Science.gov

Sample records for 1-2 gev synchrotron

  1. Conceptual design of the Argonne 6-GeV synchrotron light source

    SciTech Connect

    Cho, Y.; Crosbie, E.; Khoe, T.; Knott, M.; Kramer, S.; Kustom, R.; Lari, R.; Martin, R.; Mavrogenes, G.; Moenich, J.

    1985-01-01

    The Argonne National Laboratory Synchrotron Light Source Storage Ring is designed to have a natural emittance of 6.5 x 10/sup -9/ m for circulating 6-GeV positrons. Thirty of the 32 long straight sections, each 6.5-m long, will be available for synchrotron light insertion devices. A circulating positron current of 300 mA can be injected in about 8 min. from a booster synchrotron operating with a repetition time of 1.2 sec. The booster synchrotron will contain two different rf systems. The lower frequency system (38.97 MHz) will accept positrons from a 360-MeV linac and will accelerate them to 2.25 GeV. The higher frequency system (350.76 MHz) will accelerate the positrons to 6 GeV. The positrons will be produced from a 300-MeV electron beam on a tungsten target. A conceptual layout is shown. 5 refs., 4 figs., 3 tabs.

  2. Shielding Design Aspects of SR Beamlines for 3-GeV And 8-GeV Class Synchrotron Radiation Facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Asano, Yoshihiro; Liu, James C.; Rokni, Sayed; /SLAC

    2007-09-24

    Differences in synchrotron radiation beamline shielding design between the facilities of 3 GeV class and 8 GeV class are discussed with regard to SLAC SSRL and SPring-8 beamlines. Requirements of beamline shielding as well as the accelerator shielding depend on the stored electron energy, and here some factors in beamline shielding depending on the stored energy in particular, are clarified, namely the effect of build up, the effect of double scattering of photons at branch beamlines, and the spread of gas bremsstrahlung.

  3. 3 GeV Booster Synchrotron Conceptual Design Report

    SciTech Connect

    Wiedemann, Helmut

    2009-06-02

    Synchrotron light cna be produced from a relativistic particle beam circulating in a storage ring at extremely high intensity and brilliance over a large spectral region reaching from the far infrared regime to hard x-rays. The particles, either electrons or positrons, radiate as they are deflected in the fields of the storage ring bending magnets or of magnets specially optimized for the production of synchrotron light. The synchrotron light being very intense and well collimated in the forward direction has become a major tool in a large variety of research fields in physics, chemistry, material science, biology, and medicine.

  4. Research in atomic and applied physics using a 6-GeV synchrotron source

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, K.W.

    1985-12-01

    The Division of Atomic and Applied Physics in the Department of Applied Science at Brookhaven National Laboratory conducts a broad program of research using ion beams and synchrotron radiation for experiments in atomic physics and nuclear analytical techniques and applications. Many of the experiments would benefit greatly from the use of high energy, high intensity photon beams from a 6-GeV synchrotron source. A survey of some of the specific scientific possibilities is presented.

  5. Design of a multi-bend achromat lattice for 3 GeV synchrotron light source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Eun-San

    2016-03-01

    We present a lattice design for a low-emittance and high-brilliance 3 GeV synchrotron light source that has been widely investigated in the world. We show the design results for a MBA (Multi-Bend Achromat) lattice with an emittance of 1.3 nm and 282.4 m circumference. Each cell has 5 bending magnets that consist of outer two with bending angle of 4.5° and inner three with bending angle of 7°. The lattice is designed to be flexible and consists of 12 straight sections in which one straight section has a length of 5.9 m. We have studied the dynamic aperture in the lattice with machine errors. It is shown that the designed low-emittance lattice provides sufficient dynamic aperture after COD correction. We present the results of variations of emittance, energy spread and dynamic aperture due to in-vacuum undulators in the straight sections. We performed particle tracking after the beam injection to investigate the efficiency of the injection scheme. We show the designed results of an injection scheme that shows the space allocation in injection section and the particle motions of injected beam. Our designed lattice provides a good optimization in terms of the emittance and brilliance as a light source for 3 GeV energy and circumference of 28 m.

  6. Fragmentation of 1. 2 GeV per nucleon [sup 139]La

    SciTech Connect

    Christie, W.B.; Romero, J.L.; Brady, F.P.; Tull, C.E.; Grim, G.P.; McEachern, B.; Young, J.C. ); Crawford, H.J.; Greiner, D.E.; Lindstrom, P.J.; Sann, H. ); Lynen, U. )

    1993-12-01

    The fragmentation of 1.2 GeV per nucleon [sup 139]La nuclei has been studied. Total charge changing cross sections for H (CH[sub 2][minus]C), C, and Pb target nuclei, and elemental production cross sections for C and CH[sub 2] targets for 1[le][Delta][ital Z][le]30 have been measured. For heavy projectile fragments, the projected transverse momenta extracted are generally larger than predicted by models based on the internal momenta of nucleons in nuclei. Fits to the heavy fragment momentum distributions yield additional transverse momenta or bounce-off'' which range from [congruent]500 to 1000 MeV/[ital c].

  7. 1-MW Beam Operation Scenario of the J-PARC 3-GeV Rapid Cycling Synchrotron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hotchi, Hideaki

    The J-PARC 3-GeV Rapid Cycling Synchrotron initiates the final stage of beam commissioning aiming for the design output beam power of 1 MW from Oct. 2014 after completing the injector linac upgrade. In this paper, emittance growth and beam loss issues for the coming 1-MW beam operation will be discussed together with their possible mitigation scenarios, based on numerical simulations.

  8. Induced radioactivity and its relation to beam losses in the CERN 26 GeV proton synchrotron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sullivan, A. H.

    1987-06-01

    The results of induced radioactivity measurements made over the past 10 years around the CERN 26 GeV proton synchrotron are presented. The dose rate near different sections of the machine is shown to vary by factors up to 10 above and below the mean. A correlation is made between beam losses and radiation level, where it is estimated that to a first approximation in a machine that has been running a few years, the dose rate at 50 cm from a straight section between magnets and 24 h after stop will be 1.0 mSv/h (100 mrem/h) for beam losses equivalent to 1 W per meter of machine circumference. The dose rate after a cooling time of t days ( t ≪ 1 yr) is derived to be: D=p(1-0.4 log10t) mSv/h, where p is the average beam power loss, in W per m of circumference, over the two preceding months. This dependence of dose rate on decay time is compared with measured data from the PS for up to 43 days of cooling time. Beam losses estimated from induced activity dose rates using the above relation are shown to correspond reasonably with those expected for two operating conditions of the CERN 26 GeV proton synchrotron.

  9. Observation of e+e-→ω χc 1 ,2 near √{s }=4.42 and 4.6 GeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ablikim, M.; Achasov, M. N.; Ai, X. C.; Albayrak, O.; Albrecht, M.; Ambrose, D. J.; Amoroso, A.; An, F. F.; An, Q.; Bai, J. Z.; Baldini Ferroli, R.; Ban, Y.; Bennett, D. W.; Bennett, J. V.; Bertani, M.; Bettoni, D.; Bian, J. M.; Bianchi, F.; Boger, E.; Boyko, I.; Briere, R. A.; Cai, H.; Cai, X.; Cakir, O.; Calcaterra, A.; Cao, G. F.; Cetin, S. A.; Chang, J. F.; Chelkov, G.; Chen, G.; Chen, H. S.; Chen, H. Y.; Chen, J. C.; Chen, M. L.; Chen, S. J.; Chen, X.; Chen, X. R.; Chen, Y. B.; Cheng, H. P.; Chu, X. K.; Cibinetto, G.; Dai, H. L.; Dai, J. P.; Dbeyssi, A.; Dedovich, D.; Deng, Z. Y.; Denig, A.; Denysenko, I.; Destefanis, M.; de Mori, F.; Ding, Y.; Dong, C.; Dong, J.; Dong, L. Y.; Dong, M. Y.; Dou, Z. L.; Du, S. X.; Duan, P. F.; Eren, E. E.; Fan, J. Z.; Fang, J.; Fang, S. S.; Fang, X.; Fang, Y.; Farinelli, R.; Fava, L.; Fedorov, O.; Feldbauer, F.; Felici, G.; Feng, C. Q.; Fioravanti, E.; Fritsch, M.; Fu, C. D.; Gao, Q.; Gao, X. L.; Gao, X. Y.; Gao, Y.; Gao, Z.; Garzia, I.; Goetzen, K.; Gong, L.; Gong, W. X.; Gradl, W.; Greco, M.; Gu, M. H.; Gu, Y. T.; Guan, Y. H.; Guo, A. Q.; Guo, L. B.; Guo, Y.; Guo, Y. P.; Haddadi, Z.; Hafner, A.; Han, S.; Hao, X. Q.; Harris, F. A.; He, K. L.; Held, T.; Heng, Y. K.; Hou, Z. L.; Hu, C.; Hu, H. M.; Hu, J. F.; Hu, T.; Hu, Y.; Huang, G. S.; Huang, J. S.; Huang, X. T.; Huang, Y.; Hussain, T.; Ji, Q.; Ji, Q. P.; Ji, X. B.; Ji, X. L.; Jiang, L. W.; Jiang, X. S.; Jiang, X. Y.; Jiao, J. B.; Jiao, Z.; Jin, D. P.; Jin, S.; Johansson, T.; Julin, A.; Kalantar-Nayestanaki, N.; Kang, X. L.; Kang, X. S.; Kavatsyuk, M.; Ke, B. C.; Kiese, P.; Kliemt, R.; Kloss, B.; Kolcu, O. B.; Kopf, B.; Kornicer, M.; Kuehn, W.; Kupsc, A.; Lange, J. S.; Lara, M.; Larin, P.; Leng, C.; Li, C.; Li, C. H.; Li, Cheng; Li, D. M.; Li, F.; Li, F. Y.; Li, G.; Li, H. B.; Li, J. C.; Li, Jin; Li, K.; Li, K.; Li, Lei; Li, P. R.; Li, Q. Y.; Li, T.; Li, W. D.; Li, W. G.; Li, X. L.; Li, X. M.; Li, X. N.; Li, X. Q.; Li, Z. B.; Liang, H.; Liang, Y. F.; Liang, Y. T.; Liao, G. R.; Lin, D. X.; Liu, B. J.; Liu, C. X.; Liu, D.; Liu, F. H.; Liu, Fang; Liu, Feng; Liu, H. B.; Liu, H. H.; Liu, H. H.; Liu, H. M.; Liu, J.; Liu, J. B.; Liu, J. P.; Liu, J. Y.; Liu, K.; Liu, K. Y.; Liu, L. D.; Liu, P. L.; Liu, Q.; Liu, S. B.; Liu, X.; Liu, Y. B.; Liu, Z. A.; Liu, Zhiqing; Loehner, H.; Lou, X. C.; Lu, H. J.; Lu, J. G.; Lu, Y.; Lu, Y. P.; Luo, C. L.; Luo, M. X.; Luo, T.; Luo, X. L.; Lyu, X. R.; Ma, F. C.; Ma, H. L.; Ma, L. L.; Ma, Q. M.; Ma, T.; Ma, X. N.; Ma, X. Y.; Ma, Y. M.; Maas, F. E.; Maggiora, M.; Mao, Y. J.; Mao, Z. P.; Marcello, S.; Messchendorp, J. G.; Min, J.; Mitchell, R. E.; Mo, X. H.; Mo, Y. J.; Morales Morales, C.; Muchnoi, N. Yu.; Muramatsu, H.; Nefedov, Y.; Nerling, F.; Nikolaev, I. B.; Ning, Z.; Nisar, S.; Niu, S. L.; Niu, X. Y.; Olsen, S. L.; Ouyang, Q.; Pacetti, S.; Pan, Y.; Patteri, P.; Pelizaeus, M.; Peng, H. P.; Peters, K.; Pettersson, J.; Ping, J. L.; Ping, R. G.; Poling, R.; Prasad, V.; Qi, H. R.; Qi, M.; Qian, S.; Qiao, C. F.; Qin, L. Q.; Qin, N.; Qin, X. S.; Qin, Z. H.; Qiu, J. F.; Rashid, K. H.; Redmer, C. F.; Ripka, M.; Rong, G.; Rosner, Ch.; Ruan, X. D.; Santoro, V.; Sarantsev, A.; Savrié, M.; Schoenning, K.; Schumann, S.; Shan, W.; Shao, M.; Shen, C. P.; Shen, P. X.; Shen, X. Y.; Sheng, H. Y.; Song, W. M.; Song, X. Y.; Sosio, S.; Spataro, S.; Sun, G. X.; Sun, J. F.; Sun, S. S.; Sun, Y. J.; Sun, Y. Z.; Sun, Z. J.; Sun, Z. T.; Tang, C. J.; Tang, X.; Tapan, I.; Thorndike, E. H.; Tiemens, M.; Ullrich, M.; Uman, I.; Varner, G. S.; Wang, B.; Wang, B. L.; Wang, D.; Wang, D. Y.; Wang, K.; Wang, L. L.; Wang, L. S.; Wang, M.; Wang, P.; Wang, P. L.; Wang, S. G.; Wang, W.; Wang, W. P.; Wang, X. F.; Wang, Y. D.; Wang, Y. F.; Wang, Y. Q.; Wang, Z.; Wang, Z. G.; Wang, Z. H.; Wang, Z. Y.; Weber, T.; Wei, D. H.; Wei, J. B.; Weidenkaff, P.; Wen, S. P.; Wiedner, U.; Wolke, M.; Wu, L. H.; Wu, Z.; Xia, L.; Xia, L. G.; Xia, Y.; Xiao, D.; Xiao, H.; Xiao, Z. J.; Xie, Y. G.; Xiu, Q. L.; Xu, G. F.; Xu, L.; Xu, Q. J.; Xu, Q. N.; Xu, X. P.; Yan, L.; Yan, W. B.; Yan, W. C.; Yan, Y. H.; Yang, H. J.; Yang, H. X.; Yang, L.; Yang, Y. X.; Ye, M.; Ye, M. H.; Yin, J. H.; Yu, B. X.; Yu, C. X.; Yu, J. S.; Yuan, C. Z.; Yuan, W. L.; Yuan, Y.; Yuncu, A.; Zafar, A. A.; Zallo, A.; Zeng, Y.; Zeng, Z.; Zhang, B. X.; Zhang, B. Y.; Zhang, C.; Zhang, C. C.; Zhang, D. H.; Zhang, H. H.; Zhang, H. Y.; Zhang, J. J.; Zhang, J. L.; Zhang, J. Q.; Zhang, J. W.; Zhang, J. Y.; Zhang, J. Z.; Zhang, K.; Zhang, L.; Zhang, X. Y.; Zhang, Y.; Zhang, Y. H.; Zhang, Y. N.; Zhang, Y. T.; Zhang, Yu; Zhang, Z. H.; Zhang, Z. P.; Zhang, Z. Y.; Zhao, G.; Zhao, J. W.; Zhao, J. Y.; Zhao, J. Z.; Zhao, Lei; Zhao, Ling; Zhao, M. G.; Zhao, Q.; Zhao, Q. W.; Zhao, S. J.; Zhao, T. C.; Zhao, Y. B.; Zhao, Z. G.; Zhemchugov, A.; Zheng, B.; Zheng, J. P.; Zheng, W. J.; Zheng, Y. H.; Zhong, B.; Zhou, L.; Zhou, X.; Zhou, X. K.; Zhou, X. R.; Zhou, X. Y.; Zhu, K.; Zhu, K. J.; Zhu, S.; Zhu, S. H.; Zhu, X. L.; Zhu, Y. C.; Zhu, Y. S.; Zhu, Z. A.; Zhuang, J.; Zotti, L.; Zou, B. S.; Zou, J. H.; Besiii Collaboration

    2016-01-01

    Based on data samples collected with the BESIII detector operating at the BEPCII storage ring at center-of-mass energies √{s }>4.4 GeV , the processes e+e-→ω χc 1 ,2 are observed for the first time. With an integrated luminosity of 1074 pb-1 near √{s }=4.42 GeV , a significant ω χc 2 signal is found, and the cross section is measured to be (20.9 ±3.2 ±2.5 ) pb . With 567 pb-1 near √{s }=4.6 GeV , a clear ω χc 1 signal is seen, and the cross section is measured to be (9.5 ±2.1 ±1.3 ) pb , while evidence is found for an ω χc 2 signal. The first errors are statistical, and the second are systematic. Due to low luminosity or low cross section at other energies, no significant signals are observed. In the ω χc 2 cross section, an enhancement is seen around √{s }=4.42 GeV . Fitting the cross section with a coherent sum of the ψ (4415 ) Breit-Wigner function and a phase-space term, the branching fraction B (ψ (4415 )→ω χc 2) is obtained to be of the order of 1 0-3.

  10. Designing high energy accelerators under DOE's New Culture'' for environment and safety: An example, the Fermilab 150 GeV Main Injector proton synchrotron

    SciTech Connect

    Fowler, W.B.

    1991-05-01

    Fermilab has initiated a design for a new Main Injector (150 GeV proton synchrotron) to take the place of the current Main Ring accelerator. New Culture'' environmental and safety questions are having to be addressed. The paper will detail the necessary steps that have to be taken in order to obtain the permits which control the start of construction. Obviously these depend on site-specific circumstances, however some steps are universally applicable. In the example, floodplains and wetlands are affected and therefore the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) compliance is a significant issue. The important feature is to reduce the relevant regulations to a concise set of easily understandable requirements. The effort required and the associated time line will be presented so that other new accelerator proposals can benefit from the experience gained from this example.

  11. Energy dependence of transverse momentum fluctuations in Pb+Pb collisions at the CERN Super Proton Synchrotron (SPS) at 20A to 158A GeV

    SciTech Connect

    NA49 Collaboration; Anticic, T.

    2009-04-15

    Results are presented on event-by-event fluctuations of transverse momenta p{sub T} in central Pb+Pb interactions at 20A, 30A, 40A, 80A, and 158A GeV. The analysis was performed for charged particles at forward center-of-mass rapidity (1.1 < y*{sub {pi}} < 2.6). Three fluctuation measures were studied: the distribution of average transverse momentum M(p{sub T}) in the event, the {phi}{sub p{sub T}} fluctuation measure, and two-particle transverse momentum correlations. Fluctuations of p{sub T} are small and show no significant energy dependence in the energy range of the CERN Super Proton Synchrotron. Results are compared with QCD-inspired predictions for the critical point, and with the UrQMD model. Transverse momentum fluctuations, similar to multiplicity fluctuations, do not show the increase expected for freeze-out near the critical point of QCD.

  12. 6 GeV synchrotron x-ray source: Conceptual design report. Supplement B - conceptual design of proposed beam lines for the 6 GeV light source

    SciTech Connect

    1996-03-01

    In this document, preliminary conceptual designs are presented for ten sample beamlines for the 6 GeV Light Source. These beamlines will accommodate investigations in solid-state physics, materials science, materials technology, chemical technology, and biological and medical sciences. In future, the designs will be altered to include new developments in x-ray optics and hardware technologies. The research areas addressed by the samples beamlines are as follows: Topography and Radiography/Tomography (section 2); Inelastic Scattering with Ultrahigh Energy Resolution (Section 3); Surface and Bulk Studies Using High Momentum Resolution (Section 4); Inelastic Scattering from Charge and Spin (Section 5); Advanced X-Ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy Studies (Section 6); Small Angle X-Ray Scattering Studies (Section 7); General Purpose Scattering for Materials Studies (Section 8); Multiple-Energy Anomalous-Dispersion Studies of Proteins (Section 9); Protein Crystallography (Section 10); Time- and Space-resolved X-Ray Spectroscopy (Section 11); Medical Diagnostic Facility (Section 12); and Transuranium Research Facility (Section 13). The computer systems to be used on the beamlines are also discussed in Section 14 of this document.

  13. The Residual Gas Ionization Profile Monitor in the J-PARC 3-GeV Rapid Cycling Synchrotron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harada, Hiroyuki; Kato, Shinichi

    The residual gas Ionization Profile Monitor (IPM) is developed in the J-PARC 3-GeV RCS. The IPM is a non-destructive beam profile monitor to observe a circulating transverse beam profile in the ring. It is very important to observe the beam profile turn-by-turn in the ring for identification of the beam loss and emittance growth source because beam loss is always issue in increasing the beam power in terms of keeping hands on maintenance. The IPM has been continuously upgraded since 2008. The recent progress of the IPM is reported together with the outline of IPM system.

  14. Determination of the Azimuthal Asymmetry of Deuteron Photodisintegration in the Energy Region Eγ = 1.1 - 2.3 GeV

    SciTech Connect

    Zachariou, Nicholas

    2012-05-20

    Deuteron photodisintegration is a benchmark process for the investigation of the role of quarks and gluons in nuclei. Existing theoretical models of this process describe the available cross sections with the same degree of success. Therefore, spin-dependent observables are crucial for a better understanding of the underlying dynamical mechanisms. However, data on the induced polarization (P y), along with the polarization transfers (Cx and Cz ), have been shown to be insensitive to differences between theoretical models. On the other hand, the beam-spin asymmetry {Sigma} is predicted to have a large sensitivity and is expected to help in identifying the energy at which the transition from the hadronic to the quark-gluon picture of the deuteron takes place. Here, the work done to determine the experimental values of the beam-spin asymmetry in deuteron photodisintegration for photon energies between 1.1 - 2.3 GeV is presented. The data were taken with the CLAS at the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility during the g13 experiment. Photons with linear polarization of ~80% were produced using the coherent bremsstrahlung facility in Hall B. The work done by the author to calibrate a specific detector system, select deuteron photodisintegration events, study the degree of photon polarization, and finally determine the azimuthal asymmetry and any systematic uncertainties associate with it, is comprehensively explained. This work shows that the collected data provide the kinematic coverage and statistics to test the available QCD-based models. The results of this study show that the available theoretical models in their current state do not adequately predict the azimuthal asymmetry in the energy region 1.1 - 2.3 GeV.

  15. Determination of the beam-spin asymmetry of deuteron photodisintegration in the energy region Eγ=1.1 -2.3 GeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zachariou, N.; Ilieva, Y.; Berman, B. L.; Ivanov, N. Ya.; Sargsian, M. M.; Avakian, R.; Feldman, G.; Nadel-Turonski, P.; Adhikari, K. P.; Adikaram, D.; Anderson, M. D.; Pereira, S. Anefalos; Avakian, H.; Badui, R. A.; Baltzell, N. A.; Battaglieri, M.; Baturin, V.; Bedlinskiy, I.; Biselli, A. S.; Briscoe, W. J.; Brooks, W. K.; Burkert, V. D.; Cao, T.; Carman, D. S.; Celentano, A.; Chandavar, S.; Charles, G.; Colaneri, L.; Cole, P. L.; Compton, N.; Contalbrigo, M.; Cortes, O.; Crede, V.; D'Angelo, A.; De Vita, R.; De Sanctis, E.; Deur, A.; Djalali, C.; Dupre, R.; Egiyan, H.; Alaoui, A. El; Fassi, L. El; Elouadrhiri, L.; Fedotov, G.; Fegan, S.; Filippi, A.; Fleming, J. A.; Forest, T. A.; Fradi, A.; Gevorgyan, N.; Ghandilyan, Y.; Gilfoyle, G. P.; Giovanetti, K. L.; Girod, F. X.; Glazier, D. I.; Golovatch, E.; Gothe, R. W.; Griffioen, K. A.; Guidal, M.; Hafidi, K.; Hanretty, C.; Harrison, N.; Hattawy, M.; Hicks, K.; Ho, D.; Holtrop, M.; Hughes, S. M.; Ireland, D. G.; Ishkhanov, B. S.; Isupov, E. L.; Jiang, H.; Jo, H. S.; Joo, K.; Keller, D.; Khachatryan, G.; Khandaker, M.; Kim, A.; Kim, W.; Klein, F. J.; Kubarovsky, V.; Lenisa, P.; Livingston, K.; Lu, H. Y.; MacGregor, I. J. D.; Markov, N.; Mattione, P. T.; McKinnon, B.; Mineeva, T.; Mirazita, M.; Mokeeev, V. I.; Montgomery, R. A.; Moutarde, H.; Camacho, C. Munoz; Net, L. A.; Niccolai, S.; Niculescu, G.; Niculescu, I.; Osipenko, M.; Ostrovidov, A. I.; Park, K.; Pasyuk, E.; Phelps, W.; Phillips, J. J.; Pisano, S.; Pogorelko, O.; Pozdniakov, S.; Price, J. W.; Procureur, S.; Prok, Y.; Protopopescu, D.; Puckett, A. J. R.; Ripani, M.; Rizzo, A.; Rosner, G.; Rossi, P.; Roy, P.; Sabatié, F.; Salgado, C.; Schott, D.; Schumacher, R. A.; Seder, E.; Senderovich, I.; Sharabian, Y. G.; Skorodumina, Iu.; Smith, G. D.; Sober, D. I.; Sokhan, D.; Sparveris, N.; Stepanyan, S.; Strauch, S.; Sytnik, V.; Taiuti, M.; Tian, Ye; Ungaro, M.; Voskanyan, H.; Voutier, E.; Walford, N. K.; Watts, D.; Wei, X.; Wood, M. H.; Zana, L.; Zhang, J.; Zhao, Z. W.; Zonta, I.; CLAS Collaboration

    2015-05-01

    The beam-spin asymmetry, Σ , for the reaction γ d →p n has been measured using the CEBAF Large Acceptance Spectrometer (CLAS) at the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (JLab) for six photon-energy bins, between 1.1 and 2.3 GeV, and proton angles in the center-of-mass frame, θc .m ., between 25∘ and 160∘. These are the first measurements of beam-spin asymmetries at θc .m .=90∘ for photon-beam energies above 1.6 GeV, and the first measurements for angles other than θc .m .=90∘ . The angular and energy dependence of Σ is expected to aid in the development of QCD-based models to understand the mechanisms of deuteron photodisintegration in the transition region between hadronic and partonic degrees of freedom, where both effective field theories and perturbative QCD cannot make reliable predictions.

  16. Measurement of the B+ production cross-section in p anti-p collisions at s**(1/2) = 1960-GeV

    SciTech Connect

    Abulencia, A.; Adelman, J.; Affolder, T.; Akimoto, T.; Albrow, M.G.; Ambrose, D.; Amerio, S.; Amidei, D.; Anastassov, A.; Anikeev, K.; Annovi, A.; /Taiwan, Inst. Phys. /Argonne /Barcelona, IFAE /Baylor U. /INFN, Bologna /Bologna U. /Brandeis U. /UC, Davis /UCLA /UC, San Diego /UC, Santa Barbara

    2006-12-01

    The authors present a new measurement of the B{sup +} meson differential cross section d{sigma}/dP{sub T} at {radical}s = 1960 GeV. The data correspond to an integrated luminosity of 739 pb{sup -1} collected with the upgraded CDF detector (CDF II) at the Fermilab Tevatron collider. B{sup +} candidates are reconstructed through the decay B{sup +} {yields} J/{psi} K{sup +}, with J/{psi} {yields} {mu}{sup +}{mu}{sup -}. The integrated cross section for producing B{sup +} mesons with p{sub T} {ge} 6 GeV/c and |y| {le} 1 is measured to be 2.78 {+-} 0.24 {mu}b.

  17. K0(s) and Lambda0 production studies in p anti-p collisions at s**(1/2) = 1800 and 630-GeV

    SciTech Connect

    Acosta, D.; Affolder, Anthony A.; Albrow, M.G.; Ambrose, D.; Amidei, D.; Anikeev, K.; Antos, J.; Apollinari, G.; Arisawa, T.; Artikov, A.; Ashmanskas, W.; Azfar, F.; Azzi-Bacchetta, P.; Bacchetta, N.; Bachacou, H.; Badgett, W.; Barbaro-Galtieri, A.; Barnes, V.E.; Barnett, B.A.; Baroiant, S.; Barone, M.; /Taiwan, Inst. Phys. /Argonne /INFN, Bologna /Bologna U. /Brandeis U. /UC, Davis /UCLA /UC, Santa Barbara /Cantabria Inst. of Phys. /Carnegie Mellon U. /Chicago U., EFI /Dubna, JINR /Duke U. /Fermilab /Florida U. /Frascati /Geneva U. /Glasgow U. /Harvard U. /Hiroshima U. /Johns Hopkins U.

    2005-04-01

    The authors present a study of the production of K{sub s}{sup 0} and {Lambda}{sup 0} in inelastic p{bar p} collisions at {radical}s = 1800 and 630 GeV using data collected by the CDF experiment at the Fermilab Tevatron. Analyses of K{sub s}{sup 0} and {Lambda}{sup 0} multiplicity and transverse momentum distributions, as well as of the dependencies of the average number and (p{sub T}) of K{sub s}{sup 0} and {Lambda}{sup 0} on charged particle multiplicity are reported. Systematic comparisons are performed for the full sample of inelastic collisions, and for the low and high momentum transfer subsamples, at the two energies. The p{sub T} distributions extend above 8 GeV/c, showing a (p{sub T}) higher than previous measurements. The dependence of the mean K{sub s}{sup 0}({Lambda}{sup 0}) p{sub T} on the charged particle multiplicity for the three samples shows a behavior analogous to that of charged primary tracks.

  18. NuSTAR OBSERVATIONS OF GRB 130427A ESTABLISH A SINGLE COMPONENT SYNCHROTRON AFTERGLOW ORIGIN FOR THE LATE OPTICAL TO MULTI-GEV EMISSION

    SciTech Connect

    Kouveliotou, C.; Racusin, J. L.; Gehrels, N.; McEnery, J. E.; Zhang, W. W.; Bellm, E.; Harrison, F. A.; Vianello, G.; Oates, S.; Fryer, C. L.; Boggs, S. E.; Craig, W. W.; Christensen, F. E.; Dermer, C. D.; Hailey, C. J.; Melandri, A.; Tagliaferri, G.; Mundell, C. G.; Stern, D. K. E-mail: granot@openu.ac.il

    2013-12-10

    GRB 130427A occurred in a relatively nearby galaxy; its prompt emission had the largest GRB fluence ever recorded. The afterglow of GRB 130427A was bright enough for the Nuclear Spectroscopic Telescope ARray (NuSTAR) to observe it in the 3-79 keV energy range long after its prompt emission (∼1.5 and 5 days). This range, where afterglow observations were previously not possible, bridges an important spectral gap. Combined with Swift, Fermi, and ground-based optical data, NuSTAR observations unambiguously establish a single afterglow spectral component from optical to multi-GeV energies a day after the event, which is almost certainly synchrotron radiation. Such an origin of the late-time Fermi/Large Area Telescope >10 GeV photons requires revisions in our understanding of collisionless relativistic shock physics.

  19. Beam loss caused by edge focusing of injection bump magnets and its mitigation in the 3-GeV rapid cycling synchrotron of the Japan Proton Accelerator Research Complex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hotchi, H.; Tani, N.; Watanabe, Y.; Harada, H.; Kato, S.; Okabe, K.; Saha, P. K.; Tamura, F.; Yoshimoto, M.

    2016-01-01

    In the 3-GeV rapid cycling synchrotron of the Japan Proton Accelerator Research Complex, transverse injection painting is utilized not only to suppress space-charge induced beam loss in the low energy region but also to mitigate foil scattering beam loss during charge-exchange injection. The space-charge induced beam loss is well minimized by the combination of modest transverse painting and full longitudinal painting. But, for sufficiently mitigating the foil scattering part of beam loss, the transverse painting area has to be further expanded. However, such a wide-ranging transverse painting had not been realized until recently due to beta function beating caused by edge focusing of pulsed injection bump magnets during injection. This beta function beating additionally excites random betatron resonances through a distortion of the lattice superperiodicity, and its resultant deterioration of the betatron motion stability causes significant extra beam loss when expanding the transverse painting area. To solve this issue, we newly installed pulse-type quadrupole correctors to compensate the beta function beating. This paper presents recent experimental results on this correction scheme for suppressing the extra beam loss, while discussing the beam loss and its mitigation mechanisms with the corresponding numerical simulations.

  20. Beam emittance control by changing injection painting area in a pulse-to-pulse mode in the 3-GeV rapid cycling synchrotron of Japan Proton Accelerator Research Complex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saha, P. K.; Harada, H.; Hayashi, N.; Horino, K.; Hotchi, H.; Kinsho, M.; Takayanagi, T.; Tani, N.; Togashi, T.; Ueno, T.; Yamazaki, Y.; Irie, Y.

    2013-12-01

    The 3-GeV rapid cycling synchrotron (RCS) of Japan Proton Accelerator Research Complex (J-PARC) simultaneously delivers high intensity beam to the Material and Life Science Experimental Facility (MLF) as well as to the main ring (MR) at a repetition rate of 25 Hz. The RCS is designed for a beam power of 1 MW. RCS has to meet not only the need of power upgrade but also the specific requirement of each downstream facility. One of the issues, especially for high intensity operation, is to maintain two different transverse sizes of the extracted beam for MLF and MR; namely, a wider beam for MLF in order to reduce damage on the neutron production target but reversely a narrower one for the MR in order to ensure a permissible beam loss in the beam transport line of 3-GeV to MR and also in the MR. We proposed pulse-to-pulse direct control of the transverse painting area during the RCS beam injection process in order to get an extracted beam profile as desired. In addition to two existing dc septum magnets used for fixing injected beam trajectory for MLF beam, two additional dipoles named pulse steering magnets are designed for that purpose in order to control injected beam trajectory for a smaller painting area for the MR. The magnets are already installed in the injection beam transport line and successfully commissioned well in advance before they will be put in normal operation in 2014 for the 400 MeV injected beam energy upgraded from that of the present 181 MeV. Their parameters are found to be consistent to those expected in the corresponding numerical simulations. A trial one cycle user operation run for a painting area of 100πmmmrad for the MR switching from the MLF painting area of 150πmmmrad has also been successfully carried out. The extracted beam profile for the MR is measured to be sufficiently narrower as compared to that for the MLF, consistent with numerical simulation successfully demonstrating validity of the present principle.

  1. Precision synchrotron radiation detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Levi, M.; Rouse, F.; Butler, J.; Jung, C.K.; Lateur, M.; Nash, J.; Tinsman, J.; Wormser, G.; Gomez, J.J.; Kent, J.

    1989-03-01

    Precision detectors to measure synchrotron radiation beam positions have been designed and installed as part of beam energy spectrometers at the Stanford Linear Collider (SLC). The distance between pairs of synchrotron radiation beams is measured absolutely to better than 28 /mu/m on a pulse-to-pulse basis. This contributes less than 5 MeV to the error in the measurement of SLC beam energies (approximately 50 GeV). A system of high-resolution video cameras viewing precisely-aligned fiducial wire arrays overlaying phosphorescent screens has achieved this accuracy. Also, detectors of synchrotron radiation using the charge developed by the ejection of Compton-recoil electrons from an array of fine wires are being developed. 4 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  2. Evidence for e+e- →γχc1,2 at center-of-mass energies from 4.009 to 4.360 GeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ablikim, M.; N. Achasov, M.; Ai, X. C.; Albayrak, O.; Albrecht, M.; J. Ambrose, D.; Amoroso, A.; An, F. F.; An, Q.; Bai, J. Z.; R. Baldini, Ferroli; Ban, Y.; W. Bennett, D.; V. Bennett, J.; Bertani, M.; Bettoni, D.; Bian, J. M.; Bianchi, F.; Boger, E.; Bondarenko, O.; Boyko, I.; A. Briere, R.; Cai, H.; Cai, X.; Cakir, O.; Calcaterra, A.; Cao, G. F.; A. Cetin, S.; Chang, J. F.; Chelkov, G.; Chen, G.; Chen, H. S.; Chen, H. Y.; Chen, J. C.; Chen, M. L.; Chen, S. J.; Chen, X.; Chen, X. R.; Chen, Y. B.; Cheng, H. P.; Chu, X. K.; Cibinetto, G.; Cronin-Hennessy, D.; Dai, H. L.; Dai, J. P.; Dbeyssi, A.; Dedovich, D.; Deng, Z. Y.; Denig, A.; Denysenko, I.; Destefanis, M.; F. De, Mori; Ding, Y.; Dong, C.; Dong, J.; Dong, L. Y.; Dong, M. Y.; Du, S. X.; Duan, P. F.; Fan, J. Z.; Fang, J.; Fang, S. S.; Fang, X.; Fang, Y.; Fava, L.; Feldbauer, F.; Felici, G.; Feng, C. Q.; Fioravanti, E.; Fritsch, M.; Fu, C. D.; Gao, Q.; Gao, Y.; Gao, Z.; Garzia, I.; Goetzen, K.; Gong, W. X.; Gradl, W.; Greco, M.; Gu, M. H.; Gu, Y. T.; Guan, Y. H.; Guo, A. Q.; Guo, L. B.; Guo, T.; Guo, Y.; P. Guo, Y.; Haddadi, Z.; Hafner, A.; Han, S.; Han, Y. L.; A. Harris, F.; He, K. L.; He, Z. Y.; Held, T.; Heng, Y. K.; Hou, Z. L.; Hu, C.; Hu, H. M.; Hu, J. F.; Hu, T.; Hu, Y.; Huang, G. M.; Huang, G. S.; Huang, H. P.; Huang, J. S.; Huang, X. T.; Huang, Y.; Hussain, T.; Ji, Q.; Ji, Q. P.; Ji, X. B.; Ji, X. L.; Jiang, L. L.; Jiang, L. W.; Jiang, X. S.; Jiao, J. B.; Jiao, Z.; Jin, D. P.; Jin, S.; Johansson, T.; Julin, A.; Kalantar-Nayestanaki, N.; Kang, X. L.; Kang, X. S.; Kavatsyuk, M.; C. Ke, B.; Kliemt, R.; Kloss, B.; B. Kolcu, O.; Kopf, B.; Kornicer, M.; Kuehn, W.; Kupsc, A.; Lai, W.; S. Lange, J.; M., Lara; Larin, P.; Li, C. H.; Li, Cheng; Li, D. M.; Li, F.; Li, G.; Li, H. B.; Li, J. C.; Li, Jin; Li, K.; Li, K.; Li, P. R.; Li, T.; Li, W. D.; Li, W. G.; Li, X. L.; Li, X. M.; Li, X. N.; Li, X. Q.; Li, Z. B.; Liang, H.; Liang, Y. F.; Liang, Y. T.; Liao, G. R.; X. Lin(Lin, D.; Liu, B. J.; L. Liu, C.; Liu, C. X.; Liu, F. H.; Liu, Fang; Liu, Feng; Liu, H. B.; Liu, H. H.; Liu, H. H.; Liu, H. M.; Liu, J.; Liu, J. P.; Liu, J. Y.; Liu, K.; Liu, K. Y.; Liu, L. D.; Liu, P. L.; Liu, Q.; Liu, S. B.; Liu, X.; Liu, X. X.; Liu, Y. B.; Liu, Z. A.; Liu, Zhiqiang; Zhiqing, Liu; Loehner, H.; Lou, X. C.; Lu, H. J.; Lu, J. G.; Lu, R. Q.; Lu, Y.; Lu, Y. P.; Luo, C. L.; Luo, M. X.; Luo, T.; Luo, X. L.; Lv, M.; Lyu, X. R.; Ma, F. C.; Ma, H. L.; Ma, L. L.; Ma, Q. M.; Ma, S.; Ma, T.; Ma, X. N.; Ma, X. Y.; E. Maas, F.; Maggiora, M.; A. Malik, Q.; Mao, Y. J.; Mao, Z. P.; Marcello, S.; G. Messchendorp, J.; Min, J.; Min, T. J.; E. Mitchell, R.; Mo, X. H.; Mo, Y. J.; C. Morales, Morales; Moriya, K.; Yu. Muchnoi, N.; Muramatsu, H.; Nefedov, Y.; Nerling, F.; B. Nikolaev, I.; Ning, Z.; Nisar, S.; Niu, S. L.; Niu, X. Y.; Olsen, S. L.; Ouyang, Q.; Pacetti, S.; Patteri, P.; Pelizaeus, M.; Peng, H. P.; Peters, K.; Ping, J. L.; Ping, R. G.; Poling, R.; Pu, Y. N.; Qi, M.; Qian, S.; Qiao, C. F.; Qin, L. Q.; Qin, N.; Qin, X. S.; Qin, Y.; Qin, Z. H.; Qiu, J. F.; H. Rashid, K.; F. Redmer, C.; Ren, H. L.; Ripka, M.; Rong, G.; Ruan, X. D.; Santoro, V.; Sarantsev, A.; Savrié, M.; Schoenning, K.; Schumann, S.; Shan, W.; Shao, M.; Shen, C. P.; Shen, P. X.; Shen, X. Y.; Sheng, H. Y.; R. Shepherd, M.; Song, W. M.; Song, X. Y.; Sosio, S.; Spataro, S.; Spruck, B.; Sun, G. X.; Sun, J. F.; Sun, S. S.; Sun, Y. J.; Sun, Y. Z.; Sun, Z. J.; Sun, Z. T.; Tang, C. J.; Tang, X.; Tapan, I.; H. Thorndike, E.; Tiemens, M.; Toth, D.; Ullrich, M.; Uman, I.; S. Varner, G.; Wang, B.; Wang, B. L.; Wang, D.; Wang, D. Y.; Wang, K.; Wang, L. L.; Wang, L. S.; Wang, M.; Wang, P.; Wang, P. L.; Wang, Q. J.; Wang, S. G.; Wang, W.; Wang, X. F.; D. Wang(Yadi, Y.; Wang, Y. F.; Wang, Y. Q.; Wang, Z.; Wang, Z. G.; Wang, Z. H.; Wang, Z. Y.; Weber, T.; Wei, D. H.; Wei, J. B.; Weidenkaff, P.; Wen, S. P.; Wiedner, U.; Wolke, M.; Wu, L. H.; Wu, Z.; Xia, L. G.; Xia, Y.; Xiao, D.; Xiao, Z. J.; Xie, Y. G.; Xu, G. F.; Xu, L.; Xu, Q. J.; Xu, Q. N.; Xu, X. P.; Yan, L.; Yan, W. B.; Yan, W. C.; Yan, Y. H.; Yang, H. X.; Yang, L.; Yang, Y.; Yang, Y. X.; Ye, H.; Ye, M.; Ye, M. H.; Yin, J. H.; Yu, B. X.; Yu, C. X.; Yu, H. W.; Yu, J. S.; Yuan, C. Z.; Yuan, W. L.; Yuan, Y.; Yuncu, A.; A. Zafar, A.; Zallo, A.; Zeng, Y.; Zhang, B. X.; Zhang, B. Y.; Zhang, C.; Zhang, C. C.; Zhang, D. H.; Zhang, H. H.; Zhang, H. Y.; Zhang, J. J.; Zhang, J. L.; Zhang, J. Q.; Zhang, J. W.; Zhang, J. Y.; Zhang, J. Z.; Zhang, K.; Zhang, L.; Zhang, S. H.; Zhang, X. Y.; Zhang, Y.; Zhang, Y. H.; Zhang, Y. T.; Zhang, Z. H.; Zhang, Z. P.; Zhang, Z. Y.; Zhao, G.; Zhao, J. W.; Zhao, J. Y.; Zhao, J. Z.; Zhao, Lei; Zhao, Ling; Zhao, M. G.; Zhao, Q.; Zhao, Q. W.; Zhao, S. J.; Zhao, T. C.; Zhao, Y. B.; Zhao, Z. G.; Zhemchugov, A.; Zheng, B.; Zheng, J. P.; Zheng, W. J.; Zheng, Y. H.; Zhong, B.; Zhou, L.; Zhou, Li; Zhou, X.; Zhou, X. K.; Zhou, X. R.; Zhou, X. Y.; Zhu, K.; Zhu, K. J.; Zhu, S.; Zhu, X. L.; Zhu, Y. C.; Zhu, Y. S.; Zhu, Z. A.; Zhuang, J.; Zou, B. S.; Zou, J. H.; BESIII Collaboration

    2015-04-01

    Using data samples collected at center-of-mass energies of √s = 4.009, 4.230, 4.260, and 4.360 GeV with the BESIII detector operating at the BEPCII collider, we perform a search for the process e+e- → γχcJ (J=0, 1, 2) and find evidence for e+e- → γχc1 and e+e- → γχc2 with statistical significances of 3.0σ and 3.4σ, respectively. The Born cross sections σB(e+e- → γχcJ), as well as their upper limits at the 90% confidence level (C.L.) are determined at each center-of-mass energy. Supported by National Key Basic Research Program of China (2015CB856700), Joint Funds of National Natural Science Foundation of China (11079008, 11179007, U1232201, U1332201, U1232107), National Natural Science Foundation of China (NSFC) (10935007, 11121092, 11125525, 11235011, 11322544, 11335008), Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS) Large-Scale Scientific Facility Program, CAS (KJCX2-YW-N29, KJCX2-YW-N45), 100 Talents Program of CAS, INPAC and Shanghai Key Laboratory for Particle Physics and Cosmology; German Research Foundation DFG (Collaborative Research Center CRC-1044), Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Italy, Ministry of Development of Turkey (DPT2006K-120470), Russian Foundation for Basic Research (14-07-91152), U. S. Department of Energy (DE-FG02-04ER41291, DE-FG02-05ER41374, DE-FG02-94ER40823, DESC0010118), U.S. National Science Foundation, University of Groningen (RuG) and Helmholtzzentrum fuer Schwerionenforschung GmbH (GSI), Darmstadt, WCU Program of National Research Foundation of Korea (R32-2008-000-10155-0)

  3. Crystal structure of tris-(trans-1,2-cyclo-hexa-ne-diamine-κ(2) N,N')chromium(III) tetra-chlorido-zincate chloride trihydrate from synchrotron data.

    PubMed

    Moon, Dohyun; Choi, Jong-Ha

    2016-05-01

    The structure of the title double salt, [Cr(rac-chxn)3][ZnCl4]Cl·3H2O (chxn is trans-1,2-cyclo-hexa-nedi-amine; C6H14N2), has been determined from synchrotron data. The Cr(III) ion is coordinated by six N atoms of three chelating chxn ligands, displaying a slightly distorted octa-hedral coordination environment. The distorted tetra-hedral [ZnCl4](2-) anion, the isolated Cl(-) anion and three lattice water mol-ecules remain outside the coordination sphere. The Cr-N(chxn) bond lengths are in a narrow range between 2.0737 (12) and 2.0928 (12) Å; the mean N-Cr-N bite angle is 82.1 (4)°. The crystal packing is stabilized by hydrogen-bonding inter-actions between the amino groups of the chxn ligands and the water mol-ecules as donor groups, and O atoms of the water mol-ecules, chloride anions and Cl atoms of the [ZnCl4](2-) anions as acceptor groups, leading to the formation of a three-dimensional network. The [ZnCl4](2-) anion is disordered over two sets of sites with an occupancy ratio of 0.94:0.06. PMID:27308016

  4. Crystal structure of tris-(trans-1,2-cyclo-hexa-ne-diamine-κ(2) N,N')chromium(III) tetra-chlorido-zincate chloride trihydrate from synchrotron data.

    PubMed

    Moon, Dohyun; Choi, Jong-Ha

    2016-05-01

    The structure of the title double salt, [Cr(rac-chxn)3][ZnCl4]Cl·3H2O (chxn is trans-1,2-cyclo-hexa-nedi-amine; C6H14N2), has been determined from synchrotron data. The Cr(III) ion is coordinated by six N atoms of three chelating chxn ligands, displaying a slightly distorted octa-hedral coordination environment. The distorted tetra-hedral [ZnCl4](2-) anion, the isolated Cl(-) anion and three lattice water mol-ecules remain outside the coordination sphere. The Cr-N(chxn) bond lengths are in a narrow range between 2.0737 (12) and 2.0928 (12) Å; the mean N-Cr-N bite angle is 82.1 (4)°. The crystal packing is stabilized by hydrogen-bonding inter-actions between the amino groups of the chxn ligands and the water mol-ecules as donor groups, and O atoms of the water mol-ecules, chloride anions and Cl atoms of the [ZnCl4](2-) anions as acceptor groups, leading to the formation of a three-dimensional network. The [ZnCl4](2-) anion is disordered over two sets of sites with an occupancy ratio of 0.94:0.06.

  5. Real world issues for the new soft x-ray synchrotron sources

    SciTech Connect

    Kincaid, B.M.

    1991-05-01

    A new generation of synchrotron radiation light sources covering the VUV, soft x-ray and hard x-ray spectral regions is under construction in several countries. They are designed specifically to use periodic magnetic undulators and low-emittance electron or positron beams to produce high-brightness near-diffraction-limited synchrotron radiation beams. An introduction to the properties of undulator radiation is followed by a discussion of some of the challenges to be faced at the new facilities. Examples of predicted undulator output from the Advanced Light Source, a third generation 1--2 GeV storage ring optimized for undulator use, are used to highlight differences from present synchrotron radiation sources, including high beam power, partial coherence, harmonics, and other unusual spectral and angular properties of undulator radiation. 8 refs., 2 figs.

  6. Structures of Three Dehydration Products of Bischofite from in situ Synchrotron Powder Diffraction Data(MgCL2*nH2O;n=1,2,4)

    SciTech Connect

    Sugimoto,K.; Dinnebeir, R.; Hanson, J.

    2007-01-01

    High-quality in situ synchrotron powder diffraction data have been used to investigate the decomposition products of bischofite in the temperature range 298 {<=} T {<=} 873 K. At least eight phases could be identified: MgCl{sub 2}{center_dot}nH{sub 2}O (n = 1, 2, 4 and 6), MgOHCl{center_dot}nH{sub 2}O (0 {<=} n {<=} 1.0), MgCl{sub 2} and MgO. The crystal structures of three magnesium chloride hydrates MgCl{sub 2}{center_dot}nH{sub 2}O (n = 1, 2, 4) were determined ab initio, replacing published Rietveld refinements from low-quality powder diffraction data based on similarity criteria. MgCl{sub 2}{center_dot}4H{sub 2}O was found to be disordered and has been correctly determined for the first time. The crystal structures of bishcofite and MgCl{sub 2}4H{sub 2}O consist of discrete Mg(H{sub 2}O){sub 6} and MgCl{sub 2}(H{sub 2}O){sub 4} octahedra, respectively. The crystal structure of MgCl{sub 2}{center_dot}2H{sub 2}O is formed by single chains of edge-sharing MgCl{sub 2}(H{sub 2}O){sub 4} octahedra, while in the case of MgCl{sub 2}H{sub 2}O double chains of edge-sharing MgCl(H{sub 2}O){sub 5} octahedra are found. The phases in the system MgCl{sub 2}-H{sub 2}O are intermediates in the technologically important process of MgO and subsequently Mg production. The same phases were recently found to be of key importance in the understanding of cracks in certain magnesia concrete floors.

  7. Synchrotron radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Knotek, M.L.

    1987-01-01

    Synchrotron radiation has had a revolutionary effect on a broad range of scientific studies, from physics, chemistry and metallurgy to biology, medicine and geoscience. The situation during the last decade has been one of very rapid growth, there is a great vitality to the field and a capability has been given to a very broad range of scientific disciplines which was undreamed of just a decade or so ago. Here we will discuss some of the properties of synchrotron radiation that makes it so interesting and something of the sources in existence today including the National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS). The NSLS is one of the new facilities built specifically for synchrotron radiation research and the model that was developed there for involvement of the scientific community is a good one which provides some good lessons for these facilities and others.

  8. Experimental Demonstration of the Induction Synchrotron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takayama, Ken; Arakida, Yoshio; Dixit, Tanuja; Iwashita, Taiki; Kono, Tadaaki; Nakamura, Eiji; Otsuka, Kazunori; Shimosaki, Yoshito; Torikai, Kota; Wake, Masayoshi

    2007-02-01

    We report an experimental demonstration of the induction synchrotron, the concept of which has been proposed as a future accelerator for the second generation of neutrino factory or hadron collider. The induction synchrotron supports a superbunch and a superbunch permits more charge to be accelerated while observing the constraints of the transverse space-charge limit. By using a newly developed induction acceleration system instead of radio-wave acceleration devices, a single proton bunch injected from the 500 MeV booster ring and captured by the barrier bucket created by the induction step voltages was accelerated to 6 GeV in the KEK proton synchrotron.

  9. Experimental demonstration of the induction synchrotron.

    PubMed

    Takayama, Ken; Arakida, Yoshio; Dixit, Tanuja; Iwashita, Taiki; Kono, Tadaaki; Nakamura, Eiji; Otsuka, Kazunori; Shimosaki, Yoshito; Torikai, Kota; Wake, Masayoshi

    2007-02-01

    We report an experimental demonstration of the induction synchrotron, the concept of which has been proposed as a future accelerator for the second generation of neutrino factory or hadron collider. The induction synchrotron supports a superbunch and a superbunch permits more charge to be accelerated while observing the constraints of the transverse space-charge limit. By using a newly developed induction acceleration system instead of radio-wave acceleration devices, a single proton bunch injected from the 500 MeV booster ring and captured by the barrier bucket created by the induction step voltages was accelerated to 6 GeV in the KEK proton synchrotron.

  10. Synchrotrons: Taiwan unveils new synchrotron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horiuchi, Noriaki

    2015-05-01

    Competitive activities around the globe to develop the world's brightest synchrotron light source have accelerated in recent years. Taiwanese scientists now aspire to be at the top of the list with the recently constructed Taiwan Photon Source.

  11. B physics: measurement of the j/psi meson and b-hadron production cross sections in p anti-p collisions at s**(1/2) = 1960 gev

    SciTech Connect

    Acosta, D.; The CDF Collaboration

    2004-12-23

    The authors present a new measurement of the inclusive and differential production cross sections of J/{psi} mesons and b-hadrons in proton-antiproton collisions at {radical}s = 1960 GeV. The data correspond to an integrated luminosity of 39.7 pb{sup -1} collected by the CDF Run II detector. They find the integrated cross section for inclusive J/{psi} production for all transverse momenta from 0 to 20 GeV/c in the rapidity range |y| < 0.6 to be 4.08 {+-} 0.02(stat){sub -0.33}{sup +0.36}(syst) {mu}b. They separate the fraction of J/{psi} events from the decay of the long-lived b-hadrons using the lifetime distribution in all events with p{sub T}(J/{psi}) > 1.25 GeV/c. They find the total cross section for b-hadrons, including both hadrons and anti-hadrons, decaying to J/{psi} with transverse momenta greater than 1.25 GeV/c in the rapidity range |y(J/{psi})| < 0.6, is 0.330 {+-} 0.005(stat){sub -0.033}{sup +0.036}(syst) {mu}b. Using a Monte Carlo simulation of the decay kinematics of b-hadrons to all final states containing a J/{psi}, they extract the first measurement of the total single b-hadron cross section down to zero transverse momentum at {radical}s = 1960 GeV. They find the total single b-hadron cross section integrated over all transverse momenta for b-hadrons in the rapidity range |y| < 0.6 to be 17.6 {+-} 0.4(stat){sub -2.3}{sup +2.5}(syst) {mu}b.

  12. Measurement of the J/psi meson and b-hadron production cross sections in p anti-p collisions at s(NN)**(1/2) = 1960-GeV

    SciTech Connect

    Acosta, D.; Adelman, J.; Affolder, T.; Akimoto, T.; Albrow, M.G.; Ambrose, D.; Amerio, S.; Amidei, D.; Anastassov, A.; Anikeev, K.; Annovi, A.; Antos, J.; Aoki, M.; Apollinari, G.; Arisawa, T.; Arguin, J.-F.; Artikov, A.; Ashmanskas, W.; Attal, A.; Azfar, F.; Azzi-Bacchetta, P.; /Barcelona, Autonoma U. /Bologna U. /Brandeis U. /UC, Davis /UCLA /UC, San Diego /UC, Santa Barbara /Cantabria U., Santander /Carnegie Mellon U. /Chicago U. /Duke U. /Florida U. /Geneva U. /Glasgow U. /Harvard U. /Helsinki U. /Hiroshima U. /Illinois U., Urbana /Johns Hopkins U. /Karlsruhe U. /SungKyunKwan U.

    2004-12-01

    We present a new measurement of the inclusive and differential production cross sections of J/{psi} mesons and b-hadrons in proton-antiproton collisions at {radical}s = 1960 GeV. The data correspond to an integrated luminosity of 39.7 pb{sup -1} collected by the CDF Run II detector. We find the integrated cross section for inclusive J/{psi} production for all transverse momenta from 0 to 20 GeV/c in the rapidity range |y| < 0.6 to be 4.08 {+-} 0.02(stat){sub -0.33}{sup +0.36}(syst) {mu}b. We separate the fraction of J/{psi} events from the decay of the long-lived b-hadrons using the lifetime distribution in all events with p{sub T} (J/{psi}) > 1.25 GeV/c. We find the total cross section for b-hadrons, including both hadrons and anti-hadrons, decaying to J/{psi} with transverse momenta greater than 1.25 GeV/c in the rapidity range |y(J/{psi})| < 0.6, is 0.330 {+-} 0.005(stat){sub -0.033}{sup +0.036}(syst) {mu}b. Using a Monte Carlo simulation of the decay kinematics of b-hadrons to all final states containing a J/{psi}, we extract the first measurement of the total single b-hadron cross section down to zero transverse momentum at {radical}s = 1960 GeV. We find the total single b-hadron cross section integrated over all transverse momenta for b-hadrons in the rapidity range |y| < 0.6 to be 17.6 {+-} 0.4(stat){sub -2.3}{sup +2.5}(syst) {mu}b.

  13. 3 GeV RCS at the JKJ

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noda, Fumiaki

    2002-12-01

    3GeV RCS at the JAERI-KEK joint project (JKJ) is a rapid cycling synchrotron designed for high intensity proton beam. The designed output power is 1MW with a repetition rate of 25 Hz. In this paper, the outline of 3GeV RCS, key issues to achieve the goal, R&D status and time schedule of construction are reported.

  14. Future Synchrotron Radiation Sources

    SciTech Connect

    Winick, Herman

    2003-07-09

    Sources of synchrotron radiation (also called synchrotron light) and their associated research facilities have experienced a spectacular growth in number, performance, and breadth of application in the past two to three decades. In 1978 there were eleven electron storage rings used as light sources. Three of these were small rings, all below 500 mega-electron volts (MeV), dedicated to this purpose; the others, with energy up to 5 giga-electron volts (GeV), were used parasitically during the operation of the ring for high energy physics research. In addition, at that time synchrotron radiation from nine cyclic electron synchrotrons, with energy up to 5 GeV, was also used parasitically. At present no cyclic synchrotrons are used, while about 50 electron storage rings are in operation around the world as fully dedicated light sources for basic and applied research in a wide variety of fields. Among these fields are structural molecular biology, molecular environmental science, materials, analytic chemistry, microfabrication, archaeometry and medical diagnostics. These rings span electron energies from a few hundred MeV to 8 GeV. Several facilities serve 2000 or more users on 30-60 simultaneously operational experimental stations. The largest rings are more than 1 km in circumference, cost about US$1B to build and have annual budgets of about US$100M. This growth is due to the remarkable properties of synchrotron radiation, including its high intensity, brightness and stability; wide spectral range extending from the infra-red to hard x-rays; variable polarization; pulsed time structure; and high vacuum environment. The ever-expanding user community and the increasing number of applications are fueling a continued growth in the number of facilities around the world. In the past few years new types of light sources have been proposed based on linear accelerators. Linac-based sources now being pursued include the free-electron laser (FEL) and energy recovery linac (ERL

  15. Magnets for high intensity proton synchrotrons

    SciTech Connect

    Jean-Francois Ostiguy, Vladimir Kashikhine and Alexander Makarov

    2002-09-19

    Recently, there has been considerable interest at Fermilab for the Proton Driver, a future high intensity proton machine. Various scenarios are under consideration, including a superconducting linac. Each scenario present some special challenges. We describe here the magnets proposed in a recent study, the Proton Driver Study II, which assumes a conventional warm synchrotron, roughly of the size of the existing FNAL booster, but capable of delivering 380 kW at 8 GeV.

  16. High intensity proton synchrotrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Craddock, M. K.

    1986-10-01

    Strong initiatives are being pursued in a number of countries for the construction of ``kaon factory'' synchrotrons capable of producing 100 times more intense proton beams than those available now from machines such as the Brookhaven AGS and CERN PS. Such machines would yield equivalent increases in the fluxes of secondary particles (kaons, pions, muons, antiprotons, hyperons and neutrinos of all varieties)—or cleaner beams for a smaller increase in flux—opening new avenues to various fundamental questions in both particle and nuclear physics. Major areas of investigation would be rare decay modes, CP violation, meson and hadron spectroscopy, antinucleon interactions, neutrino scattering and oscillations, and hypernuclear properties. Experience with the pion factories has already shown how high beam intensities make it possible to explore the ``precision frontier'' with results complementary to those achievable at the ``energy frontier''. This paper will describe proposals for upgrading and AGS and for building kaon factories in Canada, Europe, Japan and the United States, emphasizing the novel aspects of accelerator design required to achieve the desired performance (typically 100 μA at 30 GeV).

  17. Design of an 8 GeV h transport and multi-turn injection system

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, D.E.; /Fermilab

    2006-08-01

    An 8 GeV superconducting linear accelerator (SCL) has been proposed as a single stage H{sup -} injector into the Main Injector (MI) synchrotron. This could be a multi-use facility which would, among other things, support a 2 MW Neutrino program at Fermi National Accelerator Lab (FNAL) [1,2,3,4]. This paper describes a solution for a transport line which is capable of low loss transmission of an H{sup -} beam from the linac to the MI, transverse and momentum collimation, and provides for flexible matching into the MI lattice. The required modifications to the MI accelerator complex to accommodate the transfer line and multi-turn injection utilizing carbon foil stripping (and/or potentially laser stripping) and the injection layout are discussed.

  18. ON THE ORIGIN OF > 10 GeV PHOTONS IN GAMMA-RAY BURST AFTERGLOWS

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Xiangyu; Liu Ruoyu; Lemoine, Martin

    2013-07-10

    Fermi/LAT has detected long-lasting high-energy photons (>100 MeV) from gamma-ray bursts (GRBs), with the highest energy photons reaching about 100 GeV. One proposed scenario is that they are produced by high-energy electrons accelerated in GRB forward shocks via synchrotron radiation. We study the maximum synchrotron photon energy in this scenario, considering the properties of the microturbulence magnetic fields behind the shock, as revealed by recent particle-in-cell simulations and theoretical analyses of relativistic collisionless shocks. Due to the small-scale nature of the microturbulent magnetic field, the Bohm acceleration approximation, in which the scattering mean free path is equal to the particle Larmor radius, breaks down at such high energies. This effect leads to a typical maximum synchrotron photon of a few GeV at 100 s after the burst and this maximum synchrotron photon energy decreases quickly with time. We show that the fast decrease of the maximum synchrotron photon energy leads to a fast decay of the synchrotron flux. The 10-100 GeV photons detected after the prompt phase cannot be produced by the synchrotron mechanism. They could originate from the synchrotron self-Compton emission of the early afterglow if the circumburst density is sufficiently large, or from the external inverse Compton process in the presence of central X-ray emission, such as X-ray flares and prompt high-latitude X-ray emission.

  19. Crystal structure of Kuzel's salt 3CaO.Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}.1/2CaSO{sub 4}.1/2CaCl{sub 2}.11H{sub 2}O determined by synchrotron powder diffraction

    SciTech Connect

    Mesbah, Adel; Francois, Michel; Cau-dit-Coumes, Celine; Frizon, Fabien; Leroux, Fabrice; Ravaux, Johann

    2011-05-15

    The crystal structure of Kuzel's salt has been successfully determined by synchrotron powder diffraction. It crystallizes in the rhombohedral R3-bar symmetry with a = 5.7508 (2) A, c = 50.418 (3) A, V = 1444.04 (11) A{sup 3}. Joint Rietveld refinement was realized using three X-ray powder patterns recorded with a unique wavelength and three different sample-to-detector distances. Kuzel's salt is the chloro-sulfoaluminate AFm phase and belongs to the layered double hydroxide (LDH) large family. Its structure is composed of positively charged main layer [Ca{sub 2}Al(OH){sub 6}]{sup +} and negatively charged interlayer [Cl{sub 0.50}.(SO{sub 4}){sub 0.25}.2.5H{sub 2}O]{sup -}. Chloride and sulfate anions are ordered into two independent crystallographic sites and fill successive interlayer leading to the formation of a second-stage compound. The two kinds of interlayer have the compositions [Cl.2H{sub 2}O]{sup -} and [(SO{sub 4}){sub 0.5}.3H{sub 2}O]{sup -}. The crystal structure explains why chloride and sulfate anions are not substituted and why the formation of extended solid solution in the chloro-sulfate AFm system does not occur.

  20. 7-GeV Advanced Photon Source Conceptual Design Report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1987-04-01

    During the past decade, synchrotron radiation emitted by circulating electron beams has come into wide use as a powerful, versatile source of x-rays for probing the structure of matter and for studying various physical processes. Several synchrotron radiation facilities with different designs and characteristics are now in regular operation throughout the world, with recent additions in this country being the 0.8-GeV and 2.5-GeV rings of NSLS at Brookhaven National Laboratory. However, none of the operating facilities has been designed to use a low-emittance, high-energy stored beam, together with modern undulator devices, to produce a large number of hard x-ray beams of extremely high brilliance. This document is a proposal to the Department of Energy to construct and operate high-energy synchrotron radiation facility at Argonne National Laboratory. We have now chosen to set the design energy of this facility at 7.0 GeV, with the capability to operate at up to 7.5 GeV.

