sugars modulate expression of hundreds of genes in plants. Previous studies on sugar signaling, using intact plants or plant tissues, were hampered by tissue heterogeneity, uneven sugar transport and/or inter-conversions of the applied sugars. This, in turn, could obscure the identity of a specific sugar that acts as a signal affecting expression of given gene in a given tissue or cell-type. To bypass those biases, we have developed a novel biological system, based on stem-cell-like Arabidopsis suspension culture. The cells were grown in a hormone-free medium and were sustained on xylose as the only carbon source. Using functional genomics we have identified 290 sugar responsive genes, responding rapidly (within 1 h) and specifically to low concentration (1 mM) of glucose, fructose and/or sucrose. For selected genes, the true nature of the signaling sugar molecules and sites of sugar perception were further clarified using non-metabolizable sugar analogues. Using both transgenic and wild-type A. thaliana seedlings, it was shown that the expression of selected sugar-responsive genes was not restricted to a specific tissue or cell type and responded to photoperiod-related changes in sugar availability. This suggested that sugar-responsiveness of genes identified in the cell culture system was not biased toward heterotrophic background and resembled that in whole plants. Altogether, our research strategy, using a combination of cell culture and whole plants, has provided an unequivocal evidence for the identity of sugar-responsive genes and the identity of the sugar signaling molecules, independently from their inter-conversions or use for energy metabolism.

  6. Arabidopsis flower specific defense gene expression patterns affect resistance to pathogens.

    PubMed

    Ederli, Luisa; Dawe, Adam; Pasqualini, Stefania; Quaglia, Mara; Xiong, Liming; Gehring, Chris

    2015-01-01

    We investigated whether the Arabidopsis flower evolved protective measures to increase reproductive success. Firstly, analyses of available transcriptome data show that the most highly expressed transcripts in the closed sepal (stage 12) are enriched in genes with roles in responses to chemical stimuli and cellular metabolic processes. At stage 15, there is enrichment in transcripts with a role in responses to biotic stimuli. Comparative analyses between the sepal and petal in the open flower mark an over-representation of transcripts with a role in responses to stress and catalytic activity. Secondly, the content of the biotic defense-associated phytohormone salicylic acid (SA) in sepals and petals is significantly higher than in leaves. To understand whether the high levels of stress responsive transcripts and the higher SA content affect defense, wild-type plants (Col-0) and transgenic plants defective in SA accumulation (nahG) were challenged with the biotrophic fungus Golovinomyces cichoracearum, the causal agent of powdery mildew, and the necrotrophic fungus Botrytis cinerea. NahG leaves were more sensitive than those of Col-0, suggesting that in leaves SA has a role in the defense against biotrophs. In contrast, sepals and petals of both genotypes were resistant to G. cichoracearum, indicating that in the flower, resistance to the biotrophic pathogen is not critically dependent on SA, but likely dependent on the up-regulation of stress-responsive genes. Since sepals and petals of both genotypes are equally susceptible to B. cinerea, we conclude that neither stress-response genes nor increased SA accumulation offers protection against the necrotrophic pathogen. These results are interpreted in the light of the distinctive role of the flower and we propose that in the early stages, the sepal may act as a chemical defense barrier of the developing reproductive structures against biotrophic pathogens.

  7. Timing of shoot development transitions affects degree of perenniality in Arabidopsis lyrata (Brassicaceae).

    PubMed

    Remington, David L; Figueroa, Jennifer; Rane, Mitali

    2015-09-17

    Perenniality is best understood in quantitative terms, involving the relationship between production vs. turnover of meristems, biomass, or energy reserves. Previous quantitative trait locus (QTL) studies using divergent populations of the perennial rock cress Arabidopsis lyrata have shown that trade-offs in vegetative growth vs. reproduction are due to cascading effects of differences in early vegetative development, which contribute to local adaptation. However, details of the developmental differences and how they affect perenniality remained unclear. In this study, we investigated in detail the developmental differences in perenniality between populations. A. lyrata from Norway and North Carolina populations, representing contrasting environments and degrees of perenniality, were grown under controlled conditions, and data were collected on plant phenology and shoot-level development. We tested hypotheses that differences in perenniality involve strict allocation of lateral meristems to vegetative vs. reproductive fates, or alternatively quantitative effects of pre-reproductive vegetative development. The two populations showed large differences in the degree of vegetative development on individual shoots prior to reproductive transitions. The number of leaves produced on shoots prior to bolting, and not strict meristem allocation or variation in apical dominance, was able to explain variation in the number of inflorescences on individual plants. These results suggested that allocation of time to shoot vegetative vs. reproductive development could be a major factor in resource allocation differences between the populations. Based on these results and those of previous QTL studies, we propose a model in which the degree of shoot vegetative development shapes the developmental context for reproduction and subsequent vegetative growth in different environments. Climate-specific effects of shoot development patterns on reproductive output and survival may result in

  8. Arabidopsis flower specific defense gene expression patterns affect resistance to pathogens

    PubMed Central

    Ederli, Luisa; Dawe, Adam; Pasqualini, Stefania; Quaglia, Mara; Xiong, Liming; Gehring, Chris

    2015-01-01

    We investigated whether the Arabidopsis flower evolved protective measures to increase reproductive success. Firstly, analyses of available transcriptome data show that the most highly expressed transcripts in the closed sepal (stage 12) are enriched in genes with roles in responses to chemical stimuli and cellular metabolic processes. At stage 15, there is enrichment in transcripts with a role in responses to biotic stimuli. Comparative analyses between the sepal and petal in the open flower mark an over-representation of transcripts with a role in responses to stress and catalytic activity. Secondly, the content of the biotic defense-associated phytohormone salicylic acid (SA) in sepals and petals is significantly higher than in leaves. To understand whether the high levels of stress responsive transcripts and the higher SA content affect defense, wild-type plants (Col-0) and transgenic plants defective in SA accumulation (nahG) were challenged with the biotrophic fungus Golovinomyces cichoracearum, the causal agent of powdery mildew, and the necrotrophic fungus Botrytis cinerea. NahG leaves were more sensitive than those of Col-0, suggesting that in leaves SA has a role in the defense against biotrophs. In contrast, sepals and petals of both genotypes were resistant to G. cichoracearum, indicating that in the flower, resistance to the biotrophic pathogen is not critically dependent on SA, but likely dependent on the up-regulation of stress-responsive genes. Since sepals and petals of both genotypes are equally susceptible to B. cinerea, we conclude that neither stress-response genes nor increased SA accumulation offers protection against the necrotrophic pathogen. These results are interpreted in the light of the distinctive role of the flower and we propose that in the early stages, the sepal may act as a chemical defense barrier of the developing reproductive structures against biotrophic pathogens. PMID:25750645

  9. Increasing Phosphatidylinositol (4,5)-Bisphosphate Biosynthesis Affects Basal Signaling and Chloroplast Metabolism in Arabidopsis thaliana

    PubMed Central

    Im, Yang Ju; Smith, Caroline M.; Phillippy, Brian Q.; Strand, Deserah; Kramer, David M.; Grunden, Amy M.; Boss, Wendy F.

    2014-01-01

    One challenge in studying the second messenger inositol(1,4,5)-trisphosphate (InsP3) is that it is present in very low amounts and increases only transiently in response to stimuli. To identify events downstream of InsP3, we generated transgenic plants constitutively expressing the high specific activity, human phosphatidylinositol 4-phosphate 5-kinase Iα (HsPIPKIα). PIP5K is the enzyme that synthesizes phosphatidylinositol (4,5)-bisphosphate (PtdIns(4,5)P2); this reaction is flux limiting in InsP3 biosynthesis in plants. Plasma membranes from transgenic Arabidopsis expressing HsPIPKIα had 2–3 fold higher PIP5K specific activity, and basal InsP3 levels in seedlings and leaves were >2-fold higher than wild type. Although there was no significant difference in photosynthetic electron transport, HsPIPKIα plants had significantly higher starch (2–4 fold) and 20% higher anthocyanin compared to controls. Starch content was higher both during the day and at the end of dark period. In addition, transcripts of genes involved in starch metabolism such as SEX1 (glucan water dikinase) and SEX4 (phosphoglucan phosphatase), DBE (debranching enzyme), MEX1 (maltose transporter), APL3 (ADP-glucose pyrophosphorylase) and glucose-6-phosphate transporter (Glc6PT) were up-regulated in the HsPIPKIα plants. Our results reveal that increasing the phosphoinositide (PI) pathway affects chloroplast carbon metabolism and suggest that InsP3 is one component of an inter-organelle signaling network regulating chloroplast metabolism. PMID:27135490

  10. A near-null magnetic field affects cryptochrome-related hypocotyl growth and flowering in Arabidopsis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Chunxiao; Yin, Xiao; Lv, Yan; Wu, Changzhe; Zhang, Yuxia; Song, Tao

    2012-03-01

    The blue light receptor, cryptochrome, has been suggested to act as a magnetoreceptor based on the proposition that photochemical reactions are involved in sensing the geomagnetic field. But the effects of the geomagnetic field on cryptochrome remain unclear. Although the functions of cryptochrome have been well demonstrated for Arabidopsis, the effect of the geomagnetic field on the growth of Arabidopsis and its mechanism of action are poorly understood. We eliminated the local geomagnetic field to grow Arabidopsis in a near-null magnetic field and found that the inhibition of Arabidopsis hypocotyl growth by white light was weakened, and flowering time was delayed. The expressions of three cryptochrome-signaling-related genes, PHYB, CO and FT also changed; the transcript level of PHYB was elevated ca. 40%, and that of CO and FT was reduced ca. 40% and 50%, respectively. These data suggest that the effects of a near-null magnetic field on Arabidopsis are cryptochrome-related, which may be revealed by a modification of the active state of cryptochrome and the subsequent signaling cascade.

  11. Identification of QTLs affecting scopolin and scopoletin biosynthesis in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Siwinska, Joanna; Kadzinski, Leszek; Banasiuk, Rafal; Gwizdek-Wisniewska, Anna; Olry, Alexandre; Banecki, Bogdan; Lojkowska, Ewa; Ihnatowicz, Anna

    2014-10-18

    Scopoletin and its glucoside scopolin are important secondary metabolites synthesized in plants as a defense mechanism against various environmental stresses. They belong to coumarins, a class of phytochemicals with significant biological activities that is widely used in medical application and cosmetics industry. Although numerous studies showed that a variety of coumarins occurs naturally in several plant species, the details of coumarins biosynthesis and its regulation is not well understood. It was shown previously that coumarins (predominantly scopolin and scopoletin) occur in Arabidopsis thaliana (Arabidopsis) roots, but until now nothing is known about natural variation of their accumulation in this model plant. Therefore, the genetic architecture of coumarins biosynthesis in Arabidopsis has not been studied before. Here, the variation in scopolin and scopoletin content was assessed by comparing seven Arabidopsis accessions. Subsequently, a quantitative trait locus (QTL) mapping was performed with an Advanced Intercross Recombinant Inbred Lines (AI-RILs) mapping population EstC (Est-1 × Col). In order to reveal the genetic basis of both scopolin and scopoletin biosynthesis, two sets of methanol extracts were made from Arabidopsis roots and one set was additionally subjected to enzymatic hydrolysis prior to quantification done by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). We identified one QTL for scopolin and five QTLs for scopoletin accumulation. The identified QTLs explained 13.86% and 37.60% of the observed phenotypic variation in scopolin and scopoletin content, respectively. In silico analysis of genes located in the associated QTL intervals identified a number of possible candidate genes involved in coumarins biosynthesis. Together, our results demonstrate for the first time that Arabidopsis is an excellent model for studying the genetic and molecular basis of natural variation in coumarins biosynthesis in plants. It additionally provides a basis

  12. An eukaryotic translation initiation factor, AteIF5A-2, affects cadmium accumulation and sensitivity in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Xu, Xiao-Yan; Ding, Zhong-Jie; Chen, Lei; Yan, Jin-Ying; Li, Gui-Xin; Zheng, Shao-Jian

    2015-10-01

    Cadmium (Cd) is one of the most toxic elements and can be accumulated in plants easily; meanwhile, eIF5A is a highly conserved protein in all eukaryotic organisms. The present work tried to investigate whether eIF5A is involved in Cd accumulation and sensitivity in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana L.) by comparing the wild-type Columbia-0 (Col-0) with a knockdown mutant of AteIF5A-2, fbr12-3 under Cd stress conditions. The results showed that the mutant fbr12-3 accumulated more Cd in roots and shoots and had significantly lower chlorophyll content, shorter root length, and smaller biomass, suggesting that downregulation of AteIF5A-2 makes the mutant more Cd sensitive. Real-time polymerase chain reaction revealed that the expressions of metal transporters involved in Cd uptake and translocation including IRT1, ZIP1, AtNramp3, and AtHMA4 were significantly increased but the expressions of PCS1 and PCS2 related to Cd detoxification were decreased notably in fbr12-3 compared with Col-0. As a result, an increase in MDA and H2 O2 content but decrease in root trolox, glutathione and proline content under Cd stress was observed, indicating that a severer oxidative stress occurs in the mutant. All these results demonstrated for the first time that AteIF5A influences Cd sensitivity by affecting Cd uptake, accumulation, and detoxification in Arabidopsis.

  13. Putrescine overproduction does not affect the catabolism of spermidine and spermine in poplar and Arabidopsis

    Treesearch

    Lin Shao; Pratiksha Bhatnagar; Rajtilak Majumdar; Rakesh Minocha; Subhash C. Minocha

    2014-01-01

    The effect of up-regulation of putrescine (Put) production by genetic manipulation on the turnover of spermidine (Spd) and spermine (Spm) was investigated in transgenic cells of poplar (Populus nigra x maximowiczii) and seedlings of Arabidopsis thaliana. Several-fold increase in Put production was achieved by expressing a mouse...

  14. Stability of small ubiquitin-like modifier (SUMO) proteases OVERLY TOLERANT TO SALT1 and -2 modulates salicylic acid signalling and SUMO1/2 conjugation in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Bailey, Mark; Srivastava, Anjil; Conti, Lucio; Nelis, Stuart; Zhang, Cunjin; Florance, Hannah; Love, Andrew; Milner, Joel; Napier, Richard; Grant, Murray; Sadanandom, Ari

    2016-01-01

    Small ubiquitin-like modifier proteases 1 and 2 (SUMO1/2) have been linked to the regulation of salicylic acid (SA)-mediated defence signalling in Arabidopsis thaliana. In order to define the role of the SUMO proteases OVERLY TOLERANT TO SALT1 and -2 (OTS1/2) in defence and to provide insight into SUMO1/2-mediated regulation of SA signalling, we examined the status of SA-mediated defences in ots1/2 mutants. The ots1 ots2 double mutant displayed enhanced resistance to virulent Pseudomonas syringae and higher levels of SA compared with wild-type (WT) plants. Furthermore, ots1 ots2 mutants exhibited upregulated expression of the SA biosynthesis gene ICS1 in addition to enhanced SA-responsive ICS1 expression beyond that of WT. SA stimulated OTS1/2 degradation and promoted accumulation of SUMO1/2 conjugates. These results indicate that OTS1 and -2 act in a feedback loop in SA signalling and that de novo OTS1/2 synthesis works antagonistically to SA-promoted degradation, adjusting the abundance of OTS1/2 to moderate SA signalling. Accumulation of SUMO1/2 conjugates coincides with SA-promoted OTS degradation and may play a positive role in SA-mediated signalling in addition to its repressive roles reported elsewhere.

  15. Glycerol Affects Root Development through Regulation of Multiple Pathways in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Jun; Zhang, Yonghong; Wang, Jinfang; Zhou, Yongming

    2014-01-01

    Glycerol metabolism has been well studied biochemically. However, the means by which glycerol functions in plant development is not well understood. This study aimed to investigate the mechanism underlying the effects of glycerol on root development in Arabidopsis thaliana. Exogenous glycerol inhibited primary root growth and altered lateral root development in wild-type plants. These phenotypes appeared concurrently with increased endogenous glycerol-3-phosphate (G3P) and H2O2 contents in seedlings, and decreased phosphate levels in roots. Upon glycerol treatment, G3P level and root development did not change in glycerol kinase mutant gli1, but G3P level increased in gpdhc1 and fad-gpdh mutants, which resulted in more severely impaired root development. Overexpression of the FAD-GPDH gene attenuated the alterations in G3P, phosphate and H2O2 levels, leading to increased tolerance to exogenous glycerol, which suggested that FAD-GPDH plays an important role in modulating this response. Free indole-3-acetic acid (IAA) content increased by 46%, and DR5pro::GUS staining increased in the stele cells of the root meristem under glycerol treatment, suggesting that glycerol likely alters normal auxin distribution. Decreases in PIN1 and PIN7 expression, β-glucuronidase (GUS) staining in plants expressing PIN7pro::GUS and green fluorescent protein (GFP) fluorescence in plants expressing PIN7pro::PIN7-GFP were observed, indicating that polar auxin transport in the root was downregulated under glycerol treatment. Analyses with auxin-related mutants showed that TIR1 and ARF7 were involved in regulating root growth under glycerol treatment. Glycerol-treated plants showed significant reductions in root meristem size and cell number as revealed by CYCB1;1pro::GUS staining. Furthermore, the expression of CDKA and CYCB1 decreased significantly in treated plants compared with control plants, implying possible alterations in cell cycle progression. Our data demonstrated that glycerol

  16. Changes in gravity affect gene expression, protein modulation and metabolite pools of arabidopsis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hampp, R.; Martzivanou, M.; Maier, R. M.; Magel, E.

    Callus cultures of Arabidopsis thaliana (cv. Columbia) in Petri dishes / suspension cultures were exposed to altered g-forces by centrifugation (1 to 10 g), klinorotation, and μ g (sounding rocket flights). Using semi-quantitative RT-PCR, transcripts of genes coding for metabolic key enzymes (ADP-glucose pyrophosphorylase, ADPG-PP; ß-amylase, fructose-1,6-bisphosphatase, FBPase; glyceraldehyde-P dehydrogenase, GAPDH; hydroxymethylglutaryl-CoA reductase, HMG; phenylalanine-ammonium-lyase, PAL; PEP carboxylase, PEPC) were used to monitor threshold conditions for g-number (all) and time of exposure (ß-amylase) which led to altered amounts of the gene product. Exposure to approx. 5 g and higher for 1h resulted in altered transcript levels: transcripts of ß-amylase, PAL, and PEPC were increased, those of ADPG-PP decreased, while those of FBPase, GAPDH, and HMG were not affected. This probably indicates a shift from starch synthesis to starch degradation and increased rates of anaplerosis (PEPC: supply of ketoacids for amino acid synthesis). In order to get more information about g-related effects on gene expression, we used a 1h-exposure to 7 g for a microarray analysis. Transcripts of more than 200 genes were significantly increased in amount (ratio 7g / 1g control; 21.6 and larger). They fall into several categories. Transcripts coding for enzymes of major pathways form the largest group (25%), followed by gene products involved in cellular organisation and cell wall formation / rearrangement (17%), signalling, phosphorylation/dephosphorylation (12%), proteolysis and transport (10% each), hormone synthesis plus related events (8%), defense (4%), stress-response (2%), and gravisensing (2%). Many of the alterations are part of a general stress response, but some changes related to the synthesis / rearrangement of cell wall components could be more hyper-g-specific. Using macroarrays with selected genes according to our hypergravity study (metabolism / signalling

  17. An Exo2 derivative affects ER and Golgi morphology and vacuolar sorting in a tissue-specific manner in arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Sorieul, Mathias; Langhans, Markus; Guetzoyan, Lucie; Hillmer, Stefan; Clarkson, Guy; Lord, John Michael; Roberts, Lynne M; Robinson, David G; Spooner, Robert A; Frigerio, Lorenzo

    2011-11-01

    We screened a panel of compounds derived from Exo2 - a drug that perturbs post-Golgi compartments and trafficking in mammalian cells - for their effect on the secretory pathway in Arabidopsis root epidermal cells. While Exo2 and most related compounds had no significant effect, one Exo2 derivative, named LG8, induced severe morphological alterations in both the Golgi (at high concentrations) and the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). LG8 causes the ER to form foci of interconnecting tubules, which at the ultrastructural level appear similar to those previously reported in Arabidopsis roots after treatment with the herbicide oryzalin. In cotyledonary leaves, LG8 causes redistribution of a trans Golgi network (TGN) marker to the vacuole. LG8 affects the anterograde secretory pathway by inducing secretion of vacuolar cargo and preventing the brassinosteroid receptor BRI1 from reaching the plasma membrane. Uptake and arrival at the TGN of the endocytic marker FM4-64 is not affected. Unlike the ADP ribosylation factor-GTP exchange factor (ARF-GEF) inhibitor brefeldin A (BFA), LG8 affects these post-Golgi events without causing the formation of BFA bodies. Up to concentrations of 50 µm, the effects of LG8 are reversible. © 2011 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  18. Enhanced Abscisic Acid-Mediated Responses in nia1nia2noa1-2 Triple Mutant Impaired in NIA/NR- and AtNOA1-Dependent Nitric Oxide Biosynthesis in Arabidopsis1[W

    PubMed Central

    Lozano-Juste, Jorge; León, José

    2010-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) regulates a wide range of plant processes from development to environmental adaptation. Despite its reported regulatory functions, it remains unclear how NO is synthesized in plants. We have generated a triple nia1nia2noa1-2 mutant that is impaired in nitrate reductase (NIA/NR)- and Nitric Oxide-Associated1 (AtNOA1)-mediated NO biosynthetic pathways. NO content in roots of nia1nia2 and noa1-2 plants was lower than in wild-type plants and below the detection limit in nia1nia2noa1-2 plants. NIA/NR- and AtNOA1-mediated biosynthesis of NO were thus active and responsible for most of the NO production in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana). The nia1nia2noa1-2 plants displayed reduced size, fertility, and seed germination potential but increased dormancy and resistance to water deficit. The increasing deficiency in NO of nia1nia2, noa1-2, and nia1nia2noa1-2 plants correlated with increased seed dormancy, hypersensitivity to abscisic acid (ABA) in seed germination and establishment, as well as dehydration resistance. In nia1nia2noa1-2 plants, enhanced drought tolerance was due to a very efficient stomata closure and inhibition of opening by ABA, thus uncoupling NO from ABA-triggered responses in NO-deficient guard cells. The NO-deficient mutants in NIA/NR- and AtNOA1-mediated pathways in combination with the triple mutant will be useful tools to functionally characterize the role of NO and the contribution of both biosynthetic pathways in regulating plant development and defense. PMID:20007448

  19. Enhanced abscisic acid-mediated responses in nia1nia2noa1-2 triple mutant impaired in NIA/NR- and AtNOA1-dependent nitric oxide biosynthesis in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Lozano-Juste, Jorge; León, José

    2010-02-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) regulates a wide range of plant processes from development to environmental adaptation. Despite its reported regulatory functions, it remains unclear how NO is synthesized in plants. We have generated a triple nia1nia2noa1-2 mutant that is impaired in nitrate reductase (NIA/NR)- and Nitric Oxide-Associated1 (AtNOA1)-mediated NO biosynthetic pathways. NO content in roots of nia1nia2 and noa1-2 plants was lower than in wild-type plants and below the detection limit in nia1nia2noa1-2 plants. NIA/NR- and AtNOA1-mediated biosynthesis of NO were thus active and responsible for most of the NO production in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana). The nia1nia2noa1-2 plants displayed reduced size, fertility, and seed germination potential but increased dormancy and resistance to water deficit. The increasing deficiency in NO of nia1nia2, noa1-2, and nia1nia2noa1-2 plants correlated with increased seed dormancy, hypersensitivity to abscisic acid (ABA) in seed germination and establishment, as well as dehydration resistance. In nia1nia2noa1-2 plants, enhanced drought tolerance was due to a very efficient stomata closure and inhibition of opening by ABA, thus uncoupling NO from ABA-triggered responses in NO-deficient guard cells. The NO-deficient mutants in NIA/NR- and AtNOA1-mediated pathways in combination with the triple mutant will be useful tools to functionally characterize the role of NO and the contribution of both biosynthetic pathways in regulating plant development and defense.

  20. Overexpression of the Novel Arabidopsis Gene At5g02890 Alters Inflorescence Stem Wax Composition and Affects Phytohormone Homeostasis

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Liping; Zeisler, Viktoria; Schreiber, Lukas; Gao, Jie; Hu, Kaining; Wen, Jing; Yi, Bin; Shen, Jinxiong; Ma, Chaozhi; Tu, Jinxing; Fu, Tingdong

    2017-01-01

    The cuticle is composed of cutin and cuticular wax. It covers the surfaces of land plants and protects them against environmental damage. At5g02890 encodes a novel protein in Arabidopsis thaliana. In the current study, protein sequence analysis showed that At5g02890 is highly conserved in the Brassicaceae. Arabidopsis lines overexpressing At5g02890 (OE-At5g02890 lines) and an At5g02890 orthologous gene from Brassica napus (OE-Bn1 lines) exhibited glossy stems. Chemical analysis revealed that overexpression of At5g02890 caused significant reductions in the levels of wax components longer than 28 carbons (C28) in inflorescence stems, whereas the levels of wax molecules of chain length C28 or shorter were significantly increased. Transcriptome analysis indicated that nine of 11 cuticular wax synthesis-related genes with different expression levels in OE-At5g02890 plants are involved in very-long-chain fatty acid (VLCFA) elongation. At5g02890 is localized to the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), which is consistent with its function in cuticular wax biosynthesis. These results demonstrate that the overexpression of At5g02890 alters cuticular wax composition by partially blocking VLCFA elongation of C28 and higher. In addition, detailed analysis of differentially expressed genes associated with plant hormones and endogenous phytohormone levels in wild-type and OE-At5g02890 plants indicated that abscisic acid (ABA), jasmonic acid (JA), and jasmonoyl-isoleucine (JA-Ile) biosynthesis, as well as polar auxin transport, were also affected by overexpression of At5g02890. Taken together, these findings indicate that overexpression of At5g02890 affects both cuticular wax biosynthesis and phytohormone homeostasis in Arabidopsis. PMID:28184233

  1. Intronic T-DNA insertion in Arabidopsis NBR1 conditionally affects wild-type transcript level

    PubMed Central

    Rodríguez, Milagros Collados; Wawrzyńska, Anna; Sirko, Agnieszka

    2014-01-01

    Abstract The SALK_135513 line of Arabidopsis thaliana is annotated by GenBank to have the T-DNA insertion in the fourth exon of NBR1 (At4g24690). Careful molecular analyses of the homozygous plants of SALK_135513 line indicated the place of T-DNA insertion in the fourth intron. Unexpectedly, 2 kinds of NBR1 transcripts, the wild-type and the mutated, resulting from alternative splicing events, were detected in those plants. Our findings explain the problems encountered by us with phenotypic evaluation of this line and emphasize the necessity for independent verification of the exact insertion site followed by careful expression studies when working with Arabidopsis T-DNA insertional mutants. PMID:25482782

  2. Intronic T-DNA insertion in Arabidopsis NBR1 conditionally affects wild-type transcript level.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez, Milagros Collados; Wawrzyńska, Anna; Sirko, Agnieszka

    2014-01-01

    The SALK_135513 line of Arabidopsis thaliana is annotated by GenBank to have the T-DNA insertion in the fourth exon of NBR1 (At4g24690). Careful molecular analyses of the homozygous plants of SALK_135513 line indicated the place of T-DNA insertion in the fourth intron. Unexpectedly, 2 kinds of NBR1 transcripts, the wild-type and the mutated, resulting from alternative splicing events, were detected in those plants. Our findings explain the problems encountered by us with phenotypic evaluation of this line and emphasize the necessity for independent verification of the exact insertion site followed by careful expression studies when working with Arabidopsis T-DNA insertional mutants.

  3. Phospholipase D affects translocation of NPR1 to the nucleus in Arabidopsis thaliana

    PubMed Central

    Janda, Martin; Šašek, Vladimír; Chmelařová, Hana; Andrejch, Jan; Nováková, Miroslava; Hajšlová, Jana; Burketová, Lenka; Valentová, Olga

    2015-01-01

    Phytohormone salicylic acid (SA) is a crucial component of plant-induced defense against biotrophic pathogens. Although the key players of the SA pathway are known, there are still gaps in the understanding of the molecular mechanism and the regulation of particular steps. In our previous research, we showed in Arabidopsis suspension cells that n-butanol, which specifically modulates phospholipase D activity, significantly suppresses the transcription of the pathogenesis related (PR-1) gene, which is generally accepted as the SA pathway marker. In the presented study, we have investigated the site of n-butanol action in the SA pathway. We were able to show in Arabidopsis plants treated with SA that n-butanol inhibits the transcription of defense genes (PR-1, WRKY38). Fluorescence microscopy of Arabidopsis thaliana mutants expressing 35S::NPR1-GFP (nonexpressor pathogenesis related 1) revealed significantly decreased nuclear localization of NPR1 in the presence of n-butanol. On the other hand, n-butanol did not decrease the nuclear localization of NPR1 in 35S::npr1C82A-GFP and 35S::npr1C216A-GFP mutants constitutively expressing NPR1 monomers. Mass spectrometric analysis of plant extracts showed that n-butanol significantly changes the metabolic fingerprinting while t-butanol had no effect. We found groups of the plant metabolites, influenced differently by SA and n-butanol treatment. Thus, we proposed several metabolites as markers for n-butanol action. PMID:25741350

  4. Magnitude of nighttime transpiration does not affect plant growth or nutrition in well-watered Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Christman, Mairgareth A; Donovan, Lisa A; Richards, James H

    2009-07-01

    Significant water loss occurs throughout the night via partially open stomata in many C(3) and C(4) plant species. Although apparently wasteful in terms of water use, nighttime transpiration (E(night)) is hypothesized to benefit plants by enhancing nutrient supply. We tested the hypothesis that plants with greater E(night) would have improved plant nutrient status and greater fitness, estimated as pre-bolting biomass, for Arabidopsis thaliana. Two very different levels of E(night) were generated in plants by exposing them to high vs low nighttime leaf-to-air vapor pressure deficits (VPD(leaf)) in controlled environment chambers. An assessment of responses of nighttime leaf conductance (g(night)) to VPD(leaf) indicated that E(night) differed by at least 80% between the treatments. This large difference in E(night), imposed over the entire vegetative growth phase of Arabidopsis, had no effect on leaf nutrient content (N, Ca, K) or pre-bolting rosette biomass. The lack of response to differences in E(night) held true for both a high and a low nitrogen (N) treatment, even though the low N treatment decreased leaf N and biomass by 40-60%. The N treatment had no effect on g(night). Thus, higher E(night) did not provide a nutrient or growth benefit to Arabidopsis, even when the plants were N-limited.

  5. Modification of AtGRDP1 gene expression affects silique and seed development in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Hernández, Aída Araceli; Muro-Medina, Carlos Vladimir; Ramírez-Alonso, Jocelin Itzel; Jiménez-Bremont, Juan Francisco

    2017-04-29

    Glycine Rich Proteins (GRPs) are induced at different developmental stages and in specific plant tissues. Recently, we described a novel Arabidopsis gene encoding a short glycine-rich domain protein (AtGRDP1). This gene is involved in abiotic stress responsiveness; the Atgrdp1-null mutant seeds were more sensitive to stress, while the opposite phenotype was achieved by AtGRDP1 overexpression. In this study, we analyzed the phenotype of the fruits produced by Arabidopsis Atgrdp1 mutants and 35S::AtGRDP1 overexpression lines. Our analyses revealed important changes in silique length, seed number, seed weight and morphology in the analyzed lines. In particular, Atgrdp1 mutant lines exhibited several defects including short siliques, a diminished number of seeds per silique, and a reduction in seed size and weight as compared to Col-0. The overexpression of the AtGRDP1 gene also generated phenotypes with alterations in size of silique, number of seeds per silique, and size and weight of the seed. In addition, the expression analysis of AtGRDP1 gene showed that it was expressed in floral and fruit organs, with the highest expression level in mature siliques. The alterations in the siliques and seeds traits in the Atgrdp1 mutant line, as well as the phenotypes observed in AtGRDP1 overexpression lines, suggest a role of the AtGRDP1 gene in the Arabidopsis fruit development. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Altered expression of the bZIP transcription factor DRINK ME affects growth and reproductive development in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Lozano-Sotomayor, Paulina; Chávez Montes, Ricardo A; Silvestre-Vañó, Marina; Herrera-Ubaldo, Humberto; Greco, Raffaella; Pablo-Villa, Jeanneth; Galliani, Bianca M; Diaz-Ramirez, David; Weemen, Mieke; Boutilier, Kim; Pereira, Andy; Colombo, Lucia; Madueño, Francisco; Marsch-Martínez, Nayelli; de Folter, Stefan

    2016-11-01

    Here we describe an uncharacterized gene that negatively influences Arabidopsis growth and reproductive development. DRINK ME (DKM; bZIP30) is a member of the bZIP transcription factor family, and is expressed in meristematic tissues such as the inflorescence meristem (IM), floral meristem (FM), and carpel margin meristem (CMM). Altered DKM expression affects meristematic tissues and reproductive organ development, including the gynoecium, which is the female reproductive structure and is determinant for fertility and sexual reproduction. A microarray analysis indicates that DKM overexpression affects the expression of cell cycle, cell wall, organ initiation, cell elongation, hormone homeostasis, and meristem activity genes. Furthermore, DKM can interact in yeast and in planta with proteins involved in shoot apical meristem maintenance such as WUSCHEL, KNAT1/BP, KNAT2 and JAIBA, and with proteins involved in medial tissue development in the gynoecium such as HECATE, BELL1 and NGATHA1. Taken together, our results highlight the relevance of DKM as a negative modulator of Arabidopsis growth and reproductive development.

  7. HDA18 Affects Cell Fate in Arabidopsis Root Epidermis via Histone Acetylation at Four Kinase Genes[W

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Cui; Li, Lin-Chen; Chen, Wen-Qian; Chen, Xian; Xu, Zhi-Hong; Bai, Shu-Nong

    2013-01-01

    The differentiation of hair (H) and non-hair (N) cells in the Arabidopsis thaliana root epidermis is dependent on positional relationships with underlying cortical cells. We previously found that histone acetylation relays positional information and that a mutant altered in the histone deacetylase gene family member HISTONE DEACETYLASE 18 (HDA18) exhibits altered H and N epidermal cell patterning. Here, we report that HDA18 has in vitro histone deacetylase activity and that both mutation and overexpression of HDA18 led to cells at the N position having H fate. The HDA18 protein physically interacted with histones related to a specific group of kinase genes, which are demonstrated in this study to be components of a positional information relay system. Both down- and upregulation of HDA18 increased transcription of the targeted kinase genes. Interestingly, the acetylation levels of histone 3 lysine 9 (H3K9), histone 3 lysine 14 (H3K14) and histone 3 lysine 18 (H3K18) at the kinase genes were differentially affected by down- or upregulation of HDA18, which explains why the transcription levels of the four HDA18-target kinase genes increased in all lines with altered HDA18 expression. Our results reveal the surprisingly complex mechanism by which HDA18 affects cellular patterning in Arabidopsis root epidermis. PMID:23362208

  8. Mutations in epidermis-specific HD-ZIP IV genes affect floral organ identity in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Kamata, Naoko; Okada, Hitomi; Komeda, Yoshibumi; Takahashi, Taku

    2013-08-01

    Development of the epidermis involves members of the class-IV homeodomain-leucine zipper (HD-ZIP IV) transcription factors. The Arabidopsis HD-ZIP IV family consists of 16 members, among which PROTODERMAL FACTOR 2 (PDF2) and ARABIDOPSIS THALIANA MERISTEM LAYER 1 (ATML1) play an indispensable role in the differentiation of shoot epidermal cells; however, the functions of other HD-ZIP IV genes that are also expressed specifically in the shoot epidermis remain to be fully elucidated. We constructed double mutant combinations of these HD-ZIP IV mutant alleles and found that the double mutants of pdf2-1 with homeodomain glabrous1-1 (hdg1-1), hdg2-3, hdg5-1 and hdg12-2 produced abnormal flowers with sepaloid petals and carpelloid stamens in association with the reduced expression of the petal and stamen identity gene APETALA 3 (AP3). Expression of another petal and stamen identity gene PISTILATA (PI) was less affected in these mutants. We confirmed that AP3 expression in pdf2-1 hdg2-3 was normally induced at the initial stages of flower development, but was attenuated both in the epidermis and internal cell layers of developing flowers. As the expression of PDF2 and these HD-ZIP IV genes during floral organ formation is exclusively limited to the epidermal cell layer, these double mutations may have non-cell-autonomous effects on AP3 expression in the internal cell layers. Our results suggest that cooperative functions of PDF2 and other members of the HD-ZIP IV family in the epidermis are crucial for normal development of floral organs in Arabidopsis.

  9. Titanium dioxide nanoparticles (100-1000 mg/l) can affect vitamin E response in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Szymańska, Renata; Kołodziej, Karolina; Ślesak, Ireneusz; Zimak-Piekarczyk, Paulina; Orzechowska, Aleksandra; Gabruk, Michał; Żądło, Andrzej; Habina, Iwona; Knap, Wiesław; Burda, Květoslava; Kruk, Jerzy

    2016-06-01

    In the present study we analyze the effect of seed treatment by a range of nano-TiO2 concentrations on the growth of Arabidopsis thaliana plants, on the vitamin E content and the expression of its biosynthetic genes, as well as activity of antioxidant enzymes and lipid peroxidation. To conduct the mechanistic analysis of nano-TiO2 on plants growth and antioxidant status we applied nanoparticles concentrations that are much higher than those reported in the environment. We find that as the concentration of nano-TiO2 increases, the biomass, and chlorophyll content in 5-week-old Arabidopsis thaliana plants decrease in a concentration dependent manner. In opposite, higher nano-TiO2 concentration enhanced root growth. Our results indicate that a high concentration of nano-TiO2 induces symptoms of toxicity and elevates the antioxidant level. We also find that the expression levels of tocopherol biosynthetic genes were either down- or upregulated in response to nano-TiO2. Thermoluminescence analysis shows that higher nano-TiO2 concentrations cause lipid peroxidation. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report concerning the effect of nano-TiO2 on vitamin E status in plants. We conclude that nano-TiO2 affects the antioxidant response in Arabidopsis thaliana plants. This could be an effect of a changes in vitamin E gene expression that is diminished under lower tested nano-TiO2 concentrations and elevated under 1000 μg/ml.

  10. Roscovitine binds to novel L-channel (CaV1.2) sites that separately affect activation and inactivation.

    PubMed

    Yarotskyy, Viktor; Gao, Guofeng; Du, Lei; Ganapathi, Sindura B; Peterson, Blaise Z; Elmslie, Keith S

    2010-01-01

    L-type (Ca(V)1.2) calcium channel antagonists play an important role in the treatment of cardiovascular disease. (R)-Roscovitine, a trisubstituted purine, has been shown to inhibit L-currents by slowing activation and enhancing inactivation. This study utilized molecular and pharmacological approaches to determine whether these effects result from (R)-roscovitine binding to a single site. Using the S enantiomer, we find that (S)-roscovitine enhances inactivation without affecting activation, which suggests multiple sites. This was further supported in studies using chimeric channels comprised of N- and L-channel domains. Those chimeras containing L-channel domains I and IV showed (R)-roscovitine-induced slowed activation like that of wild type L-channels, whereas chimeric channels containing L-channel domain I responded to (R)-roscovitine with enhanced inactivation. We conclude that (R)-roscovitine binds to distinct sites on L-type channels to slow activation and enhance inactivation. These sites appear to be unique from other calcium channel antagonist sites that reside within domains III and IV and are thus novel sites that could be exploited for future drug development. Trisubstituted purines could become a new class of drugs for the treatment of diseases related to hyperfunction of L-type channels, such as Torsades de Pointes.

  11. A recessive mutation in the RUB1-conjugating enzyme, RCE1, reveals a requirement for RUB modification for control of ethylene biosynthesis and proper induction of basic chitinase and PDF1.2 in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Larsen, Paul B; Cancel, Jesse D

    2004-05-01

    By screening etiolated Arabidopsis seedlings for mutants with aberrant ethylene-related phenotypes, we identified a mutant that displays features of the ethylene-mediated triple response even in the absence of ethylene. Further characterization showed that the phenotype observed for the dark-grown seedlings of this mutant is reversible by prevention of ethylene perception and is dependent on a modest increase in ethylene production correlated with an increase in 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylic acid (ACC) oxidase (ACO) activity in the hypocotyl. Molecular characterization of leaves of the mutant revealed severely impaired induction of basic chitinase (chiB) and plant defensin (PDF)1.2 following treatment with jasmonic acid and/or ethylene. Positional cloning of the mutation resulted in identification of a 49-bp deletion in RCE1 (related to ubiquitin 1 (RUB1)-conjugating enzyme), which has been demonstrated to be responsible for covalent attachment of RUB1 to the SCF (Skpl Cdc 53 F-box) ubiquitin ligase complex to modify its activity. Our analyses with rce1-2 demonstrate a previously unknown requirement for RUB1 modification for regulation of ethylene biosynthesis and proper induction of defense-related genes in Arabidopsis.

  12. Peering into the separate roles of root and shoot cytosolic glutamine synthetase 1;2 by use of grafting experiments in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Guan, Miao; Schjoerring, Jan K

    2016-11-01

    Cytosolic glutamine synthetase 1;2 plays an important role in the primary nitrogen assimilation in roots. Based on characterization of the knockout mutant gln1;2 we have recently demonstrated that Gln1;2 is also essential for ammonium handling in shoots. Here we built reciprocally grafted plants between wild type (Wt) and gln1;2 in order to separate the root and shoot roles of Gln1;2. Significant reduction in silique number and seed yield were observed in the grafted plants 1;2shoot/Wtroot relative to Wtshoot/1;2root and Wtshoot/Wtroot. Shoot Gln1;2 thus played a crucial role for seed production. Tracing experiments with (15)N showed that the relative nitrogen remobilization from vegetative organs to seeds in gln1;2 was just as efficient as in the Wt plants. This was the case although the total quantity of nitrogen in gln1;2 was significantly lower compared to that in the Wt. We conclude that the functions of shoot Gln1;2 are primarily associated with internal N signaling for establishment of seed yield capacity rather than with nitrogen remobilization.

  13. A mutation in protein phosphatase 2A regulatory subunit A affects auxin transport in Arabidopsis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garbers, C.; DeLong, A.; Deruere, J.; Bernasconi, P.; Soll, D.; Evans, M. L. (Principal Investigator)

    1996-01-01

    The phytohormone auxin controls processes such as cell elongation, root hair development and root branching. Tropisms, growth curvatures triggered by gravity, light and touch, are also auxin-mediated responses. Auxin is synthesized in the shoot apex and transported through the stem, but the molecular mechanism of auxin transport is not well understood. Naphthylphthalamic acid (NPA) and other inhibitors of auxin transport block tropic curvature responses and inhibit root and shoot elongation. We have isolated a novel Arabidopsis thaliana mutant designated roots curl in NPA (rcn1). Mutant seedlings exhibit altered responses to NPA in root curling and hypocotyl elongation. Auxin efflux in mutant seedlings displays increased sensitivity to NPA. The rcn1 mutation was transferred-DNA (T-DNA) tagged and sequences flanking the T-DNA insert were cloned. Analysis of the RCN1 cDNA reveals that the T-DNA insertion disrupts a gene for the regulatory A subunit of protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A-A). The RCN1 gene rescues the rcn1 mutant phenotype and also complements the temperature-sensitive phenotype of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae PP2A-A mutation, tpd3-1. These data implicate protein phosphatase 2A in the regulation of auxin transport in Arabidopsis.

  14. A loss-of-function mutation in Calmodulin2 gene affects pollen germination in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Landoni, Michela; De Francesco, Alessandra; Galbiati, Massimo; Tonelli, Chiara

    2010-10-01

    Calmodulin (CAM) is an ubiquitous calcium binding protein whose function is to translate the signals, perceived as calcium concentration variations, into the appropriate cellular responses. In Arabidopsis thaliana there are 4 CAM isoforms which are highly similar, encoded by 7 genes, and one possible explanation proposed for the evolutionary conservation of the CAM gene family is that the different genes have acquired different functions so that they play possibly overlapping but non-identical roles. Here we report the characterization of the Arabidopsis mutant cam2-2, identified among the lines of the gene-trapping collection EXOTIC because of a distorted segregation of kanamycin resistance. Phenotypic analysis showed that in normal growth conditions cam2-2 plants were indistinguishable from the wild type while genetic analysis showed a reduced transmission of the cam2-2 allele through the male gametophyte and in vitro pollen germination revealed a reduced level of germination in comparison with the wild type. These results provide genetic evidence of the involvement of a CAM gene in pollen germination and support the theory of functional diversification of the CAM gene family.

  15. A mutation in protein phosphatase 2A regulatory subunit A affects auxin transport in Arabidopsis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garbers, C.; DeLong, A.; Deruere, J.; Bernasconi, P.; Soll, D.; Evans, M. L. (Principal Investigator)

    1996-01-01

    The phytohormone auxin controls processes such as cell elongation, root hair development and root branching. Tropisms, growth curvatures triggered by gravity, light and touch, are also auxin-mediated responses. Auxin is synthesized in the shoot apex and transported through the stem, but the molecular mechanism of auxin transport is not well understood. Naphthylphthalamic acid (NPA) and other inhibitors of auxin transport block tropic curvature responses and inhibit root and shoot elongation. We have isolated a novel Arabidopsis thaliana mutant designated roots curl in NPA (rcn1). Mutant seedlings exhibit altered responses to NPA in root curling and hypocotyl elongation. Auxin efflux in mutant seedlings displays increased sensitivity to NPA. The rcn1 mutation was transferred-DNA (T-DNA) tagged and sequences flanking the T-DNA insert were cloned. Analysis of the RCN1 cDNA reveals that the T-DNA insertion disrupts a gene for the regulatory A subunit of protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A-A). The RCN1 gene rescues the rcn1 mutant phenotype and also complements the temperature-sensitive phenotype of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae PP2A-A mutation, tpd3-1. These data implicate protein phosphatase 2A in the regulation of auxin transport in Arabidopsis.

  16. NIMA-related kinase NEK6 affects plant growth and stress response in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Bo; Chen, Hao-Wei; Mu, Rui-Ling; Zhang, Wang-Ke; Zhao, Ming-Yu; Wei, Wei; Wang, Fang; Yu, Hui; Lei, Gang; Zou, Hong-Feng; Ma, Biao; Chen, Shou-Yi; Zhang, Jin-Song

    2011-12-01

    The NIMA-related kinases (NEKs) are a family of serine/threonine kinases involved largely in cell cycle control in fungi, mammals and other eukaryotes. In Arabidopsis, NEK6 is involved in the regulation of epidermal cell morphogenesis. However, other roles of NEK6 in plants are less well understood. Here we report functions of NEK6 in plant growth, development and stress responses in Arabidopsis. NEK6 transcripts and proteins are induced by ethylene precursor ACC and salt stress. Expression of other NEK genes except NEK5 is also responsive to the two treatments. Overexpression and mutant analysis disclose that the NEK6 gene increases rosette growth, seed yield and lateral root formation. However, NEK6 appears to play a negative role in the control of seed size. The gene also promotes plant tolerance to salt stress and osmotic stress in its overexpressing plants. The NEK6 gene may achieve its function through suppression of ethylene biosynthesis and activation of CYCB1;1 and CYCA3;1 expression. Our present study reveals new functions of the NEK6 gene in plant growth and stress tolerance, and manipulation of NEK6 may improve important agronomic traits in crop plants.

  17. A mutation in protein phosphatase 2A regulatory subunit A affects auxin transport in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed Central

    Garbers, C; DeLong, A; Deruére, J; Bernasconi, P; Söll, D

    1996-01-01

    The phytohormone auxin controls processes such as cell elongation, root hair development and root branching. Tropisms, growth curvatures triggered by gravity, light and touch, are also auxin-mediated responses. Auxin is synthesized in the shoot apex and transported through the stem, but the molecular mechanism of auxin transport is not well understood. Naphthylphthalamic acid (NPA) and other inhibitors of auxin transport block tropic curvature responses and inhibit root and shoot elongation. We have isolated a novel Arabidopsis thaliana mutant designated roots curl in NPA (rcn1). Mutant seedlings exhibit altered responses to NPA in root curling and hypocotyl elongation. Auxin efflux in mutant seedlings displays increased sensitivity to NPA. The rcn1 mutation was transferred-DNA (T-DNA) tagged and sequences flanking the T-DNA insert were cloned. Analysis of the RCN1 cDNA reveals that the T-DNA insertion disrupts a gene for the regulatory A subunit of protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A-A). The RCN1 gene rescues the rcn1 mutant phenotype and also complements the temperature-sensitive phenotype of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae PP2A-A mutation, tpd3-1. These data implicate protein phosphatase 2A in the regulation of auxin transport in Arabidopsis. Images PMID:8641277

  18. Alterations in seed development gene expression affect size and oil content of Arabidopsis seeds.

    PubMed

    Fatihi, Abdelhak; Zbierzak, Anna Maria; Dörmann, Peter

    2013-10-01

    Seed endosperm development in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) is under control of the polycomb group complex, which includes Fertilization Independent Endosperm (FIE). The polycomb group complex regulates downstream factors, e.g. Pheres1 (PHE1), by genomic imprinting. In heterozygous fie mutants, an endosperm develops in ovules carrying a maternal fie allele without fertilization, finally leading to abortion. Another endosperm development pathway depends on MINISEED3 (a WRKY10 transcription factor) and HAIKU2 (a leucine-rich repeat kinase). While the role of seed development genes in the embryo and endosperm establishment has been studied in detail, their impact on metabolism and oil accumulation remained unclear. Analysis of oil, protein, and sucrose accumulation in mutants and overexpression plants of the four seed development genes revealed that (1) seeds carrying a maternal fie allele accumulate low oil with an altered composition of triacylglycerol molecular species; (2) homozygous mutant seeds of phe1, mini3, and iku2, which are smaller, accumulate less oil and slightly less protein, and starch, which accumulates early during seed development, remains elevated in mutant seeds; (3) embryo-specific overexpression of FIE, PHE1, and MINI3 has no influence on seed size and weight, nor on oil, protein, or sucrose content; and (4) overexpression of IKU2 results in seeds with increased size and weight, and oil content of overexpressed IKU2 seeds is increased by 35%. Thus, IKU2 overexpression represents a novel strategy for the genetic manipulation of the oil content in seeds.

  19. Lunar gravity affects leaf movement of Arabidopsis thaliana in the International Space Station.

    PubMed

    Fisahn, Joachim; Klingelé, Emile; Barlow, Peter

    2015-06-01

    Cyclic leaf ascent and descent occur in synchrony and phase congruence with the lunisolar tidal force under a broad range of conditions. Digitized records of the vertical leaf movements of Arabidopsis thaliana were collected under space flight conditions in the International Space Station (ISS). Oscillations of leaf movements with periods of 45 and 90 min were found under light-adapted conditions, whereas in darkness, the periods were 45, 90, and 135 min. To demonstrate the close relationship between these oscillations and cyclical variations of the lunisolar gravitational force, we estimated the oscillations of the in-orbit lunisolar tide as they apply to the ISS, with the aid of the Etide software application. In general, in-orbit lunisolar gravitational profiles exhibited a periodicity of 45 min. Alignment of these in-orbit oscillations with the oscillations of Arabidopsis leaf movement revealed high degrees of synchrony and a congruence of phase. These data corroborate previous results which suggested a correlative relationship and a possible causal link between leaf movement rhythms obtained on ground and the rhythmic variation of the lunisolar tidal force.

  20. Antisense and chemical suppression of the nonmevalonate pathway affects ent-kaurene biosynthesis in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Okada, Kazunori; Kawaide, Hiroshi; Kuzuyama, Tomohisa; Seto, Haruo; Curtis, Ian S; Kamiya, Yuji

    2002-06-01

    Transgenic plants of Arabidopsis thaliana (L.) Heynh. (ecotype Columbia) expressing the antisense AtMECT gene, encoding 2- C-methyl- D-erythritol 4-phosphate cytidylyltransferase, were generated to elucidate the physiological role of the nonmevalonate pathway for production of ent-kaurene, the latter being the plastidic precursor of gibberellins. In transformed plants pigmentation and accumulation of ent-kaurene were reduced compared to wild-type plants. Fosmidomycin, an inhibitor of 1-deoxy- D-xylulose 5-phosphate reductoisomerase (DXR), caused a similar depletion of these compounds in transgenic plants. These observations suggest that both AtMECT and DXR are important in the synthesis of isopentenyl diphosphate and dimethylallyl diphosphate and that ent-kaurene is mainly produced through the nonmevalonate pathway in the plastid.

  1. Transcriptional mechanisms associated with seed dormancy and dormancy loss in the gibberellin-insensitive sly1-2 mutant of Arabidopsis thaliana

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    While widespread transcriptome changes have been previously observed with seed dormancy loss, this study specifically characterized transcriptional changes associated with the increased seed dormancy and dormancy loss of the gibberellin (GA) hormone-insensitive sleepy1-2 (sly1-2) mutant. The SLY1 g...

  2. Non-Photochemical Quenching Capacity in Arabidopsis thaliana Affects Herbivore Behaviour

    PubMed Central

    Johansson Jänkänpää, Hanna; Frenkel, Martin; Zulfugarov, Ismayil; Reichelt, Michael; Krieger-Liszkay, Anja; Mishra, Yogesh; Gershenzon, Jonathan; Moen, Jon; Lee, Choon-Hwan; Jansson, Stefan

    2013-01-01

    Under natural conditions, plants have to cope with numerous stresses, including light-stress and herbivory. This raises intriguing questions regarding possible trade-offs between stress defences and growth. As part of a program designed to address these questions we have compared herbivory defences and damage in wild type Arabidopsis thaliana and two “photoprotection genotypes”, npq4 and oePsbS, which respectively lack and overexpress PsbS (a protein that plays a key role in qE-type non-photochemical quenching). In dual-choice feeding experiments both a specialist (Plutella xylostella) and a generalist (Spodoptera littoralis) insect herbivore preferred plants that expressed PsbS most strongly. In contrast, although both herbivores survived equally well on each of the genotypes, for oviposition female P. xylostella adults preferred plants that expressed PsbS least strongly. However, there were no significant differences between the genotypes in levels of the 10 most prominent glucosinolates; key substances in the Arabidopsis anti-herbivore chemical defence arsenal. After transfer from a growth chamber to the field we detected significant differences in the genotypes’ metabolomic profiles at all tested time points, using GC-MS, but no consistent “metabolic signature” for the lack of PsbS. These findings suggest that the observed differences in herbivore preferences were due to differences in the primary metabolism of the plants rather than their contents of typical “defence compounds”. A potentially significant factor is that superoxide accumulated most rapidly and to the highest levels under high light conditions in npq4 mutants. This could trigger changes in planta that are sensed by herbivores either directly or indirectly, following its dismutation to H2O2. PMID:23301046

  3. FBH1 affects warm temperature responses in the Arabidopsis circadian clock.

    PubMed

    Nagel, Dawn H; Pruneda-Paz, Jose L; Kay, Steve A

    2014-10-07

    In Arabidopsis, the circadian clock allows the plant to coordinate daily external signals with internal processes, conferring enhanced fitness and growth vigor. Although external cues such as temperature can entrain the clock, an important feature of the clock is the ability to maintain a relatively constant period over a range of physiological temperatures; this ability is referred to as "temperature compensation." However, how temperature actually is perceived and integrated into the clock molecular circuitry remains largely unknown. In an effort to identify additional regulators of the circadian clock, including putative components that could modulate the clock response to changes in environmental signals, we identified in a previous large-scale screen a transcription factor that interacts with and regulates the promoter activity of a core clock gene. In this report, we characterized this transcription factor, flowering basic helix-loop-helix 1 (FBH1) that binds in vivo to the promoter of the key clock gene circadian clock-associated 1 (CCA1) and regulates its expression. We found that upon temperature changes, overexpression of FBH1 alters the pace of CCA1 expression by causing a period shortening and thus preventing the clock from buffering against this change in temperature. Furthermore, as is consistent with the current mechanistic model of feedback loops observed in the clock regulatory network, we also determined that CCA1 binds in vivo to the FBH1 promoter and regulates its expression. Together these results establish a role for FBH1 as a transcriptional modulator of warm temperature signals and clock responses in Arabidopsis.

  4. High expression of Lifeact in Arabidopsis thaliana reduces dynamic reorganization of actin filaments but does not affect plant development.

    PubMed

    van der Honing, Hannie S; van Bezouwen, Laura S; Emons, Anne Mie C; Ketelaar, Tijs

    2011-10-01

    Lifeact is a novel probe that labels actin filaments in a wide range of organisms. We compared the localization and reorganization of Lifeact:Venus-labeled actin filaments in Arabidopsis root hairs and root epidermal cells of lines that express different levels of Lifeact: Venus with that of actin filaments labeled with GFP:FABD2, a commonly used probe in plants. Unlike GFP:FABD2, Lifeact:Venus labeled the highly dynamic fine F-actin in the subapical region of tip-growing root hairs. Lifeact:Venus expression at varying levels was not observed to affect plant development. However, at expression levels comparable to those of GFP:FABD2 in a well-characterized marker line, Lifeact:Venus reduced reorganization rates of bundles of actin filaments in root epidermal cells. Reorganization rates of cytoplasmic strands, which reflect the reorganization of the actin cytoskeleton, were also reduced in these lines. Moreover, in the same line, Lifeact:Venus-decorated actin filaments were more resistant to depolymerization by latrunculin B than those in an equivalent GFP:FABD2-expressing line. In lines where Lifeact: Venus is expressed at lower levels, these effects are less prominent or even absent. We conclude that Lifeact: Venus reduces remodeling of the actin cytoskeleton in Arabidopsis in a concentration-dependent manner. Since this reduction occurs at expression levels that do not cause defects in plant development, selection of normally growing plants is not sufficient to determine optimal Lifeact expression levels. When correct expression levels of Lifeact have been determined, it is a valuable probe that labels dynamic populations of actin filaments such as fine F-actin, better than FABD2 does.

  5. Genotype-environment interactions at quantitative trait loci affecting inflorescence development in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed Central

    Ungerer, Mark C; Halldorsdottir, Solveig S; Purugganan, Michael D; Mackay, Trudy F C

    2003-01-01

    Phenotypic plasticity and genotype-environment interactions (GEI) play a prominent role in plant morphological diversity and in the potential functional capacities of plant life-history traits. The genetic basis of plasticity and GEI, however, is poorly understood in most organisms. In this report, inflorescence development patterns in Arabidopsis thaliana were examined under different, ecologically relevant photoperiod environments for two recombinant inbred mapping populations (Ler x Col and Cvi x Ler) using a combination of quantitative genetics and quantitative trait locus (QTL) mapping. Plasticity and GEI were regularly observed for the majority of 13 inflorescence traits. These observations can be attributable (at least partly) to variable effects of specific QTL. Pooled across traits, 12/44 (27.3%) and 32/62 (51.6%) of QTL exhibited significant QTL x environment interactions in the Ler x Col and Cvi x Ler lines, respectively. These interactions were attributable to changes in magnitude of effect of QTL more often than to changes in rank order (sign) of effect. Multiple QTL x environment interactions (in Cvi x Ler) clustered in two genomic regions on chromosomes 1 and 5, indicating a disproportionate contribution of these regions to the phenotypic patterns observed. High-resolution mapping will be necessary to distinguish between the alternative explanations of pleiotropy and tight linkage among multiple genes. PMID:14504242

  6. Genotype-environment interactions at quantitative trait loci affecting inflorescence development in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Ungerer, Mark C; Halldorsdottir, Solveig S; Purugganan, Michael D; Mackay, Trudy F C

    2003-09-01

    Phenotypic plasticity and genotype-environment interactions (GEI) play a prominent role in plant morphological diversity and in the potential functional capacities of plant life-history traits. The genetic basis of plasticity and GEI, however, is poorly understood in most organisms. In this report, inflorescence development patterns in Arabidopsis thaliana were examined under different, ecologically relevant photoperiod environments for two recombinant inbred mapping populations (Ler x Col and Cvi x Ler) using a combination of quantitative genetics and quantitative trait locus (QTL) mapping. Plasticity and GEI were regularly observed for the majority of 13 inflorescence traits. These observations can be attributable (at least partly) to variable effects of specific QTL. Pooled across traits, 12/44 (27.3%) and 32/62 (51.6%) of QTL exhibited significant QTL x environment interactions in the Ler x Col and Cvi x Ler lines, respectively. These interactions were attributable to changes in magnitude of effect of QTL more often than to changes in rank order (sign) of effect. Multiple QTL x environment interactions (in Cvi x Ler) clustered in two genomic regions on chromosomes 1 and 5, indicating a disproportionate contribution of these regions to the phenotypic patterns observed. High-resolution mapping will be necessary to distinguish between the alternative explanations of pleiotropy and tight linkage among multiple genes.

  7. Transgene Expression Patterns Indicate That Spaceflight Affects Stress Signal Perception and Transduction in Arabidopsis1

    PubMed Central

    Paul, Anna-Lisa; Daugherty, Christine J.; Bihn, Elizabeth A.; Chapman, David K.; Norwood, Kelly L.L.; Ferl, Robert J.

    2001-01-01

    The use of plants as integral components of life support systems remains a cornerstone of strategies for long-term human habitation of space and extraterrestrial colonization. Spaceflight experiments over the past few decades have refined the hardware required to grow plants in low-earth orbit and have illuminated fundamental issues regarding spaceflight effects on plant growth and development. Potential incipient hypoxia, resulting from the lack of convection-driven gas movement, has emerged as a possible major impact of microgravity. We developed transgenic Arabidopsis containing the alcohol dehydrogenase (Adh) gene promoter linked to the β-glucuronidase (GUS) reporter gene to address specifically the possibility that spaceflight induces the plant hypoxia response and to assess whether any spaceflight response was similar to control terrestrial hypoxia-induced gene expression patterns. The staining patterns resulting from a 5-d mission on the orbiter Columbia during mission STS-93 indicate that the Adh/GUS reporter gene was activated in roots during the flight. However, the patterns of expression were not identical to terrestrial control inductions. Moreover, although terrestrial hypoxia induces Adh/GUS expression in the shoot apex, no apex staining was observed in the spaceflight plants. This indicates that either the normal hypoxia response signaling is impaired in spaceflight or that spaceflight inappropriately induces Adh/GUS activity for reasons other than hypoxia. PMID:11402191

  8. Integration of Ethylene and Light Signaling Affects Hypocotyl Growth in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Yanwen; Huang, Rongfeng

    2017-01-01

    As an ideal model for studying ethylene effects on cell elongation, Arabidopsis hypocotyl growth is widely used due to the unique characteristic that ethylene stimulates hypocotyl elongation in the light but inhibits it in the dark. Although the contrasting effect of ethylene on hypocotyl growth has long been known, the molecular basis of this effect has only gradually been identified in recent years. In the light, ethylene promotes the expression of PHYTOCHROME INTERACTING FACTOR 3 (PIF3) and the degradation of ELONGATED HYPOCOTYL 5 (HY5) protein, thus stimulating hypocotyl growth. In the dark, ETHYLENE RESPONSE FACTOR 1 (ERF1) and WAVE-DAMPENED 5 (WDL5) induced by ethylene are responsible for its inhibitory effect on hypocotyl elongation. Moreover, CONSTITUTIVE PHOTOMORPHOGENIC 1 (COP1) and PHYTOCHROME B (phyB) mediate the light-suppressed ethylene response in different ways. Here, we review several pivotal advances associated with ethylene-regulated hypocotyl elongation, focusing on the integration of ethylene and light signaling during seedling emergence from the soil. PMID:28174592

  9. Root Suberin Forms an Extracellular Barrier That Affects Water Relations and Mineral Nutrition in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Baxter, Ivan; Hosmani, Prashant S.; Rus, Ana; Lahner, Brett; Borevitz, Justin O.; Muthukumar, Balasubramaniam; Mickelbart, Michael V.; Schreiber, Lukas; Franke, Rochus B.; Salt, David E.

    2009-01-01

    Though central to our understanding of how roots perform their vital function of scavenging water and solutes from the soil, no direct genetic evidence currently exists to support the foundational model that suberin acts to form a chemical barrier limiting the extracellular, or apoplastic, transport of water and solutes in plant roots. Using the newly characterized enhanced suberin1 (esb1) mutant, we established a connection in Arabidopsis thaliana between suberin in the root and both water movement through the plant and solute accumulation in the shoot. Esb1 mutants, characterized by increased root suberin, were found to have reduced day time transpiration rates and increased water-use efficiency during their vegetative growth period. Furthermore, these changes in suberin and water transport were associated with decreases in the accumulation of Ca, Mn, and Zn and increases in the accumulation of Na, S, K, As, Se, and Mo in the shoot. Here, we present direct genetic evidence establishing that suberin in the roots plays a critical role in controlling both water and mineral ion uptake and transport to the leaves. The changes observed in the elemental accumulation in leaves are also interpreted as evidence that a significant component of the radial root transport of Ca, Mn, and Zn occurs in the apoplast. PMID:19461889

  10. Perturbing phosphoinositide homeostasis oppositely affects vascular differentiation in Arabidopsis thaliana roots.

    PubMed

    Gujas, Bojan; Cruz, Tiago M D; Kastanaki, Elizabeth; Vermeer, Joop E M; Munnik, Teun; Rodriguez-Villalon, Antia

    2017-08-29

    The plant vascular network consists of specialized phloem and xylem elements that undergo two distinct morphogenetic developmental programs to become transport-functional units. While vacuolar rupture is a determinant step in protoxylem differentiation, protophloem elements never form a big central vacuole. Here we show that a genetic disturbance of phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bis-phosphate [PtdIns(4,5)P2] homeostasis rewires cell trafficking towards the vacuole in Arabidopsis thaliana roots. Consequently, an enhanced phosphoinositide-mediated vacuolar biogenesis correlate with premature programmed cell death (PCD) and secondary cell wall elaboration in xylem cells. By contrast, vacuolar fusion events in protophloem cells trigger the abnormal formation of big vacuoles, preventing cell clearance and tissue functionality. Removal of the inositol 5' phosphatase COTYLEDON VASCULAR PATTERN2 from the plasma membrane (PM) by brefeldin A (BFA) treatment increases PtdIns(4,5)P2 content at the PM and disrupts protophloem continuity. Conversely, BFA application abolishes vacuolar fusion events in xylem tissue without preventing PCD, suggesting the existence of additional PtdIns(4,5)P2-dependent cell death mechanisms. Overall, our data indicate that a tight PM phosphoinositide homeostasis is required to modulate intracellular trafficking contributing to oppositely regulate vascular differentiation. © 2017. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  11. Rhomboid proteins in the chloroplast envelope affect the level of allene oxide synthase in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Knopf, Ronit Rimon; Feder, Ari; Mayer, Kristin; Lin, Albina; Rozenberg, Mor; Schaller, Andreas; Adam, Zach

    2012-11-01

    Rhomboids are intra-membrane serine proteases whose sequences are found in nearly all organisms. They are involved in a variety of biological functions in both eukaryotes and prokaryotes. Localization assays revealed that two Arabidopsis thaliana rhomboid-like proteases (AtRBL), AtRBL8 and AtRBL9, are targeted to the chloroplast. Using transgenic plants expressing epitope-tagged AtRBL9, we localized AtRBL9 to the chloroplast inner envelope membrane, with both its N- and C-termini facing the stroma. Mass spectrometry analyses confirmed this localization, and suggested that this is also the case for AtRBL8. Both are proteins of very low abundance. The results of size-exclusion chromatography implied that AtRBL9 forms homo-oligomers. In search of a putative function, a comparative proteomic analysis was performed on wild-type and double-knockout plants, lacking both AtRBL8 and AtRBL9, using the iTRAQ method. Of 180 envelope proteins, the level of only a few was either increased or decreased in the mutant line. One of the latter, allene oxide synthase, is involved in jasmonic acid biosynthesis. This observation provides an explanation for the recently reported aberration in flower morphology that is associated with the loss of AtRBL8. © 2012 The Authors. The Plant Journal © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  12. Transgene expression patterns indicate that spaceflight affects stress signal perception and transduction in arabidopsis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paul, A. L.; Daugherty, C. J.; Bihn, E. A.; Chapman, D. K.; Norwood, K. L.; Ferl, R. J.

    2001-01-01

    The use of plants as integral components of life support systems remains a cornerstone of strategies for long-term human habitation of space and extraterrestrial colonization. Spaceflight experiments over the past few decades have refined the hardware required to grow plants in low-earth orbit and have illuminated fundamental issues regarding spaceflight effects on plant growth and development. Potential incipient hypoxia, resulting from the lack of convection-driven gas movement, has emerged as a possible major impact of microgravity. We developed transgenic Arabidopsis containing the alcohol dehydrogenase (Adh) gene promoter linked to the beta-glucuronidase (GUS) reporter gene to address specifically the possibility that spaceflight induces the plant hypoxia response and to assess whether any spaceflight response was similar to control terrestrial hypoxia-induced gene expression patterns. The staining patterns resulting from a 5-d mission on the orbiter Columbia during mission STS-93 indicate that the Adh/GUS reporter gene was activated in roots during the flight. However, the patterns of expression were not identical to terrestrial control inductions. Moreover, although terrestrial hypoxia induces Adh/GUS expression in the shoot apex, no apex staining was observed in the spaceflight plants. This indicates that either the normal hypoxia response signaling is impaired in spaceflight or that spaceflight inappropriately induces Adh/GUS activity for reasons other than hypoxia.

  13. Transgene expression patterns indicate that spaceflight affects stress signal perception and transduction in arabidopsis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paul, A. L.; Daugherty, C. J.; Bihn, E. A.; Chapman, D. K.; Norwood, K. L.; Ferl, R. J.

    2001-01-01

    The use of plants as integral components of life support systems remains a cornerstone of strategies for long-term human habitation of space and extraterrestrial colonization. Spaceflight experiments over the past few decades have refined the hardware required to grow plants in low-earth orbit and have illuminated fundamental issues regarding spaceflight effects on plant growth and development. Potential incipient hypoxia, resulting from the lack of convection-driven gas movement, has emerged as a possible major impact of microgravity. We developed transgenic Arabidopsis containing the alcohol dehydrogenase (Adh) gene promoter linked to the beta-glucuronidase (GUS) reporter gene to address specifically the possibility that spaceflight induces the plant hypoxia response and to assess whether any spaceflight response was similar to control terrestrial hypoxia-induced gene expression patterns. The staining patterns resulting from a 5-d mission on the orbiter Columbia during mission STS-93 indicate that the Adh/GUS reporter gene was activated in roots during the flight. However, the patterns of expression were not identical to terrestrial control inductions. Moreover, although terrestrial hypoxia induces Adh/GUS expression in the shoot apex, no apex staining was observed in the spaceflight plants. This indicates that either the normal hypoxia response signaling is impaired in spaceflight or that spaceflight inappropriately induces Adh/GUS activity for reasons other than hypoxia.

  14. Cytosolic phosphorylating glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenases affect Arabidopsis cellular metabolism and promote seed oil accumulation.

    PubMed

    Guo, Liang; Ma, Fangfang; Wei, Fang; Fanella, Brian; Allen, Doug K; Wang, Xuemin

    2014-07-01

    The cytosolic enzyme glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPC) catalyzes a key reaction in glycolysis, but its contribution to plant metabolism and growth are not well defined. Here, we show that two cytosolic GAPCs play important roles in cellular metabolism and seed oil accumulation. Knockout or overexpression of GAPCs caused significant changes in the level of intermediates in the glycolytic pathway and the ratios of ATP/ADP and NAD(P)H/NAD(P). Two double knockout seeds had ∼3% of dry weight decrease in oil content compared with that of the wild type. In transgenic seeds under the constitutive 35S promoter, oil content was increased up to 42% of dry weight compared with 36% in the wild type and the fatty acid composition was altered; however, these transgenic lines exhibited decreased fertility. Seed-specific overexpression lines had >3% increase in seed oil without compromised seed yield or fecundity. The results demonstrate that GAPC levels play important roles in the overall cellular production of reductants, energy, and carbohydrate metabolites and that GAPC levels are directly correlated with seed oil accumulation. Changes in cellular metabolites and cofactor levels highlight the complexity and tolerance of Arabidopsis thaliana cells to the metabolic perturbation. Further implications for metabolic engineering of seed oil production are discussed. © 2014 American Society of Plant Biologists. All rights reserved.

  15. Transcriptional mechanisms associated with seed dormancy and dormancy loss in the gibberellin-insensitive sly1-2 mutant of Arabidopsis thaliana

    PubMed Central

    Nelson, Sven K.

    2017-01-01

    While widespread transcriptome changes were previously observed with seed dormancy loss, this study specifically characterized transcriptional changes associated with the increased seed dormancy and dormancy loss of the gibberellin (GA) hormone-insensitive sleepy1-2 (sly1-2) mutant. The SLY1 gene encodes the F-box subunit of an SCF E3 ubiquitin ligase needed for GA-triggered proteolysis of DELLA repressors of seed germination. DELLA overaccumulation in sly1-2 seeds leads to increased dormancy that can be rescued without DELLA protein destruction either by overexpression of the GA receptor, GA-INSENSITIVE DWARF1b (GID1b-OE) (74% germination) or by extended dry after-ripening (11 months, 51% germination). After-ripening of sly1 resulted in different transcriptional changes in early versus late Phase II of germination that were consistent with the processes known to occur. Approximately half of the transcriptome changes with after-ripening appear to depend on SLY1-triggered DELLA proteolysis. Given that many of these SLY1/GA-dependent changes are genes involved in protein translation, it appears that GA signaling increases germination capacity in part by activating translation. While sly1-2 after-ripening was associated with transcript-level changes in 4594 genes over two imbibition timepoints, rescue of sly1-2 germination by GID1b-OE was associated with changes in only 23 genes. Thus, a big change in sly1-2 germination phenotype can occur with relatively little change in the global pattern of gene expression during the process of germination. Most GID1b-OE-responsive transcripts showed similar changes with after-ripening in early Phase II of imbibition, but opposite changes with after-ripening by late Phase II. This suggests that GID1b-OE stimulates germination early in imbibition, but may later trigger negative feedback regulation. PMID:28628628

  16. Project Ice Storm: Prenatal Maternal Stress Affects Cognitive and Linguistic Functioning in 5 1/2-Year-Old Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Laplante, David P.; Brunet, Alain; Schmitz, Norbert; Ciampi, Antonio; King, Suzanne

    2008-01-01

    The study used data from Project Ice Storm to determine the extent to which exposure to prenatal maternal stress due to a natural disaster can explain variance in the intellectual and language performance of offspring at age 5 1/2.

  17. Project Ice Storm: Prenatal Maternal Stress Affects Cognitive and Linguistic Functioning in 5 1/2-Year-Old Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Laplante, David P.; Brunet, Alain; Schmitz, Norbert; Ciampi, Antonio; King, Suzanne

    2008-01-01

    The study used data from Project Ice Storm to determine the extent to which exposure to prenatal maternal stress due to a natural disaster can explain variance in the intellectual and language performance of offspring at age 5 1/2.

  18. Inbreeding Affects Gene Expression Differently in Two Self-Incompatible Arabidopsis lyrata Populations with Similar Levels of Inbreeding Depression.

    PubMed

    Menzel, Mandy; Sletvold, Nina; Ågren, Jon; Hansson, Bengt

    2015-08-01

    Knowledge of which genes and pathways are affected by inbreeding may help understanding the genetic basis of inbreeding depression, the potential for purging (selection against deleterious recessive alleles), and the transition from outcrossing to selfing. Arabidopsis lyrata is a predominantly self-incompatible perennial plant, closely related to the selfing model species A. thaliana. To examine how inbreeding affects gene expression, we compared the transcriptome of experimentally selfed and outcrossed A. lyrata originating from two Scandinavian populations that express similar inbreeding depression for fitness (∂ ≈ 0.80). The number of genes significantly differentially expressed between selfed and outcrossed individuals were 2.5 times higher in the Norwegian population (≈ 500 genes) than in the Swedish population (≈ 200 genes). In both populations, a majority of genes were upregulated on selfing (≈ 80%). Functional annotation analysis of the differentially expressed genes showed that selfed offspring were characterized by 1) upregulation of stress-related genes in both populations and 2) upregulation of photosynthesis-related genes in Sweden but downregulation in Norway. Moreover, we found that reproduction- and pollination-related genes were affected by inbreeding only in Norway. We conclude that inbreeding causes both general and population-specific effects. The observed common effects suggest that inbreeding generally upregulates rather than downregulates gene expression and affects genes associated with stress response and general metabolic activity. Population differences in the number of affected genes and in effects on the expression of photosynthesis-related genes show that the genetic basis of inbreeding depression can differ between populations with very similar levels of inbreeding depression.

  19. Each of the chloroplast potassium efflux antiporters affects photosynthesis and growth of fully developed Arabidopsis rosettes under short-day photoperiod.

    PubMed

    Dana, Somnath; Herdean, Andrei; Lundin, Björn; Spetea, Cornelia

    2016-12-01

    In Arabidopsis thaliana, the chloroplast harbors three potassium efflux antiporters (KEAs), namely KEA1 and KEA2 in the inner envelope and KEA3 in the thylakoid membrane. They may play redundant physiological roles as in our previous analyses of young developing Arabidopsis rosettes under long-day photoperiod (16 h light per day), chloroplast kea single mutants resembled the wild-type plants, whereas kea1kea2 and kea1kea2kea3 mutants were impaired in chloroplast development and photosynthesis resulting in stunted growth. Here, we aimed to study whether chloroplast KEAs play redundant roles in chloroplast function of older Arabidopsis plants with fully developed rosettes grown under short-day photoperiod (8 h light per day). Under these conditions, we found defects in photosynthesis and growth in the chloroplast kea single mutants, and most dramatic defects in the kea1kea2 double mutant. The mechanism behind these defects in the single mutants involves reduction in the electron transport rate (kea1 and kea3), and stomata conductance (kea1, kea2 and kea3), which in turn affect CO2 fixation rates. The kea1kea2 mutant, in addition to these alterations, displayed reduced levels of photosynthetic machinery. Taken together, our data suggest that, in addition to the previously reported roles in chloroplast development in young rosettes, each chloroplast KEA affects photosynthesis and growth of Arabidopsis fully developed rosettes. © 2016 Scandinavian Plant Physiology Society.

  20. Mutations of Arabidopsis TBL32 and TBL33 affect xylan acetylation and secondary wall deposition

    DOE PAGES

    Yuan, Youxi; Teng, Quincy; Zhong, Ruiqin; ...

    2016-01-08

    Xylan is a major acetylated polymer in plant lignocellulosic biomass and it can be monoand di-acetylated at O-2 and O-3 as well as mono-acetylated at O-3 of xylosyl residues that is substituted with glucuronic acid (GlcA) at O-2. Based on the finding that ESK1, an Arabidopsis thaliana DUF231 protein, specifically mediates xylan 2-O- and 3-O-monoacetylation, we previously proposed that different acetyltransferase activities are required for regiospecific acetyl substitutions of xylan. Here, we demonstrate the functional roles of TBL32 and TBL33, two ESK1 close homologs, in acetyl substitutions of xylan. Simultaneous mutations of TBL32 and TBL33 resulted in a significant reductionmore » in xylan acetyl content and endoxylanase digestion of the mutant xylan released GlcA-substituted xylooligomers without acetyl groups. Structural analysis of xylan revealed that the tbl32 tbl33 mutant had a nearly complete loss of 3-O-acetylated, 2-O-GlcA-substituted xylosyl residues. A reduction in 3-Omonoacetylated and 2,3-di-O-acetylated xylosyl residues was also observed. Simultaneous mutations of TBL32, TBL33 and ESK1 resulted in a severe reduction in xylan acetyl level down to 15% of that of the wild type, and concomitantly, severely collapsed vessels and stunted plant growth. In particular, the S2 layer of secondary walls in xylem vessels of tbl33 esk1 and tbl32 tbl33 esk1 exhibited an altered structure, indicating abnormal assembly of secondary wall polymers. Furthermore, these results demonstrate that TBL32 and TBL33 play an important role in xylan acetylation and normal deposition of secondary walls.« less

  1. Cryopreservation affects ROS-induced oxidative stress and antioxidant response in Arabidopsis seedlings.

    PubMed

    Chen, Guan-Qun; Ren, Li; Zhang, Jie; Reed, Barbara M; Zhang, Di; Shen, Xiao-Hui

    2015-02-01

    Plant recovery status after cryopreservation by vitrification had a negative relationship to the oxidative stress induced by reactive oxygen species (ROS). Arabidopsis thaliana seedlings germinated for 48 h or 72 h with different survival tolerances were examined at five steps of cryopreservation, to determine the role of ROS (O2(-), H2O2 and OH) and antioxidant systems (SOD, POD, CAT, AsA and GSH) in cryo-injury. In addition, the effects of the steps on membrane lipid peroxidation were studied using malondialdehyde (MDA) as an indicator. The results indicated that H2O2-induced oxidative stress at the steps of dehydration and rapid warming was the main cause of cryo-injury of 48-h seedlings (high survival rate) and 72-h seedlings (no survival). The H2O2 was mainly generated in cotyledons, shoot tips and roots of seedlings as indicated by Amplex Red staining. Low survival of 72-h seedlings was associated with severe membrane lipid peroxidation, which was caused by increased OH generation activity and decreased SOD activity. The antioxidant-related gene expression by qRT-PCR and physiological assays suggested that the antioxidant system of 48-h seedlings were activated by ROS, and they mounted a defense against oxidative stress. A high level of ROS led to the weakening of the antioxidant system of 72-h seedlings. Correlation analysis indicated that enhanced antioxidant enzymes activities contributed to the high survival rate of 48-h seedlings, which could reflect by cryopreservation of antioxidant mutant seedlings. This model system indicated that elevated CAT activity and AsA content were determinants of cryogenic stress tolerance, whose manipulation could improve the recovery of seedlings after cryopreservation. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. SUCROSE TRANSPORTER 5 supplies Arabidopsis embryos with biotin and affects triacylglycerol accumulation.

    PubMed

    Pommerrenig, Benjamin; Popko, Jennifer; Heilmann, Mareike; Schulmeister, Sylwia; Dietel, Katharina; Schmitt, Bianca; Stadler, Ruth; Feussner, Ivo; Sauer, Norbert

    2013-02-01

    The Arabidopsis SUC5 protein represents a classical sucrose/H(+) symporter. Functional analyses previously revealed that SUC5 also transports biotin, an essential co-factor for fatty acid synthesis. However, evidence for a dual role in transport of the structurally unrelated compounds sucrose and biotin in plants was lacking. Here we show that SUC5 localizes to the plasma membrane, and that the SUC5 gene is expressed in developing embryos, confirming the role of the SUC5 protein as substrate carrier across apoplastic barriers in seeds. We show that transport of biotin but not of sucrose across these barriers is impaired in suc5 mutant embryos. In addition, we show that SUC5 is essential for the delivery of biotin into the embryo of biotin biosynthesis-defective mutants (bio1 and bio2). We compared embryo and seedling development as well as triacylglycerol accumulation and fatty acid composition in seeds of single mutants (suc5, bio1 or bio2), double mutants (suc5 bio1 and suc5 bio2) and wild-type plants. Although suc5 mutants were like the wild-type, bio1 and bio2 mutants showed developmental defects and reduced triacylglycerol contents. In suc5 bio1 and suc5 bio2 double mutants, developmental defects were severely increased and the triacylglycerol content was reduced to a greater extent in comparison to the single mutants. Supplementation with externally applied biotin helped to reduce symptoms in both single and double mutants, but the efficacy of supplementation was significantly lower in double than in single mutants, showing that transport of biotin into the embryo is lower in the absence of SUC5. © 2012 The Authors The Plant Journal © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  3. Verticillium longisporum Infection Affects the Leaf Apoplastic Proteome, Metabolome, and Cell Wall Properties in Arabidopsis thaliana

    PubMed Central

    Floerl, Saskia; Majcherczyk, Andrzej; Possienke, Mareike; Feussner, Kirstin; Tappe, Hella; Gatz, Christiane; Feussner, Ivo; Kües, Ursula; Polle, Andrea

    2012-01-01

    Verticillium longisporum (VL) is one of the most devastating diseases in important oil crops from the family of Brassicaceae. The fungus resides for much time of its life cycle in the extracellular fluid of the vascular system, where it cannot be controlled by conventional fungicides. To obtain insights into the biology of VL-plant interaction in the apoplast, the secretome consisting of the extracellular proteome and metabolome as well as cell wall properties were studied in the model Brassicaceae, Arabidopsis thaliana. VL infection resulted in increased production of cell wall material with an altered composition of carbohydrate polymers and increased lignification. The abundance of several hundred soluble metabolites changed in the apoplast of VL-infected plants including signalling and defence compounds such as glycosides of salicylic acid, lignans and dihydroxybenzoic acid as well as oxylipins. The extracellular proteome of healthy leaves was enriched in antifungal proteins. VL caused specific increases in six apoplast proteins (three peroxidases PRX52, PRX34, P37, serine carboxypeptidase SCPL20, α-galactosidase AGAL2 and a germin-like protein GLP3), which have functions in defence and cell wall modification. The abundance of a lectin-like, chitin-inducible protein (CILLP) was reduced. Since the transcript levels of most of the induced proteins were not elevated until late infection time points (>20 dpi), whereas those of CILLP and GLP3 were reduced at earlier time points, our results may suggest that VL enhances its virulence by rapid down-regulation and delay of induction of plant defence genes. PMID:22363647

  4. Mutations of Arabidopsis TBL32 and TBL33 Affect Xylan Acetylation and Secondary Wall Deposition

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Youxi; Teng, Quincy; Zhong, Ruiqin; Haghighat, Marziyeh; Richardson, Elizabeth A.; Ye, Zheng-Hua

    2016-01-01

    Xylan is a major acetylated polymer in plant lignocellulosic biomass and it can be mono- and di-acetylated at O-2 and O-3 as well as mono-acetylated at O-3 of xylosyl residues that is substituted with glucuronic acid (GlcA) at O-2. Based on the finding that ESK1, an Arabidopsis thaliana DUF231 protein, specifically mediates xylan 2-O- and 3-O-monoacetylation, we previously proposed that different acetyltransferase activities are required for regiospecific acetyl substitutions of xylan. Here, we demonstrate the functional roles of TBL32 and TBL33, two ESK1 close homologs, in acetyl substitutions of xylan. Simultaneous mutations of TBL32 and TBL33 resulted in a significant reduction in xylan acetyl content and endoxylanase digestion of the mutant xylan released GlcA-substituted xylooligomers without acetyl groups. Structural analysis of xylan revealed that the tbl32 tbl33 mutant had a nearly complete loss of 3-O-acetylated, 2-O-GlcA-substituted xylosyl residues. A reduction in 3-O-monoacetylated and 2,3-di-O-acetylated xylosyl residues was also observed. Simultaneous mutations of TBL32, TBL33 and ESK1 resulted in a severe reduction in xylan acetyl level down to 15% of that of the wild type, and concomitantly, severely collapsed vessels and stunted plant growth. In particular, the S2 layer of secondary walls in xylem vessels of tbl33 esk1 and tbl32 tbl33 esk1 exhibited an altered structure, indicating abnormal assembly of secondary wall polymers. These results demonstrate that TBL32 and TBL33 play an important role in xylan acetylation and normal deposition of secondary walls. PMID:26745802

  5. SUCROSE TRANSPORTER 5 supplies Arabidopsis embryos with biotin and affects triacylglycerol accumulation

    PubMed Central

    Pommerrenig, Benjamin; Popko, Jennifer; Heilmann, Mareike; Schulmeister, Sylwia; Dietel, Katharina; Schmitt, Bianca; Stadler, Ruth; Feussner, Ivo; Sauer, Norbert

    2013-01-01

    The Arabidopsis SUC5 protein represents a classical sucrose/H+ symporter. Functional analyses previously revealed that SUC5 also transports biotin, an essential co-factor for fatty acid synthesis. However, evidence for a dual role in transport of the structurally unrelated compounds sucrose and biotin in plants was lacking. Here we show that SUC5 localizes to the plasma membrane, and that the SUC5 gene is expressed in developing embryos, confirming the role of the SUC5 protein as substrate carrier across apoplastic barriers in seeds. We show that transport of biotin but not of sucrose across these barriers is impaired in suc5 mutant embryos. In addition, we show that SUC5 is essential for the delivery of biotin into the embryo of biotin biosynthesis-defective mutants (bio1 and bio2). We compared embryo and seedling development as well as triacylglycerol accumulation and fatty acid composition in seeds of single mutants (suc5, bio1 or bio2), double mutants (suc5 bio1 and suc5 bio2) and wild-type plants. Although suc5 mutants were like the wild-type, bio1 and bio2 mutants showed developmental defects and reduced triacylglycerol contents. In suc5 bio1 and suc5 bio2 double mutants, developmental defects were severely increased and the triacylglycerol content was reduced to a greater extent in comparison to the single mutants. Supplementation with externally applied biotin helped to reduce symptoms in both single and double mutants, but the efficacy of supplementation was significantly lower in double than in single mutants, showing that transport of biotin into the embryo is lower in the absence of SUC5. PMID:23031218

  6. Arabidopsis thaliana DOF6 negatively affects germination in non-after-ripened seeds and interacts with TCP14.

    PubMed

    Rueda-Romero, Paloma; Barrero-Sicilia, Cristina; Gómez-Cadenas, Aurelio; Carbonero, Pilar; Oñate-Sánchez, Luis

    2012-03-01

    Seed dormancy prevents seeds from germinating under environmental conditions unfavourable for plant growth and development and constitutes an evolutionary advantage. Dry storage, also known as after-ripening, gradually decreases seed dormancy by mechanisms not well understood. An Arabidopsis thaliana DOF transcription factor gene (DOF6) affecting seed germination has been characterized. The transcript levels of this gene accumulate in dry seeds and decay gradually during after-ripening and also upon seed imbibition. While constitutive over-expression of DOF6 produced aberrant growth and sterility in the plant, its over-expression induced upon seed imbibition triggered delayed germination, abscisic acid (ABA)-hypersensitive phenotypes and increased expression of the ABA biosynthetic gene ABA1 and ABA-related stress genes. Wild-type germination and gene expression were gradually restored during seed after-ripening, despite of DOF6-induced over-expression. DOF6 was found to interact in a yeast two-hybrid system and in planta with TCP14, a previously described positive regulator of seed germination. The expression of ABA1 and ABA-related stress genes was also enhanced in tcp14 knock-out mutants. Taken together, these results indicate that DOF6 negatively affects seed germination and opposes TCP14 function in the regulation of a specific set of ABA-related genes.

  7. Canopy light cues affect emission of constitutive and methyl jasmonate-induced volatile organic compounds in Arabidopsis thaliana

    PubMed Central

    Kegge, Wouter; Weldegergis, Berhane T; Soler, Roxina; Eijk, Marleen Vergeer-Van; Dicke, Marcel; Voesenek, Laurentius A C J; Pierik, Ronald

    2013-01-01

    The effects of plant competition for light on the emission of plant volatile organic compounds (VOCs) were studied by investigating how different light qualities that occur in dense vegetation affect the emission of constitutive and methyl-jasmonate-induced VOCs. Arabidopsis thaliana Columbia (Col-0) plants and Pieris brassicae caterpillars were used as a biological system to study the effects of light quality manipulations on VOC emissions and attraction of herbivores. VOCs were analysed using gas chromatography–mass spectrometry and the effects of light quality, notably the red : far red light ratio (R : FR), on expression of genes associated with VOC production were studied using reverse transcriptase–quantitative PCR. The emissions of both constitutive and methyl-jasmonate-induced green leaf volatiles and terpenoids were partially suppressed under low R : FR and severe shading conditions. Accordingly, the VOC-based preference of neonates of the specialist lepidopteran herbivore P. brassicae was significantly affected by the R : FR ratio. We conclude that VOC-mediated interactions among plants and between plants and organisms at higher trophic levels probably depend on light alterations caused by nearby vegetation. Studies on plant–plant and plant–insect interactions through VOCs should take into account the light quality within dense stands when extrapolating to natural and agricultural field conditions. PMID:23845065

  8. Plastid signals that affect photomorphogenesis in Arabidopsis thaliana are dependent on GENOMES UNCOUPLED 1 and cryptochrome 1.

    PubMed

    Ruckle, Michael E; Larkin, Robert M

    2009-01-01

    When plastids experience dysfunction they emit signals that help coordinate nuclear gene expression with their functional state. One of these signals can remodel a light-signaling network that regulates the expression of nuclear genes that encode particular antenna proteins of photosystem II. These findings led us to test whether plastid signals might impact other light-regulated processes. Photomorphogenesis was monitored in genomes uncoupled 1 (gun1), cryptochrome 1 (cry1), and long hypocotyl 5 (hy5), which have defects in light and plastid signaling, by growing Arabidopsis thaliana seedlings under various light conditions and either treating or not treating them with antibiotics that induce chloroplast dysfunction and trigger plastid signaling. It was found that plastid signals that depend on GUN1 can affect cotyledon opening and expansion, anthocyanin biosynthesis, and hypocotyl elongation. We also found that plastid signals that depend on CRY1 can regulate cotyledon expansion and development. Our findings suggest that plastid signals triggered by plastid dysfunction can broadly affect photomorphogenesis and that plastid and light signaling can promote or antagonize each other, depending on the responses studied. These data suggest that GUN1 and cry 1 help to integrate chloroplast function with photomorphogenesis.

  9. Arabidopsis thaliana DOF6 negatively affects germination in non-after-ripened seeds and interacts with TCP14

    PubMed Central

    Rueda-Romero, Paloma; Barrero-Sicilia, Cristina; Gómez-Cadenas, Aurelio; Carbonero, Pilar; Oñate-Sánchez, Luis

    2012-01-01

    Seed dormancy prevents seeds from germinating under environmental conditions unfavourable for plant growth and development and constitutes an evolutionary advantage. Dry storage, also known as after-ripening, gradually decreases seed dormancy by mechanisms not well understood. An Arabidopsis thaliana DOF transcription factor gene (DOF6) affecting seed germination has been characterized. The transcript levels of this gene accumulate in dry seeds and decay gradually during after-ripening and also upon seed imbibition. While constitutive over-expression of DOF6 produced aberrant growth and sterility in the plant, its over-expression induced upon seed imbibition triggered delayed germination, abscisic acid (ABA)-hypersensitive phenotypes and increased expression of the ABA biosynthetic gene ABA1 and ABA-related stress genes. Wild-type germination and gene expression were gradually restored during seed after-ripening, despite of DOF6-induced over-expression. DOF6 was found to interact in a yeast two-hybrid system and in planta with TCP14, a previously described positive regulator of seed germination. The expression of ABA1 and ABA-related stress genes was also enhanced in tcp14 knock-out mutants. Taken together, these results indicate that DOF6 negatively affects seed germination and opposes TCP14 function in the regulation of a specific set of ABA-related genes. PMID:22155632

  10. Arabidopsis thaliana plants with different levels of aliphatic- and indolyl-glucosinolates affect host selection and performance of Bemisia tabaci.

    PubMed

    Markovich, Oshry; Kafle, Dinesh; Elbaz, Moshe; Malitsky, Sergey; Aharoni, Asaph; Schwarzkopf, Alexander; Gershenzon, Jonathan; Morin, Shai

    2013-12-01

    Generalist insects show reduced selectivity when subjected to similar, but not identical, host plant chemical signatures. Here, we produced transgenic Arabidopsis thaliana plants that over-express genes regulating the aliphatic- and indolyl- glucosinolates biosynthetic pathways with either a constitutive (CaMV 35S) or a phloem-specific promoter (AtSUC2). This allowed us to examine how exposure to high levels of aliphatic- or indolyl-glucosinolates in homogenous habitats (leaf cage apparatus containing two wild-type or two transgenic leaves) and heterogeneous habitats (leaf cage apparatus containing one wild-type and one transgenic leaf) affects host selection and performance of Bemsia tabaci, a generalist phloem-feeding insect. Data from homogenous habitats indicated that exposure to A. thaliana plants accumulating high levels of aliphatic- or indolyl-glucosinolates negatively affected the performance of both adult females and nymphs of B. tabaci. Data from heterogeneous habitats indicated that B. tabaci adult females selected for oviposition plants on which their offspring perform better (preference-performance relationship). However, the combinations of wild-type and transgenic plants in heterogeneous habitats increased the period of time until the first choice was made and led to increased movement rate on transgenic plants, and reduced fecundity on wild-type plants. Overall, our findings are consistent with the view that both performance and selectivity of B. tabaci decrease in heterogeneous habitats that contain plants with closely-related chemical signatures.

  11. Roscovitine, a cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor, affects several gating mechanisms to inhibit cardiac L-type (Ca(V)1.2) calcium channels.

    PubMed

    Yarotskyy, V; Elmslie, K S

    2007-10-01

    L-type calcium channels (Ca((V))1.2) play an important role in cardiac contraction. Roscovitine, a cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor and promising anticancer drug, has been shown to affect Ca((V))1.2 by inhibiting current amplitude and slowing activation. This research investigates the mechanism by which roscovitine inhibits Ca((V))1.2 channels. Ca((V))1.2 channels were transfected into HEK 293 cells, using the calcium phosphate precipitation method, and currents were measured using the whole-cell patch clamp technique. Roscovitine slows activation at all voltages, which precludes one previously proposed mechanism. In addition, roscovitine enhances voltage-dependent, but not calcium-dependent inactivation. This enhancement resulted from both an acceleration of inactivation and a slowing of the recovery from inactivation. Internally applied roscovitine failed to affect Ca((V))1.2 currents, which supports a kinase-independent mechanism and extracellular binding site. Unlike the dihydropyridines, closed state inactivation was not affected by roscovitine. Inactivation was enhanced in a dose-dependent manner with an IC(50)=29.5+/-12 microM, which is close to that for slow activation and inhibition. We conclude that roscovitine binds to an extracellular site on Ca((V))1.2 channels to inhibit current by both slowing activation and enhancing inactivation. Purine-based drugs could become a new option for treatment of diseases that benefit from L-channel inhibition such as cardiac arrhythmias and hypertension.

  12. Project Ice Storm: prenatal maternal stress affects cognitive and linguistic functioning in 5 1/2-year-old children.

    PubMed

    Laplante, David P; Brunet, Alain; Schmitz, Norbert; Ciampi, Antonio; King, Suzanne

    2008-09-01

    This was a prospective study designed to determine the extent to which the degree of exposure to prenatal maternal stress due to a natural disaster explains variance in the intellectual and language performance of offspring at age 5(1/2) while controlling for several potential confounding variables. Subjects were eighty-nine 5(1/2)-year-old children whose mothers were pregnant during a natural disaster: the January 1998 ice storm crisis in the Canadian province of Québec that resulted in power losses for 3 million people for as long as 40 days. In June 1998, women completed several questionnaires including those about the extent of objective stress (Storm 32) and subjective distress (Impact of Events Scale-Revised) experienced due to the storm. Their children were assessed with the Wechsler Preschool and Primary Scale of Intelligence-Revised (IQ) and Peabody Picture Vocabulary Test-Revised (language) at 5(1/2) years of age, and mothers completed assessments of recent life events and psychological functioning. Children exposed in utero to high levels of objective stress had lower Full Scale IQs, Verbal IQs, and language abilities compared to children exposed to low or moderate levels of objective prenatal maternal stress; there were no effects of subjective stress or objective stress on Performance IQs. Trend analyses show that for all outcome variables except Block Design, there was a significant curvilinear association between objective stress and functioning. Prenatal exposure to a moderately severe natural disaster is associated with lower cognitive and language abilities at 5(1/2) years of age.

  13. Ecologically Different Fungi Affect Arabidopsis Development: Contribution of Soluble and Volatile Compounds

    PubMed Central

    Casarrubia, Salvatore; Sapienza, Sara; Fritz, Héma; Daghino, Stefania; Rosenkranz, Maaria; Schnitzler, Jörg-Peter; Martin, Francis; Perotto, Silvia

    2016-01-01

    Plant growth and development can be influenced by mutualistic and non-mutualistic microorganisms. We investigated the ability of the ericoid endomycorrhizal fungus Oidiodendron maius to influence growth and development of the non-host plant Arabidopsis thaliana. Different experimental setups (non-compartmented and compartmented co-culture plates) were used to investigate the influence of both soluble and volatile fungal molecules on the plant phenotype. O. maius promoted growth of A. thaliana in all experimental setups. In addition, a peculiar clumped root phenotype, characterized by shortening of the primary root and by an increase of lateral root length and number, was observed in A. thaliana only in the non-compartmented plates, suggesting that soluble diffusible molecules are responsible for this root morphology. Fungal auxin does not seem to be involved in plant growth promotion and in the clumped root phenotype because co-cultivation with O. maius did not change auxin accumulation in plant tissues, as assessed in plants carrying the DR5::GUS reporter construct. In addition, no correlation between the amount of fungal auxin produced and the plant root phenotype was observed in an O. maius mutant unable to induce the clumped root phenotype in A. thaliana. Addition of active charcoal, a VOC absorbant, in the compartmented plates did not modify plant growth promotion, suggesting that VOCs are not involved in this phenomenon. The low VOCs emission measured for O. maius further corroborated this hypothesis. By contrast, the addition of CO2 traps in the compartmented plates drastically reduced plant growth, suggesting involvement of fungal CO2 in plant growth promotion. Other mycorrhizal fungi, as well as a saprotrophic and a pathogenic fungus, were also tested with the same experimental setups. In the non-compartmented plates, most fungi promoted A. thaliana growth and some could induce the clumped root phenotype. In the compartmented plate experiments, a general

  14. Ecologically Different Fungi Affect Arabidopsis Development: Contribution of Soluble and Volatile Compounds.

    PubMed

    Casarrubia, Salvatore; Sapienza, Sara; Fritz, Héma; Daghino, Stefania; Rosenkranz, Maaria; Schnitzler, Jörg-Peter; Martin, Francis; Perotto, Silvia; Martino, Elena

    2016-01-01

    Plant growth and development can be influenced by mutualistic and non-mutualistic microorganisms. We investigated the ability of the ericoid endomycorrhizal fungus Oidiodendron maius to influence growth and development of the non-host plant Arabidopsis thaliana. Different experimental setups (non-compartmented and compartmented co-culture plates) were used to investigate the influence of both soluble and volatile fungal molecules on the plant phenotype. O. maius promoted growth of A. thaliana in all experimental setups. In addition, a peculiar clumped root phenotype, characterized by shortening of the primary root and by an increase of lateral root length and number, was observed in A. thaliana only in the non-compartmented plates, suggesting that soluble diffusible molecules are responsible for this root morphology. Fungal auxin does not seem to be involved in plant growth promotion and in the clumped root phenotype because co-cultivation with O. maius did not change auxin accumulation in plant tissues, as assessed in plants carrying the DR5::GUS reporter construct. In addition, no correlation between the amount of fungal auxin produced and the plant root phenotype was observed in an O. maius mutant unable to induce the clumped root phenotype in A. thaliana. Addition of active charcoal, a VOC absorbant, in the compartmented plates did not modify plant growth promotion, suggesting that VOCs are not involved in this phenomenon. The low VOCs emission measured for O. maius further corroborated this hypothesis. By contrast, the addition of CO2 traps in the compartmented plates drastically reduced plant growth, suggesting involvement of fungal CO2 in plant growth promotion. Other mycorrhizal fungi, as well as a saprotrophic and a pathogenic fungus, were also tested with the same experimental setups. In the non-compartmented plates, most fungi promoted A. thaliana growth and some could induce the clumped root phenotype. In the compartmented plate experiments, a general

  15. Sirtinol, a Sir2 protein inhibitor, affects stem cell maintenance and root development in Arabidopsis thaliana by modulating auxin-cytokinin signaling components

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Sharmila; Singh, Alka; Yadav, Sandeep; Gautam, Vibhav; Singh, Archita; Sarkar, Ananda K.

    2017-01-01

    In Arabidopsis thaliana, besides several key transcription factors and chromatin modifiers, phytohormones auxin and cytokinin play pivotal role in shoot and root meristem maintenance, and lateral root (LR) development. Sirtinol, a chemical inhibitor of Sir2 proteins, is known to promote some auxin induced phenotypes in Arabidopsis. However, its effect on plant stem cell maintenance or organ formation remained unaddressed. Here we show that sirtinol affects meristem maintenance by altering the expression of key stem cell regulators, cell division and differentiation by modulating both auxin and cytokinin signaling in Arabidopsis thaliana. The expression of shoot stem cell niche related genes WUSCHEL (WUS) and CLAVATA3 (CLV3) was upregulated, whereas SHOOT MERISTEMLESS (STM) was downregulated in sirtinol treated seedlings. The expression level and domain of key root stem cell regulators PLETHORA (PLTs) and WUS-Related Homeobox 5 (WOX5) were altered in sirtinol treated roots. Sirtinol affects LR development by disturbing proper auxin transport and maxima formation, similar to 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4-D). Sirtinol also affects LR formation by altering cytokinin biosynthesis and signaling genes in roots. Therefore, sirtinol affects shoot and root growth, meristem maintenance and LR development by altering the expression of cytokinin-auxin signaling components, and regulators of stem cells, meristems, and LRs. PMID:28195159

  16. Psychological Distress, Anxiety, and Depression of Cancer-Affected BRCA1/2 Mutation Carriers: a Systematic Review.

    PubMed

    Ringwald, Johanna; Wochnowski, Christina; Bosse, Kristin; Giel, Katrin Elisabeth; Schäffeler, Norbert; Zipfel, Stephan; Teufel, Martin

    2016-10-01

    Understanding the intermediate- and long-term psychological consequences of genetic testing for cancer patients has led to encouraging research, but a clear consensus of the psychosocial impact and clinical routine for cancer-affected BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers is still missing. We performed a systematic review of intermediate- and long-term studies investigating the psychological impact like psychological distress, anxiety, and depression in cancer-affected BRCA mutation carriers compared to unaffected mutation carriers. This review included the screening of 1243 studies. Eight intermediate- and long-term studies focusing on distress, anxiety, and depression symptoms among cancer-affected mutation carriers at least six months after the disclosure of genetic testing results were included. Studies reported a great variety of designs, methods, and patient outcomes. We found evidence indicating that cancer-affected mutation carriers experienced a negative effect in relation to psychological well-being in terms of an increase in symptoms of distress, anxiety, and depression in the first months after test disclosure. In the intermediate- and long-term, no significant clinical relevant symptoms occurred. However, none of the included studies used specific measurements, which can clearly identify psychological burdens of cancer-affected mutation carriers. We concluded that current well-implemented distress screening instruments are not sufficient for precisely identifying the psychological burden of genetic testing. Therefore, future studies should implement coping strategies, specific personality structures, the impact of genetic testing, supportive care needs and disease management behaviour to clearly screen for the possible intermediate- and long-term psychological impact of a positive test disclosure.

  17. Rhizosphere Microbial Community Composition Affects Cadmium and Zinc Uptake by the Metal-Hyperaccumulating Plant Arabidopsis halleri

    PubMed Central

    Muehe, E. Marie; Weigold, Pascal; Adaktylou, Irini J.; Planer-Friedrich, Britta; Kraemer, Ute; Kappler, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    The remediation of metal-contaminated soils by phytoextraction depends on plant growth and plant metal accessibility. Soil microorganisms can affect the accumulation of metals by plants either by directly or indirectly stimulating plant growth and activity or by (im)mobilizing and/or complexing metals. Understanding the intricate interplay of metal-accumulating plants with their rhizosphere microbiome is an important step toward the application and optimization of phytoremediation. We compared the effects of a “native” and a strongly disturbed (gamma-irradiated) soil microbial communities on cadmium and zinc accumulation by the plant Arabidopsis halleri in soil microcosm experiments. A. halleri accumulated 100% more cadmium and 15% more zinc when grown on the untreated than on the gamma-irradiated soil. Gamma irradiation affected neither plant growth nor the 1 M HCl-extractable metal content of the soil. However, it strongly altered the soil microbial community composition and overall cell numbers. Pyrosequencing of 16S rRNA gene amplicons of DNA extracted from rhizosphere samples of A. halleri identified microbial taxa (Lysobacter, Streptomyces, Agromyces, Nitrospira, “Candidatus Chloracidobacterium”) of higher relative sequence abundance in the rhizospheres of A. halleri plants grown on untreated than on gamma-irradiated soil, leading to hypotheses on their potential effect on plant metal uptake. However, further experimental evidence is required, and wherefore we discuss different mechanisms of interaction of A. halleri with its rhizosphere microbiome that might have directly or indirectly affected plant metal accumulation. Deciphering the complex interactions between A. halleri and individual microbial taxa will help to further develop soil metal phytoextraction as an efficient and sustainable remediation strategy. PMID:25595759

  18. Rhizosphere microbial community composition affects cadmium and zinc uptake by the metal-hyperaccumulating plant Arabidopsis halleri.

    PubMed

    Muehe, E Marie; Weigold, Pascal; Adaktylou, Irini J; Planer-Friedrich, Britta; Kraemer, Ute; Kappler, Andreas; Behrens, Sebastian

    2015-03-01

    The remediation of metal-contaminated soils by phytoextraction depends on plant growth and plant metal accessibility. Soil microorganisms can affect the accumulation of metals by plants either by directly or indirectly stimulating plant growth and activity or by (im)mobilizing and/or complexing metals. Understanding the intricate interplay of metal-accumulating plants with their rhizosphere microbiome is an important step toward the application and optimization of phytoremediation. We compared the effects of a "native" and a strongly disturbed (gamma-irradiated) soil microbial communities on cadmium and zinc accumulation by the plant Arabidopsis halleri in soil microcosm experiments. A. halleri accumulated 100% more cadmium and 15% more zinc when grown on the untreated than on the gamma-irradiated soil. Gamma irradiation affected neither plant growth nor the 1 M HCl-extractable metal content of the soil. However, it strongly altered the soil microbial community composition and overall cell numbers. Pyrosequencing of 16S rRNA gene amplicons of DNA extracted from rhizosphere samples of A. halleri identified microbial taxa (Lysobacter, Streptomyces, Agromyces, Nitrospira, "Candidatus Chloracidobacterium") of higher relative sequence abundance in the rhizospheres of A. halleri plants grown on untreated than on gamma-irradiated soil, leading to hypotheses on their potential effect on plant metal uptake. However, further experimental evidence is required, and wherefore we discuss different mechanisms of interaction of A. halleri with its rhizosphere microbiome that might have directly or indirectly affected plant metal accumulation. Deciphering the complex interactions between A. halleri and individual microbial taxa will help to further develop soil metal phytoextraction as an efficient and sustainable remediation strategy. Copyright © 2015, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  19. Heat Shock Factors HsfB1 and HsfB2b Are Involved in the Regulation of Pdf1.2 Expression and Pathogen Resistance in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Mukesh; Busch, Wolfgang; Birke, Hannah; Kemmerling, Birgit; Nürnberger, Thorsten; Schöffl, Friedrich

    2009-01-01

    In order to assess the functional roles of heat stress-induced class B-heat shock factors in Arabidopsis, we investigated T-DNA knockout mutants of AtHsfB1 and AtHsfB2b. Micorarray analysis of double knockout hsfB1/hsfB2b plants revealed as strong an up-regulation of the basal mRNA-levels of the defensin genes Pdf1.2a/b in mutant plants. The Pdf expression was further enhanced by jasmonic acid treatment or infection with the necrotrophic fungus Alternaria brassicicola. The single mutant hsfB2b and the double mutant hsfB1/B2b were significantly improved in disease resistance after A. brassicicola infection. There was no indication for a direct interaction of Hsf with the promoter of Pdf1.2, which is devoid of perfect HSE consensus Hsf-binding sequences. However, changes in the formation of late HsfA2-dependent HSE binding were detected in hsfB1/B2b plants. This suggests that HsfB1/B2b may interact with class A-Hsf in regulating the shut-off of the heat shock response. The identification of Pdf genes as targets of Hsf-dependent negative regulation is the first evidence for an interconnection of Hsf in the regulation of biotic and abiotic responses. PMID:19529832

  20. Heat shock factors HsfB1 and HsfB2b are involved in the regulation of Pdf1.2 expression and pathogen resistance in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Mukesh; Busch, Wolfgang; Birke, Hannah; Kemmerling, Birgit; Nürnberger, Thorsten; Schöffl, Friedrich

    2009-01-01

    In order to assess the functional roles of heat stress-induced class B-heat shock factors in Arabidopsis, we investigated T-DNA knockout mutants of AtHsfB1 and AtHsfB2b. Micorarray analysis of double knockout hsfB1/hsfB2b plants revealed as strong an up-regulation of the basal mRNA-levels of the defensin genes Pdf1.2a/b in mutant plants. The Pdf expression was further enhanced by jasmonic acid treatment or infection with the necrotrophic fungus Alternaria brassicicola. The single mutant hsfB2b and the double mutant hsfB1/B2b were significantly improved in disease resistance after A. brassicicola infection. There was no indication for a direct interaction of Hsf with the promoter of Pdf1.2, which is devoid of perfect HSE consensus Hsf-binding sequences. However, changes in the formation of late HsfA2-dependent HSE binding were detected in hsfB1/B2b plants. This suggests that HsfB1/B2b may interact with class A-Hsf in regulating the shut-off of the heat shock response. The identification of Pdf genes as targets of Hsf-dependent negative regulation is the first evidence for an interconnection of Hsf in the regulation of biotic and abiotic responses.

  1. Potato tuber expression of Arabidopsis WRINKLED1 increase triacylglycerol and membrane lipids while affecting central carbohydrate metabolism.

    PubMed

    Hofvander, Per; Ischebeck, Till; Turesson, Helle; Kushwaha, Sandeep K; Feussner, Ivo; Carlsson, Anders S; Andersson, Mariette

    2016-09-01

    Tuber and root crops virtually exclusively accumulate storage products in the form of carbohydrates. An exception is yellow nutsedge (Cyperus esculentus) in which tubers have the capacity to store starch and triacylglycerols (TAG) in roughly equal amounts. This suggests that a tuber crop can efficiently handle accumulation of energy dense oil. From a nutritional as well as economic aspect, it would be of interest to utilize the high yield capacity of tuber or root crops for oil accumulation similar to yellow nutsedge. The transcription factor WRINKLED1 from Arabidopsis thaliana, which in seed embryos induce fatty acid synthesis, has been shown to be a major factor for oil accumulation. WRINKLED1 was expressed in potato (Solanum tuberosum) tubers to explore whether this factor could impact tuber metabolism. This study shows that a WRINKLED1 transcription factor could induce triacylglycerol accumulation in tubers of transformed potato plants grown in field (up to 12 nmol TAG/mg dry weight, 1% of dry weight) together with a large increase in polar membrane lipids. The changes in metabolism further affected starch accumulation and composition concomitant with massive increases in sugar content.

  2. Arabidopsis PTD is required for type I crossover formation and affects recombination frequency in two different chromosomal regions.

    PubMed

    Lu, Pingli; Wijeratne, Asela J; Wang, Zhengjia; Copenhaver, Gregory P; Ma, Hong

    2014-03-20

    In eukaryotes, crossovers together with sister chromatid cohesion maintain physical association between homologous chromosomes, ensuring accurate chromosome segregation during meiosis I and resulting in exchange of genetic information between homologues. The Arabidopsis PTD (Parting Dancers) gene affects the level of meiotic crossover formation, but its functional relationships with other core meiotic genes, such as AtSPO11-1, AtRAD51, and AtMSH4, are unclear; whether PTD has other functions in meiosis is also unknown. To further analyze PTD function and to test for epistatic relationships, we compared the meiotic chromosome behaviors of Atspo11-1 ptd and Atrad51 ptd double mutants with the relevant single mutants. The results suggest that PTD functions downstream of AtSPO11-1 and AtRAD51 in the meiotic recombination pathway. Furthermore, we found that meiotic defects in rck ptd and Atmsh4 ptd double mutants showed similar meiotic phenotypes to those of the relevant single mutants, providing genetic evidences for roles of PTD and RCK in the type I crossovers pathway. Moreover, we employed a pollen tetrad-based fluorescence method and found that the meiotic crossover frequencies in two genetic intervals were significantly reduced from 6.63% and 22.26% in wild-type to 1.14% and 6.36%, respectively, in the ptd-2 mutant. These results revealed new aspects of PTD function in meiotic crossover formation.

  3. Loss of Arabidopsis p24 function affects ERD2 traffic and Golgi structure and activates the unfolded protein response.

    PubMed

    Pastor-Cantizano, Noelia; Bernat-Silvestre, Cesar; Marcote, María Jesús; Aniento, Fernando

    2017-09-04

    p24 proteins are key regulators of protein trafficking along the secretory pathway but very little is known about their functions in plants. A quadruple loss-of-function mutant affecting the p24 genes from the δ-1 subclass of the p24 delta subfamily (p24δ3δ4δ5δ6) showed alterations in the Golgi apparatus, suggesting that these p24 proteins play a role in the organization of the compartments of the early secretory pathway in Arabidopsis Loss of p24δ-1 proteins also induced the accumulation of the K/HDEL receptor ERD2 at the Golgi apparatus and increased secretion of the ER chaperone BiP, an HDEL ligand, probably due to an inhibition of COPI-dependent Golgi-to-ER transport of ERD2 and thus retrieval of K/HDEL ligands. Although the p24δ3δ4δ5δ6 mutant showed enhanced sensitivity to salt stress, it did not show obvious phenotypic alterations under standard growth conditions. Interestingly, this mutant showed a constitutive activation of the unfolded protein response (UPR) and the up-regulation of the COPII subunit SEC31A, which may help the plant to cope with those transport defects in the absence of p24 proteins. © 2017. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  4. Isolation and characterization of novel mutants affecting the abscisic acid sensitivity of Arabidopsis germination and seedling growth.

    PubMed

    Nishimura, Noriyuki; Yoshida, Tomo; Murayama, Maki; Asami, Tadao; Shinozaki, Kazuo; Hirayama, Takashi

    2004-10-01

    To gain more insight into ABA signaling mechanisms, we conducted genetic screens searching for mutants with altered ABA response in germination and post-germination growth. We isolated seven putative ABA-hypersensitive Arabidopsis mutants and named them ABA-hypersensitive germination (ahg). These mutants exhibited diminished germination or growth ability on medium supplemented with ABA. We further studied four of them: ahg1, ahg2, ahg3 and ahg4. Mapping suggested that they were new ABA-hypersensitive loci. Characterization showed that all of them had enhanced sensitivity to salinity and high osmotic stress in germinating seeds, whereas they each had distinct sugar responses. RT-PCR experiments showed that the expression patterns of the ABA-inducible genes RAB18, AtEm1, AtEm6 and ABI5 in germinating seeds were affected by these four ahg mutations, whereas those of ABI3 and ABI4 were not. ahg4 displayed slightly increased mRNA levels of several ABA-inducible genes upon ABA treatment. By contrast, ahg1 had no clear ABA-hypersensitive phenotypes in adult plants despite its strong phenotype in germination. These results suggest that ahg1, ahg2, ahg3 and ahg4 are novel ABA-hypersensitive mutants representing distinct components in the ABA response.

  5. Altered sucrose synthase and invertase expression affects the local and systemic sugar metabolism of nematode-infected Arabidopsis thaliana plants

    PubMed Central

    Hofmann, Julia

    2014-01-01

    Sedentary endoparasitic nematodes of plants induce highly specific feeding cells in the root central cylinder. From these, the obligate parasites withdraw all required nutrients. The feeding cells were described as sink tissues in the plant’s circulation system that are supplied with phloem-derived solutes such as sugars. Currently, there are several publications describing mechanisms of sugar import into the feeding cells. However, sugar processing has not been studied so far. Thus, in the present work, the roles of the sucrose-cleaving enzymes sucrose synthases (SUS) and invertases (INV) in the development of Heterodera schachtii were studied. Gene expression analyses indicate that both enzymes are regulated transcriptionally. Nematode development was enhanced on multiple INV and SUS mutants. Syncytia of these mutants were characterized by altered enzyme activity and changing sugar pool sizes. Further, the analyses revealed systemically affected sugar levels and enzyme activities in the shoots of the tested mutants, suggesting changes in the source–sink relationship. Finally, the development of the root-knot nematode Meloidogyne javanica was studied in different INV and SUS mutants and wild-type Arabidopsis plants. Similar effects on the development of both sedentary endoparasitic nematode species (root-knot and cyst nematode) were observed, suggesting a more general role of sucrose-degrading enzymes during plant–nematode interactions. PMID:24187419

  6. Altered sucrose synthase and invertase expression affects the local and systemic sugar metabolism of nematode-infected Arabidopsis thaliana plants.

    PubMed

    Cabello, Susana; Lorenz, Cindy; Crespo, Sara; Cabrera, Javier; Ludwig, Roland; Escobar, Carolina; Hofmann, Julia

    2014-01-01

    Sedentary endoparasitic nematodes of plants induce highly specific feeding cells in the root central cylinder. From these, the obligate parasites withdraw all required nutrients. The feeding cells were described as sink tissues in the plant's circulation system that are supplied with phloem-derived solutes such as sugars. Currently, there are several publications describing mechanisms of sugar import into the feeding cells. However, sugar processing has not been studied so far. Thus, in the present work, the roles of the sucrose-cleaving enzymes sucrose synthases (SUS) and invertases (INV) in the development of Heterodera schachtii were studied. Gene expression analyses indicate that both enzymes are regulated transcriptionally. Nematode development was enhanced on multiple INV and SUS mutants. Syncytia of these mutants were characterized by altered enzyme activity and changing sugar pool sizes. Further, the analyses revealed systemically affected sugar levels and enzyme activities in the shoots of the tested mutants, suggesting changes in the source-sink relationship. Finally, the development of the root-knot nematode Meloidogyne javanica was studied in different INV and SUS mutants and wild-type Arabidopsis plants. Similar effects on the development of both sedentary endoparasitic nematode species (root-knot and cyst nematode) were observed, suggesting a more general role of sucrose-degrading enzymes during plant-nematode interactions.

  7. Synergistic action of histone acetyltransferase GCN5 and receptor CLAVATA1 negatively affects ethylene responses in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Poulios, Stylianos; Vlachonasios, Konstantinos E

    2016-02-01

    GENERAL CONTROL NON-REPRESSIBLE 5 (GCN5) is a histone acetyltransferase (HAT) and the catalytic subunit of several multicomponent HAT complexes that acetylate lysine residues of histone H3. Mutants in AtGCN5 display pleiotropic developmental defects including aberrant meristem function. Shoot apical meristem (SAM) maintenance is regulated by CLAVATA1 (CLV1), a receptor kinase that controls the size of the shoot and floral meristems. Upon activation through CLV3 binding, CLV1 signals to the transcription factor WUSCHEL (WUS), restricting WUS expression and thus the meristem size. We hypothesized that GCN5 and CLV1 act together to affect SAM function. Using genetic and molecular approaches, we generated and characterized clv gcn5 mutants. Surprisingly, the clv1-1 gcn5-1 double mutant exhibited constitutive ethylene responses, suggesting that GCN5 and CLV signaling act synergistically to inhibit ethylene responses in Arabidopsis. This genetic and molecular interaction was mediated by ETHYLENE INSENSITIVE 3/ EIN3-LIKE1 (EIN3/EIL1) transcription factors. Our data suggest that signals from the CLV transduction pathway reach the GCN5-containing complexes in the nucleus and alter the histone acetylation status of ethylene-responsive genes, thus translating the CLV information to transcriptional activity and uncovering a link between histone acetylation and SAM maintenance in the complex mode of ethylene signaling.

  8. The Evolutionarily Conserved Protein PHOTOSYNTHESIS AFFECTED MUTANT71 Is Required for Efficient Manganese Uptake at the Thylakoid Membrane in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Steinberger, Iris; Herdean, Andrei; Gandini, Chiara; Labs, Mathias; Flügge, Ulf-Ingo; Geimer, Stefan; Schmidt, Sidsel Birkelund; Husted, Søren; Spetea, Cornelia; Leister, Dario

    2016-01-01

    In plants, algae, and cyanobacteria, photosystem II (PSII) catalyzes the light-driven oxidation of water. The oxygen-evolving complex of PSII is a Mn4CaO5 cluster embedded in a well-defined protein environment in the thylakoid membrane. However, transport of manganese and calcium into the thylakoid lumen remains poorly understood. Here, we show that Arabidopsis thaliana PHOTOSYNTHESIS AFFECTED MUTANT71 (PAM71) is an integral thylakoid membrane protein involved in Mn2+ and Ca2+ homeostasis in chloroplasts. This protein is required for normal operation of the oxygen-evolving complex (as evidenced by oxygen evolution rates) and for manganese incorporation. Manganese binding to PSII was severely reduced in pam71 thylakoids, particularly in PSII supercomplexes. In cation partitioning assays with intact chloroplasts, Mn2+ and Ca2+ ions were differently sequestered in pam71, with Ca2+ enriched in pam71 thylakoids relative to the wild type. The changes in Ca2+ homeostasis were accompanied by an increased contribution of the transmembrane electrical potential to the proton motive force across the thylakoid membrane. PSII activity in pam71 plants and the corresponding Chlamydomonas reinhardtii mutant cgld1 was restored by supplementation with Mn2+, but not Ca2+. Furthermore, PAM71 suppressed the Mn2+-sensitive phenotype of the yeast mutant Δpmr1. Therefore, PAM71 presumably functions in Mn2+ uptake into thylakoids to ensure optimal PSII performance. PMID:27020959

  9. Novel Genes Affecting the Interaction between the Cabbage Whitefly and Arabidopsis Uncovered by Genome-Wide Association Mapping

    PubMed Central

    Broekgaarden, Colette; Bucher, Johan; Bac-Molenaar, Johanna; Keurentjes, Joost J. B.; Kruijer, Willem; Voorrips, Roeland E.; Vosman, Ben

    2015-01-01

    Plants have evolved a variety of ways to defend themselves against biotic attackers. This has resulted in the presence of substantial variation in defense mechanisms among plants, even within a species. Genome-wide association (GWA) mapping is a useful tool to study the genetic architecture of traits, but has so far only had limited exploitation in studies of plant defense. Here, we study the genetic architecture of defense against the phloem-feeding insect cabbage whitefly (Aleyrodes proletella) in Arabidopsis thaliana. We determined whitefly performance, i.e. the survival and reproduction of whitefly females, on 360 worldwide selected natural accessions and subsequently performed GWA mapping using 214,051 SNPs. Substantial variation for whitefly adult survival and oviposition rate (number of eggs laid per female per day) was observed between the accessions. We identified 39 candidate SNPs for either whitefly adult survival or oviposition rate, all with relatively small effects, underpinning the complex architecture of defense traits. Among the corresponding candidate genes, i.e. genes in linkage disequilibrium (LD) with candidate SNPs, none have previously been identified as a gene playing a role in the interaction between plants and phloem-feeding insects. Whitefly performance on knock-out mutants of a number of candidate genes was significantly affected, validating the potential of GWA mapping for novel gene discovery in plant-insect interactions. Our results show that GWA analysis is a very useful tool to gain insight into the genetic architecture of plant defense against herbivorous insects, i.e. we identified and validated several genes affecting whitefly performance that have not previously been related to plant defense against herbivorous insects. PMID:26699853

  10. Novel Genes Affecting the Interaction between the Cabbage Whitefly and Arabidopsis Uncovered by Genome-Wide Association Mapping.

    PubMed

    Broekgaarden, Colette; Bucher, Johan; Bac-Molenaar, Johanna; Keurentjes, Joost J B; Kruijer, Willem; Voorrips, Roeland E; Vosman, Ben

    2015-01-01

    Plants have evolved a variety of ways to defend themselves against biotic attackers. This has resulted in the presence of substantial variation in defense mechanisms among plants, even within a species. Genome-wide association (GWA) mapping is a useful tool to study the genetic architecture of traits, but has so far only had limited exploitation in studies of plant defense. Here, we study the genetic architecture of defense against the phloem-feeding insect cabbage whitefly (Aleyrodes proletella) in Arabidopsis thaliana. We determined whitefly performance, i.e. the survival and reproduction of whitefly females, on 360 worldwide selected natural accessions and subsequently performed GWA mapping using 214,051 SNPs. Substantial variation for whitefly adult survival and oviposition rate (number of eggs laid per female per day) was observed between the accessions. We identified 39 candidate SNPs for either whitefly adult survival or oviposition rate, all with relatively small effects, underpinning the complex architecture of defense traits. Among the corresponding candidate genes, i.e. genes in linkage disequilibrium (LD) with candidate SNPs, none have previously been identified as a gene playing a role in the interaction between plants and phloem-feeding insects. Whitefly performance on knock-out mutants of a number of candidate genes was significantly affected, validating the potential of GWA mapping for novel gene discovery in plant-insect interactions. Our results show that GWA analysis is a very useful tool to gain insight into the genetic architecture of plant defense against herbivorous insects, i.e. we identified and validated several genes affecting whitefly performance that have not previously been related to plant defense against herbivorous insects.

  11. Roscovitine, a cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor, affects several gating mechanisms to inhibit cardiac L-type (Ca(V)1.2) calcium channels

    PubMed Central

    Yarotskyy, V; Elmslie, K S

    2007-01-01

    Background and purpose: L-type calcium channels (Ca (V)1.2) play an important role in cardiac contraction. Roscovitine, a cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor and promising anticancer drug, has been shown to affect Ca (V)1.2 by inhibiting current amplitude and slowing activation. This research investigates the mechanism by which roscovitine inhibits Ca (V)1.2 channels. Experimental approach: Ca (V)1.2 channels were transfected into HEK 293 cells, using the calcium phosphate precipitation method, and currents were measured using the whole-cell patch clamp technique. Key results: Roscovitine slows activation at all voltages, which precludes one previously proposed mechanism. In addition, roscovitine enhances voltage-dependent, but not calcium-dependent inactivation. This enhancement resulted from both an acceleration of inactivation and a slowing of the recovery from inactivation. Internally applied roscovitine failed to affect Ca (V)1.2 currents, which supports a kinase-independent mechanism and extracellular binding site. Unlike the dihydropyridines, closed state inactivation was not affected by roscovitine. Inactivation was enhanced in a dose-dependent manner with an IC50=29.5±12 μM, which is close to that for slow activation and inhibition. Conclusions and implications: We conclude that roscovitine binds to an extracellular site on Ca (V)1.2 channels to inhibit current by both slowing activation and enhancing inactivation. Purine-based drugs could become a new option for treatment of diseases that benefit from L-channel inhibition such as cardiac arrhythmias and hypertension. PMID:17700718

  12. A New Mutation, hap1-2, Reveals a C Terminal Domain Function in AtMago Protein and Its Biological Effects in Male Gametophyte Development in Arabidopsis thaliana

    PubMed Central

    Cilano, Kevin; Mazanek, Zachary; Khan, Mahmuda; Metcalfe, Sarah; Zhang, Xiao-Ning

    2016-01-01

    The exon-exon junction complex (EJC) is a conserved eukaryotic multiprotein complex that examines the quality of and determines the availability of messenger RNAs (mRNAs) posttranscriptionally. Four proteins, MAGO, Y14, eIF4AIII and BTZ, function as core components of the EJC. The mechanisms of their interactions and the biological indications of these interactions are still poorly understood in plants. A new mutation, hap1-2. leads to premature pollen death and a reduced seed production in Arabidopsis. This mutation introduces a viable truncated transcript AtMagoΔC. This truncation abolishes the interaction between AtMago and AtY14 in vitro, but not the interaction between AtMago and AteIF4AIII. In addition to a strong nuclear presence of AtMago, both AtMago and AtMagoΔC exhibit processing-body (P-body) localization. This indicates that AtMagoΔC may replace AtMago in the EJC when aberrant transcripts are to be degraded. When introducing an NMD mutation, upf3-1, into the existing HAP1/hap1-2 mutant, plants showed a severely reduced fertility. However, the change of splicing pattern of a subset of SR protein transcripts is mostly correlated with the sr45-1 and upf3-1 mutations, not the hap1-2 mutation. These results imply that the C terminal domain (CTD) of AtMago is required for the AtMago-AtY14 heterodimerization during EJC assembly, UPF3-mediated NMD pathway and the AtMago-AtY14 heterodimerization work synergistically to regulate male gametophyte development in plants. PMID:26867216

  13. A New Mutation, hap1-2, Reveals a C Terminal Domain Function in AtMago Protein and Its Biological Effects in Male Gametophyte Development in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Cilano, Kevin; Mazanek, Zachary; Khan, Mahmuda; Metcalfe, Sarah; Zhang, Xiao-Ning

    2016-01-01

    The exon-exon junction complex (EJC) is a conserved eukaryotic multiprotein complex that examines the quality of and determines the availability of messenger RNAs (mRNAs) posttranscriptionally. Four proteins, MAGO, Y14, eIF4AIII and BTZ, function as core components of the EJC. The mechanisms of their interactions and the biological indications of these interactions are still poorly understood in plants. A new mutation, hap1-2. leads to premature pollen death and a reduced seed production in Arabidopsis. This mutation introduces a viable truncated transcript AtMagoΔC. This truncation abolishes the interaction between AtMago and AtY14 in vitro, but not the interaction between AtMago and AteIF4AIII. In addition to a strong nuclear presence of AtMago, both AtMago and AtMagoΔC exhibit processing-body (P-body) localization. This indicates that AtMagoΔC may replace AtMago in the EJC when aberrant transcripts are to be degraded. When introducing an NMD mutation, upf3-1, into the existing HAP1/hap1-2 mutant, plants showed a severely reduced fertility. However, the change of splicing pattern of a subset of SR protein transcripts is mostly correlated with the sr45-1 and upf3-1 mutations, not the hap1-2 mutation. These results imply that the C terminal domain (CTD) of AtMago is required for the AtMago-AtY14 heterodimerization during EJC assembly, UPF3-mediated NMD pathway and the AtMago-AtY14 heterodimerization work synergistically to regulate male gametophyte development in plants.

  14. Region-Specific Disruption of Adenylate Cyclase Type 1 Gene Differentially Affects Somatosensorimotor Behaviors in Mice1,2,3

    PubMed Central

    Arakawa, Hiroyuki; Akkentli, Fatih

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Cover Figure Region-specific adenylyl cyclase 1 (AC1) loss of function differentially affects both patterning and sensorimotor behaviors in mice. AC1 is expressed at all levels of the somatosensory pathway and plays a major role in refinement and patterning of topographic sensory maps. Cortex-specific AC1 loss of function (CxAC1KO mice) does not affect barrel patterning and activation of specific barrels corresponding to stimulated whiskers and does not impair sensorimotor behaviors. While global (AC1KO) and thalamus-specific (ThAC1KO) AC1 loss of function leads to absence of barrel patterns, selective whisker stimulation activates topographically aligned cortical loci. Despite functional topography of the whisker-barrel cortex, sensorimotor and social behaviors are impaired, indicating the importance of patterning of topographical sensory maps in the neocortex. Adenylate cyclase type I (AC1) is primarily, and, abundantly, expressed in the brain. Intracellular calcium/calmodulin increases regulate AC1 in an activity-dependent manner. Upon stimulation, AC1 produces cAMP and it is involved in the patterning and the refinement of neural circuits. In mice, spontaneous mutations or targeted deletion of the Adcy1 gene, which encodes AC1, resulted in neuronal pattern formation defects. Neural modules in the primary somatosensory (SI) cortex, the barrels, which represent the topographic distribution of the whiskers on the snout, failed to form (Welker et al., 1996; Abdel-Majid et al., 1998). Cortex- or thalamus-specific Adcy1 deletions led to different cortical pattern phenotypes, with thalamus-specific disruption phenotype being more severe (Iwasato et al., 2008; Suzuki et al., 2013). Despite the absence of barrels in the “barrelless”/Adcy1 null mice, thalamocortical terminal bouton density and activation of cortical zones following whisker stimulation were roughly topographic (Abdel-Majid et al., 1998; Gheorghita et al., 2006). To what extent does patterning

  15. Inactivation of gacS Does Not Affect the Competitiveness of Pseudomonas chlororaphis in the Arabidopsis thaliana Rhizosphere

    PubMed Central

    Schmidt-Eisenlohr, Heike; Gast, Astrid; Baron, Christian

    2003-01-01

    Quorum-sensing-controlled processes are considered to be important for the competitiveness of microorganisms in the rhizosphere. They affect cell-cell communication, biofilm formation, and antibiotic production, and the GacS-GacA two-component system plays a role as a key regulator. In spite of the importance of this system for the regulation of various processes, strains with a Gac− phenotype are readily recovered from natural habitats. To analyze the influence of quorum sensing and the influence of the production of the antibiotic phenazine-1-carboxamide on rhizosphere colonization by Pseudomonas chlororaphis, a gnotobiotic system based on Arabidopsis thaliana seedlings in soil was investigated. Transposon insertion mutants of P. chlororaphis isolate SPR044 carrying insertions in different genes required for the production of N-acyl-homoserine lactones and phenazine-1-carboxamide were generated. Analysis of solitary rhizosphere colonization revealed that after prolonged growth, the population of the wild type was significantly larger than that of the homoserine lactone-negative gacS mutant and that of a phenazine-1-carboxamide-overproducing strain. In cocultivation experiments, however, the population size of the gacS mutant was similar to that of the wild type after extended growth in the rhizosphere. A detailed analysis of growth kinetics was performed to explain this phenomenon. After cells grown to the stationary phase were transferred to fresh medium, the gacS mutant had a reduced lag phase, and production of the stationary-phase-specific sigma factor RpoS was strongly reduced. This may provide a relative competitive advantage in cocultures with other bacteria, because it permits faster reinitiation of growth after a change to nutrient-rich conditions. In addition, delayed entry into the stationary phase may allow more efficient nutrient utilization. Thus, GacS-GacA-regulated processes are not absolutely required for efficient rhizosphere colonization in

  16. The GI-CDF module of Arabidopsis affects freezing tolerance and growth as well as flowering.

    PubMed

    Fornara, Fabio; de Montaigu, Amaury; Sánchez-Villarreal, Alfredo; Takahashi, Yasuyuki; Ver Loren van Themaat, Emiel; Huettel, Bruno; Davis, Seth J; Coupland, George

    2015-03-01

    Plants monitor and integrate temperature, photoperiod and light quality signals to respond to continuous changes in their environment. The GIGANTEA (GI) protein is central in diverse signaling pathways, including photoperiodic, sugar and light signaling pathways, stress responses and circadian clock regulation. Previously, GI was shown to activate expression of the key floral regulators CONSTANS (CO) and FLOWERING LOCUS T (FT) by facilitating degradation of a family of CYCLING DOF FACTOR (CDF) transcriptional repressors. However, whether CDFs are implicated in other processes affected by GI remains unclear. We investigated the contribution of the GI-CDF module to traits that depend on GI. Transcriptome profiling indicated that mutations in GI and the CDF genes have antagonistic effects on expression of a wider set of genes than CO and FT, whilst other genes are regulated by GI independently of the CDFs. Detailed expression studies followed by phenotypic assays showed that the CDFs function downstream of GI, influencing responses to freezing temperatures and growth, but are not necessary for proper clock function. Thus GI-mediated regulation of CDFs contributes to several processes in addition to flowering, but is not implicated in all of the traits influenced by GI. © 2015 The Authors The Plant Journal published by Society for Experimental Biology and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  17. Narcissus tazetta SVP-like gene NSVP1 affects flower development in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiao-Fang; Wu, Wen-Ting; Zhang, Xue-Ping; Qiu, Yan; Zhang, Wei; Li, Rui; Xu, Jing; Sun, Yue; Wang, Yang; Xu, Ling

    2015-01-15

    SHORT VEGETATIVE PHASE (SVP) related genes have important functions in regulating floral transition and inflorescence structure in many plant species. Some SVP related genes have been shown associated with dormancy transition. Narcissus tazetta var. chinensis exhibits summer dormancy release and floral transition promoted by extended high temperature exposure. However, the molecular mechanism underlying such development remains unknown. In this study, we isolated and characterized one SVP-like gene, NSVP1 from N. tazetta var. chinensis. The results of RT-PCR and in situ hybridization assay showed that NSVP1 was expressed in both vegetative and floral tissues. The highest level of NSVP1 in the bulb apices was detected when the above-ground just senesced and its transcripts declined gradually during endo-dormany. The lowest level was found at the beginning of flower differentiation and the release of endo-dormancy. These data suggest that NSVP1 is differentially regulated coordinately with endo-dormancy induction and release. Ectopic expression of NSVP1 neither complemented the early flowering phenotype of svp mutant nor altered the rosette leaf number in Col background. However, NSVP1 in svp mutant and Ler plants increased the number of lateral inflorescence and caused abnormal floral morphologies. In addition, strong expression of NSVP1 in Ler background affected plastochron. These results suggest that NSVP1 might play a role in the regulation of flower development. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  18. TRICHOME BIREFRINGENCE-LIKE27 Affects Aluminum Sensitivity by Modulating the O-Acetylation of Xyloglucan and Aluminum-Binding Capacity in Arabidopsis1[W][OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Xiao Fang; Sun, Ying; Zhang, Bao Cai; Mansoori, Nasim; Wan, Jiang Xue; Liu, Yu; Wang, Zhi Wei; Shi, Yuan Zhi; Zhou, Yi Hua; Zheng, Shao Jian

    2014-01-01

    Xyloglucan (XyG) has been reported to contribute to the aluminum (Al)-binding capacity of the cell wall in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana). However, the influence of O-acetylation of XyG, accomplished by the putative O-acetyltransferase TRICHOME BIREFRINGENCE-LIKE27 (TBL27 [AXY4]), on its Al-binding capacity is not known. In this study, we found that the two corresponding TBL27 mutants, axy4-1 and axy4-3, were more Al sensitive than wild-type Columbia-0 plants. TBL27 was expressed in roots as well as in leaves, stems, flowers, and siliques. Upon Al treatment, even within 30 min, TBL27 transcript accumulation was strongly down-regulated. The mutants axy4-1 and axy4-3 accumulated significantly more Al in the root and wall, which could not be correlated with pectin content or pectin methylesterase activity, as no difference in the mutants was observed compared with the wild type when exposed to Al stress. The increased Al accumulation in the wall of the mutants was found to be in the hemicellulose fraction. While the total sugar content of the hemicellulose fraction did not change, the O-acetylation level of XyG was reduced by Al treatment. Taken together, we conclude that modulation of the O-acetylation level of XyG influences the Al sensitivity in Arabidopsis by affecting the Al-binding capacity in the hemicellulose. PMID:25006026

  19. High resolution genetic and physical mapping of the I-3 region of tomato chromosome 7 reveals almost continuous microsynteny with grape chromosome 12 but interspersed microsynteny with duplications on Arabidopsis chromosomes 1, 2 and 3.