  1. Shower development of particles with momenta from 15 GeV to 150 GeV in the CALICE scintillator-tungsten hadronic calorimeter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chefdeville, M.; Karyotakis, Y.; Repond, J.; Schlereth, J.; Xia, L.; Eigen, G.; Marshall, J. S.; Thomson, M. A.; Ward, D. R.; Alipour Tehrani, N.; Apostolakis, J.; Dannheim, D.; Elsener, K.; Folger, G.; Grefe, C.; Ivantchenko, V.; Killenberg, M.; Klempt, W.; van der Kraaij, E.; Linssen, L.; Lucaci-Timoce, A.-I.; Münnich, A.; Poss, S.; Ribon, A.; Roloff, P.; Sailer, A.; Schlatter, D.; Sicking, E.; Strube, J.; Uzhinskiy, V.; Chang, S.; Khan, A.; Kim, D. H.; Kong, D. J.; Oh, Y. D.; Blazey, G. C.; Dyshkant, A.; Francis, K.; Zutshi, V.; Giraud, J.; Grondin, D.; Hostachy, J.-Y.; Brianne, E.; Cornett, U.; David, D.; Falley, G.; Gadow, K.; Göttlicher, P.; Günter, C.; Hartbrich, O.; Hermberg, B.; Irles, A.; Karstensen, S.; Krivan, F.; Krüger, K.; Kvasnicka, J.; Lu, S.; Lutz, B.; Morozov, S.; Morgunov, V.; Neubüser, C.; Provenza, A.; Reinecke, M.; Sefkow, F.; Smirnov, P.; Terwort, M.; Tran, H. L.; Vargas-Trevino, A.; Garutti, E.; Laurien, S.; Matysek, M.; Ramilli, M.; Schröder, S.; Briggl, K.; Eckert, P.; Harion, T.; Munwes, Y.; Schultz-Coulon, H.-Ch.; Shen, W.; Stamen, R.; Bilki, B.; Onel, Y.; Kawagoe, K.; Hirai, H.; Sudo, Y.; Suehara, T.; Sumida, H.; Takada, S.; Tomita, T.; Yoshioka, T.; Wing, M.; Calvo Alamillo, E.; Fouz, M.-C.; Marin, J.; Puerta-Pelayo, J.; Verdugo, A.; Bobchenko, B.; Chadeeva, M.; Danilov, M.; Markin, O.; Mizuk, R.; Novikov, E.; Rusinov, V.; Tarkovsky, E.; Kirikova, N.; Kozlov, V.; Smirnov, P.; Soloviev, Y.; Besson, D.; Buzhan, P.; Popova, E.; Gabriel, M.; Kiesling, C.; van der Kolk, N.; Seidel, K.; Simon, F.; Soldner, C.; Szalay, M.; Tesar, M.; Weuste, L.; Amjad, M. S.; Bonis, J.; Cornebise, P.; Richard, F.; Pöschl, R.; Rouëné, J.; Thiebault, A.; Anduze, M.; Balagura, V.; Boudry, V.; Brient, J.-C.; Cizel, J.-B.; Cornat, R.; Frotin, M.; Gastaldi, F.; Haddad, Y.; Magniette, F.; Nanni, J.; Pavy, S.; Rubio-Roy, M.; Shpak, K.; Tran, T. H.; Videau, H.; Yu, D.; Callier, S.; Conforti di Lorenzo, S.; Dulucq, F.; Fleury, J.; Martin-Chassard, G.; de la Taille, Ch.; Raux, L.; Seguin-Moreau, N.; Cvach, J.; Gallus, P.; Havranek, M.; Janata, M.; Kovalcuk, M.; Kvasnicka, J.; Lednicky, D.; Marcisovsky, M.; Polak, I.; Popule, J.; Tomasek, L.; Tomasek, M.; Ruzicka, P.; Sicho, P.; Smolik, J.; Vrba, V.; Zalesak, J.; Ieki, S.; Kamiya, Y.; Ootani, W.; Shibata, N.; Chen, S.; Jeans, D.; Komamiya, S.; Kozakai, C.; Nakanishi, H.; Götze, M.; Sauer, J.; Weber, S.; Zeitnitz, C.

    2015-12-01

    We present a study of showers initiated by electrons, pions, kaons, and protons with momenta from 15 GeV to 150 GeV in the highly granular CALICE scintillator-tungsten analogue hadronic calorimeter. The data were recorded at the CERN Super Proton Synchrotron in 2011. The analysis includes measurements of the calorimeter response to each particle type as well as measurements of the energy resolution and studies of the longitudinal and radial shower development for selected particles. The results are compared to Geant4 simulations (version 9.6.p02). In the study of the energy resolution we include previously published data with beam momenta from 1 GeV to 10 GeV recorded at the CERN Proton Synchrotron in 2010.

  2. The Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory, 20 years of synchrotron light

    SciTech Connect

    Cantwell, K.

    1993-08-01

    The Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory (SSRL) is now operating as a fully dedicated light source with low emittance electron optics, delivering high brightness photon beams to 25 experimental stations six to seven months per year. On October 1, 1993 SSRL became a Division of the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center, rather than an Independent Laboratory of Stanford University, so that high energy physics and synchrotron radiation now function under a single DOE contract. The SSRL division of SLAC has responsibility for operating, maintaining and improving the SPEAR accelerator complex, which includes the storage ring and a 3 GeV injector. SSRL has thirteen x-ray stations and twelve VUV/Soft x-ray stations serving its 600 users. Recently opened to users is a new spherical grating monochromator (SGM) and a multiundulator beam line. Circularly polarized capabilities are being exploited on a second SGM line. New YB{sub 66} crystals installed in a vacuum double-crystal monochromator line have sparked new interest for Al and Mg edge studies. One of the most heavily subscribed stations is the rotation camera, which has been recently enhanced with a MAR imaging plate detector system for protein crystallography on a multipole wiggler. Under construction is a new wiggler-based structural molecular biology beam line with experimental stations for crystallography, small angle scattering and x-ray absorption spectroscopy. Plans for new developments include wiggler beam lines and associated facilities specialized for environmental research and materials processing.

  3. Constraining supersymmetric dark matter with synchrotron measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Hooper, Dan

    2008-06-15

    The annihilations of neutralino dark matter (or other dark matter candidate) generate, among other standard model states, electrons and positrons. These particles emit synchrotron photons as a result of their interaction with the galactic magnetic field. In this paper, we use the measurements of the Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe satellite to constrain the intensity of this synchrotron emission and, in turn, the annihilation cross section of the lightest neutralino. We find this constraint to be more stringent than that provided by any other current indirect detection channel. In particular, the neutralino annihilation cross section must be less than {approx_equal}3x10{sup -26} cm{sup 3}/s (1x10{sup 25} cm{sup 3}/s) for 100 GeV (500 GeV) neutralinos distributed with a Navarro-Frenk-White halo profile. For the conservative case of an entirely flat dark matter distribution within the inner 8 kiloparsecs of the Milky Way, the constraint is approximately a factor of 30 less stringent. Even in this conservative case, synchrotron measurements strongly constrain, for example, the possibility of wino or Higgsino neutralino dark matter produced nonthermally in the early universe.

  4. An improved 8 GeV beam transport system for the Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Syphers, M.J.

    1987-06-01

    A new 8 GeV beam transport system between the Booster and Main Ring synchrotrons at the Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory is presented. The system was developed in an effort to improve the transverse phase space area occupied by the proton beam upon injection into the Main Ring accelerator. Problems with the original system are described and general methods of beamline design are formulated. Errors in the transverse properties of a beamline at the injection point of the second synchrotron and their effects on the region in transverse phase space occupied by a beam of particles are discussed. Results from the commissioning phase of the project are presented as well as measurements of the degree of phase space dilution generated by the transfer of 8 GeV protons from the Booster synchrotron to the Main Ring synchrotron.

  5. Shielding and radiation protection at the SSRL 3 GeV injector

    SciTech Connect

    Ipe, N.E.; Liu, J.C.

    1991-12-01

    The Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory (SSRL) Injector is comprised of a linear accelerator (linac) capable of energies {le} 150 MeV, a 3 GeV booster synchrotron, and a beam line to transport the electrons into the storage ring SPEAR. The injector is shielded so that under normal operating conditions, the annual dose equivalent at the shield surface does not exceed 10 mSv. This paper describes the shielding and radiation protection at the injector.

  6. 3 GeV Injector Design Handbook

    SciTech Connect

    Wiedemann, H.; /SLAC, SSRL

    2009-12-16

    This Design Handbook is intended to be the main reference book for the specifications of the 3 GeV SPEAR booster synchrotron project. It is intended to be a consistent description of the project including design criteria, key technical specifications as well as current design approaches. Since a project is not complete till it's complete changes and modifications of early conceptual designs must be expected during the duration of the construction. Therefore, this Design Handbook is issued as a loose leaf binder so that individual sections can be replaced as needed. Each page will be dated to ease identification with respect to latest revisions. At the end of the project this Design Handbook will have become the 'as built' reference book of the injector for operations and maintenance personnel.

  7. Synchrotron radiation from protons

    SciTech Connect

    Dutt, S.K.

    1992-12-01

    Synchrotron radiation from protons, though described by the same equations as the radiation from electrons, exhibits a number of interesting features on account of the parameters reached in praxis. In this presentation, we shall point out some of the features relating to (i) normal synchrotron radiation from dipoles in proton machines such as the High Energy Booster and the Superconducting Super Collider; (ii) synchrotron radiation from short dipoles, and its application to light monitors for proton machines, and (iii) synchrotron radiation from undulators in the limit when, the deflection parameter is much smaller than unity. The material for this presentation is taken largely from the work of Hofmann, Coisson, Bossart, and their collaborators, and from a paper by Kim. We shall emphasize the qualitative aspects of synchrotron radiation in the cases mentioned above, making, when possible, simple arguments for estimating the spectral and angular properties of the radiation. Detailed analyses can be found in the literature.

  8. First operation of SOLEIL, a third generation synchrotron radiation source in France and prospects for ARC-EN-CIEL, a LINAC based fourth generation source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Couprie, M. E.; Filhol, J. M.; Benabderhammane, C.; Berteaud, P.; Besson, J. C.; Briquez, F.; Brunelle, P.; Bruni, C.; Chubar, O.; Denard, J. C.; Girault, M.; Godefroy, J. M.; Herbaux, C.; Lebasque, P.; Le Roux, V.; Level, M. P.; Lestrade, A.; Loulergue, A.; Marchand, P.; Marcouille, O.; Marteau, F.; Massal, M.; Nadji, A.; Nadolski, L.; Nagaoka, R.; Paulin, F.; Pottin, B.; Tordeux, M. A.; Valleau, M.; Vétéran, J.; Carré, B.; Garzella, D.; Labat, M.; Lambert, G.; Monot, P.; Jablonka, M.; Méot, F.; Mosnier, A.; Marquès, J. R.; Ortéga, J. M.

    2007-05-01

    The first results of commissioning for the French Synchrotron Radiation Facility SOLEIL at 2.75 GeV are presented. Perspectives for the fourth generation light source based on the ARC-EN-CIEL project are described.

  9. Synchrotron polarization in blazars

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Haocheng; Böttcher, Markus; Chen, Xuhui

    2014-07-01

    We present a detailed analysis of time- and energy-dependent synchrotron polarization signatures in a shock-in-jet model for γ-ray blazars. Our calculations employ a full three-dimensional radiation transfer code, assuming a helical magnetic field throughout the jet. The code considers synchrotron emission from an ordered magnetic field, and takes into account all light-travel-time and other relevant geometric effects, while the relevant synchrotron self-Compton and external Compton effects are handled with the two-dimensional Monte-Carlo/Fokker-Planck (MCFP) code. We consider several possible mechanisms through which a relativistic shock propagating through the jet may affect the jet plasma to produce a synchrotron and high-energy flare. Most plausibly, the shock is expected to lead to a compression of the magnetic field, increasing the toroidal field component and thereby changing the direction of the magnetic field in the region affected by the shock. We find that such a scenario leads to correlated synchrotron + synchrotron-self-Compton flaring, associated with substantial variability in the synchrotron polarization percentage and position angle. Most importantly, this scenario naturally explains large polarization angle rotations by ≳ 180°, as observed in connection with γ-ray flares in several blazars, without the need for bent or helical jet trajectories or other nonaxisymmetric jet features.

  10. Status of the Synchrotron Light Source DELTA

    SciTech Connect

    Berges, U.; Sternemann, C.; Tolan, M.; Westphal, C.; Weis, T.; Wille, K.

    2007-01-19

    The Dortmund Electron Accelerator DELTA, a 1.5 GeV synchrotron light source located at University of Dortmund, is operated for 3000 h per year including 2000 h beam time for synchrotron radiation use and 1000 h for machine physics, optimisation and maintenance. The status of the synchrotron light source is presented with emphasis on the operation, commissioning and installation of beamlines and insertion devices. The soft X-ray undulator beamlines provide photon energies between 5 to 400 eV (U250) and 55 and 1500 eV (U55), respectively. One dipole beamline covers soft X-rays between 6 to 200 eV, and a second dipole beamline is used without a monochromator at 2.2 keV critical energy of the dipole spectrum. For photons in the hard X-ray regime, a superconducting asymmetric wiggler (SAW) with a field of 5.3 T and 7.9 keV critical energy was installed, providing circularly polarized X-rays in the range of 2 to 30 keV. Due to its broad radiation fan, three beamlines are simultaneously served. The first SAW-beamline with an energy range between 4 to 30 keV is in full operation, the second is under commissioning, serving the energy range between 2 to 30 keV. The third SAW beamline is near completion, additional dipole beamlines are under construction.

  11. National Synchrotron Light Source

    SciTech Connect

    2009-03-10

    A tour of Brookhaven's National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS). The NSLS is one of the world's most widely used scientific research facilities, hosting more than 2,500 guest researchers each year. The NSLS provides intense beams of infrared, ultraviole

  12. National Synchrotron Light Source

    ScienceCinema

    None

    2016-07-12

    A tour of Brookhaven's National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS). The NSLS is one of the world's most widely used scientific research facilities, hosting more than 2,500 guest researchers each year. The NSLS provides intense beams of infrared, ultraviole

  13. DAFNE-Light INFN-LNF Synchrotron Radiation Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Balerna, A.; Cestelli-Guidi, M.; Cimino, R.; Commisso, M.; Grilli, A.; Pietropaoli, M.; Raco, A.; Sciarra, V.; Tullio, V.; Viviani, G.; De Sio, A.; Gambicorti, L.; Hampai, D.; Pace, E.

    2010-06-23

    DAFNE-Light is the Synchrotron Radiation Facility at the INFN-Frascati National Laboratory (Rome, Italy). Three beamlines are operational, using in parasitic and dedicated mode the intense photon emission of DAFNE, a 0.51 GeV storage ring with a routinely circulating electron current higher than 1 Ampere. Two of these beamlines--the soft x-ray (DXR1) and UV (DXR2)--use one of the DAFNE wiggler magnets as synchrotron radiation source, while the third beamline SINBAD (Synchrotron Infrared Beamline At DAFNE) collects the radiation from a bending magnet. New XUV bending magnet beamlines are nowadays under construction and the low energy one (35-200 eV) will be ready for commissioning by the end of 2009. A presentation of the facility will be given together with some recent scientific results achieved at SINBAD and DXR1 beamlines.

  14. An inverse Compton origin for the 55 GeV photon in the late afterglow of GRB 130907A

    SciTech Connect

    Tang, Qing-Wen; Wang, Xiang-Yu; Tam, Pak-Hin Thomas E-mail: phtam@phys.nthu.edu.tw

    2014-06-20

    The extended high-energy gamma-ray (>100 MeV) emission which occurs well after the prompt gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) is usually explained as the afterglow synchrotron radiation. Here we report the analysis of Fermi Large Area Telescope observations of GRB 130907A. A 55 GeV photon compatible with the position of the burst was found about 5 hr after the prompt phase. The probability that this photon is associated with GRB 130907A is higher than 99.96%. The energy of this photon exceeds the maximum synchrotron photon energy at this time and its occurrence thus challenges the synchrotron mechanism as the origin for the extended high-energy >10 GeV emission. Modeling of the broadband spectral energy distribution suggests that such high energy photons can be produced by the synchrotron self-Compton emission of the afterglow.

  15. Microangiography in Living Mice Using Synchrotron Radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Yuan Falei; Wang Yongting; Xie Bohua; Tang Yaohui; Guan Yongjing; Lu Haiyan; Yang Guoyuan; Xie Honglan; Du Guohao; Xiao Tiqiao

    2010-07-23

    Traditionally, there are no methods available to detect the fine morphologic changes of cerebrovasculature in small living animals such as rats and mice. Newly developed synchrotron radiation microangiography can achieve a fine resolution of several micrometers and had provided us with a powerful tool to study the cerebral vasculature in small animals. The purpose of this study is to identify the morphology of cerebrovasculature especially the structure of Lenticulostriate arteries (LSAs) in living mice using the synchrotron radiation source at Shanghai Synchrotron Radiation Facility (SSRF) in Shanghai, China. Adult CD-1 mice weighing 35-40 grams were anesthetized. Nonionic iodine (Omnipaque, 350 mg I /mL) was used as a contrast agent. The study was performed at the BL13W1 beam line at SSRF. The beam line was derived from a storage ring of electrons with an accelerated energy of 3.5 GeV and an average beam current of 200 mA. X-ray energy of 33.3 keV was used to produce the highest contrast image. Images were acquired every 172 ms by a x-ray camera (Photonic-Science VHR 1.38) with a resolution of 13 {mu}m/pixel. The optimal dose of contrast agent is 100 {mu}l per injection and the injecting rate is 33 {mu}l/sec. The best position for imaging is to have the mouse lay on its right or left side, with ventral side facing the X-ray source. We observed the lenticulostriate artery for the first time in living mice. Our result show that there are 4 to 5 lenticulostriate branches originating from the root of middle cerebral artery in each hemisphere. LSAs have an average diameter of 43{+-}6.8 {mu}m. There were no differences between LSAs from the left and right hemisphere (p<0.05). These results suggest that synchrotron radiation may provide a unique tool for experimental stroke research.

  16. Diffuse Hard X-Ray Emission in Starburst Galaxies as Synchrotron from Very High Energy Electrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lacki, Brian C.; Thompson, Todd A.

    2013-01-01

    submillimeter galaxies, in the context of the FIR-X-ray relation, finding that anywhere between 0% and 16% of the total hard X-ray emission is synchrotron for different parameters, and up to 2% in the densest starbursts assuming an E -2.2 injection spectrum and a diffusive escape time of 10 Myr (E/3 GeV)-1/2 (h/100 pc). Neutrino observations by IceCube and TeV γ-ray data from HESS, VERITAS, and CTA can further constrain the synchrotron X-ray emission of starbursts. Our models do not constrain the possibility of hard, second components of primary e ± from sources like pulsars in starbursts, which could enhance the synchrotron X-ray emission further.

  17. Molecular beam studies of unimolecular and bimolecular chemical reaction dynamics using VUV synchrotron radiation as a product probe

    SciTech Connect

    Blank, D.A.

    1997-08-01

    This dissertation describes the use of a new molecular beam apparatus designed to use tunable VUV synchrotron radiation for photoionization of the products from scattering experiments. The apparatus was built at the recently constructed Advanced Light Source at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, a third generation 1-2 GeV synchrotron radiation source. The new apparatus is applied to investigations of the dynamics of unimolecular reactions, photodissociation experiments, and bimolecular reactions, crossed molecular beam experiments. The first chapter describes the new apparatus and the VUV radiation used for photoionization. This is followed by a number of examples of the many advantages provided by using VUV photoionization in comparison with the traditional technique of electron bombardment ionization. At the end of the chapter there is a discussion of the data analysis employed in these scattering experiments. The remaining four chapters are complete investigations of the dynamics of four chemical systems using the new apparatus and provide numerous additional examples of the advantages provided by VUV photoionizaiton of the products. Chapters 2-4 are photofragment translational spectroscopy studies of the photodissociation dynamics of dimethyl sulfoxide, acrylonitrile, and vinyl chloride following absorption at 193 mn. All of these systems have multiple dissociation channels and provide good examples of the ability of the new apparatus to unravel the complex UV photodissociation dynamics that can arise in small polyatomic molecules.

  18. Synchrotron Radiation II.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    MOSAIC, 1978

    1978-01-01

    Synchrotron radiation is a unique form of radiation that spans the electro-magnetic spectrum from X-rays through the ultraviolet and visible into the infrared. Tunable monochromators enable scientists to select a narrow band of wavelengths at any point in the spectrum. (Author/BB)

  19. Synchrotron radiation in biosciences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marinkovic, Nebojsa S.; Gupta, Sayan; Zhan, Chenyang; Chance, Mark R.

    2005-12-01

    The Center for Synchrotron Biosciences (CSB) operates five beamlines at the National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS). Infrared (IR) micro-spectroscopy, X-ray absorption spectroscopy, structural proteomics and macromolecular footprinting are among the major technologies available through the Center. IR micro-spectroscopy is used to examine protein-folding in the microsecond time regime, image bone, neurons, seeds and other biological tissues, as well as image samples of interest in the chemical and environmental sciences. Structural proteomics research of New York Structural Genomics Research Consortium (NYSGRC) is steadily increasing the number of solved protein structures, with a goal to solve 100-200 structures per year. To speed up the research, a high-throughput method called 'metallomics' was implemented for NYSGRC crystallographers to detect intrinsic anomalous scatterers using X-ray absorption spectroscopy. Hydroxyl radical mediated X-ray footprinting is capable of resolving folding events of RNA, at single base resolution on millisecond timescales using a synchrotron white beam. The high brightness of synchrotron source is essential for CSB projects as it permits the use of smaller sample sizes and/or concentration, and allows studies of more complicated biological systems than with conventional sources.

  20. Early Commissioning Experience and Future Plans for the 12 GeV Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Spata, Michael F.

    2014-12-01

    Jefferson Lab has recently completed the accelerator portion of the 12 GeV Upgrade for the Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility. All 52 SRF cryomodules have been commissioned and operated with beam. The initial beam transport goals of demonstrating 2.2 GeV per pass, greater than 6 GeV in 3 passes to an existing experimental facility and greater than 10 GeV in 5-1/2 passes have all been accomplished. These results along with future plans to commission the remaining beamlines and to increase the performance of the accelerator to achieve reliable, robust and efficient operations at 12 GeV are presented.

  1. Status Of The Synchrotron Light Source DELTA

    SciTech Connect

    Berges, U.; Friedl, J.; Hartmann, P.; Schirmer, D.; Schmidt, G.; Sternemann, C.; Tolan, M.; Weis, T.; Westphal, C.; Wille, K.

    2004-05-12

    The Dortmund Electron Accelerator DELTA, located at the University of Dortmund, changed its scope during the last years into a 1.5 GeV synchrotron light source. DELTA is now operated for 3000 h per year including 2000 h dedicated beam time for synchrotron radiation use and 1000 h for machine physics, optimization and maintenance. The status of the accelerator complex is presented together with the beam operation, the installation and commissioning of beamlines and insertion devices. To serve user demands of photon energies up to more than 10 keV a 5.3 T superconducting asymmetric multipole wiggler (SAW) with a critical energy of 7.9 keV has been installed serving three beamlines in the hard X-ray regime with also circular polarization. Two undulator beamlines for photon energies between 5 and 400 eV (U250) and between 55 and 1500 eV (U55) and several dipole beamlines up to 200 eV are under operation. The construction and operation of the different beamlines is done by various universities and laboratories in Nordrhein-Westfalen.

  2. Synchrotron radiation sources and research

    SciTech Connect

    Teng, L.C.

    1995-12-31

    This is an introduction and a review of Synchrotron Radiation sources and the research performed using synchrotron radiation. I will begin with a brief discussion of the two principal uses of particle storage rings: for colliding beams (Collider) and for synchrotron radiation (Radiator). Then I will concentrate on discussions of synchrotron radiation topics, starting with a historical account, followed by descriptions of the features of the storage ring and the features of the radiation from the simplest source -- the bending magnet. I will then discuss the special insertion device sources -- wigglers and undulators -- and their radiations, and end with a brief general account of the research and other applications of synchrotron radiation.

  3. National Synchrotron Light Source

    ScienceCinema

    BNL

    2016-07-12

    A tour of Brookhaven's National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS), hosted by Associate Laboratory Director for Light Sources, Stephen Dierker. The NSLS is one of the world's most widely used scientific research facilities, hosting more than 2,500 guest researchers each year. The NSLS provides intense beams of infrared, ultraviolet, and x-ray light for basic and applied research in physics, chemistry, medicine, geophysics, environmental, and materials sciences.

  4. Synchrotron Radiation Workshop (SRW)

    2013-03-01

    "Synchrotron Radiation Workshop" (SRW) is a physical optics computer code for calculation of detailed characteristics of Synchrotron Radiation (SR) generated by relativistic electrons in magnetic fields of arbitrary configuration and for simulation of the radiation wavefront propagation through optical systems of beamlines. Frequency-domain near-field methods are used for the SR calculation, and the Fourier-optics based approach is generally used for the wavefront propagation simulation. The code enables both fully- and partially-coherent radiation propagation simulations inmore » steady-state and in frequency-/time-dependent regimes. With these features, the code has already proven its utility for a large number of applications in infrared, UV, soft and hard X-ray spectral range, in such important areas as analysis of spectral performances of new synchrotron radiation sources, optimization of user beamlines, development of new optical elements, source and beamline diagnostics, and even complete simulation of SR based experiments. Besides the SR applications, the code can be efficiently used for various simulations involving conventional lasers and other sources. SRW versions interfaced to Python and to IGOR Pro (WaveMetrics), as well as cross-platform library with C API, are available.« less

  5. Synchrotron Radiation Workshop (SRW)

    SciTech Connect

    Chubar, O.; Elleaume, P.

    2013-03-01

    "Synchrotron Radiation Workshop" (SRW) is a physical optics computer code for calculation of detailed characteristics of Synchrotron Radiation (SR) generated by relativistic electrons in magnetic fields of arbitrary configuration and for simulation of the radiation wavefront propagation through optical systems of beamlines. Frequency-domain near-field methods are used for the SR calculation, and the Fourier-optics based approach is generally used for the wavefront propagation simulation. The code enables both fully- and partially-coherent radiation propagation simulations in steady-state and in frequency-/time-dependent regimes. With these features, the code has already proven its utility for a large number of applications in infrared, UV, soft and hard X-ray spectral range, in such important areas as analysis of spectral performances of new synchrotron radiation sources, optimization of user beamlines, development of new optical elements, source and beamline diagnostics, and even complete simulation of SR based experiments. Besides the SR applications, the code can be efficiently used for various simulations involving conventional lasers and other sources. SRW versions interfaced to Python and to IGOR Pro (WaveMetrics), as well as cross-platform library with C API, are available.

  6. Influence of synchrotron radiation on corrosion at the water—metal boundary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Momose, Takashi; Hirayama, Hideo; Ishimaru, Hajime

    1993-06-01

    Radiation damage due to synchrotron radiation has been studied at the boundary of cooling water and metal related to vacuum chambers: oxygen free copper (OFC). The damage was evaluated by measuring the dissolved ion concentration in water, sampled from the pure water circulating system with a sample pipe (10 mm in inner diameter and 1 mm in thickness), irradiated by synchrotron radiation with photons (40-700 keV) of the order of 10 16 photons (MeV mA s) -1 in the TRISTAN e +e - colliding ring (bending radius of 246 m and beam energy of 29 GeV). OFC with an irradiated surface area of 10 mm 2 showed a Cu ion concentration of 6 mg 1 -1 after 1.3 A h irradiation (800 h operation, 5.3 x 10 20 photons mm -2). The ion concentration showed an increasing rate of t 1/3- 1/2 before 500 h. After 500 h operation, it was roughly proportional to t. The time dependence of the concentration of the non-irradiated sample was t 1/3 before 10 3 h. The concentration increased from 0.01 before 10 3 h to 1 mg l -1 after 10 3 h. The relationship between the free energy of formation and the estimated dissolved ion concentration of OFC together with the one of aluminum alloys, a 10 μm thick silicon dioxide film inside an Al pipe, and stainless steel 316L at 10 A h (the dose of the materials ranging from 4.1 to 5.8 x 10 21 photons mm -2) gives that the higher the free energy of formation, the lower the dissolved ion concentration. Therefore, to obtain a radiation resistant surface, the stable oxide (with higher free energy of formation) should be selected.

  7. First Beam Measurements with the LHC Synchrotron Light Monitors

    SciTech Connect

    Lefevre, Thibaut; Bravin, Enrico; Burtin, Gerard; Guerrero, Ana; Jeff, Adam; Rabiller, Aurelie; Roncarolo, Federico; Fisher, Alan; /SLAC

    2012-07-13

    The continuous monitoring of the transverse sizes of the beams in the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) relies on the use of synchrotron radiation and intensified video cameras. Depending on the beam energy, different synchrotron light sources must be used. A dedicated superconducting undulator has been built for low beam energies (450 GeV to 1.5 TeV), while edge and centre radiation from a beam-separation dipole magnet are used respectively for intermediate and high energies (up to 7 TeV). The emitted visible photons are collected using a retractable mirror, which sends the light into an optical system adapted for acquisition using intensified CCD cameras. This paper presents the design of the imaging system, and compares the expected light intensity with measurements and the calculated spatial resolution with a cross calibration performed with the wire scanners. Upgrades and future plans are also discussed.

  8. Charge - dependent increase in coherence of synchrotron oscillation at injection

    SciTech Connect

    MacLachlan, J.A.; /Fermilab

    2004-11-01

    Because of coupled bunch instability and/or because of some unidentified mechanism, bunches from the 8 GeV Booster accelerator at Fermilab arrive in the Main Injector synchrotron with a complicated centroid distribution in phase and energy. The currently installed broad band kicker provides a maximum of 2 kV, insufficient to remove injection errors before the oscillations would de-cohere, ignoring the influence of bunch charge. Perhaps surprisingly, for sufficient but generally modest charge, the effect of potential well distortion is to maintain bunch integrity. This talk illustrates the phenomenon for injection into the Fermilab Main Injector and offers an explanation sufficiently general to apply elsewhere.

  9. A POSSIBLE SYNCHROTRON LIGHT BEAM PROFILE MONITOR IN RHIC.

    SciTech Connect

    TRBOJEVIC, D.

    1998-06-26

    This report examines the possibility of observing transverse beam profiles by using synchrotron light emission from the 100 GeV/nucleon heavy-ion gold beam in the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC). Synchrotron radiation experiences a shift towards higher photon energy when the magnetic field at the end of a dipole varies rapidly over a short distance. Synchrotron light signals from high energy (larger than 400 GeV) proton beams have already been routinely used to observe the transverse beam profiles at the SPS in CERN and at the TEVATRON at Fermilab. Because of the modest relativistic factor of the fully stripped stored gold ions in RHIC this ''push'' towards higher critical energy is not large enough to place the synchrotron light within the visible region of the spectrum. The critical wavelength remains within the infrared region. A 77K cooled infrared array detector with 160 elements, made of PbSe (Lead salt) could be used for beam profile detection. It would cover the wavelength range between 1 and 6 microns, with maximum sensitivity at a wavelength of 4.5 microns.

  10. Synchrotron based proton drivers

    SciTech Connect

    Weiren Chou

    2002-09-19

    Proton drivers are the proton sources that produce intense short proton bunches. They have a wide range of applications. This paper discusses the proton drivers based on high-intensity proton synchrotrons. It gives a review of the high-intensity proton sources over the world and a brief report on recent developments in this field in the U.S. high-energy physics (HEP) community. The Fermilab Proton Driver is used as a case study for a number of challenging technical design issues.

  11. 1,2-Dichloroethane

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    1,2 - Dichloroethane ; CASRN 107 - 06 - 2 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for Noncarcinoge

  12. 1,2-Dichloropropane

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    1,2 - Dichloropropane ; CASRN 78 - 87 - 5 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for Noncarcinoge

  13. 1,2-Dichlorobenzene

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    1,2 - Dichlorobenzene ; CASRN 95 - 50 - 1 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for Noncarcinoge

  14. 1,2-Diphenylhydrazine

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    1,2 - Diphenylhydrazine ; CASRN 122 - 66 - 7 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for Noncarcin

  15. 1,2-Dibromoethane

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    1,2 - Dibromoethane ; CASRN 106 - 93 - 4 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for Noncarcinogen

  16. Introducing Synchrotrons Into the Classroom

    ScienceCinema

    None

    2016-07-12

    Brookhaven's Introducing Synchrotrons Into the Classroom (InSynC) program gives teachers and their students access to the National Synchrotron Light Source through a competitive proposal process. The first batch of InSynC participants included a group of students from Islip Middle School, who used the massive machine to study the effectiveness of different what filters.

  17. Introducing Synchrotrons Into the Classroom

    SciTech Connect

    2011-05-20

    Brookhaven's Introducing Synchrotrons Into the Classroom (InSynC) program gives teachers and their students access to the National Synchrotron Light Source through a competitive proposal process. The first batch of InSynC participants included a group of students from Islip Middle School, who used the massive machine to study the effectiveness of different what filters.

  18. Current Status of the Synchrotron Radiation Center

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kinraide, R.; Moore, C. J.; Jacobs, K. D.; Severson, M.; Bissen, M. J.; Frazer, B.; Bisognano, J. J.; Bosch, R. A.; Eisert, D.; Fisher, M.; Green, M. A.; Gundelach, C. T.; Hansen, R. W. C.; Hochst, H.; Julian, R. L.; Keil, R.; Kleman, K.; Kubala, T.; Legg, R. A.; Pedley, B.; Rogers, G. C.; Stott, J. P.; Wallace, D. J.; Wehlitz, R.; Wiese, L. M.; Taylor, J.; Campuzano, J. C.; De Stasio, G.

    2004-05-01

    The Synchrotron Radiation Center (SRC) operates the Aladdin electron storage ring at energies of 800 MeV or 1 GeV in support of a broad range of national and international research programs. A low emittance configuration is in routine operation during 800-MeV shifts and offers improved photon flux density with about the same beam lifetime. An improved undulator compensation algorithm and new optical beam position monitors have been implemented improving beam stability and maintaining vertical beam size variations to < 2% peak-to-peak during undulator scanning. Instrumentation initiatives include construction of a modified Wadsworth beamline (7.8 - 50 eV) and a variable-line-spacing plane-grating monochromator (VLS-PGM, 75 - 2000 eV) to utilize radiation from a permanent magnet undulator. The Wadsworth beamline is being commissioned for photoelectron spectroscopy (PES) experiments using high-resolution Scienta analyzers. The VLS-PGM is being constructed for experiments that require higher photon energies and high flux density such as x-ray photoemission electron microscopy (X-PEEM) and x-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS). It is scheduled to be available in early 2004. Recent research at the SRC has produced exciting results in a variety of fields, culminating in eight articles published in Physical Review Letters and three in Nature since October 2002, in addition to articles in many other publications. An outreach program offers research experiences for undergraduates and provides the general public with an awareness of synchrotron radiation. Hands-on workshops and activities on FTIR microscopy and X-PEEM are offered for graduate students and scientists. SRC sponsors a summer Research Experience for Undergraduates (REU) program and offers opportunities to non-research universities and high schools. Tours and educational events are coordinated with local civic groups and schools. Open houses are offered that include tours, demonstrations, and family activities.

  19. Turn-By Beam Extraction during Acceleration in a Synchrotron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsoupas, Nicholaos; Trbojevic, Dejan

    2014-02-01

    A synchrotron to accelerate protons or carbon ions for medical applications is being designed at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL). Single beam bunches with maximum beam energy of 1.18 GeV and 400 MeV/u for protons and carbon ions respectively will be extracted from the synchrotron at 15 Hz. For protons, the maximum required energy for irradiating a tumor is ˜206 MeV. A pencil-like proton beam containing ˜5.4×107 p/bunch delivers a therapeutic dose of 2.5 Gy in ˜1.5 minutes to treat a tumor of 1 liter volume. It will take ˜80 minutes with bunches containing 4.5×104 ions/bunch to deliver the same dose of 2.5 Gy with a 400 MeV/u pencil-like carbon beam. This extended treatment time when using carbon ions is not acceptable. In addition, the synchrotron cannot be controlled with a beam bunch containing such a low number of carbon ions. To overcome these two problems of the extended treatment time and the low bunch intensity required for the treatment when carbon ions are used, we have devised a method to “peel” the required 4.5×104 carbon-ions/bunch from the accelerating carbon beam bunch containing ˜108 ions/bunch and deliver them to the tumor on a “turn-by-turn” basis. Unlike other methods of beam extraction from a synchrotron, such as resonance extraction, this method does not allow for any beam losses during the extraction and the carbon beam can be peeled off in less than 15 ms during the acceleration or deceleration cycle of the synchrotron. Thus, this turn-by-turn beam extraction method provides beam with variable energy and precisely controlled beam current during the 30 ms acceleration or deceleration time.

  20. The Variable Crab Nebula: Evidence for a Connection Between GeV Flares and Hard X-ray Variations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson-Hodge, Colleen A.; Harding, A. K.; Hays, E. A.; Cherry, M. L.; Case, G. L.; Finger, M. H.; Jenke, P.; Zhang, X.

    2016-01-01

    In 2010, hard X-ray variations (Wilson-Hodge et al. 2011) and GeV flares (Tavani et al 2011, Abdo et al. 2011) from the Crab Nebula were discovered. Connections between these two phenomena were unclear, in part because the timescales were quite different, with yearly variations in hard X-rays and hourly to daily variations in the GeV flares. The hard X-ray flux from the Crab Nebula has again declined since 2014, much like it did in 2008-2010. During both hard X-ray decline periods, the Fermi LAT detected no GeV flares, suggesting that injection of particles from the GeV flares produces the much slower and weaker hard X-ray variations. The timescale for the particles emitting the GeV flares to lose enough energy to emit synchrotron photons in hard X-rays is consistent with the yearly variations observed in hard X-rays and with the expectation that the timescale for variations slowly increases with decreasing energy. This hypothesis also predicts even slower and weaker variations below 10 keV, consistent with the non-detection of counterparts to the GeV flares by Chandra (Weisskopf et al 2013). We will present a comparison of the observed hard X-ray variations and a simple model of the decay of particles from the GeV flares to test our hypothesis.

  1. The Variable Crab Nebula: Evidence for a Connection between GeV flares and Hard X-ray Variations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson-Hodge, Colleen A.; Kust Harding, Alice; Hays, Elizabeth A.; Cherry, Michael L.; Case, Gary L.; Finger, Mark H.; Jenke, Peter; Zhang, Xiao-Ling

    2016-04-01

    In 2010, hard X-ray variations (Wilson-Hodge et al. 2011) and GeV flares (Tavani et al 2011, Abdo et al. 2011) from the Crab Nebula were discovered. Connections between these two phenomena were unclear, in part because the timescales were quite different, with yearly variations in hard X-rays and hourly to daily variations in the GeV flares. The hard X-ray flux from the Crab Nebula has again declined since 2014, much like it did in 2008-2010. During both hard X-ray decline periods, the Fermi LAT detected no GeV flares, suggesting that injection of particles from the GeV flares produces the much slower and weaker hard X-ray variations. The timescale for the particles emitting the GeV flares to lose enough energy to emit synchrotron photons in hard X-rays is consistent with the yearly variations observed in hard X-rays and with the expectation that the timescale for variations slowly increases with decreasing energy. This hypothesis also predicts even slower and weaker variations below 10 keV, consistent with the non-detection of counterparts to the GeV flares by Chandra (Weisskopf et al 2013). We will present a comparison of the observed hard X-ray variations and a simple model of the decay of particles from the GeV flares to test our hypothesis.

  2. Characteristics of radiation safety for synchrotron radiation and X-ray free electron laser facilities.

    PubMed

    Asano, Yoshihiro

    2011-07-01

    Radiation safety problems are discussed for typical electron accelerators, synchrotron radiation (SR) facilities and X-ray free electron laser (XFEL) facilities. The radiation sources at the beamline of the facilities are SR, including XFEL, gas bremsstrahlung and high-energy gamma ray and photo-neutrons due to electron beam loss. The radiation safety problems for each source are compared by using 8 GeV class SR and XFEL facilities as an example.

  3. Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory activity report for 1986

    SciTech Connect

    Cantwell, K.

    1987-12-31

    1986 was another year of major advances for SSRL as the ultimate capabilities of PEP as a synchrotron radiation source became more apparent and a second PEP beam line was initiated, while effective development and utilization of SPEAR proceeded. Given these various PEP developments, SSRL abandoned its plans for a separate diffraction limited ring, as they abandoned their plans for a 6--7 GeV ring of the APS type last year. It has become increasingly apparent that SSRL should concentrate on developing SPEAR and PEP as synchrotron radiation sources. Consequently, initial planning for a 3 GeV booster synchrotron injector for SPEAR was performed in 1986, with a proposal to the Department of Energy resulting. As described in Chapter 2, the New Rings Group and the Machine Physics Group were combined into one Accelerator Physics Group. This group is focusing mainly on the improvement of SPEAR`s operating conditions and on planning for the conversion of PEP into a fourth generation x-ray source. Considerable emphasis is also being given to the training of accelerator physics graduate students. At the same time, several improvements of SSRL`s existing facilities were made. These are described in Chapter 3. Chapter 4 describes new SSRL beam lines being commissioned. Chapter 5 discusses SSRL`s present construction projects. Chapter 6 discusses a number of projects presently underway in the engineering division. Chapter 7 describes SSRL`s advisory panels while Chapter 8 discusses SSRL`s overall organization. Chapter 9 describes the experimental progress reports.

  4. RF parameter curves for a proton driver synchrotron

    SciTech Connect

    James A. MacLachlan, Z. Qian and J.E. Griffin

    2001-07-12

    High average beam power proton synchrotrons in the medium energy range are under consideration at several laboratories for intense and specialized secondary particle sources like muon colliders and {nu} factories. A 12-16 GeV machine with a 15 Hz cycle and 3 {center_dot} 10{sup 13} p/pulse capability called the Proton Driver (PD) has been studied as a replacement for the Fermilab Booster and as a base for future facilities.[1] A staged development is proposed, initially using 20 modified 53 MHz Booster cavities in 12 GeV operation.[2] A second stage would allow 16 GeV top energy using a 7.5 MHz rf system consisting of 100 15 kV low-Q cavities.[3] This paper discusses the choices of rf system parameters made in the design study. The limited number of existing Booster cavities has led to consideration for stage 1 of an inductive insert in the ring to aid initial beam capture by compensating longitudinal space charge, an admittedly speculative expedient requiring followup with further calculation and some beam experiments. This report is one of nineteen papers at this conference by members of the Proton Driver design team; it relies on these others to help establish the general context.

  5. Simple modification of Compton polarimeter to redirect synchrotron radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benesch, J.; Franklin, G. B.; Quinn, B. P.; Paschke, K. D.

    2015-11-01

    Synchrotron radiation produced as an electron beam passes through a bending magnet is a significant source of background in many experiments. Using modeling, we show that simple modifications of the magnet geometry can reduce this background by orders of magnitude in some circumstances. Specifically, we examine possible modifications of the four dipole magnets used in Jefferson Lab's Hall A Compton polarimeter chicane. This Compton polarimeter has been a crucial part of experiments with polarized beams and the next generation of experiments will utilize increased beam energies, up to 11 GeV, requiring a corresponding increase in Compton dipole field to 1.5 T. In consequence, the synchrotron radiation (SR) from the dipole chicane will be greatly increased. Three possible modifications of the chicane dipoles are studied; each design moves about 2% of the integrated bending field to provide a gentle bend in critical regions along the beam trajectory which, in turn, greatly reduces the synchrotron radiation within the acceptance of the Compton polarimeter photon detector. Each of the modifications studied also softens the SR energy spectrum at the detector sufficiently to allow shielding with 5 mm of lead. Simulations show that these designs are each capable of reducing the background signal due to SR by three orders of magnitude. The three designs considered vary in their need for vacuum vessel changes and in their effectiveness.

  6. Longitudinal bunch dynamics study with coherent synchrotron radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Billinghurst, B. E.; Bergstrom, J. C.; Baribeau, C.; Batten, T.; May, T. E.; Vogt, J. M.; Wurtz, W. A.

    2016-02-01

    An electron bunch circulating in a storage ring constitutes a dynamical system with both longitudinal and transverse degrees of freedom. Through a self-interaction with the wakefields created by the bunch, certain of these degrees may get excited, defining a set of eigenmodes analogous to a spectroscopic series. The present study focuses on the longitudinal modes of a single bunch. The excitation of a mode appears as an amplitude modulation at the mode frequency of the coherent synchrotron radiation (CSR) emitted by the bunch. The modulations are superimposed on a much larger continuum from CSR emission in the continuous mode. A given eigenmode is classified by the integer m which is the ratio of the mode frequency to the synchrotron frequency. The present measurements extend up to m =8 and focus on the region near the instability thresholds. At threshold the modes are excited sequentially, resembling a staircase when the mode frequencies are plotted as a function of bunch length or synchrotron frequency. Adjacent modes are observed to coexist at the boundaries between the modes. An energy-independent correlation is observed between the threshold current for an instability and the corresponding zero-current bunch length. Measurements were made at five beam energies between 1.0 and 2.9 GeV at the Canadian Light Source. The CSR was measured in the time domain using an unbiased Schottky diode spanning 50-75 GHz.

  7. Synchrotron Radiation Research--An Overview.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bienenstock, Arthur; Winick, Herman

    1983-01-01

    Discusses expanding user community seeking access to synchrotron radiation sources, properties/sources of synchrotron radiation, permanent-magnet technology and its impact on synchrotron radiation research, factors limiting power, the density of synchrotron radiation, and research results illustrating benefit of higher flux and brightness. Also…

  8. Mossbauer spectroscopy with synchrotron radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Alp, E.E.; Mooney, T.M.; Toellner, T.; Sturhahn, W.

    1993-07-01

    The principles underlying observation of the Mossbauer effect with synchrotron radiation are explained. The current status of the field is reviewed, and prospects for dedicated experimental stations on third generation machines are discussed.

  9. Single-bunch synchrotron shutter

    DOEpatents

    Norris, James R.; Tang, Jau-Huei; Chen, Lin; Thurnauer, Marion

    1993-01-01

    An apparatus for selecting a single synchrotron pulse from the millions of pulses provided per second from a synchrotron source includes a rotating spindle located in the path of the synchrotron pulses. The spindle has multiple faces of a highly reflective surface, and having a frequency of rotation f. A shutter is spaced from the spindle by a radius r, and has an open position and a closed position. The pulses from the synchrotron are reflected off the spindle to the shutter such that the speed s of the pulses at the shutter is governed by: s=4.times..pi..times.r.times.f. such that a single pulse is selected for transmission through an open position of the shutter.

  10. Single-bunch synchrotron shutter

    SciTech Connect

    Norris, J.R.; Tang, Jau-Huei; Chen, Lin; Thurnauer, M.

    1991-12-31

    An apparatus for selecting a single synchrotron pulse from the millions of pulses provided per second from a synchrotron source includes a rotating spindle located in the path of the synchrotron pulses. The spindle has multiple faces of a highly reflective surface, and having a frequency of rotation f. A shutter is spaced from the spindle by a radius r, and has an open position and a closed position. The pulses from the synchrotron are reflected off the spindle to the shutter such that the speed s of the pulses at the shutter is governed by: s=4 {times} {pi} {times} r {times} such that a single pulse is selected for transmission through an open position of the shutter.

  11. Synchrotron light source data book

    SciTech Connect

    Murphy, J.

    1989-01-01

    The ''Synchrotron Light Source Data Book'' is as its name implies a collection of data on existing and planned synchrotron light sources. The intention was to provide a compendium of tools for the design of electron storage rings as synchrotron radiation sources. The slant is toward the accelerator physicist as other booklets such as the X-ray Data Booklet, edited by D. Vaughan (LBL PUB-490), address the 'use' of synchrotron radiation. It is hoped that the booklet serves as a pocket sized reference to facilitate back of the envelope type calculations. It contains some useful formulae in 'practical units' and a brief description of many of the existing and planned light source lattices.

  12. Proton synchrotron radiation at Fermilab

    SciTech Connect

    Thurman-Keup, Randy; /Fermilab

    2006-05-01

    While protons are not generally associated with synchrotron radiation, they do emit visible light at high enough energies. This paper presents an overview of the use of synchrotron radiation in the Tevatron to measure transverse emittances and to monitor the amount of beam in the abort gap. The latter is necessary to ensure a clean abort and prevent quenches of the superconducting magnets and damage to the silicon detectors of the collider experiments.

  13. Angiography by Synchrotron Radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rubenstein, E.; Brown, G. S.; Giacomini, J. C.; Gordon, H. J.; Hofstadter, R.; Kernoff, R. S.; Otis, J. N.; Thomlinson, W.; Thompson, A. C.; Zeman, H. D.

    1987-01-01

    Because coronary disease represents the principal health problem in the Western, industrialized world, and because of the risks and costs associated with conventional methods of visualizing the coronary arteries, an effort has been underway at the Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory to develop a less invasive coronary imaging procedure based on iodine K-edge dichromography. A pair of line images, recorded within a few milliseconds of each other, is taken with two monochromatic X-ray beams whose energy closely brackets the K-edge of iodine, 33.17 keV. The logarithmic subtraction of the images produced by these beams results in an image which greatly enhances signals arising from attenuation by iodine and almost totally suppresses signals arising from attenuation by soft tissue and bone. The high sensitivity to iodine allows the visualization of arterial structures after an intravenous injection of contrast agent and its subsequent 20-30 fold dilution. The experiments began in 1979, with initial studies done on phantoms and excised pig hearts. The first images of anesthetized dogs were taken in 1982. The results of experiments on dogs will be reviewed, showing the stepwise evolution of the imaging system, leading to the use of the system on human subjects in 1986. The images recorded on human subjects will be described and the remaining problems discussed.

  14. Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory 1991 activity report. Facility developments January 1991--March 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Cantwell, K.; St. Pierre, M.

    1992-12-31

    SSRL is a national facility supported primarily by the Department of Energy for the utilization of synchrotron radiation for basic and applied research in the natural sciences and engineering. It is a user-oriented facility which welcomes proposals for experiments from all researchers. The synchrotron radiation is produced by the 3.5 GeV storage ring, SPEAR, located at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC). SPEAR is a fully dedicated synchrotron radiation facility which operates for user experiments 7 to 9 months per year. SSRL currently has 24 experimental stations on the SPEAR storage ring. There are 145 active proposals for experimental work from 81 institutions involving approximately 500 scientists. There is normally no charge for use of beam time by experimenters. This report summarizes the activity at SSRL for the period January 1, 1991 to December 31, 1991 for research. Facility development through March 1992 is included.

  15. Manufacturability of compact synchrotron mirrors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Douglas, Gary M.

    1997-11-01

    While many of the government funded research communities over the years have put their faith and money into increasingly larger synchrotrons, such as Spring8 in Japan, and the APS in the United States, a viable market appears to exist for smaller scale, research and commercial grade, compact synchrotrons. These smaller, and less expensive machines, provide the research and industrial communities with synchrotron radiation beamline access at a portion of the cost of their larger and more powerful counterparts. A compact synchrotron, such as the Aurora-2D, designed and built by Sumitomo Heavy Industries, Ltd. of japan (SHI), is a small footprint synchrotron capable of sustaining 20 beamlines. Coupled with a Microtron injector, with 150 MeV of injection energy, an entire facility fits within a 27 meter [88.5 ft] square floorplan. The system, controlled by 2 personal computers, is capable of producing 700 MeV electron energy and 300 mA stored current. Recently, an Aurora-2D synchrotron was purchased from SHI by the University of Hiroshima. The Rocketdyne Albuquerque Operations Beamline Optics Group was approached by SHI with a request to supply a group of 16 beamline mirrors for this machine. These mirrors were sufficient to supply 3 beamlines for the Hiroshima machine. This paper will address engineering issues which arose during the design and manufacturing of these mirrors.

  16. The DELTA Synchrotron Light Interferometer

    SciTech Connect

    Berges, U.

    2004-05-12

    Synchrotron radiation sources like DELTA, the Dortmund Electron Accelerator, a third generation synchrotron light source, need an optical monitoring system to measure the beam size at different points of the ring with high resolution and accuracy. These measurements also allow an investigation of the emittance of the storage ring, an important working parameter for the efficiency of working beamlines with experiments using the synchrotron radiation. The resolution limits of the different types of optical synchrotron light monitors at DELTA are investigated. The minimum measurable beamsize with the normal synchrotron light monitor using visible light at DELTA is about 80 {mu}m. Due to this a synchrotron light interferometer was built up and tested at DELTA. The interferometer uses the same beamline in the visible range. The minimum measurable beamsize is with about 8 {mu}m one order of magnitude smaller. This resolution is sufficient for the expected small vertical beamsizes at DELTA. The electron beamsize and emittance were measured with both systems at different electron beam energies of the storage ring. The theoretical values of the present optics are smaller than the measured emittance. So possible reasons for beam movements are investigated.

  17. Laser synchrotron radiation and beam cooling

    SciTech Connect

    Esarey, E.; Sprangle, P.; Ting, A.

    1995-12-31

    The interaction of intense {approx_gt} 10{sup 18} W/cm{sup 2}, short pulse ({approx_lt} 1 ps) lasers with electron beams and plasmas can lead to the generation of harmonic radiation by several mechanisms. Laser synchrotron radiation may provide a practical method for generating tunable, near monochromatic, well collimated, short pulse x-rays in compact, relatively inexpensive source. The mechanism for the generation of laser synchrotron radiation is nonlinear Thomson scattering. Short wavelengths can be generated via Thomson scattering by two methods, (i) backscattering from relativistic electron beams, in which the radiation frequency is upshifted by the relativistic factor 4{gamma}{sup 2}, and (ii) harmonic scattering, in which a multitude of harmonics are generated with harmonic numbers extending out to the critical harmonic number nc{approx_equal}a{sub 0}{sup 3} {much_gt} 1, where a{sub 0} {approx_equal}10{sup -9}{lambda}I{sup 1/2}, {lambda} is the laser wavelength in {mu}m and I is the laser intensity in W/cm{sup 2}. Laser synchrotron sources are capable of generating short ({approx_lt} ps) x-ray pulses with high peak flux ({approx_gt} 10{sup 21} photons/s) and brightness ({approx_gt}{sup 19} photons/s-mm{sup 2}-mrad{sup 2} 0.1%BW. As the electron beam radiates via Thomson scattering, it can subsequently be cooled, i.e., the beam emittance and energy spread can be reduced. This cooling can occur on rapid ({approximately} ps) time scales. In addition, electron distributions with sufficiently small axial energy spreads can be used to generate coherent XUV radiation via a laser-pumped FEL mechanism.

  18. CCD sensors in synchrotron X-ray detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strauss, M. G.; Naday, I.; Sherman, I. S.; Kraimer, M. R.; Westbrook, E. M.; Zaluzec, N. J.

    1988-04-01

    The intense photon flux from advanced synchrotron light sources, such as the 7-GeV synchrotron being designed at Argonne, require integrating-type detectors. Charge-coupled devices (CCDs) are well suited as synchrotron X-ray detectors. When irradiated indirectly via a phosphor followed by reducing optics, diffraction patterns of 100 cm 2 can be imaged on a 2 cm 2 CCD. With a conversion efficiency of ˜ 1 CCD electron/X-ray photon, a peak saturation capacity of > 10 6 X-rays can be obtained. A programmable CCD controller operating at a clock frequency of 20 MHz has been developed. The readout rate is 5 × 10 6 pixels/s and the shift rate in the parallel registers is 10 6 lines/s. The test detector was evaluated in two experiments. In protein crystallography diffraction patterns have been obtained from a lysozyme crystal using a conventional rotating anode X-ray generator. Based on these results we expect to obtain at a synchrotron diffraction images at a rate of ˜ 1 frame/s or a complete 3-dimensional data set from a single crystal in ˜ 2 min. In electron energy-loss spectroscopy (EELS), the CCD was used in a parallel detection mode which is similar to the mode array detectors are used in dispersive EXAFS. With a beam current corresponding to 3 × 10 9 electron/s on the detector, a series of 64 spectra were recorded on the CCD in a continuous sequence without interruption due to readout. The frame-to-frame pixel signal fluctuations had σ = 0.4% from which DQE = 0.4 was obtained, where the detector conversion efficiency was 2.6 CCD electrons/X-ray photon. These multiple frame series also showed the time-resolved modulation of the electron microscope optics by stray magnetic fields.

  19. Spin Echo in Synchrotrons

    SciTech Connect

    Chao, Alexander W.; Courant, Ernest D.; /Brookhaven

    2006-12-01

    As a polarized beam is accelerated through a depolarization resonance, its polarization is reduced by a well-defined calculable reduction factor. When the beam subsequently crosses a second resonance, the final beam polarization is considered to be reduced by the product of the two reduction factors corresponding to the two crossings, each calculated independently of the other. This is a good approximation when the spread of spin precession frequency {Delta}{nu}{sub spin} of the beam (particularly due to its energy spread) is sufficiently large that the spin precession phases of individual particles smear out completely during the time {tau} between the two crossings. This approximate picture, however, ignores two spin dynamics effects: an interference effect and a spin echo effect. This paper is to address these two effects. The interference effect occurs when {Delta}{nu}{sub spin} is too small, or when {tau} is too short, to complete the smearing process. In this case, the two resonance crossings interfere with each other, and the final polarization exhibits constructive or destructive patterns depending on the exact value of {tau}. Typically, the beam's energy spread is large and this interference effect does not occur. To study this effect, therefore, it is necessary to reduce the beam energy spread and to consider two resonance crossings very close to each other. The other mechanism, also due to the interplay between two resonance crossings, is spin echo. It turns out that even when the precession phases appear to be completely smeared between the two crossings, there will still be a sudden and short-lived echo signal of beam polarization at a time {tau} after the second crossing; the magnitude of which can be as large as 57%. This echo signal exists even when the beam has a sizable energy spread and when {tau} is very large, and could be a sensitive (albeit challenging) way to experimentally test the intricate spin dynamics in a synchrotron. After giving an

  20. CHARGED HADRON PRODUCTION IN E+ E- ANNIHILATION AT S**(1/2) = 29-GEV

    SciTech Connect

    Wolf, Z

    2004-03-26

    Data from the Time Projection Chamber at the SLAC storage ring PEP have been used to study the inclusive production of charged hadrons. Particles were identified by simultaneous dE/dx and momentum measurements. Cross sections and particle fractions for pi +/-, k+/-, and p(anti-p) are given as a function of several variables. Predictions of various hadronization models are compared to the data. A comparison is made with other fragmentation processes.

  1. Contact microscopy with synchrotron radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Panessa-Warren, B.J.

    1985-10-01

    Soft x-ray contact microscopy with synchrotron radiation offers the biologist and especially the microscopist, a way to morphologically study specimens that could not be imaged by conventional TEM, STEM or SEM methods (i.e. hydrated samples, samples easily damaged by an electron beam, electron dense samples, thick specimens, unstained low contrast specimens) at spatial resolutions approaching those of the TEM, with the additional possibility to obtain compositional (elemental) information about the sample as well. Although flash x-ray sources offer faster exposure times, synchrotron radiation provides a highly collimated, intense radiation that can be tuned to select specific discrete ranges of x-ray wavelengths or specific individual wavelengths which optimize imaging or microanalysis of a specific sample. This paper presents an overview of the applications of x-ray contact microscopy to biological research and some current research results using monochromatic synchrotron radiation to image biological samples. 24 refs., 10 figs.

  2. Balloon measurements of the energy spectrum of cosmic electrons between 1 and 25 GeV.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Earl, J. A.; Neely, D. E.; Rygg, T. A.

    1972-01-01

    During three balloon flights made in 1966 and 1967, cosmic electrons were investigated with the aid of a hodoscope detector that provided extensive and detailed information on each cosmic-ray event triggering the apparatus. Similar information obtained during calibration exposures to protons and pions as well as to electrons was used to provide identification of cosmic electrons and to determine their energies. Differential primary electron intensities measured in the range from 1 to 25 GeV were substantially larger than some earlier measurements. In conjunction with existing measurements at energies above 100 GeV, this finding indicates that the energy spectrum of cosmic electrons is steeper than that of cosmic-ray nuclei and consequently suggests that Compton/synchrotron energy loss plays a significant role in shaping the electron spectrum.

  3. Conceptual design of the vaccum system for the 6 GeV storage ring

    SciTech Connect

    Be, S.H.; Morimoto, Y.; Sakamoto, H.; Yokouchi, S.

    1988-09-30

    Preliminary design results for the vacuum system of the 6 GeV storage ring which is being planned at RIKEN, are presented. The vacuum system is designed to maintain a beam-on operating pressure of 1 x 10/sup 10/ Torr. This report places special emphasis on the new vacuum chamber whose antechamber is with two isolated-pump chambers, and pumping system. The distribution of the synchrotron radiation depositions at the absorber or within the vacuum chambers is discussed. Finally the new type of a crotch absorber is briefly described.

  4. An 8 GeV H- multi-turn injection system for the Fermilab Main Injector

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, D.E.; Yoon, P.; Liaw, C-J.; Raparia, D.; Bebee-Wang, J.; /Brookhaven

    2007-06-01

    An 8 GeV superconducting linear accelerator (SCL) has been proposed [1] as a single stage H{sup -} injector into the Main Injector (MI) synchrotron . This would be the highest energy H{sup -} multi-turn injection system in the world. The conceptual design of an injection system has been further refined by addressing transverse phase space painting issues, chicane dipole fields and foil location, foil temperature issues, and initial longitudinal phase space painting simulations. We present the current state of design.

  5. A Bunch Length Monitor for JLab 12 GeV Upgrade

    SciTech Connect

    Ahmad, Mahmoud Mohamad Ali; Freyberger, Arne P.; Gubeli, Joseph F.; Krafft, Geoffrey A.

    2013-12-01

    A continuous non-invasive bunch length monitor for the 12 GeV upgrade of Jefferson Lab will be used to determine the bunch length of the beam. The measurement will be done at the fourth dipole of the injector chicane at 123 MeV using the coherent synchrotron light emitted from the dipole. The estimated bunch length is 333 fs. A vacuum chamber will be fabricated and a Radiabeam real time interferometer will be used. In this paper, background, the estimated calculations and the construction of the chamber will be discussed.

  6. Characteristics of the 7-GeV advanced photon source: A guide for users

    SciTech Connect

    Shenoy, G.K.; Viccaro, P.J.; Mills, D.M.

    1988-02-01

    In this document we present the characteristics of the electromagnetic radiation from various types of sources on the 7-GeV Advanced Photon Source (APS) storage ring. The sources include bending magnets, undulators, and wigglers. The characteristics are compared with those of other synchrotron sources when operated at their design specifications. The influence of positron beam size on the on-axis brilliance is discussed, along with the power distribution from these sources. The goal of this document is to provide users with enough information on the characteristics of radiation from the APS storage ring so that experiments can be efficiently planned. 23 refs., 20 figs., 8 tabs.

  7. The Storage Ring Magnets of the Australian Synchrotron

    SciTech Connect

    Barg, B.; Jackson, A.; LeBlanc, G.; Huttel, E.; Tanabe, J.; /SLAC

    2005-05-11

    A 3 GeV Synchrotron Radiation Source is being built in Melbourne, Australia. Commissioning is foreseen in 2006. The Storage ring has a circumference of 216 m and has a 14 fold DBA structure. For the storage ring the following magnets will be installed: 28 dipoles with a field of 1.3 T, and a gradient of 3.35 T/m; 56 quadrupoles with a gradient of 18 T/m and 28 with a gradient of 10 T/m; 56 sextupoles with a strength of B'' = 350 T/m and 42 with 150 T/m. The sextupoles are equipped with additional coils for horizontal and vertical steering and for a skew quadrupole. The pole profile was determined by scaling the pole profile of the SPEAR magnets [1] to the aperture of the ASP magnets. The magnets are to be supplied by Buckley Systems Ltd in Auckland, New Zealand.

  8. Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory. Activity report for 1988

    SciTech Connect

    Cantwell, K.

    1996-01-01

    For SSRL operations, 1988 was a year of stark contrasts. The first extended PEP parasitic running since the construction of our two beam lines on that storage ring took place in November and December. Four experiments discussed below, were performed and detailed operational procedures which allowed synchrotron radiation an high energy users to coexist were established. SSRL anticipates that there will be significant amounts of beam time when PEP is run again for high energy physics. On the other hand, activity on SPEAR consisted of brief parasitic running on the VUV lines in December when the ring was operated at 1.85 GeV for colliding beam experiments. There was no dedicated SPEAR running throughout the entire calendar year. This is the first time since dedicated SPEAR operation was initiated in 1980 that there was no such running. The decision was motivated by both cost and performance factors, as discussed in Section 1 of this report. Fortunately, SLAC and SSRL have reached an agreement on SPEAR and PEP dedicated time charges which eliminates the cost volatility which was so important in the cancellation of the June-July dedicated SPEAR run. As discussed in Section 2, the 3 GeV SPEAR injector construction is proceeding on budget and on schedule. The injector will overcome the difficulties associated with the SLC-era constraint of only two injections per day. SSR and SLAC have also embarked on a program to upgrade SPEAR to achieve high reliability and performance. As a consequence, SSRL`s users may anticipate a highly effective SPEAR by 1991, at the latest. At that time, SPEAR is expected to be fully dedicated to synchrotron radiation research and operated by SSRL. Also contained in this report is a discussion of the improvements to SSRL`s experimental facilities and highlights of the experiments of the past year.

  9. National Synchrotron Light Source II

    ScienceCinema

    Steve Dierker

    2016-07-12

    The National Synchrotron Light Source II (NSLS-II) at the U.S. Department of Energy's Brookhaven National Laboratory is a proposed new state-of-the-art medium energy storage ring designed to deliver world-leading brightness and flux with top-off operation

  10. Medical Applications of Synchrotron Radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prezado, Yolanda; Martínez-Rovira, Immaculada

    This chapter describes the state-of-art of synchrotron radiation therapies in the treatment of radioresistant tumors. The tolerance of the surrounding healthy tissue severely limits the achievement of a curative treatment for some brain tumors, like gliomas. This restriction is especially important in children, due to the high risk of complications in the development of the central nervous system. In addition, the treatment of tumors close to an organ at risk, like the spinal cord, is also restrained. One possible solution is the development of new radiotherapy techniques would exploit radically different irradiation modes, as it is the case of synchrotron radiotherapies. Their distinct features allow to modify the biological equivalent doses. In this chapter the three new approaches under development at the European Synchrotron Radiation Facility (ESRF), in Grenoble (France), will be described, namely: stereotactic synchrotron radiation therapy, microbeam radiation therapy and minibeam radiation therapy. The promising results obtained in the treatment of high grade brain tumors in preclinical studies have paved the way to the forthcoming clinical trials, currently in preparation.

  11. National Synchrotron Light Source II

    SciTech Connect

    Steve Dierker

    2008-03-12

    The National Synchrotron Light Source II (NSLS-II) at the U.S. Department of Energy's Brookhaven National Laboratory is a proposed new state-of-the-art medium energy storage ring designed to deliver world-leading brightness and flux with top-off operation

  12. Tandems as injectors for synchrotrons

    SciTech Connect

    Ruggiero, A.G.

    1992-08-01

    This is a review on the use of Tandem electrostatic accelerators for injection and filling of synchrotrons to accelerate intense beams of heavy-ions to relativistic energies. The paper emphasizes the need of operating the Tandems in pulsed mode for this application. It has been experimentally demonstrated that at the present this type of accelerators still provides the most reliable and best performance.

  13. Tandems as injectors for synchrotrons

    SciTech Connect

    Ruggiero, A.G.

    1992-01-01

    This is a review on the use of Tandem electrostatic accelerators for injection and filling of synchrotrons to accelerate intense beams of heavy-ions to relativistic energies. The paper emphasizes the need of operating the Tandems in pulsed mode for this application. It has been experimentally demonstrated that at the present this type of accelerators still provides the most reliable and best performance.

  14. Optical systems for synchrotron radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Howells, M.R.

    1985-12-01

    Various fundamental topics which underlie the design and use of optical systems for synchrotron radiation are considered from the viewpoint of linear system theory. These topics include the damped harmonic oscillator, free space propagation of an optical field, electromagnetic theory of optical properties of materials, theory of dispersion, and the Kramers-Kronig relations. 32 refs., 5 figs. (LEW)

  15. Synchrotron radiation and biomedical imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Luccio, A.

    1986-08-01

    In this lecture we describe the characteristics of Synchrotron radiation as a source of X rays. We discuss the properties of SR arc sources, wigglers, undulators and the use of backscattering of laser light. Applications to angiography, X ray microscopy and tomography are reviewed. 16 refs., 23 figs.