    PubMed

    Lim, G T T; Wang, G-P; Hemming, M N; McGrath, D J; Jones, D A

    2008-12-01

    The tomato I-3 gene introgressed from the Lycopersicon pennellii accession LA716 confers resistance to race 3 of the fusarium wilt pathogen Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. lycopersici. We have improved the high-resolution map of the I-3 region of tomato chromosome 7 with the development and mapping of 31 new PCR-based markers. Recombinants recovered from L. esculentum cv. M82 x IL7-2 F2 and (IL7-2 x IL7-4) x M82 TC1F2 mapping populations, together with recombinants recovered from a previous M82 x IL7-3 F2 mapping population, were used to position these markers. A significantly higher recombination frequency was observed in the (IL7-2 x IL7-4) x M82 TC1F2 mapping population based on a reconstituted L. pennellii chromosome 7 compared to the other two mapping populations based on smaller segments of L. pennellii chromosome 7. A BAC contig consisting of L. esculentum cv. Heinz 1706 BACs covering the I-3 region has also been established. The new high-resolution map places the I-3 gene within a 0.38 cM interval between the molecular markers RGA332 and bP23/gPT with an estimated physical size of 50-60 kb. The I-3 region was found to display almost continuous microsynteny with grape chromosome 12 but interspersed microsynteny with Arabidopsis thaliana chromosomes 1, 2 and 3. An S-receptor-like kinase gene family present in the I-3 region of tomato chromosome 7 was found to be present in the microsyntenous region of grape chromosome 12 but was absent altogether from the A. thaliana genome.

  20. A mutation in Arabidopsis seedling plastid development1 affects plastid differentiation in embryo-derived tissues during seedling growth.

    PubMed

    Ruppel, Nicholas J; Logsdon, Charles A; Whippo, Craig W; Inoue, Kentaro; Hangarter, Roger P

    2011-01-01

    Oilseed plants like Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) develop green photosynthetically active embryos. Upon seed maturation, the embryonic chloroplasts degenerate into a highly reduced plastid type called the eoplast. Upon germination, eoplasts redifferentiate into chloroplasts and other plastid types. Here, we describe seedling plastid development1 (spd1), an Arabidopsis seedling albino mutant capable of producing normal green vegetative tissues. Mutant seedlings also display defects in etioplast and amyloplast development. Precocious germination of spd1 embryos showed that the albino seedling phenotype of spd1 was dependent on the passage of developing embryos through the degreening and dehydration stages of seed maturation, suggesting that SPD1 is critical during eoplast development or early stages of eoplast redifferentiation. The SPD1 gene was found to encode a protein containing a putative chloroplast-targeting sequence in its amino terminus and also domains common to P-loop ATPases. Chloroplast localization of the SPD1 protein was confirmed by targeting assays in vivo and in vitro. Although the exact function of SPD1 remains to be defined, our findings reveal aspects of plastid development unique to embryo-derived cells.

  1. Family-based linkage and association mapping reveals novel genes affecting Plum pox virus infection in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Pagny, Gaëlle; Paulstephenraj, Pauline S; Poque, Sylvain; Sicard, Ophélie; Cosson, Patrick; Eyquard, Jean-Philippe; Caballero, Mélodie; Chague, Aurélie; Gourdon, Germain; Negrel, Lise; Candresse, Thierry; Mariette, Stéphanie; Decroocq, Véronique

    2012-11-01

    Sharka is a devastating viral disease caused by the Plum pox virus (PPV) in stone fruit trees and few sources of resistance are known in its natural hosts. Since any knowledge gained from Arabidopsis on plant virus susceptibility factors is likely to be transferable to crop species, Arabidopsis's natural variation was searched for host factors essential for PPV infection. To locate regions of the genome associated with susceptibility to PPV, linkage analysis was performed on six biparental populations as well as on multiparental lines. To refine quantitative trait locus (QTL) mapping, a genome-wide association analysis was carried out using 147 Arabidopsis accessions. Evidence was found for linkage on chromosomes 1, 3 and 5 with restriction of PPV long-distance movement. The most relevant signals occurred within a region at the bottom of chromosome 3, which comprises seven RTM3-like TRAF domain-containing genes. Since the resistance mechanism analyzed here is recessive and the rtm3 knockout mutant is susceptible to PPV infection, it suggests that other gene(s) present in the small identified region encompassing RTM3 are necessary for PPV long-distance movement. In consequence, we report here the occurrence of host factor(s) that are indispensable for virus long-distance movement. © 2012 INRA. New Phytologist © 2012 New Phytologist Trust.

  2. Mutations Affecting Starch Synthase III in Arabidopsis Alter Leaf Starch Structure and Increase the Rate of Starch Synthesis1

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xiaoli; Myers, Alan M.; James, Martha G.

    2005-01-01

    The role of starch synthase (SS) III (SSIII) in the synthesis of transient starch in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) was investigated by characterizing the effects of two insertion mutations at the AtSS3 gene locus. Both mutations, termed Atss3-1 and Atss3-2, condition complete loss of SSIII activity and prevent normal gene expression at both the mRNA and protein levels. The mutations cause a starch excess phenotype in leaves during the light period of the growth cycle due to an apparent increase in the rate of starch synthesis. In addition, both mutations alter the physical structure of leaf starch. Significant increases were noted in the mutants in the frequency of linear chains in amylopectin with a degree of polymerization greater than approximately 60, and relatively small changes were observed in chains of degree of polymerization 4 to 50. Furthermore, starch in the Atss3-1 and Atss3-2 mutants has a higher phosphate content, approximately two times that of wild-type leaf starch. Total SS activity is increased in both Atss3 mutants and a specific SS activity appears to be up-regulated. The data indicate that, in addition to its expected direct role in starch assembly, SSIII also has a negative regulatory function in the biosynthesis of transient starch in Arabidopsis. PMID:15908598

  3. [Molecular mechanism of AtGA3OX1 and AtGA3OX2 genes affecting secondary wall thickening in stems in Arabidopsis].

    PubMed

    Wang, Zeng-Guang; Chai, Guo-Hua; Wang, Zhi-Yao; Tang, Xian-Feng; Sun, Chang-Jiang; Zhou, Gong-Ke; Ma, San-Mei

    2013-05-01

    Bioactive gibberellins (GAs) are a type of important plant growth regulators, which play the key roles in multiple processes, such as seed germination, leaf expansion, flowering, fruit bearing, and stem development. Its biosynthesis is regulated by a variety of enzymes including gibberellin 3-oxidase that is a key rate-limiting enzyme. In Arabidopsis, gibberellin 3-oxidase consists of four members, of which AtGA3OX1 and AtGA3OX2 are highly expressed in stems, suggesting the potential roles in the stem development played by the two genes. To date, there are few studies on AtGA3OX1 and AtGA3OX2 regulating secondary wall thickening in stems. In this study, we used the atga3ox1atga3ox2 double mutant as the materials to study the effects of AtGA3OX1 and AtGA3OX2 genes on secondary wall thickening in stems. The results indicated that simulations repression of AtGA3OX1 and AtGA3OX2 genes resulted in significantly reduction of secondary wall thickening of fiber cells, but not that of vessel cells. Three main components (cellulose, hemicelluloses, and lignin) were also dramatically suppressed in the double mutants. qRT-PCR analysis demonstrated that the expressions of secondary wall biosynthetic genes and the associated transcription factors were obviously affected in AtGA3OX1 and AtGA3OX2 double mutant. Therefore, we presume that Arabidopsis AtGA3OX1 and AtGA3OX2 genes might activate the expression of these transcription factors, thus regulate secondary wall thickening in stems. Together, our results provide a theoretical basis for enhancing the lodging resistance of food crops and improving the biomass of energy plants by genetically engineering Arabidopsis AtGA3OX homologs.

  4. Overexpression of Arabidopsis Ceramide Synthases Differentially Affects Growth, Sphingolipid Metabolism, Programmed Cell Death, and Mycotoxin Resistance1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Luttgeharm, Kyle D.; Chen, Ming; Mehra, Amit; Cahoon, Rebecca E.; Markham, Jonathan E.; Cahoon, Edgar B.

    2015-01-01

    Ceramide synthases catalyze an N-acyltransferase reaction using fatty acyl-coenzyme A (CoA) and long-chain base (LCB) substrates to form the sphingolipid ceramide backbone and are targets for inhibition by the mycotoxin fumonisin B1 (FB1). Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) contains three genes encoding ceramide synthases with distinct substrate specificities: LONGEVITY ASSURANCE GENE ONE HOMOLOG1 (LOH1; At3g25540)- and LOH3 (At1g19260)-encoded ceramide synthases use very-long-chain fatty acyl-CoA and trihydroxy LCB substrates, and LOH2 (At3g19260)-encoded ceramide synthase uses palmitoyl-CoA and dihydroxy LCB substrates. In this study, complementary DNAs for each gene were overexpressed to determine the role of individual isoforms in physiology and sphingolipid metabolism. Differences were observed in growth resulting from LOH1 and LOH3 overexpression compared with LOH2 overexpression. LOH1- and LOH3-overexpressing plants had enhanced biomass relative to wild-type plants, due in part to increased cell division, suggesting that enhanced synthesis of very-long-chain fatty acid/trihydroxy LCB ceramides promotes cell division and growth. Conversely, LOH2 overexpression resulted in dwarfing. LOH2 overexpression also resulted in the accumulation of sphingolipids with C16 fatty acid/dihydroxy LCB ceramides, constitutive induction of programmed cell death, and accumulation of salicylic acid, closely mimicking phenotypes observed previously in LCB C-4 hydroxylase mutants defective in trihydroxy LCB synthesis. In addition, LOH2- and LOH3-overexpressing plants acquired increased resistance to FB1, whereas LOH1-overexpressing plants showed no increase in FB1 resistance, compared with wild-type plants, indicating that LOH1 ceramide synthase is most strongly inhibited by FB1. Overall, the findings described here demonstrate that overexpression of Arabidopsis ceramide synthases results in strongly divergent physiological and metabolic phenotypes, some of which have significance

  5. The Transcript and Metabolite Networks Affected by the Two Clades of Arabidopsis Glucosinolate Biosynthesis Regulators1[W

    PubMed Central

    Malitsky, Sergey; Blum, Eyal; Less, Hadar; Venger, Ilya; Elbaz, Moshe; Morin, Shai; Eshed, Yuval; Aharoni, Asaph

    2008-01-01

    In this study, transcriptomics and metabolomics data were integrated in order to examine the regulation of glucosinolate (GS) biosynthesis in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) and its interface with pathways of primary metabolism. Our genetic material for analyses were transgenic plants overexpressing members of two clades of genes (ALTERED TRYPTOPHAN REGULATION1 [ATR1]-like and MYB28-like) that regulate the aliphatic and indole GS biosynthetic pathways (AGs and IGs, respectively). We show that activity of these regulators is not restricted to the metabolic space surrounding GS biosynthesis but is tightly linked to more distal metabolic networks of primary metabolism. This suggests that with similarity to the regulators we have investigated here, other factors controlling pathways of secondary metabolism might also control core pathways of central metabolism. The relatively broad view of transcripts and metabolites altered in transgenic plants overexpressing the different factors underlined novel links of GS metabolism to additional metabolic pathways, including those of jasmonic acid, folate, benzoic acid, and various phenylpropanoids. It also revealed transcriptional and metabolic hubs in the “distal” network of metabolic pathways supplying precursors to GS biosynthesis and that overexpression of the ATR1-like clade genes has a much broader effect on the metabolism of indolic compounds than described previously. While the reciprocal, negative cross talk between the methionine and tryptophan pathways that generate GSs in Arabidopsis has been suggested previously, we now show that it is not restricted to AGs and IGs but includes additional metabolites, such as the phytoalexin camalexin. Combining the profiling data of transgenic lines with gene expression correlation analysis allowed us to propose a model of how the balance in the metabolic network is maintained by the GS biosynthesis regulators. It appears that ATR1/MYB34 is an important mediator between the

  6. The absence of chlorophyll b affects lateral mobility of photosynthetic complexes and lipids in grana membranes of Arabidopsis and barley chlorina mutants.

    PubMed

    Tyutereva, Elena V; Evkaikina, Anastasiia I; Ivanova, Alexandra N; Voitsekhovskaja, Olga V

    2017-04-05

    The lateral mobility of integral components of thylakoid membranes, such as plastoquinone, xanthophylls, and pigment-protein complexes, is critical for the maintenance of efficient light harvesting, high rates of linear electron transport, and successful repair of damaged photosystem II (PSII). The packaging of the photosynthetic pigment-protein complexes in the membrane depends on their size and stereometric parameters which in turn depend on the composition of the complexes. Chlorophyll b (Chlb) is an important regulator of antenna size and composition. In this study, the lateral mobility (the mobile fraction size) of pigment-protein complexes and lipids in grana membranes was analyzed in chlorina mutants of Arabidopsis and barley lacking Chlb. In the Arabidopsis ch1-3 mutant, diffusion of membrane lipids decreased as compared to wild-type plants, but the diffusion of photosynthetic complexes was not affected. In the barley chlorina f2 3613 mutant, the diffusion of pigment-protein complexes significantly decreased, while the diffusion of lipids increased, as compared to wild-type plants. We propose that the size of the mobile fractions of pigment-protein complexes in grana membranes in vivo is higher than reported previously. The data are discussed in the context of the protein composition of antennae, characteristics of the plastoquinone pool, and production of reactive oxygen species in leaves of chlorina mutants.

  7. Depletion of Arabidopsis SC35 and SC35-like serine/arginine-rich proteins affects the transcription and splicing of a subset of genes.

    PubMed

    Yan, Qingqing; Xia, Xi; Sun, Zhenfei; Fang, Yuda

    2017-03-01

    Serine/arginine-rich (SR) proteins are important splicing factors which play significant roles in spliceosome assembly and splicing regulation. However, little is known regarding their biological functions in plants. Here, we analyzed the phenotypes of mutants upon depleting different subfamilies of Arabidopsis SR proteins. We found that loss of the functions of SC35 and SC35-like (SCL) proteins cause pleiotropic changes in plant morphology and development, including serrated leaves, late flowering, shorter roots and abnormal silique phyllotaxy. Using RNA-seq, we found that SC35 and SCL proteins play roles in the pre-mRNA splicing. Motif analysis revealed that SC35 and SCL proteins preferentially bind to a specific RNA sequence containing the AGAAGA motif. In addition, the transcriptions of a subset of genes are affected by the deletion of SC35 and SCL proteins which interact with NRPB4, a specific subunit of RNA polymerase II. The splicing of FLOWERING LOCUS C (FLC) intron1 and transcription of FLC were significantly regulated by SC35 and SCL proteins to control Arabidopsis flowering. Therefore, our findings provide mechanistic insight into the functions of plant SC35 and SCL proteins in the regulation of splicing and transcription in a direct or indirect manner to maintain the proper expression of genes and development.

  8. ALA10, a Phospholipid Flippase, Controls FAD2/FAD3 Desaturation of Phosphatidylcholine in the ER and Affects Chloroplast Lipid Composition in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Botella, César; Sautron, Emeline; Boudiere, Laurence; Michaud, Morgane; Dubots, Emmanuelle; Yamaryo-Botté, Yoshiki; Albrieux, Catherine; Marechal, Eric; Block, Maryse A; Jouhet, Juliette

    2016-03-01

    The biogenesis of photosynthetic membranes relies on galactoglycerolipids, which are synthesized via pathways that are dispatched over several cell compartments. This membrane biogenesis requires both trafficking of lipid intermediates and a tight homeostatic regulation. In this work, we address the role of ALA10 (for aminophospholipid ATPase), a P4-type ATPase, in a process counteracting the monogalactosyldiacylglycerol (MGDG) shortage in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) leaves. ALA10 can interact with protein partners, ALIS1 (for ALA-interacting subunit1) or ALIS5, leading to differential endomembrane localizations of the interacting proteins, close to the plasma membrane with ALIS1 or to chloroplasts with ALIS5. ALA10 interacts also with FATTY ACID DESATURASE2 (FAD2), and modification of ALA10 expression affects phosphatidylcholine (PC) fatty acyl desaturation by disturbing the balance between FAD2 and FAD3 activities. Modulation of ALA10 expression downstream impacts the fatty acyl composition of chloroplast PC. ALA10 expression also enhances leaf growth and improves the MGDG-PC ratio, possibly through MGDG SYNTHASE1 (MGD1) activation by phosphatidic acid. The positive effect of ALA10 on leaf development is significant in conditions such as upon treatment of plants with Galvestine-1, an inhibitor of MGDG synthases, or when plants are grown at chilling temperature.

  9. ALA10, a Phospholipid Flippase, Controls FAD2/FAD3 Desaturation of Phosphatidylcholine in the ER and Affects Chloroplast Lipid Composition in Arabidopsis thaliana1

    PubMed Central

    Sautron, Emeline; Boudiere, Laurence; Michaud, Morgane; Dubots, Emmanuelle; Albrieux, Catherine; Marechal, Eric; Jouhet, Juliette

    2016-01-01

    The biogenesis of photosynthetic membranes relies on galactoglycerolipids, which are synthesized via pathways that are dispatched over several cell compartments. This membrane biogenesis requires both trafficking of lipid intermediates and a tight homeostatic regulation. In this work, we address the role of ALA10 (for aminophospholipid ATPase), a P4-type ATPase, in a process counteracting the monogalactosyldiacylglycerol (MGDG) shortage in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) leaves. ALA10 can interact with protein partners, ALIS1 (for ALA-interacting subunit1) or ALIS5, leading to differential endomembrane localizations of the interacting proteins, close to the plasma membrane with ALIS1 or to chloroplasts with ALIS5. ALA10 interacts also with FATTY ACID DESATURASE2 (FAD2), and modification of ALA10 expression affects phosphatidylcholine (PC) fatty acyl desaturation by disturbing the balance between FAD2 and FAD3 activities. Modulation of ALA10 expression downstream impacts the fatty acyl composition of chloroplast PC. ALA10 expression also enhances leaf growth and improves the MGDG-PC ratio, possibly through MGDG SYNTHASE1 (MGD1) activation by phosphatidic acid. The positive effect of ALA10 on leaf development is significant in conditions such as upon treatment of plants with Galvestine-1, an inhibitor of MGDG synthases, or when plants are grown at chilling temperature. PMID:26620528

  10. Depletion of Arabidopsis SC35 and SC35-like serine/arginine-rich proteins affects the transcription and splicing of a subset of genes

    PubMed Central

    Xia, Xi; Sun, Zhenfei

    2017-01-01

    Serine/arginine-rich (SR) proteins are important splicing factors which play significant roles in spliceosome assembly and splicing regulation. However, little is known regarding their biological functions in plants. Here, we analyzed the phenotypes of mutants upon depleting different subfamilies of Arabidopsis SR proteins. We found that loss of the functions of SC35 and SC35-like (SCL) proteins cause pleiotropic changes in plant morphology and development, including serrated leaves, late flowering, shorter roots and abnormal silique phyllotaxy. Using RNA-seq, we found that SC35 and SCL proteins play roles in the pre-mRNA splicing. Motif analysis revealed that SC35 and SCL proteins preferentially bind to a specific RNA sequence containing the AGAAGA motif. In addition, the transcriptions of a subset of genes are affected by the deletion of SC35 and SCL proteins which interact with NRPB4, a specific subunit of RNA polymerase II. The splicing of FLOWERING LOCUS C (FLC) intron1 and transcription of FLC were significantly regulated by SC35 and SCL proteins to control Arabidopsis flowering. Therefore, our findings provide mechanistic insight into the functions of plant SC35 and SCL proteins in the regulation of splicing and transcription in a direct or indirect manner to maintain the proper expression of genes and development. PMID:28273088

  11. Peri-pubertal administration of 3-nitro-1,2,4-triazol-5-one (NTO) affects reproductive organ development in male but not female Sprague Dawley rats.

    PubMed

    Lent, Emily May; Crouse, Lee C B; Wallace, Shannon M; Carroll, Erica E

    2015-11-01

    Nitrotriazolone (3-nitro-1,2,4-triazol-5-one; NTO) is an insensitive munition that has demonstrated effects on reproductive organs in adult male rats. NTO was administered to male (0, 250, and 500milligrams per kilogram per day (mg/kg-day)) and female (0, 500, and 1000mg/kg-day) Sprague-Dawley rats (15/sex/group) via oral gavage from weaning through post-natal day 53/54 and 42/43, respectively. Age and body mass at vaginal opening (VO) and preputial separation (PPS), as well as all measures of estrous cyclicity were not affected by treatment with NTO. Males treated with NTO exhibited reductions in testis mass associated with tubular degeneration/atrophy. Less pronounced reductions in accessory sex organ masses were also observed in the 500mg/kg-day group. Treatment with NTO did not affect thyroid hormone or testosterone levels. These findings suggest that NTO is not acting as an estrogen or thyroid active compound, but may indicate effects on steroidogenesis and/or direct testicular toxicity. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  12. The Arabidopsis DELAY OF GERMINATION 1 gene affects ABSCISIC ACID INSENSITIVE 5 (ABI5) expression and genetically interacts with ABI3 during Arabidopsis seed development.

    PubMed

    Dekkers, Bas J W; He, Hanzi; Hanson, Johannes; Willems, Leo A J; Jamar, Diaan C L; Cueff, Gwendal; Rajjou, Loïc; Hilhorst, Henk W M; Bentsink, Leónie

    2016-02-01

    The seed expressed gene DELAY OF GERMINATION (DOG) 1 is absolutely required for the induction of dormancy. Next to a non-dormant phenotype, the dog1-1 mutant is also characterized by a reduced seed longevity suggesting that DOG1 may affect additional seed processes as well. This aspect however, has been hardly studied and is poorly understood. To uncover additional roles of DOG1 in seeds we performed a detailed analysis of the dog1 mutant using both transcriptomics and metabolomics to investigate the molecular consequences of a dysfunctional DOG1 gene. Further, we used a genetic approach taking advantage of the weak aba insensitive (abi) 3-1 allele as a sensitized genetic background in a cross with dog1-1. DOG1 affects the expression of hundreds of genes including LATE EMBRYOGENESIS ABUNDANT and HEAT SHOCK PROTEIN genes which are affected by DOG1 partly via control of ABI5 expression. Furthermore, the content of a subset of primary metabolites, which normally accumulate during seed maturation, was found to be affected in the dog1-1 mutant. Surprisingly, the abi3-1 dog1-1 double mutant produced green seeds which are highly ABA insensitive, phenocopying severe abi3 mutants, indicating that dog1-1 acts as an enhancer of the weak abi3-1 allele and thus revealing a genetic interaction between both genes. Analysis of the dog1 and dog1 abi3 mutants revealed additional seed phenotypes and therefore we hypothesize that DOG1 function is not limited to dormancy but that it is required for multiple aspects of seed maturation, in part by interfering with ABA signalling components. © 2016 The Authors The Plant Journal © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. A Genetic Screen for Mutations Affecting Cell Division in the Arabidopsis thaliana Embryo Identifies Seven Loci Required for Cytokinesis

    PubMed Central

    Gillmor, C. Stewart; Roeder, Adrienne H. K.; Sieber, Patrick; Somerville, Chris; Lukowitz, Wolfgang

    2016-01-01

    Cytokinesis in plants involves the formation of unique cellular structures such as the phragmoplast and the cell plate, both of which are required to divide the cell after nuclear division. In order to isolate genes that are involved in de novo cell wall formation, we performed a large-scale, microscope-based screen for Arabidopsis mutants that severely impair cytokinesis in the embryo. We recovered 35 mutations that form abnormally enlarged cells with multiple, often polyploid nuclei and incomplete cell walls. These mutants represent seven genes, four of which have previously been implicated in phragmoplast or cell plate function. Mutations in two loci show strongly reduced transmission through the haploid gametophytic generation. Molecular cloning of both corresponding genes reveals that one is represented by hypomorphic alleles of the kinesin-5 gene RADIALLY SWOLLEN 7 (homologous to tobacco kinesin-related protein TKRP125), and that the other gene corresponds to the Arabidopsis FUSED ortholog TWO-IN-ONE (originally identified based on its function in pollen development). No mutations that completely abolish the formation of cross walls in diploid cells were found. Our results support the idea that cytokinesis in the diploid and haploid generations involve similar mechanisms. PMID:26745275

  14. Iron Availability Affects Phosphate Deficiency-Mediated Responses, and Evidence of Cross-Talk with Auxin and Zinc in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Rai, Vandna; Sanagala, Raghavendrarao; Sinilal, Bhaskaran; Yadav, Sandeep; Sarkar, Ananda K; Dantu, Prem Kumar; Jain, Ajay

    2015-06-01

    Phosphate (Pi) is pivotal for plant growth and development. Pi deficiency triggers local and systemically regulated adaptive responses in Arabidopsis thaliana. Inhibition of primary root growth (PRG) and retarded development of lateral roots (LRs) are typical local Pi deficiency-mediated responses of the root system. Expression of Pi starvation-responsive (PSR) genes is regulated systemically. Here, we report the differential influence of iron (Fe) availability on local and systemic sensing of Pi by Arabidopsis. P-Fe- condition disrupted local Pi sensing, resulting in an elongated primary root (PR). Altered Fe homeostasis in the lpsi mutant with aberration in local Pi sensing provided circumstantial evidence towards the role of Fe in the maintenance of Pi homeostasis. Reporter gene assays, expression analysis of auxin-responsive genes (ARGs) and root phenotyping of the arf7arf19 mutant demonstrated the role of Fe availability on local Pi deficiency-mediated LR development. In addition, Fe availability also exerted a significant influence on PSR genes belonging to different functional categories. Together, these results demonstrated a substantial influence of Fe availability on Pi deficiency-mediated responses of ontogenetically distinct traits of the root system and PSR genes. The study also provided evidence of cross-talk between Pi, Fe and Zn, highlighting a complex tripartite interaction amongst them for maintaining Pi homeostasis. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Japanese Society of Plant Physiologists. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  15. A Genetic Screen for Mutations Affecting Cell Division in the Arabidopsis thaliana Embryo Identifies Seven Loci Required for Cytokinesis

    SciTech Connect

    Gillmor, C. Stewart; Roeder, Adrienne H. K.; Sieber, Patrick; Somerville, Chris; Lukowitz, Wolfgang

    2016-01-08

    Cytokinesis in plants involves the formation of unique cellular structures such as the phragmoplast and the cell plate, both of which are required to divide the cell after nuclear division. In order to isolate genes that are involved in de novo cell wall formation, we performed a large-scale, microscope-based screen for Arabidopsis mutants that severely impair cytokinesis in the embryo. We recovered 35 mutations that form abnormally enlarged cells with multiple, often polyploid nuclei and incomplete cell walls. These mutants represent seven genes, four of which have previously been implicated in phragmoplast or cell plate function. Mutations in two loci show strongly reduced transmission through the haploid gametophytic generation. Molecular cloning of both corresponding genes reveals that one is represented by hypomorphic alleles of the kinesin-5 gene RADIALLY SWOLLEN 7 (homologous to tobacco kinesin-related protein TKRP125), and that the other gene corresponds to the Arabidopsis FUSED ortholog TWO-IN-ONE (originally identified based on its function in pollen development). No mutations that completely abolish the formation of cross walls in diploid cells were found. Lastly, our results support the idea that cytokinesis in the diploid and haploid generations involve similar mechanisms.

  16. A Genetic Screen for Mutations Affecting Cell Division in the Arabidopsis thaliana Embryo Identifies Seven Loci Required for Cytokinesis

    DOE PAGES

    Gillmor, C. Stewart; Roeder, Adrienne H. K.; Sieber, Patrick; ...

    2016-01-08

    Cytokinesis in plants involves the formation of unique cellular structures such as the phragmoplast and the cell plate, both of which are required to divide the cell after nuclear division. In order to isolate genes that are involved in de novo cell wall formation, we performed a large-scale, microscope-based screen for Arabidopsis mutants that severely impair cytokinesis in the embryo. We recovered 35 mutations that form abnormally enlarged cells with multiple, often polyploid nuclei and incomplete cell walls. These mutants represent seven genes, four of which have previously been implicated in phragmoplast or cell plate function. Mutations in two locimore » show strongly reduced transmission through the haploid gametophytic generation. Molecular cloning of both corresponding genes reveals that one is represented by hypomorphic alleles of the kinesin-5 gene RADIALLY SWOLLEN 7 (homologous to tobacco kinesin-related protein TKRP125), and that the other gene corresponds to the Arabidopsis FUSED ortholog TWO-IN-ONE (originally identified based on its function in pollen development). No mutations that completely abolish the formation of cross walls in diploid cells were found. Lastly, our results support the idea that cytokinesis in the diploid and haploid generations involve similar mechanisms.« less

  17. MES Buffer Affects Arabidopsis Root Apex Zonation and Root Growth by Suppressing Superoxide Generation in Root Apex

    PubMed Central

    Kagenishi, Tomoko; Yokawa, Ken; Baluška, František

    2016-01-01

    In plants, growth of roots and root hairs is regulated by the fine cellular control of pH and reactive oxygen species (ROS). MES, 2-(N-morpholino)ethanesulfonic acid as one of the Good’s buffers has broadly been used for buffering medium, and it is thought to suit for plant growth with the concentration at 0.1% (w/v) because the buffer capacity of MES ranging pH 5.5–7.0 (for Arabidopsis, pH 5.8). However, many reports have shown that, in nature, roots require different pH values on the surface of specific root apex zones, namely meristem, transition zone, and elongation zone. Despite the fact that roots always grow on a media containing buffer molecule, little is known about impact of MES on root growth. Here, we have checked the effects of different concentrations of MES buffer using growing roots of Arabidopsis thaliana. Our results show that 1% of MES significantly inhibited root growth, the number of root hairs and length of meristem, whereas 0.1% promoted root growth and root apex area (region spanning from the root tip up to the transition zone). Furthermore, superoxide generation in root apex disappeared at 1% of MES. These results suggest that MES disturbs normal root morphogenesis by changing the ROS homeostasis in root apex. PMID:26925066

  18. Alterations in Seed Development Gene Expression Affect Size and Oil Content of Arabidopsis Seeds1[C][W][OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Fatihi, Abdelhak; Zbierzak, Anna Maria; Dörmann, Peter

    2013-01-01

    Seed endosperm development in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) is under control of the polycomb group complex, which includes Fertilization Independent Endosperm (FIE). The polycomb group complex regulates downstream factors, e.g. Pheres1 (PHE1), by genomic imprinting. In heterozygous fie mutants, an endosperm develops in ovules carrying a maternal fie allele without fertilization, finally leading to abortion. Another endosperm development pathway depends on MINISEED3 (a WRKY10 transcription factor) and HAIKU2 (a leucine-rich repeat kinase). While the role of seed development genes in the embryo and endosperm establishment has been studied in detail, their impact on metabolism and oil accumulation remained unclear. Analysis of oil, protein, and sucrose accumulation in mutants and overexpression plants of the four seed development genes revealed that (1) seeds carrying a maternal fie allele accumulate low oil with an altered composition of triacylglycerol molecular species; (2) homozygous mutant seeds of phe1, mini3, and iku2, which are smaller, accumulate less oil and slightly less protein, and starch, which accumulates early during seed development, remains elevated in mutant seeds; (3) embryo-specific overexpression of FIE, PHE1, and MINI3 has no influence on seed size and weight, nor on oil, protein, or sucrose content; and (4) overexpression of IKU2 results in seeds with increased size and weight, and oil content of overexpressed IKU2 seeds is increased by 35%. Thus, IKU2 overexpression represents a novel strategy for the genetic manipulation of the oil content in seeds. PMID:24014578

  19. MES Buffer Affects Arabidopsis Root Apex Zonation and Root Growth by Suppressing Superoxide Generation in Root Apex.

    PubMed

    Kagenishi, Tomoko; Yokawa, Ken; Baluška, František

    2016-01-01

    In plants, growth of roots and root hairs is regulated by the fine cellular control of pH and reactive oxygen species (ROS). MES, 2-(N-morpholino)ethanesulfonic acid as one of the Good's buffers has broadly been used for buffering medium, and it is thought to suit for plant growth with the concentration at 0.1% (w/v) because the buffer capacity of MES ranging pH 5.5-7.0 (for Arabidopsis, pH 5.8). However, many reports have shown that, in nature, roots require different pH values on the surface of specific root apex zones, namely meristem, transition zone, and elongation zone. Despite the fact that roots always grow on a media containing buffer molecule, little is known about impact of MES on root growth. Here, we have checked the effects of different concentrations of MES buffer using growing roots of Arabidopsis thaliana. Our results show that 1% of MES significantly inhibited root growth, the number of root hairs and length of meristem, whereas 0.1% promoted root growth and root apex area (region spanning from the root tip up to the transition zone). Furthermore, superoxide generation in root apex disappeared at 1% of MES. These results suggest that MES disturbs normal root morphogenesis by changing the ROS homeostasis in root apex.

  20. Overexpression of the Brassica napus BnLAS gene in Arabidopsis affects plant development and increases drought tolerance.

    PubMed

    Yang, Minggui; Yang, Qingyong; Fu, Tingdong; Zhou, Yongming

    2011-03-01

    The GRAS proteins are a family of transcription regulators found in plants and play diverse roles in plant growth and development. To study the biological roles of GRAS family genes in Brassica napus, an Arabidopsis LAS homologous gene, BnLAS and its two homologs were cloned from B. napus and its two progenitor species, Brassica rapa and Brassica oleracea. Relatively high levels of BnLAS were observed in roots, shoot tips, lateral meristems and flower organs based on the analysis of the transcripts by quantitative RT-PCR and promoter-reporter assays. Constitutive overexpression of BnLAS in Arabidopsis resulted in inhibition of growth, and delays in leaf senescence and flowering time. A large portion of transgenic lines had darker leaf color and higher chlorophyll content than in wild type plants. Interestingly, water lose rates in transgenic leaves were reduced, and transgenic plants exhibited enhanced drought tolerance and increased recovery after exposed to dehydration treatment. The stomatal density on leaves of the transgenic plants increased significantly due to the smaller cell size. However, the stomatal aperture on the leaves of the transgenic plants reduced significantly compared with wild type plants. More epidermal wax deposition on transgenic leaves was observed. Furthermore, several genes involved in wax synthesis and regulation, including CER1, CER2, KCS1 and KCS2, were upregulated in the transgenic plants. Our results indicate a potential to utilize BnLAS in the improvement of drought tolerance in plants.

  1. Genome Sequencing of Arabidopsis abp1-5 Reveals Second-Site Mutations That May Affect Phenotypes.

    PubMed

    Enders, Tara A; Oh, Sookyung; Yang, Zhenbiao; Montgomery, Beronda L; Strader, Lucia C

    2015-07-01

    Auxin regulates numerous aspects of plant growth and development. For many years, investigating roles for AUXIN BINDING PROTEIN1 (ABP1) in auxin response was impeded by the reported embryo lethality of mutants defective in ABP1. However, identification of a viable Arabidopsis thaliana TILLING mutant defective in the ABP1 auxin binding pocket (abp1-5) allowed inroads into understanding ABP1 function. During our own studies with abp1-5, we observed growth phenotypes segregating independently of the ABP1 lesion, leading us to sequence the genome of the abp1-5 line described previously. We found that the abp1-5 line we sequenced contains over 8000 single nucleotide polymorphisms in addition to the ABP1 mutation and that at least some of these mutations may originate from the Arabidopsis Wassilewskija accession. Furthermore, a phyB null allele in the abp1-5 background is likely causative for the long hypocotyl phenotype previously attributed to disrupted ABP1 function. Our findings complicate the interpretation of abp1-5 phenotypes for which no complementation test was conducted. Our findings on abp1-5 also provide a cautionary tale illustrating the need to use multiple alleles or complementation lines when attributing roles to a gene product. © 2015 American Society of Plant Biologists. All rights reserved.

  2. A Genetic Screen for Mutations Affecting Cell Division in the Arabidopsis thaliana Embryo Identifies Seven Loci Required for Cytokinesis.

    PubMed

    Gillmor, C Stewart; Roeder, Adrienne H K; Sieber, Patrick; Somerville, Chris; Lukowitz, Wolfgang

    2016-01-01

    Cytokinesis in plants involves the formation of unique cellular structures such as the phragmoplast and the cell plate, both of which are required to divide the cell after nuclear division. In order to isolate genes that are involved in de novo cell wall formation, we performed a large-scale, microscope-based screen for Arabidopsis mutants that severely impair cytokinesis in the embryo. We recovered 35 mutations that form abnormally enlarged cells with multiple, often polyploid nuclei and incomplete cell walls. These mutants represent seven genes, four of which have previously been implicated in phragmoplast or cell plate function. Mutations in two loci show strongly reduced transmission through the haploid gametophytic generation. Molecular cloning of both corresponding genes reveals that one is represented by hypomorphic alleles of the kinesin-5 gene RADIALLY SWOLLEN 7 (homologous to tobacco kinesin-related protein TKRP125), and that the other gene corresponds to the Arabidopsis FUSED ortholog TWO-IN-ONE (originally identified based on its function in pollen development). No mutations that completely abolish the formation of cross walls in diploid cells were found. Our results support the idea that cytokinesis in the diploid and haploid generations involve similar mechanisms.

  3. VERDANDI Is a Direct Target of the MADS Domain Ovule Identity Complex and Affects Embryo Sac Differentiation in Arabidopsis[W

    PubMed Central

    Matias-Hernandez, Luis; Battaglia, Raffaella; Galbiati, Francesca; Rubes, Marco; Eichenberger, Christof; Grossniklaus, Ueli; Kater, Martin M.; Colombo, Lucia

    2010-01-01

    In Arabidopsis thaliana, the three MADS box genes SEEDSTICK (STK), SHATTERPROOF1 (SHP1), and SHP2 redundantly regulate ovule development. Protein interaction studies have shown that a multimeric complex composed of the ovule identity proteins together with the SEPALLATA MADS domain proteins is necessary to determine ovule identity. Despite the extensive knowledge that has become available about these MADS domain transcription factors, little is known regarding the genes that they regulate. Here, we show that STK, SHP1, and SHP2 redundantly regulate VERDANDI (VDD), a putative transcription factor that belongs to the plant-specific B3 superfamily. The vdd mutant shows defects during the fertilization process resulting in semisterility. Analysis of the vdd mutant female gametophytes indicates that antipodal and synergid cell identity and/or differentiation are affected. Our results provide insights into the pathways regulated by the ovule identity factors and the role of the downstream target gene VDD in female gametophyte development. PMID:20581305

  4. Neutron Radiation Affects the Expression of Genes Involved in the Response to Auxin, Senescence and Oxidative Stress in Arabidopsis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fortunati, A.; Tassone, P.; Migliaccio, F.

    2008-06-01

    Researches were conducted on the effect of neutron radiation on the expression of genes auxin activated or connected with the process of senescence in Arabidopsis plants. The research was done by applying the real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) technique. The results indicated that the auxin response factors (ARFs) genes are clearly downregulated, whereas the indolacetic acid-induced (Aux/IAAs) genes in some cases were upregulated. By contrast in the mutants for auxin transport aux1 and eir1 the ARFs genes were upregulated. In addition, both in the wildtype and mutants, some already known genes activated by stress and senescence were significantly upregulated. On the basis of these researches we conclude that the process of senescence induced by irradiation is, at least in part, controlled by the physiology of the hormone auxin.

  5. Chlorophyll Synthase under Epigenetic Surveillance Is Critical for Vitamin E Synthesis, and Altered Expression Affects Tocopherol Levels in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Chunyu; Zhang, Wei; Ren, Guodong; Li, Delin; Cahoon, Rebecca E; Chen, Ming; Zhou, Yongming; Yu, Bin; Cahoon, Edgar B

    2015-08-01

    Chlorophyll synthase catalyzes the final step in chlorophyll biosynthesis: the esterification of chlorophyllide with either geranylgeranyl diphosphate or phytyl diphosphate (PDP). Recent studies have pointed to the involvement of chlorophyll-linked reduction of geranylgeranyl by geranylgeranyl reductase as a major pathway for the synthesis of the PDP precursor of tocopherols. This indirect pathway of PDP synthesis suggests a key role of chlorophyll synthase in tocopherol production to generate the geranylgeranyl-chlorophyll substrate for geranylgeranyl reductase. In this study, contributions of chlorophyll synthase to tocopherol formation in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) were explored by disrupting and altering expression of the corresponding gene CHLOROPHYLL SYNTHASE (CHLSYN; At3g51820). Leaves from the homozygous chlysyn1-1 null mutant were nearly devoid of tocopherols, whereas seeds contained only approximately 25% of wild-type tocopherol levels. Leaves of RNA interference lines with partial suppression of CHLSYN displayed marked reductions in chlorophyll but up to a 2-fold increase in tocopherol concentrations. Cauliflower mosaic virus35S-mediated overexpression of CHLSYN unexpectedly caused a cosuppression phenotype at high frequencies accompanied by strongly reduced chlorophyll content and increased tocopherol levels. This phenotype and the associated detection of CHLSYN-derived small interfering RNAs were reversed with CHLSYN overexpression in rna-directed rna polymerase6 (rdr6), which is defective in RNA-dependent RNA polymerase6, a key enzyme in sense transgene-induced small interfering RNA production. CHLSYN overexpression in rdr6 had little effect on chlorophyll content but resulted in up to a 30% reduction in tocopherol levels in leaves. These findings show that altered CHLSYN expression impacts tocopherol levels and also, show a strong epigenetic surveillance of CHLSYN to control chlorophyll and tocopherol synthesis. © 2015 American Society of

  6. Genetic Dissection of Morphometric Traits Reveals That Phytochrome B Affects Nucleus Size and Heterochromatin Organization in Arabidopsis thaliana

    PubMed Central

    Snoek, Basten L.; Pavlova, Penka; Tessadori, Federico; Peeters, Anton J. M.; Bourbousse, Clara; Barneche, Fredy; de Jong, Hans; Fransz, Paul F.; van Zanten, Martijn

    2017-01-01

    Microscopically visible chromatin is partitioned into two major components in Arabidopsis thaliana nuclei. On one hand, chromocenters are conspicuous foci of highly condensed “heterochromatic” domains that contain mostly repeated sequences. On the other hand, less condensed and gene-rich “euchromatin” emanates from these chromocenters. This differentiation, together with the dynamic nature of chromatin compaction in response to developmental and environmental stimuli, makes Arabidopsis a powerful system for studying chromatin organization and dynamics. Heterochromatin dynamics can be monitored by measuring the Heterochromatin Index, i.e., the proportion of nuclei displaying well-defined chromocenters, or the DNA fraction of chromocenters (relative heterochromatin fraction). Both measures are composite traits, thus their values represent the sum of effects of various underlying morphometric properties. We exploited genetic variation between natural occurring accessions to determine the genetic basis of individual nucleus and chromocenter morphometric parameters (area, perimeter, density, roundness, and heterogeneity) that together determine chromatin compaction. Our novel reductionist genetic approach revealed quantitative trait loci (QTL) for all measured traits. Genomic colocalization among QTL was limited, which suggests a complex genetic regulation of chromatin compaction. Yet genomic intervals of QTL for nucleus size (area and perimeter) both overlap with a known QTL for heterochromatin compaction that is explained by natural polymorphism in the red/far-red light and temperature receptor Phytochrome B. Mutant analyses and genetic complementation assays show that Phytochrome B is a negative regulator of nucleus size, revealing that perception of climatic conditions by a Phytochrome-mediated hub is a major determinant for coordinating nucleus size and heterochromatin compaction. PMID:28592555

  7. AaMYB1 and its orthologue AtMYB61 affect terpene metabolism and trichome development in Artemisia annua and Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Matías-Hernández, Luis; Jiang, Weimin; Yang, Ke; Tang, Kexuan; Brodelius, Peter E; Pelaz, Soraya

    2017-05-01

    The effective anti-malarial drug artemisinin (AN) isolated from Artemisia annua is relatively expensive due to the low AN content in the plant as AN is only synthesized within the glandular trichomes. Therefore, genetic engineering of A. annua is one of the most promising approaches for improving the yield of AN. In this work, the AaMYB1 transcription factor has been identified and characterized. When AaMYB1 is overexpressed in A. annua, either exclusively in trichomes or in the whole plant, essential AN biosynthetic genes are also overexpressed and consequently the amount of AN is significantly increased. Artemisia AaMYB1 constitutively overexpressing plants displayed a greater number of trichomes. In order to study the role of AaMYB1 on trichome development and other possibly connected biological processes, AaMYB1 was overexpressed in Arabidopsis thaliana. To support our findings in Arabidopsis thaliana, an AaMYB1 orthologue from this model plant, AtMYB61, was identified and atmyb61 mutants characterized. Both AaMYB1 and AtMYB61 affected trichome initiation, root development and stomatal aperture in A. thaliana. Molecular analyses indicated that two crucial trichome activator genes are misexpressed in atmyb61 mutant plants and in plants overexpressing AaMYB1. Furthermore, AaMYB1 and AtMYB61 are also essential for gibberellin (GA) biosynthesis and degradation in both species by positively affecting the expression of the enzymes that convert GA9 into the bioactive GA4 as well as the enzymes involved in the degradation of GA4 . Overall, these results identify AaMYB1/AtMYB61 as a key component of the molecular network that connects important biosynthetic processes, and reveal its potential value for AN production through genetic engineering. © 2017 The Authors The Plant Journal © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  8. Modifications of Sphingolipid Content Affect Tolerance to Hemibiotrophic and Necrotrophic Pathogens by Modulating Plant Defense Responses in Arabidopsis1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Magnin-Robert, Maryline; Le Bourse, Doriane; Markham, Jonathan; Dorey, Stéphan; Clément, Christophe; Baillieul, Fabienne; Dhondt-Cordelier, Sandrine

    2015-01-01

    Sphingolipids are emerging as second messengers in programmed cell death and plant defense mechanisms. However, their role in plant defense is far from being understood, especially against necrotrophic pathogens. Sphingolipidomics and plant defense responses during pathogenic infection were evaluated in the mutant of long-chain base phosphate (LCB-P) lyase, encoded by the dihydrosphingosine-1-phosphate lyase1 (AtDPL1) gene and regulating long-chain base/LCB-P homeostasis. Atdpl1 mutants exhibit tolerance to the necrotrophic fungus Botrytis cinerea but susceptibility to the hemibiotrophic bacterium Pseudomonas syringae pv tomato (Pst). Here, a direct comparison of sphingolipid profiles in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) during infection with pathogens differing in lifestyles is described. In contrast to long-chain bases (dihydrosphingosine [d18:0] and 4,8-sphingadienine [d18:2]), hydroxyceramide and LCB-P (phytosphingosine-1-phosphate [t18:0-P] and 4-hydroxy-8-sphingenine-1-phosphate [t18:1-P]) levels are higher in Atdpl1-1 than in wild-type plants in response to B. cinerea. Following Pst infection, t18:0-P accumulates more strongly in Atdpl1-1 than in wild-type plants. Moreover, d18:0 and t18:0-P appear as key players in Pst- and B. cinerea-induced cell death and reactive oxygen species accumulation. Salicylic acid levels are similar in both types of plants, independent of the pathogen. In addition, salicylic acid-dependent gene expression is similar in both types of B. cinerea-infected plants but is repressed in Atdpl1-1 after treatment with Pst. Infection with both pathogens triggers higher jasmonic acid, jasmonoyl-isoleucine accumulation, and jasmonic acid-dependent gene expression in Atdpl1-1 mutants. Our results demonstrate that sphingolipids play an important role in plant defense, especially toward necrotrophic pathogens, and highlight a novel connection between the jasmonate signaling pathway, cell death, and sphingolipids. PMID:26378098

  9. Lack of cytochrome c in Arabidopsis decreases stability of Complex IV and modifies redox metabolism without affecting Complexes I and III.

    PubMed

    Welchen, Elina; Hildebrandt, Tatjana M; Lewejohann, Dagmar; Gonzalez, Daniel H; Braun, Hans-Peter

    2012-07-01

    We studied the role of cytochrome c (CYTc), which mediates electron transfer between Complexes III and IV, in cellular events related with mitochondrial respiration, plant development and redox homeostasis. We analyzed single and double homozygous mutants in both CYTc-encoding genes from Arabidopsis: CYTC-1 and CYTC-2. While individual mutants were similar to wild-type, knock-out of both genes produced an arrest of embryo development, showing that CYTc function is essential at early stages of plant development. Mutants in which CYTc levels were extremely reduced respective to wild-type had smaller rosettes with a pronounced decrease in parenchymatic cell size and an overall delay in development. Mitochondria from these mutants had lower respiration rates and a relative increase in alternative respiration. Furthermore, the decrease in CYTc severely affected the activity and the amount of Complex IV, without affecting Complexes I and III. Reactive oxygen species levels were reduced in these mutants, which showed induction of genes encoding antioxidant enzymes. Ascorbic acid levels were not affected, suggesting that a small amount of CYTc is enough to support its normal synthesis. We postulate that, in addition to its role as an electron carrier between Complexes III and IV, CYTc influences Complex IV levels in plants, probably reflecting a role of this protein in Complex IV stability. This double function of CYTc most likely explains why it is essential for plant survival. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Cell wall composition and penetration resistance against the fungal pathogen Colletotrichum higginsianum are affected by impaired starch turnover in Arabidopsis mutants

    PubMed Central

    Engelsdorf, Timo; Will, Cornelia; Hofmann, Jörg; Schmitt, Christine; Merritt, Brian B.; Rieger, Leonie; Frenger, Marc S.; Marschall, André; Franke, Rochus B.; Pattathil, Sivakumar

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Penetration resistance represents the first level of plant defense against phytopathogenic fungi. Here, we report that the starch-deficient Arabidopsis thaliana phosphoglucomutase (pgm) mutant has impaired penetration resistance against the hemibiotrophic fungus Colletotrichum higginsianum. We could not determine any changes in leaf cutin and epicuticular wax composition or indolic glucosinolate levels, but detected complex alterations in the cell wall monosaccharide composition of pgm. Notably, other mutants deficient in starch biosynthesis (adg1) or mobilization (sex1) had similarly affected cell wall composition and penetration resistance. Glycome profiling analysis showed that both overall cell wall polysaccharide extractability and relative extractability of specific pectin and xylan epitopes were affected in pgm, suggesting extensive structural changes in pgm cell walls. Screening of mutants with alterations in content or modification of specific cell wall monosaccharides indicated an important function of pectic polymers for penetration resistance and hyphal growth of C. higginsianum during the biotrophic interaction phase. While mutants with affected pectic rhamnogalacturonan-I (mur8) were hypersusceptible, penetration frequency and morphology of fungal hyphae were impaired on pmr5 pmr6 mutants with increased pectin levels. Our results reveal a strong impact of starch metabolism on cell wall composition and suggest a link between carbohydrate availability, cell wall pectin and penetration resistance. PMID:28204541

  11. Glutathione Deficiency of the Arabidopsis Mutant pad2-1 Affects Oxidative Stress-Related Events, Defense Gene Expression, and the Hypersensitive Response1[C][W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Dubreuil-Maurizi, Carole; Vitecek, Jan; Marty, Laurent; Branciard, Lorelise; Frettinger, Patrick; Wendehenne, David; Meyer, Andreas J.; Mauch, Felix; Poinssot, Benoît

    2011-01-01

    The Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) phytoalexin-deficient mutant pad2-1 displays enhanced susceptibility to a broad range of pathogens and herbivorous insects that correlates with deficiencies in the production of camalexin, indole glucosinolates, and salicylic acid (SA). The pad2-1 mutation is localized in the GLUTAMATE-CYSTEINE LIGASE (GCL) gene encoding the first enzyme of glutathione biosynthesis. While pad2-1 glutathione deficiency is not caused by a decrease in GCL transcripts, analysis of GCL protein level revealed that pad2-1 plants contained only 48% of the wild-type protein amount. In contrast to the wild type, the oxidized form of GCL was dominant in pad2-1, suggesting a distinct redox environment. This finding was corroborated by the expression of GRX1-roGFP2, showing that the cytosolic glutathione redox potential was significantly less negative in pad2-1. Analysis of oxidative stress-related gene expression showed a higher transcript accumulation in pad2-1 of GLUTATHIONE REDUCTASE, GLUTATHIONE-S-TRANSFERASE, and RESPIRATORY BURST OXIDASE HOMOLOG D in response to the oomycete Phytophthora brassicae. Interestingly, oligogalacturonide elicitation in pad2-1 revealed a lower plasma membrane depolarization that was found to act upstream of an impaired hydrogen peroxide production. This impaired hydrogen peroxide production was also observed during pathogen infection and correlated with a reduced hypersensitive response in pad2-1. In addition, a lack of pathogen-triggered expression of the ISOCHORISMATE SYNTHASE1 gene, coding for the SA-biosynthetic enzyme isochorismate synthase, was identified as the cause of the SA deficiency in pad2-1. Together, our results indicate that the pad2-1 mutation is related to a decrease in GCL protein and that the resulting glutathione deficiency negatively affects important processes of disease resistance. PMID:22007023

  12. Antiphase Light and Temperature Cycles Affect PHYTOCHROME B-Controlled Ethylene Sensitivity and Biosynthesis, Limiting Leaf Movement and Growth of Arabidopsis1[C][W

    PubMed Central

    Bours, Ralph; van Zanten, Martijn; Pierik, Ronald; Bouwmeester, Harro; van der Krol, Alexander

    2013-01-01

    In the natural environment, days are generally warmer than the night, resulting in a positive day/night temperature difference (+DIF). Plants have adapted to these conditions, and when exposed to antiphase light and temperature cycles (cold photoperiod/warm night [−DIF]), most species exhibit reduced elongation growth. To study the physiological mechanism of how light and temperature cycles affect plant growth, we used infrared imaging to dissect growth dynamics under +DIF and −DIF in the model plant Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana). We found that −DIF altered leaf growth patterns, decreasing the amplitude and delaying the phase of leaf movement. Ethylene application restored leaf growth in −DIF conditions, and constitutive ethylene signaling mutants maintain robust leaf movement amplitudes under −DIF, indicating that ethylene signaling becomes limiting under these conditions. In response to −DIF, the phase of ethylene emission advanced 2 h, but total ethylene emission was not reduced. However, expression analysis on members of the 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylic acid (ACC) synthase ethylene biosynthesis gene family showed that ACS2 activity is specifically suppressed in the petiole region under −DIF conditions. Indeed, petioles of plants under −DIF had reduced ACC content, and application of ACC to the petiole restored leaf growth patterns. Moreover, acs2 mutants displayed reduced leaf movement under +DIF, similar to wild-type plants under −DIF. In addition, we demonstrate that the photoreceptor PHYTOCHROME B restricts ethylene biosynthesis and constrains the −DIF-induced phase shift in rhythmic growth. Our findings provide a mechanistic insight into how fluctuating temperature cycles regulate plant growth. PMID:23979970

  13. Nitrogen Source and External Medium pH Interaction Differentially Affects Root and Shoot Metabolism in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Sarasketa, Asier; González-Moro, M. Begoña; González-Murua, Carmen; Marino, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    Ammonium nutrition often represents an important growth-limiting stress in plants. Some of the symptoms that plants present under ammonium nutrition have been associated with pH deregulation, in fact external medium pH control is known to improve plants ammonium tolerance. However, the way plant cell metabolism adjusts to these changes is not completely understood. Thus, in this work we focused on how Arabidopsis thaliana shoot and root respond to different nutritional regimes by varying the nitrogen source (NO3- and NH4+), concentration (2 and 10 mM) and pH of the external medium (5.7 and 6.7) to gain a deeper understanding of cell metabolic adaptation upon altering these environmental factors. The results obtained evidence changes in the response of ammonium assimilation machinery and of the anaplerotic enzymes associated to Tricarboxylic Acids (TCA) cycle in function of the plant organ, the nitrogen source and the degree of ammonium stress. A greater stress severity at pH 5.7 was related to NH4+ accumulation; this could not be circumvented in spite of the stimulation of glutamine synthetase, glutamate dehydrogenase, and TCA cycle anaplerotic enzymes. Moreover, this study suggests specific functions for different gln and gdh isoforms based on the nutritional regime. Overall, NH4+ accumulation triggering ammonium stress appears to bear no relation to nitrogen assimilation impairment. PMID:26870054

  14. Nitrogen Source and External Medium pH Interaction Differentially Affects Root and Shoot Metabolism in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Sarasketa, Asier; González-Moro, M Begoña; González-Murua, Carmen; Marino, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    Ammonium nutrition often represents an important growth-limiting stress in plants. Some of the symptoms that plants present under ammonium nutrition have been associated with pH deregulation, in fact external medium pH control is known to improve plants ammonium tolerance. However, the way plant cell metabolism adjusts to these changes is not completely understood. Thus, in this work we focused on how Arabidopsis thaliana shoot and root respond to different nutritional regimes by varying the nitrogen source ([Formula: see text] and [Formula: see text]), concentration (2 and 10 mM) and pH of the external medium (5.7 and 6.7) to gain a deeper understanding of cell metabolic adaptation upon altering these environmental factors. The results obtained evidence changes in the response of ammonium assimilation machinery and of the anaplerotic enzymes associated to Tricarboxylic Acids (TCA) cycle in function of the plant organ, the nitrogen source and the degree of ammonium stress. A greater stress severity at pH 5.7 was related to [Formula: see text] accumulation; this could not be circumvented in spite of the stimulation of glutamine synthetase, glutamate dehydrogenase, and TCA cycle anaplerotic enzymes. Moreover, this study suggests specific functions for different gln and gdh isoforms based on the nutritional regime. Overall, [Formula: see text] accumulation triggering ammonium stress appears to bear no relation to nitrogen assimilation impairment.

  15. Atmospheric CO2 Alters Resistance of Arabidopsis to Pseudomonas syringae by Affecting Abscisic Acid Accumulation and Stomatal Responsiveness to Coronatine.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Yeling; Vroegop-Vos, Irene; Schuurink, Robert C; Pieterse, Corné M J; Van Wees, Saskia C M

    2017-01-01

    Atmospheric CO2 influences plant growth and stomatal aperture. Effects of high or low CO2 levels on plant disease resistance are less well understood. Here, resistance of Arabidopsis thaliana against the foliar pathogen Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato DC3000 (Pst) was investigated at three different CO2 levels: high (800 ppm), ambient (450 ppm), and low (150 ppm). Under all conditions tested, infection by Pst resulted in stomatal closure within 1 h after inoculation. However, subsequent stomatal reopening at 4 h, triggered by the virulence factor coronatine (COR), occurred only at ambient and high CO2, but not at low CO2. Moreover, infection by Pst was reduced at low CO2 to the same extent as infection by mutant Pst cor(-) . Under all CO2 conditions, the ABA mutants aba2-1 and abi1-1 were as resistant to Pst as wild-type plants under low CO2, which contained less ABA. Moreover, stomatal reopening mediated by COR was dependent on ABA. Our results suggest that reduced ABA levels at low CO2 contribute to the observed enhanced resistance to Pst by deregulation of virulence responses. This implies that enhanced ABA levels at increasing CO2 levels may have a role in weakening plant defense.

  16. Neutron irradiation affects the expression of genes involved in the response to auxin, senescence and oxidative stress in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Damasso, Mario

    2010-01-01

    We report, in Arabidopsis thaliana plants, the effect of neutron irradiation on the transcription of a set of genes belonging to different physiological groups: auxin action, senescence, oxidative stress and some aspects of photosynthesis. The results indicated that, in the wild-types, the effect on the ARF1, ARF2 and 19 genes was of downregulation, whereas of the tested AUX/IAA only AUX/IAA7 showed upregulation. Different results were obtained as regards the irradiation of the auxin transport mutants aux1 and eir1 because, in these cases, the ARF genes were upregulated, whereas AUX/IAA7 was downregulated in eir1. On the other hand, the senescence activated genes SAG12 and SAG13, and those connected to oxidative stress were upregulated in the wild-type, but downregulated in aux1. The gene CAB1, connected to photosynthesis, was also downregulated in the wild-type, but upregulated in aux1. Gene expression recovered in many cases almost to the initial condition in a time lapse of 24 hours, even though some effect persisted for a longer time. In particular, the state of juvenility of arf2 was extended by irradiation, whereas, in all the other cases, senescence was accelerated. The research indicates that through mutant selection or genetic engineering a true possibility exists of producing organism more suitable for life in space. PMID:20505355

  17. Mutations in Arabidopsis thaliana genes involved in the tryptophan biosynthesis pathway affect root waving on tilted agar surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rutherford, R.; Gallois, P.; Masson, P. H.

    1998-01-01

    Arabidopsis thaliana roots grow in a wavy pattern upon a slanted surface. A novel mutation in the anthranilate synthase alpha 1 (ASA1) gene, named trp5-2wvc1, and mutations in the tryptophan synthase alpha and beta 1 genes (trp3-1 and trp2-1, respectively) confer a compressed root wave phenotype on tilted agar surfaces. When trp5-2wvc1 seedlings are grown on media supplemented with anthranilate metabolites, their roots wave like wild type. Genetic and pharmacological experiments argue that the compressed root wave phenotypes of trp5-2wvc1, trp2-1 and trp3-1 seedlings are not due to reduced IAA biosynthetic potential, but rather to a deficiency in L-tryptophan (L-Trp), or in a L-Trp derivative. Although the roots of 7-day-old seedlings possess higher concentrations of free L-Trp than the shoot as a whole, trp5-2wvc1 mutants show no detectable alteration in L-Trp levels in either tissue type, suggesting that a very localized shortage of L-Trp, or of a L-Trp-derived compound, is responsible for the observed phenotype.

  18. Mutations in Arabidopsis thaliana genes involved in the tryptophan biosynthesis pathway affect root waving on tilted agar surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rutherford, R.; Gallois, P.; Masson, P. H.

    1998-01-01

    Arabidopsis thaliana roots grow in a wavy pattern upon a slanted surface. A novel mutation in the anthranilate synthase alpha 1 (ASA1) gene, named trp5-2wvc1, and mutations in the tryptophan synthase alpha and beta 1 genes (trp3-1 and trp2-1, respectively) confer a compressed root wave phenotype on tilted agar surfaces. When trp5-2wvc1 seedlings are grown on media supplemented with anthranilate metabolites, their roots wave like wild type. Genetic and pharmacological experiments argue that the compressed root wave phenotypes of trp5-2wvc1, trp2-1 and trp3-1 seedlings are not due to reduced IAA biosynthetic potential, but rather to a deficiency in L-tryptophan (L-Trp), or in a L-Trp derivative. Although the roots of 7-day-old seedlings possess higher concentrations of free L-Trp than the shoot as a whole, trp5-2wvc1 mutants show no detectable alteration in L-Trp levels in either tissue type, suggesting that a very localized shortage of L-Trp, or of a L-Trp-derived compound, is responsible for the observed phenotype.

  19. Alteration of seed fatty acid composition by an ethyl methanesulfonate-induced mutation in Arabidopsis thaliana affecting diacylglycerol acyltransferase activity.

    PubMed Central

    Katavic, V; Reed, D W; Taylor, D C; Giblin, E M; Barton, D L; Zou, J; Mackenzie, S L; Covello, P S; Kunst, L

    1995-01-01

    In characterizing the enzymes involved in the formation of very long-chain fatty acids (VLCFAs) in the Brassicaceae, we have generated a series of mutants of Arabidopsis thaliana that have reduced VLCFA content. Here we report the characterization of a seed lipid mutant, AS11, which, in comparison to wild type (WT), has reduced levels of 20:1 and 18:1 and accumulates 18:3 as the major fatty acid in triacylglycerols. Proportions of 18:2 remain similar to WT. Genetic analyses indicate that the fatty acid phenotype is caused by a semidominant mutation in a single nuclear gene, designated TAG1, located on chromosome 2. Biochemical analyses have shown that the AS11 phenotype is not due to a deficiency in the capacity to elongate 18:1 or to an increase in the relative delta 15 or delta 12 desaturase activities. Indeed, the ratio of desaturase/elongase activities measured in vitro is virtually identical in developing WT and AS11 seed homogenates. Rather, the fatty acid phenotype of AS11 is the result of reduced diacylglycerol acyltransferase activity throughout development, such that triacylglycerol biosynthesis is reduced. This leads to a reduction in 20:1 biosynthesis during seed development, leaving more 18:1 available for desaturation. Thus, we have demonstrated that changes to triacylglycerol biosynthesis can result in dramatic changes in fatty acid composition and, in particular, in the accumulation of VLCFAs in seed storage lipids. PMID:7784510

  20. Atmospheric CO2 Alters Resistance of Arabidopsis to Pseudomonas syringae by Affecting Abscisic Acid Accumulation and Stomatal Responsiveness to Coronatine

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Yeling; Vroegop-Vos, Irene; Schuurink, Robert C.; Pieterse, Corné M. J.; Van Wees, Saskia C. M.

    2017-01-01

    Atmospheric CO2 influences plant growth and stomatal aperture. Effects of high or low CO2 levels on plant disease resistance are less well understood. Here, resistance of Arabidopsis thaliana against the foliar pathogen Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato DC3000 (Pst) was investigated at three different CO2 levels: high (800 ppm), ambient (450 ppm), and low (150 ppm). Under all conditions tested, infection by Pst resulted in stomatal closure within 1 h after inoculation. However, subsequent stomatal reopening at 4 h, triggered by the virulence factor coronatine (COR), occurred only at ambient and high CO2, but not at low CO2. Moreover, infection by Pst was reduced at low CO2 to the same extent as infection by mutant Pst cor-. Under all CO2 conditions, the ABA mutants aba2-1 and abi1-1 were as resistant to Pst as wild-type plants under low CO2, which contained less ABA. Moreover, stomatal reopening mediated by COR was dependent on ABA. Our results suggest that reduced ABA levels at low CO2 contribute to the observed enhanced resistance to Pst by deregulation of virulence responses. This implies that enhanced ABA levels at increasing CO2 levels may have a role in weakening plant defense. PMID:28559899

  1. A Peptide Chain Release Factor 2 Affects the Stability of UGA-Containing Transcripts in Arabidopsis Chloroplasts

    PubMed Central

    Meurer, Jörg; Lezhneva, Lina; Amann, Katrin; Gödel, Manfred; Bezhani, Staver; Sherameti, Irena; Oelmüller, Ralf

    2002-01-01

    Positional cloning of the hcf109 (high chlorophyll fluorescence) mutation in Arabidopsis has identified a nucleus-encoded, plastid-localized release factor 2–like protein, AtprfB, indicating that the processes of translational termination in chloroplasts resemble those of eubacteria. Control of atprfB expression by light and tissues is connected to chloroplast development. A point mutation at the last nucleotide of the second intron causes a new splice site farther downstream, resulting in a deletion of seven amino acid residues in the N-terminal region of the Hcf109 protein. The mutation causes decreased stability of UGA-containing mRNAs. Our data suggest that transcripts with UGA stop codons are terminated exclusively by AtprfB in chloroplasts and that AtprfB is involved in the regulation of both mRNA stability and protein synthesis. Furthermore, sequence data reveal a +1 frameshift at an internal in-frame TGA stop codon in the progenitor prfB gene of cyanobacteria. The expression pattern and functions of atprfB could reflect evolutionary driving forces toward the conservation of TGA stop codons exclusively in plastid genomes of land plants. PMID:12468741

  2. Loss of GET pathway orthologs in Arabidopsis thaliana causes root hair growth defects and affects SNARE abundance

    PubMed Central

    Xing, Shuping; Mehlhorn, Dietmar Gerald; Wallmeroth, Niklas; Asseck, Lisa Yasmin; Kar, Ritwika; Voss, Alessa; Denninger, Philipp; Schmidt, Vanessa Aphaia Fiona; Schwarzländer, Markus; Stierhof, York-Dieter

    2017-01-01

    Soluble N-ethylmaleimide–sensitive factor attachment protein receptor (SNARE) proteins are key players in cellular trafficking and coordinate vital cellular processes, such as cytokinesis, pathogen defense, and ion transport regulation. With few exceptions, SNAREs are tail-anchored (TA) proteins, bearing a C-terminal hydrophobic domain that is essential for their membrane integration. Recently, the Guided Entry of Tail-anchored proteins (GET) pathway was described in mammalian and yeast cells that serve as a blueprint of TA protein insertion [Schuldiner M, et al. (2008) Cell 134(4):634–645; Stefanovic S, Hegde RS (2007) Cell 128(6):1147–1159]. This pathway consists of six proteins, with the cytosolic ATPase GET3 chaperoning the newly synthesized TA protein posttranslationally from the ribosome to the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) membrane. Structural and biochemical insights confirmed the potential of pathway components to facilitate membrane insertion, but the physiological significance in multicellular organisms remains to be resolved. Our phylogenetic analysis of 37 GET3 orthologs from 18 different species revealed the presence of two different GET3 clades. We identified and analyzed GET pathway components in Arabidopsis thaliana and found reduced root hair elongation in Atget lines, possibly as a result of reduced SNARE biogenesis. Overexpression of AtGET3a in a receptor knockout (KO) results in severe growth defects, suggesting presence of alternative insertion pathways while highlighting an intricate involvement for the GET pathway in cellular homeostasis of plants. PMID:28096354

  3. Loss of GET pathway orthologs in Arabidopsis thaliana causes root hair growth defects and affects SNARE abundance.

    PubMed

    Xing, Shuping; Mehlhorn, Dietmar Gerald; Wallmeroth, Niklas; Asseck, Lisa Yasmin; Kar, Ritwika; Voss, Alessa; Denninger, Philipp; Schmidt, Vanessa Aphaia Fiona; Schwarzländer, Markus; Stierhof, York-Dieter; Grossmann, Guido; Grefen, Christopher

    2017-02-21

    Soluble N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive factor attachment protein receptor (SNARE) proteins are key players in cellular trafficking and coordinate vital cellular processes, such as cytokinesis, pathogen defense, and ion transport regulation. With few exceptions, SNAREs are tail-anchored (TA) proteins, bearing a C-terminal hydrophobic domain that is essential for their membrane integration. Recently, the Guided Entry of Tail-anchored proteins (GET) pathway was described in mammalian and yeast cells that serve as a blueprint of TA protein insertion [Schuldiner M, et al. (2008) Cell 134(4):634-645; Stefanovic S, Hegde RS (2007) Cell 128(6):1147-1159]. This pathway consists of six proteins, with the cytosolic ATPase GET3 chaperoning the newly synthesized TA protein posttranslationally from the ribosome to the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) membrane. Structural and biochemical insights confirmed the potential of pathway components to facilitate membrane insertion, but the physiological significance in multicellular organisms remains to be resolved. Our phylogenetic analysis of 37 GET3 orthologs from 18 different species revealed the presence of two different GET3 clades. We identified and analyzed GET pathway components in Arabidopsis thaliana and found reduced root hair elongation in Atget lines, possibly as a result of reduced SNARE biogenesis. Overexpression of AtGET3a in a receptor knockout (KO) results in severe growth defects, suggesting presence of alternative insertion pathways while highlighting an intricate involvement for the GET pathway in cellular homeostasis of plants.

  4. Vascular development in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Ye, Zheng-Hua; Freshour, Glenn; Hahn, Michael G; Burk, David H; Zhong, Ruiqin

    2002-01-01

    Vascular tissues, xylem and phloem, form a continuous network throughout the plant body for transport of water, minerals, and food. Characterization of Arabidopsis mutants defective in various aspects of vascular formation has demonstrated that Arabidopsis is an ideal system for investigating the molecular mechanisms controlling vascular development. The processes affected in these mutants include initiation or division of procambium or vascular cambium, formation of continuous vascular cell files, differentiation of procambium or vascular cambium into vascular tissues, cell elongation, patterned secondary wall thickening, and biosynthesis of secondary walls. Identification of the genes affected by some of these mutations has revealed essential roles in vascular development for a cytokinin receptor and several factors mediating auxin transport or signaling. Mutational studies have also identified a number of Arabidopsis mutants defective in leaf venation pattern or vascular tissue organization in stems. Genetic evidence suggests that the vascular tissue organization is regulated by the same positional information that determines organ polarity.

  5. Peroxisomal polyamine oxidase and NADPH-oxidase cross-talk for ROS homeostasis which affects respiration rate in Arabidopsis thaliana

    PubMed Central

    Andronis, Efthimios A.; Moschou, Panagiotis N.; Toumi, Imene; Roubelakis-Angelakis, Kalliopi A.

    2014-01-01

    Homeostasis of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in the intracellular compartments is of critical importance as ROS have been linked with nearly all cellular processes and more importantly with diseases and aging. PAs are nitrogenous molecules with an evolutionary conserved role in the regulation of metabolic and energetic status of cells. Recent evidence also suggests that polyamines (PA) are major regulators of ROS homeostasis. In Arabidopsis the backconversion of the PAs spermidine (Spd) and spermine to putrescine and Spd, respectively, is catalyzed by two peroxisomal PA oxidases (AtPAO). However, the physiological role of this pathway remains largely elusive. Here we explore the role of peroxisomal PA backconversion and in particular that catalyzed by the highly expressed AtPAO3 in the regulation of ROS homeostasis and mitochondrial respiratory burst. Exogenous PAs exert an NADPH-oxidase dependent stimulation of oxygen consumption, with Spd exerting the strongest effect. This increase is attenuated by treatment with the NADPH-oxidase blocker diphenyleneiodonium iodide (DPI). Loss-of-function of AtPAO3 gene results to increased NADPH-oxidase-dependent production of superoxide anions (O2•− ), but not H2O2, which activate the mitochondrial alternative oxidase pathway (AOX). On the contrary, overexpression of AtPAO3 results to an increased but balanced production of both H2O2 and O2•− . These results suggest that the ratio of O2•− /H2O2 regulates respiratory chain in mitochondria, with PA-dependent production of O2•− by NADPH-oxidase tilting the balance of electron transfer chain in favor of the AOX pathway. In addition, AtPAO3 seems to be an important component in the regulating module of ROS homeostasis, while a conserved role for PA backconversion and ROS across kingdoms is discussed. PMID:24765099

  6. Magnitude and timing of leaf damage affect seed production in a natural population of Arabidopsis thaliana (Brassicaceae).

    PubMed

    Akiyama, Reiko; Ågren, Jon

    2012-01-01

    The effect of herbivory on plant fitness varies widely. Understanding the causes of this variation is of considerable interest because of its implications for plant population dynamics and trait evolution. We experimentally defoliated the annual herb Arabidopsis thaliana in a natural population in Sweden to test the hypotheses that (a) plant fitness decreases with increasing damage, (b) tolerance to defoliation is lower before flowering than during flowering, and (c) defoliation before flowering reduces number of seeds more strongly than defoliation during flowering, but the opposite is true for effects on seed size. In a first experiment, between 0 and 75% of the leaf area was removed in May from plants that flowered or were about to start flowering. In a second experiment, 0, 25%, or 50% of the leaf area was removed from plants on one of two occasions, in mid April when plants were either in the vegetative rosette or bolting stage, or in mid May when plants were flowering. In the first experiment, seed production was negatively related to leaf area removed, and at the highest damage level, also mean seed size was reduced. In the second experiment, removal of 50% of the leaf area reduced seed production by 60% among plants defoliated early in the season at the vegetative rosettes, and by 22% among plants defoliated early in the season at the bolting stage, but did not reduce seed output of plants defoliated one month later. No seasonal shift in the effect of defoliation on seed size was detected. The results show that leaf damage may reduce the fitness of A. thaliana, and suggest that in this population leaf herbivores feeding on plants before flowering should exert stronger selection on defence traits than those feeding on plants during flowering, given similar damage levels.

  7. Conserved phosphorylation sites in the activation loop of the Arabidopsis phytosulfokine receptor PSKR1 differentially affect kinase and receptor activity

    PubMed Central

    Hartmann, Jens; Linke, Dennis; Bönniger, Christine; Tholey, Andreas; Sauter, Margret

    2015-01-01

    PSK (phytosulfokine) is a plant peptide hormone perceived by a leucine-rich repeat receptor kinase. Phosphosite mapping of epitope-tagged PSKR1 (phytosulfokine receptor 1) from Arabidopsis thaliana plants identified Ser696 and Ser698 in the JM (juxtamembrane) region and probably Ser886 and/or Ser893 in the AL (activation loop) as in planta phosphorylation sites. In vitro-expressed kinase was autophosphorylated at Ser717 in the JM, and at Ser733, Thr752, Ser783, Ser864, Ser911, Ser958 and Thr998 in the kinase domain. The LC–ESI–MS/MS spectra provided support that up to three sites (Thr890, Ser893 and Thr894) in the AL were likely to be phosphorylated in vitro. These sites are evolutionarily highly conserved in PSK receptors, indicative of a conserved function. Site-directed mutagenesis of the four conserved residues in the activation segment, Thr890, Ser893, Thr894 and Thr899, differentially altered kinase activity in vitro and growth-promoting activity in planta. The T899A and the quadruple-mutated TSTT-A (T890A/S893A/T894A/T899A) mutants were both kinase-inactive, but PSKR1(T899A) retained growth-promoting activity. The T890A and S893A/T894A substitutions diminished kinase activity and growth promotion. We hypothesize that phosphorylation within the AL activates kinase activity and receptor function in a gradual and distinctive manner that may be a means to modulate the PSK response. PMID:26472115

  8. Egg Laying of Cabbage White Butterfly (Pieris brassicae) on Arabidopsis thaliana Affects Subsequent Performance of the Larvae

    PubMed Central

    Blenn, Beatrice; Drechsler, Navina; Gershenzon, Jonathan; Kunze, Reinhard; Hilker, Monika

    2013-01-01

    Plant resistance to the feeding by herbivorous insects has recently been found to be positively or negatively influenced by prior egg deposition. Here we show how crucial it is to conduct experiments on plant responses to herbivory under conditions that simulate natural insect behaviour. We used a well-studied plant – herbivore system, Arabidopsis thaliana and the cabbage white butterfly Pieris brassicae, testing the effects of naturally laid eggs (rather than egg extracts) and allowing larvae to feed gregariously as they do naturally (rather than placing single larvae on plants). Under natural conditions, newly hatched larvae start feeding on their egg shells before they consume leaf tissue, but access to egg shells had no effect on subsequent larval performance in our experiments. However, young larvae feeding gregariously on leaves previously laden with eggs caused less feeding damage, gained less weight during the first 2 days, and suffered twice as high a mortality until pupation compared to larvae feeding on plants that had never had eggs. The concentration of the major anti-herbivore defences of A. thaliana, the glucosinolates, was not significantly increased by oviposition, but the amount of the most abundant member of this class, 4-methylsulfinylbutyl glucosinolate was 1.8-fold lower in larval-damaged leaves with prior egg deposition compared to damaged leaves that had never had eggs. There were also few significant changes in the transcript levels of glucosinolate metabolic genes, except that egg deposition suppressed the feeding-induced up-regulation of FMOGS-OX2, a gene encoding a flavin monooxygenase involved in the last step of 4-methylsulfinylbutyl glucosinolate biosynthesis. Hence, our study demonstrates that oviposition does increase A. thaliana resistance to feeding by subsequently hatching larvae, but this cannot be attributed simply to changes in glucosinolate content. PMID:23527243

  9. The overexpression of the pine transcription factor PpDof5 in Arabidopsis leads to increased lignin content and affects carbon and nitrogen metabolism.

    PubMed

    Rueda-López, Marina; Cañas, Rafael A; Canales, Javier; Cánovas, Francisco M; Ávila, Concepción

    2015-12-01

    PpDof 5 is a regulator of the expression of glutamine synthetase (GS; EC 6.3.1.2) genes in photosynthetic and non-photosynthetic tissues of maritime pine. We have used Arabidopsis thaliana as a model system to study PpDof 5 function in planta, generating transgenic lines overexpressing the pine transcription factor. The overexpression of PpDof 5 resulted in a substantial increase of lignin content with a simultaneous regulation of carbon and nitrogen key genes. In addition, partitioning in carbon and nitrogen compounds was spread via various secondary metabolic pathways. These results suggest pleiotropic effects of PpDof 5 expression on various metabolic pathways of carbon and nitrogen metabolism. Plants overexpressing PpDof 5 exhibited upregulation of genes encoding enzymes for sucrose and starch biosynthesis, with a parallel increase in the content of soluble sugars. When the plants were grown under nitrate as the sole nitrogen source, they exhibited a significant regulation of the expression of genes involved mainly in signaling, but similar growth rates to wild-type plants. However, plants grown under ammonium exhibited major induction of the expression of photosynthetic genes and differential expression of ammonium and nitrate transporters. All these data suggest that in addition to controlling ammonium assimilation, PpDof 5 could be also involved in the regulation of other pathways in carbon and nitrogen metabolism in pine trees.

  10. Grana-Localized Proteins, RIQ1 and RIQ2, Affect the Organization of Light-Harvesting Complex II and Grana Stacking in Arabidopsis[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Yokoyama, Ryo; Yamamoto, Hiroshi; Kondo, Maki; Takeda, Satomi; Ifuku, Kentaro; Fukao, Yoichiro; Kamei, Yasuhiro; Nishimura, Mikio; Shikanai, Toshiharu

    2016-01-01

    Grana are stacked thylakoid membrane structures in land plants that contain PSII and light-harvesting complex II proteins (LHCIIs). We isolated two Arabidopsis thaliana mutants, reduced induction of non-photochemical quenching1 (riq1) and riq2, in which stacking of grana was enhanced. The curvature thylakoid 1a (curt1a) mutant was previously shown to lack grana structure. In riq1 curt1a, the grana were enlarged with more stacking, and in riq2 curt1a, the thylakoids were abnormally stacked and aggregated. Despite having different phenotypes in thylakoid structure, riq1, riq2, and curt1a showed a similar defect in the level of nonphotochemical quenching of chlorophyll fluorescence (NPQ). In riq curt1a double mutants, NPQ induction was more severely affected than in either single mutant. In riq mutants, state transitions were inhibited and the PSII antennae were smaller than in wild-type plants. The riq defects did not affect NPQ induction in the chlorophyll b-less mutant. RIQ1 and RIQ2 are paralogous and encode uncharacterized grana thylakoid proteins, but despite the high level of identity of the sequence, the functions of RIQ1 and RIQ2 were not redundant. RIQ1 is required for RIQ2 accumulation, and the wild-type level of RIQ2 did not complement the NPQ and thylakoid phenotypes in riq1. We propose that RIQ proteins link the grana structure and organization of LHCIIs. PMID:27600538

  11. Overexpression of an Arabidopsis heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein gene, AtRNP1, affects plant growth and reduces plant tolerance to drought and salt stresses

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Zhenyu; Zhao, Xiuyang; Wang, Bing; Liu, Erlong; Chen, Ni; Zhang, Wei; Liu, Heng

    2016-04-01

    Heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoproteins (hnRNPs) participate in diverse regulations of plant growth and environmental stress responses. In this work, an Arabidopsis hnRNP of unknown function, AtRNP1, was investigated. We found that AtRNP1 gene is highly expressed in rosette and cauline leaves, and slightly induced under drought, salt, osmotic and ABA stresses. AtRNP1 protein is localized to both the nucleus and cytoplasm. We performed homologous overexpression of AtRNP1 and found that the transgenic plants showed shortened root length and plant height, and accelerated flowering. In addition, the transgenic plants also showed reduced tolerance to drought, salt, osmotic and ABA stresses. Further studies revealed that under both normal and stress conditions, the proline contents in the transgenic plants are markedly decreased, associated with reduced expression levels of a proline synthase gene and several stress-responsive genes. These results suggested that the overexpression of AtRNP1 negatively affects plant growth and abiotic stress tolerance. - Highlights: • AtRNP1 is a widely expressed gene and its expression is slightly induced under abiotic stresses. • AtRNP1 protein is localized to both the nucleus and cytoplasm. • Overexpression of AtRNP1 affects plant growth. • Overexpression of AtRNP1 reduces plant tolerance to drought and salt stresses. • AtRNP1 overexpression plants show decreased proline accumulation and stress-responsive gene expressions.

  12. COBRA-LIKE2, a Member of the Glycosylphosphatidylinositol-Anchored COBRA-LIKE Family, Plays a Role in Cellulose Deposition in Arabidopsis Seed Coat Mucilage Secretory Cells1,2[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Ben-Tov, Daniela; Abraham, Yael; Stav, Shira; Thompson, Kevin; Loraine, Ann; Elbaum, Rivka; de Souza, Amancio; Pauly, Markus; Kieber, Joseph J.; Harpaz-Saad, Smadar

    2015-01-01

    Differentiation of the maternally derived seed coat epidermal cells into mucilage secretory cells is a common adaptation in angiosperms. Recent studies identified cellulose as an important component of seed mucilage in various species. Cellulose is deposited as a set of rays that radiate from the seed upon mucilage extrusion, serving to anchor the pectic component of seed mucilage to the seed surface. Using transcriptome data encompassing the course of seed development, we identified COBRA-LIKE2 (COBL2), a member of the glycosylphosphatidylinositol-anchored COBRA-LIKE gene family in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana), as coexpressed with other genes involved in cellulose deposition in mucilage secretory cells. Disruption of the COBL2 gene results in substantial reduction in the rays of cellulose present in seed mucilage, along with an increased solubility of the pectic component of the mucilage. Light birefringence demonstrates a substantial decrease in crystalline cellulose deposition into the cellulosic rays of the cobl2 mutants. Moreover, crystalline cellulose deposition into the radial cell walls and the columella appears substantially compromised, as demonstrated by scanning electron microscopy and in situ quantification of light birefringence. Overall, the cobl2 mutants display about 40% reduction in whole-seed crystalline cellulose content compared with the wild type. These data establish that COBL2 plays a role in the deposition of crystalline cellulose into various secondary cell wall structures during seed coat epidermal cell differentiation. PMID:25583925

  13. Sequence adaptations affecting cleavage of the VP1/2A junction by the 3C protease in foot-and-mouth disease virus-infected cells.

    PubMed

    Gullberg, Maria; Polacek, Charlotta; Belsham, Graham J

    2014-11-01

    The foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) capsid protein precursor P1-2A is cleaved by the virus-encoded 3C protease to VP0, VP3, VP1 and 2A. It was shown previously that modification of a single amino acid residue (K210E) within the VP1 protein and close to the VP1/2A cleavage site, inhibited cleavage of this junction and produced 'self-tagged' virus particles. A second site substitution (E83K) within VP1 was also observed within the rescued virus [Gullberg et al. (2013). J Virol 87: , 11591-11603]. It was shown here that introduction of this E83K change alone into a serotype O virus resulted in the rapid accumulation of a second site substitution within the 2A sequence (L2P), which also blocked VP1/2A cleavage. This suggests a linkage between the E83K change in VP1 and cleavage of the VP1/2A junction. Cells infected with viruses containing the VP1 K210E or the 2A L2P substitutions contained the uncleaved VP1-2A protein. The 2A L2P substitution resulted in the VP1/2A junction being highly resistant to cleavage by the 3C protease, hence it may be a preferred route for 'tagging' virus particles.

  14. Lead-induced stress, which triggers the production of nitric oxide (NO) and superoxide anion (O2(·-)) in Arabidopsis peroxisomes, affects catalase activity.

    PubMed

    Corpas, Francisco J; Barroso, Juan B

    2017-08-01

    Lead (Pb) contamination has a toxic effect on plant metabolisms, leading to a decrease in biomass production. The free radical nitric oxide (NO) is involved in the mechanism of response to a wide range of abiotic stresses. However, little is known about the interplay between Pb-induced stress and NO metabolism. Peroxisomes are sub-cellular compartments involved in multiple cellular metabolic pathways which are characterized by an active nitro-oxidative metabolism. Thus, Arabidopsis thaliana mutants expressing cyan fluorescent protein (CFP) through the addition of peroxisomal targeting signal 1 (PTS1), which enables peroxisomes to be visualized in vivo by confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) combined with fluorescent probes for nitric oxide (NO), superoxide anion (O2(·-)) and peroxynitrite (ONOO(-)), were used to evaluate the potential involvement of these organelles in the mechanism of response to 150 μM lead-induced stress. Both NO and O2(·-) radicals, and consequently ONOO(-), were overproduced under Pb-stress. Additionally, biochemical and gene expression analyses of peroxisomal enzymes, including the antioxidant catalase (CAT) and two photorespiration enzymes, such as glycolate oxidase (GOX) and hydroxypyruvate reductase (HPR), show that, under Pb-stress, only the catalase was negatively affected, while the two photorespiration enzymes remained unaffected. These results corroborate the involvement of plant peroxisomal metabolisms in the mechanism of response to lead contamination and highlight the importance of the peroxisomal NO metabolism. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. A R2R3-MYB transcription factor that is specifically expressed in cotton (Gossypium hirsutum) fibers affects secondary cell wall biosynthesis and deposition in transgenic Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Sun, Xiang; Gong, Si-Ying; Nie, Xiao-Ying; Li, Yang; Li, Wen; Huang, Geng-Qing; Li, Xue-Bao

    2015-07-01

    Secondary cell wall (SCW) is an important industrial raw material for pulping, papermaking, construction, lumbering, textiles and potentially for biofuel production. The process of SCW thickening of cotton fibers lays down the cellulose that will constitute the bulk (up to 96%) of the fiber at maturity. In this study, a gene encoding a MYB-domain protein was identified in cotton (Gossypium hirsutum) and designated as GhMYBL1. Quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) analysis revealed that GhMYBL1 was specifically expressed in cotton fibers at the stage of secondary wall deposition. Further analysis indicated that this protein is a R2R3-MYB transcription factor, and is targeted to the cell nucleus. Overexpression of GhMYBL1 in Arabidopsis affected the formation of SCW in the stem xylem of the transgenic plants. The enhanced SCW thickening also occurred in the interfascicular fibers, xylary fibers and vessels of the GhMYBL1-overexpression transgenic plants. The expression of secondary wall-associated genes, such as CesA4, CesA7, CesA8, PAL1, F5H and 4CL1, were upregulated, and consequently, cellulose and lignin biosynthesis were enhanced in the GhMYBL1 transgenic plants. These data suggested that GhMYBL1 may participate in modulating the process of secondary wall biosynthesis and deposition of cotton fibers.

  16. KONJAC1 and 2 Are Key Factors for GDP-Mannose Generation and Affect l-Ascorbic Acid and Glucomannan Biosynthesis in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Sawake, Shota; Tajima, Noriaki; Mortimer, Jenny C; Lao, Jeemeng; Ishikawa, Toshiki; Yu, Xiaolan; Yamanashi, Yukiko; Yoshimi, Yoshihisa; Kawai-Yamada, Maki; Dupree, Paul; Tsumuraya, Yoichi; Kotake, Toshihisa

    2015-12-01

    Humans are unable to synthesize l-ascorbic acid (AsA), yet it is required as a cofactor in many critical biochemical reactions. The majority of human dietary AsA is obtained from plants. In Arabidopsis thaliana, a GDP-mannose pyrophosphorylase (GMPP), VITAMIN C DEFECTIVE1 (VTC1), catalyzes a rate-limiting step in AsA synthesis: the formation of GDP-Man. In this study, we identified two nucleotide sugar pyrophosphorylase-like proteins, KONJAC1 (KJC1) and KJC2, which stimulate the activity of VTC1. The kjc1kjc2 double mutant exhibited severe dwarfism, indicating that KJC proteins are important for growth and development. The kjc1 mutation reduced GMPP activity to 10% of wild-type levels, leading to a 60% reduction in AsA levels. On the contrary, overexpression of KJC1 significantly increased GMPP activity. The kjc1 and kjc1kjc2 mutants also exhibited significantly reduced levels of glucomannan, which is also synthesized from GDP-Man. Recombinant KJC1 and KJC2 enhanced the GMPP activity of recombinant VTC1 in vitro, while KJCs did not show GMPP activity. Yeast two-hybrid assays suggested that the stimulation of GMPP activity occurs via interaction of KJCs with VTC1. These results suggest that KJCs are key factors for the generation of GDP-Man and affect AsA level and glucomannan accumulation through the stimulation of VTC1 GMPP activity.

  17. ABA Is an Essential Signal for Plant Resistance to Pathogens Affecting JA Biosynthesis and the Activation of Defenses in Arabidopsis[W

    PubMed Central

    Adie, Bruce A.T.; Pérez-Pérez, Julián; Pérez-Pérez, Manuel M.; Godoy, Marta; Sánchez-Serrano, José-J.; Schmelz, Eric A.; Solano, Roberto

    2007-01-01

    Analyses of Arabidopsis thaliana defense response to the damping-off oomycete pathogen Pythium irregulare show that resistance to P. irregulare requires a multicomponent defense strategy. Penetration represents a first layer, as indicated by the susceptibility of pen2 mutants, followed by recognition, likely mediated by ERECTA receptor-like kinases. Subsequent signaling of inducible defenses is predominantly mediated by jasmonic acid (JA), with insensitive coi1 mutants showing extreme susceptibility. In contrast with the generally accepted roles of ethylene and salicylic acid cooperating with or antagonizing, respectively, JA in the activation of defenses against necrotrophs, both are required to prevent disease progression, although much less so than JA. Meta-analysis of transcriptome profiles confirmed the predominant role of JA in activation of P. irregulare–induced defenses and uncovered abscisic acid (ABA) as an important regulator of defense gene expression. Analysis of cis-regulatory sequences also revealed an unexpected overrepresentation of ABA response elements in promoters of P. irregulare–responsive genes. Subsequent infections of ABA-related and callose-deficient mutants confirmed the importance of ABA in defense, acting partly through an undescribed mechanism. The results support a model for ABA affecting JA biosynthesis in the activation of defenses against this oomycete. PMID:17513501

  18. KONJAC1 and 2 Are Key Factors for GDP-Mannose Generation and Affect l-Ascorbic Acid and Glucomannan Biosynthesis in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Sawake, Shota; Tajima, Noriaki; Lao, Jeemeng; Ishikawa, Toshiki; Yu, Xiaolan; Yamanashi, Yukiko; Yoshimi, Yoshihisa; Kawai-Yamada, Maki

    2015-01-01

    Humans are unable to synthesize l-ascorbic acid (AsA), yet it is required as a cofactor in many critical biochemical reactions. The majority of human dietary AsA is obtained from plants. In Arabidopsis thaliana, a GDP-mannose pyrophosphorylase (GMPP), VITAMIN C DEFECTIVE1 (VTC1), catalyzes a rate-limiting step in AsA synthesis: the formation of GDP-Man. In this study, we identified two nucleotide sugar pyrophosphorylase-like proteins, KONJAC1 (KJC1) and KJC2, which stimulate the activity of VTC1. The kjc1kjc2 double mutant exhibited severe dwarfism, indicating that KJC proteins are important for growth and development. The kjc1 mutation reduced GMPP activity to 10% of wild-type levels, leading to a 60% reduction in AsA levels. On the contrary, overexpression of KJC1 significantly increased GMPP activity. The kjc1 and kjc1kjc2 mutants also exhibited significantly reduced levels of glucomannan, which is also synthesized from GDP-Man. Recombinant KJC1 and KJC2 enhanced the GMPP activity of recombinant VTC1 in vitro, while KJCs did not show GMPP activity. Yeast two-hybrid assays suggested that the stimulation of GMPP activity occurs via interaction of KJCs with VTC1. These results suggest that KJCs are key factors for the generation of GDP-Man and affect AsA level and glucomannan accumulation through the stimulation of VTC1 GMPP activity. PMID:26672069

  19. Calcium-dependent protein kinase CPK28 targets the methionine adenosyltransferases for degradation by the 26S proteasome and affects ethylene biosynthesis and lignin deposition in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Jin, Yu; Ye, Nenghui; Zhu, Fuyuan; Li, Haoxuan; Wang, Juan; Jiang, Liwen; Zhang, Jianhua

    2017-04-01

    S-adenosylmethionine (AdoMet) is synthesized by methionine adenosyltransferase (MAT), and plays an essential role in ethylene biosynthesis and other methylation reactions. Despite increasing knowledge of MAT regulation at transcriptional levels, how MAT is post-translationally regulated remains unknown in plant cells. Phosphorylation is an important post-translational modification for regulating the activity of enzymes, protein function and signaling transduction. Using molecular and biochemical approaches, we have identified the phosphorylation of MAT proteins by calcium-dependent protein kinase (CPK28). Phenotypically, both MAT2-overexpressing transgenic plants and cpk28 mutants display short hypocotyls and ectopic lignifications. Their shortened hypocotyl phenotypes are caused by ethylene overproduction and rescued by ethylene biosynthesis inhibitor aminoethoxyvinylglycine treatment. Genetic evidence reveals that MAT2 mutation restores the phenotype of ectopic lignification in CPK28-deficient plants. We find that total MAT proteins and AdoMet are increased in cpk28 mutants, but decreased in CPK28-overexpressing seedlings. We also find that MATs in OE::CPK28 are degraded through the 26S proteasome pathway. Our work suggests that CPK28 targets MATs (MAT1, MAT2 and MAT3) for degradation by the 26S proteasome pathway, and thus affects ethylene biosynthesis and lignin deposition in Arabidopsis. © 2017 The Authors The Plant Journal © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  20. Overexpression of a cotton gene that encodes a putative transcription factor of AP2/EREBP family in Arabidopsis affects growth and development of transgenic plants.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Ying; Xia, Hui; Li, Xiao-Jie; Hu, Rong; Chen, Yun; Li, Xue-Bao

    2013-01-01

    In the study, a gene encoding a putative ethylene response factor of AP2/EREBP family was isolated from cotton (Gossypium hirsutum) and designated as GhERF12. Sequence alignment showed that GhERF12 protein contains a central AP2/ERF domain (58 amino acids) with two functional conserved amino acid residues (ala14 and asp19). Transactivation assay indicated that GhERF12 displayed strong transcription activation activity in yeast cells, suggesting that this protein may be a transcriptional activator in cotton. Quantitative RT-PCR analysis showed that GhERF12 expression in cotton was induced by ACC and IAA. Overexpression of GhERF12 in Arabidopsis affected seedling growth and development. The GhERF12 transgenic plants grew slowly, and displayed a dwarf phenotype. The mean bolting time of the transgenic plants was delayed for about 10 days, compared with that of wild type. Further study revealed that some ethylene-related and auxin-related genes were dramatically up-regulated in the transgenic plants, compared with those of wild type. Collectively, we speculated that GhERF12, as a transcription factor, may be involved in regulation of plant growth and development by activating the constitutive ethylene response likely related to auxin biosynthesis and/or signaling.

  1. Altered Xylem-Phloem Transfer of Amino Acids Affects Metabolism and Leads to Increased Seed Yield and Oil Content in Arabidopsis[W

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Lizhi; Tan, Qiumin; Lee, Raymond; Trethewy, Alexander; Lee, Yong-Hwa; Tegeder, Mechthild

    2010-01-01

    Seed development and nitrogen (N) storage depend on delivery of amino acids to seed sinks. For efficient translocation to seeds, amino acids are loaded into the phloem in source leaves and along the long distance transport pathway through xylem-phloem transfer. We demonstrate that Arabidopsis thaliana AMINO ACID PERMEASE2 (AAP2) localizes to the phloem throughout the plant. AAP2 T-DNA insertion lines showed changes in source-sink translocation of amino acids and a decrease in the amount of seed total N and storage proteins, supporting AAP2 function in phloem loading and amino acid distribution to the embryo. Interestingly, in aap2 seeds, total carbon (C) levels were unchanged, while fatty acid levels were elevated. Moreover, branch and silique numbers per plant and seed yield were strongly increased. This suggests changes in N and C delivery to sinks and subsequent modulations of sink development and seed metabolism. This is supported by tracer experiments, expression studies of genes of N/C transport and metabolism in source and sink, and by phenotypic and metabolite analyses of aap2 plants. Thus, AAP2 is key for xylem to phloem transfer and sink N and C supply; moreover, modifications of N allocation can positively affect C assimilation and source-sink transport and benefit sink development and oil yield. PMID:21075769

  2. Altered xylem-phloem transfer of amino acids affects metabolism and leads to increased seed yield and oil content in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lizhi; Tan, Qiumin; Lee, Raymond; Trethewy, Alexander; Lee, Yong-Hwa; Tegeder, Mechthild

    2010-11-01

    Seed development and nitrogen (N) storage depend on delivery of amino acids to seed sinks. For efficient translocation to seeds, amino acids are loaded into the phloem in source leaves and along the long distance transport pathway through xylem-phloem transfer. We demonstrate that Arabidopsis thaliana AMINO ACID PERMEASE2 (AAP2) localizes to the phloem throughout the plant. AAP2 T-DNA insertion lines showed changes in source-sink translocation of amino acids and a decrease in the amount of seed total N and storage proteins, supporting AAP2 function in phloem loading and amino acid distribution to the embryo. Interestingly, in aap2 seeds, total carbon (C) levels were unchanged, while fatty acid levels were elevated. Moreover, branch and silique numbers per plant and seed yield were strongly increased. This suggests changes in N and C delivery to sinks and subsequent modulations of sink development and seed metabolism. This is supported by tracer experiments, expression studies of genes of N/C transport and metabolism in source and sink, and by phenotypic and metabolite analyses of aap2 plants. Thus, AAP2 is key for xylem to phloem transfer and sink N and C supply; moreover, modifications of N allocation can positively affect C assimilation and source-sink transport and benefit sink development and oil yield.

  3. AtLSG1-2 Regulates Leaf Growth by Affecting Cell Proliferation and the Onset of Endoreduplication and Synergistically Interacts with AtNMD3 during Cell Proliferation Process.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Huayan; Lü, Shiyou; Xiong, Liming

    2017-01-01

    AtLSG1-2 is a circularly permuted GTPase required for ribosome biogenesis and recently shown to be involved in early leaf development, although it was unclear how AtLSG1-2 affects leaf growth. Here, we found that atlsg1-2 mutants had reduced leaf size as a result of decreased cell size and cell number. Leaf kinematic analysis and CYCB1;1::GUS expression pattern in atlsg1-2 mutant indicated that loss of function of AtLSG1-2 delays the transition from cell division to cell expansion. Decreases in ploidy levels and trichome branch number suggest that AtLSG1-2 deficiency suppresses endoreduplication. Real-time PCR analysis showed that genes specifically expressed in the proliferation stage were highly expressed and those involved in endoreduplication were differentially regulated. LSG1 is known to mediate the recruitment of nucleocytoplasmic shuttling protein NMD3 back to the nucleus in yeast, yet their relationship was unclear in plants. Our genetic analysis revealed that the atlsg1 atnmd3 double mutant displayed enhanced phenotypes as compared with the respective single mutant and that AtLSG1-2 and AtNMD3 synergistically affect the cell proliferation process.

  4. AtLSG1-2 Regulates Leaf Growth by Affecting Cell Proliferation and the Onset of Endoreduplication and Synergistically Interacts with AtNMD3 during Cell Proliferation Process

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Huayan; Lü, Shiyou; Xiong, Liming

    2017-01-01

    AtLSG1-2 is a circularly permuted GTPase required for ribosome biogenesis and recently shown to be involved in early leaf development, although it was unclear how AtLSG1-2 affects leaf growth. Here, we found that atlsg1-2 mutants had reduced leaf size as a result of decreased cell size and cell number. Leaf kinematic analysis and CYCB1;1::GUS expression pattern in atlsg1-2 mutant indicated that loss of function of AtLSG1-2 delays the transition from cell division to cell expansion. Decreases in ploidy levels and trichome branch number suggest that AtLSG1-2 deficiency suppresses endoreduplication. Real-time PCR analysis showed that genes specifically expressed in the proliferation stage were highly expressed and those involved in endoreduplication were differentially regulated. LSG1 is known to mediate the recruitment of nucleocytoplasmic shuttling protein NMD3 back to the nucleus in yeast, yet their relationship was unclear in plants. Our genetic analysis revealed that the atlsg1 atnmd3 double mutant displayed enhanced phenotypes as compared with the respective single mutant and that AtLSG1-2 and AtNMD3 synergistically affect the cell proliferation process. PMID:28344588

  5. Depletion of the "gamma-type carbonic anhydrase-like" subunits of complex I affects central mitochondrial metabolism in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Fromm, Steffanie; Göing, Jennifer; Lorenz, Christin; Peterhänsel, Christoph; Braun, Hans-Peter

    2016-01-01

    "Gamma-type carbonic anhydrase-like" (CAL) proteins form part of complex I in plants. Together with "gamma carbonic anhydrase" (CA) proteins they form an extra domain which is attached to the membrane arm of complex I on its matrix exposed side. In Arabidopsis two CAL and three CA proteins are present, termed CAL1, CAL2, CA1, CA2 and CA3. It has been proposed that the carbonic anhydrase domain of complex I is involved in a process mediating efficient recycling of mitochondrial CO2 for photosynthetic carbon fixation which is especially important during growth conditions causing increased photorespiration. Depletion of CAL proteins has been shown to significantly affect plant development and photomorphogenesis. To better understand CAL function in plants we here investigated effects of CAL depletion on the mitochondrial compartment. In mutant lines and cell cultures complex I amount was reduced by 90-95% but levels of complexes III and V were unchanged. At the same time, some of the CA transcripts were less abundant. Proteome analysis of CAL depleted cells revealed significant reduction of complex I subunits as well as proteins associated with photorespiration, but increased amounts of proteins participating in amino acid catabolism and stress response reactions. Developmental delay of the mutants was slightly alleviated if plants were cultivated at high CO2. Profiling of selected metabolites revealed defined changes in intermediates of the citric acid cycle and amino acid catabolism. It is concluded that CAL proteins are essential for complex I assembly and that CAL depletion specifically affects central mitochondrial metabolism. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Deletion of a C-terminal intrinsically disordered region of WRINKLED1 affects its stability and enhances oil accumulation in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Ma, Wei; Kong, Que; Grix, Michael; Mantyla, Jenny J; Yang, Yang; Benning, Christoph; Ohlrogge, John B

    2015-09-01

    WRINKLED1 (WRI1) is a key transcription factor governing plant oil biosynthesis. We characterized three intrinsically disordered regions (IDRs) in Arabidopsis WRI1, and found that one C-terminal IDR of AtWRI1 (IDR3) affects the stability of AtWRI1. Analysis by bimolecular fluorescence complementation and yeast-two-hybrid assays indicated that the IDR3 domain does not determine WRI1 stability by interacting with BTB/POZ-MATH proteins connecting AtWRI1 with CULLIN3-based E3 ligases. Analysis of the WRI1 sequence revealed that a putative PEST motif (proteolytic signal) is located at the C-terminal region of AtWRI1(IDR) (3). We also show that a 91 amino acid domain at the C-terminus of AtWRI1 without the PEST motif is sufficient for transactivation. We found that removal of the PEST motif or mutations in putative phosphorylation sites increased the stability of AtWRI1, and led to increased oil biosynthesis when these constructs were transiently expressed in tobacco leaves. Oil content was also increased in the seeds of stable transgenic wri1-1 plants expressing AtWRI1 with mutations in the IDR3-PEST motif. Taken together, our data suggest that intrinsic disorder of AtWRI1(IDR3) may facilitate exposure of the PEST motif to protein kinases. Thus, phosphorylation of the PEST motif in the AtWRI1(IDR) (3) domain may affect AtWRI1-mediated plant oil biosynthesis. The results obtained here suggest a means to increase accumulation of oils in plant tissues through WRI1 engineering.

  7. Deletion of a Tandem Gene Family in Arabidopsis: Increased MEKK2 Abundance Triggers Autoimmunity when the MEKK1-MKK1/2-MPK4 Signaling Cascade Is Disrupted[C][W

    PubMed Central

    Su, Shih-Heng; Bush, Susan M.; Zaman, Najia; Stecker, Kelly; Sussman, Michael R.; Krysan, Patrick

    2013-01-01

    An Arabidopsis thaliana mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase cascade composed of MEKK1, MKK1/MKK2, and MPK4 was previously described as a negative regulator of defense response. MEKK1 encodes a MAP kinase kinase kinase and is a member of a tandemly duplicated gene family with MEKK2 and MEKK3. Using T-DNA insertion lines, we isolated a novel deletion mutant disrupting this gene family and found it to be phenotypically wild-type, in contrast with the mekk1 dwarf phenotype. Follow-up genetic analyses indicated that MEKK2 is required for the mekk1, mkk1 mkk2, and mpk4 autoimmune phenotypes. We next analyzed a T-DNA insertion in the MEKK2 promoter region and found that although it does not reduce the basal expression of MEKK2, it does prevent the upregulation of MEKK2 that is observed in mpk4 plants. This mekk2 allele can rescue the mpk4 autoimmune phenotype in a dosage-dependent manner. We also found that expression of constitutively active MPK4 restored MEKK2 abundance to wild-type levels in mekk1 mutant plants. Finally, using mass spectrometry, we showed that MEKK2 protein levels mirror MEKK2 mRNA levels. Taken together, our results indicate that activated MPK4 is responsible for regulating MEKK2 RNA abundance. In turn, the abundance of MEKK2 appears to be under cellular surveillance such that a modest increase can trigger defense response activation. PMID:23695980

  8. Bax/Mcl-1 balance affects neutrophil survival in intermittent hypoxia and obstructive sleep apnea: effects of p38MAPK and ERK1/2 signaling

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Prolonged neutrophil survival is evident in various cardiovascular and respiratory morbidities, in hypoxic conditions in-vitro and in patients with obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) characterized by nightly intermittent hypoxia (IH). This may lead to persistent inflammation, tissue injury and dysfunction. We therefore investigated by a translational approach the potential contribution of the intrinsic stress-induced mitochondrial pathway in extending neutrophil survival under IH conditions. Thus, neutrophils of healthy individuals treated with IH in-vitro and neutrophils of OSA patients undergoing nightly IH episodes in-vivo were investigated. Specifically, the balance between pro-apoptotic Bax and anti-apoptotic Mcl-1 protein expression, and the potential involvement of p38MAPK and ERK1/2 signaling pathways in the control of Mcl-1 expression were investigated. Methods Purified neutrophils were exposed to IH and compared to normoxia and to sustained hypoxia (SH) using a BioSpherix-OxyCycler C42 system. Bax and Mcl-1 levels, and p38MAPK and ERK1/2 phosphorylation were determined by western blotting. Also, Bax/Mcl-1 expression and Bax translocation to the mitochondria were assessed by confocal microscopy in pre-apoptotic neutrophils, before the appearance of apoptotic morphology. Co-localization of Bax and mitochondria was quantified by LSM 510 CarlZeiss MicroImaging using Manders Overlap Coefficient. A paired two-tailed t test, with Bonferroni correction for multiple comparisons, was used for statistical analysis. Results Compared to normoxia, IH and SH up-regulated the anti-apoptotic Mcl-1 by about 2-fold, down-regulated the pro-apoptotic Bax by 41% and 27%, respectively, and inhibited Bax co-localization with mitochondria before visible morphological signs of apoptosis were noted. IH induced ERK1/2 and p38MAPKs phosphorylation, whereas SH induced only p38MAPK phosphorylation. Accordingly, both ERK and p38MAPK inhibitors attenuated the IH-induced Mcl-1

  9. Genome Wide Association Mapping for the Tolerance to the Polyamine Oxidase Inhibitor Guazatine in Arabidopsis thaliana

    PubMed Central

    Atanasov, Kostadin E.; Barboza-Barquero, Luis; Tiburcio, Antonio F.; Alcázar, Rubén

    2016-01-01

    Guazatine is a potent inhibitor of polyamine oxidase (PAO) activity. In agriculture, guazatine is used as non-systemic contact fungicide efficient in the protection of cereals and citrus fruits against disease. The composition of guazatine is complex, mainly constituted by a mixture of synthetic guanidated polyamines (polyaminoguanidines). Here, we have studied the effects from exposure to guazatine in the weed Arabidopsis thaliana. We report that micromolar concentrations of guazatine are sufficient to inhibit growth of Arabidopsis seedlings and induce chlorosis, whereas germination is barely affected. We observed the occurrence of quantitative variation in the response to guazatine between 107 randomly chosen Arabidopsis accessions. This enabled us to undertake genome-wide association (GWA) mapping that identified a locus on chromosome one associated with guazatine tolerance. CHLOROPHYLLASE 1 (CLH1) within this locus was studied as candidate gene, together with its paralog (CLH2). The analysis of independent clh1-2, clh1-3, clh2-3, clh2-2, and double clh1-2 clh2-3 mutant alleles indicated that CLH1 and/or CLH2 loss-of-function or expression down-regulation promote guazatine tolerance in Arabidopsis. We report a natural mechanism by which Arabidopsis populations can overcome toxicity by the fungicide guazatine. PMID:27092150

  10. Genome Wide Association Mapping for the Tolerance to the Polyamine Oxidase Inhibitor Guazatine in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Atanasov, Kostadin E; Barboza-Barquero, Luis; Tiburcio, Antonio F; Alcázar, Rubén

    2016-01-01

    Guazatine is a potent inhibitor of polyamine oxidase (PAO) activity. In agriculture, guazatine is used as non-systemic contact fungicide efficient in the protection of cereals and citrus fruits against disease. The composition of guazatine is complex, mainly constituted by a mixture of synthetic guanidated polyamines (polyaminoguanidines). Here, we have studied the effects from exposure to guazatine in the weed Arabidopsis thaliana. We report that micromolar concentrations of guazatine are sufficient to inhibit growth of Arabidopsis seedlings and induce chlorosis, whereas germination is barely affected. We observed the occurrence of quantitative variation in the response to guazatine between 107 randomly chosen Arabidopsis accessions. This enabled us to undertake genome-wide association (GWA) mapping that identified a locus on chromosome one associated with guazatine tolerance. CHLOROPHYLLASE 1 (CLH1) within this locus was studied as candidate gene, together with its paralog (CLH2). The analysis of independent clh1-2, clh1-3, clh2-3, clh2-2, and double clh1-2 clh2-3 mutant alleles indicated that CLH1 and/or CLH2 loss-of-function or expression down-regulation promote guazatine tolerance in Arabidopsis. We report a natural mechanism by which Arabidopsis populations can overcome toxicity by the fungicide guazatine.

  11. Probing native lignin macromolecular configuration in Arabidopsis thaliana in specific cell wall types: further insights into limited substrate degeneracy and assembly of the lignins of ref8, fah 1-2 and C4H::F5H lines.

    PubMed

    Patten, Ann M; Jourdes, Michaël; Cardenas, Claudia L; Laskar, Dhrubojyoti D; Nakazawa, Yoshihisa; Chung, Byung-Yeoup; Franceschi, Vincent R; Davin, Laurence B; Lewis, Norman G

    2010-03-01

    The interest in renewable, plant-derived, bioenergy/biofuels has resulted in a renaissance of plant cell-wall/lignin research. Herein, effects of modulating lignin monomeric compositions in a single plant species, Arabidopsis, are described. The earliest stage of putative "AcBr/Klason lignin" deposition was apparently unaffected by modulating p-coumarate 3-hydroxylase or ferulate 5-hydroxylase activities. This finding helps account for the inability of many other studies to fully suppress the reported putative levels of lignin deposition through monolignol biosynthesis manipulation, and also underscores limitations in frequently used lignin analytical protocols. The overall putative lignin content was greatly reduced (circa 62%) in a plant line harboring an H-(p-hydroxyphenyl) enriched lignin phenotype. This slightly increased H-monomer deposition level apparently occurred in cell-wall domains normally harboring guaiacyl (G) and/or syringyl (S) lignin moieties. For G- and S-enriched lignin phenotypes, the overall lignification process appeared analogous to wild type, with only xylem fiber and interfascicular fiber cells forming the S-enriched lignins. Laser microscope dissection of vascular bundles and interfascicular fibers, followed by pyrolysis GC/MS, supported these findings. Some cell types, presumably metaxylem and possibly protoxylem, also afforded small amounts of benzodioxane (sub)structures due to limited substrate degeneracy (i.e. utilizing 5-hydroxyconiferyl alcohol rather than sinapyl alcohol). For all plant lines studied, the 8-O-4' inter-unit frequency of cleavable H, G and/or S monomers was essentially invariant of monomeric composition for a given (putative) lignin content. These data again underscore the need for determination of lignin primary structures and identification of all proteins/enzymes involved in control of lignin polymer assembly/macromolecular configuration.

  12. Arabidopsis thaliana bZIP44: a transcription factor affecting seed germination and expression of the mannanase-encoding gene AtMAN7.

    PubMed

    Iglesias-Fernández, Raquel; Barrero-Sicilia, Cristina; Carrillo-Barral, Néstor; Oñate-Sánchez, Luis; Carbonero, Pilar

    2013-06-01

    Endo-β-mannanases (MAN; EC. 3.2.1.78) catalyze the cleavage of β1→4 bonds in mannan polymers and have been associated with the process of weakening the tissues surrounding the embryo during seed germination. In germinating Arabidopsis thaliana seeds, the most highly expressed MAN gene is AtMAN7 and its transcripts are restricted to the micropylar endosperm and to the radicle tip just before radicle emergence. Mutants with a T-DNA insertion in AtMAN7 have a slower germination than the wild type. To gain insight into the transcriptional regulation of the AtMAN7 gene, a bioinformatic search for conserved non-coding cis-elements (phylogenetic shadowing) within the Brassicaceae MAN7 gene promoters has been done, and these conserved motifs have been used as bait to look for their interacting transcription factors (TFs), using as a prey an arrayed yeast library from A. thaliana. The basic-leucine zipper TF AtbZIP44, but not the closely related AtbZIP11, has thus been identified and its transcriptional activation upon AtMAN7 has been validated at the molecular level. In the knock-out lines of AtbZIP44, not only is the expression of the AtMAN7 gene drastically reduced, but these mutants have a significantly slower germination than the wild type, being affected in the two phases of the germination process, both in the rupture of the seed coat and in the breakage of the micropylar endosperm cell walls. In the over-expression lines the opposite phenotype is observed. © 2013 The Authors The Plant Journal © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. The absence of eukaryotic initiation factor eIF(iso)4E affects the systemic spread of a Tobacco etch virus isolate in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Contreras-Paredes, Carlos A; Silva-Rosales, Laura; Daròs, José-Antonio; Alejandri-Ramírez, Naholi D; Dinkova, Tzvetanka D

    2013-04-01

    Translation initiation factor eIF4E exerts an important role during infection of viral species in the family Potyviridae. Particularly, a eIF(iso)4E family member is required for Arabidopsis thaliana susceptibility to Turnip mosaic virus, Lettuce mosaic virus, and Tobacco etch virus (TEV). In addition, a resistance mechanism named restriction of TEV movement (RTM) in A. thaliana controls the systemic spread of TEV in Col-0 ecotype. Here, we describe that TEV-TAMPS, a Mexican isolate, overcomes the RTM resistance mechanism reported for TEV-7DA infection of the Col-0 ecotype but depends on eIF(iso)4E for its systemic spread. To understand at which level eIF(iso)4E participates in A. thaliana TEV-TAMPS infection, the viral RNA replication and translation were measured. The absence or overexpression of eIF(iso)4E did not affect viral translation, and replication was still observed in the absence of eIF(iso)4E. However, the TEV-TAMPS systemic spread was completely abolished in the null mutant. The viral protein genome-linked (VPg) precursor NIa was found in coimmunoprecipitated complexes with both, eIF(iso)4E and eIF4E. However, the viral coat protein (CP) was only present in the eIF(iso)4E complexes. Since both the VPg and the CP proteins are needed for systemic spread, we propose a role of A. thaliana eIF(iso)4E in the movement of TEV-TAMPS within this host.

  14. Mg-chelatase I subunit 1 and Mg-protoporphyrin IX methyltransferase affect the stomatal aperture in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Tomiyama, Masakazu; Inoue, Shin-Ichiro; Tsuzuki, Tomo; Soda, Midori; Morimoto, Sayuri; Okigaki, Yukiko; Ohishi, Takaya; Mochizuki, Nobuyoshi; Takahashi, Koji; Kinoshita, Toshinori

    2014-07-01

    To elucidate the molecular mechanisms of stomatal opening and closure, we performed a genetic screen using infrared thermography to isolate stomatal aperture mutants. We identified a mutant designated low temperature with open-stomata 1 (lost1), which exhibited reduced leaf temperature, wider stomatal aperture, and a pale green phenotype. Map-based analysis of the LOST1 locus revealed that the lost1 mutant resulted from a missense mutation in the Mg-chelatase I subunit 1 (CHLI1) gene, which encodes a subunit of the Mg-chelatase complex involved in chlorophyll synthesis. Transformation of the wild-type CHLI1 gene into lost1 complemented all lost1 phenotypes. Stomata in lost1 exhibited a partial ABA-insensitive phenotype similar to that of rtl1, a Mg-chelatase H subunit missense mutant. The Mg-protoporphyrin IX methyltransferase (CHLM) gene encodes a subsequent enzyme in the chlorophyll synthesis pathway. We examined stomatal movement in a CHLM knockdown mutant, chlm, and found that it also exhibited an ABA-insensitive phenotype. However, lost1 and chlm seedlings all showed normal expression of ABA-induced genes, such as RAB18 and RD29B, in response to ABA. These results suggest that the chlorophyll synthesis enzymes, Mg-chelatase complex and CHLM, specifically affect ABA signaling in the control of stomatal aperture and have no effect on ABA-induced gene expression.

  15. Loss of LORELEI function in the pistil delays initiation but does not affect embryo development in Arabidopsis thaliana

    PubMed Central

    Tsukamoto, Tatsuya

    2010-01-01

    Double fertilization, uniquely observed in plants, requires successful sperm cell delivery by the pollen tube to the female gametophyte, followed by migration, recognition and fusion of the two sperm cells with two female gametic cells. The female gametophyte not only regulates these steps but also controls the subsequent initiation of seed development. Previously, we reported that loss of LORELEI, which encodes a putative glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI)-anchored protein, in the female reproductive tissues causes a delay in initiation of seed development. From these studies, however, it was unclear if embryos derived from fertilization of lre-5 gametophytes continued to lag behind wild-type during seed development. Additionally, it was not determined if the delay in initiation of seed development had any lingering effects during seed germination. Finally, it was not known if loss of LORELEI function affects seedling development given that LORELEI is expressed in eight-day-old seedlings. Here, we showed that despite a delay in initiation, lre-5/lre-5 embryos recover, becoming equivalent to the developing wild-type embryos beginning at 72 hours after pollination. Additionally, lre-5/lre-5 seed germination, and seedling and root development are indistinguishable from wild-type indicating that loss of LORELEI is tolerated, at least under standard growth conditions, in vegetative tissues. PMID:21051955

  16. Loss of LORELEI function in the pistil delays initiation but does not affect embryo development in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Tsukamoto, Tatsuya; Palanivelu, Ravishankar

    2010-11-01

    Double fertilization, uniquely observed in plants, requires successful sperm cell delivery by the pollen tube to the female gametophyte, followed by migration, recognition and fusion of the two sperm cells with two female gametic cells. The female gametophyte not only regulates these steps but also controls the subsequent initiation of seed development. Previously, we reported that loss of LORELEI, which encodes a putative glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI)-anchored protein, in the female reproductive tissues causes a delay in initiation of seed development. From these studies, however, it was unclear if embryos derived from fertilization of lre-5 gametophytes continued to lag behind wild type during seed development. Additionally, it was not determined if the delay in initiation of seed development had any lingering effects during seed germination. Finally, it was not known if loss of LORELEI function affects seedling development given that LORELEI is expressed in eight-day-old seedlings. Here, we showed that despite a delay in initiation, lre-5/lre-5 embryos recover, becoming equivalent to the developing wild-type embryos beginning at 72 hours after pollination. Additionally, lre-5/lre-5 seed germination, and seedling and root development are indistinguishable from wild type indicating that loss of LORELEI is tolerated, at least under standard growth conditions, in vegetative tissues.

  17. Light intensity affects chlorophyll synthesis during greening process by metabolite signal from mitochondrial alternative oxidase in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Da-Wei; Yuan, Shu; Xu, Fei; Zhu, Feng; Yuan, Ming; Ye, Hua-Xun; Guo, Hong-Qing; Lv, Xin; Yin, Yanhai; Lin, Hong-Hui

    2016-01-01

    Although mitochondrial alternative oxidase (AOX) has been proposed to play essential roles in high light stress tolerance, the effects of AOX on chlorophyll synthesis are unclear. Previous studies indicated that during greening, chlorophyll accumulation was largely delayed in plants whose mitochondrial cyanide-resistant respiration was inhibited by knocking out nuclear encoded AOX gene. Here, we showed that this delay of chlorophyll accumulation was more significant under high light condition. Inhibition of cyanide-resistant respiration was also accompanied by the increase of plastid NADPH/NADP(+) ratio, especially under high light treatment which subsequently blocked the import of multiple plastidial proteins, such as some components of the photosynthetic electron transport chain, the Calvin-Benson cycle enzymes and malate/oxaloacetate shuttle components. Overexpression of AOX1a rescued the aox1a mutant phenotype, including the chlorophyll accumulation during greening and plastidial protein import. It thus suggests that light intensity affects chlorophyll synthesis during greening process by a metabolic signal, the AOX-derived plastidial NADPH/NADP(+) ratio change. Further, our results thus revealed a molecular mechanism of chloroplast-mitochondria interactions. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  18. Factors affecting the activation and inhibition of intracellular enzymes for degradation of 1,2 diamino benzene: kinetics and thermodynamic studies.

    PubMed

    P, Saranya; G, Sekaran

    2015-11-01

    Citrobacter freundii, the bacterium isolated from marine sediments was capable of degrading 1,2 diamino benzene (DAB), an endocrine disruptor. The mixed intracellular enzymes from C. freundii were extracted and purified. The mixed intracellular enzymes were used for the degradation of DAB and degree of degradation was evaluated in terms of pyruvic acid, the end product, formed. The variables such as effect of pH, temperature and metal ions on the degradation of DAB using mixed intracellular enzymes (MICE) were investigated. The maximum amount of pyruvic acid formed was found to be 569 ± 5 µg with 96% degradation efficiency at pH 7; temperature 25 °C; zinc nitrate 0.1 mM; and copper sulphate ions 0.15 mM. The stability of MICE at different temperatures and the interaction of MICE with metal ions were confirmed using FT-IR spectroscopy. The formation of pyruvic acid from degradation of DAB followed pseudo-second-order rate kinetics and it was a spontaneous, exothermic process. The activation energy of degradation of DAB by MICE was found to be 82.55 kJ/mol.

  19. Intra-periaqueductal grey microinjections of an imidazo[1,2-b]pyridazine derivative, DM2, affects rostral ventromedial medulla cell activity and shows antinociceptive effect.

    PubMed

    Palazzo, Enza; Rimoli, Maria Grazia; De Chiaro, Maria; Guida, Francesca; Melisi, Daniela; Curcio, Annalisa; de Novellis, Vito; Marabese, Ida; Rossi, Francesco; Abignente, Enrico; Maione, Sabatino

    2010-03-01

    The 6-methoxy-2-phenylimidazo[1,2-b]pyridazine-3-carboxylic acid, DM2, exerts anti-absence activity and blocks Cav3.1 channel, a T-type voltage-dependent Ca(2+) channel subtype, in vitro. The current study investigated the effect of intra-ventrolateral periaqueductal grey (VLPAG) administration of DM2 on formalin-induced nocifensive responses in rats. In addition, the effect of intra-VLPAG microinjection of DM2 on the ongoing and tail flick-related activities of rostral ventromedial medulla (RVM) cell population was also investigated. Formalin was injected subcutaneously into the dorsal surface of the hind paws of awake rats. We found that DM2 reduced nocifensive responses in the late phase of the formalin test. Moreover, in the RVM, the intra-VLPAG microinjection of DM2 reduced the ongoing and tail flick-related activity of the nociceptive ON cells, whereas it increased the ongoing activity and reduced the tail flick-induced pause of the antinociceptive OFF cells, consistent with antinociception. Behavioural and electrophysiological effects were reproduced by intra-VLPAG microinjection of ethosuximide, a conventional T-type Ca(2+) channel blocker. Finally, DM2 administration did not produce any adverse cardiovascular effects as blood pressure and heart rate remained unchanged. In conclusion, DM2 plays an analgesic role in vivo and changes RVM cell activity, consistent with antinociception. These effects were even more potent than those elicited by ethosuximide treatments. Copyright 2009 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. AtMYB44 regulates resistance to the green peach aphid and diamondback moth by activating EIN2-affected defences in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Lü, B-B; Li, X-J; Sun, W-W; Li, L; Gao, R; Zhu, Q; Tian, S-M; Fu, M-Q; Yu, H-L; Tang, X-M; Zhang, C-L; Dong, H-S

    2013-09-01

    Recently we showed that the transcription activator AtMYB44 regulates expression of EIN2, a gene essential for ethylene signalling and insect resistance, in Arabidopsis thaliana (Arabidopsis). To link the transactivation with insect resistance, we investigated the wild-type and atmyb44 mutant plants, genetically Complemented atmyb44 (Catmyb44) and AtMYB44-Overexpression Transgenic Arabidopsis (MYB44OTA). We found that AtMYB44 played a critical role in Arabidopsis resistance to the phloem-feeding generalist green peach aphid (Myzus persicae Sulzer) and leaf-chewing specialist caterpillar diamondback moth (Plutella xylostella L.). AtMYB44 was required not only for the development of constitutive resistance but also for the induction of resistance by both herbivorous insects. Levels of constitutive and herbivore-induced resistance were consistent with corresponding amounts of the AtMYB44 protein constitutively produced in MYB44OTA and induced by herbivory in Catmyb44. In both cases, AtMYB44 promoted EIN2 expression to a greater extent in MYB44OTA than in Catmyb44. However, AtMYB44-promoted EIN2 expression was arrested with reduced resistance levels in the EIN2-deficient Arabidopsis mutant ein2-1 and the MYB44OTA ein2-1 hybrid. In the different plant genotypes, only MYB44OTA constitutively displayed phloem-based defences, which are specific to phloem-feeding insects, and robust expression of genes involved in the biosynthesis of glucosinolates, which are the secondary plant metabolites known as deterrents to generalist herbivores. Phloem-based defences and glucosinolate-related gene expression were not detected in ein2-1 and MYB44OTA ein2-1. These results establish a genetic connection between the regulatory role of AtMYB44 in EIN2 expression and the development of Arabidopsis resistance to insects.

  1. Base-pair opening dynamics of the microRNA precursor pri-miR156a affect temperature-responsive flowering in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hee-Eun; Kim, Wanhui; Lee, Ae-Ree; Jin, Suhyun; Jun, A Rim; Kim, Nak-Kyoon; Lee, Joon-Hwa; Ahn, Ji Hoon

    2017-03-18

    Internal and environmental cues, including ambient temperature changes, regulate the timing of flowering in plants. Arabidopsis miR156 represses flowering and plays an important role in the regulation of temperature-responsive flowering. However, the molecular basis of miR156 processing at lower temperatures remains largely unknown. Here, we performed nuclear magnetic resonance studies to investigate the base-pair opening dynamics of model RNAs at 16 °C and investigated the in vivo effects of the mutant RNAs on temperature-responsive flowering. The A9C and A10CG mutations in the B5 bulge of the lower stem of pri-miR156a stabilized the C15∙G98 and U16∙A97 base-pairs at the cleavage site of pri-miR156a at 16 °C. Consistent with this, production of mature miR156 was severely affected in plants overexpressing the A9C and A10CG constructs and these plants exhibited almost no delay in flowering at 16 °C. The A10G and A9AC mutations did not strongly affect C15∙G98 and U16∙A97 base-pairs at 16 °C, and plants overexpressing A10G and A9AC mutants of miR156 produced more mature miR156 than plants overexpressing the A9C and A10CG mutants and showed a strong delay in flowering at 16 °C. Interestingly, the A9AC mutation had distinct effects on the opening dynamics of the C15∙G98 and U16∙A97 base-pairs between 16 °C and 23 °C, and plants expressing the A9AC mutant miR156 showed only a moderate delay in flowering at 16 °C. Based on these results, we propose that fine-tuning of the base-pair stability at the cleavage site is essential for efficient processing of pri-miR156a at a low temperature and for reduced flowering sensitivity to ambient temperature changes.

  2. The Arabidopsis thaliana AT PRP39-1 gene, encoding a tetratricopeptide repeat protein with similarity to the yeast pre-mRNA processing protein PRP39, affects flowering time.

    PubMed

    Wang, Cunxi; Tian, Qing; Hou, Zhenglin; Mucha, Mark; Aukerman, Milo; Olsen, Odd-Arne

    2007-08-01

    Flowering is regulated by a network integrated from four major pathways, including the photoperiod, vernalization, gibberellin, and autonomous pathways. RNA processing within the autonomous pathway is well known to regulate Arabidopsis thaliana flowering time. Here we identify a novel Arabidopsis gene, designated AT PRP39-1, that affects flowering time. Based on observations that homozygous at prp39-1 plants are late flowering under both long and short days and responsive to GA and vernalization treatment, we tentatively conclude that AT PRP39-1 may represent a new component of the autonomous pathway. Consistent with previous studies on genes of the autonomous pathway, knockout of AT PRP39-1 in Arabidopsis displays an upregulation of the steady state level of FLC, and simultaneous downregulation of FT and SOC1 transcript levels in adult tissues. AT PRP39-1 encodes a tetratricopeptide repeat protein with a similarity to a yeast mRNA processing protein Prp39p, suggesting that the involvement of these tetratricopeptide repeat proteins in RNA processing is conserved among yeast, human, and plants. Structure modeling suggests that AT PRP39-1 has two TPR superhelical domains suitable for target protein binding. We discuss how AT PRP39-1 may function in the control of flowering in the context of the autonomous pathway.

  3. 2-DE based proteomic analysis of Saccharomyces cerevisiae wild and K+ transport-affected mutant (trk1,2) strains at the growth exponential and stationary phases.