  16. Combined function lattices for a 6 GeV synchrotron light source

    SciTech Connect

    Vignola, G.

    1985-01-01

    Some characteristics of the ''undulator'' machine proposed a few months ago are discussed. The basic cell is an achromatic arc with three dipoles, having a vertical focusing gradient. The optical functions are shown and the main machine parameters are listed. This machine seems to have a resonable dynamic aperture and a good chromatic behavior but has period length of approx. 35 m. The reduction of the period length implies a reduction of the dynamic aperture. The results are summarized and the corresponding dynamic apertures are shown.

  17. ACCELERATING POLARIZED PROTONS TO 250 GEV

    SciTech Connect

    BAI,M.; AHRENS, L.; ALEKSEEV, I.G.; ALESSI, J.; BEEBE-WANG, J.; ET AL.

    2007-06-25

    The Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) as the first high energy polarized proton collider was designed t o provide polarized proton collisions a t a maximum beam energy of 250 GeV. I t has been providing collisions a t a beam energy of 100 Gel' since 2001. Equipped with two full Siberian snakes in each ring, polarization is preserved during the acceleration from injection to 100 GeV with careful control of the betatron tunes and the vertical orbit distortions. However, the intrinsic spin resonances beyond 100 GeV are about a factor of two stronger than those below 100 GeV? making it important t o examine the impact of these strong intrinsic spin resonances on polarization survival and the tolerance for vertical orbit distortions. Polarized protons were accelerated t o the record energy of 250 GeV in RHIC with a polarization of 46% measured a t top energy in 2006. The polarization measurement as a function of beam energy also shows some polarization loss around 136 GeV, the first strong intrinsic resonance above 100 GeV. This paper presents the results and discusses the sensitivity of the polarization survival t o orbit distortions.

  18. Dark Matter and Synchrotron Emission from Galactic Center Radio Filaments

    SciTech Connect

    Linden, Tim; Hooper, Dan; Yusef-Zadeh, Farhad

    2011-11-10

    The inner degrees of the Galactic center contain a large population of filamentary structures observed at radio frequencies. These so-called non-thermal radio filaments (NRFs) trace magnetic field lines and have attracted significant interest due to their hard (S_v ~ -0.1 +/- 0.4) synchrotron emission spectra. The origin of these filaments remains poorly understood. We show that the electrons and positrons created through the annihilations of a relatively light (~5-10 GeV) dark matter particle with the cross section predicted for a simple thermal relic can provide a compelling match to the intensity, spectral shape, and flux variation of the NRFs. Furthermore, the characteristics of the dark matter particle necessary to explain the synchrotron emission from the NRFs is consistent with those required to explain the excess gamma-ray emission observed from the Galactic center by the Fermi-LAT, as well as the direct detection signals observed by CoGeNT and DAMA/LIBRA.

  19. Arbitrary function generator for APS injector synchrotron correction magnets

    SciTech Connect

    Despe, O.D.

    1990-11-07

    The APS injector synchrotron ring measures about 368 m in circumference. In order to obtain the precision of the magnetic field required for the positron acceleration from 450 Mev to 7.7 Gev with low beam loss, eighty correction magnets are distributed around its circumference. These magnets provide the vernier field changes required for beam orbit correction during the acceleration phase of the injector synchrotron cycle. Because of mechanical imperfections in the construction, as well as installation of real dipole and multi-pole magnets, the exact field correction required at each correction magnet location is not known until a beam is actually accelerated. It is therefore essential that a means is provided to generate a correction field that is a function of the beam energy from injection until extraction for each correction magnet. The fairly large number of correction magnets in the system requires that the arbitrary function generator design be as simple as possible yet provide the required performance. An important, required performance feature is that the function can be changed or modified ``on the fly``, to provide the operator with a real-time feel during the tune up process. The arbitrary function generator described in this report satisfies these requirements.

  20. Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory activity report for 1987

    SciTech Connect

    Robinson, S.; Cantwell, K.

    1988-12-31

    During 1987, SSRL achieved many significant advances and reached several major milestones utilizing both SPEAR and PEP as synchrotron radiation sources as described in this report. Perhaps the following two are worthy of particular mention: (1) SPEAR reached an all time high of 4,190 delivered user-shifts during calendar year 1987, highlights of the many scientific results are given; (2) during a 12 day run in December of 1987, PEP was operated in a low emittance mode (calculated emittance 6.4 nanometer-radians) at 7.1 GeV with currents up to 33 mA. A second undulator beam line on PEP was commissioned during this run and used to record many spectra showing the extremely high brightness of the radiation. PEP is now by far the highest brightness synchrotron radiation source in the world. The report is divided into the following sections: (1) laboratory operations; (2) accelerator physics programs; (3) experimental facilities; (4) engineering division; (5) conferences and workshops; (6) SSRL organization; (7) experimental progress reports; (8) active proposals; (9) SSRL experiments and proposals by institution; and (10) SSRL publications.

  1. PEP as a synchrotron radiation source: Status and review

    SciTech Connect

    Paterson, J.M.

    1989-03-01

    The electron-positron collider, PEP, is a 15 GeV storage ring built and operated for high energy physics. As a synchrotron radiation source, it has some unique characteristics which give it extraordinary capabilities which are now beginning to be exploited. Two insertion device beam lines are operational, each illuminated by 2-m-long, 77-mm period undulator magnets. In parasitic operation on high energy physics runs, they provide photons above 10 KeV, with a peak brightness of 10/sup 16/ photons/(s-mm/sup 2//minus/mrad/sup 2/) within a 0.1% band width. This record brightness in this spectral range has already opened up exciting new areas of research. In tests of a low emittance mode of operation at 7.1 GeV, horizontal emittances of about 5 mm-rad were measured, which is about the same as that planned for the new third generation x-ray sources. At a current of 15 mA at 7.1 GeV, the present undulators deliver photon beams from 2.7 to 14 KeV with a peak brightness of about 10/sup 17/. Higher performance can be achieved with longer insertion devices optimized for these energies. Future operation in both parasitic mode and dedicated low emittance mode is planned; this will not only provide new physics opportunities, but the ability to advance the technology of beamline components and instrumentation will be required for the high power, high brightness beams from the third generation x-ray sources. Further performance upgrades are being studied and planned. These will be discussed in this paper along with a description of the present status and a review of PEP's capabilities and limitations. 18 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab.

  2. Medical applications of synchrotron radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomlinson, W.

    1992-08-01

    Ever since the first diagnostic X-ray was done in the United States on February 3, 1896, the application of ionizing radiation to the field of medicine has become increasingly important. Both in clinical medicine and basic research the use of X-rays for diagnostic imaging and radiotheraphy is now widespread. Radiography, angiography, CAT and PETT scanning, mammography, and nuclear medicine are all examples of technologies developed to image the human anatomy. In therapeutic applications, both external and internal sources of radiation are applied to the battle against cancer. The development of dedicated synchrotron radiation sources has allowed exciting advances to take place in many of these applications. The new sources provide tunable, high-intensity monochromatic beams over a wide range of energies which can be tailored to specific programmatc needs. This paper surveys those areas of medical research in which synchrotron radiation facilities are actively involved.

  3. Medical applications of synchrotron radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Thomlinson, W.

    1991-10-01

    Ever since the first diagnostic x-ray was done in the United States on February 3, 1896, the application of ionizing radiation to the field of medicine has become increasingly important. Both in clinical medicine and basic research the use of x-rays for diagnostic imaging and radiotherapy is now widespread. Radiography, angiography, CAT and PETT scanning, mammography, and nuclear medicine are all examples of technologies developed to image the human anatomy. In therapeutic applications, both external and internal sources of radiation are applied to the battle against cancer. The development of dedicated synchrotron radiation sources has allowed exciting advances to take place in many of these applications. The new sources provide tunable, high-intensity monochromatic beams over a wide range of energies which can be tailored to specific programmatic needs. This paper surveys those areas of medical research in which synchrotron radiation facilities are actively involved.

  4. Medical Applications of Synchrotron Radiation

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Thomlinson, W.

    1991-10-01

    Ever since the first diagnostic x-ray was done in the United States on February 3, 1896, the application of ionizing radiation to the field of medicine has become increasingly important. Both in clinical medicine and basic research the use of x-rays for diagnostic imaging and radiotherapy is now widespread. Radiography, angiography, CAT and PETT scanning, mammography, and nuclear medicine are all examples of technologies developed to image the human anatomy. In therapeutic applications, both external and internal sources of radiation are applied to the battle against cancer. The development of dedicated synchrotron radiation sources has allowed exciting advances to take place in many of these applications. The new sources provide tunable, high-intensity monochromatic beams over a wide range of energies which can be tailored to specific programmatic needs. This paper surveys those areas of medical research in which synchrotron radiation facilities are actively involved.

  5. Synchrotron Radiation in Life Sciences

    SciTech Connect

    Stojanoff, Vivian; Northrup, Paul; Pietri, Ruth; Zhong, Zhong

    2012-05-01

    Synchrotron Radiation (SR) presents itself as a “play-ground” with a large range of methods and techniques suitable to unveil the mysteries of life. Here we attempt to present a few of these methods that complement those employed in the home laboratory. SR diffraction, spectroscopy and imaging methods relevant to the atomic structure determination and characterization of the properties and function of chemical compounds and macromolecules of biological relevance, are introduced.

  6. Breast tomography with synchrotron radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pani, Silvia; Arfelli, Fulvia; Dreossi, Diego; Montanari, Francesco; Longo, Renata; Olivo, Alessandro; Poropat, Paolo; Zanconati, Fabrizio; Palma, Ludovico D.; Castelli, Edoardo

    2002-05-01

    A feasibility study of breast CT with synchrotron radiation is currently being carried on at Elettra, the Trieste synchrotron radiation facility. Breast CT cannot be implemented easily with conventional radiographic tubes, due to the high dose that would be delivered to the breast by a polychromatic X-ray spectrum. The possibility of tuning the beam energy, available at a synchrotron radiation beamline, allows a significant reduction in the delivered dose, and at the same time the use of monochromatic beams avoids beam hardening artifacts on the reconstructed image. Images of in vitro breast tissue samples have been acquired by means of a high efficiency linear array detector coupled to a VLSI single photon counting readout electronics. The pixel width, determining the pixel size of the reconstructed image, is 200 micrometers , while the pixel height, determining the CT slice thickness, is 300 micrometers . Tomograms have been reconstructed by means of standard filtered backprojection algorithms. Images of normal and pathologic breast tissue samples show a good visibility of glandular structure. The delivered dose was in all cases comparable to the one delivered in clinical planar mammography. Due to the promising results we obtained, in vivo studies are under evaluation.

  7. Infrared microspectroscopy with synchrotron radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Carr, G.L.; Williams, G.P.

    1997-09-01

    Infrared microspectroscopy with a high brightness synchrotron source can achieve a spatial resolution approaching the diffraction limit. However, in order to realize this intrinsic source brightness at the specimen location, some care must be taken in designing the optical system. Also, when operating in diffraction limited conditions, the effective spatial resolution is no longer controlled by the apertures typically used for a conventional (geometrically defined) measurement. Instead, the spatial resolution depends on the wavelength of light and the effective apertures of the microscope`s Schwarzchild objectives. The authors have modeled the optical system from the synchrotron source up to the sample location and determined the diffraction-limited spatial distribution of light. Effects due to the dependence of the synchrotron source`s numerical aperture on wavelength, as well as the difference between transmission and reflection measurement modes, are also addressed. Lastly, they examine the benefits (when using a high brightness source) of an extrinsic germanium photoconductive detector with cone optics as a replacement for the standard MCT detector.

  8. The First GeV Outburst of the Radio-loud Narrow-line Seyfert 1 Galaxy PKS 1502+036

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paliya, Vaidehi S.; Stalin, C. S.

    2016-03-01

    The γ-ray-loud narrow-line Seyfert 1 (γ-NLSy1) galaxy PKS 1502+036 (z = 0.409) exhibited its first γ-ray outburst on 2015 December 20. In the energy range of 0.1-300 GeV, the highest flux measured by the Fermi-Large Area Telescope is (3.90 ± 1.52) × 10-6 {ph} {{cm}}-2 {{{s}}}-1, which is the highest γ-ray flux ever detected from this object. The associated spectral shape is soft (Γ0.1-300 GeV = 2.57 ± 0.17) and this corresponds to an isotropic γ-ray luminosity of (1.2 ± 0.6) × 1048 erg s-1. We generate the broadband spectral energy distribution (SED) during the GeV flare and reproduce it using a one-zone leptonic emission model. The optical-UV spectrum can be explained by a combination of synchrotron and accretion disk emission, whereas the X-ray-to-γ-ray SED can be satisfactorily reproduced by inverse-Compton scattering of thermal photons that originated from the torus. The derived SED parameters hint that the increase in the bulk Lorentz factor is a major cause of the flare and the location of the emission region is estimated as being outside the broad-line region but still inside the torus. A comparison of the GeV-flaring SED of PKS 1502+036 with that of two other γ-NLSy1 galaxies, namely, 1H 0323+342 (z = 0.061) and PMN J0948+0022 (z = 0.585), and also with flat spectrum radio quasar (FSRQ) 3C 279 (z = 0.536), has led to the conclusion that the GeV-flaring SEDs of γ-NLSy1 galaxies resemble FSRQs and a major fraction of their bolometric luminosities are emitted at γ-ray energies.

  9. Instabilities related with RF cavity in the booster synchrotron for NSLS-II

    SciTech Connect

    Kawashima, Y.; Cupolo, J.; Ma, H.; Oliva, J.; Rose, J.; Sikora, R.; Yeddulla, M.

    2010-12-01

    The booster synchrotron for NSLS-II accepts beam with 200 MeV from a linac and raises its energy up to 3 GeV. In order to raise beam energy up to 3 GeV, a 7-cell PETRA cavity is installed. Beam instabilities related to the cavity impedances are discussed. In particular, in order to avoid coupled-bunch instability, we consider that cooling water temperature for the cavity should be changed to shift frequencies of higher order modes (HOM) to avoid beam revolution lines. To obtain the relation between the temperature dependence of amount of frequency shift in each HOM and cavity body temperature, we carried out the measurement by changing cavity body temperature. From the measurement data, we calculate the required temperature variation. We summarize the results and describe the system design.

  10. Low-Level Radio Frequency System Development for the National Synchrotron Light Source II

    SciTech Connect

    Ma,H.; Rose, J.

    2009-05-04

    The National Synchrotron Light Source-II (NSLS-II) is a new ultra-bright 3GeV 3rd generation synchrotron radiation light source. The performance goals require operation with a beam current of 500mA and a bunch current of at least 0.5mA. The position and timing specifications of the ultra-bright photon beam imposes a set of stringent requirements on the performance of radio frequency (RF) control. In addition, commissioning and staged installation of damping wigglers and insertion devices requires the flexibility of handling varying beam conditions. To meet these requirements, a digital implementation of the LLRF is chosen, and digital serial links are planned for the system integration. The first prototype of the controller front-end hardware has been built, and is currently being tested.

  11. Cosmic ray electrons, positrons and the synchrotron emission of the Galaxy: consistent analysis and implications

    SciTech Connect

    Bernardo, Giuseppe Di; Evoli, Carmelo; Gaggero, Daniele; Grasso, Dario; Maccione, Luca E-mail: carmelo.evoli@desy.de E-mail: dario.grasso@pi.infn.it

    2013-03-01

    A multichannel analysis of cosmic ray electron and positron spectra and of the diffuse synchrotron emission of the Galaxy is performed by using the DRAGON code. This study is aimed at probing the interstellar electron source spectrum down to E ∼< 1GeV and at constraining several propagation parameters. We find that above 4GeV the e{sup −} source spectrum is compatible with a power-law of index ∼ 2.5. Below 4GeV instead it must be significantly suppressed and the total lepton spectrum is dominated by secondary particles. The positron spectrum and fraction measured below a few GeV are consistently reproduced only within low reacceleration models. We also constrain the scale-height z{sub t} of the cosmic-ray distribution using three independent (and, in two cases, original) arguments, showing that values of z{sub t} ∼< 2kpc are excluded. This result may have strong implications for particle dark matter searches.

  12. Synchrotron Environmental Science-I Workshop Report.

    SciTech Connect

    1999-07-08

    Attendees of the Synchrotrons Environmental Science 1 (SES-1) workshop represented a broad spectrum of environmental science research areas and expertise in all of the current synchrotrons techniques (X-ray scattering and diffraction, X-ray absorption spectroscopy, and two- and three-dimensional X-ray imaging). These individuals came together to discuss current measurement obstacles in environmental research and, more specifically, ways to overcome such obstacles by applying synchrotrons radiation techniques. Significant obstacles in measurement affect virtually all of the research issues described. Attendees identified synchrotrons approaches of potential value in their research. A number of the environmental research studies discussed are currently being addressed with some success by synchrotron-based approaches. Nevertheless, improvements in low-Z measurement capabilities are needed to facilitate the use of synchrotrons radiation methodologies in environmental research.

  13. Scaling behavior of circular colliders dominated by synchrotron radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Talman, Richard

    2015-08-01

    The scaling formulas in this paper — many of which involve approximation — apply primarily to electron colliders like CEPC or FCC-ee. The more abstract “radiation dominated” phrase in the title is intended to encourage use of the formulas — though admittedly less precisely — to proton colliders like SPPC, for which synchrotron radiation begins to dominate the design in spite of the large proton mass. Optimizing a facility having an electron-positron Higgs factory, followed decades later by a p, p collider in the same tunnel, is a formidable task. The CEPC design study constitutes an initial “constrained parameter” collider design. Here the constrained parameters include tunnel circumference, cell lengths, phase advance per cell, etc. This approach is valuable, if the constrained parameters are self-consistent and close to optimal. Jumping directly to detailed design makes it possible to develop reliable, objective cost estimates on a rapid time scale. A scaling law formulation is intended to contribute to a “ground-up” stage in the design of future circular colliders. In this more abstract approach, scaling formulas can be used to investigate ways in which the design can be better optimized. Equally important, by solving the lattice matching equations in closed form, as contrasted with running computer programs such as MAD, one can obtain better intuition concerning the fundamental parametric dependencies. The ground-up approach is made especially appropriate by the seemingly impossible task of simultaneous optimization of tunnel circumference for both electrons and protons. The fact that both colliders will be radiation dominated actually simplifies the simultaneous optimization task. All GeV scale electron accelerators are “synchrotron radiation dominated”, meaning that all beam distributions evolve within a fraction of a second to an equilibrium state in which “heating” due to radiation fluctuations is canceled by the “cooling” in

  14. National Synchrotron Light Source 2008 Activity Report

    SciTech Connect

    Nasta,K.

    2009-05-01

    Funded by the U.S. Department of Energy's Office of Basic Energy Sciences, the National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS) is a national user facility that operates two electron storage rings: X-Ray (2.8 GeV, 300 mA) and Vacuum Ultraviolet (VUV) (800 mev, 1.0A). These two rings provide intense light spanning the electromagnetic spectrum -- from very long infrared rays to ultraviolet light and super-short x-rays -- to analyze very small or highly dilute samples. The properties of this light, and the specially designed experimental stations, called beamlines, allow scientists in many diverse disciplines of research to perform experiments not possible at their own laboratories. Each year, about 2,200 scientists from more than 400 universities and companies use the NSLS for research in such diverse fields as biology, physics, chemistry, geology, medicine, and environmental and materials sciences. For example, researchers have used the NSLS to examine the minute details of computer chips, decipher the structures of viruses, probe the density of bone, determine the chemical composition of moon rocks, and reveal countless other mysteries of science. The facility has 65 operating beamlines, with 51 beamlines on the X-Ray Ring and 14 beamlines on the VUV-Infrared Ring. It runs seven days a week, 24 hours a day throughout the year, except during periods of maintenance and studies. Researchers are not charged for beam time, provided that the research results are published in open literature. Proprietary research is conducted on a full-cost-recovery basis. With close to 1,000 publications per year, the NSLS is one of the most prolific scientific facilities in the world. Among the many accolades given to its users and staff, the NSLS has won nine R&D 100 Awards for innovations ranging from a closed orbit feedback system to the first device able to focus a large spread of high-energy x-rays. In addition, a visiting NSLS researcher shared the 2003 Nobel Prize in Chemistry for work

  15. Barrier rf systems in synchrotrons

    SciTech Connect

    Chandra M. Bhat

    2004-06-28

    Recently, many interesting applications of the barrier RF system in hadron synchrotrons have been realized. A remarkable example of this is the development of longitudinal momentum mining and implementation at the Fermilab Recycler for extraction of low emittance pbars for the Tevatron shots. At Fermilab, we have barrier RF systems in four different rings. In the case of Recycler Ring, all of the rf manipulations are carried out using a barrier RF system. Here, the author reviews various uses of barrier rf systems in particle accelerators including some new schemes for producing intense proton beam and possible new applications.

  16. GeV electron microtron design report

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jackson, H. E.

    1982-05-01

    Rising interest in the nuclear physics community in a GeV CW electron accelerator reflects the growing importance of high resolution short-range nuclear physics to future advances in the field. Major current problems are reviewed and the details of prospective measurements which could be made with a GeV CW electron facility are discussed, together with their impact on an understanding of nuclear forces and the structure of nuclear matter. The microtron accelerator was chosen as the technology to generate the electron beams required for the research discussed because of the advantages of superior beam quality, low capital and operating cost and capability of furnishing beams of several energies and intensities simultaneously. A complete technical description of the conceptual design for a 2 GeV double-sided CW electron microtron is presented. The accelerator can furnish three beams with independently controlled energy and intensity.

  17. Computed tomography using synchrotron radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, A.C.; Llacer, J.; Finman, L.C.; Hughes, E.B.; Otis, J.N.; Wilson, S.; Zeman, H.D.

    1983-09-01

    X-ray computed tomography (CT) is a widely used method of obtaining cross-sectional views of objects. The high intensity, natural collimation, monochromaticity and energy tunability of synchrotron x-ray sources could potentially be used to provide CT images of improved quality. The advantages of these systems would be that images could be produced more rapidly with better spatial resolution and reduced beam artifacts. In addition, images, in some cases, could be acquired with elemental sensitivity. As a demonstration of the capability of such a system, CT images were obtained of four slices of an excised pig heart in which the arteries and the cardiac chambers were filled with an iodinated medium. Images were taken with incident x-rays tuned successively to energies just above and below the iodine K edge. Iodine specific images were obtained by logarithmically subtracting the low energy image data from the high energy data and then reconstructing the image. CT imaging using synchrotron radiation may become a convenient and non-destructive method of imaging samples difficult to study by other methods.

  18. Estimation of effective dose caused by stray radiations of photons, electrons and positrons around a small storage ring for a synchrotron radiation facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takashima, Y.; Oki, S.; Sugiyama, H.; Kobayakawa, H.

    2005-10-01

    The spatial distribution of the effective dose of photons, electrons and positrons caused by beam loss around a small electron storage ring in a synchrotron radiation source is calculated. We propose a simple formula applicable to calculate the effective dose for storage rings for beam energies ranging from 200 MeV to 5 GeV. The formula is derived from Monte Carlo calculations of radiation flux using the simulation code EGS4. We apply the formula to estimate the effective dose distribution in a small synchrotron radiation facility planned by the Nagoya University.

  19. GeV electron beams from a cm-scale accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Leemans, W.P.; Nagler, B.; Gonsalves, A.J.; Toth, C.; Nakamura,K.; Geddes, C.G.R.; Esarey, E.B.; Schroeder, C.; Hooker, S.M.

    2006-05-04

    GeV electron accelerators are essential to synchrotron radiation facilities and free electron lasers, and as modules for high-energy particle physics. Radio frequency based accelerators are limited to relatively low accelerating fields (10-50 MV/m) and hence require tens to hundreds of meters to reach the multi-GeV beam energies needed to drive radiation sources, and many kilometers to generate particle energies of interest to the frontiers of high-energy physics.Laser wakefield accelerators (LWFA) in which particles are accelerated by the field of a plasma wave driven by an intense laser pulse produce electric fields several orders of magnitude stronger (10-100 GV/m) and so offer the potential of very compact devices. However, until now it has not been possible to maintain the required laser intensity, and hence acceleration, over the several centimeters needed to reach GeV energies.For this reason laser-driven accelerators have to date been limited to the 100 MeV scale. Contrary to predictions that PW-class lasers would be needed to reach GeV energies, here we demonstrate production of a high-quality electron beam with 1 GeV energy by channeling a 40 TW peak power laser pulse in a 3.3 cm long gas-filled capillary discharge waveguide. We anticipate that laser-plasma accelerators based on capillary discharge waveguides will have a major impact on the development of future femtosecond radiation sources such as x-ray free electron lasers and become a standard building block for next generation high-energy accelerators.

  20. On the origin of GeV emission in gamma-ray bursts

    SciTech Connect

    Beloborodov, Andrei M.; Hascoët, Romain; Vurm, Indrek

    2014-06-10

    The most common progenitors of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) are massive stars with strong stellar winds. We show that the GRB blast wave in the wind should emit a bright GeV flash. It is produced by inverse-Compton cooling of the thermal plasma behind the forward shock. The main part of the flash is shaped by scattering of the prompt MeV radiation (emitted at smaller radii) which streams through the external blast wave. The inverse-Compton flash is bright due to the huge e {sup ±} enrichment of the external medium by the prompt radiation ahead of the blast wave. At late times, the blast wave switches to normal synchrotron-self-Compton cooling. The mechanism is demonstrated by a detailed transfer simulation. The observed prompt MeV radiation is taken as an input of the simulation; we use GRB 080916C as an example. The result reproduces the GeV flash observed by the Fermi telescope. It explains the delayed onset, the steep rise, the peak flux, the time of the peak, the long smooth decline, and the spectral slope of GeV emission. The wind density required to reproduce all these features is typical of Wolf-Rayet stars. Our simulation predicts strong TeV emission 1 minute after the burst trigger; then a cutoff in the observed high-energy spectrum is expected from absorption by extragalactic background light. In addition, a bright optical counterpart of the GeV flash is predicted for plausible values of the magnetic field; such a double (optical+GeV) flash has been observed in GRB 130427A.

  1. Mars14 Monte Carlo simulation for the shielding studies of the J-PARC 3 GeV ring.

    PubMed

    Nakao, Noriaki; Mokhov, Nikolai; Yamamoto, Kazami; Irie, Yoshiro; Drozhdin, Alexander

    2005-01-01

    MARS14 Monte Carlo simulations were performed for collimation and shielding studies of the J-PARC 3 GeV synchrotron ring. The beam line module locations in the 348.3 m ring and the curved tunnel sections were described by the 'MAD-MARS beam line builder' tool. A 400 MeV proton beam loss distribution, calculated with the STRUCT code, was used as a 4 kW source term in the collimator region, with 1 kW source terms in the injection and extraction regions at 400 MeV and 3 GeV, respectively. Deep penetration calculations were carried out with good statistics using a newly developed three-dimensional multi-layer technique. Prompt dose-rate distributions were calculated inside and outside the concrete and soil shield up to the ground level. Using the calculation results obtained thus, an effective shielding design was made.

  2. Workshop on detectors for synchrotron radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Robinson, Arthur L.

    2000-11-22

    Forefront experiments in many scientific areas for which synchrotron sources provide sufficient flux are nonetheless hindered because detectors cannot collect data fast enough, do not cover sufficiently solid angle, or do no have adequate resolution. Overall, the synchrotron facilities, each of which represents collective investments from funding agencies and user institutions ranging from many hundreds of millions to more than a billion dollars, are effectively significantly underutilized. While this chronic and growing problem plagues facilities around the world, it is particularly acute in the United States, where detector research often has to ride on the coat tails of explicitly science-oriented projects. As a first step toward moving out of this predicament, scientists from the U.S. synchrotron facilities held a national workshop in Washington, DC, on October 30-31, 2000. The Workshop on Detectors for Synchrotron Research aimed to create a national ''roadmap'' for development of synchrotron-radiation detectors.

  3. trans-1,2-Dichloroethylene

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    trans - 1,2 - Dichloroethylene ; CASRN 156 - 60 - 5 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for No

  4. 1,2,4-Tribromobenzene

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    1,2,4 - Tribromobenzene ; CASRN 615 - 54 - 3 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for Noncarcin

  5. 1,1,2-Trichloropropane

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    1,1,2 - Trichloropropane ; CASRN 598 - 77 - 6 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for Noncarci

  6. 1,2,3-Trichloropropane

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    1,2,3 - Trichloropropane ; CASRN 96 - 18 - 4 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in IRIS only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data by U.S . EPA health scientists from several program offices , regional offices , and the Office of Research and Development

  7. cis-1,2-Dichloroethylene

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    cis - 1,2 - Dichloroethylene ; CASRN 156 - 59 - 2 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for Nonc

  8. 1,1,2-Trichloroethane

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    1,1,2 - Trichloroethane ; CASRN 79 - 00 - 5 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for Noncarcino

  9. 1,2,4-Trichlorobenzene

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    1,2,4 - Trichlorobenzene ; CASRN 120 - 82 - 1 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for Noncarci

  10. 1,2-Epoxybutane (EBU)

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    1,2 - Epoxybutane ( EBU ) ; CASRN 106 - 88 - 7 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for Noncarc

  11. DEVELOPMENTS IN SYNCHROTRON X-RAY COMPUTED MICROTOMOGRAPHY AT THE NATIONAL SYNCHROTRON LIGHT SOURCE.

    SciTech Connect

    DOWD,B.A.

    1999-07-23

    Last year, the X27A beamline at the National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS) became dedicated solely to X-Ray Computed Microtomography (XCMT). This is a third-generation instrument capable of producing tomographic volumes of 1-2 micron resolution over a 2-3mm field of view. Recent enhancements will be discussed. These have focused on two issues: the desire for real-time data acquisition and processing and the need for highly monochromatic beam (.1 % energy bandpass). The latter will permit k-edge subtraction studies and will provide improved image contrast from below the Cr (6 keV) up to the Cs (36 keV) k-edge. A range of applications that benefit from these improvements will be discussed as well. These two goals are somewhat counterproductive, however; higher monochromaticity yields a lower flux forcing longer data acquisition times. To balance the two, a more efficient scintillator for X-ray conversion is being developed. Some testing of a prototype scintillator has been performed; preliminary results will be presented here. In the meantime, data reconstruction times have been reduced, and the entire tomographic acquisition, reconstruction and volume rendering process streamlined to make efficient use of synchrotron beam time. A Fast Filtered Back Transform (FFBT) reconstruction program recently developed helped to reduce the time to reconstruct a volume of 150 x 150 x 250 pixels{sup 3} (over 5 million voxels) from the raw camera data to 1.5 minutes on a dual R10,000 CPU. With these improvements, one can now obtain a ''quick look'' of a small tomographic volume ({approximately}10{sup 6}voxels) in just over 15 minutes from the start of data acquisition.

  12. Synchrotron Self-Compton Emission from the Crab and Other Pulsars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harding, Alice K.; Kalapotharakos, Konstantinos

    2015-01-01

    Results of a simulation of synchrotron-self Compton (SSC) emission from a rotation-powered pulsar are presented. The radiating particles are assumed to be both accelerated primary electrons and a spectrum of electron-positron pairs produced in cascades near the polar cap. They follow trajectories in a slot gap using 3D force-free magnetic field geometry, gaining pitch angles through resonant cyclotron absorption of radio photons, radiating and scattering synchrotron emission at high altitudes out to and beyond the light cylinder. Full angular dependence of the synchrotron photon density is simulated in the scattering and all processes are treated in the inertial observer frame. Spectra for the Crab and Vela pulsars as well as two energetic millisecond pulsars, B1821-24 and B1937+21 are simulated using this model. The simulation of the Crab pulsar radiation can reproduce both the flux level and the shape of the observed optical to hard X-ray emission assuming a pair multiplicity of M+ = 3x10(exp 5), as well as the very-high- energy emission above 50 GeV detected by MAGIC and VERITAS, with both the synchrotron and SSC components reflecting the shape of the pair spectrum. Simulations of Vela, B1821-24 and B1937+21, for M+ up to 10(exp 5), do not produce pair SSC emission that is detectable by current telescopes, indicating that only Crab-like pulsars produce significant SSC components. The pair synchrotron emission matches the observed X-ray spectrum of the millisecond pulsars and the predicted peak of this emission at 1-10 MeV would be detectable with planned Compton telescopes.

  13. SESAME-A 3rd Generation Synchrotron Light Source for the Middle East

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winick, Herman

    2010-02-01

    Developed under the auspices of UNESCO and modeled on CERN, SESAME (Synchrotron-light for Experimental Science and Applications in the Middle East) is an international research center in construction in Jordan. It will enable world class research by scientists from the region, reversing the brain drain. It will also build bridges between diverse societies, contributing to a culture of peace through international cooperation in science. The centerpiece is a synchrotron light source originating from BESSY I, a gift by Germany. The upgraded machine, a 2.5 GeV 3rd Generation Light Source (133m circumference, 26nm-rad emittance and 12 places for insertion devices), will provide light from infra-red to hard X-rays, offering excellent opportunities to train local scientists and attract those working abroad to return. The SESAME Council meets twice each year and presently has nine Members (Bahrain, Cyprus, Egypt, Iran, Israel, Jordan, Pakistan, Palestinian Authority, Turkey). Members have responsibility for the project and provide the annual operations budget (1.5M US dollars in 2009, expected to rise to about 5M when operation starts in 2012-13). Jordan provided the site, building, and infrastructure. A staff of 20 is installing the 0.8 GeV BESSY I injection system. The facility will have the capacity to serve 30 or more experiments operating simultaneously. See www.sesame.org.jo )

  14. a Study of the Energy Dependence of Certain Single Particle Inclusive Cross Sections at Beam Momenta Between 4 and 20 Gev/c.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Featherston, Gary Dale

    An experiment to measure the energy dependence of hadronic single particle inclusive processes a + b ( --->) c + X, X = all additional secondaries, using a magnetic, single-arm, multiwire proportional chamber spectrometer is described. Cross sections integrated over secondary momenta between 300 MeV/c and 600 MeV/c and laboratory production angles in (DELTA)(theta) = 62 - 3.2/p 3(DEGREES) are presented from reactions initiated by projectiles a = (pi)('(+OR-)), K('(+OR-)), p, and p. Proton fragment secondaries detected and identified include c = (pi)('(+OR -)), K('+), and p. Data at projectile (beam) momenta 4, 6, 8, 10, 12, 15, and 20 GeV/c were acquired at the Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) Alternating Gradient Synchrotron. Within the BNL regime, pion and kaon inclusive production data are found consistent with the form A + Bs('- 1/2), s = (p(,a) + p(,b))('2), suggested by A. H. Mueller's extension of the optical theorem and application of a simple Regge pole model to inclusive processes. Cross sections for proton production are resonant at beam momentum 6 GeV/c, making application of the Regge-Mueller phenomenology inapplicable at BNL energies. Cross sections for p + p (--->) (pi)('(+OR-)) + X rise as energy increases, suggesting study of scaling variables other than s('- 1/2). Data on these reactions produced at the ISR by Capiluppi et al., with s(' 1/2) = 23.3 GeV, fall below the fits to A + Bs('- 1/2), when integrated over the acceptance employed in this dissertation. Thus, asymptotic cross section values A deduced from BNL data employing the linear (energy)('-1) dependence above are inaccurate for reactions with B (NOT=) 0. Ratios of asymptotic energy inclusive cross sections deduced using A + Bs('- 1/2) do not agree with 200 GeV/c total cross section ratios, in general. If the ISR data are used as estimates of the asymptotic limits of proton -induced inclusive pion production, it is found that. (DIAGRAM, TABLE OR GRAPHIC OMITTED...PLEASE SEE DAI

  15. High heat load synchrotron optics

    SciTech Connect

    Mills, D.M.

    1992-08-01

    Third generation synchrotron radiation sources currently being constructed worldwide will produce x-ray beams of unparalleled power and power density these high heat fluxes coupled with the stringent dimensional requirements of the x-ray optical components pose a prodigious challenge to designers of x-ray optical elements, specifically x-ray mirrors and crystal monochromators. Although certain established techniques for the cooling of high heat flux components can be directly applied to this problem, the thermal management of high heat load x-ray optical components has several unusual aspects that may ultimately lead to unique solutions. This manuscript attempts to summarize the various approaches currently being applied to this undertaking and to point out the areas of research that require further development.

  16. Synchrotron radiation and industrial research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Townsend, Rodney P.

    1995-05-01

    Fundamental studies on the properties of many different materials are of prime importance to most industrial concerns. For Unilever, solids (crystalline and amorphous), soft solids and complex fluids are the materials of primary interest. Synchrotron radiation has proved of great value for the analysis of a variety of such materials, because the intense and highly collimated radiation source has enabled us to obtain structural information rapidly as well as in time-resolved mode. In this paper are outlined the types of materials problems faced, and how we use different techniques to elucidate structure (both short and long range order) in zeolites, amorphous solids, as well as in biomaterials such as skin and hair containing lipid phases. Both equilibrium and time-resolved studies are described.

  17. The Brazilian Synchrotron Light Source

    SciTech Connect

    Brum, J. A.; Tavares, P. F.

    2007-01-19

    The Brazilian Synchrotron Light Laboratory has been operating the only light source in the southern hemisphere since July 1997. During this period, approximately 28000 hours of beam time were delivered reaching more than 1000 users per year from all over Brazil as well as from 10 other countries. In this paper, we briefly recall the history of the project and describe the present configuration of the machine and associated instrumentation, focusing on improvements and upgrades of the various light source subsystems and beamlines implemented in recent years. Finally, we report on the use of the facility by the national and international scientific communities, its impact on the scientific and technological scene in Brazil and present perspectives for future improvements of the machine.

  18. SESAME - A 3rd Generation Synchrotron Light Source for the Middle East

    SciTech Connect

    Ulkue, Dincer; Rahighi, Javad; Winick, Herman

    2007-01-19

    SESAME (Synchrotron-light for Experimental Science and Applications in the Middle East) will be the Middle East's first international research center. It is a cooperative venture by the scientists and governments of the region with founding members Bahrain, Egypt, Israel, Jordan, Pakistan, Palestine Authority, and Turkey. Iran is in the process of finalizing its formal membership. Other countries (Cyprus, Morocco, and the United Arab Emirates) are also expected to join. The permanent Council of member states has full responsibility for the project. Members provide the annual operating budget. Observer countries are Germany, Greece, Italy, Kuwait, Portugal, Russian Federation, Sweden, the UK, and the US. SESAME is being developed under the umbrella of UNESCO. Jordan was selected as the building site. SESAME will offer excellent opportunities for training of Middle East scientists and attract those working abroad to consider returning. SESAME will be a 2.5GeV 3rd Generation light source (emittance 26nm-rad, circumference {approx}133m), providing excellent performance for structural molecular biology, molecular environmental science, surface and interface science, microelectromechanical devices, x-ray imaging, archaeological microanalysis, and materials characterization. It will cover a broad spectral range from the infrared to hard x-rays and will have 12 straight sections for insertion devices (average length 2.75m). The injector will be the BESSY I 0.8 GeV booster synchrotron which has been given as a gift from Germany. Four committees advise the Council and assist in developing the technical design, beam lines, user community, and scientific Program. The SESAME building, now in construction with funds and a site provided by Jordan, is scheduled for completion in late 2006 after which the BESSY I injector will be installed. First stored beam in the new 2.5 GeV ring is planned for 2009 with six initial beamlines planned. Some beamlines will be built by member

  19. Report of the Synchrotron Radiation Vacuum Workshop

    SciTech Connect

    Avery, R.T.

    1984-06-01

    The Synchrotron Radiation Vacuum Workshop was held to consider two vacuum-related problems that bear on the design of storage rings and beam lines for synchrotron radiation facilities. These problems are gas desorption from the vacuum chamber walls and carbon deposition on optical components. Participants surveyed existing knowledge on these topics and recommended studies that should be performed as soon as possible to provide more definitive experimental data on these topics. This data will permit optimization of the final design of the Advanced Light Source (ALS) and its associated beam lines. It also should prove useful for other synchrotron radiation facilities as well.

  20. Synchrotron radiation as an infrared source.

    PubMed

    Stevenson, J R; Ellis, H; Bartlett, R

    1973-12-01

    The increasing availability of synchrotron radiation sources in a number of geographical regions of the world has motivated an evaluation of the radiation from electron accelerators and storage rings as a possible source for ir spectroscopy. As synchrotron radiation can be analytically described, a direct comparison is made with blackbody radiation for typical solid state spectroscopy. Both existing and proposed synchrotron radiation sources are found to be attractive in the ir. The ultrahigh vacuum environment of the source is compatible with clean surface investigations, the analytical description of the radiation is appropriate for calibration studies, and the continuous nature is suitable for Fourier spectroscopy or whenever a white light source is desirable.

  1. Users program for storage-ring based FEL and synchrotron sources of the Duke FEL Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Straub, K.D.; Barnett, G.; Burnham, B.

    1995-12-31

    The storage ring at the Duke FEL Laboratory was first operated with a stored e-beam in November, 1994. It has now achieved operation energies in excess 1 GeV with more than 100 mA current at 280 MeV. The ring has several ports for FEL and synchrotron light source research. The circulating ring current can be synchronized with the seperate Mark III FEL operating in the 2-9.5 {mu}m IR region. This allows low optical jitter (10-20 ps) between the two sources and thus pump-probe operation. The ring has been configured to drive a number of light sources including the OK-4 FEL system capable of FEL operation between 400 and 65 nm, an inverse Compton scattering source using this undulator which will yield 4-200 MeV gammas, an undulator source at approximately 40 {angstrom} (not an FEL), a mm FEL with inverse compton scattering providing 1-100 keV x-rays and two synchrotron ports from the bend magnets for which the {lambda}{sub c} = 11-12 {angstrom} for 1 GeV. The broadly tunable FEL sources and their associated inverse compton scattering are extremely bright. The initial research proposals, submitted to the Laboratory emphasizes photoelectron spectroscopy, PEEM, high resolution vacuum UV of gases, solid spectroscopy and photochemistry in the UV, X-ray microprobe studies, X-ray microscopy, X-ray holography, X-ray crystallography, Mossbauer spectroscopy, nuclear spectroscopy, neutron production, photon activation therapy and broadband synchrotron as a probe of fast reaction in the IR and near IR.

  2. Near-field imaging of optical diffraction radiation generated by 7-GeV electron beam

    SciTech Connect

    Lumpkin, A.H.; Berg, W.J.; Sereno, N.S.; Rule, D.W.; Yao, C.-Y.; Accelerator Systems Division; Carderock Division, NSWC

    2007-01-01

    We report the first unambiguous demonstration of near-field imaging of optical diffraction radiation (ODR). The source of the ODR was an aluminum metal reflective surface with a 7-GeV electron beam passing nearby its single edge. Because of the high Lorentz factor {gamma} involved, appreciable ODR is emitted at visible wavelengths even for impact parameters of 1 to 2 mm, so standard imaging techniques were employed. The experimental results are compared to a simple near-field model. We show that the ODR signals are sensitive to both beam size and position. Applications to multi-GeV beams in transport lines in the major synchrotron radiation facilities, x-ray free-electron lasers, energy recovering linacs, and the International Linear Collider are possible.

  3. Annex to 7-GeV Advanced Photon Source Conceptual Design Report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1988-05-01

    The Annex to the 7-GeV Advanced Photon Source Conceptual Design Report updates the Conceptual Design Report of 1987 (CDR-87) to include the results of further optimization and changes of the design during the past year. The design changes can be summarized as affecting three areas: the accelerator system, conventional facilities, and experimental systems. Most of the changes in the accelerator system result from inclusion of a positron accumulator ring (PAR), which was added at the suggestion of the 1987 DOE Review Committee, to speed up the filling rate of the storage ring. The addition of the PAR necessitates many minor changes in the linac system, the injector synchrotron, and the low-energy beam transport lines. 63 figs., 18 tabs.

  4. Search for GeV γ-Ray Pair Halos Around Low Redshift Blazars.

    PubMed

    Chen, Wenlei; Buckley, James H; Ferrer, Francesc

    2015-11-20

    We report on the results of a search for γ-ray pair halos with a stacking analysis of low redshift blazars using data from the Fermi Large Area Telescope. For this analysis we used a number of a priori selection criteria, including the spatial and spectral properties of the Fermi sources. The angular distribution of ~1 GeV photons around 24 stacked isolated high-synchrotron-peaked BL Lacs with redshift z<0.5 shows an excess over that of pointlike sources. A frequentist test yields a p value of p~0.01 for the extended emission against the point-source hypothesis. A Bayesian estimation provides Bayes factors log_{10}B_{10}>2, consistent with expectations for pair halos produced in the intergalactic magnetic fields with strength B_{IGMF}~10^{-17}-10^{-15} G. PMID:26636838

  5. Polarized 3He+2 ions in the Alternate Gradient Synchrotron to RHIC transfer line

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsoupas, N.; Huang, H.; Méot, F.; Ptitsyn, V.; Roser, T.; Trbojevic, D.

    2016-09-01

    The proposed electron-hadron collider (eRHIC) to be built at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) will allow the collisions of 20 GeV polarized electrons with 250 GeV polarized protons, or 100 GeV /n polarized 3He+2 ions, or other unpolarized ion species. The large value of the anomalous magnetic moment of the 3He nucleus GHe=(g -2 )/2 =-4.184 (where g is the g -factor of the 3He nuclear spin) combined with the peculiar layout of the transfer line which transports the beam bunches from the Alternate Gradient Synchrotron (AGS) to the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) makes the transfer and injection of polarized 3He ions from AGS to RHIC (AtR) a special case as we explain in the paper. Specifically in this paper we calculate the stable spin direction of a polarized 3He beam at the exit of the AtR line which is also the injection point of RHIC, and we discuss a simple modifications of the AtR beam-transfer-line, to perfectly match the stable spin direction of the injected polarized 3He beam to that of the circulating beam, at the injection point of RHIC.

  6. A Lattice for a Hybrid Fast-Ramping Muon Accelerator to 750 GeV

    SciTech Connect

    Garren, A.A.; Berg, J.

    2011-09-06

    We describe a lattice for accelerating muons from 375 GeV to 750 GeV. The lattice is a fast-ramping synchrotron with a mixture of fixed-field superconducting dipoles and warm dipoles, so as to have a high average bending field while still being able to rapidly change the average bending field as the beam momentum increases. For a 1.5 TeV center of mass muon collider, muons must be rapidly accelerated to 750 GeV. To accomplish this efficiently, we wish to make as many passes through the RF cavities as possible, while keeping the average RF gradients sufficiently high to avoid excess muon decays. A synchrotron where the magnets are very rapidly ramped has been envisioned as one option to accomplish this. The entire acceleration cycle takes place in less than 1 ms, presenting a technological challenge for the magnets. Clearly superconducting magnets cannot be ramped on this time scale, so instead room-temperature magnets will be ramped. To keep losses low, dipoles can use grain-oriented silicon steel, but quadrupoles will probably need to use more conventional steel, giving a lower maximum field for these high ramping rates. If we want to have a large average RF gradient and simultaneously make a large number of passes through the RF cavities, the average bending field must be high. To achieve such a large bending field while rapidly ramping magnets, it has been proposed to use a hybrid lattice consisting of interleaved superconducting dipoles and bipolar ramped dipoles. Due to the large single-bunch current and the relatively small apertures we desire (both because we would like to use high-frequency RF, and because power requirements and heating will be more reasonable for smaller aperture ramped magnets), collective effects are expected to be very significant. To reduce their effects, we propose to have strong synchrotron oscillations (a synchrotron tune of over 1). To have such a high synchrotron tune, a large number of superperiods are needed. Putting together

  7. Nuclear dynamical diffraction using synchrotron radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, D.E.

    1993-05-01

    The scattering of synchrotron radiation by nuclei is extensively explored in this thesis. From the multipole electric field expansion resulting from time-dependent nonrelativistic perturbation theory, a dynamical scattering theory is constructed. This theory is shown, in the many particle limit, to be equivalent to the semi-classical approach where a quantum mechanical scattering amplitude is used in the Maxwell inhomogeneous wave equation. The Moessbauer specimen whose low-lying energy levels were probed is a ferromagnetic lattice of {sup 57}Fe embedded in a yttrium iron garnet (YIG) crystal matrix. The hyperfine fields in YIG thin films were studied at low and room temperature using time-resolved quantum beat spectroscopy. Nuclear hyperfine structure quantum beats were measured using a fast plastic scintillator coincidence photodetector and associated electronics having a time resolution of 2.5 nsec. The variation of the quantum beat patterns near the Bragg [0 0 2] diffraction peak gave a Lamb-Moessbauer factor of 8.2{plus_minus}0.4. Exploring characteristic dynamical features in the higher order YIG [0 0 10] reflection revealed that one of the YIG crystals had bifurcated into two different layers. The dynamics of nuclear superradiance was explored. This phenomenon includes the radiative speedup exhibited by a collective state of particles, and, in striking concurrence, resonance frequency shifts. A speedup of a factor of 4 in the total decay rate and a beat frequency shift of 1{1/2} natural resonance linewidths were observed. Nuclear resonance scattering was also found to be a useful way of performing angular interferometry experiments, and it was used to observe the phase shift of a rotated quantum state. On the whole, nuclear dynamical diffraction theory has superbly explained many of the fascinating features of resonant magnetic dipole radiation scattered by a lattice of nuclei.

  8. Meson Spectroscopy At Jlab At 12 Gev

    SciTech Connect

    Fegan, Stuart

    2014-12-01

    The 12 GeV upgrade to the Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility (CEBAF) at Jefferson Lab will enable a new generation of experiments in hadronic nuclear physics, seeking to address fundamental questions in our understanding of QCD. The existence of exotic states, suggested by both quark models and lattice calculations, would allow gluonic degrees of freedom to be explored, and may help explain the role played by gluons in the QCD interaction. This article will review the meson spectroscopy program being planned at the lab following the 12 GeV upgrade, utilising real and quasi-real photon beams in two of the lab's four experimental halls, whose distinct capabilities will enable an extensive set of spectroscopy experiments to be performed at the same facility.

  9. Booster 6-GeV study

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Xi; Ankenbrandt, Charles M.; Pellico, William A.; Lackey, James; Padilla, Rene; Norem, James; /Argonne

    2005-05-01

    A wider aperture, which has been obtained along the Booster beam line recently, brings the opportunity to run beams with the intensity higher than ever before. Sooner or later, the available RF accelerating voltage will become a new limit for the beam intensity. Extra accelerating voltages can be achieved either by increasing the RFSUM or by reducing the accelerating rate via a slower acceleration, and this motivates the 6-GeV study.

  10. Booster 6-GeV study

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Xi; Ankenbrandt, Charles M.; Pellico, William A.; Lackey, James; Padilla, Rene; Norem, J.; /Argonne

    2004-12-01

    Since a wider aperture has been obtained along the Booster beam line, this opens the opportunity for Booster running a higher intensity beam than ever before. Sooner or later, the available RF accelerating voltage will become a new limit for the beam intensity. Either by increasing the RFSUM or by reducing the accelerating rate can achieve the similar goal. The motivation for the 6-GeV study is to gain the relative accelerating voltage via a slower acceleration.

  11. Molecular photoemission studies using synchrotron radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Truesdale, C.M.

    1983-04-01

    The angular distributions of photoelectrons and Auger electrons were measured by electron spectroscopy using synchrotron radiation. The experimental results are compared with theoretical calculations to interpret the electronic behavior of photoionization for molecular systems.

  12. Synchrotron radiation applications in medical research

    SciTech Connect

    Thomlinson, W.

    1997-08-01

    Over the past two decades there has been a phenomenal growth in the number of dedicated synchrotron radiation facilities and a corresponding growth in the number of applications in both basic and applied sciences. The high flux and brightness, tunable beams, time structure and polarization of synchrotron radiation provide an ideal x- ray source for many applications in the medical sciences. There is a dual aspect to the field of medical applications of synchrotron radiation. First there are the important in-vitro programs such as structural biology, x-ray microscopy, and radiation cell biology. Second there are the programs that are ultimately targeted at in-vivo applications. The present status of synchrotron coronary angiography, bronchography, multiple energy computed tomography, mammography and radiation therapy programs at laboratories around the world is reviewed.

  13. Simulation of synchrotron motion with rf noise

    SciTech Connect

    Leemann, B.T.; Forest, E.; Chattopadhyay, S.

    1986-08-01

    The theoretical formulation is described that is behind an algorithm for synchrotron phase-space tracking with rf noise and some preliminary simulation results of bunch diffusion under rf noise obtained by actual tracking.

  14. Time resolved spectroscopy using synchrotron infrared pulses

    SciTech Connect

    Carr, G.L.; Lobo, R.P.S.M. |; Hirschmugl, C.J.; LaVeigne, J.; Reitze, D.H.; Tanner, D.B.

    1997-09-01

    Electron synchrotron storage rings, such as the VUV ring at the National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS), produce short pulses of infrared (IR) radiation suitable for investigating the time-dependent phenomena in a variety of interesting experimental systems. In contrast to other pulses sources of IR, the synchrotron produces a continuum spectral output over the entire IR (and beyond), though at power levels typically below those obtained from laser systems. The infrared synchrotron radiation (IRSR) source is therefore well-suited as a probe using standard FTIR spectroscopic techniques. Here the authors describe the pump-probe spectroscopy facility being established at the NSLS and demonstrate the technique by measuring the photocarrier decay in a semiconductor.

  15. THE RAPID CYCLING MEDICAL SYNCHROTRON RCMS.

    SciTech Connect

    PEGGS,S.; BARTON,D.; BEEBE-WANG,J.; CARDONA,J.; BRENNAN,M.; FISCHER,W.; GARDNER,C.; GASSNER,D.; ET AL

    2002-06-02

    Thirteen hadron beam therapy facilities began operation between 1990 and 2001 - 5 in Europe, 4 in North America, 3 in Japan, and 1 in South Africa [l]. Ten of them irradiate tumors with protons, 2 with Carbon- 12 ions, and 1 with both protons and Carbon-12. The facility with the highest patient throughput - a total of 6 174 patients in 11 years and as many as 150 patient treatments per day -is the Loma Linda University Medical Center, which uses a weak focusing slow cycling synchrotron to accelerate beam for delivery to passive scattering nozzles at the end of rotatable gantries [2, 3,4]. The Rapid Cycling Medical Synchrotron (RCMS) is a second generation synchrotron that, by contrast with the Loma Linda synchrotron, is strong focusing and rapid cycling, with a repetition rate of 30 Hz. Primary parameters for the RCMS are listed in Table 1.

  16. National Synchrotron Light Source annual report 1988

    SciTech Connect

    Hulbert, S.; Lazarz, N.; Williams, G.

    1988-01-01

    This report discusses the experiment done at the National Synchrotron Light Source. Most experiments discussed involves the use of the x-ray beams to study physical properties of solid materials. (LSP)

  17. Simulations of synchrotron loss in hotspots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matthews, Alan P.

    Simulations of the radio emission and polarization of hot spots are presented in which synchrotron losses have been taken into account. The hot spots were modeled on the basis of simulations of an axisymetric nonrelativistic jet into which a passive, initial randomly oriented magnetic field is introduced. The magnetic field configuration is then distorted by the flow. The simulations illustrate that synchrotron loss takes its toll not only in old parts of a source, but also in regions of enhanced magnetic fields.

  18. New theoretical results in synchrotron radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bagrov, V. G.; Gitman, D. M.; Tlyachev, V. B.; Jarovoi, A. T.

    2005-11-01

    One of the remarkable features of the relativistic electron synchrotron radiation is its concentration in small angle Δ ≈ 1/γ (here γ-relativistic factor: γ = E/mc2, E energy, m electron rest mass, c light velocity) near rotation orbit plane [V.G. Bagrov, V.A. Bordovitsyn, V.G. Bulenok, V. Ya. Epp, Kinematical projection of pulsar synchrotron radiation profiles, in: Proceedings of IV ISTC Scientific Advisory Commitee Seminar on Basic Science in ISTC Aktivities, Akademgorodok, Novosibirsk, April 23 27, 2001, p. 293 300]. This theoretically predicted and experimentally confirmed feature is peculiar to total (spectrum summarized) radiating intensity. This angular distribution property has been supposed to be (at least qualitatively) conserved and for separate spectrum synchrotron radiation components. In the work of V.G. Bagrov, V.A. Bordovitsyn, V. Ch. Zhukovskii, Development of the theory of synchrotron radiation and related processes. Synchrotron source of JINR: the perspective of research, in: The Materials of the Second International Work Conference, Dubna, April 2 6, 2001, pp. 15 30 and in Angular dependence of synchrotron radiation intensity. http://lanl.arXiv.org/abs/physics/0209097, it is shown that the angular distribution of separate synchrotron radiation spectrum components demonstrates directly inverse tendency the angular distribution deconcentration relatively the orbit plane takes place with electron energy growth. The present work is devoted to detailed investigation of this situation. For exact quantitative estimation of angular concentration degree of synchrotron radiation the definition of radiation effective angle and deviation angle is proposed. For different polarization components of radiation the dependence of introduced characteristics was investigated as a functions of electron energy and number of spectrum component.

  19. Wakefields in Coherent Synchrotron Radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Billinghurst, Brant E.; Bergstrom, J. C.; Baribeau, C.; Batten, T.; Dallin, L.; May, Tim E.; Vogt, J. M.; Wurtz, Ward A.; Warnock, Robert L.; Bizzozero, D. A.; Kramer, S.; Michaelian, K. H.

    2016-06-01

    When the electron bunches in a storage ring are sufficiently short the electrons act coherently producing radiation several orders of magnitude more intense than normal synchrotron radiation. This is referred to as Coherent Syncrotron Radiation (CSR). Due to the potential of CSR to provide a good source of Terahertz radiation for our users, the Canadian Light Source (CLS) has been researching the production and application of CSR. CSR has been produced at the CLS for many years, and has been used for a number of applications. However, resonances that permeate the spectrum at wavenumber intervals of 0.074 cm-1, and are highly stable under changes in the machine setup, have hampered some experiments. Analogous resonances were predicted long ago in an idealized theory. Through experiments and further calculations we elucidate the resonance and wakefield mechanisms in the CLS vacuum chamber. The wakefield is observed directly in the 30-110 GHz range by rf diodes. These results are consistent with observations made by the interferometer in the THz range. Also discussed will be some practical examples of the application of CSR for the study of condensed phase samples using both transmission and Photoacoustic techniques.

  20. Nuclear interactions of 340-GeV pions in emulsion

    SciTech Connect

    Tufail, A.; Ahmad, S.; Khan, A.R.; Zafar, M.; Shafi, M. )

    1990-10-01

    Some results on heavy- and shower-particle multiplicities produced in interactions of 340-GeV pions in nuclear emulsion are presented and compared with similar results in proton-nucleus interactions at different energies. Values of {l angle}{ital N}{sub {ital g}}{r angle} in {pi}{sup {minus}}{ital A} interactions are found to be less than its value in {ital pA} interactions at similar energies. This is understood in terms of additive quark model. The result on mean normalized multiplicity reveals that the values of {ital R}{sub {ital A}1} are almost constant in the forward direction for all values of {l angle}{nu}({ital N}{sub {ital g}}){r angle} and {ital R}{sub {ital A}1} increases with {l angle}{nu}({ital N}{sub {ital g}}){r angle} in the intervals 1.2{lt}{eta}{le}2.0 and {eta}{le}1.2.

  1. Environmental assessment of the proposed 7-GeV Advanced Photon Source

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-02-01

    The potential environmental impacts of construction and operation of a 6- to 7-GeV synchrotron radiation source known as the 7-GeV Advanced Photon Source at Argonne National Laboratory were evaluated. Key elements considered include on- and off-site radiological effects; socioeconomic effects; and impacts to aquatic and terrestrial flora and fauna, wetlands, water and air quality, cultural resources, and threatened or endangered species. Also incorporated are the effects of decisions made as a result of the preliminary design (Title I) being prepared. Mitigation plans to further reduce impacts are being developed. These plans include coordination with the US Army Corps of Engineers (COE) and other responsible agencies to mitigate potential impacts to wetlands. This mitigation includes providing habitat of comparable ecological value to assure no net loss of wetlands. These mitigation actions would be permitted and monitored by COE. A data recovery plan to protect cultural resources has been developed and approved, pursuant to a Programmatic Agreement among the US Department of Energy, the Advisory Council on Historic Preservation, and the Illinois State Historic Preservation Office. Applications for National Emission Standard for Hazardous Air Pollutants (NESHAP) and air emissions permits have been submitted to the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and the Illinois Environmental Protection Agency (IEPA), respectively. 71 refs., 10 figs., 11 tabs.

  2. Dielectron Mass Spectra from Au +Au Collisions at √sNN =200 GeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adamczyk, L.; Adkins, J. K.; Agakishiev, G.; Aggarwal, M. M.; Ahammed, Z.; Alekseev, I.; Alford, J.; Anson, C. D.; Aparin, A.; Arkhipkin, D.; Aschenauer, E. C.; Averichev, G. S.; Banerjee, A.; Barnovska, Z.; Beavis, D. R.; Bellwied, R.; Bhasin, A.; Bhati, A. K.; Bhattarai, P.; Bichsel, H.; Bielcik, J.; Bielcikova, J.; Bland, L. C.; Bordyuzhin, I. G.; Borowski, W.; Bouchet, J.; Brandin, A. V.; Brovko, S. G.; Bültmann, S.; Bunzarov, I.; Burton, T. P.; Butterworth, J.; Caines, H.; Calderón de la Barca Sánchez, M.; Cebra, D.; Cendejas, R.; Cervantes, M. C.; Chaloupka, P.; Chang, Z.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Chen, H. F.; Chen, J. H.; Chen, L.; Cheng, J.; Cherney, M.; Chikanian, A.; Christie, W.; Chwastowski, J.; Codrington, M. J. M.; Cramer, J. G.; Crawford, H. J.; Cui, X.; Das, S.; Davila Leyva, A.; De Silva, L. C.; Debbe, R. R.; Dedovich, T. G.; Deng, J.; Derevschikov, A. A.; Derradi de Souza, R.; Dhamija, S.; di Ruzza, B.; Didenko, L.; Dilks, C.; Ding, F.; Djawotho, P.; Dong, X.; Drachenberg, J. L.; Draper, J. E.; Du, C. M.; Dunkelberger, L. E.; Dunlop, J. C.; Efimov, L. G.; Engelage, J.; Engle, K. S.; Eppley, G.; Eun, L.; Evdokimov, O.; Fatemi, R.; Fazio, S.; Fedorisin, J.; Filip, P.; Finch, E.; Fisyak, Y.; Flores, C. E.; Gagliardi, C. A.; Gangadharan, D. R.; Garand, D.; Geurts, F.; Gibson, A.; Girard, M.; Gliske, S.; Grosnick, D.; Guo, Y.; Gupta, A.; Gupta, S.; Guryn, W.; Haag, B.; Hajkova, O.; Hamed, A.; Han, L.-X.; Haque, R.; Harris, J. W.; Heppelmann, S.; Hirsch, A.; Hoffmann, G. W.; Hofman, D. J.; Horvat, S.; Huang, B.; Huang, H. Z.; Huang, X.; Huck, P.; Humanic, T. J.; Igo, G.; Jacobs, W. W.; Jang, H.; Judd, E. G.; Kabana, S.; Kalinkin, D.; Kang, K.; Kauder, K.; Ke, H. W.; Keane, D.; Kechechyan, A.; Kesich, A.; Khan, Z. H.; Kikola, D. P.; Kisel, I.; Kisiel, A.; Koetke, D. D.; Kollegger, T.; Konzer, J.; Koralt, I.; Korsch, W.; Kotchenda, L.; Kravtsov, P.; Krueger, K.; Kulakov, I.; Kumar, L.; Kycia, R. A.; Lamont, M. A. C.; Landgraf, J. M.; Landry, K. D.; Lauret, J.; Lebedev, A.; Lednicky, R.; Lee, J. H.; LeVine, M. J.; Li, C.; Li, W.; Li, X.; Li, X.; Li, Y.; Li, Z. M.; Lima, L. M.; Lisa, M. A.; Liu, F.; Ljubicic, T.; Llope, W. J.; Longacre, R. S.; Luo, X.; Ma, G. L.; Ma, Y. G.; Madagodagettige Don, D. M. M. D.; Mahapatra, D. P.; Majka, R.; Margetis, S.; Markert, C.; Masui, H.; Matis, H. S.; McDonald, D.; McShane, T. S.; Minaev, N. G.; Mioduszewski, S.; Mohanty, B.; Mondal, M. M.; Morozov, D. A.; Munhoz, M. G.; Mustafa, M. K.; Nandi, B. K.; Nasim, Md.; Nayak, T. K.; Nelson, J. M.; Nogach, L. V.; Noh, S. Y.; Novak, J.; Nurushev, S. B.; Odyniec, G.; Ogawa, A.; Oh, K.; Ohlson, A.; Okorokov, V.; Oldag, E. W.; Oliveira, R. A. N.; Pachr, M.; Page, B. S.; Pal, S. K.; Pan, Y. X.; Pandit, Y.; Panebratsev, Y.; Pawlak, T.; Pawlik, B.; Pei, H.; Perkins, C.; Peryt, W.; Pile, P.; Planinic, M.; Pluta, J.; Plyku, D.; Poljak, N.; Porter, J.; Poskanzer, A. M.; Pruthi, N. K.; Przybycien, M.; Pujahari, P. R.; Qiu, H.; Quintero, A.; Ramachandran, S.; Raniwala, R.; Raniwala, S.; Ray, R. L.; Riley, C. K.; Ritter, H. G.; Roberts, J. B.; Rogachevskiy, O. V.; Romero, J. L.; Ross, J. F.; Roy, A.; Ruan, L.; Rusnak, J.; Sahoo, N. R.; Sahu, P. K.; Sakrejda, I.; Salur, S.; Sandacz, A.; Sandweiss, J.; Sangaline, E.; Sarkar, A.; Schambach, J.; Scharenberg, R. P.; Schmah, A. M.; Schmidke, W. B.; Schmitz, N.; Seger, J.; Seyboth, P.; Shah, N.; Shahaliev, E.; Shanmuganathan, P. V.; Shao, M.; Sharma, B.; Shen, W. Q.; Shi, S. S.; Shou, Q. Y.; Sichtermann, E. P.; Singaraju, R. N.; Skoby, M. J.; Smirnov, D.; Smirnov, N.; Solanki, D.; Sorensen, P.; deSouza, U. G.; Spinka, H. M.; Srivastava, B.; Stanislaus, T. D. S.; Stevens, J. R.; Stock, R.; Strikhanov, M.; Stringfellow, B.; Suaide, A. A. P.; Sumbera, M.; Sun, X.; Sun, X. M.; Sun, Y.; Sun, Z.; Surrow, B.; Svirida, D. N.; Symons, T. J. M.; Szanto de Toledo, A.; Takahashi, J.; Tang, A. H.; Tang, Z.; Tarnowsky, T.; Thomas, J. H.; Timmins, A. R.; Tlusty, D.; Tokarev, M.; Trentalange, S.; Tribble, R. E.; Tribedy, P.; Trzeciak, B. A.; Tsai, O. D.; Turnau, J.; Ullrich, T.; Underwood, D. G.; Van Buren, G.; van Nieuwenhuizen, G.; Vanfossen, J. A.; Varma, R.; Vasconcelos, G. M. S.; Vasiliev, A. N.; Vertesi, R.; Videbæk, F.; Viyogi, Y. P.; Vokal, S.; Vossen, A.; Wada, M.; Wang, F.; Wang, G.; Wang, H.; Wang, J. S.; Wang, X. L.; Wang, Y.; Wang, Y.; Webb, G.; Webb, J. C.; Westfall, G. D.; Wieman, H.; Wissink, S. W.; Witt, R.; Wu, Y. F.; Xiao, Z.; Xie, W.; Xin, K.; Xu, H.; Xu, N.; Xu, Q. H.; Xu, Y.; Xu, Z.; Yan, W.; Yang, C.; Yang, Y.; Yang, Y.; Ye, Z.; Yepes, P.; Yi, L.; Yip, K.; Yoo, I.-K.; Zawisza, Y.; Zbroszczyk, H.; Zha, W.; Zhang, J. B.; Zhang, J. L.; Zhang, S.; Zhang, X. P.; Zhang, Y.; Zhang, Z. P.; Zhao, F.; Zhao, J.; Zhong, C.; Zhu, X.; Zhu, Y. H.; Zoulkarneeva, Y.; Zyzak, M.; STAR Collaboration

    2014-07-01

    We report the STAR measurements of dielectron (e+e-) production at midrapidity (|yee|<1) in Au +Au collisions at √sNN =200 GeV. The measurements are evaluated in different invariant mass regions with a focus on 0.30-0.76 (ρ-like), 0.76-0.80 (ω-like), and 0.98-1.05 (ϕ-like) GeV /c2. The spectrum in the ω-like and ϕ-like regions can be well described by the hadronic cocktail simulation. In the ρ-like region, however, the vacuum ρ spectral function cannot describe the shape of the dielectron excess. In this range, an enhancement of 1.77±0.11(stat)±0.24(syst)±0.33(cocktail) is determined with respect to the hadronic cocktail simulation that excludes the ρ meson. The excess yield in the ρ-like region increases with the number of collision participants faster than the ω and ϕ yields. Theoretical models with broadened ρ contributions through interactions with constituents in the hot QCD medium provide a consistent description of the dilepton mass spectra for the measurement presented here and the earlier data at the Super Proton Synchrotron energies.