    PubMed

    Curto, Miguel; Valledor, Luis; Navarrete, Clara; Gutiérrez, Dolores; Sychrova, Hana; Ramos, José; Jorrin, Jesús

    2010-11-10

    By using a 2-DE based workflow, the proteome of wild and potassium transport mutant trk1,2 under optimal growth potassium concentration (50mM) has been analyzed. At the exponential and stationary phases, both strains showed similar growth, morphology potassium content, and Vmax of rubidium transport, the only difference found being the Km values for this potassium analogue transport, higher for the mutant (20mM) than for the wild (3-6mM) cells. Proteins were buffer-extracted, precipitated, solubilized, quantified, and subjected to 2-DE analysis in the 5-8 pH range. More differences in protein content (37-64mgg(-1) cell dry weight) and number of resolved spots (178-307) were found between growth phases than between strains. In all, 164 spots showed no differences between samples and a total of 105 were considered to be differential after ANOVA test. 171 proteins, corresponding to 71 unique gene products have been identified, this set being dominated by cytosolic species and glycolitic enzymes. The ranking of the more abundant spots revealed no differences between samples and indicated fermentative metabolism, and active cell wall biosynthesis, redox homeostasis, biosynthesis of amino acids, coenzymes, nucleotides, and RNA, and protein turnover, apart from cell division and growth. PCA analysis allowed the separation of growth phases (PC1 and 2) and strains at the stationary phase (PC3 and 4), but not at the exponential one. These results are also supported by clustering analysis. As a general tendency, a number of spots newly appeared at the stationary phase in wild type, and to a lesser extent, in the mutant. These up-accumulated spots corresponded to glycolitic enzymes, indicating a more active glucose catabolism, accompanied by an accumulation of methylglyoxal detoxification, and redox-homeostasis enzymes. Also, more extensive proteolysis was observed at the stationary phase with this resulting in an accumulation of low Mr protein species. Copyright © 2010

  4. Composition and Physiological Function of the Wax Layers Coating Arabidopsis Leaves: β-Amyrin Negatively Affects the Intracuticular Water Barrier1[W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Buschhaus, Christopher; Jetter, Reinhard

    2012-01-01

    Plants prevent dehydration by coating their aerial, primary organs with waxes. Wax compositions frequently differ between species, organs, and developmental stages, probably to balance limiting nonstomatal water loss with various other ecophysiological roles of surface waxes. To establish structure-function relationships, we quantified the composition and transpiration barrier properties of the gl1 mutant leaf waxes of Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) to the necessary spatial resolution. The waxes coating the upper and lower leaf surfaces had distinct compositions. Moreover, within the adaxial wax, the epicuticular layer contained more wax and a higher relative quantity of alkanes, whereas the intracuticular wax had a higher percentage of alcohols. The wax formed a barrier against nonstomatal water loss, where the outer layer contributed twice as much resistance as the inner layer. Based on this detailed description of Arabidopsis leaf waxes, structure-function relationships can now be established by manipulating one cuticle component and assessing the effect on cuticle functions. Next, we ectopically expressed the triterpenoid synthase gene AtLUP4 (for lupeol synthase4 or β-amyrin synthase) to compare water loss with and without added cuticular triterpenoids in Arabidopsis leaf waxes. β-Amyrin accumulated solely in the intracuticular wax, constituting up to 4% of this wax layer, without other concomitant changes of wax composition. This triterpenoid accumulation caused a significant reduction in the water barrier effectiveness of the intracuticular wax. PMID:22885935

  5. Arabidopsis MET1 cytosine methyltransferase mutants.

    PubMed Central

    Kankel, Mark W; Ramsey, Douglas E; Stokes, Trevor L; Flowers, Susan K; Haag, Jeremy R; Jeddeloh, Jeffrey A; Riddle, Nicole C; Verbsky, Michelle L; Richards, Eric J

    2003-01-01

    We describe the isolation and characterization of two missense mutations in the cytosine-DNA-methyltransferase gene, MET1, from the flowering plant Arabidopsis thaliana. Both missense mutations, which affect the catalytic domain of the protein, led to a global reduction of cytosine methylation throughout the genome. Surprisingly, the met1-2 allele, with the weaker DNA hypomethylation phenotype, alters a well-conserved residue in methyltransferase signature motif I. The stronger met1-1 allele caused late flowering and a heterochronic delay in the juvenile-to-adult rosette leaf transition. The distribution of late-flowering phenotypes in a mapping population segregating met1-1 indicates that the flowering-time phenotype is caused by the accumulation of inherited defects at loci unlinked to the met1 mutation. The delay in flowering time is due in part to the formation and inheritance of hypomethylated fwa epialleles, but inherited defects at other loci are likely to contribute as well. Centromeric repeat arrays hypomethylated in met1-1 mutants are partially remethylated when introduced into a wild-type background, in contrast to genomic sequences hypomethylated in ddm1 mutants. ddm1 met1 double mutants were constructed to further our understanding of the mechanism of DDM1 action and the interaction between two major genetic loci affecting global cytosine methylation levels in Arabidopsis. PMID:12663548

  6. The duration of time that beef cattle are fed a high-grain diet affects feed sorting behavior both before and after acute ruminal acidosis1,2.

    PubMed

    DeVries, T J; Schwaiger, T; Beauchemin, K A; Penner, G B

    2014-04-01

    The objective of this study was to determine how duration of time that cattle are fed a high-grain diet affects feed sorting, both before and after an episode of acute ruminal acidosis. Sixteen Angus heifers (261 ± 6.1 kg; BW ± SEM) were assigned to 1 of 4 blocks and fed a backgrounding (BG) diet (60% forage, DM basis). Within block, heifers were randomly assigned to 1 of 2 treatments differing in days fed a high-grain (HG; 9% forage, DM basis, fed ad libitum) diet before a ruminal acidosis challenge: 34 d for long adapted (LA) and 8 d for short adapted (SA). Ruminal acidosis was induced by restricting feed to 50% of DMI as a proportion of BW (determined individually for each heifer) for 24 h followed by an intraruminal infusion of ground barley at 10% of DMI as a proportion of BW measured before feed restriction. Feed and orts were sampled during the BG period, the first 26 d on the HG diet (only for LA cattle), the 8-d baseline (BASE) period, on the day of the ruminal acidosis challenge (CH), and during 2 consecutive 8-d recovery periods (REC1 and REC2) for each heifer and subjected to particle size analysis: 19-mm (long), 8-mm (medium), and 1.18-mm (short) screens and a pan (fine). On the BG diet, sorting for medium particles tended to be greater (104.2 vs. 102.1%; P = 0.07) for LA heifers than SA heifers, while sorting against short particles was greater (98.2 vs. 100.0%; P = 0.05) for LA heifers. During the first 26 d on the HG diet, LA cattle sorted for (P < 0.001) long (118.8%), medium (117.8%), and short (104.1%) particles and sorted against (P < 0.001) fine particles (45.3%). This sorting pattern was consistent for LA heifers during BASE period, CH day, and recovery periods, across which SA heifers exhibited less sorting (P ≤ 0.1). Greater duration of pH < 5.5 during the BASE period was associated with greater sorting for long particles (R(2) = 0.75, P = 0.01) in LA heifers and for long (R(2) = 0.49, P = 0.05) and medium (R(2) = 0.88, P < 0

  7. Trace concentrations of imazethapyr (IM) affect floral organs development and reproduction in Arabidopsis thaliana: IM-induced inhibition of key genes regulating anther and pollen biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Qian, Haifeng; Li, Yali; Sun, Chongchong; Lavoie, Michel; Xie, Jun; Bai, Xiaocui; Fu, Zhengwei

    2015-01-01

    Understanding how herbicides affect plant reproduction and growth is critical to develop herbicide toxicity model and refine herbicide risk assessment. Although our knowledge of herbicides toxicity mechanisms at the physiological and molecular level in plant vegetative phase has increased substantially in the last decades, few studies have addressed the herbicide toxicity problematic on plant reproduction. Here, we determined the long-term (4-8 weeks) effect of a chiral herbicide, imazethapyr (IM), which has been increasingly used in plant crops, on floral organ development and reproduction in the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana. More specifically, we followed the effect of two IM enantiomers (R- and S-IM) on floral organ structure, seed production, pollen viability and the transcription of key genes involved in anther and pollen development. The results showed that IM strongly inhibited the transcripts of genes regulating A. thaliana tapetum development (DYT1: DYSFUNCTIONAL TAPETUM 1), tapetal differentiation and function (TDF1: TAPETAL DEVELOPMENT AND FUNCTION1), and pollen wall formation and developments (AMS: ABORTED MICROSPORES, MYB103: MYB DOMAIN PROTEIN 103, MS1: MALE STERILITY 1, MS2: MALE STERILITY 2). Since DYT1 positively regulates 33 genes involved in cell-wall modification (such as, TDF1, AMS, MYB103, MS1, MS2) that can catalyze the breakdown of polysaccharides to facilitate anther dehiscence, the consistent decrease in the transcription of these genes after IM exposure should hamper anther opening as observed under scanning electron microscopy. The toxicity of IM on anther opening further lead to a decrease in pollen production and pollen viability. Furthermore, long-term IM exposure increased the number of apurinic/apyrimidinic sites (AP sites) in the DNA of A. thaliana and also altered the DNA of A. thaliana offspring grown in IM-free soils. Toxicity of IM on floral organs development and reproduction was generally higher in the presence of the R

  8. A Single Amino Acid Change in Turnip Crinkle Virus Movement Protein p8 Affects RNA Binding and Virulence on Arabidopsis thaliana

    PubMed Central

    Wobbe, Kristin K.; Akgoz, Muslum; Dempsey, D’Maris Amick; Klessig, Daniel F.

    1998-01-01

    Comparison of the symptoms caused by turnip crinkle virus strain M (TCV-M) and TCV-B infection of a resistant Arabidopsis thaliana line termed Di-17 demonstrates that TCV-B has a greater ability to spread in planta. This ability is due to a single amino acid change in the viral movement protein p8 and inversely correlates with p8 RNA binding affinity. PMID:9621099

  9. Differential tissue accumulation of 2,3,7,8-Tetrachlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxin in Arabidopsis thaliana affects plant chronology, lipid metabolism and seed yield.

    PubMed

    Hanano, Abdulsamie; Almousally, Ibrahem; Shaban, Mouhnad; Moursel, Nour; Shahadeh, AbdAlbaset; Alhajji, Eskander

    2015-08-11

    Dioxins are one of the most toxic groups of persistent organic pollutants. Their biotransmission through the food chain constitutes a potential risk for human health. Plants as principal actors in the food chain can play a determinant role in removing dioxins from the environment. Due to the lack of data on dioxin/plant research, this study sets out to determine few responsive reactions adopted by Arabidopsis plant towards 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD), the most toxic congener of dioxins. Using a high resolution gas chromatography/mass spectrometry, we demonstrated that Arabidopsis plant uptakes TCDD by the roots and accumulates it in the vegetative parts in a tissue-specific manner. TCDD mainly accumulated in rosette leaves and mature seeds and less in stem, flowers and immature siliques. Moreover, we observed that plants exposed to high doses of TCDD exhibited a delay in flowering and yielded fewer seeds of a reduced oil content with a low vitality. A particular focus on the plant fatty acid metabolism showed that TCDD caused a significant reduction in C18-unsaturated fatty acid level in plant tissues. Simultaneously, TCDD induced the expression of 9-LOX and 13-LOX genes and the formation of their corresponding hydroperoxides, 9- and 13-HPOD as well as 9- or 13-HPOT, derived from linoleic and linolenic acids, respectively. The current work highlights a side of toxicological effects resulting in the administration of 2,3,7,8-TCDD on the Arabidopsis plant. Similarly to animals, it seems that plants may accumulate TCDD in their lipids by involving few of the FA-metabolizing enzymes for sculpting a specific oxylipins "signature" typified to plant TCDD-tolerance. Together, our results uncover novel responses of Arabidopsis to dioxin, possibly emerging to overcome its toxicity.

  10. The Arabidopsis-related halophyte Thellungiella halophila: boron tolerance via boron complexation with metabolites?

    PubMed

    Lamdan, Netta Li; Attia, Ziv; Moran, Nava; Moshelion, Menachem

    2012-04-01

    Tolerance to boron (B) is still not completely understood. We tested here the hypothesis that Thellungiella halophila, an Arabidopsis thaliana-related 'extremophile' plant, with abundance of B in its natural environment, is tolerant to B, and examined the potential mechanisms of this tolerance. With 1-10 mm B applied ([B](ext)) to Thellungiella and Arabidopsis grown in hydroponics, the steady-state accumulated B concentration ([B](int)) in the root was below [B](ext), and was similar in both, suggesting both extrude B actively. Whether grown in soil or hydroponically, the shoot [B](int) was higher in Arabidopsis than in Thellungiella, suggesting more effective net B exclusion by Thellungiella root. Arabidopsis exhibited toxicity symptoms including reduced shoot fresh weight (FW), but Thellungiella was not affected, even at similar levels of shoot-accumulated [B](int) (about 10 to 40 mm B in 'shoot water'), suggesting additional B tolerance mechanism in Thellungiella shoot. At [B](ext) = 5 mm, the summed shoot concentration of the potentially B-binding polyhydroxyl metabolites (malic acid, fructose, glucose, sucrose and citric acid) in Arabidopsis was below [B](int) , but in Thellungiella it was over twofold higher than [B](int) , and therefore likely to allow appreciable 1:2 boron-metabolite complexation in the shoot. This, we suggest, is an important component of Thellungiella B tolerance mechanism.

  11. A Novel Arabidopsis Vacuolar Glucose Exporter Is Involved in Cellular Sugar Homeostasis and Affects the Composition of Seed Storage Compounds1[W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Poschet, Gernot; Hannich, Barbara; Raab, Sabine; Jungkunz, Isabel; Klemens, Patrick A.W.; Krueger, Stephan; Wic, Stefan; Neuhaus, H. Ekkehard; Büttner, Michael

    2011-01-01

    Subcellular sugar partitioning in plants is strongly regulated in response to developmental cues and changes in external conditions. Besides transitory starch, the vacuolar sugars represent a highly dynamic pool of instantly accessible metabolites that serve as energy source and osmoprotectant. Here, we present the molecular identification and functional characterization of the vacuolar glucose (Glc) exporter Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) Early Responsive to Dehydration-Like6 (AtERDL6). We demonstrate tonoplast localization of AtERDL6 in plants. In Arabidopsis, AtERDL6 expression is induced in response to factors that activate vacuolar Glc pools, like darkness, heat stress, and wounding. On the other hand, AtERDL6 transcript levels drop during conditions that trigger Glc accumulation in the vacuole, like cold stress and external sugar supply. Accordingly, sugar analyses revealed that Aterdl6 mutants have elevated vacuolar Glc levels and that Glc flux across the tonoplast is impaired under stress conditions. Interestingly, overexpressor lines indicated a very similar function for the ERDL6 ortholog Integral Membrane Protein from sugar beet (Beta vulgaris). Aterdl6 mutant plants display increased sensitivity against external Glc, and mutant seeds exhibit a 10% increase in seed weight due to enhanced levels of seed sugars, proteins, and lipids. Our findings underline the importance of vacuolar Glc export during the regulation of cellular Glc homeostasis and the composition of seed reserves. PMID:21984725

  12. A Mutation in Arabidopsis SEEDLING PLASTID DEVELOPMENT1 Affects Plastid Differentiation in Embryo-Derived Tissues during Seedling Growth1[W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Ruppel, Nicholas J.; Logsdon, Charles A.; Whippo, Craig W.; Inoue, Kentaro; Hangarter, Roger P.

    2011-01-01

    Oilseed plants like Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) develop green photosynthetically active embryos. Upon seed maturation, the embryonic chloroplasts degenerate into a highly reduced plastid type called the eoplast. Upon germination, eoplasts redifferentiate into chloroplasts and other plastid types. Here, we describe seedling plastid development1 (spd1), an Arabidopsis seedling albino mutant capable of producing normal green vegetative tissues. Mutant seedlings also display defects in etioplast and amyloplast development. Precocious germination of spd1 embryos showed that the albino seedling phenotype of spd1 was dependent on the passage of developing embryos through the degreening and dehydration stages of seed maturation, suggesting that SPD1 is critical during eoplast development or early stages of eoplast redifferentiation. The SPD1 gene was found to encode a protein containing a putative chloroplast-targeting sequence in its amino terminus and also domains common to P-loop ATPases. Chloroplast localization of the SPD1 protein was confirmed by targeting assays in vivo and in vitro. Although the exact function of SPD1 remains to be defined, our findings reveal aspects of plastid development unique to embryo-derived cells. PMID:21045120

  13. Overexpression of ALDH10A8 and ALDH10A9 Genes Provides Insight into Their Role in Glycine Betaine Synthesis and Affects Primary Metabolism in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Missihoun, Tagnon D; Willée, Eva; Guegan, Jean-Paul; Berardocco, Solenne; Shafiq, Muhammad R; Bouchereau, Alain; Bartels, Dorothea

    2015-09-01

    Betaine aldehyde dehydrogenases oxidize betaine aldehyde to glycine betaine in species that accumulate glycine betaine as a compatible solute under stress conditions. In contrast, the physiological function of betaine aldehyde dehydrogenase genes is at present unclear in species that do not accumulate glycine betaine, such as Arabidopsis thaliana. To address this question, we overexpressed the Arabidopsis ALDH10A8 and ALDH10A9 genes, which were identified to code for betaine aldehyde dehydrogenases, in wild-type A. thaliana. We analysed changes in metabolite contents of transgenic plants in comparison with the wild type. Using exogenous or endogenous choline, our results indicated that ALDH10A8 and ALDH10A9 are involved in the synthesis of glycine betaine in Arabidopsis. Choline availability seems to be a factor limiting glycine betaine synthesis. Moreover, the contents of diverse metabolites including sugars (glucose and fructose) and amino acids were altered in fully developed transgenic plants compared with the wild type. The plant metabolic response to salt and the salt stress tolerance were impaired only in young transgenic plants, which exhibited a delayed growth of the seedlings early after germination. Our results suggest that a balanced expression of the betaine aldehyde dehydrogenase genes is important for early growth of A. thaliana seedlings and for salt stress mitigation in young seedlings.

  14. Acute morphine affects the rat circadian clock via rhythms of phosphorylated ERK1/2 and GSK3β kinases and Per1 expression in the rat suprachiasmatic nucleus

    PubMed Central

    Pačesová, Dominika; Volfová, Barbora; Červená, Kateřina; Hejnová, Lucie; Novotný, Jiří; Bendová, Zdeňka

    2015-01-01

    Background and Purpose Opioids affect the circadian clock and may change the timing of many physiological processes. This study was undertaken to investigate the daily changes in sensitivity of the circadian pacemaker to an analgesic dose of morphine, and to uncover a possible interplay between circadian and opioid signalling. Experimental Approach A time-dependent effect of morphine (1 mg·kg−1, i.p.) applied either during the day or during the early night was followed, and the levels of phosphorylated ERK1/2, GSK3β, c-Fos and Per genes were assessed by immunohistochemistry and in situ hybridization. The effect of morphine pretreatment on light-induced pERK and c-Fos was examined, and day/night difference in activity of opioid receptors was evaluated by [35S]-GTPγS binding assay. Key Results Morphine stimulated a rise in pERK1/2 and pGSK3β levels in the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) when applied during the day but significantly reduced both kinases when applied during the night. Morphine at night transiently induced Period1 but not Period2 in the SCN and did not attenuate the light-induced level of pERK1/2 and c-Fos in the SCN. The activity of all three principal opioid receptors was high during the day but decreased significantly at night, except for the δ receptor. Finally, we demonstrated daily profiles of pERK1/2 and pGSK3β levels in the rat ventrolateral and dorsomedial SCN. Conclusions and Implications Our data suggest that the phase-shifting effect of opioids may be mediated via post-translational modification of clock proteins by means of activated ERK1/2 and GSK3β. PMID:25828914

  15. The Arabidopsis U12-Type Spliceosomal Protein U11/U12-31K Is Involved in U12 Intron Splicing via RNA Chaperone Activity and Affects Plant Development[C][W

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Won Yong; Jung, Hyun Ju; Kwak, Kyung Jin; Kim, Min Kyung; Oh, Seung Han; Han, Yeon Soo; Kang, Hunseung

    2010-01-01

    U12 introns are removed from precursor-mRNA by a U12 intron-specific spliceosome that contains U11 and U12 small nuclear ribonucleoproteins. Although several proteins unique to the U12-type spliceosome have been identified, the manner by which they affect U12-dependent intron splicing as well as plant growth and development remain largely unknown. Here, we assessed the role of U11/U12-31K, a U12-type spliceosomal protein in Arabidopsis thaliana. T-DNA–tagged homozygote lines for U11/U12-31K could not be obtained, and heterozygote mutants were defective for seed maturation, indicating that U11/U12-31K is essential for the normal development of Arabidopsis. Knockdown of U11/U12-31K by artificial microRNA caused a defect in proper U12 intron splicing, resulting in abnormal stem growth and development of Arabidopsis. This defect in proper splicing was not restricted to specific U12-type introns, but most U12 intron splicing was influenced by U11/U12-31K. The stunted inflorescence stem growth was recovered by exogenously applied gibberellic acid (GA), but not by cytokinin, auxin, or brassinosteroid. GA metabolism-related genes were highly downregulated in U11/U12-31K knockdown plants. Importantly, U11/U12-31K was determined to harbor RNA chaperone activity. We propose that U11/U12-31K is an RNA chapereone that is indispensible for proper U12 intron splicing and for normal growth and development of plants. PMID:21148817

  16. Constitutive expression of two apple (Malus x domestica Borkh.) homolog genes of LIKE HETEROCHROMATIN PROTEIN1 affects flowering time and whole-plant growth in transgenic Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Mimida, Naozumi; Kidou, Shin-Ichiro; Kotoda, Nobuhiro

    2007-09-01

    Fruit trees, such as apple (Malus x domestica Borkh.), are woody perennial plants with a long juvenile phase. The biological analysis for the regulation of flowering time provides insights into the reduction of juvenile phase and the acceleration of breeding in fruit trees. In Arabidopsis, LIKE HETEROCHROMATIN PROTEIN1 (LHP1) is involved in epigenetic silencing of the target genes such as flowering genes. We isolated and characterized twin apple LHP1 homolog genes, MdLHP1a and MdLHP1b. These genes may have been generated as a result of ancient genome duplication. Although the putative MdLHP1 proteins showed lower similarity to any other known plant LHP1 homologs, a chromo domain, a chromo shadow domain, and the nuclear localization signal motifs were highly conserved among them. RT-PCR analysis showed that MdLHP1a and MdLHP1b were expressed constantly in developing shoot apices of apple trees throughout the growing season. Constitutive expression of MdLHP1a or MdLHP1b could compensate for the pleiotropic phenotype of lhp1/tfl2 mutant, suggesting that apple LHP1 homolog genes are involved in the regulation of flowering time and whole-plant growth. Based on these results, LHP1 homolog genes might have rapidly evolved among plant species, but the protein functions were conserved, at least between Arabidopsis and apple.

  17. AtrbohD and AtrbohF positively regulate abscisic acid-inhibited primary root growth by affecting Ca2+ signalling and auxin response of roots in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Jiao, Yiheng; Sun, Lirong; Song, Yalin; Wang, Limin; Liu, Liping; Zhang, Liyue; Liu, Bo; Li, Ning; Miao, Chen; Hao, Fushun

    2013-11-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) originating from the NADPH oxidases AtrbohD and AtrbohF play an important role in abscisic acid (ABA)-inhibited primary root growth in Arabidopsis. However, the mechanisms underlying this process remain elusive. In this study, the double mutant atrbohD1/F1 and atrbohD2/F2, in which both AtrbohD and AtrbohF were disrupted, were less sensitive to ABA suppression of root cell elongation than wild-type (WT) plants. Furthermore, the double mutants showed impaired ABA responses in roots, including ROS generation, cytosolic Ca(2+) increases, and activation of plasma membrane Ca(2+)-permeable channels compared with WT. Exogenous H2O2 can activate the Ca(2+) currents in roots of atrbohD1/F1. In addition, exogenous application of the auxin transport inhibitor naphthylphthalamic acid effectively promoted ABA inhibition of root growth of the mutants relative to that of WT. The ABA-induced decreases in auxin sensitivity of the root tips were more pronounced in WT than in atrbohD1/F1. These findings suggest that both AtrbohD and AtrbohF are essential for ABA-promoted ROS production in roots. ROS activate Ca(2+) signalling and reduce auxin sensitivity of roots, thus positively regulating ABA-inhibited primary root growth in Arabidopsis.

  18. An S18 ribosomal protein gene copy at the Arabidopsis PFL locus affects plant development by its specific expression in meristems.

    PubMed Central

    Van Lijsebettens, M; Vanderhaeghen, R; De Block, M; Bauw, G; Villarroel, R; Van Montagu, M

    1994-01-01

    In Arabidopsis, mutation at PFL causes pointed first leaves, reduced fresh weight and growth retardation. We have cloned the wild-type PFL gene by T-DNA tagging, and demonstrate that it complements the mutant phenotype. PFL codes for ribosomal protein S18, based on the high homology with rat S18 and on purification of S18-equivalent peptides from plant ribosomes. pfl represents the first mutation in eukaryotic S18 proteins or their S13 prokaryotic counterparts, involved in translation initiation. Arabidopsis contains three S18 gene copies dispersed in the genetic map; they are all transcribed and code for completely identical proteins. No transcript is detected from the mutated gene, S18A. The activity of the S18A promoter is restricted to meristems, with a markedly high expression at the embryonic heart stage, and to wounding sites. This means that plants activate an extra copy of this ribosomal protein gene in tissues with cell division activity. We postulate that in meristematic tissues plants use transcriptional control to synthesize extra ribosomes to increase translational efficiency. In analogy with this, an additional, developmentally regulated gene copy might be expected for all ribosomal proteins. Images PMID:7913892

  19. Lack of FTSH4 Protease Affects Protein Carbonylation, Mitochondrial Morphology, and Phospholipid Content in Mitochondria of Arabidopsis: New Insights into a Complex Interplay.

    PubMed

    Smakowska, Elwira; Skibior-Blaszczyk, Renata; Czarna, Malgorzata; Kolodziejczak, Marta; Kwasniak-Owczarek, Malgorzata; Parys, Katarzyna; Funk, Christiane; Janska, Hanna

    2016-08-01

    FTSH4 is one of the inner membrane-embedded ATP-dependent metalloproteases in mitochondria of Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana). In mutants impaired to express FTSH4, carbonylated proteins accumulated and leaf morphology was altered when grown under a short-day photoperiod, at 22°C, and a long-day photoperiod, at 30°C. To provide better insight into the function of FTSH4, we compared the mitochondrial proteomes and oxyproteomes of two ftsh4 mutants and wild-type plants grown under conditions inducing the phenotypic alterations. Numerous proteins from various submitochondrial compartments were observed to be carbonylated in the ftsh4 mutants, indicating a widespread oxidative stress. One of the reasons for the accumulation of carbonylated proteins in ftsh4 was the limited ATP-dependent proteolytic capacity of ftsh4 mitochondria, arising from insufficient ATP amount, probably as a result of an impaired oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS), especially complex V. In ftsh4, we further observed giant, spherical mitochondria coexisting among normal ones. Both effects, the increased number of abnormal mitochondria and the decreased stability/activity of the OXPHOS complexes, were probably caused by the lower amount of the mitochondrial membrane phospholipid cardiolipin. We postulate that the reduced cardiolipin content in ftsh4 mitochondria leads to perturbations within the OXPHOS complexes, generating more reactive oxygen species and less ATP, and to the deregulation of mitochondrial dynamics, causing in consequence the accumulation of oxidative damage.

  20. Arabidopsis acyl-CoA-binding proteins ACBP4 and ACBP5 are subcellularly localized to the cytosol and ACBP4 depletion affects membrane lipid composition.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Shi; Li, Hong-Ye; Zhang, Jiao-Ping; Chan, Suk-Wah; Chye, Mee-Len

    2008-12-01

    In Arabidopsis thaliana, acyl-CoA-binding proteins (ACBPs) are encoded by six genes, and they display varying affinities for acyl-CoA esters. Recombinant ACBP4 and ACBP5 have been shown to bind oleoyl-CoA esters in vitro. In this study, the subcellular localizations of ACBP4 and ACBP5 were determined by biochemical fractionation followed by western blot analyses using anti-ACBP4 and anti-ACBP5 antibodies and immuno-electron microscopy. Confocal microscopy of autofluorescence-tagged ACBP4 and ACBP5, expressed transiently in onion epidermal cells and in transgenic Arabidopsis, confirmed their expression in the cytosol. Taken together, ACBP4 and ACBP5 are available in the cytosol to bind and transfer cytosolic oleoyl-CoA esters. Lipid profile analysis further revealed that an acbp4 knockout mutant showed decreases in membrane lipids (digalactosyldiacylglycerol, monogalactosyldiacylglycerol, phosphatidylcholine, phosphatidylethanolamine and phosphatidylinositol) while acbp4-complemented lines attained levels similar to wild type, suggesting that ACBP4 plays a role in the biosynthesis of membrane lipids including galactolipids and phospholipids.

  1. Ectopic Expression of a Maize Hybrid Down-Regulated Gene ZmARF25 Decreases Organ Size by Affecting Cellular Proliferation in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Meng, Lingxue; Xing, Jiewen; Wang, Tianya; Yang, Hua; Yao, Yingyin; Peng, Huiru; Hu, Zhaorong; Sun, Qixin; Ni, Zhongfu

    2014-01-01

    Heterosis is associated with differential gene expression between hybrids and their parental lines, and the genes involved in cell proliferation played important roles. AtARF2 is a general cell proliferation repressor in Arabidopsis. In our previous study, two homologues (ZmARF10 and ZmARF25) of AtARF2 were identified in maize, but their relationship with heterosis was not elucidated. Here, the expression patterns of ZmARF10 and ZmARF25 in seedling leaves of maize hybrids and their parental lines were analyzed. The results of qRT-PCR exhibited that ZmARF25 was down-regulated in leaf basal region of hybrids. Moreover, overexpression of ZmARF25 led to reduced organ size in Arabidopsis, which was mainly due to the decrease in cell number, not cell size. In addition, the cell proliferation related genes AtANT, AtGIF1 and AtGRF5 were down-regulated in 35S::ZmARF25 transgenic lines. Collectively, we proposed that the down-regulation of ZmARF25 in maize hybrid may accelerate cell proliferation and promote leaf development, which, in turn, contributes to the observed leaf size heterosis in maize. PMID:24756087

  2. The circadian clock-associated small GTPase LIGHT INSENSITIVE PERIOD1 suppresses light-controlled endoreplication and affects tolerance to salt stress in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Terecskei, Kata; Tóth, Réka; Gyula, Péter; Kevei, Eva; Bindics, János; Coupland, George; Nagy, Ferenc; Kozma-Bognár, László

    2013-01-01

    Circadian clocks are biochemical timers regulating many physiological and molecular processes according to the day/night cycle. The small GTPase LIGHT INSENSITIVE PERIOD1 (LIP1) is a circadian clock-associated protein that regulates light input to the clock. In the absence of LIP1, the effect of light on free-running period length is much reduced. Here, we show that in addition to suppressing red and blue light-mediated photomorphogenesis, LIP1 is also required for light-controlled inhibition of endoreplication and tolerance to salt stress in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana). We demonstrate that in the processes of endoreplication and photomorphogenesis, LIP1 acts downstream of the red and blue light photoreceptors phytochrome B and cryptochromes. Manipulation of the subcellular distribution of LIP1 revealed that the circadian function of LIP1 requires nuclear localization of the protein. Our data collectively suggest that LIP1 influences several signaling cascades and that its role in the entrainment of the circadian clock is independent from the other pleiotropic effects. Since these functions of LIP1 are important for the early stages of development or under conditions normally experienced by germinating seedlings, we suggest that LIP1 is a regulator of seedling establishment.

  3. Altered expression of cytosolic/nuclear HSC70-1 molecular chaperone affects development and abiotic stress tolerance in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Cazalé, Anne-Claire; Clément, Mathilde; Chiarenza, Serge; Roncato, Marie-Anne; Pochon, Nathalie; Creff, Audrey; Marin, Elena; Leonhardt, Nathalie; Noël, Laurent D

    2009-01-01

    Molecular chaperones of the heat shock cognate 70 kDa (HSC70) family are highly conserved in all living organisms and assist nascent protein folding in normal physiological conditions as well as in biotic and abiotic stress conditions. In the absence of specific inhibitors or viable knockout mutants, cytosolic/nuclear HSC70-1 overexpression (OE) and mutants in the HSC70 co-chaperone SGT1 (suppressor of G(2)/M allele of skp1) were used as genetic tools to identify HSC70/SGT1 functions in Arabidopsis development and abiotic stress responses. HSC70-1 OE caused a reduction in root and shoot meristem activities, thus explaining the dwarfism of those plants. In addition, HSC70-1 OE did not impair auxin-dependent phenotypes, suggesting that SGT1 functions previously identified in auxin signalling are HSC70 independent. While responses to abiotic stimuli such as UV-C exposure, phosphate starvation, or seedling de-etiolation were not perturbed by HSC70-1 OE, it specifically conferred gamma-ray hypersensitivity and tolerance to salt, cadmium (Cd), and arsenic (As). Cd and As perception was not perturbed, but plants overexpressing HSC70-1 accumulated less Cd, thus providing a possible molecular explanation for their tolerance phenotype. In summary, genetic evidence is provided for HSC70-1 involvement in a limited set of physiological processes, illustrating the essential and yet specific functions of this chaperone in development and abiotic stress responses in Arabidopsis.

  4. AtOMA1 Affects the OXPHOS System and Plant Growth in Contrast to Other Newly Identified ATP-Independent Proteases in Arabidopsis Mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Migdal, Iwona; Skibior-Blaszczyk, Renata; Heidorn-Czarna, Malgorzata; Kolodziejczak, Marta; Garbiec, Arnold; Janska, Hanna

    2017-01-01

    Compared with yeast, our knowledge on members of the ATP-independent plant mitochondrial proteolytic machinery is rather poor. In the present study, using confocal microscopy and immunoblotting, we proved that homologs of yeast Oma1, Atp23, Imp1, Imp2, and Oct1 proteases are localized in Arabidopsis mitochondria. We characterized these components of the ATP-independent proteolytic system as well as the earlier identified protease, AtICP55, with an emphasis on their significance in plant growth and functionality in the OXPHOS system. A functional complementation assay demonstrated that out of all the analyzed proteases, only AtOMA1 and AtICP55 could substitute for a lack of their yeast counterparts. We did not observe any significant developmental or morphological changes in plants lacking the studied proteases, either under optimal growth conditions or after exposure to stress, with the only exception being retarded root growth in oma1-1, thus implying that the absence of a single mitochondrial ATP-independent protease is not critical for Arabidopsis growth and development. We did not find any evidence indicating a clear functional complementation of the missing protease by any other protease at the transcript or protein level. Studies on the impact of the analyzed proteases on mitochondrial bioenergetic function revealed that out of all the studied mutants, only oma1-1 showed differences in activities and amounts of OXPHOS proteins. Among all the OXPHOS disorders found in oma1-1, the complex V deficiency is distinctive because it is mainly associated with decreased catalytic activity and not correlated with complex abundance, which has been observed in the case of supercomplex I + III2 and complex I deficiencies. Altogether, our study indicates that despite the presence of highly conservative homologs, the mitochondrial ATP-independent proteolytic system is not functionally conserved in plants as compared with yeast. Our findings also highlight the importance of

  5. Analysis of the Metabolic Pathways Affected by Poly(γ-glutamic Acid) in Arabidopsis thaliana Based on GeneChip Microarray.

    PubMed

    Xu, Zongqi; Lei, Peng; Feng, Xiaohai; Li, Sha; Xu, Hong

    2016-08-17

    Plant growth is promoted by poly(γ-glutamic acid) (γ-PGA). However, the molecular mechanism underlying such promotion is not yet well understood. Therefore, we used GeneChip microarrays to explore the effects of γ-PGA on gene transcription in Arabidopsis thaliana. Our results revealed 299 genes significantly regulated by γ-PGA. These differently expressed genes participate mainly in metabolic and cellular processes and in stimuli responses. The metabolic pathways linked to these differently expressed genes were also investigated. A total of 64 of the 299 differently expressed genes were shown to be directly involved in 24 pathways such as brassinosteroid biosynthesis, α-linolenic acid metabolism, phenylpropanoid biosynthesis, and nitrogen metabolism, all of which were influenced by γ-PGA. The analysis demonstrated that γ-PGA promoted nitrogen assimilation and biosynthesis of brassinosteroids, jasmonic acid, and lignins, providing a better explanation for why γ-PGA promotes growth and enhances stress tolerance in plants.

  6. Targeted enhancement of glutamate-to-γ-aminobutyrate conversion in Arabidopsis seeds affects carbon-nitrogen balance and storage reserves in a development-dependent manner.

    PubMed

    Fait, Aaron; Nesi, Adriano Nunes; Angelovici, Ruthie; Lehmann, Martin; Pham, Phuong Anh; Song, Luhua; Haslam, Richard P; Napier, Johnathan A; Galili, Gad; Fernie, Alisdair R

    2011-11-01

    In seeds, glutamate decarboxylase (GAD) operates at the metabolic nexus between carbon and nitrogen metabolism by catalyzing the unidirectional decarboxylation of glutamate to form γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA). To elucidate the regulatory role of GAD in seed development, we generated Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) transgenic plants expressing a truncated GAD from Petunia hybrida missing the carboxyl-terminal regulatory Ca(2+)-calmodulin-binding domain under the transcriptional regulation of the seed maturation-specific phaseolin promoter. Dry seeds of the transgenic plants accumulated considerable amounts of GABA, and during desiccation the content of several amino acids increased, although not glutamate or proline. Dry transgenic seeds had higher protein content than wild-type seeds but lower amounts of the intermediates of glycolysis, glycerol and malate. The total fatty acid content of the transgenic seeds was 50% lower than in the wild type, while acyl-coenzyme A accumulated in the transgenic seeds. Labeling experiments revealed altered levels of respiration in the transgenic seeds, and fractionation studies indicated reduced incorporation of label in the sugar and lipid fractions extracted from transgenic seeds. Comparative transcript profiling of the dry seeds supported the metabolic data. Cellular processes up-regulated at the transcript level included the tricarboxylic acid cycle, fatty acid elongation, the shikimate pathway, tryptophan metabolism, nitrogen-carbon remobilization, and programmed cell death. Genes involved in the regulation of germination were similarly up-regulated. Taken together, these results indicate that the GAD-mediated conversion of glutamate to GABA during seed development plays an important role in balancing carbon and nitrogen metabolism and in storage reserve accumulation.

  7. Chlorophyll Synthase under Epigenetic Surveillance Is Critical for Vitamin E Synthesis, and Altered Expression Affects Tocopherol Levels in Arabidopsis1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Chunyu; Zhang, Wei; Ren, Guodong; Li, Delin; Cahoon, Rebecca E.; Chen, Ming; Zhou, Yongming; Yu, Bin

    2015-01-01

    Chlorophyll synthase catalyzes the final step in chlorophyll biosynthesis: the esterification of chlorophyllide with either geranylgeranyl diphosphate or phytyl diphosphate (PDP). Recent studies have pointed to the involvement of chlorophyll-linked reduction of geranylgeranyl by geranylgeranyl reductase as a major pathway for the synthesis of the PDP precursor of tocopherols. This indirect pathway of PDP synthesis suggests a key role of chlorophyll synthase in tocopherol production to generate the geranylgeranyl-chlorophyll substrate for geranylgeranyl reductase. In this study, contributions of chlorophyll synthase to tocopherol formation in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) were explored by disrupting and altering expression of the corresponding gene CHLOROPHYLL SYNTHASE (CHLSYN; At3g51820). Leaves from the homozygous chlysyn1-1 null mutant were nearly devoid of tocopherols, whereas seeds contained only approximately 25% of wild-type tocopherol levels. Leaves of RNA interference lines with partial suppression of CHLSYN displayed marked reductions in chlorophyll but up to a 2-fold increase in tocopherol concentrations. Cauliflower mosaic virus35S-mediated overexpression of CHLSYN unexpectedly caused a cosuppression phenotype at high frequencies accompanied by strongly reduced chlorophyll content and increased tocopherol levels. This phenotype and the associated detection of CHLSYN-derived small interfering RNAs were reversed with CHLSYN overexpression in rna-directed rna polymerase6 (rdr6), which is defective in RNA-dependent RNA polymerase6, a key enzyme in sense transgene-induced small interfering RNA production. CHLSYN overexpression in rdr6 had little effect on chlorophyll content but resulted in up to a 30% reduction in tocopherol levels in leaves. These findings show that altered CHLSYN expression impacts tocopherol levels and also, show a strong epigenetic surveillance of CHLSYN to control chlorophyll and tocopherol synthesis. PMID:26048882

  8. HAG3, a Histone Acetyltransferase, Affects UV-B Responses by Negatively Regulating the Expression of DNA Repair Enzymes and Sunscreen Content in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Fina, Julieta P; Casati, Paula

    2015-07-01

    Histone acetylation is regulated by histone acetyltransferases and deacetylases. In Arabidopsis, there are 12 histone acetyltransferases and 18 deacetylases. Histone acetyltransferases are organized in four families: the GNAT/HAG, the MYST, the p300/CBP and the TAFII250 families. Previously, we demonstrated that Arabidopsis mutants in the two members of the MYST acetyltransferase family show increased DNA damage after UV-B irradiation. To investigate further the role of other histone acetyltransferases in UV-B responses, a putative role for enzymes of the GNAT family, HAG1, HAG2 and HAG3, was analyzed. HAG transcripts are not UV-B regulated; however, hag3 RNA interference (RNAi) transgenic plants show a lower inhibition of leaf and root growth by UV-B, higher levels of UV-B-absorbing compounds and less UV-B-induced DNA damage than Wassilewskija (Ws) plants, while hag1 RNAi transgenic plants and hag2 mutants do not show significant differences from wild-type plants. Transcripts for UV-B-regulated genes are highly expressed under control conditions in the absence of UV-B in hag3 RNAi transgenic plants, suggesting that the higher UV-B tolerance may be due to increased levels of proteins that participate in UV-B responses. Together, our data provide evidence that HAG3, directly or indirectly, participates in UV-B-induced DNA damage repair and signaling. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Japanese Society of Plant Physiologists. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  9. Glyphosate-induced oxidative stress in Arabidopsis thaliana affecting peroxisomal metabolism and triggers activity in the oxidative phase of the pentose phosphate pathway (OxPPP) involved in NADPH generation.

    PubMed

    de Freitas-Silva, Larisse; Rodríguez-Ruiz, Marta; Houmani, Hayet; da Silva, Luzimar Campos; Palma, José M; Corpas, Francisco J

    2017-08-31

    Glyphosate is a broad-spectrum systemic herbicide used worldwide. In susceptible plants, glyphosate affects the shikimate pathway and reduces aromatic amino acid synthesis. Using Arabidopsis seedlings grown in the presence of 20μM glyphosate, we analyzed H2O2, ascorbate, glutathione (GSH) and protein oxidation content as well as antioxidant catalase, superoxide dismutase (SOD) and ascorbate-glutathione cycle enzyme activity. We also examined the principal NADPH-generating system components, including glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PDH), 6-phosphogluconate dehydrogenase (6PGDH), NADP-malic enzyme (NADP-ME) and NADP-isocitrate dehydrogenase (NADP-ICDH). Glyphosate caused a drastic reduction in growth parameters and an increase in protein oxidation. The herbicide also resulted in an overall increase in GSH content, antioxidant enzyme activity (catalase and all enzymatic components of the ascorbate-glutathione cycle) in addition to the two oxidative phase enzymes, G6PDH and 6PGDH, in the pentose phosphate pathway involved in NADPH generation. In this study, we provide new evidence on the participation of G6PDH and 6PGDH in the response to oxidative stress induced by glyphosate in Arabidopsis, in which peroxisomal enzymes, such as catalase and glycolate oxidase, are positively affected. We suggest that the NADPH provided by the oxidative phase of the pentose phosphate pathway (OxPPP) should serve to maintain glutathione reductase (GR) activity, thus preserving and regenerating the intracellular GSH pool under glyphosate-induced stress. It is particularly remarkable that the 6PGDH activity was unaffected by pro-oxidant and nitrating molecules such as H202, nitric oxide or peroxynitrite. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  10. Changes in the effective gravitational field strength affect the state of phosphorylation of stress-related proteins in callus cultures of Arabidopsis thaliana

    PubMed Central

    Barjaktarović, Žarko; Schütz, Wolfgang; Madlung, Johannes; Fladerer, Claudia; Nordheim, Alfred; Hampp, Rüdiger

    2009-01-01

    In a recent study it was shown that callus cell cultures of Arabidopsis thaliana respond to changes in gravitational field strengths by changes in protein expression. Using ESI-MS/MS for proteins with differential abundance after separation by 2D-PAGE, 28 spots which changed reproducibly and significantly in amount (P <0.05) after 2 h of hypergravity (18 up-regulated, 10 down-regulated) could be identified. The corresponding proteins were largely involved in stress responses, including the detoxification of reactive oxygen species (ROS). In the present study, these investigations are extended to phosphorylated proteins. For this purpose, callus cell cultures of Arabidopsis thaliana were exposed to hypergravity (8 g) and simulated weightlessness (random positioning; RP) for up to 30 min, a period of time which yielded the most reliable data. The first changes, however, were visible as early as 10 min after the start of treatment. In comparison to 1 g controls, exposure to hypergravity resulted in 18 protein spots, and random positioning in 25, respectively, with increased/decreased signal intensity by at least 2-fold (P <0.05). Only one spot (alanine aminotransferase) responded the same way under both treatments. After 30 min of RP, four spots appeared, which could not be detected in control samples. Among the protein spots altered in phosphorylation, it was possible to identify 24 from those responding to random positioning and 12 which responded to 8 g. These 12 proteins (8 g) are partly (5 out of 12) the same as those changed in expression after exposure to 2 h of hypergravity. The respective proteins are involved in scavenging and detoxification of ROS (32%), primary metabolism (20.5%), general signalling (14.7%), protein translation and proteolysis (14.7%), and ion homeostasis (8.8%). Together with our recent data on protein expression, it is assumed that changes in gravitational fields induce the production of ROS. Our data further indicate that responses

  11. Changes in the effective gravitational field strength affect the state of phosphorylation of stress-related proteins in callus cultures of Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Barjaktarović, Zarko; Schütz, Wolfgang; Madlung, Johannes; Fladerer, Claudia; Nordheim, Alfred; Hampp, Rüdiger

    2009-01-01

    In a recent study it was shown that callus cell cultures of Arabidopsis thaliana respond to changes in gravitational field strengths by changes in protein expression. Using ESI-MS/MS for proteins with differential abundance after separation by 2D-PAGE, 28 spots which changed reproducibly and significantly in amount (P <0.05) after 2 h of hypergravity (18 up-regulated, 10 down-regulated) could be identified. The corresponding proteins were largely involved in stress responses, including the detoxification of reactive oxygen species (ROS). In the present study, these investigations are extended to phosphorylated proteins. For this purpose, callus cell cultures of Arabidopsis thaliana were exposed to hypergravity (8 g) and simulated weightlessness (random positioning; RP) for up to 30 min, a period of time which yielded the most reliable data. The first changes, however, were visible as early as 10 min after the start of treatment. In comparison to 1 g controls, exposure to hypergravity resulted in 18 protein spots, and random positioning in 25, respectively, with increased/decreased signal intensity by at least 2-fold (P <0.05). Only one spot (alanine aminotransferase) responded the same way under both treatments. After 30 min of RP, four spots appeared, which could not be detected in control samples. Among the protein spots altered in phosphorylation, it was possible to identify 24 from those responding to random positioning and 12 which responded to 8 g. These 12 proteins (8 g) are partly (5 out of 12) the same as those changed in expression after exposure to 2 h of hypergravity. The respective proteins are involved in scavenging and detoxification of ROS (32%), primary metabolism (20.5%), general signalling (14.7%), protein translation and proteolysis (14.7%), and ion homeostasis (8.8%). Together with our recent data on protein expression, it is assumed that changes in gravitational fields induce the production of ROS. Our data further indicate that responses

  12. Barley Hv CIRCADIAN CLOCK ASSOCIATED 1 and Hv PHOTOPERIOD H1 Are Circadian Regulators That Can Affect Circadian Rhythms in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Martí, María C.; Laurie, David A.; Greenland, Andy J.; Hall, Anthony; Webb, Alex A. R.

    2015-01-01

    Circadian clocks regulate many aspects of plant physiology and development that contribute to essential agronomic traits. Circadian clocks contain transcriptional feedback loops that are thought to generate circadian timing. There is considerable similarity in the genes that comprise the transcriptional and translational feedback loops of the circadian clock in the plant Kingdom. Functional characterisation of circadian clock genes has been restricted to a few model species. Here we provide a functional characterisation of the Hordeum vulgare (barley) circadian clock genes Hv CIRCADIAN CLOCK ASSOCIATED 1 (HvCCA1) and Hv PHOTOPERIODH1, which are respectively most similar to Arabidopsis thaliana CIRCADIAN CLOCK ASSOCIATED 1 (AtCCA1) and PSEUDO RESPONSE REGULATOR 7 (AtPRR7). This provides insight into the circadian regulation of one of the major crop species of Northern Europe. Through a combination of physiological assays of circadian rhythms in barley and heterologous expression in wild type and mutant strains of A. thaliana we demonstrate that HvCCA1 has a conserved function to AtCCA1. We find that Hv PHOTOPERIOD H1 has AtPRR7-like functionality in A. thaliana and that the effects of the Hv photoperiod h1 mutation on photoperiodism and circadian rhythms are genetically separable. PMID:26076005

  13. Elevated CO2-induced production of nitric oxide (NO) by NO synthase differentially affects nitrate reductase activity in Arabidopsis plants under different nitrate supplies.

    PubMed

    Du, Shaoting; Zhang, Ranran; Zhang, Peng; Liu, Huijun; Yan, Minggang; Chen, Ni; Xie, Huaqiang; Ke, Shouwei

    2016-02-01

    CO2 elevation often alters the plant's nitrate reductase (NR) activity, the first enzyme acting in the nitrate assimilation pathway. However, the mechanism underlying this process remains unknown. The association between elevated CO2-induced alterations of NR activity and nitric oxide (NO) was examined in Col-0 Arabidopsis fed with 0.2-10 mM nitrate, using NO donors, NO scavenger, and NO synthase (NOS) inhibitor. The noa1 mutant, in which most NOS activity was lost, and the NR activity-null mutant nia1 nia2 were also used to examine the above association. In response to CO2 elevation, NR activity increased in low-nitrate Col-0 plants but was inhibited in high-nitrate Col-0 plants. NO scavenger and NOS inhibitor could eliminate these two responses, whereas the application of NO donors mimicked these distinct responses in ambient CO2-grown Col-0 plants. Furthermore, in both low- and high-nitrate conditions, elevated CO2 increased NOS activity and NO levels in Col-0 and nia1 nia2 plants but had little effect on NO level and NR activity in noa1 plants. Considering all of these findings, this study concluded that, in response to CO2 elevation, either the NR activity induction in low-nitrate plants or the NR activity inhibition in high-nitrate plants is regulated by NOS-generated NO.

  14. A naturally occurring mutation in an Arabidopsis accession affects a beta-D-galactosidase that increases the hydrophilic potential of rhamnogalacturonan I in seed mucilage.

    PubMed

    Macquet, Audrey; Ralet, Marie-Christine; Loudet, Olivier; Kronenberger, Jocelyne; Mouille, Gregory; Marion-Poll, Annie; North, Helen M

    2007-12-01

    The Arabidopsis thaliana accession Shahdara was identified as a rare naturally occurring mutant that does not liberate seed mucilage on imbibition. The defective locus was found to be allelic to the mum2-1 and mum2-2 mutants. Map-based cloning showed that MUCILAGE-MODIFIED2 (MUM2) encodes the putative beta-D-galactosidase BGAL6. Activity assays demonstrated that one of four major beta-D-galactosidase activities present in developing siliques is absent in mum2 mutants. No difference was observed in seed coat epidermal cell structure between wild-type and mutant seed; however, weakening of the outer tangential cell wall by chemical treatment resulted in the release of mucilage from mum2 seed coat epidermal cells, and the mum2 mucilage only increased slightly in volume, relative to the wild type. Consistent with the absence of beta-D-galactosidase activity in the mutant, the inner layer of mucilage contained more Gal. The allocation of polysaccharides between the inner and outer mucilage layers was also modified in mum2. Mass spectrometry showed that rhamnogalacturonan I in mutant mucilage had more branching between rhamnose and hexose residues relative to the wild type. We conclude that the MUM2/BGAL6 beta-D-galactosidase is required for maturation of rhamnogalacturonan I in seed mucilage by the removal of galactose/galactan branches, resulting in increased swelling and extrusion of the mucilage on seed hydration.

  15. Homologues of the Arabidopsis thaliana SHI/STY/LRP1 genes control auxin biosynthesis and affect growth and development in the moss Physcomitrella patens.

    PubMed

    Eklund, D Magnus; Thelander, Mattias; Landberg, Katarina; Ståldal, Veronika; Nilsson, Anders; Johansson, Monika; Valsecchi, Isabel; Pederson, Eric R A; Kowalczyk, Mariusz; Ljung, Karin; Ronne, Hans; Sundberg, Eva

    2010-04-01

    The plant hormone auxin plays fundamental roles in vascular plants. Although exogenous auxin also stimulates developmental transitions and growth in non-vascular plants, the effects of manipulating endogenous auxin levels have thus far not been reported. Here, we have altered the levels and sites of auxin production and accumulation in the moss Physcomitrella patens by changing the expression level of homologues of the Arabidopsis SHI/STY family proteins, which are positive regulators of auxin biosynthesis genes. Constitutive expression of PpSHI1 resulted in elevated auxin levels, increased and ectopic expression of the auxin response reporter GmGH3pro:GUS, and in an increased caulonema/chloronema ratio, an effect also induced by exogenous auxin application. In addition, we observed premature ageing and necrosis in cells ectopically expressing PpSHI1. Knockout of either of the two PpSHI genes resulted in reduced auxin levels and auxin biosynthesis rates in leafy shoots, reduced internode elongation, delayed ageing, a decreased caulonema/chloronema ratio and an increased number of axillary hairs, which constitute potential auxin biosynthesis sites. Some of the identified auxin functions appear to be analogous in vascular and non-vascular plants. Furthermore, the spatiotemporal expression of the PpSHI genes and GmGH3pro:GUS strongly overlap, suggesting that local auxin biosynthesis is important for the regulation of auxin peak formation in non-vascular plants.

  16. A mutation in the Arabidopsis HYL1 gene encoding a dsRNA binding protein affects responses to abscisic acid, auxin, and cytokinin

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lu, C.; Fedoroff, N.

    2000-01-01

    Both physiological and genetic evidence indicate interconnections among plant responses to different hormones. We describe a pleiotropic recessive Arabidopsis transposon insertion mutation, designated hyponastic leaves (hyl1), that alters the plant's responses to several hormones. The mutant is characterized by shorter stature, delayed flowering, leaf hyponasty, reduced fertility, decreased rate of root growth, and an altered root gravitropic response. It also exhibits less sensitivity to auxin and cytokinin and hypersensitivity to abscisic acid (ABA). The auxin transport inhibitor 2,3,5-triiodobenzoic acid normalizes the mutant phenotype somewhat, whereas another auxin transport inhibitor, N-(1-naph-thyl)phthalamic acid, exacerbates the phenotype. The gene, designated HYL1, encodes a 419-amino acid protein that contains two double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) binding motifs, a nuclear localization motif, and a C-terminal repeat structure suggestive of a protein-protein interaction domain. We present evidence that the HYL1 gene is ABA-regulated and encodes a nuclear dsRNA binding protein. We hypothesize that the HYL1 protein is a regulatory protein functioning at the transcriptional or post-transcriptional level.

  17. A mutation in the Arabidopsis HYL1 gene encoding a dsRNA binding protein affects responses to abscisic acid, auxin, and cytokinin

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lu, C.; Fedoroff, N.

    2000-01-01

    Both physiological and genetic evidence indicate interconnections among plant responses to different hormones. We describe a pleiotropic recessive Arabidopsis transposon insertion mutation, designated hyponastic leaves (hyl1), that alters the plant's responses to several hormones. The mutant is characterized by shorter stature, delayed flowering, leaf hyponasty, reduced fertility, decreased rate of root growth, and an altered root gravitropic response. It also exhibits less sensitivity to auxin and cytokinin and hypersensitivity to abscisic acid (ABA). The auxin transport inhibitor 2,3,5-triiodobenzoic acid normalizes the mutant phenotype somewhat, whereas another auxin transport inhibitor, N-(1-naph-thyl)phthalamic acid, exacerbates the phenotype. The gene, designated HYL1, encodes a 419-amino acid protein that contains two double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) binding motifs, a nuclear localization motif, and a C-terminal repeat structure suggestive of a protein-protein interaction domain. We present evidence that the HYL1 gene is ABA-regulated and encodes a nuclear dsRNA binding protein. We hypothesize that the HYL1 protein is a regulatory protein functioning at the transcriptional or post-transcriptional level.

  18. DNA Topoisomerase I Affects Polycomb Group Protein-Mediated Epigenetic Regulation and Plant Development by Altering Nucleosome Distribution in Arabidopsis[W

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xigang; Gao, Lei; Dinh, Thanh Theresa; Shi, Ting; Li, Dongming; Wang, Ruozhong; Guo, Lin; Xiao, Langtao; Chen, Xuemei

    2014-01-01

    It has been perplexing that DNA topoisomerases, enzymes that release DNA supercoils, play specific roles in development. In this study, using a floral stem cell model in Arabidopsis thaliana, we uncovered a role for TOPOISOMERASE1α (TOP1α) in Polycomb Group (PcG) protein-mediated histone 3 lysine 27 trimethylation (H3K27me3) at, and transcriptional repression of, the stem cell maintenance gene WUSCHEL (WUS). We demonstrated that H3K27me3 deposition at other PcG targets also requires TOP1α. Intriguingly, the repression of some, as well as the expression of many, PcG target genes requires TOP1α. The mechanism that unifies the opposing effects of TOP1α appears to lie in its role in decreasing nucleosome density, which probably allows the binding of factors that either recruit PcG, as we demonstrated for AGAMOUS at the WUS locus, or counteract PcG-mediated regulation. Although TOP1α reduces nucleosome density at all genes, the lack of a 5′ nucleosome-free region is a feature that distinguishes PcG targets from nontargets and may condition the requirement for TOP1α for their expression. This study uncovers a connection between TOP1α and PcG, which explains the specific developmental functions of TOP1α. PMID:25070639

  19. Barley Hv CIRCADIAN CLOCK ASSOCIATED 1 and Hv PHOTOPERIOD H1 Are Circadian Regulators That Can Affect Circadian Rhythms in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Kusakina, Jelena; Rutterford, Zoe; Cotter, Sean; Martí, María C; Laurie, David A; Greenland, Andy J; Hall, Anthony; Webb, Alex A R

    2015-01-01

    Circadian clocks regulate many aspects of plant physiology and development that contribute to essential agronomic traits. Circadian clocks contain transcriptional feedback loops that are thought to generate circadian timing. There is considerable similarity in the genes that comprise the transcriptional and translational feedback loops of the circadian clock in the plant Kingdom. Functional characterisation of circadian clock genes has been restricted to a few model species. Here we provide a functional characterisation of the Hordeum vulgare (barley) circadian clock genes Hv circadian clock associated 1 (HvCCA1) and Hv photoperiodh1, which are respectively most similar to Arabidopsis thaliana circadian clock associated 1 (AtCCA1) and pseudo response regulator 7 (AtPRR7). This provides insight into the circadian regulation of one of the major crop species of Northern Europe. Through a combination of physiological assays of circadian rhythms in barley and heterologous expression in wild type and mutant strains of A. thaliana we demonstrate that HvCCA1 has a conserved function to AtCCA1. We find that Hv photoperiod H1 has AtPRR7-like functionality in A. thaliana and that the effects of the Hv photoperiod h1 mutation on photoperiodism and circadian rhythms are genetically separable.

  20. Accumulation of Zeaxanthin in Abscisic Acid-Deficient Mutants of Arabidopsis Does Not Affect Chlorophyll Fluorescence Quenching or Sensitivity to Photoinhibition in Vivo.

    PubMed Central

    Hurry, V.; Anderson, J. M.; Chow, W. S.; Osmond, C. B.

    1997-01-01

    Abscisic acid (ABA)-deficient mutants of Arabidopsis do not synthesize the epoxy-xanthophylls antheraxanthin, violaxanthin, or neoxanthin. However, thylakoid membranes from these mutants contain 3-fold more zeaxanthin than wild-type plants. This increase in zeaxanthin occurs as a stoichiometric replacement of the missing violaxanthin and neoxanthin within the pigment-protein complexes of both photosystem I and photosystem II (PSII). The retention of zeaxanthin in the dark by ABA-deficient mutants sensitizes the leaves to the development of nonphotochemical quenching (NPQ) during the first 2 to 4 min following a dark-light transition. However, the increase in pool size does not result in any increase in steady-state NPQ. When we exposed wild-type and ABA-deficient mutants leaves to twice growth irradiance, the mutants developed lower maximal NPQ but suffered similar photoinhibition to wildtype, measured both as a decline in the ratio of variable to maximal fluorescence and as a loss of functional PSII centers from oxygen flash yield measurements. These results suggest that only a few of the zeaxanthin molecules present within the light-harvesting antenna of PSII may be involved in NPQ and neither the accumulation of a large pool of zeaxanthin within the antenna of PSII nor an increase in conversion of violaxanthin to zeaxanthin will necessarily enhance photoprotective energy dissipation. PMID:12223632

  1. Time-Series Transcriptomics Reveals That AGAMOUS-LIKE22 Affects Primary Metabolism and Developmental Processes in Drought-Stressed Arabidopsis[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Penfold, Christopher A.; Jenkins, Dafyd J.; Legaie, Roxane; Lawson, Tracy; Vialet-Chabrand, Silvere R.M.; Subramaniam, Sunitha; Hickman, Richard; Feil, Regina; Bowden, Laura; Hill, Claire; Lunn, John E.; Finkenstädt, Bärbel; Buchanan-Wollaston, Vicky; Beynon, Jim; Wild, David L.; Ott, Sascha

    2016-01-01

    In Arabidopsis thaliana, changes in metabolism and gene expression drive increased drought tolerance and initiate diverse drought avoidance and escape responses. To address regulatory processes that link these responses, we set out to identify genes that govern early responses to drought. To do this, a high-resolution time series transcriptomics data set was produced, coupled with detailed physiological and metabolic analyses of plants subjected to a slow transition from well-watered to drought conditions. A total of 1815 drought-responsive differentially expressed genes were identified. The early changes in gene expression coincided with a drop in carbon assimilation, and only in the late stages with an increase in foliar abscisic acid content. To identify gene regulatory networks (GRNs) mediating the transition between the early and late stages of drought, we used Bayesian network modeling of differentially expressed transcription factor (TF) genes. This approach identified AGAMOUS-LIKE22 (AGL22), as key hub gene in a TF GRN. It has previously been shown that AGL22 is involved in the transition from vegetative state to flowering but here we show that AGL22 expression influences steady state photosynthetic rates and lifetime water use. This suggests that AGL22 uniquely regulates a transcriptional network during drought stress, linking changes in primary metabolism and the initiation of stress responses. PMID:26842464

  2. Circadian Stress Regimes Affect the Circadian Clock and Cause Jasmonic Acid-Dependent Cell Death in Cytokinin-Deficient Arabidopsis Plants[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Nitschke, Silvia; Cortleven, Anne; Iven, Tim; Havaux, Michel; Schmülling, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    The circadian clock helps plants measure daylength and adapt to changes in the day-night rhythm. We found that changes in the light-dark regime triggered stress responses, eventually leading to cell death, in leaves of Arabidopsis thaliana plants with reduced cytokinin levels or defective cytokinin signaling. Prolonged light treatment followed by a dark period induced stress and cell death marker genes while reducing photosynthetic efficiency. This response, called circadian stress, is also characterized by altered expression of clock and clock output genes. In particular, this treatment strongly reduced the expression of CIRCADIAN CLOCK ASSOCIATED1 (CCA1) and LATE ELONGATED HYPOCOTYL (LHY). Intriguingly, similar changes in gene expression and cell death were observed in clock mutants lacking proper CCA1 and LHY function. Circadian stress caused strong changes in reactive oxygen species- and jasmonic acid (JA)-related gene expression. The activation of the JA pathway, involving the accumulation of JA metabolites, was crucial for the induction of cell death, since the cell death phenotype was strongly reduced in the jasmonate resistant1 mutant background. We propose that adaptation to circadian stress regimes requires a normal cytokinin status which, acting primarily through the AHK3 receptor, supports circadian clock function to guard against the detrimental effects of circadian stress. PMID:27354555

  3. Circadian Stress Regimes Affect the Circadian Clock and Cause Jasmonic Acid-Dependent Cell Death in Cytokinin-Deficient Arabidopsis Plants.

    PubMed

    Nitschke, Silvia; Cortleven, Anne; Iven, Tim; Feussner, Ivo; Havaux, Michel; Riefler, Michael; Schmülling, Thomas

    2016-07-01

    The circadian clock helps plants measure daylength and adapt to changes in the day-night rhythm. We found that changes in the light-dark regime triggered stress responses, eventually leading to cell death, in leaves of Arabidopsis thaliana plants with reduced cytokinin levels or defective cytokinin signaling. Prolonged light treatment followed by a dark period induced stress and cell death marker genes while reducing photosynthetic efficiency. This response, called circadian stress, is also characterized by altered expression of clock and clock output genes. In particular, this treatment strongly reduced the expression of CIRCADIAN CLOCK ASSOCIATED1 (CCA1) and LATE ELONGATED HYPOCOTYL (LHY). Intriguingly, similar changes in gene expression and cell death were observed in clock mutants lacking proper CCA1 and LHY function. Circadian stress caused strong changes in reactive oxygen species- and jasmonic acid (JA)-related gene expression. The activation of the JA pathway, involving the accumulation of JA metabolites, was crucial for the induction of cell death, since the cell death phenotype was strongly reduced in the jasmonate resistant1 mutant background. We propose that adaptation to circadian stress regimes requires a normal cytokinin status which, acting primarily through the AHK3 receptor, supports circadian clock function to guard against the detrimental effects of circadian stress. © 2016 American Society of Plant Biologists. All rights reserved.

  4. DAR2 acts as an important node connecting cytokinin, auxin, SHY2 and PLT1/2 in root meristem size control.

    PubMed

    Peng, Yuancheng; Chen, Liangliang; Lu, Yaru; Ma, Wenying; Tong, Yiping; Li, Yunhai

    2013-06-01

    Cytokinin and auxin antagonistically affect cell proliferation and differentiation and thus regulate root meristem size by influencing the abundance of SHORT HYPOCOTYL2 (SHY2/IAA3). SHY2 affects auxin distribution in the root meristem by repressing the auxin-inducible expression of PIN-FORMED (PIN) auxin transport genes. The PLETHORA (PLT1/2) genes influence root meristem growth by promoting stem cells and transit-amplifying cells. However, the factors connecting cytokinin, auxin, SHY2 and PLT1/2 are largely unknown. In a recent study, we have shown that the DA1-related protein 2 (DAR2) acts downstream of cytokinin and SHY2 but upstream of PLT1/2 to affect root meristem size. Here, we discuss the possible molecular mechanisms by which Arabidopsis DAR2 controls root meristem size.

  5. Knocking Out ACR2 Does Not Affect Arsenic Redox Status in Arabidopsis thaliana: Implications for As Detoxification and Accumulation in Plants

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Wenju; Schat, Henk; Bliek, Mathijs; Chen, Yi; McGrath, Steve P.; George, Graham; Salt, David E.; Zhao, Fang-Jie

    2012-01-01

    Many plant species are able to reduce arsenate to arsenite efficiently, which is an important step allowing detoxification of As through either efflux of arsenite or complexation with thiol compounds. It has been suggested that this reduction is catalyzed by ACR2, a plant homologue of the yeast arsenate reductase ScACR2. Silencing of AtACR2 was reported to result in As hyperaccumulation in the shoots of Arabidopsis thaliana. However, no information of the in vivo As speciation has been reported. Here, we investigated the effect of AtACR2 knockout or overexpression on As speciation, arsenite efflux from roots and As accumulation in shoots. T-DNA insertion lines, overexpression lines and wild-type (WT) plants were exposed to different concentrations of arsenate for different periods, and As speciation in plants and arsenite efflux were determined using HPLC-ICP-MS. There were no significant differences in As speciation between different lines, with arsenite accounting for >90% of the total extractable As in both roots and shoots. Arsenite efflux to the external medium represented on average 77% of the arsenate taken up during 6 h exposure, but there were no significant differences between WT and mutants or overexpression lines. Accumulation of As in the shoots was also unaffected by AtACR2 knockout or overexpression. Additionally, after exposure to arsenate, the yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) strain with ScACR2 deleted showed similar As speciation as the WT with arsenite-thiol complexes being the predominant species. Our results suggest the existence of multiple pathways of arsenate reduction in plants and yeast. PMID:22879969

  6. Mutations of Arabidopsis TBL32 and TBL33 affect xylan acetylation and secondary wall deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Yuan, Youxi; Teng, Quincy; Zhong, Ruiqin; Haghighat, Marziyeh; Richardson, Elizabeth A.; Ye, Zheng -Hua; Zhang, Jin -Song

    2016-01-08

    Xylan is a major acetylated polymer in plant lignocellulosic biomass and it can be monoand di-acetylated at O-2 and O-3 as well as mono-acetylated at O-3 of xylosyl residues that is substituted with glucuronic acid (GlcA) at O-2. Based on the finding that ESK1, an Arabidopsis thaliana DUF231 protein, specifically mediates xylan 2-O- and 3-O-monoacetylation, we previously proposed that different acetyltransferase activities are required for regiospecific acetyl substitutions of xylan. Here, we demonstrate the functional roles of TBL32 and TBL33, two ESK1 close homologs, in acetyl substitutions of xylan. Simultaneous mutations of TBL32 and TBL33 resulted in a significant reduction in xylan acetyl content and endoxylanase digestion of the mutant xylan released GlcA-substituted xylooligomers without acetyl groups. Structural analysis of xylan revealed that the tbl32 tbl33 mutant had a nearly complete loss of 3-O-acetylated, 2-O-GlcA-substituted xylosyl residues. A reduction in 3-Omonoacetylated and 2,3-di-O-acetylated xylosyl residues was also observed. Simultaneous mutations of TBL32, TBL33 and ESK1 resulted in a severe reduction in xylan acetyl level down to 15% of that of the wild type, and concomitantly, severely collapsed vessels and stunted plant growth. In particular, the S2 layer of secondary walls in xylem vessels of tbl33 esk1 and tbl32 tbl33 esk1 exhibited an altered structure, indicating abnormal assembly of secondary wall polymers. Furthermore, these results demonstrate that TBL32 and TBL33 play an important role in xylan acetylation and normal deposition of secondary walls.

  7. Arabidopsis PTB1 and PTB2 proteins negatively regulate splicing of a mini-exon splicing reporter and affect alternative splicing of endogenous genes differentially.

    PubMed

    Simpson, Craig G; Lewandowska, Dominika; Liney, Michele; Davidson, Diane; Chapman, Sean; Fuller, John; McNicol, Jim; Shaw, Paul; Brown, John W S

    2014-07-01

    This paper examines the function of Arabidopsis thaliana AtPTB1 and AtPTB2 as plant splicing factors. The effect on splicing of overexpression of AtPTB1 and AtPTB2 was analysed in an in vivo protoplast transient expression system with a novel mini-exon splicing reporter. A range of mutations in pyrimidine-rich sequences were compared with and without AtPTB and NpU2AF65 overexpression. Splicing analyses of constructs in protoplasts and RNA from overexpression lines used high-resolution reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). AtPTB1 and AtPTB2 reduced inclusion/splicing of the potato invertase mini-exon splicing reporter, indicating that these proteins can repress plant intron splicing. Mutation of the polypyrimidine tract and closely associated Cytosine and Uracil-rich (CU-rich) sequences, upstream of the mini-exon, altered repression by AtPTB1 and AtPTB2. Coexpression of a plant orthologue of U2AF65 alleviated the splicing repression of AtPTB1. Mutation of a second CU-rich upstream of the mini-exon 3' splice site led to a decline in mini-exon splicing, indicating the presence of a splicing enhancer sequence. Finally, RT-PCR of AtPTB overexpression lines with c. 90 known alternative splicing (AS) events showed that AtPTBs significantly altered AS of over half the events. AtPTB1 and AtPTB2 are splicing factors that influence alternative splicing. This occurs in the potato invertase mini-exon via the polypyrimidine tract and associated pyrimidine-rich sequence.

  8. Arabidopsis phosphatidylinositol monophosphate 5-kinase 2 is involved in root gravitropism through regulation of polar auxin transport by affecting the cycling of PIN proteins.

    PubMed

    Mei, Yu; Jia, Wen-Jing; Chu, Yu-Jia; Xue, Hong-Wei

    2012-03-01

    Phosphatidylinositol monophosphate 5-kinase (PIP5K) catalyzes the synthesis of PI-4,5-bisphosphate (PtdIns(4,5)P(2)) by phosphorylation of PI-4-phosphate at the 5 position of the inositol ring, and is involved in regulating multiple developmental processes and stress responses. We here report on the functional characterization of Arabidopsis PIP5K2, which is expressed during lateral root initiation and elongation, and whose expression is enhanced by exogenous auxin. The knockout mutant pip5k2 shows reduced lateral root formation, which could be recovered with exogenous auxin, and interestingly, delayed root gravity response that could not be recovered with exogenous auxin. Crossing with the DR5-GUS marker line and measurement of free IAA content confirmed the reduced auxin accumulation in pip5k2. In addition, analysis using the membrane-selective dye FM4-64 revealed the decelerated vesicle trafficking caused by PtdIns(4,5)P(2) reduction, which hence results in suppressed cycling of PIN proteins (PIN2 and 3), and delayed redistribution of PIN2 and auxin under gravistimulation in pip5k2 roots. On the contrary, PtdIns(4,5)P(2) significantly enhanced the vesicle trafficking and cycling of PIN proteins. These results demonstrate that PIP5K2 is involved in regulating lateral root formation and root gravity response, and reveal a critical role of PIP5K2/PtdIns(4,5)P(2) in root development through regulation of PIN proteins, providing direct evidence of crosstalk between the phosphatidylinositol signaling pathway and auxin response, and new insights into the control of polar auxin transport.

  9. The Arabidopsis thaliana lectin receptor kinase LecRK-I.9 is required for full resistance to Pseudomonas syringae and affects jasmonate signalling.

    PubMed

    Balagué, Claudine; Gouget, Anne; Bouchez, Olivier; Souriac, Camille; Haget, Nathalie; Boutet-Mercey, Stéphanie; Govers, Francine; Roby, Dominique; Canut, Hervé

    2016-07-11

    On microbial attack, plants can detect invaders and activate plant innate immunity. For the detection of pathogen molecules or cell wall damage, plants employ receptors that trigger the activation of defence responses. Cell surface proteins that belong to large families of lectin receptor kinases are candidates to function as immune receptors. Here, the function of LecRK-I.9 (At5g60300), a legume-type lectin receptor kinase involved in cell wall-plasma membrane contacts and in extracellular ATP (eATP) perception, was studied through biochemical, gene expression and reverse genetics approaches. In Arabidopsis thaliana, LecRK-I.9 expression is rapidly, highly and locally induced on inoculation with avirulent strains of Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato (Pst). Two allelic lecrk-I.9 knock-out mutants showed decreased resistance to Pst. Conversely, over-expression of LecRK-I.9 led to increased resistance to Pst. The analysis of defence gene expression suggests an alteration of both the salicylic acid (SA) and jasmonic acid (JA) signalling pathways. In particular, LecRK-I.9 expression during plant-pathogen interaction was dependent on COI1 (CORONATINE INSENSITIVE 1) and JAR1 (JASMONATE RESISTANT 1) components, and JA-responsive transcription factors (TFs) showed altered levels of expression in plants over-expressing LecRK-I.9. A similar misregulation of these TFs was obtained by JA treatment. This study identified LecRK-I.9 as necessary for full resistance to Pst and demonstrated its involvement in the control of defence against pathogens through a regulation of JA signalling components. The role of LecRK-I.9 is discussed with regard to the potential molecular mechanisms linking JA signalling to cell wall damage and/or eATP perception.

  10. 1,2-Dichloropropane

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    1,2 - Dichloropropane ; CASRN 78 - 87 - 5 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for Noncarcinoge

  11. 1,2-Dibromoethane

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    1,2 - Dibromoethane ; CASRN 106 - 93 - 4 ( 07 / 29 / 2004 ) Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessment

  12. 1,2-Dichlorobenzene

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    1,2 - Dichlorobenzene ; CASRN 95 - 50 - 1 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for Noncarcinoge

  13. 1,2-Dichloroethane

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    1,2 - Dichloroethane ; CASRN 107 - 06 - 2 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for Noncarcinoge

  14. 1,2-Diphenylhydrazine

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    1,2 - Diphenylhydrazine ; CASRN 122 - 66 - 7 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for Noncarcin

  15. A Brassica napus PHT1 phosphate transporter, BnPht1;4, promotes phosphate uptake and affects roots architecture of transgenic Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Ren, Feng; Zhao, Cai-Zhi; Liu, Chun-Sen; Huang, Ke-Lin; Guo, Qian-Qian; Chang, Li-Li; Xiong, Huan; Li, Xue-Bao

    2014-12-01

    Phosphorus (P) is one of the essential nutrient elements for plant development. In this work, BnPht1;4 gene, encoding a phosphate transporter of PHT1 family, was isolated from Brassica napus. BnPht1;4 possesses the major characteristic of PHT1 high-affinity Pi transporters in plants, such as plasma-membrane localization and 12 transmembrane-spanning domains. Quantitative reverse-transcription PCR analysis and promoter activity assay showed BnPht1;4 was inert in plants under Pi sufficient conditions. However, expression of this gene was remarkably enhanced in roots under Pi deficient conditions. Interestingly, under low Pi conditions, its promoter activity is impaired in tips of elongated roots, suggesting that the high-affinity Pi transporter may be not involved in low Pi response at root tip area. The experimental results also indicated that BnPht1;4 induction by Pi deficiency is dependent on the existence of sugar. In 35S:BnPht1;4 transgenic Arabidopsis, the increase of Pi availability resulted in the change of root architecture under Pi deficient conditions, showing longer primary roots and lower lateral root density than that of wild type. By cis-element analysis, two P1BS and two W-box elements were found in BnPht1;4 promoter. Yeast one-hybrid assay indicated that PHR1 could bind to the BnPht1;4 promoter. P1BS elements in BnPht1;4 promoter are essential for BnPht1;4 induction in Pi starvation response. Furthermore, WRKY75 could bind to the BnPht1;4 promoter, in which W-box elements are important for this binding. These results indicated BnPht1;4 may be dually controlled by two family regulators under low Pi responses. Thus, our data on the regulative mechanism of high-affinity Pi transporter in Pi starvation response will be valuable for B. napus molecular agriculture.

  16. Neutralisation of a single voltage sensor affects gating determinants in all four pore-forming S6 segments of Ca(V)1.2: a cooperative gating model.

    PubMed

    Beyl, Stanislav; Depil, Katrin; Hohaus, Annette; Stary-Weinzinger, Anna; Linder, Tobias; Timin, Eugen; Hering, Steffen

    2012-10-01

    Voltage sensors trigger the closed-open transitions in the pore of voltage-gated ion channels. To probe the transmission of voltage sensor signalling to the channel pore of Ca(V)1.2, we investigated how elimination of positive charges in the S4 segments (charged residues were replaced by neutral glutamine) modulates gating perturbations induced by mutations in pore-lining S6 segments. Neutralisation of all positively charged residues in IIS4 produced a functional channel (IIS4(N)), while replacement of the charged residues in IS4, IIIS4 and IVS4 segments resulted in nonfunctional channels. The IIS4(N) channel displayed activation kinetics similar to wild type. Mutations in a highly conserved structure motif on S6 segments ("GAGA ring": G432W in IS6, A780T in IIS6, G1193T in IIIS6 and A1503G in IVS6) induce strong left-shifted activation curves and decelerated channel deactivation kinetics. When IIS4(N) was combined with these mutations, the activation curves were shifted back towards wild type and current kinetics were accelerated. In contrast, 12 other mutations adjacent to the GAGA ring in IS6-IVS6, which also affect activation gating, were not rescued by IIS4(N). Thus, the rescue of gating distortions in segments IS6-IVS6 by IIS4(N) is highly position-specific. Thermodynamic cycle analysis supports the hypothesis that IIS4 is energetically coupled with the distantly located GAGA residues. We speculate that conformational changes caused by neutralisation of IIS4 are not restricted to domain II (IIS6) but are transmitted to gating structures in domains I, III and IV via the GAGA ring.

  17. Arabidopsis hybrid speciation processes

    PubMed Central

    Schmickl, Roswitha; Koch, Marcus A.

    2011-01-01

    The genus Arabidopsis provides a unique opportunity to study fundamental biological questions in plant sciences using the diploid model species Arabidopsis thaliana and Arabidopsis lyrata. However, only a few studies have focused on introgression and hybrid speciation in Arabidopsis, although polyploidy is a common phenomenon within this genus. More recently, there is growing evidence of significant gene flow between the various Arabidopsis species. So far, we know Arabidopsis suecica and Arabidopsis kamchatica as fully stabilized allopolyploid species. Both species evolved during Pleistocene glaciation and deglaciation cycles in Fennoscandinavia and the amphi-Beringian region, respectively. These hybrid studies were conducted either on a phylogeographic scale or reconstructed experimentally in the laboratory. In our study we focus at a regional and population level. Our research area is located in the foothills of the eastern Austrian Alps, where two Arabidopsis species, Arabidopsis arenosa and A. lyrata ssp. petraea, are sympatrically distributed. Our hypothesis of genetic introgression, migration, and adaptation to the changing environment during the Pleistocene has been confirmed: We observed significant, mainly unidirectional gene flow between the two species, which has given rise to the tetraploid A. lyrata. This cytotype was able to escape from the narrow ecological niche occupied by diploid A. lyrata ssp. petraea on limestone outcrops by migrating northward into siliceous areas, leaving behind a trail of genetic differentiation. PMID:21825128

  18. The defense response in Arabidopsis thaliana against Fusarium sporotrichioides

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Certain graminaceous plants such as Zea mays and Triticum aestivum serve as hosts for Fusarium sporotrichioides; however, molecular interactions between the host plants and F. sporotrichioides remain unknown. It is also not known whether any interaction between Arabidopsis thaliana and F. sporotrichioides can occur. To understand these interactions, we performed proteomic analysis. Results Arabidopsis leaves and flowers were inoculated with F. sporotrichioides. Accumulation of PLANT DEFENSIN1.2 (PDF1.2) and PATHOGENESIS RELATED1 (PR1) mRNA in Arabidopsis were increased by inoculation of F. sporotrichioides. Furthermore, mitogen-activated protein kinase 3 (MPK3) and mitogen-activated protein kinase 6 (MPK6), which represent MAP kinases in Arabidopsis, were activated by inoculation of F. sporotrichioides. Proteomic analysis revealed that some defense-related proteins were upregulated, while the expression of photosynthesis- and metabolism-related proteins was down regulated, by inoculation with F. sporotrichioides. We carried out the proteomic analysis about upregulated proteins by inoculation with Fusarium graminearum. The glutathione S-transferases (GSTs), such as GSTF4 and GSTF7 were upregulated, by inoculation with F. graminearum-infected Arabidopsis leaves. On the other hand, GSTF3 and GSTF9 were uniquely upregulated, by inoculation with F. sporotrichioides. Conclusions These results indicate that Arabidopsis is a host plant for F. sporotrichioides. We revealed that defense response of Arabidopsis is initiated by infection with F. sporotrichioides. PMID:23110430

  19. The Arabidopsis Circadian System

    PubMed Central

    McClung, C. Robertson; Salomé, Patrice A.; Michael, Todd P.

    2002-01-01

    Rhythms with periods of approximately 24 hr are widespread in nature. Those that persist in constant conditions are termed circadian rhythms and reflect the activity of an endogenous biological clock. Plants, including Arabidopsis, are richly rhythmic. Expression analysis, most recently on a genomic scale, indicates that the Arabidopsis circadian clock regulates a number of key metabolic pathways and stress responses. A number of sensitive and high-throughput assays have been developed to monitor the Arabidopsis clock. These assays have facilitated the identification of components of plant circadian systems through genetic and molecular biological studies. Although much remains to be learned, the framework of the Arabidopsis circadian system is coming into focus. Dedication This review is dedicated to the memory of DeLill Nasser, a wonderful mentor and an unwavering advocate of both Arabidopsis and circadian rhythms research. PMID:22303209

  20. Arabidopsis BPM proteins function as substrate adaptors to a cullin3-based E3 ligase to affect fatty acid metabolism in plants.

    PubMed

    Chen, Liyuan; Lee, Joo Hyun; Weber, Henriette; Tohge, Takayuki; Witt, Sandra; Roje, Sanja; Fernie, Alisdair R; Hellmann, Hanjo

    2013-06-01

    Regulation of transcriptional processes is a critical mechanism that enables efficient coordination of the synthesis of required proteins in response to environmental and cellular changes. Transcription factors require accurate activity regulation because they play a critical role as key mediators assuring specific expression of target genes. In this work, we show that cullin3-based E3 ligases have the potential to interact with a broad range of ethylene response factor (ERF)/APETALA2 (AP2) transcription factors, mediated by Math-BTB/POZ (for Meprin and TRAF [tumor necrosis factor receptor associated factor] homolog)-Broad complex, Tramtrack, Bric-a-brac/Pox virus and Zinc finger) proteins. The assembly with an E3 ligase causes degradation of their substrates via the 26S proteasome, as demonstrated for the wrinkled1 ERF/AP2 protein. Furthermore, loss of Math-BTB/POZ proteins widely affects plant development and causes altered fatty acid contents in mutant seeds. Overall, this work demonstrates a link between fatty acid metabolism and E3 ligase activities in plants and establishes CUL3-based E3 ligases as key regulators in transcriptional processes that involve ERF/AP2 family members.

  1. Arabidopsis BPM Proteins Function as Substrate Adaptors to a CULLIN3-Based E3 Ligase to Affect Fatty Acid Metabolism in Plants[W

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Liyuan; Lee, Joo Hyun; Weber, Henriette; Tohge, Takayuki; Witt, Sandra; Roje, Sanja; Fernie, Alisdair R.; Hellmann, Hanjo

    2013-01-01

    Regulation of transcriptional processes is a critical mechanism that enables efficient coordination of the synthesis of required proteins in response to environmental and cellular changes. Transcription factors require accurate activity regulation because they play a critical role as key mediators assuring specific expression of target genes. In this work, we show that CULLIN3-based E3 ligases have the potential to interact with a broad range of ETHYLENE RESPONSE FACTOR (ERF)/APETALA2 (AP2) transcription factors, mediated by MATH-BTB/POZ (for Meprin and TRAF [tumor necrosis factor receptor associated factor] homolog)-Broad complex, Tramtrack, Bric-a-brac/Pox virus and Zinc finger) proteins. The assembly with an E3 ligase causes degradation of their substrates via the 26S proteasome, as demonstrated for the WRINKLED1 ERF/AP2 protein. Furthermore, loss of MATH-BTB/POZ proteins widely affects plant development and causes altered fatty acid contents in mutant seeds. Overall, this work demonstrates a link between fatty acid metabolism and E3 ligase activities in plants and establishes CUL3-based E3 ligases as key regulators in transcriptional processes that involve ERF/AP2 family members. PMID:23792371

  2. Tomato Transcription Factors Pti4, Pti5, and Pti6 Activate Defense Responses When Expressed in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Gu, Yong-Qiang; Wildermuth, Mary C.; Chakravarthy, Suma; Loh, Ying-Tsu; Yang, Caimei; He, Xiaohua; Han, Yu; Martin, Gregory B.

    2002-01-01

    The Pti4, Pti5, and Pti6 proteins from tomato were identified based on their interaction with the product of the Pto disease resistance gene, a Ser-Thr protein kinase. They belong to the ethylene-response factor (ERF) family of plant-unique transcription factors and bind specifically to the GCC-box cis element present in the promoters of many pathogenesis-related (PR) genes. Here, we show that these tomato ERFs are localized to the nucleus and function in vivo as transcription activators that regulate the expression of GCC box–containing PR genes. Expression of Pti4, Pti5, or Pti6 in Arabidopsis activated the expression of the salicylic acid–regulated genes PR1 and PR2. Expression of jasmonic acid– and ethylene-regulated genes, such as PR3, PR4, PDF1.2, and Thi2.1, was affected differently by each of the three tomato ERFs, with Arabidopsis-Pti4 plants having very high levels of PDF1.2 transcripts. Exogenous application of salicylic acid to Arabidopsis-Pti4 plants suppressed the increased expression of PDF1.2 but further stimulated PR1 expression. Arabidopsis plants expressing Pti4 displayed increased resistance to the fungal pathogen Erysiphe orontii and increased tolerance to the bacterial pathogen Pseudomonas syringae pv tomato. These results indicate that Pti4, Pti5, and Pti6 activate the expression of a wide array of PR genes and play important and distinct roles in plant defense. PMID:11971137

  3. Copper(I) and nickel(II) complexes with 1:1 vs. 1:2 coordination of ferrocenyl hydrazone ligands: do the geometry and composition of complexes affect DNA binding/cleavage, protein binding, antioxidant and cytotoxic activities?

    PubMed

    Krishnamoorthy, Paramasivam; Sathyadevi, Palanisamy; Butorac, Rachel R; Cowley, Alan H; Bhuvanesh, Nattamai S P; Dharmaraj, Nallasamy

    2012-04-21

    A new series of geometrically different complexes containing ferrocenyl hydrazone ligands were synthesised by reacting suitable precursor complex [MCl(2)(PPh(3))(2)] with the ligands HL(1) or HL(2) (where M = Cu(II) or Ni(II); HL(1) = [Cp(2)Fe(CH=N-NH-CO-C(6)H(5))] (1) and HL(2) = [Cp(2)Fe(CH=N-NH-CO-C(5)H(4)N)]) (2). The new complexes of the composition [Cu(L(1))(PPh(3))(2)], (3) [Cu(L(2))(PPh(3))(2)] (4), [Ni(L(1))(2)] (5) and [Ni(L(2))(2)] (6) were characterised by various spectral studies. Among them, complexes 3 and 5 characterised by single crystal X-ray diffraction showed a distorted tetrahedral structure for the former with 1:1 metal-ligand stoichiometry, but a distorted square planar geometry with 1:2 metal-ligand stoichiometry in the case of the latter. Systematic biological investigations like DNA binding, DNA cleavage, protein binding, free radical scavenging and cytotoxicity activities were carried out using all the synthesised compounds and the results obtained were explained on the basis of structure-activity relationships. The binding constant (K(b)) values of the synthesised compounds are found to be in the order of magnitude 10(3)-10(5) M(-1) and also they exhibit significant cleavage of supercoiled (SC) pUC19 DNA in the presence of H(2)O(2) as co-oxidant. The conformational changes of bovine serum albumin (BSA) upon binding with the above complexes were also studied. In addition, concentration dependent free radical scavenging potential of all the synthesised compounds (1-6) was also carried out under in vitro conditions. Assays on the cytotoxicity of the above complexes against HeLa and A431 tumor cells and NIH 3T3 normal cells were also carried out.

  4. Open-System Magma Reservoir Affects Gas Segregation, Vesiculation, Fragmentation and Lava/Pyroclast Dispersal During the 1.2 km-deep 2007-2010 Submarine Eruption at West Mata Volcano

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rubin, K. H.; Clague, D. A.; Embley, R. W.; Hellebrand, E.; Soule, S. A.; Resing, J.

    2014-12-01

    West Mata, a small, active rear-arc volcano in the NE Lau Basin, erupts crystal and gas rich boninite magma. Eruptions were observed at the summit (1.2 km water depth) during 5 ROV Jason dives in 2009 (the deepest erupting submarine volcano observed to date). Subsequent ROV and ship-based bathymetric mapping revealed that a pit crater formed and the summit eruption ceased in 2010, with roughly simultaneous eruptions along the SW rift zone. During the summit eruption, a combination of water depth, H2O-CO2-rich and high crystallinity magma, a split in the conduit to feed two vent sites, and waxing/waning magma supply led to a range of effusive/explosive eruption styles and volcanic deposit types. The 2-3 vent Hades cluster and the lone Prometheus vent had different eruption characteristics. Petrographic, petrologic and geochemical studies of erupted products indicate a change in magma composition in time and space over a period of 3.5 yrs, suggesting a small, open-system magma reservoir within the volcano. Prometheus (1174m depth) produced mostly pyroclastic material during our observations (e.g., highly vesicular glowing fluidal ejecta that cooled in the water column and rounded recycled dense clasts), but sampling and 210Po radiometric dating show that several months prior pillowed lava flows, subsequently covered with cm-sized pyroclasts, had flowed >50m from the vent. In contrast, vents at Hades (1200m depth) cycled between lava production and vigorous degassing, 10-20m high fire fountains and bursts of glowing lava-skinned bubbles, the products of which froze/broke in the water column, forming unstable cones of spatter and scoria near the vents. We hypothesize that bubbles collapse rather than form lava balloons because of skin brittleness (from high crystal content) and hydrostatic pressure. Clast settling times and patterns suggest >100m water column rise height for 10+ cm-sized fragments. Pillow flows were also observed to be issuing from the base of the

  5. Evaluation of processes affecting 1,2-dibromo-3-chloropropane (DBCP) concentrations in ground water in the eastern San Joaquin Valley, California : analysis of chemical data and ground-water flow and transport simulations

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Burow, Karen R.; Panshin, Sandra Y.; Dubrovsky, Neil H.; Vanbrocklin, David; Fogg, Graham E.

    1999-01-01

    A conceptual two-dimensional numerical flow and transport modeling approach was used to test hypotheses addressing dispersion, transformation rate, and in a relative sense, the effects of ground- water pumping and reapplication of irrigation water on DBCP concentrations in the aquifer. The flow and transport simulations, which represent hypothetical steady-state flow conditions in the aquifer, were used to refine the conceptual understanding of the aquifer system rather than to predict future concentrations of DBCP. Results indicate that dispersion reduces peak concentrations, but this process alone does not account for the apparent decrease in DBCP concentrations in ground water in the eastern San Joaquin Valley. Ground-water pumping and reapplication of irrigation water may affect DBCP concentrations to the extent that this process can be simulated indirectly using first-order decay. Transport simulation results indicate that the in situ 'effective' half-life of DBCP caused by processes other than dispersion and transformation to BAA could be on the order of 6 years.

  6. Arabidopsis brassinosteroid signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Belkhadir, Youssef; Wang, Xuelu; Chory, Joanne

    2006-12-05

    Plants control their size through the action of several phytohormones. One class of growth-promoting hormones is the brassinosteroids (BRs), the polyhydroxylated steroid hormones of plants. Here, we present the Arabidopsis-specific proteins that are the founding members of key BR signaling pathway components found in all plants. The genetic studies that identified these components are unique to Arabidopsis owing to its rapid generation time, sophisticated genetics, and facile transformation protocols, thereby highlighting the importance of a reference plant for understanding fundamental processes in all land plants.

  7. Plastidial Glycolytic Glyceraldehyde-3-Phosphate Dehydrogenase Is an Important Determinant in the Carbon and Nitrogen Metabolism of Heterotrophic Cells in Arabidopsis1

    PubMed Central

    Anoman, Armand D.; Muñoz-Bertomeu, Jesús; Rosa-Téllez, Sara; Flores-Tornero, María; Serrano, Ramón; Bueso, Eduardo; Fernie, Alisdair R.; Segura, Juan; Ros, Roc

    2015-01-01

    This study functionally characterizes the Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) plastidial glycolytic isoforms of glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPCp) in photosynthetic and heterotrophic cells. We expressed the enzyme in gapcp double mutants (gapcp1gapcp2) under the control of photosynthetic (Rubisco small subunit RBCS2B [RBCS]) or heterotrophic (phosphate transporter PHT1.2 [PHT]) cell-specific promoters. Expression of GAPCp1 under the control of RBCS in gapcp1gapcp2 had no significant effect on the metabolite profile or growth in the aerial part (AP). GAPCp1 expression under the control of the PHT promoter clearly affected Arabidopsis development by increasing the number of lateral roots and having a major effect on AP growth and metabolite profile. Our results indicate that GAPCp1 is not functionally important in photosynthetic cells but plays a fundamental role in roots and in heterotrophic cells of the AP. Specifically, GAPCp activity may be required in root meristems and the root cap for normal primary root growth. Transcriptomic and metabolomic analyses indicate that the lack of GAPCp activity affects nitrogen and carbon metabolism as well as mineral nutrition and that glycerate and glutamine are the main metabolites responding to GAPCp activity. Thus, GAPCp could be an important metabolic connector of glycolysis with other pathways, such as the phosphorylated pathway of serine biosynthesis, the ammonium assimilation pathway, or the metabolism of γ-aminobutyrate, which in turn affect plant development. PMID:26134167

  8. Plastidial Glycolytic Glyceraldehyde-3-Phosphate Dehydrogenase Is an Important Determinant in the Carbon and Nitrogen Metabolism of Heterotrophic Cells in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Anoman, Armand D; Muñoz-Bertomeu, Jesús; Rosa-Téllez, Sara; Flores-Tornero, María; Serrano, Ramón; Bueso, Eduardo; Fernie, Alisdair R; Segura, Juan; Ros, Roc

    2015-11-01

    This study functionally characterizes the Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) plastidial glycolytic isoforms of glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPCp) in photosynthetic and heterotrophic cells. We expressed the enzyme in gapcp double mutants (gapcp1gapcp2) under the control of photosynthetic (Rubisco small subunit RBCS2B [RBCS]) or heterotrophic (phosphate transporter PHT1.2 [PHT]) cell-specific promoters. Expression of GAPCp1 under the control of RBCS in gapcp1gapcp2 had no significant effect on the metabolite profile or growth in the aerial part (AP). GAPCp1 expression under the control of the PHT promoter clearly affected Arabidopsis development by increasing the number of lateral roots and having a major effect on AP growth and metabolite profile. Our results indicate that GAPCp1 is not functionally important in photosynthetic cells but plays a fundamental role in roots and in heterotrophic cells of the AP. Specifically, GAPCp activity may be required in root meristems and the root cap for normal primary root growth. Transcriptomic and metabolomic analyses indicate that the lack of GAPCp activity affects nitrogen and carbon metabolism as well as mineral nutrition and that glycerate and glutamine are the main metabolites responding to GAPCp activity. Thus, GAPCp could be an important metabolic connector of glycolysis with other pathways, such as the phosphorylated pathway of serine biosynthesis, the ammonium assimilation pathway, or the metabolism of γ-aminobutyrate, which in turn affect plant development.

  9. Crystallization of DIR1, a LTP2-like resistance signalling protein from Arabidopsis thaliana

    SciTech Connect

    Lascombe, Marie-Bernard; Buhot, Nathalie; Bakan, Bénédicte; Marion, Didier; Blein, Jean Pierre; Lamb, Chris J.; Prangé, Thierry

    2006-07-01

    DIR1, a putative LTP2 protein from Arabidopsis thaliana implicated in systemic acquired resistance in planta, has been crystallized in space group P2{sub 1}2{sub 1}2{sub 1} with one molecule per asymmetric unit. DIR1, a putative LTP2 protein from Arabidopsis thaliana implicated in systemic acquired resistance in planta, has been crystallized in space group P2{sub 1}2{sub 1}2{sub 1} with one molecule per asymmetric unit. The crystals diffract to a resolution of 1.6 Å.

  10. Cysteine-Generated Sulfide in the Cytosol Negatively Regulates Autophagy and Modulates the Transcriptional Profile in Arabidopsis[W

    PubMed Central

    Álvarez, Consolación; García, Irene; Moreno, Inmaculada; Pérez-Pérez, María Esther; Crespo, José L.; Romero, Luis C.; Gotor, Cecilia

    2012-01-01

    In Arabidopsis thaliana, DES1 is the only identified l-Cysteine desulfhydrase located in the cytosol, and it is involved in the degradation of cysteine and the concomitant production of H2S in this cell compartment. Detailed characterization of the T-DNA insertion mutants des1-1 and des1-2 has provided insight into the role of sulfide metabolically generated in the cytosol as a signaling molecule. Mutations of L-CYS DESULFHYDRASE 1 (DES1) impede H2S generation in the Arabidopsis cytosol and strongly affect plant metabolism. Senescence-associated vacuoles are detected in mesophyll protoplasts of des1 mutants. Additionally, DES1 deficiency promotes the accumulation and lipidation of the ATG8 protein, which is associated with the process of autophagy. The transcriptional profile of the des1-1 mutant corresponds to its premature senescence and autophagy-induction phenotypes, and restoring H2S generation has been shown to eliminate the phenotypic defects of des1 mutants. Moreover, sulfide is able to reverse ATG8 accumulation and lipidation, even in wild-type plants when autophagy is induced by carbon starvation, suggesting a general effect of sulfide on autophagy regulation that is unrelated to sulfur or nitrogen limitation stress. Our results suggest that cysteine-generated sulfide in the cytosol negatively regulates autophagy and modulates the transcriptional profile of Arabidopsis. PMID:23144183

  11. cis-1,2-Dichloroethylene

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    EPA / 635 / R - 09 / 006 F www.epa.gov / iris TOXICOLOGICAL REVIEW OF cis - 1,2 - DICHLOROETHYLENE and trans - 1,2 - DICHLOROETHYLENE ( CAS Nos . cis : 156 - 59 - 2 ; trans : 156 - 60 - 5 ; mixture : 540 - 59 - 0 ) In Support of Summary Information on the Integrated Risk Information System ( IRIS )

  12. A tetratricopeptide repeat domain-containing protein SSR1 located in mitochondria is involved in root development and auxin polar transport in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Min; Wang, Cuiping; Lin, Qingfang; Liu, Aihua; Wang, Ting; Feng, Xuanjun; Liu, Jie; Han, Huiling; Ma, Yan; Bonea, Diana; Zhao, Rongmin; Hua, Xuejun

    2015-08-01

    Auxin polar transport mediated by a group of Pin-formed (PIN) transporters plays important roles in plant root development. However, the mechanism underlying the PIN expression and targeting in response to different developmental and environmental stimuli is still not fully understood. Here, we report a previously uncharacterized gene SSR1, which encodes a mitochondrial protein with tetratricopeptide repeat (TPR) domains, and show its function in root development in Arabidopsis thaliana. In ssr1-2, a SSR1 knock-out mutant, the primary root growth was dramatically inhibited due to severely impaired cell proliferation and cell elongation. Significantly lowered level of auxin was found in ssr1-2 roots by auxin measurement and was further supported by reduced expression of DR5-driven reporter gene. As a result, the maintenance of the root stem cell niche is compromised in ssr1-2. It is further revealed that the expression level of several PIN proteins, namely, PIN1, PIN2, PIN3, PIN4 and PIN7, were markedly reduced in ssr1-2 roots. In particular, we showed that the reduced protein level of PIN2 on cell membrane in ssr1-2 is due to impaired retrograde trafficking, possibly resulting from a defect in retromer sorting system, which destines PIN2 for degradation in vacuoles. In conclusion, our results indicated that SSR1 is functioning in root development in Arabidopsis, possibly by affecting PIN protein expression and subcellular targeting.

  13. Increased Activity of the Vacuolar Monosaccharide Transporter TMT1 Alters Cellular Sugar Partitioning, Sugar Signaling, and Seed Yield in Arabidopsis1[OA

    PubMed Central

    Wingenter, Karina; Schulz, Alexander; Wormit, Alexandra; Wic, Stefan; Trentmann, Oliver; Hoermiller, Imke I.; Heyer, Arnd G.; Marten, Irene; Hedrich, Rainer; Neuhaus, H. Ekkehard

    2010-01-01

    The extent to which vacuolar sugar transport activity affects molecular, cellular, and developmental processes in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) is unknown. Electrophysiological analysis revealed that overexpression of the tonoplast monosaccharide transporter TMT1 in a tmt1-2::tDNA mutant led to increased proton-coupled monosaccharide import into isolated mesophyll vacuoles in comparison with wild-type vacuoles. TMT1 overexpressor mutants grew faster than wild-type plants on soil and in high-glucose (Glc)-containing liquid medium. These effects were correlated with increased vacuolar monosaccharide compartmentation, as revealed by nonaqueous fractionation and by chlorophyllab-binding protein1 and nitrate reductase1 gene expression studies. Soil-grown TMT1 overexpressor plants respired less Glc than wild-type plants and only about half the amount of Glc respired by tmt1-2::tDNA mutants. In sum, these data show that TMT activity in wild-type plants limits vacuolar monosaccharide loading. Remarkably, TMT1 overexpressor mutants produced larger seeds and greater total seed yield, which was associated with increased lipid and protein content. These changes in seed properties were correlated with slightly decreased nocturnal CO2 release and increased sugar export rates from detached source leaves. The SUC2 gene, which codes for a sucrose transporter that may be critical for phloem loading in leaves, has been identified as Glc repressed. Thus, the observation that SUC2 mRNA increased slightly in TMT1 overexpressor leaves, characterized by lowered cytosolic Glc levels than wild-type leaves, provided further evidence of a stimulated source capacity. In summary, increased TMT activity in Arabidopsis induced modified subcellular sugar compartmentation, altered cellular sugar sensing, affected assimilate allocation, increased the biomass of Arabidopsis seeds, and accelerated early plant development. PMID:20709831

  14. Starch Metabolism in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Streb, Sebastian; Zeeman, Samuel C.

    2012-01-01

    Starch is the major non-structural carbohydrate in plants. It serves as an important store of carbon that fuels plant metabolism and growth when they are unable to photosynthesise. This storage can be in leaves and other green tissues, where it is degraded during the night, or in heterotrophic tissues such as roots, seeds and tubers, where it is stored over longer time periods. Arabidopsis accumulates starch in many of its tissues, but mostly in its leaves during the day. It has proven to be a powerful genetic system for discovering how starch is synthesised and degraded, and new proteins and processes have been discovered. Such work has major significance for our starch crops, whose yield and quality could be improved by the application of this knowledge. Research into Arabidopsis starch metabolism has begun to reveal how its daily turnover is integrated into the rest of metabolism and adapted to the environmental conditions. Furthermore, Arabidopsis mutant lines deficient in starch metabolism have been employed as tools to study other biological processes ranging from sugar sensing to gravitropism and flowering time control. This review gives a detailed account of the use of Arabidopsis to study starch metabolism. It describes the major discoveries made and presents an overview of our understanding today, together with some as-yet unresolved questions. PMID:23393426

  15. Hypermethylated SUPERMAN epigenetic alleles in arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Jacobsen, S E; Meyerowitz, E M

    1997-08-22

    Mutations in the SUPERMAN gene affect flower development in Arabidopsis. Seven heritable but unstable sup epi-alleles (the clark kent alleles) are associated with nearly identical patterns of excess cytosine methylation within the SUP gene and a decreased level of SUP RNA. Revertants of these alleles are largely demethylated at the SUP locus and have restored levels of SUP RNA. A transgenic Arabidopsis line carrying an antisense methyltransferase gene, which shows an overall decrease in genomic cytosine methylation, also contains a hypermethylated sup allele. Thus, disruption of methylation systems may yield more complex outcomes than expected and can result in methylation defects at known genes. The clark kent alleles differ from the antisense line because they do not show a general decrease in genomic methylation.

  16. A R2R3-MYB transcription factor, GmMYB12B2, affects the expression levels of flavonoid biosynthesis genes encoding key enzymes in transgenic Arabidopsis plants.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiao-Wei; Li, Jing-Wen; Zhai, Ying; Zhao, Yan; Zhao, Xu; Zhang, Hai-Jun; Su, Lian-Tai; Wang, Ying; Wang, Qing-Yu

    2013-12-10

    Isoflavones play diverse roles in plant-microbe interactions and are potentially important for human nutrition and health. To study the regulation of isoflavonoid synthesis in soybean, the R2R3-MYB transcription factor GmMYB12B2 was isolated and characterized. Yeast expression experiments demonstrated that GmMYB12B2 showed transcriptional activity. GmMYB12B2 was localized in the nucleus when it was transiently expressed in onion epidermal cells. Real-time quantitative PCR analysis revealed that GmMYB12B2 transcription was increased in roots and mature seeds compared with other organs. The gene expression level in immature embryos was consistent with the accumulation of isoflavones. CHS8 is a key enzyme in plant flavonoid biosynthesis. Transient expression experiments in soybean calli demonstrated that CHS8 was regulated by GmMYB12B2 and produced more fluorescence. The expression levels of some key enzymes in flavonoid biosynthesis were examined in transgenic Arabidopsis lines. The results showed that the expression levels of PAL1, CHS and FLS in transgenic plants were significantly higher than those in wild type plants. However, the expression level of DFR was lower, and the expression levels of CHI, F3H and F3'H were the same in all lines. GmMYB12B2 expression caused a constitutive increase in the accumulation of flavonoids in transgenic Arabidopsis lines compared with wild type plants.

  17. Arabidopsis assay for mutagenicity.

    PubMed

    Gichner, T; Badayev, S A; Demchenko, S I; Relichová, J; Sandhu, S S; Usmanov, P D; Usmanova, O; Velemínský, J

    1994-10-16

    Four laboratories, two in the Czech Republic (Brno and Prague) and two in the CIS (Moscow and Duschanbe), participated in the International Programme on Chemical Safety's (IPCS) collaborative study to evaluate the utility of the most commonly used plant test systems, including the Arabidopsis thaliana assay, for assessing the mutagenic potential of environmental agents. Out of the five compounds evaluated in the Arabidopsis assay, three compounds, i.e., ethyl methanesulfonate, N-methyl-N-nitrosourea, and azidoglycerol, were reported to be mutagenic by all four participating laboratories. Sodium azide (NaN3) demonstrated a negative response in all four laboratories, whereas maleic hydrazide was reported to be weakly mutagenic by one laboratory and nonmutagenic by the other three laboratories.

  18. Mutant analysis, protein-protein interactions and subcellular localization of the Arabidopsis B sister (ABS) protein.

    PubMed

    Kaufmann, Kerstin; Anfang, Nicole; Saedler, Heinz; Theissen, Günter

    2005-09-01

    Recently, close relatives of class B floral homeotic genes, termed B(sister) genes, have been identified in both angiosperms and gymnosperms. In contrast to the B genes themselves, B(sister) genes are exclusively expressed in female reproductive organs, especially in the envelopes or integuments surrounding the ovules. This suggests an important ancient function in ovule or seed development for B(sister) genes, which has been conserved for about 300 million years. However, investigation of the first loss-of-function mutant for a B(sister) gene (ABS/TT16 from Arabidopsis) revealed only a weak phenotype affecting endothelium formation. Here, we present an analysis of two additional mutant alleles, which corroborates this weak phenotype. Transgenic plants that ectopically express ABS show changes in the growth and identity of floral organs, suggesting that ABS can interact with floral homeotic proteins. Yeast-two-hybrid and three-hybrid analyses indicated that ABS can form dimers with SEPALLATA (SEP) floral homeotic proteins and multimeric complexes that also include the AGAMOUS-like proteins SEEDSTICK (STK) or SHATTERPROOF1/2 (SHP1, SHP2). These data suggest that the formation of multimeric transcription factor complexes might be a general phenomenon among MIKC-type MADS-domain proteins in angiosperms. Heterodimerization of ABS with SEP3 was confirmed by gel retardation assays. Fusion proteins tagged with CFP (Cyan Fluorescent Protein) and YFP (Yellow Fluorescent Protein) in Arabidopsis protoplasts showed that ABS is localized in the nucleus. Phylogenetic analysis revealed the presence of a structurally deviant, but closely related, paralogue of ABS in the Arabidopsis genome. Thus the evolutionary developmental genetics of B(sister) genes can probably only be understood as part of a complex and redundant gene network that may govern ovule formation in a conserved manner, which has yet to be fully explored.

  19. 1,1,2-Trichloroethane

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    1,1,2 - Trichloroethane ; CASRN 79 - 00 - 5 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for Noncarcino

  20. trans-1,2-Dichloroethylene

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    trans - 1,2 - Dichloroethylene ; CASRN 156 - 60 - 5 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for No

  1. 1,2,3-Trichloropropane

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    1,2,3 - Trichloropropane ; CASRN 96 - 18 - 4 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in IRIS only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data by U.S . EPA health scientists from several program offices , regional offices , and the Office of Research and Development

  2. 1,1,2-Trichloropropane

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    1,1,2 - Trichloropropane ; CASRN 598 - 77 - 6 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for Noncarci

  3. 1,2,4-Trichlorobenzene

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    1,2,4 - Trichlorobenzene ; CASRN 120 - 82 - 1 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for Noncarci

  4. 1,2,4-Tribromobenzene

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    1,2,4 - Tribromobenzene ; CASRN 615 - 54 - 3 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for Noncarcin

  5. 1,2-Epoxybutane (EBU)

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    1,2 - Epoxybutane ( EBU ) ; CASRN 106 - 88 - 7 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for Noncarc

  6. Effect of cultural conditions on the seed-to-seed growth of Arabidopsis and Cardamine - A study of growth rates and reproductive development as affected by test tube seals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoshizaki, T.

    1982-01-01

    The effects of test tube seals on the growth, flowering, and seed pod formation of Arabidopsis thaliana (L.) Heynh., mouse ear cress, and Cardamine oligosperma Nutt, bitter cress, are studied in order to assess the conditions used in weightlessness experiments. Among other results, it is found that the growth (height) and flowering (date of bud appearance) were suppressed in mouse ear cress in tubes sealed with Saran. Seed pod formation which occurred by day 45 in open-to-air controls, was still lacking in the sealed plants even up to day 124. The growth and flowering of bitter cress were also suppressed by the Saran seal, although up to day 55 the Saran-sealed plants were taller. It is suggested that atmospheric composition was the cause of the suppression of growth, flowering, and seed pod development in these plants, since the mouse ear cress renewed their growth and then set seed pods after the Saran seal was ruptured.

  7. Effect of cultural conditions on the seed-to-seed growth of Arabidopsis and Cardamine - A study of growth rates and reproductive development as affected by test tube seals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoshizaki, T.

    1982-01-01

    The effects of test tube seals on the growth, flowering, and seed pod formation of Arabidopsis thaliana (L.) Heynh., mouse ear cress, and Cardamine oligosperma Nutt, bitter cress, are studied in order to assess the conditions used in weightlessness experiments. Among other results, it is found that the growth (height) and flowering (date of bud appearance) were suppressed in mouse ear cress in tubes sealed with Saran. Seed pod formation which occurred by day 45 in open-to-air controls, was still lacking in the sealed plants even up to day 124. The growth and flowering of bitter cress were also suppressed by the Saran seal, although up to day 55 the Saran-sealed plants were taller. It is suggested that atmospheric composition was the cause of the suppression of growth, flowering, and seed pod development in these plants, since the mouse ear cress renewed their growth and then set seed pods after the Saran seal was ruptured.

  8. [Imprinting genes and it's expression in Arabidopsis].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hong-Yu; Xu, Pei-Zhou; Yang, Hua; Wu, Xian-Jun

    2010-07-01

    Genomic imprinting refers to the phenomenon that the expression of a gene copy depends on its parent of origin. The Arabidopsis imprinted FIS (Fertilisation-independent seed) genes, mea, fis2, and fie, play essential roles in the repression of central cell and the regulation of early endosperm development. fis mutants display two phenotypes: autonomous diploid endosperm development when fertilization is absent and un-cellularised endosperm formation when fertilization occurs. The FIS Polycomb protein complex including the above three FIS proteins catalyzes histone H3 K27 tri-methylation on target loci. DME (DEMETER), a DNA glycosylase, and AtMET1 (Methyltransferase1), a DNA methyltransferase, are involved in the regulation of imprinted expression of both mea and fis2. This review summarizes the studies on the Arabidopsis imprinted FIS genes and other related genes. Recent works have shown that the insertion of transposons may affect nearby gene expression, which may be the main driving force behind the evolution of genomic imprinting. This summary covers the achievements on Arabidopsis imprinted genes will provide important information for studies on genomic imprinting in the important crops such as rice and maize.

  9. Sodium Influx and Accumulation in Arabidopsis1

    PubMed Central

    Essah, Pauline A.; Davenport, Romola; Tester, Mark

    2003-01-01

    Arabidopsis is frequently used as a genetic model in plant salt tolerance studies, however, its physiological responses to salinity remain poorly characterized. This study presents a characterization of initial Na+ entry and the effects of Ca2+ on plant growth and net Na+ accumulation in saline conditions. Unidirectional Na+ influx was measured carefully using very short influx times in roots of 12-d-old seedlings. Influx showed three components with distinct sensitivities to Ca2+, diethylpyrocarbonate, and osmotic pretreatment. Pharmacological agents and known mutants were used to test the contribution of different transport pathways to Na+ uptake. Influx was stimulated by 4-aminobutyric acid and glutamic acid; was inhibited by flufenamate, quinine, and cGMP; and was insensitive to modulators of K+ and Ca2+ channels. Influx did not differ from wild type in akt1 and hkt1 insertional mutants. These data suggested that influx was mediated by several different types of nonselective cation channels. Na+ accumulation in plants grown in 50 mm NaCl was strongly reduced by increasing Ca2+ activity (from 0.05-3.0 mm), and plant survival was improved. However, plant biomass was not affected by shoot Na+ concentration, suggesting that in Arabidopsis Na+ toxicity is not dependent on shoot Na+ accumulation. These data suggest that Arabidopsis is a good model for investigation of Na+ transport, but may be of limited utility as a model for the study of Na+ toxicity. PMID:12970496

  10. Targeted Enhancement of Glutamate-to-γ-Aminobutyrate Conversion in Arabidopsis Seeds Affects Carbon-Nitrogen Balance and Storage Reserves in a Development-Dependent Manner1[W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Fait, Aaron; Nesi, Adriano Nunes; Angelovici, Ruthie; Lehmann, Martin; Pham, Phuong Anh; Song, Luhua; Haslam, Richard P.; Napier, Johnathan A.; Galili, Gad; Fernie, Alisdair R.

    2011-01-01

    In seeds, glutamate decarboxylase (GAD) operates at the metabolic nexus between carbon and nitrogen metabolism by catalyzing the unidirectional decarboxylation of glutamate to form γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA). To elucidate the regulatory role of GAD in seed development, we generated Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) transgenic plants expressing a truncated GAD from Petunia hybrida missing the carboxyl-terminal regulatory Ca2+-calmodulin-binding domain under the transcriptional regulation of the seed maturation-specific phaseolin promoter. Dry seeds of the transgenic plants accumulated considerable amounts of GABA, and during desiccation the content of several amino acids increased, although not glutamate or proline. Dry transgenic seeds had higher protein content than wild-type seeds but lower amounts of the intermediates of glycolysis, glycerol and malate. The total fatty acid content of the transgenic seeds was 50% lower than in the wild type, while acyl-coenzyme A accumulated in the transgenic seeds. Labeling experiments revealed altered levels of respiration in the transgenic seeds, and fractionation studies indicated reduced incorporation of label in the sugar and lipid fractions extracted from transgenic seeds. Comparative transcript profiling of the dry seeds supported the metabolic data. Cellular processes up-regulated at the transcript level included the tricarboxylic acid cycle, fatty acid elongation, the shikimate pathway, tryptophan metabolism, nitrogen-carbon remobilization, and programmed cell death. Genes involved in the regulation of germination were similarly up-regulated. Taken together, these results indicate that the GAD-mediated conversion of glutamate to GABA during seed development plays an important role in balancing carbon and nitrogen metabolism and in storage reserve accumulation. PMID:21921115

  11. A petal breakstrength meter for Arabidopsis abscission studies

    PubMed Central

    Lease, Kevin A; Cho, Sung Ki; Walker, John C

    2006-01-01

    Background Abscission is the regulated dropping of plant organs, such as leaves or flower petals. This process involves a break down of the cell wall between layers of cells in the abscission zone, causing the organ to become detached. The model plant Arabidopsis thaliana undergoes floral organ abscission. Various experimental methods have been used to study Arabidopsis floral organ abscission, including measuring the petal breakstrength, or the amount of force required to pull a petal from the receptacle. Petal breakstrength provides a quantitative insight into the physical integrity of the petal abscission zone. Results We developed a petal breakstrength meter that allows rapid data acquisition on a personal computer. We present the design of the device and show its utility in measuring Arabidopsis petal breakstrength for abscission studies. Conclusion This petal breakstrength meter should enable researchers to perform the petal breakstrength assay as a routine part of the characterization of environmental and genetic factors affecting abscission. PMID:16483376

  12. Study of cis-cinnamic acid in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Wong, Wai Shing; Guo, Di; Wang, Xiao Li; Yin, Zhi Qi; Xia, Bing; Li, Ning

    2005-01-01

    Trans-cinnamic acid (CA) can be isomerized to cis-CA in Arabidopsis thaliana extract under sunlight. Piperonylic acid treatment of Arabidopsis under ultraviolet (UV) light increased the level of cis-CA in these treated tissues. Similarly, cis-CA was also detected from Oryza sativa seedlings grown under sunlight. These results suggest that cis-CA may occur in planta. Application of cis-CA to seedlings of both wild type Arabidopsis and auxin-insensitive mutants, aux1 and axr2, resulted in nearly identical dose response curves in root growth, indicating that the mode of action by which cis-CA affects plant growth is different from that of auxins. According to root growth inhibition assay, cis-CA is nearly 10 times more active than trans-CA. These results suggest that cis-CA is a unique plant growth regulator but its in vivo function remains to be elucidated.

  13. A Homolog of Blade-On-Petiole 1 and 2 (BOP1/2) Controls Internode Length and Homeotic Changes of the Barley Inflorescence.

    PubMed

    Jost, Matthias; Taketa, Shin; Mascher, Martin; Himmelbach, Axel; Yuo, Takahisa; Shahinnia, Fahimeh; Rutten, Twan; Druka, Arnis; Schmutzer, Thomas; Steuernagel, Burkhard; Beier, Sebastian; Taudien, Stefan; Scholz, Uwe; Morgante, Michele; Waugh, Robbie; Stein, Nils

    2016-06-01

    Inflorescence architecture in small-grain cereals has a direct effect on yield and is an important selection target in breeding for yield improvement. We analyzed the recessive mutation laxatum-a (lax-a) in barley (Hordeum vulgare), which causes pleiotropic changes in spike development, resulting in (1) extended rachis internodes conferring a more relaxed inflorescence, (2) broadened base of the lemma awns, (3) thinner grains that are largely exposed due to reduced marginal growth of the palea and lemma, and (4) and homeotic conversion of lodicules into two stamenoid structures. Map-based cloning enforced by mapping-by-sequencing of the mutant lax-a locus enabled the identification of a homolog of BLADE-ON-PETIOLE1 (BOP1) and BOP2 as the causal gene. Interestingly, the recently identified barley uniculme4 gene also is a BOP1/2 homolog and has been shown to regulate tillering and leaf sheath development. While the Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) BOP1 and BOP2 genes act redundantly, the barley genes contribute independent effects in specifying the developmental growth of vegetative and reproductive organs, respectively. Analysis of natural genetic diversity revealed strikingly different haplotype diversity for the two paralogous barley genes, likely affected by the respective genomic environments, since no indication for an active selection process was detected. © 2016 American Society of Plant Biologists. All Rights Reserved.

  14. A Homolog of Blade-On-Petiole 1 and 2 (BOP1/2) Controls Internode Length and Homeotic Changes of the Barley Inflorescence1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Taketa, Shin; Mascher, Martin; Yuo, Takahisa; Beier, Sebastian; Taudien, Stefan; Morgante, Michele

    2016-01-01

    Inflorescence architecture in small-grain cereals has a direct effect on yield and is an important selection target in breeding for yield improvement. We analyzed the recessive mutation laxatum-a (lax-a) in barley (Hordeum vulgare), which causes pleiotropic changes in spike development, resulting in (1) extended rachis internodes conferring a more relaxed inflorescence, (2) broadened base of the lemma awns, (3) thinner grains that are largely exposed due to reduced marginal growth of the palea and lemma, and (4) and homeotic conversion of lodicules into two stamenoid structures. Map-based cloning enforced by mapping-by-sequencing of the mutant lax-a locus enabled the identification of a homolog of BLADE-ON-PETIOLE1 (BOP1) and BOP2 as the causal gene. Interestingly, the recently identified barley uniculme4 gene also is a BOP1/2 homolog and has been shown to regulate tillering and leaf sheath development. While the Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) BOP1 and BOP2 genes act redundantly, the barley genes contribute independent effects in specifying the developmental growth of vegetative and reproductive organs, respectively. Analysis of natural genetic diversity revealed strikingly different haplotype diversity for the two paralogous barley genes, likely affected by the respective genomic environments, since no indication for an active selection process was detected. PMID:27208226

  15. Type-f thioredoxins have a role in the short-term activation of carbon metabolism and their loss affects growth under short-day conditions in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Naranjo, Belén; Diaz-Espejo, Antonio; Lindahl, Marika; Cejudo, Francisco Javier

    2016-03-01

    Redox regulation plays a central role in the adaptation of chloroplast metabolism to light. Extensive biochemical analyses in vitro have identified f-type thioredoxins (Trxs) as the most important catalysts for light-dependent reduction and activation of the enzymes of the Calvin-Benson cycle. However, the precise function of type f Trxs in vivo and their impact on plant growth are still poorly known. To address this issue we have generated an Arabidopsis thaliana double knock-out mutant, termed trxf1f2, devoid of both f1 and f2 Trxs. Despite the essential function previously proposed for f-type Trxs, the visible phenotype of the trxf1f2 double mutant was virtually indistinguishable from the wild type when grown under a long-day photoperiod. However, the Trx f-deficient plants showed growth inhibition under a short-day photoperiod which was not rescued at high light intensity. The absence of f-type Trxs led to significantly lower photosynthetic electron transport rates and higher levels of non-photochemical energy quenching. Notably, the Trx f null mutant suffered from a shortage of photosystem I electron acceptors and delayed activation of carbon dioxide fixation following a dark-light transition. Two redox-regulated Calvin-Benson cycle enzymes, fructose 1,6-bisphosphatase (FBPase) and Rubisco activase, showed retarded and incomplete reduction in the double mutant upon illumination, compared with wild-type plants. These results show that the function of f-type Trxs in the rapid activation of carbon metabolism in response to light is not entirely compensated for by additional plastid redox systems, and suggest that these Trxs have an important role in the light adjustment of photosynthetic metabolism.

  16. Type-f thioredoxins have a role in the short-term activation of carbon metabolism and their loss affects growth under short-day conditions in Arabidopsis thaliana

    PubMed Central

    Naranjo, Belén; Diaz-Espejo, Antonio; Lindahl, Marika; Cejudo, Francisco Javier

    2016-01-01

    Redox regulation plays a central role in the adaptation of chloroplast metabolism to light. Extensive biochemical analyses in vitro have identified f-type thioredoxins (Trxs) as the most important catalysts for light-dependent reduction and activation of the enzymes of the Calvin–Benson cycle. However, the precise function of type f Trxs in vivo and their impact on plant growth are still poorly known. To address this issue we have generated an Arabidopsis thaliana double knock-out mutant, termed trxf1f2, devoid of both f1 and f2 Trxs. Despite the essential function previously proposed for f-type Trxs, the visible phenotype of the trxf1f2 double mutant was virtually indistinguishable from the wild type when grown under a long-day photoperiod. However, the Trx f-deficient plants showed growth inhibition under a short-day photoperiod which was not rescued at high light intensity. The absence of f-type Trxs led to significantly lower photosynthetic electron transport rates and higher levels of non-photochemical energy quenching. Notably, the Trx f null mutant suffered from a shortage of photosystem I electron acceptors and delayed activation of carbon dioxide fixation following a dark–light transition. Two redox-regulated Calvin–Benson cycle enzymes, fructose 1,6-bisphosphatase (FBPase) and Rubisco activase, showed retarded and incomplete reduction in the double mutant upon illumination, compared with wild-type plants. These results show that the function of f-type Trxs in the rapid activation of carbon metabolism in response to light is not entirely compensated for by additional plastid redox systems, and suggest that these Trxs have an important role in the light adjustment of photosynthetic metabolism. PMID:26842981

  17. LaAP2L1, a heterosis-associated AP2/EREBP transcription factor of Larix, increases organ size and final biomass by affecting cell proliferation in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Li, Ai; Zhou, Yanan; Jin, Chuan; Song, Wenqin; Chen, Chengbin; Wang, Chunguo

    2013-11-01

    In Larix and in some crops, heterosis is prevalent and has been widely used in breeding to produce excellent varieties. However, the molecular basis of heterosis in Larix remains ambiguous. LaAP2L1, a member of the AP2/EREBP transcription factor family, has been suggested to be involved in heterosis in Larix hybrids. Here, the function and regulation of LaAP2L1 were further explored. Overexpression of LaAP2L1 led to markedly enlarged organs and heterosis-like traits in Arabidopsis. Fresh weight of leaves was almost twice as great as in vector controls. Likewise, seed yield of 35S::LaAP2L1 individual plants was >200% greater than that of control plants. The enlarged organs and heterosis-like traits displayed by 35S::LaAP2L1 plants were mainly due to enhanced cell proliferation and prolonged growth duration. At the molecular level, LaAP2L1 upregulated the expression of ANT, EBP1, and CycD3;1 and inhibited the expression of ARGOS in 35S::LaAP2L1 plants, suggesting an important molecular role of LaAP2L1 in regulating plant organ development. These findings provide new insights into the formation of heterosis in woody plants and suggest that LaAP2L1 has potential applications in breeding high-yielding crops and energy plants. In addition, 50 AP2/EREBP transcription factors, including LaAP2L1, in Larix were identified by transcriptome sequencing, and phylogenetic analysis was conducted. This provided information that will be important in further revealing the functions of these transcription factors.

  18. ITN1, a novel gene encoding an ankyrin-repeat protein that affects the ABA-mediated production of reactive oxygen species and is involved in salt-stress tolerance in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Sakamoto, Hikaru; Matsuda, Osamu; Iba, Koh

    2008-11-01

    Salt stress and abscisic acid (ABA) induce accumulation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in plant cells. ROS not only act as second messengers for the activation of salt-stress responses, but also have deleterious effects on plant growth due to their cytotoxicity. Therefore, the timing and degree of activation of ROS-producing or ROS-scavenging enzymes must be tightly regulated under salt-stress conditions. We identified a novel locus of Arabidopsis, designated itn1 (increased tolerance to NaCl1), whose disruption leads to increased salt-stress tolerance in vegetative tissues. ITN1 encodes a transmembrane protein with an ankyrin-repeat motif that has been implicated in diverse cellular processes such as signal transduction. Comparative microarray analysis between wild-type and the itn1 mutant revealed that induction of genes encoding the ROS-producing NADPH oxidases (RBOHC and RBOHD) under salt-stress conditions was suppressed in the mutant. This suppression was accompanied by a corresponding reduction in ROS accumulation. The ABA-induced expression of RBOHC and RBOHD was also suppressed in the mutant, as was the case for RD29A, an ABA-inducible marker gene. However, the ABA-induced expression of another marker gene, RD22, was not impaired in the mutant. These results suggest that the itn1 mutation partially impairs ABA signaling pathways, possibly leading to the reduction in ROS accumulation under salt-stress conditions. We discuss the possible mechanisms underlying the salt-tolerant phenotype of the itn1 mutant.

  19. Transgenic Arabidopsis Gene Expression System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ferl, Robert; Paul, Anna-Lisa

    2009-01-01

    The Transgenic Arabidopsis Gene Expression System (TAGES) investigation is one in a pair of investigations that use the Advanced Biological Research System (ABRS) facility. TAGES uses Arabidopsis thaliana, thale cress, with sensor promoter-reporter gene constructs that render the plants as biomonitors (an organism used to determine the quality of the surrounding environment) of their environment using real-time nondestructive Green Fluorescent Protein (GFP) imagery and traditional postflight analyses.

  20. Arabidopsis gene expression patterns are altered during spaceflight

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paul, Anna-Lisa; Popp, Michael P.; Gurley, William B.; Guy, Charles; Norwood, Kelly L.; Ferl, Robert J.

    The exposure of Arabidopsis thaliana (Arabidopsis) plants to spaceflight environments results in differential gene expression. A 5-day mission on orbiter Columbia in 1999 (STS-93) carried transgenic Arabidopsis plants engineered with a transgene composed of the alcohol dehydrogenase (Adh) gene promoter linked to the β-Glucuronidase (GUS) reporter gene. The plants were used to evaluate the effects of spaceflight on gene expression patterns initially by using the Adh/GUS transgene to address specifically the possibility that spaceflight induces a hypoxic stress response (Paul, A.L., Daugherty, C.J., Bihn, E.A., Chapman, D.K., Norwood, K.L., Ferl, R.J., 2001. Transgene expression patterns indicate that spaceflight affects stress signal perception and transduction in arabidopsis, Plant Physiol. 126, 613-621). As a follow-on to the reporter gene analysis, we report here the evaluation of genome-wide patterns of native gene expression within Arabidopsis shoots utilizing the Agilent DNA array of 21,000 Arabidopsis genes. As a control for the veracity of the array analyses, a selection of genes was further characterized with quantitative Real-Time RT PCR (ABI - Taqman®). Comparison of the patterns of expression for arrays probed with RNA isolated from plants exposed to spaceflight compared to RNA isolated from ground control plants revealed 182 genes that were differentially expressed in response to the spaceflight mission by more than 4-fold, and of those only 50 genes were expressed at levels chosen to support a conservative change call. None of the genes that are hallmarks of hypoxic stress were induced to this level. However, genes related to heat shock were dramatically induced - but in a pattern and under growth conditions that are not easily explained by elevated temperatures. These gene expression data are discussed in light of current models for plant responses to the spaceflight environment and with regard to potential future spaceflight experiment

  1. Expression of BvGLP-1 encoding a germin-like protein from sugar beet in Arabidopsis thaliana leads to resistance against phytopathogenic fungi.

    PubMed

    Knecht, Katrin; Seyffarth, Monique; Desel, Christine; Thurau, Tim; Sherameti, Irena; Lou, Binggan; Oelmüller, Ralf; Cai, Daguang

    2010-04-01

    Nematode (Heterodera schachtii) resistance in sugar beet (Beta vulgaris) is controlled by a single dominant resistance gene, Hs1(pro-1). BvGLP-1 was cloned from resistant sugar beet. The BvGLP-1 messenger (m)RNA is highly upregulated in the resistant plants after nematode infection, suggesting its role in the Hs1(pro-1) mediated resistance. BvGLP-1 exhibits sequence homology to a set of plant germin-like proteins (GLP), from which several have proved to be functional in plant basal or defense resistance against fungal pathogens. To test whether BvGLP-1 is also involved in the plant-fungus interaction, we transferred BvGLP-1 into Arabidopsis and challenged the transgenic plants with the pathogenic fungi Verticillium longisporum and Rhizoctonia solani as well as with the beneficial endophytic fungus Piriformospora indica. The expression of BvGLP-1 in Arabidopsis elevated the H(2)O(2) content and conferred significant resistance to V. longisporum and R. solani but did not affect the beneficial interaction with P. indica in seedlings. Microscopic observations revealed a dramatic reduction in the amount of hyphae of the pathogenic fungi on the root surface as well as of fungal mycelium developed inside the roots of transgenic Arabidopsis compared with wild-type plants. Molecular analysis demonstrated that the BvGLP-1 expression in Arabidopsis constitutively activates the expression of a subset of plant defense-related proteins such as PR-1 to PR-4 and PDF1.2 but not PDF2.1 and PDF2.3. In contrast, the PDF2.1 mRNA level was downregulated. These data suggest an important role of BvGLP-1 in establishment of plant defense responses, which follow specific signaling routes that diverge from those induced by the beneficial fungus.

  2. Brassinosteroids in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Fujioka, S; Noguchi, T; Yokota, T; Takatsuto, S; Yoshida, S

    1998-06-01

    From the seeds and siliques of Arabidopsis thaliana, six brassinosteroids, brassinolide, castasterone, typhasterol, 6-deoxocastasterone, 6-deoxotyphasterol and 6-deoxoteasterone, were identified by GC-mass spectrometry or GC-selected ion monitoring. As the occurrence of castasterone, typhasterol, 6-deoxocastasterone and 6-deoxotyphasterol in the shoots of A. thaliana has already been reported, this study provides evidence for the occurrence of the above four brassinosteroids in different organs, seeds and siliques, and the first evidence for the occurrence of brassinolide and 6-deoxoteasterone in A. thaliana. All brassinosteroids identified in this study belong to important components of both the early and late C-6 oxidation pathways, which were established in the cultured cells of Catharanthus roseus. This suggests that both pathways are operating in A. thaliana to produce the most biologically active brassinosteroid, brassinolide, which is responsible for growth and development of the plant.

  3. Auxin polar transport in arabidopsis under simulated microgravity conditions - relevance to growth and development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyamoto, K.; Oka, M.; Yamamoto, R.; Masuda, Y.; Hoson, T.; Kamisaka, S.; Ueda, J.

    1999-01-01

    Activity of auxin polar transport in inflorescence axes of Arabidopsis thaliana grown under simulated microgravity conditions was studied in relation to the growth and development. Seeds were germinated and allowed to grow on an agar medium in test tubes on a horizontal clinostat. Horizontal clinostat rotation substantially reduced the growth of inflorescence axes and the productivity of seeds of Arabidopsis thaliana (ecotypes Landsberg erecta and Columbia), although it little affected seed germination, development of rosette leaves and flowering. The activity of auxin polar transport in inflorescence axes decreased when Arabidopsis plants were grown on a horizontal clinostat from germination stage, being ca. 60% of 1 g control. On the other hand, the auxin polar transport in inflorescence axes of Arabidopsis grown in 1 g conditions was not affected when the segments were exposed to various gravistimuli, including 3-dimensional clinorotation, during transport experiments. Pin-formed mutant of Arabidopsis, having a unique structure of the inflorescence axis with no flower and extremely low levels of the activity of auxin polar transport in inflorescence axes and endogenous auxin, did not continue its vegetative growth under clinostat rotation. These facts suggest that the development of the system of auxin polar transport in Arabidopsis is affected by microgravity, resulting in the inhibition of growth and development, especially during reproductive growth.

  4. Contributions of two cytosolic glutamine synthetase isozymes to ammonium assimilation in Arabidopsis roots.

    PubMed

    Konishi, Noriyuki; Ishiyama, Keiki; Beier, Marcel Pascal; Inoue, Eri; Kanno, Keiichi; Yamaya, Tomoyuki; Takahashi, Hideki; Kojima, Soichi

    2016-12-21

    Glutamine synthetase (GS) catalyzes a reaction that incorporates ammonium into glutamate and yields glutamine in the cytosol and chloroplasts. Although the enzymatic characteristics of the GS1 isozymes are well known, their physiological functions in ammonium assimilation and regulation in roots remain unclear. In this study we show evidence that two cytosolic GS1 isozymes (GLN1;2 and GLN1;3) contribute to ammonium assimilation in Arabidopsis roots. Arabidopsis T-DNA insertion lines for GLN1;2 and GLN1;3 (i.e. gln1;2 and gln1;3 single-mutants), the gln1;2:gln1;3 double-mutant, and the wild-type accession (Col-0) were grown in hydroponic culture with variable concentrations of ammonium to compare their growth, and their content of nitrogen, carbon, ammonium, and amino acids. GLN1;2 and GLN1;3 promoter-dependent green fluorescent protein was observed under conditions with or without ammonium supply. Loss of GLN1;2 caused significant suppression of plant growth and glutamine biosynthesis under ammonium-replete conditions. In contrast, loss of GLN1;3 caused slight defects in growth and Gln biosynthesis that were only visible based on a comparison of the gln1;2 single- and gln1;2:gln1;3 double-mutants. GLN1;2, being the most abundantly expressed GS1 isozyme, markedly increased following ammonium supply and its promoter activity was localized at the cortex and epidermis, while GLN1;3 showed only low expression at the pericycle, suggesting their different physiological contributions to ammonium assimilation in roots. The GLN1;2 promoter-deletion analysis identified regulatory sequences required for controlling ammonium-responsive gene expression of GLN1;2 in Arabidopsis roots. These results shed light on GLN1 isozyme-specific regulatory mechanisms in Arabidopsis that allow adaptation to an ammonium-replete environment.