  3. Parameters for a 30 GeV Undulator Test Facility in the FFTB/LCLS

    SciTech Connect

    Krejcik, Patrick

    2001-04-12

    The parameters for a 30 GeV test beam are outlined for use with an undulator in the FFTB tunnel where the LCLS will eventually be housed. It is proposed to use the SLAC linac and damping rings in their present mode of operation for PEP II injection, where 30 GeV beams are also delivered at 10 Hz to the FFTB. High peak currents are obtained with the addition of a second bunch compressor in the linac. In order to minimize the synchrotron radiation induced emittance growth in the bunch compressor it is necessary to locate the new bunch compressor at the low-energy end of the linac, just after the damping rings. The bunch compressor is a duplicate of the LCLS chicane-style bunch compressor. This test beam would provide an exciting possibility to test LCLS undulator sections and provide a unique high-brightness source of incoherent X-rays and begin developing the LCLS experimental station. The facility will also act as a much needed accelerator test bed for the production, diagnostics and tuning of very short bunches in preparation for the LCLS after the photo injector is commissioned.

  4. Search for the {theta}{sup +} via the K{sup +}p{yields}{pi}{sup +}X reaction with a 1.2 GeV/c K{sup +} beam

    SciTech Connect

    Miwa, K.; Dairaku, S.; Fujimura, H.; Funahashi, H.; Hayata, M.; Imai, K.; Kamigaito, S.; Miyabe, M.; Niiyama, M.; Saito, N.; Seki, Y.; Senzaka, K.; Shoji, K.; Nakajima, D.; Fujioka, H.; Maruta, T.; Takahashi, T. N.; Ajimura, S.; Arvieux, J.; Fukuda, T.

    2008-04-15

    The {theta}{sup +} was searched for via the K{sup +}p{yields}{pi}{sup +}X reaction using the 1.2 GeV/c K{sup +} beam at the K6 beam line of the KEK-PS 12 GeV Proton Synchrotron. In the missing mass spectrum of the K{sup +}p{yields}{pi}{sup +}X reaction, no clear peak structure was observed. Therefore a 90% C.L. upper limit of 3.5 {mu}b/sr was derived for the differential cross section averaged over 2 deg. to 22 deg. in the laboratory frame of the K{sup +}p{yields}{pi}{sup +}{theta}{sup +} reaction. This upper limit is much smaller than the theoretical calculation for the t-channel process where a K{sup 0}* is exchanged. From the present result, either the t-channel process is excluded or the coupling constant of g{sub K*N{theta}} is quite small.

  5. Channeling, Volume Reection and Gamma Emission Using 14GeV Electrons in Bent Silicon Crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Benson, Brandon

    2015-08-14

    High energy electrons can be deflected with very tight bending radius using a bent silicon crystal. This produces gamma radiation. As these crystals can be thin, a series of bent silicon crystals with alternating direction has the potential to produce coherent gamma radiation with reasonable energy of the driving electron beam. Such an electron crystal undulator offers the prospect for higher energy radiation at lower cost than current methods. Permanent magnetic undulators like LCLS at SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory are expensive and very large (about 100 m in case of the LCLS undulator). Silicon crystals are inexpensive and compact when compared to the large magnetic undulators. Additionally, such a high energy coherent light source could be used for probing through materials currently impenetrable by x-rays. In this work we present the experimental data and analysis of experiment T523 conducted at SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory. We collected the spectrum of gamma ray emission from 14 GeV electrons on a bent silicon crystal counting single photons. We also investigated the dynamics of electron motion in the crystal i.e. processes of channeling and volume reflection at 14 GeV, extending and building off previous work. Our single photon spectrum for the amorphous crystal orientation is consistent with bremsstrahlung radiation and the volume reflection crystal orientation shows a trend consistent with synchrotron radiation at a critical energy of 740 MeV. We observe that in these two cases the data are consistent, but we make no further claims because of statistical limitations. We also extended the known energy range of electron crystal dechanneling length and channeling efficiency to 14 GeV.

  6. Case for a 700+GeV WIMP: Cosmic ray spectra from PAMELA, Fermi, and ATIC

    SciTech Connect

    Cholis, Ilias; Goodenough, Lisa; Weiner, Neal; Dobler, Gregory; Finkbeiner, Douglas P.

    2009-12-15

    Multiple lines of evidence indicate an anomalous injection of high-energy e{sup +}e{sup -} in the galactic halo. The recent e{sup +} fraction spectrum from the payload for antimatter matter exploration and light-nuclei astrophysics (PAMELA) shows a sharp rise up to 100 GeV. The Fermi gamma-ray space telescope has found a significant hardening of the e{sup +}e{sup -} cosmic-ray spectrum above 100 GeV, with a break, confirmed by HESS at around 1 TeV. The advanced thin ionization calorimeter (ATIC) has also detected a similar excess, falling back to the expected spectrum at 1 TeV and above. Excess microwaves towards the galactic center in the WMAP data are consistent with hard synchrotron radiation from a population of 10-100 GeV e{sup +}e{sup -} (the WMAP 'Haze'). We argue that dark matter annihilations can provide a consistent explanation of all of these data, focusing on dominantly leptonic modes, either directly or through a new light boson. Normalizing the signal to the highest energy evidence (Fermi and HESS), we find that similar cross sections provide good fits to PAMELA and the Haze, and that both the required cross section and annihilation modes are achievable in models with Sommerfeld-enhanced annihilation. These models naturally predict significant production of gamma rays in the galactic center via a variety of mechanisms. Most notably, there is a robust inverse-Compton scattered (ICS) gamma-ray signal arising from the energetic electrons and positrons, detectable at Fermi/GLAST energies, which should provide smoking gun evidence for this production.

  7. MX1: a bending-magnet crystallography beamline serving both chemical and macromolecular crystallography communities at the Australian Synchrotron.

    PubMed

    Cowieson, Nathan Philip; Aragao, David; Clift, Mark; Ericsson, Daniel J; Gee, Christine; Harrop, Stephen J; Mudie, Nathan; Panjikar, Santosh; Price, Jason R; Riboldi-Tunnicliffe, Alan; Williamson, Rachel; Caradoc-Davies, Tom

    2015-01-01

    MX1 is a bending-magnet crystallography beamline at the 3 GeV Australian Synchrotron. The beamline delivers hard X-rays in the energy range from 8 to 18 keV to a focal spot at the sample position of 120 µm FWHM. The beamline endstation and ancillary equipment facilitate local and remote access for both chemical and biological macromolecular crystallography. Here, the design of the beamline and endstation are discussed. The beamline has enjoyed a full user program for the last seven years and scientific highlights from the user program are also presented.

  8. Measurements of Transverse Emittance Growth due to Coherent Synchrotron Radiation in the SLAC SPPS Bunch Compressor Chicane

    SciTech Connect

    Emma, Paul J

    2003-06-20

    A four-dipole bunch compressor chicane has recently been installed in the SLAC linac at 9 GeV and is capable of compressing a 3.4-nC electron bunch to an rms length of 50 microns, resulting in a peak current of nearly 10 kA [1]. The electron bunch is extracted from a damping ring with normalized horizontal emittance of {approx} 30 {micro}m. We present preliminary measurements of the initial and final emittance in the chicane and compare these to 1D and 3D calculations of the effects of coherent synchrotron radiation (CSR).

  9. A Numerical Algorithm to Calculate the Pressure Distribution of the TPS Front End Due to Desorption Induced by Synchrotron Radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Sheng, I. C.; Kuan, C. K.; Chen, Y. T.; Yang, J. Y.; Hsiung, G. Y.; Chen, J. R.

    2010-06-23

    The pressure distribution is an important aspect of a UHV subsystem in either a storage ring or a front end. The design of the 3-GeV, 400-mA Taiwan Photon Source (TPS) foresees outgassing induced by photons and due to a bending magnet and an insertion device. An algorithm to calculate the photon-stimulated absorption (PSD) due to highly energetic radiation from a synchrotron source is presented. Several results using undulator sources such as IU20 are also presented, and the pressure distribution is illustrated.

  10. Discriminating different scenarios to account for the cosmic e{sup {+-}} excess by synchrotron and inverse Compton radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang Juan; Yuan Qiang; Bi Xiaojun; Liu Jia; Yin Pengfei; Zhu Shouhua; Liu Siming

    2009-07-15

    The excesses of the cosmic positron fraction recently measured by PAMELA and the electron spectra by ATIC, PPB-BETS, Fermi, and H.E.S.S. indicate the existence of primary electron and positron sources. The possible explanations include dark matter annihilation, decay, and astrophysical origin, like pulsars. In this work we show that these three scenarios can all explain the experimental results of the cosmic e{sup {+-}} excess. However, it may be difficult to discriminate these different scenarios by the local measurements of electrons and positrons. We propose possible discriminations among these scenarios through the synchrotron and inverse Compton radiation of the primary electrons/positrons from the region close to the Galactic center. Taking typical configurations, we find the three scenarios predict quite different spectra and skymaps of the synchrotron and inverse Compton radiation, though there are relatively large uncertainties. The most prominent differences come from the energy band 10{sup 4}{approx}10{sup 9} MHz for synchrotron emission and > or approx. 10 GeV for inverse Compton emission. It might be able to discriminate at least the annihilating dark matter scenario from the other two given the high precision synchrotron and diffuse {gamma}-ray skymaps in the future.

  11. Discriminating different scenarios to account for the cosmic e± excess by synchrotron and inverse Compton radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Juan; Bi, Xiao-Jun; Liu, Jia; Liu, Si-Ming; Yin, Peng-Fei; Yuan, Qiang; Zhu, Shou-Hua

    2009-07-01

    The excesses of the cosmic positron fraction recently measured by PAMELA and the electron spectra by ATIC, PPB-BETS, Fermi, and H.E.S.S. indicate the existence of primary electron and positron sources. The possible explanations include dark matter annihilation, decay, and astrophysical origin, like pulsars. In this work we show that these three scenarios can all explain the experimental results of the cosmic e± excess. However, it may be difficult to discriminate these different scenarios by the local measurements of electrons and positrons. We propose possible discriminations among these scenarios through the synchrotron and inverse Compton radiation of the primary electrons/positrons from the region close to the Galactic center. Taking typical configurations, we find the three scenarios predict quite different spectra and skymaps of the synchrotron and inverse Compton radiation, though there are relatively large uncertainties. The most prominent differences come from the energy band 104˜109MHz for synchrotron emission and ≳10GeV for inverse Compton emission. It might be able to discriminate at least the annihilating dark matter scenario from the other two given the high precision synchrotron and diffuse γ-ray skymaps in the future.

  12. Design of a synchrotron radiation detector for the test beam lines at the Superconducting Super Collider Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Hutton, R.D.

    1994-01-01

    As part of the particle- and momentum-tagging instrumentation required for the test beam lines of the Superconducting Super Collider (SSC), the synchrotron radiation detector (SRD) was designed to provide electron tagging at momentum above 75 GeV. In a parallel effort to the three test beam lines at the SSC, schedule demands required testing and calibration operations to be initiated at Fermilab. Synchrotron radiation detectors also were to be installed in the NM and MW beam lines at Femilab before the test beam lines at the SSC would become operational. The SRD is the last instrument in a series of three used in the SSC test beam fines. It follows a 20-m drift section of beam tube downstream of the last silicon strip detector. A bending dipole just in of the last silicon strip detector produces the synchrotron radiation that is detected in a 50-mm-square cross section NaI crystal. A secondary scintillator made of Bicron BC-400 plastic is used to discriminate whether it is synchrotron radiation or a stray particle that causes the triggering of the NaI crystal`s photo multiplier tube (PMT).

  13. Operating synchrotron light sources with a high gain free electron laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Di Mitri, S.; Cornacchia, M.

    2015-11-01

    Since the 1980s synchrotron light sources have been considered as drivers of a high repetition rate (RR), high gain free electron laser (FEL) inserted in a by-pass line or in the ring itself. As of today, the high peak current required by the laser is not deemed to be compatible with the standard multi-bunch filling pattern of synchrotrons, and in particular with the operation of insertion device (ID) beamlines. We show that this problem can be overcome by virtue of magnetic bunch length compression in a ring section, and that, after lasing, the beam returns to equilibrium conditions without beam quality disruption. Bunch length compression brings a double advantage: the high peak current stimulates a high gain FEL emission, while the large energy spread makes the beam less sensitive to the FEL heating and to the microwave instability in the ring. The beam’s large energy spread at the undulator is matched to the FEL energy bandwidth through a transverse gradient undulator. Feasibility of lasing at 25 nm is shown for the Elettra synchrotron light source at 1 GeV, and scaling to shorter wavelengths as a function of momentum compaction, beam energy and transverse emittance in higher energy, larger rings is discussed. For the Elettra case study, a low (100 Hz) and a high (463 kHz) FEL RR are considered, corresponding to an average FEL output power at the level of ∼1 W (∼1013 photons per pulse) and ∼300 W (∼1011 photons per pulse), respectively. We also find that, as a by-product of compression, the ∼5 W Renieri’s limit on the average FEL power can be overcome. Our conclusion is that existing and planned synchrotron light sources may be made compatible with this new hybrid IDs-plus-FEL operational mode, with little impact on the standard beamlines functionality.

  14. Walking from 750 GeV to 950 GeV in the technipion zoo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsuzaki, Shinya; Yamawaki, Koichi

    2016-06-01

    If the 750-GeV diphoton excess is identified with the color-singlet isosinglet technipion P0 (750) in the one-family walking technicolor model, as in our previous paper, then there should exist another color-singlet technipion-isotriplet one, P±,3, predicted at around 950 GeV independently of the dynamical details. The P±,3(950 ) are produced at the LHC via vector-boson and photon-fusion processes, predominantly decaying to W γ and γ γ , respectively. Those walking technicolor signals can be explored at run 2 or 3, which would further open the door for a plethora of other (colored) technipions.

  15. Baryon production and collective flow in relativistic heavy-ion collisions in the AGS, SPS, RHIC, and LHC energy regions ({radical}(s{sub NN}){<=}5 GeV to 5.5 TeV)

    SciTech Connect

    Feng Shengqin; Zhong Yang

    2011-03-15

    The features of net-baryon productions and collective flow in relativistic heavy-ion collisions at energies reached at the CERN Large Hadron Collider (LHC), BNL Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC), CERN Super Proton Synchrotron (SPS), and BNL Alternating Gradient Synchrotron (AGS) with the model of nonuniform flow model (NUFM) are systematically studied in this paper. In particular we predict the feature of net-baryon productions and collective flow at LHC {radical}(s{sub NN})=5500 GeV based on the detailed study at RHIC {radical}(s{sub NN})=62.4 and 200 GeV. The dependencies of the features of baryon stopping and collective flow on the collision energies and centralities are investigated.

  16. The ISAS Synchrotron Microprobe at DELTA

    SciTech Connect

    Bohlen, Alex von; Kraemer, Markus; Hergenroeder, Roland; Berges, Ulf

    2007-01-19

    Since 2004 ISAS operates a dipole beamline at the synchrotron radiation facility DELTA at University of Dortmund. Synchrotron radiation is used at this beamline as an excellent excitation source for X-ray fluorescence spectrometry (XRF). Among others, the high brilliance of the synchrotron radiation in contrast to conventional X-ray tubes, the strong polarization of the synchrotron radiation and the low divergence of the electron beam can be applied to XRF offering several advantages for spectroscopy. These outstanding features encouraged us to develop and operate a synchrotron radiation induced X-ray micro fluorescence probe connected to a wavelength dispersive spectrometer (SR-WDXRF). A relevant characteristic of such a device, namely, good lateral resolution at high spectral resolution can be applied for single spot-, line-scan and area map analyses of a variety of objects. The instrumentation of the SR-WDXRF and the performed experiments will be presented. Main task is the detection of light elements by their fluorescence K-lines and the specification of element compounds.

  17. Synchrotron radiation applications in medical research

    SciTech Connect

    Thomlinson, W.

    1995-12-31

    The medical projects employing synchrotron radiation as discussed in this paper are, for the most part, still in their infancies and no one can predict the direction in which they will develop. Both the basic research and applied medical programs are sure to be advanced at the new facilities coming on line, especially the ESRF and Spring- 8. However, success is not guaranteed. There is a lot of competition from advances in conventional imaging with the development of digital angiography, computed tomography, functional magnetic resonance imaging and ultrasound. The synchrotron programs will have to provide significant advantages over these modalities in order to be accepted by the medical profession. Advances in image processing and potentially the development of compact sources will be required in order to move the synchrotron developed imaging technologies into the clinical world. In any event, it can be expected that the images produced by the synchrotron technologies will establish ``gold standards`` to be targeted by conventional modalities. A lot more work needs to be done in order to bring synchrotron radiation therapy and surgery to the level of human studies and, subsequently, to clinical applications.

  18. Synchrotron based spallation neutron source concepts

    SciTech Connect

    Cho, Y.

    1998-07-01

    During the past 20 years, rapid-cycling synchrotrons (RCS) have been used very productively to generate short-pulse thermal neutron beams for neutron scattering research by materials science communities in Japan (KENS), the UK (ISIS) and the US (IPNS). The most powerful source in existence, ISIS in the UK, delivers a 160-kW proton beam to a neutron-generating target. Several recently proposed facilities require proton beams in the MW range to produce intense short-pulse neutron beams. In some proposals, a linear accelerator provides the beam power and an accumulator ring compresses the pulse length to the required {approx} 1 {micro}s. In others, RCS technology provides the bulk of the beam power and compresses the pulse length. Some synchrotron-based proposals achieve the desired beam power by combining two or more synchrotrons of the same energy, and others propose a combination of lower and higher energy synchrotrons. This paper presents the rationale for using RCS technology, and a discussion of the advantages and disadvantages of synchrotron-based spallation sources.

  19. Commissioning and Operation of 12 GeV CEBAF

    SciTech Connect

    Freyberger, Arne P.

    2015-09-01

    The Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility (CEBAF) located at the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Laboratory (JLab) has been recently upgraded to deliver continuous electron beams to the experimental users at a maximum energy of 12 GeV, three times the original design energy of 4 GeV. This paper will present an overview of the upgrade, referred to as the 12GeV upgrade, and highlights from recent beam commissioning results.

  20. 750 GeV diphoton resonance from singlets in an exceptional supersymmetric standard model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    King, Stephen F.; Nevzorov, Roman

    2016-03-01

    The 750-760 GeV diphoton resonance may be identified as one or two scalars and/or one or two pseudoscalars contained in the two singlet superfields S 1,2 arising from the three 27-dimensional representations of E 6. The three 27s also contain three copies of colour-triplet charge ∓1 /3 vector-like fermions D, overline{D} and two copies of charged inert Higgsinos {tilde{H}}+ , {tilde{H}}- to which the singlets S 1,2 may couple. We propose a variant of the E6SSM where the third singlet S 3 breaks a gauged U(1) N above the TeV scale, predicting Z N ' , D, overline{D} , {tilde{H}}+ , {tilde{H}}- at LHC Run 2, leaving the two lighter singlets S 1,2 with masses around 750 GeV. We calculate the branching ratios and cross-sections for the two scalar and two pseudoscalar states associated with the S 1,2 singlets, including possible degeneracies and maximal mixing, subject to the constraint that their couplings remain perturbative up to the unification scale.

  1. Space-charge calculations in synchrotrons

    SciTech Connect

    Machida, S.

    1993-05-01

    One obvious bottleneck of achieving high luminosity in hadron colliders, such as the Superconducting Super Collider (SSC), is the beam emittance growth, due to space-charge effects in low energy injector synchrotrons. Although space-charge effects have been recognized since the alternating-gradient synchrotron was invented, and the Laslett tune shift usually calculated to quantify these effects, our understanding of the effects is limited, especially when the Laslett tune shift becomes a large fraction of the integer. Using the Simpsons tracking code, which we developed to study emittance preservation issues in proton synchrotrons, we investigated space-charge effects in the SSC Low Energy Booster (LEB). We observed detailed dependence on parameters such as beam intensity, initial emittance, injection energy, lattice function, and longitudinal motion. A summary of those findings, as well as the tracking technique we developed for the study, are presented.

  2. Chemical applications of synchrotron radiation: Workshop report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1989-04-01

    The most recent in a series of topical meetings for Advanced Photon Source user subgroups, the Workshop on Chemical Applications of Synchrotron Radiation (held at Argonne National Laboratory, October 3-4, 1988) dealt with surfaces and kinetics, spectroscopy, small-angle scattering, diffraction, and topography and imaging. The primary objectives were to provide an educational resource for the chemistry community on the scientific research being conducted at existing synchrotron sources and to indicate some of the unique opportunities that will be made available with the Advanced Photon Source. The workshop organizers were also interested in gauging the interest of chemists in the field of synchrotron radiation. Interest expressed at the meeting has led to initial steps toward formation of a Chemistry Users Group at the APS. Individual projects are processed separately for the data bases.

  3. 100 GeV SLAC Linac

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farkas, Z. D.

    2002-03-01

    The SLAC beam energy can be increased from the current 50 GeV to 100 GeV, if we change the operating frequency from the present 2856 MHz to 11424 MHz, using technology developed for the NLC. We replace the power distribution system with a proposed NLC distribution system as shown in Fig. 1. The four 3 meter s-band 820 nS .ll time accelerator sections are replaced by six 2 meter x-band 120 nS .ll time sections. Thus the accelerator length per klystron retains the same length, 12 meters. The 4050 65MW- 3.5microS klystrons are replaced by 75MW-1.5microS permanent magnet klystrons developed here and in Japan. The present input to the klystrons would be multiplied by a factor of 4 and possibly ampli.ed. The SLED cavities have to be replaced. The increase in beam voltage is due to the higher elastance to group velocity ratio, higher compression ratio and higher unloaded to external Q ratio of the new SLED cavities. The average power input is reduced because of the narrower klystron pulse width and because the klystron electro-magnets are replaced by permanent magnets.

  4. A 100 GeV SLAC Linac

    SciTech Connect

    Farkas, Zoltan D

    2002-03-07

    The SLAC beam energy can be increased from the current 50 GeV to 100 GeV, if we change the operating frequency from the present 2856 MHz to 11424 MHz, using technology developed for the NLC. We replace the power distribution system with a proposed NLC distribution system as shown in Fig. 1. The four 3 meter s-band 820 nS fill time accelerator sections are replaced by six 2 meter x-band 120 nS fill time sections. Thus the accelerator length per klystron retains the same length, 12 meters. The 4050 65MW-3.5 {micro}S klystrons are replaced by 75MW-1.5 {micro}S permanent magnet klystrons developed here and in Japan. The present input to the klystrons would be multiplied by a factor of 4 and possibly amplified. The SLED [1] cavities have to be replaced. The increase in beam voltage is due to the higher elastance to group velocity ratio, higher compression ratio and higher unloaded to external Q ratio of the new SLED cavities. The average power input is reduced because of the narrower klystron pulse width and because the klystron electro-magnets are replaced by permanent magnets.

  5. Coherent Synchrotron Radiation: Theory and Simulations.

    SciTech Connect

    Novokhatski, Alexander; /SLAC

    2012-03-29

    The physics of coherent synchrotron radiation (CSR) emitted by ultra-relativistic electron bunches, known since the last century, has become increasingly important with the development of high peak current free electron lasers and shorter bunch lengths in storage rings. Coherent radiation can be described as a low frequency part of the familiar synchrotron radiation in bending magnets. As this part is independent of the electron energy, the fields of different electrons of a short bunch can be in phase and the total power of the radiation will be quadratic with the number of electrons. Naturally the frequency spectrum of the longitudinal electron distribution in a bunch is of the same importance as the overall electron bunch length. The interest in the utilization of high power radiation from the terahertz and far infrared region in the field of chemical, physical and biological processes has led synchrotron radiation facilities to pay more attention to the production of coherent radiation. Several laboratories have proposed the construction of a facility wholly dedicated to terahertz production using the coherent radiation in bending magnets initiated by the longitudinal instabilities in the ring. Existing synchrotron radiation facilities also consider such a possibility among their future plans. There is a beautiful introduction to CSR in the 'ICFA Beam Dynamics Newsletter' N 35 (Editor C. Biscari). In this paper we recall the basic properties of CSR from the theory and what new effects, we can get from the precise simulations of the coherent radiation using numerical solutions of Maxwell's equations. In particular, transverse variation of the particle energy loss in a bunch, discovered in these simulations, explains the slice emittance growth in bending magnets of the bunch compressors and transverse de-coherence in undulators. CSR may play same the role as the effect of quantum fluctuations of synchrotron radiation in damping rings. It can limit the minimum

  6. Synchrotron characterization of functional tin dioxide nanowires

    SciTech Connect

    Domashevskaya, E. P. Chuvenkova, O. A.; Turishchev, S. Yu.

    2015-12-31

    Wire-like crystals of tin dioxide were synthesized by a gas-transport technique. The wires, of mainly nanometric diameters, were characterized by spectroscopy and microscopy techniques with the use of highly brilliant and intense synchrotron radiation. We studied the influence of the surface chemical state and the oxygen vacancies on the atomic and electronic structure of the nanowires. The surface of the nanowires is covered by a few nanometers of tin suboxides. The lack of oxygen over the surface layers leads to specific sub-zone formation in a gap, as shown by synchrotron studies.

  7. 12 Experimental Techniques at Synchrotron Lightsource Beamlines

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Peter L; Rhyne, James J

    2015-01-01

    The unique properties of synchrotron radiation are its continuous spectrum, high flux and brightness, and high coherence, which make it an indispensable tool in the exploration of matter. The wavelengths of the emitted photons span a range of dimensions from the atomic level to biological cells, thereby providing incisive probes for advanced research in materials science, physical and chemical sciences, metrology, geosciences, environmental sciences, biosciences, medical sciences, and pharmaceutical sciences. The features of synchrotron radiation are especially well matched to the needs of nanoscience.

  8. SYNCHROTRON RADIO FREQUENCY PHASE CONTROL SYSTEM

    DOEpatents

    Plotkin, M.; Raka, E.C.; Snyder, H.S.

    1963-05-01

    A system for canceling varying phase changes introduced by connecting cables and control equipment in an alternating gradient synchrotron is presented. In a specific synchrotron embodiment twelve spaced accelerating stations for the proton bunches are utilized. In order to ensure that the protons receive their boost or kick at the exact instant necessary it is necessary to compensate for phase changes occurring in the r-f circuitry over the wide range of frequencies dictated by the accelerated velocities of the proton bunches. A constant beat frequency is utilized to transfer the r-f control signals through the cables and control equipment to render the phase shift constant and readily compensable. (AEC)

  9. High-energy thermal synchrotron emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Imamura, J. N.; Epstein, R. I.; Petrosian, V.

    1985-09-01

    The authors compute thermal synchrotron spectra for which the photon energy is comparable to the mean electron thermal energy. In this regime it is necessary to include the restriction that a photon receives no more energy than the kinetic energy of the radiating electron. The derived spectra fall off more rapidly at high energies than was previously estimated. It is found that the thermal synchrotron mechanism can still provide satisfactory fits to the very hard γ-ray burst spectra for sufficiently high temperatures and low magnetic fields. As example, data for the γ-ray burst of 1982 January 25 are discussed.

  10. Development of soft X-ray polarized light beamline on Indus-2 synchrotron radiation source

    SciTech Connect

    Phase, D. M. Gupta, Mukul Potdar, S. Behera, L. Sah, R. Gupta, Ajay

    2014-04-24

    This article describes the development of a soft x-ray beamline on a bending magnet source of Indus-2 storage ring (2.5 GeV) and some preliminary results of x-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) measurements using the same. The beamline layout is based on a spherical grating monochromator. The beamline is able to accept synchrotron radiation from the bending magnet port BL-1 of the Indus-2 ring with a wide solid angle. The large horizontal and vertical angular acceptance contributes to high photon flux and selective polarization respectively. The complete beamline is tested for ultrahigh vacuum (UHV) ∼ 10{sup −10} mbar. First absorption spectrum was obtained on HOPG graphite foil. Our performance test indicates that modest resolving power has been achieved with adequate photon flux to carry out various absorption experiments.

  11. Calculation of synchrotron radiation from high intensity electron beam at eRHIC

    SciTech Connect

    Jing Y.; Chubar, O.; Litvinenko, V.

    2012-05-20

    The Electron-Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (eRHIC) at Brookhaven National Lab is an upgrade project for the existing RHIC. A 30 GeV energy recovery linac (ERL) will provide a high charge and high quality electron beam to collide with proton and ion beams. This will improve the luminosity by at least 2 orders of magnitude. The synchrotron radiation (SR) from the bending magnets and strong quadrupoles for such an intense beam could be penetrating the vacuum chamber and producing hazards to electronic devices and undesired background for detectors. In this paper, we calculate the SR spectral intensity, power density distributions and heat load on the chamber wall. We suggest the wall thickness required to stop the SR and estimate spectral characteristics of the residual and scattered background radiation outside the chamber.

  12. Side Elevation, End Elevation, Cross Section, 1/2 Roof Plan, 1/2 ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Side Elevation, End Elevation, Cross Section, 1/2 Roof Plan, 1/2 Reflected Plan, 1/2 Floor Plan, 1/2 Reflected Plan - Jack's Mill Covered Bridge, Spanning Henderson Creek, Oquawka, Henderson County, IL

  13. Shocks in nova outflows - II. Synchrotron radio emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vlasov, Andrey; Vurm, Indrek; Metzger, Brian D.

    2016-11-01

    The discovery of GeV gamma-rays from classical novae indicates that shocks and relativistic particle acceleration are energetically key in these events. Further evidence for shocks comes from thermal keV X-ray emission and an early peak in the radio light curve on a time-scale of months with a brightness temperature which is too high to result from freely expanding photoionized gas. Paper I developed a one-dimensional model for the thermal emission from nova shocks. This work concluded that the shock-powered radio peak cannot be thermal if line cooling operates in the post-shock gas at the rate determined by collisional ionization equilibrium. Here we extend this calculation to include non-thermal synchrotron emission. Applying our model to three classical novae, we constrain the amplification of the magnetic field ɛB and the efficiency ɛe of accelerating relativistic electrons of characteristic Lorentz factor γ ˜ 100. If the shocks are radiative (low velocity vsh ≲ 1000 km s-1) and cover a large solid angle of the nova outflow, as likely characterize those producing gamma-rays, then values of ɛe ˜ 0.01-0.1 are required to achieve the peak radio brightness for ɛB = 10-2. Such high efficiencies exclude secondary pairs from pion decay as the source of the radio-emitting particles, instead favouring the direct acceleration of electrons at the shock. If the radio-emitting shocks are instead adiabatic (high velocity), as likely characterize those responsible for the thermal X-rays, then much higher brightness temperatures are possible, allowing the radio-emitting shocks to cover a smaller outflow solid angle.

  14. Shocks in nova outflows. II. Synchrotron radio emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vlasov, Andrey; Vurm, Indrek; Metzger, Brian D.

    2016-08-01

    The discovery of GeV gamma-rays from classical novae indicates that shocks and relativistic particle acceleration are energetically key in these events. Further evidence for shocks comes from thermal keV X-ray emission and an early peak in the radio light curve on a timescale of months with a brightness temperature which is too high to result from freely expanding photo-ionized gas. Paper I developed a one dimensional model for the thermal emission from nova shocks. This work concluded that the shock-powered radio peak cannot be thermal if line cooling operates in the post-shock gas at the rate determined by collisional ionization equilibrium. Here we extend this calculation to include non-thermal synchrotron emission. Applying our model to three classical novae, we constrain the amplification of the magnetic field ɛB and the efficiency ɛe of accelerating relativistic electrons of characteristic Lorentz factor γ ˜ 100. If the shocks are radiative (low velocity v_sh ≲ 1000 km s-1) and cover a large solid angle of the nova outflow, as likely characterize those producing gamma-rays, then values of ɛe ˜ 0.01 - 0.1 are required to achieve the peak radio brightness for ɛB = 10-2. Such high efficiencies exclude secondary pairs from pion decay as the source of the radio-emitting particles, instead favoring the direct acceleration of electrons at the shock. If the radio-emitting shocks are instead adiabatic (high velocity), as likely characterize those responsible for the thermal X-rays, then much higher brightness temperatures are possible, allowing the radio-emitting shocks to cover a smaller outflow solid angle.

  15. Synchrotron and inverse-Compton emissions from pairs formed in GRB afterglows (analytical treatment)

    SciTech Connect

    Panaitescu, A.; Vestrand, W. T.

    2014-10-01

    We calculate the synchrotron and inverse-Compton emissions from pairs formed in gamma-ray burst (GRB) afterglows from high-energy photons (above 100 MeV), assuming a power-law photon spectrum C {sub ν}∝ν{sup –2} and considering only the pairs generated from primary high-energy photons. The essential properties of these pairs (number, minimal energy, cooling energy, distribution with energy) and of their emission (peak flux, spectral breaks, spectral slope) are set by the observables GeV fluence Φ(t) = Ft and spectrum, and by the Lorentz factor, Γ, and magnetic field, B, of the source of high-energy photons, at observer time, t. Optical and X-ray pseudo light curves, F {sub ν}(Γ), are calculated for the given B; proper synchrotron self-Compton light curves are calculated by setting the dynamics Γ(t) of the high-energy photon source to be that of a decelerating, relativistic shock. It is found that the emission from pairs can accommodate the flux and decays of the optical flashes measured during the prompt (GRB) phase, but it decays faster than the X-ray plateaus observed during the delayed (afterglow) phase. The brightest pair optical emission is obtained for 100 < Γ < 500, and depends mostly on the GeV fluence, being independent of the source redshift. Emission from pairs formed during the GRB phase offers an alternate explanation to reverse-shock optical flashes. These two models may be distinguished based on their corresponding flux decay index-spectral slope relations, different correlations with the Large Area Telescope fluence, or through modeling of the afterglow multiwavelength data.

  16. GAMMA-RAY BLAZARS NEAR EQUIPARTITION AND THE ORIGIN OF THE GeV SPECTRAL BREAK IN 3C 454.3

    SciTech Connect

    Cerruti, Matteo; Dermer, Charles D.; Lott, Benoit

    2013-07-01

    Observations performed with the Fermi-LAT telescope have revealed the presence of a spectral break in the GeV spectrum of flat-spectrum radio quasars (FSRQs) and other low- and intermediate-synchrotron peaked blazars. We propose that this feature can be explained by Compton scattering of broad-line region photons by a non-thermal population of electrons described by a log-parabolic function. We consider in particular a scenario in which the energy densities of particles, magnetic field, and soft photons in the emitting region are close to equipartition. We show that this model can satisfactorily account for the overall spectral energy distribution of the FSRQ 3C 454.3, reproducing the GeV spectral cutoff due to Klein-Nishina effects and a curving electron distribution.

  17. HIGH-ENERGY OBSERVATIONS OF PSR B1259–63/LS 2883 THROUGH THE 2014 PERIASTRON PASSAGE: CONNECTING X-RAYS TO THE GeV FLARE

    SciTech Connect

    Tam, P. H. T.; Li, K. L.; Kong, A. K. H.; Takata, J.; Okazaki, A. T.; Hui, C. Y.

    2015-01-01

    The binary system PSR B1259–63/LS 2883 is well sampled in radio, X-rays, and TeV γ-rays, and shows orbital-phase-dependent variability in these frequencies. The first detection of GeV γ-rays from the system was made around the 2010 periastron passage. In this Letter, we present an analysis of X-ray and γ-ray data obtained by the Swift/XRT, NuSTAR/FPM, and Fermi/LAT, through the recent periastron passage which occurred on 2014 May 4. While PSR B1259–63/LS 2883 was not detected by the Large Area Telescope before and during this passage, we show that the GeV flares occurred at a similar orbital phase as in early 2011, thus establishing the repetitive nature of the post-periastron GeV flares. Multiple flares each lasting for a few days have been observed and short-term variability is seen as well. We also found X-ray flux variation contemporaneous with the GeV flare for the first time. Strong evidence of the keV-to-GeV connection came from the broadband high-energy spectra, which we interpret as synchrotron radiation from the shocked pulsar wind.

  18. Synchrotron IR spectromicroscopy: chemistry of living cells.

    PubMed

    Holman, Hoi-Ying N; Bechtel, Hans A; Hao, Zhao; Martin, Michael C

    2010-11-01

    Advanced analytical capabilities of synchrotron IR spectromicroscopy meet the demands of modern biological research for studying molecular reactions in individual living cells. (To listen to a podcast about this article, please go to the Analytical Chemistry multimedia page at pubs.acs.org/page/ancham/audio/index.html.).

  19. Synchrotron X-ray footprinting on tour

    PubMed Central

    Bohon, Jen; D’Mello, Rhijuta; Ralston, Corie; Gupta, Sayan; Chance, Mark R.

    2014-01-01

    Synchrotron footprinting is a valuable technique in structural biology for understanding macromolecular solution-state structure and dynamics of proteins and nucleic acids. Although an extremely powerful tool, there is currently only a single facility in the USA, the X28C beamline at the National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS), dedicated to providing infrastructure, technology development and support for these studies. The high flux density of the focused white beam and variety of specialized exposure environments available at X28C enables footprinting of highly complex biological systems; however, it is likely that a significant fraction of interesting experiments could be performed at unspecialized facilities. In an effort to investigate the viability of a beamline-flexible footprinting program, a standard sample was taken on tour around the nation to be exposed at several US synchrotrons. This work describes how a relatively simple and transportable apparatus can allow beamlines at the NSLS, CHESS, APS and ALS to be used for synchrotron footprinting in a general user mode that can provide useful results. PMID:24365913

  20. PRINCIPLES OF SYNCHROTRON TECHNIQUES, POTENTIAL AND LIMITATIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Once environmental contaminants, such as arsenic, chromium, cadmium and lead, are detected, the problem becomes how to deal with them. For the past decade, researchers at the US EPA in Cincinnati have been employing synchrotron speciation methods to determine the exact chemical f...

  1. Assessing noise sources at synchrotron infrared ports

    PubMed Central

    Lerch, Ph.; Dumas, P.; Schilcher, T.; Nadji, A.; Luedeke, A.; Hubert, N.; Cassinari, L.; Boege, M.; Denard, J.-C.; Stingelin, L.; Nadolski, L.; Garvey, T.; Albert, S.; Gough, Ch.; Quack, M.; Wambach, J.; Dehler, M.; Filhol, J.-M.

    2012-01-01

    Today, the vast majority of electron storage rings delivering synchrotron radiation for general user operation offer a dedicated infrared port. There is growing interest expressed by various scientific communities to exploit the mid-IR emission in microspectroscopy, as well as the far infrared (also called THz) range for spectroscopy. Compared with a thermal (laboratory-based source), IR synchrotron radiation sources offer enhanced brilliance of about two to three orders of magnitude in the mid-IR energy range, and enhanced flux and brilliance in the far-IR energy range. Synchrotron radiation also has a unique combination of a broad wavelength band together with a well defined time structure. Thermal sources (globar, mercury filament) have excellent stability. Because the sampling rate of a typical IR Fourier-transform spectroscopy experiment is in the kHz range (depending on the bandwidth of the detector), instabilities of various origins present in synchrotron radiation sources play a crucial role. Noise recordings at two different IR ports located at the Swiss Light Source and SOLEIL (France), under conditions relevant to real experiments, are discussed. The lowest electron beam fluctuations detectable in IR spectra have been quantified and are shown to be much smaller than what is routinely recorded by beam-position monitors. PMID:22186638

  2. SYNCHROTRON RADIATION MONITOR FOR NSLS BOOSTER.

    SciTech Connect

    PINAYEV, I.; SHAFTAN, T.

    2005-11-04

    NSLS booster diagnostics consisted of tune measurement system, system for turn-by-turn measurement on the electron beam, and beam intensity monitor, which is not absolutely calibrated. We present design and implementation of synchrotron light monitor for the booster, which expands diagnostics capabilities. The system allows to measure an orbit, beam sizes and coupling of the electron beam along the ramp.

  3. Assessing noise sources at synchrotron infrared ports.

    PubMed

    Lerch, Ph; Dumas, P; Schilcher, T; Nadji, A; Luedeke, A; Hubert, N; Cassinari, L; Boege, M; Denard, J-C; Stingelin, L; Nadolski, L; Garvey, T; Albert, S; Gough, Ch; Quack, M; Wambach, J; Dehler, M; Filhol, J-M

    2012-01-01

    Today, the vast majority of electron storage rings delivering synchrotron radiation for general user operation offer a dedicated infrared port. There is growing interest expressed by various scientific communities to exploit the mid-IR emission in microspectroscopy, as well as the far infrared (also called THz) range for spectroscopy. Compared with a thermal (laboratory-based source), IR synchrotron radiation sources offer enhanced brilliance of about two to three orders of magnitude in the mid-IR energy range, and enhanced flux and brilliance in the far-IR energy range. Synchrotron radiation also has a unique combination of a broad wavelength band together with a well defined time structure. Thermal sources (globar, mercury filament) have excellent stability. Because the sampling rate of a typical IR Fourier-transform spectroscopy experiment is in the kHz range (depending on the bandwidth of the detector), instabilities of various origins present in synchrotron radiation sources play a crucial role. Noise recordings at two different IR ports located at the Swiss Light Source and SOLEIL (France), under conditions relevant to real experiments, are discussed. The lowest electron beam fluctuations detectable in IR spectra have been quantified and are shown to be much smaller than what is routinely recorded by beam-position monitors.

  4. Synchrotron Emission from Chaotic Stellar Winds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    White, R. L.

    1985-01-01

    A model is presented for the radio emission from hot stars. Electrons are accelerated to relativistic energies by shocks in the wind near the star and emit radio radiation through the synchrotron mechanism. The particle spectrum and radio spectrum for this model are derived. The model accounts for many of the observed characteristics of some recently discovered stars which have peculiar radio emission.

  5. Molecular electronics studies by synchrotron radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Wee, Andrew T. S.; Chen Wei; Chi Dongchen; Chen Shi; Wang Li; Gao Xingyu

    2009-01-29

    In molecular electronics research, the molecule-metal interfacial properties crucially control the electronic properties of the devices fabricated. We use synchrotron radiation techniques of PES and NEXAFS, complemented by STM, to study the molecular orientation and interfacial charge transfer processes of model molecule-metal systems.

  6. SYNCHROTRON TECHNIQUES IN ENVIRONMENTAL AND FORSENIC SCIENCES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The application of synchrotron based research for understanding the fate of contaminants in water, soil, and atmosphere is proving to be beneficial for scientists and regulators. Drawing the connection of a contaminated site to knowledge of metal speciation provides direct eviden...

  7. Overview of United States synchrotron radiation facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Watson, R.E.

    1983-01-01

    There has been considerable activity within the past year involving the creation of new and the improvement of existing capabilities for research with synchrotron light. The purpose of this review is to summarize what has happened within the United States. Being a status report, some of the information necessarily has a date attached to it - the date, in this case, being early September 1983.

  8. A Conceptual Design of an Internal Injection Absorber of 8 GeV H-Injection into the Fermilab Main Injector

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, D.E.; Chen, A.; Rakhno, I.; /Fermilab

    2007-06-01

    An 8 GeV superconducting linear accelerator (SCL) has been proposed as a single stage H{sup -} injector into the Main Injector (MI) synchrotron[1]. This would be the highest energy H{sup -} multi-turn injection system in the world. An injection absorber is required to absorb a few percent o the incoming beam on a regular pulse by pulse basis. The requirements and conceptual design of an internal absorber, capable of steady state 6.5 kW is discussed.

  9. Computerized microtomography using synchrotron radiation from the NSLS (National Synchrotron Light Source)

    SciTech Connect

    Spanne, P.; Rivers, M.L.

    1986-09-01

    Results of microtomography experiments that employ filtered radiation from the National Synchrotron Light Source X-26 Microprobe beam line are presented. These experiments have yielded images of a freeze-dried caterpillar with a spatial resolution of the order of 30 ..mu..m and show that the limit on the spatial resolution with the present apparatus will be 1 to 10 ..mu..m. Directions for improvement in synchrotron microtomography techniques and some possible applications are discussed. 14 refs., 3 figs.

  10. Irradiation of EUV multilayer optics with synchrotron radiation of a different time structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klein, Roman; Scholze, Frank; Thornagel, R.; Tummler, Johannes; Wedowski, M.; Jansen, R.; Mertens, B.; van de Runstraat, A.; Ulm, Gerhard

    2002-12-01

    Extensive investigations on the lifetime of EUVL optics using synchrotron radiation [1, 2, 3] have been performed at the radiometry laboratory [4] of the Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt (PTB) at the BESSY II electron storage ring in the past. Nevertheless, synchrotron radiation shows a very different time structure as compared to the radiation of EUVL sources to be used in lithography tools. To assess the question, whether the different time structure of the radiation has an impact on the contamination behavior of EUVL optics, an irradiation experiment was performed using synchrotron radiation of different time structure available at the BESSY II electron storage ring: Keeping all other parameters constant, radiation from the normal operation mode of BESSY II, which resembles quasi-cw- illumination, and the special single bunch operation mode, which gives pulsed synchrotron radiation with 1.25 MHz repetition rate were used to irradiate samples in a defined residual gas environment. The reflectance of the samples were measured before and after the illumination to determine the loss in reflectance due to irradiation. Although the time structure of the single bunch mode still differs considerably from those of potential EUVL sources, trends in the contamination behavior could possibly be observed.

  11. Remote Synchrotron Light Instrumentation Using Optical Fibers

    SciTech Connect

    De Santis, S.; Yin, Y.

    2009-05-04

    By coupling the emitted synchrotron light into an optical fiber, it is possible to transmit the signal at substantial distances from the light port, without the need to use expensive beamlines. This would be especially beneficial in all those cases when the synchrotron is situated in areas not easily access because of their location, or due to high radiation levels. Furthermore, the fiber output can be easily switched, or even shared, between different diagnostic instruments. We present the latest results on the coupling and dispersion measurements performed at the Advanced Light Source in Berkeley. In several cases, coupling synchrotron light into optical fibers can substantially facilitate the use of beam diagnostic instrumentation that measures longitudinal beam properties by detecting synchrotron radiation. It has been discussed in with some detail, how fiberoptics can bring the light at relatively large distances from the accelerator, where a variety of devices can be used to measure beam properties and parameters. Light carried on a fiber can be easily switched between instruments so that each one of them has 100% of the photons available, rather than just a fraction, when simultaneous measurements are not indispensable. From a more general point of view, once synchrotron light is coupled into the fiber, the vast array of techniques and optoelectronic devices, developed by the telecommunication industry becomes available. In this paper we present the results of our experiments at the Advanced Light Source, where we tried to assess the challenges and limitations of the coupling process and determine what level of efficiency one can typically expect to achieve.

  12. SESAME -- A third generation synchrotron light source for the Middle East

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winick, Herman

    2012-03-01

    Developed under the auspices of UNESCO and modeled on CERN, SESAME (Synchrotron-light for Experimental Science and Applications in the Middle East) is an international research centre in construction in Jordan, enabling world-class research while promoting peace through scientific cooperation. Its centerpiece, a new 2.5 GeV 3rd Generation Electron Storage Ring (133m circumference, 26nm-rad emittance, 12 places for insertion devices), will provide intense light from infra-red to hard X-rays. Members of the Council (Bahrain, Cyprus, Egypt, Iran, Israel, Jordan, Pakistan, Palestinian Authority,Turkey) provide the operations budget. Voluntary contributions by several Council Members that could amount to over 20 million over 5 years are now being finalized. This, plus funds from other sources, will enable acquisition of the technical components of the new ring and the upgrading of beamline equipment donated by several European and US labs. All concrete shielding is complete. The 0.8 GeV BESSY I injector system, a gift from Germany, is now being installed. A training program has been underway since 2000. SESAME is on track to start operation with four day-one beam lines in 2015.

  13. High resolution hard x-ray microscope on a second generation synchrotron source

    SciTech Connect

    Tian Yangchao; Li Wenjie; Chen Jie; Liu Longhua; Liu Gang; Tian Jinping; Xiong Ying; Tkachuk, Andrei; Gelb, Jeff; Hsu, George; Yun Wenbing

    2008-10-15

    A full-field, transmission x-ray microscope (TXM) operating in the energy range of 7-11 keV has been installed at the U7A beamline at the National Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory, a second generation synchrotron source operating at 0.8 GeV. Although the photon flux at sample position in the operating energy range is significantly low due to its relatively large emittance, the TXM can get high quality x-ray images with a spatial resolution down to 50 nm with acceptable exposure time. This TXM operates in either absorption or Zernike phase contrast mode with similar resolution. This TXM is a powerful analytical tool for a wide range of scientific areas, especially studies on nanoscale phenomena and structural imaging in biology, materials science, and environmental science. We present here the property of the x-ray source, beamline design, and the operation and key optical components of the x-ray TXM. Plans to improve the throughput of the TXM will be discussed.

  14. High resolution hard x-ray microscope on a second generation synchrotron source.

    PubMed

    Tian, Yangchao; Li, Wenjie; Chen, Jie; Liu, Longhua; Liu, Gang; Tkachuk, Andrei; Tian, Jinping; Xiong, Ying; Gelb, Jeff; Hsu, George; Yun, Wenbing

    2008-10-01

    A full-field, transmission x-ray microscope (TXM) operating in the energy range of 7-11 keV has been installed at the U7A beamline at the National Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory, a second generation synchrotron source operating at 0.8 GeV. Although the photon flux at sample position in the operating energy range is significantly low due to its relatively large emittance, the TXM can get high quality x-ray images with a spatial resolution down to 50 nm with acceptable exposure time. This TXM operates in either absorption or Zernike phase contrast mode with similar resolution. This TXM is a powerful analytical tool for a wide range of scientific areas, especially studies on nanoscale phenomena and structural imaging in biology, materials science, and environmental science. We present here the property of the x-ray source, beamline design, and the operation and key optical components of the x-ray TXM. Plans to improve the throughput of the TXM will be discussed. PMID:19044720

  15. High resolution hard x-ray microscope on a second generation synchrotron source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Yangchao; Li, Wenjie; Chen, Jie; Liu, Longhua; Liu, Gang; Tkachuk, Andrei; Tian, Jinping; Xiong, Ying; Gelb, Jeff; Hsu, George; Yun, Wenbing

    2008-10-01

    A full-field, transmission x-ray microscope (TXM) operating in the energy range of 7-11 keV has been installed at the U7A beamline at the National Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory, a second generation synchrotron source operating at 0.8 GeV. Although the photon flux at sample position in the operating energy range is significantly low due to its relatively large emittance, the TXM can get high quality x-ray images with a spatial resolution down to 50 nm with acceptable exposure time. This TXM operates in either absorption or Zernike phase contrast mode with similar resolution. This TXM is a powerful analytical tool for a wide range of scientific areas, especially studies on nanoscale phenomena and structural imaging in biology, materials science, and environmental science. We present here the property of the x-ray source, beamline design, and the operation and key optical components of the x-ray TXM. Plans to improve the throughput of the TXM will be discussed.

  16. Beam studies at the SPEAR3 synchrotron using a digital optical mask

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, H. D.; Fiorito, R. B.; Corbett, J.; Shkvarunets, A. G.; Tian, K.; Fisher, A.

    2016-05-01

    The 3GeV SPEAR3 synchrotron light source operates in top-up injection mode with up to 500 mA circulating in the storage ring (equivalently 392 nC). Each injection pulse contains 40-80 pC producing a contrast ratio between total stored charge and injected charge of about 6500:1. In order to study transient injected beam dynamics during user operations, it is desirable to optically image the injected pulse in the presence of the bright stored beam. In the present work this is done by imaging the visible component of the synchrotron radiation onto a digital micro-mirror-array device (DMD), which is then used as an optical mask to block out light from the bright central core of the stored beam. The physical masking, together with an asynchronously-gated, ICCD imaging camera, makes it possible to observe the weak injected beam component on a turn-by-turn basis. The DMD optical masking system works similar to a classical solar coronagraph but has some distinct practical advantages: i.e. rapid adaption to changes in the shape of the stored beam, a high extinction ratio for unwanted light and minimum scattering from the primary beam into the secondary optics. In this paper we describe the DMD masking method, features of the high dynamic range point spread function for the SPEAR3 optical beam line and measurements of the injected beam in the presence of the stored beam.

  17. Low-cycle-fatigue behavior of copper materials and their use in synchrotron beamline components

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Z.; Nian, T.; Ryding, D.; Kuzay, T.M.

    1993-09-01

    The third generation synchrotron facilities such as the 7-GeV Advanced Photon Source Project (APS) generate x-ray beams with very high heat loads and heat flux levels. The front-end and beamline components are required to sustain total heat loads of 5 to 15 kW and heat flux levels exceeding 400 W/mm{sup 2}. Grazing geometry and enhanced heat transfer techniques are used in the design of such components to reduce heat flux levels below the 30 W/mm{sup 2} level, which is sustainable by the special copper materials routinely used in the component design. Although the resulting maximum surface temperatures can be sustained, the structural stresses and the fatigue issues remain viable concerns for the copper, particularly under brazing or bonding of the parts. Brazing and bonding are almost always utilized in the design of the components, and the drastically lowered yield stress of the annealed copper subjected to bonding temperatures above 400{degree}C is a real concern. Such materials with reduced post-bonding stress levels easily reach yield point under thermal stresses during ordinary use on the beamline. The resulting plastic deformation in each load cycle may cause low-cycle-fatigue problems. The two common copper materials are OFHC and Glidcop. This paper critically reviews the available literature for low-cycle-fatigue properties, of OFHC at the elevated temperatures typically found in synchrotron operations.

  18. 43 CFR 2812.1-2 - Contents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Contents. 2812.1-2 Section 2812.1-2 Public Lands: Interior Regulations Relating to Public Lands (Continued) BUREAU OF LAND MANAGEMENT, DEPARTMENT... Bay Revested Lands § 2812.1-2 Contents. (a) An individual applicant and each member of...

  19. 43 CFR 2812.1-2 - Contents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Contents. 2812.1-2 Section 2812.1-2 Public Lands: Interior Regulations Relating to Public Lands (Continued) BUREAU OF LAND MANAGEMENT, DEPARTMENT... Bay Revested Lands § 2812.1-2 Contents. (a) An individual applicant and each member of...

  20. 16 CFR 1.2 - Procedure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Procedure. 1.2 Section 1.2 Commercial Practices FEDERAL TRADE COMMISSION ORGANIZATION, PROCEDURES AND RULES OF PRACTICE GENERAL PROCEDURES Industry Guidance Advisory Opinions § 1.2 Procedure. (a) Application. The request for advice...

  1. 44 CFR 1.2 - Definitions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 44 Emergency Management and Assistance 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Definitions. 1.2 Section 1.2... GENERAL RULEMAKING; POLICY AND PROCEDURES General § 1.2 Definitions. (a) Rule or regulation means the...) Significant adverse effects on competition, employment, investment, productivity, innovation, or on...

  2. 43 CFR 2812.1-2 - Contents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2006-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 2 2006-10-01 2006-10-01 false Contents. 2812.1-2 Section 2812.1-2 Public Lands: Interior Regulations Relating to Public Lands (Continued) BUREAU OF LAND MANAGEMENT, DEPARTMENT... Bay Revested Lands § 2812.1-2 Contents. (a) An individual applicant and each member of...

  3. 43 CFR 2812.1-2 - Contents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    1997-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 2 1997-10-01 1997-10-01 false Contents. 2812.1-2 Section 2812.1-2 LAND RESOURCE MANAGEMENT (2000) TRAMROADS AND LOGGING ROADS Over O. and C. and Coos Bay Revested Lands § 2812.1-2 Contents. (a) An individual applicant and each member of any unincorporated association which...

  4. 7 CFR 1.2 - Policy.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Policy. 1.2 Section 1.2 Agriculture Office of the Secretary of Agriculture ADMINISTRATIVE REGULATIONS Official Records § 1.2 Policy. (a) Agencies of USDA shall comply with the time limits set forth in the FOIA and in this subpart for responding to...

  5. 49 CFR 1.2 - Definitions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Definitions. 1.2 Section 1.2 Transportation Office of the Secretary of Transportation ORGANIZATION AND DELEGATION OF POWERS AND DUTIES General § 1.2 Definitions. As used in this part, Administrator includes: (a) The Federal Aviation Administrator. (b) The Federal Highway Administrator. (c)...

  6. 7 CFR 1.2 - Policy.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Policy. 1.2 Section 1.2 Agriculture Office of the Secretary of Agriculture ADMINISTRATIVE REGULATIONS Official Records § 1.2 Policy. (a) Agencies of USDA shall comply with the time limits set forth in the FOIA and in this subpart for responding to...

  7. 43 CFR 2812.1-2 - Contents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Contents. 2812.1-2 Section 2812.1-2 Public Lands: Interior Regulations Relating to Public Lands (Continued) BUREAU OF LAND MANAGEMENT, DEPARTMENT... Bay Revested Lands § 2812.1-2 Contents. (a) An individual applicant and each member of...

  8. 43 CFR 2812.1-2 - Contents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Contents. 2812.1-2 Section 2812.1-2 Public Lands: Interior Regulations Relating to Public Lands (Continued) BUREAU OF LAND MANAGEMENT, DEPARTMENT... Bay Revested Lands § 2812.1-2 Contents. (a) An individual applicant and each member of...

  9. PARMELA_B: a new version of PARMELA with coherent synchrotron radiation effects and a finite difference space charge routine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koltenbah, Benjamin E. C.; Parazzoli, Claudio G.; Greegor, Robert B.; Dowell, David H.

    2002-07-01

    Recent interest in advanced laser light sources has stimulated development of accelerator systems of intermediate beam energy, 100-200 MeV, and high charge, 1-10 nC, for high power FEL applications and high energy, 1-2 GeV, high charge, SASE-FEL applications. The current generation of beam transport codes which were developed for high-energy, low-charge beams with low self-fields are inadequate to address this energy and charge regime, and better computational tools are required to accurately calculate self-fields. To that end, we have developed a new version of PARMELA, named PARMELA_B and written in Fortran 95, which includes a coherent synchrotron radiation (CSR) routine and an improved, generalized space charge (SC) routine. An electron bunch is simulated by a collection of macro-particles, which traverses a series of beam line elements. At each time step through the calculation, the momentum of each particle is updated due to the presence of external and self-fields. The self-fields are due to CSR and SC. For the CSR calculations, the macro-particles are further combined into macro-particle-bins that follow the central trajectory of the bend. The energy change through the time step is calculated from expressions derived from the Liénard-Wiechart formulae, and from this energy change the particle's momentum is updated. For the SC calculations, we maintain the same rest-frame-electrostatic approach of the original PARMELA; however, we employ a finite difference Poisson equation solver instead of the symmetrical ring algorithm of the original code. In this way, we relax the symmetry assumptions in the original code. This method is based upon standard numerical procedures and conserves momentum to first order. The SC computational grid is adaptive and conforms to the size of the pulse as it evolves through the calculation. We provide descriptions of these two algorithms, validation comparisons with other CSR and SC methods, and a limited comparison with

  10. CCD(charge-coupled device)-based synchrotron x-ray detector for protein crystallography: Performance projected from an experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Strauss, M.G.; Naday, I.; Sherman, I.S.; Kraimer, M.R.; Westbrook, E.M.

    1986-01-01

    The intense x radiation from a synchrotron source could, with a suitable detector, provide a complete set of diffraction images from a protein crystal before the crystal is damaged by radiation (2 to 3 min). An area detector consisting of a 40 mm dia. x-ray fluorescing phosphor, coupled with an image intensifier and lens to a CCD image sensor, was developed to determine the effectiveness of such a detector in protein crystallography. The detector was used in an experiment with a rotating anode x-ray generator. Diffraction patterns from a lysozyme crystal obtained with this detector are compared to those obtained with film. The two images appear to be virtually identical. The flux of 10/sup 4/ x-ray photons/s was observed on the detector at the rotating anode generator. At the 6-GeV synchrotron being designed at Argonne, the flux on an 80 x 80 mm/sup 2/ detector is expected to be >10/sup 9/ photons/s. The projected design of such a synchrotron detector shows that a diffraction-peak count >10/sup 6/ could be obtained in approx.0.5 s. With an additional approx.0.5 s readout time of a 512 x 512 pixel CCD, the data acquisition time per frame would be approx.1 s so that ninety 1/sup 0/ diffraction images could be obtained, with approximately 1% precision, in less than 3 min.

  11. Baryon stopping and charged particle production from lead-lead collisions at 158 GeV per nucleon

    SciTech Connect

    Toy, Milton Y.

    1999-07-01

    Net proton (proton minus antiproton) and negative charge hadron spectra (h-) from central Pb+Pb collisions at 158 GeV per nucleon at the CERN Super Proton Synchrotron were measured and compared to spectra from central collisions of the lighter S+S system. Net baryon distributions were derived from those of net protons and net lambdas. Stopping, or rapidity shift with respect to the beam, of net protons and net baryons increase with system size. The mean transverse momentum &60;pT&62; of net protons also increase with system size. The h- rapidity density scales with the number of participant nucleons for nuclear collisions, where their &60;pT&62; is independent of system size. The &60;pT&62; dependence upon particle mass and system size is consistent with larger transverse flow velocity at midrapidity for central collisions of Pb+Pb compared to that of S+S.

  12. Phase contrast portal imaging using synchrotron radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Umetani, K.; Kondoh, T.

    2014-07-15

    Microbeam radiation therapy is an experimental form of radiation treatment with great potential to improve the treatment of many types of cancer. We applied a synchrotron radiation phase contrast technique to portal imaging to improve targeting accuracy for microbeam radiation therapy in experiments using small animals. An X-ray imaging detector was installed 6.0 m downstream from an object to produce a high-contrast edge enhancement effect in propagation-based phase contrast imaging. Images of a mouse head sample were obtained using therapeutic white synchrotron radiation with a mean beam energy of 130 keV. Compared to conventional portal images, remarkably clear images of bones surrounding the cerebrum were acquired in an air environment for positioning brain lesions with respect to the skull structure without confusion with overlapping surface structures.

  13. Phase contrast portal imaging using synchrotron radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Umetani, K.; Kondoh, T.

    2014-07-01

    Microbeam radiation therapy is an experimental form of radiation treatment with great potential to improve the treatment of many types of cancer. We applied a synchrotron radiation phase contrast technique to portal imaging to improve targeting accuracy for microbeam radiation therapy in experiments using small animals. An X-ray imaging detector was installed 6.0 m downstream from an object to produce a high-contrast edge enhancement effect in propagation-based phase contrast imaging. Images of a mouse head sample were obtained using therapeutic white synchrotron radiation with a mean beam energy of 130 keV. Compared to conventional portal images, remarkably clear images of bones surrounding the cerebrum were acquired in an air environment for positioning brain lesions with respect to the skull structure without confusion with overlapping surface structures.

  14. Resonant diffraction of synchrotron radiation: New possibilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ovchinnikova, E. N.; Mukhamedzhanov, E. Kh.

    2016-09-01

    Resonant diffraction of synchrotron radiation (SR) is a modern method of studying the structure and properties of condensed matter that can be implemented on third-generation synchrotrons. This method allows one to investigate local properties of media (including magnetic and electronic ones) and observe thermal vibrations, defects, and orbital and charge orderings. A brief review of the advance provided by SR resonant diffraction is presented, and the capabilities of this method for analyzing phase transitions are considered in more detail by the example of potassium dihydrogen phosphate and rubidium dihydrogen phosphate crystals. It is shown that the investigation of the temperature dependence of forbidden reflections not only makes it possible to observe the transition from para- to ferroelectric phase, but also gives information about the proton distribution at hydrogen bonds.

  15. Transverse damping systems in modern synchrotrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhabitsky, V. M.

    2006-12-01

    Transverse feedback systems for suppression of transverse coherent beam oscillations are used in modern synchrotrons for preventing the development of transverse instabilities and damping residual beam oscillations after injection. Information on damper systems for the Large Hadron Collider (LHC; CERN, Geneva) and the accelerator complex FAIR (GSI, Darmstadt) is presented. The project for the LHC is being performed at the Laboratory of Particle Physics of the Joint Institute for Nuclear Research in collaboration with CERN. The information concerning the state of the project and the plans of its completion at the LHC is given. The results of the first design activity on transverse damping systems at the SIS100 and SIS300 synchrotrons, to be created in the framework of the new international project FAIR, are presented.

  16. Ideas for future synchrotron light sources

    SciTech Connect

    Jackson, A.; Hassenzahl, W.; Meddahi, M.

    1992-03-01

    Synchrotron light sources have advanced in the past two-to-three decades through three ``generations,`` from irritating parasitic sources on high-energy physics accelerators to dedicated electron and position storage rings of unprecedented low emittance, utilizing undulator and wiggler magnets. The evolution through these three generations followed a predicable, science-driven, course towards brighter beams of VUV- and x-radiation. The requirements of future light sources is not so clear. The limit on how emittance has certainly not been reached, and diffraction-limited sources at shorter wavelengths would be the natural progression from previous generations. However, scientists are now looking at other radiation characteristics that might better serve their needs, for example, more coherent power, fast switching polarization, ultra-short (sub-picosecond) time structure, and synchronized beams for pump-probe experiments. This paper discusses some current ideas that might drive the fourth-generation synchrotron light source.

  17. Ideas for future synchrotron light sources

    SciTech Connect

    Jackson, A.; Hassenzahl, W.; Meddahi, M.

    1992-03-01

    Synchrotron light sources have advanced in the past two-to-three decades through three generations,'' from irritating parasitic sources on high-energy physics accelerators to dedicated electron and position storage rings of unprecedented low emittance, utilizing undulator and wiggler magnets. The evolution through these three generations followed a predicable, science-driven, course towards brighter beams of VUV- and x-radiation. The requirements of future light sources is not so clear. The limit on how emittance has certainly not been reached, and diffraction-limited sources at shorter wavelengths would be the natural progression from previous generations. However, scientists are now looking at other radiation characteristics that might better serve their needs, for example, more coherent power, fast switching polarization, ultra-short (sub-picosecond) time structure, and synchronized beams for pump-probe experiments. This paper discusses some current ideas that might drive the fourth-generation synchrotron light source.

  18. Interpreting 750 GeV diphoton excess in plain NMSSM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Badziak, Marcin; Olechowski, Marek; Pokorski, Stefan; Sakurai, Kazuki

    2016-09-01

    NMSSM has enough ingredients to explain the diphoton excess at 750 GeV: singlet-like (pseudo) scalar (a) s and higgsinos as heavy vector-like fermions. We consider the production of the 750 GeV singlet-like pseudo scalar a from a decay of the doublet-like pseudo scalar A, and the subsequent decay of a into two photons via higgsino loop. We demonstrate that this cascade decay of the NMSSM Higgs bosons can explain the diphoton excess at 750 GeV.

  19. Diffraction imaging (topography) with monochromatic synchrotron radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Steiner, B.; Kuriyama, M.; Dobbyn, R.C.; Laor, U.

    1988-01-01

    Structural information of special interest to crystal growers and device physicists is now available from high resolution monochromatic synchrotron diffraction imaging (topography). In the review, the importance of superior resolution in momentum transfer and in space is described, and illustrations are taken from a variety of crystals: gallium arsenide, cadmium telluride, mercuric iodide, bismuth silicon oxide, and lithium niobate. The identification and understanding of local variations in crystal growth processes are shown. Finally, new experimental opportunities now available for exploitation are indicated.

  20. The time variability of Jupiter's synchrotron radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bolton, Scott Jay

    1991-02-01

    The time variability of the Jovian synchrotron emission is investigated by analyzing radio observations of Jupiter at decimetric wavelengths. The observations are composed from two distinct sets of measurements addressing both short term (days to weeks) and long term (months to years) variability. The study of long term variations utilizes a set of measurements made several times each month with the NASA Deep Space Network (DNS) antennas operating at 2295 MHz (13.1 cm). The DSN data set, covering 1971 through 1985, is compared with a set of measurements of the solar wind from a number of Earth orbiting spacecraft. The analysis indicates a maximum correlation between the synchrotron emission and the solar wind ram pressure with a two year time lag. Physical mechanisms affecting the synchrotron emission are discussed with an emphasis on radial diffusion. Calculations are performed that suggest the correlation is consistent with inward adiabatic diffusion of solar wind particles driven by Brice's model of ionospheric neutral wind convection (Brice 1972). The implication is that the solar wind could be a source of particles of Jupiter's radiation belts. The investigation of short term variability focuses on a three year Jupiter observing program using the University of California's Hat Creek radio telescope operating at 1400 MHz (21 cm). Measurements are made every two days during the months surrounding opposition. Results from the three year program suggest short term variability near the 10-20 percent level but should be considered inconclusive due to scheduling and observational limitations. A discussion of magneto-spheric processes on short term timescales identifies wave-particle interactions as a candidate source. Further analysis finds that the short term variations could be related to whistler mode wave-particles interactions in the radiation belts associated with atmospheric lightning on Jupiter. However, theoretical calculations on wave particle interactions

  1. Coherent synchrotron radiation: Theory and experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Courtland L. Bohn

    2002-07-19

    Our understanding of the generation of coherent synchrotron radiation in magnetic bending systems and its impact on beam dynamics has grown considerably over the past few years. The search for understanding has brought a number of surprises, all related to the complexity of the fully self-consistent problem. Herein I survey the associated phenomenology, theory, and experiments while emphasizing important subtleties that have recently been uncovered. I conclude by speculating on courses of future investigations that may prove fruitful.

  2. MICROANALYSIS OF MATERIALS USING SYNCHROTRON RADIATION.

    SciTech Connect

    JONES,K.W.; FENG,H.

    2000-12-01

    High intensity synchrotron radiation produces photons with wavelengths that extend from the infrared to hard x rays with energies of hundreds of keV with uniquely high photon intensities that can be used to determine the composition and properties of materials using a variety of techniques. Most of these techniques represent extensions of earlier work performed with ordinary tube-type x-ray sources. The properties of the synchrotron source such as the continuous range of energy, high degree of photon polarization, pulsed beams, and photon flux many orders of magnitude higher than from x-ray tubes have made possible major advances in the possible chemical applications. We describe here ways that materials analyses can be made using the high intensity beams for measurements with small beam sizes and/or high detection sensitivity. The relevant characteristics of synchrotron x-ray sources are briefly summarized to give an idea of the x-ray parameters to be exploited. The experimental techniques considered include x-ray fluorescence, absorption, and diffraction. Examples of typical experimental apparatus used in these experiments are considered together with descriptions of actual applications.

  3. THE SYNCHROTRON EMISSION MECHANISM IN THE RECENTLY DETECTED VERY HIGH ENERGY RADIATION FROM THE CRAB PULSAR

    SciTech Connect

    George, Machabeli; Zaza, Osmanov E-mail: z.osmanov@astro-ge.org

    2009-08-01

    Interpretation of the recently discovered very high energy (VHE) pulsed emission from the Crab pulsar is presented. By taking into account the fact that Crab pulsar's radiation for the optical and VHE spectrum peak at the same phases, we argue that the source of this broadband emission is spatially localized. It is shown that the only mechanism providing the results of the MAGIC Cherenkov telescope should be synchrotron radiation. We find that in the magnetospheric electron-positron plasma, due to the cyclotron instability, the pitch angle becomes non-vanishing, which leads to an efficient synchrotron mechanism, intensifying on the light cylinder length scales. We also estimate the VHE radiation spectral index to be equal to -1/2.

  4. a Study of the Synchrotron Laue Method for Quantitative Crystal Structure Analysis.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gomez de Anderez, Dora M.

    1990-01-01

    Available from UMI in association with The British Library. Quantitative crystal structure analyses have been carried out on small molecule crystals using synchrotron radiation and the Laue method. A variety of single crystal structure determinations and associated refinements are used and compared with the monochromatic analyses. The new molecular structure of 7-amino-5-bromo -4-methyl-2-oxo-1,2,3,4-tetrahidro-1, 6 -naphthyridine-8-carbonitrile (C_{10 }H_9ON_4 Br.H_2O) has been determined, first using monochromatic Mo Kalpha radiation and a four-circle diffractometer, then using synchrotron Laue diffraction photography. The structure refinements showed a R-factor of 4.97 and 14.0% for the Mo Kalpha and Laue data respectively. The molecular structure of (S)-2-chloro-2-fluoro-N-((S)-1-phenylethyl) ethanamide, (C_{10}H _{11}ClFNO), has been determined using the same crystal throughout for X-ray monochromatic analyses (Mo Kalpha and Cu K alpha) followed by synchrotron Laue data collection. The Laue and monochromatic data compare favourably. The R -factors (on F) were 6.23, 6.45 and 8.19% for the Mo K alpha, Cu Kalpha and Laue data sets respectively. The molecular structure of 3-(5-hydroxy-3-methyl-1-phenylpyrazol-4-yl)-1,3-diphenyl -prop- 2-en-1-one, (C_{25 }H_{20}N _2O_2) has been determined using the synchrotron Laue method. The results compare very well with Mo Kalpha monochromatic data. The R-factors (on F) were 4.60 and 5.29% for Mo Kalpha and Laue analysis respectively. The Laue method is assessed in locating the 20 hydrogen atoms in this structure. The structure analysis of the benzil compound ((C_6H_5 O.CO_2)) is carried out using the synchrotron Laue method firstly at room temperature and secondly at low temperature -114 ^circC. The structure shows an R-factor (on F) of 13.06% and 6.85% for each data set respectively. The synchrotron Laue method was used to collect data for ergocalciferol (Vitamin D_2). The same crystal was also used to record oscillation

  5. A Study of the Synchrotron Laue Method for Quantitative Crystal Structure Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gomez de Anderez, Dora M.

    1990-01-01

    Quantitative crystal structure analyses have been carried out on small molecule crystals using synchrotron radiation and the Laue method. A variety of single crystal structure determinations and associated refinements are used and compared with the monochromatic analyses. The new molecular structure of 7-amino-5-bromo -4-methyl-2-oxo-1,2,3,4 -tetrahidro-1,6 -naphthyridine-8-carbonitrile (C_{10 }H_9ON_4 BrcdotH_2O) has been determined, first using monochromatic Mo K alpha radiation and a four-circle diffractometer, then using synchrotron Laue diffraction photography. The structure refinements showed an R-factor of 4.97 and 14.0% for the Mo Kalpha and Laue data respectively. The molecular structure of (S)-2-chloro-2-fluoro-N-((S)-1-phenylethyl) ethanamide, (C_{10}H _{11}ClFNO), has been determined using the same crystal throughout for X-ray monochromatic analyses (Mo Kalpha and Cu K alpha) followed by synchrotron Laue data collection. The Laue and monochromatic data compare favourably. The R -factors (on F) were 6.23, 6.45 and 8.19% for the Mo K alpha, Cu Kalpha and Laue data sets respectively. The molecular structure of 3-(5-hydroxy-3-methyl-1-phenylpyrazol-4-yl)-1,3-diphenyl -prop-2-en-1-one, (C_{25}H _{20}N_2 O_2) has been determined using the synchrotron Laue method. The results compare very well with Mo Kalpha monochromatic data. The R-factors (on F) were 4.60 and 5.29% for Mo Kalpha and Laue analyses respectively. The Laue method is assessed in locating the 20 hydrogen atoms in this structure. The structure analyses of the benzil compound ((C_6H_5 OcdotCO_2)) is carried out using the synchrotron Laue method firstly at room temperature and secondly at low temperature. The structure shows an R-factor (on F) of 13.06% and 6.85% for each data set respectively. The synchrotron Laue method was used to collect data for ergocalciferol (Vitamin D_2). The same crystal was also used to record oscillation data with the synchrotron radiation monochromatic beam. A new

  6. New results from the studies of the Ν (1440) 1/2+, Ν (1520) 3/2–, and Δ (1620) 1/2– resonances in exclusive ep → e'p'π+π– electroproduction with the CLAS detector

    DOE PAGES

    Mokeev, Viktor I.; Burkert, Volker D.; Carman, Daniel S.; Elouadrhiri, Latifa; Fedotov, Gleb V.; Golovatch, Evgeny N.; Gothe, Ralf W.; Hicks, Ken; Ishkhanov, Boris S.; Isupov, Evgeny L.; et al

    2016-02-25

    In this study, the transition helicity amplitudes from the proton ground state to the N(1440)1/2+, N(1520)3/2–, and Δ(1620)1/2– resonances (γvpN* electrocouplings) were determined from the analysis of nine independent onefold differential π+π–p electroproduction cross sections off a proton target, taken with CLAS at photon virtualities 0.5GeV2 < Q2 < 1.5 GeV2. The phenomenological reaction model employed for separation of the resonant and nonresonant contributions to this exclusive channel was further developed.

  7. Biological applications of synchrotron radiation infrared spectromicroscopy.

    PubMed

    Marcelli, Augusto; Cricenti, Antonio; Kwiatek, Wojciech M; Petibois, Cyril

    2012-01-01

    Extremely brilliant infrared (IR) beams provided by synchrotron radiation sources are now routinely used in many facilities with available commercial spectrometers coupled to IR microscopes. Using these intense non-thermal sources, a brilliance two or three order of magnitude higher than a conventional source is achievable through small pinholes (<10 μm) with a high signal to-noise ratio. IR spectroscopy is a powerful technique to investigate biological systems and offers many new imaging opportunities. The field of infrared biological imaging covers a wide range of fundamental issues and applied researches such as cell imaging or tissue imaging. Molecular maps with a spatial resolution down to the diffraction limit may be now obtained with a synchrotron radiation IR source also on thick samples. Moreover, changes of the protein structure are detectable in an IR spectrum and cellular molecular markers can be identified and used to recognize a pathological status of a tissue. Molecular structure and functions are strongly correlated and this aspect is particularly relevant for imaging. We will show that the brilliance of synchrotron radiation IR sources may enhance the sensitivity of a molecular signal obtained from small biosamples, e.g., a single cell, containing extremely small amounts of organic matter. We will also show that SR IR sources allow to study chemical composition and to identify the distribution of organic molecules in cells at submicron resolution is possible with a high signal-to-noise ratio. Moreover, the recent availability of two-dimensional IR detectors promises to push forward imaging capabilities in the time domain. Indeed, with a high current synchrotron radiation facility and a Focal Plane Array the chemical imaging of individual cells can be obtained in a few minutes. Within this framework important results are expected in the next years using synchrotron radiation and Free Electron Laser (FEL) sources for spectro-microscopy and spectral

  8. X-Ray Counterparts of Puzzling Gev-Tev Sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kargaltsev, Oleg

    2014-09-01

    We propose to look for X-ray counterparts of the extended TeV source HESS J1616-508 that may also have been detected with Fermi at GeV energies. The nature of the source and the connection between the TeV source and the nearby GeV sources are unknown. It has been suggested that it may be a relic plerion powered by the offset PSR J1617-5055, but a deep Chandra observation of this pulsar and its wind nebula has not confirmed this hypothesis. To understand the nature of this long-standing "dark accelerator", we propose to observe the GeV sources (which could be young pulsars) and another nearby young pulsar (J1614-5048) to check whether or not they could supply relativistic particles and power the TeV source. We will also explore the nature of the GeV sources.

  9. Medical applications of synchrotron radiation at the National Synchrotron Light Source

    SciTech Connect

    Thomlinson, W.

    1992-01-01

    The overriding features of the synchrotron beams which make them applicable to medical research are their extremely high intensity and broadband energy spectrum. Several orders of magnitude separate the smooth, continuous spectrum of the synchrotron from the sharply peaked characteristic emission spectrum of a conventional source. Basically, the high intensity and tunability allow monochromatic beams to be generated at virtually any energy. The standard problem of beam hardening in both medical imaging and therapy is eliminated by the monochromatic beams since the energy spectrum does not change with passage through tissue. The tunable spectrum allows enhancement of images and therapeutic dose by selection of the most effective energy for a given procedure.

  10. Medical applications of synchrotron radiation at the National Synchrotron Light Source

    SciTech Connect

    Thomlinson, W.

    1992-10-01

    The overriding features of the synchrotron beams which make them applicable to medical research are their extremely high intensity and broadband energy spectrum. Several orders of magnitude separate the smooth, continuous spectrum of the synchrotron from the sharply peaked characteristic emission spectrum of a conventional source. Basically, the high intensity and tunability allow monochromatic beams to be generated at virtually any energy. The standard problem of beam hardening in both medical imaging and therapy is eliminated by the monochromatic beams since the energy spectrum does not change with passage through tissue. The tunable spectrum allows enhancement of images and therapeutic dose by selection of the most effective energy for a given procedure.

  11. 23 CFR 1.2 - Definitions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 23 Highways 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Definitions. 1.2 Section 1.2 Highways FEDERAL HIGHWAY... shall have the following meaning: Administrator. The Federal Highway Administrator. Advertising policy... laws, heretofore or hereafter enacted, relating to Federal aid for highways. Latest available...

  12. 23 CFR 1.2 - Definitions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 23 Highways 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Definitions. 1.2 Section 1.2 Highways FEDERAL HIGHWAY... shall have the following meaning: Administrator. The Federal Highway Administrator. Advertising policy... laws, heretofore or hereafter enacted, relating to Federal aid for highways. Latest available...

  13. 23 CFR 1.2 - Definitions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 23 Highways 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Definitions. 1.2 Section 1.2 Highways FEDERAL HIGHWAY... shall have the following meaning: Administrator. The Federal Highway Administrator. Advertising policy... laws, heretofore or hereafter enacted, relating to Federal aid for highways. Latest available...

  14. 23 CFR 1.2 - Definitions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 23 Highways 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Definitions. 1.2 Section 1.2 Highways FEDERAL HIGHWAY... shall have the following meaning: Administrator. The Federal Highway Administrator. Advertising policy... laws, heretofore or hereafter enacted, relating to Federal aid for highways. Latest available...

  15. 23 CFR 1.2 - Definitions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 23 Highways 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Definitions. 1.2 Section 1.2 Highways FEDERAL HIGHWAY... shall have the following meaning: Administrator. The Federal Highway Administrator. Advertising policy... laws, heretofore or hereafter enacted, relating to Federal aid for highways. Latest available...

  16. 24 CFR 1.2 - Definitions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... participates in carrying out such program or activity (such as a redeveloper in the Urban Renewal Program... 24 Housing and Urban Development 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Definitions. 1.2 Section 1.2 Housing and Urban Development Office of the Secretary, Department of Housing and Urban...

  17. 24 CFR 1.2 - Definitions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... participates in carrying out such program or activity (such as a redeveloper in the Urban Renewal Program... 24 Housing and Urban Development 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Definitions. 1.2 Section 1.2 Housing and Urban Development Office of the Secretary, Department of Housing and Urban...

  18. 24 CFR 1.2 - Definitions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... participates in carrying out such program or activity (such as a redeveloper in the Urban Renewal Program... 24 Housing and Urban Development 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Definitions. 1.2 Section 1.2 Housing and Urban Development Office of the Secretary, Department of Housing and Urban...

  19. 24 CFR 1.2 - Definitions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... participates in carrying out such program or activity (such as a redeveloper in the Urban Renewal Program... 24 Housing and Urban Development 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Definitions. 1.2 Section 1.2 Housing and Urban Development Office of the Secretary, Department of Housing and Urban...

  20. 24 CFR 1.2 - Definitions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... participates in carrying out such program or activity (such as a redeveloper in the Urban Renewal Program... 24 Housing and Urban Development 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Definitions. 1.2 Section 1.2 Housing and Urban Development Office of the Secretary, Department of Housing and Urban...

  1. 8 CFR 1.2 - Definitions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 8 Aliens and Nationality 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Definitions. 1.2 Section 1.2 Aliens and... alien means an applicant for admission coming or attempting to come into the United States at a port-of-entry, or an alien seeking transit through the United States at a port-of-entry, or an alien...

  2. 45 CFR 1210.1-2 - Scope.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Scope. 1210.1-2 Section 1210.1-2 Public Welfare Regulations Relating to Public Welfare (Continued) CORPORATION FOR NATIONAL AND COMMUNITY SERVICE VISTA... separation of any Trainee or Volunteer. Separate procedures, as detailed in the VISTA Handbook,...

  3. Channeling, volume reflection and gamma emission using 14GeV electrons in bent silicon crystals - Oral presentation

    SciTech Connect

    Benson, Brandon

    2015-08-23

    High energy electrons can be deflected with very tight bending radius using a bent silicon crystal. This produces gamma radiation. As these crystals can be thin, a series of bent silicon crystals with alternating direction has the potential to produce coherent gamma radiation with reasonable energy of the driving electron beam. Such an electron crystal undulator offers the prospect for higher energy radiation at lower cost than current methods. Permanent magnetic undulators like LCLS at SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory are expensive and very large (about 100 m in case of the LCLS undulator). Silicon crystals are inexpensive and compact when compared to the large magnetic undulators. Additionally, such a high energy coherent light source could be used for probing through materials currently impenetrable by x-rays. In this work we present the experimental data and analysis of experiment T523 conducted at SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory. We collected the spectrum of gamma ray emission from 14 GeV electrons on a bent silicon crystal counting single photons. We also investigated the dynamics of electron motion in the crystal i.e. processes of channeling and volume reflection at 14 GeV, extending and building off previous work. Our single photon spectrum for the amorphous crystal orientation is consistent with bremsstrahlung radiation and the volume reflection crystal orientation shows a trend consistent with synchrotron radiation at a critical energy of 740 MeV. We observe that in these two cases the data are consistent, but we make no further claims because of statistical limitations. We also extended the known energy range of electron crystal dechanneling length and channeling efficiency to 14 GeV.

  4. Gamma-ray connection of Pulsars-Pulsar Wind Nebulae: From GeV to TeV energies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    López-Coto, Rubén; de Ona Wilhelmi, Emma

    2015-08-01

    Pulsars are the remnants of massive star explosions and Pulsar Wind Nebulae (PWNe) are the bubbles of relativistic particles and magnetic field surrounding pulsars. The acceleration in PWNe is produced when the pulsar's relativistic wind interacts with its surrounding medium and particles are accelerated at the shock region. The non-thermal photon emission ranges from the radio to the very-high-energy (VHE) range and it is believed to be originated in synchrotron, curvature and inverse Compton processes.So far, pulsars and PWNe represent the largest population of identified GeV and TeV sources. In this contribution, we will describe the recent measurements on young PWNe such as the Crab whose inverse Compton peak was recently accurately determined. We will also discuss the origin of the GeV gamma-ray flares and their non-detection at any other wavelength, together with the recent reports of pulsed emission up to TeV energies. This result evidences the extreme acceleration of electrons in the surrounding of the Crab pulsar, up to Lorenz factors of 5 × 106. We will also put in context the recent discovery of VHE pulsed emission from the Vela pulsar. We will discuss the case of the inefficient pulsar at the center of 3C 58, a PWN discovered by Fermi at GeV energies and by MAGIC at TeV. In addition, we will also present population studies comparing several properties of the central engine such as age or spin-down power with the gamma-ray luminosity of their surrounding PWNe. We will finally show the measurement prospects for this kind of sources with the future Cherenkov Telescope Array.

  5. Atomic photoelectron-spectroscopy studies using synchrotron radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Kobrin, P.H.

    1983-02-01

    Photoelectron spectroscopy combined with tunable synchrotron radiation has been used to study the photoionization process in several atomic systems. The time structure of the synchrotron radiation source at the Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory (SSRL) was used to record time-of-flight (TOF) photoelectron spectra of gaseous Cd, Hg, Ne, Ar, Ba, and Mn. The use of two TOF analyzers made possible the measurement of photoelectron angular distributions as well as branching ratios and partial cross sections.

  6. Impact of synchrotron radiation on macromolecular crystallography: a personal view

    PubMed Central

    Dauter, Zbigniew; Jaskolski, Mariusz; Wlodawer, Alexander

    2010-01-01

    The introduction of synchrotron radiation sources almost four decades ago has led to a revolutionary change in the way that diffraction data from macromolecular crystals are being collected. Here a brief history of the development of methodologies that took advantage of the availability of synchrotron sources are presented, and some personal experiences with the utilization of synchrotrons in the early days are recalled. PMID:20567074

  7. NATIONAL SYNCHROTRON LIGHT SOURCE ACTIVITY REPORT 1998.

    SciTech Connect

    ROTHMAN,E.

    1999-05-01

    In FY 1998, following the 50th Anniversary Year of Brookhaven National Laboratory, Brookhaven Science Associates became the new Managers of BNL. The new start is an appropriate time to take stock of past achievements and to renew or confirm future goals. During the 1998 NSLS Annual Users Meeting (described in Part 3 of this Activity Report), the DOE Laboratory Operations Board, Chaired by the Under Secretary for Energy, Ernest Moniz met at BNL. By chance all the NSLS Chairmen except Martin Blume (acting NSLS Chair 84-85) were present as recorded in the picture. Under their leadership the NSLS has improved dramatically: (1) The VUV Ring current has increased from 100 mA in October 1982 to nearly 1 A today. For the following few years 10 Ahrs of current were delivered most weeks - NSLS now exceeds that every day. (2) When the first experiments were performed on the X-ray ring during FY1985 the electron energy was 2 GeV and the current up to 100 mA - the X-Ray Ring now runs routinely at 2.5 GeV and at 2.8 GeV with up to 350 mA of current, with a very much longer beam half-life and improved reliability. (3) Starting in FY 1984 the proposal for the Phase II upgrade, mainly for a building extension and a suite of insertion devices and their associated beamlines, was pursued - the promises were delivered in full so that for some years now the NSLS has been running with two undulators in the VUV Ring and three wigglers and an undulator in the X-Ray Ring. In addition two novel insertion devices have been commissioned in the X13 straight. (4) At the start of FY 1998 the NSLS welcomed its 7000th user - attracted by the opportunity for pursuing research with high quality beams, guaranteed not to be interrupted by 'delivery failures', and welcomed by an efficient and caring user office and first class teams of PRT and NSLS staff. R & D have lead to the possibility of running the X-Ray Ring at the higher energy of 2.8 GeV. Figure 1 shows the first user beam, which was provided

  8. Bystander Effects During Synchrotron Imaging Procedures?

    SciTech Connect

    Schueltke, Elisabeth; Nikkhah, Guido; Bewer, Brian; Wysokinski, Tomasz; Chapman, Dean

    2010-07-23

    Using monochromatic beam and synchrotron phase-contrast technique at the biomedical beamline of the Italian synchrotron facility Elettra (SYRMEP), we have shown in a small animal model of malignant brain tumor that it is possible to obtain high-resolution images of very small tumors when they have developed from implanted tumor cells loaded with colloidal gold nanoparticles (GNP). All previous experiments were conducted in post-mortem samples. We have now designed a cell culture experiment to investigate the effects of synchrotron radiation with an energy and dose profile similar to that expected in our first in vivo imaging studies according to the protocol developed at SYRMEP.Materials and Methods: Culture flasks containing either gold-loaded or naieve C6 glioma cells were exposed to a dose of 0.5 Gy at 24 keV. The irradiated medium was aspirated and replaced with fresh growth medium. Twenty-four hours later this non-irradiated medium exposed to irradiated cells was aspirated, then added to non-irradiated C6 cells in order to investigate whether bystander effects are seen under the conditions of our image acquisition protocol. The irradiated medium was added to a number of other non-irradiated cell cultures. Cell counts were followed until 72 hrs after irradiation. Western blots were conducted with H2AX antibodies. This experiment was one of the first biomedical experiments conducted at BMIT, the new biomedical imaging and therapy beamline of the Canadian Light Source.Results: No significant differences in proliferation were seen between cells that were directly irradiated, exposed to irradiated medium or exposed to the non-irradiated 24-hr-medium from the irradiated cells. However, there was a tendency towards a higher number of double strand breaks in previously irradiated cells when they were exposed to non-irradiated medium that had been in contact with irradiated cells for 24 hrs.

  9. Bystander Effects During Synchrotron Imaging Procedures?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schültke, Elisabeth; Bewer, Brian; Wysokinski, Tomasz; Chapman, Dean; Nikkhah, Guido

    2010-07-01

    Using monochromatic beam and synchrotron phase-contrast technique at the biomedical beamline of the Italian synchrotron facility Elettra (SYRMEP), we have shown in a small animal model of malignant brain tumor that it is possible to obtain high-resolution images of very small tumors when they have developed from implanted tumor cells loaded with colloidal gold nanoparticles (GNP). All previous experiments were conducted in post-mortem samples. We have now designed a cell culture experiment to investigate the effects of synchrotron radiation with an energy and dose profile similar to that expected in our first in vivo imaging studies according to the protocol developed at SYRMEP. Materials and Methods: Culture flasks containing either gold-loaded or naïve C6 glioma cells were exposed to a dose of 0.5 Gy at 24 keV. The irradiated medium was aspirated and replaced with fresh growth medium. Twenty-four hours later this non-irradiated medium exposed to irradiated cells was aspirated, then added to non-irradiated C6 cells in order to investigate whether bystander effects are seen under the conditions of our image acquisition protocol. The irradiated medium was added to a number of other non-irradiated cell cultures. Cell counts were followed until 72 hrs after irradiation. Western blots were conducted with H2AX antibodies. This experiment was one of the first biomedical experiments conducted at BMIT, the new biomedical imaging and therapy beamline of the Canadian Light Source. Results: No significant differences in proliferation were seen between cells that were directly irradiated, exposed to irradiated medium or exposed to the non-irradiated 24-hr-medium from the irradiated cells. However, there was a tendency towards a higher number of double strand breaks in previously irradiated cells when they were exposed to non-irradiated medium that had been in contact with irradiated cells for 24 hrs.

  10. Ampicillin Trihydrate from Synchrotron Powder Diffraction Data

    SciTech Connect

    Burley,J.; van de Streek, J.; Stephens, P.

    2006-01-01

    The crystal structure of ampicillin trihydrate {l_brace}systematic name: 6-[D(-)-{alpha}-aminophenylacetamido]penicillanic acid trihydrate{r_brace}, C{sub 16}H{sub 19}N{sub 3}O{sub 4}S{center_dot}3H{sub 2}O, a broad-spectrum {beta}-lactam antibiotic of the aminopenicillin type, has been determined from synchrotron X-ray powder diffraction data. The three water molecules form an infinite hydrogen-bonded chain through the crystal structure, with hydrogen bonds to the NH{sub 3}{sup +}, COO{sup -}, C{double_bond}O and NH groups of the ampicillin molecules.

  11. X-ray microscopy using synchrotron radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, K.W.; Gordon, B.M.; Hanson, A.L.; Pounds, J.G.; Rivers, M.L.; Schidlovsky, G.; Smith, J.V.; Spanne, P.; Sutton, S.R.

    1989-01-01

    The system for x-ray microscopy now being developed at the X-26 beam line of the Brookhaven National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS) is described here. Examples of the use of x-ray microscopy for trace element geochemistry, biology and medicine, and materials investigations are given to emphasize the scientific applications of the technique. Future directions for the improvement and further development of the X-26 microscope and of the x-ray microscopy field in general are discussed. 11 refs., 7 figs.

  12. Synchrotron-Radiation-Based Moessbauer Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Seto, Makoto; Masuda, Ryo; Mitsui, Takaya; Higashitaniguchi, Satoshi; Kitao, Shinji; Kobayashi, Yasuhiro; Inaba, Chika; Yoda, Yoshitaka

    2009-05-29

    We have developed a new method that yields Moessbauer absorption spectra using synchrotron radiation (SR); this method is applicable for almost all Moessbauer nuclides including those that cannot be measured by previous methods using radioisotope (RI) sources. The Moessbauer spectrum of the 68.752 keV excited state of {sup 73}Ge, which cannot be measured using a RI source, was measured using SR. Our results show that this method can be used to perform advanced Moessbauer spectroscopy measurements owing to the excellent features of SR.

  13. Variable-Period Undulators For Synchrotron Radiation

    DOEpatents

    Shenoy, Gopal; Lewellen, John; Shu, Deming; Vinokurov, Nikolai

    2005-02-22

    A new and improved undulator design is provided that enables a variable period length for the production of synchrotron radiation from both medium-energy and high-energy storage rings. The variable period length is achieved using a staggered array of pole pieces made up of high permeability material, permanent magnet material, or an electromagnetic structure. The pole pieces are separated by a variable width space. The sum of the variable width space and the pole width would therefore define the period of the undulator. Features and advantages of the invention include broad photon energy tunability, constant power operation and constant brilliance operation.

  14. Synchrotron beam coherence: a spatially resolved measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tran, C. Q.; Peele, A. G.; Roberts, A.; Nugent, K. A.; Paterson, D.; McNulty, I.

    2005-01-01

    We report a precise and spatially resolved measurement of the complex degree of coherence of a one-dimensional 1.5-keV beam produced by a third-generation synchrotron source. The method of phase-space tomography is used, which requires only measurements of the x-ray intensity. We find that the field is statistically stationary to within experimental error, the correlations are very well approximated by a Gaussian distribution, and the measured coherence length is in excellent agreement with expectations.

  15. Bent approximations to synchrotron radiation optics

    SciTech Connect

    Heald, S.

    1981-01-01

    Ideal optical elements can be approximated by bending flats or cylinders. This paper considers the applications of these approximate optics to synchrotron radiation. Analytic and raytracing studies are used to compare their optical performance with the corresponding ideal elements. It is found that for many applications the performance is adequate, with the additional advantages of lower cost and greater flexibility. Particular emphasis is placed on obtaining the practical limitations on the use of the approximate elements in typical beamline configurations. Also considered are the possibilities for approximating very long length mirrors using segmented mirrors.

  16. Spherical quartz crystals investigated with synchrotron radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Pereira, N. R.; Macrander, A. T.; Hill, K. W.; Baronova, E. O.; George, K. M.; Kotick, J.

    2015-10-15

    The quality of x-ray spectra and images obtained from plasmas with spherically bent crystals depends in part on the crystal’s x-ray diffraction across the entire crystal surface. We employ the energy selectivity and high intensity of synchrotron radiation to examine typical spherical crystals from alpha-quartz for their diffraction quality, in a perpendicular geometry that is particularly convenient to examine sagittal focusing. The crystal’s local diffraction is not ideal: the most noticeable problems come from isolated regions that so far have failed to correlate with visible imperfections. Excluding diffraction from such problem spots has little effect on the focus beyond a decrease in background.

  17. Aspherical lens shapes for focusing synchrotron beams.

    PubMed

    Sanchez del Rio, Manuel; Alianelli, Lucia

    2012-05-01

    Aspherical surfaces required for focusing collimated and divergent synchrotron beams using a single refractive element (lens) are reviewed. The Cartesian oval, a lens shape that produces perfect point-to-point focusing for monochromatic radiation, is studied in the context of X-ray beamlines. Optical surfaces that approximate ideal shapes are compared. Results are supported by ray-tracing simulations. Elliptical lenses, rather than parabolic, are preferred for nanofocusing X-rays because of the higher peak and lower tails in the intensity distribution. Cartesian ovals will improve the gain when using high-demagnification lenses of high numerical aperture. PMID:22514171

  18. Variable-Period Undulators for Synchrotron Radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Shenoy, Gopal; Lewellen, John; Shu, Deming; Vinokurov, Nikolai

    2005-02-22

    A new and improved undulator design is provided that enables a variable period length for the production of synchrotron radiation from both medium-energy and high energy storage rings. The variable period length is achieved using a staggered array of pole pieces made up of high permeability material, permanent magnet material, or an electromagnetic structure. The pole pieces are separated by a variable width space. The sum of the variable width space and the pole width would therefore define the period of the undulator. Features and advantages of the invention include broad photon energy tunability, constant power operation and constant brilliance operation.

  19. Nonthermal Synchrotron and Synchrotron Self-Compton Emission from GRBs: Predictions for Swift and GLAST

    SciTech Connect

    Finke, Justin D.; Boettcher, Markus

    2008-05-22

    Results of a leptonic jet model for the prompt emission and early afterglows of GRBs are presented. The synchrotron component is modeled with the canonical Band spectrum and the synchrotron self-Compton component is calculated from the implied synchrotron-emitting electron spectrum in a relativistic plasma blob. In the comoving frame the magnetic field is assumed to be tangled and the electron and photon distributions are assumed to be isotropic. The Compton-scattered spectrum is calculated using the full Compton cross-section in the Thomson through Klein-Nishina using the Jones formula. Pair production photoabsorption, both from ambient radiation in the jet and from the extragalactic background light (EBL), is taken into account. Results are presented as a function of a small set of parameters: the Doppler factor, the observed variability timescale, the comoving magnetic field, the peak synchrotron flux, and the redshift of the burst. Model predictions will be tested by multiwavelength observations, including the Swift and GLAST satellites, which will provide unprecedented coverage of GRBs.

  20. Synchrotron and Synchrotron Self-Compton Spectral Signatures and Blazar Emission Models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chiang, James; Boettcher, Markus; White, Nicholas E. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    We find that energy losses due to synchrotron self-Compton (BBC) emission in Blazar jets can produce distinctive signatures in the time-averaged synchrotron and SSC spectra of these objects. For a fairly broad range of particle injection distributions, SSC-loss-dominated synchrotron emission exhibits a spectral dependence Fv approximately v (exp -3/2). The presence or absence of this dependence in the optical and ultraviolet spectra of flat-spectrum radio quasars such as PC 279 and in the soft X-ray spectra of high-frequency BL Lac objects such as Mark 501 gives a robust measure of the importance of SSC losses. Furthermore, for partially cooled particle distributions, spectral breaks of varying sizes can appear in the synchrotron and SSC spectra and will be related to the spectral indices of the emission below the break. These spectral signatures place constraints on the size scale and the nonthermal particle content of the emitting plasma, as well as the observer orientation relative to the jet axis.

  1. Electric field induced lattice strain in pseudocubic Bi(Mg1/2Ti1/2)O3-modified BaTiO3-BiFeO3 piezoelectric ceramics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujii, Ichiro; Iizuka, Ryo; Nakahira, Yuki; Sunada, Yuya; Ueno, Shintaro; Nakashima, Kouichi; Magome, Eisuke; Moriyoshi, Chikako; Kuroiwa, Yoshihiro; Wada, Satoshi

    2016-04-01

    Contributions to the piezoelectric response in pseudocubic 0.3BaTiO3-0.1Bi(Mg1/2Ti1/2)O3-0.6BiFeO3 ceramics were investigated by synchrotron X-ray diffraction under electric fields. All of the lattice strain determined from the 110, 111, and 200 pseudocubic diffraction peaks showed similar lattice strain hysteresis that was comparable to the bulk butterfly-like strain curve. It was suggested that the hysteresis of the lattice strain and the lack of anisotropy were related to the complex domain structure and the phase boundary composition.

  2. 45 CFR 1211.1-2 - Applicability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... VOLUNTEER GRIEVANCE PROCEDURES § 1211.1-2 Applicability. This part applies to all volunteers enrolled under part A of title I of the Domestic Volunteer Service Act of 1973, as amended, Pub. L. 93-113, (42...

  3. 45 CFR 1211.1-2 - Applicability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... VOLUNTEER GRIEVANCE PROCEDURES § 1211.1-2 Applicability. This part applies to all volunteers enrolled under part A of title I of the Domestic Volunteer Service Act of 1973, as amended, Pub. L. 93-113, (42...

  4. AC conductivity and relaxation mechanism in (Nd1/2Li1/2)(Fe1/2V1/2)O3 ceramics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nath, Susmita; Barik, Subrat Kumar; Choudhary, R. N. P.

    2016-05-01

    In the present study we have synthesized polycrystalline sample of (Nd1/2Li1/2)(Fe1/2V1/2)O3 ceramic by a standard high-temperature solid-state reaction technique. Studies of dielectric and electrical properties of the compound have been carried out in a wide range of temperature (RT - 400 °C) and frequency (1kHz - 1MHz) using complex impedance spectroscopic technique. The imaginary vs. real component of the complex impedance plot (Nyquist plot) of the prepared sample exhibits the existence of grain, grain boundary contributions in the complex electrical parameters and negative temperature coefficient of resistance (NTCR) type behavior like semiconductor. Details study of ac conductivity plot reveals that the material obeys universal Jonscher's power law.

  5. Cloaking spin-(1/2) matter waves

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, De-Hone

    2010-06-15

    A physical construct for the cloaking of relativistic spin-(1/2) matter waves is proposed. It is shown that when the effective energy and mass of relativistic spin-(1/2) particles moving in an effective vector field in a spherical shell are controlled, their matter waves can be perfectly guided through the shell without any distortion or loss; that is, the construct provides a three-dimensional cloaking shell for relativistic spin-(1/2) matter waves. The proposal serves as the basis for some interesting applications such as providing a method to guide the matter waves of spin particles and an ideal setup to exhibit spin-spin interactions as well as perfect quantum interferences of some global effects in spin-(1/2) matter waves.

  6. Explaining the 750 GeV diphoton excess with a colored scalar charged under a new confining gauge interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foot, Robert; Gargalionis, John

    2016-07-01

    We consider a charged scalar particle χ of mass around 375 GeV charged under both SU (3 )C and a new confining non-Abelian gauge interaction. After pair production, these interactions confine the exotic scalar into nonrelativistic bound states whose decays into photons can explain the 750 GeV diphoton excess observed at the LHC. Taking the new confining group to be SU(2), we find χ must carry an electric charge of Q ˜[1/2 ,1 ] to fit the data. Interestingly, we find that pair production of the scalars and the subsequent formation of the bound state dominates over direct bound state resonance production. This explanation is quite weakly constrained by current searches and data from the forthcoming run at the LHC will be able to probe our scenario more fully. In particular dijet, monojet, di-Higgs, and jet+photon searches may be the most promising discovery channels.

  7. Booster Synchrotron RF System Upgrade for SPEAR3

    SciTech Connect

    Park, Sanghyun; Corbett, Jeff; /SLAC

    2012-07-06

    Recent progress at the SPEAR3 includes the increase in stored current from 100 mA to 200 mA and top-off injection to allow beamlines to stay open during injection. Presently the booster injects 3.0 GeV beam to SPEAR3 three times a day. The stored beam decays to about 150 mA between the injections. The growing user demands are to increase the stored current to the design value of 500 mA, and to maintain it at a constant value within a percent or so. To achieve this goal the booster must inject once every few minutes. For improved injection efficiency, all RF systems at the linac, booster and SPEAR3 need to be phase-locked. The present booster RF system is basically a copy of the SPEAR2 RF system with 358.5 MHz and 40 kW peak RF power driving a 5-cell RF cavity for 1.0 MV gap voltage. These requirements entail a booster RF system upgrade to a scaled down version of the SPEAR3 RF system of 476.3 MHz with 1.2 MW cw klystron output power capabilities. We will analyze each subsystem option for their merits within budgetary and geometric space constraints. A substantial portion of the system will come from the decommissioned PEP-II RF stations.

  8. Transverse Mode-Coupling Instability in the CERN Super Proton Synchrotron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Métral, E.; Arduini, G.; Benedetto, E.; Burkhardt, H.; Shaposhnikova, E.; Rumolo, G.

    2005-06-01

    A vertical single-bunch instability has been observed in 2003 right after injection at 26 GeV/c in the CERN Super Proton Synchrotron (SPS). High-intensity proton bunches (˜1.2 1011 p/b) with low longitudinal emittance (˜0.2 eVs) are affected by heavy losses after less than one synchrotron period. Such phenomenon has already been observed with leptons in many machines, e.g. in the SPS, or with protons at transition, e.g. in the CERN Proton Synchrotron (PS). However, to the authors' knowledge, it is the first time with protons far from transition. The absence of transverse mode-coupling instability in hadron machines is generally explained by three mechanisms: (i) the intensity threshold for the longitudinal microwave instability is generally lower than for the transverse mode-coupling instability, (ii) the intensity threshold due to mode-coupling between the two lowest azimuthal modes increases with space charge, and (iii) the intensity threshold increases with bunch length (in the long-bunch regime). In this talk measurements performed in the SPS are compared to analytical and simulation predictions.

  9. Analysis of cytogenetic effects of the secondary radiation resulting from 70 GeV protons of chinese hamster cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akhmadieva, A. Kh.; Aptikaeva, G. Ph.; Livanova, I. A.; Antipov, A. V.; Akoev, I. G.; Ganassi, E. E.

    The cell culture of a Chinese hamster was irradiated on a Serpuchov proton synchrotron at a dose of 0.5-4 Gy and a dose rate of 1 Gy/min and by gamma-irradiation at dose 1-5 Gy and dose rate 1.2-1.4 Gy/min. The effect of radiation on the cell culture was judged from chromosomal aberrations in G2-stage of cell cycle and micronuclear test. The relative biological efficience of the secondary radiation was approximately 3. Modifying effect of caffeine on the cells irradiated by secondary radiation of synchrotron was not observed. In the presence of caffeine the effect of γ-irradiation practically is increased up to the level observed upon secondary irradiation. This suggests that secondary radiation inhibits the repair of the cytogenetic damage.

  10. Synchrotron Facilities and Free Electron Lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Vaclav, Vylet; Liu, James; /SLAC

    2007-12-21

    Synchrotron radiation (SR) is electromagnetic radiation emitted when a charged particle travels along a curved trajectory. Initially encountered as a nuisance around orbits of high energy synchrotron accelerators, it gradually became an indispensable research tool in many applications: crystallography, X-ray lithography, micromechanics, structural biology, microprobe X-ray experiments, etc. So-called first generation SR sources were exploiting SR in parasitic mode at electron accelerators built to study particle collisions. The second generation of SR sources was the first facilities solely devoted to SR production. They were optimized to achieve stable high currents in the accelerator ring to achieve substantially higher photon flux and to provide a large number of SR beam lines for users. Third generation sources were further optimized for increased brilliance, i.e. with photons densely packed into a beam of very small cross-sectional area and minimal angular divergence (see the Appendix for more detailed definitions of flux, brightness and brilliance) and makes extensive use of the insertion devices such as wigglers and undulators. Free Electron Lasers (FELs), the fourth generation SR sources, open new research possibilities by offering extremely short pulses of extremely bright and coherent radiation. The number of SR sources around the world now probably exceeds 100. These facilities vary greatly in size, energy of the electron (or positron) beams, range of photon energies and other characteristics of the photon beams produced. In what follows we will concentrate on describing some common aspects of SR facilities, their operation modes and specific radiation protection aspects.

  11. Performances of BNL high-intensity synchrotrons

    SciTech Connect

    Weng, W.T.

    1998-03-01

    The AGS proton synchrotron was completed in 1960 with initial intensity in the 10 to the 10th power proton per pulse (ppp) range. Over the years, through many upgrades and improvements, the AGS now reached an intensity record of 6.3 {times} 10{sup 13} ppp, the highest world intensity record for a proton synchrotron on a single pulse basis. At the same time, the Booster reached 2.2 {times} 10{sup 13} ppp surpassing the design goal of 1.5 {times} 10{sup 13} ppp due to the introduction of second harmonic cavity during injection. The intensity limitation caused by space charge tune spread and its relationship to injection energy at 50 MeV, 200 MeV, and 1,500 MeV will be presented as well as many critical accelerator manipulations. BNL currently participates in the design of an accumulator ring for the SNS project at Oak Ridge. The status on the issues of halo formation, beam losses and collimation are also presented.

  12. Impact system for ultrafast synchrotron experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Jensen, B. J.; Owens, C. T.; Ramos, K. J.; Yeager, J. D.; Saavedra, R. A.; Luo, S. N.; Hooks, D. E.; Iverson, A. J.; Fezzaa, K.

    2013-01-15

    The impact system for ultrafast synchrotron experiments, or IMPULSE, is a 12.6-mm bore light-gas gun (<1 km/s projectile velocity) designed specifically for performing dynamic compression experiments using the advanced imaging and X-ray diffraction methods available at synchrotron sources. The gun system, capable of reaching projectile velocities up to 1 km/s, was designed to be portable for quick insertion/removal in the experimental hutch at Sector 32 ID-B of the Advanced Photon Source (Argonne, IL) while allowing the target chamber to rotate for sample alignment with the beam. A key challenge in using the gun system to acquire dynamic data on the nanosecond time scale was synchronization (or bracketing) of the impact event with the incident X-ray pulses (80 ps width). A description of the basic gun system used in previous work is provided along with details of an improved launch initiation system designed to significantly reduce the total system time from launch initiation to impact. Experiments were performed to directly measure the gun system time and to determine the gun performance curve for projectile velocities ranging from 0.3 to 0.9 km/s. All results show an average system time of 21.6 {+-} 4.5 ms, making it possible to better synchronize the gun system and detectors to the X-ray beam.

  13. Looking Back at International Synchrotron Radiation Instrumentation

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, Gwyn

    2012-03-01

    With the 11th International Synchrotron Radiation Instrumentation coming up in July 2012 in Lyons, France, we thought it might be of interest to our readers to review all the past meetings in this series. We thank Denny Mills of the APS, Argonne for putting the list together. Prior to these larger meetings, and in the early days, facilities held their own meetings similar to the user meetings of today. However, the meeting held at ACO in Orsay, France in 1977 was the first such meeting with an international flavor and so it is on the list. However it is not counted as number 1 since it was agreed way back to start the numbering with the 1982 DESY meeting. The 2005 USA National Meeting scheduled at CAMD in Baton Rouge had to be canceled due to Hurricane Katrina. It was ultimately held in 2007, with the CLS hosted meeting the following year. And a personal note from the magazine - Synchrotron Radiation News was born at the 1987 meeting in Madison, Wisconsin with a proposal that was put to a special session of the meeting organized by Susan Lord. Initial proposals were to model it after the CERN Courier, but it soon adopted its own distinct flavor.

  14. Mapping prehistoric ghosts in the synchrotron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edwards, N. P.; Wogelius, R. A.; Bergmann, U.; Larson, P.; Sellers, W. I.; Manning, P. L.

    2013-04-01

    The detailed chemical analysis of fossils has the potential to reveal great insight to the composition, preservation and biochemistry of ancient life. Such analyses would ideally identify, quantify, and spatially resolve the chemical composition of preserved bone and soft tissue structures, but also the embedding matrix. Mapping the chemistry of a fossil in situ can place constraints on mass transfer between the enclosing matrix and the preserved organism(s), and therefore aid in distinguishing taphonomic processes from original chemical zonation remnant within the fossils themselves. Conventional analytical methods, such as scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and pyrolysis-gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (Py-GC/MS) have serious limitations in this case, primarily, an inability to provide large (i.e., decimeter) scale chemical maps. Additionally, vacuum chamber size and the need for destructive sampling preclude analysis of large and precious fossil specimens. However, the recent development of Synchrotron Rapid Scanning X-ray Fluorescence (SRS-XRF) at the Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource (SSRL) allows the non-destructive chemical analysis and imaging of major, minor, and trace element concentrations of large paleontological and archeological specimens in rapid scanning times. Here we present elemental maps of a fossil reptile produced using the new SRS-XRF method. Our results unequivocally show that preserved biological structures are not simply impressions or carbonized remains, but possess a remnant of the original organismal biochemistry. We show that SRS-XRF is a powerful new tool for the study of paleontological and archaeological samples.

  15. Three energy computed tomography with synchrotron radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Menk, R.H.; Thomlinson, W.; Zhong, Z.; Charvet, A.M.; Arfelli, F. |; Chapman, L.

    1997-09-01

    Preliminary experiments for digital subtraction computed tomography (CT) at the K-edge of iodine (33.1 keV) were carried out at SMERF (Synchrotron Medical Research Facility X17B2) at the National Synchrotron Light Source, Brookhaven National Laboratory. The major goal was to evaluate the availability of this kind of imaging for in vivo neurological studies. Using the transvenous coronary angiography system, CT images of various samples and phantoms were taken simultaneously at two slightly different energies bracketing the K-absorption edge of iodine. The logarithmic subtraction of the two images resulted in the contrast enhancement of iodine filled structures. An additional CT image was taken at 99.57 keV (second harmonic of the fundamental wave). The third energy allowed the calculation of absolute iodine, tissue and bone images by means of a matrix inversion. A spatial resolution of 0.8 LP/mm was measured in single energy images and iodine concentrations down to 0.082 mg/ml in a 1/4 diameter detail were visible in the reconstructed subtraction image.

  16. Thermal loading considerations for synchrotron radiation mirrors

    SciTech Connect

    Holdener, F.R.; Berglin, E.J.; Fuchs, B.A.; Humpal, H.H.; Karpenko, V.P.; Martin, R.W.; Tirsell, K.G.

    1986-03-26

    Grazing incidence mirrors used to focus synchrotron radiation beams through small distant apertures have severe optical requirements. The surface distortion due to heat loading of the first mirror in a bending magnet beam line is of particular concern when a large fraction of the incident beam is absorbed. In this paper we discuss mirror design considerations involved in minimizing the thermal/mechanical loading on vertically deflecting first surface mirrors required for SPEAR synchrotron radiation beam lines. Topics include selection of mirror material and cooling method, the choice of SiC for the substrate, optimization of the thickness, and the design of the mirror holder and cooling mechanism. Results obtained using two-dimensional, finite-element thermal/mechanical distortion analysis are presented for the case of a 6/sup 0/ grazing incidence SiC mirror absorbing up to 260 W at Beam Line VIII on the SPEAR ring. Test descriptions and results are given for the material used to thermally couple this SiC mirror to a water-cooled block. The interface material is limited to applications for which the equivalent normal heat load is less than 20 W/cm/sup 2/.

  17. Beam halo collimation in heavy ion synchrotrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strašík, I.; Prokhorov, I.; Boine-Frankenheim, O.

    2015-08-01

    This paper presents a systematic study of the halo collimation of ion beams from proton up to uranium in synchrotrons. The projected Facility for Antiproton and Ion Research synchrotron SIS100 is used as a reference case. The concepts are separated into fully stripped (e.g., 238U92+ ) and partially stripped (e.g., 238U28+ ) ion collimation. An application of the two-stage betatron collimation system, well established for proton accelerators, is intended also for fully stripped ions. The two-stage system consists of a primary collimator (a scattering foil) and secondary collimators (bulky absorbers). Interaction of the particles with the primary collimator (scattering, momentum losses, and nuclear interactions) was simulated by using fluka. Particle-tracking simulations were performed by using mad-x. Finally, the dependence of the collimation efficiency on the primary ion species was determined. The influence of the collimation system adjustment, lattice imperfections, and beam parameters was estimated. The concept for the collimation of partially stripped ions employs a thin stripping foil in order to change their charge state. These ions are subsequently deflected towards a dump location using a beam optical element. The charge state distribution after the stripping foil was obtained from global. The ions were tracked by using mad-x.

  18. Animals In Synchrotrons: Overcoming Challenges For High-Resolution, Live, Small-Animal Imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Donnelley, Martin; Parsons, David; Morgan, Kaye; Siu, Karen

    2010-07-23

    Physiological studies in small animals can be complicated, but the complexity is increased dramatically when performing live-animal synchrotron X-ray imaging studies. Our group has extensive experience in high-resolution live-animal imaging at the Japanese SPring-8 synchrotron, primarily examining airways in two-dimensions. These experiments normally image an area of 1.8 mmx1.2 mm at a pixel resolution of 0.45 {mu}m and are performed with live, intact, anaesthetized mice.There are unique challenges in this experimental setting. Importantly, experiments must be performed in an isolated imaging hutch not specifically designed for small-animal imaging. This requires equipment adapted to remotely monitor animals, maintain their anesthesia, and deliver test substances while collecting images. The horizontal synchrotron X-ray beam has a fixed location and orientation that limits experimental flexibility. The extremely high resolution makes locating anatomical regions-of-interest slow and can result in a high radiation dose, and at this level of magnification small animal movements produce motion-artifacts that can render acquired images unusable. Here we describe our experimental techniques and how we have overcome several challenges involved in performing live mouse synchrotron imaging.Experiments have tested different mouse strains, with hairless strains minimizing overlying skin and hair artifacts. Different anesthetics have also be trialed due to the limited choices available at SPring-8. Tracheal-intubation methods have been refined and controlled-ventilation is now possible using a specialized small-animal ventilator. With appropriate animal restraint and respiratory-gating, motion-artifacts have been minimized. The animal orientation (supine vs. head-high) also appears to affect animal physiology, and can alter image quality. Our techniques and image quality at SPring-8 have dramatically improved and in the near future we plan to translate this experience to the

  19. Biological X-ray spectroscopy on 3rd generation synchrotron radiation sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ralston, Corie Y.; Chen, Jie; Peng, Gang; George, Simon J.; van Elp, Jan; Cramer, Stephen P.

    1995-02-01

    Third generation synchrotron radiation sources such as the Advanced Light Source (ALS) at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory deliver 1-2 orders of magnitude more monochromatic flux (and many orders of magnitude higher brightness) than previously available. This paper describes the ring and existing beamlines of the advanced light source, and plans for crystallography and elliptical wiggler stations are discussed. Using nickel metalloprotein spectra recorded at NSLS and SSRL as examples, this paper describes how the higher monochromatic flux available from the ALS will be used for biological soft X-ray spectroscopy.

  20. New synchrotron luminosity distance limit for the 1979 March 5 gamma-ray event

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liang, E. P.

    1986-01-01

    New synchrotron luminosity estimates are provided for the March 5, 1979 gamma-ray event, based on the lack of low-frequency self-absorption cutoff. This leads to distance limits much lower than 55 kpc for a neutron-star emission area even in the most conservative case. The source is likely Galactic. If in addition the thermal self-Compton interpretation is invoked for the hard tail above 300 keV in the burst spectrum, then the source distance lies in the range 0.1-2 kpc for extreme ranges of the neutron-star emission area. This result strongly impacts current observational programs for this source.

  1. Status of the National Synchrotron Light Source project

    SciTech Connect

    Heese, R.N.

    1981-01-01

    The National Synchrotron Light Source is in its final stages of construction, and as the turn-on time for the 700 MeV vuv storage ring draws near, an overview of the project is presented. Emphasis is placed on the linac and booster synchrotron performance and the status of major subsystems.

  2. Current status and perspectives of synchrotron radiation in medicine

    SciTech Connect

    Thomlinson, W.

    1996-11-01

    The high flux and brightness, tunable beams, time structure and polarization of synchrotron radiation provide an ideal x-ray source for many medical applications. The present status of synchrotron angiography, multiple energy computed tomography, mammography and radiation therapy at laboratories around the world is reviewed and some future projections for these applications are addressed.

  3. Third generation synchrotron radiation applied to materials science

    SciTech Connect

    Kaufmann, E.N.; Yun, W.

    1993-11-01

    Utility of synchrotron radiation for characterization of materials and ramifications of availability of new third-generation, high-energy, high-intensity sources of synchrotron radiation are discussed. Examples are given of power of x-ray analysis techniques to be expected with these new machines.

  4. Design and prototype tests of a large-aperture 37-53 MHz ferrite-tuned booster synchrotron cavity

    SciTech Connect

    Mark S. Champion et al.

    2001-07-12

    The Booster synchrotron at Fermilab employs eighteen 37-53 MHz ferrite-tuned double-gap coaxial radiofrequency cavities for acceleration of protons from 400 MeV to 8 GeV. The cavities have an aperture of 2.25 inches and operate at 55 kV per cavity. Future high duty factor operation of the Booster will be problematic due to unavoidable beam loss at the cavities resulting in excessive activation. The power amplifiers, high maintenance items, are mounted directly to the cavities in the tunnel. A proposed replacement for the Booster, the Proton Driver, will utilize the Booster radiofrequency cavities and requires not only a larger aperture, but also higher voltage. A research and development program is underway at Fermilab to modify the Booster cavities to provide a 5-inch aperture and a 20% voltage increase. A prototype has been constructed and high power tests have bee completed. The cavity design and test results is presented.

  5. Using the transverse digital damper as a real-time tune monitor for the Booster synchrotron at Fermilab

    SciTech Connect

    Eddy, N.; Lysenko, O.; /FERMILAB

    2011-08-01

    The Fermilab Booster is a fast ramping (15Hz) synchrotron which accelerates protons from 400MeV to 8GeV. During commissioning of a transverse digital damper system, it was shown that the damper could provide a measurement of the machine tune throughout the cycle by exciting just 1 of the 84 bunches with minimal impact on the machine operation. The algorithms used to make the measurement have been incorporated into the damper FPGA firmware allowing for real-time tune monitoring of all Booster cycles. A new Booster tune monitor was implemented in the digital damper which has minimal impact on the Booster operation. The tune measures the tunes in two planes over the energy ramping cycle with an accuracy of 0.01 in real time.

  6. Characterization of a tungsten/gas multislit collimator for microbeam radiation therapy at the European Synchrotron Radiation Facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bräuer-Krisch, E.; Bravin, A.; Zhang, L.; Siegbahn, E.; Stepanek, J.; Blattmann, H.; Slatkin, D. N.; Gebbers, J.-O.; Jasmin, M.; Laissue, J. A.

    2005-06-01

    Clinical microbeam radiation therapy (MRT) will require a multislit collimator with adjustable uniform slit widths to enable reliable Monte Carlo-based treatment planning. Such a collimator has been designed, fabricated of >99% tungsten [W] by Tecomet/Viasys (Woburn, Massachusetts, USA) and installed at the 6GeV electron-wiggler-generated hard x-ray ID17 beamline of the European Synchrotron Radiation Facility. Its pair of 125 parallel, 8mm deep, 0.100mm wide radiolucent slits, 0.400mm on center, are perfused with nitrogen gas [N2] to dissipate heat during irradiation. Major improvements in uniformity of microbeam widths and good peak/valley dose ratios combined with a very high dose rate in targeted tissues have been achieved.

  7. RHIC 100 GeV Polarized Proton Luminosity

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, S. Y.

    2014-01-17

    A big problem in RHIC 100 GeV proton run 2009 was the significantly lower luminosity lifetime than all previous runs. It is shown in this note that the beam intensity decay in run 2009 is caused by the RF voltage ramping in store. It is also shown that the beam decay is not clearly related to the beam momentum spread, therefore, not directly due to the 0.7m. β* Furthermore, the most important factor regarding the low luminosity lifetime is the faster transverse emittance growth in store, which is also much worse than the previous runs, and is also related to the RF ramping. In 100 GeV proton run 2012a, the RF ramping was abandoned, but the β* was increased to 0.85m, with more than 20% loss of luminosity, which is not necessary. It is strongly suggested to use smaller β* in 100 GeV polarized proton run 2015/2016

  8. CEBAF SRF Performance during Initial 12 GeV Commissioning

    SciTech Connect

    Bachimanchi, Ramakrishna; Allison, Trent; Daly, Edward; Drury, Michael; Hovater, J; Lahti, George; Mounts, Clyde; Nelson, Richard; Plawski, Tomasz

    2015-09-01

    The Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility (CEBAF) energy upgrade from 6 GeV to 12 GeV includes the installation of eleven new 100 MV cryomodules (88 cavities). The superconducting RF cavities are designed to operate CW at an accelerating gradient of 19.3 MV/m with a QL of 3×107. Not all the cavities were operated at the minimum gradient of 19.3 MV/m with the beam. Though the initial 12 GeV milestones were achieved during the initial commissioning of CEBAF, there are still some issues to be addressed for long term reliable operation of these modules. This paper reports the operational experiences during the initial commissioning and the path forward to improve the performance of C100 (100 MV) modules.

  9. The 6 GeV TMD Program at Jefferson Lab

    SciTech Connect

    Puckett, Andrew J.

    2015-01-01

    The study of the transverse momentum dependent parton distributions (TMDs) of the nucleon in semi-inclusive deep-inelastic scattering (SIDIS) has emerged as one of the major physics motivations driving the experimental program using the upgraded 11 GeV electron beam at Jefferson Lab’s Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility (CEBAF). The accelerator construction phase of the CEBAF upgrade is essentially complete and commissioning of the accelerator has begun as of April, 2014. As the new era of CEBAF operations begins, it is appropriate to review the body of published and forthcoming results on TMDs from the 6 GeV era of CEBAF operations, discuss what has been learned, and discuss the key challenges and opportunities for the 11 GeV SIDIS program of CEBAF.

  10. Characterising the 750 GeV diphoton excess

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernon, Jérémy; Goudelis, Andreas; Kraml, Sabine; Mawatari, Kentarou; Sengupta, Dipan

    2016-05-01

    We study kinematic distributions that may help characterise the recently observed excess in diphoton events at 750 GeV at the LHC Run 2. Several scenarios are considered, including spin-0 and spin-2 750 GeV resonances that decay directly into photon pairs as well as heavier parent resonances that undergo three-body or cascade decays. We find that combinations of the distributions of the diphoton system and the leading photon can distinguish the topology and mass spectra of the different scenarios, while patterns of QCD radiation can help differentiate the production mechanisms. Moreover, missing energy is a powerful discriminator for the heavy parent scenarios if they involve (effectively) invisible particles. While our study concentrates on the current excess at 750 GeV, the analysis is general and can also be useful for characterising other potential diphoton signals in the future.

  11. The Jefferson Lab 12 GeV Upgrade

    SciTech Connect

    R.D. McKeown

    2010-09-01

    Construction of the 12 GeV upgrade to the Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility (CEBAF) at the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility is presently underway. This upgrade includes doubling the energy of the electron beam to 12 GeV, the addition of a new fourth experimental hall, and the construction of upgraded detector hardware. An overview of this upgrade project is presented, along with highlights of the anticipated experimental program. The 12 GeV upgrade project at Jefferson Lab will enable a powerful new experimental program that will advance our understanding of the quark/gluon structure of hadronic matter, the nature of Quantum Chromodynamics, and the properties of a new extended standard model of particle interactions. Commissioning of the upgraded beam will be begin in 2013, and the full complement of upgraded experimental equipment will be completed in 2015. This unique facility will provide many opportunities for exploration and discovery for a large international community of nuclear scientists.

  12. The 6 GeV TMD Program at Jefferson Lab

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Puckett, Andrew

    2015-01-01

    The study of the transverse momentum dependent parton distributions (TMDs) of the nucleon in semi-inclusive deep-inelastic scattering (SIDIS) has emerged as one of the major physics motivations driving the experimental program using the upgraded 11 GeV electron beam at Jefferson Lab's Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility (CEBAF). The accelerator construction phase of the CEBAF upgrade is essentially complete and commissioning of the accelerator has begun as of April, 2014. As the new era of CEBAF operations begins, it is appropriate to review the body of published and forthcoming results on TMDs from the 6 GeV era of CEBAF operations, discuss what has been learned, and discuss the key challenges and opportunities for the 11 GeV SIDIS program of CEBAF.

  13. Comments on Landau damping due to synchrotron frequency spread

    SciTech Connect

    Ng, K.Y.; /Fermilab

    2005-01-01

    An inductive/space-charge impedance shifts the synchrotron frequency downwards above/below transition, but it is often said that the coherent synchrotron frequency of the bunch is not shifted in the rigid-dipole mode. On the other hand, the incoherent synchrotron frequency due to the sinusoidal rf always spreads in the downward direction. This spread will therefore not be able to cover the coherent synchrotron frequency, implying that there will not be any Landau damping no matter how large the frequency spread is. By studying the dispersion relation, it is shown that the above argument is incorrect, and there will be Landau damping if there is sufficient frequency spread. The main reason is that the coherent frequency of the rigid-dipole mode will no longer remain unshifted in the presence of a synchrotron frequency spread.

  14. Parasitic slow extraction of extremely weak beam from a high-intensity proton rapid cycling synchrotron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zou, Ye; Tang, Jingyu; Yang, Zheng; Jing, Hantao

    2014-02-01

    This paper proposes a novel method to extract extremely weak beam from a high-intensity proton rapid cycling synchrotron (RCS) in the parasitic mode, while maintaining the normal fast extraction. The usual slow extraction method from a synchrotron by employing third-order resonance cannot be applied in a high-intensity RCS due to a very short flat-top at the extraction energy and the strict control on beam loss. The proposed parasitic slow extraction method moves the beam to scrape a scattering foil prior to the fast beam extraction by employing either a local orbit bump or momentum deviation or their combination, so that the halo part of the beam will be scattered. A part of the scattered particles will be extracted from the RCS and guided to the experimental area. The slow extraction process can last about a few milliseconds before the beam is extracted by the fast extraction system. The method has been applied to the RCS of China Spallation Neutron Source. With 1.6 GeV in the extraction energy, 62.5 μA in the average current and 25 Hz in the repetition rate for the RCS, the proton intensity by the slow extraction method can be up to 2×104 protons per cycle or 5×105 protons per second. The extracted beam has also a good time structure of approximately uniform in a spill which is required for many applications such as detector tests. Detailed studies including the scattering effect in the foil, the local orbit bump by the bump magnets and dispersive orbit bump by modifying the RF pattern, the multi-particle simulations by ORBIT and TURTLE codes, and some technical features for the extraction magnets are presented.