  5. Abscisic acid deficiency increases defence responses against Myzus persicae in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Hillwig, Melissa S; Chiozza, Mariana; Casteel, Clare L; Lau, Siau Ting; Hohenstein, Jessica; Hernández, Enrique; Jander, Georg; MacIntosh, Gustavo C

    2016-02-01

    Comparison of Arabidopsis thaliana (Arabidopsis) gene expression induced by Myzus persicae (green peach aphid) feeding, aphid saliva infiltration and abscisic acid (ABA) treatment showed a significant positive correlation. In particular, ABA-regulated genes are over-represented among genes that are induced by M. persicae saliva infiltration into Arabidopsis leaves. This suggests that the induction of ABA-related gene expression could be an important component of the Arabidopsis-aphid interaction. Consistent with this hypothesis, M. persicae populations induced ABA production in wild-type plants. Furthermore, aphid populations were smaller on Arabidopsis aba1-1 mutants, which cannot synthesize ABA, and showed a significant preference for wild-type plants compared with the mutant. Total free amino acids, which play an important role in aphid nutrition, were not altered in the aba1-1 mutant line, but the levels of isoleucine (Ile) and tryptophan (Trp) were differentially affected by aphids in wild-type and mutant plants. Recently, indole glucosinolates have been shown to promote aphid resistance in Arabidopsis. In this study, 4-methoxyindol-3-ylmethylglucosinolate was more abundant in the aba1-1 mutant than in wild-type Arabidopsis, suggesting that the induction of ABA signals that decrease the accumulation of defence compounds may be beneficial for aphids. © 2015 BSPP AND JOHN WILEY & SONS LTD.

  6. Possible Role of MADS AFFECTING FLOWERING 3 and B-BOX DOMAIN PROTEIN 19 in Flowering Time Regulation of Arabidopsis Mutants with Defects in Nonsense-Mediated mRNA Decay

    PubMed Central

    Nasim, Zeeshan; Fahim, Muhammad; Ahn, Ji Hoon

    2017-01-01

    Eukaryotic cells use nonsense-mediated mRNA decay (NMD) to clear aberrant mRNAs from the cell, thus preventing the accumulation of truncated proteins. In Arabidopsis, two UP-Frameshift (UPF) proteins, UPF1 and UPF3, play a critical role in NMD. Although deficiency of UPF1 and UPF3 leads to various developmental defects, little is known about the mechanism underlying the regulation of flowering time by NMD. Here, we showed that the upf1-5 and upf3-1 mutants had a late-flowering phenotype under long-day conditions and the upf1-5 upf3-1 double mutants had an additive effect in delaying flowering time. RNA sequencing of the upf mutants revealed that UPF3 exerted a stronger effect than UPF1 in the UPF-mediated regulation of flowering time. Among genes known to regulate flowering time, FLOWERING LOCUS C (FLC) mRNA levels increased (up to 8-fold) in upf mutants, as confirmed by qPCR. The upf1-5, upf3-1, and upf1-5 upf3-1 mutants responded to vernalization, suggesting a role of FLC in delayed flowering of upf mutants. Consistent with the high FLC transcript levels and delayed flowering in upf mutants, levels of FLOWERING LOCUS T (FT) and SUPPRESSOR OF OVEREXPRESSION OF CONSTANS 1 (SOC1) mRNAs were reduced in the upf mutants. However, RNA-seq did not identify an aberrant FLC transcript containing a premature termination codon (PTC), suggesting that FLC is not a direct target in the regulation of flowering time by NMD. Among flowering time regulators that act in an FLC-dependent manner, we found that MAF3, NF-YA2, NF-YA5, and TAF14 showed increased transcript levels in upf mutants. We also found that BBX19 and ATC, which act in an FLC-independent manner, showed increased transcript levels in upf mutants. An aberrant transcript containing a PTC was identified from MAF3 and BBX19 and the levels of the aberrant transcripts increased in upf mutants. Taking these results together, we propose that the late-flowering phenotype of upf mutants is mediated by at least two different

  7. AtC3H14, a plant-specific tandem CCCH zinc-finger protein, binds to its target mRNAs in a sequence-specific manner and affects cell elongation in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Kim, Won-Chan; Kim, Joo-Yeol; Ko, Jae-Heung; Kang, Hunseung; Kim, Jungmook; Han, Kyung-Hwan

    2014-12-01

    AtC3H14 (At1 g66810) is a plant-specific tandem CCCH zinc-finger (TZF) protein that belongs to the 68-member CCCH family in Arabidopsis thaliana. In animals, TZFs have been shown to bind and recruit target mRNAs to the cytoplasmic foci where mRNA decay enzymes are active. However, it is not known whether plant TZF proteins such as AtC3H14 function. So far, no mRNA targets of plant TZFs have been identified. We have obtained several lines of experimental evidence in support of our hypothesis that AtC3H14 is involved in post-transcriptional regulation of its target genes. Nucleic acid binding assays using [(35) S]-labeled AtC3H14 protein showed that AtC3H14 could bind to ssDNA, dsDNA, and ribohomopolymers, suggesting its RNA-binding activity. RNA immunoprecipitation (RIP) assay identified several putative target RNAs of AtC3H14, including a polygalacturonase, a well-known cell wall modifying gene. RNA electrophoretic mobility shift assays (RNA-EMSA) were used to confirm the RIP results and demonstrate that the TZF domain of AtC3H14 is required for the target RNA binding. Microarray analysis of 35S::AtC3H14 plants revealed that many of the cell wall elongation and/or modification-associated genes were differentially expressed, which is consistent with the cell elongation defect phenotype and the changes in the cell wall monosaccharide composition. In addition, yeast activation assay showed that AtC3H14 also function as a transcriptional activator, which is consistent with the previous finding that AtC3H14 activate the secondary wall biosynthesis genes. Taken together, we conclude that AtC3H14 may play a key role in both transcriptional and post-transcriptional regulation. © 2014 The Authors The Plant Journal © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  8. Possible Role of MADS AFFECTING FLOWERING 3 and B-BOX DOMAIN PROTEIN 19 in Flowering Time Regulation of Arabidopsis Mutants with Defects in Nonsense-Mediated mRNA Decay.

    PubMed

    Nasim, Zeeshan; Fahim, Muhammad; Ahn, Ji Hoon

    2017-01-01

    Eukaryotic cells use nonsense-mediated mRNA decay (NMD) to clear aberrant mRNAs from the cell, thus preventing the accumulation of truncated proteins. In Arabidopsis, two UP-Frameshift (UPF) proteins, UPF1 and UPF3, play a critical role in NMD. Although deficiency of UPF1 and UPF3 leads to various developmental defects, little is known about the mechanism underlying the regulation of flowering time by NMD. Here, we showed that the upf1-5 and upf3-1 mutants had a late-flowering phenotype under long-day conditions and the upf1-5 upf3-1 double mutants had an additive effect in delaying flowering time. RNA sequencing of the upf mutants revealed that UPF3 exerted a stronger effect than UPF1 in the UPF-mediated regulation of flowering time. Among genes known to regulate flowering time, FLOWERING LOCUS C (FLC) mRNA levels increased (up to 8-fold) in upf mutants, as confirmed by qPCR. The upf1-5, upf3-1, and upf1-5 upf3-1 mutants responded to vernalization, suggesting a role of FLC in delayed flowering of upf mutants. Consistent with the high FLC transcript levels and delayed flowering in upf mutants, levels of FLOWERING LOCUS T (FT) and SUPPRESSOR OF OVEREXPRESSION OF CONSTANS 1 (SOC1) mRNAs were reduced in the upf mutants. However, RNA-seq did not identify an aberrant FLC transcript containing a premature termination codon (PTC), suggesting that FLC is not a direct target in the regulation of flowering time by NMD. Among flowering time regulators that act in an FLC-dependent manner, we found that MAF3, NF-YA2, NF-YA5, and TAF14 showed increased transcript levels in upf mutants. We also found that BBX19 and ATC, which act in an FLC-independent manner, showed increased transcript levels in upf mutants. An aberrant transcript containing a PTC was identified from MAF3 and BBX19 and the levels of the aberrant transcripts increased in upf mutants. Taking these results together, we propose that the late-flowering phenotype of upf mutants is mediated by at least two different

  9. Systemic acquired resistance in soybean is regulated by two proteins, Orthologous to Arabidopsis NPR1

    PubMed Central

    Sandhu, Devinder; Tasma, I Made; Frasch, Ryan; Bhattacharyya, Madan K

    2009-01-01

    Background Systemic acquired resistance (SAR) is induced in non-inoculated leaves following infection with certain pathogenic strains. SAR is effective against many pathogens. Salicylic acid (SA) is a signaling molecule of the SAR pathway. The development of SAR is associated with the induction of pathogenesis related (PR) genes. Arabidopsis non-expressor of PR1 (NPR1) is a regulatory gene of the SA signal pathway [1-3]. SAR in soybean was first reported following infection with Colletotrichum trancatum that causes anthracnose disease. We investigated if SAR in soybean is regulated by a pathway, similar to the one characterized in Arabidopsis. Results Pathogenesis-related gene GmPR1 is induced following treatment of soybean plants with the SAR inducer, 2,6-dichloroisonicotinic acid (INA) or infection with the oomycete pathogen, Phytophthora sojae. In P. sojae-infected plants, SAR was induced against the bacterial pathogen, Pseudomonas syringae pv. glycinea. Soybean GmNPR1-1 and GmNPR1-2 genes showed high identities to Arabidopsis NPR1. They showed similar expression patterns among the organs, studied in this investigation. GmNPR1-1 and GmNPR1-2 are the only soybean homologues of NPR1and are located in homoeologous regions. In GmNPR1-1 and GmNPR1-2 transformed Arabidopsis npr1-1 mutant plants, SAR markers: (i) PR-1 was induced following INA treatment and (ii) BGL2 following infection with Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato (Pst), and SAR was induced following Pst infection. Of the five cysteine residues, Cys82, Cys150, Cys155, Cys160, and Cys216 involved in oligomer-monomer transition in NPR1, Cys216 in GmNPR1-1 and GmNPR1-2 proteins was substituted to Ser and Leu, respectively. Conclusion Complementation analyses in Arabidopsis npr1-1 mutants revealed that homoeologous GmNPR1-1 and GmNPR1-2 genes are orthologous to Arabidopsis NPR1. Therefore, SAR pathway in soybean is most likely regulated by GmNPR1 genes. Substitution of Cys216 residue, essential for oligomer

  10. A conserved function for Arabidopsis SUPERMAN in regulating floral-whorl cell proliferation in rice, a monocotyledonous plant.

    PubMed

    Nandi, A K; Kushalappa, K; Prasad, K; Vijayraghavan, U

    2000-02-24

    Studies of floral organ development in two dicotyledonous plants, Arabidopsis thaliana and Antirrhinum majus, have shown that three sets of genes (A, B and C) can pattern sepals, petals, stamens and carpels [1] [2]. Mechanisms that define boundaries between these floral whorls are unclear, however. The Arabidopsis gene SUPERMAN (SUP), which encodes a putative transcription factor, maintains the boundary between stamens and carpels [3] [4] [5], possibly by regulating cell proliferation. By overexpressing SUP cDNA in rice, we examined whether its effects on whorl boundaries are conserved in a divergent monocotyledonous species. High-level ectopic SUP expression in transgenic rice resulted in juvenile death or dwarf plants with decreased axillary growth. Plants with lower levels of SUP RNA were vegetatively normal, but the flowers showed ubiquitous ventral carpel expansion. This was often coupled with reduced stamen number, or occurrence of third-whorl stamen-carpel mosaic organs. Additionally, proliferation of second-whorl ventral cells produced adventitious lodicules, and flowers lost the asymmetry that is normally inherent to this whorl. We predict that SUP is a conserved regulator of floral whorl boundaries and that it affects cell proliferation.

  11. Nitrate, a signal relieving seed dormancy in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Alboresi, A; Gestin, C; Leydecker, M-T; Bedu, M; Meyer, C; Truong, H-N

    2005-04-01

    Nitrate is an important nitrogen source for plants, but also a signal molecule that controls various aspects of plant development. In the present study the role of nitrate on seed dormancy in Arabidopsis was investigated. The effects of either mutations affecting the Arabidopsis nitrate reductase genes or of different nitrate regimes of mother plants on the dormancy of the seeds produced were analysed. Altogether, data show that conditions favouring nitrate accumulation in mother plants and in seeds lead to a lower dormancy of seeds with little other morphological or biochemical differences. Analysis of germination during seed development indicated that nitrate does not prevent the onset of dormancy but rather its maintenance. The effect of an exogenous supply of nitrate on seed germination was tested: nitrate in contrast to glutamine or potassium chloride clearly stimulated the germination of dormant seeds. Data show, moreover, that the Arabidopsis dual affinity nitrate transporter NRT1.1 (CHL1) may be involved in conveying the nitrate signal into seeds. Thus, nitrate provided exogenously or by mother plants to the produced seeds, acts as a signal molecule favouring germination in Arabidopsis. This signalling may involve interaction with the abscisic acid or gibberellin pathway.

  12. Local evolution of seed flotation in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Saez-Aguayo, Susana; Rondeau-Mouro, Corinne; Macquet, Audrey; Kronholm, Ilkka; Ralet, Marie-Christine; Berger, Adeline; Sallé, Christine; Poulain, Damien; Granier, Fabienne; Botran, Lucy; Loudet, Olivier; de Meaux, Juliette; Marion-Poll, Annie; North, Helen M

    2014-03-01

    Arabidopsis seeds rapidly release hydrophilic polysaccharides from the seed coat on imbibition. These form a heavy mucilage layer around the seed that makes it sink in water. Fourteen natural Arabidopsis variants from central Asia and Scandinavia were identified with seeds that have modified mucilage release and float. Four of these have a novel mucilage phenotype with almost none of the released mucilage adhering to the seed and the absence of cellulose microfibrils. Mucilage release was modified in the variants by ten independent causal mutations in four different loci. Seven distinct mutations affected one locus, coding the MUM2 β-D-galactosidase, and represent a striking example of allelic heterogeneity. The modification of mucilage release has thus evolved a number of times independently in two restricted geographical zones. All the natural mutants identified still accumulated mucilage polysaccharides in seed coat epidermal cells. Using nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) relaxometry their production and retention was shown to reduce water mobility into internal seed tissues during imbibition, which would help to maintain seed buoyancy. Surprisingly, despite released mucilage being an excellent hydrogel it did not increase the rate of water uptake by internal seed tissues and is more likely to play a role in retaining water around the seed.

  13. Local Evolution of Seed Flotation in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Saez-Aguayo, Susana; Rondeau-Mouro, Corinne; Macquet, Audrey; Kronholm, Ilkka; Ralet, Marie-Christine; Berger, Adeline; Sallé, Christine; Poulain, Damien; Granier, Fabienne; Botran, Lucy; Loudet, Olivier; de Meaux, Juliette; Marion-Poll, Annie; North, Helen M.

    2014-01-01

    Arabidopsis seeds rapidly release hydrophilic polysaccharides from the seed coat on imbibition. These form a heavy mucilage layer around the seed that makes it sink in water. Fourteen natural Arabidopsis variants from central Asia and Scandinavia were identified with seeds that have modified mucilage release and float. Four of these have a novel mucilage phenotype with almost none of the released mucilage adhering to the seed and the absence of cellulose microfibrils. Mucilage release was modified in the variants by ten independent causal mutations in four different loci. Seven distinct mutations affected one locus, coding the MUM2 β-D-galactosidase, and represent a striking example of allelic heterogeneity. The modification of mucilage release has thus evolved a number of times independently in two restricted geographical zones. All the natural mutants identified still accumulated mucilage polysaccharides in seed coat epidermal cells. Using nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) relaxometry their production and retention was shown to reduce water mobility into internal seed tissues during imbibition, which would help to maintain seed buoyancy. Surprisingly, despite released mucilage being an excellent hydrogel it did not increase the rate of water uptake by internal seed tissues and is more likely to play a role in retaining water around the seed. PMID:24625826

  14. Epigenetic natural variation in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Vaughn, Matthew W; Tanurdzić, Milos; Lippman, Zachary; Jiang, Hongmei; Carrasquillo, Robert; Rabinowicz, Pablo D; Dedhia, Neilay; McCombie, W Richard; Agier, Nicolas; Bulski, Agnès; Colot, Vincent; Doerge, R W; Martienssen, Robert A

    2007-07-01

    Cytosine methylation of repetitive sequences is widespread in plant genomes, occurring in both symmetric (CpG and CpNpG) as well as asymmetric sequence contexts. We used the methylation-dependent restriction enzyme McrBC to profile methylated DNA using tiling microarrays of Arabidopsis Chromosome 4 in two distinct ecotypes, Columbia and Landsberg erecta. We also used comparative genome hybridization to profile copy number polymorphisms. Repeated sequences and transposable elements (TEs), especially long terminal repeat retrotransposons, are densely methylated, but one third of genes also have low but detectable methylation in their transcribed regions. While TEs are almost always methylated, genic methylation is highly polymorphic, with half of all methylated genes being methylated in only one of the two ecotypes. A survey of loci in 96 Arabidopsis accessions revealed a similar degree of methylation polymorphism. Within-gene methylation is heritable, but is lost at a high frequency in segregating F(2) families. Promoter methylation is rare, and gene expression is not generally affected by differences in DNA methylation. Small interfering RNA are preferentially associated with methylated TEs, but not with methylated genes, indicating that most genic methylation is not guided by small interfering RNA. This may account for the instability of gene methylation, if occasional failure of maintenance methylation cannot be restored by other means.

  15. Epigenetic Natural Variation in Arabidopsis thaliana

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Hongmei; Carrasquillo, Robert; Rabinowicz, Pablo D; Dedhia, Neilay; McCombie, W. Richard; Agier, Nicolas; Bulski, Agnès; Colot, Vincent; Doerge, R.W; Martienssen, Robert A

    2007-01-01

    Cytosine methylation of repetitive sequences is widespread in plant genomes, occurring in both symmetric (CpG and CpNpG) as well as asymmetric sequence contexts. We used the methylation-dependent restriction enzyme McrBC to profile methylated DNA using tiling microarrays of Arabidopsis Chromosome 4 in two distinct ecotypes, Columbia and Landsberg erecta. We also used comparative genome hybridization to profile copy number polymorphisms. Repeated sequences and transposable elements (TEs), especially long terminal repeat retrotransposons, are densely methylated, but one third of genes also have low but detectable methylation in their transcribed regions. While TEs are almost always methylated, genic methylation is highly polymorphic, with half of all methylated genes being methylated in only one of the two ecotypes. A survey of loci in 96 Arabidopsis accessions revealed a similar degree of methylation polymorphism. Within-gene methylation is heritable, but is lost at a high frequency in segregating F 2 families. Promoter methylation is rare, and gene expression is not generally affected by differences in DNA methylation. Small interfering RNA are preferentially associated with methylated TEs, but not with methylated genes, indicating that most genic methylation is not guided by small interfering RNA. This may account for the instability of gene methylation, if occasional failure of maintenance methylation cannot be restored by other means. PMID:17579518

  16. Epigenetic regulation of gene responsiveness in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    To, Taiko K.; Kim, Jong Myong

    2014-01-01

    The regulation of chromatin structure is inevitable for proper transcriptional response in eukaryotes. Recent reports in Arabidopsis have suggested that gene responsiveness is modulated by particular chromatin status. One such feature is H2A.Z, a histone variant conserved among eukaryotes. In Arabidopsis, H2A.Z is enriched within gene bodies of transcriptionally variable genes, which is in contrast to genic DNA methylation found within constitutive genes. In the absence of H2A.Z, the genes normally harboring H2A.Z within gene bodies are transcriptionally misregulated, while DNA methylation is unaffected. Therefore, H2A.Z may promote variability of gene expression without affecting genic DNA methylation. Another epigenetic information that could be important for gene responsiveness is trimethylation of histone H3 lysine 4 (H3K4me3). The level of H3K4me3 increases when stress responsive genes are transcriptionally activated, and it decreases after recovery from the stress. Even after the recovery, however, H3K4me3 is kept at some atypical levels, suggesting possible role of H3K4me3 for a stress memory. In this review, we summarize and discuss the growing evidences connecting chromatin features and gene responsiveness. PMID:24432027

  17. MTHFD1 controls DNA methylation in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Groth, Martin; Moissiard, Guillaume; Wirtz, Markus; Wang, Haifeng; Garcia-Salinas, Carolina; Ramos-Parra, Perla A.; Bischof, Sylvain; Feng, Suhua; Cokus, Shawn J.; John, Amala; Smith, Danielle C.; Zhai, Jixian; Hale, Christopher J.; Long, Jeff A.; Hell, Ruediger; Díaz de la Garza, Rocío I.; Jacobsen, Steven E.

    2016-01-01

    DNA methylation is an epigenetic mechanism that has important functions in transcriptional silencing and is associated with repressive histone methylation (H3K9me). To further investigate silencing mechanisms, we screened a mutagenized Arabidopsis thaliana population for expression of SDCpro-GFP, redundantly controlled by DNA methyltransferases DRM2 and CMT3. Here, we identify the hypomorphic mutant mthfd1-1, carrying a mutation (R175Q) in the cytoplasmic bifunctional methylenetetrahydrofolate dehydrogenase/methenyltetrahydrofolate cyclohydrolase (MTHFD1). Decreased levels of oxidized tetrahydrofolates in mthfd1-1 and lethality of loss-of-function demonstrate the essential enzymatic role of MTHFD1 in Arabidopsis. Accumulation of homocysteine and S-adenosylhomocysteine, genome-wide DNA hypomethylation, loss of H3K9me and transposon derepression indicate that S-adenosylmethionine-dependent transmethylation is inhibited in mthfd1-1. Comparative analysis of DNA methylation revealed that the CMT3 and CMT2 pathways involving positive feedback with H3K9me are mostly affected. Our work highlights the sensitivity of epigenetic networks to one-carbon metabolism due to their common S-adenosylmethionine-dependent transmethylation and has implications for human MTHFD1-associated diseases. PMID:27291711

  18. Photoperiodic flowering regulation in Arabidopsis thaliana

    PubMed Central

    Golembeski, Greg S.; Kinmonth-Schultz, Hannah A.; Song, Young Hun; Imaizumi, Takato

    2015-01-01

    Photoperiod, or the duration of light in a given day, is a critical cue that flowering plants utilize to effectively assess seasonal information and coordinate their reproductive development in synchrony with the external environment. The use of the model plant, Arabidopsis thaliana, has greatly improved our understanding of the molecular mechanisms that determine how plants process and utilize photoperiodic information to coordinate a flowering response. This mechanism is typified by the transcriptional activation of FLOWERING LOCUS T (FT) gene by the transcription factor CONSTANS (CO) under inductive long-day conditions in Arabidopsis. FT protein then moves from the leaves to the shoot apex, where floral meristem development can be initiated. As a point of integration from a variety of environmental factors in the context of a larger system of regulatory pathways that affect flowering, the importance of photoreceptors and the circadian clock in CO regulation throughout the day has been a key feature of the photoperiodic flowering pathway. In addition to these established mechanisms, the recent discovery of a photosynthate derivative trehalose-6-phosphate as an activator of FT in leaves has interesting implications for the involvement of photosynthesis in the photoperiodic flowering response that were suggested from previous physiological experiments in flowering induction. PMID:25684830

  19. A predicted interactome for Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Geisler-Lee, Jane; O'Toole, Nicholas; Ammar, Ron; Provart, Nicholas J; Millar, A Harvey; Geisler, Matt

    2007-10-01

    The complex cellular functions of an organism frequently rely on physical interactions between proteins. A map of all protein-protein interactions, an interactome, is thus an invaluable tool. We present an interactome for Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) predicted from interacting orthologs in yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae), nematode worm (Caenorhabditis elegans), fruitfly (Drosophila melanogaster), and human (Homo sapiens). As an internal quality control, a confidence value was generated based on the amount of supporting evidence for each interaction. A total of 1,159 high confidence, 5,913 medium confidence, and 12,907 low confidence interactions were identified for 3,617 conserved Arabidopsis proteins. There was significant coexpression of genes whose proteins were predicted to interact, even among low confidence interactions. Interacting proteins were also significantly more likely to be found within the same subcellular location, and significantly less likely to be found in conflicting localizations than randomly paired proteins. A notable exception was that proteins located in the Golgi were more likely to interact with Golgi, vacuolar, or endoplasmic reticulum sorted proteins, indicating possible docking or trafficking interactions. These predictions can aid researchers by extending known complexes and pathways with candidate proteins. In addition we have predicted interactions for many previously unknown proteins in known pathways and complexes. We present this interactome, and an online Web interface the Arabidopsis Interactions Viewer, as a first step toward understanding global signaling in Arabidopsis, and to whet the appetite for those who are awaiting results from high-throughput experimental approaches.

  20. Arabidopsis thaliana—Aphid Interaction

    PubMed Central

    Louis, Joe; Singh, Vijay; Shah, Jyoti

    2012-01-01

    Aphids are important pests of plants that use their stylets to tap into the sieve elements to consume phloem sap. Besides the removal of photosynthates, aphid infestation also alters source-sink patterns. Most aphids also vector viral diseases. In this chapter, we will summarize on recent significant findings in plant-aphid interaction, and how studies involving Arabidopsis thaliana and Myzus persicae (Sülzer), more commonly known as the green peach aphid (GPA), are beginning to provide important insights into the molecular basis of plant defense and susceptibility to aphids. The recent demonstration that expression of dsRNA in Arabidopsis can be used to silence expression of genes in GPA has further expanded the utility of Arabidopsis for evaluating the contribution of the aphid genome-encoded proteins to this interaction. PMID:22666177

  1. Arabidopsis Responds to Alternaria alternata Volatiles by Triggering Plastid Phosphoglucose Isomerase-Independent Mechanisms1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Sánchez-López, Ángela María; Bahaji, Abdellatif; De Diego, Nuria; Baslam, Marouane; Li, Jun; Almagro, Goizeder; García-Gómez, Pablo; Ricarte-Bermejo, Adriana; Novák, Ondřej; Spíchal, Lukáš; Ciordia, Sergio; Mena, María Carmen

    2016-01-01

    Volatile compounds (VCs) emitted by phylogenetically diverse microorganisms (including plant pathogens and microbes that do not normally interact mutualistically with plants) promote photosynthesis, growth, and the accumulation of high levels of starch in leaves through cytokinin (CK)-regulated processes. In Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) plants not exposed to VCs, plastidic phosphoglucose isomerase (pPGI) acts as an important determinant of photosynthesis and growth, likely as a consequence of its involvement in the synthesis of plastidic CKs in roots. Moreover, this enzyme plays an important role in connecting the Calvin-Benson cycle with the starch biosynthetic pathway in leaves. To elucidate the mechanisms involved in the responses of plants to microbial VCs and to investigate the extent of pPGI involvement, we characterized pPGI-null pgi1-2 Arabidopsis plants cultured in the presence or absence of VCs emitted by Alternaria alternata. We found that volatile emissions from this fungal phytopathogen promote growth, photosynthesis, and the accumulation of plastidic CKs in pgi1-2 leaves. Notably, the mesophyll cells of pgi1-2 leaves accumulated exceptionally high levels of starch following VC exposure. Proteomic analyses revealed that VCs promote global changes in the expression of proteins involved in photosynthesis, starch metabolism, and growth that can account for the observed responses in pgi1-2 plants. The overall data show that Arabidopsis plants can respond to VCs emitted by phytopathogenic microorganisms by triggering pPGI-independent mechanisms. PMID:27663407

  2. Side Elevation, End Elevation, Cross Section, 1/2 Roof Plan, 1/2 ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Side Elevation, End Elevation, Cross Section, 1/2 Roof Plan, 1/2 Reflected Plan, 1/2 Floor Plan, 1/2 Reflected Plan - Jack's Mill Covered Bridge, Spanning Henderson Creek, Oquawka, Henderson County, IL

  3. GOLDEN 2-LIKE transcription factors for chloroplast development affect ozone tolerance through the regulation of stomatal movement

    PubMed Central

    Nagatoshi, Yukari; Mitsuda, Nobutaka; Hayashi, Maki; Inoue, Shin-ichiro; Okuma, Eiji; Kubo, Akihiro; Murata, Yoshiyuki; Seo, Mitsunori; Saji, Hikaru; Kinoshita, Toshinori; Ohme-Takagi, Masaru

    2016-01-01

    Stomatal movements regulate gas exchange, thus directly affecting the efficiency of photosynthesis and the sensitivity of plants to air pollutants such as ozone. The GARP family transcription factors GOLDEN 2-LIKE1 (GLK1) and GLK2 have known functions in chloroplast development. Here, we show that Arabidopsis thaliana (A. thaliana) plants expressing the chimeric repressors for GLK1 and -2 (GLK1/2-SRDX) exhibited a closed-stomata phenotype and strong tolerance to ozone. By contrast, plants that overexpress GLK1/2 exhibited an open-stomata phenotype and higher sensitivity to ozone. The plants expressing GLK1-SRDX had reduced expression of the genes for inwardly rectifying K+ (K+in) channels and reduced K+in channel activity. Abscisic acid treatment did not affect the stomatal phenotype of 35S:GLK1/2-SRDX plants or the transcriptional activity for K+in channel gene, indicating that GLK1/2 act independently of abscisic acid signaling. Our results indicate that GLK1/2 positively regulate the expression of genes for K+in channels and promote stomatal opening. Because the chimeric GLK1-SRDX repressor driven by a guard cell-specific promoter induced a closed-stomata phenotype without affecting chloroplast development in mesophyll cells, modulating GLK1/2 activity may provide an effective tool to control stomatal movements and thus to confer resistance to air pollutants. PMID:27035938

  4. GOLDEN 2-LIKE transcription factors for chloroplast development affect ozone tolerance through the regulation of stomatal movement.

    PubMed

    Nagatoshi, Yukari; Mitsuda, Nobutaka; Hayashi, Maki; Inoue, Shin-Ichiro; Okuma, Eiji; Kubo, Akihiro; Murata, Yoshiyuki; Seo, Mitsunori; Saji, Hikaru; Kinoshita, Toshinori; Ohme-Takagi, Masaru

    2016-04-12

    Stomatal movements regulate gas exchange, thus directly affecting the efficiency of photosynthesis and the sensitivity of plants to air pollutants such as ozone. The GARP family transcription factors GOLDEN 2-LIKE1 (GLK1) and GLK2 have known functions in chloroplast development. Here, we show that Arabidopsis thaliana (A. thaliana) plants expressing the chimeric repressors for GLK1 and -2 (GLK1/2-SRDX) exhibited a closed-stomata phenotype and strong tolerance to ozone. By contrast, plants that overexpress GLK1/2 exhibited an open-stomata phenotype and higher sensitivity to ozone. The plants expressing GLK1-SRDX had reduced expression of the genes for inwardly rectifying K(+) (K(+) in) channels and reduced K(+) in channel activity. Abscisic acid treatment did not affect the stomatal phenotype of 35S:GLK1/2-SRDX plants or the transcriptional activity for K(+) in channel gene, indicating that GLK1/2 act independently of abscisic acid signaling. Our results indicate that GLK1/2 positively regulate the expression of genes for K(+) in channels and promote stomatal opening. Because the chimeric GLK1-SRDX repressor driven by a guard cell-specific promoter induced a closed-stomata phenotype without affecting chloroplast development in mesophyll cells, modulating GLK1/2 activity may provide an effective tool to control stomatal movements and thus to confer resistance to air pollutants.

  5. Metabolic engineering of Arabidopsis for butanetriol production using bacterial genes.

    PubMed

    Abdel-Ghany, Salah E; Day, Irene; Heuberger, Adam L; Broeckling, Corey D; Reddy, Anireddy S N

    2013-11-01

    1,2,4-butanetriol (butanetriol) is a useful precursor for the synthesis of the energetic material butanetriol trinitrate and several pharmaceutical compounds. Bacterial synthesis of butanetriol from xylose or arabinose takes place in a pathway that requires four enzymes. To produce butanetriol in plants by expressing bacterial enzymes, we cloned native bacterial or codon optimized synthetic genes under different promoters into a binary vector and stably transformed Arabidopsis plants. Transgenic lines expressing introduced genes were analyzed for the production of butanetriol using gas chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry (GC-MS). Soil-grown transgenic plants expressing these genes produced up to 20 µg/g of butanetriol. To test if an exogenous supply of pentose sugar precursors would enhance the butanetriol level, transgenic plants were grown in a medium supplemented with either xylose or arabinose and the amount of butanetriol was quantified. Plants expressing synthetic genes in the arabinose pathway showed up to a forty-fold increase in butanetriol levels after arabinose was added to the medium. Transgenic plants expressing either bacterial or synthetic xylose pathways, or the arabinose pathway showed toxicity symptoms when xylose or arabinose was added to the medium, suggesting that a by-product in the pathway or butanetriol affected plant growth. Furthermore, the metabolite profile of plants expressing arabinose and xylose pathways was altered. Our results demonstrate that bacterial pathways that produce butanetriol can be engineered into plants to produce this chemical. This proof-of-concept study for phytoproduction of butanetriol paves the way to further manipulate metabolic pathways in plants to enhance the level of butanetriol production.

  6. Arabidopsis cpSRP54 regulates carotenoid accumulation in Arabidopsis and Brassica napus

    PubMed Central

    Gruber, Margaret Y.; Hannoufa, Abdelali

    2012-01-01

    An Arabidopsis thaliana mutant, cbd (carotenoid biosynthesis deficient), was recovered from a mutant population based on its yellow cotyledons, yellow-first true leaves, and stunted growth. Seven-day-old seedlings and mature seeds of this mutant had lower chlorophyll and total carotenoids than the wild type (WT). Genetic and molecular characterization revealed that cbd was a recessive mutant caused by a T-DNA insertion in the gene cpSRP54 encoding the 54kDa subunit of the chloroplast signal recognition particle. Transcript levels of most of the main carotenoid biosynthetic genes in cbd were unchanged relative to WT, but expression increased in carotenoid and abscisic acid catabolic genes. The chloroplasts of cbd also had developmental defects that contributed to decreased carotenoid and chlorophyll contents. Transcription of AtGLK1 (Golden 2-like 1), AtGLK2, and GUN4 appeared to be disrupted in the cbd mutant suggesting that the plastid-to-nucleus retrograde signal may be affected, regulating the changes in chloroplast functional and developmental states and carotenoid content flux. Transformation of A. thaliana and Brassica napus with a gDNA encoding the Arabidopsis cpSRP54 showed the utility of this gene in enhancing levels of seed carotenoids without affecting growth or seed yield. PMID:22791829

  7. Functional aspects of the photosynthetic light reactions in heat stressed Arabidopsis deficient in digalactosyl-diacylglycerol.

    PubMed

    Essemine, Jemâa; Govindachary, Sridharan; Ammar, Saïda; Bouzid, Sadok; Carpentier, Robert

    2011-09-01

    Plants are often submitted, in their natural environment, to various abiotic stresses such as heat stress. However, elevated temperature has a detrimental impact on overall plant growth and development. We have examined the physiological response of the dgd1-2 and dgd1-3 Arabidopsis mutants lacking 30-40% of digalactosyl-diacylglycerol (DGDG) exposed to heat constraint. These mutants, which grow similarly to wild type under normal conditions, were previously reported to be defective in basal thermotolerance as measured by cotyledon development. However their functional properties were not described. Chlorophyll fluorescence measurements and absorbance changes at 820nm were used to monitor photosystem II (PSII) and PSI activity, respectively. It was observed that both mutants have similar photosystem activities with some differences. The mutants were less able to use near saturation light energy and elicited higher rates of cyclic PSI electron flow compare to wild type. Arabidopsis leaves exposed to short-term (5min) mild (40°C) or strong (44°C) heat treatment have shown a decline in the operating effective quantum yield of PSII and in the proportion of active PSI reaction centers. However, cyclic PSI electron flow was enhanced. The establishment of the energy-dependent non-photochemical quenching of chlorophyll fluorescence was accelerated but its decline under illumination was inhibited. Furthermore, heat stress affected the process implicated in the redistribution of light excitation energy between the photosystems known as the light state transitions. All the effects of heat stress mentioned above were more intense in the mutant leaves with dgd1-3 being even more susceptible. The decreased DGDG content of the thylakoid membranes together with other lipid changes are proposed to influence the thermo-sensitivity of the light reactions of photosynthesis towards heat stress. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  8. Defects in Peroxisomal 6-Phosphogluconate Dehydrogenase Isoform PGD2 Prevent Gametophytic Interaction in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Hölscher, Christian; Lutterbey, Marie-Christin; Lansing, Hannes; Meyer, Tanja; Fischer, Kerstin; von Schaewen, Antje

    2016-05-01

    We studied the localization of 6-phosphogluconate dehydrogenase (PGD) isoforms of Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana). Similar polypeptide lengths of PGD1, PGD2, and PGD3 obscured which isoform may represent the cytosolic and/or plastidic enzyme plus whether PGD2 with a peroxisomal targeting motif also might target plastids. Reporter-fusion analyses in protoplasts revealed that, with a free N terminus, PGD1 and PGD3 accumulate in the cytosol and chloroplasts, whereas PGD2 remains in the cytosol. Mutagenesis of a conserved second ATG enhanced the plastidic localization of PGD1 and PGD3 but not PGD2. Amino-terminal deletions of PGD2 fusions with a free C terminus resulted in peroxisomal import after dimerization, and PGD2 could be immunodetected in purified peroxisomes. Repeated selfing of pgd2 transfer (T-)DNA alleles yielded no homozygous mutants, although siliques and seeds of heterozygous plants developed normally. Detailed analyses of the C-terminally truncated PGD2-1 protein showed that peroxisomal import and catalytic activity are abolished. Reciprocal backcrosses of pgd2-1 suggested that missing PGD activity in peroxisomes primarily affects the male gametophyte. Tetrad analyses in the quartet1-2 background revealed that pgd2-1 pollen is vital and in vitro germination normal, but pollen tube growth inside stylar tissues appeared less directed. Mutual gametophytic sterility was overcome by complementation with a genomic construct but not with a version lacking the first ATG. These analyses showed that peroxisomal PGD2 activity is required for guided growth of the male gametophytes and pollen tube-ovule interaction. Our report finally demonstrates an essential role of oxidative pentose-phosphate pathway reactions in peroxisomes, likely needed to sustain critical levels of nitric oxide and/or jasmonic acid, whose biosynthesis both depend on NADPH provision. © 2016 American Society of Plant Biologists. All Rights Reserved.

  9. Lipid transport mediated by Arabidopsis TGD proteins is unidirectional from the endoplasmic reticulum to the plastid

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, C.; Moellering, E. R., Muthan, B.; Fan, J.; Benning, C.

    2010-06-01

    The transfer of lipids between the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and the plastid in Arabidopsis involves the TRIGALACTOSYLDIACYLGLYCEROL (TGD) proteins. Lipid exchange is thought to be bidirectional based on the presence of specific lipid molecular species in Arabidopsis mutants impaired in the desaturation of fatty acids of membrane lipids in the ER and plastid. However, it was unclear whether TGD proteins were required for lipid trafficking in both directions. This question was addressed through the analysis of double mutants of tgd1-1 or tgd4-3 in genetic mutant backgrounds leading to a defect in lipid fatty acid desaturation either in the ER (fad2) or the plastid (fad6). The fad6 tgd1-1 and fad6 tgd4-3 double mutants showed drastic reductions in the relative levels of polyunsaturated fatty acids and of galactolipids. The growth of these plants and the development of photosynthetic membrane systems were severely compromised, suggesting a disruption in the import of polyunsaturated fatty acid-containing lipid species from the ER. Furthermore, a forward-genetic screen in the tgd1-2 dgd1 mutant background led to the isolation of a new fad6-2 allele with a marked reduction in the amount of digalactosyldiacylglycerol. In contrast, the introduction of fad2, affecting fatty acid desaturation of lipids in the ER, into the two tgd mutant backgrounds did not further decrease the level of fatty acid desaturation in lipids of extraplastidic membranes. These results suggest that the role of TGD proteins is limited to plastid lipid import, but does not extend to lipid export from the plastid to extraplastidic membranes.

  10. The Arabidopsis Transcription Factor NAC016 Promotes Drought Stress Responses by Repressing AREB1 Transcription through a Trifurcate Feed-Forward Regulatory Loop Involving NAP[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Sakuraba, Yasuhito; Kim, Ye-Sol; Han, Su-Hyun; Lee, Byoung-Doo; Paek, Nam-Chon

    2015-01-01

    Drought and other abiotic stresses negatively affect plant growth and development and thus reduce productivity. The plant-specific NAM/ATAF1/2/CUC2 (NAC) transcription factors have important roles in abiotic stress-responsive signaling. Here, we show that Arabidopsis thaliana NAC016 is involved in drought stress responses; nac016 mutants have high drought tolerance, and NAC016-overexpressing (NAC016-OX) plants have low drought tolerance. Using genome-wide gene expression microarray analysis and MEME motif searches, we identified the NAC016-specific binding motif (NAC16BM), GATTGGAT[AT]CA, in the promoters of genes downregulated in nac016-1 mutants. The NAC16BM sequence does not contain the core NAC binding motif CACG (or its reverse complement CGTG). NAC016 directly binds to the NAC16BM in the promoter of ABSCISIC ACID-RESPONSIVE ELEMENT BINDING PROTEIN1 (AREB1), which encodes a central transcription factor in the stress-responsive abscisic acid signaling pathway and represses AREB1 transcription. We found that knockout mutants of the NAC016 target gene NAC-LIKE, ACTIVATED BY AP3/PI (NAP) also exhibited strong drought tolerance; moreover, NAP binds to the AREB1 promoter and suppresses AREB1 transcription. Taking these results together, we propose that a trifurcate feed-forward pathway involving NAC016, NAP, and AREB1 functions in the drought stress response, in addition to affecting leaf senescence in Arabidopsis. PMID:26059204

  11. The Arabidopsis Transcription Factor NAC016 Promotes Drought Stress Responses by Repressing AREB1 Transcription through a Trifurcate Feed-Forward Regulatory Loop Involving NAP.

    PubMed

    Sakuraba, Yasuhito; Kim, Ye-Sol; Han, Su-Hyun; Lee, Byoung-Doo; Paek, Nam-Chon

    2015-06-01

    Drought and other abiotic stresses negatively affect plant growth and development and thus reduce productivity. The plant-specific NAM/ATAF1/2/CUC2 (NAC) transcription factors have important roles in abiotic stress-responsive signaling. Here, we show that Arabidopsis thaliana NAC016 is involved in drought stress responses; nac016 mutants have high drought tolerance, and NAC016-overexpressing (NAC016-OX) plants have low drought tolerance. Using genome-wide gene expression microarray analysis and MEME motif searches, we identified the NAC016-specific binding motif (NAC16BM), GATTGGAT[AT]CA, in the promoters of genes downregulated in nac016-1 mutants. The NAC16BM sequence does not contain the core NAC binding motif CACG (or its reverse complement CGTG). NAC016 directly binds to the NAC16BM in the promoter of ABSCISIC ACID-RESPONSIVE ELEMENT BINDING PROTEIN1 (AREB1), which encodes a central transcription factor in the stress-responsive abscisic acid signaling pathway and represses AREB1 transcription. We found that knockout mutants of the NAC016 target gene NAC-LIKE, ACTIVATED BY AP3/PI (NAP) also exhibited strong drought tolerance; moreover, NAP binds to the AREB1 promoter and suppresses AREB1 transcription. Taking these results together, we propose that a trifurcate feed-forward pathway involving NAC016, NAP, and AREB1 functions in the drought stress response, in addition to affecting leaf senescence in Arabidopsis.

  12. Unidirectional Movement of Cellulose Synthase Complexes in Arabidopsis Seed Coat Epidermal Cells Deposit Cellulose Involved in Mucilage Extrusion, Adherence, and Ray Formation1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Lam, Patricia; Young, Robin; DeBolt, Seth

    2015-01-01

    CELLULOSE SYNTHASE5 (CESA5) synthesizes cellulose necessary for seed mucilage adherence to seed coat epidermal cells of Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana). The involvement of additional CESA proteins in this process and details concerning the manner in which cellulose is deposited in the mucilage pocket are unknown. Here, we show that both CESA3 and CESA10 are highly expressed in this cell type at the time of mucilage synthesis and localize to the plasma membrane adjacent to the mucilage pocket. The isoxaben resistant1-1 and isoxaben resistant1-2 mutants affecting CESA3 show defects consistent with altered mucilage cellulose biosynthesis. CESA3 can interact with CESA5 in vitro, and green fluorescent protein-tagged CESA5, CESA3, and CESA10 proteins move in a linear, unidirectional fashion around the cytoplasmic column of the cell, parallel with the surface of the seed, in a pattern similar to that of cortical microtubules. Consistent with this movement, cytological evidence suggests that the mucilage is coiled around the columella and unwinds during mucilage extrusion to form a linear ray. Mutations in CESA5 and CESA3 affect the speed of mucilage extrusion and mucilage adherence. These findings imply that cellulose fibrils are synthesized in an ordered helical array around the columella, providing a distinct structure to the mucilage that is important for both mucilage extrusion and adherence. PMID:25926481

  13. 44 CFR 1.2 - Definitions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 44 Emergency Management and Assistance 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Definitions. 1.2 Section 1.2 Emergency Management and Assistance FEDERAL EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT AGENCY, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY GENERAL RULEMAKING; POLICY AND PROCEDURES General § 1.2 Definitions. (a) Rule or regulation means the whole or a part of any agency statement of...

  14. 11 CFR 1.2 - Definitions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 11 Federal Elections 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Definitions. 1.2 Section 1.2 Federal Elections FEDERAL ELECTION COMMISSION PRIVACY ACT § 1.2 Definitions. As defined in the Privacy Act of 1974 and for... print or a photograph. Routine use means the use of such record for a purpose compatible with the...

  15. 45 CFR 1210.1-2 - Scope.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Scope. 1210.1-2 Section 1210.1-2 Public Welfare Regulations Relating to Public Welfare (Continued) CORPORATION FOR NATIONAL AND COMMUNITY SERVICE VISTA TRAINEE DESELECTION AND VOLUNTEER EARLY TERMINATION PROCEDURES General § 1210.1-2 Scope. (a) This part applies to all Trainees and...

  16. 45 CFR 1211.1-2 - Applicability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Applicability. 1211.1-2 Section 1211.1-2 Public Welfare Regulations Relating to Public Welfare (Continued) CORPORATION FOR NATIONAL AND COMMUNITY SERVICE VOLUNTEER GRIEVANCE PROCEDURES § 1211.1-2 Applicability. This part applies to all volunteers enrolled under part A of title I of the...

  17. 7 CFR 1.2 - Policy.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Policy. 1.2 Section 1.2 Agriculture Office of the Secretary of Agriculture ADMINISTRATIVE REGULATIONS Official Records § 1.2 Policy. (a) Agencies of USDA shall comply with the time limits set forth in the FOIA and in this subpart for responding to...

  18. 29 CFR 1.2 - Definitions. 1

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Definitions. 1 1.2 Section 1.2 Labor Office of the Secretary of Labor PROCEDURES FOR PREDETERMINATION OF WAGE RATES § 1.2 Definitions. 1 1 These definitions... Assistance Act of 1972. (e) The term Wage Determinations OnLine (WDOL) shall mean the Government Internet...

  19. 29 CFR 1.2 - Definitions. 1

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 1 2014-07-01 2013-07-01 true Definitions. 1 1.2 Section 1.2 Labor Office of the Secretary of Labor PROCEDURES FOR PREDETERMINATION OF WAGE RATES § 1.2 Definitions. 1 1 These definitions are... Assistance Act of 1972. (e) The term Wage Determinations OnLine (WDOL) shall mean the Government Internet...

  20. 29 CFR 1.2 - Definitions. 1

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Definitions. 1 1.2 Section 1.2 Labor Office of the Secretary of Labor PROCEDURES FOR PREDETERMINATION OF WAGE RATES § 1.2 Definitions. 1 1 These definitions... Assistance Act of 1972. (e) The term Wage Determinations OnLine (WDOL) shall mean the Government Internet...

  1. Araport: the Arabidopsis information portal.

    PubMed

    Krishnakumar, Vivek; Hanlon, Matthew R; Contrino, Sergio; Ferlanti, Erik S; Karamycheva, Svetlana; Kim, Maria; Rosen, Benjamin D; Cheng, Chia-Yi; Moreira, Walter; Mock, Stephen A; Stubbs, Joseph; Sullivan, Julie M; Krampis, Konstantinos; Miller, Jason R; Micklem, Gos; Vaughn, Matthew; Town, Christopher D

    2015-01-01

    The Arabidopsis Information Portal (https://www.araport.org) is a new online resource for plant biology research. It houses the Arabidopsis thaliana genome sequence and associated annotation. It was conceived as a framework that allows the research community to develop and release 'modules' that integrate, analyze and visualize Arabidopsis data that may reside at remote sites. The current implementation provides an indexed database of core genomic information. These data are made available through feature-rich web applications that provide search, data mining, and genome browser functionality, and also by bulk download and web services. Araport uses software from the InterMine and JBrowse projects to expose curated data from TAIR, GO, BAR, EBI, UniProt, PubMed and EPIC CoGe. The site also hosts 'science apps,' developed as prototypes for community modules that use dynamic web pages to present data obtained on-demand from third-party servers via RESTful web services. Designed for sustainability, the Arabidopsis Information Portal strategy exploits existing scientific computing infrastructure, adopts a practical mixture of data integration technologies and encourages collaborative enhancement of the resource by its user community. © The Author(s) 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  2. Araport: the Arabidopsis Information Portal

    PubMed Central

    Krishnakumar, Vivek; Hanlon, Matthew R.; Contrino, Sergio; Ferlanti, Erik S.; Karamycheva, Svetlana; Kim, Maria; Rosen, Benjamin D.; Cheng, Chia-Yi; Moreira, Walter; Mock, Stephen A.; Stubbs, Joseph; Sullivan, Julie M.; Krampis, Konstantinos; Miller, Jason R.; Micklem, Gos; Vaughn, Matthew; Town, Christopher D.

    2015-01-01

    The Arabidopsis Information Portal (https://www.araport.org) is a new online resource for plant biology research. It houses the Arabidopsis thaliana genome sequence and associated annotation. It was conceived as a framework that allows the research community to develop and release ‘modules’ that integrate, analyze and visualize Arabidopsis data that may reside at remote sites. The current implementation provides an indexed database of core genomic information. These data are made available through feature-rich web applications that provide search, data mining, and genome browser functionality, and also by bulk download and web services. Araport uses software from the InterMine and JBrowse projects to expose curated data from TAIR, GO, BAR, EBI, UniProt, PubMed and EPIC CoGe. The site also hosts ‘science apps,’ developed as prototypes for community modules that use dynamic web pages to present data obtained on-demand from third-party servers via RESTful web services. Designed for sustainability, the Arabidopsis Information Portal strategy exploits existing scientific computing infrastructure, adopts a practical mixture of data integration technologies and encourages collaborative enhancement of the resource by its user community. PMID:25414324

  3. Systemic endopolyploidy in Arabidopsis thaliana

    SciTech Connect

    Galbraith, D.W.; Harkins, K.R. ); Knapp, S. )

    1991-07-01

    Microfluorometric analysis of the nuclear DNA contents of the somatic tissues of Arabidopsis thaliana has revealed extensive endoreduplication, resulting in tissues that comprise mixtures of polypoloid cells. Endoreduplication was found in all tissues except those of the inflorescences and was developmentally regulated according to the age of the tissues and their position within the plant.

  4. The salty tale of Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Sanders, D

    2000-06-29

    High concentrations of sodium chloride are toxic to most plant species. New insights into the mechanisms by which plants tolerate salt have emerged from the identification of genes in Arabidopsis thaliana that play a critical part in physiological resistance to salt.

  5. The Phenylpropanoid Pathway in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Fraser, Christopher M.; Chapple, Clint

    2011-01-01

    The phenylpropanoid pathway serves as a rich source of metabolites in plants, being required for the biosynthesis of lignin, and serving as a starting point for the production of many other important compounds, such as the flavonoids, coumarins, and lignans. In spite of the fact that the phenylpropanoids and their derivatives are sometimes classified as secondary metabolites, their relevance to plant survival has been made clear via the study of Arabidopsis and other plant species. As a model system, Arabidopsis has helped to elucidate many details of the phenylpropanoid pathway, its enzymes and intermediates, and the interconnectedness of the pathway with plant metabolism as a whole. These advances in our understanding have been made possible in large part by the relative ease with which mutations can be generated, identified, and studied in Arabidopsis. Herein, we provide an overview of the research progress that has been made in recent years, emphasizing both the genes (and gene families) associated with the phenylpropanoid pathway in Arabidopsis, and the end products that have contributed to the identification of many mutants deficient in the phenylpropanoid metabolism: the sinapate esters. PMID:22303276

  6. EDS1 contributes to nonhost resistance of Arabidopsis thaliana against Erwinia amylovora.

    PubMed

    Moreau, Manon; Degrave, Alexandre; Vedel, Régine; Bitton, Frédérique; Patrit, Oriane; Renou, Jean-Pierre; Barny, Marie-Anne; Fagard, Mathilde

    2012-03-01

    Erwinia amylovora causes fire blight in rosaceous plants. In nonhost Arabidopsis thaliana, E. amylovora triggers necrotic symptoms associated with transient bacterial multiplication, suggesting either that A. thaliana lacks a susceptibility factor or that it actively restricts E. amylovora growth. Inhibiting plant protein synthesis at the time of infection led to an increase in necrosis and bacterial multiplication and reduced callose deposition, indicating that A. thaliana requires active protein synthesis to restrict E. amylovora growth. Analysis of the callose synthase-deficient pmr4-1 mutant indicated that lack of callose deposition alone did not lead to increased sensitivity to E. amylovora. Transcriptome analysis revealed that approximately 20% of the genes induced following E. amylovora infection are related to defense and signaling. Analysis of mutants affected in NDR1 and EDS1, two main components of the defense-gene activation observed, revealed that E. amylovora multiplied ten times more in the eds1-2 mutant than in the wild type but not in the ndr1-1 mutant. Analysis of mutants affected in three WRKY transcription factors showing EDS1-dependent activation identified WRKY46 and WRKY54 as positive regulators and WRKY70 as a negative regulator of defense against E. amylovora. Altogether, we show that EDS1 is a positive regulator of nonhost resistance against E. amylovora in A. thaliana and hypothesize that it controls the production of several effective defenses against E. amylovora through the action of WRKY46 and WRKY54, while WRKY70 acts as a negative regulator.

  7. A Developmental Response to Pathogen Infection in Arabidopsis1

    PubMed Central

    Korves, Tonia M.; Bergelson, Joy

    2003-01-01

    We present evidence that susceptible Arabidopsis plants accelerate their reproductive development and alter their shoot architecture in response to three different pathogen species. We infected 2-week-old Arabidopsis seedlings with two bacterial pathogens, Pseudomonas syringae and Xanthomonas campestris, and an oomycete, Peronospora parasitica. Infection with each of the three pathogens reduced time to flowering and the number of aerial branches on the primary inflorescence. In the absence of competition, P. syringae and P. parasitica infection also increased basal branch development. Flowering time and branch responses were affected by the amount of pathogen present. Large amounts of pathogen caused the most dramatic changes in the number of branches on the primary inflorescence, but small amounts of P. syringae caused the fastest flowering and the production of the most basal branches. RPS2 resistance prevented large changes in development when it prevented visible disease symptoms but not at high pathogen doses and when substantial visible hypersensitive response occurred. These experiments indicate that phylogenetically disparate pathogens cause similar changes in the development of susceptible Arabidopsis. We propose that these changes in flowering time and branch architecture constitute a general developmental response to pathogen infection that may affect tolerance of and/or resistance to disease. PMID:12970499

  8. A hydroxycinnamoyltransferase responsible for synthesizing suberin aromatics in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Gou, Jin-Ying; Yu, Xiao-Hong; Liu, Chang-Jun

    2009-01-01

    Suberin, a polyester polymer in the cell wall of terrestrial plants, controls the transport of water and nutrients and protects plant from pathogenic infections and environmental stresses. Structurally, suberin consists of aliphatic and aromatic domains; p-hydroxycinnamates, such as ferulate, p-coumarate, and/or sinapate, are the major phenolic constituents of the latter. By analyzing the “wall-bound” phenolics of mutant lines of Arabidopsis deficient in a family of acyl-CoA dependent acyltransferase (BAHD) genes, we discovered that the formation of aromatic suberin in Arabidopsis, primarily in seed and root tissues, depends on a member of the BAHD superfamily of enzymes encoded by At5g41040. This enzyme exhibits an ω-hydroxyacid hydroxycinnamoyltransferase activity with an in vitro kinetic preference for feruloyl-CoA and 16-hydroxypalmitic acid. Knocking down or knocking out the At5g41040 gene in Arabidopsis reduces specifically the quantity of ferulate in suberin, but does not affect the accumulation of p-coumarate or sinapate. The loss of the suberin phenolic differentially affects the aliphatic monomer loads and alters the permeability and sensitivity of seeds and roots to salt stress. This highlights the importance of suberin aromatics in the polymer's function. PMID:19846769

  9. Arabidopsis Response Regulator1 and Arabidopsis Histidine Phosphotransfer Protein2 (AHP2), AHP3, and AHP5 Function in Cold Signaling1[W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Jeon, Jin; Kim, Jungmook

    2013-01-01

    The Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) two-component signaling system, which is composed of sensor histidine kinases, histidine phosphotransfer proteins, and response regulators, mediates the cytokinin response and various other plant responses. We have previously shown that ARABIDOPSIS HISTIDINE KINASE2 (AHK2), AHK3, and cold-inducible type A ARABIDOPSIS RESPONSE REGULATORS (ARRs) play roles in cold signaling. However, the roles of type B ARRs and ARABIDOPSIS HISTIDINE PHOSPHOTRANSFER PROTEINS (AHPs) have not been investigated in cold signaling. Here, we show that ARR1 and AHP2, AHP3, and AHP5 play positive roles in the cold-inducible expression of type A ARRs. arr1 mutants showed greatly reduced cold-responsive expression of type A ARRs compared with the wild type, whereas ARR1-overexpressing Arabidopsis exhibited the hypersensitive cold response of type A ARRs as well as enhanced freezing tolerance with cytokinin, suggesting that ARR1 functions as a positive factor of cold signaling. Transgenic Arabidopsis expressing ARR1ΔDDK:GR lacking the amino-terminal receiver domain showed wild-type expression levels of type A ARRs in response to cold, indicating that the signal receiver domain of ARR1 might be important for cold-responsive expression of type A ARRs. ahp2 ahp3 ahp5 triple mutations greatly reduced type A ARR expression in response to cold, whereas the single or double ahp mutants displayed wild-type levels of ARR expression, suggesting that AHP2, AHP3, and AHP5 are redundantly involved in cold signaling. Taken together, these results suggest that ARR1 mediates cold signal via AHP2, AHP3, or AHP5 from AHK2 and AHK3 to express type A ARRs. We further identified a cold transcriptome affected by ahk2 ahk3 mutations by microarray analysis, revealing a new cold-responsive gene network regulated downstream of AHK2 and AHK3. PMID:23124324

  10. Cell cycle regulates cell type in the Arabidopsis sepal.

    PubMed

    Roeder, Adrienne H K; Cunha, Alexandre; Ohno, Carolyn K; Meyerowitz, Elliot M

    2012-12-01

    The formation of cellular patterns during development requires the coordination of cell division with cell identity specification. This coordination is essential in patterning the highly elongated giant cells, which are interspersed between small cells, in the outer epidermis of the Arabidopsis thaliana sepal. Giant cells undergo endocycles, replicating their DNA without dividing, whereas small cells divide mitotically. We show that distinct enhancers are expressed in giant cells and small cells, indicating that these cell types have different identities as well as different sizes. We find that members of the epidermal specification pathway, DEFECTIVE KERNEL1 (DEK1), MERISTEM LAYER1 (ATML1), Arabidopsis CRINKLY4 (ACR4) and HOMEODOMAIN GLABROUS11 (HDG11), control the identity of giant cells. Giant cell identity is established upstream of cell cycle regulation. Conversely, endoreduplication represses small cell identity. These results show not only that cell type affects cell cycle regulation, but also that changes in the cell cycle can regulate cell type.

  11. The roles of anion channels in Arabidopsis immunity

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Wei; Wang, Chengcheng; Zuo, Zhangli; Qiu, Jin-Long

    2014-01-01

    Anion efflux is one of the most immediate responses of plant cells to pathogen attacks, suggesting that anion channels may play a role in plant defense. Recently we reported that the chloride channel AtCLCd negatively regulates Arabidopsis pathogen-associated molecular pattern-triggered immunity (PTI), probably by affecting trafficking of the pattern recognition receptors (PRRs). Since AtCLCd is localized to the trans-Golgi network, it is not likely to be directly involved in anion flux across the plasma membrane. Here, we used a pharmacological approach to explore further the function of plasma membrane-localized R-type and S-type anion channels in plant immunity. We found that the R-type and S-type anion channels play opposite roles in Arabidopsis innate immunity. Inhibition of the R-type anion channels enhances, whereas inhibition of the S-type channels inhibits PTI and effector-triggered immunity (ETI). PMID:25763497

  12. FtsHi1/ARC1 is an essential gene in Arabidopsis that links chloroplast biogenesis and division.

    PubMed

    Kadirjan-Kalbach, Deena K; Yoder, David W; Ruckle, Michael E; Larkin, Robert M; Osteryoung, Katherine W

    2012-12-01

    The Arabidopsis arc1 (accumulation and replication of chloroplasts 1) mutant has pale seedlings and smaller, more numerous chloroplasts than the wild type. Previous work has suggested that arc1 affects the timing of chloroplast division but does not function directly in the division process. We isolated ARC1 by map-based cloning and discovered it encodes FtsHi1 (At4g23940), one of several FtsHi proteins in Arabidopsis. These poorly studied proteins resemble FtsH metalloproteases important for organelle biogenesis and protein quality control but are presumed to be proteolytically inactive. FtsHi1 bears a predicted chloroplast transit peptide and localizes to the chloroplast envelope membrane. Phenotypic studies showed that arc1 (hereafter ftsHi1-1), which bears a missense mutation, is a weak allele of FtsHi1 that disrupts thylakoid development and reduces de-etiolation efficiency in seedlings, suggesting that FtsHi1 is important for chloroplast biogenesis. Consistent with this finding, transgenic plants suppressed for accumulation of an FtsHi1 fusion protein were often variegated. A strong T-DNA insertion allele, ftsHi1-2, caused embryo-lethality, indicating that FtsHi1 is an essential gene product. A wild-type FtsHi1 transgene rescued both the chloroplast division and pale phenotypes of ftsHi1-1 and the embryo-lethal phenotype of ftsHi1-2. FtsHi1 overexpression produced a subtle increase in chloroplast size and decrease in chloroplast number in wild-type plants while suppression led to increased numbers of small chloroplasts, providing new evidence that FtsHi1 negatively influences chloroplast division. Taken together, our analyses reveal that FtsHi1 functions in an essential, envelope-associated process that may couple plastid development with division. © 2012 The Authors. The Plant Journal © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  13. Herbivore-induced resistance against microbial pathogens in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    De Vos, Martin; Van Zaanen, Wendy; Koornneef, Annemart; Korzelius, Jerôme P; Dicke, Marcel; Van Loon, L C; Pieterse, Corné M J

    2006-09-01

    Caterpillars of the herbivore Pieris rapae stimulate the production of jasmonic acid (JA) and ethylene (ET) in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) and trigger a defense response that affects insect performance on systemic tissues. To investigate the spectrum of effectiveness of P. rapae-induced resistance, we examined the level of resistance against different pathogens. Although the necrotrophic fungus Alternaria brassicicola is sensitive to JA-dependent defenses, herbivore-induced resistance was not effective against this pathogen. By contrast, caterpillar feeding significantly reduced disease caused by the bacterial pathogens Pseudomonas syringae pv tomato and Xanthomonas campestris pv armoraciae. However, this effect was apparent only locally in caterpillar-damaged tissue. Arabidopsis mutants jar1, coi1, ein2, sid2, eds5, and npr1 showed wild-type levels of P. rapae-induced protection against P. syringae pv tomato, suggesting that this local, herbivore-induced defense response does not depend exclusively on either JA, ET, or salicylic acid (SA). Resistance against the biotroph Turnip crinkle virus (TCV) requires SA, but not JA and ET. Nevertheless, herbivore feeding strongly affected TCV multiplication and TCV lesion formation, also in systemic tissues. Wounding alone was not effective, but application of P. rapae regurgitate onto the wounds induced a similar level of protection. Analysis of SA-induced PATHOGENESIS RELATED-1 (PR-1) expression revealed that P. rapae grazing primed Arabidopsis leaves for augmented expression of SA-dependent defenses. Pharmacological experiments showed that ET acts synergistically on SA-induced PR-1, suggesting that the increased production of ET upon herbivore feeding sensitizes the tissue to respond faster to SA, thereby contributing to an enhanced defensive capacity toward pathogens, such as TCV, that trigger SA-dependent defenses upon infection.

  14. Herbivore-Induced Resistance against Microbial Pathogens in Arabidopsis1

    PubMed Central

    De Vos, Martin; Van Zaanen, Wendy; Koornneef, Annemart; Korzelius, Jerôme P.; Dicke, Marcel; Van Loon, L.C.; Pieterse, Corné M.J.

    2006-01-01

    Caterpillars of the herbivore Pieris rapae stimulate the production of jasmonic acid (JA) and ethylene (ET) in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) and trigger a defense response that affects insect performance on systemic tissues. To investigate the spectrum of effectiveness of P. rapae-induced resistance, we examined the level of resistance against different pathogens. Although the necrotrophic fungus Alternaria brassicicola is sensitive to JA-dependent defenses, herbivore-induced resistance was not effective against this pathogen. By contrast, caterpillar feeding significantly reduced disease caused by the bacterial pathogens Pseudomonas syringae pv tomato and Xanthomonas campestris pv armoraciae. However, this effect was apparent only locally in caterpillar-damaged tissue. Arabidopsis mutants jar1, coi1, ein2, sid2, eds5, and npr1 showed wild-type levels of P. rapae-induced protection against P. syringae pv tomato, suggesting that this local, herbivore-induced defense response does not depend exclusively on either JA, ET, or salicylic acid (SA). Resistance against the biotroph Turnip crinkle virus (TCV) requires SA, but not JA and ET. Nevertheless, herbivore feeding strongly affected TCV multiplication and TCV lesion formation, also in systemic tissues. Wounding alone was not effective, but application of P. rapae regurgitate onto the wounds induced a similar level of protection. Analysis of SA-induced PATHOGENESIS RELATED-1 (PR-1) expression revealed that P. rapae grazing primed Arabidopsis leaves for augmented expression of SA-dependent defenses. Pharmacological experiments showed that ET acts synergistically on SA-induced PR-1, suggesting that the increased production of ET upon herbivore feeding sensitizes the tissue to respond faster to SA, thereby contributing to an enhanced defensive capacity toward pathogens, such as TCV, that trigger SA-dependent defenses upon infection. PMID:16829584

  15. Concentration-dependent effects of narciclasine on cell cycle progression in Arabidopsis root tips

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Narciclasine (NCS) is an Amaryllidaceae alkaloid isolated from Narcissus tazetta bulbs. NCS has inhibitory effects on a broad range of biological activities and thus has various potential practical applications. Here we examine how NCS represses plant root growth. Results Results showed that the inhibition of NCS on cell division in Arabidopsis root tips and its effects on cell differentiation are concentration-dependent; at low concentrations (0.5 and 1.0 μM) NCS preferentially targets mitotic cell cycle specific/cyclin complexes, whereas at high concentration (5.0 μM) the NCS-stimulated accumulation of Kip-related proteins (KRP1 and RP2) affects the CDK complexes with a role at both G1/S and G2/M phases. Conclusions Our findings suggest that NCS modulates the coordination between cell division and differentiation in Arabidopsis root tips and hence affects the postembryonic development of Arabidopsis seedlings. PMID:22204558

  16. Synthesis and properties of 1, 2-difluorodiniteroethylene

    SciTech Connect

    Baum, K.; Archibald, T.G.; Dongjaw Tzeng ); Gilardi, R.; Flippen-Anderson, J.L.; George, C. )

    1991-01-18

    1,2-Difluorodinitroethylene was synthesized by flash vacuum pyrolysis of 1,2-difluorotetranitroethane. X-ray crystallography showed that one of the two nitro groups is out of the plane of the rest of molecule and that the C-C double-bond distance in unusually short at 1.284 {angstrom}. 1, 2-Difluorotetranitroethane reacted with alcohols to give alkyl fluoronitroacetates and with anthracene and cyclopentadiene to give Diels-Alder adducts.