  15. Right-handed neutrino production rate at T > 160 GeV

    SciTech Connect

    Ghisoiu, I.; Laine, M. E-mail: laine@itp.unibe.ch

    2014-12-01

    The production rate of right-handed neutrinos from a Standard Model plasma at a temperature above a hundred GeV has previously been evaluated up to NLO in Standard Model couplings (g ∼ 2/3) in relativistic (M ∼ πT) and non-relativistic regimes (M >> πT), and up to LO in an ultrarelativistic regime (M ∼< gT). The last result necessitates an all-orders resummation of the loop expansion, accounting for multiple soft scatterings of the nearly light-like particles participating in 1 ↔ 2 reactions. In this paper we suggest how the regimes can be interpolated into a result applicable for any right-handed neutrino mass and at all temperatures above 160GeV. The results can also be used for determining the lepton number washout rate in models containing right-handed neutrinos. Numerical results are given in a tabulated form permitting for their incorporation into leptogenesis codes. We note that due to effects from soft Higgs bosons there is a narrow intermediate regime around (M ∼ g{sup 1/2}T in which our interpolation is phenomenological and a more precise study would be welcome.

  16. Right-handed neutrino production rate at T>160 GeV

    SciTech Connect

    Ghisoiu, I.; Laine, M.

    2014-12-16

    The production rate of right-handed neutrinos from a Standard Model plasma at a temperature above a hundred GeV has previously been evaluated up to NLO in Standard Model couplings (g∼2/3) in relativistic (M∼πT) and non-relativistic regimes (M≫πT), and up to LO in an ultrarelativistic regime (M≲gT). The last result necessitates an all-orders resummation of the loop expansion, accounting for multiple soft scatterings of the nearly light-like particles participating in 1↔2 reactions. In this paper we suggest how the regimes can be interpolated into a result applicable for any right-handed neutrino mass and at all temperatures above 160 GeV. The results can also be used for determining the lepton number washout rate in models containing right-handed neutrinos. Numerical results are given in a tabulated form permitting for their incorporation into leptogenesis codes. We note that due to effects from soft Higgs bosons there is a narrow intermediate regime around M∼g{sup 1/2}T in which our interpolation is phenomenological and a more precise study would be welcome.

  17. Vela Pulsar and Its Synchrotron Nebula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Helfand, D. J.; Gotthelf, E. V.; Halpern, J. P.

    2001-07-01

    We present high-resolution Chandra X-ray observations of PSR B0833-45, the 89 ms pulsar associated with the Vela supernova remnant. We have acquired two observations separated by 1 month to search for changes in the pulsar and its environment following an extreme glitch in its rotation frequency. We find a well-resolved nebula with a toroidal morphology remarkably similar to that observed in the Crab Nebula, along with an axial Crab-like jet. Between the two observations, taken ~3×105 s and ~3×106 s after the glitch, the flux from the pulsar is found to be steady to within 0.75% the 3 σ limit on the fractional increase in the pulsar's X-ray flux is <~10-5 of the inferred glitch energy. We use this limit to constrain parameters of glitch models and neutron star structure. We do find a significant increase in the flux of the nebula's outer arc; if associated with the glitch, the inferred propagation velocity is >~0.7c, similar to that seen in the brightening of the Crab Nebula wisps. We propose an explanation for the X-ray structure of the Vela synchrotron nebula based on a model originally developed for the Crab Nebula. In this model, the bright X-ray arcs are the shocked termination of a relativistic equatorial pulsar wind that is contained within the surrounding kidney-bean shaped synchrotron nebula comprising the postshock, but still relativistic, flow. In a departure from the Crab model, the magnetization parameter σ of the Vela pulsar wind is allowed to be of order unity; this is consistent with the simplest MHD transport of magnetic field from the pulsar to the nebula, where B<=4×10-4 G. The inclination angle of the axis of the equatorial torus with respect to the line of sight is identical to that of the rotation axis of the pulsar as previously measured from the polarization of the radio pulse. The projection of the rotation axis on the sky may also be close to the direction of proper motion of the pulsar if previous radio measurements were confused by

  18. Electroexcitation of the Roper resonance for 1.7 < Q**2 < 4.5 -GeV2 in vec-ep ---> en pi+

    SciTech Connect

    Aznauryan, Inna; Burkert, Volker; Kim, Wooyoung; Park, Kil; Adams, Gary; Amaryan, Moscov; Amaryan, Moskov; Ambrozewicz, Pawel; Anghinolfi, Marco; Asryan, Gegham; Avagyan, Harutyun; Bagdasaryan, H.; Baillie, Nathan; Ball, J.P.; Ball, Jacques; Baltzell, Nathan; Barrow, Steve; Batourine, V.; Battaglieri, Marco; Bedlinskiy, Ivan; Bektasoglu, Mehmet; Bellis, Matthew; Benmouna, Nawal; Berman, Barry; Biselli, Angela; Blaszczyk, Lukasz; Bonner, Billy; Bookwalter, Craig; Bouchigny, Sylvain; Boyarinov, Sergey; Bradford, Robert; Branford, Derek; Briscoe, Wilbert; Brooks, William; Bultmann, S.; Bueltmann, Stephen; Butuceanu, Cornel; Calarco, John; Careccia, Sharon; Carman, Daniel; Casey, Liam; Cazes, Antoine; Chen, Shifeng; Cheng, Lu; Cole, Philip; Collins, Patrick; Coltharp, Philip; Cords, Dieter; Corvisiero, Pietro; Crabb, Donald; Crede, Volker; Cummings, John; Dale, Daniel; Dashyan, Natalya; De Masi, Rita; De Vita, Raffaella; De Sanctis, Enzo; Degtiarenko, Pavel; Denizli, Haluk; Dennis, Lawrence; Deur, Alexandre; Dhamija, Seema; Dharmawardane, Kahanawita; Dhuga, Kalvir; Dickson, Richard; Djalali, Chaden; Dodge, Gail; Donnelly, J.; Doughty, David; Dugger, Michael; Dytman, Steven; Dzyubak, Oleksandr; Egiyan, Hovanes; Egiyan, Kim; Elfassi, Lamiaa; Elouadrhiri, Latifa; Eugenio, Paul; Fatemi, Renee; Fedotov, Gleb; Feldman, Gerald; Feuerbach, Robert; Forest, Tony; Fradi, Ahmed; Funsten, Herbert; Gabrielyan, Marianna; Garcon, Michel; Gavalian, Gagik; Gevorgyan, Nerses; Gilfoyle, Gerard; Giovanetti, Kevin; Girod, Francois-Xavier; Goetz, John; Gohn, Wesley; Golovach, Evgeny; Gonenc, Atilla; Gordon, Christopher; Gothe, Ralf; Graham, L.; Griffioen, Keith; Guidal, Michel; Guillo, Matthieu; Guler, Nevzat; Guo, Lei; Gyurjyan, Vardan; Hadjidakis, Cynthia; Hafidi, Kawtar; Hafnaoui, Khadija; Hakobyan, Hayk; Hakobyan, Rafael; Hanretty, Charles; Hardie, John; Hassall, Neil; Heddle, David; Hersman, F.; Hicks, Kenneth; Hleiqawi, Ishaq; Holtrop, Maurik; Hyde, Charles; Ilieva, Yordanka; Ireland, David; Ishkhanov, Boris; Isupov, Evgeny; Ito, Mark; Jenkins, David; Jo, Hyon-Suk; Johnstone, John; Joo, Kyungseon; Juengst, Henry; Kalantarians, Narbe; Keller, Dustin; Kellie, James; Khandaker, Mahbubul; Kim, Kui; Klein, Andreas; Klein, Andreas; Klimenko, Alexei; Kossov, Mikhail; Krahn, Zebulun; Kramer, Laird; Kubarovsky, Valery; Kuhn, Joachim; Kuhn, Sebastian; Kuleshov, Sergey; Kuznetsov, Viacheslav; Lachniet, Jeff; Laget, Jean; Langheinrich, Jorn; Lawrence, Dave; Lee, T.; Lima, Ana; Livingston, Kenneth; Lu, Haiyun; Lukashin, Konstantin; MacCormick, Marion; Markov, Nikolai; Mattione, Paul; McAleer, Simeon; McKinnon, Bryan; McNabb, John; Mecking, Bernhard; Mehrabyan, Surik; Melone, Joseph; Mestayer, Mac; Meyer, Curtis; Mibe, Tsutomu; Mikhaylov, Konstantin; Minehart, Ralph; Mirazita, Marco; Miskimen, Rory; Mokeev, Viktor; Morand, Ludyvine; Moreno, Brahim; Moriya, Kei; Morrow, Steven; Moteabbed, Maryam; Mueller, James; Munevar Espitia, Edwin; Mutchler, Gordon; Nadel-Turonski, Pawel; Nasseripour, Rakhsha; Niccolai, Silvia; Niculescu, Gabriel; Niculescu, Maria-Ioana; Niczyporuk, Bogdan; Niroula, Megh; Niyazov, Rustam; Nozar, Mina; O'Rielly, Grant; Osipenko, Mikhail; Ostrovidov, Alexander; Park, S.; Pasyuk, Evgueni; Paterson, Craig; Anefalos Pereira, S.; Philips, Sasha; Pierce, Jerome; Pivnyuk, Nikolay; Pocanic, Dinko; Pogorelko, Oleg; Polli, Ermanno; Popa, Iulian; Pozdnyakov, Sergey; Preedom, Barry; Price, John; Prok, Yelena; Protopopescu, Dan; Qin, Liming; Raue, Brian; Riccardi, Gregory; Ricco, Giovanni; Ripani, Marco; Ritchie, Barry; Rosner, Guenther; Rossi, Patrizia; Rowntree, David; Rubin, Philip; Sabatie, Franck; Saini, Mukesh; Salamanca, Julian; Salgado, Carlos; Santoro, Joseph; Sapunenko, Vladimir; Schott, Diane; Schumacher, Reinhard; Serov, Vladimir; Sharabian, Youri; Sharov, Dmitri; Shaw, J.; Shvedunov, Nikolay; Skabelin, Alexander; Smith, Elton; Smith, Lee; Sober, Daniel; Sokhan, Daria; Stavinskiy, Aleksey; Stepanyan, Samuel; Stepanyan, Stepan; Stokes, Burnham

    2008-10-01

    DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1103/PhysRevC.78.045209
    The helicity amplitudes of the electroexcitation of the Roper resonance are extracted for 1.7 < Q2 < 4.5 GeV2 from recent high precision JLab-CLAS cross section and longitudinally polarized beam asymmetry data for pi+ electroproduction on protons at W=1.15-1.69 GeV. The analysis is made using two approaches, dispersion relations and a unitary isobar model, which give consistent results. It is found that the transverse helicity amplitude A_{1/2} for the gamma* p -> N(1440)P11 transition, which is large and negative at Q2=0, becomes large and positive at Q2 ~ 2 GeV2, and then drops slowly with Q2. The longitudinal helicity amplitude S_{1/2}, which was previously found from CLAS ep -> eppi0,enpi+ data to be large and positive at Q2=0.4,0.65 GeV2, drops with Q2. Available model predictions for gamma* p -> N(1440)P11 allow us to conclude that these results provide strong evidence in favor of N(1440)P11 as a first radial excitation of

  19. COSY - a cooler synchrotron and storage ring

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, S.A.; Berg, G.P.A.; Hacker, U.; Hardt, A.; Kohler, M.; Osterfeld, F.; Prasuhn, D.; Riepe, G.; Rogge, M.; Schult, O.W.B.

    1985-10-01

    The storage ring COSY with phase space cooling and RF acceleration is designed to accept protons and light ions injected from the existing cyclotron JULIC or protons from the LINAC of the proposed neutron spallation source (SNQ). The lay-out of COSY was developed in cooperation with the Universities in Nordrhein-Westfalen and meets the experimental requirements of variable and high quality beams which are necessary for future nuclear research under discussion. The three essential properties of the storage ring will be: high luminosities and very efficient use of the beam in the storage ring by thin internal targets; energy variability in the range of 20 MeV to 1.5 GeV by RF acceleration; and very high beam quality through phase space cooling.

  20. Synchrotron-based EUV lithography illuminator simulator

    DOEpatents

    Naulleau, Patrick P.

    2004-07-27

    A lithographic illuminator to illuminate a reticle to be imaged with a range of angles is provided. The illumination can be employed to generate a pattern in the pupil of the imaging system, where spatial coordinates in the pupil plane correspond to illumination angles in the reticle plane. In particular, a coherent synchrotron beamline is used along with a potentially decoherentizing holographic optical element (HOE), as an experimental EUV illuminator simulation station. The pupil fill is completely defined by a single HOE, thus the system can be easily modified to model a variety of illuminator fill patterns. The HOE can be designed to generate any desired angular spectrum and such a device can serve as the basis for an illuminator simulator.

  1. Synchrotron studies of narrow band materials

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-01-01

    Since last year, we have had three 3-week blocks of beamtime, in April and November 1991 and February 1992, on the Ames/Montana beamline at the Wisconsin Synchrotron Radiation Center (SRC). These runs continued our program on high temperature superconductors, heavy Fermion and related uranium and rare earth materials, and started some work on transition metal oxides. We have also had beamtime at the Brookhaven NSLS, 5 days of beamtime on the Dragon monochromator, beamline U4B, studying resonant photoemission of transition metal oxides using photon energies around the transition metal 2p edges. Data from past runs has been analyzed, and in some cases combined with photoemission and bremsstrahlung isochromat spectroscopy (BIS) data taken in the home U-M lab. 1 fig.

  2. Synchrotron studies of narrow band materials

    SciTech Connect

    Allen, J.W.

    1993-01-01

    Objective was to determine the single-particle electronic structure of selected narrow band materials in order to understand the relation between their electronic structures and novel low energy properties, such as mixed valence, heavy Fermions, Kondo effect, insulator-metal transitions, non-Fermi liquid behavior, and high-temperature superconductivity. This program supports photoemission spectroscopy (PES) at various synchrotrons. The progress is reported under the following section titles: ZSA (Zaanen-Sawatzky-Allen) systematics and I-M transitions in 3d transition metal oxides, insulator-metal transitions in superconducting cuprates, Fermi liquid and non-Fermi liquid behavior in angular resolved PES lineshapes, heavy-Fermion and non-Fermi liquid 5f electron systems, and Kondo insulators.

  3. Synchrotron radiation — 1873 to 1947

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blewett, John P.

    1988-04-01

    In 1873 Maxwell's treatise "Electricity and Magnetism" made it clear that a changing electric current will emit electromagnetic radiation. By the turn of the century, J.J. Thomson was showing that currents in space could be carried by electrons; accordingly, it was reasonable to believe that electrons, when accelerated, would radiate. By 1912, the theory of radiation from accelerated electrons was worked out and buried in the literature. Radiation from accelerated relativistic electrons did not come into prominence again until the 1940's when, finally, it was observed at the Research Laboratory of the General Electric Company. This paper will discuss the early theoretical treatments and will describe the first observations with the G.E. 100 MeV betatron and 75 MeV synchrotron.

  4. Synchrotron emissivity from mildly relativistic particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Petrosian, V.

    1981-01-01

    Approximate analytic expressions are presented for evaluation of the frequency and angular dependence of synchrotron emissivity from mildly relativistic particles with arbitrary energy spectrum and pitch angle distribution in a given magnetic field. Results agree with previous expressions for a nonrelativistic Maxwellian particle distribution, and when extrapolated to nonrelativistic and extreme relativistic regimes, they also agree with the previous expressions obtained under those limiting conditions. The results from the analytic expression are compared with results from detailed numerical evaluations. Excellent agreement is found not only at frequencies large compared to the gyro-frequency but also at lower frequencies, in fact, all the way down to the gyro-frequency, where the analytic approximations are expected to be less accurate.

  5. Imaging of coronary arteries using synchrotron radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thompson, A. C.; Zeman, H.; Thomlinson, W.; Rubenstein, E.; Kernoff, R. S.; Hofstadter, R.; Giacomini, J. C.; Gordon, H. J.; Brown, G. S.

    1989-04-01

    Currently the imaging of coronary arteries is dangerous since it requires that a catheter be inserted into a peripheral artery and threaded up to the heart so that contrast agent can be injected directly into the artery being imaged. Using synchrotron radiation it may be possible to use a much safer venous injection of a contrast agent and still have sufficient image contrast to visualize the coronary arteries. A pair of monochromatized X-ray beams are used which have energies that bracket the iodine K absorption edge where the iodine absorption cross section jumps by a factor of six. Therefore, the logarithmic difference image has excellent sensitivity to contrast agent and minimal sensitivity to tissue and bone. Images have been taken of both dogs and humans. Improvements are being made to the imaging system which will substantially improve the image quality.

  6. Exploring actinide materials through synchrotron radiation techniques.

    PubMed

    Shi, Wei-Qun; Yuan, Li-Yong; Wang, Cong-Zhi; Wang, Lin; Mei, Lei; Xiao, Cheng-Liang; Zhang, Li; Li, Zi-Jie; Zhao, Yu-Liang; Chai, Zhi-Fang

    2014-12-10

    Synchrotron radiation (SR) based techniques have been utilized with increasing frequency in the past decade to explore the brilliant and challenging sciences of actinide-based materials. This trend is partially driven by the basic needs for multi-scale actinide speciation and bonding information and also the realistic needs for nuclear energy research. In this review, recent research progresses on actinide related materials by means of various SR techniques were selectively highlighted and summarized, with the emphasis on X-ray absorption spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction and scattering spectroscopy, which are powerful tools to characterize actinide materials. In addition, advanced SR techniques for exploring future advanced nuclear fuel cycles dealing with actinides are illustrated as well.

  7. A Thick Target for Synchrotrons and Betatrons

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    McMillan, E. M.

    1950-09-19

    If a wide x-ray beam from an electron synchrotron or betatron is desired, in radiographic work with large objects for example, the usually very thin target may be replaced by a thick one, provided the resulting distortion of the x-ray spectrum due to multiple radiative processes is permissible. It is difficult to make the circulating electron beam traverse a thick target directly because of the small spacing between successive turns. Mounting a very thin beryllium, or other low-z material, fin on the edge of the thick target so that the fin projects into the beam will cause the beam to lose sufficient energy, and therefore radium, to strike the thick target the next time around. Sample design calculations are given.

  8. Quadrupole magnet for a rapid cycling synchrotron

    SciTech Connect

    Witte, H.; Berg, J. S.

    2015-05-03

    Rapid Cycling Synchrotrons (RCS) feature interleaved warm and cold dipole magnets; the field of the warm magnets is used to modulate the average bending field depending on the particle energy. It has been shown that RCS can be an attractive option for fast acceleration of particles, for example, muons, which decay quickly. In previous studies it was demonstrated that in principle warm dipole magnets can be designed which can provide the required ramp rates, which are equivalent to frequencies of about 1 kHz. To reduce the losses it is beneficial to employ two separate materials for the yoke; it was also shown that by employing an optimized excitation coil geometry the eddy current losses are acceptable. In this paper we show that the same principles can be applied to quadrupole magnets targeting 30 T/m with a repetition rate of 1kHz and good field quality.

  9. Optical substrate materials for synchrotron radiation beamlines

    SciTech Connect

    Howells, M.R.; Paquin, R.A.

    1997-06-01

    The authors consider the materials choices available for making optical substrates for synchrotron radiation beam lines. They find that currently the optical surfaces can only be polished to the required finish in fused silica and other glasses, silicon, CVD silicon carbide, electroless nickel and 17-4 PH stainless steel. Substrates must therefore be made of one of these materials or of a metal that can be coated with electroless nickel. In the context of material choices for mirrors they explore the issues of dimensional stability, polishing, bending, cooling, and manufacturing strategy. They conclude that metals are best from an engineering and cost standpoint while the ceramics are best from a polishing standpoint. They then give discussions of specific materials as follows: silicon carbide, silicon, electroless nickel, Glidcop{trademark}, aluminum, precipitation-hardening stainless steel, mild steel, invar and superinvar. Finally they summarize conclusions and propose ideas for further research.

  10. 1,2,4,5-Tetrachlorobenzene

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    1,2,4,5 - Tetrachlorobenzene ; CASRN 95 - 94 - 3 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for Nonca

  11. 1,1,1,2-Tetrafluoroethane

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    1,1,1,2 - Tetrafluoroethane ; CASRN 811 - 97 - 2 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for Nonca

  12. 1,1,2,2-Tetrachloroethane

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    1,1,2,2 - Tetrachloroethane ; CASRN 79 - 34 - 5 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for Noncar

  13. 1,2-Dibromo-3-chloropropane (DBCP)

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    1,2 - Dibromo - 3 - chloropropane ( DBCP ) ; CASRN 96 - 12 - 8 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessm

  14. 1,1,1,2-Tetrachloroethane

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    1,1,1,2 - Tetrachloroethane ; CASRN 630 - 20 - 6 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for Nonca

  15. 1,2,3-triazolium ionic liquids

    DOEpatents

    Luebke, David; Nulwala, Hunaid; Tang, Chau

    2014-12-09

    The present invention relates to compositions of matter that are ionic liquids, the compositions comprising substituted 1,2,3-triazolium cations combined with any anion. Compositions of the invention should be useful in the separation of gases and, perhaps, as catalysts for many reactions.

  16. 43 CFR 1815.1-2 - Applications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ..., DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR GENERAL MANAGEMENT (1000) INTRODUCTION AND GENERAL GUIDANCE Disaster Relief § 1815.1-2 Applications. (a) Place of filing. The application for relief shall be filed in the office which... particular disaster and its effect upon contract performance. (3) An estimate of the damages suffered. (4)...

  17. The Vela Pulsar and Its Synchrotron Nebula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Helfand, D.; Gotthelf, E.; Halpern, J.

    2000-10-01

    We present high-resolution Chandra X-ray observations of PSR0833-45, the 89 ms pulsar associated with the Vela supernova remnant. We have acquired two observations of the pulsar separated by one month to search for morphological changes in the pulsar and its environment following an extreme glitch in its rotation frequency. We find a well-resolved nebula with a morphology remarkably similar to the torus-like structure observed in the Crab Nebula, along with an axial Crab-like jet. The flux from the pulsar is found to be steady to within 0.75 %; the 3 sigma limit on the fractional increase in the pulsar's X-ray flux is <10-5 of the inferred glitch energy. We use this limit to constrain parameters of glitch models and neutron star structure. We do find a significant increase in the flux of the nebula's outer torus; if associated with the glitch, the inferred propogation velocity is ~0.5c, similar to that seen in the brightening of the Crab Nebula wisps. We propose an explanation for the X-ray structure of the Vela synchrotron nebula based on a model originally developed for the Crab Nebula. In this model, the bright, arc-shaped X-ray wisps are the shocked termination of a relativistic equatorial pulsar wind which is contained within the surrounding kidney-bean shaped synchrotron nebula which comprises the post-shock, but still relativistic, flow. In a departure from the Crab model, the magnetization parameter of the Vela pulsar wind is required to be of order unity; this is consistent with the simplest MHD transport of magnetic field from the pulsar to the nebula, where B ~ 4 x 10-4G.

  18. Liquid metal cooling of synchrotron optics

    SciTech Connect

    Smither, R.K.

    1992-09-01

    The installation of insertion devices at existing synchrotron facilities around the world has stimulated the development of new ways to cool the optical elements in the associated x-ray beamlines. Argonne has been a leader in the development of liquid metal cooling for high heat load x-ray optics for the next generation of synchrotron facilities. The high thermal conductivity, high volume specific heat, low kinematic viscosity, and large working temperature range make liquid metals a very efficient heat transfer fluid. A wide range of liquid metals were considered in the initial phase of this work. The most promising liquid metal cooling fluid identified to date is liquid gallium, which appears to have all the desired properties and the fewest number of undesired features of the liquid metals examined. Besides the special features of liquid metals that make them good heat transfer fluids, the very low vapor pressure over a large working temperature range make liquid gallium an ideal cooling fluid for use in a high vacuum environment. A leak of the liquid gallium into the high vacuum and even into very high vacuum areas will not result in any detectable vapor pressure and may even improve the vacuum environment as the liquid gallium combines with any water vapor or oxygen present in the system. The practical use of a liquid metal for cooling silicon crystals and other high heat load applications depends on having a convenient and efficient delivery system. The requirements for a typical cooling system for a silicon crystal used in a monochromator are pumping speeds of 2 to 5 gpm (120 cc per sec to 600 cc per sec) at pressures up to 100 psi.

  19. VLBA observations of radio faint Fermi-LAT sources above 10 GeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lico, R.; Giroletti, M.; Orienti, M.; D'Ammando, F.

    2016-10-01

    Context. The first Fermi-LAT high-energy source catalog (1FHL), containing γ-ray sources detected above 10 GeV, is an ideal sample for characterizing the physical properties of the most extreme γ-ray sources. Aims: We investigate the pc scale properties of a subsample of radio faint 1FHL sources with the aim of confirming the proposed blazar associations by revealing a compact high brightness temperature radio core, and we propose new low-frequency counterparts for the unassociated γ-ray sources (UGS). Moreover, we increase the number of 1FHL sources with high-resolution observations to explore the possible connection between radio and γ rays at E> 10 GeV. Methods: We observed 84 1FHL sources, mostly blazars of high synchrotron peaked (HSP) type, in the northern sky with the Very Long Baseline Array (VLBA) at 5 GHz. These sources lack high-resolution radio observations and have at least one NRAO VLA sky survey counterpart within the 95% confidence radius. For those sources without a well-identified radio counterpart we exploit the VLBA multiple phase-center correlation capability to identify the possible low-frequency candidates. Results: For ~93% of the sources in our sample we reveal a compact high brightness temperature radio core, which supports their proposed blazar association. The vast majority of the detected sources are radio weak, with a median VLBI flux density value of 16.3 mJy. For the detected sources we obtain an average brightness temperature on the order of 2 × 1010 K. We find a compact component for 16 UGS, for which we propose a new low-frequency association. Conclusions: We find brightness temperature values that do not require high Doppler factors, and are in agreement with the expected values for the equipartition of energy between particles and magnetic field. We find strong indications for the blazar nature of all of the detected UGS, for which we propose new low-frequency associations. The characterization of the physical properties of

  20. Internal rotation for predicting conformational population of 1,2-difluorethane and 1,2-dichloroethane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Venâncio, Mateus F.; Dos Santos, Hélio F.; De Almeida, Wagner B.

    2016-06-01

    The contribution of internal rotation to the thermal correction of Gibbs free energy (ΔG) is estimated using the quantum pendulum model (QPM) to solve the characteristic Schrödinger equation. The procedure is applied to theoretical prediction of conformational population of 1,2-difluorethane (1,2-DFE) and 1,2-dichloroethane (1,2-DCE) molecules. The predicted population for the anti form was 37% and 75%, for 1,2-DFE and 1,2-DCE respectively, in excellent agreement with experimental gas phase data available, 37 ± 5% and 78 ± 5%. These results provide great support to the use of the QPM model to account for the low vibrational frequency modes effect on the calculation of thermodynamic properties.

  1. Evaluating the dynamic aperture evaluation for the new RHIC 250 GeV polarized proton lattice

    SciTech Connect

    Gu, X.; Luo, Y.; Fischer, W.; Huang, H.; Tepikian, S.

    2011-03-28

    To increase luminosity in the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider's (RHIC's) polarized proton 250 GeV operations, we are considering reducing {beta}* to 0.65 m at the interaction points (IPs), and increasing bunch intensity. The new working point near the 2/3 integer will used on the ramp to preserve polarization. In addition, we plan to adjust the betatron-phase advances between IP6 and IP8 to (k+1/2)*{pi} so to lower the dynamic beta-beat from the beam-beam interaction. The effects of all these changes will impact the dynamic aperture, and hence, it must be evaluated carefully. In this article, we present the results of tracking the dynamic aperture with the proposed lattices.

  2. Systematics of central heavy ion collisions in the 1A GeV regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reisdorf, W.; Andronic, A.; Averbeck, R.; Benabderrahmane, M. L.; Hartmann, O. N.; Herrmann, N.; Hildenbrand, K. D.; Kang, T. I.; Kim, Y. J.; Kiš, M.; Koczoń, P.; Kress, T.; Leifels, Y.; Merschmeyer, M.; Piasecki, K.; Schüttauf, A.; Stockmeier, M.; Barret, V.; Basrak, Z.; Bastid, N.; Čaplar, R.; Crochet, P.; Dupieux, P.; Dželalija, M.; Fodor, Z.; Gasik, P.; Grishkin, Y.; Hong, B.; Kecskemeti, J.; Kirejczyk, M.; Korolija, M.; Kotte, R.; Lebedev, A.; Lopez, X.; Matulewicz, T.; Neubert, W.; Petrovici, M.; Rami, F.; Ryu, M. S.; Seres, Z.; Sikora, B.; Sim, K. S.; Simion, V.; Siwek-Wilczyńska, K.; Smolyankin, V.; Stoicea, G.; Tymiński, Z.; Wiśniewski, K.; Wohlfarth, D.; Xiao, Z. G.; Xu, H. S.; Yushmanov, I.; Zhilin, A.; FOPI Collaboration

    2010-12-01

    Using the large acceptance apparatus FOPI, we study central collisions in the reactions (energies in A GeV are given in parentheses): 40Ca + 40Ca (0.4, 0.6, 0.8, 1.0, 1.5, 1.93), 58Ni + 58Ni (0.15, 0.25, 0.4), 96Ru + 96Ru (0.4, 1.0, 1.5), 96Zr + 96Zr (0.4, 1.0, 1.5), 129Xe + CsI (0.15, 0.25, 0.4), 197Au + 197Au (0.09, 0.12, 0.15, 0.25, 0.4, 0.6, 0.8, 1.0, 1.2, 1.5). The observables include cluster multiplicities, longitudinal and transverse rapidity distributions and stopping, and radial flow. The data are compared to earlier data where possible and to transport model simulations.

  3. Ground and Excited State Charmonium Production in p + p Collisions at s = 200 GeV

    SciTech Connect

    Adare, A.; Awes, Terry C; Cianciolo, Vince; Efremenko, Yuri V; Enokizono, Akitomo; Read Jr, Kenneth F; Silvermyr, David O; Stankus, Paul W; SorensenUTK Oak Ridge National Laboratory ; Young, Glenn R; PHENIX, Collaboration

    2012-01-01

    We report on charmonium measurements [J/{psi} (1S), {psi}' (2S), and {chi}{sub c} (1P)] in p+p collisions at {radical}s = 200 GeV. We find that the fraction of J/{psi} coming from the feed-down decay of {psi}' and {chi}{sub c} in the midrapidity region (|y| < 0.35) is 9.6 {+-} 2.4% and 32 {+-} 9%, respectively. We also present the p{sub T} and rapidity dependencies of the J/{psi} yield measured via dielectron decay at midrapidity (|y| < 0.35) and via dimuon decay at forward rapidity (1.2 < |y| < 2.2). The statistical precision greatly exceeds that reported in our previous publication [Phys. Rev. Lett. 98 232002 (2007)]. The new results are compared with other experiments and discussed in the context of current charmonium production models.

  4. Introduction to nuclear resonant scattering with synchrotron radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Sturhahn, W.; Alp, E.E.; Toellner, T.S.; Hession, P.; Hu, M.; Sutter, J.

    1997-08-01

    In recent years, the use of synchrotron radiation has enjoyed increasing interest in applications to topics of Moessbauer spectroscopy. The development was initiated by the pioneering experimental work of Gerdau et al. following the original proposal of Ruby to use synchrotron radiation for the excitation of low energy nuclear resonances. From the early experiments it was clear that synchrotron radiation experiments with nuclear resonances would only succeed if familiar energy resolved measurements were replaced with a new time resolved technique. During the last decade, the authors experienced the refinement of this novel method for obtaining hyperfine parameters. This exciting development-materialized because of more intense synchrotron radiation sources at the European Synchrotron Radiation Facility (ESRF) and at the Advanced Photon Source (APS), powerful new avalanche photo diode detectors, and improved high energy resolution monochromators. Simultaneously the tools for evaluation of the novel time spectra were created, e.g., Sturhahn and Gerdau developed extensive computer codes based on the theoretical descriptions of Hannon and Trammel. Many beautiful demonstrations of the basic features of the coherent elastic scattering channel using Bragg- and Laue-reflections from single crystals deepened the understanding of nuclear resonant scattering. The concepts leading to the application of synchrotron radiation to elastic and inelastic nuclear resonant scattering are discussed. The resulting new experimental techniques are compared to conventional Moessbauer spectroscopy. A survey of situations that favor experiments with synchrotron radiation is offered.

  5. The SIBERIA dedicated synchrotron radiation source: status report on the storage rings complex at the Kurchatov Institute for Atomic Energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Artemiev, A. N.; Akhmedzhanov, S. M.; Vasilyev, A. A.; Gritsuk, G. M.; Dozorov, A. V.; Doronkin, Yu. V.; Zabelin, A. V.; Klimenko, M. N.; Kotov, S. A.; Krylov, Yu. V.; Lebedev, V. A.; Lipilin, A. V.; Nagornyh, I. M.; Nikulin, O. N.; Odintsov, D. G.; Pashkov, S. D.; Pesterev, S. G.; Prosvetov, V. K.; Rybakov, V. N.; Samorukov, M. M.; Treshchin, V. A.; Ushkov, V. L.; Tsup, A. R.; Chaikin, E. M.; Yupinov, Yu. L.

    1991-10-01

    This paper reviews the status of the SIBERIA storage rings complex. The parameters of the linac, booster synchrotron and main ring are given. The transfer of the SIBERIA-1 storage ring to its new site is described. The main parameters of the engineering systems for the SIBERIA complex are presented. The assembly of the SIBERIA-2 storage ring is planned to be finished in 1991. The SIBERIA storage rings complex has been constructed at the Kurchatov Institute for Atomic Energy (IAE) and is the first dedicated synchrotron radiation source in the USSR. The facility includes the SIBERIA-1 450 MeV electron storage ring, the SIBERIA-2 2.5 GeV electron storage ring, two electron transport lines EOC-1 and EOC-2, and an 80-100 MeV electron linac which serves as the injector. The general layout of SIBERIA is shown in fig. 1. All accelerators of the SIBERIA facility are designed and manufactured at the Institute of Nuclear Physics (INP) at Novosibirsk.

  6. The JLAB 12 GeV Energy Upgrade of CEBAF

    SciTech Connect

    Harwood, Leigh H.

    2013-12-01

    This presentation should describe the progress of the 12GeV Upgrade of CEBAF at Jefferson Lab. The status of the upgrade should be presented as well as details on the construction, procurement, installation and commissioning of the magnet and SRF components of the upgrade.

  7. 12 GeV detector technology at Jefferson Lab

    SciTech Connect

    Leckey, John P.; Collaboration: GlueX Collaboration

    2013-04-19

    The Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (JLab) is presently in the middle of an upgrade to increase the energy of its CW electron beam from 6 GeV to 12 GeV along with the addition of a fourth experimental hall. Driven both by necessity and availability, novel detectors and electronics modules have been used in the upgrade. One such sensor is the Silicon Photomultiplier (SiPM), specifically a Multi-Pixel Photon Counter (MPPC), which is an array of avalanche photodiode pixels operating in Geiger mode that are used to sense photons. The SiPMs replace conventional photomultiplier tubes and have several distinct advantages including the safe operation in a magnetic field and the lack of need for high voltage. Another key to 12 GeV success is advanced fast electronics. Jlab will use custom 250 MHz and 125 MHz 12-bit analog to digital converters (ADCs) and time to digital converters (TDCs) all of which take advantage of VME Switched Serial (VXS) bus with its GB/s high bandwidth readout capability. These new technologies will be used to readout drift chambers, calorimeters, spectrometers and other particle detectors at Jlab once the 12 GeV upgrade is complete. The largest experiment at Jlab utilizing these components is GlueX - an experiment in the newly constructed Hall D that will study the photoproduction of light mesons in the search for hybrid mesons. The performance of these components and their respective detectors will be presented.

  8. 12 GeV detector technology at Jefferson Lab

    SciTech Connect

    Leckey, John P.

    2013-04-01

    The Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (JLab) is presently in the middle of an upgrade to increase the energy of its CW electron beam from 6 GeV to 12 GeV along with the addition of a fourth experimental hall. Driven both by necessity and availability, novel detectors and electronics modules have been used in the upgrade. One such sensor is the Silicon Photomultiplier (SiPM), specifically a Multi-Pixel Photon Counter (MPPC), which is an array of avalanche photodiode pixels operating in Geiger mode that are used to sense photons. The SiPMs replace conventional photomultiplier tubes and have several distinct advantages including the safe operation in a magnetic field and the lack of need for high voltage. Another key to 12 GeV success is advanced fast electronics. Jlab will use custom 250 MHz and 125 MHz 12-bit analog to digital converters (ADCs) and time to digital converters (TDCs) all of which take advantage of VME Switched Serial (VXS) bus with its GB/s high bandwidth readout capability. These new technologies will be used to readout drift chambers, calorimeters, spectrometers and other particle detectors at Jlab once the 12 GeV upgrade is complete. The largest experiment at Jlab utilizing these components is GlueX - an experiment in the newly constructed Hall D that will study the photoproduction of light mesons in the search for hybrid mesons. The performance of these components and their respective detectors will be presented.

  9. JLab's Hall A after the 12 GeV upgrade

    SciTech Connect

    John Lerose

    2004-11-14

    An overview is presented of the planned physics program for JLab's Hall A following the 12 GeV upgrade with emphasis on the equipment needed to achieve the desired experimental goals. Results of simulations of sample experiments with anticipated uncertainties are presented.

  10. Nucleon Form Factors experiments with 12 GeV CEBAF

    SciTech Connect

    Wojtsekhowski, B.

    2008-10-13

    A number of precision form factor experiments at high momentum transfer will be performed with the 11 GeV electron beam of CEBAF. We review the approved proposals and the conceptual schemes of several new suggestions. Form factor data will serve as a major input for the construction of a tomographic image of the nucleon.

  11. 750 GeV diphoton resonance and electric dipole moments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Kiwoon; Im, Sang Hui; Kim, Hyungjin; Mo, Doh Young

    2016-09-01

    We examine the implication of the recently observed 750 GeV diphoton excess for the electric dipole moments of the neutron and electron. If the excess is due to a spin zero resonance which couples to photons and gluons through the loops of massive vector-like fermions, the resulting neutron electric dipole moment can be comparable to the present experimental bound if the CP-violating angle α in the underlying new physics is of O (10-1). An electron EDM comparable to the present bound can be achieved through a mixing between the 750 GeV resonance and the Standard Model Higgs boson, if the mixing angle itself for an approximately pseudoscalar resonance, or the mixing angle times the CP-violating angle α for an approximately scalar resonance, is of O (10-3). For the case that the 750 GeV resonance corresponds to a composite pseudo-Nambu-Goldstone boson formed by a QCD-like hypercolor dynamics confining at ΛHC, the resulting neutron EDM can be estimated with α ∼(750 GeV /ΛHC) 2θHC, where θHC is the hypercolor vacuum angle.

  12. Polarization of Λ and Λbar in 920 GeV fixed-target proton-nucleus collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abt, I.; Adams, M.; Agari, M.; Albrecht, H.; Aleksandrov, A.; Amaral, V.; Amorim, A.; Aplin, S. J.; Aushev, V.; Bagaturia, Y.; Balagura, V.; Bargiotti, M.; Barsukova, O.; Bastos, J.; Batista, J.; Bauer, C.; Bauer, Th. S.; Belkov, A.; Belkov, Ar.; Belotelov, I.; Bertin, A.; Bobchenko, B.; Böcker, M.; Bogatyrev, A.; Bohm, G.; Bräuer, M.; Bruinsma, M.; Bruschi, M.; Buchholz, P.; Buran, T.; Carvalho, J.; Conde, P.; Cruse, C.; Dam, M.; Danielsen, K. M.; Danilov, M.; De Castro, S.; Deppe, H.; Dong, X.; Dreis, H. B.; Egorytchev, V.; Ehret, K.; Eisele, F.; Emeliyanov, D.; Erhan, S.; Essenov, S.; Fabbri, L.; Faccioli, P.; Feuerstack-Raible, M.; Flammer, J.; Fominykh, B.; Funcke, M.; Garrido, Ll.; Gellrich, A.; Giacobbe, B.; Gläß, J.; Goloubkov, D.; Golubkov, Y.; Golutvin, A.; Golutvin, I.; Gorbounov, I.; Gorišek, A.; Gouchtchine, O.; Goulart, D. C.; Gradl, S.; Gradl, W.; Grimaldi, F.; Guilitsky, Yu.; Hansen, J. D.; Hernández, J. M.; Hofmann, W.; Hohlmann, M.; Hott, T.; Hulsbergen, W.; Husemann, U.; Igonkina, O.; Ispiryan, M.; Jagla, T.; Jiang, C.; Kapitza, H.; Karabekyan, S.; Karpenko, N.; Keller, S.; Kessler, J.; Khasanov, F.; Kiryushin, Yu.; Kisel, I.; Klinkby, E.; Knöpfle, K. T.; Kolanoski, H.; Korpar, S.; Krauss, C.; Kreuzer, P.; Križan, P.; Krücker, D.; Kupper, S.; Kvaratskheliia, T.; Lanyov, A.; Lau, K.; Lewendel, B.; Lohse, T.; Lomonosov, B.; Männer, R.; Mankel, R.; Masciocchi, S.; Massa, I.; Matchikhilian, I.; Medin, G.; Medinnis, M.; Mevius, M.; Michetti, A.; Mikhailov, Yu.; Mizuk, R.; Muresan, R.; zur Nedden, M.; Negodaev, M.; Nörenberg, M.; Nowak, S.; Núñez Pardo de Vera, M. T.; Ouchrif, M.; Ould-Saada, F.; Padilla, C.; Peralta, D.; Pernack, R.; Pestotnik, R.; Petersen, B. AA.; Piccinini, M.; Pleier, M. A.; Poli, M.; Popov, V.; Pose, D.; Prystupa, S.; Pugatch, V.; Pylypchenko, Y.; Pyrlik, J.; Reeves, K.; Reßing, D.; Rick, H.; Riu, I.; Robmann, P.; Rostovtseva, I.; Rybnikov, V.; Sánchez, F.; Sbrizzi, A.; Schmelling, M.; Schmidt, B.; Schreiner, A.; Schröder, H.; Schwanke, U.; Schwartz, A. J.; Schwarz, A. S.; Schwenninger, B.; Schwingenheuer, B.; Sciacca, F.; Semprini-Cesari, N.; Shuvalov, S.; Silva, L.; Sözüer, L.; Solunin, S.; Somov, A.; Somov, S.; Spengler, J.; Spighi, R.; Spiridonov, A.; Stanovnik, A.; Starič, M.; Stegmann, C.; Subramania, H. S.; Symalla, M.; Tikhomirov, I.; Titov, M.; Tsakov, I.; Uwer, U.; van Eldik, C.; Vassiliev, Yu.; Villa, M.; Vitale, A.; Vukotic, I.; Wahlberg, H.; Walenta, A. H.; Walter, M.; Wang, J. J.; Wegener, D.; Werthenbach, U.; Wolters, H.; Wurth, R.; Wurz, A.; Zaitsev, Yu.; Zavertyaev, M.; Zeuner, T.; Zhelezov, A.; Zheng, Z.; Zimmermann, R.; Živko, T.; Zoccoli, A.; HERA-B Collaboration

    2006-07-01

    A measurement of the polarization of Λ and Λbar baryons produced in pC and pW collisions at √{ s} = 41.6 GeV has been performed with the HERA-B spectrometer. The measurements cover the kinematic range of 0.6 GeV / c 1.2 GeV / c in transverse momentum and - 0.15

  13. Synchrotron-based Infrared Microspectroscopy as a Useful Tool to Study Hydration States of Meteorite Constituents

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moroz, L. V.; Schmidt, M.; Schade, U.; Hiroi, T.; Ivanova, M. A.

    2005-01-01

    The meteorites Dho 225 and Dho 735 were recently found in Oman. Studies of their mineralogical and chemical composition suggest that these unusual meteorites are thermally metamorphosed CM2 chondrites [1,2,3]. Similar to Antarctic metamorphosed carbonaceous chondrites, the Dho 225 and Dho 735 are enriched in heavy oxygen compared to normal CMs [1,2]. However, IR studies indicating dehydration of matrix phyllosilicates are needed to confirm that the two new meteorites from Oman are thermally metamorphosed [4]. Synchrotron-based IR microspectroscopy is a new promising technique which allows the acquisition of IR spectra from extremely small samples. Here we demonstrate that this non-destructive technique is a useful tool to study hydration states of carbonaceous chondrites in situ. In addition, we acquired reflectance spectra of bulk powders of the Dho 225 and Dho 735 in the range of 0.3-50 microns.

  14. 1,2-Diazinium hydrogen chloranilate

    PubMed Central

    Gotoh, Kazuma; Ishida, Hiroyuki

    2008-01-01

    In the crystal structure of the title compound, C4H5N2 +·C6HCl2O4 −, there are three crystallographically independent 1,2-diazinium cations and hydrogen chloranilate anions. The anions are held together by pairs of O—H⋯O hydrogen bonds to form two types of dimers, one of which is centrosymmetric. The 1,2-diazinium cations are linked on both sides of each dimer via bifurcated N—H⋯O hydrogen bonds to give two kinds of 2–2 cation–anion associations. The 2–2 associations are linked by inter­molecular C—H⋯O and C—H⋯N hydrogen bonds, forming a mol­ecular tape along the [230] direction. The tapes are further connected by C—H⋯O hydrogen bonds, forming a three-dimensional network. PMID:21580959

  15. Nitrone Cycloadditions of 1,2-Cyclohexadiene

    PubMed Central

    Barber, Joyann S.; Styduhar, Evan D.; Pham, Hung V.; McMahon, Travis C.; Houk, K. N.; Garg, Neil K.

    2016-01-01

    We report the first 1,3-dipolar cycloadditions of 1,2-cyclohexadiene, a rarely exploited strained allene. 1,2-Cyclohexadiene is generated in situ under mild conditions and trapped with nitrones to give isoxazolidine products in synthetically useful yields. The reactions occur regioselectively and exhibit a notable endo preference, thus resulting in the controlled formation of two new bonds and two stereogenic centers. DFT calculations of stepwise and concerted reaction pathways are used to rationalize the observed selectivities. Moreover, the strategic manipulation of nitrone cycloadducts demonstrates the utility of this methodology for the assembly of compounds bearing multiple heterocyclic units. These studies showcase the exploitation of a traditionally avoided reactive intermediate in chemical synthesis. PMID:26854652

  16. Initial performance of the Wire Imaging Synchrotron Radiation Detector

    SciTech Connect

    Von Zanthier, C.; Gomez Cadenas, J.J.; Kent, J.; King, M.; Watson, S. ); Briggs, D.D.; Rouse, F.; Tinsman, J. )

    1990-01-01

    This paper describes the initial performance of a novel detector that measures the positions of intense synchrotron-radiation beams with high precision. Two detectors of this kind are used for the precision energy spectrometers of the Stanford Linear Collider (SLC). The detectors accurately determine the distance between pairs of intense synchrotron beams of typically 1 MeV photons, which are emitted by the primary electron and positron beams of the SLC. The detectors intercept the synchrotron beams with arrays of fine wires. The ejection of Compton-recoil electrons leaves positive charges on the wires, enabling a determination of beam positions. 6 refs., 6 figs.

  17. Optical systems for synchrotron radiation. Lecture 2. Mirror systems

    SciTech Connect

    Howells, M.R.

    1986-02-01

    The process of reflection of VUV and x-radiation is summarized. The functions of mirrors in synchrotron beamlines are described, which include deflection, filtration, power absorption, formation of a real image, focusing, and collimation. Fabrication of optical surfaces for synchrotron radiation beamlines are described, and include polishing of a near spherical surface as well as bending a cylindrical surface to toroidal shape. The imperfections present in mirrors, aberrations and surface figure inaccuracy, are discussed. Calculation of the thermal load of a mirror in a synchrotron radiation beam and the cooling of the mirror are covered briefly. 50 refs., 7 figs. (LEW)

  18. Synchrotron Heating by a Fast Radio Burst in a Self-absorbed Synchrotron Nebula and Its Observational Signature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Yuan-Pei; Zhang, Bing; Dai, Zi-Gao

    2016-03-01

    Fast radio bursts (FRBs) are mysterious transient sources. If extragalactic, as suggested by their relative large dispersion measures, their brightness temperatures must be extremely high. Some FRB models (e.g., young pulsar model, magnetar giant flare model, or supra-massive neutron star collapse model) suggest that they may be associated with a synchrotron nebula. Here we study a synchrotron-heating process by an FRB in a self-absorbed synchrotron nebula. If the FRB frequency is below the synchrotron self-absorption frequency of the nebula, electrons in the nebula would absorb FRB photons, leading to a harder electron spectrum and enhanced self-absorbed synchrotron emission. In the meantime, the FRB flux is absorbed by the nebula electrons. We calculate the spectra of FRB-heated synchrotron nebulae, and show that the nebula spectra would show a significant hump in several decades near the self-absorption frequency. Identifying such a spectral feature would reveal an embedded FRB in a synchrotron nebula.

  19. 1,1,2-Trichloro-1,2,2-trifluoroethane (CFC-113)

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    1,1,2 - Trichloro - 1,2,2 - trifluoroethane ( CFC - 113 ) ; CASRN 76 - 13 - 1 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health

  20. Equilibria of 1,1,2,-trichloro-1,2,2-trifluoroethane on activated carbons

    SciTech Connect

    Cho, S.Y.; Lee, Y.Y.

    1995-07-01

    ChloroFluoroCarbons (CFCs) are now considered to be the prime contribution to stratospheric ozone depletion. As a result, the use of activated carbons to adsorb specific CFCs has received great attention. In this paper, the equilibrium adsorption characteristics of 1,1,2-trichloro-1,2,2-trifluoroethane vapor on different-shaped carbons were studied. Adsorption isotherms of 1,2,2-trichloro-1,2,2-trifluoroethane on an activated carbon pellet and an activated carbon felt were measured. The equilibria of 1,1,2-trichloro-1,2,2-trifluoroethane on the activated carbon pellet having a dual pore structure were expressed by the Redlich-Peterson equation, and equilibrium constants were expressed as functions of temperature from 298 to 393 K. On the other hand, the equilibria of 1,1,2-trichloro-1,2,2-trifluoroethane on the activated carbon felt having a relatively uniform pore structure were interpreted by the Dubinin-Radushkevich correlation based on the micropore volume filling theory. The affinity coefficient was correlated by the molar polarization.

  1. New Perspectives for Advanced Science at the Brazilian Synchrotron Light Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Tolentino, Helio C.N.

    2003-01-24

    The LNLS (Laboratorio Nacional de Luz Sincrotron) is a national laboratory in Brazil that operates a 1.37 GeV storage ring for synchrotron light users since July 1997. Eleven bending magnet beamlines are open to a wide range of possibilities for research in ultra-violet and X-ray spectroscopy, single crystal and powder diffraction, magnetic and anomalous scattering, protein crystallography, X-ray fluorescence, X-ray lithography and small angle X-ray scattering. The recent conclusion of the booster injector opened the way for insertion devices to be accommodated in the four straight sections available. A multipolar wiggler, for protein crystallography using the MAD technique, is the first planned to be installed during 2003. The construction of the first LNLS undulator, for the vaccum ultra-violet and soft X-ray domain, has already started and will expand the possibilities in atomic, molecular and surface physics, as well as in catalysis and magnetism. LNLS has expanded its infra-structure as an open multidisciplinary research laboratory into complementary areas, such as electron and scanning probe microscopy, nanostructure synthesis and molecular biology. Many technological and scientific achievements have been attained in these last five years. Some of them will be highlighted here, with emphasis in the area of nanostructured and magnetic materials.

  2. Studies of longitudinal profile of electron bunches and impedance measurements at Indus-2 synchrotron radiation source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garg, Akash Deep; Yadav, S.; Kumar, Mukesh; Shrivastava, B. B.; Karnewar, A. K.; Ojha, A.; Puntambekar, T. A.

    2016-04-01

    Indus-2 is a 3rd generation synchrotron radiation source at the Raja Ramanna Centre for Advanced Technology (RRCAT) in India. We study the longitudinal profile of electrons in Indus-2 by using dual sweep synchroscan streak camera at visible diagnostic beamline. In this paper, the longitudinal profiles of electron bunch are analyzed by filling beam current in a single bunch mode. These studies are carried at injection energy (550 MeV) and at ramped beam energy (2.5 GeV). The effects of the wakefield generated interactions between the circulating electrons and the surrounding vacuum chamber are analyzed in terms of measured effects on longitudinal beam distribution. The impedance of the storage ring is obtained by fitting the solutions of Haissinski equation to the measured bunch lengthening with different impedance models. The impedance of storage ring obtained by a series R+L impedance model indicates a resistance (R) of 1350±125 Ω, an inductance (L) of 180±25 nH and broadband impedance of 2.69 Ω. These results are also compared with the values obtained from measured synchronous phase advancing and scaling laws. These studies are very useful in better understanding and control of the electromagnetic interactions.

  3. Testing one-zone synchrotron-self-Compton models with spectral energy distributions of Mrk 421

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Qianqian; Yan, Dahai; Zhang, Pengfei; Yin, Qian-Qing; Zhang, Li; Zhang, Shuang-Nan

    2016-09-01

    We test one-zone synchrotron self-Compton (SSC) models with high-quality multiwavelength spectral energy distribution (SED) data of Mrk 421. We use Markov chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) technique to fit twelve day-scale SEDs of Mrk 421 with one-zone SSC models. Three types of electron energy distribution (EED), a log-parabola (LP) EED, a power-law log-parabola (PLLP) EED and a broken power-law (BPL) EED, are assumed in fits. We find that the one-zone SSC model with the PLLP EED provides successful fits to all the twelve SEDs. However, the one-zone SSC model with the LP and BPL EEDs fail to provide acceptable fits to the highest energy X-ray data or GeV data in several states. We therefore conclude that the one-zone SSC model works well in explaining the SEDs of Mrk 421, and the PLLP EED is preferred over the LP and BPL EEDs for Mrk 421 during the flare in March 2010. We derive magnetic field B' ˜ 0.01 G, Doppler factor δD ˜30-50, and the curvature parameter of EED r ˜ 1-10 in the model with the PLLP EED. The evolutions of model parameters are explored. The physical implications of our results are discussed.

  4. Possible proton synchrotron origin of X-ray and gamma-ray emission in large-scale jet of 3C 273

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kundu, Esha; Gupta, Nayantara

    2014-10-01

    The large-scale jet of quasar 3C 273 has been observed in radio to gamma-ray frequencies. Earlier the X-ray emission from knot A of this jet has been explained with inverse Compton scattering of the cosmic microwave background radiations by the shock accelerated relativistic electrons in the jet. More recently it has been shown that this mechanism overproduces the gamma-ray flux at GeV energy and violates the observational results from Fermi LAT. We have considered the synchrotron emission from a broken power-law spectrum of accelerated protons in the jet to explain the observed X-ray to gamma-ray flux from knot A. The two scenarios discussed in our work are (i) magnetic field is high, synchrotron energy loss time of the protons is shorter than their escape time from the knot region and the age of the jet and (ii) their escape time is shorter than their synchrotron energy loss time and the age of the jet. These scenarios can explain the observed photon spectrum well for moderate values of Doppler factor. The required jet luminosity is high ˜1046 erg s-1 in the first scenario and moderate ˜1045 erg s-1 in the second, which makes the second scenario more favourable.

  5. 7-GeV advanced photon source beamline initiative: Conceptual design report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-05-01

    The DOE is building a new generation 6-7 GeV Synchrotron Radiation Source known as the Advanced Photon Source (APS) at Argonne National Laboratory. This facility, to be completed in FY 1996, can provide 70 x-ray sources of unprecedented brightness to meet the research needs of virtually all scientific disciplines and numerous technologies. The technological research capability of the APS in the areas of energy, communications and health will enable a new partnership between the DOE and US industry. Current funding for the APS will complete the current phase of construction so that scientists can begin their applications in FY 1996. Comprehensive utilization of the unique properties of APS beams will enable cutting-edge research not currently possible. It is now appropriate to plan to construct additional radiation sources and beamline standard components to meet the excess demands of the APS users. In this APS Beamline Initiative, 2.5-m-long insertion-device x-ray sources will be built on four straight sections of the APS storage ring, and an additional four bending-magnet sources will also be put in use. The front ends for these eight x-ray sources will be built to contain and safeguard access to these bright x-ray beams. In addition, funds will be provided to build standard beamline components to meet scientific and technological research demands of the Collaborative Access Teams. The Conceptual Design Report (CDR) for the APS Beamline Initiative describes the scope of all the above technical and conventional construction and provides a detailed cost and schedule for these activities. The document also describes the preconstruction R&D plans for the Beamline Initiative activities and provides the cost estimates for the required R&D.

  6. 12th International School and Symposium on Synchrotron Radiation in Natural Sciences (ISSRNS 2014)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kozak, Maciej; Kwiatek, Wojciech M.; Kowalski, Bogdan

    2015-12-01

    Polish Synchrotron Radiation Society (PTPS - Polskie Towarzystwo Promieniowania Synchrotronowego), founded in 1991, is one of the oldest world scientific societies gathering not only active users of synchrotron radiation, but also a large group of those interested in synchrotron techniques (http://www.synchrotron.org.pl)

  7. Challenges for Synchrotron X-Ray Optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freund, Andreas K.

    2002-12-01

    It is the task of x-ray optics to adapt the raw beam generated by modern sources such as synchrotron storage rings to a great variety of experimental requirements in terms of intensity, spot size, polarization and other parameters. The very high quality of synchrotron radiation (source size of a few microns and beam divergence of a few micro-radians) and the extreme x-ray flux (power of several hundred Watts in a few square mm) make this task quite difficult. In particular the heat load aspect is very important in the conditioning process of the brute x-ray power to make it suitable for being used on the experimental stations. Cryogenically cooled silicon crystals and water-cooled diamond crystals can presently fulfill this task, but limits will soon be reached and new schemes and materials must be envisioned. A major tendency of instrument improvement has always been to concentrate more photons into a smaller spot utilizing a whole variety of focusing devices such as Fresnel zone plates, refractive lenses and systems based on bent surfaces, for example, Kirkpatrick-Baez systems. Apart from the resistance of the sample, the ultimate limits are determined by the source size and strength on one side, by materials properties, cooling, mounting and bending schemes on the other side, and fundamentally by the diffraction process. There is also the important aspect of coherence that can be both a nuisance and a blessing for the experiments, in particular for imaging techniques. Its conservation puts additional constraints on the quality of the optical elements. The overview of the present challenges includes the properties of present and also mentions aspects of future x-ray sources such as the "ultimate" storage ring and free electron lasers. These challenges range from the thermal performances of monochromators to the surface quality of mirrors, from coherence preservation of modern multilayers to short pulse preservation by crystals, and from micro- and nano

  8. Why is GeV physics relevant in the age of the LHC?

    SciTech Connect

    Pennington, Michael R.

    2014-02-01

    The contribution that Jefferson Lab has made, with its 6 GeV electron beam, and will make, with its 12 GeV upgrade, to our understanding of the way the fundamental interactions work, particularly strong coupling QCD, is outlined. The physics at the GeV scale is essential even in TeV collisions.

  9. Low-lying {Lambda} baryons with spin 1/2 in two-flavor lattice QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Takahashi, Toru T.; Oka, Makoto

    2010-02-01

    Low-lying {Lambda} baryons with spin 1/2 are analyzed in full (unquenched) lattice QCD. We construct 2x2 cross correlators from flavor SU(3) octet and singlet baryon operators, and diagonalize them so as to extract information of two low-lying states for each parity. The two-flavor CP-PACS gauge configurations are used, which are generated in the renormalization-group improved gauge action and the O(a)-improved quark action. Three different {beta}'s, {beta}=1.80, 1.95, and 2.10, are employed, whose corresponding lattice spacings are a=0.2150, 0.1555, and 0.1076 fm. For each cutoff, we use four hopping parameters, ({kappa}{sub val},{kappa}{sub sea}), which correspond to the pion masses ranging about from 500 MeV to 1.1 GeV. Results indicate that there are two negative-parity {Lambda} states nearly degenerate at around 1.6 GeV, while no state as low as {Lambda}(1405) is observed. By decomposing the flavor components of each state, we find that the lowest (1st-excited) negative-parity state is dominated by flavor-singlet (flavor-octet) component. We also discuss meson-baryon components of each state, which has drawn considerable attention in the context of multiquark pictures of {Lambda}(1405).

  10. The metrology of spherical shells using synchrotron x ray microtomography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hmelo, Anthony B.; Allen, James L.; Damico, Kevin L.

    1990-01-01

    With recent advances in solid state imaging technology and the increasing availability of synchrotron x-ray radiation sources, synchrotron x-ray microtomography is emerging as a nondestructive technique for the evaluation of the structure and composition of small specimens with spatial resolution in the micron range. Synchrotron radiation offers the following advantages over conventional x-ray sources: high brightness, continuous emission which is tunable over a large energy range, faster data collection rates, and a highly collimated beam of large cross section permitting the illumination of large specimens. Synchrotron x-ray microtomography enables the structure of individual spheres to be evaluated in order to reveal the concentricity and sphericity of the internal void and the uniformity of the shell wall in the case of high quality spherical shells for Sandia National Laboratories' Inertial Confinement Fusion project.

  11. Synchrotron radiation for direct analysis of metalloproteins on electrophoresis gels.

    PubMed

    Ortega, Richard

    2009-03-01

    Metalloproteomics requires analytical techniques able to assess and quantify the inorganic species in metalloproteins. The most widely used methods are hyphenated techniques, based on the coupling of a high resolution chromatographic method with a high sensitivity method for metal analysis in solution. An alternative approach is the use of methods for solid sample analysis, combining metalloprotein separation by gel electrophoresis and direct analysis of the gels. Direct methods are based on beam analysis, such as lasers, ion beams or synchrotron radiation beams. The aim of this review article is to present the main features of synchrotron radiation based methods and their applications for metalloprotein analysis directly on electrophoresis gels. Synchrotron radiation X-ray fluorescence has been successfully employed for sensitive metal identification, and X-ray absorption spectroscopy for metal local structure speciation in proteins. Synchrotron based methods will be compared to ion beam and mass spectrometry for direct analysis of metalloproteins in electrophoresis gels.

  12. Summary of session 3 on synchrotron radiation and beam dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Shiltsev, V.; Metral, E.; /CERN

    2010-12-01

    We summarize presentations, discussions and general conclusions of the Workshop session on 'Beam Dynamics Issues'. Major subjects include effects due to synchrotron radiation (SR), cryogenic loads, electron cloud, impedances, intra-beam scattering (IBS) and beam-beam interactions.

  13. On the implementation of computed laminography using synchrotron radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Helfen, L.; Pernot, P.; Elyyan, M.; Myagotin, A.; Mikulik, P.; Voropaev, A.; Di Michiel, M.; Baruchel, J.; Baumbach, T.

    2011-06-15

    Hard x rays from a synchrotron source are used in this implementation of computed laminography for three-dimensional (3D) imaging of flat, laterally extended objects. Due to outstanding properties of synchrotron light, high spatial resolution down to the micrometer scale can be attained, even for specimens having lateral dimensions of several decimeters. Operating either with a monochromatic or with a white synchrotron beam, the method can be optimized to attain high sensitivity or considerable inspection throughput in synchrotron user and small-batch industrial experiments. The article describes the details of experimental setups, alignment procedures, and the underlying reconstruction principles. Imaging of interconnections in flip-chip and wire-bonded devices illustrates the peculiarities of the method compared to its alternatives and demonstrates the wide application potential for the 3D inspection and quality assessment in microsystem technology.

  14. Stability of high-brilliance synchrotron radiation sources

    SciTech Connect

    Chattopadhyay, S.

    1989-12-01

    This paper discusses the following topics: characteristics of synchrotron radiation sources; stability of the orbits; orbit control; nonlinear dynamic stability; and coherent stability and control. 1 ref., 5 figs., 1 tab. (LSP)

  15. (1+2)-dimensional strongly nonlocal solitons

    SciTech Connect

    Ouyang Shigen; Guo Qi

    2007-11-15

    Approximate solutions of (1+2)-dimensional strongly nonlocal solitons (SNSs) are presented. It is shown that the power of a SNS in a nematic liquid crystal is in direct proportion to the second power of the degree of nonlocality, the power of a SNS in a nonlocal medium with a logarithmic nonlocal response is in inverse proportion to the second power of its beamwidth, and the power of a SNS in a nonlocal medium with an sth-power decay nonlocal response is in direct proportion to the (s+2)th power of the degree of nonlocality.

  16. ON THE GeV AND TeV DETECTIONS OF THE STARBURST GALAXIES M82 AND NGC 253

    SciTech Connect

    Lacki, Brian C.; Thompson, Todd A.; Quataert, Eliot; Loeb, Abraham; Waxman, Eli

    2011-06-20

    The GeV and TeV emission from M82 and NGC 253 observed by Fermi, HESS, and VERITAS constrain the physics of cosmic rays (CRs) in these dense starbursts. We argue that the {gamma}-rays are predominantly hadronic in origin, as expected by previous studies. The measured fluxes imply that pionic losses are efficient for CR protons in both galaxies: we show that a fraction F{sub cal} {approx} 0.2-0.4 of the energy injected in high-energy primary CR protons is lost to inelastic proton-proton collisions (pion production) before escape, producing {gamma}-rays, neutrinos, and secondary electrons and positrons. We discuss the factor of {approx}2 uncertainties in this estimate, including supernova rate and leptonic contributions to the GeV-TeV emission. We argue that {gamma}-ray data on ULIRGs like Arp 220 can test whether M82 and NGC 253 are truly calorimetric, and we present upper limits on Arp 220 from the Fermi data. We show that the observed ratio of the GeV to GHz fluxes of the starbursts suggests that non-synchrotron cooling processes are important for cooling the CR electron/positron population. We briefly reconsider previous predictions in light of the {gamma}-ray detections, including the starburst contribution to the {gamma}-ray background and CR energy densities. Finally, as a guide for future studies, we list the brightest star-forming galaxies on the sky and present updated predictions for their {gamma}-ray and neutrino fluxes.

  17. Synchrotron powder diffraction on Aztec blue pigments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sánchez Del Río, M.; Gutiérrez-León, A.; Castro, G. R.; Rubio-Zuazo, J.; Solís, C.; Sánchez-Hernández, R.; Robles-Camacho, J.; Rojas-Gaytán, J.

    2008-01-01

    Some samples of raw blue pigments coming from an archaeological rescue mission in downtown Mexico City have been characterized using different techniques. The samples, some recovered as a part of a ritual offering, could be assigned to the late Aztec period (XVth century). The striking characteristic of these samples is that they seem to be raw pigments prior to any use in artworks, and it was possible to collect a few μg of pigment after manual grain selection under a microscopy monitoring. All pigments are made of indigo, an organic colorant locally known as añil or xiuhquilitl. The colorant is always found in combination with an inorganic matrix, studied by powder diffraction. In one case the mineral base is palygorskite, a rare clay mineral featuring micro-channels in its structure, well known as the main ingredient of the Maya blue pigment. However, other samples present the minerals sepiolite (a clay mineral of the palygorskite family) and calcite. Another sample contains barite, a mineral never reported in prehispanic paints. We present the results of characterization using high resolution powder diffraction recorded at the European Synchrotron Radiation Facility (BM25A, SpLine beamline) complemented with other techniques. All of them gave consistent results on the composition. A chemical test on resistance to acids was done, showing a high resistance for the palygorskite and eventually sepiolite compounds, in good agreement with the excellent resistance of the Maya blue.

  18. Far Infrared Synchrotron Spectrum of Trimethlyene Oxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahassneh, Omar; van Wijngaarden, Jennifer

    2016-06-01

    Rotationally-resolved vibrational spectra of trimethlyene oxide (c-C3H6O) from 650 through 1200 wn were recorded using far infrared synchrotron radiation at the Canadian Light Source with better than 0.001 wn resolution. The observed bands correspond to at least eight different fundamental vibrations in this region. Due to the low frequency ring puckering motion, the observed rovibrational pattern of each band is congested with hot-combination bands that originate in the first two excited ring puckering states (52.9 wn, 142.6 wn). The ongoing analysis of the strong b-type bands corresponding to asymmetric in-plane CO stretching (ν10:1008 wn) will be discussed along with the identification of allowed Coriolis interactions arising from nearby energy levels related to in-plane CC stretching (ν9: 940 wn, ν3: 1033 wn). G. Moruzzi et al., J. Mol. Spectrosc. 219, 152 (2003). Bánhegyi et al. Spectrochim. Acta. 39A, 761 (1983).

  19. Brightness of synchrotron radiation from wigglers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geloni, Gianluca; Kocharyan, Vitali; Saldin, Evgeni

    2016-01-01

    According to the literature, while calculating the brightness of synchrotron radiation from wigglers, one needs to account for the so-called 'depth-of-field' effects. In fact, the particle beam cross-section varies along the wiggler. It is usually stated that the effective photon source size increases accordingly, while the brightness is reduced. Here we claim that this is a misconception originating from an analysis of the wiggler source based on geometrical arguments, regarded as almost self-evident. According to electrodynamics, depth-of-field effects do not exist: we demonstrate this statement both theoretically and numerically, using a well-known first-principle computer code. This fact shows that under the usually accepted approximations, the description of the wiggler brightness turns out to be inconsistent even qualitatively. Therefore, there is a need for a well-defined procedure for computing the brightness from a wiggler source. We accomplish this task based on the use of a Wigner function formalism. We exemplify this formalism in simple limiting cases. We consider the problem of the calculation of the wiggler source size by means of numerical simulations alone, which play the same role of an experiment. We report a significant numerical disagreement between exact calculations and approximations currently used in the literature.

  20. TOWARDS FAST-PULSED SUPERCONDUCTING SYNCHROTRON MAGNETS.

    SciTech Connect

    MORITZ,G.; MUEHLE,C.; ANERELLA,M.; GHOSH,A.; SAMPSON,W.; WANDERER,P.; WILLEN,E.; AGAPOV,N.; KHODZHIBAGIYAN,H.; KOVALENKO,A.; HASSENZAHL,W.V.; WILSON,M.N.

    2001-06-18

    The concept for the new GSI accelerator facilities is based on a large synchrotron designed for operation at BR=200 Tm and with the short cycle-time of about one second to achieve high average beam intensities. Superconducting magnets may reduce considerably investment and operating costs in comparison with conventional magnets. A R and D program was initiated to develop these magnets for a maximum field of 2-4 Tesla and a ramp rate of 4 T/s. In collaboration with JINR (Dubna), the window-frame type Nuclotron dipole, which has been operated with 4 T/s at a maximum field of 2 Tesla, shall be developed to reduce heat losses and to improve the magnetic field quality. Another collaboration with BNL (Brookhaven) was established to develop the one-layer-coil cos{theta}-type RHIC arc dipole designed for operation at 3.5 Tesla with a rather slow ramp-rate of 0.07 T/s towards the design ramp-rate of 4 T/s. The design concepts for both R and D programs are reported.

  1. High contrast computed tomography with synchrotron radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Itai, Yuji; Takeda, Tohoru; Akatsuka, Takao; Maeda, Tomokazu; Hyodo, Kazuyuki; Uchida, Akira; Yuasa, Tetsuya; Kazama, Masahiro; Wu, Jin; Ando, Masami

    1995-02-01

    This article describes a new monochromatic x-ray CT system using synchrotron radiation with applications in biomedical diagnosis which is currently under development. The system is designed to provide clear images and to detect contrast materials at low concentration for the quantitative functional evaluation of organs in correspondence with their anatomical structures. In this system, with x-ray energy changing from 30 to 52 keV, images can be obtained to detect various contrast materials (iodine, barium, and gadolinium), and K-edge energy subtraction is applied. Herein, the features of the new system designed to enhance the advantages of SR are reported. With the introduction of a double-crystal monochromator, the high-order x-ray contamination is eliminated. The newly designed CCD detector with a wide dynamic range of 60 000:1 has a spatial resolution of 200 μm. The resulting image quality, which is expected to show improved contrast and spatial resolution, is currently under investigation.

  2. Studying Magnetohydrodynamic Turbulence with Synchrotron Polarization Dispersion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jian-Fu; Lazarian, Alex; Lee, Hyeseung; Cho, Jungyeon

    2016-07-01

    We test a new technique for studying magnetohydrodynamic turbulence suggested by Lazarian & Pogosyan, using synthetic observations of synchrotron polarization. This paper focuses on a one-point statistics, which is termed polarization frequency analysis, that is characterized by the variance of polarized emission as a function of the square of the wavelength along a single line of sight. We adopt the ratio η of the standard deviation of the line-of-sight turbulent magnetic field to the line-of-sight mean magnetic field to depict the level of turbulence. When this ratio is large (η \\gg 1), which characterizes a region dominated by turbulent field, or small (η ≲ 0.2), which characterizes a region dominated by the mean field, we obtain the polarization variance < {P}2> \\propto {λ }-2 or < {P}2> \\propto {λ }-2-2m, respectively. At small η, i.e., in the region dominated by the mean field, we successfully recover the turbulent spectral index from the polarization variance. We find that our simulations agree well with the theoretical prediction of Lazarian & Pogosyan. With existing and upcoming data cubes from the Low-Frequency Array for Radio Astronomy (LOFAR) and the Square Kilometer Array (SKA), this new technique can be applied to study the magnetic turbulence in the Milky Way and other galaxies.

  3. METROLOGICAL CHALLENGES OF SYNCHROTRON RADIATION OPTICS.

    SciTech Connect

    SOSTERO,G.

    1999-05-25

    Modern third generation storage rings, require state-of-the-art grazing incidence x-ray optics, in order to monochromate the Synchrotrons Radiation (SR) source photons, and focus them into the experimental stations. Slope error tolerances in the order of 0.5 {micro}Rad RMS, and surface roughness well below 5 {angstrom} RMS, are frequently specified for mirrors and gratings exceeding 300 mm in length. Non-contact scanning instruments were developed, in order to characterize SR optical surfaces, of spherical and aspherical shape. Among these, the Long Trace Profiler (LTP), a double pencil slope measuring interferometer, has proved to be particularly reliable, and was adopted by several SR optics metrology laboratories. The ELETTRA soft x-rays and optics metrology laboratory, has operated an LTP since 1992. We review the basic operating principles of this instrument, and some major instrumental and environmental improvements, that were developed in order to detect slope errors lower than 1 {micro}Rad RMS on optical surfaces up to one metre in length. A comparison among measurements made on the same reference flat, by different interferometers (most of them were LTPs) can give some helpful indications in order to optimize the quality of measurement.

  4. A Synchrotron Radiation Research Facility for Africa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winick, Herman

    2015-03-01

    Africa is the only habitable continent without a synchrotron light source. Dozens of African scientists use facilities abroad. Although South Africa has become a member of ESRF, the number of users is limited by distance and travel cost. A light source in Africa would give thousands of African scientists access to this tool. Momentum is now building for an African light source, as a collaboration involving several sub-Saharan African countries. An interim Steering Committee has been formed. SESAME, now nearing completion in Jordan as a collaboration of 9 countries in the Middle East (www.sesame.org.jo) may be the example followed. UNESCO became the umbrella organization for SESAME at its Executive Board 164th session, May 2002, as it did in the case of CERN in the 1950s. UNESCO's Executive Board described SESAME as ``a quintessential UNESCO project combining capacity building with vital peace-building through science'' and ``a model project for other regions''. It is likely that UNESCO, if asked, would play a similar role as a facilitator for an African light source.

  5. A Synchrotron Radiation Research Facility for Africa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evans-Lutterodt, Kenneth; Mtingwa, Sekazi; Wague, Ahmadou; Tessema, Guebre; Winick, Herman

    2015-04-01

    Africa is the only habitable continent without a synchrotron light source. Dozens of African scientists use facilities abroad. Even though South Africa has become a member of ESRF, the number of users is limited by distance and travel cost. A light source in Africa would give many more African scientists access to this tool. Momentum is now building for an African light source, as a collaboration involving several African countries. An interim Steering Committee has been formed, with a mandate to plan a conference. SESAME, now nearing completion in Jordan, is a collaboration of 9 countries in the Middle East (www.sesame.org.jo) is an example to follow. UNESCO became the umbrella organization for SESAME at its Executive Board 164th session, May 2002, as it did in the case of CERN in the 1950s. UNESCO's Executive Board described SESAME as ``a quintessential UNESCO project combining capacity building with vital peace-building through science'' and ``a model project for other regions.'' It is likely that UNESCO, if asked, would play a similar role as a facilitator for an African light source.

  6. Synchrotron brightness distribution of turbulent radio jets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Henriksen, R. N.; Bridle, A. H.; Chan, K. L.

    1981-01-01

    Radio jets are considered as turbulent mixing regions and it is proposed that the essential small scale viscous dissipation in these jets is by emission of MHD waves and by their subsequent strong damping due, at least partly, to gyro-resonant acceleration of supra-thermal particles. A formula relating the synchrotron surface brightness of a radio jet to the turbulent power input is deduced from physical postulates, and is tested against the data for NGC315 and 3C31 (NGC383). The predicted brightness depends essentially on the collimation behavior of the jet, and, to a lesser extent, on the CH picture of a 'high' nozzle with accelerating flow. The conditions for forming a large scale jet at a high nozzle from a much smaller scale jet are discussed. The effect of entrainment on the prediction is discussed with the use of similarity solutions. Although entrainment is inevitably associated with the turbulent jet, it may or may not be a dominant factor depending on the ambient density profile.

  7. The AGS synchrotron with four helical magnets

    SciTech Connect

    Tsoupas N.; Huang, H.; Roser, T.; MacKay, W.W.; Trbojevic, D.

    2012-05-20

    The idea of using two partial helical magnets was applied successfully to the AGS synchrotron to preserve the proton beam polarization. In this paper we explore in details the idea of using four helical magnets placed symmetrically in the AGS ring. The placement of four helical magnets in the AGS ring provides many advantages over the present setup of the AGS which uses two partial helical magnets. First, the symmetric placement of the four helical magnets allows for a better control of the AGS optics with reduced values of the beta functions especially near beam injection, second, the vertical spin direction during beam injection and extraction is closer to vertical, and third, it provides for a larger 'spin tune gap', which allows the vertical and horizontal tunes to be placed, and prevent the horizontal and vertical intrinsic spin resonances of the AGS to occur during the acceleration cycle. Although the same spin gap can be obtained with a single or two partial helices, the required high field strength of a single helix makes its use impractical, and that of the double helix rather difficult. In this paper we will provide results on the spin tune and on the optics of the AGS with four partial helical magnets, and compare these results with the present setup of the AGS that uses two partial helical magnets.

  8. Imaging using synchrotron radiation for forensic science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cervelli, F.; Carrato, S.; Mattei, A.; Jerian, M.; Benevoli, L.; Mancini, L.; Zanini, F.; Vaccari, L.; Perucchi, A.; Aquilanti, G.

    2011-03-01

    Forensic science is already taking benefits from synchrotron radiation (SR) sources in trace evidence analysis. In this contribution we show a multi-technique approach to study fingerprints from the morphological and chemical point of view using SR based techniques such as Fourier transform infrared microspectroscopy (FTIRMS), X-ray fluorescence (XRF), X-ray absorption structure (XAS), and phase contrast microradiography. Both uncontaminated and gunshot residue contaminated human fingerprints were deposited on lightly doped silicon wafers and on poly-ethylene-terephthalate foils. For the uncontaminated fingerprints an univariate approach of functional groups mapping to model FT-IRMS data was used to get the morphology and the organic compounds map. For the gunshot residue contaminated fingerprints, after a preliminary elemental analysis using XRF, microradiography just below and above the absorption edge of the elements of interest has been used to map the contaminants within the fingerprint. Finally, XAS allowed us to determine the chemical state of the different elements. The next step will be fusing the above information in order to produce an exhaustive and easily understandable evidence.

  9. J/{psi} Production vs Centrality, Transverse Momentum, and Rapidity in Au + Au Collisions at sqrt(s_NN) = 200 GeV

    SciTech Connect

    Awes, Terry C; Batsouli, Sotiria; Cianciolo, Vince; Efremenko, Yuri; Plasil, F; Read Jr, Kenneth F; Silvermyr, David O; Sorensen, Soren P; Stankus, Paul W; Young, Glenn R; Zhang, Chun; PHENIX, Collaboration

    2007-06-01

    The PHENIX experiment at the BNL Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC)has measured J/{psi} production for rapidities -2.2GeV. The J/{psi} invariant yield and nuclear modification factor R{sub AA} as a function of centrality, transverse momentum, and rapidity are reported. A suppression of J/{psi} relative to binary collision scaling of proton-proton reaction yields is observed. Models which describe the lower energy J/{psi} data at the CERN Super Proton Synchrotron invoking only J/psi destruction based on the local medium density predicta significantly larger suppression at RHIC and more suppression at midrapidity than at forward rapidity. Both trends are contradicted by our data.

  10. ON THE SPECTRUM OF THE PULSED GAMMA-RAY EMISSION OF THE CRAB PULSAR FROM 10 MeV TO 400 GeV

    SciTech Connect

    Chkheidze, N.; Machabeli, G.; Osmanov, Z.

    2013-08-20

    In the present paper, a self-consistent theory, interpreting VERITAS and the MAGIC observations of the very high-energy pulsed emission from the Crab pulsar, is considered. The photon spectrum between 10 MeV and 400 GeV can be described by two power-law functions with spectral indices of 2.0 and 3.8. The source of the pulsed emission above 10 MeV is assumed to be synchrotron radiation, which is generated near the light cylinder during the quasi-linear stage of the cyclotron instability. The emitting particles are the primary beam electrons with Lorentz factors up to 10{sup 9}. Such high energies of beam particles can be reached due to Landau damping of the Langmuir waves in the light cylinder region.

  11. Nuclear Modification of ψ', χc, and J/ψ Production in d+Au Collisions at sNN=200GeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adare, A.; Aidala, C.; Ajitanand, N. N.; Akiba, Y.; Al-Bataineh, H.; Alexander, J.; Angerami, A.; Aoki, K.; Apadula, N.; Aramaki, Y.; Atomssa, E. T.; Averbeck, R.; Awes, T. C.; Azmoun, B.; Babintsev, V.; Bai, M.; Baksay, G.; Baksay, L.; Barish, K. N.; Bassalleck, B.; Basye, A. T.; Bathe, S.; Baublis, V.; Baumann, C.; Bazilevsky, A.; Belikov, S.; Belmont, R.; Bennett, R.; Bhom, J. H.; Blau, D. S.; Bok, J. S.; Boyle, K.; Brooks, M. L.; Buesching, H.; Bumazhnov, V.; Bunce, G.; Butsyk, S.; Campbell, S.; Caringi, A.; Chen, C.-H.; Chi, C. Y.; Chiu, M.; Choi, I. J.; Choi, J. B.; Choudhury, R. K.; Christiansen, P.; Chujo, T.; Chung, P.; Chvala, O.; Cianciolo, V.; Citron, Z.; Cole, B. A.; Conesa del Valle, Z.; Connors, M.; Csanád, M.; Csörgő, T.; Dahms, T.; Dairaku, S.; Danchev, I.; Das, K.; Datta, A.; David, G.; Dayananda, M. K.; Denisov, A.; Deshpande, A.; Desmond, E. J.; Dharmawardane, K. V.; Dietzsch, O.; Dion, A.; Donadelli, M.; Drapier, O.; Drees, A.; Drees, K. A.; Durham, J. M.; Durum, A.; Dutta, D.; D'Orazio, L.; Edwards, S.; Efremenko, Y. V.; Ellinghaus, F.; Engelmore, T.; Enokizono, A.; En'yo, H.; Esumi, S.; Fadem, B.; Fields, D. E.; Finger, M.; Finger, M., Jr.; Fleuret, F.; Fokin, S. L.; Fraenkel, Z.; Frantz, J. E.; Franz, A.; Frawley, A. D.; Fujiwara, K.; Fukao, Y.; Fusayasu, T.; Garishvili, I.; Glenn, A.; Gong, H.; Gonin, M.; Goto, Y.; Granier de Cassagnac, R.; Grau, N.; Greene, S. V.; Grim, G.; Grosse Perdekamp, M.; Gunji, T.; Gustafsson, H.-Å.; Haggerty, J. S.; Hahn, K. I.; Hamagaki, H.; Hamblen, J.; Han, R.; Hanks, J.; Haslum, E.; Hayano, R.; He, X.; Heffner, M.; Hemmick, T. K.; Hester, T.; Hill, J. C.; Hohlmann, M.; Holzmann, W.; Homma, K.; Hong, B.; Horaguchi, T.; Hornback, D.; Huang, S.; Ichihara, T.; Ichimiya, R.; Ikeda, Y.; Imai, K.; Inaba, M.; Isenhower, D.; Ishihara, M.; Issah, M.; Ivanischev, D.; Iwanaga, Y.; Jacak, B. V.; Jia, J.; Jiang, X.; Jin, J.; Johnson, B. M.; Jones, T.; Joo, K. S.; Jouan, D.; Jumper, D. S.; Kajihara, F.; Kamin, J.; Kang, J. H.; Kapustinsky, J.; Karatsu, K.; Kasai, M.; Kawall, D.; Kawashima, M.; Kazantsev, A. V.; Kempel, T.; Khanzadeev, A.; Kijima, K. M.; Kikuchi, J.; Kim, A.; Kim, B. I.; Kim, D. J.; Kim, E.-J.; Kim, Y.-J.; Kinney, E.; Kiss, Á.; Kistenev, E.; Kleinjan, D.; Kochenda, L.; Komkov, B.; Konno, M.; Koster, J.; Král, A.; Kravitz, A.; Kunde, G. J.; Kurita, K.; Kurosawa, M.; Kwon, Y.; Kyle, G. S.; Lacey, R.; Lai, Y. S.; Lajoie, J. G.; Lebedev, A.; Lee, D. M.; Lee, J.; Lee, K. B.; Lee, K. S.; Leitch, M. J.; Leite, M. A. L.; Li, X.; Lichtenwalner, P.; Liebing, P.; Linden Levy, L. A.; Liška, T.; Liu, H.; Liu, M. X.; Love, B.; Lynch, D.; Maguire, C. F.; Makdisi, Y. I.; Malik, M. D.; Manko, V. I.; Mannel, E.; Mao, Y.; Masui, H.; Matathias, F.; McCumber, M.; McGaughey, P. L.; McGlinchey, D.; Means, N.; Meredith, B.; Miake, Y.; Mibe, T.; Mignerey, A. C.; Miki, K.; Milov, A.; Mitchell, J. T.; Mohanty, A. K.; Moon, H. J.; Morino, Y.; Morreale, A.; Morrison, D. P.; Moukhanova, T. V.; Murakami, T.; Murata, J.; Nagamiya, S.; Nagle, J. L.; Naglis, M.; Nagy, M. I.; Nakagawa, I.; Nakamiya, Y.; Nakamura, K. R.; Nakamura, T.; Nakano, K.; Nam, S.; Newby, J.; Nguyen, M.; Nihashi, M.; Nouicer, R.; Nyanin, A. S.; Oakley, C.; O'Brien, E.; Oda, S. X.; Ogilvie, C. A.; Oka, M.; Okada, K.; Onuki, Y.; Oskarsson, A.; Ouchida, M.; Ozawa, K.; Pak, R.; Pantuev, V.; Papavassiliou, V.; Park, I. H.; Park, S. K.; Park, W. J.; Pate, S. F.; Pei, H.; Peng, J.-C.; Pereira, H.; Perepelitsa, D.; Peressounko, D. Yu.; Petti, R.; Pinkenburg, C.; Pisani, R. P.; Proissl, M.; Purschke, M. L.; Qu, H.; Rak, J.; Ravinovich, I.; Read, K. F.; Rembeczki, S.; Reygers, K.; Riabov, V.; Riabov, Y.; Richardson, E.; Roach, D.; Roche, G.; Rolnick, S. D.; Rosati, M.; Rosen, C. A.; Rosendahl, S. S. E.; Ružička, P.; Sahlmueller, B.; Saito, N.; Sakaguchi, T.; Sakashita, K.; Samsonov, V.; Sano, S.; Sato, T.; Sawada, S.; Sedgwick, K.; Seele, J.; Seidl, R.; Seto, R.; Sharma, D.; Shein, I.; Shibata, T.-A.; Shigaki, K.; Shimomura, M.; Shoji, K.; Shukla, P.; Sickles, A.; Silva, C. L.; Silvermyr, D.; Silvestre, C.; Sim, K. S.; Singh, B. K.; Singh, C. P.; Singh, V.; Slunečka, M.; Soltz, R. A.; Sondheim, W. E.; Sorensen, S. P.; Sourikova, I. V.; Stankus, P. W.; Stenlund, E.; Stoll, S. P.; Sugitate, T.; Sukhanov, A.; Sziklai, J.; Takagui, E. M.; Taketani, A.; Tanabe, R.; Tanaka, Y.; Taneja, S.; Tanida, K.; Tannenbaum, M. J.; Tarafdar, S.; Taranenko, A.; Themann, H.; Thomas, D.; Thomas, T. L.; Togawa, M.; Toia, A.; Tomášek, L.; Torii, H.; Towell, R. S.; Tserruya, I.; Tsuchimoto, Y.; Vale, C.; Valle, H.; van Hecke, H. W.; Vazquez-Zambrano, E.; Veicht, A.; Velkovska, J.; Vértesi, R.; Virius, M.; Vrba, V.; Vznuzdaev, E.; Wang, X. R.; Watanabe, D.; Watanabe, K.; Watanabe, Y.; Wei, F.; Wei, R.; Wessels, J.; White, S. N.; Winter, D.; Woody, C. L.; Wright, R. M.; Wysocki, M.; Yamaguchi, Y. L.; Yamaura, K.; Yang, R.; Yanovich, A.; Ying, J.; Yokkaichi, S.; You, Z.; Young, G. R.; Younus, I.; Yushmanov, I. E.; Zajc, W. A.; Zhou, S.

    2013-11-01

    We present results for three charmonia states (ψ', χc, and J/ψ) in d+Au collisions at |y|<0.35 and sNN=200GeV. We find that the modification of the ψ' yield relative to that of the J/ψ scales approximately with charged particle multiplicity at midrapidity across p+A, d+Au, and A+A results from the Super Proton Synchrotron and the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider. In large-impact-parameter collisions we observe a similar suppression for the ψ' and J/ψ, while in small-impact-parameter collisions the more weakly bound ψ' is more strongly suppressed. Owing to the short time spent traversing the Au nucleus, the larger ψ' suppression in central events is not explained by an increase of the nuclear absorption owing to meson formation time effects.

  12. Beam Commissioning Results of the J-PARC 3-GeV RCS Injection System with Upgraded 400 MeV Beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saha, P. K.

    In order to achieve 1 MW beam power, injection system of the 3-GeV Rapid Cycling Synchrotron (RCS) of Japan Proton Accelerator Research Complex (J-PARC) was upgraded to the design injection energy of 400 MeV in the 2013 from that of 181 MeV. The higher injection energy plays a key role to mitigate the space charge effect at lower energy region so as to realize 1 MW beam. The beam commissioning with newly installed and upgraded components was successful to demonstrate a more than 550 kW beam power in the RCS with sufficiently low beam loss. This is a milestone towards realizing 1 MW, which is scheduled in October 2014. A detail of the design criteria along with 1st stage beam commissioning results are presented.

  13. Taming the 1.2 m Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Griffin, S.; Edwards, M.; Greenwald, D.; Kono, D.; Liang, D.; Lohnes, K.; Wright, V.; Spillar, E.

    2013-09-01

    Achievable residual jitter on the 1.2 m telescope at MSSS shown in Figure 1 has historically been limited to 10-20 arc-sec. peak in moderate wind conditions due to the combination of the dynamics associated with the twin telescopes on the common declination axis shaft, and the related control system behavior. Figure 1 1.2 m Telescope The lightly damped, low frequency fundamental vibration mode shape of the telescopes rotating out of phase on the common declination axis shaft severely degraded the performance of the prior controllers. This vibration mode is easily excited by external forces such as wind loading and internal torque commands from the mount control system. The relatively poor historic performance was due to a combination of the low error rejection of external disturbances, and the controller exciting the mode. A radical new approach has been implemented that has resulted in a decrease of jitter to less than 1 arcsec under most conditions. The new approach includes minor hardware modifications to provide active damping with accelerometers as feedback sensors. This architecture has allowed a bandwidth increase of almost an order of magnitude and eliminated the large amplitude motions at the mode natural frequency, resulting in much improved pointing and jitter performance. A representative comparison of historical versus new architecture performance is shown in Figure 2 for the declination axis.

  14. Operation of the Australian Store.Synchrotron for macromolecular crystallography

    SciTech Connect

    Meyer, Grischa R.; Aragão, David; Mudie, Nathan J.; Caradoc-Davies, Tom T.; McGowan, Sheena; Bertling, Philip J.; Groenewegen, David; Quenette, Stevan M.; Bond, Charles S.; Buckle, Ashley M.; Androulakis, Steve

    2014-10-01

    The Store.Synchrotron service, a fully functional, cloud computing-based solution to raw X-ray data archiving and dissemination at the Australian Synchrotron, is described. The Store.Synchrotron service, a fully functional, cloud computing-based solution to raw X-ray data archiving and dissemination at the Australian Synchrotron, is described. The service automatically receives and archives raw diffraction data, related metadata and preliminary results of automated data-processing workflows. Data are able to be shared with collaborators and opened to the public. In the nine months since its deployment in August 2013, the service has handled over 22.4 TB of raw data (∼1.7 million diffraction images). Several real examples from the Australian crystallographic community are described that illustrate the advantages of the approach, which include real-time online data access and fully redundant, secure storage. Discoveries in biological sciences increasingly require multidisciplinary approaches. With this in mind, Store.Synchrotron has been developed as a component within a greater service that can combine data from other instruments at the Australian Synchrotron, as well as instruments at the Australian neutron source ANSTO. It is therefore envisaged that this will serve as a model implementation of raw data archiving and dissemination within the structural biology research community.

  15. Scaled simulations of a 10 GeV accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Cormier-Michel, Estelle; Geddes, C. G. R.; Schroeder, C. B.; Esarey, E.; Leemans, W. P.; Bruhwiler, D. L.; Paul, K.; Cowan, B.

    2009-01-22

    Laser plasma accelerators are able to produce high quality electron beams from 1 MeV to 1 GeV. The next generation of plasma accelerator experiments will likely use a multi-stage approach where a high quality electron bunch is first produced and then injected into an accelerating structure. In this paper we present scaled particle-in-cell simulations of a 10 GeV stage in the quasi-linear regime. We show that physical parameters can be scaled to be able to perform these simulations at reasonable computational cost. Beam loading properties and electron bunch energy gain are calculated. A range of parameter regimes are studied to optimize the quality of the electron bunch at the output of the stage.

  16. The 12 GeV Energy Upgrade at Jefferson Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Pilat, Fulvia C.

    2012-09-01

    Two new cryomodules and an extensive upgrade of the bending magnets at Jefferson Lab has been recently completed in preparation for the full energy upgrade in about one year. Jefferson Laboratory has undertaken a major upgrade of its flagship facility, the CW re-circulating CEBAF linac, with the goal of doubling the linac energy to 12 GeV. I will discuss here the main scope and timeline of the upgrade and report on recent accomplishments and the present status. I will then discuss in more detail the core of the upgrade, the new additional C100 cryomodules, their production, tests and recent successful performance. I will then conclude by looking at the future plans of Jefferson Laboratory, from the commissioning and operations of the 12 GeV CEBAF to the design of the MEIC electron ion collider.

  17. THE LASER EMITTANCE SCANNER FOR 1 GEV H- BEAM

    SciTech Connect

    Jeon, Dong-O; Pogge, James R; Menshov, Alexander A; Nesterenko, Igor N; Aleksandrov, Alexander V; Webster, Anthony W; Grice, Warren P

    2009-01-01

    A transverse phase space laser emittance scanner is proposed [1] and under development for the 1-GeV H- SNS linac, using a laser beam as a slit. For a 1-GeV H- beam, it is difficult to build a slit because the stopping distance is more than 50 cm in copper. We propose a Laser Emittance Scanner (LES) to use a laser beam as an effective slit by stripping off the outer electron of the H- (making it neutral) upstream of a bend magnet and measuring the stripped component downstream of the bend magnet. The design and modeling of the system will be discussed. We are expecting to make a preliminary measurement in 2009.

  18. Scaled simulations of a 10 GeV accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Cormier-Michel, Estelle; Geddes, C.G.R; Esarey, E.; Schroeder, C.B.; Bruhwiler, D.L.; Paul, K.; Cowan, B.; Leemans, W.P.

    2008-09-08

    Laser plasma accelerators are able to produce high quality electron beams from 1 MeV to 1 GeV. The next generation of plasma accelerator experiments will likely use a multi-stage approach where a high quality electron bunch is first produced and then injected into an accelerating structure. In this paper we present scaled particle-in-cell simulations of a 10 GeV stage in the quasi-linear regime. We show that physical parameters can be scaled to be able to perform these simulations at reasonable computational cost. Beam loading properties and electron bunch energy gain are calculated. A range of parameter regimes are studied to optimize the quality of the electron bunch at the output of the stage.

  19. Meson Spectroscopy at JLab@12 GeV

    SciTech Connect

    Celentano, Andrea

    2013-03-01

    Meson, being the simplest hadronic bound system, is the ideal "laboratory" to study the interaction between quarks, to understand the role of the gluons inside hadrons and to investigate the origin of color confinement. To perform such studies it is important to measure the meson spectrum, with precise determination of resonance masses and properties, looking for rare qbar q states and for unconventional mesons with exotic quantum numbers (i.e. mesons with quantum numbers that are not compatible with a qbar q structure). With the imminent advent of the 12 GeV upgrade of Jefferson Lab a new generation of meson spectroscopy experiments will start: "Meson-Ex" in Hall B and "GLUEX" in Hall D. Both will use photo-production to explore the spectrum of mesons in the light-quark sector, in the energy range of few GeVs.

  20. Fragrance material review on 1,2-ethanediol, 1-phenyl-, 1,2-diacetate.

    PubMed

    McGinty, D; Letizia, C S; Api, A M

    2012-09-01

    A toxicologic and dermatologic review of 1,2-ethanediol, 1-phenyl-, 1,2-diacetate when used as a fragrance ingredient is presented. 1,2-Ethanediol, 1-phenyl-, 1,2-diacetate is a member of the fragrance structural group Aryl Alkyl Alcohol Simple Acid Esters (AAASAE). The AAASAE fragrance ingredients are prepared by reacting an aryl alkyl alcohol with a simple carboxylic acid (a chain of 1-4 carbons) to generate formate, acetate, propionate, butyrate, isobutyrate and carbonate esters. This review contains a detailed summary of all available toxicology and dermatology papers that are related to this individual fragrance ingredient and is not intended as a stand-alone document. Available data for 1,2-ethanediol, 1-phenyl-, 1,2-diacetate were evaluated, then summarized, and includes physical properties data. A safety assessment of the entire AAASAE will be published simultaneously with this document. Please refer to Belsito et al. (2012) for an overall assessment of the safe use of this material and all AAASAE fragrances.

  1. Beyond the MSSM Higgs bosons at 125 GeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boudjema, F.; Drieu La Rochelle, G.

    2012-07-01

    Beyond the MSSM framework is an effective theory approach that encapsulates a variety of extensions beyond the MSSM with which it shares the same field content. The lightest Higgs mass can be much heavier than in the MSSM without creating a tension with naturalness or requiring superheavy stops. The phenomenology of the Higgs sector is at the same time much richer. We critically review the properties of a Higgs with mass around 125 GeV in this model. In particular, we investigate how the rates in the important inclusive 2γ channel, the 2γ+2 jets and the ZZ→4l (and/or WW) can be enhanced or reduced compared to the standard model and what kind of correlations between these rates are possible. We consider both a vanilla model where stops have moderate masses with no trilinear stop mixing term and a model having a large stop mixing with a light stop. We show that in both cases there are scenarios that lead to enhancements in these rates at a mass of 125 GeV corresponding to either the lightest Higgs or the heaviest CP-even Higgs of the model. In all of these scenarios we study the prospects of finding other signatures of either the 125 GeV Higgs or those of the heavier Higgses. In most cases the τ¯τ channels are the most promising. Exclusion limits from the recent LHC Higgs searches are folded in our analyses while the tantalizing hints for a Higgs signal at 125 GeV are used as an example of how to constrain beyond the MSSM and/or direct future searches.

  2. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray analysis of the Man(α1-2)Man-specific lectin from Bowringia mildbraedii in complex with its carbohydrate ligand

    SciTech Connect

    Garcia-Pino, Abel; Loris, Remy; Wyns, Lode; Buts, Lieven

    2005-10-01

    The lectin from the Nigerian legume B. mildbraedii was crystallized in complex with Man(α1-2)Man and data were collected to a resolution of 1.90 Å using synchrotron radiation. The lectin from Bowringia mildbraedii seeds crystallizes in the presence of the disaccharide Man(α1-2)Man. The best crystals grow at 293 K within four weeks after a pre-incubation at 277 K to induce nucleation. A complete data set was collected to a resolution of 1.90 Å using synchrotron radiation. The crystals belong to space group I222, with unit-cell parameters a = 66.06, b = 86.35, c = 91.76 Å, and contain one lectin monomer in the asymmetric unit.

  3. The estimation of production rates of {\\pi }^{+}{K}^{-}, {\\pi }^{-}{K}^{+} and {\\pi }^{+}{\\pi }^{-} atoms in proton-nucleus interactions at 450 GeV c-1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorchakov, O. E.; Nemenov, L. L.

    2016-09-01

    Short-lived (τ ˜ 3× {10}-15 s) {π }+{K}-, {K}+{π }- and {π }+{π }- atoms as well as long-lived (τ ≥slant 1× {10}-11 s) {π }+{π }- atoms produced in proton-nucleus interactions at 24 GeV c-1 are observed and studied in the DIRAC experiment at the CERN Proton Synchroton. The purpose of this paper is to show that the yields of the short-lived {π }+{K}-, {K}+{π }- and {π }+{π }- atoms in proton-nucleus interactions at 450 GeV c-1 and {θ }{{lab}}=4^\\circ are estimated to be, respectively 67 ± 13, 31 ± 6 and 15 ± 2 times higher. This may allow a significant improvement of the precision of their lifetime measurement and π π and π K scattering length combinations | {a}0-{a}2| and | {a}1/2-{a}3/2| . The yields of the long-lived {π }+{K}-, {K}+{π }- and {π }+{π }- atoms at 450 GeV c-1 are estimated to be 265 ± 53, 120 ± 24 and 60 ± 9 times higher per time unit than at 24 GeV c-1. This may allow the resonance method to be used for measuring the Lamb shift in the π π atom and a new π π scattering length combination 2{a}0+{a}2 to be obtained.

  4. In vivo imaging of rat cortical bone porosity by synchrotron phase contrast micro computed tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pratt, I. V.; Belev, G.; Zhu, N.; Chapman, L. D.; Cooper, D. M. L.

    2015-01-01

    Cortical bone is a dynamic tissue which undergoes adaptive and pathological changes throughout life. Direct longitudinal tracking of this remodeling process holds great promise for improving our understanding of bone development, maintenance and senescence. The application of in vivo micro-computed tomography (micro-CT) has enabled longitudinal tracking of trabecular bone microarchitecture with commercially available scanners generally operating in the 10-20 µm voxel range with absorbed doses reported between 0.5 and 1 Gy. Imaging of cortical bone microarchitecture (porosity) requires higher resolution and thus in vivo imaging of these structures has not been achieved due to excessive radiation dose. In this study we tested the hypothesis that synchrotron propagation phase contrast micro-CT can enable in vivo imaging of cortical porosity in rats at doses comparable to those currently employed for trabecular bone imaging. Synchrotron imaging experiments were conducted at the Canadian Light Source using the bending magnet beamline of the BioMedical Imaging and Therapy (BMIT) facility. Protocol optimization (propagation distance, projection number) was conducted ex vivo on rat (Sprague-Dawley) forelimbs with dose determined by ion chamber and lithium fluoride crystal thermoluminescent dosimeters. Comparative ex vivo imaging was performed using laboratory in vivo scanning systems, identifying a range of doses between 1.2-3.6 Gy for common protocols. A final in vivo synchrotron protocol involving a 2.5 Gy dose was implemented with live rats. The resulting images demonstrated improved delineation of cortical porosity through the improved edge enhancement effect of phase contrast, opening the door to novel experimental studies involving the longitudinal tracking of remodeling.

  5. In vivo imaging of rat cortical bone porosity by synchrotron phase contrast micro computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Pratt, I V; Belev, G; Zhu, N; Chapman, L D; Cooper, D M L

    2015-01-01

    Cortical bone is a dynamic tissue which undergoes adaptive and pathological changes throughout life. Direct longitudinal tracking of this remodeling process holds great promise for improving our understanding of bone development, maintenance and senescence. The application of in vivo micro-computed tomography (micro-CT) has enabled longitudinal tracking of trabecular bone microarchitecture with commercially available scanners generally operating in the 10-20 µm voxel range with absorbed doses reported between 0.5 and 1 Gy. Imaging of cortical bone microarchitecture (porosity) requires higher resolution and thus in vivo imaging of these structures has not been achieved due to excessive radiation dose. In this study we tested the hypothesis that synchrotron propagation phase contrast micro-CT can enable in vivo imaging of cortical porosity in rats at doses comparable to those currently employed for trabecular bone imaging. Synchrotron imaging experiments were conducted at the Canadian Light Source using the bending magnet beamline of the BioMedical Imaging and Therapy (BMIT) facility. Protocol optimization (propagation distance, projection number) was conducted ex vivo on rat (Sprague-Dawley) forelimbs with dose determined by ion chamber and lithium fluoride crystal thermoluminescent dosimeters. Comparative ex vivo imaging was performed using laboratory in vivo scanning systems, identifying a range of doses between 1.2-3.6 Gy for common protocols. A final in vivo synchrotron protocol involving a 2.5 Gy dose was implemented with live rats. The resulting images demonstrated improved delineation of cortical porosity through the improved edge enhancement effect of phase contrast, opening the door to novel experimental studies involving the longitudinal tracking of remodeling. PMID:25489926

  6. Breast tomography with synchrotron radiation: preliminary results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pani, Silvia; Longo, Renata; Dreossi, Diego; Montanari, Francesco; Olivo, Alessandro; Arfelli, Fulvia; Bergamaschi, Anna; Poropat, Paolo; Rigon, Luigi; Zanconati, Fabrizio; Dalla Palma, Ludovico; Castelli, Edoardo

    2004-05-01

    A system for in vivo breast imaging with monochromatic x-rays has been designed and built at the synchrotron radiation facility Elettra in Trieste (Italy) and will be operational in 2004. The system design involves the possibility of performing both planar mammography and breast tomography. In the present work, the first results obtained with a test set-up for breast tomography are shown and discussed. Tomographic images of in vitro breasts were acquired using monochromatic x-ray beams in the energy range 20-28 keV and a linear array silicon pixel detector. Tomograms were reconstructed using standard filtered backprojection algorithms; the effect of different filters was evaluated. The attenuation coefficients of fibroglandular and adipose tissue were measured, and a quantitative comparison of images acquired at different energies was performed by calculating the differential signal-to-noise ratio of fibroglandular details in adipose tissue. All images required a dose comparable to the dose delivered in clinical, conventional mammography and showed a high resolution of the breast structures without the overlapping effects that limit the visibility of the structures in 2D mammography. A quantitative evaluation of the images proves that the image quality at a given dose increases in the considered energy range and for the considered breast sizes. This work is dedicated to the memory of Paolo Poropat, who died tragically on June 8th, 2002. He was a brilliant experimental scientist and gave relevant contributions to the fields of high energy physics and medical physics. He had a very rich and versatile personality, a brilliant character, a big vitality. We will never forget him, his love of life, the passion and the enthusiasm he put into everything he did.

  7. ϕ meson production in d +Au collisions at √{sN N}=200 GeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adare, A.; Aidala, C.; Ajitanand, N. N.; Akiba, Y.; Al-Bataineh, H.; Alexander, J.; Alfred, M.; Angerami, A.; Aoki, K.; Apadula, N.; Aramaki, Y.; Asano, H.; Atomssa, E. T.; Averbeck, R.; Awes, T. C.; Azmoun, B.; Babintsev, V.; Bai, M.; Baksay, G.; Baksay, L.; Bandara, N. S.; Bannier, B.; Barish, K. N.; Bassalleck, B.; Basye, A. T.; Bathe, S.; Baublis, V.; Baumann, C.; Bazilevsky, A.; Beaumier, M.; Beckman, S.; Belikov, S.; Belmont, R.; Bennett, R.; Berdnikov, A.; Berdnikov, Y.; Bhom, J. H.; Blau, D. S.; Bok, J. S.; Boyle, K.; Brooks, M. L.; Bryslawskyj, J.; Buesching, H.; Bumazhnov, V.; Bunce, G.; Butsyk, S.; Campbell, S.; Caringi, A.; Chen, C.-H.; Chi, C. Y.; Chiu, M.; Choi, I. J.; Choi, J. B.; Choudhury, R. K.; Christiansen, P.; Chujo, T.; Chung, P.; Chvala, O.; Cianciolo, V.; Citron, Z.; Cole, B. A.; Conesa Del Valle, Z.; Connors, M.; Csanád, M.; Csörgő, T.; Dahms, T.; Dairaku, S.; Danchev, I.; Danley, D.; Das, K.; Datta, A.; Daugherity, M. S.; David, G.; Dayananda, M. K.; Deblasio, K.; Dehmelt, K.; Denisov, A.; Deshpande, A.; Desmond, E. J.; Dharmawardane, K. V.; Dietzsch, O.; Dion, A.; Diss, P. B.; Do, J. H.; Donadelli, M.; D'Orazio, L.; Drapier, O.; Drees, A.; Drees, K. A.; Durham, J. M.; Durum, A.; Dutta, D.; Edwards, S.; Efremenko, Y. V.; Ellinghaus, F.; Engelmore, T.; Enokizono, A.; En'yo, H.; Esumi, S.; Fadem, B.; Feege, N.; Fields, D. E.; Finger, M.; Finger, M.; Fleuret, F.; Fokin, S. L.; Fraenkel, Z.; Frantz, J. E.; Franz, A.; Frawley, A. D.; Fujiwara, K.; Fukao, Y.; Fusayasu, T.; Gal, C.; Gallus, P.; Garg, P.; Garishvili, I.; Ge, H.; Giordano, F.; Glenn, A.; Gong, H.; Gonin, M.; Goto, Y.; Granier de Cassagnac, R.; Grau, N.; Greene, S. V.; Grim, G.; Grosse Perdekamp, M.; Gunji, T.; Gustafsson, H.-Å.; Hachiya, T.; Haggerty, J. S.; Hahn, K. I.; Hamagaki, H.; Hamblen, J.; Hamilton, H. F.; Han, R.; Han, S. Y.; Hanks, J.; Hasegawa, S.; Haseler, T. O. S.; Hashimoto, K.; Haslum, E.; Hayano, R.; He, X.; Heffner, M.; Hemmick, T. K.; Hester, T.; Hill, J. C.; Hohlmann, M.; Hollis, R. S.; Holzmann, W.; Homma, K.; Hong, B.; Horaguchi, T.; Hornback, D.; Hoshino, T.; Hotvedt, N.; Huang, J.; Huang, S.; Ichihara, T.; Ichimiya, R.; Ikeda, Y.; Imai, K.; Inaba, M.; Iordanova, A.; Isenhower, D.; Ishihara, M.; Issah, M.; Ivanishchev, D.; Iwanaga, Y.; Jacak, B. V.; Jezghani, M.; Jia, J.; Jiang, X.; Jin, J.; Johnson, B. M.; Jones, T.; Joo, K. S.; Jouan, D.; Jumper, D. S.; Kajihara, F.; Kamin, J.; Kanda, S.; Kang, J. H.; Kapustinsky, J.; Karatsu, K.; Kasai, M.; Kawall, D.; Kawashima, M.; Kazantsev, A. V.; Kempel, T.; Key, J. A.; Khachatryan, V.; Khanzadeev, A.; Kijima, K. M.; Kikuchi, J.; Kim, A.; Kim, B. I.; Kim, C.; Kim, D. J.; Kim, E.-J.; Kim, G. W.; Kim, M.; Kim, Y.-J.; Kimelman, B.; Kinney, E.; Kiss, Á.; Kistenev, E.; Kitamura, R.; Klatsky, J.; Kleinjan, D.; Kline, P.; Koblesky, T.; Kochenda, L.; Komkov, B.; Konno, M.; Koster, J.; Kotov, D.; Král, A.; Kravitz, A.; Kunde, G. J.; Kurita, K.; Kurosawa, M.; Kwon, Y.; Kyle, G. S.; Lacey, R.; Lai, Y. S.; Lajoie, J. G.; Lebedev, A.; Lee, D. M.; Lee, J.; Lee, K. B.; Lee, K. S.; Lee, S.; Lee, S. H.; Leitch, M. J.; Leite, M. A. L.; Li, X.; Lichtenwalner, P.; Liebing, P.; Lim, S. H.; Linden Levy, L. A.; Liška, T.; Liu, H.; Liu, M. X.; Love, B.; Lynch, D.; Maguire, C. F.; Makdisi, Y. I.; Makek, M.; Malik, M. D.; Manion, A.; Manko, V. I.; Mannel, E.; Mao, Y.; Masui, H.; Matathias, F.; McCumber, M.; McGaughey, P. L.; McGlinchey, D.; McKinney, C.; Means, N.; Meles, A.; Mendoza, M.; Meredith, B.; Miake, Y.; Mibe, T.; Mignerey, A. C.; Miki, K.; Milov, A.; Mishra, D. K.; Mitchell, J. T.; Miyasaka, S.; Mizuno, S.; Mohanty, A. K.; Montuenga, P.; Moon, H. J.; Moon, T.; Morino, Y.; Morreale, A.; Morrison, D. P.; Moukhanova, T. V.; Murakami, T.; Murata, J.; Mwai, A.; Nagamiya, S.; Nagashima, K.; Nagle, J. L.; Naglis, M.; Nagy, M. I.; Nakagawa, I.; Nakagomi, H.; Nakamiya, Y.; Nakamura, K. R.; Nakamura, T.; Nakano, K.; Nam, S.; Nattrass, C.; Netrakanti, P. K.; Newby, J.; Nguyen, M.; Nihashi, M.; Niida, T.; Nishimura, S.; Nouicer, R.; Novak, T.; Novitzky, N.; Nyanin, A. S.; Oakley, C.; O'Brien, E.; Oda, S. X.; Ogilvie, C. A.; Oka, M.; Okada, K.; Onuki, Y.; Orjuela Koop, J. D.; Osborn, J. D.; Oskarsson, A.; Ouchida, M.; Ozawa, K.; Pak, R.; Pantuev, V.; Papavassiliou, V.; Park, I. H.; Park, J. S.; Park, S.; Park, S. K.; Park, W. J.; Pate, S. F.; Patel, M.; Pei, H.; Peng, J.-C.; Pereira, H.; Perepelitsa, D. V.; Perera, G. D. N.; Peressounko, D. Yu.; Perry, J.; Petti, R.; Pinkenburg, C.; Pinson, R.; Pisani, R. P.; Proissl, M.; Purschke, M. L.; Qu, H.; Rak, J.; Ramson, B. J.; Ravinovich, I.; Read, K. F.; Rembeczki, S.; Reygers, K.; Reynolds, D.; Riabov, V.; Riabov, Y.; Richardson, E.; Rinn, T.; Roach, D.; Roche, G.; Rolnick, S. D.; Rosati, M.; Rosen, C. A.; Rosendahl, S. S. E.; Rowan, Z.; Rubin, J. G.; Ružička, P.; Sahlmueller, B.; Saito, N.; Sakaguchi, T.; Sakashita, K.; Sako, H.; Samsonov, V.; Sano, S.; Sarsour, M.; Sato, S.; Sato, T.; Sawada, S.; Schaefer, B.; Schmoll, B. K.; Sedgwick, K.; Seele, J.; Seidl, R.; Sen, A.; Seto, R.; Sett, P.; Sexton, A.; Sharma, D.; Shein, I.; Shibata, T.-A.; Shigaki, K.; Shimomura, M.; Shoji, K.; Shukla, P.; Sickles, A.; Silva, C. L.; Silvermyr, D.; Silvestre, C.; Sim, K. S.; Singh, B. K.; Singh, C. P.; Singh, V.; Slunečka, M.; Snowball, M.; Soltz, R. A.; Sondheim, W. E.; Sorensen, S. P.; Sourikova, I. V.; Stankus, P. W.; Stenlund, E.; Stepanov, M.; Stoll, S. P.; Sugitate, T.; Sukhanov, A.; Sumita, T.; Sun, J.; Sziklai, J.; Takagui, E. M.; Taketani, A.; Tanabe, R.; Tanaka, Y.; Taneja, S.; Tanida, K.; Tannenbaum, M. J.; Tarafdar, S.; Taranenko, A.; Themann, H.; Thomas, D.; Thomas, T. L.; Tieulent, R.; Timilsina, A.; Todoroki, T.; Togawa, M.; Toia, A.; Tomášek, L.; Tomášek, M.; Torii, H.; Towell, C. L.; Towell, R.; Towell, R. S.; Tserruya, I.; Tsuchimoto, Y.; Vale, C.; Valle, H.; van Hecke, H. W.; Vazquez-Zambrano, E.; Veicht, A.; Velkovska, J.; Vértesi, R.; Virius, M.; Vrba, V.; Vznuzdaev, E.; Wang, X. R.; Watanabe, D.; Watanabe, K.; Watanabe, Y.; Watanabe, Y. S.; Wei, F.; Wei, R.; Wessels, J.; White, A. S.; White, S. N.; Winter, D.; Woody, C. L.; Wright, R. M.; Wysocki, M.; Xia, B.; Xue, L.; Yalcin, S.; Yamaguchi, Y. L.; Yamaura, K.; Yang, R.; Yanovich, A.; Ying, J.; Yokkaichi, S.; Yoo, J. H.; Yoon, I.; You, Z.; Young, G. R.; Younus, I.; Yu, H.; Yushmanov, I. E.; Zajc, W. A.; Zelenski, A.; Zhou, S.; Zou, L.; Phenix Collaboration

    2015-10-01

    The PHENIX Collaboration has measured ϕ meson production in d +Au collisions at √{sNN}=200 GeV using the dimuon and dielectron decay channels. The ϕ meson is measured in the forward (backward) d -going (Au-going) direction, 1.2 1.2 ) in the transverse-momentum (pT) range from 1-7 GeV /c and at midrapidity |y |<0.35 in the pT range below 7 GeV/c . The ϕ meson invariant yields and nuclear-modification factors as a function of pT, rapidity, and centrality are reported. An enhancement of ϕ meson production is observed in the Au-going direction, while suppression is seen in the d -going direction, and no modification is observed at midrapidity relative to the yield in p +p collisions scaled by the number of binary collisions. Similar behavior was previously observed for inclusive charged hadrons and open heavy flavor, indicating similar cold-nuclear-matter effects.

  8. Energies of GRB blast waves and prompt efficiencies as implied by modelling of X-ray and GeV afterglows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beniamini, Paz; Nava, Lara; Duran, Rodolfo Barniol; Piran, Tsvi

    2015-11-01

    We consider a sample of 10 gamma-ray bursts with long-lasting ( ≳ 102 s) emission detected by Fermi/Large Area Telescope and for which X-ray data around 1 d are also available. We assume that both the X-rays and the GeV emission are produced by electrons accelerated at the external forward shock, and show that the X-ray and the GeV fluxes lead to very different estimates of the initial kinetic energy of the blast wave. The energy estimated from GeV is on average ˜50 times larger than the one estimated from X-rays. We model the data (accounting also for optical detections around 1 d, if available) to unveil the reason for this discrepancy and find that good modelling within the forward shock model is always possible and leads to two possibilities: (i) either the X-ray emitting electrons (unlike the GeV emitting electrons) are in the slow-cooling regime or (ii) the X-ray synchrotron flux is strongly suppressed by Compton cooling, whereas, due to the Klein-Nishina suppression, this effect is much smaller at GeV energies. In both cases the X-ray flux is no longer a robust proxy for the blast wave kinetic energy. On average, both cases require weak magnetic fields (10-6 ≲ ɛB ≲ 10-3) and relatively large isotropic kinetic blast wave energies 10^{53} erg<{E}_{0,kin}<10^{55} erg corresponding to large lower limits on the collimated energies, in the range 10^{52} erg<{E}_{θ ,kin}<5× 10^{52} erg for an ISM (interstellar medium) environment with n ˜ 1 cm-3 and 10^{52} erg<{E}_{θ ,kin}<10^{53} erg for a wind environment with A* ˜ 1. These energies are larger than those estimated from the X-ray flux alone, and imply smaller inferred values of the prompt efficiency mechanism, reducing the efficiency requirements on the still uncertain mechanism responsible for prompt emission.

  9. Compton scattering of self-absorbed synchrotron emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, He; Lei, Wei-Hua; Wu, Xue-Feng; Zhang, Bing

    2013-11-01

    Synchrotron self-Compton (SSC) scattering is an important emission mechanism in many astronomical sources, such as gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) and active galactic nuclei. We give a complete presentation of the analytical approximations for the Compton scattering of synchrotron emission with both weak and strong synchrotron self-absorption. All possible orders of the characteristic synchrotron spectral breaks (νa, νm and νc) are studied. In the weak self-absorption regime, i.e. νa < νc, the electron energy distribution is not modified by the self-absorption process. The shape of the SSC component broadly resembles that of synchrotron, but with the following features: The SSC flux increases linearly with frequency up to the SSC break frequency corresponding to the self-absorption frequency νa; and the presence of a logarithmic term in the high-frequency range of the SSC spectra makes it harder than the power-law approximation. In the strong absorption regime, i.e. νa > νc, heating of low-energy electrons due to synchrotron absorption leads to pile-up of electrons, and form a thermal component besides the broken power-law component. This leads to two-component (thermal + non-thermal) spectra for both the synchrotron and SSC spectral components. For νc < νa < νm, the spectrum is thermal (non-thermal) dominated if ν _a > √{ν _m ν _c} (ν _a < √{ν _m ν _c}). Similar to the weak-absorption regime, the SSC spectral component is broader than the simple broken power-law approximation. We derive the critical condition for strong absorption (electron pile-up), and discuss a case of GRB reverse shock emission in a wind medium, which invokes νa > max(νm, νc).

  10. Walking on the ladder: 125 GeV technidilaton, or Conformal Higgs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsuzaki, Shinya; Yamawaki, Koichi

    2015-12-01

    The walking technicolor based on the ladder Schwinger-Dyson gap equation is studied, with the scale-invariant coupling being an idealization of the Caswell-Banks-Zaks infrared fixed point in the "anti-Veneziano limit", such that N C → ∞ with N C · α( μ 2) = fixed and N F / N C = fixed (≫1), of the SU( N C ) gauge theory with massless N F flavors near criticality. We show that the 125 GeV Higgs can be naturally identified with the technidilaton (TD) predicted in the walking technicolor, a pseudo Nambu-Goldstone (NG) boson of the spontaneous symmetry breaking of the approximate scale symmetry. Ladder calculations yield the TD mass M ϕ from the trace anomaly as {M}_{φ}^2{F}_{φ}^2=-4<{θ}_{μ}^{μ}> =-β (α ({μ}^2))/α ({μ^2)}< {G}_{λ ν}^2({μ}^2)> ˜eq {N}_C{N}_F16/π^4{m}_F^4 , independently of the renormalization point μ, where m F is the dynamical mass of the technifermion, and {F}_{φ }=O(√{N_F{N}_C}{m}_F) the TD decay constant. It reads {M}_{φ}^2˜eq {(\\upsilon_{EW}/2\\cdot 5{\\upsilon}_{EW}/F_{φ })}^2\\cdot [8/N_F4/N_C],({\\upsilon}_{EW}=246GeV) , which implies F ϕ ≃ 5 v EW for M ϕ ≃ 125 GeV1/2 v EW in the one-family model ( N C = 4 , N F = 8), in good agreement with the current LHC Higgs data. The result reflects a generic scaling M ϕ 2 / υ EW 2 ˜ M ϕ 2 / F ϕ 2 ˜ m F 2 / F ϕ 2 ˜ 1/( N F N C ) → 0 as a vanishing trace anomaly, namely the TD has a mass vanishing in the anti-Veneziano limit, similarly to η' meson as a pseudo-NG boson of the ordinary QCD with vanishing U(1) A anomaly in the Veneziano limit ( N F / N C ≪ 1).

  11. The 1.2 micron CMOS technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pina, C. A.

    1985-01-01

    A set of test structures was designed using the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) test chip assembler and was used to evaluate the first CMOS-bulk foundry runs with feature sizes of 1.2 microns. In addition to the problems associated with the physical scaling of the structures, this geometry provided an additional set of problems, since the design files had to be generated in such a way as to be capable of being processed through p-well, n-well, and twin-well processing lines. This requirement meant that the files containing the geometric design rules as well as the structure design files had to produce process-insensitive designs, a requirement that does not apply to the more mature 3.0-micron CMOS feature size technology. Because of the photolithographic steps required with this feature size, the maximum allowable chip size was 10 x 10 mm, and this chip was divided into 24 project areas, with each area being 1.6 x 1.6 mm in size. The JPL-designed structures occupied 13 out of the 21 allowable project sizes and provided the only test information obtained from these three preliminary runs. The structures were used to successfully evaluate three different manufacturing runs through two separate foundries.

  12. Dehalogenimonas spp. can Reductively Dehalogenate High Concentrations of 1,2-Dichloroethane, 1,2-Dichloropropane, and 1,1,2-Trichloroethane

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    The contaminant concentrations over which type strains of the species Dehalogenimonas alkenigignens and Dehalogenimonas lykanthroporepellens were able to reductively dechlorinate 1,2-dichloroethane (1,2-DCA), 1,2-dichloropropane (1,2-DCP), and 1,1,2-trichloroethane (1,1,2-TCA) were evaluated. Although initially isolated from an environment with much lower halogenated solvent concentrations, D. alkenigignens IP3-3T was found to reductively dehalogenate chlorinated alkanes at concentrations comparable to D. lykanthroporepellens BL-DC-9T. Both species dechlorinated 1,2-DCA, 1,2-DCP, and 1,1,2-TCA present at initial concentrations at least as high as 8.7, 4.0, and 3.5 mM, respectively. The ability of Dehalogenimonas spp. to carry out anaerobic reductive dechlorination even in the presence of high concentrations of chlorinated aliphatic alkanes has important implications for remediation of contaminated soil and groundwater. PMID:23046725

  13. Dehalogenimonas spp. can Reductively Dehalogenate High Concentrations of 1,2-Dichloroethane, 1,2-Dichloropropane, and 1,1,2-Trichloroethane.

    PubMed

    Maness, Andrew D; Bowman, Kimberly S; Yan, Jun; Rainey, Fred A; Moe, William M

    2012-01-01

    The contaminant concentrations over which type strains of the species Dehalogenimonas alkenigignens and Dehalogenimonas lykanthroporepellens were able to reductively dechlorinate 1,2-dichloroethane (1,2-DCA), 1,2-dichloropropane (1,2-DCP), and 1,1,2-trichloroethane (1,1,2-TCA) were evaluated. Although initially isolated from an environment with much lower halogenated solvent concentrations, D. alkenigignens IP3-3T was found to reductively dehalogenate chlorinated alkanes at concentrations comparable to D. lykanthroporepellens BL-DC-9T. Both species dechlorinated 1,2-DCA, 1,2-DCP, and 1,1,2-TCA present at initial concentrations at least as high as 8.7, 4.0, and 3.5 mM, respectively. The ability of Dehalogenimonas spp. to carry out anaerobic reductive dechlorination even in the presence of high concentrations of chlorinated aliphatic alkanes has important implications for remediation of contaminated soil and groundwater. PMID:23046725

  14. Dehalogenimonas spp. can Reductively Dehalogenate High Concentrations of 1,2-Dichloroethane, 1,2-Dichloropropane, and 1,1,2-Trichloroethane.

    PubMed

    Maness, Andrew D; Bowman, Kimberly S; Yan, Jun; Rainey, Fred A; Moe, William M

    2012-01-01

    The contaminant concentrations over which type strains of the species Dehalogenimonas alkenigignens and Dehalogenimonas lykanthroporepellens were able to reductively dechlorinate 1,2-dichloroethane (1,2-DCA), 1,2-dichloropropane (1,2-DCP), and 1,1,2-trichloroethane (1,1,2-TCA) were evaluated. Although initially isolated from an environment with much lower halogenated solvent concentrations, D. alkenigignens IP3-3T was found to reductively dehalogenate chlorinated alkanes at concentrations comparable to D. lykanthroporepellens BL-DC-9T. Both species dechlorinated 1,2-DCA, 1,2-DCP, and 1,1,2-TCA present at initial concentrations at least as high as 8.7, 4.0, and 3.5 mM, respectively. The ability of Dehalogenimonas spp. to carry out anaerobic reductive dechlorination even in the presence of high concentrations of chlorinated aliphatic alkanes has important implications for remediation of contaminated soil and groundwater.

  15. Application of Synchrotron Radiation Imaging for Non-destructive Monitoring of Mouse Rheumatoid Arthritis Model

    SciTech Connect

    Choi, Chang-Hyuk; Kim, Hong-Tae; Choe, Jung-Yoon; Kim, Jong Ki; Youn, Hwa Shik

    2007-01-19

    This study was performed to observe microstructures of the rheumatoid arthritis induced mouse feet using a synchrotron radiation beam and to compare findings with histological observations. X-ray refraction images from ex-vivo rheumatoid arthritis induced mouse feet were obtained with an 8KeV white (unmonochromatic) beam and 20 micron thick CsI(Tl) scintillation crystal. The visual image was magnified using a x 10 microscope objective and captured using digital CCD camera. Experiments were performed at 1B2 bending magnet beamline of the Pohang Accelerator Laboratory (PAL) in Korea. Obtained images were compared with histopathologic findings from same sample. Cartilage destruction and thickened joint capsule with joint space narrowing were clearly identified at each grade of rheumatoid model with spatial resolution of as much as 1.2 micron and these findings were directly correlated with histopathologic findings. The results suggest that x-ray microscopy study of the rheumatoid arthritis model using synchrotron radiation demonstrates the potential for clinically relevant micro structure of mouse feet without sectioning and fixation.

  16. Application of Synchrotron Radiation Imaging for Non-destructive Monitoring of Mouse Rheumatoid Arthritis Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Chang-Hyuk; Kim, Hong-Tae; Choe, Jung-Yoon; Kim, Jong Ki; Youn, Hwa Shik

    2007-01-01

    This study was performed to observe microstructures of the rheumatoid arthritis induced mouse feet using a synchrotron radiation beam and to compare findings with histological observations. X-ray refraction images from ex-vivo rheumatoid arthritis induced mouse feet were obtained with an 8KeV white (unmonochromatic) beam and 20 micron thick CsI(Tl) scintillation crystal. The visual image was magnified using a × 10 microscope objective and captured using digital CCD camera. Experiments were performed at 1B2 bending magnet beamline of the Pohang Accelerator Laboratory (PAL) in Korea. Obtained images were compared with histopathologic findings from same sample. Cartilage destruction and thickened joint capsule with joint space narrowing were clearly identified at each grade of rheumatoid model with spatial resolution of as much as 1.2 micron and these findings were directly correlated with histopathologic findings. The results suggest that x-ray microscopy study of the rheumatoid arthritis model using synchrotron radiation demonstrates the potential for clinically relevant micro structure of mouse feet without sectioning and fixation.

  17. Evaluation of the 3-GeV proton beam profile at the spallation target of the JSNS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meigo, Shin-ichiro; Noda, Fumiaki; Ishikura, Syuichi; Futakawa, Masatoshi; Sakamoto, Shinichi; Ikeda, Yujiro

    2006-06-01

    At JSNS, 3-GeV protons beam is delivered from rapid cycling synchrotron (RCS) to the spallation neutron target. In order to reduce the damage of pitting on the target container, the peak current density should be kept as small as possible. In this study, the beam profile at spallation neutron target is evaluated. The phase-space distribution, including the space-charge effect, is calculated with SIMPSONS code. The beam profile on the target is obtained with the transfer matrix from exit of RCS to the target. As for injection to RCS, two methods of correlated and anti-correlated painting are considered. By using anti-correlated painting for injection of beam at RCS, it is found the shape of beam becomes flatter than the distribution by using correlated painting. As other aspect for the study of target, in order to carry out target performance test especially for the study of pitting issue, it is better to have the beam profile variety from the beginning of facility. The adjustable range for the beam profile at the beginning is also studied. Although the beam shape is narrow and the duty is very low, the strong enough peak density is achievable equivalent as 1 MW.