  17. Dataset of Arabidopsis plants that overexpress FT driven by a meristem-specific KNAT1 promoter.

    PubMed

    Duplat-Bermúdez, L; Ruiz-Medrano, R; Landsman, D; Mariño-Ramírez, L; Xoconostle-Cázares, B

    2016-09-01

    In this dataset we integrated figures comparing leaf number and rosette diameter in three Arabidopsis FT overexpressor lines (AtFTOE) driven by KNAT1 promoter, "A member of the KNOTTED class of homeodomain proteins encoded by the STM gene of Arabidopsis" [5], vs Wild Type (WT) Arabidopsis plats. Also, presented in the tables are some transcriptomic data obtained by RNA-seq Illumina HiSeq from rosette leaves of Arabidopsis plants of AtFTOE 2.1 line vs WT with accession numbers SRR2094583 and SRR2094587 for AtFTOE replicates 1-3 and AtWT for control replicates 1-2 respectively. Raw data of paired-end sequences are located in the public repository of the National Center for Biotechnology Information of the National Library of Medicine, National Institutes of Health, United States of America, Bethesda, MD, USA as Sequence Read Archive (SRA). Performed analyses of differential expression genes are visualized by Mapman and presented in figures. "Transcriptomic analysis of Arabidopsis overexpressing flowering locus T driven by a meristem-specific promoter that induces early flowering" [2], described the interpretation and discussion of the obtained data.

  18. Powerful Partners: Arabidopsis and Chemical Genomics

    PubMed Central

    Robert, Stéphanie; Raikhel, Natasha V.; Hicks, Glenn R.

    2009-01-01

    Chemical genomics (i.e. genomics scale chemical genetics) approaches capitalize on the ability of low molecular mass molecules to modify biological processes. Such molecules are used to modify the activity of a protein or a pathway in a manner that it is tunable and reversible. Bioactive chemicals resulting from forward or reverse chemical screens can be useful in understanding and dissecting complex biological processes due to the essentially limitless variation in structure and activities inherent in chemical space. A major advantage of this approach as a powerful addition to conventional plant genetics is the fact that chemical genomics can address loss-of-function lethality and redundancy. Furthermore, the ability of chemicals to be added at will and to act quickly can permit the study of processes that are highly dynamic such as endomembrane trafficking. An important aspect of utilizing small molecules effectively is to characterize bioactive chemicals in detail including an understanding of structure-activity relationships and the identification of active and inactive analogs. Bioactive chemicals can be useful as reagents to probe biological pathways directly. However, the identification of cognate targets and their pathways is also informative and can be achieved by screens for genetic resistance or hypersensitivity in Arabidopsis thaliana or other organisms from which the results can be translated to plants. In addition, there are approaches utilizing “tagged” chemical libraries that possess reactive moieties permitting the immobilization of active compounds. This opens the possibility for biochemical purification of putative cognate targets. We will review approaches to screen for bioactive chemicals that affect biological processes in Arabidopsis and provide several examples of the power and challenges inherent in this new approach in plant biology. PMID:22303245

  19. The Arabidopsis ISR1 Locus Controlling Rhizobacteria-Mediated Induced Systemic Resistance Is Involved in Ethylene Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Ton, Jurriaan; Davison, Sylke; Van Wees, Saskia C.M.; Van Loon, L.C.; Pieterse, Corné M.J.

    2001-01-01

    In Arabidopsis, the rhizobacterial strain Pseudomonas fluorescens WCS417r triggers an induced systemic resistance (ISR) response that is effective against different types of pathogens. The ISR signaling pathway functions independent of salicylic acid, but requires responsiveness to jasmonate (JA) and ethylene. Using the genetic variability of ISR inducibility between Arabidopsis accessions, we recently identified a locus (ISR1) on chromosome III that is involved in ISR signaling. Accessions RLD and Wassilewskija (Ws) are recessive at the ISR1 locus and are, therefore, unable to develop ISR. Here we investigated whether the ISR1 locus is involved in JA or ethylene signaling. Compared with the ISR-inducible accession Columbia (Col), accessions RLD and Ws were not affected in JA-induced inhibition of root growth and expression of the JA-responsive gene Atvsp, suggesting that the ISR1 locus is not involved in JA signaling. However, RLD and Ws showed an affected expression of the triple response and a reduced expression of the ethylene responsive genes Hel and Pdf1.2 after exogenous application of the ethylene precursor 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylate. Moreover, in contrast to Col, RLD and Ws did not develop resistance against P. syringae pv. tomato DC3000 after treatment of the leaves with 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylate. Analysis of the F2 and F3 progeny of a cross between Col (ISR1/ISR1) and RLD (isr1/isr1) revealed that reduced sensitivity to ethylene cosegregates with the recessive alleles of the ISR1 locus. These results suggest that the ISR1 locus encodes a component of the ethylene response, which is required for the expression of rhizobacteria-mediated ISR. PMID:11161023

  20. Assessing Gravitropic Responses in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Barker, Richard; Cox, Benjamin; Silber, Logan; Sangari, Arash; Assadi, Amir; Masson, Patrick

    2016-01-01

    Arabidopsis thaliana was the first higher organism to have its genome sequenced and is now widely regarded as the model dicot. Like all plants, Arabidopsis develops distinct growth patterns in response to different environmental stimuli. This can be seen in the gravitropic response of roots. Methods to investigate this particular tropism are presented here. First, we describe a high-throughput time-lapse photographic analysis of root growth and curvature response to gravistimulation allowing the quantification of gravitropic kinetics and growth rate at high temporal resolution. Second, we present a protocol that allows a quantitative evaluation of gravitropic sensitivity using a homemade 2D clinostat. Together, these approaches allow an initial comparative analysis of the key phenomena associated with root gravitropism between different genotypes and/or accessions.

  1. Asparagine Metabolic Pathways in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Gaufichon, Laure; Rothstein, Steven J; Suzuki, Akira

    2016-04-01

    Inorganic nitrogen in the form of ammonium is assimilated into asparagine via multiple steps involving glutamine synthetase (GS), glutamate synthase (GOGAT), aspartate aminotransferase (AspAT) and asparagine synthetase (AS) in Arabidopsis. The asparagine amide group is liberated by the reaction catalyzed by asparaginase (ASPG) and also the amino group of asparagine is released by asparagine aminotransferase (AsnAT) for use in the biosynthesis of amino acids. Asparagine plays a primary role in nitrogen recycling, storage and transport in developing and germinating seeds, as well as in vegetative and senescence organs. A small multigene family encodes isoenzymes of each step of asparagine metabolism in Arabidopsis, except for asparagine aminotransferase encoded by a single gene. The aim of this study is to highlight the structure of the genes and encoded enzyme proteins involved in asparagine metabolic pathways; the regulation and role of different isogenes; and kinetic and physiological properties of encoded enzymes in different tissues and developmental stages.

  2. 24 CFR 1.2 - Definitions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... participates in carrying out such program or activity (such as a redeveloper in the Urban Renewal Program... 24 Housing and Urban Development 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Definitions. 1.2 Section 1.2 Housing and Urban Development Office of the Secretary, Department of Housing and Urban...

  3. 24 CFR 1.2 - Definitions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... participates in carrying out such program or activity (such as a redeveloper in the Urban Renewal Program... 24 Housing and Urban Development 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Definitions. 1.2 Section 1.2 Housing and Urban Development Office of the Secretary, Department of Housing and Urban...

  4. 24 CFR 1.2 - Definitions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... participates in carrying out such program or activity (such as a redeveloper in the Urban Renewal Program... 24 Housing and Urban Development 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Definitions. 1.2 Section 1.2 Housing and Urban Development Office of the Secretary, Department of Housing and Urban...

  5. 24 CFR 1.2 - Definitions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... participates in carrying out such program or activity (such as a redeveloper in the Urban Renewal Program... 24 Housing and Urban Development 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Definitions. 1.2 Section 1.2 Housing and Urban Development Office of the Secretary, Department of Housing and Urban...

  6. 24 CFR 1.2 - Definitions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... participates in carrying out such program or activity (such as a redeveloper in the Urban Renewal Program... 24 Housing and Urban Development 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Definitions. 1.2 Section 1.2 Housing and Urban Development Office of the Secretary, Department of Housing and Urban...

  7. 44 CFR 1.2 - Definitions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 44 Emergency Management and Assistance 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Definitions. 1.2 Section 1.2 Emergency Management and Assistance FEDERAL EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT AGENCY, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY... Emergency Management Agency. (e) Major rule means any regulation that is likely to result in: (1) An...

  8. 8 CFR 1.2 - Definitions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 8 Aliens and Nationality 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Definitions. 1.2 Section 1.2 Aliens and... alien means an applicant for admission coming or attempting to come into the United States at a port-of-entry, or an alien seeking transit through the United States at a port-of-entry, or an alien...

  9. 43 CFR 3120.1-2 - Requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Requirements. 3120.1-2 Section 3120.1-2 Public Lands: Interior Regulations Relating to Public Lands (Continued) BUREAU OF LAND MANAGEMENT... Requirements. (a) Each proper BLM Sate office shall hold sales at least quarterly if lands are available for...

  10. 43 CFR 3120.1-2 - Requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Requirements. 3120.1-2 Section 3120.1-2 Public Lands: Interior Regulations Relating to Public Lands (Continued) BUREAU OF LAND MANAGEMENT... Requirements. (a) Each proper BLM Sate office shall hold sales at least quarterly if lands are available for...

  11. 43 CFR 3120.1-2 - Requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Requirements. 3120.1-2 Section 3120.1-2 Public Lands: Interior Regulations Relating to Public Lands (Continued) BUREAU OF LAND MANAGEMENT... Requirements. (a) Each proper BLM Sate office shall hold sales at least quarterly if lands are available for...

  12. Cold tolerance in Arabidopsis kamchatica.

    PubMed

    Armstrong, Jessica J; Takebayashi, Naoki; Sformo, Todd; Wolf, Diana E

    2015-03-01

    • Cold tolerance is a critically important factor determining how plants will be influenced by climate change, including changes in snowcover and extreme weather events. Although a great deal is known about cold tolerance in Arabidopsis thaliana, it is not highly cold tolerant. This study examined cold tolerance and its genetic diversity in an herbaceous subarctic relative, Arabidopsis kamchatica, which generally occurs in much colder climates.• Thermal analysis and electrolyte leakage were used to estimate supercooling points and lethal temperatures (LT50) in cold-acclimated and nonacclimated families from three populations of A. kamchatica.• Arabidopsis kamchatica was highly cold tolerant, with a mean LT50 of -10.8°C when actively growing, and -21.8°C when cold acclimated. It also was able to supercool to very low temperatures. Surprisingly, actively growing plants supercooled more than acclimated plants (-14.7 vs. -12.7°C). There was significant genetic variation for cold tolerance both within and among populations. However, both cold tolerance and genetic diversity were highest in the midlatitude population rather than in the far north, indicating that adaptations to climate change are most likely to arise in the center of the species range rather than at the edges.• Arabidopsis kamchatica is highly cold tolerant throughout its range. It is far more freeze tolerant than A. thaliana, and supercooled to lower temperatures, suggesting that A. kamchatica provides a valuable complement to A. thaliana for cold tolerance research. © 2015 Botanical Society of America, Inc.

  13. Cadmium interferes with maintenance of auxin homeostasis in Arabidopsis seedlings.

    PubMed

    Hu, Yan Feng; Zhou, Guoying; Na, Xiao Fan; Yang, Lijing; Nan, Wen Bin; Liu, Xu; Zhang, Yong Qiang; Li, Jiao Long; Bi, Yu Rong

    2013-07-15

    Auxin and its homeostasis play key roles in many aspects of plant growth and development. Cadmium (Cd) is a phytotoxic heavy metal and its inhibitory effects on plant growth and development have been extensively studied. However, the underlying molecular mechanism of the effects of Cd stress on auxin homeostasis is still unclear. In the present study, we found that the root elongation, shoot weight, hypocotyl length and chlorophyll content in wild-type (WT) Arabidopsis seedlings were significantly reduced after exposure to Cd stress. However, the lateral root (LR) formation was markedly promoted by Cd stress. The level and distribution of auxin were both greatly altered in primary root tips and cotyledons of Cd-treated plants. The results also showed that after Cd treatment, the IAA content was significantly decreased, which was accompanied by increases in the activity of the IAA oxidase and alteration in the expression of several putative auxin biosynthetic and catabolic genes. Application of the auxin transport inhibitor, 1-naphthylphthalamic acid (NPA) and 1-naphthoxyacetic acid (1-NOA), reversed the effects of Cd on LR formation. Additionally, there was less promotion of LR formation by Cd treatment in aux1-7 and pin2 mutants than that in the WT. Meanwhile, Cd stress also altered the expression of PINs and AUX1 in Arabidopsis roots, implying that the auxin transport pathway is required for Cd-modulated LR development. Taken together, these findings suggest that Cd stress disturbs auxin homeostasis through affecting auxin level, distribution, metabolism, and transport in Arabidopsis seedling.

  14. PAUSED Encodes the Arabidopsis Exportin-t Ortholog1

    PubMed Central

    Hunter, Christine A.; Aukerman, Milo J.; Sun, Hui; Fokina, Maria; Poethig, R. Scott

    2003-01-01

    Los1p/exportin-t (XPOT) mediates the nuclear export of tRNAs in yeast and mammals. The requirements for this transport pathway are unclear, however, because los1 mutations do not affect yeast growth, and the phenotype of XPOT mutations in mammals is unknown. Here, we show that PAUSED (PSD) is the Arabidopsis ortholog of LOS1/XPOT and is capable of rescuing the tRNA export defect of los1 in Brewer's yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae), suggesting that its function has been conserved. Putative null alleles of PSD disrupt the initiation of the shoot apical meristem and delay leaf initiation after germination, the emergence of the radicle and lateral roots, and the transition to flowering. Plants doubly mutant for psd and hasty, the Arabidopsis ortholog of exportin 5, are viable but have a more severe phenotype than either single mutant. These results suggest that PSD plays a role in tRNA export in Arabidopsis, but that at least one—and perhaps several—additional tRNA export pathways also exist. The PSD transcript is broadly expressed during development and is alternatively spliced in the 3′-untranslated region. No temporal or spatial difference in the abundance of different splice forms was observed. We propose that the mutant phenotype of psd reflects defects in developmental events and cell/tissue types that require elevated levels of protein synthesis and are therefore acutely sensitive to a reduction in tRNA export. PMID:12913168

  15. PAUSED encodes the Arabidopsis exportin-t ortholog.

    PubMed

    Hunter, Christine A; Aukerman, Milo J; Sun, Hui; Fokina, Maria; Poethig, R Scott

    2003-08-01

    Los1p/exportin-t (XPOT) mediates the nuclear export of tRNAs in yeast and mammals. The requirements for this transport pathway are unclear, however, because los1 mutations do not affect yeast growth, and the phenotype of XPOT mutations in mammals is unknown. Here, we show that PAUSED (PSD) is the Arabidopsis ortholog of LOS1/XPOT and is capable of rescuing the tRNA export defect of los1 in Brewer's yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae), suggesting that its function has been conserved. Putative null alleles of PSD disrupt the initiation of the shoot apical meristem and delay leaf initiation after germination, the emergence of the radicle and lateral roots, and the transition to flowering. Plants doubly mutant for psd and hasty, the Arabidopsis ortholog of exportin 5, are viable but have a more severe phenotype than either single mutant. These results suggest that PSD plays a role in tRNA export in Arabidopsis, but that at least one-and perhaps several-additional tRNA export pathways also exist. The PSD transcript is broadly expressed during development and is alternatively spliced in the 3'-untranslated region. No temporal or spatial difference in the abundance of different splice forms was observed. We propose that the mutant phenotype of psd reflects defects in developmental events and cell/tissue types that require elevated levels of protein synthesis and are therefore acutely sensitive to a reduction in tRNA export.

  16. The Arabidopsis O-Linked N-Acetylglucosamine Transferase SPINDLY Interacts with Class I TCPs to Facilitate Cytokinin Responses in Leaves and Flowers[C][W

    PubMed Central

    Steiner, Evyatar; Efroni, Idan; Gopalraj, Manjula; Saathoff, Katie; Tseng, Tong-Seung; Kieffer, Martin; Eshed, Yuval; Olszewski, Neil; Weiss, David

    2012-01-01

    O-linked N-acetylglucosamine (O-GlcNAc) modifications regulate the posttranslational fate of target proteins. The Arabidopsis thaliana O-GlcNAc transferase (OGT) SPINDLY (SPY) suppresses gibberellin signaling and promotes cytokinin (CK) responses by unknown mechanisms. Here, we present evidence that two closely related class I TCP transcription factors, TCP14 and TCP15, act with SPY to promote CK responses. TCP14 and TCP15 interacted with SPY in yeast two-hybrid and in vitro pull-down assays and were O-GlcNAc modified in Escherichia coli by the Arabidopsis OGT, SECRET AGENT. Overexpression of TCP14 severely affected plant development in a SPY-dependent manner and stimulated typical CK morphological responses, as well as the expression of the CK-regulated gene RESPONSE REGULATOR5. TCP14 also promoted the transcriptional activity of the CK-induced mitotic factor CYCLIN B1;2. Whereas TCP14-overexpressing plants were hypersensitive to CK, spy and tcp14 tcp15 double mutant leaves and flowers were hyposensitive to the hormone. Reducing CK levels by overexpressing CK OXIDASE/DEHYDROGENASE3 suppressed the TCP14 overexpression phenotypes, and this suppression was reversed when the plants were treated with exogenous CK. Taken together, we suggest that responses of leaves and flowers to CK are mediated by SPY-dependent TCP14 and TCP15 activities. PMID:22267487

  17. The Arabidopsis Polycomb Repressive Complex 1 (PRC1) Components AtBMI1A, B, and C Impact Gene Networks throughout All Stages of Plant Development1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Yue

    2017-01-01

    Polycomb Group regulation in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) is required to maintain cell differentiation and allow developmental phase transitions. This is achieved by the activity of three PcG repressive complex 2s (PRC2s) and the participation of a yet poorly defined PRC1. Previous results showed that apparent PRC1 components perform discrete roles during plant development, suggesting the existence of PRC1 variants; however, it is not clear in how many processes these components participate. We show that AtBMI1 proteins are required to promote all developmental phase transitions and to control cell proliferation during organ growth and development, expanding their proposed range of action. While AtBMI1 function during germination is closely linked to B3 domain transcription factors VAL1/2 possibly in combination with GT-box binding factors, other AtBMI1 regulatory networks require participation of different factor combinations. Conversely, EMF1 and LHP1 bind many H3K27me3 positive genes up-regulated in atbmi1a/b/c mutants; however, loss of their function affects expression of a different subset, suggesting that even if EMF1, LHP1, and AtBMI1 exist in a common PRC1 variant, their role in repression depends on the functional context. PMID:27837089

  18. An International Bioinformatics Infrastructure to Underpin the Arabidopsis Community

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The future bioinformatics needs of the Arabidopsis community as well as those of other scientific communities that depend on Arabidopsis resources were discussed at a pair of recent meetings held by the Multinational Arabidopsis Steering Committee (MASC) and the North American Arabidopsis Steering C...

  19. Arabidopsis AtERF014 acts as a dual regulator that differentially modulates immunity against Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato and Botrytis cinerea.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Huijuan; Hong, Yongbo; Huang, Lei; Li, Dayong; Song, Fengming

    2016-07-22

    ERF transcription factors play critical roles in plant immune responses. Here, we report the function of AtERF014, a nucleus-localized transcriptional activator, in Arabidopsis immunity. Expression of AtERF014 was induced by Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato (Pst) and Botrytis cinerea (Bc). AtERF014-overexpressing (OE) plants displayed increased Pst resistance but decreased Bc resistance, whereas AtERF014-RNAi plants exhibited decreased Pst resistance but increased Bc resistance. After Pst infection, expression of salicylic acid (SA)-responsive genes AtPR1 and AtPR5 in AtERF014-OE plants and of a jasmonic acid/ethylene-responsive gene AtPDF1.2 in AtERF014-RNAi plants was intensified but expression of AtPDF1.2 in AtERF014-OE plants and of AtPR1 and AtPR5 in AtERF014-RNAi plants was weakened. After Bc infection, expression of AtPR1 and AtPR5 in AtERF014-OE plants was attenuated but expression of AtPR1, AtPR5 and AtPDF1.2 in AtERF014-RNAi plants was strengthened. Pathogen- and flg22-induced ROS burst, expression of PTI genes and SA-induced defense were partially suppressed in AtERF014-RNAi plants, whereas pathogen-induced ROS and flg22-induced immune response were strengthened in AtER014-OE plants. Altered expression of AtERR014 affected expression of pectin biosynthetic genes and pectin content in AtERF014-RNAi plants was decreased. These data demonstrate that AtERF014 acts as a dual regulator that differentially modulates immunity against Pst and Bc in Arabidopsis.

  20. Arabidopsis AtERF014 acts as a dual regulator that differentially modulates immunity against Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato and Botrytis cinerea

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Huijuan; Hong, Yongbo; Huang, Lei; Li, Dayong; Song, Fengming

    2016-01-01

    ERF transcription factors play critical roles in plant immune responses. Here, we report the function of AtERF014, a nucleus-localized transcriptional activator, in Arabidopsis immunity. Expression of AtERF014 was induced by Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato (Pst) and Botrytis cinerea (Bc). AtERF014-overexpressing (OE) plants displayed increased Pst resistance but decreased Bc resistance, whereas AtERF014-RNAi plants exhibited decreased Pst resistance but increased Bc resistance. After Pst infection, expression of salicylic acid (SA)-responsive genes AtPR1 and AtPR5 in AtERF014-OE plants and of a jasmonic acid/ethylene-responsive gene AtPDF1.2 in AtERF014-RNAi plants was intensified but expression of AtPDF1.2 in AtERF014-OE plants and of AtPR1 and AtPR5 in AtERF014-RNAi plants was weakened. After Bc infection, expression of AtPR1 and AtPR5 in AtERF014-OE plants was attenuated but expression of AtPR1, AtPR5 and AtPDF1.2 in AtERF014-RNAi plants was strengthened. Pathogen- and flg22-induced ROS burst, expression of PTI genes and SA-induced defense were partially suppressed in AtERF014-RNAi plants, whereas pathogen-induced ROS and flg22-induced immune response were strengthened in AtER014-OE plants. Altered expression of AtERR014 affected expression of pectin biosynthetic genes and pectin content in AtERF014-RNAi plants was decreased. These data demonstrate that AtERF014 acts as a dual regulator that differentially modulates immunity against Pst and Bc in Arabidopsis. PMID:27445230

  1. Gravity-regulated gene expression in Arabidopsis thaliana

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sederoff, Heike; Brown, Christopher S.; Heber, Steffen; Kajla, Jyoti D.; Kumar, Sandeep; Lomax, Terri L.; Wheeler, Benjamin; Yalamanchili, Roopa

    Plant growth and development is regulated by changes in environmental signals. Plants sense environmental changes and respond to them by modifying gene expression programs to ad-just cell growth, differentiation, and metabolism. Functional expression of genes comprises many different processes including transcription, translation, post-transcriptional and post-translational modifications, as well as the degradation of RNA and proteins. Recently, it was discovered that small RNAs (sRNA, 18-24 nucleotides long), which are heritable and systemic, are key elements in regulating gene expression in response to biotic and abiotic changes. Sev-eral different classes of sRNAs have been identified that are part of a non-cell autonomous and phloem-mobile network of regulators affecting transcript stability, translational kinetics, and DNA methylation patterns responsible for heritable transcriptional silencing (epigenetics). Our research has focused on gene expression changes in response to gravistimulation of Arabidopsis roots. Using high-throughput technologies including microarrays and 454 sequencing, we iden-tified rapid changes in transcript abundance of genes as well as differential expression of small RNA in Arabidopsis root apices after minutes of reorientation. Some of the differentially regu-lated transcripts are encoded by genes that are important for the bending response. Functional mutants of those genes respond faster to reorientation than the respective wild type plants, indicating that these proteins are repressors of differential cell elongation. We compared the gravity responsive sRNAs to the changes in transcript abundances of their putative targets and identified several potential miRNA: target pairs. Currently, we are using mutant and transgenic Arabidopsis plants to characterize the function of those miRNAs and their putative targets in gravitropic and phototropic responses in Arabidopsis.

  2. Using "Arabidopsis" Genetic Sequences to Teach Bioinformatics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zhang, Xiaorong

    2009-01-01

    This article describes a new approach to teaching bioinformatics using "Arabidopsis" genetic sequences. Several open-ended and inquiry-based laboratory exercises have been designed to help students grasp key concepts and gain practical skills in bioinformatics, using "Arabidopsis" leucine-rich repeat receptor-like kinase (LRR…

  3. Using "Arabidopsis" Genetic Sequences to Teach Bioinformatics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zhang, Xiaorong

    2009-01-01

    This article describes a new approach to teaching bioinformatics using "Arabidopsis" genetic sequences. Several open-ended and inquiry-based laboratory exercises have been designed to help students grasp key concepts and gain practical skills in bioinformatics, using "Arabidopsis" leucine-rich repeat receptor-like kinase (LRR…

  4. Characterization of a Selenate-Resistant Arabidopsis Mutant. Root Growth as a Potential Target for Selenate Toxicity1[OA

    PubMed Central

    El Kassis, Elie; Cathala, Nicole; Rouached, Hatem; Fourcroy, Pierre; Berthomieu, Pierre; Terry, Norman; Davidian, Jean-Claude

    2007-01-01

    Screening an Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) T-DNA mutant library for selenate resistance enabled us to isolate a selenate-resistant mutant line (sel1-11). Molecular and genetic characterization showed that the mutant contained a lesion in the SULTR1;2 gene that encodes a high affinity root sulfate transporter. We showed that SULTR1;2 is the only gene among 13 mutated genes of the Arabidopsis sulfate transporter family whose mutation conferred selenate resistance to Arabidopsis. The selenate resistance phenotype of the sel1-11 mutant was mirrored by an 8-fold increase of root growth in the presence of selenate as shown by the calculated lethal concentration values. The impairment of SULTR1;2 activity in sel1-11 resulted in a reduced 35S-sulfate uptake capacity by both roots and calli and a reduced sulfate and selenate content in root, shoot, and calli. Comparing sulfate-to-selenate ratios instead of absolute sulfate and selenate contents in roots and shoots enabled us to gain better insight into the mechanism of selenate toxicity in Arabidopsis. Roots of the sel1-11 mutant line showed a higher sulfate to selenate ratio than that of wild-type roots, while there were no significant differences in sulfate to selenate ratios in shoots of wild-type and mutant lines. These results indicated that the mechanism that confers the selenate resistance phenotype to the sel1-11 line takes place rather in the roots. It might be in part the result of a lower selenate uptake and of a protective effect of sulfate against the toxic effects of selenate on root growth. These results revealed in plants a central and specific role of the transporter SULTR1;2 in selenate sensitivity; they further suggested that root growth and potentially the root tip activity might be a specific target of selenate toxicity in Arabidopsis. PMID:17208959

  5. Arabidopsis basic leucine-zipper transcription factors TGA9 and TGA10 interact with floral glutaredoxins ROXY1 and ROXY2 and are redundantly required for anther development.

    PubMed

    Murmu, Jhadeswar; Bush, Michael J; DeLong, Catherine; Li, Shutian; Xu, Mingli; Khan, Madiha; Malcolmson, Caroline; Fobert, Pierre R; Zachgo, Sabine; Hepworth, Shelley R

    2010-11-01

    ROXY1 and ROXY2 are CC-type floral glutaredoxins with redundant functions in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) anther development. We show here that plants lacking the basic leucine-zipper transcription factors TGA9 and TGA10 have defects in male gametogenesis that are strikingly similar to those in roxy1 roxy2 mutants. In tga9 tga10 mutants, adaxial and abaxial anther lobe development is differentially affected, with early steps in anther development blocked in adaxial lobes and later steps affected in abaxial lobes. Distinct from roxy1 roxy2, microspore development in abaxial anther lobes proceeds to a later stage with the production of inviable pollen grains contained within nondehiscent anthers. Histological analysis shows multiple defects in the anther dehiscence program, including abnormal stability and lignification of the middle layer and defects in septum and stomium function. Compatible with these defects, TGA9 and TGA10 are expressed throughout early anther primordia but resolve to the middle and tapetum layers during meiosis of pollen mother cells. Several lines of evidence suggest that ROXY promotion of anther development is mediated in part by TGA9 and TGA10. First, TGA9 and TGA10 expression overlaps with ROXY1/2 during anther development. Second, TGA9/10 and ROXY1/2 operate downstream of SPOROCYTELESS/NOZZLE, where they positively regulate a common set of genes that contribute to tapetal development. Third, TGA9 and TGA10 directly interact with ROXY proteins in yeast and in plant cell nuclei. These findings suggest that activation of TGA9/10 transcription factors by ROXY-mediated modification of cysteine residues promotes anther development, thus broadening our understanding of how redox-regulated TGA factors function in plants.

  6. Imidazo[1,2-a]pyrazines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basiuk, Vladimir A.

    1997-03-01

    Published data on the methods for synthesis, reactions and natural occurrence of imidazo[1,2-a]pyrazines are surveyed. Some other properties and applications of these compounds are also considered. The bibliography includes 273 references.

  7. Cloaking spin-(1/2) matter waves

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, De-Hone

    2010-06-15

    A physical construct for the cloaking of relativistic spin-(1/2) matter waves is proposed. It is shown that when the effective energy and mass of relativistic spin-(1/2) particles moving in an effective vector field in a spherical shell are controlled, their matter waves can be perfectly guided through the shell without any distortion or loss; that is, the construct provides a three-dimensional cloaking shell for relativistic spin-(1/2) matter waves. The proposal serves as the basis for some interesting applications such as providing a method to guide the matter waves of spin particles and an ideal setup to exhibit spin-spin interactions as well as perfect quantum interferences of some global effects in spin-(1/2) matter waves.

  8. AC conductivity and relaxation mechanism in (Nd1/2Li1/2)(Fe1/2V1/2)O3 ceramics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nath, Susmita; Barik, Subrat Kumar; Choudhary, R. N. P.

    2016-05-01

    In the present study we have synthesized polycrystalline sample of (Nd1/2Li1/2)(Fe1/2V1/2)O3 ceramic by a standard high-temperature solid-state reaction technique. Studies of dielectric and electrical properties of the compound have been carried out in a wide range of temperature (RT - 400 °C) and frequency (1kHz - 1MHz) using complex impedance spectroscopic technique. The imaginary vs. real component of the complex impedance plot (Nyquist plot) of the prepared sample exhibits the existence of grain, grain boundary contributions in the complex electrical parameters and negative temperature coefficient of resistance (NTCR) type behavior like semiconductor. Details study of ac conductivity plot reveals that the material obeys universal Jonscher's power law.

  9. 12 CFR 1.2 - Definitions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... State. (h) (i) Political subdivision means a county, city, town, or other municipal corporation, a... paragraph (j) of § 1.2; (2) Obligations of international and multilateral development banks and...

  10. In vitro Arabidopsis pollen germination and characterization of the inward potassium currents in Arabidopsis pollen grain protoplasts.

    PubMed

    Fan, L M; Wang, Y F; Wang, H; Wu, W H

    2001-08-01

    The focus of this study is to investigate the regulatory role of K(+) influx in Arabidopsis pollen germination and pollen tube growth. Using agar-containing media, in vitro methods for Arabidopsis pollen germination have been successfully established for the first time. The pollen germination percentage was nearly 75% and the average pollen tube length reached 135 microm after a 6 h incubation. A decrease in external K(+) concentration from 1 mM to 35 microM resulted in 30% inhibition of pollen germination and 40% inhibition of pollen tube growth. An increase in external K(+) concentration from 1 mM to 30 mM stimulated pollen tube growth but inhibited pollen germination. To study how K(+) influx is associated with pollen germination and tube growth, regulation of the inward K(+) channels in the pollen plasma membrane was investigated by conducting patch-clamp whole-cell recording with pollen protoplasts. K(+) currents were first identified in Arabidopsis pollen protoplasts. The inward K(+) currents were insensitive to changes in cytoplasmic Ca(2+) but were inhibited by a high concentration of external Ca(2+). A decrease of external Ca(2+) concentration from 10 mM (control) to 1 mM had no significant effect on the inward K(+) currents, while an increase of external Ca(2+) concentration from 10 mM to 50 mM inhibited the inward K(+) currents by 46%. Changes in external pH significantly affected the magnitude, conductance, voltage-independent maximal conductance, and activation kinetics of the inward K(+) currents. The physiological importance of potassium influx mediated by the inward K(+)-channels during Arabidopsis pollen germination and tube growth is discussed.

  11. ZEITLUPE positively regulates hypocotyl elongation at warm temperature under light in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Miyazaki, Yuji; Takase, Tomoyuki; Kiyosue, Tomohiro

    2015-01-01

    Hypocotyl cell elongation has been studied as a model to understand how cellular expansion contributes to plant organ growth. Hypocotyl elongation is affected by multiple environmental factors, including light quantity and light quality. Red light inhibits hypocotyl growth via the phytochrome signaling pathways. Proteins of the flavin-binding KELCH repeat F-box 1 / LOV KELCH protein 2 / ZEITLUPE family are positive regulators of hypocotyl elongation under red light in Arabidopsis. These proteins were suggested to reduce phytochrome-mediated inhibition of hypocotyl elongation. Here, we show that ZEITLUPE also functions as a positive regulator in warmth-induced hypocotyl elongation under light in Arabidopsis.

  12. 43 CFR 2812.1-2 - Contents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Contents. 2812.1-2 Section 2812.1-2 Public... portions of such road system which the applicant directly controls within the meaning of § 2812.0-5(i), the portions thereof which the applicant indirectly controls within the meaning of § 2812.0-5(j), and the...

  13. The SERRATE protein is involved in alternative splicing in Arabidopsis thaliana

    PubMed Central

    Raczynska, Katarzyna Dorota; Stepien, Agata; Kierzkowski, Daniel; Kalak, Malgorzata; Bajczyk, Mateusz; McNicol, Jim; Simpson, Craig G.; Szweykowska-Kulinska, Zofia; Brown, John W. S.; Jarmolowski, Artur

    2014-01-01

    How alternative splicing (AS) is regulated in plants has not yet been elucidated. Previously, we have shown that the nuclear cap-binding protein complex (AtCBC) is involved in AS in Arabidopsis thaliana. Here we show that both subunits of AtCBC (AtCBP20 and AtCBP80) interact with SERRATE (AtSE), a protein involved in the microRNA biogenesis pathway. Moreover, using a high-resolution reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction AS system we have found that AtSE influences AS in a similar way to the cap-binding complex (CBC), preferentially affecting selection of 5′ splice site of first introns. The AtSE protein acts in cooperation with AtCBC: many changes observed in the mutant lacking the correct SERRATE activity were common to those observed in the cbp mutants. Interestingly, significant changes in AS of some genes were also observed in other mutants of plant microRNA biogenesis pathway, hyl1-2 and dcl1-7, but a majority of them did not correspond to the changes observed in the se-1 mutant. Thus, the role of SERRATE in AS regulation is distinct from that of HYL1 and DCL1, and is similar to the regulation of AS in which CBC is involved. PMID:24137006

  14. The Arabidopsis Histidine Phosphotransfer Proteins Are Redundant Positive Regulators of Cytokinin Signaling[W

    PubMed Central

    Hutchison, Claire E.; Li, Jie; Argueso, Cristiana; Gonzalez, Monica; Lee, Eurie; Lewis, Michael W.; Maxwell, Bridey B.; Perdue, Tony D.; Schaller, G. Eric; Alonso, Jose M.; Ecker, Joseph R.; Kieber, Joseph J.

    2006-01-01

    Arabidopsis thaliana histidine phosphotransfer proteins (AHPs) are similar to bacterial and yeast histidine phosphotransfer proteins (HPts), which act in multistep phosphorelay signaling pathways. A phosphorelay pathway is the current model for cytokinin signaling. To assess the role of AHPs in cytokinin signaling, we isolated T-DNA insertions in the five AHP genes that are predicted to encode functional HPts and constructed multiple insertion mutants, including an ahp1,2,3,4,5 quintuple mutant. Single ahp mutants were indistinguishable from wild-type seedlings in cytokinin response assays. However, various higher-order mutants displayed reduced sensitivity to cytokinin in diverse cytokinin assays, indicating both a positive role for AHPs in cytokinin signaling and functional overlap among the AHPs. In contrast with the other four AHPs, AHP4 may play a negative role in some cytokinin responses. The quintuple ahp mutant showed various abnormalities in growth and development, including reduced fertility, increased seed size, reduced vascular development, and a shortened primary root. These data indicate that most of the AHPs are redundant, positive regulators of cytokinin signaling and affect multiple aspects of plant development. PMID:17122069

  15. Architectural phenotypes in the transparent testa mutants of Arabidopsis thaliana

    PubMed Central

    Buer, Charles S.; Djordjevic, Michael A.

    2009-01-01

    Flavonoids are low molecular weight secondary plant metabolites with a myriad of functions. As flavonoids affect auxin transport (an important growth-controlling hormone) and are biologically active in eukaryotes, flavonoid mutants were expected to have undescribed architectural phenotypes. The Arabidopsis thaliana transparent testa (tt) mutants are compromised in the enzymatic steps or transcriptional regulators affecting flavonoid synthesis. tt mutant seedlings were grown on hard-slanted agar (a stress condition), under varying light conditions, and in soil to examine the resulting growth patterns. These tt mutants revealed a wide variety of architectural phenotypes in root and aerial tissues. Mutants with increased inflorescences, siliques, and lateral root density or reduced stature are traits that could affect plant yield or performance under certain environmental conditions. The regulatory genes affected in architectural traits may provide useful molecular targets for examination in other plants. PMID:19129166

  16. Molecular genetics of root gravitropism and waving in Arabidopsis thaliana

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sedbrook, J.; Boonsirichai, K.; Chen, R.; Hilson, P.; Pearlman, R.; Rosen, E.; Rutherford, R.; Batiza, A.; Carroll, K.; Schulz, T.; hide

    1998-01-01

    When Arabidopsis thaliana seedlings grow embedded in an agar-based medium, their roots grow vertically downward. This reflects their ability to sense the gravity vector and to position their tip parallel to it (gravitropism). We have isolated a number of mutations affecting root gravitropism in Arabidopsis thaliana. One of these mutations, named arg1, affects root and hypocotyl gravitropism without promoting defects in starch content or in the ability of seedlings' organs to respond to plant hormones. The ARG1 gene was cloned and shown to code for a protein with a J domain at its amino terminus and a second sequence motif found in several cytoskeleton binding proteins. Mutations in the AGR1 locus promote a strong defect in root gravitropism. Some alleles also confer an increased root resistance to exogenous ethylene and an increased sensitivity to auxin. AGR1 was cloned and found to encode a putative transmembrane protein which might be involved in polar auxin transport, or in regulating the differential growth response to gravistimulation. When Arabidopsis seedlings grow on the surface of agar-based media tilted backward, their roots wave. That wavy pattern of root growth derives from a combined response to gravity, touch and other surface-derived stimuli. It is accompanied by a reversible rotation of the root tip about its axis. A number of mutations affect the presence or the shape of root waves on tilted agar-based surfaces. One of them, wvc1, promotes the formation of compressed root waves under these conditions. The physiological and molecular analyses of this mutant suggest that a tryptophan-derived molecule other than IAA might be an important regulator of the curvature responsible for root waving.

  17. Molecular genetics of root gravitropism and waving in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Sedbrook, J; Boonsirichai, K; Chen, R; Hilson, P; Pearlman, R; Rosen, E; Rutherford, R; Batiza, A; Carroll, K; Schulz, T; Masson, P H

    1998-05-01

    When Arabidopsis thaliana seedlings grow embedded in an agar-based medium, their roots grow vertically downward. This reflects their ability to sense the gravity vector and to position their tip parallel to it (gravitropism). We have isolated a number of mutations affecting root gravitropism in Arabidopsis thaliana. One of these mutations, named arg1, affects root and hypocotyl gravitropism without promoting defects in starch content or in the ability of seedlings' organs to respond to plant hormones. The ARG1 gene was cloned and shown to code for a protein with a J domain at its amino terminus and a second sequence motif found in several cytoskeleton binding proteins. Mutations in the AGR1 locus promote a strong defect in root gravitropism. Some alleles also confer an increased root resistance to exogenous ethylene and an increased sensitivity to auxin. AGR1 was cloned and found to encode a putative transmembrane protein which might be involved in polar auxin transport, or in regulating the differential growth response to gravistimulation. When Arabidopsis seedlings grow on the surface of agar-based media tilted backward, their roots wave. That wavy pattern of root growth derives from a combined response to gravity, touch and other surface-derived stimuli. It is accompanied by a reversible rotation of the root tip about its axis. A number of mutations affect the presence or the shape of root waves on tilted agar-based surfaces. One of them, wvc1, promotes the formation of compressed root waves under these conditions. The physiological and molecular analyses of this mutant suggest that a tryptophan-derived molecule other than IAA might be an important regulator of the curvature responsible for root waving.

  18. Aspartate oxidase plays an important role in Arabidopsis stomatal immunity.

    PubMed

    Macho, Alberto P; Boutrot, Freddy; Rathjen, John P; Zipfel, Cyril

    2012-08-01

    Perception of pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs), such as bacterial flagellin (or the peptide flg22), by surface-localized receptors activates defense responses and subsequent immunity. In a previous forward-genetic screen aimed at the identification of Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) flagellin-insensitive (fin) mutants, we isolated fin4, which is severely affected in flg22-triggered reactive oxygen species (ROS) bursts. Here, we report that FIN4 encodes the chloroplastic enzyme ASPARTATE OXIDASE (AO), which catalyzes the first irreversible step in the de novo biosynthesis of NAD. Genetic studies on the role of NAD have been hindered so far by the lethality of null mutants in NAD biosynthetic enzymes. Using newly identified knockdown fin alleles, we found that AO is required for the ROS burst mediated by the NADPH oxidase RBOHD triggered by the perception of several unrelated PAMPs. AO is also required for RBOHD-dependent stomatal closure. However, full AO activity is not required for flg22-induced responses that are RBOHD independent. Interestingly, although the fin4 mutation dramatically affects RBOHD function, it does not affect functions carried out by other members of the RBOH family, such as RBOHC and RBOHF. Finally, we determined that AO is required for stomatal immunity against the bacterium Pseudomonas syringae. Altogether, our work reveals a novel specific requirement for AO activity in PAMP-triggered RBOHD-dependent ROS burst and stomatal immunity. In addition, the availability of viable mutants for the chloroplastic enzyme AO will enable future detailed studies on the role of NAD metabolism in different cellular processes, including immunity, in Arabidopsis.

  19. Molecular genetics of root gravitropism and waving in Arabidopsis thaliana

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sedbrook, J.; Boonsirichai, K.; Chen, R.; Hilson, P.; Pearlman, R.; Rosen, E.; Rutherford, R.; Batiza, A.; Carroll, K.; Schulz, T.; Masson, P. H.

    1998-01-01

    When Arabidopsis thaliana seedlings grow embedded in an agar-based medium, their roots grow vertically downward. This reflects their ability to sense the gravity vector and to position their tip parallel to it (gravitropism). We have isolated a number of mutations affecting root gravitropism in Arabidopsis thaliana. One of these mutations, named arg1, affects root and hypocotyl gravitropism without promoting defects in starch content or in the ability of seedlings' organs to respond to plant hormones. The ARG1 gene was cloned and shown to code for a protein with a J domain at its amino terminus and a second sequence motif found in several cytoskeleton binding proteins. Mutations in the AGR1 locus promote a strong defect in root gravitropism. Some alleles also confer an increased root resistance to exogenous ethylene and an increased sensitivity to auxin. AGR1 was cloned and found to encode a putative transmembrane protein which might be involved in polar auxin transport, or in regulating the differential growth response to gravistimulation. When Arabidopsis seedlings grow on the surface of agar-based media tilted backward, their roots wave. That wavy pattern of root growth derives from a combined response to gravity, touch and other surface-derived stimuli. It is accompanied by a reversible rotation of the root tip about its axis. A number of mutations affect the presence or the shape of root waves on tilted agar-based surfaces. One of them, wvc1, promotes the formation of compressed root waves under these conditions. The physiological and molecular analyses of this mutant suggest that a tryptophan-derived molecule other than IAA might be an important regulator of the curvature responsible for root waving.

  20. Azospirillum brasilense ameliorates the response of Arabidopsis thaliana to drought mainly via enhancement of ABA levels.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Ana C; Bottini, Rubén; Pontin, Mariela; Berli, Federico J; Moreno, Daniela; Boccanlandro, Hernán; Travaglia, Claudia N; Piccoli, Patricia N

    2015-01-01

    Production of phytohormones is one of the main mechanisms to explain the beneficial effects of plant growth-promoting rhizobacteria (PGPR) such as Azospirillum sp. The PGPRs induce plant growth and development, and reduce stress susceptibility. However, little is known regarding the stress-related phytohormone abscisic acid (ABA) produced by bacteria. We investigated the effects of Azospirillum brasilense Sp 245 strain on Arabidopsis thaliana Col-0 and aba2-1 mutant plants, evaluating the morphophysiological and biochemical responses when watered and in drought. We used an in vitro-grown system to study changes in the root volume and architecture after inoculation with Azospirillum in Arabidopsis wild-type Col-0 and on the mutant aba2-1, during early growth. To examine Arabidopsis development and reproductive success as affected by the bacteria, ABA and drought, a pot experiment using Arabidopsis Col-0 plants was also carried out. Azospirillum brasilense augmented plant biomass, altered root architecture by increasing lateral roots number, stimulated photosynthetic and photoprotective pigments and retarded water loss in correlation with incremented ABA levels. As well, inoculation improved plants seed yield, plants survival, proline levels and relative leaf water content; it also decreased stomatal conductance, malondialdehyde and relative soil water content in plants submitted to drought. Arabidopsis inoculation with A. brasilense improved plants performance, especially in drought. © 2014 Scandinavian Plant Physiology Society.

  1. A Rhizosphere Fungus Enhances Arabidopsis Thermotolerance through Production of an HSP90 Inhibitor1

    PubMed Central

    McLellan, Catherine A.; Turbyville, Thomas J.; Wijeratne, E.M. Kithsiri; Kerschen, Arthur; Vierling, Elizabeth; Queitsch, Christine; Whitesell, Luke; Gunatilaka, A.A. Leslie

    2007-01-01

    The molecular chaperone HEAT SHOCK PROTEIN90 (HSP90) is essential for the maturation of key regulatory proteins in eukaryotes and for the response to temperature stress. Earlier, we have reported that fungi living in association with plants of the Sonoran desert produce small molecule inhibitors of mammalian HSP90. Here, we address whether elaboration of the HSP90 inhibitor monocillin I (MON) by the rhizosphere fungus Paraphaeosphaeria quadriseptata affects plant HSP90 and plant environmental responsiveness. We demonstrate that MON binds Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) HSP90 and can inhibit the function of HSP90 in lysates of wheat (Triticum aestivum) germ. MON treatment of Arabidopsis seedlings induced HSP101 and HSP70, conserved components of the stress response. Application of MON, or growth in the presence of MON, allowed Arabidopsis wild type but not AtHSP101 knockout mutant seedlings to survive otherwise lethal temperature stress. Finally, cocultivation of P. quadriseptata with Arabidopsis enhanced plant heat stress tolerance. These data demonstrate that HSP90-inhibitory compounds produced by fungi can influence plant growth and responses to the environment. PMID:17631526

  2. Overexpression of 20-Oxidase Confers a Gibberellin-Overproduction Phenotype in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Shihshieh; Raman, Anuradha S.; Ream, Joel E.; Fujiwara, Hideji; Cerny, R. Eric; Brown, Sherri M.

    1998-01-01

    In the gibberellin (GA) biosynthesis pathway, 20-oxidase catalyzes the oxidation and elimination of carbon-20 to give rise to C19-GAs. All bioactive GAs are C19-GAs. We have overexpressed a cDNA encoding 20-oxidase isolated from Arabidopsis seedlings in transgenic Arabidopsis plants. These transgenic plants display a phenotype that may be attributed to the overproduction of GA. The phenotype includes a longer hypocotyl, lighter-green leaves, increased stem elongation, earlier flowering, and decreased seed dormancy. However, the fertility of the transgenic plants is not affected. Increased levels of endogenous GA1, GA9, and GA20 were detected in seedlings of the transgenic line examined. GA4, which is thought to be the predominantly active GA in Arabidopsis, was not present at increased levels in this line. These results suggest that the overexpression of this 20-oxidase increases the levels of some endogenous GAs in transgenic seedlings, which causes the GA-overproduction phenotype. PMID:9808721

  3. A multicomponent formal [1+2+1+2]-cycloaddition for the synthesis of dihydropyridines.

    PubMed

    Girling, P Ricardo; Batsanov, Andrei S; Shen, Hong C; Whiting, Andrew

    2012-05-18

    Reaction of methoxyvinylmethylketone with different amines and aldehydes under Lewis-acid catalysed conditions results in a novel, formal, step-wise [1+2+1+2]-cycloaddition to give dihydropyridine products.

  4. A Chemical Genetic Screening Procedure for Arabidopsis thaliana Seedlings

    PubMed Central

    Bjornson, Marta; Song, Xingshun; Dandekar, Abhaya; Franz, Annaliese; Drakakaki, Georgia; Dehesh, Katayoon

    2016-01-01

    Unbiased screening approaches are powerful tools enabling identification of novel players in biological processes. Chemical genetic screening refers to the technique of using a reporter response, such as expression of luciferase driven by a promoter of interest, to discover small molecules that affect a given process when applied to plants. These chemicals then act as tools for identification of regulatory components that could not otherwise be detected by forward genetic screens due to gene family redundancy or mutant lethality. This protocol describes a chemical genetic screen using Arabidopsis thaliana seedlings, which has led to recognition of novel players in the plant general stress response. PMID:27446980

  5. Function of Arabidopsis CPL1 in cadmium responses

    PubMed Central

    Aksoy, Emre; Koiwa, Hisashi

    2013-01-01

    Transcriptional and post-transcriptional responses to external iron (Fe) availability are essential for the cellular Fe homeostasis. Fe deficiency strongly induces Fe utilization-related gene expression; however, little is known about the early Fe signaling that regulates expression of a central transcription factor FIT. In Arabidopsis, mutations in RNA polymerase II CTD-phosphatase-like 1 (CPL1) enhance the expression of Fe utilization-related genes including FIT under Fe deficiency. Fe content is significantly increased in the roots and decreased in the shoots of cpl1-2 plants, and root growth of the cpl1-2 mutant shows higher tolerance to Fe deficiency and to toxicity of cadmium (Cd). The cpl1-2 plants accumulate more Cd in the shoots, suggesting that Cd toxicity in the cpl1-2 roots is circumvented by the transport of excess Cd to the shoots. Here we show data suggesting that the root-to-shoot translocation of Cd in cpl1-2 is mediated by yet uncharacterized Cd transport mechanisms. PMID:23455022

  6. Function of Arabidopsis CPL1 in cadmium responses.

    PubMed

    Aksoy, Emre; Koiwa, Hisashi

    2013-05-01

    Transcriptional and post-transcriptional responses to external iron (Fe) availability are essential for the cellular Fe homeostasis. Fe deficiency strongly induces Fe utilization-related gene expression; however, little is known about the early Fe signaling that regulates expression of a central transcription factor FIT. In Arabidopsis, mutations in RNA polymerase II CTD-phosphatase-like 1 (CPL1) enhance the expression of Fe utilization-related genes including FIT under Fe deficiency. Fe content is significantly increased in the roots and decreased in the shoots of cpl1-2 plants, and root growth of the cpl1-2 mutant shows higher tolerance to Fe deficiency and to toxicity of cadmium (Cd). The cpl1-2 plants accumulate more Cd in the shoots, suggesting that Cd toxicity in the cpl1-2 roots is circumvented by the transport of excess Cd to the shoots. Here we show data suggesting that the root-to-shoot translocation of Cd in cpl1-2 is mediated by yet uncharacterized Cd transport mechanisms.

  7. Purification, crystallization and preliminary crystallographic analysis of deoxyuridine triphosphate nucleotidohydrolase from Arabidopsis thaliana

    SciTech Connect

    Bajaj, Mamta; Moriyama, Hideaki

    2007-05-01

    The first crystallization of deoxyuridine triphosphate nucleotidohydrolase from plant, Arabidopsis thaliana, has been performed. An additive, taurine, was effective in producing the single crystal. The deoxyuridine triphosphate nucleotidohydrolase gene from Arabidopsis thaliana was expressed and the gene product was purified. Crystallization was performed by the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion method at 298 K using 2 M ammonium sulfate as the precipitant. X-ray diffraction data were collected to 2.2 Å resolution using Cu Kα radiation. The crystal belongs to the orthorhombic space group P2{sub 1}2{sub 1}2{sub 1}, with unit-cell parameters a = 69.90, b = 70.86 Å, c = 75.55 Å. Assuming the presence of a trimer in the asymmetric unit, the solvent content was 30%, with a V{sub M} of 1.8 Å{sup 3} Da{sup −1}.

  8. KATANIN 1 Is Essential for Embryogenesis and Seed Formation in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Luptovčiak, Ivan; Samakovli, Despina; Komis, George; Šamaj, Jozef

    2017-01-01

    Cytoskeletal remodeling has a fundamental role, especially during transitional developmental stages when cells rapidly adopt new forms and roles, like gametogenesis, fertilization and concomitant embryogenesis and seed formation. KATANIN 1, a microtubule severing protein, fulfills a major regulatory mechanism of dynamic microtubule turnover in eukaryotes. Herein, we show that three well-established KATANIN 1 mutants, fra2, lue1 and ktn1-2 collectively display lower fertility and seed set in Arabidopsis. These lower fertility and seed set rates of fra2, lue1 and ktn1-2 mutants were correlated to abnormalities in the development of embryo proper and seed. Such phenotypes were rescued by transformation of mutants with functional pKTN1::GFP:KTN1 construct. This study significantly expands the already broad functional repertoire of KATANIN 1 and unravels its new role in embryo and seed development. Thus, KATANIN 1 significantly contributes to the fertility and proper embryo and seed formation in Arabidopsis. PMID:28529520

  9. Defects in Peroxisomal 6-Phosphogluconate Dehydrogenase Isoform PGD2 Prevent Gametophytic Interaction in Arabidopsis thaliana1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Hölscher, Christian; Meyer, Tanja; Fischer, Kerstin

    2016-01-01

    We studied the localization of 6-phosphogluconate dehydrogenase (PGD) isoforms of Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana). Similar polypeptide lengths of PGD1, PGD2, and PGD3 obscured which isoform may represent the cytosolic and/or plastidic enzyme plus whether PGD2 with a peroxisomal targeting motif also might target plastids. Reporter-fusion analyses in protoplasts revealed that, with a free N terminus, PGD1 and PGD3 accumulate in the cytosol and chloroplasts, whereas PGD2 remains in the cytosol. Mutagenesis of a conserved second ATG enhanced the plastidic localization of PGD1 and PGD3 but not PGD2. Amino-terminal deletions of PGD2 fusions with a free C terminus resulted in peroxisomal import after dimerization, and PGD2 could be immunodetected in purified peroxisomes. Repeated selfing of pgd2 transfer (T-)DNA alleles yielded no homozygous mutants, although siliques and seeds of heterozygous plants developed normally. Detailed analyses of the C-terminally truncated PGD2-1 protein showed that peroxisomal import and catalytic activity are abolished. Reciprocal backcrosses of pgd2-1 suggested that missing PGD activity in peroxisomes primarily affects the male gametophyte. Tetrad analyses in the quartet1-2 background revealed that pgd2-1 pollen is vital and in vitro germination normal, but pollen tube growth inside stylar tissues appeared less directed. Mutual gametophytic sterility was overcome by complementation with a genomic construct but not with a version lacking the first ATG. These analyses showed that peroxisomal PGD2 activity is required for guided growth of the male gametophytes and pollen tube-ovule interaction. Our report finally demonstrates an essential role of oxidative pentose-phosphate pathway reactions in peroxisomes, likely needed to sustain critical levels of nitric oxide and/or jasmonic acid, whose biosynthesis both depend on NADPH provision. PMID:26941195

  10. Antagonistic interaction of BLADE-ON-PETIOLE1 and 2 with BREVIPEDICELLUS and PENNYWISE regulates Arabidopsis inflorescence architecture.

    PubMed

    Khan, Madiha; Xu, Mingli; Murmu, Jhadeswar; Tabb, Paul; Liu, Yuanyuan; Storey, Kathryn; McKim, Sarah M; Douglas, Carl J; Hepworth, Shelley R

    2012-02-01

    The transition to flowering in many plant species, including Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana), is marked by the elongation of internodes to make an inflorescence upon which lateral branches and flowers are arranged in a characteristic pattern. Inflorescence patterning relies in part on the activities of two three-amino-acid loop-extension homeodomain transcription factors: BREVIPEDICELLUS (BP) and PENNYWISE (PNY) whose interacting products also promote meristem function. We examine here the genetic interactions between BP-PNY whose expression is up-regulated in stems at the floral transition, and the lateral organ boundary genes BLADE-ON-PETIOLE1 (BOP1) and BOP2, whose expression is restricted to pedicel axils. Our data show that bp and pny inflorescence defects are caused by BOP1/2 gain of function in stems and pedicels. Compatible with this, inactivation of BOP1/2 rescues these defects. BOP expression domains are differentially enlarged in bp and pny mutants, corresponding to the distinctive patterns of growth restriction in these mutants leading to compacted internodes and clustered or downward-oriented fruits. Our data indicate that BOP1/2 are positive regulators of KNOTTED1-LIKE FROM ARABIDOPSIS THALIANA6 expression and that growth restriction in BOP1/2 gain-of-function plants requires KNOTTED1-LIKE FROM ARABIDOPSIS THALIANA6. Antagonism between BOP1/2 and BP is explained in part by their reciprocal regulation of gene expression, as evidenced by the identification of lignin biosynthetic genes that are repressed by BP and activated by BOP1/2 in stems. These data reveal BOP1/2 gain of function as the basis of bp and pny inflorescence defects and reveal how antagonism between BOP1/2 and BP-PNY contributes to inflorescence patterning in a model plant species.

  11. Microwave spectrum of 1,2-propanediol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lovas, F. J.; Plusquellic, D. F.; Pate, Brooks H.; Neill, Justin L.; Muckle, Matthew T.; Remijan, Anthony J.

    2009-09-01

    The microwave spectrum of the sugar alcohol 1,2-propanediol (CH 3CHOHCH 2OH) has been measured over the frequency range 6.5-25.0 GHz with several pulsed-beam Fourier-transform microwave spectrometers. Seven conformers of 1,2-propanediol have been assigned and ab initio electronic structure calculations of the 10 lowest energy forms have been calculated. Stark effect measurements were carried out on several of the lowest energy conformers to provide accurate determinations of the dipole moment components and assist in conformer assignment.

  12. Sodium fluxes through nonselective cation channels in the plasma membrane of protoplasts from Arabidopsis roots.

    PubMed

    Demidchik, Vadim; Tester, Mark

    2002-02-01

    The aim of the present work was to characterize Na(+) currents through nonselective cation channels (NSCCs) in protoplasts derived from root cells of Arabidopsis. The procedure of the protoplast isolation was modified to increase the stability of Arabidopsis root protoplasts in low external Ca(2+) by digesting tissue in elevated Ca(2+). Experiments in whole-cell and outside-out modes were carried out. We found that Na(+) currents in Arabidopsis root protoplasts were mediated by cation channels that were insensitive to externally applied tetraethylammonium(+) and verapamil, had no time-dependent activation (permanently opened or completely activated within 1-2 ms), were voltage independent, and were weakly selective for monovalent cations. The selectivity sequence was as follows: K(+) (1.49) > NH(4)(+) (1.24) > Rb(+) (1.15) approximately equal to Cs(+) (1.10) approximately equal to Na(+) (1.00) > Li(+) (0.73) > tetraethylammonium(+) (0.47). Arabidopsis root NSCCs were blocked by H(+) (pK approximately equal to 6.0), Ca(2+) (K(1/2) approximately equal to 0.1 mM), Ba(2+), Zn(2+), La(3+), Gd(3+), quinine, and the His modifier diethylpyrocarbonate. They were insensitive to most organic blockers (nifedipine, verapamil, flufenamate, and amiloride) and to the SH-group modifier p-chloromercuriphenyl sulfonic acid. Voltage-insensitive, Ca(2+)-sensitive single channels were also resolved. Properties of Arabidopsis root NSCCs are discussed and compared with characteristics of similar conductances studied previously in plants and animals. It is suggested that NSCCs present a distinct group of plant ion channels, mediating toxic Na(+) influx to the cell and probably having other important roles in physiological processes of plants.

  13. Taxonomy and Phylogeny of Arabidopsis (Brassicaceae)

    PubMed Central

    Al-Shehbaz, Ihsan A.; O'Kane, Steve L.

    2002-01-01

    Detailed taxonomic, cytological, and phylogenetic accounts of Arabidopsis are presented. As currently delimited, the genus consists of nine species all of which are indigenous to Europe, with the ranges of two species extending into northern and eastern Asia and North American into central United States. A survey of chromosome numbers in the genus is presented, and the country of origin for each count is given. Detailed descriptions of all species and subspecies and keys to all taxa are provided. Generic assignments are updated for the 50 species previously included in Arabidopsis. A cladogram of the species of Arabidopsis based on molecular phylogenetic studies by the authors is given. PMID:22303187

  14. Bacterial Cyclic β-(1,2)-Glucan Acts in Systemic Suppression of Plant Immune Responses[W

    PubMed Central

    Rigano, Luciano Ariel; Payette, Caroline; Brouillard, Geneviève; Marano, Maria Rosa; Abramowicz, Laura; Torres, Pablo Sebastián; Yun, Maximina; Castagnaro, Atilio Pedro; Oirdi, Mohamed El; Dufour, Vanessa; Malamud, Florencia; Dow, John Maxwell; Bouarab, Kamal; Vojnov, Adrian Alberto

    2007-01-01

    Although cyclic glucans have been shown to be important for a number of symbiotic and pathogenic bacterium–plant interactions, their precise roles are unclear. Here, we examined the role of cyclic β-(1,2)-glucan in the virulence of the black rot pathogen Xanthomonas campestris pv campestris (Xcc). Disruption of the Xcc nodule development B (ndvB) gene, which encodes a glycosyltransferase required for cyclic glucan synthesis, generated a mutant that failed to synthesize extracellular cyclic β-(1,2)-glucan and was compromised in virulence in the model plants Arabidopsis thaliana and Nicotiana benthamiana. Infection of the mutant bacterium in N. benthamiana was associated with enhanced callose deposition and earlier expression of the PATHOGENESIS-RELATED1 (PR-1) gene. Application of purified cyclic β-(1,2)-glucan prior to inoculation of the ndvB mutant suppressed the accumulation of callose deposition and the expression of PR-1 in N. benthamiana and restored virulence in both N. benthamiana and Arabidopsis plants. These effects were seen when cyclic glucan and bacteria were applied either to the same or to different leaves. Cyclic β-(1,2)-glucan–induced systemic suppression was associated with the transport of the molecule throughout the plant. Systemic suppression is a novel counterdefensive strategy that may facilitate pathogen spread in plants and may have important implications for the understanding of plant–pathogen coevolution and for the development of phytoprotection measures. PMID:17601826

  15. Cytosolic Glutamine Synthetase Gln1;2 Is the Main Isozyme Contributing to GS1 Activity and Can Be Up-Regulated to Relieve Ammonium Toxicity1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Pedersen, Carsten

    2016-01-01

    Cytosolic GS1 (Gln synthetase) is central for ammonium assimilation in plants. High ammonium treatment enhanced the expression of the GS1 isogene Gln-1;2 encoding a low-affinity high-capacity GS1 protein in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) shoots. Under the same conditions, the expression of the high-affinity low-capacity isoform Gln-1;1 was reduced. The expression of Gln-1;3 did not respond to ammonium treatment while Gln-1;4 and Gln-1;5 isogenes in all cases were expressed at a very low level. Gln-2 was highly expressed in shoots but only at a very low level in roots. To investigate the specific functions of the two isogenes Gln-1;1 and Gln-1;2 in shoots for ammonium detoxification, single and double knock-out mutants were grown under standard N supply or with high ammonium provision. Phenotypes of the single mutant gln1;1 were similar to the wild type, while growth of the gln1;2 single mutant and the gln1;1:gln1;2 double mutant was significantly impaired irrespective of N regime. GS1 activity was significantly reduced in both gln1;2 and gln1;1:gln1;2. Along with this, the ammonium content increased while that of Gln decreased, showing that Gln-1;2 was essential for ammonium assimilation and amino acid synthesis. We conclude that Gln-1;2 is the main isozyme contributing to shoot GS1 activity in vegetative growth stages and can be up-regulated to relieve ammonium toxicity. This reveals, to our knowledge, a novel shoot function of Gln-1;2 in Arabidopsis shoots. PMID:27231101

  16. 50 CFR 1.2 - Authorized representative.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... Wildlife and Fisheries UNITED STATES FISH AND WILDLIFE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR GENERAL PROVISIONS DEFINITIONS § 1.2 Authorized representative. Authorized representative means the subordinate... matters. The Director, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service is frequently the authorized representative of...

  17. 1,2-Dibromo-3-chloropropane (DBCP)

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    1,2 - Dibromo - 3 - chloropropane ( DBCP ) ; CASRN 96 - 12 - 8 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessm

  18. 1,1,1,2-Tetrafluoroethane

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    1,1,1,2 - Tetrafluoroethane ; CASRN 811 - 97 - 2 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for Nonca

  19. 1,1,2,2-Tetrachloroethane

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    1,1,2,2 - Tetrachloroethane ; CASRN 79 - 34 - 5 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for Noncar

  20. 1,2,4,5-Tetrachlorobenzene

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    1,2,4,5 - Tetrachlorobenzene ; CASRN 95 - 94 - 3 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for Nonca

  1. Rotational barriers. 1. 1,2-dihaloethanes

    SciTech Connect

    Wiberg, K.B.; Murcko, M.A.

    1987-06-18

    The rotational barrier about the C-C bond of 1,2-dichloroethane has been calculated by using several basis sets (4-31G, 6-31G*, 6-31+G*, and 6-31++G**) and including electron correlation. Corrections for zero-point energy differences, and the differences in enthalpy change from 0 to 298 K, were made by using the calculated geometries and vibrational frequencies. The trans/gauche energy difference was found to be 1.39 kcal/mol as compared to the observed value, 1.1 +/- 0.1 kcal/mol. The intramolecular interactions in the several rotamers are discussed. The trans/gauche energy difference for 1,2-difluoroethane also was calculated (MP3/6-311++G**) and was found to be 0.76 kcal/mol favoring the gauche conformer, again in good agreement with the experimental value of 0.57 +/- 0.09 kcal/mol. The trend in trans/gauche energy differences in the series n-butane, 1,2-dichloroethane, 1,2-difluoroethane is noted.

  2. 1,1,1,2-Tetrachloroethane

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    1,1,1,2 - Tetrachloroethane ; CASRN 630 - 20 - 6 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for Nonca

  3. CMMI Version 1.2 and Beyond

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-03-06

    architecture will allow post-V1.2 expansion. • Extensions of the life cycle (Services, Outsourcing /Acquisition) could expand use of a common...Communications NASA Nokia NTT Data Raytheon Samsung U.S. Air Force U.S. Treasury Department Bank of America Bosch EDS Fannie Mae General Motors IBM Global

  4. 1,2,3-triazolium ionic liquids

    SciTech Connect

    Luebke, David; Nulwala, Hunaid; Tang, Chau

    2014-12-09

    The present invention relates to compositions of matter that are ionic liquids, the compositions comprising substituted 1,2,3-triazolium cations combined with any anion. Compositions of the invention should be useful in the separation of gases and, perhaps, as catalysts for many reactions.

  5. Theoretical study of the photo-isomerisation reactions of 1,2-dihydro-1,2-phosphaborine and 1,2-dihydro-1,2-alumazaine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Ming-Der

    2015-07-01

    The mechanisms of the photochemical isomerisation reactions are investigated theoretically using the model systems, 1,2-dihydro-1,2-phosphaborine (5) and 1,2-dihydro-1,2-alumazaine (6), using the CAS(6,6)/6-311G(d,p) and MP2-CAS-(6,6)/6-311++G(3df,3pd)//CAS(6,6)/6-311G(d,p) methods. For each model reactant, three reaction pathways, which lead to three kinds of photo-isomers, are examined. The structures of the conical intersections, which play a key role in such photo-rearrangements, are determined. The thermal (or dark) reactions of the reactant species are also examined, using the same level of theory, to provide a qualitative explanation of the reaction pathways. These model investigations demonstrate that the preferred reaction route for these two aromatic heterocyclics is as follows: reactant → Franck-Condon region → conical intersection → photoproduct. The theoretical evidences anticipate that after irradiation of 5, the photoproduct yield of the Dewar BP-isomer, 8, should be larger than that of the Dewar BP-isomer, 7, whereas no Dewar BP-isomer 9 can be observed. Moreover, the present theoretical data predict after irradiation of 6, all three Dewar AlN-isomers (10, 11, and 12) and the starting molecule, 6, are produced.

  6. Sulfenome mining in Arabidopsis thaliana

    PubMed Central

    Waszczak, Cezary; Akter, Salma; Eeckhout, Dominique; Persiau, Geert; Wahni, Khadija; Bodra, Nandita; Va