  18. Neutron yield and induced radioactivity: a study of 235-MeV proton and 3-GeV electron accelerators.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Yung-Cheng; Lai, Bo-Lun; Sheu, Rong-Jiun

    2016-01-01

    This study evaluated the magnitude of potential neutron yield and induced radioactivity of two new accelerators in Taiwan: a 235-MeV proton cyclotron for radiation therapy and a 3-GeV electron synchrotron serving as the injector for the Taiwan Photon Source. From a nuclear interaction point of view, neutron production from targets bombarded with high-energy particles is intrinsically related to the resulting target activation. Two multi-particle interaction and transport codes, FLUKA and MCNPX, were used in this study. To ensure prediction quality, much effort was devoted to the associated benchmark calculations. Comparisons of the accelerators' results for three target materials (copper, stainless steel and tissue) are presented. Although the proton-induced neutron yields were higher than those induced by electrons, the maximal neutron production rates of both accelerators were comparable according to their respective beam outputs during typical operation. Activation products in the targets of the two accelerators were unexpectedly similar because the primary reaction channels for proton- and electron-induced activation are (p,pn) and (γ,n), respectively. The resulting residual activities and remnant dose rates as a function of time were examined and discussed.

  19. Production of the 178m2Hf isomer using a 4.5-GeV electron accelerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karamian, S. A.; Carroll, J. J.; Adam, J.; Demekhina, N. A.

    2004-09-01

    High-productivity methods are required for the accumulation of long-lived isomers in amounts that are sufficient for the creation of experimental targets. A tantalum sample was activated with the Yerevan synchrotron using 4.5-GeV bremsstrahlung and the presence of 178m2Hf was detected with good statistical accuracy by γ-activity measurements. The integrated and mean cross-section values were deduced from the experiment. The isomer-to-ground-state ratio was then estimated and compared with that known for the p+ Ta reaction studied at 660 MeV. In the present experiment, both converter and target were relatively thin for better definition of the experimental conditions. However, an assembly designed for high-productivity irradiations should be thick and then the converter can also serve as the target sample when irradiated with a high-energy electron beam. The optimization of the isomer production was solved analytically and the largest estimated yield was determined as calibrated to the experimental yield. The maximum yield of 178m2Hf was found to be of about 3×109 nuclei/s using an electron beam current of 100 μA. This is lower than the yield achieved with proton beams, although for a practical comparison the total cost and radiation safety conditions should be considered. The present results provide a basis for numerical estimations.

  20. A novel molecular synchrotron for cold collision and EDM experiments.

    PubMed

    Hou, Shunyong; Wei, Bin; Deng, Lianzhong; Yin, Jianping

    2016-09-07

    Limited by the construction demands, the state-of-the-art molecular synchrotrons consist of only 40 segments that hardly make a good circle. Imperfections in the circular structure will lead to the appearance of unstable velocity regions (i.e. stopbands), where molecules of certain forward velocity will be lost from the structure. In this paper, we propose a stopband-free molecular synchrotron. It contains 1570 ring electrodes, which nearly make a perfect circle, capable of confining both light and heavy polar molecules in the low-field-seeking states. Molecular packets can be conveniently manipulated with this synchrotron by various means, like acceleration, deceleration or even trapping. Trajectory calculations are carried out using a pulsed (88)SrF molecular beam with a forward velocity of 50 m/s. The results show that the molecular beam can make more than 500 round trips inside the synchrotron with a 1/e lifetime of 6.2 s. The synchrotron can find potential applications in low-energy collision and reaction experiments or in the field of precision measurements, such as the searches for electric dipole moment of elementary particles.

  1. A novel molecular synchrotron for cold collision and EDM experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hou, Shunyong; Wei, Bin; Deng, Lianzhong; Yin, Jianping

    2016-09-01

    Limited by the construction demands, the state-of-the-art molecular synchrotrons consist of only 40 segments that hardly make a good circle. Imperfections in the circular structure will lead to the appearance of unstable velocity regions (i.e. stopbands), where molecules of certain forward velocity will be lost from the structure. In this paper, we propose a stopband-free molecular synchrotron. It contains 1570 ring electrodes, which nearly make a perfect circle, capable of confining both light and heavy polar molecules in the low-field-seeking states. Molecular packets can be conveniently manipulated with this synchrotron by various means, like acceleration, deceleration or even trapping. Trajectory calculations are carried out using a pulsed 88SrF molecular beam with a forward velocity of 50 m/s. The results show that the molecular beam can make more than 500 round trips inside the synchrotron with a 1/e lifetime of 6.2 s. The synchrotron can find potential applications in low-energy collision and reaction experiments or in the field of precision measurements, such as the searches for electric dipole moment of elementary particles.

  2. A novel molecular synchrotron for cold collision and EDM experiments

    PubMed Central

    Hou, Shunyong; Wei, Bin; Deng, Lianzhong; Yin, Jianping

    2016-01-01

    Limited by the construction demands, the state-of-the-art molecular synchrotrons consist of only 40 segments that hardly make a good circle. Imperfections in the circular structure will lead to the appearance of unstable velocity regions (i.e. stopbands), where molecules of certain forward velocity will be lost from the structure. In this paper, we propose a stopband-free molecular synchrotron. It contains 1570 ring electrodes, which nearly make a perfect circle, capable of confining both light and heavy polar molecules in the low-field-seeking states. Molecular packets can be conveniently manipulated with this synchrotron by various means, like acceleration, deceleration or even trapping. Trajectory calculations are carried out using a pulsed 88SrF molecular beam with a forward velocity of 50 m/s. The results show that the molecular beam can make more than 500 round trips inside the synchrotron with a 1/e lifetime of 6.2 s. The synchrotron can find potential applications in low-energy collision and reaction experiments or in the field of precision measurements, such as the searches for electric dipole moment of elementary particles. PMID:27600539

  3. Applications of synchrotron radiation to Chemical Engineering Science: Workshop report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-07-01

    This report contains extended abstracts that summarize presentations made at the Workshop on Applications of Synchrotron Radiation to Chemical Engineering Science held at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL), Argonne, IL, on April 22--23, 1991. The talks emphasized the application of techniques involving absorption fluorescence, diffraction, and reflection of synchrotron x-rays, with a focus on problems in applied chemistry and chemical engineering, as well as on the use of x-rays in topographic, tomographic, and lithographic procedures. The attendees at the workshop included experts in the field of synchrotron science, scientists and engineers from ANL, other national laboratories, industry, and universities; and graduate and undergraduate students who were enrolled in ANL educational programs at the time of the workshop. Talks in the Plenary and Overview Session described the status of and special capabilities to be offered by the Advanced Photon Source (APS), as well as strategies and opportunities for utilization of synchrotron radiation to solve science and engineering problems. Invited talks given in subsequent sessions covered the use of intense infrared, ultraviolet, and x-ray photon beams (as provided by synchrotrons) in traditional and nontraditional areas of chemical engineering research related to electrochemical and corrosion science, catalyst development and characterization, lithography and imaging techniques, and microanalysis.

  4. A novel molecular synchrotron for cold collision and EDM experiments.

    PubMed

    Hou, Shunyong; Wei, Bin; Deng, Lianzhong; Yin, Jianping

    2016-01-01

    Limited by the construction demands, the state-of-the-art molecular synchrotrons consist of only 40 segments that hardly make a good circle. Imperfections in the circular structure will lead to the appearance of unstable velocity regions (i.e. stopbands), where molecules of certain forward velocity will be lost from the structure. In this paper, we propose a stopband-free molecular synchrotron. It contains 1570 ring electrodes, which nearly make a perfect circle, capable of confining both light and heavy polar molecules in the low-field-seeking states. Molecular packets can be conveniently manipulated with this synchrotron by various means, like acceleration, deceleration or even trapping. Trajectory calculations are carried out using a pulsed (88)SrF molecular beam with a forward velocity of 50 m/s. The results show that the molecular beam can make more than 500 round trips inside the synchrotron with a 1/e lifetime of 6.2 s. The synchrotron can find potential applications in low-energy collision and reaction experiments or in the field of precision measurements, such as the searches for electric dipole moment of elementary particles. PMID:27600539

  5. Industrial Use of Synchrotron Radiation:. Love at Second Sight

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hormes, Josef; Warner, Jeffrey

    2012-06-01

    Synchrotron radiation (SR) has become one of the most valuable tools for many areas of basic and applied research. In some cases, techniques have been developed that rely completely on the specific properties of synchrotron radiation; in many other cases, using synchrotron radiation has opened completely new and exciting opportunities for conventional techniques. In this chapter, the challenges, problems, and advantages of the industrial use of synchrotron radiation will be highlighted, in an admittedly subjective way, based on the experience of the authors at various synchrotron radiation facilities. "Typical" examples of industrial use of SR will be discussed for all areas of industrial activities, i.e., production, quality control and control of regulatory requirements, and research and development. Emphasis will be put on examples from R&D as this is the most intensively used area. Because this field is much too broad for a complete review here, examples will focus on applications from just three major sectors: biotechnology, pharmaceuticals and cosmetics, and automotive and mining. Environmental research is a fourth area that will be partly covered in the section on regulatory requirements.

  6. X-1-2 on ramp

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1951-01-01

    The Bell Aircraft Corporation X-1-2 aircraft on the ramp at NACA High Speed Flight Research Station located on the South Base of Muroc Army Air Field in 1947. The X-1-2 flew until October 23, 1951, completing 74 glide and powered flights with nine different pilots. The aircraft has white paint and the NACA tail band. The black Xs are reference markings for tracking purposes. They were widely used on NACA aircraft in the early 1950s. There were five versions of the Bell X-1 rocket-powered research aircraft that flew at the NACA High-Speed Flight Research Station, Edwards, California. The bullet-shaped X-1 aircraft were built by Bell Aircraft Corporation, Buffalo, N.Y. for the U.S. Army Air Forces (after 1947, U.S. Air Force) and the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics (NACA). The X-1 Program was originally designated the XS-1 for EXperimental Sonic. The X-1's mission was to investigate the transonic speed range (speeds from just below to just above the speed of sound) and, if possible, to break the 'sound barrier.' Three different X-1s were built and designated: X-1-1, X-1-2 (later modified to become the X-1E), and X-1-3. The basic X-1 aircraft were flown by a large number of different pilots from 1946 to 1951. The X-1 Program not only proved that humans could go beyond the speed of sound, it reinforced the understanding that technological barriers could be overcome. The X-1s pioneered many structural and aerodynamic advances including extremely thin, yet extremely strong wing sections; supersonic fuselage configurations; control system requirements; powerplant compatibility; and cockpit environments. The X-1 aircraft were the first transonic-capable aircraft to use an all-moving stabilizer. The flights of the X-1s opened up a new era in aviation. The first X-1 was air-launched unpowered from a Boeing B-29 Superfortress on Jan. 25, 1946. Powered flights began in December 1946. On Oct. 14, 1947, the X-1-1, piloted by Air Force Captain Charles 'Chuck' Yeager

  7. Substrate interactions in dehalogenation of 1,2-dichloroethane, 1,2-dichloropropane, and 1,1,2-trichloroethane mixtures by Dehalogenimonas spp.

    PubMed

    Dillehay, Jacob L; Bowman, Kimberly S; Yan, Jun; Rainey, Fred A; Moe, William M

    2014-04-01

    When chlorinated alkanes are present as soil or groundwater pollutants, they often occur in mixtures. This study evaluated substrate interactions during the anaerobic reductive dehalogenation of chlorinated alkanes by the type strains of two Dehalogenimonas species, D. lykanthroporepellens and D. alkenigignens. Four contaminant mixtures comprised of combinations of the chlorinated solvents 1,2-dichloroethane (1,2-DCA), 1,2-dichloropropane (1,2-DCP), and 1,1,2-trichloroethane (1,1,2-TCA) were assessed for each species. Chlorinated solvent depletion and daughter product formation determined as a function of time following inoculation into anaerobic media revealed preferential dechlorination of 1,1,2-TCA over both 1,2-DCA and 1,2-DCP for both species. 1,2-DCA in particular was not dechlorinated until 1,1,2-TCA reached low concentrations. In contrast, both species concurrently dechlorinated 1,2-DCA and 1,2-DCP over a comparably large concentration range. This is the first report of substrate interactions during chlorinated alkane dehalogenation by pure cultures, and the results provide insights into the chlorinated alkane transformation processes that may be expected for contaminant mixtures in environments where Dehalogenimonas spp. are present. PMID:23990262

  8. Analytical approximations for matter effects on CP violation in the accelerator-based neutrino oscillations with E ≲ 1 GeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xing, Zhi-zhong; Zhu, Jing-yu

    2016-07-01

    Given an accelerator-based neutrino experiment with the beam energy E ≲ 1 GeV, we expand the probabilities of ν μ → ν e and {overline{ν}}_{μ}to {overline{ν}}_e oscillations in matter in terms of two small quantities Δ21 /Δ31 and A/Δ31, where Δ 21≡ m 2 2 - m 1 2 and Δ 31≡ m 3 2 - m 1 2 are the neutrino mass-squared differences, and A measures the strength of terrestrial matter effects. Our analytical approximations are numerically more accurate than those made by Freund in this energy region, and thus they are particularly applicable for the study of leptonic CP violation in the low-energy MOMENT, ESS νSM and T2K oscillation experiments. As a by-product, the new analytical approximations help us to easily understand why the matter-corrected Jarlskog parameter tilde{J} peaks at the resonance energy E ∗ ≃ 0 .14GeV (or 0 .12 GeV) for the normal (or inverted) neutrino mass hierarchy, and how the three Dirac unitarity triangles are deformed due to the terrestrial matter contamination. We also affirm that a medium-baseline neutrino oscillation experiment with the beam energy E lying in the E ∗ ≲ E ≲ 2 E ∗ range is capable of exploring leptonic CP violation with little matter-induced suppression.

  9. Chemical Imaging of Biological Tissue with Synchrotron Infrared Light

    SciTech Connect

    Miller,L.; Dumas, P.

    2006-01-01

    Fourier transform infrared micro-spectroscopy (FTIRM) and imaging (FTIRI) have become valuable techniques for examining the chemical makeup of biological materials by probing their vibrational motions on a microscopic scale. Synchrotron infrared (S-IR) light is an ideal source for FTIRM and FTIRI due to the combination of its high brightness (i.e., flux density), also called brilliance, and broadband nature. Through a 10-{mu}m pinhole, the brightness of a synchrotron source is 100-1000 times higher than a conventional thermal (globar) source. Accordingly, the improvement in spatial resolution and in spectral quality to the diffraction limit has led to a plethora of applications that is just being realized. In this review, we describe the development of synchrotron-based FTIRM, illustrate its advantages in many applications to biological systems, and propose some potential future directions for the technique.

  10. Chemical Dynamics, Molecular Energetics, and Kinetics at the Synchrotron

    SciTech Connect

    Leone, Stephen R.; Ahmed, Musahid; Wilson, Kevin R.

    2010-03-14

    Scientists at the Chemical Dynamics Beamline of the Advanced Light Source in Berkeley are continuously reinventing synchrotron investigations of physical chemistry and chemical physics with vacuum ultraviolet light. One of the unique aspects of a synchrotron for chemical physics research is the widely tunable vacuum ultraviolet light that permits threshold ionization of large molecules with minimal fragmentation. This provides novel opportunities to assess molecular energetics and reaction mechanisms, even beyond simple gas phase molecules. In this perspective, significant new directions utilizing the capabilities at the Chemical Dynamics Beamline are presented, along with an outlook for future synchrotron and free electron laser science in chemical dynamics. Among the established and emerging fields of investigations are cluster and biological molecule spectroscopy and structure, combustion flame chemistry mechanisms, radical kinetics and product isomer dynamics, aerosol heterogeneous chemistry, planetary and interstellar chemistry, and secondary neutral ion-beam desorption imaging of biological matter and materials chemistry.

  11. Transvenous coronary angiography in humans with synchrotron radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Thomlinson, W.

    1994-10-01

    The transvenous coronary angiography project at the National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS) is presently undergoing a significant upgrade to the hardware and software in the synchrotron medical facility. When completed, the project will have reached a level of maturity in the imaging technology which will allow the research team to begin to concentrate on medical research programs. This paper will review the status of the project and imaging technology and will discuss the current upgrades and future advanced technology initiatives. The advantages of using the radiation from a synchrotron, over that from a standard x-ray source, were the motivation for the project. A total of 23 human imaging sessions have been carried out with in the project. The primary goals have been to establish the imaging parameters and protocol necessary to obtain clinically useful images.

  12. Rising dough and baking bread at the Australian synchrotron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mayo, S. C.; McCann, T.; Day, L.; Favaro, J.; Tuhumury, H.; Thompson, D.; Maksimenko, A.

    2016-01-01

    Wheat protein quality and the amount of common salt added in dough formulation can have a significant effect on the microstructure and loaf volume of bread. High-speed synchrotron micro-CT provides an ideal tool for observing the three dimensional structure of bread dough in situ during proving (rising) and baking. In this work, the synchrotron micro-CT technique was used to observe the structure and time evolution of doughs made from high and low protein flour and three different salt additives. These experiments showed that, as expected, high protein flour produces a higher volume loaf compared to low protein flour regardless of salt additives. Furthermore the results show that KCl in particular has a very negative effect on dough properties resulting in much reduced porosity. The hundreds of datasets produced and analysed during this experiment also provided a valuable test case for handling large quantities of data using tools on the Australian Synchrotron's MASSIVE cluster.

  13. NATIONAL SYNCHROTRON LIGHT SOURCE MEDICAL PERSONNEL PROTECTION INTERLOCK

    SciTech Connect

    BUDA,S.; GMUR,N.F.; LARSON,R.; THOMLINSON,W.

    1998-11-03

    This report is founded on reports written in April 1987 by Robert Hettel for angiography operations at the Stanford Synchrotron Research Laboratory (SSRL) and a subsequent report covering angiography operations at the National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS); BNL Informal Report 47681, June 1992. The latter report has now been rewritten in order to accurately reflect the design and installation of a new medical safety system at the NSLS X17B2 beamline Synchrotron Medical Research Facility (SMERF). Known originally as the Angiography Personnel Protection Interlock (APPI), this system has been modified to incorporate other medical imaging research programs on the same beamline and thus the name has been changed to the more generic Medical Personnel Protection Interlock (MPPI). This report will deal almost exclusively with the human imaging (angiography, bronchography, mammography) aspects of the safety system, but will briefly explain the modular aspects of the system allowing other medical experiments to be incorporated.

  14. Phase contrast image guidance for synchrotron microbeam radiotherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pelliccia, Daniele; Crosbie, Jeffrey C.; Larkin, Kieran G.

    2016-08-01

    Recent image guidance developments for preclinical synchrotron microbeam radiotherapy represent a necessary step for future clinical translation of the technique. Image quality can be further improved using x-ray phase contrast, which is readily available at synchrotron facilities. We here describe a methodology for phase contrast image guidance at the Imaging and Medical Beamline at the Australian Synchrotron. Differential phase contrast is measured alongside conventional attenuation and used to improve the image quality. Post-processing based on the inverse Riesz transform is employed on the measured data to obtain noticeably sharper images. The procedure is extremely well suited for applications such as image guidance which require both visual assessment and sample alignment based on semi automatic image registration. Moreover, our approach can be combined with all other differential phase contrast imaging techniques, in all cases where a quantitative evaluation of the refractive index is not required.

  15. Synchrotron radiation from a runaway electron distribution in tokamaks

    SciTech Connect

    Stahl, A.; Fülöp, T.; Landreman, M.; Papp, G.; Hollmann, E.

    2013-09-15

    The synchrotron radiation emitted by runaway electrons in a fusion plasma provides information regarding the particle momenta and pitch-angles of the runaway electron population through the strong dependence of the synchrotron spectrum on these parameters. Information about the runaway density and its spatial distribution, as well as the time evolution of the above quantities, can also be deduced. In this paper, we present the synchrotron radiation spectra for typical avalanching runaway electron distributions. Spectra obtained for a distribution of electrons are compared with the emission of mono-energetic electrons with a prescribed pitch-angle. We also examine the effects of magnetic field curvature and analyse the sensitivity of the resulting spectrum to perturbations to the runaway distribution. The implications for the deduced runaway electron parameters are discussed. We compare our calculations to experimental data from DIII-D and estimate the maximum observed runaway energy.

  16. Charmed Meson Production in 800 GEV Proton-Proton Interactions.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Senko, Mark Frederick

    The purpose of this dissertation is to present the results of a study concerning the energy dependence of charmed meson production properties as a test of Quantum Chromodynamics (QCD). This experiment was performed at Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory, using a rapid cycling bubble chamber (LEBC) as a hydrogen target and high resolution vertex detector, in combination with the Fermilab Multiparticle Spectrometer (FMPS). The multiplicity trigger was unbiased, and spectrometer acceptance was good at x_ {F} >=q 0. A comparison of the results from previous experiments at center of mass energies sqrt{s} <=q 27 GeV and sqrt {s} >=q 53 GeV implies a total charm particle production cross section which rises rapidly as a function of sqrt{s} . The result of our experiment, sigma (D/| D) = 42.7 +/- 7.8 mub at sqrt{s} = 38 GeV, indicates a slower rise, in agreement with QCD predictions. A maximum likelihood fit to the parameterization of the differential cross section as d^2sigma/dx_{F}dp _sp{|}{2} ~ (1 - | x_{F }|)^{n}e^{-bp _sp{|}{2}} gives the results n = 8.4_sp {-1.9}{+2.2}, b = 0.78_sp{-0.16}{+0.19} (GeV/c)^{-2}, and < pbot > = 1.1_sp{-0.1}{+0.2} GeV/c. When compared with results from the lower energy experiments, these values indicate charm production becoming more central and < pbot > being consistent with the charmed quark mass. These results are once again consistent with QCD predictions. Lastly, analysis has shown that sigma(D ^*^+/-)/sigma(D^0) is governed primarily by spin statistics, displaying no energy dependence. The resulting cross section for D^*^+/- production is sigma(D^*^+/-) = 13.31 +/- 5.74 mub.

  17. Background model systematics for the Fermi GeV excess

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calore, Francesca; Cholis, Ilias; Weniger, Christoph

    2015-03-01

    The possible gamma-ray excess in the inner Galaxy and the Galactic center (GC) suggested by Fermi-LAT observations has triggered a large number of studies. It has been interpreted as a variety of different phenomena such as a signal from WIMP dark matter annihilation, gamma-ray emission from a population of millisecond pulsars, or emission from cosmic rays injected in a sequence of burst-like events or continuously at the GC. We present the first comprehensive study of model systematics coming from the Galactic diffuse emission in the inner part of our Galaxy and their impact on the inferred properties of the excess emission at Galactic latitudes 2° < |b| < 20° and 300 MeV to 500 GeV. We study both theoretical and empirical model systematics, which we deduce from a large range of Galactic diffuse emission models and a principal component analysis of residuals in numerous test regions along the Galactic plane. We show that the hypothesis of an extended spherical excess emission with a uniform energy spectrum is compatible with the Fermi-LAT data in our region of interest at 95% CL. Assuming that this excess is the extended counterpart of the one seen in the inner few degrees of the Galaxy, we derive a lower limit of 10.0° (95% CL) on its extension away from the GC. We show that, in light of the large correlated uncertainties that affect the subtraction of the Galactic diffuse emission in the relevant regions, the energy spectrum of the excess is equally compatible with both a simple broken power-law of break energy Ebreak = 2.1 ± 0.2 GeV, and with spectra predicted by the self-annihilation of dark matter, implying in the case of bar bb final states a dark matter mass of mχ=49+6.4-5.4 GeV.

  18. Crystal Structural Analyses of Ferrielectric Tetragonal (Bi1/2Na1/2)TiO3-7%BaTiO3 Powders and Single Crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kitanaka, Yuuki; Ogino, Motohiro; Hirano, Kiyotaka; Noguchi, Yuji; Miyayama, Masaru; Kagawa, Yutaka; Moriyoshi, Chikako; Kuroiwa, Yoshihiro; Torii, Shuki; Kamiyama, Takeshi

    2013-09-01

    We have investigated the crystal structure of (Bi1/2Na1/2)TiO3-7%BaTiO3 (BNT-7%BT) by high-resolution neutron powder diffraction (NPD) and high-energy synchrotron radiation X-ray diffraction (SR-XRD) analyses. The NPD study revealed that the BNT-7%BT crystals have a single-phase tetragonal structure with P4bm symmetry. The crystal structure refined by the Rietveld method was found to be similar to the ferrielectric P4bm phase reported for BNT at a high temperature of 673 K. The SR-XRD analyses for single crystals of BNT-7%BT demonstrated that the P4bm phase remains as a stable phase in the crystals even after a high electric field is applied for poling, which is different from the structural analysis of ceramics by Ma et al. [Phys. Rev. Lett. 109 (2012) 107602].

  19. Structure and dielectric dispersion in cubic-like 0.5K0.5Na0.5NbO3-0.5Na1/2Bi1/2TiO3 ceramic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Laijun; Knapp, Michael; Schmitt, Ljubomira Ana; Ehrenberg, Helmut; Fang, Liang; Fuess, Hartmut; Hoelzel, Markus; Hinterstein, Manuel

    2016-05-01

    The nature of the cubic-like state in the lead-free piezoelectric ceramics 0.5K0.5Na0.5NbO3-0.5Na1/2Bi1/2TiO3 (KNN-50BNT) has been examined in detail by synchrotron x-ray diffraction (SD), selected-area electron diffraction (SAED), neutron diffraction (ND), and temperature-dependent dielectric characterization. The SD pattern of KNN-50BNT presents a pure perovskite structure with pseudocubic symmetry. However, superlattice reflections were observed by SAED and completely indexed by tetragonal symmetry with P4bm space group in ND pattern. The relaxor behavior of KNN-50BNT is compared with Pb-based and Ba-based relaxors and discussed in the framework of the Vogel-Fulcher law and the new glass model. The KNN-50BNT ceramic exhibits the strongest dielectric dispersion among them.

  20. 8 GeV H- ions: Transport and injection

    SciTech Connect

    Chou, W.; Bryant, H.; Drozhdin, A.; Hill, C.; Kostin, M.; Macek, R.; Ostiguy, J.-F.; Rees, G.H.; Tang, Z.; Yoon, P.; /Fermilab /New Mexico U. /Los Alamos /Rutherford /Rochester U.

    2005-05-01

    Fermilab is working on the design of an 8 GeV superconducting RF H{sup -} linac called the Proton Driver. The energy of H{sup -} beam will be an order of magnitude higher than the existing ones. This brings up a number of technical challenges to transport and injection of H{sup -} ions. This paper will focus on the subjects of stripping losses (including stripping by blackbody radiation, field and residual gas) and carbon foil stripping efficiency, along with a brief discussion on other issues such as Stark states lifetime of hydrogen atoms, single and multiple Coulomb scattering, foil heating and stress, radiation activation, collimation and jitter correction, etc.

  1. The 12 GeV JLab Upgrade Project

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, Elton

    2009-01-01

    The upgrade of the CEBAF Accelerator at Jefferson Lab to 12 GeV will deliver high luminosity and high quality beams, which will open unique opportunities for studies of the quark and gluon structure of hadrons in the valence region. Such physics will be made accessible by substantial additions to the experimental equipment in combination with the increased energy reach of the upgraded machine. The emphasis of the talk will be on the program in a new experimental Hall D designed to search for gluonic excitations.

  2. Recent developments in photoelectron dynamics using synchrotron radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Carlson, T.A.; Krause, M.O.; Taylor, J.W.; Keller, P.R.; Piancastelli, M.N.; Grimm, F.A.; Whitley, T.A.

    1982-01-01

    Through a collaborative effort of members of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory and Universities of Wisconsin and Tennessee, a comprehensive study of atoms and molecules using angle-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy and synchrotron radiation is underway at the Synchrotron Radiation Center, Stoughton, Wisconsin. Over 50 molecules and atoms have been investigated. These results, coupled with theory, aim at a better understanding of the dynamics of photoionization and of the wave functions that control these processes. In particular, attention is given to the following topics: metal atomic vapors, generalization of molecular orbital types, autoionization, shape resonances, core shell effects, satellite structure, and the Cooper minimum.

  3. Mysterious dipole synchrotron oscillations during and after adiabatic capture

    SciTech Connect

    Ng, K.Y.; /Fermilab

    2012-03-01

    Strong synchrotron oscillations were observed during and after the 2.5-MHz rf adiabatic capture of a debunched booster batch in the Main Injector. Analysis shows two possible sources for the synchrotron oscillations. One is the frequency drift of the 2.5-MHz rf after the turning off of the 53-MHz rf voltage, thus resulting in an energy mismatch with the debunched beam. The second source is the energy mismatch of the injected booster beam with the frequency of the 53-MHz rf. We have been able to rule out the first possibility.

  4. Potential applications of synchrotron computed microtomography to soil science

    SciTech Connect

    Spanne, P.; Jones, K.W. ); Prunty, L.D. ); Anderson, S.H. )

    1993-01-01

    Synchrotron x-ray computed microtomography (CMT) can be used to make non-destructive tomographic sections with spatial resolutions of a few [mu]m. This resolution presents possibilities for study of soil-fluid interactions on a spatial scale hitherto unreachable. Details of a CMT apparatus in operation at the Brookhaven National Synchrotron Light Source X26 beam line are presented and prospects for future investigations of test systems have been made and results for wet and dry samples of glass beads and sand samples are given to show the power of the system.

  5. Potential applications of synchrotron computed microtomography to soil science

    SciTech Connect

    Spanne, P.; Jones, K.W.; Prunty, L.D.; Anderson, S.H.

    1993-01-01

    Synchrotron x-ray computed microtomography (CMT) can be used to make non-destructive tomographic sections with spatial resolutions of a few {mu}m. This resolution presents possibilities for study of soil-fluid interactions on a spatial scale hitherto unreachable. Details of a CMT apparatus in operation at the Brookhaven National Synchrotron Light Source X26 beam line are presented and prospects for future investigations of test systems have been made and results for wet and dry samples of glass beads and sand samples are given to show the power of the system.

  6. Etude de la Production de Paires de Leptons dans les Interactions Proton-Beryllium a 450 GEV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aubry, Pierre Rene Roger

    L'experience HELIOS a fait une etude precise de la production des paires e^+e^-, mu^+mu^-, mu ^+mu^-+nu, et mu^+/- e^+/- dans les interactions p-Be a 450 GeV. Le detecteur comporte un spectrometre a electrons, un spectrometre a muons, et un ensemble de calorimetres qui peuvent mesurer les photons et l'energie manquante emportee par les neutrinos. Les paires de leptons sont observees dans la region cinematique ^1: eqalign {2/m_mu 6 GeV cr E_{e}&>2.8 GeV cr.25&GeV cr -.75&GeV a ete faite:sigma_{c|c}= 24+/-8 (statistique) +/-16 (systématique) mu barn/nucléon. L'etude de la distribution en energie manquante des dimuons de masse intermediaire (1.2 GeV GeV) permet de mesurer le rapport entre la contribution du processus Drell-Yan et la contribution de particules charmees. Les desintegrations d'excitations radiales de mesons vecteurs n'ont pas ete considerees. Le rapport xi = Drell-Yan/Charme obtenu dans la region de masse intermediaire est:xi = .49 {-.40}{+.56}(statistique) {-.20}{+.30}(systématique). Cette

  7. Nucleon Resonance Electrocouplings from Light-Front Quark Models at {\\varvec{Q}}^2 up to 12 GeV^2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Obukhovsky, Igor T.; Faessler, Amand; Gutsche, Thomas; Lyubovitskij, Valery E.

    2016-08-01

    A relativistic light-front quark model is used to describe both the elastic nucleon and nucleon-Roper transition form factors in a large Q^2 range, up to 35 GeV^2 for the elastic and up to 12 GeV^2 for the resonance case. Relativistic three-quark configurations satisfying the Pauli exclusion principle on the light-front are used for the derivation of the current matrix elements. The Roper resonance is considered as a mixed state of a three-quark core configuration and a molecular N+σ hadron component. Based on this ansatz we obtain a realistic description of both processes, elastic and inelastic, in the sector of positive parity and show that existing experimental data are indicative of a composite structure of the Roper resonance. A useful generalization of this technique is suggested for description of negative parity nucleon resonances 1/2^-, 3/2^-, 5/2^-.

  8. National Synchrotron Light Source 2010 Activity Report

    SciTech Connect

    Rowe, M.; Snyder, K. J.

    2010-12-29

    This is a very exciting period for photon sciences at Brookhaven National Laboratory. It is also a time of unprecedented growth for the Photon Sciences Directorate, which operates the National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS) and is constructing NSLS-II, both funded by the Department of Energy's Office of Science. Reflecting the quick pace of our activities, we chose the theme 'Discovery at Light Speed' for the directorate's 2010 annual report, a fiscal year bookended by October 2009 and September 2010. The year began with the news that NSLS users Venki Ramakrishnan of Cambridge University (also a former employee in Brookhaven's biology department) and Thomas A. Steitz of Yale University were sharing the 2009 Nobel Prize in Chemistry with Ada E. Yonath of the Weizmann Institute of Science. Every research project has the potential for accolades. In 2010, NSLS users and staff published close to 900 papers, with about 170 appearing in premiere journals. Those are impressive stats for a facility nearly three decades old, testament to the highly dedicated team keeping NSLS at peak performance and the high quality of its user community. Our NSLS users come from a worldwide community of scientists using photons, or light, to carry out research in energy and environmental sciences, physics, materials science, chemistry, biology and medicine. All are looking forward to the new capabilities enabled by NSLS-II, which will offer unprecedented resolution at the nanoscale. The new facility will produce x-rays more than 10,000 times brighter than the current NSLS and host a suite of sophisticated instruments for cutting-edge science. Some of the scientific discoveries we anticipate at NSLS-II will lead to major advances in alternative energy technologies, such as hydrogen and solar. These discoveries could pave the way to: (1) catalysts that split water with sunlight for hydrogen production; (2) materials that can reversibly store large quantities of electricity or hydrogen; (3

  9. Electrical properties of Ba(Dy1/2Nb1/2)O3 ceramic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nath, K. Amar; Chandra, K. P.; Dubey, K.; Prasad, K.

    2016-05-01

    Polycrystalline Ba(Dy1/2Nb1/2)O3 was prepared using a high-temperature solid-state reaction method. X-ray diffraction analysis indicated the formation of a single-phase cubic structure having space group Pm3m. AC impedance plots as a function of frequency at different temperatures were used to analyse the electrical behaviour of the sample, which indicated the negative temperature coefficient of resistance character. Complex impedance analysis targeted non-Debye type dielectric relaxation. Frequency dependent ac conductivity data obeyed Jonscher's power law. The apparent activation energy was estimated to be 0.97 eV at 1 kHz.

  10. Optimization of the 8 GeV AP3-P1 Lattice for Antiproton Transfers

    SciTech Connect

    McGinnis, Dave; /Fermilab

    2001-01-22

    During 8 GeV antiproton transfers between the Accumulator to the Main Injector, the antiprotons must travel through four separate beam lines, AP3, AP1, P2, and P1. This note describes the optimization of a single lattice that describes these beam lines for 8 GeV antiproton transfers from the Accumulator to the Main Injector and 8 GeV proton transfers from the Main Injector to the Accumulator.

  11. Microwave spectrum, structural parameters, and quadrupole coupling for 1,2-dihydro-1,2-azaborine.

    PubMed

    Daly, Adam M; Tanjaroon, Chakree; Marwitz, Adam J V; Liu, Shih-Yuan; Kukolich, Stephen G

    2010-04-21

    The first microwave spectrum for 1,2-dihydro-1,2-azaborine has been measured in the frequency range 7-18 GHz, providing accurate rotational constants and nitrogen and boron quadrupole coupling strengths for three isotopomers, H(6)C(4)(11)B(14)N, H(6)C(4)(10)B(14)N, and H(5)DC(4)(11)B(14)N. The measured rotational constants were used to accurately determine coordinates for the substituted atoms and provide sufficient data to determine most of the important structural parameters for this molecule. The spectra were obtained using a pulsed beam Fourier transform microwave spectrometer, with sufficient resolution to allow accurate measurements of (14)N, (11)B, and (10)B nuclear quadrupole hyperfine interactions. High-level ab initio calculations provided structural parameters and quadrupole coupling strengths that are in very good agreement with measured values. The rotational constants for the parent compound are A = 5657.335(1), B = 5349.2807(5), and C = 2749.1281(4) MHz, yielding the inertial defect Delta(0) = 0.02 amu x A(2) for the ground-state structure. The observed near-zero and positive inertial defect clearly indicates that the molecular structure of 1,2-dihydro-1,2-azaborine is planar. The least-squares fit analysis to determine the azaborine ring structure yielded the experimental bond lengths and 2sigma errors R(B-N) = 1.45(3) A, R(B-C) = 1.51(1) A, and R(N-C) = 1.37(3) A for the ground-state structure. Interbond angles for the ring were also determined. An extended Townes-Dailey population analysis of the boron and nitrogen quadrupole coupling constants provided the valence p-electron occupancy p(c) = 0.3e for boron and p(c) = 1.3e for nitrogen.

  12. Synchrotron-Radiation Induced X-Ray Emission (SRIXE)

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, Keith W.

    1999-09-01

    Elemental analysis using emission of characteristic x rays is a well-established scientific method. The success of this analytical method is highly dependent on the properties of the source used to produce the x rays. X-ray tubes have long existed as a principal excitation source, but electron and proton beams have also been employed extensively. The development of the synchrotron radiation x-ray source that has taken place during the past 40 years has had a major impact on the general field of x-ray analysis. Even tier 40 years, science of x-ray analysis with synchrotron x-ray beams is by no means mature. Improvements being made to existing synchrotron facilities and the design and construction of new facilities promise to accelerate the development of the general scientific use of synchrotron x-ray sources for at least the next ten years. The effective use of the synchrotron source technology depends heavily on the use of high-performance computers for analysis and theoretical interpretation of the experimental data. Fortunately, computer technology has advanced at least as rapidly as the x-ray technology during the past 40 years and should continue to do so during the next decade. The combination of these technologies should bring about dramatic advances in many fields where synchrotron x-ray science is applied. It is interesting also to compare the growth and rate of acceptance of this particular research endeavor to the rates for other technological endeavors. Griibler [1997] cataloged the time required for introduction, diffusion,and acceptance of technological, economic, and social change and found mean values of 40 to 50 years. The introduction of the synchrotron source depends on both technical and non-technical factors, and the time scale at which this seems to be occurring is quite compatible with what is seen for other major innovations such as the railroad or the telegraph. It will be interesting to see how long the present rate of technological change

  13. Synchrotron x-ray reflectivity study of oxidation/passivation of copper and silicon.

    SciTech Connect

    Chu, Y.; Nagy, Z.; Parkhutik, V.; You, H.

    1999-07-21

    Synchrotron x-ray-scattering technique studies of copper and silicon electrochemical interfaces are reported. These two examples illustrate the application of synchrotron x-ray techniques for oxidation, passivation, and dissolution of metals and semiconductors.

  14. Commissioning of the 123 MeV injector for 12 GeV CEBAF

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Yan; Hofler, Alicia S.; Kazimi, Reza

    2015-09-01

    The upgrade of CEBAF to 12GeV included modifications to the injector portion of the accelerator. These changes included the doubling of the injection energy and relocation of the final transport elements to accommodate changes in the CEBAF recirculation arcs. This paper will describe the design changes and the modelling of the new 12GeV CEBAF injector. Stray magnetic fields have been a known issue for the 6 GeV CEBAF injector, the results of modelling the new 12GeV injector and the resulting changes implemented to mitigate this issue are described in this paper. The results of beam commissioning of the injector are also presented.

  15. First polarized proton collision at a beam energy of 250 GeV in RHIC

    SciTech Connect

    Bai,M.; Ahrens, L.; Alekseev, I. G.; Alessi, J.; et al.

    2009-05-04

    After providing collisions of polarized protons at a beam energy of 100 GeV since 2001, the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) at BNL had its first opportunity to collide polarized protons at its maximum beam energy of 250 GeV in the 2009 polarized proton operations. Equipped with two full Siberian snakes [1] in each ring, RHIC preserves polarization during acceleration from injection to 100 GeV with precise control of the betatron tunes and vertical orbit distortions. However, the strong intrinsic spin resonances beyond 100 GeV are more than two times stronger than those below 100 GeV, requiring much tighter tolerances on vertical orbit distortions and betatron tunes. With the currently achieved orbit correction and tune control, average polarizations of {approx_equal} 42% at top energy and average polarizations of {approx_equal} 55% at injection energy were achieved. Polarization measurements as a function of beam energy also indicated aU polarization losses occurred around three strong intrinsic resonances at 136 GeV, 199.3 GeV and 220.8 GeV Peak luminosity of 122 x 10{sup 30} cm{sup -2} s{sup -1} was also demonstrated. This paper presents the performance of the first RHIC 250 GeV operation and discusses the depolarization issues encountered during the run.

  16. The Jefferson Lab program: From 6 GeV operations to the 12 GeV upgrade

    SciTech Connect

    Marco Battaglieri

    2012-04-01

    The Thomas Jefferson National Laboratory and the CEBAF accelerator operated for more than a decade, running a comprehensive scientific program that improved our understanding of the strong interaction. The facility is now moving toward an upgrade of the machine, from 6 to 12 GeV; a new experimental hall will be added and the equipment of the three existing halls will be enhanced. In this contribution some selected results from the rich physics program run at JLab, as well as the prospects for the near future, will be presented.

  17. 750 GeV diphotons from supersymmetry with Dirac gauginos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cohen, Timothy; Kribs, Graham D.; Nelson, Ann E.; Ostdiek, Bryan

    2016-07-01

    Motivated by the recent excess in the diphoton invariant mass near 750 GeV, we explore a supersymmetric extension of the Standard Model that includes the minimal set of superpartners as well as additional Dirac partner chiral superfields in the adjoint representation for each gauge group. The bino partner pseudoscalar is identified as the 750 GeV resonance, while superpotential interactions between it and the gluino (wino) partners yield production via gluon fusion (decay to photon pairs) at one-loop. The gauginos and these additional adjoint superpartners are married by a Dirac mass and must also have Majorana masses. While a large wino partner Majorana mass is necessary to explain the excess, the gluino can be approximately Dirac-like, providing benefits consistent with being both "supersoft" (loop corrections to the scalar masses from Dirac gauginos are free of logarithmic enhancements) and "supersafe" (the experimental limits on the squark/gluino masses can be relaxed due to the reduced production rate). Consistency with the measured Standard Model-like Higgs boson mass is imposed, and a numerical exploration of the parameter space is provided. Models that can account for the diphoton excess are additionally characterized by having couplings that can remain perturbative up to very high scales, while remaining consistent with experimental constraints, the Higgs boson mass, and an electroweak scale which is not excessively fine-tuned.

  18. STANDARDIZATION OF CEBAF 12 GEV UPGRADE CAVITY TESTING

    SciTech Connect

    Tiffany Bass, G. Davis, Christiana Wilson, Mircea Stirbet

    2012-07-01

    CEBAF 12GeV upgrade project includes 80 new 7-cell cavities to form 10 cryomodules. Each cavity underwent RF qualification at 2.07K using a high power accelerating gradient test and an HOM survey in Jefferson Lab's Vertical Testing Area (VTA) before cavity string assembly. In order to ensure consistently high quality data, updated cavity testing procedures and analysis were implemented and used by a group of VTA operators. For high power tests, a cavity testing procedure was developed and used in conjunction with a LabVIEW program to collect the test data. Additionally while the cavity was at 2.07K, an HOM survey was performed using a network analyzer and a combination of Excel and Mathematica programs. Data analysis was standardized and an online logbook, Pansophy, was used for data storage and mining. The Pansophy system allowed test results to be easily summarized and searchable across all cavity tests. In this presentation, the CEBAF 12GeV upgrade cavity testing procedure, method for data analysis, and results reporting results will be discussed.

  19. 750 GeV diphotons from a D3-brane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heckman, Jonathan J.

    2016-05-01

    Motivated by the recently reported diphoton excess at 750 GeV observed by both CMS and ATLAS, we study string-based particle physics models which can accommodate this signal. Quite remarkably, although Grand Unified Theories in F-theory tend to impose tight restrictions on candidate extra sectors, the case of a probe D3-brane near an E-type Yukawa point naturally leads to a class of strongly coupled models capable of accommodating the observed signature. In these models, the visible sector is realized by intersecting 7-branes, and the 750 GeV resonance is a scalar modulus associated with motion of the D3-brane in the direction transverse to the Standard Model 7-branes. Integrating out heavy 3-7 string messenger states leads to dimension five operators for gluon fusion production and diphoton decays. Due to the unified structure of interactions, these models also predict that there should be additional decay channels to ZZ and Zγ. We also comment on models with distorted unification, where both the production mechanism and decay channels can differ.

  20. 12 GeV Upgrade Project - Cryomodule Production

    SciTech Connect

    J. Hogan, A. Burrill, G.K. Davis, M.A. Drury, M. Wiseman

    2012-07-01

    The Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (Jefferson Lab) is producing ten 100+MV SRF cryomodules (C100) as part of the CEBAF 12 GeV Upgrade Project. Once installed, these cryomodules will become part of an integrated accelerator system upgrade that will result in doubling the energy of the CEBAF machine from 6 to 12 GeV. This paper will present a complete overview of the C100 cryomodule production process. The C100 cryomodule was designed to have the major components procured from private industry and assembled together at Jefferson Lab. In addition to measuring the integrated component performance, the performance of the individual components is verified prior to being released for production and assembly into a cryomodule. Following a comprehensive cold acceptance test of all subsystems, the completed C100 cryomodules are installed and commissioned in the CEBAF machine in preparation of accelerator operations. This overview of the cryomodule production process will include all principal performance measurements, acceptance criterion and up to date status of current activities.

  1. Search for GeV GRBs at Chacaltaya

    SciTech Connect

    Castellina, A.; Ghia, P. L.; Morello, C.; Trinchero, G.; Vallania, P.; Vernetto, S.; Navarra, G.; Saavedra, O.; Yoshii, H.; Kaneko, T.; Kakimoto, K.; Nishi, K.; Cabrera, R.; Urzagasti, D.; Velarde, A.; Barthelmy, S. D.; Butterworth, P.; Cline, T. L.; Gehrels, N.; Fishman, G. J.

    1998-05-16

    In this paper we present the results of a search for GeV Gamma Ray Bursts made by the INCA experiment during the first 9 months of operation. INCA, an air shower array located at Mount Chacaltaya (Bolivia) at 5200 m a.s.l., has been searching for GRBs since December 1996. Up to August, 1997, 34 GRBs detected by BATSE occurred in the field of view of the experiment. For any burst, the counting rate of the array in the 2 hours interval around the burst trigger time has been studied. No significant excess has been observed. Assuming for the bursts a power low energy spectrum extending up to 1 TeV with a slope {alpha}=-2 and a duration of 10 s, the obtained 1 GeV-1 TeV energy fluence upper limits range from 7.9 10{sup -5} erg cm{sup -2} to 3.5 10{sup -3} erg cm{sup -2} depending on the event zenith angles.

  2. Detector development for Jefferson Lab's 12 GeV Upgrade

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiang, Yi

    2015-05-01

    Jefferson Lab will soon finish its highly anticipated 12 GeV Upgrade. With doubled maximum energy, Jefferson Lab's Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility (CEBAF) will enable a new experimental program with substantial discovery potential, addressing important topics in nuclear, hadronic and electroweak physics. In order to take full advantage of the high energy, high luminosity beam, new detectors are being developed, designed and constructed to fit the needs of different physics topics. The paper will give an overview of various new detector technologies to be used for 12 GeV experiments. It will then focus on the development of two solenoid-based spectrometers, the GlueX and SoLID spectrometers. The GlueX experiment in Hall D will study the complex properties of gluons through exotic hybrid meson spectroscopy. The GlueX spectrometer, a hermetic detector package designed for spectroscopy and the associated partial wave analysis, is currently in the final stage of construction. Hall A, on the other hand, is developing the SoLID spectrometer to capture the 3D image of the nucleon from semi-inclusive processes and to study the intrinsic properties of quarks through mirror symmetry breaking. Such a spectrometer will have the capability to handle very high event rates while still maintaining a large acceptance in the forward region.

  3. Galactic Diffuse Gamma Ray Emission Is Greater than 10 Gev

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hunter, Stanley D.; White, Nicholas E. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    AGILE and Gamma-ray Large Area Telescope (GLAST) are the next high-energy gamma-ray telescopes to be flown in space. These instruments will have angular resolution about 5 times better than Energetic Gamma-Ray Experiment Telescope (EGRET) above 10 GeV and much larger field of view. The on-axis effective area of AGILE will be about half that of EGRET, whereas GLAST will have about 6 times greater effective area than EGRET. The capabilities of ground based very high-energy telescopes are also improving, e.g. Whipple, and new telescopes, e.g. Solar Tower Atmospheric Cerenkov Effect Experiment (STACEE), Cerenkov Low Energy Sampling and Timing Experiment (CELESTE), and Mars Advanced Greenhouse Integrated Complex (MAGIC) are expected to have low-energy thresholds and sensitivities that will overlap the GLAST sensitivity above approximately 10 GeV. In anticipation of the results from these new telescopes, our current understanding of the galactic diffuse gamma-ray emission, including the matter and cosmic ray distributions is reviewed. The outstanding questions are discussed and the potential of future observations with these new instruments to resolve these questions is examined.

  4. Detector development for Jefferson Lab's 12GeV Upgrade

    SciTech Connect

    Qiang, Yi

    2015-05-01

    Jefferson Lab will soon finish its highly anticipated 12 GeV Upgrade. With doubled maximum energy, Jefferson Lab’s Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility (CEBAF) will enable a new experimental program with substantial discovery potential, addressing important topics in nuclear, hadronic and electroweak physics. In order to take full advantage of the high energy, high luminosity beam, new detectors are being developed, designed and constructed to fit the needs of different physics topics. The paper will give an overview of various new detector technologies to be used for 12 GeV experiments. It will then focus on the development of two solenoid-based spectrometers, the GlueX and SoLID spectrometers. The GlueX experiment in Hall D will study the complex properties of gluons through exotic hybrid meson spectroscopy. The GlueX spectrometer, a hermetic detector package designed for spectroscopy and the associated partial wave analysis, is currently in the final stage of construction. Hall A, on the other hand, is developing the SoLID spectrometer to capture the 3D image of the nucleon from semi-inclusive processes and to study the intrinsic properties of quarks through mirror symmetry breaking. Such a spectrometer will have the capability to handle very high event rates while still maintaining a large acceptance in the forward region.

  5. Detector development for Jefferson Lab's 12GeV Upgrade

    DOE PAGES

    Qiang, Yi

    2015-05-01

    Jefferson Lab will soon finish its highly anticipated 12 GeV Upgrade. With doubled maximum energy, Jefferson Lab’s Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility (CEBAF) will enable a new experimental program with substantial discovery potential, addressing important topics in nuclear, hadronic and electroweak physics. In order to take full advantage of the high energy, high luminosity beam, new detectors are being developed, designed and constructed to fit the needs of different physics topics. The paper will give an overview of various new detector technologies to be used for 12 GeV experiments. It will then focus on the development of two solenoid-based spectrometers,more » the GlueX and SoLID spectrometers. The GlueX experiment in Hall D will study the complex properties of gluons through exotic hybrid meson spectroscopy. The GlueX spectrometer, a hermetic detector package designed for spectroscopy and the associated partial wave analysis, is currently in the final stage of construction. Hall A, on the other hand, is developing the SoLID spectrometer to capture the 3D image of the nucleon from semi-inclusive processes and to study the intrinsic properties of quarks through mirror symmetry breaking. Such a spectrometer will have the capability to handle very high event rates while still maintaining a large acceptance in the forward region.« less

  6. Radiation microscope for SEE testing using GeV ions.

    SciTech Connect

    Doyle, Barney Lee; Knapp, James Arthur; Rossi, Paolo; Hattar, Khalid M.; Vizkelethy, Gyorgy; Brice, David Kenneth; Branson, Janelle V.

    2009-09-01

    Radiation Effects Microscopy is an extremely useful technique in failure analysis of electronic parts used in radiation environment. It also provides much needed support for development of radiation hard components used in spacecraft and nuclear weapons. As the IC manufacturing technology progresses, more and more overlayers are used; therefore, the sensitive region of the part is getting farther and farther from the surface. The thickness of these overlayers is so large today that the traditional microbeams, which are used for REM are unable to reach the sensitive regions. As a result, higher ion beam energies have to be used (> GeV), which are available only at cyclotrons. Since it is extremely complicated to focus these GeV ion beams, a new method has to be developed to perform REM at cyclotrons. We developed a new technique, Ion Photon Emission Microscopy, where instead of focusing the ion beam we use secondary photons emitted from a fluorescence layer on top of the devices being tested to determine the position of the ion hit. By recording this position information in coincidence with an SEE signal we will be able to indentify radiation sensitive regions of modern electronic parts, which will increase the efficiency of radiation hard circuits.

  7. GRB 131231A: IMPLICATIONS OF THE GeV EMISSION

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Bin; Chen, Wei; Liang, Yun-Feng; Zhou, Bei; He, Hao-Ning; Jin, Zhi-Ping; Fan, Yi-Zhong; Wei, Da-Ming; Tam, Pak-Hin Thomas; Shao, Lang E-mail: beizhou@pmo.ac.cn E-mail: dmwei@pmo.ac.cn

    2014-05-20

    GRB 131231A was detected by the Large Area Telescope on board the Fermi Space Gamma-ray Telescope. The high-energy gamma-ray (>100 MeV) afterglow emission spectrum is F {sub ν}∝ν{sup –0.54} {sup ±} {sup 0.15} in the first ∼1300 s after the trigger and the most energetic photon has an energy of ∼62 GeV, arriving at t ∼ 520 s. With reasonable parameters of the gamma-ray burst (GRB) outflow as well as the density of the circum-burst medium, the synchrotron radiation of electrons or protons accelerated at an external forward shock have difficulty accounting for the data. Rather, the synchrotron self-Compton radiation of the forward shock-accelerated electrons can account for both the spectrum and temporal behavior of the GeV afterglow emission. We also show that the prospect for detecting GRB 131231A-like GRBs with the Cherenkov Telescope Array is promising.

  8. Unified description of nuclear stopping in central heavy-ion collisions from 10A MeV to 1.2A GeV

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, G. Q.; Zhou, C. L.; Ma, Y. G.; Cao, X. G.; Cai, X. Z.; Fang, D. Q.; Tian, W. D.; Wang, H. W.

    2011-09-15

    A detailed analysis of the wide excitation function of nuclear stopping has been conducted within a transport model, isospin-dependent quantum molecular dynamics model, and an overall good agreement with the INDRA and FOPI Collaborations' experimental data has been achieved. It is found that the mean value of isotropy in central heavy-ion collision (HIC) reaches a minimum near-Fermi energy and approaches a maximum at around 300-400A MeV. This suggests that, in statistical average, the equilibration is far from being reached, even in central HIC especially near Fermi energy. A hierarchy in the stopping of fragments, which favors heavy fragments to penetrate, provides a robust restriction on the global trend of nuclear stopping and could serve as a probe for nuclear equations of state.

  9. Synchrotron Radiation and X-ray FEL Projects in Korea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, M. H.

    2012-03-01

    There are two on-going major projects in Pohang Accelerator Laboratory (PAL), the PLS-II light source upgrade and the construction of PAL-XFEL facility. PLS-II is a new light source upgraded from PLS(Pohang Light Source) which had been operated for 16 years from 1995 and shut down in Dec. 2010. The performance will be improved from ``18.9 nm-rad, 2.5 GeV, and 200 mA'' to ``5.8 nm-rad, 3 GeV, and 400 mA'' using three superconducting RF cavities. The old storage ring has been completely dismantled and new DBA ring has been re-installed in the same tunnel within 6 months, and is under commissioning now. The unique feature of PLS-II is the compact employment of 20 insertion-devices including 14 in-vacuum undulators. The PALXFEL is a 0.1-nm hard X-ray FEL construction project started in 2011 and to compete in 2014 with a total budget of 400 M. The PAL-XFEL is designed to have hard X-ray undulator lines at the end of 10-GeV linac, and a dog-leg branch line at 2.65 GeV point for a soft X-ray undulator line simultaneously and independently from hard X-ray FEL undulator line. The overview of two projects with current status is presented.

  10. Metabolism of 1,2,3,4-, 1,2,3,5-, and 1,2,4,5-tetrachlorobenzene in the squirrel monkey

    SciTech Connect

    Schwartz, H.; Chu, I.; Villeneuve, D.C.; Benoit, F.M.

    1987-01-01

    The metabolism of three tetrachlorobenzene isomers (TeCB) was investigated in the squirrel monkey. The animals were administered orally 6 single doses of /sup 14/C-labeled 1,2,3,4-, 1,2,4,5-, or 1,2,3,5-tetrachlorobenzene over a 3-wk period at levels ranging from 50 to 100 mg/kg body weight (b.w) and kept in individual metabolism cages to collect urine and feces for radioassay. Approximately 38% (1,2,3,4-TeCB), 36% (1,2,3,5-TeCB), and 18% (1,2,4,5-TeCB) of the doses were excreted respectively in the feces 48 h post administration. In monkeys dosed with 1,2,3,4-TeCB, unchanged compound accounted for 50% of the fecal radioactivity. Unchanged compound accounted for more than 50% of the fecal radioactivity found in the monkeys dosed with 1,2,3,5-TeCB. The fecal metabolites were identified in both groups. No metabolites were detected in the feces of monkeys dosed with 1,2,4,5-TeCB. While the fecal route represented the major route of excretion for 1,2,3,4-TeCB, the other two isomers were eliminated exclusively in the feces. The above data in the squirrel monkey are different from those obtained with the rat and the rabbit, and demonstrate the different metabolic pathways for the isomers.

  11. Research by industry at the National Synchrotron Light Source

    SciTech Connect

    1995-05-01

    The world`s foremost facility for research using x-rays and ultraviolet and infrared radiation, is operated by the National Synchrotron Light Source dept. This pamphlet described the participating research teams that built most of the beam lines, various techniques for studying materials, treatment of materials, and various industrial research (catalysis, pharmaceuticals, etc.).

  12. Initial scientific uses of coherent synchrotron radiation inelectron storage rings

    SciTech Connect

    Basov, D.N.; Feikes, J.; Fried, D.; Holldack, K.; Hubers, H.W.; Kuske, P.; Martin, M.C.; Pavlov, S.G.; Schade, U.; Singley, E.J.; Wustefeld, G.

    2004-11-23

    The production of stable, high power, coherent synchrotron radiation at sub-terahertz frequency at the electron storage ring BESSY opens a new region in the electromagnetic spectrum to explore physical properties of materials. Just as conventional synchrotron radiation has been a boon to x-ray science, coherent synchrotron radiation may lead to many new innovations and discoveries in THz physics. With this new accelerator-based radiation source we have been able to extend traditional infrared measurements down into the experimentally poorly accessible sub-THz frequency range. The feasibility of using the coherent synchrotron radiation in scientific applications was demonstrated in a series of experiments: We investigated shallow single acceptor transitions in stressed and unstressed Ge:Ga by means of photoconductance measurements below 1 THz. We have directly measured the Josephson plasma resonance in optimally doped Bi{sub 2}Sr{sub 2}CaCu{sub 2}O{sub 8} for the first time and finally we succeeded to confine the sub-THz radiation for spectral near-field imaging on biological samples such as leaves and human teeth.

  13. SYNCHROTRON X - RAY OBSERVATIONS OF A MONOLAYER TEMPLATE FOR MINERALIZATION.

    SciTech Connect

    DIMASI,E.; GOWER,L.B.

    2000-11-27

    Mineral nucleation at a Langmuir film interface has been studied by synchrotron x-ray scattering. Diluted calcium bicarbonate solutions were used as subphases for arachidic and stearic acid monolayers, compressed in a Langmuir trough. Self-assembly of the monolayer template is observed directly, and subsequent crystal growth monitored in-situ.

  14. Operation of the Australian Store.Synchrotron for macromolecular crystallography

    PubMed Central

    Meyer, Grischa R.; Aragão, David; Mudie, Nathan J.; Caradoc-Davies, Tom T.; McGowan, Sheena; Bertling, Philip J.; Groenewegen, David; Quenette, Stevan M.; Bond, Charles S.; Buckle, Ashley M.; Androulakis, Steve

    2014-01-01

    The Store.Synchrotron service, a fully functional, cloud computing-based solution to raw X-ray data archiving and dissemination at the Australian Synchrotron, is described. The service automatically receives and archives raw diffraction data, related metadata and preliminary results of automated data-processing workflows. Data are able to be shared with collaborators and opened to the public. In the nine months since its deployment in August 2013, the service has handled over 22.4 TB of raw data (∼1.7 million diffraction images). Several real examples from the Australian crystallographic community are described that illustrate the advantages of the approach, which include real-time online data access and fully redundant, secure storage. Discoveries in biological sciences increasingly require multidisciplinary approaches. With this in mind, Store.Synchrotron has been developed as a component within a greater service that can combine data from other instruments at the Australian Synchrotron, as well as instruments at the Australian neutron source ANSTO. It is therefore envisaged that this will serve as a model implementation of raw data archiving and dissemination within the structural biology research community. PMID:25286837

  15. Dedicated Beamline Facilities for Catalytic Research. Synchrotron Catalysis Consortium (SCC)

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Jingguang; Frenkel, Anatoly; Rodriguez, Jose; Adzic, Radoslav; Bare, Simon R.; Hulbert, Steve L.; Karim, Ayman; Mullins, David R.; Overbury, Steve

    2015-03-04

    Synchrotron spectroscopies offer unique advantages over conventional techniques, including higher detection sensitivity and molecular specificity, faster detection rate, and more in-depth information regarding the structural, electronic and catalytic properties under in-situ reaction conditions. Despite these advantages, synchrotron techniques are often underutilized or unexplored by the catalysis community due to various perceived and real barriers, which will be addressed in the current proposal. Since its establishment in 2005, the Synchrotron Catalysis Consortium (SCC) has coordinated significant efforts to promote the utilization of cutting-edge catalytic research under in-situ conditions. The purpose of the current renewal proposal is aimed to provide assistance, and to develop new sciences/techniques, for the catalysis community through the following concerted efforts: Coordinating the implementation of a suite of beamlines for catalysis studies at the new NSLS-II synchrotron source; Providing assistance and coordination for catalysis users at an SSRL catalysis beamline during the initial period of NSLS to NSLS II transition; Designing in-situ reactors for a variety of catalytic and electrocatalytic studies; Assisting experimental set-up and data analysis by a dedicated research scientist; Offering training courses and help sessions by the PIs and co-PIs.

  16. Synchrotron radiation vacuum chamber installation and beam size

    SciTech Connect

    Shleifer, M.

    1985-01-01

    In this paper we address the question of storage ring vacuum chamber placement and its effect on the synchrotron radiation fan obtainable. We consider only horizonal errors and thus treat the problem two-dimensionally. Specifically, we describe the correlation between the parameters of the chamber and its position in the magnet and the size of the fan of radiation emerging from a port.

  17. Synchrotron Radiation Therapy from a Medical Physics point of view

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prezado, Y.; Adam, J. F.; Berkvens, P.; Martinez-Rovira, I.; Fois, G.; Thengumpallil, S.; Edouard, M.; Vautrin, M.; Deman, P.; Bräuer-Krisch, E.; Renier, M.; Elleaume, H.; Estève, F.; Bravin, A.

    2010-07-01

    Synchrotron radiation (SR) therapy is a promising alternative to treat brain tumors, whose management is limited due to the high morbidity of the surrounding healthy tissues. Several approaches are being explored by using SR at the European Synchrotron Radiation Facility (ESRF), where three techniques are under development Synchrotron Stereotactic Radiation Therapy (SSRT), Microbeam Radiation Therapy (MRT) and Minibeam Radiation Therapy (MBRT). The sucess of the preclinical studies on SSRT and MRT has paved the way to clinical trials currently in preparation at the ESRF. With this aim, different dosimetric aspects from both theoretical and experimental points of view have been assessed. In particular, the definition of safe irradiation protocols, the beam energy providing the best balance between tumor treatment and healthy tissue sparing in MRT and MBRT, the special dosimetric considerations for small field dosimetry, etc will be described. In addition, for the clinical trials, the definition of appropiate dosimetry protocols for patients according to the well established European Medical Physics recommendations will be discussed. Finally, the state of the art of the MBRT technical developments at the ESRF will be presented. In 2006 A. Dilmanian and collaborators proposed the use of thicker microbeams (0.36-0.68 mm). This new type of radiotherapy is the most recently implemented technique at the ESRF and it has been called MBRT. The main advantage of MBRT with respect to MRT is that it does not require high dose rates. Therefore it can be more easily applied and extended outside synchrotron sources in the future.

  18. Synchrotron Radiation Therapy from a Medical Physics point of view

    SciTech Connect

    Prezado, Y.; Berkvens, P.; Braeuer-Krisch, E.; Renier, M.; Bravin, A.; Adam, J. F.; Martinez-Rovira, I.; Fois, G.; Thengumpallil, S.; Edouard, M.; Deman, P.; Vautrin, M.

    2010-07-23

    Synchrotron radiation (SR) therapy is a promising alternative to treat brain tumors, whose management is limited due to the high morbidity of the surrounding healthy tissues. Several approaches are being explored by using SR at the European Synchrotron Radiation Facility (ESRF), where three techniques are under development Synchrotron Stereotactic Radiation Therapy (SSRT), Microbeam Radiation Therapy (MRT) and Minibeam Radiation Therapy (MBRT).The sucess of the preclinical studies on SSRT and MRT has paved the way to clinical trials currently in preparation at the ESRF. With this aim, different dosimetric aspects from both theoretical and experimental points of view have been assessed. In particular, the definition of safe irradiation protocols, the beam energy providing the best balance between tumor treatment and healthy tissue sparing in MRT and MBRT, the special dosimetric considerations for small field dosimetry, etc will be described. In addition, for the clinical trials, the definition of appropiate dosimetry protocols for patients according to the well established European Medical Physics recommendations will be discussed. Finally, the state of the art of the MBRT technical developments at the ESRF will be presented. In 2006 A. Dilmanian and collaborators proposed the use of thicker microbeams (0.36-0.68 mm). This new type of radiotherapy is the most recently implemented technique at the ESRF and it has been called MBRT. The main advantage of MBRT with respect to MRT is that it does not require high dose rates. Therefore it can be more easily applied and extended outside synchrotron sources in the future.

  19. Diagnostics of coated fuel particles by neutron and synchrotron radiography

    SciTech Connect

    Momot, G. V.; Podurets, K. M.; Pogorelyi, D. K.; Somenkov, V. A.; Yakovenko, E. V.

    2011-12-15

    The nondestructive monitoring of coated fuel particles has been performed using contact neutron radiography and refraction radiography based on synchrotron radiation. It is shown that these methods supplement each other and have a high potential for determining the sizes, densities, and isotopic composition of the particle components.

  20. Surface Reactions Studied by Synchrotron Based Photoelectron Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Hrbek, J.

    1998-11-03

    The goal of this article is to illustrate the use of synchrotron radiation for investigating surface chemical reactions by photoelectron spectroscopy. A brief introduction and background information is followed by examples of layer resolved spectroscopy, oxidation and sulfidation of metallic, semiconducting and oxide surfaces.